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Sample records for suppressalis walker lepidoptera

  1. Morphological and phylogenetic analysis of a microsporidium (Nosema sp.) isolated from rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

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    Xing, Dongxu; Yang, Qiong; Liao, Sentai; Han, Lanzhi; Li, Qingrong; Zhao, Chaoyi; Xiao, Yang; Ye, Mingqiang

    2017-10-01

    A new microsporidium was isolated from Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), one of the most important rice pests in China. The morphology and molecular systematics of this novel microsporidium were described in this study. The spores were long oval and measured 3.17 × 1.64 μm on fresh smears. Ultrastructure of the spores was characteristic for the genus Nosema: a diplokaryon, 10-12 polar filament coils of the same type, and posterior vacuole. Small subunit rRNA gene sequence data and phylogenetic analysis further confirmed that the microsporidian species from C. suppressalis belong to the true Nosema sub-group of the genus Nosema. Besides, the microsporidium Nosema sp. CS could cause systemic infection of Bombyx mori and infect silkworms through vertical transmission. Therefore, mulberry field pest control should be carefully monitored, and sanitation of mulberry leaves is essential to control the pebrine disease in sericulture.

  2. Immune response of Chilo suppressalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) larvae to different entomopathogenic fungi.

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    Zibaee, A; Malagoli, D

    2014-04-01

    The current study reports mortality and effects on cellular immune response of several entomopathogenic fungi including isoleates BB1, BB2 and BB3 of Beauveria bassiana, Metarhizium anisopliae, Isaria fumosoroseus and Lecanicilium lecanii against larvae of Chilo suppressalis. Prohemocytes, granulocytes, plasmatocytes and oenocytoids were identified as the main circulating hemocytes in the hemolymph of larvae using Giemsa staining solution. Entomopathogenic fungi caused differential mortality on larvae: BB1, BB3, M. anisopliae lead to the highest mortality on larvae and L. lecanii caused the lowest mortality. The highest numbers of total hemocytes were observed 3 h post-injection of B. bassiana isolates and 6 h for the other treatments. The highest numbers of plasmatocytes were observed 3 h post-injection of BB1 and Tween 80, whereas BB2, BB3, M. anisopliae, I. fumosoroseus and L. lecani caused plasmatocyte increase 6 h post-injection. Similar results were obtained in case of granulocytes but only Tween 80 showed the highest number of hemocytes 3 h post-injection. The highest numbers of nodules were found at various time intervals after injection of fungal isolates and latex bead. The highest activities of phenoloxidase were observed 12 h post-injection by BbB1, BbB3, M. anisopliae and latex bead; 3-6 h post-injection by BbB2, 6 h post-injection by I. fumosoroseus and 3-6 h post-injection by L. lecanii. Our data demonstrate the possibility of utilizing different fungal extracts in the field to help reduce the risk of resistance evolution in C. suppressalis and encourage experimentations aimed to increase the number of biological control agent for insect pests such as the striped rice stem borer C. suppressalis.

  3. Construction and analysis of antennal cDNA library from rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), and expression profiles of putative odorant-binding protein and chemosensory protein genes.

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    Gong, Zhong-Jun; Liu, Su; Jiang, Yan-Dong; Zhou, Wen-Wu; Liang, Qing-Mei; Cheng, Jiaan; Zhang, Chuan-Xi; Zhu, Zeng-Rong; Gurr, Geoff M

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we constructed a high-quality cDNA library from the antennae of the Chilo suppressalis (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). A total of 1,235 colonies with inserts greater than 0.7 kb were sequenced and analyzed. Homology searching coupled with bioinformatics analysis identified 15 and 7 cDNA sequences, respectively, encoding putative odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and chemosensory proteins (CSPs). A phylogenetic tree of CsupCSPs showed that each CsupCSP has orthologs in Manduca sexta and Bombyx mori with strong bootstrapping support. One CSP was either very specific or more related to the CSPs of another species than to conspecific CSP. The expression profiles of the OBPs and CSPs in different tissues were measured by real-time quantitative PCR. The results revealed that of the 11 OBP genes, the transcript levels of CsupOBP1, CsupOBP5, and CsupOBP7 were higher in both male and female antennae than those in other tissues. And CsupCSP7 was highly expressed in both male and female antennae. Based on these results, the possible physiological functions of CsupOBPs and CsupCSPs were discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Resistance Monitoring of Four Insecticides and a Description of an Artificial Diet Incorporation Method for Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

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    Shuijin, Huang; Qiong, Chen; Wenjing, Qin; Yang, Sun; Houguo, Qin

    2017-12-05

    Chilo suppressalis (Walker; Lepidoptera: Crambidae) is one of the most damaging rice pests in China. Insecticides play a major role in its management. We describe how we monitored the resistance of C. suppressalis to four insecticides in seven field populations from Jiangxi, Hubei, and Hunan Provinces, China, in 2014-2016. The topical application method for resistance monitoring was suitable for triazophos, monosultap, and abamectin. The conventional rice seedling dipping method proved ineffective for testing chlorantraniliprole so the new artificial diet incorporation method was substituted. This new method provided more consistent results than the other methods, once baseline toxicity data had been established. All populations had moderate to high resistance to triazophos from 2014 to 2016. Monosultap resistance in two populations increased from low in 2014 to moderate in 2016 and the other five populations showed moderate to high-level resistance throughout. Abamectin resistance in three populations increased from sensitive or low in 2014 to moderate in 2015-2016, and the other populations had moderate to high levels of resistance. Resistance to chlorantraniliprole increased from sensitive or low in 2014 to moderate to high in 2016. These results suggested that resistance management strategies should be developed according to the needs of a specific location. It was suggested that, in these localities, organophosphate insecticides should be prohibited, the application of nereistoxin, macrolide antibiotic, and diamide insecticides should be limited, and other insecticides, including spinetoram and methoxyfenozide, that exhibited no resistance should be used rationally and in rotation to delay resistance development. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Responses of striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), from Taiwan to a range of insecticides.

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    Cheng, Xuan; Chang, Cheng; Dai, Shu-Mei

    2010-07-01

    Information on the insecticide susceptibility of striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker), is essential for an effective pest management programme. An early detection of resistance development can prompt the modification of current control methods and increase the lifespan of insecticides through the rotation of chemicals with different modes of action. In this study, the susceptibility of this pest in Taiwan to four classes of insecticides has been examined. Over 1000-fold resistance to carbofuran was detected in C. suppressalis collected from Chiayi and Changhua prefectures, with estimated LC(50) values of > 3 mg cm(-2). In addition, 61-fold resistance to cartap was found in the Chiayi population. On the other hand, all tested populations of rice stem borer were still relatively susceptible to chlorpyrifos, fipronil and permethrin, with LC(50) values ranging from 30 to 553 ng cm(-2). Chilo suppressalis populations collected from the central parts of Taiwan have a higher degree of resistance to the tested insecticides than those from northern areas. The occurrence of high resistance to carbofuran in the Chiayi and Changhua areas suggests that this compound should be replaced with chemicals having a different mode of action, such as chlorpyrifos, fipronil and permethrin, to which low cross-resistance has been detected. Copyright (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Characterization of the Complete Mitochondrial Genomes of Cnaphalocrocis medinalis and Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

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    Chai, Huan-Na; Du, Yu-Zhou; Zhai, Bao-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of Cnaphalocrocis medinalis and Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) were determined and analyzed. The circular genomes were 15,388 bp long for C. medinalis and 15,395 bp long for C. suppressalis. Both mitogenomes contained 37 genes, with gene order similar to that of other lepidopterans. Notably, 12 protein-coding genes (PCGs) utilized the standard ATN, but the cox1 gene used CGA as the initiation codon; the cox1, cox2, and nad4 genes in the two mitogenomes had the truncated termination codons T, T, and TA, respectively, but the nad5 gene was found to use T as the termination codon only in the C. medinalis mitogenome. Additionally, the codon distribution and Relative Synonymous Codon Usage of the 13 PCGs in the C. medinalis mitogenome were very different from those in other pyralid moth mitogenomes. Most of the tRNA genes had typical cloverleaf secondary structures. However, the dihydrouridine (DHU) arm of the trnS1(AGN) gene did not form a stable stem-loop structure. Forty-nine helices in six domains, and 33 helices in three domains were present in the secondary structures of the rrnL and rrnS genes of the two mitogenomes, respectively. There were four major intergenic spacers, except for the A+T-rich region, spanning at least 12 bp in the two mitogenomes. The A+T-rich region contained an 'ATAGT(A)'-like motif followed by a poly-T stretch in the two mitogenomes. In addition, there were a potential stem-loop structure, a duplicated 25-bp repeat element, and a microsatellite '(TA)13' observed in the A+T-rich region of the C. medinalis mitogenome. A poly-T motif, a duplicated 31-bp repeat element, and a 19-bp triplication were found in the C. suppressalis mitogenome. However, there are many differences in the A+T-rich regions between the C. suppressalis mitogenome sequence in the present study and previous reports. Finally, the phylogenetic relationships of these insects were reconstructed based on amino acid

  7. Molecular characterization of the piggyBac-like element, a candidate marker for phylogenetic research of Chilo suppressalis (Walker) in China.

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    Luo, Guang-Hua; Li, Xiao-Huan; Han, Zhao-Jun; Guo, Hui-Fang; Yang, Qiong; Wu, Min; Zhang, Zhi-Chun; Liu, Bao-Sheng; Qian, Lu; Fang, Ji-Chao

    2014-12-17

    Transposable elements (TEs, transposons) are mobile genetic DNA sequences. TEs can insert copies of themselves into new genomic locations and they have the capacity to multiply. Therefore, TEs have been crucial in the shaping of hosts' current genomes. TEs can be utilized as genetic markers to study population genetic diversity. The rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis Walker is one of the most important insect pests of many subtropical and tropical paddy fields. This insect occurs in all the rice-growing areas in China. This research was carried out in order to find diversity between C. suppressalis field populations and detect the original settlement of C. suppressalis populations based on the piggyBac-like element (PLE). We also aim to provide insights into the evolution of PLEs in C. suppressalis and the phylogeography of C. suppressalis. Here we identify a new piggyBac-like element (PLE) in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis Walker, which is called CsuPLE1.1 (GenBank accession no. JX294476). CsuPLE1.1 is transcriptionally active. Additionally, the CsuPLE1.1 sequence varied slightly between field populations, with polymorphic indels (insertion/deletion) and hyper-variable regions including the identification of the 3' region outside the open reading frame (ORF). CsuPLE1.1 insertion frequency varied between field populations. Sequences variation was found between CsuPLE1 copies and varied within and among field populations. Twenty-one different insertion sites for CsuPLE1 copies were identified with at least two insertion loci found in all populations. Our results indicate that the initial invasion of CsuPLE1 into C. suppressalis occurred before C. suppressalis populations spread throughout China, and suggest that C. suppressalis populations have a common ancestor in China. Additionally, the lower reaches of the Yangtze River are probably the original settlement of C. suppressalis in China. Finally, the CsuPLE1 insertion site appears to be a candidate marker

  8. Lonomia obliqua Walker (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae: hemostasis implications

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    Silviane Maggi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary In southern Brazil, since 1989, several cases of accidents produced by unwilling contact with the body of poisonous caterpillars of the moth species Lonomia obliqua Walker, 1855 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae, were described. L. obliqua caterpillars have gregarious behavior and feed on leaves of host trees during the night, staying grouped in the trunk during the day, which favors the occurrence of accidents with the species. This caterpillar has the body covered with bristles that on contact with the skin of individuals, breaks and release their contents, inoculating the venom into the victim. The basic constitution of the venom is protein and its components produce physiological changes in the victim, which include disturbances in hemostasis. Hemorrhagic syndrome associated with consumption coagulopathy, intravascular hemolysis and acute renal failure are some of the possible clinical manifestations related to poisoning by L. obliqua. Specific laboratory tests for diagnosis of poisoning have not been described previously. The diagnosis of poisoning is made based on the patient's medical history, clinical manifestations, erythrocyte levels, and, primarily, parameters that evaluate blood coagulation. Treatment is performed with the use of supportive care and the administration of specific hyperimmune antivenom. Poisoning can be serious and even fatal.

  9. Host plants of Chrysodeixis includens (Walker (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Plusiinae

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    Alexandre Specht

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This work has the objective to catalogue the information of Chrysodeixis includens (Walker, [1858] (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Plusiinae host plants. The list of plants comprehends new reports of host plants in Brazil and information from literature review around the world. It is listed 174 plants which are from 39 botanic families. The higher number of host plants of C. includens are in Asteraceae (29, Solanaceae (21, Fabaceae (18 and Lamiaceae (12.

  10. Expression and Enzyme Activity of Catalase in Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) Is Responsive to Environmental Stresses.

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    Lu, Yanhui; Bai, Qi; Zheng, Xusong; Lu, Zhongxian

    2017-08-01

    Catalase (CAT) is an important antioxidant enzyme that protects organisms against oxidative stresses by eliminating hydrogen peroxide. In this study, we cloned and characterized a full-length cDNA of CAT from Chilo suppressalis (CsCAT) and examined the influence of environmental stresses on CsCAT expression and enzyme activity. The cDNA contains a 1659-bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 553 amino acids most closely related (90.14%) to Papilio polytes catalases. The CsCAT was expressed in all developmental stages with the highest expression in the fat body, and the CsCAT enzyme activity closely mirrored its observed mRNA expression patterns. The CsCAT mRNA was up-regulated when the larvae were exposed to high temperature (≥30 °C), insecticides (abamectin and chlorantraniliprole), chemicals (H2O2, CHP, CdCl2, and CuSO4), and a dead-end trap plant (vetiver grass), and the CsCAT enzyme activity again mirrored the observed CsCAT expression patterns. These results suggest that up-regulation of CsCAT may enhance the defense response of C. suppressalis by weakening the effects of environmental stresses, and provide insight into the role of CsCAT during development of C. suppressalis. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. The navel orangeworm, Amyelois transtilla (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) discovered in northeastern Mexico feeding on Sapindaceae

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    Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), the navel orangeworm, is an important pest of a wide variety fruits and their seeds. We discovered and report for the first time A. transitella feeding on Sapindaceae in wild populations of U. speciosa (Endl.) in northeastern Mexico. We provid...

  12. Effect of insecticide on the irradiated tropical warehouse moth,Cadra cautella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Phycitidae)

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    Faruki, S.I.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of the synthetic pyrethroids, Fenom(r) on the gamma- irradiated Tropical Warehouse Moth, Cadra cautella (Walker)(Lepidoptera: Phycitidae) larvae have been studied. Both theinsecticide and gamma irradiation either singly or in combination,significantly increased larval mortality and developmental periods.The pupation and adult eclosion, reproductive potential and longevity of the adults from treated larvae were significantly decreased

  13. Efeito de extratos de annonáceas sobre a lagarta falsa medideira Chrysodeixis includens(Walker 1857)(Lepidoptera

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    Massaroli, Angélica

    2013-01-01

    Resumo: Chrysodeixis (=Pseudoplusia) includens (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) ou lagarta falsa medideira, como é conhecida popularmente, é praga desfolhadora de diversas culturas de importância econômica. Seu controle é feito quase exclusivamente através de inseticidas químicos, que nem sempre são eficientes devido ao hábito da lagarta em permanecer na face abaxial das folhas no terço médio da planta. Além disso, os agrotóxicos trazem inúmeras desvantagens como a contaminação ambiental, su...

  14. Biological aspects of Periga circumstans Walker, 1855 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae: Hemileucinae with larvae reared on khaki and mate-plant leaves

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    A. Specht

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study was to investigate biological aspects of Periga circumstans Walker, 1855 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae: Hemileucinae whose larvae were fed on leaves of khaki-plant (Diospyros khaki Linnaeus - Ebenaceae and Mate-plant (Ilex paraguariensis Saint Hilaire - Aquifoliaceae leaves. The biological parameters were obtained from specimens kept under controlled conditions: temperature of 25 ± 1 °C, relative humidity of 70 ± 10%, and photoperiod of 12 hours. For each developmental stage, morphological and ethological parameters are described. The larvae passed through six instars with a growth average rate of 1.4 for each instar. The host plants influenced significantly only the total duration of the larval phase, which was prolonged for larvae fed on khaki-plant leaves. Several aspects related to the morphology and the ethology of P. circumstans are similar to those described for Lonomia obliqua Walker, 1855.

  15. Outbreaks of Chrysodeixis includens (Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae in common bean and castor bean in São Paulo State, Brazil

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    Edson Luiz Lopes Baldin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 2009, increasing populations of Chrysodeixis includens (Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae have been observed in cultivated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and castor bean (Ricinus communis L. at the Lageado Experimental Farm, belonging to the FCA/UNESP, Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil. Defoliations around 80% and 50% were observed in the common bean cv. Pérola and castor bean cv. IAC-2028, respectively. Samples of individuals (caterpillars and pupae were collected in the field, and kept in laboratory until adult emergence aiming to confirm the species. These are new observations for common bean in São Paulo State and, in the case of castor bean, unpublished in Brazil. It suggests that C. includens has adapted to attack other agricultural crops, demanding attention of common bean and castor bean producers.

  16. Description of a new species of Enispa Walker, 1866 (Lepidoptera: Erebidae, Boletobiinae) from Thailand.

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    Pellinen, Markku J

    2017-05-31

    The genus Enispa Walker, 1866, type species: Enispa eosarialis Walker, 1866 [Borneo, Sarawak] (= Micraeschus Butler, 1878, type species: Hyria elataria Walker, 1861 [Sri Lanka]), contains several species, about 20 of which described and many still undescribed, some also probably misplaced. The genus occurs in Indo-Australian tropics and subtropics. Presently there are 5 species known from Borneo, with mention of several undescribed Enispa-like species (Holloway, 2009). From Thailand there are 8 species illustrated in Kononenko & Pinratana's (2013) book, 5 of which unidentified and some others, based on specimens originated from present author, which most probably are not Enispa. Nielsen & al. (1996) mentioned 7 species in Australia.

  17. OBSERVAÇÕES SOBRE O ATAQUE DA Azochis gripusalis WALKER, 1859 (PYRAUSTIDAE – LEPIDOPTERA EM Ficus carica L. (MORACEAE OBSERVATIONS ABOUT THE ATTACK OF Azochis gripusalis (WALKER, 1859 (PYRAUSTIDAE - LEPIDOPTERA IN Ficus carica (L. (MORACEAE

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    Antônio Henrique Garcia

    2007-09-01

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    Entre fevereiro de 1972 e março de 1973 foi feito o levantamento do ataque da Azochis gripusalis Walker, 1859 (Pyraustidae-Lepidoptera em uma plantação da figueira cultivada, Ficus carica L. (Moraceae em Curitiba, Paraná, onde a praga apresenta duas gerações por ano. Foi observado que a geração de inverno apresentou um ataque de 46,6% e ocorre durante o mês de março e início de abril e a geração de verão de 43,4%, ocorrendo durante o mês de dezembro e início de janeiro. Constatou-se também a presença da praga em 14 outros municípios do Estado do Paraná.

    This paper about Azochis gripusalis Walker, 1859 (PyraustidaeLepidoptera was the first to describe the occurrence of this pest in Paraná State, Brazil. It was observed initially that larvae were attacking F. carica trees in one of the districts of Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil, and subsequently a survey of their occurrence was carried out in 14 municipal districts near Curitiba. The observations began in February 1972, and continued until March 1973, when complete biological cycle of two generations, in winter and summer, was obtained. In the same area a survey was carried out of the damage caused by A. gripusalis, in the winter and summer generations; by comparing the number of attacks and bealty growing points it was observed that in the winter the attacks were 46.6% and in the summer, 43.4%. It was also found that the same larva can attack more than one growing point during life, causing considerable damage.

  18. Effect of four varieties of mulberry on biochemistry and nutritional physiology of mulberry pyralid, Glyphodes pyloalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

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    M. Oftadeh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of four mulberry varieties (Kenmochi, Ichinose, Shin Ichinose, Mahalii on nutritional indices and digestive proteolytic and amylolytic activities of Glyphodes pyloalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae were determined at 24±1°C, 75±5% RH and a photoperiod of 16:8 L:D. Fifth instar larvae reared on Shin Ichinose showed the highest efficiency of conversion of digested food and efficiency of conversion of ingested food (3.82±0.16% and 3.11±0.07%, respectively. Approximate digestibility values of the fourth instar larvae were highest (95.23±0.73% and lowest (91.77±1.45% on Kenmochi and Shin Ichinose, respectively. The fifth instar larvae fed on Kenmochi had the highest consumption index (4.6±0.73 and lowest relative growth rate (0.03±0.10, respectively. Our results showed that the highest protease activity in optimal pH was on Malalii variety (0.97 U/mg and the lowest was on Kenmochi (0.75 U/mg. In addition, the highest amylase activity in optimal pH was on Mahalii (0.17 U/mg and lowest on Kenmochi (0.103 U/mg. Specific proteolytic analysis showed that larvae feeding on Mahalii had the highest activity of trypsin and elastase (2.30 and 2.13 U/mg, respectively. This research showed that plasticity in food utilization and enzyme activity is functionally relevant to host plant cultivars. The results of nutritional indices and activity of digestive enzymes indicated that Kenmochi was an unsuitable host for feeding of Glyphodes pyloalis.

  19. Comparative transcriptome analysis of Glyphodes pyloalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) reveals novel insights into heat stress tolerance in insects.

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    Liu, Yuncai; Su, Hang; Li, Rongqiao; Li, Xiaotong; Xu, Yusong; Dai, Xiangping; Zhou, Yanyan; Wang, Huabing

    2017-12-19

    Heat tolerance is a key parameter that affects insect distribution and abundance. Glyphodes pyloalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) is a devastating pest of mulberry in the main mulberry-growing regions and can cause tremendous losses to sericulture by directly feeding on mulberry leaves and transmitting viruses to Bombyx mori. Moreover, G. pyloalis shows a prominent capacity for adaptation to daily and seasonal temperature fluctuations and can survive several hours under high temperature. To date, the molecular mechanism underlying the outstanding adaptability of this pest to high temperature remains unclear. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analyses on G. pyloalis exposed to 25 and 40 °C for 4 h. We obtained 34,034 unigenes and identified 1275 and 1222 genes significantly upregulated or downregulated, respectively, by heat stress. Data from the transcriptome analyses indicated that some processes involved in heat tolerance are conserved, such as high expression of heat shock protein (HSP) genes and partial repression of metabolism progress. In addition, vitamin digestion and absorption pathways and detoxification pathways identified here provided new insights for the investigation of the molecular mechanisms of heat stress tolerance. Furthermore, transcriptome analysis indicated that immune and phosphatidylinositol signaling system have a close relationship with heat tolerance. In addition, the expression patterns of ten randomly selected genes, such as HSP and cytochrome P450, were consistent with the transcriptome results obtained through quantitative real-time PCR. Comparisons among transcriptome results revealed the upregulation of HSPs and genes involved in redox homeostasis, detoxication, and immune progress. However, many metabolism progresses, such as glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and fatty acid biosynthesis, were partially repressed. The results reflected that the heat tolerance of G. pyloalis is a fairly complicated process and

  20. Immature stages of Spodoptera albula (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae): developmental parameters and host plants.

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    Montezano, Débora G; Specht, Alexandre; Bortolin, Tarciso M; Fronza, Edegar; Sosa-Gómez, Daniel R; Roque-Specht, Vânia F; Pezzi, Patrícia; Luz, Priscila C; Barros, Neiva M

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to detail the temporal and morphological parameters of the immature stages of Spodoptera albula (Walker 1857) under controlled conditions (25 ± 1°C, 70 ± 10% RH and 14 hour photophase) and to gather information about their larval host plants. For this purpose, a new rearing method and artificial diet was employed and validated. The viability of the egg, larval, pupal and pre-pupal stages was 94.54, 97.33, 93.84 and 92.34%, respectively. The average duration of the egg, larval, pupal and pre-pupal stages was 4.14, 16.37, 1.69, and 9.34 days, respectively. During the larval stage, 80.85% of females and 93.99% of males passed through six and remaining through seven instars, with significant larval protandry. The larvae that developed through six and seven instars exhibited a mean growth rate of 1.58 and 1.48, respectively. Fifty five host plant species belonging to 29 families are listed. The female pupae were significantly larger, exhibiting protogyny. Both the rearing methods as well as the larval diet proved adequate, providing more detailled observations of the biological cycle, especially the larval stage, and resulting in an overall survival of almost 80%.

  1. Immature stages of Spodoptera albula (Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Developmental parameters and host plants

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    DÉBORA G. MONTEZANO

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to detail the temporal and morphological parameters of the immature stages of Spodoptera albula (Walker 1857 under controlled conditions (25 ± 1°C, 70 ± 10% RH and 14 hour photophase and to gather information about their larval host plants. For this purpose, a new rearing method and artificial diet was employed and validated. The viability of the egg, larval, pupal and pre-pupal stages was 94.54, 97.33, 93.84 and 92.34%, respectively. The average duration of the egg, larval, pupal and pre-pupal stages was 4.14, 16.37, 1.69, and 9.34 days, respectively. During the larval stage, 80.85% of females and 93.99% of males passed through six and remaining through seven instars, with significant larval protandry. The larvae that developed through six and seven instars exhibited a mean growth rate of 1.58 and 1.48, respectively. Fifty five host plant species belonging to 29 families are listed. The female pupae were significantly larger, exhibiting protogyny. Both the rearing methods as well as the larval diet proved adequate, providing more detailled observations of the biological cycle, especially the larval stage, and resulting in an overall survival of almost 80%.

  2. Interseasonal variation of Chrysodeixis includens (Walker, [1858] (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae populations in the Brazilian Savanna

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    Sabrina Raisa dos Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract Chrysodeixis includens (Walker, [1858] is currently the main plusiine pest in the Americas, not only because of the damage caused to soybean, but also with several crop species in a broad geographical range. However, its population dynamics is still poorly understood, despite outbreak records that are common across different locations in the Americas. The current study aimed at identifying phenological patterns of C. includens emphasizing its differences among the three years of sampling effort in an intercropping area of the Brazilian Savanna. Thereafter, we tested whether the El Niño size effect, meteorological factors, or soybean, corn and wheat cycles, are better predictors of its monthly abundance. The insects were collected with a light trap during five consecutive nights (repetitions during 35 new moons. In total, 2026 specimens were collected in all months of the year although not consecutively. Across each year, monthly abundance of C. includens was non-uniform, characterized by sharp population peaks concentrated in the rainy season. These peaks varied from January until March, depending on the year sampled. We found that the local soybean cycle and El Niño effect to significantly influence the species abundance across the entire period of study. These results aid in understanding the species population dynamics and its status as a pest, providing evidence of factors that determine its phenological patterns. Although it presents a very defined phenology, the population dynamics of C. includens varies significantly between years and locations, which demonstrates the importance and need to monitor local populations of larvae and adults for its management.

  3. Reproductive parameters of Lonomia obliqua Walker, 1855 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae in laboratory

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    Lisete Maria Lorini

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Lonomia obliqua is an insect that has urticant spines in the larval stage. This species may cause death as a result of haemorrhages caused by a toxin released from the caterpillar's spines onto the skin of the victim. Since 1989 when this species was identified in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, many accidents have happened. The aim of this study was to verify the oviposition, fecundity, fertility, viability of eggs and incubation period of the species. Adults were left in a moth's cage to mate and lay eggs. Thirteen couples were observed daily, and the number of eggs and the caterpillars emerged were recorded. The results showed a mean of 2.8 (± 1.3 ovipositions, a mean fecundity of 135.3 (± 54.4 eggs/female, a mean fertility of 111.9 (± 55.4 eggs/female, a mean egg viability of 80.9 (± 20.97 % and a mean incubation period of 31.8 (± 5.8 days.O objetivo desse trabalho foi estudar os parâmetros biológicos de oviposição, fecundidade, fertilidade, viabilidade dos ovos e período de incubação de Lonomia obliqua Walker, 1855, em laboratório. As lagartas foram coletadas no campo nos municípios de Santa Cruz do Sul, Erechim, Guaporé, Passo Fundo, Não-Me-Toque, São Jorge, Farroupilha e Vila Lângaro, no Rio Grande do Sul, e Concórdia em Santa Catarina. As lagartas foram mantidas em sala de criação, com a leitura diária da temperatura e umidade relativa do ar, até a emergência dos adultos. Após a sexagem, cada casal foi colocado em uma gaiola para acasalamento e postura. Acompanhou-se, diariamente, as posturas das fêmeas e a eclosão das lagartas, determinando-se o número de posturas por fêmea, a fecundidade, a fertilidade, a viabilidade e o período de incubação dos ovos. O número médio de oviposições foi de 2,8 (± 1,3, fecundidade média de 135,30 (± 54,4 ovos por fêmea, fertilidade média de 111,9 (± 55,4 ovos por fêmea. A viabilidade média dos ovos foi de 80,9 (± 21,0 % e obteve-se um período médio de incuba

  4. OBSERVAÇÃO SOBRE A PERDA DE PESO EM LAGARTAS DE Azochis gripusalis Walker, 1859 (PYRAUSTIDAE – LEPIDOPTERA DURANTE A DIAPAUSA COMMENT ON THE WEIGHT LOSS OF CATERPILLARS OF Azochis gripusalis WALKER, 1859 (PYRAUSTIDAE LEPDOPTERA DURING THE DORMANCY PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Henrique Garcia

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Foram observadas a perda de peso em lagartas da Azochis gripusalis Walker, 1859 (Pyraustidae-Lepidoptera durante o período hibernal em Curitiba, Paraná, onde a praga da figueira cultivada, Ficus carica L. (Moraceae, apresenta duas gerações por ano. Em 28 lagartas da geração de verão e 28 da geração de inverno, ambas no 5° instar e pesadas em intervalos de 20 dias, verificou-se uma perda de peso bem acentuada nas lagartas da geração de inverno durante a hibernação.

    In this work the loss of weight in caterpillars of Azochis gripusalis Walker, 1859 (Pyraustidae-Lepidoptera important pest of cultivated fig-trees Ficus carica L. (Moraceae was observed during the hibernation (diapause period. In Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil, the A.gripusalis presents two generations in a year, winter generation and summer generation. The winter generation caterpillar hibernate during the 5th phase in a period of 158 to 163 days. The caterpillars, as a whole of 28 were confined in the Ficus stalk and grown up in laboratories and weighed at intervals of 20 days, since the beginning while the period of hibernation lasted.

  5. Lepidoptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aguiar, António M. Franquinho; Karsholt, Ole

    2009-01-01

      Being the first of a series dealing with the entomofauna of the Madeira and Selvagens Islands, this catalogue is a list of all Lepidoptera recorded from this region of Macaronesia, with references to the relevant literature. The checklist includes 37 families, 211 genera and 331 species. 31...... species are recorded from Madeira for the first time, and exact data and locality are given for these in the notes. 32 species, which had previously been recorded from Madeira, are removed from the list of Lepidoptera found in the Madeira Islands being misidentifications, doubtful and unconfirmed records......, undetermined species requiring further study and accidentally introduced species which have not established themselves in Madeira. No genus of Lepidoptera is endemic to Madeira, but 81 species are endemic to the Madeira Archipelago, and a further 36 species are considered Macaronesian endemics. One species...

  6. Lepidoptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez-Vaamonde, Carlos; Agassiz, David; Augustin, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive overview of those Lepidopteran invasions to Europe that result from increasing globalisation and also review expansion of species within Europe. A total of 97 non-native Lepidoptera species (about 1% of the known fauna), in 20 families and 11 superfamilies have...... established so far in Europe, of which 30 alone are Pyraloidea. In addition, 88 European species in 25 families have expanded their range within Europe and around 23% of these are of Mediterranean or Balkan origin, invading the north and west. Although a number of these alien species have been in Europe...... for hundreds of years, 74% have established during the 20th century and arrivals are accelerating, with an average of 1.9 alien Lepidoptera newly established per year between 2000–2007. For 78 aliens with a known area of origin, Asia has contributed 28.9%, Africa (including Macaronesian islands, Canaries...

  7. The identity of Arhodia egenaria Walker, 1866 (Lepidoptera, Mimallonoidea, Mimallonidae) and a new synonym of Cicinnus melsheimeri (Harris, 1841).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Ryan A St; McCabe, Timothy L

    2017-04-18

    The holotypes of Arhodia egenaria Walker, 1866 and Cicinnus primolus Schaus, 1928, syn. n., were examined. Both names are junior synonyms of C. melsheimeri (Harris, 1841). Cicinnus melsheimeri (as Perophora egenaria), sensu Hampson, 1904, is a misidentification of C. bahamensis St Laurent & McCabe, 2016.

  8. Revision of the genus Ortopla Walker, [1859] with description of two new species from Southeast Asia (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Pantheinae). Revision of Pantheinae, contribution X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behounek, G; Han, H L; Kononenko, V S

    2013-12-11

    The pantheine genus Ortopla Walker, [1859] 1858 is revised. Two new species, Ortopla witti sp. n. from the Philippines and O. longiuncus sp. n. from Nepal, Vietnam, Thailand, Myanmar and South China are described. The name O. commutanda Warren, 1891 (syn. n.) is synonymised with O. iarbasalis Walker, [1859] 1858. The distribution of species in East Asia is clarified. A checklist of the genus Ortopla is presented. Imagines, male and female genitalia of all species are illustrated.

  9. Agile Walker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the Agile Walker is to improve the outdoor mobility of healthy elderly people with some mobility limitations. It is a newly developed, all-terrain walker, equipped with an electric drive system and speed control that can assists elderly people to walk outdoors or to hike. The walker has a unique product design with an attractive look that will appeal to "active-agers" population. This paper describes product design requirements and the development process of the Agile Walker, its features and some preliminary testing results.

  10. Interrelation of mating, flight, and fecundity in navel orangeworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) females

    Science.gov (United States)

    The navel orangeworm Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) is an economically important pest of nut crops in California. Improved management will require better understanding of insect dispersal, particularly relative to when mating occurs. A previous study demonstrated a more robus...

  11. The Lepidoptera of White Sands National Monument, Otero County, New Mexico, USA 9. A new species of Givira Walker (Cossidae, Hypoptinae) dedicated to Delinda Mix, including a list of species of Cossidae recorded from the Monument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Eric H.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The U.S. National Park Service initiated a 10-year study of the Lepidoptera at White Sands National Monument, Otero County, New Mexico in late 2006. Givira delindae sp. n., discovered in 2007 during the first year of study, is described here. The male and female adult moths and genitalia are illustrated. The name is dedicated to Delinda Mix, mother of Steve Mix. The species of Cossidae recorded from the Monument during the study are listed. PMID:28331399

  12. Combination phenyl propionate/pheromone traps for monitoring navel orangeworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in almonds in the vicinity of mating disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerosol mating disruption is used for management of navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), in an increasing portion of California almonds and pistachios. This formulation suppresses pheromone monitoring traps far beyond the treatment block, potentially complicating...

  13. Sir Gilbert Thomas Walker

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    He married May Constance Carter in 1908 and they had a son and a daughter. Sir. Gilbert Walker died at Cousdon, Surrey on 4 November 1958. In an obituary written in. 1959, P A Sheppard argued that Walker's statistical method for forecasting Indian monsoon was not a great success. This view was prevalent till the ...

  14. Dandy-Walker Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Organizations Publications Definition Dandy-Walker Syndrome is a congenital brain malformation involving the cerebellum (an area of the back ... and toes. × Definition Dandy-Walker Syndrome is a congenital brain malformation involving the cerebellum (an area of the back ...

  15. Sir Gilbert Thomas Walker

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    playa fundamental role in the variability of the earth's climate. Walker noted a tendency of ... Walker was however not able to ascertain the physical mechanism governing these oscillations. In the first two ... In 1927, he made the follow- ing prophetic statement: "There is, to-day, always a risk that specialists in two subjects,.

  16. Evaluation of Walkers for Elderly People

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tamura, T

    2001-01-01

    .... The experiments were performed using three walkers: a familiar conventional folding walker, a caster walker and a power-assisted walker, We evaluated walking speed, body acceleration and an electromyogram of the gastrocnemius during use of each walker...

  17. Families of vicious walkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardy, John; Katori, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    We consider a generalization of the vicious walker problem in which N random walkers in R d are grouped into p families. Using field-theoretic renormalization group methods we calculate the asymptotic behaviour of the probability that no pairs of walkers from different families have met up to time t. For d > 2, this is constant, but for d -α , which we compute to O(ε 2 ) in an expansion in ε = 2 - d. The second-order term depends on the ratios of the diffusivities of the different families. In two dimensions, we find a logarithmic decay (ln t) -α-bar and compute α-bar exactly

  18. The overexpression of insect endogenous small RNAs in transgenic rice inhibits growth and delays pupation of striped stem borer (Chilo suppressalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Wu, Hao; Liu, Haoju; Zheng, Jie; Lin, Yongjun; Chen, Hao

    2017-07-01

    The striped stem borer (SSB), Chilo suppressalis Walker, is a major rice insect pest worldwide. RNA interference (RNAi) has become a promising strategy for developing insect-resistant crops. In a previous study, five double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) targeting important SSB housekeeping genes were overexpressed in rice, but none of the acquired dsRNA-transgenic rice plants showed significant effects on SSB. Thirteen selected SSB endogenous small RNAs, predicted as SSB novel microRNAs (miRNAs), were overexpressed in rice using artificial miRNA (amiRNA) expression technology. Feeding tests showed that two out of 13 selected SSB novel miRNAs caused significant growth inhibition for feeding SSB larvae based on transgenic rice expression. Pupation was delayed 4 days when SSB larvae consecutively fed on transgenic rice expressing the SSB novel miRNA candidate csu-novel-miR15 (csu-15 rice). Gene expression analysis confirmed that the expression levels of at least six SSB unigenes significantly changed (i.e., were up- or down-regulated) after feeding on csu-15 rice. Our research demonstrated a novel RNAi strategy using SSB endogenous small RNAs to develop RNAi crops for pest management; this strategy is different from the common RNAi resulting from transgenic dsRNAs or amiRNAs targeting certain insect endogenous genes. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Dandy-Walker malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Walker deformity Dandy-Walker syndrome DWM DWS hydrocephalus, internal, Dandy-Walker type hydrocephalus, noncommunicating, Dandy-Walker type ... of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA HONCode ...

  20. Dandy-Walker malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Silian Mandu Fonseca

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Dandy-Walker malformation is characterized by complete or partial agenesis of the cerebellar vermis, cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, and enlargement of the posterior fossa with displacement of the lateral sinuses. This article aims to present current, anatomical, etiological, pathophysiological, syndromic and treatment aspects of this malformation.

  1. Quincke random walkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradillo, Gerardo; Heintz, Aneesh; Vlahovska, Petia

    2017-11-01

    The spontaneous rotation of a sphere in an applied uniform DC electric field (Quincke effect) has been utilized to engineer self-propelled particles: if the sphere is initially resting on a surface, it rolls. The Quincke rollers have been widely used as a model system to study collective behavior in ``active'' suspensions. If the applied field is DC, an isolated Quincke roller follows a straight line trajectory. In this talk, we discuss the design of a Quincke roller that executes a random-walk-like behavior. We utilize AC field - upon reversal of the field direction a fluctuation in the axis of rotation (which is degenerate in the plane perpendicular to the field and parallel to the surface) introduces randomness in the direction of motion. The MSD of an isolated Quincke walker depends on frequency, amplitude, and waveform of the electric field. Experiment and theory are compared. We also investigate the collective behavior of Quincke walkers,the transport of inert particles in a bath of Quincke walkers, and the spontaneous motion of a drop containing Quincke active particle. supported by NSF Grant CBET 1437545.

  2. Cloning and bioinformatics analysis of an ubiquitin gene of the rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ubiquitin which has the function of selective protein degradation may play an important role in the regulation of insect growth and development. The coding sequence of an ubiquitin gene from the larvae of the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) named CsUB (GenBank Accession No.

  3. Cloning and bioinformatics analysis of an ubiquitin gene of the rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-05

    Oct 5, 2011 ... The coding sequence of an ubiquitin gene from the larvae of the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) named CsUB (GenBank. Accession No. GU238420) was cloned by RT-PCR and sequenced in this study, with primers according to the sequences of ubiquitin genes from ...

  4. Joseph (Joe) A. Walker

    Science.gov (United States)

    1956-01-01

    In March 1945 Joseph A. Walker joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory, Cleveland, Ohio, (later NASA's Lewis Research Center, now the Glenn Research Center) as a physicist. He transferred to the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California in 1951, as a research pilot. For the next fifteen years Walker served as a pilot at the Edwards flight research facility (today known as NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center) on such projects as the Bell X-1#2 (2 flights, first on August 27, 1951), Bell X-1A (1 flight on July 20, 1955), X-1E (21 flights, first on December 12, 1955), Douglas D-558-I #3 Skystreak (14 flights, first on June 29, 1951), Douglas D-558-II #2 Skyrocket (3 flights, first on April 29, 1955), Douglas D-558-II #3 Skyrocket (2 flights, first on May 7, 1954). On the Douglas X-3, Joe was project pilot and made all 20 flights, the first on August 1, 1954. Joe considered this aircraft the 'worst' plane he ever flew. He flew the Northrup X-4 (2 flights, first on October 18, 1951), Bell X-5 (78 flights, first on January 9, 1952). He also flew programs involving the F-100, F-101, F-102, F-104 and the B-47. Walker made the first NASA flight on the North American X-15 on March 25, 1960. His 25th and final X-15 flight on August 22, 1963, reached 354,200 feet, an unofficial record altitude of almost 67 miles. On October 30, 1964, Walker took the first Bell Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) on its maiden flight, reaching a peak altitude of 10 feet and a free flight time of just under one minute. Two LLRV's and three Lunar Landing Training Vehicles developed from them were used to develop piloting and operational techniques for lunar landings. In November, he left the program after 35 flights on the first LLRV. Walker flew chase flights as well as research flights. On June 8, 1966 he was flying chase in NASA's F-104N for the Air Force's experimental bomber, North American XB-70A, when he was fatally

  5. Fall prevention walker during rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Kian Sek; E, Chun Zhi; Saim, Hashim; Zakaria, Wan Nurshazwani Wan; Khialdin, Safinaz Binti Mohd; Isa, Hazlita; Awad, M. I.; Soon, Chin Fhong

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposes on the design of a walker for the prevention of falling among elderlies or patients during rehabilitation whenever they use a walker to assist them. Fall happens due to impaired balance or gait problem. The assistive device is designed by applying stability concept and an accelerometric fall detection system is included. The accelerometric fall detection system acts as an alerting device that acquires body accelerometric data and detect fall. Recorded accelerometric data could be useful for further assessment. Structural strength of the walker was verified via iterations of simulation using finite element analysis, before being fabricated. Experiments were conducted to identify the fall patterns using accelerometric data. The design process and detection of fall pattern demonstrates the design of a walker that could support the user without fail and alerts the helper, thus salvaging the users from injuries due to fall and unattended situation.

  6. Disease Precautions for Dog Walkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools for K-12 Educators Disease Precautions for Dog Walkers CC by Tomwsulcer Whether you’re walking ... routes or durations may need to be altered. Dog bites Always be careful when walking a dog ...

  7. Walker-Warburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schachter Harry

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Walker-Warburg Syndrome (WWS is a rare form of autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy associated with brain and eye abnormalities. WWS has a worldwide distribution. The overall incidence is unknown but a survey in North-eastern Italy has reported an incidence rate of 1.2 per 100,000 live births. It is the most severe form of congenital muscular dystrophy with most children dying before the age of three years. WWS presents at birth with generalized hypotonia, muscle weakness, developmental delay with mental retardation and occasional seizures. It is associated with type II cobblestone lissencephaly, hydrocephalus, cerebellar malformations, eye abnormalities and congenital muscular dystrophy characterized by hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan. Several genes have been implicated in the etiology of WWS, and others are as yet unknown. Several mutations were found in the Protein O-Mannosyltransferase 1 and 2 (POMT1 and POMT2 genes, and one mutation was found in each of the fukutin and fukutin-related protein (FKRP genes. Laboratory investigations usually show elevated creatine kinase, myopathic/dystrophic muscle pathology and altered α-dystroglycan. Antenatal diagnosis is possible in families with known mutations. Prenatal ultrasound may be helpful for diagnosis in families where the molecular defect is unknown. No specific treatment is available. Management is only supportive and preventive.

  8. Identification and Functional Analysis of the First Aquaporin from Striped Stem Borer, Chilo suppressalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Xing Lu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins are integral membrane proteins some of which form high capacity water-selective channels, promoting water permeation across cell membranes. In this study, we isolated the aquaporin transcript (CsDrip1 of Chilo suppressalis, one of the important rice pests. CsDrip1 included two variants, CsDrip1_v1 and CsDrip1_v2. Although CsDrip1_v2 sequence (>409 bp was longer than CsDrip1_v1, they possessed the same open reading frame (ORF. Protein structure and topology of CsDrip1 was analyzed using a predicted model, and the results demonstrated the conserved properties of insect water-specific aquaporins, including 6 transmembrane domains, 2 NPA motifs, ar/R constriction region (Phe69, His194, Ser203, and Arg209 and the C-terminal peptide sequence ending in “SYDF.” Our data revealed that the Xenopus oocytes expressing CsDrip1 indicated CsDrip1 could transport water instead of glycerol, trehalose and urea. Further, the transcript of CsDrip1 expressed ubiquitously but differentially in different tissues or organs and developmental stages of C. suppressalis. CsDrip1 mRNA exhibited the highest level of expression within hindgut and the third instar larvae. Regardless of pupae and adults, there were significantly different expression levels of CsDrip1 gene between male and female. Different from at low temperature, the transcript of CsDrip1 in larvae exposed to high temperature was increased significantly. Moreover, the mRNA levels of CsDrip1 in the third instar larvae, the fifth instar larvae, pupae (male and female, and adults (male and female under different humidities were investigated. However, the mRNA levels of CsDrip1 of only female and male adults were changed remarkably. In conclusions, CsDrip1 plays important roles in maintaining water homeostasis in this important rice pest.

  9. Madame Kara Walker, notre artiste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riché Deianne Richardson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available « Mon Ennemi, Mon Frère, Mon Bourreau, Mon Amour, » the epic exhibition at ARC/ Musée d’art moderne de la ville de Paris running from 20 June to 9 September, reveals the creative genius and vision of the artist Kara Walker, who was born in Stockton, California in 1969. The show is her most comprehensive one yet in Europe and includes the form that Walker has uniquely developed and for which she is best known, cut-out black silhouettes that are sometimes small and at other times gigantic and r...

  10. Multiple miRNAs jointly regulate the biosynthesis of ecdysteroid in the holometabolous insects, Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kang; Sun, Yang; Xiao, Huamei; Ge, Chang; Li, Fei; Han, Zhaojun

    2017-12-01

    The accurate rise and fall of active hormones is important for insect development. The ecdysteroids must be cleared in a timely manner. However, the mechanism of suppressing the ecdysteroid biosynthesis at the right time remains unclear. Here, we sequenced a small RNA library of Chilo suppressalis and identified 300 miRNAs in this notorious rice insect pest. Microarray analysis yielded 54 differentially expressed miRNAs during metamorphosis development. Target prediction and in vitro dual-luciferase assays confirmed that seven miRNAs (two conserved and five novel miRNAs) jointly targeted three Halloween genes in the ecdysteroid biosynthesis pathway. Overexpression of these seven miRNAs reduced the titer of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), induced mortality, and retarded development, which could be rescued by treatment with 20E. Comparative analysis indicated that the miRNA regulation of metamorphosis development is a conserved process but that the miRNAs involved are highly divergent. In all, we present evidence that both conserved and lineage-specific miRNAs have crucial roles in regulating development in insects by controlling ecdysteroid biosynthesis, which is important for ensuring developmental convergence and evolutionary diversity. © 2017 He et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  11. Knockdown of Cs-Spook induces delayed larval molting in rice striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Muhammad Faisal; Li, Yao; Ge, Chang; Sun, Yang; Yang, Qiupu; Li, Fei

    2015-03-01

    Spook has essential roles in the biogenesis of the molting hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-E). The function of spook in the rice striped stem borer (SSB) Chilo suppressalis remains unclear, prompting our hypothesis that it exerts actions similar to those reported for other insect species. Here we amplified the full-length transcript of spook (Cs-Spook) in SSB by 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Cs-Spook has conserved P450 motifs such as Helix-C, Helix-I, Helix-K, and PERF motif (PxxFxPxRF). It was highly expressed in late instar larvae but less so in newly molted larvae. Cs-Spook was highly expressed in prothoracic glands. Cs-Spook was knocked down by dsRNA treatments. Compared with controls, the gene expression level was reduced to 9% at 24 h post injection (PI), 33% at 48 h PI, and 24% at 72 h PI. The ecdysteroid titer decreased significantly in the dsRNA-treated group (P < 0.05), resulting in delayed larval development. The delayed development in dsRNA-treatment group was rescued by treating with 20-E. Our work demonstrates that Cs-Spook participates in the biogenesis of 20-E and regulates the molt of SSB, as seen in other species. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The Lepidoptera associated with forestry crop species in Brazil: a historical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczuck, Manoela; Carneiro, E; Casagrande, M M; Mielke, O H H

    2012-10-01

    Despite the long history of forestry activity in Brazil and its importance to the national economy, there is still much disorder in the information regarding pests of forestry species. Considering the importance of the entomological knowledge for the viability of silvicultural management, this work aimed to gather information on the species of Lepidoptera associated with forestry crops within Brazil using a historical approach. Through a literature review, all registered species of Lepidoptera related to forestry crops in Brazil from 1896 to 2010 were identified. The historical evaluation was based on the comparison of the number of published articles, species richness, and community similarities of the Lepidoptera and their associated forest crops, grouped in 10-year samples. A total of 417 occurrences of Lepidoptera associated with forestry species were recorded, from which 84 species are related with 40 different forestry crops. The nocturnal Lepidoptera were dominant on the records, with Eacles imperialis magnifica Walker as the most frequent pest species cited. Myrtaceae was the most frequent plant family, with Cedrela fissilis as the most cited forestry crop species. A successional change in both Lepidoptera species and their host plants was observed over the decades. The richness of lepidopteran pest species increased over the years, unlike the richness of forestry crop species. This increase could be related to the inefficient enforcement of sanitary barriers, to the increase of monoculture areas, and to the adaptability of native pests to exotic forestry species used in monoculture stands.

  13. 21 CFR 890.3825 - Mechanical walker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mechanical walker. 890.3825 Section 890.3825 Food... DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3825 Mechanical walker. (a) Identification. A mechanical walker is a four-legged device with a metal frame intended for medical purposes to...

  14. sur Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera : Plutellidae)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficacité d'extraits de feuilles de neem Azadirachta indica (Sapindale) sur Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera : Plutellidae), Hellula undalis (Lepidoptera : Pyralidae) et Lipaphis erysimi (Hemiptera : Aphididae) du chou Brassica oleracea (Brassicaceae) da.

  15. Mating disruption of the navel orangeworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) using widely spaced, aerosol dispensers: is the pheromone blend the most efficacious disruptant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is a key pest of almonds and pistachios and is sometimes controlled using mating disruption as part of a program of integrated management. The formulation used has a single, non-attractive compound [(Z,Z)-11-13-hexadecadie...

  16. Fast Detection of Striped Stem-Borer (Chilo suppressalis Walker Infested Rice Seedling Based on Visible/Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangyang Fan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Striped stem-borer (SSB infestation is one of the most serious sources of damage to rice growth. A rapid and non-destructive method of early SSB detection is essential for rice-growth protection. In this study, hyperspectral imaging combined with chemometrics was used to detect early SSB infestation in rice and identify the degree of infestation (DI. Visible/near-infrared hyperspectral images (in the spectral range of 380 nm to 1030 nm were taken of the healthy rice plants and infested rice plants by SSB for 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 days. A total of 17 characteristic wavelengths were selected from the spectral data extracted from the hyperspectral images by the successive projection algorithm (SPA. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to the hyperspectral images, and 16 textural features based on the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM were extracted from the first two principal component (PC images. A back-propagation neural network (BPNN was used to establish infestation degree evaluation models based on full spectra, characteristic wavelengths, textural features and features fusion, respectively. BPNN models based on a fusion of characteristic wavelengths and textural features achieved the best performance, with classification accuracy of calibration and prediction sets over 95%. The accuracy of each infestation degree was satisfactory, and the accuracy of rice samples infested for 2 days was slightly low. In all, this study indicated the feasibility of hyperspectral imaging techniques to detect early SSB infestation and identify degrees of infestation.

  17. Fast Detection of Striped Stem-Borer (Chilo suppressalis Walker) Infested Rice Seedling Based on Visible/Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yangyang; Wang, Tao; Qiu, Zhengjun; Peng, Jiyu; Zhang, Chu; He, Yong

    2017-10-27

    Striped stem-borer (SSB) infestation is one of the most serious sources of damage to rice growth. A rapid and non-destructive method of early SSB detection is essential for rice-growth protection. In this study, hyperspectral imaging combined with chemometrics was used to detect early SSB infestation in rice and identify the degree of infestation (DI). Visible/near-infrared hyperspectral images (in the spectral range of 380 nm to 1030 nm) were taken of the healthy rice plants and infested rice plants by SSB for 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 days. A total of 17 characteristic wavelengths were selected from the spectral data extracted from the hyperspectral images by the successive projection algorithm (SPA). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the hyperspectral images, and 16 textural features based on the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) were extracted from the first two principal component (PC) images. A back-propagation neural network (BPNN) was used to establish infestation degree evaluation models based on full spectra, characteristic wavelengths, textural features and features fusion, respectively. BPNN models based on a fusion of characteristic wavelengths and textural features achieved the best performance, with classification accuracy of calibration and prediction sets over 95%. The accuracy of each infestation degree was satisfactory, and the accuracy of rice samples infested for 2 days was slightly low. In all, this study indicated the feasibility of hyperspectral imaging techniques to detect early SSB infestation and identify degrees of infestation.

  18. Anholts sommerfugle (Lepidoptera)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsholt, Ole; Bygebjerg, Rune; Meedom, Peter

    2008-01-01

      The Lepidoptera fauna of the Danish island of Anholt is surveyed, and 1160 species are recorded. Anholt is situated in Kattegat 44 km from Denmark and 47 km from Sweden. The history and environment of the island are briefly discussed, with special focus on the flora, and earlier studies...... of the Lepidopterera fauna of Anholt are dealt with. The present study is in first hand based on material collected by the late Ebbe Schmidt Nielsen and the authors, partly in the 1970's and partly in more recent years. The material do not permit a general comparison between the status of the Lepidoptera fauna...

  19. Lagarta- falsa-medideira, Pseudoplusia includens (WALKER, 1857), nova praga do maracujazeiro no Espírito Santo

    OpenAIRE

    Benassi,Vera Lúcia Rodrigues Machado; Valente,Fabrício Iglesias; Comério,Emerson Fraga; Carvalho,Simão

    2012-01-01

    A espécie Pseudoplusia includens (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), lagarta-falsa-medideira, ataca diversas culturas de importância econômica, causando, na maioria das vezes, prejuízos consideráveis. Foram realizados levantamentos de todas as fases de desenvolvimento do inseto, no período de abril/2009 a abril/2010, em uma cultura de maracujá-azedo, Passifora edulis f. flavicarpa, no município de Linhares-ES, após ter sido constatada sua presença na área. A lagarta foi observada durante os me...

  20. Beliefs about the use of baby walkers

    OpenAIRE

    Chagas,Paula S. C.; Mancini,Marisa C.; Tirado,Marcella G. A.; Megale,Luiz; Sampaio,Rosana F.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To understand the opinion of the parents about the baby walker and compare the age of gait acquisition between infants that used a walker and those that did not. METHODS: In this quali-quantitative study, an interview involving a semi-structured questionnaire was carried out with 26 parents, 14 of whose infants used the equipment (BWG) and 12 of whose infants did not (NBWG) prior to gait acquisition. After extensive content analysis, categories for interpreting the results emerged...

  1. Beliefs about the use of baby walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas, Paula S C; Mancini, Marisa C; Tirado, Marcella G A; Megale, Luiz; Sampaio, Rosana F

    2011-01-01

    To understand the opinion of the parents about the baby walker and compare the age of gait acquisition between infants that used a walker and those that did not. In this quali-quantitative study, an interview involving a semi-structured questionnaire was carried out with 26 parents, 14 of whose infants used the equipment (BWG) and 12 of whose infants did not (NBWG) prior to gait acquisition. After extensive content analysis, categories for interpreting the results emerged. For data triangulation, the age of gait acquisition was documented by weekly telephone contact. Student's t-test was used for comparison between groups with a significance level of α=0.05. The following categories were identified in the parents' reports: a) information about the baby walker; b) doubt/decision to use it vs. certainty about not using it; c) beliefs about the use of a baby-walker; and d) benefits and harm from use. The age of independent gait acquisition did not differ between groups (p=0.837): BWG initiated gait at 376.17 (SD=32.62) days and NBWG did so at 378.75 (SD=27.99) days. The beliefs and feelings that permeate the decision to use a baby walker illustrate the different rationales adopted by parents about the role of this equipment in the child's development of gait and autonomy. The use of a baby walker did not influence the age of gait acquisition. The results broaden the understanding of choices that influence child-rearing practices prior to gait acquisition.

  2. Fermi-Walker transport and Thomas precession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor Lambare, Justo

    2017-07-01

    An exact derivation of the Thomas precession formula is presented based on the Fermi-Walker transport equation. Given that the Thomas precession effect is not a particularly intuitive phenomenon, such that when discovered in 1925 it took by surprise even experts in relativity theory, Einstein included, an alternative perspective can be useful at an intermediate level for physics students. The existing literature linking the Thomas precession to Fermi-Walker transport use geometric algebra as mathematical tool. Here the mathematics is kept within the limits of the usual vector and tensor algebra commonly used in special relativity theory at a level appropriate for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students.

  3. RNA interference in Lepidoptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terenius, Ole; Papanicolaou, Alexie; Garbutt, Jennie S.

    2011-01-01

    Gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) has revolutionized the study of gene function, particularly in non-model insects. However, in Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) RNAi has many times proven to be difficult to achieve. Most of the negative results have been anecdotal and the positive...... is particularly successful in the family Saturniidae and in genes involved in immunity. On the contrary, gene expression in epidermal tissues seems to be most difficult to silence. In addition, gene silencing by feeding dsRNA requires high concentrations for success. Possible causes for the variability of success...

  4. Dandy Walker malformation (variant): late presentation with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a rare case of Dandy Walker Syndrome in a child who presents with complaints of frontal headache, neck pain, fever, progressive visual impairment and multiple generalized tonic clonic seizures, inability to stand and urinary incontinence. Given the clinical and neuro-imaging findings, the diagnosis of Dandy ...

  5. Modern lacustrine stromatolites, Walker Lake, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Robert H.; Licari, Gerald R.; Link, Martin H.

    1982-05-01

    The Walker River drainage basin occupies about 10,000 km 2 in western Nevada and parts of California and is essentially a closed hydrologic system which drains from the crest of the Sierra Nevada in California and terminates in Walker Lake, Nevada. Walker Lake trends north and is about 27.4 km long and 8 km wide with water depths exceeding 30.5 m. The lake is situated in an asymmetric basin with steep alluvial fans flanking the western shoreline (Wassuk Range) and more gentle but areally more extensive alluvial fans flanking the eastern shoreline (Gillis Range). Exposed lake terraces and the present shoreline of Walker Lake record a sequence of Pleistocene and Holocene stromatolitic and tufaceous carbonate deposits. Small generalized and columnar stromatolites, frequently encrusted on exposed coarse-grained clasts or bedrock, are present along parts of the nearshore margin of Walker Lake and at elevated lake stands. Columnar stromatolites as much as 4 cm high are subcylindrical to club shaped discrete, and laterally linked at the base with local branching. These digitate stromatolites start as wavy, generalized stromatolites which are vertically transitional to small, laterally linked cabbage heads with laminae which thicken over the crests. Although algal structures are not well preserved in the older stromatolites, recent precipitation of low magnesium calcite occurs as smooth encrustations and as tiny mounds which are consistently associated with a diverse, seasonally variable, green and blue-green algal community including Cladophora glomerata, Ulothrix (cf. aequalis), Gongrosira, Schizothrix, Amphithrix janthina, Calothrix, Homeothrix, Spirulina, Anabaena, Lyngbya, and Entophysalis. Cladophora glomerata and a species of Ulothrix, which are the two most abundant algae within the Walker Lake stromatolite community, are known to condition semi-alkaline lake water by the removal of CO 2 from bicarbonate during photosynthesis. Such conditioning results in the

  6. Analysis of evolution in the lower Lepidoptera (Proceedings of the First International Workshop on Lower Lepidoptera)

    OpenAIRE

    Mutuura, Akira

    1991-01-01

    The evolutionary mechanism in Lepidoptera is discussed. As a result of the comparison of evolution between the Microptergidae and the typical Lepidoptera, two different kinds of evolution are recognized. ・・・

  7. Primer registro de Hypercompe indecisa (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Arctiinae en perales y álamos en la Patagonia First record of Hypercompe indecisa (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Arctiinae on pear trees and poplars in Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Dapoto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available La región del Alto Valle de Río Negro y Neuquén es la zona más importante de producción de frutas de pepita de la Argentina. La principal plaga de estos cultivos es Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera:Tortricidae. Los cambios implementados en las estrategias de control, principalmente la generalización del uso de la Técnica de Confusión Sexual, han causado en los últimos años cambios en la biodiversidad en esos cultivos. Durante la temporada 2008/09, en un establecimiento frutícola de producción orgánica en Vista Alegre (Neuquén, fue detectada Hypercompe indecisa (Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, produciendo graves daños en frutos y hojas de perales y sobre el follaje de Populus spp. Se cita por primera vez H. indecisa para la Patagonia y el primer hallazgo de esta especie sobre Populus spp. y Pyrus communis L.The Alto Valle of Río Negro and Neuquén is the main production zone of pomme fruits from Argentina. The main pest is Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae. Changes operated in control strategies in the last years have brought changes in the biodiversity of fruit orchards. During the season 2008/09, Hypercompe indecisa (Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae was detected in a fruit establishment of Vista Alegre (Neuquén under organic production causing serious damages on fruits and leaves of pear trees and in the leaves of Populus spp. Hypercompe indecisa is reported for the first time in Patagonia and is the first record of this species on Populus spp.and Pyrus communis L.

  8. The escape problem for mortal walkers

    OpenAIRE

    Grebenkov, D. S.; Rupprecht, J. -F.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce and investigate the escape problem for random walkers that may eventually die, decay, bleach, or lose activity during their diffusion towards an escape or reactive region on the boundary of a confining domain. In the case of a first-order kinetics (i.e., exponentially distributed lifetimes), we study the effect of the associated death rate onto the survival probability, the exit probability, and the mean first passage time. We derive the upper and lower bounds and some approximat...

  9. Space Walker - the Cognitive Visualization System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarinskiy, S.; Vitkovskiy, V. V.; Gorohov, V.; Zakharevski, D.

    2008-08-01

    The data cognitive visualization system --- ``Space Walker'' is presented. The creation of program products requires the practical mastery of the entire complex of achievements in the field of mathematical statistics, theory of illegible sets, cognitive machine drawing, cognitive psychology and theory of knowledge. SW system base on the ground of possibility use already acting program software intellectual support adopted solution in task control complex system with deep a priori uncertainty.

  10. Auditory perception of a human walker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, David; Campbell, Megan E J

    2014-01-01

    When one hears footsteps in the hall, one is able to instantly recognise it as a person: this is an everyday example of auditory biological motion perception. Despite the familiarity of this experience, research into this phenomenon is in its infancy compared with visual biological motion perception. Here, two experiments explored sensitivity to, and recognition of, auditory stimuli of biological and nonbiological origin. We hypothesised that the cadence of a walker gives rise to a temporal pattern of impact sounds that facilitates the recognition of human motion from auditory stimuli alone. First a series of detection tasks compared sensitivity with three carefully matched impact sounds: footsteps, a ball bouncing, and drumbeats. Unexpectedly, participants were no more sensitive to footsteps than to impact sounds of nonbiological origin. In the second experiment participants made discriminations between pairs of the same stimuli, in a series of recognition tasks in which the temporal pattern of impact sounds was manipulated to be either that of a walker or the pattern more typical of the source event (a ball bouncing or a drumbeat). Under these conditions, there was evidence that both temporal and nontemporal cues were important in recognising theses stimuli. It is proposed that the interval between footsteps, which reflects a walker's cadence, is a cue for the recognition of the sounds of a human walking.

  11. [Dandy-Walker variant: Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva-Núñez, José E; Lozano-Bustillo, Alejandra; Irias-Álvarez, Merlyn S; Vásquez-Montes, Raúl F; Varela-González, Douglas M

    Dandy Walker variant is defined by a variable hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermix with or without posterior fossa increase and without tentorium elevation. describe the case of a rare disease and emphasise the need to clarify the aetiology of prenatal malformations, as well as its multidisciplinary management. A male patient, 8 years of age, with a history of Infantile Cerebral Palsy and epilepsy, who was admitted with a history of tonic-clonic seizures. He was admitted due to psycho-motor developmental delay. During his hospitalisation, he had multiple seizure episodes, controlled with anticonvulsants. A computerized tomography was performed, in which communication was observed between the cisterna magna and fourth ventricle (the latter increased in size). In addition, the cerebellar vermix showed a partial hypoplasia. All these findings were compatible with a variant of the Dandy Walker syndrome. Dandy Walker variant may be asymptomatic and the images found may not indicate them as the cause of developmental disorders, due to its association with multiple syndromes and chromosomal abnormalities. Clinical presentation and prognosis depends on the related disorders, and a multidisciplinary approach is important, because the treatment depends on the symptoms presented. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Water Budgets of the Walker River Basin and Walker Lake, California and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Thomas J.; Allander, Kip K.

    2009-01-01

    The Walker River is the main source of inflow to Walker Lake, a closed-basin lake in west-central Nevada. The only outflow from Walker Lake is evaporation from the lake surface. Between 1882 and 2008, upstream agricultural diversions resulted in a lake-level decline of more than 150 feet and storage loss of 7,400,000 acre-feet. Evaporative concentration increased dissolved solids from 2,500 to 17,000 milligrams per liter. The increase in salinity threatens the survival of the Lahontan cutthroat trout, a native species listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. This report describes streamflow in the Walker River basin and an updated water budget of Walker Lake with emphasis on the lower Walker River basin downstream from Wabuska, Nevada. Water budgets are based on average annual flows for a 30-year period (1971-2000). Total surface-water inflow to the upper Walker River basin upstream from Wabuska was estimated to be 387,000 acre-feet per year (acre-ft/yr). About 223,000 acre-ft/yr (58 percent) is from the West Fork of the Walker River; 145,000 acre-ft/yr (37 percent) is from the East Fork of the Walker River; 17,000 acre-ft/yr (4 percent) is from the Sweetwater Range; and 2,000 acre-ft/yr (less than 1 percent) is from the Bodie Mountains, Pine Grove Hills, and western Wassuk Range. Outflow from the upper Walker River basin is 138,000 acre-ft/yr at Wabuska. About 249,000 acre-ft/yr (64 percent) of inflow is diverted for irrigation, transpired by riparian vegetation, evaporates from lakes and reservoirs, and recharges alluvial aquifers. Stream losses in Antelope, Smith, and Bridgeport Valleys are due to evaporation from reservoirs and agricultural diversions with negligible stream infiltration or riparian evapotranspiration. Diversion rates in Antelope and Smith Valleys were estimated to be 3.0 feet per year (ft/yr) in each valley. Irrigated fields receive an additional 0.8 ft of precipitation, groundwater pumpage, or both for a total applied-water rate

  13. STORED COCOA BEANS QUALITY AFFECTED BY FERMENTATION AND EPHESTIA CAUTELLA WALKER (LEPIDOPTERA: PHYCITIDAE INFESTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OK.KY S. DHARMAPUTRA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of fermentation on Ephestia cautella population and cocoa bean s quality in terms of moisture content, fungal population, the percentage of insect-damaged and mouldy beans, lipid and free fatty acid contents during storage were investigated together with the effects of £. cautella infestation on the quality of stored cocoa beans and weight loss. Fermented and unfermented cocoa beans with initial moisture contents of 7 or 9% were placed in ventilated plastic jars (Ikg/jar and stored for 6 months under room conditions. Seven larvae of £. cautella instar IV (2 males and 5 females were introduced in each jar at the beginning of storage. Untreated jars contained only cocoa beans. Population of £. cautella on fermented cocoa beans with either initial moisture content of 7 or 9% was lower than that on unfermented beans during storage. The population either on fermented or unfermented cocoa beans with initial moisture content of 7% was lower than that of 9%, and the population of all treatments increased during storage. Moisture content of all treatments either on cocoa beans with initial moisture contents of 7 or 9% had the same pattern. The percentage of insect-damaged beans on fermented cocoa beans was lower than that on unfermented cocoa beans after 5 to 6 months of storage. The damaged beans on fermented cocoa after 6 months of storage was not different than on unfermented beans after 4 months of storage. The weig ht loss either on fermented or unfermented cocoa beans with initial moisture content of 9% was higher than that with initial moisture content of 7%. The weight loss on fermented cocoa beans either with mois ture content of 7 or 9% was lower than that on unfermented beans during storage. The weight loss either on fermented or unfermented cocoa beans increased during storage. The percentage of mouldy beans on cocoa infested with £. cautella tended to increase during storage, while on beans not infested with the insect it fluctuated during storage. The highest percentage of mouldy beans was on unfermented and infested cocoa beans. Twenty-one fungal species were isolated from all treatments of coco a beans during storage. The total fungal population on fermented and unfermented beans had the same pattern. The population on fermented cocoa beans was lower than that on unfermented beans. Total lipid content on fermented cocoa beans either infested or not with £. cautella having initial moisture content of 7 or 9%, was lower than that of unfermented beans. The content either on fermented or unfermented cocoa beans and either infested or not decreased during storage. Free fatty acid content on cocoa beans infested with £. cautella was higher and significantly different than that on not infested. The content for both types increased during storage.

  14. Variante de Dandy Walker: relato de caso = Dandy Walker variant: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan, Richard Lester

    2009-01-01

    Conclusões: este artigo procura caracterizar a variante de Dandy Walker, que é uma malformação congênita do sistema nervoso central e é o tipo mais comum da Síndrome de Dandy Walker. Seu fenótipo é variável, devendo-se sempre pesquisar malformações tanto intra quanto extracranianas, visto que o risco de mortalidade pós-natal aumenta quando existe esta associação. O tratamento envolve equipe multidisciplinar e o prognóstico é reservado, variando conforme o fenótipo

  15. Molecular cloning, spatiotemporal and functional expression of GABA receptor subunits RDL1 and RDL2 of the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Cheng-Wang; Jia, Zhong-Qiang; Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Huang, Qiu-Tang; Han, Zhao-Jun; Zhao, Chun-Qing

    2018-03-01

    Insect γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor (GABAR) is one of the major targets of insecticides. In the present study, cDNAs (CsRDL1A and CsRDL2S) encoding the two isoforms of RDL subunits were cloned from the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis. Transcripts of both genes demonstrated similar expression patterns in different tissues and developmental stages, although CsRDL2S was ∼2-fold more abundant than CsRDL1A throughout all development stages. To investigate the function of channels formed by CsRDL subunits, both genes were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes singly or in combination in different ratios. Electrophysiological results using a two-electrode voltage clamp demonstrated that GABA activated currents in oocytes injected with both cRNAs. The EC 50 value of GABA in activating currents was smaller in oocytes co-injected with CsRDL1A and CsRDL2S than in oocytes injected singly. The IC 50 value of the insecticide fluralaner in inhibiting GABA responses was smaller in oocytes co-injected with different cRNAs than in oocytes injected singly. Co-injection also changed the potency of the insecticide dieldrin in oocytes injected singly. These findings suggested that heteromeric GABARs were formed by the co-injections of CsRDL1A and CsRDL2S in oocytes. Although the presence of Ser at the 2'-position in the second transmembrane segment was responsible for the insensitivity of GABARs to dieldrin, this amino acid did not affect the potencies of the insecticides fipronil and fluralaner. These results lead us to hypothesize that C. suppressalis may adapt to insecticide pressure by regulating the expression levels of CsRDL1A and CsRDL2S and the composition of both subunits in GABARs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Overview: Identification characters of Lepidoptera eggs (Insecta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are 160,000 species of described Lepidoptera, or moths and butterflies, on Earth. The egg stage is the least known biological stage of moths and butterflies and there have been very few comparative studies. The purpose of this video is to provide the few, major characteristics of Lepidoptera...

  17. 75 FR 35265 - Safety Standard for Infant Walkers: Final Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ..., the weight of the CAMI dummy, the weight of the CAMI vest, the coefficient of friction between the... fatality reports or injury estimates related to walkers since publication of the proposed rule. That...\\ (This estimate has been adjusted to exclude jumpers from the walker code.) No deaths were reported...

  18. Helen M. Walker: Influential in 1929 and Still Cited Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Marti H.; Stallings, William M.

    Helen M. Walker contributed to the field of educational research and statistics during a 55-year career. Born in Iowa in 1891, Walker earned a bachelor's degree from Iowa Wesleyan College and taught high school mathematics for nine years. She then taught at the University of Kansas while doing graduate work. One source noted that she was the first…

  19. MoonWalker: Veri��?cation of .NET Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aan de Brugh, N.H.M.; Nguyen, V.Y.; Ruys, T.C.; Kowalewski, S.; Philippou, A.

    MoonWalker is a software model checker for CIL bytecode programs, which is able to detect deadlocks and assertion violations in CIL assemblies, better known as Microsoft .NET programs. The design of MoonWalker is inspired by the Java PathFinder (JPF), a model checker for Java programs. The

  20. A review of the functionalities of smart walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Maria; Santos, Cristina; Frizera, Anselmo; Ceres, Ramón

    2015-10-01

    There is a need to conceptualize and improve the investigation and developments in assistive devices, focusing on the design and effectiveness of walkers in the user's rehabilitation process and functional compensation. This review surveys the importance of smart walkers in maintaining mobility and discusses their potential in rehabilitation and their demands as assistive devices. It also presents related research in addressing and quantifying the smart walker's efficiency and influence on gait. Besides, it discusses smart walkers focusing on studies related to the concept of autonomous and shared-control and manual guidance, the use of smart walkers as personal helpers to sit-to-stand and diagnostic tools for patients' rehabilitation through the evaluation of their gait. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dandy-Walker variant in Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, T; Hattori, H; Miyazaki, M; Higuchi, Y; Adachi, S; Nakahata, T

    2001-04-22

    We describe a five-month-old male infant with Coffin-Siris syndrome, the so-called Dandy-Walker variant (hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis with cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, but without enlargement of the posterior fossa), and partial agenesis of the corpus callosum. Dandy-Walker malformation and mega cisterna magna, but not Dandy-Walker variant, have been reported in Coffin-Siris syndrome. The presence of Dandy-Walker variant in the infant we described confirms that the full continuum of the Dandy-Walker complex can occur in Coffin-Siris syndrome. The yet unidentified gene(s) for the syndrome may be related to the development of the hindbrain. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Síndrome de Dandy-walker The Dandy-Walker syndrome. Report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaderson Costa da Costa

    1973-03-01

    Full Text Available São relatados os casos de 4 pacientes com síndrome de Dandy-Walker diagnosticada pela pneumencefalografia fracionada e ventriculografia. O tratamento e a patogenia desta malformação são discutidos com base em dados embriológicos.Four cases of Dandy-Walker syndrome diagnosed through encephalography and ventriculography with air are reported. The pathogenesis of this malformation is discussed. Particularly stressed are the radiological aspects of the condition, which are considered to be pathognomonic. The roentgenological findings are quite typical, indicating the extreme dolichocephaly, thinning and bulging of the bones of the posterior cranial fossa, prominent separation of the lambdoid sutures and an abnormal position of the lateral sinuses. Ventriculography shows symmetric hydrocephalus with extremely large cyst -like formation in the posterior fossa. Surgical indications are also considered. The ventricle lateral shunt is the recommended treatment for the DandyWalker malformations which show cerebral subarachnoid agenesis by pneumoencephalography.

  3. Intelligent control of a smart walker and its performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, Simon L; Li, Qingguo

    2013-06-01

    Recent technological advances have allowed the development of force-dependent, intelligently controlled smart walkers that are able to provide users with enhanced mobility, support and gait assistance. The purpose of this study was to develop an intelligent rule-based controller for a smart walker to achieve a smooth interaction between the user and the walker. This study developed a rule-based mapping between the interaction force, measured by a load cell attached to the walker handle, and the acceleration of the walker. Ten young, healthy subjects were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed controller compared to a well-known admittance-based control system. There were no significant differences between the two control systems concerning their user experience, velocity profiles or average cost of transportation. However, the admittance-based control system required a 1.2N lower average interaction force to maintain the 1m/s target speed (p = 0.002). Metabolic data also indicated that smart walker-assisted gait could considerably reduce the metabolic demand of walking with a four-legged walker.

  4. Aging in mortal superdiffusive Lévy walkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, Helena

    2017-12-01

    A growing body of literature examines the effects of superdiffusive subballistic movement premeasurement (aging or time lag) on observations arising from single-particle tracking. A neglected aspect is the finite lifetime of these Lévy walkers, be they proteins, cells, or larger structures. We examine the effects of aging on the motility of mortal walkers, and discuss the means by which permanent stopping of walkers may be categorized as arising from "natural" death or experimental artifacts such as low photostability or radiation damage. This is done by comparison of the walkers' mean squared displacement (MSD) with the front velocity of propagation of a group of walkers, which is found to be invariant under time lags. For any running time distribution of a mortal random walker, the MSD is tempered by the stopping rate θ . This provides a physical interpretation for truncated heavy-tailed diffusion processes and serves as a tool by which to better classify the underlying running time distributions of random walkers. Tempering of aged MSDs raises the issue of misinterpreting superdiffusive motion which appears Brownian or subdiffusive over certain time scales.

  5. Human-robot interaction strategies for walker-assisted locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Cifuentes, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the development of a new multimodal human-robot interface for testing and validating control strategies applied to robotic walkers for assisting human mobility and gait rehabilitation. The aim is to achieve a closer interaction between the robotic device and the individual, empowering the rehabilitation potential of such devices in clinical applications. A new multimodal human-robot interface for testing and validating control strategies applied to robotic walkers for assisting human mobility and gait rehabilitation is presented. Trends and opportunities for future advances in the field of assistive locomotion via the development of hybrid solutions based on the combination of smart walkers and biomechatronic exoskeletons are also discussed. .

  6. A Simple, Cleated DNA Walker That Hangs on to Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Cheulhee; Allen, Peter B; Ellington, Andrew D

    2017-08-22

    We designed and demonstrated a single-legged or unipedal walker that has a "cleat" that allows it to persistently associate with a track and make autonomous decisions about movement. The walker is highly processive over long periods of time, as shown by its movement over a microparticle surface suffused with substrate. The simple design can be readily optimized on the basis of simple energetic considerations. The walker can be used for signal amplification and should prove especially valuable for programming amorphous computations within chemical reaction networks.

  7. Comparative embryogenesis of Mecoptera and Lepidoptera with special reference to the abdominal prolegs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Li-Xuan; Hua, Bao-Zhen

    2016-05-01

    The eruciform larvae of holometabolous insects are primarily characterized by bearing a varying number of abdominal prolegs in addition to three pairs of thoracic legs. However, whether the prolegs are evolutionarily homologous among different insect orders is still a disputable issue. We examined the embryonic features and histological structure of the prolegs of the scorpionfly Panorpa byersi Hua and Huang (Mecoptera: Panorpidae) and the Oriental armyworm Mythimna separata (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) to investigate whether the prolegs are homologous between these two holometabolous insect orders. In the scorpionfly, paired lateral process primordia arise on abdominal segments I-VIII (A1-A8) in line with the thoracic legs in early embryonic stages, but degenerate into triangular protuberances in later stages, and paired medial processes appear along the midventral line before dorsal closure and eventually develop into unjointed, cone-shaped prolegs. Histological observation showed that the lumina of the prolegs are not continuous with the hemocoel, differing distinctly from that of the basic appendicular plan of thoracic legs. These results suggest that the prolegs are likely secondary outgrowths in Mecoptera. In the armyworm, lateral process primordia appear on A1-A10 in alignment with the thoracic legs in the early embryonic stages, although only the rudiments on A3-A6 and A10 develop into segmented prolegs with the lumina continuous with the hemocoel and others degenerate eventually, suggesting that the prolegs are true segmental appendages serially homologous with the thoracic legs in Lepidoptera. Therefore, we conclude that the larval prolegs are likely not evolutionarily homologous between Mecoptera and Lepidoptera. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Instability of Walker propagating domain wall in magnetic nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, B; Wang, X R

    2013-07-12

    The stability of the well-known Walker propagating domain wall (DW) solution of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation is analytically investigated. Surprisingly, a propagating DW is always dressed with spin waves so that the Walker rigid-body propagating DW mode does not occur in reality. In the low field region only stern spin waves are emitted while both stern and bow waves are generated under high fields. In a high enough field, but below the Walker breakdown field, the Walker solution could be convective or absolute unstable if the transverse magnetic anisotropy is larger than a critical value, corresponding to a significant modification of the DW profile and DW propagating speed.

  9. Walker Branch Watershed Vegetation Inventory, 1967-2006, R1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains five data files, in comma-separated format (.csv), derived from the Walker Branch Watershed (WBW) vegetation inventory in eastern Tennessee....

  10. Late Holocene slowdown of the Indian Ocean Walker circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Mahyar; Prange, Matthias; Schefuß, Enno; Jennerjahn, Tim C

    2017-10-18

    Changes in tropical zonal atmospheric (Walker) circulation induce shifts in rainfall patterns along with devastating floods and severe droughts that dramatically impact the lives of millions of people. Historical records and observations of the Walker circulation over the 20th century disagree on the sign of change and therefore, longer climate records are necessary to better project tropical circulation changes in response to global warming. Here we examine proxies for thermocline depth and rainfall in the eastern tropical Indian Ocean during the globally colder Last Glacial Maximum (19-23 thousand years ago) and for the past 3000 years. We show that increased thermocline depth and rainfall indicate a stronger-than-today Walker circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum, which is supported by an ensemble of climate simulations. Our findings underscore the sensitivity of tropical circulation to temperature change and provide evidence for a further weakening of the Walker circulation in response to greenhouse warming.

  11. Walker Branch Watershed Vegetation Inventory, 1967-1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The original objectives of the long-term vegetation survey of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee (WBW; Curlin and Nelson 1968) was to quantify...

  12. The escape problem for mortal walkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenkov, D. S.; Rupprecht, J.-F.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce and investigate the escape problem for random walkers that may eventually die, decay, bleach, or lose activity during their diffusion towards an escape or reactive region on the boundary of a confining domain. In the case of a first-order kinetics (i.e., exponentially distributed lifetimes), we study the effect of the associated death rate onto the survival probability, the exit probability, and the mean first passage time. We derive the upper and lower bounds and some approximations for these quantities. We reveal three asymptotic regimes of small, intermediate, and large death rates. General estimates and asymptotics are compared to several explicit solutions for simple domains and to numerical simulations. These results allow one to account for stochastic photobleaching of fluorescent tracers in bio-imaging, degradation of mRNA molecules in genetic translation mechanisms, or high mortality rates of spermatozoa in the fertilization process. Our findings provide a mathematical ground for optimizing storage containers and materials to reduce the risk of leakage of dangerous chemicals or nuclear wastes.

  13. ACADEMIC TRAINING (R.P. Walker)

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    15, 16, 17 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Council room, bldg. 503 on 15 May, Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 16 and 17 May Introduction to free electron lasers by R.P. Walker / Rutherford Laboratory, UK The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise the...

  14. A Rare Cause of Congenital Hypotonia: Walker Warburg Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Cigdem Sivrice

    2014-01-01

    Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is an autosomal recessive rare muscle disease which characterized by type 2 lissencephaly, cerebellar abnormalities, and congenital muscular dystrophy of the retinal abnormalities. In this article, we described a patient who born from 1st degree consanguineous marriage mother and father and admitted to our hospital suction weakness and had been diagnosed Walker- Warburg syndrome with physical examination and laboratory tests as a result of severe hypotonia, atypi...

  15. Chrysodeixis includens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) on soybean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chrysodeixis includens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) on soybean treated with resistance inducers. P Vinicius de Souza, BR Machado, M Mueller de Freitas, F Correa, A Cirilo de Sousa Almeida, FG de Jesus ...

  16. An annotated list of the Lepidoptera of Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Pohl

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This checklist documents the 2367 Lepidoptera species reported to occur in the province of Alberta, Canada, based on examination of the major public insect collections in Alberta and the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids and Nematodes. Records from relevant literature sources published since 1950 and from selected older works are also included. The entry for each species includes the scientific name, the author and year of publication of the original description, occurrence status, provincial distribution (according to ecoclimatic region, and adult phenology. The most recent taxonomic references are given, and common names are listed for butterflies and conspicuous moth species. The sources of specimen- and literature-based records are provided for each species. An additional 138 species whose occurrence in Alberta is probable are appended to the list. For 1524 of the listed species and subspecies, annotations are given, with selected information on taxonomy, nomenclature, distribution, habitat, and biology. An additional section provides details on 171 species erroneously reported from Alberta in previous works. Introductory sections to the volume provide a general overview of the order Lepidoptera and review the natural regions of Alberta, the state of knowledge of their Lepidoptera faunas, and the history and current state of knowledge of Alberta Lepidoptera. Each of the 63 families (and selected subfamilies occurring in Alberta is briefly reviewed, with information on distinguishing features, general appearance, and general biology. A bibliography and an index of genus-level, species-level, and subspecies-level names are provided. The list is accompanied by an appendix of proposed nomenclature changes, consisting of revised status for 25 taxa raised from synonymy to species level, and new synonymy for 20 species-level and one genus-level taxa here considered to be subjective synonyms, with resultant revised synonymy for one

  17. Phylogeny and Evolution of Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitter, Charles; Davis, Donald R; Cummings, Michael P

    2017-01-31

    Until recently, deep-level phylogeny in Lepidoptera, the largest single radiation of plant-feeding insects, was very poorly understood. Over the past two decades, building on a preceding era of morphological cladistic studies, molecular data have yielded robust initial estimates of relationships both within and among the ∼43 superfamilies, with unsolved problems now yielding to much larger data sets from high-throughput sequencing. Here we summarize progress on lepidopteran phylogeny since 1975, emphasizing the superfamily level, and discuss some resulting advances in our understanding of lepidopteran evolution.

  18. The Transmembrane Morphogenesis Protein gp1 of Filamentous Phages Contains Walker A and Walker B Motifs Essential for Phage Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Loh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to lytic phages, filamentous phages are assembled in the inner membrane and secreted across the bacterial envelope without killing the host. For assembly and extrusion of the phage across the host cell wall, filamentous phages code for membrane-embedded morphogenesis proteins. In the outer membrane of Escherichia coli, the protein gp4 forms a pore-like structure, while gp1 and gp11 form a complex in the inner membrane of the host. By comparing sequences with other filamentous phages, we identified putative Walker A and B motifs in gp1 with a conserved lysine in the Walker A motif (K14, and a glutamic and aspartic acid in the Walker B motif (D88, E89. In this work we demonstrate that both, Walker A and Walker B, are essential for phage production. The crucial role of these key residues suggests that gp1 might be a molecular motor driving phage assembly. We further identified essential residues for the function of the assembly complex. Mutations in three out of six cysteine residues abolish phage production. Similarly, two out of six conserved glycine residues are crucial for gp1 function. We hypothesise that the residues represent molecular hinges allowing domain movement for nucleotide binding and phage assembly.

  19. The Transmembrane Morphogenesis Protein gp1 of Filamentous Phages Contains Walker A and Walker B Motifs Essential for Phage Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Belinda; Haase, Maximilian; Mueller, Lukas; Kuhn, Andreas; Leptihn, Sebastian

    2017-04-09

    In contrast to lytic phages, filamentous phages are assembled in the inner membrane and secreted across the bacterial envelope without killing the host. For assembly and extrusion of the phage across the host cell wall, filamentous phages code for membrane-embedded morphogenesis proteins. In the outer membrane of Escherichia coli, the protein gp4 forms a pore-like structure, while gp1 and gp11 form a complex in the inner membrane of the host. By comparing sequences with other filamentous phages, we identified putative Walker A and B motifs in gp1 with a conserved lysine in the Walker A motif (K14), and a glutamic and aspartic acid in the Walker B motif (D88, E89). In this work we demonstrate that both, Walker A and Walker B, are essential for phage production. The crucial role of these key residues suggests that gp1 might be a molecular motor driving phage assembly. We further identified essential residues for the function of the assembly complex. Mutations in three out of six cysteine residues abolish phage production. Similarly, two out of six conserved glycine residues are crucial for gp1 function. We hypothesise that the residues represent molecular hinges allowing domain movement for nucleotide binding and phage assembly.

  20. Lagarta- falsa-medideira, Pseudoplusia includens (WALKER, 1857, nova praga do maracujazeiro no Espírito Santo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia Rodrigues Machado Benassi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A espécie Pseudoplusia includens (Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, lagarta-falsa-medideira, ataca diversas culturas de importância econômica, causando, na maioria das vezes, prejuízos consideráveis. Foram realizados levantamentos de todas as fases de desenvolvimento do inseto, no período de abril/2009 a abril/2010, em uma cultura de maracujá-azedo, Passifora edulis f. flavicarpa, no município de Linhares-ES, após ter sido constatada sua presença na área. A lagarta foi observada durante os meses de abril a novembro/2009 e de fevereiro a abril/2010, sendo constatados surtos mais severos nos meses de junho, setembro e novembro/2009, atingindo índices de até 80% de folhas danificadas. A planta invasora Solanum americanum (maria-pretinha, associada à cultura, é também hospedeira do inseto. Como inimigos naturais da lagarta, foram constatados o parasitoide Copidosoma truncatellum (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae e o entomopatógeno Baculovirus sp.. Este é o primeiro registro da ocorrência de P. includens na cultura de maracujá-azedo.

  1. A Rare Cause of Congenital Hypotonia: Walker Warburg Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem Sivrice

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS is an autosomal recessive rare muscle disease which characterized by type 2 lissencephaly, cerebellar abnormalities, and congenital muscular dystrophy of the retinal abnormalities. In this article, we described a patient who born from 1st degree consanguineous marriage mother and father and admitted to our hospital suction weakness and had been diagnosed Walker- Warburg syndrome with physical examination and laboratory tests as a result of severe hypotonia, atypical facial appearance, accompanying eye and brain abnormalities are very high serum creatine phosphokinase levels and wanted to draw attention to this rare muscle disease in the differential diagnosis of hypotonic infants.

  2. Casimir densities for a boundary in Robertson-Walker spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saharian, A.A., E-mail: saharian@ictp.i [Department of Physics, Yerevan State University, 1 Alex Manoogian Street, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Setare, M.R., E-mail: rezakord@ipm.i [Department of Science of Bijar, University of Kurdistan, Bijar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-04-12

    For scalar and electromagnetic fields we evaluate the vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor induced by a curved boundary in the Robertson-Walker spacetime with negative spatial curvature. In order to generate the vacuum densities we use the conformal relation between the Robertson-Walker and Rindler spacetimes and the corresponding results for a plate moving by uniform proper acceleration through the Fulling-Rindler vacuum. For the general case of the scale factor the vacuum energy-momentum tensor is presented as the sum of the boundary free and boundary induced parts.

  3. Casimir densities for a boundary in Robertson-Walker spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saharian, A.A.; Setare, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    For scalar and electromagnetic fields we evaluate the vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor induced by a curved boundary in the Robertson-Walker spacetime with negative spatial curvature. In order to generate the vacuum densities we use the conformal relation between the Robertson-Walker and Rindler spacetimes and the corresponding results for a plate moving by uniform proper acceleration through the Fulling-Rindler vacuum. For the general case of the scale factor the vacuum energy-momentum tensor is presented as the sum of the boundary free and boundary induced parts.

  4. The role of walkers' needs and expectations in supporting maintenance of attendance at walking groups: a longitudinal multi-perspective study of walkers and walk group leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassavou, Aikaterini; Turner, Andrew; French, David P

    2015-01-01

    There is good evidence that when people's needs and expectations regarding behaviour change are met, they are satisfied with that change, and maintain those changes. Despite this, there is a dearth of research on needs and expectations of walkers when initially attending walking groups and whether and how these needs and expectations have been satisfied after a period of attendance. Equally, there is an absence of research on how people who lead these groups understand walkers' needs and walk leaders' actions to address them. The present study was aimed at addressing both of these gaps in the research. Two preliminary thematic analyses were conducted on face-to-face interviews with (a) eight walkers when they joined walking groups, five of whom were interviewed three months later, and (b) eight walk leaders. A multi-perspective analysis building upon these preliminary analyses identified similarities and differences within the themes that emerged from the interviews with walkers and walk leaders. Walkers indicated that their main needs and expectations when joining walking groups were achieving long-term social and health benefits. At the follow up interviews, walkers indicated that satisfaction with meeting similar others within the groups was the main reason for continued attendance. Their main source of dissatisfaction was not feeling integrated in the existing walking groups. Walk leaders often acknowledged the same reasons for walkers joining and maintaining attendance at walking. However, they tended to attribute dissatisfaction and drop out to uncontrollable environmental factors and/or walkers' personalities. Walk leaders reported a lack of efficacy to effectively address walkers' needs. Interventions to increase retention of walkers should train walk leaders with the skills to help them modify the underlying psychological factors affecting walkers' maintenance at walking groups. This should result in greater retention of walkers in walking groups, thereby

  5. The role of walkers' needs and expectations in supporting maintenance of attendance at walking groups: a longitudinal multi-perspective study of walkers and walk group leaders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Kassavou

    Full Text Available There is good evidence that when people's needs and expectations regarding behaviour change are met, they are satisfied with that change, and maintain those changes. Despite this, there is a dearth of research on needs and expectations of walkers when initially attending walking groups and whether and how these needs and expectations have been satisfied after a period of attendance. Equally, there is an absence of research on how people who lead these groups understand walkers' needs and walk leaders' actions to address them. The present study was aimed at addressing both of these gaps in the research.Two preliminary thematic analyses were conducted on face-to-face interviews with (a eight walkers when they joined walking groups, five of whom were interviewed three months later, and (b eight walk leaders. A multi-perspective analysis building upon these preliminary analyses identified similarities and differences within the themes that emerged from the interviews with walkers and walk leaders.Walkers indicated that their main needs and expectations when joining walking groups were achieving long-term social and health benefits. At the follow up interviews, walkers indicated that satisfaction with meeting similar others within the groups was the main reason for continued attendance. Their main source of dissatisfaction was not feeling integrated in the existing walking groups. Walk leaders often acknowledged the same reasons for walkers joining and maintaining attendance at walking. However, they tended to attribute dissatisfaction and drop out to uncontrollable environmental factors and/or walkers' personalities. Walk leaders reported a lack of efficacy to effectively address walkers' needs.Interventions to increase retention of walkers should train walk leaders with the skills to help them modify the underlying psychological factors affecting walkers' maintenance at walking groups. This should result in greater retention of walkers in walking

  6. Bioenergetics and psychological profile of an ultra-endurance walker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrinolla, Anna; Li Volti, Giovanni; Galvano, Fabio; Schena, Federico; Perciavalle, Valentina; DI Corrado, Donatella

    2018-04-01

    Ultra-endurance walking provides athletes with significant physiological and psychological challenges. In this study ultra-endurance walking races are intended as events where the participants have to cover the largest distance within a given time, usually 24, 36, 48 hours, or longer, keeping the pause time within 5% of the total walking time. The aim of the study was to evaluate the metabolic, bioenergetics, and psychological characteristics of a world record ultra-endurance walker during three different ultra-endurance events characterized by different durations (36 hours, 48 hours and 70 hours). The participant investigated in this study was an experienced male ultra-endurance walker (age 41 years; mass 69 kg; height 173 cm), who used always the Nordic walking technique. During the 70 hours event, our walker broke the "Longest Marathon Nordic Walking" Guinness World Record covering 274 km in 70 hours. An overall time-dependent increase of oxidative stress, as assessed by lipid hydroperoxide levels, was observed in 36 hours and 48 hours events. Speed and metabolic cost of walking decreased rather linearly with walking time over all the three events. The study shows how the walker was able to approach the three different ultra-endurance events characterized by different durations applying physiological, and psychological strategies allowing him to reach the goal of the completion of each ultra-endurance event.

  7. Mapping a Memoir within Australian Landscapes: Shirley Walker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Moreno Álvarez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Shirley Walker (1927, retired Senior Lecturer in English from the University of New England at Armidale, where she taught Australian Literature, decided to try her own hand at writing a memoir. The result is Roundabout at Bangalow: An Intimate Chronicle (2001, which is her account of growing up in the Northern Rivers area of New South Wales in Australia. The author has also published numerous critical articles on Australian Literature, commenting thoroughly on the work of Mary Gilmore (1865- 1962, Judith Wright (1915-2000 and Dorothy Hewett (1923-2002. Walker has also published The Ghost at the Wedding (2009 based on the life of Walker’s mother in law, a woman whose life was largely shaped by war, and who, in 1918 near the end of WW1, married a returned soldier. This biography, which was awarded the Asher Literary Prize (2009 and the Nita B Kibble Award (2010, Australia’s premier award for women’s writing, has been described as a major work of Australian literature and a major contribution to Australian history. The present article focuses on Roundabout at Bangalow: An Intimate Chronicle, where Walker narrates the complicated and, sometimes, blurred resonances of her “half-a-lifetime” memoir. This work exemplifies how Walker is deeply concerned with the unreliability of memory and the way it can exaggerate grievances or distort past perceptions, unloosing itself from historical and geographical truth and adopting first and foremost a primal function in the formation of identities.

  8. Spruce aphid (Elatobium abietinum Walker) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) [Chapter XXIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann M. Lynch

    2014-01-01

    Elatobium abietinum Walker is a spruce-feeding aphid that in Europe is referred to as the green spruce aphid (Day et al., 1998a) (Fig. 1). However, in North America E. abietinum is known simply as the spruce aphid, while the common name "green spruce aphid" refers to a different species, Cinara fornacula Hottes (Hemiptera: Aphididae) (http://www.entsoc.org/...

  9. Karyotype and meiosis studies in Oxycatantops spissus (Walker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The standard karyotype of Oxycatantops spissus (Walker) (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Acridinae) from Limbe in the South West Province of Cameroon, comprises 2n = 23 acrocentric chromosomes in the male with the XO/XX sex determining mechanism [2n = 23 (22AA+XO)]. The karyotype structure is represented by five pairs of ...

  10. Nursery Pest Management of Phytolyma lata Walker (Scott) Attack ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The establishment of plantations of Milicia excelsa has been constrained by the gall-forming psyllid Phytolyma lata Walker (Scott) that causes extensive damage to young plants. We present findings of an experiment aimed at preventing Phytolyma attack on Milicia seedlings in the nursery using chemical control and ...

  11. Philip Glass, Scott Walker ja Sigur Ros! / Immo Mihkelson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mihkelson, Immo, 1959-

    2007-01-01

    Pimedate Ööde 11. filmifestivali muusikafilme - Austraalia "Glass: Philipi portree 12 osas" (rež. Scott Hicks), Islandi "Sigur Ros kodus" (rež. Dean DeBois), Suurbritannia "Scott Walker: 30 Century Man" (rež. Stephen Kijak)

  12. Future null infinity of Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreschi, O.M.

    1988-08-01

    The future null infinity for all non-contracting Robertson-Walker space time is studied systematically. A theorem is proved which establishes the expected relation between the nature of J + and the appearance or absence of cosmic event horizons. (author). 7 refs, 1 tab

  13. Construction of calibration pads facility, Walker Field, Grand Junction, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.L.

    1978-08-01

    A gamma-ray spectrometer facility was completed at Walker Field Airport, Grand Junction, Colorado, in November 1976. This report describes spectrometers and their calibration, the construction of the spectrometer facility, the radioelement concentrations, procedures for using the facilites, and environmental considerations

  14. Dandy-Walker syndrome together with occipital encephalocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, A; Zeyrek, D; Cekin, A; Karazeybek, H

    2008-08-01

    Dandy-Walker malformation is an anomaly characterized by dysgenesis of the foramina of Magendie and Lushka in the upper 4(th) ventricle, hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Encephalocele is diagnosed from the calvarium defect, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and herniation of the meninges. It is the rarest neural tube defect. A 7 x 9 cm encephalocele was found on physical examination of a 6-day old baby boy patient. From cranial magnetic resonance, it was seen that the posterior fossa was enlarged with cysts and there was agenesis of the vermis. A connection was established between the ventricle and the development of cysts on the posterior fossa. These findings were evaluated as significant from the aspect of Dandy-Walker malformation. The extension of the bone defect in the left occipital area towards the posterior, and the cranio-caudal diameter reaching 9 cm was seen to be in accordance with encephalocele. It is rare for Dandy-Walker syndrome to occur together with occipital encephalocele. The authors present a case of Dandy-Walker syndrome together with occipital encephalocele.

  15. Dandy-Walker malformation | Hamid | Egyptian Journal of Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dandy-Walker malformation is a rare congenital malformation and involves the cerebellum and fourth ventricle. The condition is characterized by agenesis or hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, and enlargement of the posterior fossa. A large number of concomitant problems may be ...

  16. Quantization of Robertson-Walker geometry coupled to fermionic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christodoulakis, T.; Zanelli, J.

    1983-06-01

    A Robertson-Walker universe coupled to a spin 1/2 Dirac field is quantized following Dirac's formalism for constrained Hamiltonian systems. It is found that in nearly all cases it can be asserted that the universe avoids the collapse. (author)

  17. Primer registro de Hypercompe indecisa (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Arctiinae en perales y álamos en la Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela DAPOTO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available La región del Alto Valle de Río Negro y Neuquén es la zona más importante de producción de frutas de pepita de la Argentina. La principal plaga de estos cultivos es Cydia pomonella L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae. Los cambios implementados en las estrategias de control, principalmente la generalización del uso de la Técnica de Confusión Sexual, han causado en los últimos años cambios en la biodiversidad en esos cultivos. Durante la temporada 2008/09, en un establecimiento frutícola de producción orgánica en Vista Alegre (Neuquén, fue detectada Hypercompe indecisa (Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, produciendo graves daños en frutos y hojas de perales y sobre el follaje de Populus spp. Se cita por primera vez a H. indecisa para la Patagonia y el primer hallazgo de esta especie sobre Populus spp. y Pyrus communis L.

  18. (JE Smith, 1797) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith, 1797) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) annually cause enormous loss to the producers and their combat has become a worldwide challenge mainly due to several reports of pesticides resistance. Today, one of the best alternatives used in this combat is the application of natural insecticides such ...

  19. Evolution of sexual dimorphism in the Lepidoptera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, C.E.; Zwaan, B.J.; Brakefield, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Among the animals, the Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) are second only to beetles in number of described species and are known for their striking intra- and interspecific diversity. Within species, sexual dimorphism is a source of variation in life history (e.g., sexual size dimorphism and

  20. Entrevista al profesor D. Michael Walker. - Interview with Professor D. Michael Walker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caravaca Guerrero, Consuelo Isabel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Entrevistar a un investigador de la talla de D. Michael Walker supone hablar de un investigador reconocido a nivel nacional e internacional, uno de los mayores expertos en evolución humana de nuestros días. Nació en Colchester (Inglaterra en 1941 y tiene doble nacionalidad: británica y australiana. Actualmente es profesor emérito de la Universidad de Murcia en el Departamento de Zoología y Antropología Física de la Facultad de Biología. Pero su currículum no acaba aquí, Michael realizó tres carreras, Fisiología Animal, Medicina, y Arqueología Prehistórica, en la Universidad de Oxford. Es Doctor por esta universidad, gracias a su tesis leída sobre Paleoantropología y Prehistoria de las cuencas de los ríos Segura y Vinalopó. Nuestro entrevistado, también fue elegido Académico (Fellow –F.S.A.- en 1988 de la Society of Antiquaries of Londono SAL. Fundada en 1707, la SAL es la equivalente británica de la española Real Academia de la Historia. Es Fellow también del Real Instituto Antropológico de la Gran Bretaña (Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain y socio emérito de la Asociación Americana de Antropólogos Físicos (American Association of Physical Anthropologists.

  1. Reduced incidence of cardiac arrhythmias in walkers and runners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T Williams

    Full Text Available Walking is purported to reduce the risk of atrial fibrillation by 48%, whereas jogging is purported to increase its risk by 53%, suggesting a strong anti-arrhythmic benefit of walking over running. The purpose of these analyses is to compare incident self-reported physician-diagnosed cardiac arrhythmia to baseline energy expenditure (metabolic equivalent hours per day, METhr/d from walking, running and other exercise.Proportional hazards analysis of 14,734 walkers and 32,073 runners.There were 1,060 incident cardiac arrhythmias (412 walkers, 648 runners during 6.2 years of follow-up. The risk for incident cardiac arrhythmias declined 4.4% per baseline METhr/d walked by the walkers, or running in the runners (P = 0.0001. Specifically, the risk declined 14.2% (hazard ratio: 0.858 for 1.8 to 3.6 METhr/d, 26.5% for 3.6 to 5.4 METhr/d, and 31.7% for ≥5.4 METhr/d, relative to <1.8 METhr/d. The risk reduction per METhr/d was significantly greater for walking than running (P<0.01, but only because walkers were at 34% greater risk than runners who fell below contemporary physical activity guideline recommendations; otherwise the walkers and runners had similar risks for cardiac arrhythmias. Cardiac arrhythmias were unrelated to walking and running intensity, and unrelated to marathon participation and performance.The risk for cardiac arrhythmias was similar in walkers and runners who expended comparable METhr/d during structured exercise. We found no significant risk increase for self-reported cardiac arrhythmias associated with running distance, exercise intensity, or marathon participation. Rhythm abnormalities were based on self-report, precluding definitive categorization of the nature of the rhythm disturbance. However, even if the runners' arrhythmias include sinus bradycardia due to running itself, there was no increase in arrhythmias with greater running distance.

  2. Gamma radiation effects on mating behavior, inherited sterility, and competitiveness of Cadra cautella (Walker) (Lepidoptera:Pyralidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoako-Atta, B.

    1976-01-01

    Mating efficiency of male Cadra cautella is restricted to within 72 hr of pose-eclosion. Gamma radiation of 8-day pupae did not affect the mating frequency of males in constant association with females for 72 hrs. When association was delayed for 1--7 days, there was progressive decrease in mating efficiency. The decline was related to reduced sperm viability. Increasing the dose accentuated the reduction in reproductive potential. Reproductive behavior of generation lines (F 1 --F 5 ) between irradiated males and normal females was studied. The sex ratio was distorted (more males) primarily in the F 1 and F 2 generations; the reproductive rate was lower in these early generations. When reproductive rate increased, the sex ratio was not distorted. A partially sterilizing dose of 20 krad to P 1 males induced complete inherited sterility in the progeny; the population of F 1 --F 2 collapsed. The ratio of sterile to fertile males needed to reduce reproductive nonirradiated females to 0 in the laboratory was studied. Release ratios of sterile males (S) : normal males (M) : fertile virgin females (N) varied from 0--20 S:M:N respectively. Population increases from various release ratios were lowered in each successive release ratio. The 20 S reduced the mean population increase of 2N from the expected 300-fold (as in the controls 0S:2M:2N) to only 4-fold. In that 20S:2M:2N release ratio, only 15% of the cultures produced any measurable F 1 progeny (average = 4F 1 progeny/culture) whereas the remaining 85% of the cultures did not produce any F 1 progeny. All control cultures were productive

  3. Revalidation of Ceresa terminalis walker and its placement in Stictocephala Stål (Hemiptera, Membracidae Revalidação de Ceresa terminalis walker e sua alocação em Stictocephala Stål (Hemiptera, Membracidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel S. de Andrade

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Ceresa terminalis Walker, 1851 is reinstated and transferred to Stictocephala Stål, 1869: Stictocephala terminalis (Walker, 1851 sp. rev., comb. nov.Ceresa terminalis Walker, 1851 é revalidada e transferida para Stictocephala Stål, 1869: Stictocephala terminalis (Walker, 1851 sp. rev., comb. nov.

  4. Terrain interaction with the quarter scale beam walker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Wendell H.; Price, S.; Spiessbach, A.

    1990-01-01

    Frame walkers are a class of mobile robots that are robust and capable mobility platforms. Variations of the frame walker robot are in commercial use today. Komatsu Ltd. of Japan developed the Remotely Controlled Underwater Surveyor (ReCUS) and Normed Shipyards of France developed the Marine Robot (RM3). Both applications of the frame walker concept satisfied robotic mobility requirements that could not be met by a wheeled or tracked design. One vehicle design concept that falls within this class of mobile robots is the walking beam. A one-quarter scale prototype of the walking beam was built by Martin Marietta to evaluate the potential merits of utilizing the vehicle as a planetary rover. The initial phase of prototype rover testing was structured to evaluate the mobility performance aspects of the vehicle. Performance parameters such as vehicle power, speed, and attitude control were evaluated as a function of the environment in which the prototype vehicle was tested. Subsequent testing phases will address the integrated performance of the vehicle and a local navigation system.

  5. Cochlear implantation in patient with Dandy-walker syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira, Adriana Kosma Pires de

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dandy Walker Syndrome is a congenital abnormality in the central nervous system, characterized by a deficiency in the development of middle cerebelar structures, cystic dilatation of the posterior pit communicating with the fourth ventricle and upward shift of the transverse sinuses, tentorium and dyes. Among the clinical signs are occipital protuberances, a progressive increase of the skull, bowing before the fontanels, papilledema, ataxia, gait disturbances, nystagmus, and intellectual impairment. Objectives: To describe a case of female patient, 13 years old with a diagnosis of this syndrome and bilateral hearing loss underwent cochlear implant surgery under local anesthesia and sedation. Case Report: CGS, 13 years old female was referred to the Otolaryngological Department of Otolaryngology Institute of Parana with a diagnosis of "Dandy-Walker syndrome" for Otolaryngological evaluation for bilateral hearing loss with no response to the use of hearing aids. Final Comments: The field of cochlear implants is growing rapidly. We believe that the presence of Dandy-Walker syndrome cannot be considered a contraindication to the performance of cochlear implant surgery, and there were no surgical complications due to neurological disorders with very favorable results for the patient who exhibits excellent discrimination. It has less need for lip reading with improvement in speech quality.

  6. Development and evaluation of low-cost walker with trunk support for senior citizen

    OpenAIRE

    Poier, Paloma Hohmann; Godke, Francisco; Foggiatto, José Aguiomar; Ulbricht, Leandra

    2017-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE Develop and evaluate a low-cost walker with trunk support for senior citizens. METHOD Two-stage descriptive study: development of a walker with trunk support and evaluation with fourth age senior citizens. RESULTS Twenty-three fourth age senior citizens were selected. The evaluated criteria were the immediate influence of the walker on the static stabilometry with baropodometer and the evaluation of gait with accelerometers monitoring time and amplitude of the hip movem...

  7. Effects of walker gender and observer gender on biological motion walking direction discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoying; Cai, Peng; Jiang, Yi

    2014-09-01

    The ability to recognize the movements of other biological entities, such as whether a person is walking toward you, is essential for survival and social interaction. Previous studies have shown that the visual system is particularly sensitive to approaching biological motion. In this study, we examined whether the gender of walkers and observers influenced the walking direction discrimination of approaching point-light walkers in fine granularity. The observers were presented a walker who walked in different directions and were asked to quickly judge the walking direction (left or right). The results showed that the observers demonstrated worse direction discrimination when the walker was depicted as male than when the walker was depicted as female, probably because the observers tended to perceive the male walkers as walking straight ahead. Intriguingly, male observers performed better than female observers at judging the walking directions of female walkers but not those of male walkers, a result indicating perceptual advantage with evolutionary significance. These findings provide strong evidence that the gender of walkers and observers modulates biological motion perception and that an adaptive perceptual mechanism exists in the visual system to facilitate the survival of social organisms. © 2014 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Difficulties with Prenatal Diagnosis of the Walker-Warburg Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, A.S.C.; Lee, S.L.; Tan, A.S.A.; Chan, D.K.L.; Chan, L.L.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a postnatally diagnosed case of Walker-Warburg syndrome - a form of congenital muscular dystrophy with lissencephaly and eye abnormalities. We reviewed the literature to highlight its clinico-radiological diagnostic features and discuss the difficulties encountered with prenatal diagnosis, especially in cases with no positive family history. An increased awareness of this rare but lethal condition, and a high index of suspicion during routine antenatal ultrasound, could prompt further advanced fetal ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, and aid in timely prenatal diagnosis, management, and counseling. Brain/brainstem, congenital, magnetic resonance imaging, obstetrics, pediatrics, ultrasound

  9. Public and private space curvature in Robertson-Walker universes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindler, W.

    1981-05-01

    The question is asked: what space curvature would a fundamental observer in an ideal Robertson-Walker universe obtain by direct local spatial measurements, i.e., without reference to the motion pattern of the other galaxies? The answer is that he obtains the curvatureK of his “private” space generated by all the geodesics orthogonal to his world line at the moment in question, and that ˜K is related to the usual curvatureK=k/R 2 of the “public” space of galaxies byK=K+H 2/c2, whereH is Hubble's parameter.

  10. Thomas James Walker (1835-1916): Surgeon and general practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Martyn

    2018-02-01

    Thomas James Walker was a surgeon and general practitioner who worked in the city of Peterborough at a time when there were changes and innovations in the practice of medicine. After training in medicine and surgery at Edinburgh University, he qualified in London in 1857. He was a pioneer of laryngoscopy. He played an important role in introducing antiseptic surgery to the Peterborough Infirmary and was instrumental in the development of the operating theatre which opened in 1894. He was a philanthropist and collector of Roman and Saxon artefacts. In 1915, he was recognized as an outstanding member of the Peterborough community when he was offered the Freedom of the City.

  11. Difficulties with Prenatal Diagnosis of the Walker-Warburg Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, A.S.C.; Lee, S.L.; Tan, A.S.A.; Chan, D.K.L.; Chan, L.L. [Singapore General Hospital (Singapore). Depts. of Diagnostic Radiology, Obstetrics and Gynecology and Neonatology

    2005-10-01

    We describe a postnatally diagnosed case of Walker-Warburg syndrome - a form of congenital muscular dystrophy with lissencephaly and eye abnormalities. We reviewed the literature to highlight its clinico-radiological diagnostic features and discuss the difficulties encountered with prenatal diagnosis, especially in cases with no positive family history. An increased awareness of this rare but lethal condition, and a high index of suspicion during routine antenatal ultrasound, could prompt further advanced fetal ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, and aid in timely prenatal diagnosis, management, and counseling. Brain/brainstem, congenital, magnetic resonance imaging, obstetrics, pediatrics, ultrasound.

  12. An asymptotic solution to a passive biped walker model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudaev, Sergey A.; Rachinskii, Dmitrii; Sobolev, Vladimir A.

    2017-02-01

    We consider a simple model of a passive dynamic biped robot walker with point feet and legs without knee. The model is a switched system, which includes an inverted double pendulum. Robot’s gait and its stability depend on parameters such as the slope of the ramp, the length of robot’s legs, and the mass distribution along the legs. We present an asymptotic solution of the model. The first correction to the zero order approximation is shown to agree with the numerical solution for a limited parameter range.

  13. Silencing of Target Chitinase Genes via Oral Delivery of dsRNA Caused Lethal Phenotypic Effects in Mythimna separata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Budao; Bao, Wenhua; Wuriyanghan, Hada

    2017-02-01

    Mythimna separata walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a polyphagous, migratory corn pest. Outbreak of M. separata has led to severe damage to corn production recently in China. RNAi (RNA interference) is a gene silencing technology applied both in model and non-model organisms, and it is especially useful for the latter in which the reverse genetic research tools are not available. RNAi approach was broadly investigated in many plant pathogens and was used for the generation of anti-pest transgenic plants. We are proposing to use this technology to silence M. separata endogenous genes, thereby, providing a biocontrol method for this insect. Feeding of dsRNAs for target Chitinase genes resulted in substantial decreases of their transcript levels in M. separata. Furthermore, silencing of target Chitinase genes led to phenotypic effects such as reduced body weight and increased mortality. Our study provided both reverse genetic research tool and potential control strategy for this insect species.

  14. Third annual Walker Branch watershed research symposium: Programs and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    The methods and concepts of watershed research, originally applied in an experimental or monitoring mode to relatively small catchments, are increasingly being used at larger scales and for specific applied problems. Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the US Forest Service, and other agencies and institutions participating in this symposium reflects research over a broad range of spatial scales. These research projects address the basic atmospheric, geophysical, biogeochemical, and biological processes that regulate the responses of forested ecosystems to natural environmental variation and anthropogenic stresses. Regional and global issues addressed by presentations include emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and other hydrocarbons; deposition of sulfate, nitrate, and mercury; land-use changes; biological diversity; droughts; and water quality. The Department of Energy's local research site, Walker Branch Watershed, is a long-term ecosystem research project initiated on the Oak Ridge Reservation in 1967. Walker Branch provides a well-characterized site where many of these methods can be tested and applied.In addition, other large-scale experiments represented in this symposium include experiments on the effects of clearcutting and burning on forest structure and productivity associated with Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, and whole-tree ozone exposure chambers constructed by TVA and ORNL researchers

  15. FreeWalker: a smart insole for longitudinal gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baitong; Rajput, Kuldeep Singh; Tam, Wing-Kin; Tung, Anthony K H; Yang, Zhi

    2015-08-01

    Gait analysis is an important diagnostic measure to investigate the pattern of walking. Traditional gait analysis is generally carried out in a gait lab, with equipped force and body tracking sensors, which needs a trained medical professional to interpret the results. This procedure is tedious, expensive, and unreliable and makes it difficult to track the progress across multiple visits. In this paper, we present a smart insole called FreeWalker, which provides quantitative gait analysis outside the confinement of traditional lab, at low- cost. The insole consists of eight pressure sensors and two motion tracking sensors, i.e. 3-axis accelerometer and 3-axis gyroscope. This enables measurement of under-foot pressure distribution and motion sequences in real-time. The insole is enabled with onboard SD card as well as wireless data transmission, which help in continuous gait-cycle analysis. The data is then sent to a gateway, for analysis and interpretation of data, using a user interface where gait features are graphically displayed. We also present validation result of a subject's left foot, who was asked to perform a specific task. Experiment results show that we could achieve a data-sampling rate of over 1 KHz, transmitting data up to a distance of 20 meter and maintain a battery life of around 24 hours. Taking advantage of these features, FreeWalker can be used in various applications, like medical diagnosis, rehabilitation, sports and entertainment.

  16. Metalloproteins during development of Walker-256 carcinosarcoma resistant phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Chekhun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was focused on the detection of changes in serum and tumor metal-containing proteins in animals during development of doxorubicin-resistant phenotype in malignant cells after 12 courses of chemotherapy. We found that on every stage of resistance development there was a significant increase in content of ferritin and transferrin proteins (which take part in iron traffick and storage in Walker-256 carcinosarcoma tissue. We observed decreased serum ferritin levels at the beginning stage of the resistance development and significant elevation of this protein levels in the cases with fully developed resistance phenotype. Transferrin content showed changes opposite to that of ferritin. During the development of resistance phenotype the tumor tissue also exhibited increased ‘free iron’ concentration that putatively correlate with elevation of ROS generation and levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 active forms. The tumor non-protein thiol content increases gradually as well. The serum of animals with early stages of resistance phenotype development showed high ceruloplasmin activity and its significant reduction after loss of tumor sensitivity to doxorubicin. Therefore, the development of resistance phenotype in Walker-256 carcinosarcoma is accompanied by both the deregulation of metal-containing proteins in serum and tumor tissue and by the changes in activity of antioxidant defense system. Thus, the results of this study allow us to determine the spectrum of metal-containing proteins that are involved in the development of resistant tumor phenotype and that may be targeted for methods for doxorubicin sensitivity correction therapy.

  17. Specific alterations of physiological parameters in competitive race walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanovic, Dragan; Ponorac, N; Ignjatovic, A; Stojiljkovic, N; Popovic, T; Rakovic, A

    2011-12-01

    Race walking is the technical and athletic expression of fast walking and it can be considered as a type of endurance performance. The purpose of this study was to examine whether 12 weeks of a specially designed training program results in the further training enhancement of endurance performance and the related physiological parameters in already well-trained race walkers competing at the national and international level. The investigation protocol consisted of determining the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and related gas exchange values using an automated cardiopulmonary exercise system and of determining blood lactate variables (aerobic threshold - LTAer and the maximal lactate steady state - MLSS) during walking with proper technique at 8, 10, 12 and 14 km·h-1 for 4 minutes without rest in between. Thereafter, the speed on the treadmill was increased by 0.5 km·h-1 every two minutes until exhaustion to determine VO2peak. After 12 weeks of a specially designed endurance training, statistically significant increases in VO2peak (61.8±8.5 mL·kg-1·min-1 pre vs. 66.9±9.5 mL·kg-1·min-1 post training; pprogram can improve endurance and race performance in previously well trained race walkers.

  18. SYMMETRY AS CONCEPTUAL METAPHOR IN WALKER'S THE COLOR PURPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tapia

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available The author analyzes three types of the conceptual metaphor of embodied symmetry in Alice Walker's novel, The color purple (1982. These metaphorical projections, perceived as equilibrium and its breakage in abstract phenomena, enable readers to reexamine issues of race, non-traditional families, and gender roles. The dis/equilibrium emerges in the novel's epistolary structure. Biological equilibrium breaks in incidents of rape and incest. Walker creates characters in the novel through default-concept opposites of black/white, submissive/dominant, male/female and others. These contraries foreground issues of race and gender. The novel's asymmetries engage readers, leading them to rethink individual character histories and motives. The removal of objects (e.g., rape, mothers deprived of children suggests conceptual asymmetry and alerts readers to parallel themes of sexual and racial oppression. Subjugation sometimes subtle, sometimes blatant- manifests in simple oppositions. In epistemological terms, readers seek causal explanations for the asymmetries of the narrative, interpreting each to recover its history.

  19. Fuzzy Random Walkers with Second Order Bounds: An Asymmetric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Drakopoulos

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Edge-fuzzy graphs constitute an essential modeling paradigm across a broad spectrum of domains ranging from artificial intelligence to computational neuroscience and social network analysis. Under this model, fundamental graph properties such as edge length and graph diameter become stochastic and as such they are consequently expressed in probabilistic terms. Thus, algorithms for fuzzy graph analysis must rely on non-deterministic design principles. One such principle is Random Walker, which is based on a virtual entity and selects either edges or, like in this case, vertices of a fuzzy graph to visit. This allows the estimation of global graph properties through a long sequence of local decisions, making it a viable strategy candidate for graph processing software relying on native graph databases such as Neo4j. As a concrete example, Chebyshev Walktrap, a heuristic fuzzy community discovery algorithm relying on second order statistics and on the teleportation of the Random Walker, is proposed and its performance, expressed in terms of community coherence and number of vertex visits, is compared to the previously proposed algorithms of Markov Walktrap, Fuzzy Walktrap, and Fuzzy Newman–Girvan. In order to facilitate this comparison, a metric based on the asymmetric metrics of Tversky index and Kullback–Leibler divergence is used.

  20. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of the Amylase Gene from the Rice Pest Walker and its Inhibitor from Wheat (Variety MP Sehore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Scirpophaga incertulas Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralideae, commonly known as yellow stem borer, is a predominant monophagous pest of rice, which causes 5% to 30% loss of the rice crop. We report for the first time, the cloning and sequence analysis of the amylase gene of this pest. The cloned gene translates into a protein of 487 amino acids having a predicted molecular weight of 54,955 daltons and a theoretical pI of 5.9. The 3D structure of the amylase is predicted from its amino acid sequence by homology modeling using the structure of the amylase from Tenebrio molitor L (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae. We also report the purification of a dimeric α-amylase inhibitor from a local variety of wheat MP Sehore that is specific for the amylase of this pest and does not inhibit human salivary amylase or porcine pancreatic amylase. The gene encoding this inhibitor has been cloned and its sequence has been analysed to find a possible explanation for this specificity.

  1. Evapotranspiration from the Lower Walker River Basin, West-Central Nevada, Water Years 2005-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allander, Kip K.; Smith, J. LaRue; Johnson, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Evapotranspiration is the ultimate path of outflow of nearly all water from the Lower Walker River basin. Walker Lake is the terminus of the topographically closed Walker River basin, and the lake level has been declining at an average rate of about 1.6 feet per year (ft/yr) since 1917. As a result of the declining lake level, dissolved-solids concentrations are increasingly threatening the fishery and ecosystem health of the lake. Uncertainties in the water budget components of the Lower Walker River basin led the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, to undertake an investigation to refine estimates of the water budget. Evapotranspiration from the Lower Walker River basin represents a major component of this water budget. The specific objectives of this report are to provide estimates of total and net evapotranspiration for water years 2005-07 for areas in the Lower Walker River basin in which annual evapotranspiration exceeds annual precipitation, and to summarize these results for areas of similar vegetation and soil characteristics, hydrographic subareas, and Walker Lake and Weber Reservoir. The three hydrographic subareas include the area along Walker River north of Walker Lake, the area of and adjacent to Walker Lake, and the area south of Walker Lake. Areas of annual evapotranspiration exceeding annual precipitation were identified and mapped in the field and were further delineated using remote-sensing analysis. These areas were classified into 10 evapotranspiration units. A network of 11 evapotranspiration stations was operated in natural and agricultural vegetation and on Walker Lake. Measured evapotranspiration rates ranged from 0.5 ft/yr at a sparsely vegetated desert shrub site to 5.0 ft/yr from Walker Lake. The greatest evapotranspiration rate on land was 4.1 ft/yr at an irrigated alfalfa field, and the greatest rate for natural vegetation was 3.9 ft/yr in a riparian community along Walker River. At an

  2. 75 FR 35279 - Revocation of Regulations Banning Certain Baby-Walkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... years of age. The measurements relevant here are the little finger diameter and middle finger diameter... existing regulations pertaining to baby-walkers because those regulations are being replaced by a new and more comprehensive safety standard applicable to baby- walkers. The new standard is being added by the...

  3. 75 FR 24753 - The Walker Auto Group, Inc., Miamisburg, OH; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-72,471] The Walker Auto Group... Auto Group, Inc., Miamisburg, Ohio, was based on the finding that the subject firm did not shift abroad... of the subject firm should be eligible for TAA because the Walker Auto Group, Inc., Miamisburg, Ohio...

  4. Development and evaluation of low-cost walker with trunk support for senior citizen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poier, Paloma Hohmann; Godke, Francisco; Foggiatto, José Aguiomar; Ulbricht, Leandra

    2017-10-09

    Develop and evaluate a low-cost walker with trunk support for senior citizens. Two-stage descriptive study: development of a walker with trunk support and evaluation with fourth age senior citizens. Twenty-three fourth age senior citizens were selected. The evaluated criteria were the immediate influence of the walker on the static stabilometry with baropodometer and the evaluation of gait with accelerometers monitoring time and amplitude of the hip movement. There was a significant decrease in the body oscillation of senior citizens with the use of the developed walker, and there were changes in the joint amplitudes of the hip, but they were not significant. Using low-cost materials, it was possible to develop and equipment that met resistance and effectiveness requirements. The walker interfered in the balance of the senior citizens, reducing significantly the static body oscillation.

  5. Sex pheromone of the baldcypress leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian T. Sullivan; Jeremy D. Allison; Richard A. Goyer; William P. Shepherd

    2015-01-01

    The baldcypress leafroller, Archips goyerana Kruse (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is a specialist on Taxodium distichum (L.) Richard and has caused serious defoliation in swamps of southeastern Louisiana, accelerating decline of baldcypress forests concurrently suffering from nutrient depletion, prolonged flooding, and saltwater...

  6. On genitalia of some southern African Phycitinae (Lepidoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The male and female genitalia of 28 previously known species of sothern Africa phycilinae (Lepidoptera pyralidae) are describe. Two new species, characterized by their gentalia, are described; Epicrocis varri, and Trachypteryx victoriota.

  7. Hearing in hooktip moths (Drepanidae: Lepidoptera)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surlykke, Annemarie; Yack, Jayne E; Spence, Andrew J

    2003-01-01

    This study presents anatomical and physiological evidence for a sense of hearing in hooktip moths (Drepanoidea). Two example species, Drepana arcuata and Watsonalla uncinula, were examined. The abdominal ears of drepanids are structurally unique compared to those of other Lepidoptera and other...... to the dorsal chamber. The ear is tuned to ultrasonic frequencies between 30 and 65 kHz, with a best threshold of around 52 dB SPL at 40 kHz, and no apparent difference between genders. Thus, drepanid hearing resembles that of other moths, indicating that the main function is bat detection. Two sensory cells...

  8. Conformal Killing vectors in Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maartens, R.; Maharaj, S.d.

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that Robertson-Walker spacetimes admit a conformal Killingl vector normal to the spacelike homogeneous hypersurfaces. Because these spacetimes are conformally flat, there are a further eight conformal Killing vectors, which are neither normal nor tangent to the homogeneous hypersurfaces. The authors find these further conformal Killing vectors and the Lie algebra of the full G 15 of conformal motions. Conditions on the metric scale factor are determined which reduce some of the conformal Killing vectors to homothetic Killing vectors or Killing vectors, allowing one to regain in a unified way the known special geometries. The non-normal conformal Killing vectors provide a counter-example to show that conformal motions do not, in general, map a fluid flow conformally. These non-normal vectors are also used to find the general solution of the null geodesic equation and photon Liouville equation. (author)

  9. Multiple phases and vicious walkers in a wedge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesualdo Delfino

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider a statistical system in a planar wedge, for values of the bulk parameters corresponding to a first order phase transition and with boundary conditions inducing phase separation. Our previous exact field theoretical solution for the case of a single interface is extended to a class of systems, including the Blume–Capel model as the simplest representative, allowing for the appearance of an intermediate layer of a third phase. We show that the interfaces separating the different phases behave as trajectories of vicious walkers, and determine their passage probabilities. We also show how the theory leads to a remarkable form of wedge covariance, i.e. a relation between properties in the wedge and in the half plane, which involves the appearance of self-Fourier functions.

  10. Profiling core-periphery network structure by random walkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossa, Fabio Della; Dercole, Fabio; Piccardi, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Disclosing the main features of the structure of a network is crucial to understand a number of static and dynamic properties, such as robustness to failures, spreading dynamics, or collective behaviours. Among the possible characterizations, the core-periphery paradigm models the network as the union of a dense core with a sparsely connected periphery, highlighting the role of each node on the basis of its topological position. Here we show that the core-periphery structure can effectively be profiled by elaborating the behaviour of a random walker. A curve—the core-periphery profile—and a numerical indicator are derived, providing a global topological portrait. Simultaneously, a coreness value is attributed to each node, qualifying its position and role. The application to social, technological, economical, and biological networks reveals the power of this technique in disclosing the overall network structure and the peculiar role of some specific nodes. PMID:23507984

  11. On Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model in conformal teleparallel gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, J.G.; Ulhoa, S.C. [International Center of Condensed Matter Physics Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Santos, A.F. [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Instituto de Fisica, Mato Grosso (Brazil); University of Victoria, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper we use the conformal teleparallel gravity to study an isotropic and homogeneous Universe which is settled by the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric. The conformal symmetry demands the existence of a scalar field which works as a dark field for this model. We solve numerically the field equations then we obtain the behavior of some cosmological parameters such as the scale factor, the deceleration parameter and the energy density of the perfect fluid which is the matter field of our model. The field equations, which we called modified Friedmann equations, allow us to define a dark fluid, with dark energy density and pressure, responsible for the acceleration in the Universe, once we defined an equation of state for the dark fluid. (orig.)

  12. Walker-Warburg syndrome: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VASCONCELOS MARCIO M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to describe two infants that were diagnosed with Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS, a rare form of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD.They were studied in their clinical, laboratory, and neuroradiologic features. The index case had a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and the second patient had a head computerized tomography (CT. In addition, a literature review was performed to describe the main forms of CMD. The index case fulfilled all criteria for WWS. A brain MRI performed at age 4 months served to corroborate the clinical diagnosis, showing severe hydrocephalus, type II lissencephaly, cerebellar vermian aplasia, and a hypoplastic brain stem. The authors were able to establish a retrospective diagnosis of WWS in the index case's older sister, based upon her clinical picture and head CT report.

  13. Electromagnetic Radiation in Multiply Connected Robertson-Walker Cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    1993-01-01

    Maxwell's equations on a topologically nontrivial cosmological background are studied. The cosmology is locally determined by a Robertson-Walker line element, but the spacelike slices are open hyperbolic manifolds, whose topology and geometry may vary in time. In this context the spectral resolution of Maxwell's equations in terms of horospherical elementary waves generated at infinity of hyperbolic space is given. The wave fronts are orthogonal to bundles of unstable geodesic rays, and the eikonal of geometric optics appears just as the phase of the horospherical waves. This fact is used to attach to the unstable geodesic rays a quantum mechanical momentum. In doing so the quantized energy-momentum tensor of the radiation field is constructed in a geometrically and dynamically transparent way, without appealing to the intricacies of the second quantization. In particular Planck's radiation formula, and the bearing of the multiply connected topology on the fluctuations in the temperature of the background rad...

  14. Walker-Warburg Syndrome: A Case with multiple uncommon features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedri, Hibba A; Mustafa, Babiker M; Jadallah, Yosif M

    2011-01-01

    Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is a rare and lethal autosomal recessive disorder, caused by defective glycosylation of α-dystroglycan that is important for muscle integrity and neuronal migration. Mutations in six genes involved in the glycosylation of α-dystroglycan (POMT1, POMT2, POMGNT1, FCMD, FKRP and LARGE) have been identified in WWS patients, and others remain under study. Prenatal diagnosis may be possible by means of prenatal ultrasonography, or magnetic resonance imaging. We report a patient demonstrating the typical clinical features of lissencephaly, congenital muscular dystrophy and ocular abnormalities, in addition to other features including hydrocephalus, occipital encephalocele, agenesis of the corpus collosum, microphthalmia, ventricular septal defect, and rocker bottom feet deformity.

  15. Field diet of the grasshopper Abracris dilecta Walker (Orthoptera, Acrididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Frankl Sperber

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Abracris dilecta Walker, 1870 (Orthoptera, Acrididae, Ommatolampinae ate leafs of at least 14 plant species, in the families Asteraceae, Lamiaceae, Malvales (Sterculiaceae, Tiliaceae or Malvaceae, Poaceae, Fabaceae, Verbenaceae, Aristolochiaceae, Rubiaceae and Melastomataccae. Elephantopus mollis H.B.K. (Asteraceae and Hyptis suaveolens Poit. (Lamiaceae comprised 50% of the diet. The diet breadth of A. dilecta was compared to that of other 11 grasshopper species of the same sub-family, with rarefaction curves. The number of plant species eaten by A. dilecta was greater than that of nine other grasshopper species of the same sub-family (Rhachicreagra spp. but was lower then two others (Microptylopteryx hebardi Rehn, 1905 and Rhachicreagra astytophallus Jago & Rowell, 1981. This results are discussed in view of the broad geographical range and possession of developed wings by A. dilecta, which contrasts with most Ommatolampinae grasshoppers.

  16. Inverse curvature flows in asymptotically Robertson Walker spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröner, Heiko

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we consider inverse curvature flows in a Lorentzian manifold N which is the topological product of the real numbers with a closed Riemannian manifold and equipped with a Lorentzian metric having a future singularity so that N is asymptotically Robertson Walker. The flow speeds are future directed and given by 1 / F where F is a homogeneous degree one curvature function of class (K*) of the principal curvatures, i.e. the n-th root of the Gauss curvature. We prove longtime existence of these flows and that the flow hypersurfaces converge to smooth functions when they are rescaled with a proper factor which results from the asymptotics of the metric.

  17. Gut microbiota of Busseola fusca (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, Maxi; Gupta, Arvind Kumar; Bezuidenhout, Cornelius Carlos; Claassens, Sarina; van den Berg, Johnnie

    2016-07-01

    Busseola fusca (Fuller) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a stemborer pest that attacks maize (Zea mays) throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Genetically modified maize has been shown to be effective against B. fusca. However, resistance of B. fusca against Bt-maize has developed and spread throughout South Africa. Previous studies suggested that gut microbiota contribute to mortality across a range of Lepidoptera. To fully assess the role of microbiota within the gut, it is essential to understand the microbiota harboured by natural B. fusca populations. This study aimed to identify the gut-associated bacteria by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. A total of 78 bacterial strains were characterised from the midgut of B. fusca larvae that were collected from 30 sites across the maize producing region of South Africa. Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed bacteria affiliated to Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Taxonomic distribution placed these isolates into 15 different genera representing 20 species. The majority of bacteria identified belong to the genera Bacillus, Enterococcus, and Klebsiella. The B. fusca gut represents an intriguing and unexplored niche for analysing microbial ecology. The study could provide opportunities for developing new targets for pest management and contribute to understanding the phenomenon of resistance evolution of this species.

  18. Gustatory receptors in Lepidoptera: chemosensation and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, A R; Roy, A A; Joshi, R S

    2016-10-01

    Lepidoptera is one of the most widespread insect orders and includes several agriculturally important insect species. Ecological success of the lepidopteran insects partly depends on their adaptive chemoreception tactics, which play an important role in the selection of hosts, egg-laying sites and mates. Members of the G-protein coupled receptor family, gustatory receptors (GRs), are an integral part of the Lepidoptera chemosensory machinery. They are expressed in chemosensory neurones and are known to detect different environmental stimuli. Here, we discuss various aspects of the lepidopteran GRs with an emphasis on their roles in different processes such as chemosensation, host selection and adaptation. Phylogenetic analyses have shown that the large diversity of GR genes may have been generated through gene duplication and positive selection events, which also show lineage- and tissue-specific expression. Moreover, lepidopteran GR proteins are diverse and demonstrate broad ligand selectivity for several molecules including sugars, deterrents, salts and CO2 . Binding of ligands to GRs generates multiple downstream changes at the cellular level, which are followed by changes in behaviour. GRs play a critical role in chemosensation and influence the insect's behaviour. Overall, insect GRs are potential targets in the design of effective insect control strategies. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  19. Cyanogenesis - a general phenomenon in the lepidoptera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witthohn, K.; Naumann, C.M.

    1987-08-01

    There are two different pathways known to be used for the detoxification of hydrocyanic acid in insects, viz., rhodanese and ..beta..-cyano-L-alanine synthase. The authors consider the latter to be indicative for cyanogenesis, while rhodanese might, in general, play a more important role in sulfur transfer for protein synthesis. This paper reports on the distribution of ..beta..-cyano-L-alanine (BCA) in the Lepidoptera. First reports of cyanogenesis are presented for the following families: Papilionidae, Pieridae, Lycaenidae, Hesperiidae, Lymantriidae, Arctiidae, Notodontidae, Megalopygidae, Limacodidae, Cymatophoridae, Noctuidae, Geometridae, and Yponomeutidae. New and old records for three other families, the Nymphalidae, Zygaenidae, and Heterogynidae, are included to complete the present state of knowledge. Special emphasis has been laid on the Nymphalidae, where BCA has been detected in eight subfamilies. Taxonomic, geographic, and seasonal variation has been found in a number of cases. In all cases observed so far, the source of cyanogenesis in the Lepidoptera is most probably the cyanoglucosides linamarin and lotaustralin, although cyanogenesis based on mustard oil glucosides and cyclopentenoid glucosides might occur as well. BCA has been found in both cryptic and aposematic species, including taxa such as the Pieridae, Danainae, Ithomiinae, and Arctiidae, where the defensive biology is believed to be linked with other compounds, like mustard oil glucosides, cardenolides, or pyrrolizidinie alkaloids. The ecological interaction and significance of such secondary compounds is not yet understood.

  20. Use of molecular markers in biochemical taxonomy of Tischeriidae (Lepidoptera: Tischerioidea) and Elachistidae (Lepidoptera: Gelechioidea)

    OpenAIRE

    Paulavičiūtė, Brigita

    2010-01-01

    The field of molecular biology has expanded greatly in the last ten years and currently many entomologists want to use this technology since it is a new level of carrying out studies of insect ecological systems and taxonomy. The study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences has become the method for a wide range of taxonomic, population and evolutionary investigations in Lepidoptera (Lunt et al, 1996). The increasing popularity of molecular taxonomy will undoubtedly exert a major impact on co...

  1. Geomorphic Analysis Supporting Restoration of the Walker River, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, J. W.; Echterling, C.; Majerova, M.; Wilcock, P.

    2012-12-01

    Agricultural water diversions have degraded the Walker River, Nevada, and have led to a reduction of water level at its terminus, Walker Lake. The geomorphic response of the river to water reallocation is an important issue associated with restoration of the system. To address this issue, we performed a geomorphic assessment of the portions of the river passing through the two main agricultural valleys in the watershed, Smith and Mason Valleys, Nevada. The project involved field data collection, analysis of remotely sensed data, and numerical modeling. Fieldwork focused primarily on characterizing bed and bank sediment grain size distributions and on delineating geomorphically similar reaches. The remote sensing analysis used LiDAR and air photograph mosaics from 1938, 1950, 1996, 1999, and 2006 to quantify historic changes in the active channel geometry and to identify banks that represent potential sediment sources or sinks. Polygons representing in-channel features (here defined as the scoured region between vegetation lines) were delineated by hand on each photograph. Channel centerlines were then derived from this data set and were used to identify locations of active channel movement by measuring either direct centerline offsets or local sinuosity increase rates. Both active bar area and channel migration were focused on reaches near the head of each agricultural valley, where slope decreases as the channel emerges from an upstream bedrock-controlled canyon. These same reaches also experienced large increases in width during the 1997 flood of record. The gage record shows that attenuation of this flood was most pronounced in the lower of the two agricultural valleys, Mason Valley. Surprisingly little attenuation occurred in the upstream Smith Valley, despite the relatively low relief of the valley floor, which consists primarily of Pleistocene lake deposits. The major difference between the two valleys is that the meander belt through Smith Valley is incised

  2. POMT2 mutations cause alpha-dystroglycan hypoglycosylation and Walker-Warburg syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeuwijk, J. van; Janssen, M.; Elzen, C. van der; Beltran Valero de Bernabe, D.; Sabatelli, P.; Merlini, L.; Boon, M.; Scheffer, H.; Brockington, M.; Muntoni, F.; Huynen, M.A.; Verrips, A.; Walsh, C.A.; Barth, P.G.; Brunner, H.G.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is an autosomal recessive condition characterised by congenital muscular dystrophy, structural brain defects, and eye malformations. Typical brain abnormalities are hydrocephalus, lissencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, fusion of the hemispheres,

  3. POMT2 mutations cause alpha-dystroglycan hypoglycosylation and Walker-Warburg syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reeuwijk, J.; Janssen, M.; van den Elzen, C.; Beltran-Valero de Bernabé, D.; Sabatelli, P.; Merlini, L.; Boon, M.; Scheffer, H.; Brockington, M.; Muntoni, F.; Huynen, M. A.; Verrips, A.; Walsh, C. A.; Barth, P. G.; Brunner, H. G.; van Bokhoven, H.

    2005-01-01

    Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is an autosomal recessive condition characterised by congenital muscular dystrophy, structural brain defects, and eye malformations. Typical brain abnormalities are hydrocephalus, lissencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, fusion of the hemispheres, cerebellar

  4. POMT2 mutations cause alpha-dystroglycan hypoglycosylation and Walker-Warburg syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reeuwijk, J; Janssen, M; van den Elzen, C; de Bernabe, DBV; Sabatelli, P; Merlini, L; Boon, M; Scheffer, H; Brockington, M; Muntoni, F; Huynen, MA; Verrips, A; Walsh, CA; Barth, PG; Brunner, HG; van Bokhoven, H

    2005-01-01

    Background: Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is an autosomal recessive condition characterised by congenital muscular dystrophy, structural brain defects, and eye malformations. Typical brain abnormalities are hydrocephalus, lissencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, fusion of the hemispheres,

  5. Draft Title V Operating Permit: Andeavor Field Services, LLC - Walker Hollow Compressor Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draft Operating Permit (Permit Number: V-UO-000979-2017.00), statement of basis, public notice bulletin, and the administrative permit docket (application and other supporting documents) for the Andeavor Walker Hollow Compressor Station.

  6. Spacetime emergence of the robertson-walker universe from a matrix model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Meyer, René; Park, Jeong-Hyuck

    2007-06-29

    Using a novel, string theory-inspired formalism based on a Hamiltonian constraint, we obtain a conformal mechanical system for the spatially flat four-dimensional Robertson-Walker Universe. Depending on parameter choices, this system describes either a relativistic particle in the Robertson-Walker background or metric fluctuations of the Robertson-Walker geometry. Moreover, we derive a tree-level M theory matrix model in this time-dependent background. Imposing the Hamiltonian constraint forces the spacetime geometry to be fuzzy near the big bang, while the classical Robertson-Walker geometry emerges as the Universe expands. From our approach, we also derive the temperature of the Universe interpolating between the radiation and matter dominated eras.

  7. Worldwide host plants of the highly polyphagous, invasive Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockerhoff, E G; Suckling, D M; Ecroyd, C E; Wagstaff, S J; Raabe, M C; Dowell, R V; Wearings, C H

    2011-10-01

    The light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is a highly successful biological invader. It was accidentally introduced to several countries including New Zealand, Hawaii, England, and California. Light brown apple moth attacks a wide range of crop plants and other woody and herbaceous plants, but a more comprehensive analysis of its host range is needed for risk assessments, to evaluate the likely economic and environmental impacts, and to enable targeting of particular plant species for detection surveys and treatments. We reviewed and synthesized the host range and host selection behavior of light brown apple moth by using information from Australia and invaded countries. The host range of light brown apple moth is determined by the behavior of both adult females and larvae. Females use visual, chemical and physical cues to choose host plants. Larvae are capable of limited active dispersal by walking and longer range dispersal by ballooning on silken strands; therefore, larvae also may need to select host plants. We review larval performance indicators across a range of plants. Based on our review, there are at least 545 plant species in 363 genera from 121 families that have been reported as hosts of light brown apple moth. Some plants were reported only once and need verification. Nevertheless, many host plant species and their wide phylogenetic range (from ferns to higher dicotyledons) indicates that light brown apple moth is one of the most polyphagous insects known. This information and our categorization of frequency of host use are valuable for incursion response and pest management activities.

  8. Toxicity of natural insecticides on the larvae of wheat head armyworm, Dargida diffusa (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Gadi V P; Antwi, Frank B

    2016-03-01

    The wheat head armyworm, Dargida (previously Faronta) diffusa (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is widely distributed in North American grasslands and is most common on the Great Plains, where it is often a serious pest of corn and cereal crops. Six commercially available botanical or microbial insecticides used against D. diffusa were tested in the laboratory: Entrust(®) WP (spinosad 80%), Mycotrol(®) ESO (Beauveria bassiana GHA), Aza-Direct(®) (azadirachtin), Met52(®) EC (Metarhizium brunneum F52), Xpectro(®) OD (Beauveria bassiana GHA+pyrethrins), and Xpulse(®) OD (Beauveria bassiana GHA+azadirachtin). Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 fold the lowest labelled rates of formulated products were tested for all products, while for Entrust WP additional concentrations of 0.001 and 0.01 fold the label rates were also assessed. Survival rates were determined from larval mortality at 1-9 days post treatment application. We found that among the tested chemicals, Entrust(®) (spinosad) was the most effective, causing 83-100% mortality (0-17% survival rate) at day 3 across all concentrations. The others, in order of efficacy from most to least, were Xpectro(®) (B. bassiana GHA+pyrethrins), Xpulse(®)OD (B. bassiana GHA+azadirachtin), Aza-Direct(®) (azadirachtin), Met52(®) EC (M. brunneum F52), and Mycotrol(®) ESO (B. bassiana GHA). These products and entomopathogenic fungi caused 70-100% mortality (0-30% survivability) from days 7 to 9. The tested products and entomopathogenic fungi can be used in management of D. diffusa. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. First report of Endoclita signifer (Lepidoptera: Hepialidae) as a new pest on Eucalyptus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiu-Hao; Yu, Yong-Hui; Wu, Yao-Jun; Qin, Jiang-Lin; Luo, You-Qing

    2013-04-01

    Endoclita signifier Walker (Lepidoptera: Hepialidae) has become a new wood borer pest in Eucalyptus plantations in southern China. This article documents survey results of its geographic distribution and host plant range in Guangxi and its morphological measurements, life cycle and behavior. In total, 83 Eucalyptus growing counties were surveyed. E. signifier was found in 59 counties. Host plants included 31 species in 16 families and 24 genera. Four Eucalyptus hybrid species were recorded as its host plant with E. grandis x E. urophylla and E. urophylla x E. grandis infested the heaviest. The infestation of Eucalyptus trees 1-2 yr old was heavier than that of older trees. Most individuals of E. signifier took 1 yr to complete a generation, overwintering as larvae in tunnels in wooden stems, and pupating in February of the following year. Adults emerge, mate, and lay eggs in April, and the eggs hatch in late April or early May. Adult emergence peaks between 17:00-18:59 hours. Mating flights last under 30 min at dusk and the copulation duration was 24 h. Moths were large, weighting and average of 3.4 g. Eggs and newly hatched larvae were very small, weighing only 0.127 +/- 0.001 mg and 0.093 +/- 0.017 mg, respectively. The larvae have two distinct development stages. One stage spends 1-2 mo living in the forest litter, the second stage then moves to woody stems where it feeds for approximately 10 mo. Larvae start boring into hosts between June and November, mainly in July and August. This study indicated that E. signifier, a highly polyphagous native species, has shifted host to exotic Eucalyptus and can cause significant damage to plantations.

  10. Technical characteristics of elite junior men and women race walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, B; Bissas, A; Drake, A

    2014-12-01

    Successful coaching in race walking requires a thorough understanding of the biomechanical principles underlying this unique form of gait. The purpose of this study was to analyze elite male and female junior race walkers and identify key kinematic variables. Twenty junior men and 20 junior women were videoed as they competed over 10 km in the 8th European Cup Race Walking. Three-dimensional kinematic data were obtained using motion analysis software (SIMI, Munich). Step length and cadence were correlated with speed in both sexes, and greater step lengths were the kinematic reason for junior men's faster walking speeds. While cadence did not differ between junior men and junior women, there was a difference in proportion of step time spent in contact. There were some differences between genders for upper body joint angles (e.g., elbow) but there were few differences within lower limb joint angles. Although some technical aspects (e.g., pelvic and shoulder girdle rotation) appeared undeveloped, it was noteworthy that most athletes achieved full knee extension at initial contact in accordance with the rules. However, in many athletes flight times were evident that might present problems during the transition to the higher standards of senior competition. There was a large range of ability among both sexes and coaches are advised to ensure that technical development continues during the transition to senior competition.

  11. A jump persistent turning walker to model zebrafish locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwaffo, Violet; Anderson, Ross P; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-01-06

    Zebrafish are gaining momentum as a laboratory animal species for the investigation of several functional and dysfunctional biological processes. Mathematical models of zebrafish behaviour are expected to considerably aid in the design of hypothesis-driven studies by enabling preliminary in silico tests that can be used to infer possible experimental outcomes without the use of zebrafish. This study is motivated by observations of sudden, drastic changes in zebrafish locomotion in the form of large deviations in turn rate. We demonstrate that such deviations can be captured through a stochastic mean reverting jump diffusion model, a process that is commonly used in financial engineering to describe large changes in the price of an asset. The jump process-based model is validated on trajectory data of adult subjects swimming in a shallow circular tank obtained from an overhead camera. Through statistical comparison of the empirical distribution of the turn rate against theoretical predictions, we demonstrate the feasibility of describing zebrafish as a jump persistent turning walker. The critical role of the jump term is assessed through comparison with a simplified mean reversion diffusion model, which does not allow for describing the heavy-tailed distributions observed in the fish turn rate. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Third annual Walker Branch Watershed research symposium. Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The methods and concepts of watershed research, originally applied in an experimental or monitoring mode to relatively small catchments, are increasingly being used at larger scales and for specific applied problems. Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the US Forest Service, and other agencies and institutions participating in this symposium reflects research over a broad range of spatial scales that is being integrated through large-scale experiments along with computer modeling and graphical interfaces. These research projects address the basic atmospheric, geophysical, biogeochemical, and biological processes that regulate the responses of forested ecosystems to natural environmental variation and anthropogenic stresses. Regional and global issues addressed by presentations include emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and other hydrocarbons; deposition of sulfate, nitrate, and mercury; land-use changes; biological diversity; droughts; and water quality. The reports presented in this symposium illustrate a wide range of methods and approaches and focus more on concepts and techniques than on a specific physical site. Sites and projects that have contributed research results to this symposium include Walker Branch Watershed (DOE), the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory and LTER site (USFS and NSF), Great Smoky Mountains National Park (research funded by NPS, TVA, and EPRI), Imnavait Creek, Alaska (DOE), the TVA-Norris Whole-tree Facility (TVA and EPRI), and DOE`s Biomass Program.

  13. Conformally Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Matt

    2015-07-01

    In a Universe where, according to the standard cosmological models, some 97% of the total mass-energy is still ‘missing in action’, it behooves us to spend at least a little effort critically assessing and exploring radical alternatives. Among possible (dare we say plausible), nonstandard but superficially viable models, those spacetimes conformal to the standard Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) class of cosmological models play a very special role—these models have the unique and important property of permitting large non-perturbative geometric deviations from FLRW cosmology without unacceptably distorting the cosmic microwave background. Performing a ‘cosmographic’ analysis (that is, temporarily setting aside the Einstein equations, since the question of whether or not the Einstein equations are valid on galactic and cosmological scales is essentially the same question as whether or not dark matter/dark energy actually exist), and using both supernova data and information about galactic structure, one can nevertheless place some quite significant observational constraints on any possible conformal mode—however, there is still an extremely rich range of phenomenological possibilities for both cosmologists and astrophysicists to explore.

  14. An Architect Cicada in Brazilian Rainforest: Guyalna chlorogena (Walker).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béguin, C F

    2017-04-01

    To study the noteworthy nest building behavior of the nymph of the Brazilian Rainforest cicada Guyalna chlorogena (Walker) during the last year of its underground life, we monitored a large number of edifices, consisting of a vertical well (up to 1 m deep) with a turret (20 to 40 cm tall) on top, and we also performed experiments. We have shown that the buildings are occupied by a single nymph, male or female, which increases the height of its turret each night by about 3 cm, during a short active growing phase. The nymph softens and reshapes the apex by pushing upwards a lump of freshly mixed soaked clay, without any opening present, i. e., without ever exposing itself to the outside. We also established that the nymph is very active once its building is achieved. For example, it restores the height of the turret to its original value when shortening and opens the top of its building in case of variation of environmental parameters. Finally, we have shown how the nymph opens its edifice to reach the outside for molting into an adult stage (imago). With this work, we contributed to a better understanding of the nesting behavior of Amazon cicadas.

  15. Glucagon degradation by a product of the Walker 256 carcinosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zepp, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats (125-150g) were implanted (im.) with the Walker 256 carcinosarcoma. After both 7 and 10 days, plasma levels of glucagon in tumor-bearing rats were approximately half the level seen in control rats (P 125 I-glucagon (0.075 μCi, 2200 Ci/mmol) in 20mM TRIS-HCl buffer (pH 7.4) with 2.5% bovine serum albumin (total volume of 750 μl) for 45 min. After incubation with tumor cells, only about 25% of the total radiolabel was TCA-precipitable vs 97% in the control (minus tumor cells) incubations. It also appears that the tumor cells may release a substance which degrades hormone. If tumor cells are preincubated for 60 min at 37 0 then removed from the medium, the incubation medium contains a factor which degrades subsequently added 125 I-glucagon (57% TCA-precipitable vs 98% in control incubations). That this factor is a protease is suggested by the results of another experiment in which aprotinin (a protease inhibitor, 1 mg/ml), when added along with the labeled glucagon, virtually eliminated degradation by a factor released from the tumor cells (79% TCA-precipitable in the absence of aprotinin vs 94% in its presence and 98% in controls)

  16. Fourth annual Walker Branch Watershed research symposium: Program and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The methods and concepts of watershed research, originally applied in an experimental or monitoring mode to relatively small catchments, are increasingly being used at larger scales and for specific applied problems. Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the US Forest Service, and other agencies and institutions participating in this symposium reflects research over a broad range of spatial scales that is being integrated through large-scale experiments along with computer modeling and graphical interfaces. These research projects address the basic atmospheric, geophysical, biogeochemical, and biological processes that regulate the responses of forested ecosystems to natural environmental variation and anthropogenic stresses. This symposium highlights the use of large-scale ecosystem experiments to address environmental issues of global concern. These experiments provide the only effective way to test models of ecosystem response that are based on the current state of knowledge of hydrology, biogeochemistry, plant physiology, and other ecosystem processes. Major environmental problems that are being addressed include acidic deposition and nitrogen loading (Bear Brook Watershed, Maine; and the Girdsjoen Covered Catchment, Sweden); climate warming (Soil Warming Experiment, Maine); and altered rainfall amounts (Savannah River Loblolly Pine Soil Water Manipulation and the Walker Branch Watershed Throughfall Displacement Experiment)

  17. Improved solubility of replication factor C (RFC) Walker A mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzahn, Melissa R; Bloom, Linda B

    2012-06-01

    Protein insolubility often poses a significant problem during purification protocols and in enzyme assays, especially for eukaryotic proteins expressed in a recombinant bacterial system. The limited solubility of replication factor C (RFC), the clamp loader complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been previously documented. We found that mutant forms of RFC harboring a single point mutation in the Walker A motif were even less soluble than the wild-type complex. The addition of maltose at 0.75 M to the storage and assay buffers greatly increases protein solubility and prevents the complex from falling apart. Our analysis of the clamp loading reaction is dependent on fluorescence-based assays, which are environmentally sensitive. Using wt RFC as a control, we show that the addition of maltose to the reaction buffers does not affect fluorophore responses in the assays or the enzyme activity, indicating that maltose can be used as a buffer additive for further downstream analysis of these mutants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Walking my way? Walker gender and display format Confounds the perception of specific emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halovic, Shaun; Kroos, Christian

    2018-02-01

    Previous evidence has shown that males and females display different gait kinematics which may influence the perception of emotions displayed through the same walking gait. We therefore investigated the influence of walker gender on the perception of happiness, sadness, anger and fear displayed through walking movements. Full-light (FL), point-light (PL) and synthetically modelled point-light walkers (SW) of both genders were shown to perceivers over three experiments. Additionally, gender ambiguous synthetic walkers were shown to control for the influence of form, gender stereotypes and idiosyncratic gait movements on emotional gait perception. Each emotion was identified above chance level for both walker genders and in all display conditions though significantly less in PL and SW than in FL. The gender of the walker did not influence the pattern of identifications in FL walkers (Fear > Sad > Happy > Anger > Neutral), but did influence the identification patterns in PL (Female: [Happy = Sad = Fear = Anger] > Neutral; Male: Fear = Sad = [Happy > Anger] > Neutral) and SWs (Female: Happy = Sad = Anger = Fear = Neutral; Male: [Happy = Sad = Anger] > [Fear = Neutral]; Ambiguous: [[Happy = Sad = Anger] > Fear] = Neutral). The gender of the walker and format in which they are displayed influenced the perception of different basic emotions. The constructed SW stimuli also displayed happiness, sadness and anger with equivalent intensity in female, male and gender ambiguous walkers thus untangling the perception-expression entanglement that has plagued previous emotion perception research. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Phenyl Propionate and Sex Pheromone for Monitoring Navel Orangeworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in the Presence of Mating Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Charles S; Kuenen, L P S Bas; Daane, Kent M

    2016-04-01

    The recent availability of sex pheromone lures for the navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), improves options for monitoring this key pest in conventionally managed almonds. These lures are, however, minimally effective in the presence of mating disruption. Experiments were conducted to determine if phenyl propionate (PPO), an attractant for the navel orangeworm, acts in an additive or synergistic manner when presented together with the pheromone. In the absence of mating disruption, traps baited with PPO captured significantly fewer adults than traps baited with a sex pheromone lure. There was no difference in the number of adults captured in traps with both attractants when mating disruption was not used. In the presence of mating disruption, pheromone traps were completely suppressed, yet traps with both pheromone and PPO captured significantly more adults than traps baited with only PPO. Traps with only PPO captured equal numbers of both sexes, whereas traps with both attractants had significantly more males. These findings demonstrate that PPO is likely to be useful for monitoring navel orangeworm in fields treated with mating disruption.

  20. Postharvest treatment of fresh fruit from California with methyl bromide for control of light brown apple moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walse, Spencer S; Myers, Scott W; Liu, Yong-Biao; Bellamy, David E; Obenland, David; Simmons, Greg S; Tebbets, Steve

    2013-06-01

    Methyl bromide (MB) chamber fumigations were evaluated for postharvest control of light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), in fresh fruit destined for export from California. To simulate external feeding, larvae were contained in gas-permeable cages and distributed throughout loads of peaches, plums, nectarines (all Prunus spp.), apples (Malus spp.), raspberries (Rubus spp.), or grapes (Vitis spp.). Varying the applied MB dose and the differential sorption of MB by the loads resulted in a range of exposures, expressed as concentration x time cross products (CTs) that were verified by gas-chromatographic quantification of MB in chamber headspace over the course of each fumigation. CTs > or = 60 and > or = 72 mg liter(-1) h at 10.0 +/- 0.5 and 15.6 +/- 0.5 degrees C (x +/- s, average +/- SD), respectively, yielded complete mortality of approximately 6,200 larvae at each temperature. These confirmatory fumigations corroborate E. postvittana mortality data for the first time in relation to measured MB exposures and collectively comprise the largest number of larval specimens tested to date. In addition, akinetic model of MB sorption was developed for the quarantine fumigation of fresh fruit based on the measurement of exposures and how they varied across the fumigation trials. The model describes how to manipulate the applied MB dose, the load factor, and the load geometry for different types of packaged fresh fruit so that the resultant exposure is adequate for insect control.

  1. Continuous observation of the stochastic motion of an individual small-molecule walker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcu, Gökçe Su; Mikhailova, Ellina; Choi, Lai-Sheung; Bayley, Hagan

    2015-01-01

    Motion—whether it the ability to change shape, rotate or translate—is an important potential asset for functional nanostructures. For translational motion, a variety of DNA-based and small-molecule walkers have been created, but observing the translational motion of individual molecules in real time remains a significant challenge. Here, we show that the movement of a small-molecule walker along a five-foothold track can be monitored continuously within a protein nanoreactor. The walker is an organoarsenic(III) molecule with exchangeable thiol ligands, and the track a line of cysteine residues 6 Å apart within an α-haemolysin protein pore that acts as the nanoreactor. Changes in the flow of ionic current through the pore reflect the individual steps of a single walker, which require the making and breaking of As-S bonds, and occur in aqueous solution at neutral pH and room temperature. The walker moves considerably faster (˜0.7 s per step) than previous walkers based on covalent chemistry and is weakly processive (6 ± 1 steps per outing). It shows weak net directional movement, which can be described by a thermodynamic sink arising from the different environments of the cysteines that constitute the track.

  2. Hydrologic Setting and Conceptual Hydrologic Model of the Walker River Basin, West-Central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Thomas J.; Allander, Kip K.

    2009-01-01

    The Walker River is the main source of inflow to Walker Lake, a closed-basin lake in west-central Nevada. Between 1882 and 2008, agricultural diversions resulted in a lake-level decline of more than 150 feet and storage loss of 7,400,000 acre-ft. Evaporative concentration increased dissolved solids from 2,500 to 17,000 milligrams per liter. The increase in salinity threatens the survival of the Lahontan cutthroat trout, a native species listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. This report describes the hydrologic setting of the Walker River basin and a conceptual hydrologic model of the relations among streams, groundwater, and Walker Lake with emphasis on the lower Walker River basin from Wabuska to Hawthorne, Nevada. The Walker River basin is about 3,950 square miles and straddles the California-Nevada border. Most streamflow originates as snowmelt in the Sierra Nevada. Spring runoff from the Sierra Nevada typically reaches its peak during late May to early June with as much as 2,800 cubic feet per second in the Walker River near Wabuska. Typically, 3 to 4 consecutive years of below average streamflow are followed by 1 or 2 years of average or above average streamflow. Mountain ranges are comprised of consolidated rocks with low hydraulic conductivities, but consolidated rocks transmit water where fractured. Unconsolidated sediments include fluvial deposits along the active channel of the Walker River, valley floors, alluvial slopes, and a playa. Sand and gravel deposited by the Walker River likely are discontinuous strata throughout the valley floor. Thick clay strata likely were deposited in Pleistocene Lake Lahontan and are horizontally continuous, except where strata have been eroded by the Walker River. At Walker Lake, sediments mostly are clay interbedded with alluvial slope, fluvial, and deltaic deposits along the lake margins. Coarse sediments form a multilayered, confined-aquifer system that could extend several miles from the shoreline

  3. Multisensory integration in Lepidoptera: Insights into flower-visitor interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Michiyo; Stewart, Finlay J; Ômura, Hisashi

    2017-04-01

    As most work on flower foraging focuses on bees, studying Lepidoptera can offer fresh perspectives on how sensory capabilities shape the interaction between flowers and insects. Through a combination of innate preferences and learning, many Lepidoptera persistently visit particular flower species. Butterflies tend to rely on their highly developed sense of colour to locate rewarding flowers, while moths have evolved sophisticated olfactory systems towards the same end. However, these modalities can interact in complex ways; for instance, butterflies' colour preference can shift depending on olfactory context. The mechanisms by which such cross-modal interaction occurs are poorly understood, but the mushroom bodies appear to play a central role. Because of the diversity seen within Lepidoptera in terms of their sensory capabilities and the nature of their relationships with flowers, they represent a fruitful avenue for comparative studies to shed light on the co-evolution of flowers and flower-visiting insects. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Glucagon degradation by a product of the Walker 256 carcinosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zepp, E.A.

    1986-03-05

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats (125-150g) were implanted (im.) with the Walker 256 carcinosarcoma. After both 7 and 10 days, plasma levels of glucagon in tumor-bearing rats were approximately half the level seen in control rats (P < 0.01) even though fasting plasma glucose levels were slightly (but not significantly) less in the tumor-bearing rats. To determine if the tumor degrades the hormone, tumor cells were incubated at room temperature with /sup 125/I-glucagon (0.075 ..mu..Ci, 2200 Ci/mmol) in 20mM TRIS-HCl buffer (pH 7.4) with 2.5% bovine serum albumin (total volume of 750 ..mu..l) for 45 min. After incubation with tumor cells, only about 25% of the total radiolabel was TCA-precipitable vs 97% in the control (minus tumor cells) incubations. It also appears that the tumor cells may release a substance which degrades hormone. If tumor cells are preincubated for 60 min at 37/sup 0/ then removed from the medium, the incubation medium contains a factor which degrades subsequently added /sup 125/I-glucagon (57% TCA-precipitable vs 98% in control incubations). That this factor is a protease is suggested by the results of another experiment in which aprotinin (a protease inhibitor, 1 mg/ml), when added along with the labeled glucagon, virtually eliminated degradation by a factor released from the tumor cells (79% TCA-precipitable in the absence of aprotinin vs 94% in its presence and 98% in controls).

  5. Relativistic models of thin disks immersed in a Robertson-Walker type spacetime Modelos relativistas de discos delgados inmersos en un espacio-tiempo tipo Robertson-Walker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo García Reyes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Using the well known “displace, cut and reflect” method used to generate disks from given solutions of Einstein field equations, we construct some relativistic models of time dependent thin disks of infinite extension made of a perfect fluid based on the Robertson-Walker metric. Two simple families of models of disks based on Robertson-Walker solutions admitting Matter and Ricci collineations are presented. We obtain disks that are in agreement with all the energy conditions.Usando el método de “desplazamiento, corte y reflexión” se construyen algunos modelos relativistas exactas de soluciones que representan discos delgados de extensión infinita, dependientes del tiempo y hechos de un fluido perfecto, basados en la métrica de Robertson-Walker. Se presentan dos familias simples de modelos de discos basados sobre el espacio tiempo de Robertson-Walker que admiten colineaciones de Ricci y de materia. Se obtienen modelos de discos que satisfacen todas las condiciones de energía.

  6. Obituary: Richard L. (Dick) Walker, Jr., 1938-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pier, Jeffrey R.; Mason, Brian

    2005-12-01

    Dick Walker, 67, died 30 March 2005 in Flagstaff, AZ, following a long illness. He was born on 9 March 1938 in Hampton, Iowa and grew up in Waterloo, Iowa. As a child, Dick was fascinated with astronomy and built his own telescope. He saved his pennies and bought and read every book on the subject he could find. He also raised pigeons, naming four of them Hertzsprung, Hoyle, Gamow, and Kron. In 1957, the year Sputnik was launched, Dick began his college studies at the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls. In 1959, he transferred to the State University of Iowa (subsequently renamed the University of Iowa) in Iowa City, where he earned a BA degree in astronomy and physics in 1963. He joined the staff of the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, DC, where he worked in the Time Service Division for a year before his assignment to the Astrometry and Astrophysics Division. Dick relocated to Flagstaff, AZ, in 1966 to continue his Naval Observatory service at the Flagstaff Station. His retirement in May 1999, ended a thirty-six-year career with USNO. Dick was first and foremost an observational astronomer. From the mid 1960s through the late 1970s, much of Dick's time was devoted to the measurement of binary stars, observing with the 12-inch and 26-inch refractors in Washington and later the 40-inch and 61-inch reflectors in Flagstaff. He also made many trips to Lick Observatory to work with the 36-inch Clark Refractor there. During this time he consulted with Charles Worley, who was observing on the 26-inch, to make sure time was well-spent examining doubles that could not be observed in Washington. This period of observing overlapped with the early years of speckle interferometry, and Dick's observations, made with the largest telescope used for micrometry at the time, were very important for ascertaining the veracity of this new technique. He was a studious and very careful observer of doubles and made over 8,000 measures, resulting in almost 3,000 mean positions

  7. LepNet: The Lepidoptera of North America Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltmann, Katja C; Cobb, Neil S; Gall, Lawrence F; Bartlett, Charles R; Basham, M Anne; Betancourt, Isabelle; Bills, Christy; Brandt, Benjamin; Brown, Richard L; Bundy, Charles; Caterino, Michael S; Chapman, Caitlin; Cognato, Anthony; Colby, Julia; Cook, Stephen P; Daly, Kathryn M; Dyer, Lee A; Franz, Nico M; Gelhaus, Jon K; Grinter, Christopher C; Harp, Charles E; Hawkins, Rachel L; Heydon, Steve L; Hill, Geena M; Huber, Stacey; Johnson, Norman; Kawahara, Akito Y; Kimsey, Lynn S; Kondratieff, Boris C; Krell, Frank-Thorsten; Leblanc, Luc; Lee, Sangmi; Marshall, Christopher J; McCabe, Lindsie M; McHugh, Joseph V; Menard, Katrina L; Opler, Paul A; Palffy-Muhoray, Nicole; Pardikes, Nick; Peterson, Merrill A; Pierce, Naomi E; Poremski, Andre; Sikes, Derek S; Weintraub, Jason D; Wikle, David; Zaspel, Jennifer M; Zolnerowich, Gregory

    2017-03-23

    The Lepidoptera of North America Network, or LepNet, is a digitization effort recently launched to mobilize biodiversity data from 3 million specimens of butterflies and moths in United States natural history collections (http://www.lep-net.org/). LepNet was initially conceived as a North American effort but the project seeks collaborations with museums and other organizations worldwide. The overall goal is to transform Lepidoptera specimen data into readily available digital formats to foster global research in taxonomy, ecology and evolutionary biology.

  8. Blood, sweat, and tears: a review of the hematophagous, sudophagous, and lachryphagous Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, David; Goddard, Jerome

    2013-12-01

    Although adult Lepidoptera are not often considered medically relevant, some butterflies and moths are notorious for their consumption of mammalian body fluids. These Lepidoptera can be blood-feeding (hematophagous), tear-feeding (lachryphagous), or sweat-feeding (we use the term "sudophagous"). Blood-feeding Lepidoptera have been observed piercing the skin of their hosts during feeding, while tear-feeding Lepidoptera have been observed frequenting the eyes of hosts in order to directly obtain lachrymal fluid. These behaviors have negative human health implications and some potential for disease transmission. In this study, articles concerning feeding behavior of blood, sweat, and tear-feeding Lepidoptera were reviewed, with emphasis on correlations between morphological characters and feeding behaviors. Harmful effects and vector potential of these Lepidoptera are presented and discussed. © 2013 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  9. Hydrologic data for the Walker River Basin, Nevada and California, water years 2010–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelko, Michael T.; Orozco, Erin L.

    2015-12-10

    Walker Lake is a threatened and federally protected desert terminal lake in western Nevada. To help protect the desert terminal lake and the surrounding watershed, the Bureau of Reclamation and U.S. Geological Survey have been studying the hydrology of the Walker River Basin in Nevada and California since 2004. Hydrologic data collected for this study during water years 2010 through 2014 included groundwater levels, surface-water discharge, water chemistry, and meteorological data. Groundwater levels were measured in wells, and surface-water discharge was measured in streams, canals, and ditches. Water samples for chemical analyses were collected from wells, streams, springs, and Walker Lake. Chemical analyses included determining physical properties; the concentrations of major ions, nutrients, trace metals, dissolved gases, and radionuclides; and ratios of the stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen. Walker Lake water properties and meteorological parameters were monitored from a floating platform on the lake. Data collection methods followed established U.S. Geological Survey guidelines, and all data are stored in the National Water Information System database. All of the data are presented in this report and accessible on the internet, except multiple-depth Walker Lake water-chemistry data, which are available only in this report.

  10. A New Controller for a Smart Walker Based on Human-Robot Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadão, Carlos; Caldeira, Eliete; Bastos-Filho, Teodiano; Frizera-Neto, Anselmo; Carelli, Ricardo

    2016-07-19

    This paper presents the development of a smart walker that uses a formation controller in its displacements. Encoders, a laser range finder and ultrasound are the sensors used in the walker. The control actions are based on the user (human) location, who is the actual formation leader. There is neither a sensor attached to the user's body nor force sensors attached to the arm supports of the walker, and thus, the control algorithm projects the measurements taken from the laser sensor into the user reference and, then, calculates the linear and angular walker's velocity to keep the formation (distance and angle) in relation to the user. An algorithm was developed to detect the user's legs, whose distances from the laser sensor provide the information necessary to the controller. The controller was theoretically analyzed regarding its stability, simulated and validated with real users, showing accurate performance in all experiments. In addition, safety rules are used to check both the user and the device conditions, in order to guarantee that the user will not have any risks when using the smart walker. The applicability of this device is for helping people with lower limb mobility impairments.

  11. The fire-walker's high: affect and physiological responses in an extreme collective ritual.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Fischer

    Full Text Available How do people feel during extreme collective rituals? Despite longstanding speculation, few studies have attempted to quantify ritual experiences. Using a novel pre/post design, we quantified physiological fluctuations (heart rates and self-reported affective states from a collective fire-walking ritual in a Mauritian Hindu community. Specifically, we compared changes in levels of happiness, fatigue, and heart rate reactivity among high-ordeal participants (fire-walkers, low-ordeal participants (non-fire-walking participants with familial bonds to fire-walkers and spectators (unrelated/unknown to the fire-walkers. We observed that fire-walkers experienced the highest increase in heart rate and reported greater happiness post-ritual compared to low-ordeal participants and spectators. Low-ordeal participants reported increased fatigue after the ritual compared to both fire-walkers and spectators, suggesting empathetic identification effects. Thus, witnessing the ritualistic suffering of loved ones may be more exhausting than experiencing suffering oneself. The findings demonstrate that the level of ritual involvement is important for shaping affective responses to collective rituals. Enduring a ritual ordeal is associated with greater happiness, whereas observing a loved-one endure a ritual ordeal is associated with greater fatigue post-ritual.

  12. north indian fauna of genus macrobathra meyrick (lepidoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gs

    Lepidopterorum Catalogus, 79: 630p. Meyrick E. 1910. Descriptions of Indian microlepidoptera. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc., 20: 143–168, 435–462, 706–736. Meyrick E. 1914a. Descriptions of Indian microlepidoptera. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc., 23: 18–130. Meyrick E. 1914b. Lepidoptera : Heterocera,. Family Heliodinidae.

  13. Conservation of silk genes in Trichoptera and Lepidoptera

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yonemura, N.; Mita, K.; Tamura, T.; Sehnal, František

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 6 (2009), s. 641-653 ISSN 0022-2844 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5007402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : silk evolution * Trichoptera * Lepidoptera Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.323, year: 2009

  14. Male secondary sexual characters in Aphnaeinae wings (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Bálint, Zsolt; Heath, Alan; Katona, Gergely; Kertész, Krisztián; Sáfián, Szabolcs

    2017-01-01

    Male secondary sexual characters have been discovered on the hindwing verso of genera Aphnaeus Hübner, [1819], Cigaritis Donzel, 1847, Lipaphnaeus Aurivillius, 1916 and Pseudaletis Druce, 1888 representing the Palaeotropical subfamily Aphnaeinae Lycaenidae: Lepidoptera). Relevant wing parts are illustrated, described, and some observations on the organs are briefly annotated. With an appendix and 14 figures.

  15. DNA Barcodes of Lepidoptera Reared from Yawan, Papua New Guinea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miller, S. E.; Rosati, M. E.; Gewa, B.; Novotný, Vojtěch; Weiblen, G. D.; Herbert, P. D. N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 2 (2015), s. 247-250 ISSN 0013-8797 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-04258S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : DNA barcodes * Lepidoptera * Papua New Guinea Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.593, year: 2015

  16. Molecular analysis of the muscle protein projectin in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayme-Southgate, A J; Turner, L; Southgate, R J

    2013-01-01

    Striated muscles of both vertebrates and insects contain a third filament composed of the giant proteins, namely kettin and projectin (insects) and titin (vertebrates). All three proteins have been shown to contain several domains implicated in conferring elasticity, in particular a PEVK segment. In this study, the characterization of the projectin protein in the silkmoth, Bombyx mori L. (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae), and the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus L. (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae), as well as a partial characterization in the Carolina sphinx, Manduca sexta L. (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae), are presented. This study showed that, similar to other insects, projectin's overall modular organization was conserved, but in contrast, the PEVK region had a highly divergent sequence. The analysis of alternative splicing in the PEVK region revealed a small number of possible isoforms and the lack of a flight-muscle specific variant, both characteristics being in sharp contrast with findings from other insects. The possible correlation with difference in flight muscle stiffness and physiology between Lepidoptera and other insect orders is discussed.

  17. Response of Males of Maruca vitrata Fabricius(Lepidoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maruca vitrata Fabricius (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) is a key pest of bean in Mauritius. Their larvae feed within flowers and pods and are thus well protected from insecticidal sprays. To achieve effective control, farmers spray their bean fields on a prophylactic basis. This has consequently led to undesirable problems that ...

  18. The Tortricidae described by J. C. Fabricius (Lepidoptera)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baixeras, Joaquin; Karsholt, Ole

    2011-01-01

    The identity and nomenclature of the 88 species of Tortricidae (Lepidoptera) described by J. C. Fabricius are reviewed. Type material deposited in the Natural History Museum Denmark is illustrated. Lectotypes for Tinea compositella (Fabricius, 1775), Pyralis rivellana (Fabricius, 1775) and P...

  19. Two new Gelechiidae for the Iberian Peninsula (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsholt, Ole; Vives Moreno, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of Gelechiidae, Chrysoesthia hispanica Karsholt & Vives, sp. n. from Spain and Neofriseria hitadoella Karsholt & Vives, sp. n. from Spain and Portugal are described. The adults and male and female genitalia are illustrated. The generic assignment of C. hispanica is discussed. KEY ...... WORD: Lepidoptera, Gelechiidae, new species, Iberian peninsula....

  20. Six new species of Metarbelidae (Lepidoptera: Cossoidea) from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six new species of Metarbelidae (Lepidoptera: Cossoidea) from the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania, including one new species from Marenji Forest in southeast ... Journal of East African Natural History ... from Morogoro (Uluguru Mountains) and Ortharbela cliftoni spec. nov. from Amani (East Usambara Mountains).

  1. Male secondary sexu al characters in Aphnaeinae wings (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bálint, Zsolt

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Male secondary sexual characters have been discovered on the hindwing verso of genera Aphnaeus Hübner, [1819], Cigaritis Donzel, 1847, Lipaphnaeus Aurivillius, 1916 and Pseudaletis Druce, 1888 representing the Palaeotropical subfamily Aphnaeinae Lycaenidae: Lepidoptera. Relevant wing parts are illustrated, described, and some observations on the organs are briefly annotated. With an appendix and 14 figures.

  2. Biogeography and ecology of southern Portuguese butterflies and burnets (Lepidoptera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, T.

    2003-01-01

    Biogeography and ecology of southern Portuguese butterflies and burnets (Lepidoptera) During several visits to the western part of the Algarve (southern Portugal), the author mapped the butterflies and burnets of this region. In total, I observed 58 butterfly species (51 Papilionoidea, 7

  3. COMPARISON OF SAMPLING TECHNIQUES USED IN STUDYING LEPIDOPTERA POPULATION DYNAMICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four methods (light traps, foliage samples, canvas bands, and gypsy moth egg mass surveys) that are used to study the population dynamics of foliage-feeding Lepidoptera were compared for 10 species, including gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar L. Samples were collected weekly at 12 sit...

  4. Identification to Lepidoptera Superfamily-under the microscope (Insecta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are 160,000 species of described Lepidoptera, or moths and butterflies, on Earth, although it is estimated that the number is closer to 500,000 species. Many moths from all over the world are intercepted at U.S. ports on a wide variety of economically important commodities. The purpose of t...

  5. Antibiosis in Ascia monuste orseis Godart (Lepidoptera: Pieridae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ascia monuste orseis (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) is one of the main insect pests of kale. The study was done to identify kale varieties resistant to A. monuste orseis by the antibiosis resistance mechanism. Kale genotypes (26) were evaluated in experiments performed at the Laboratory of Agricultural Entomology of Goiano ...

  6. Dagvlinders in 1998: nog steeds onder druk (Lepidoptera: Rhopalocera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, K.

    1999-01-01

    Butterflies in the Netherlands still under pressure (Lepidoptera: Rhopalocera) New information on the Dutch Rhopalocera fauna since the distribution atlas of Tax (1989) is presented. Coenonympha pamphilus was common in large parts of the Netherlands, but has declined dramatically. C. arcania is now

  7. A provisional annotated list of the Lepidoptera of Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    A biodiversity inventory of the Lepidoptera of Pico Bonito National Park and vicinity, in the Department of Atlantida of northern Honduras, has been initiated and will be conducted to obtain baseline data. We present a revised checklist of Honduran butterfly species (updated from the initial 1967 l...

  8. The RBE of Fractionated Fast Neutron on Walker 256 Carcinosarcoma with KCCH-Cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seong Yul; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Cho, Chul Koo [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Charn Il; Kang, Wee Saing [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-12-15

    For evaluation of biological effect of p+(50.5 MeV) Be neutron beam produced by Korea Cancer Center Hospital(KCCH) cyclotron the RBE had been measured in experimental tumor Walker 256 carcinosarcoma as well as normal tissue, mouse intestine and bone marrow, in single and fractionated irradiation. As pilot study, the RBE had been measured for the mouse jejunal crypt cells in single whole body irradiation of which the result was 2.8. The obtained RBE values of TCD 50 of Walker 256 tumor, bone marrow and intestine in single irradiation were 1.9, 1.9 and 1.5 respectively. In fractionated irradiation, the RBE value of tumor Walker 256 was decreased as increasing of fraction number and increased as increasing of fraction size.

  9. Robust Redundant Input Reliable Tracking Control for Omnidirectional Rehabilitative Training Walker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of robust reliable tracking control on the omnidirectional rehabilitative training walker is examined. The new nonlinear redundant input method is proposed when one wheel actuator fault occurs. The aim of the study is to design an asymptotically stable controller that can guarantee the safety of the user and ensure tracking on a training path planned by a physical therapist. The redundant degrees of freedom safety control and the asymptotically zero state detectable concept of the walker are presented, the model of redundant degree is constructed, and the property of center of gravity constant shift is obtained. A controller that can satisfy asymptotic stability is obtained using a common Lyapunov function for admissible uncertainties resulting from an actuator fault. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method and verify that the walker can provide safe sequential motion when one wheel actuator is at fault.

  10. Directional transport of colloids inside a bath of self-propelling walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlitz, Holger; Wu, Chenxu; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2017-05-24

    We present a setup in which passive colloids inside a solvent are moved to the boundaries of the container. The directional transport is facilitated by self-propelling microparticles ("walkers") with an activity gradient, which reduces their propulsion in the vicinity of bounding walls. An attractive interaction leads to the adsorption of walkers onto the colloid-surfaces in regions of low walker activity. It is shown that the activity gradient generates a free energy gradient which in turn acts as a driving force on the passive colloids. We carry out molecular dynamics simulations and present approaches to a theoretical description of the involved processes. Although the simulation data are not reproduced on a fully quantitative level, their qualitative features are covered by the model. The effect described here may be applied to facilitate a directional transport of drugs or to eliminate pollutants.

  11. Mary Edwards Walker, M.D.: a feminist physician a century ahead of her time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, A D; Suskind, P B

    1996-06-01

    In her teens, Mary Edwards Walker already wore the "bloomer" outfit began to campaign for reforming the "unhygienic" clothing of women. Assertively, she attended medical school and earned her M.D. degree. Due to prejudice, her practice did not flourish and she moved to Washington to offer her medical services to the Union as the Civil War began. Rebuffed by the male medical bureaucrats, she volunteered her services anyway. Eventually, she was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, the only women to ever gain such distinction. After the war, Walker became a journalist, an author of two sensational books, a political lobbyist, a suffrage campaigner, a professional and public lecturer, an ardent dress reformer, a peace activist, a Utopianist and a women's right advocate. Light-years ahead of her times, Dr. Walker was an intelligent, independent, irrepressible and indefatigable proponent for a host of worthy causes.

  12. Anterior or posterior walkers for children with cerebral palsy? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Marilyn; Simkiss, Doug; Rose, Alice; Li, François-Xavier

    2018-05-01

    To review the literature comparing use of anterior and posterior walkers (PW's) by children with cerebral palsy (CP) to determine which walker type is preferable. Electronic databases were searched using pre-defined terms by two independent reviewers. Reference lists of included studies were hand searched. Studies published between 1985 and 2016 comparing use of anterior and PW's by children with CP were included. All study designs and outcomes were accepted. Risk of bias was assessed using the "Quality assessment standard for a cross-over study". Quality of evidence was evaluated using GRADE. Six studies were analysed. All studies had small sample sizes. A total of 4/6 studies were randomized. A total of 4/6 had high risk of bias. Outcomes included velocity, pelvic tilt, hip flexion, knee flexion, step length, stride length, cadence, double stance time, oxygen cost and participant/parental preference. Velocity, trunk flexion/pelvic tilt, and stability may be improved by using a PW, however, GRADE quality was very low for all outcomes and there was heterogeneity between studies. The majority of participants and parents preferred the PW. Heterogeneity and low quality of existing evidence prevented recommendation of one walker type. Well-designed studies with adequate power are needed to inform clinical recommendations. Implications for rehabilitation Clinical recommendations cannot be made for whether anterior or posterior walkers are preferable for children with cerebral palsy based on the existing evidence. Velocity, trunk flexion/pelvic tilt, and stability may be improved by using a posterior walker. The majority of walking aid users and their parents preferred posterior walkers. Adequately powered studies designed to minimize bias are needed.

  13. Empowering and Assisting Natural Empowering and Assisting Natural Human Mobility: The Simbiosis Walker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselmo Frizera-Neto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the complete development of the Simbiosis Smart Walker. The device is equipped with a set of sensor subsystems to acquire user-machine interaction forces and the temporal evolution of user's feet during gait. The authors present an adaptive filtering technique used for the identification and separation of different components found on the human-machine interaction forces. This technique allowed isolating the components related with the navigational commands and developing a Fuzzy logic controller to guide the device. The Smart Walker was clinically validated at the Spinal Cord Injury Hospital of Toledo - Spain, presenting great acceptability by spinal chord injury patients and clinical staff.

  14. The genus Cecyrina Walker, 1867, with the description of two new species (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae: Asopinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing; Bu, Wen-Jun; Liu, Guo-Qing

    2016-05-24

    In this paper, three species of the genus Cecyrina Walker are reported. Of these, the type species C. platyrhinoides Walker, 1867 is the only member of the genus previously recorded. Cecyrina flata sp. nov. and C. rubra sp. nov. are described as new to science. Illustrations of the male and female genitalic structures, the dorsal view of the head, the ventral view of the abdomen, and photographs of the adult dorsal and ventral habitus are provided. A key to the males of the genus is also provided to assist in future identification. The type specimens are deposited in the Institute of Entomology, Nankai University, Tianjin, China, except where noted.

  15. Presence of dynorphin-like immunoreactivity but not opiate binding in Walker-256 tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, H.U.; Conroy, W.G.; Isom, G.E.; Malven, P.V.; Yim, G.K.W.

    1985-07-15

    Walker-256 tumor tissue was removed from rats on day 8 of tumor growth. An acidified methanol extract of the tumor tissue was assayed for immunoreactive (ir) dynorphin-A 1-17 (DYN-17) and ir-dynorphin-A (DYN-8). Levels of ir-DYN-17 and ir-DYN-8 were nearly 4- and 8-fold higher, respectively, in tumors versus normal muscle. However, tumor homogenates did not exhibit specific /sup 3/H-naloxone binding. These results indicate that although the Walker-256 carcinosarcoma may produce opioids, it is unlikely that these ectopic substances have direct opioid actions on the tumor itself. 34 references, 1 figure.

  16. Test pilots 1962 - Armstrong, Walker, Dana, Peterson, McKay, Thompson, Butchart

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    The research pilots at what in 1962 was called the Flight Research Center standing in front of the X-1E. They are (left to right) Neil Armstrong, Joe Walker, Bill Dana, Bruce Peterson, Jack McKay, Milt Thompson, and Stan Butchart. of the group, Armstrong, Walker, Dana, McKay and Thompson all flew the X-15. Bruce Peterson flew the M2-F2 and HL-10 lifting bodies, while Stan Butchart was the B-29 drop plane pilot for many of the D-558-II and X-1 series research aircraft.

  17. Species of Lepidoptera defoliators of Eucalyptus as new host for the parasitoid Palmistichus elaeisis (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio Fagundes Pereira

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Pupae of Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll and Thyrinteina leucoceraea Rindge (Lepidoptera: Geometridae were obtained from Eucalyptus cloeziana F. Muell and Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake plants, respectively. Specimens of a parasitoid emerged from T. arnobia pupae and also found parasitising T. leucoceraea pupae in the field were identified as Palmistichus elaeisis Delvare and LaSalle (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae. This is the first report on P. elaeisis parasitizing T. arnobia and T. leucoceraea pupae in natural conditions in Brazil. P. elaeisis also parasitized these hosts and Bombyx mori Linnaeus (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae, Anticarsia gemmatalis Hubner, Pseudaletia sequax Franclemont, Alabama argillacea Huebner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Dirphia moderata Bouvier (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae and Halysidota pearsoni Watson (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae in the laboratory. The production and release of P. elaeisis could be an efficient alternative for controlling Lepidoptera defoliators in eucalyptus plantations.Pupas de Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll e Thyrinteina leucoceraea Rindge (Lepidoptera: Geometridae foram coletadas em Eucalyptus cloeziana F. Muell e Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake, respectivamente. Espécimes de Palmistichus elaeisis Delvare and LaSalle (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae emergiram de T. arnobia e foram encontrados sobre pupas de T. leucoceraea em plantas de eucalipto no campo. Esse é o primeiro relato de P. elaeisis parasitando pupas de T. arnobia e T. leucoceraea em condições naturais no Brasil. Além desses hospedeiros, P. elaeisis parasitou em laboratório Bombyx mori Linnaeus (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae, Anticarsia gemmatalis Hubner, Pseudaletia sequax Franclemont, Alabama argillacea Huebner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Dirphia moderata Bouvier (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae e Halysidota pearsoni Watson (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae. A produção de P. elaeisis e sua liberação em eucaliptais podem representar uma alternativa eficiente de controle de lagartas

  18. 77 FR 67811 - Porter-Walker LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. ER13-327-000] Porter-Walker LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for Blanket Section 204 Authorization This is a supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Porter-Walker...

  19. Simulation of the Lower Walker River Basin hydrologic system, west-central Nevada, using PRMS and MODFLOW models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allander, Kip K.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Jeton, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Walker Lake is a terminal lake in west-central Nevada with almost all outflow occurring through evaporation. Diversions from Walker River since the early 1900s have contributed to a substantial reduction in flow entering Walker Lake. As a result, the lake is receding, and salt concentrations have increased to a level in which Oncorhynchus clarkii henshawi (Lahontan Cutthroat trout) are no longer present, and the lake ecosystem is threatened. Consequently, there is a concerted effort to restore the Walker Lake ecosystem and fishery to a level that is more sustainable. However, Walker Lake is interlinked with the lower Walker River and adjacent groundwater system which makes it difficult to understand the full effect of upstream water-management actions on the overall hydrologic system including the lake level, volume, and dissolved-solids concentrations of Walker Lake. To understand the effects of water-management actions on the lower Walker River Basin hydrologic system, a watershed model and groundwater flow model have been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

  20. Strepsicrates smithiana Walsingham (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae: first record from Chile and a newly documented host plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor A. Vargas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Strepsicrates smithiana Walsingham (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae: first record from Chile and a newly documented host plant. Strepsicrates smithiana Walsingham, 1892 (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae is recorded for the first time from Chile. Male and female adults were reared from leaf-tying larvae collected on Myrica pavonis (Myricaceae, which is a new host plant record for S. smithiana.

  1. The apparent influence of climatic change on recent changes of range by European insects (Lepidoptera, Orthoptera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burton, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    The apparent influence of climatic change on recent changes of range by European insects (Lepidoptera, Orthoptera) For several years I have been collecting data concerning changes in the ranges of European insects, especially Lepidoptera and Orthoptera. The vast majority of those species which have

  2. Trophic ecology of Lepidoptera larvae associated with woody vegetation in a savanna ecosystem

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholtz, CH

    1982-06-01

    Full Text Available This study represents a quantitative survey of a Lepidoptera community and deals with the trophic ecology of the 27 species of foliage-feeding Lepidoptera on the eight dominant woody plants in the Burkea africana-Eragrostis pallens savanna...

  3. Brachymeria pandora (Crawford (Hymenoptera, Chalcididae: a new parasitoid of Historis odius (Fabricius (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélcio R. Gil-Santana

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The first record of parasitism of Brachymeria pandora (Crawford, 1914 (Hymenoptera, Chalcididae on Historis odius (Fabricius, 1775 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil is presented.Apresenta-se o primeiro registro de parasitismo de Brachymeria pandora (Crawford, 1914 (Hymenoptera, Chalcididae em Historis odius (Fabricius, 1775 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, no estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil.

  4. Prenatal diagnosis of the Dandy-Walker syndrome by sonography and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelly, E.; Ebner, F.; Oberbauer, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    A case of Dandy-Walker-syndrome is presented, comparing the value of sonography and CT in intrauterine diagnosis. Together with a review of the literature of the subject, pathogenesis, morphology and prognosis in regard to the psychomotoric development are discussed. (orig.) [de

  5. Finite-Sample Bias Propagation in Autoregressive Estimation With the Yule–Walker Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersen, P.M.T.

    2009-01-01

    The Yule-Walker (YW) method for autoregressive (AR) estimation uses lagged-product (LP) autocorrelation estimates to compute an AR parametric spectral model. The LP estimates only have a small triangular bias in the estimated autocorrelation function and are asymptotically unbiased. However, using

  6. Experience in the management of Dandy-Walker syndrome in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dandy-Walker Syndrome (DWS) is a congenital brain malformation involving the cerebellum and the fluid spaces around it. There is atresia of foramenofMagendie and Lushka resulting in a complete absence of the part of the brain located between the two cerebellar hemispheres (cerebellarvermis) and cystic dilatation of ...

  7. Cloning, purification and crystallization of a Walker-type Pyrococcus abyssi ATPase family member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhring, Muriel; Bey, Gilbert; Lecompte, Odile; Cavarelli, Jean; Moras, Dino; Poch, Olivier

    2005-01-01

    The Walker-type ATPase PABY2304 of P. abyssi has been cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data from selenomethionine-derivative crystals have been collected to 2.6 Å. The structure has been solved by MAD techniques. Several ATPase proteins play essential roles in the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in archaea. Walker-type ATPases are defined by their conserved Walker A and B motifs, which are associated with nucleotide binding and ATP hydrolysis. A family of 28 ATPase proteins with non-canonical Walker A sequences has been identified by a bioinformatics study of comparative genomics in Pyrococcus genomes. A high-throughput structural study on P. abyssi has been started in order to establish the structure of these proteins. 16 genes have been cloned and characterized. Six out of the seven soluble constructs were purified in Escherichia coli and one of them, PABY2304, has been crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected from selenomethionine-derivative crystals using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 79.41, b = 48.63, c = 108.77 Å, and diffract to beyond 2.6 Å resolution

  8. A revision of the Indian species of Oligosita Walker (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Salma; Anis, Shoeba Binte; Khan, Mohd Talib

    2015-06-19

    The Indian species of the genus Oligosita Walker, 1851 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) are revised. One new species, Oligosita aseta Begum & Anis, sp. nov., is described based on specimens collected from Kerala, India. A key to the 16 Indian species of the genus is also given.

  9. Menkes' disease with a Dandy-Walker variant: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Central Railway Hospital, Warsaw (Poland); Rokicki, D.; Gremida, M. [Dept. of Metabolic Diseases, Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Warsaw (Poland); Walecki, J. [Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Medical Centre for Postgraduate Education, Warsaw (Poland)

    2001-11-01

    We report a boy with Menkes' disease in whom MRI revealed delayed myelination of the white matter, brain atrophy and tortuosity of the intracranial vessels. The characteristic MRI features of Menkes' disease were accompanied by a Dandy-Walker variant. (orig.)

  10. Epiphanic Awakenings in Raymond Carver's "Cathedral" and Alice Walker's "Everyday Use"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeq, Ala Eddin; Al-Badawi, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores how two short stories from very different backgrounds conclude in a significant epiphany for the characters. Raymond Carver's short story "Cathedral" and Alice Walker's "Everyday Use" are studied to see how the husband in Carver's work is blinder than his visually-impaired overnight guest, and the…

  11. Bistability and biasing effects in the perception of ambiguous point-light walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanrie, Jan; Dekeyser, Mathias; Verfaillie, Karl

    2004-01-01

    The perceptually bistable character of point-light walkers has been examined in three experiments. A point-light figure without explicit depth cues constitutes a perfectly ambiguous stimulus: from all viewpoints, multiple interpretations are possible concerning the depth orientation of the figure. In the first experiment, it is shown that non-lateral views of the walker are indeed interpreted in two orientations, either as facing towards the viewer or as facing away from the viewer, but that the interpretation in which the walker is oriented towards the viewer is reported more frequently. In the second experiment the point-light figure was walking backwards, making the global orientation of the point-light figure opposite to the direction of global motion. The interpretation in which the walker was facing the viewer was again reported more frequently. The robustness of these findings was examined in the final experiment, in which the effects of disambiguating the stimulus by introducing a local depth cue (occlusion) or a more global depth cue (applying perspective projection) were explored.

  12. Race walking gait and its influence on race walking economy in world-class race walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Ezeiza, Josu; Torres-Unda, Jon; Tam, Nicholas; Irazusta, Jon; Granados, Cristina; Santos-Concejero, Jordan

    2018-03-06

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationships between biomechanical parameters of the gait cycle and race walking economy in world-class Olympic race walkers. Twenty-One world-class race walkers possessing the Olympic qualifying standard participated in this study. Participants completed an incremental race walking test starting at 10 km·h -1 , where race walking economy (ml·kg -1 ·km -1 ) and spatiotemporal gait variables were analysed at different speeds. 20-km race walking performance was related to race walking economy, being the fastest race walkers those displaying reduced oxygen cost at a given speed (R = 0.760, p economy (moderate effect, p economi cal than the lesser performers. Similarly, shorter flight times are associated with a more efficient race walking economy. Coaches and race walkers should avoid modifying their race walking style by increasing flight times, as it may not only impair economy, but also lead to disqualification.

  13. Precipitation Change and Soil Leaching: Field Results and Simulations from Walker Branch Watershed, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.W. Johnson; P.J. Hanson; D.E. Todd; R.B. Susfalk; Carl C. Trettin

    1998-01-01

    Abstract. To investigate the potential effects of changing precipitation on a deciduous forest ecosystem, an experiment was established on Walker Branch Watershed, Tennessee that modified the amount of throughfall at 4 -33 %. ambient (no change), and +33 % using a system of rain gutters and sprinklers. We hypothesized that the drier treatments would...

  14. Slowdown of the Walker circulation driven by tropical Indo-Pacific warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokinaga, Hiroki; Xie, Shang-Ping; Deser, Clara; Kosaka, Yu; Okumura, Yuko M

    2012-11-15

    Global mean sea surface temperature (SST) has risen steadily over the past century, but the overall pattern contains extensive and often uncertain spatial variations, with potentially important effects on regional precipitation. Observations suggest a slowdown of the zonal atmospheric overturning circulation above the tropical Pacific Ocean (the Walker circulation) over the twentieth century. Although this change has been attributed to a muted hydrological cycle forced by global warming, the effect of SST warming patterns has not been explored and quantified. Here we perform experiments using an atmospheric model, and find that SST warming patterns are the main cause of the weakened Walker circulation over the past six decades (1950-2009). The SST trend reconstructed from bucket-sampled SST and night-time marine surface air temperature features a reduced zonal gradient in the tropical Indo-Pacific Ocean, a change consistent with subsurface temperature observations. Model experiments with this trend pattern robustly simulate the observed changes, including the Walker circulation slowdown and the eastward shift of atmospheric convection from the Indonesian maritime continent to the central tropical Pacific. Our results cannot establish whether the observed changes are due to natural variability or anthropogenic global warming, but they do show that the observed slowdown in the Walker circulation is presumably driven by oceanic rather than atmospheric processes.

  15. Sex Differences in Moral Reasoning: Response to Walker's (1984) Conclusion That There Are None.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Diana

    1986-01-01

    Takes issue with Lawrence Walker's literature review on developmental and individual differences in moral reasoning which found no consistent evidence for sex differences in moral development. Argues instead that the source and specific nature of these differences have yet to be established. (HOD)

  16. Trans-sphenoidal encephalocele in association with Dandy-Walker complex and cardiovascular anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy, H.M.; Barker, C.S. [Wessex Neurological Centre, Southampton (United Kingdom); Small, J.H. [Dept. of Radiology, Royal Bournemouth Hospital (United Kingdom); Armitage, M. [Bournemouth Diabetes and Endocrine Centre, Royal Bournemouth Hospital (United Kingdom)

    2001-01-01

    We present a case of trans-sphenoidal encephalomeningocele in association with a posterior cranial fossa malformation which fulfils the criteria for the Dandy-Walker complex. Congenital cardiovascular defects were also present. An abnormality of neural crest development may be responsible for the combined occurrence of these anomalies. (orig.)

  17. A Noncomputerized Version of the Williams and Walker Stock Market Experiment in a Finance Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Christopher R.

    1993-01-01

    Asserts that the computerized stock market simulation described by Williams and Walker is complex and a better approach to teaching financial economics. Describes a noncomputerized version of the same teaching activity used to teach asset valuation to undergraduate financial economics students. (CFR)

  18. On Maximal Surfaces in Certain Non-Flat 3-Dimensional Robertson-Walker Spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Alfonso, E-mail: aromero@ugr.es [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Geometria y Topologia (Spain); Rubio, Rafael M., E-mail: rmrubio@uco.es [Universidad de Cordoba, Departamento de Matematicas, Campus de Rabanales (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    An upper bound for the integral, on a geodesic disc, of the squared length of the gradient of a distinguished function on any maximal surface in certain non-flat 3-dimensional Robertson-Walker spacetimes is obtained. As an application, a new proof of a known Calabi-Bernstein's theorem is given.

  19. Black Matrilineage: The Case of Alice Walker and Zora Neale Hurston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoff, Diane F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the relationship of the Black contemporary author, Alice Walker, to folklorist Zora Neale Hurston and presents a clarification of the relationship of gender and race in a revised theory of literary influence. Argues that Black women authors sometimes misread literary forbears in order to discover and express a positive matrilineage…

  20. Parenchymal neurocutaneous melanosis in association with intraventricular dermoid and Dandy-walker variant: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Joo; Won, Yoo Dong; Kim, Ki Tae; Chang, Eun Deok; Huh, Pil Woo [The Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Uijongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Neurocutaneous melanosis (NCM) is a rare congenital disease that is characterized by the presence of large or multiple congenital melanocytic nevi and melanotic lesions of the central nervous system. We report here on the CT and MR imaging findings of an unusual case of NCM that was associated with intraventricular dermoid and Dandy-Walker malformation.

  1. The Deep Semantics of Imagery in Alice Walker's The Color Purple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hinged on this theoretical framework, the paper assesses the deep semantics of imagery in Walker's The Color Purple and highlights the salient non-ostensive references of the text and the new world it proposes. The analysis reveals the key to a deeper and broader perception of God, the imperativeness of equality of ...

  2. Cloning, purification and crystallization of a Walker-type Pyrococcus abyssi ATPase family member

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhring, Muriel; Bey, Gilbert; Lecompte, Odile; Cavarelli, Jean; Moras, Dino; Poch, Olivier, E-mail: poch@igbmc.u-strasbg.fr [Département de Biologie et Génomiques Structurales, UMR 7104, Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, CNRS/INSERM/ULP Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 64404 Illkirch (France)

    2005-10-01

    The Walker-type ATPase PABY2304 of P. abyssi has been cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data from selenomethionine-derivative crystals have been collected to 2.6 Å. The structure has been solved by MAD techniques. Several ATPase proteins play essential roles in the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in archaea. Walker-type ATPases are defined by their conserved Walker A and B motifs, which are associated with nucleotide binding and ATP hydrolysis. A family of 28 ATPase proteins with non-canonical Walker A sequences has been identified by a bioinformatics study of comparative genomics in Pyrococcus genomes. A high-throughput structural study on P. abyssi has been started in order to establish the structure of these proteins. 16 genes have been cloned and characterized. Six out of the seven soluble constructs were purified in Escherichia coli and one of them, PABY2304, has been crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected from selenomethionine-derivative crystals using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 79.41, b = 48.63, c = 108.77 Å, and diffract to beyond 2.6 Å resolution.

  3. Strengthening of the Walker circulation under globalwarming in an aqua-planet general circulation model simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tim; Zhang, Lei; Murakami, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    Most climate models project a weakening of theWalker circulation under global warming scenarios. It is argued, based on a global averaged moisture budget, that this weakening can be attributed to a slower rate of rainfall increase compared to that of moisture increase, which leads to a decrease in ascending motion. Through an idealized aqua-planet simulation in which a zonal wavenumber-1 SST distribution is prescribed along the equator, we find that the Walker circulation is strengthened under a uniform 2-K SST warming, even though the global mean rainfall-moisture relationship remains the same. Further diagnosis shows that the ascending branch of the Walker cell is enhanced in the upper troposphere but weakened in the lower troposphere. As a result, a "double-cell" circulation change pattern with a clockwise (anti-clockwise) circulation anomaly in the upper (lower) troposphere forms, and the upper tropospheric circulation change dominates. The mechanism for the formation of the "double cell" circulation pattern is attributed to a larger (smaller) rate of increase of diabatic heating than static stability in the upper (lower) troposphere. The result indicates that the future change of the Walker circulation cannot simply be interpreted based on a global mean moisture budget argument.

  4. [Stress parameters and behaviour of horses in walkers with and without the use of electricity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, C; Gerber, V; Howald, M; Bachmann, I; Burger, D

    2014-04-01

    In order to investigate stress responses of horses in walkers with and without electricity, 12 horses were trained during 3 weeks in a horse walker with and without the use of electricity (3.7 kV). To evaluate the stress response, cortisol levels in the blood were measured, the heart rate was monitored using the Polar® system and the behaviour was evaluated. Neither the cortisol levels nor the heart rates showed any relevant statistically significant difference between horses moved in the horse walker with or without the use of electricity. The highest cortisol levels and heart rates were recorded during the first week (habituation period). A significant difference could be observed regarding spontaneous compartment changes: while this happened mainly during the first week and before the first use of electricity, no horses changed compartments in the periods when electricity was used and thereafter. The results of this study indicate that the use of electricity in the horse walker does not seem to cause significant detectable stress in the horses.

  5. Swing-Leg Retraction for Limit Cycle Walkers Improves Disturbance Rejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobbelen, D.G.E.; Wisse, M.

    2008-01-01

    Limit cycle walkers are bipeds that exhibit a stable cyclic gaitwithout requiring local controllability at all times during gait. A well-known example of limit cycle walking is McGeer’s “passive dynamic walking,” but the concept expands to actuated bipeds as involved in this study. One of the

  6. Influence of infant-walkers on motor development: mimicking spastic diplegia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbert, R. H.; van Empelen, R.; Scheurer, N. D.; Helders, P. J.; van Nieuwenhuizen, O.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss two patients, who used an infant walker during the period in which they learned to walk. The influence on qualitative and quantitative motor development is illustrated in this report. A disharmonic and delayed motor development, contractures of the calf-muscles and motor development

  7. Inherited sterility in Eldana saccharina Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): effect of sub-sterilizing doses of gamma radiation on mating, fecundity and fertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annoh, C.E.; Adabie-Gomez, D.A. Biotechnology and Nuclear Agriculture Research Institute; Botchey, M.A.; Mensah, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    Mature pupae (6-8 days old) of Eldana saccharina were exposed to increasing sub-sterilizing doses of ionizing gamma radiation in the range of 80-180 Gy. In the parental (P) generation, emerged male and female moths were out-crossed with untreated moths of the opposite sex. Reciprocal crosses between progeny of treated and untreated moths were also made in the F1 generation. In both generations, radiation doses used did not have any significant effect on mating behaviour of adults E. saccharina. There was also no significant difference in the mean number of spermatophores (approximately 1.0 per female) transferred by males to females during copulation among treated and control crosses. Fecundity in the parental generation was reduced by 40-44% in crosses between treated males and untreated females without any clear dose dependence. In the reciprocal crosses, however, fecundity considerably decreased with the increasing dose of radiation. The dose-dependent decreased of fecundity, similar in both reciprocal crosses, was also observed in F1 generation. Increasing doses of radiation generally resulted in decreasing fertility of treated moths in both the P and F1 generations. There was, however, a remarkable difference between reciprocal crosses. While radiation induced only partial sterility of treated P males even at the highest dose (180 Gy), treated P females exhibited a high sterility at 100 Gy. In both F1 crosses, fertility was lower than in treated P males, and F1 males exhibited a higher level of inherited sterility than F1 females. The results demonstrate a potential of using inherited sterility in integrated pest management programme to suppress the pest population of E. saccharina and other related stemborer species (author)

  8. Population dynamics of Eldana saccharina Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): application of a biophysical model to understand phenological variation in an agricultural pest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleynhans, E; Barton, M G; Conlong, D E; Terblanche, J S

    2017-08-08

    Understanding pest population dynamics and seasonal phenology is a critical component of modern integrated pest-management programs. Accurate forecasting allows timely, cost-effective interventions, including maximum efficacy of, for example, biological control and/or sterile insect technique. Due to the variation in life stage-related sensitivity toward climate, insect pest population abundance models are often not easily interpreted or lack direct relevance to management strategies in the field. Here we apply a process-based (biophysical) model that incorporates climate data with life stage-dependent physiology and life history to attempt to predict Eldana saccharina life stage and generation turnover in sugarcane fields. Fitness traits are modelled at two agricultural locations in South Africa that differ in average temperature (hereafter a cold and a warm site). We test whether the life stage population structures in the field entering winter and local climate during winter directly affect development rates, and therefore interact to determine the population dynamics and phenological responses of E. saccharina in subsequent spring and summer seasons. The model predicts that: (1) E. saccharina can cycle through more generations at the warm site where fewer hours of cold and heat stress are endured, and (2) at the cold site, overwintering as pupae (rather than larvae) confer higher relative fitness and fecundity in the subsequent summer adult moths. The model predictions were compared with a large dataset of field observations from scouting records. Model predictions for larval presence (or absence) generally overlapped well with positive (or negative) scout records. These results are important for integrated pest management strategies by providing a useful foundation for future population dynamics models, and are applicable to a variety of agricultural landscapes, but especially the sugarcane industry of South Africa.

  9. Obituary: Alastair Graham Walker Cameron, 1925-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truran, James W.; Thielemann, F.-K.; Cowan, J. J.

    2005-12-01

    Alastair Graham Walker Cameron, one of the most creative and influential astrophysicists of his generation, passed away on 3 October 2005, at the age of 80, at his home in Tucson. Subsequent to his retirement from Harvard University, where he had been a member of the faculty from 1973 through 1999, Cameron remained active as a Senior Research Scientist at the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory of the University of Arizona. Cameron had a distinguished career during which he made outstanding contributions both in scientific research and in public service to science. Notable among the latter are the years he spent as Chairman of the Space Science Board of the National Academy of Sciences from 1976 to 1982. He was a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the recipient of a number of awards for his diverse contributions to the sciences, including the J. Lawrence Smith Medal of the National Academy of Sciences in 1988, the Leonard Medal of the American Meteoritical Society in 1994, the Henry Norris Russell Lectureship of the American Astronomical Society in 1997, and the Hans A. Bethe prize of the Division of Nuclear Physics of the American Physical Society for 2006, for outstanding work in nuclear physics and astrophysics. He was enormously active in the organization of conferences and workshops and in an editorial capacity, for a number of journals in astronomy, astrophysics, and space physics. Over the course of his career, he made seminal contributions to such diverse areas of astronomical and astrophysical research as nuclear reactions in stars, nucleosynthesis, the abundances of the elements in the Solar System, meteoritics, stellar evolution, neutron stars, the origin of the Solar System, the physics of planets and planetary atmospheres, and the origin of the Moon. Born on 21 June 1925 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Cameron received his undergraduate degree from the University of Manitoba and his doctorate in nuclear physics from the University of Saskatchewan in 1952

  10. Extraction of user's navigation commands from upper body force interaction in walker assisted gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pons José L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advances in technology make possible the incorporation of sensors and actuators in rollators, building safer robots and extending the use of walkers to a more diverse population. This paper presents a new method for the extraction of navigation related components from upper-body force interaction data in walker assisted gait. A filtering architecture is designed to cancel: (i the high-frequency noise caused by vibrations on the walker's structure due to irregularities on the terrain or walker's wheels and (ii the cadence related force components caused by user's trunk oscillations during gait. As a result, a third component related to user's navigation commands is distinguished. Results For the cancelation of high-frequency noise, a Benedict-Bordner g-h filter was designed presenting very low values for Kinematic Tracking Error ((2.035 ± 0.358·10-2 kgf and delay ((1.897 ± 0.3697·101ms. A Fourier Linear Combiner filtering architecture was implemented for the adaptive attenuation of about 80% of the cadence related components' energy from force data. This was done without compromising the information contained in the frequencies close to such notch filters. Conclusions The presented methodology offers an effective cancelation of the undesired components from force data, allowing the system to extract in real-time voluntary user's navigation commands. Based on this real-time identification of voluntary user's commands, a classical approach to the control architecture of the robotic walker is being developed, in order to obtain stable and safe user assisted locomotion.

  11. A gait stability investigation into FES-assisted paraplegic walking based on the walker tipping index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Dong; Bai, Yanru; Liu, Xiuyun; Qi, Hongzhi; Cheng, Longlong; Wan, Baikun; Hu, Yong; Wong, Yatwa; Luk, Keith D. K.; Leong, John C. Y.

    2009-12-01

    The gait outcome measures used in clinical trials of paraplegic locomotor training determine the effectiveness of improved walking function assisted by the functional electrical stimulation (FES) system. Focused on kinematic, kinetic or physiological changes of paraplegic patients, traditional methods cannot quantify the walking stability or identify the unstable factors of gait in real time. Up until now, the published studies on dynamic gait stability for the effective use of FES have been limited. In this paper, the walker tipping index (WTI) was used to analyze and process gait stability in FES-assisted paraplegic walking. The main instrument was a specialized walker dynamometer system based on a multi-channel strain-gauge bridge network fixed on the frame of the walker. This system collected force information for the handle reaction vector between the patient's upper extremities and the walker during the walking process; the information was then converted into walker tipping index data, which is an evaluation indicator of the patient's walking stability. To demonstrate the potential usefulness of WTI in gait analysis, a preliminary clinical trial was conducted with seven paraplegic patients who were undergoing FES-assisted walking training and seven normal control subjects. The gait stability levels were quantified for these patients under different stimulation patterns and controls under normal walking with knee-immobilization through WTI analysis. The results showed that the walking stability in the FES-assisted paraplegic group was worse than that in the control subject group, with the primary concern being in the anterior-posterior plane. This new technique is practical for distinguishing useful gait information from the viewpoint of stability, and may be further applied in FES-assisted paraplegic walking rehabilitation.

  12. The mitochondrial genome of Prays oleae (Insecta: Lepidoptera: Praydidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asch, Barbara; Blibech, Imen; Pereira-Castro, Isabel; Rei, Fernando Trindade; da Costa, Luís Teixeira

    2016-05-01

    Prays oleae is one of the most important olive tree pests and a species of interest in evolutionary studies, as it belongs to one of the oldest extant superfamilies of Ditrysian Lepidoptera. We determined its mitogenome sequence, and found it has common features for Lepidoptera, e.g. an >80% A + T content, an apparent CGA start codon for COX1 and an ATAGA(T)n motif in the control region, which also contains several copies of a 163-164 bp repeat. Importantly, the mitogenome displays the Met-Ile-Gln tRNA gene order typical of Ditrysia, consistent with the hypothesis that this is a synapomorphy of that clade.

  13. A new case constructing adelid moth from Chile (Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Parra

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A new case constructing adelid moth from Chile (Lepidoptera. The adult and larva of Ceromitia tubulifolia sp. nov. are described and illustrated. The larvae seem to be associated with sclerophyllous forest of central Chile. The larvae make a protective case from of a piece of leaf. The name phylloikos is proposed for this form of larval case. A review of the morphology and bionomics of this species are provided.Uma nova mariposa Adelidae (Lepidoptera construtora de casulo do Chile. O adulto e a larva de Ceromitia tubulifolia sp. nov. são descritos e ilustrados. As larvas parecem estar associadas à mata esclerófila do Chile central. A larva utiliza um pedaço de folha para construir uma estrutura protetora denominada phylloikos. Comentários sobre aspectos morfológicos e bionômicos da espécie são apresentados.

  14. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of three odorant binding protein gene transcripts in Dendrolimus species (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Su-Fang; Zhang, Zhen; Kong, Xiang-Bo; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2014-10-01

    Pine caterpillar moths, Dendrolimus spp. (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae), are serious economic pest of pines. Previously, phylogenetic analyses of Dendrolimus using different methods yielded inconsistent results. The chemosensory systems of insects may play fundamental roles in promoting speciation. Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) participate in the first step of odor detection. Studying the evolution of OBPs in closely related species may help us to identify their role in speciation. We identified three OBPs - one pheromone-binding protein and two general odorant-binding proteins - from male antennae of four Dendrolimus species, D. superans (Butler), D. punctatus (Walker), D. kikuchii Matsumura, and D. houi Lajonquiere, the olfactory recognition systems of which had not been previously investigated. We analyzed their molecular characteristics and compared their sequences to those of OBPs in D. tabulaeformis Tsai et Liu. Ka/Ks ratio analyses among the five Dendrolimus species indicate that PBP1 genes experienced more evolutionary pressure than the GOBPs. Phylogenetic relationships of PBP1 and GOBP1 both indicated that D. houi was the basal species, then branched D. kikuchii, while D. tabulaeformis, D. punctatus, and D. superans evolved more recently. These relationships are consistent with the changes in sex pheromone components of these five species. Dendrolimus tabulaeformis and D. punctatus are closely related sister species. However, the distances among GOBP2 sequences in the five Dendrolimus were very short, and the relationships of D. houi and D. kikuchii could not be resolved. Integrating our results with those of previous studies, we hypothesized that D. kikuchii, D. punctatus and D. superans evolved from the basal ancestor because of sex pheromone mutations and environmental pressure. © 2013 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. Comparative fitness of irradiated light brown apple moths (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in a wind tunnel, hedgerow, and vineyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckling, David M; Stringer, Lloyd D; Mitchell, Vanessa J; Sullivan, Thomas E S; Sullivan, Nicola J; Simmons, Gregory S; Barrington, Anne M; El-Sayed, Ashraf M

    2011-08-01

    Light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is the target of the sterile insect technique, but reduced moth fitness from irradiation lowers the effective overflooding ratio of sterile to wild moths. New measures of insect quality are being sought to improve field performance of irradiated insects, thus improving the cost effectiveness of this technique. Male pupae were irradiated at intervals between 0 and 300 Gy, and adult flight success was assessed in a wind tunnel equipped with flight track recording software. A dose response was evident with reduced successful search behaviors at higher irradiation doses. Irradiation at 250 Gy reduced arrival success to 49% of untreated controls, during 2-min assays. Mark-release-recapture of males irradiated at 250 Gy indicated reduced male moth recapture in hedgerows (75% of control values of 7.22% +/- 1.20 [SEM] males recaptured) and in vineyards (78% of control values 10.5% +/- 1.66% [SEM] recaptured). Males dispersed similar distances in both habitats, and overflooding ratios dropped off rapidly from the release point in both landscapes. Transects of traps with central releases proved to be an efficient method for measuring the quality of released males. Relative field performance of moths was greater than suggested by wind tunnel performance, which could be due to time differences between the two assays, two-minute wind tunnel tests compared with days in the field treatments. Release strategies involving ground releases should consider the effect of limited postrelease dispersal. Aerial release could solve this problem and warrants investigation.

  16. Orientation of Navel Orangeworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) Larvae and Adults Toward Volatiles Associated With Almond Hull Split and Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Daniel S; Lawrance, Allen; Siegel, Joel P; Berenbaum, May R

    2017-06-01

    The navel orangeworm Amyelois transitella (Walker, 1863, Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), a pest of California tree nuts, is associated with the fungus Aspergillus flavus, and previous research suggests these species are facultative mutualists. Because navel orangeworm larvae exhibit improved performance on diets containing this fungus, orientation toward hostplants infected with A. flavus may be adaptive. We conducted behavioral assays to determine if larvae respond to chemical cues produced by almond hull split and fungal infection. In petri dish arenas, larvae showed a preference for 1-octen-3-ol and 2-phenylethanol, volatiles characteristic of damaged plants, as well as methanolic extracts of almond meal with 1-octen-3-ol and the fungal volatile conophthorin. In contrast, larvae displayed aversion to ethyl benzoate, an inhibitor of fungal growth. When we assessed oviposition behavior relative to substrates with and without A. flavus, females laid almost twice as many eggs near inoculated surfaces. Moreover, an average of 63% of eggs laid near inoculated substrates were fertilized, compared with 24% of eggs near uninoculated sites. We also tested the hypothesis that unfertilized eggs are laid on nutrient-poor substrates to provide supplemental nutrition for larvae in an assay comparing larval survivorship in the presence and absence of unfertilized eggs. Neonates given eggs survived 2.5 times longer on an average than unprovisioned neonates (208.8 h vs. 85.2 h), indicating that this species may compensate with cannibalism for oviposition on lower-quality food sources. We conclude that larvae orient to probable host plant and fungal volatiles associated with hull split and document a possible strategy for larvae to establish on low-quality hosts. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Larval Preference and Performance of Amyelois transitella (Navel Orangeworm, Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in Relation to the Fungus Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampt, Eline A; Bush, Daniel S; Siegel, Joel P; Berenbaum, May R

    2016-02-01

    The navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker), is a polyphagous pest of California nut crops and is responsible for extensive losses in the United States. It directly damages crops by feeding and contaminating nuts with frass and webbing and vectors saprophytic fungi that infect crops. The navel orangeworm is commonly associated with Aspergillus species, including the toxigenic Aspergillus flavus, which causes crop loss by producing carcinogens, including aflatoxin B1. This lepidopteran-fungus association is the most economically serious pest complex in Central Valley orchards, and evidence indicates that this relationship is mutualistic. We assessed preference and performance of navel orangeworm larvae associated with A. flavus in behavioral bioassays in which neonates were allowed to orient within arenas to media with or without fungal tissue, and performance bioassays in which larvae were reared with and without A. flavus on potato dextrose agar (PDA) and a semidefined almond PDA diet to evaluate effects on development and pupal weight. Navel orangeworm larvae were attracted to A. flavus and developed faster in its presence, indicating a nutritional benefit to the caterpillars. Larvae reached pupation ∼33% faster on diet containing A. flavus, and pupal weights were ∼18% higher for males and ∼13% higher for females on this diet. Our findings indicate that A. flavus plays an important role in larval orientation and development on infected hosts. The preference-performance relationship between navel orangeworms and Aspergillus flavus is consistent with a facultative mutualism that has broad implications for pest management efforts and basic understanding of Lepidoptera-plant interactions. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Patterns of flight behavior and capacity of unmated navel orangeworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) adults related to age, gender, and wing size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappington, Thomas W; Burks, Charles S

    2014-06-01

    The navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is a key pest of almond, pistachio, and walnut tree crops in California. Understanding dispersal of adults between orchards is important to improving management options. Laboratory flight behavior of unmated navel orangeworm of ages 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 d posteclosion was examined using flight mills. As a group, females flew farther and longer than males, but the differences were not statistically significant. Flight speed did not differ between sexes. Flight duration and distance did not differ with age, except that 7-d-old adults performed worse for these parameters than did 1- and 2-d-old adults. Females began their flights ≍1.5 h after the onset of dusk, and ≍1.5 h earlier in the night than males. Flight capacity and propensity were substantial for both sexes and all age classes tested. At least 20% of adults (except 7-d-old males) made a continuous flight ≥5.5 h, and median total distances flown during the 10.5-h night ranged from 7 to 15 km depending on age class. Thus navel orangeworm flight mill performance was greater than that of most pests tested from the families Pyralidae and Tortricidae. Surface area and length of forewings and hindwings were greater in females than males, but had little effect on flight performance. The results are generally consistent with field observations of navel orangeworm dispersal, but it will be important to characterize the effects of mating on flight, and flight on fecundity.

  19. Phylogenetic Molecular Species Delimitations Unravel Potential New Species in the Pest Genus Spodoptera Guenée, 1852 (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Pascaline; Barbut, Jérôme; Le Ru, Bruno; Silvain, Jean-François; Clamens, Anne-Laure; d’Alençon, Emmanuelle; Kergoat, Gael J.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays molecular species delimitation methods promote the identification of species boundaries within complex taxonomic groups by adopting innovative species concepts and theories (e.g. branching patterns, coalescence). As some of them can efficiently deal with large single-locus datasets, they could speed up the process of species discovery compared to more time consuming molecular methods, and benefit from the existence of large public datasets; these methods can also particularly favour scientific research and actions dealing with threatened or economically important taxa. In this study we aim to investigate and clarify the status of economically important moths species belonging to the genus Spodoptera (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae), a complex group in which previous phylogenetic analyses and integrative approaches already suggested the possible occurrence of cryptic species and taxonomic ambiguities. In this work, the effectiveness of innovative (and faster) species delimitation approaches to infer putative species boundaries has been successfully tested in Spodoptera, by processing the most comprehensive dataset (in terms of number of species and specimens) ever achieved; results are congruent and reliable, irrespective of the set of parameters and phylogenetic models applied. Our analyses confirm the existence of three potential new species clusters (for S. exigua (Hübner, 1808), S. frugiperda (J.E. Smith, 1797) and S. mauritia (Boisduval, 1833)) and support the synonymy of S. marima (Schaus, 1904) with S. ornithogalli (Guenée, 1852). They also highlight the ambiguity of the status of S. cosmiodes (Walker, 1858) and S. descoinsi Lalanne-Cassou & Silvain, 1994. This case study highlights the interest of molecular species delimitation methods as valuable tools for species discovery and to emphasize taxonomic ambiguities. PMID:25853412

  20. Comparative Effectiveness of Potential Elicitors of Plant Resistance against Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae in Four Crop Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Gordy

    Full Text Available Feeding by insect herbivores activates plant signaling pathways, resulting in the enhanced production of secondary metabolites and other resistance-related traits by injured plants. These traits can reduce insect fitness, deter feeding, and attract beneficial insects. Organic and inorganic chemicals applied as a foliar spray, seed treatment, or soil drench can activate these plant responses. Azelaic acid (AA, benzothiadiazole (BTH, gibberellic acid (GA, harpin, and jasmonic acid (JA are thought to directly mediate plant responses to pathogens and herbivores or to mimic compounds that do. The effects of these potential elicitors on the induction of plant defenses were determined by measuring the weight gains of fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith (FAW (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae larvae on four crop plants, cotton, corn, rice, and soybean, treated with the compounds under greenhouse conditions. Treatment with JA consistently reduced growth of FAW reared on treated cotton and soybean. In contrast, FAW fed BTH- and harpin-treated cotton and soybean tissue gained more weight than those fed control leaf tissue, consistent with negative crosstalk between the salicylic acid and JA signaling pathways. No induction or inconsistent induction of resistance was observed in corn and rice. Follow-up experiments showed that the co-application of adjuvants with JA failed to increase the effectiveness of induction by JA and that soybean looper [Chrysodeixis includens (Walker], a relative specialist on legumes, was less affected by JA-induced responses in soybean than was the polyphagous FAW. Overall, the results of these experiments demonstrate that the effectiveness of elicitors as a management tactic will depend strongly on the identities of the crop, the pest, and the elicitor involved.

  1. Combination Phenyl Propionate/Pheromone Traps for Monitoring Navel Orangeworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in Almonds in the Vicinity of Mating Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Charles S

    2017-04-01

    Aerosol mating disruption is used for management of navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), in an increasing portion of California almonds and pistachios. This formulation suppresses pheromone monitoring traps far beyond the treatment block, potentially complicating monitoring and management of this key pest. Phenyl propionate is an attractant used to capture adults in the presence of mating disruption, completely suppressing pheromone traps, and lures combining phenyl propionate with a pheromone lure (PPO-combo lure) synergize trap capture in the presence of mating disruption. In this study, laboratory and field trials of different phenyl propionate dispensers indicate a useful life of six weeks. Controlled experiments found similar numbers of adults captured in phenyl propionate and PPO-combo lures in the presence of varying levels of mating disruption intensity. A subsequent trial compared monitoring of field plots at various distances from fields under commercial mating disruption for much of the growing season with pheromone and PPO-combo lures. Although there was some evidence of partial suppression of capture in PPO-combo traps closer to mating disruption compared with lures farther away, there was no failure of detection as occurred with pheromone lures. The ratio of adults in pheromone and PPO-combo traps varied with proximity from treated fields. These results indicate that, in addition to monitoring in mating disruption plots, phenyl propionate lures can be useful for insuring against failure of detection of navel orangeworm pressure in areas where mating disruption is widely used. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by a US Government employee and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. A unique guild of Lepidoptera associated with the glacial relict populations of Labrador tea (Ledum palustre Linnaeus, 1753) in Central European peatlands (Insecta: Lepidoptera)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spitzer, Karel; Jaroš, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 166 (2014), s. 319-327 ISSN 0300-5267 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Insecta * Lepidoptera * relict peat bogs Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.435, year: 2014

  3. Dataset reporting the perceiver identification rates of basic emotions expressed by male, female and ambiguous gendered walkers in full-light, point-light and synthetically modelled point-light walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halovic, Shaun; Kroos, Christian

    2017-12-01

    This data set describes the experimental data collected and reported in the research article "Walking my way? Walker gender and display format confounds the perception of specific emotions" (Halovic and Kroos, in press) [1]. The data set represent perceiver identification rates for different emotions (happiness, sadness, anger, fear and neutral), as displayed by full-light, point-light and synthetic point-light walkers. The perceiver identification scores have been transformed into H t rates, which represent proportions/percentages of correct identifications above what would be expected by chance. This data set also provides H t rates separately for male, female and ambiguously gendered walkers.

  4. The importance of trans-generational effects in Lepidoptera

    OpenAIRE

    Woestmann, Luisa; Saastamoinen, Marjo

    2016-01-01

    The importance of trans-generational effects in shaping an individuals' phenotype and fitness, and consequently even impacting population dynamics is increasingly apparent. Most of the research on trans-generational effects still focuses on plants, mammals, and birds. In the past few years, however, increasing number of studies, especially on maternal effects, have highlighted their importance also in many insect systems. Lepidoptera, specifically butterflies, have been used as model systems ...

  5. DNA barcodes of caterpillars (Lepidoptera) from Papua New Guinea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miller, S. E.; Hrček, Jan; Novotný, Vojtěch; Weiblen, G. D.; Hebert, P. D. N.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 1 (2013), s. 107-109 ISSN 0013-8797 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0115 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0064; U.S. National Science Foundation(US) DEB-0515678 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Lepidoptera Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.479, year: 2013

  6. Notes on the life history of Acraea encedon l. (Lepidoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The life cycle of Acraea encedon (Lepidoptera: Acraeidae) was completed in 40.3 + 2.64 days at a mean daily temperature of 27.91 + 0.440C and relative humidity of 84.8 + 2.62%. The duration of the developmental period of the different life stages of the insect are: embryonic development, 7.5 + 0.54 days; 1st instar, 10.4 + ...

  7. New data on the Pterophoridae fauna of Liberia (Lepidoptera: Pterophoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustjuzhanin, Petr; Kovtunovich, Vasily; Sáfián, Szabolcs

    2017-03-27

    There have been no special studies on plume moths of Liberia until recently. In the World Catalogue of Insects (Gielis 2003) only two species are reported from Liberia: Agdistis tamaricis (Zeller, 1847) and Megalorhipida leucodactyla (Fabricius, 1794) despite its well-known richness for other Lepidoptera groups (Fox et al. 1965, Larsen 2005) and its biogeographic position in the centre of the Upper Guinean biodiversity hotspot (Myers et al. 2000).

  8. An annotated list of the Lepidoptera of Alberta, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Pohl, Greg; Anweiler, Gary; Schmidt, Christian; Kondla, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    This checklist documents the 2367 Lepidoptera species reported to occur in the province of Alberta, Canada, based on examination of the major public insect collections in Alberta and the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids and Nematodes. Records from relevant literature sources published since 1950 and from selected older works are also included. The entry for each species includes the scientific name, the author and year of publication of the original description, occurrence s...

  9. The richness and diversity of Lepidoptera species in different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The family Nymphalidae was the most dominant one in the parc with 32.48%. The diversity index (H' and H'max) and the equitability (E) calculated for the 6 types of habitats is H'= 2,74 bits, H'max = 4,09 bits and E = 0,67 bits, meaning that the Lepidoptera species are at equilibrium with the different types of habitat which ...

  10. Launching and steering flagship Lepidoptera for conservation benefit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.R. New

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Lepidoptera, particularly butterflies and large moths, are popular targets for conservation efforts and as flagship species can help to publicize the need for habitat and resource protection and the ecological value of invertebrates. Here I present an overview of the relevant issues in selecting and promoting flagship species, and discuss how local community support for conservation may be encouraged, using examples from Australia.

  11. The importance of trans-generational effects in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woestmann, Luisa; Saastamoinen, Marjo

    2016-10-01

    The importance of trans-generational effects in shaping an individuals' phenotype and fitness, and consequently even impacting population dynamics is increasingly apparent. Most of the research on trans-generational effects still focuses on plants, mammals, and birds. In the past few years, however, increasing number of studies, especially on maternal effects, have highlighted their importance also in many insect systems. Lepidoptera, specifically butterflies, have been used as model systems for studying the role of phenotypic plasticity within generations. As ectotherms, they are highly sensitive to environmental variation, and indeed many butterflies show adaptive phenotypic plasticity in response to environmental conditions. Here, we synthesize what is known about trans-generational effects in Lepidoptera, compile evidence for different environmental cues that are important drivers of trans-generational effects, and point out which offspring traits are mainly impacted. Finally, we emphasize directions for future research that are needed for better understanding of the adaptive nature of trans-generational effects in Lepidoptera in particular, but potentially also in other organisms.

  12. Impact of Lateral Transfers on the Genomes of Lepidoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drezen, Jean-Michel; Josse, Thibaut; Bézier, Annie; Gauthier, Jérémy; Huguet, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Transfer of DNA sequences between species regardless of their evolutionary distance is very common in bacteria, but evidence that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) also occurs in multicellular organisms has been accumulating in the past few years. The actual extent of this phenomenon is underestimated due to frequent sequence filtering of “alien” DNA before genome assembly. However, recent studies based on genome sequencing have revealed, and experimentally verified, the presence of foreign DNA sequences in the genetic material of several species of Lepidoptera. Large DNA viruses, such as baculoviruses and the symbiotic viruses of parasitic wasps (bracoviruses), have the potential to mediate these transfers in Lepidoptera. In particular, using ultra-deep sequencing, newly integrated transposons have been identified within baculovirus genomes. Bacterial genes have also been acquired by genomes of Lepidoptera, as in other insects and nematodes. In addition, insertions of bracovirus sequences were present in the genomes of certain moth and butterfly lineages, that were likely corresponding to rearrangements of ancient integrations. The viral genes present in these sequences, sometimes of hymenopteran origin, have been co-opted by lepidopteran species to confer some protection against pathogens. PMID:29120392

  13. The mitochondrial genome of Cethosia biblis (Drury) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tianrong; Li, Lei; Yao, Chengyi; Wang, Yayu; Zou, Zhiwen; Wang, Jing; Xia, Bin

    2016-07-01

    We present the complete mitogenome of Cethosia biblis (Drury) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) in this article. The mitogenome was a circle molecular consisting of 15,286 nucleotides, 37 genes, and an A + T-rich region. The order of 37 genes was typical of insect mitochondrial DNA sequences described to date. The overall base composition of the genome is A (37.41%), T (42.80%), C (11.87%), and G (7.91%) with an A + T-rich hallmark as that of other invertebrate mitochondrial genomes. The start codon was mainly ATA in most of the mitochondrial protein-coding genes such as ND2, COI, ATP8, ND3, ND5, ND4, ND6, and ND1, but COII, ATP6, COIII, ND4L, and Cob genes employing ATG. The stop codon was TAA in all the protein-coding genes. The A + T region is located between 12S rRNA and tRNA(M)(et). The phylogenetic relationships of Lepidoptera species were constructed based on the nucleotides sequences of 13 PCGs of mitogenomes using the neighbor-joining method. The molecular-based phylogeny supported the traditional morphological classification on relationships within Lepidoptera species.

  14. Impact of Lateral Transfers on the Genomes of Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Drezen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Transfer of DNA sequences between species regardless of their evolutionary distance is very common in bacteria, but evidence that horizontal gene transfer (HGT also occurs in multicellular organisms has been accumulating in the past few years. The actual extent of this phenomenon is underestimated due to frequent sequence filtering of “alien” DNA before genome assembly. However, recent studies based on genome sequencing have revealed, and experimentally verified, the presence of foreign DNA sequences in the genetic material of several species of Lepidoptera. Large DNA viruses, such as baculoviruses and the symbiotic viruses of parasitic wasps (bracoviruses, have the potential to mediate these transfers in Lepidoptera. In particular, using ultra-deep sequencing, newly integrated transposons have been identified within baculovirus genomes. Bacterial genes have also been acquired by genomes of Lepidoptera, as in other insects and nematodes. In addition, insertions of bracovirus sequences were present in the genomes of certain moth and butterfly lineages, that were likely corresponding to rearrangements of ancient integrations. The viral genes present in these sequences, sometimes of hymenopteran origin, have been co-opted by lepidopteran species to confer some protection against pathogens.

  15. Field efficacy and application timing of methoxyfenozide, a reduced-risk treatment for control of navel orangeworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in almond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higbee, Bradley S; Siegel, Joel P

    2012-10-01

    Large-scale field efficacy trials of methoxyfenozide (Intrepid), a reduced-risk molting agonist insecticide, were conducted in 2004 and 2005 in an orchard containing 'Nonpareil' and 'Sonora almonds [Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb] located in Kern County, CA. Methoxyfenozide applied one to three times, the organophosphate phosmet (Imidan) alone or in combination with methoxyfenozide, or the pyrethroid permethrin (Perm-Up) were tested for efficacy against the primary lepidopteran pest navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), and three other lepidopteran pests of almond: oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck); oblique-banded leafroller, Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris); and peach twig borer, Anarsia lineatella Zeller. Two or three applications of methoxyfenozide (bracketing hull split or spring plus bracketing hull split) were more effective than a single hull split application of phosmet, phosmet combined with permethrin, or methoxyfenozide. In these trials, a spring application followed by a posthull split application was as effective as the applications bracketing hull split. Navel orangeworm accounted for > 60% of the total damage, whereas oriental fruit moth and peach twig borer were the dominant secondary pests. In experiments conducted in 2010 to assess the direct toxicity of methoxyfenozide to navel orangeworm eggs under field conditions, exposure to methoxyfenozide reduced survival by 96-99%. We conclude that this reduced-risk insecticide is effective, although its efficacy is maximized with more than one well-timed application.

  16. Effects of a naturally occurring and a synthetic synergist on toxicity of three insecticides and a phytochemical to navel orangeworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Guodong; Pollock, Henry S; Lawrance, Allen; Siegel, Joel P; Berenbaum, May R

    2012-04-01

    The navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is the most destructive lepidopteran pest of almonds [Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D.A.Webb] and pistachios (Pistacia vera L.) in California and is a serious problem in figs (Ficus carica L.) and walnuts (Juglans spp.). In addition to direct damage, larval feeding leaves nuts vulnerable to infection by Aspergillus spp., fungi that produce toxic aflatoxins. A potentially safe and sustainable approach for managing navel orangeworm in orchards may be to use natural essential oil synergists to interfere with this insect's ability to detoxify insecticides and phytochemicals. We tested the effects of a naturally occurring plant-derived chemical, myristicin, and a synthetic inhibitor of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), piperonyl butoxide, on the toxicity of three insecticides (alpha-cypermethrin, tau-fluvalinate, and methoxyfenozide [Intrepid]) and a phytochemical (xanthotoxin) to A. transitella. Piperonyl butoxide significantly synergized alpha-cypermethrin and tau-fluvalinate, whereas myristicin synergized only alpha-cypermethrin. Piperonyl butoxide synergized the toxicity of xanthotoxin as early as 72 h after exposure, whereas myristicin synergized xanthotoxin after 120 h. In view of these findings and the limited availability of environmentally safe synthetic insecticides for sustainable management, particularly in organic orchards, myristicin is a potential field treatment in combination with insecticides to reduce both navel orangeworm survival and aflatoxin contamination of nuts. In addition, this study demonstrates that in A. transitella the insect growth regulator methoxyfenozide is not detoxified by P450s.

  17. Experimental model of ultrasound thermotherapy in rats inoculated with Walker-236 tumor Modelo experimental de termoterapia ultrassônica em ratos inoculados com tumor de Walker-236

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Carlos Otaviano David Morano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To develop a model to evaluate the effects of focal pulsed ultrasound (US waves as a source of heat for treatment of murine subcutaneous implanted Walker tumor. METHODS: An experimental, controlled, comparative study was conducted. Twenty male Wistar rats (160-300 g randomized in 2 equal groups (G-1: Control and G-2: Hyperthermia were inoculated with Walker-256 carcinosarcoma tumor. After 5 days G-2 rats were submitted to 45ºC hyperthermia. Heat was delivered directly to the tumor by an ultrasound (US equipment (3 MHz frequency, 1,5W/cm³. Tumor temperature reached 45º C in 3 minutes and was maintained at this level for 5 minutes. Tumor volume was measured on days 5, 8, 11, 14 e 17 post inoculation in both groups. Unpaired t-test was used for comparison. POBJETIVO: Desenvolver um modelo para avaliar os efeitos do ultra-som focal pulsado como fonte de calor para o tratamento de tumores de Walker subcutâneos implantados em ratos. MÉTODOS: Um estudo experimental, controlado, comparativo foi realizado. Vinte ratos Wistar machos (160-300 g divididos em dois grupos (G-1: Controle e G-2: hipertermia foram inoculados com tumor de Walker carcinossarcoma-256. Após cinco dias os ratos do grupo G-2 ratos foram submetidos a hipertermia (45ºC. O calor foi aplicado diretamente no tumor por um equipamento de ultrassonografia (3 MHz, 1,5 W/cm³. A temperatura no tumor atingiu 45ºC em 3 minutos e foi mantida nesse nível por 5 minutos. O volume do tumor foi medido nos dias 5, 8, 11, 14 e 17 após a inoculação, em ambos os grupos. Teste t não pareado foi utilizado para comparação. P <0,05 foi considerado significante. RESULTADOS: O volume do tumor foi significativamente maior no 5º dia e diminuiu nos dias 11, 14 e 17 nos ratos tratados. Animais submetidos à hipertermia sobreviveram mais tempo que os animais do grupo controle. No 29º dia após a inoculação do tumor, 40% dos ratos do grupo controle e 77,78% dos ratos tratados com

  18. Nuevos registros para la fauna de Saturniidae (Lepidoptera en Argentina New records for the fauna of Saturniidae (Lepidoptera from Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana I. Zapata

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Se brindan nuevas citas de 17 especies de Saturniidae para la Argentina. Estos registros corresponden a las subfamilias: Arsenurinae [Arsenura xanthopus (Walker y Titaea tamerlan (Maassen]; Ceratocampinae: [Almeidella approximans (Schaus, Cicia nettia (Schaus, Citheronia aroa Schaus, Citheronia maureillei Wolfe & Herbin, Citioica anthonilis (Herrich-Schäffer, Eacles ducalis (Walker, Othorene cadmus (Herrich-Schäffer, Othorene purpurascens (Schaus y Ptiloscola photophila (Rothschild] y Hemileucinae [Cerodirphia brunnea (Draudt, Dirphia curitiba Draudt, Hirpida nigrolinea (Druce, Hylesia ebalus (Cramer, Leucanella gibbosa (Conte y Molippa strigosa (Maassen & Weyding].New records are provided for 17 species of Saturniidae from Argentina. The new records correpond to the following subfamilies: Arsenurinae [Arsenura xanthopus (Walker and Titaea tamerlan (Maassen]; Ceratocampinae [Almeidella approximans (Schaus, Cicia nettia (Schaus, Citheronia aroa Schaus, Citheronia maureillei Wolfe & Herbin, Citioica anthonilis (Herrich-Schäffer, Eacles ducalis (Walker, Othorene cadmus (Herrich-Schäffer, Othorene purpurascens (Schaus and Ptiloscola photophila (Rothschild]; and Hemileucinae [Cerodirphia brunnea (Draudt, Dirphia curitiba Draudt, Hirpida nigrolinea (Druce, Hylesia ebalus (Cramer, Leucanella gibbosa (Conte and Molippa strigosa (Maassen & Weyding].

  19. Dataset reporting the perceiver identification rates of basic emotions expressed by male, female and ambiguous gendered walkers in full-light, point-light and synthetically modelled point-light walkers

    OpenAIRE

    Halovic, Shaun; Kroos, Christian

    2017-01-01

    This data set describes the experimental data collected and reported in the research article âWalking my way? Walker gender and display format confounds the perception of specific emotionsâ (Halovic and Kroos, in press) [1]. The data set represent perceiver identification rates for different emotions (happiness, sadness, anger, fear and neutral), as displayed by full-light, point-light and synthetic point-light walkers. The perceiver identification scores have been transformed into Ht rates, ...

  20. Design and control of a two-wheeled robotic walker for balance enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Airton R; Sup, Frank

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the preliminary design results and control strategy of a two-wheeled inverted pendulum (TWIP) robotic walker for assisting mobility-impaired users with balance and stability. A conceptual model of the vehicle is developed and used to illustrate the purpose of this study. Motor dynamics is considered and the linearized equations of motion for the system are derived using Newtonian mechanics. In order to eliminate the effects of loop interaction and impose the desired dynamics on the system, a decoupling control scheme was implemented. Upright stabilization of the robotic walker is achieved using linear quadratic regulator (LQR) control. Improved disturbance rejection is achieved through the implementation of a pitch controller. Simulation results demonstrate that a robustly tuned pitch controller can mitigate effect of disturbance on the linear displacement of the vehicle by as much as 74%.

  1. Decoherence induced by a chaotic enviroment: A quantum walker with a complex coin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermann, Leonardo; Paz, Juan Pablo; Saraceno, Marcos

    2006-01-01

    We study the differences between the processes of decoherence induced by chaotic and regular environments. For this we analyze a family of simple models that contain both regular and chaotic environments. In all cases the system of interest is a ''quantum walker,'' i.e., a quantum particle that can move on a lattice with a finite number of sites. The walker interacts with an environment which has a D-dimensional Hilbert space. The results we obtain suggest that regular and chaotic environments are not distinguishable from each other in a (short) time scale t*, which scales with the dimensionality of the environment as t*∝log 2 (D). However, chaotic environments continue to be effective over exponentially longer time scales while regular environments tend to reach saturation much sooner. We present both numerical and analytical results supporting this conclusion. The family of chaotic evolutions we consider includes the so-called quantum multibaker map as a particular case

  2. Quantum field theory in flat Robertson-Walker space-time functional Schrodinger picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pi, S.Y.

    1990-01-01

    Quantum field theory in Robertson-Walker space-time is intrinsically time-dependent and the functional Schrodinger picture provides a useful description. This paper discusses free and self-interacting bosonic quantum field theories: Schrodinger picture quantization, time-dependent Gaussian approximations based on variational principles describing time evolution of pure and mixed states, and renormalizability of the Schrodinger picture. The technique introduced can be used to study various dynamical questions in early universe processes

  3. On Parallel Transport in Quantum Bundles over Robertson-Walker Spacetimes

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, James

    1996-01-01

    A recently-developed theory of quantum general relativity provides a propagator for free-falling particles in curved spacetimes. These propagators are constructed by parallel-transporting quantum states within a quantum bundle associated to the Poincare frame bundle. We consider such parallel transport in the case that the spacetime is a classical Robertson-Walker universe. An explicit integral formula is developed which expresses the propagators for parallel transport between any two points ...

  4. Test pilots 1962 - Thompson, McKay, Dana, Armstrong, Peterson, Butchart, Walker

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    A group photo of NASA research pilots at the front door of the Flight Research Center headquarters building. In the front row are (left to right) Milt Thompson, Jack McKay, and Bill Dana. All three flew the X-15, and Thompson and Dana were also involved in the lifting body flights. McKay was injured in a crash landing in X-15 #2. Although he recovered, the injuries eventually forced him to retire from research flying. In the back row (left to right) are Neil Armstrong, Bruce Peterson, Stanley Butchart, and Joe Walker. Armstrong and Walker also both flew the X-15. Soon after this photo was taken, Armstrong was selected as an astronaut, and seven years later became the first man to walk on the Moon. Walker made the highest flight in the X-15, reaching 354,200 feet. He then went on to fly the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle, and was killed on June 8, 1966 when his F-104N collided with the XB-70. Peterson made the first flight in the HL-10 lifting body, and was later badly injured in the crash of the M2-F2 lifting body. Butchart flew a wide range of research missions in the 1950s, and was the B-29 drop plane pilot for a number of rocket flight.

  5. New Analytical Solution of the Equilibrium Ampere's Law Using the Walker's Method: a Didactic Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, A. N. Laurindo; Ojeda-González, A.; Prestes, A.; Klausner, V.; Caritá, L. A.

    2018-02-01

    This work aims to demonstrate the analytical solution of the Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation or generalized Ampere's law, which is important in the studies of self-consistent 2.5-D solution for current sheet structures. A detailed mathematical development is presented to obtain the generating function as shown by Walker (RSPSA 91, 410, 1915). Therefore, we study the general solution of the GS equation in terms of the Walker's generating function in details without omitting any step. The Walker's generating function g( ζ) is written in a new way as the tangent of an unspecified function K( ζ). In this trend, the general solution of the GS equation is expressed as exp(- 2Ψ) = 4| K '( ζ)|2/cos2[ K( ζ) - K( ζ ∗)]. In order to investigate whether our proposal would simplify the mathematical effort to find new generating functions, we use Harris's solution as a test, in this case K( ζ) = arctan(exp( i ζ)). In summary, one of the article purposes is to present a review of the Harris's solution. In an attempt to find a simplified solution, we propose a new way to write the GS solution using g( ζ) = tan( K( ζ)). We also present a new analytical solution to the equilibrium Ampere's law using g( ζ) = cosh( b ζ), which includes a generalization of the Harris model and presents isolated magnetic islands.

  6. Effects of aquatic walking exercise using a walker in a chronic stroke patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Tadashi; Akezaki, Yoshiteru

    2017-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness of aquatic walking exercise using a walker for chronic stroke patients. We also examined the psychological effects on the study subject and the primary caregiver before and after aquatic walking exercise. [Subject and Methods] The subject was a 60-year-old male with bilateral paralysis after a cerebrovascular accident. The Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) total score was 116 on the right and 115 on the left. The intervention combined aquatic and land walking exercise. A U-shaped walker was used for both water and land exercise. Continuous walking distance was the measure used to evaluate land walking ability. The psychological effects on the study subject and the primary caregiver were examined with the questionnaire. [Results] In aquatic walking, the mean time to walk 5 m showed an increase from the intervention after two months. After the aquatic walking and land walking combination, continuous walking distance also showed a prolonged trend. In the survey given to the main caregivers, improvements were observed. [Conclusion] Aquatic walking practice using a walker improved motivation in a chronic stroke patient, leading to improved walking ability, with a positive psychological influence on the participant and family caregiver.

  7. HitWalker2: visual analytics for precision medicine and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottomly, Daniel; McWeeney, Shannon K; Wilmot, Beth

    2016-04-15

    The lack of visualization frameworks to guide interpretation and facilitate discovery is a potential bottleneck for precision medicine, systems genetics and other studies. To address this we have developed an interactive, reproducible, web-based prioritization approach that builds on our earlier work. HitWalker2 is highly flexible and can utilize many data types and prioritization methods based upon available data and desired questions, allowing it to be utilized in a diverse range of studies such as cancer, infectious disease and psychiatric disorders. Source code is freely available at https://github.com/biodev/HitWalker2 and implemented using Python/Django, Neo4j and Javascript (D3.js and jQuery). We support major open source browsers (e.g. Firefox and Chromium/Chrome). wilmotb@ohsu.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Additional information/instructions are available at https://github.com/biodev/HitWalker2/wiki. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Active immunotherapy of Walker-256 carcinosarcoma by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes associated with photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, Vasile F.; Vasiliu, Virgil V.; Laky, Dezideriu; Ionescu, Paul; Dima, Stefan V.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments were performed on five batches of Wistar inbred rats with Walker-256 carcinosarcoma receiving as sole treatment photodynamic therapy (PDT), tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), or associated therapy (PDT + TIL - A; PDT + TIL - B). The control batch (HBSS) consisted of animals with untreated Walker-256 tumors. The results were as follows: the sole treatment (PDT, TIL) gave survival rates between 41.4 and 52.9%, the cure rates ranging from 13.8 to 38.2%. The `combined' therapy in multiple doses increased significantly (92.8%) the survival rate of tumor bearing rats as well as the highest incidence of complete tumor regression (82.1%). Cell-mediated immunity test values in batches III and IV exposed to multiple doses of PDT + TIL showed higher values as compared to the values noticed in batches I - II and the control batch V, performed at 10 and 21 days post-treatment. Summing up, this work demonstrates that `combined' photodynamic therapy with immunotherapy with TIL stimulates cell-mediated antitumoral activity, increases survival rates, and reduces incidence of Walker-256 carcinosarcoma in the rat model.

  9. Protective Effect of Metformin Against Walker 256 Tumor Growth is Not Dependent on Metabolism Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudinéia Conationi da Silva Franco

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The objective of the current work was to test the effect of metformin on the tumor growth in rats with metabolic syndrome. Methods: We obtained pre-diabetic hyperinsulinemic rats by neonatal treatment with monosodium L-glutamate (MSG, which were chronically treated every day, from weaning to 100 day old, with dose of metformin (250 mg/kg body weight. After the end of metformin treatment, the control and MSG rats, treated or untreated with metformin, were grafted with Walker 256 carcinoma cells. Tumor weight was evaluated 14 days after cancer cell inoculation. The blood insulin, glucose levels and glucose-induced insulin secretion were evaluated. Results: Chronic metformin treatment improved the glycemic homeostasis in pre-diabetic MSG-rats, glucose intolerance, tissue insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia and decreased the fat tissue accretion. Meanwhile, the metformin treatment did not interfere with the glucose insulinotropic effect on isolated pancreatic islets. Chronic treatment with metformin was able to decrease the Walker 256 tumor weight by 37% in control and MSG rats. The data demonstrated that the anticancer effect of metformin is not related to its role in correcting metabolism imbalances, such as hyperinsulinemia. However, in morphological assay to apoptosis, metformin treatment increased programmed cell death. Conclusion: Metformin may have a direct effect on cancer growth, and it may programs the rat organism to attenuate the growth of Walker 256 carcinoma.

  10. Contribution of radiosensitivity study for Walker 256 tumor in rats. Association of early immunization with action of ionized radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakate, A.T.Y.

    1979-01-01

    The suspension of tumoral cells from Walker 256 were irradiated with doses of 2.500, 4.500, 5.000, 5.500 and 7.500 rad for determining the attenuation dose. The suspension of inactives tumoral cells were injected in rats for verifying the immunized effects in relation of active Walker tumor. After be certified the growth of tumor, the rats were irradiated with cobalt 60 and was verified the decrease of tumor. (author)

  11. Cloning of Two Acetylcholinesterase Genes and Analysis of Point Mutations Putatively Associated with Triazophos Resistance in Chilo auricilius (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guang-Hua; Li, Xiao-Huan; Zhang, Zhi-Chun; Liu, Bao-Sheng; Huang, Shui-Jin; Fang, Ji-Chao

    2015-06-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the target of organophosphate (OP) and carbamate insecticides. Mutations in the AChE gene (ace) leading to decreased insecticide susceptibility is the main resistance mechanism in insects. In this study, two Chilo auricilius acetylcholinesterase genes, designated as Caace1 and Caace2, were cloned using RT-PCR and RACE. Caace1 cDNA is 2534 bp, with ORF of 2082 bp, and it encodes an acetylcholinesterase 1 (CaAChE1) protein comprising a calculated 693 amino acid (aa) residues. Caace2 cDNA contains 2280 bp, with a full-length ORF of 1917 bp, encoding acetylcholinesterase 2 (CaAChE2) comprising a calculated 638 aa residues. At the aa level, CaAChE1 displays the highest similarity (97%) with the Chilo suppressalis AChE1, and CaAChE2 shows the highest similarity with the C. suppressalis AChE2 (99%). From the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) PCR (RFLP-PCR) analysis, one mutation in Caace1, similar to the ace1 mutation associated with triazophos resistance in C. suppressalis, was detected. Detailed examination of field populations of C. auricilius indicated this resistance mutation in C. auricilius is still quite infrequent. Based on the assay of AChE activity and RFLP-PCR testing, an individual that contains resistance mutation has lower AChE activities, while the individual that does not contain the resistance mutation has higher AChE activities. This study provides a basis for future investigations into the mechanism of OP resistance in C. auricilius, as well as a guidance for C. auricilius control with reasonable choice of pesticides. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Upper-Ocean Heat Balance Processes and the Walker Circulation in CMIP5 Model Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, F. R.; Roberts, J. B.; Funk, C.; Lyon, B.; Ricciardulli, L.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable uncertainty remains as to the importance of mechanisms governing decadal and longer variability of the Walker Circulation, its connection to the tropical climate system, and prospects for tropical climate change in the face of anthropogenic forcing. Most contemporary climate models suggest that in response to elevated CO2 and a warmer but more stratified atmosphere, the required upward mass flux in tropical convection will diminish along with the Walker component of the tropical mean circulation as well. Alternatively, there is also evidence to suggest that the shoaling and increased vertical stratification of the thermocline in the eastern Pacific will enable a muted SST increase there-- preserving or even enhancing some of the dynamical forcing for the Walker cell flow. Over the past decade there have been observational indications of an acceleration in near-surface easterlies, a strengthened Pacific zonal SST gradient, and globally-teleconnected dislocations in precipitation. But is this evidence in support of an ocean dynamical thermostat process posited to accompany anthropogenic forcing, or just residual decadal fluctuations associated with variations in warm and cold ENSO events and other stochastic forcing? From a modeling perspective we try to make headway on this question by examining zonal variations in surface energy fluxes and dynamics governing tropical upper ocean heat content evolution in the WCRP CMIP5 model projections. There is some diversity among model simulations; for example, the CCSM4 indicates net ocean warming over the IndoPacific region while the CSIRO model concentrates separate warming responses over the central Pacific and Indian Ocean regions. The models, as with observations, demonstrate strong local coupling between variations in column water vapor, downward surface longwave radiation and SST; but the spatial patterns of changes in the sign of this relationship differ among models and, for models as a whole, with

  13. Complete mitochondrial genomes of five skippers (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae) and phylogenetic reconstruction of Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jee; Wang, Ah Rha; Park, Jeong Sun; Kim, Iksoo

    2014-10-01

    We sequenced mitogenomes of five skippers (family Hesperiidae, Lepidoptera) to obtain further insight into the characteristics of butterfly mitogenomes and performed phylogenetic reconstruction using all available gene sequences (PCGs, rRNAs, and tRNAs) from 85 species (20 families in eight superfamilies). The general genomic features found in the butterflies also were found in the five skippers: a high A+T composition (79.3%-80.9%), dominant usage of TAA stop codon, similar skewness pattern in both strands, consistently length intergenic spacer sequence between tRNA(Gln) and ND2 (64-87 bp), conserved ATACTAA motif between tRNA(Ser (UCN)) and ND1, and characteristic features of the A+T-rich region (the ATAGA motif, varying length of poly-T stretch, and poly-A stretch). The start codon for COI was CGA in four skippers as typical, but Lobocla bifasciatus evidently possessed canonical ATG as start codon. All species had the ancestral arrangement tRNA(Asn)/tRNA(Ser (AGN)), instead of the rearrangement tRNA(Ser (AGN))/tRNA(Asn), found in another skipper species (Erynnis). Phylogenetic analyses using all available genes (PCGs, rRNAS, and tRNAs) yielded the consensus superfamilial relationships ((((((Bombycoidea+Noctuoidea+Geometroidea)+Pyraloidea)+Papilionoidea)+Tortricoidea)+Yponomeutoidea)+Hepialoidea), confirming the validity of Macroheterocera (Bombycoidea, Noctuoidea, and Geometroidea in this study) and its sister relationship to Pyraloidea. Within Rhopalocera (butterflies and skippers) the familial relationships (Papilionidae+(Hesperiidae+(Pieridae+((Lycaenidae+Riodinidae)+Nymphalidae)))) were strongly supported in all analyses (0.98-1 by BI and 96-100 by ML methods), rendering invalid the superfamily status for Hesperioidea. On the other hand, current mitogenome-based phylogeny did not find consistent superfamilial relationships among Noctuoidea, Geometroidea, and Bombycoidea and the familial relationships within Bombycoidea between analyses, requiring further

  14. Two species of Gelechioidea (Lepidoptera) from Southeast Asia associated with downy rose myrtle, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Myrtaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two species of Gelechioidea (Lepidoptera), Metharmostis multilineata Adamski, n. sp. (Cosmopterigidae), and Idiophantis soreuta Meyrick, 1906 (Gelechiidae), were collected in southeastern Asia for evaluation as potential biocontrol agents against downy rose myrtle, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Aiton) Hass...

  15. POPULATION SYNCHRONY WITHIN AND AMONG LEPIDOPTERA SPECIES IN RELATION TO WEATHER, PHYLOGENY, AND LARVEL PHENOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. The population dynamics of native herbivore species in central Appalachian deciduous forests were studied by analysing patterns of synchrony among intra- and interspecific populations and weather. 2. Spatial synchrony of 10 Lepidoptera species and three weather variables (min...

  16. Parasitoid communities attacking externally feeding folivorous Lepidoptera in New Guinea rainforest

    OpenAIRE

    HRČEK, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The host - parasitoid community of externally feeding folivorous Lepidoptera and their parasitoids was studied on 45 focal tree species in a New Guinea rainforest. The patterns of parasitation rate, parasitoid species richness and parasitoid host specificity are described.

  17. De valkruidmineervlinder Digitivalva arnicella in Nederland: herontdekking en behoud (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae: Acrolepiinae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieukerken, van E.J.; Koster, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The occurrence of Digitivalva arnicella in the Netherlands: rediscovery and conservation (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae: Acrolepiinae) Digitivalva arnicella (Heyden, 1863), previously only known from two localities before 1902, has been rediscovered in eight localities in the northern part of the

  18. Modelo experimental de tumor na cavidade oral de ratos com carcinossarcoma de Walker 256 Experimental model of Walker 256 carcinosarcoma developed in the oral cavity of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes Alves

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estabelecer um modelo experimental de desenvolvimento tumoral na cavidade oral de ratos, permitindo, assim, o estudo da osteólise induzida pelo tumor nos ossos do complexo maxilomandibular como também nas estruturas dentais, através da caracterização histomorfológica da reabsorção óssea e dentária. MÉTODOS: Uma suspensão de células tumorais (0,1mL do Carcinossarcoma de Walker 256, na concentração de 10(6 células/mL foi implantado na cavidade alveolar de ratos previamente aberta por exodontia. Os animais foram observados durante 12 (doze dias consecutivos para determinação da curva de peso corpóreo, sendo posteriormente sacrificados e as mandíbulas removidas para exames radiográfico e histológico. RESULTADOS: No exame radiográfico foi verificada área lítica, sem evidência de reparo, na região dos alvéolos. No exame microscópico foi identificada infiltração óssea, periférica e central, de pequenas células hipercromáticas e pleomórficas, com leve infiltrado inflamatório mononuclear associado e áreas de necrose. O índice de pega foi de 100%. CONCLUSÃO: O modelo animal de invasão óssea, do tumor de Walker na cavidade oral, possibilita a avaliação in vivo de drogas antitumorais e esquemas terapêuticos no tratamento do câncer bucal.PURPOSE: To estabilish an experimental model of tumor development in the oral cavity of rats, that would enable to study the tumor-induced autolysis in the maxillomandibular bone complex as well as of the dental structures, through histomorphological characterization of bone and dental resorption. METHODS: Walker 256 carcinossarcoma cell suspension (0,1 mL containing 10(6 cell/mL was implanted in the alveoli of first and second molars. The animals were observed during twelve consecutive days and the body weigth were determined. Later, the animals were sacrificed and their mandibles removed to radiographic and hystologic analysis. RESULTS: The radiographic image

  19. The complete mitochondrial genome of Acleris fimbriana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jin-Liang; Wu, Yu-Peng; Su, Tian-Juan; Jiang, Guo-Fang; Wu, Chun-Sheng; Zhu, Chao-Dong

    2016-05-01

    The yellow tortrix, Acleris fimbriana belongs to Tortricidae in Lepidoptera. We described the complete mitogenome of A. fimbriana, which is typical circular duplex molecules and 15,933 bp in length containing the standard metazoan set of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and an A + T-rich region with macro-repeat sequences. All the inferred tRNA secondary structures show the common cloverleaf pattern, with the exception of trnS1(AGN) which lacks the DHU arm. The A. fimbriana mitochondrial genome has the same gene order with other lepidopterans.

  20. Ichneumonidae (Hymenoptera) parasitóides de larvas de Lepidoptera associadas a Croton floribundus Spreng (Euphorbiaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Luciana Bueno dos Reis; Dias Filho, Manoel Martins; Fernandes, Marcelo Adorna; Penteado-Dias, Angelica Maria

    2010-01-01

    Parasitoids of the family Ichneumonidae (Hymenoptera) were obtained during an inventory of Lepidoptera larvae caught feeding in the wild on Croton floribundus (Euphorbiaceae). The Lepidoptera larvae were collected from host plants along trails inside three preserved forest areas in the Brazilian state of São Paulo. Fifteen different species of Ichneumonidae belonging to five subfamilies (Banchinae, Campopleginae, Cremastinae, Mesochorinae and Metopiinae) were obtained. Seven species of Ichneu...

  1. Materiały do znajomości Gelechiidae (Lepidoptera) Wielkopolskiego Parku Narodowego

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraniak, Edward; Walczak, Urszula; Karsholt, Ole

    2014-01-01

    A faunistic list of 48 species of gelechiid moths (Lepidoptera: Gele-chiidae) collected in the Wielkopolski National Park is given. Syncopacma larseniella GOZMANY, 1957 is new to the fauna of Poland.......A faunistic list of 48 species of gelechiid moths (Lepidoptera: Gele-chiidae) collected in the Wielkopolski National Park is given. Syncopacma larseniella GOZMANY, 1957 is new to the fauna of Poland....

  2. DIVERSIDADE DE LEPIDOPTERA EM UM FRAGMENTO FLORESTAL EM MUZAMBINHO, MINAS GERAIS

    OpenAIRE

    Dirlene Aparecida de Andrade; Isabel Ribeiro do Valle Teixeira

    2017-01-01

    The monitoring Lepidoptera populations provides important information to assess the dynamics and ecological changes in ecosystems. In this work, it was evaluated and characterized the Lepidoptera fauna of forest fragment of the IFSULDEMINAS - Campus Muzambinho, MG state. Throughout 12 months, 590 Individuals of 69 species belonging to 10 families were captured. The most abundant family was Nymphalidae (73.56% of subjects). The most abundant ...

  3. Extinction cascades partially estimate herbivore losses in a complete Lepidoptera--plant food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, Ian S; Altermatt, Florian

    2013-08-01

    The loss of species from an ecological community can have cascading effects leading to the extinction of other species. Specialist herbivores are highly diverse and may be particularly susceptible to extinction due to host plant loss. We used a bipartite food web of 900 Lepidoptera (butterfly and moth) herbivores and 2403 plant species from Central Europe to simulate the cascading effect of plant extinctions on Lepidoptera extinctions. Realistic extinction sequences of plants, incorporating red-list status, range size, and native status, altered subsequent Lepidoptera extinctions. We compared simulated Lepidoptera extinctions to the number of actual regional Lepidoptera extinctions and found that all predicted scenarios underestimated total observed extinctions but accurately predicted observed extinctions attributed to host loss (n = 8, 14%). Likely, many regional Lepidoptera extinctions occurred for reasons other than loss of host plant alone, such as climate change and habitat loss. Ecological networks can be useful in assessing a component of extinction risk to herbivores based on host loss, but further factors may be equally important.

  4. THE PARASITOID Anastatus sp. (EUPELMIDAE-HYMENOPTERA ACTION ON Dirphia rosacordis WALKER, 1855 (SATURNIIDAE-LEPIDOPTERA EGGS IN ”PEQUI” (Caryocar brasiliense CAMBESS AÇÃO DO PARASITÓIDE Anastatus sp. (EUPELMIDAE - HYMENOPTERA EM OVOS DE Dirphia rosacordis WALKER, 1855 (LEPIDOPTERA - SATURNIIDAE EM PEQUIZEIRO (Caryocar brasiliense CAMBESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Henrique Garcia

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The action of parasitoid Anastatus sp. on eggs of D. rosacordis, common for defoliating “pequizeiro” (Caryocar brasiliense Cambess, was studied on eggs collected in the field and eggs obtained in laboratory. Eggs were collected in Hidrolândia, Senador Canedo and Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil. In these regions, D. rosacordis shows two generations: September and December. To obtain eggs, a D. rosacordis colony was maintained on pequi leaves over the egg mass obtained in the laboratory and kept under controlled temperature, relative humidity and photoperiod. Among 1,346 eggs obtained in laboratory conditions, 44.3% were parasitized, 40.2% were viable and 15.4 % were not viable. From 697 eggs collected in the field, 25.5% were parasitized, 58.9% were viable and 15.6% were not viable. Adult emergency was observed among 83,4% of parasitized eggs. These data suggest the possibility of using this parasitoid for the pequi caterpillar control, which also causes serious damage on Eucalyptus sp., mainly in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    KEY-WORDS: Anastatus; parasitoid; egg.

    A ação do parasitóide Anastatus sp. sobre os ovos da D. rosacordis, importante desfolhadora do pequizeiro (Caryocar brasiliense Cambess, foi estudada em ovos coletados no campo e em ovos originados da criação em laboratório. Os ovos foram coletados nos municípios de Hidrolândia, Senador Canedo e Goiânia, Goiás, no início de setembro. Nessas regiões a D. rosacordis apresenta duas gerações, setembro e dezembro. Foi mantida uma criação da D. rosacordis sobre folhas do pequizeiro em condições de laboratório para obtenção de ovos. Os parasitóides emergidos dos ovos coletados no campo foram liberados sobre as massas de ovos obtidos no laboratório. Todas as observações de laboratório foram realizadas sem controle de temperatura, umidade relativa e fotoperíodo. Entre 1.346 ovos obtidos em condições de laboratório, 44,3% foram parasitados, 40,2% foram viáveis e 15,4% não viáveis. Dos 697 coletados no campo, 25,5% estavam parasitados, 58,9% foram viáveis e 15,6% não viáveis. Entre os ovos parasitados foram observadas 83,4% de emergência dos adultos do parasitóide. Estes dados sugerem a possibilidade da utilização desse parasitóide para o controle desta lagarta desfolhadora do pequizeiro, que também causa sérios danos à cultura de Eucalyptus sp., principalmente em Minas Gerais.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Parasitóide; ovos; Caryocar; Anastatus.

  5. The influence of septal lesions on sodium and water retention induced by Walker 256 tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Guimarães

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In the course of studies on the effects of septal area lesions on neuroimmunomodulation and Walker 256 tumor development, it was observed that tumor-induced sodium and water retention was less marked in lesioned than in non-lesioned rats. In the present study possible mechanisms involved in this phenomenon were investigated. The experiments were performed in septal-lesioned (LW; N = 15 and sham-operated (SW; N = 7 8-week-old male Wistar rats, which received multifocal simultaneous subcutaneous (sc inoculations of Walker 256 tumor cells about 30 days after the stereotaxic surgery. Control groups (no tumor, sham-operated food-restricted (SFR, N = 7 and lesioned food-restricted (LFR, N = 10 were subjected to a feeding pattern similar to that observed in tumor-bearing animals. Multifocal inoculation of Walker 256 tumor rapidly induces anorexia, which is paradoxically accompanied by an increase in body weight, as a result of renal Na+ and fluid retention. These effects of the tumor were also seen in LW rats, although the rise in fractional sodium balance during the early clinical period was significantly smaller than in SW rats (day 4: SW = 47.6 ± 6.4% and LW = 13.8 ± 5.2%; day 5: SW = 57.5 ± 3.5% and LW = 25.7 ± 4.8%; day 6: SW = 54.4 ± 3.8% and LW = 32.1 ± 4.4%; P<0.05, suggesting a temporary reduction in tumor-induced sodium retention. In contrast, urine output was significantly reduced in SW rats and increased in LW rats (LW up to -0.85 and SW up to 4.5 ml/100 g body weight, with no change in osmolar excretion. These temporary changes in the tumor's effects on LW rats may reflect a "reversal" of the secondary central antidiuretic response induced by the tumor (from antidiuretic to diuretic.

  6. Do Canes or Walkers Make Any Difference? NonUse and Fall Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Clare; Bush, Tamara; Shen, Xiaoxi

    2017-04-01

    Examine patterns of cane and walker use as related to falls and fall injuries. Among people who fall at home, most do not have an assistive device with them when they fall. Nonusers who fall sustain more severe injuries. This was a cross-sectional study using a self-administered written survey completed by 262 people aged 60 and older who were community dwelling, cognitively intact, and current cane/walker users with a history of falls. They were recruited through clinical practice sites, churches, and senior housing in central Michigan. Outcomes of interest included patterns of device use, reasons for nonuse, device use at time of fall, and fall-related injuries. Seventy-five percent of respondents who fell were not using their device at the time of fall despite stating that canes help prevent falls. Reasons for nonuse included believing it was not needed, forgetfulness, the device made them feel old, and inaccessibility. Perceived risk was not high enough to engage in self-protective behavior. However, nonuse led to a significantly higher proportion of falls resulting in surgery than among device users. Among respondents requiring surgery, 100% were nonusers. Most respondents never received a home safety evaluation (68%) and only 50% received training on proper device use. Providers must place increased emphasis on the importance of cane/walker use for injury prevention through patient education to promote personal relevance, proper fitting, and training. New strategies are needed to improve device acceptability and accessibility. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Robust spinal neuroinflammation mediates mechanical allodynia in Walker 256 induced bone cancer rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Ying Qi-Liang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been reported that remarkable and sustained activation of astrocytes and/or microglia occurs in cancer induced pain (CIP, which is different from neuropathic and inflammatory pain. The present study was designed to investigate the role of spinal Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 induced glial neuroinflammation in cancer induced pain using a modified rat model of bone cancer. The rat model of CIP consisted of unilateral intra-tibial injection with Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma. Nine days after Walker 256 inoculation, a robust activation of both astrocytes and microglia in bilateral spinal dorsal horn was observed together with significant bilateral mechanical allodynia. This neuroinflammation was characterized by enhanced immunostaining of both glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, astrocyte marker and OX-42 (microglia marker, and an elevated level of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA. I.t. administration of fluorocitrate (an inhibitor of glial metabolism, 1 nmol or minocycline (an inhibitor of microglia, 100 μg has significant anti-allodynic effects on day 12 after Walker 256 inoculation. Naloxone (a nonstereoselective TLR4 signaling blocker, 60 μg, i.t. also significantly alleviated mechanical allodynia and simultaneously blocked the increased inflammatory cytokine mRNA. The results suggested that spinal TLR4 might play an important role in the sustained glial activation that critically contributed to the robust and sustained spinal neuroinflammation in CIP. This result could potentially help clinicians and researchers to better understand the mechanism of complicated cancer pain.

  8. Beyond the Friedmann—Lemaître—Robertson—Walker Big Bang Singularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoica, Cristi

    2012-01-01

    Einstein's equation, in its standard form, breaks down at the Big Bang singularity. A new version, equivalent to Einstein's whenever the latter is defined, but applicable in wider situations, is proposed. The new equation remains smooth at the Big Bang singularity of the Friedmann—Lemaître—Robertson—Walker model. It is a tensor equation defined in terms of the Ricci part of the Riemann curvature. It is obtained by taking the Kulkarni—Nomizu product between Einstein's equation and the metric tensor.

  9. Lanczos potentials and a definition of gravitational entropy for perturbed Friedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mena, Filipe C; Tod, Paul

    2007-01-01

    We give a prescription for constructing a Lanczos potential for a cosmological model which is a purely gravitational perturbation of a Friedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker spacetime. For the radiation equation of state, we find the Lanczos potential explicitly via Fourier transforms. As an application, we follow up a suggestion of Penrose (1979 Singularities and time-asymmetry General Relativity: An Einstein Centenary Survey ed S W Hawking and W Israel (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)) and propose a definition of gravitational entropy for these cosmologies. With this definition, the gravitational entropy initially is finite if and only if the initial Weyl tensor is finite

  10. Palmistichus elaeisis Delvare & LaSalle (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae: a new parasitoid of Dione juno juno (Cramer (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae Palmistichus elaeisis Delvare & LaSalle (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae: um novo parasitóide de Dione juno juno (Cramer (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélcio R. Gil-Santana

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Palmistichus elaeisis Delvare & LaSalle, 1993 (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae is recorded as parasitoid of Dione juno juno (Cramer, 1779 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Palmistichus elaeisis Delvare & LaSalle, 1993 (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae é registrado como parasitóide de Dione juno juno (Cramer, 1779 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, no estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil.

  11. Dataset reporting the perceiver identification rates of basic emotions expressed by male, female and ambiguous gendered walkers in full-light, point-light and synthetically modelled point-light walkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Halovic

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This data set describes the experimental data collected and reported in the research article “Walking my way? Walker gender and display format confounds the perception of specific emotions” (Halovic and Kroos, in press [1]. The data set represent perceiver identification rates for different emotions (happiness, sadness, anger, fear and neutral, as displayed by full-light, point-light and synthetic point-light walkers. The perceiver identification scores have been transformed into Ht rates, which represent proportions/percentages of correct identifications above what would be expected by chance. This data set also provides Ht rates separately for male, female and ambiguously gendered walkers.

  12. Lepidoptera outbreaks in response to successional changes after the passage of Hurricane Hugo in Puerto Rico Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.A. Torres

    1992-01-01

    Fifteen species of Lepidoptera occurred in large numbers in spring and early summer after the passage of Hurricane Hugo over the north-east of Puerto Rico. Spodoptera eridania (Noctuidae) was the most common of the larvae and fed on 56 plant species belonging to 31 families. All the Lepidoptera fed on early successional vegetation. Some of the plants represent new host...

  13. Treatment of rat Walker-256 carcinosarcoma with photodynamic therapy and endotoxin irradiated with high-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, Vasile F.; Vasiliu, Virgil V.; Laky, Dezideriu; Ionescu, Mircea D.; Dima, Stefan V.

    1994-03-01

    Experiments were performed on five batches of Wistar inbred rats with Walker-256 carcinosarcoma receiving sole treatment photodynamic therapy (PDT), irradiated endotoxin (R-LPS), native-endotoxin (N-LPS), or associated therapy (PDT + R-LPS) and the control batch (saline) consisted of animals with untreated Walker-256 tumors. The results were as follows: the sole treatment (PDT, R-LPS, N-LPS) gave survival rates between 56.3 and 60.7% and cure rates ranging from 32.1 to 37.5%. The `combined' therapy in multiple doses increased significantly (88.6%) the survival rate of tumor bearing rats as well as the highest incidence of complete tumor regression (71.4%). This work demonstrates that `combined' photodynamic and immunotherapy with irradiated endotoxin stimulates cell-mediated antitumoral activity and induces changes in the tumoral incidence in Walker-256 carcinosarcoma in the rat model.

  14. Dandy-Walker syndrome in adult mimicking myasthenia gravis Síndrome de Dandy-Walker em adulto simulando miastenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cardoso

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS is a rare posterior fossa malformation. The DWS can occur associated with other brain or systemic malformations, but ocular abnormalities in this disease are rare and clinical findings mimicking myasthenia gravis have not been described to date. We report a 23-year-old woman who presented mild limitation of the ocular movements with progressive palpebral ptosis, which changed in intensity during the day. The investigation showed negative anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody, repetitive nerve stimulation and "Tensilon test", but the brain magnetic resonance image reveals DWS with hydrocephalus associated with calosal dysgenesis. The characteristic of disease, clinical manifestations and pathologic features, specially the clinical evaluation of ocular abnormalities in suspicion of DWS, including the MG in differential diagnosis are discussed.A síndrome de Dandy-Walker (DWS é uma rara malformação da fossa posterior que pode ocorrer associada com outras malformações cerebrais ou sistêmicas. As alterações oculares são raras e as manifestações clínicas, simulando miastenia gravis (MG, não foram descritas até o momento. Descrevemos uma mulher de 23 anos apresentando discreta limitação da movimentação ocular com progressiva ptose palpebral que mudava de intensidade durante o dia. A investigação mostrou negativos o anticorpo anti-receptor de acetilcolina, a estimulação nervosa repetitiva e o "teste do Tensilon", porém a ressonância magnética de crânio revelou DWS com hidrocefalia associada à disgenesia de corpo caloso. As características da doença, manifestações clínicas e patológicas, especialmente a avaliação clínica de anormalidade ocular na suspeita de DWS serão discutidas, incluindo a MG no diagnóstico diferencial.

  15. Baseline-dependent effect of noise-enhanced insoles on gait variability in healthy elderly walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Damian G; Wilcox, Bethany J; Niemi, James B; Franz, Jason R; Franz, Jason; Kerrigan, Dr; Kerrigan, D Casey; D'Andrea, Susan E

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether providing subsensory stochastic-resonance mechanical vibration to the foot soles of elderly walkers could decrease gait variability. In a randomized double-blind controlled trial, 29 subjects engaged in treadmill walking while wearing sandals customized with three actuators capable of producing stochastic-resonance mechanical vibration embedded in each sole. For each subject, we determined a subsensory level of vibration stimulation. After a 5-min acclimation period of walking with the footwear, subjects were asked to walk on the treadmill for six trials, each 30s long. Trials were pair-wise random: in three trials, actuators provided subsensory vibration; in the other trials, they did not. Subjects wore reflective markers to track body motion. Stochastic-resonance mechanical stimulation exhibited baseline-dependent effects on spatial stride-to-stride variability in gait, slightly increasing variability in subjects with least baseline variability and providing greater reductions in variability for subjects with greater baseline variability (pgait variability for subjects with more variable gait. Stochastic-resonance mechanical vibrations may provide an effective intervention for preventing falls in healthy elderly walkers. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. A class of almost equilibrium states in Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueskue, Muharrem

    2008-01-01

    In quantum field theory in curved spacetimes the construction of the algebra of observables of linear fields is today well understood. However, it remains a non-trivial task to construct physically meaningful states on the algebra. For instance, we are in the unsatisfactory situation that there exist no examples of states suited to describe local thermal equilibrium in a non-stationary spacetime. In this thesis, we construct a class of states for the Klein-Gordon field in Robertson-Walker spacetimes, which seem to provide the first example of thermal states in a spacetime without time translation symmetry. More precisely, in the setting of real, linear, scalar fields in Robertson-Walker spacetimes we define on the set of homogeneous, isotropic, quasi-free states a free energy functional that is based on the averaged energy density measured by an isotropic observer along his worldline. This functional is well defined and lower bounded by a suitable quantum energy inequality. Subsequently, we minimize this functional and obtain states that we interpret as 'almost equilibrium states'. It turns out that the states of low energy are the ground states of the almost equilibrium states. Finally, we prove that the almost equilibrium states satisfy the Hadamard condition, which qualifies them as physically meaningful states. (orig.)

  17. Automatic liver segmentation on Computed Tomography using random walkers for treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghbel, Mehrdad; Mashohor, Syamsiah; Mahmud, Rozi; Saripan, M Iqbal Bin

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation of the liver from Computed Tomography (CT) volumes plays an important role during the choice of treatment strategies for liver diseases. Despite lots of attention, liver segmentation remains a challenging task due to the lack of visible edges on most boundaries of the liver coupled with high variability of both intensity patterns and anatomical appearances with all these difficulties becoming more prominent in pathological livers. To achieve a more accurate segmentation, a random walker based framework is proposed that can segment contrast-enhanced livers CT images with great accuracy and speed. Based on the location of the right lung lobe, the liver dome is automatically detected thus eliminating the need for manual initialization. The computational requirements are further minimized utilizing rib-caged area segmentation, the liver is then extracted by utilizing random walker method. The proposed method was able to achieve one of the highest accuracies reported in the literature against a mixed healthy and pathological liver dataset compared to other segmentation methods with an overlap error of 4.47 % and dice similarity coefficient of 0.94 while it showed exceptional accuracy on segmenting the pathological livers with an overlap error of 5.95 % and dice similarity coefficient of 0.91.

  18. Death and Communal Mass-Mourning: Vin Diesel and the Remembrance of Paul Walker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbeth Klastrup

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines Vin Diesel’s use of his public Facebook Page to mourn the loss of his friend and co-actor Paul Walker in the period from 2013-2015. It discusses how Vin Diesel performed his grief and how his mourning process was communally reflected and repeated by both Vin Diesel and Walker fans, who used Vin Diesel’s page to share and verbalise their own feelings of loss in a both public and safe space. An analysis of Vin Diesel’s own status updates and 1800 comments reacting to three popular status updates related to the death of Paul Walk posted over the course of more than a year show that commentary was used to make condolences to both Vin Diesel and Walker’s familes and to affectively express the users’ immediate feelings, both verbally and through the use of emojis. However, over time, both the form and intensity of expression of both Vin Diesel and his followers changed, pointing to the need to further study celebrity mourning processes on social media over extended periods of time.

  19. Anestesia em criança com síndrome de Walker-Warburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Arzu Kose

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Justificativa e objetivos: A síndrome de Walker-Warburg é uma distrofia muscular autossômica recessiva congênita rara, manifestada pelo sistema nervoso central com malformações oculares e possível envolvimento de vários sistemas. O diagnóstico é estabelecido pela presença de quatro critérios: distrofia muscular congênita, lisencefalia tipo II, malformação cerebelar e malformação da retina. A maioria das crianças com a síndrome morre nos primeiros três anos de vida por causa de insuficiência respiratória, pneumonia, convulsões, hipertermia e fibrilação ventricular. Relato de caso: É discutida a conduta anestésica em uma criança do sexo masculino, de dois meses, programada para cirurgia eletiva de derivação ventrículo-peritoneal. Conclusões: Uma abordagem anestésica cuidadosa é necessária por causa do envolvimento de vários sistemas. Relatamos a conduta anestésica em uma criança do sexo masculino de dois meses com síndrome de Walker-Warburg, que foi programada para cirurgia eletiva de derivação ventrículo-peritoneal.

  20. A class of almost equilibrium states in Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueskue, Muharrem

    2008-11-06

    In quantum field theory in curved spacetimes the construction of the algebra of observables of linear fields is today well understood. However, it remains a non-trivial task to construct physically meaningful states on the algebra. For instance, we are in the unsatisfactory situation that there exist no examples of states suited to describe local thermal equilibrium in a non-stationary spacetime. In this thesis, we construct a class of states for the Klein-Gordon field in Robertson-Walker spacetimes, which seem to provide the first example of thermal states in a spacetime without time translation symmetry. More precisely, in the setting of real, linear, scalar fields in Robertson-Walker spacetimes we define on the set of homogeneous, isotropic, quasi-free states a free energy functional that is based on the averaged energy density measured by an isotropic observer along his worldline. This functional is well defined and lower bounded by a suitable quantum energy inequality. Subsequently, we minimize this functional and obtain states that we interpret as 'almost equilibrium states'. It turns out that the states of low energy are the ground states of the almost equilibrium states. Finally, we prove that the almost equilibrium states satisfy the Hadamard condition, which qualifies them as physically meaningful states. (orig.)

  1. Automatic liver segmentation on Computed Tomography using random walkers for treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghbel, Mehrdad; Mashohor, Syamsiah; Mahmud, Rozi; Saripan, M. Iqbal Bin

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation of the liver from Computed Tomography (CT) volumes plays an important role during the choice of treatment strategies for liver diseases. Despite lots of attention, liver segmentation remains a challenging task due to the lack of visible edges on most boundaries of the liver coupled with high variability of both intensity patterns and anatomical appearances with all these difficulties becoming more prominent in pathological livers. To achieve a more accurate segmentation, a random walker based framework is proposed that can segment contrast-enhanced livers CT images with great accuracy and speed. Based on the location of the right lung lobe, the liver dome is automatically detected thus eliminating the need for manual initialization. The computational requirements are further minimized utilizing rib-caged area segmentation, the liver is then extracted by utilizing random walker method. The proposed method was able to achieve one of the highest accuracies reported in the literature against a mixed healthy and pathological liver dataset compared to other segmentation methods with an overlap error of 4.47 % and dice similarity coefficient of 0.94 while it showed exceptional accuracy on segmenting the pathological livers with an overlap error of 5.95 % and dice similarity coefficient of 0.91. PMID:28096782

  2. Ground reaction force and 3D biomechanical characteristics of walking in short-leg walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songning; Clowers, Kurt G; Powell, Douglas

    2006-12-01

    Short-leg walking boots offer several advantages over traditional casts. However, their effects on ground reaction forces (GRF) and three-dimensional (3D) biomechanics are not fully understood. The purpose of the study was to examine 3D lower extremity kinematics and joint dynamics during walking in two different short-leg walking boots. Eleven (five females and six males) healthy subjects performed five level walking trials in each of three conditions: two testing boot conditions, Gait Walker (DeRoyal Industries, Inc.) and Equalizer (Royce Medical Co.), and one pair of laboratory shoes (Noveto, Adidas). A force platform and a 6-camera Vicon motion analysis system were used to collect GRFs and 3D kinematic data during the testing session. A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate selected kinematic, GRF, and joint kinetic variables (pboots were effective in minimizing ankle eversion and hip adduction. Neither walker increased the bimodal vertical GRF peaks typically observed in normal walking. However, they did impose a small initial peak (knee extensors while they decreased the demand of the knee and hip abductors based on the joint kinetic results.

  3. An anxiety-induced bias in the perception of a bistable point-light walker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Cruys, Sander; Schouten, Ben; Wagemans, Johan

    2013-11-01

    Human sensitivity for social cues is exquisite, as illustrated by the ease with which simplified point-light movements invoke social and emotional responses. Compared to faces, these biological motion stimuli only recently started to be used to explore questions regarding social cognition and anxiety. We presented human point-light walkers that could be perceived as facing towards or facing away from the observer, and tested whether participants with high social anxiety would perceive these bistable stimuli differently, because this type of stimuli has particular relevance for them. The results showed that observers with high social anxiety tended to see walkers as facing away more frequently than those with low social anxiety. This may mean that high socially anxious observers are biased towards the more positive perceptual alternative because they are motivated to protect themselves against threatening social experiences, but we also explore alternative explanations. The findings are in line with the evidence for a positivity bias in perception, also called wishful seeing, but in contrast with the attentional negativity bias often found in social anxiety. We discuss reasons for this divergence and possible limitations of the current study. © 2013.

  4. Risks of vaginal breech delivery at term compared with elective cesarean section - reply to comments by Walker and Powell, and Sholapurkar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlemmix, Floortje; Mol, Ben Willem; Kok, Marjolein

    2015-01-01

    We thank both Walker and Powell (1), as well as Sholapurkar (2) for their interest in our work. Walker and Powell note that the risk of neonatal mortality for planned vaginal breech delivery (VBD) in our study is lower than the mortality reported in the term breech trial and comparable to the risk

  5. Temporal Patterns in the Abundance and Species Composition of Spiders on Host Plants of the Invasive Moth Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Brian N; Mills, Nicholas J; Daane, Kent M

    2017-06-01

    Generalist predators such as spiders may help mitigate the spread and impact of exotic herbivores. The lack of prey specificity and long generation times of spiders may allow them to persist when pests are scarce, and to limit the growth of pest populations before they reach damaging levels. We examined whether resident spiders are likely to play a role in maintaining populations of the invasive light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), below outbreak levels in California. We surveyed the spider community on two E. postvittana host plants, the ornamental Australian tea tree, Leptospermum laevigatum, and the weed French broom, Genista monspessulana, to characterize spider and larval E. postvittana abundance and spider species composition throughout the year. Spider densities and species composition showed slight seasonal changes. Spiders were present during periods of high and low E. postvittana abundance. Anyphaenid hunting spiders, Anyphaena aperta Banks in Australian tea tree and Anyphaena pacifica Banks in French broom, dominated spider species composition at four of five sampled sites, and underwent only slight seasonal variation in abundance. Adult A. aperta were rare at all times of the year, suggesting that high mortality among juvenile A. aperta limits the potential of this species as a predator of E. postvittana. Nevertheless, the continued presence of spiders throughout the year indicates that the resident spider community is likely to play a key role in reducing E. postvittana populations in California. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  6. Pathogenicity, morphology, and characterization of a Nosema fumiferanae isolate (Microsporidia: Nosematidae) from the light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Julie V; Huang, Wei-Fone; Solter, Leellen F; Mills, Nicholas J

    2016-02-01

    We recently discovered infections by a microsporidium closely related to Nosema fumiferanae in field populations of the light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), in the San Francisco region of California. E. postvittana originates from Australia and was first detected in California in 2006; therefore, our aim was to identify and determine the origin of the Nosema isolate. We characterized the pathogenicity, transmission pathways, and ultrastructure of this new Nosema isolate. In addition, we sequenced fragments of commonly used genetic markers (ITS, SSU, and RPB1), and examined the phylogenetic relationships between the Nosema isolate and other microsporidian species commonly found in lepidopteran hosts. The pathogenicity of the Nosema isolate was investigated by infecting second instar larvae of E. postvittana. Larval and pupal survivorship were reduced by 7% and 13% respectively, and pupation occurred 1-2d later in infected individuals than in healthy individuals. Emerging infected females died 5d earlier than healthy females, and daily fecundity was 22% lower. Hatch rate also was 22% lower for eggs oviposited by infected females. Vertical transmission was confirmed; spores were present in 68% of egg masses and 100% of the surviving larvae from infected females. Ultrastructure images, together with sequences from selected genetic markers, confirmed the Nosema isolate to be a member of the Nosema fumiferanae species complex (Nosema fumiferanae postvittana subsp. n.). The association of this pathogen with E. postvittana contributes further to the biotic resistance that E. postvittana has experienced since its introduction to California. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mating Disruption of the Navel Orangeworm (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) Using Widely Spaced, Aerosol Dispensers: Is the Pheromone Blend the Most Efficacious Disruptant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higbee, Bradley S; Burks, Charles S; Cardé, Ring T

    2017-10-01

    The navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is a key pest of almonds and pistachios and is sometimes controlled using mating disruption as part of a program of integrated management. The formulation used has a single, nonattractive compound [(11Z,13Z)-hexadecadienal] as the active ingredient that is emitted from timed aerosol dispensers. This study compared this nonattractive, single-compound formulation with two aerosol formulations also containing two additional compounds [(11Z,13Z)-hexadecadien-1-ol and (3Z,6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)-tricosapentaene] that are found in the pheromone glands, and that in combination with the aldehyde are attractive in wind-tunnel and field-attraction trials. An experiment in pistachios found 97% to 99% suppression of males captured in female-baited traps and 82-93% suppression of mating in sentinel females. Both assays revealed a trend to greater suppression by the more complete pheromone formulations. In almonds, where the abundance of navel orangeworm was lower, all three formulations suppressed males captured in traps and mating in sentinel females by >99%. Each of the formulations significantly reduced damage to Nonpareil almonds. In almonds, there were no significant differences among the formulations in disruption of sexual communication or in damage. These findings suggest that it may be possible to make mating disruption more cost-effective and to achieve higher levels of mating disruption by using attractive aerosol formulations to reduce the number of dispenser per ha. Such a formulation, however, would be more expensive to register in the United States than pheromones meeting the definition of straight-chain lepidopteran pheromone, including the currently used aldehyde-only formulation. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  8. The second Afrotropical Lepidoptera Workshop in Uganda – A contribution to the Lepidoptera fauna of Kibale National Park and the Mpanga Forest Reserve

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baron, T.; Akite, P.; Barnett, M.; Collins, S. C.; Dobson, J.; Fric, Zdeněk; Henning, G.; Kühne, L.; Mey, W.; Ochse, M.; Przybylowicz, L.; Sáfián, S.; Schutte, R.; Selb, H.; Ward, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 127, č. 2 (2017), s. 77-105 ISSN 0013-8843 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Uganda * Lepidoptera * Afrotropical Region https://www. dropbox .com/s/qqt4jqut03sljqi/Baron_2017_Uganda.pdf?dl=0

  9. The Lepidoptera of White Sands National Monument, Otero County, New Mexico, USA 3. A new species of Aleptina Dyar, 1902 (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Amphipyrinae, Psaphidini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Eric H.; Forbes, Gregory S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In 2006 the US National Park Service initiated a long-term study of the Lepidoptera at White Sands National Monument, Otero County, New Mexico. Aleptina arenaria sp. n., described here, was discovered in 2008, the second year of the study. The adult moths and male and female genitalia are illustrated. PMID:22207800

  10. The Lepidoptera of White Sands National Monument, Otero County, New Mexico, USA 4. A new species of Schinia Hübner, 1818 (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Heliothinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Metzler

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2006 the U.S. National Park Service initiated a long term study of the Lepidoptera at White Sands National Monument, Otero County, New Mexico. Schinia poguei sp. n., described here, was discovered in 2007, the second year of the study. The male and female adult moths and genitalia are illustrated.

  11. The Lepidoptera of White Sands National Monument, Otero County, New Mexico, USA 4. A new species of Schinia Hübner, 1818 (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Heliothinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Eric H.; Forbes, Gregory S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In 2006 the U.S. National Park Service initiated a long term study of the Lepidoptera at White Sands National Monument, Otero County, New Mexico. Schinia poguei sp. n., described here, was discovered in 2007, the second year of the study. The male and female adult moths and genitalia are illustrated. PMID:22207801

  12. Hyperspectral optical imaging of two different species of lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukusic Pete

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, we report a hyperspectral optical imaging application for measurement of the reflectance spectra of photonic structures that produce structural colors with high spatial resolution. The measurement of the spectral reflectance function is exemplified in the butterfly wings of two different species of Lepidoptera: the blue iridescence reflected by the nymphalid Morpho didius and the green iridescence of the papilionid Papilio palinurus. Color coordinates from reflectance spectra were calculated taking into account human spectral sensitivity. For each butterfly wing, the observed color is described by a characteristic color map in the chromaticity diagram and spreads over a limited volume in the color space. The results suggest that variability in the reflectance spectra is correlated with different random arrangements in the spatial distribution of the scales that cover the wing membranes. Hyperspectral optical imaging opens new ways for the non-invasive study and classification of different forms of irregularity in structural colors.

  13. New Records of Seven Eupithecia (Lepidoptera: Geometridae from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi, Sei-Woong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The genus Eupithecia Curtis is the largest taxon in Lepidoptera (more than 1,500 species worldwide and the adults of the genus are characterized by small in size, cryptically colored grayish and brownish forewing, and indistinct basal, ante- and postmedial transverse lines mostly with a definite discal spot on the forewing. Forty-four species have been reported so far in Korea. Herein, we present the first report on seven species of Eupithecia: Eupithecia rufescens Butler (1878, Eupithecia costiconvexa Inoue (1979, Eupithecia daemionata Dietze (1904, Eupithecia persuastrix Mironov (1990, Eupithecia actaeata Walderdorff (1869, Eupithecia suboxydata Staudinger (1897 and Eupithecia costimacularia Leech (1897. Diagnosis, descriptions and figures of the available species are provided.

  14. The complete mitochondrial genome of Gonepteryx mahaguru (Lepidoptera: Pieridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianing; Xu, Chang; Li, Jialian; Lei, Ying; Fan, Cheng; Gao, Yuan; Xu, Chongren; Wang, Rongjiang

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Gonepteryx mahaguru (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) is 15,221 bp in length, containing 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA genes (tRNAs), 2 ribosomal RNA genes (LrRNA and SrRNA) and 1 non-coding A + T-rich region. The nucleotide composition is significantly biased toward A + T (80.9%). All PCGs are initiated by classical ATN codon, with the exception of COI, which begins with TTA codon. Nine PCGs harbor the complete stop codon TAA, whereas COI, COII, ND4 and ND5 stop with incomplete codons, single T or TA. All tRNAs can be folded into the typical cloverleaf secondary structure, except for tRNA(Ser)(AGN). The A + T content of AT-rich region is 95.2%, same to the highest one in the known species in Pieridae.

  15. Hyperspectral optical imaging of two different species of lepidoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José Manuel; Nascimento, Sérgio Miguel Cardoso; Vukusic, Pete

    2011-05-01

    In this article, we report a hyperspectral optical imaging application for measurement of the reflectance spectra of photonic structures that produce structural colors with high spatial resolution. The measurement of the spectral reflectance function is exemplified in the butterfly wings of two different species of Lepidoptera: the blue iridescence reflected by the nymphalid Morpho didius and the green iridescence of the papilionid Papilio palinurus. Color coordinates from reflectance spectra were calculated taking into account human spectral sensitivity. For each butterfly wing, the observed color is described by a characteristic color map in the chromaticity diagram and spreads over a limited volume in the color space. The results suggest that variability in the reflectance spectra is correlated with different random arrangements in the spatial distribution of the scales that cover the wing membranes. Hyperspectral optical imaging opens new ways for the non-invasive study and classification of different forms of irregularity in structural colors.

  16. Complete mitochondrial DNA genome of Polytremis nascens (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weibin; Zhu, Jianqing; Yang, Qichang; Zhao, Huidong; Chen, Minghan; He, Haiyan; Yu, Weidong

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of Polytremis nascens (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae) was determined. The 15,392 bp mitogenome with GenBank accession number KM981865 contained 13 protein genes, 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs, and a non-coding control region (D-loop). All the 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes were found. The overall base composition was 39.7% A, 40.7% T, 7.7% G and 11.9% C, with a high A + T content (80.4%). This complete mitogenome of P. nascens provides a basic data for studies on species identification, molecular systematics and conservation genetics.

  17. Costs of insecticide resistance in Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Joanna K; Scott, Ian M; McNeil, Jeremy N

    2012-06-01

    The obvious benefits associated with insecticide resistance for pest species may come at a cost to other life-history traits. In this study, we compared the larval and pupal developmental times, pupal mass wing surface area and wing fluctuating asymmetry (FA) in insecticide resistant and control strains of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), collected from apple (Malus spp.) orchards in central Canada. Resistant strains had significantly longer larval developmental times and lower pupal masses compared with the susceptible strain. Although the forewings of resistant moths were smaller in resistant than control strain, no difference in wing FA was detected. Longer developmental times could increase exposure time to natural enemies, and reduced adult size could affect longevity and total reproductive output.

  18. Mapping global biodiversity connections with DNA barcodes: Lepidoptera of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashfaq, Muhammad; Akhtar, Saleem; Rafi, Muhammad Athar; Mansoor, Shahid; Hebert, Paul D N

    2017-01-01

    Sequences from the DNA barcode region of the mitochondrial COI gene are an effective tool for specimen identification and for the discovery of new species. The Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) (www.boldsystems.org) currently hosts 4.5 million records from animals which have been assigned to more than 490,000 different Barcode Index Numbers (BINs), which serve as a proxy for species. Because a fourth of these BINs derive from Lepidoptera, BOLD has a strong capability to both identify specimens in this order and to support studies of faunal overlap. DNA barcode sequences were obtained from 4503 moths from 329 sites across Pakistan, specimens that represented 981 BINs from 52 families. Among 379 species with a Linnaean name assignment, all were represented by a single BIN excepting five species that showed a BIN split. Less than half (44%) of the 981 BINs had counterparts in other countries; the remaining BINs were unique to Pakistan. Another 218 BINs of Lepidoptera from Pakistan were coupled with the 981 from this study before being compared with all 116,768 BINs for this order. As expected, faunal overlap was highest with India (21%), Sri Lanka (21%), United Arab Emirates (20%) and with other Asian nations (2.1%), but it was very low with other continents including Africa (0.6%), Europe (1.3%), Australia (0.6%), Oceania (1.0%), North America (0.1%), and South America (0.1%). This study indicates the way in which DNA barcoding facilitates measures of faunal overlap even when taxa have not been assigned to a Linnean species.

  19. Breast cancer mortality vs. exercise and breast size in runners and walkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T Williams

    Full Text Available Identify predictors of breast cancer mortality in women who exercised below (<7.5 metabolic equivalent hours/week, MET-hours/wk, at (7.5 to 12.5 MET-hours/wk, or above (≥12.5 MET-hours/wk recommended levels.Cox proportional hazard analyses of baseline pre-diagnosis MET-hours/wk vs. breast cancer mortality adjusted for follow-up age, race, baseline menopause, and estrogen and oral contraceptive use in 79,124 women (32,872 walkers, 46,252 runners from the National Walkers' and Runners' Health Studies.One-hundred eleven women (57 walkers, 54 runners died from breast cancer during the 11-year follow-up. The decline in mortality in women who exercised ≥7.5 MET-hours/wk was not different for walking and running (P = 0.34, so running and walking energy expenditures were combined. The risk for breast cancer mortality was 41.5% lower for ≥7.5 vs. <7.5 MET-hours/wk (HR: 0.585, 95%CI: 0.382 to 0.924, P = 0.02, which persisted when adjusted for BMI (HR: 0.584, 95%CI: 0.368 to 0.956, P = 0.03. Other than age and menopause, baseline bra cup size was the strongest predictor of breast cancer mortality, i.e., 57.9% risk increase per cup size when adjusted for MET-hours/wk and the other covariates (HR: 1.579, 95%CI: 1.268 to 1.966, P<0.0001, and 70.4% greater when further adjusted for BMI (HR: 1.704, 95%CI: 1.344 to 2.156, P = 10(-5. Breast cancer mortality was 4.0-fold greater (HR: 3.980, 95%CI: 1.894 to 9.412, P = 0.0001 for C-cup, and 4.7-fold greater (HR: 4.668, 95%CI: 1.963 to 11.980, P = 0.0004 for ≥D-cup vs. A-cup when adjusted for BMI and other covariates. Adjustment for cup size and BMI did not eliminate the association between breast cancer mortality and ≥7.5 MET-hour/wk walked or run (HR: 0.615, 95%CI: 0.389 to 1.004, P = 0.05.Breast cancer mortality decreased in association with both meeting the exercise recommendations and smaller breast volume.

  20. Pore Size Distribution and Methane Equilibrium Conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihani, A. D.; Daigle, H.; Cook, A.; Glosser, D.; Shushtarian, A.

    2015-12-01

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  1. Pore size distribution and methane equilibrium conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bihani, Abhishek [University of Texas at Austin; Daigle, Hugh [University of Texas at Austin; Cook, Ann [Ohio State University; Glosser, Deborah [Ohio State University; Shushtarian, Arash [University of Texas at Austin

    2015-12-15

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  2. A COMPARATIVE PET STUDY USING DIFFERENT C-11 LABELED AMINO-ACIDS IN WALKER 256 CARCINOSARCOMA-BEARING RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DAEMEN, BJG; ELSINGA, PH; ISHIWATA, K; PAANS, AMJ; VAALBURG, W

    1991-01-01

    In Walker 256 carcinosarcoma-bearing rats, the dynamic distribution of L-[1-C-11]tyrosine, L-[methyl-C-11]methionine, L-[1-C-11]methionine and D-[1-C-11]methionine has been measured by PET. An equivalent tumor-imaging potential was observed for each of the three L-amino acids. Thirty minutes after

  3. Work/text: Investigating "The Man from U.N.C.L.E.," by Cynthia W. Walker [book review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Coppa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Review of Cynthia W. Walker. 2015. Work/text: Investigating "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." New York: Hampton Press, 2013. Hardcover, $89.50 (367p ISBN 978-1612891200; paperback, $37.95 (379p ISBN 978-1612891217.

  4. Review of the East Palaearctic and North Oriental Psyttalia Walker, with the description of three new species (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Opiinae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Q.; Achterberg, van C.; Tan, J.-L.; Chen, X.-X.

    2016-01-01

    The East Palaearctic and North Oriental species of the genus Psyttalia Walker (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Opiinae) are reviewed. Three new species are described and illustrated: P. latinervis Wu & van Achterberg, sp. n. and P. majocellata Wu & van Achterberg, sp. n. from China, and P. spectabilis van

  5. Rapid Communication. Tamarixia monesus (Walker (Hym.: Eulophidae parasitoid of Bactericera tremblayi (Wagner, 1961 (Hemiptera: Triozidae in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotfalizadeh Hossein

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bactericera tremblayi (Wagner, 1961 (Hemiptera: Triozidae is reported on Brassica oleracea var. capitata (Brassicaceae in northwestern Iran. Tamarixia monesus (Walker (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea, Eulophidae was reared for the first time on B. tremblayi, and compared with Tamarixia tremblayi, another parasitoid of B. tremblayi. This is a new record of T. monesus from the Middle East.

  6. On the linear stability of a scalar-field with exponential potential in a flat Robertson-Walker background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alho, Artur, E-mail: artur.alho@gmail.co [Centro de Matematica, Universidade do Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2010-05-01

    We study covariant and gauge-invariant linear scalar perturbations of a scalar-field with positive exponential potential in a flat Robertson-Walker background. By applying a dynamical systems approach we investigate how the phase of the perturbations evolves, finding bounds on the wave-number in terms of the slope parameter, for which the perturbations decays when approaching the inflationary solution.

  7. Changes in Energy Cost and Total External Work of Muscles in Elite Race Walkers Walking at Different Speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chwała Wiesław

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess energy cost and total external work (total energy depending on the speed of race walking. Another objective was to determine the contribution of external work to total energy cost of walking at technical, threshold and racing speed in elite competitive race walkers.

  8. Pediatric physical therapists' use of support walkers for children with disabilities: a nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Sheryl A; McCoy, Sarah Westcott; Beling, Janna; Adams, Janet

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated pediatric physical therapists' use of support walkers (SWs) for children with disabilities. An 8-page survey was mailed to 2500 randomly selected members of the Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association. Respondents to the survey included 513 pediatric physical therapists who were users of SWs. Descriptive statistics were calculated and themes were analyzed. Several SWs were reported as used most often to improve gait, mobility, participation at school, and interaction with peers. Use commonly included a month trial before purchase and 9 sessions of physical therapy to train a child for use in school. Reasons given for the use of SWs were improving impairments, functional limitations, and participation with peers. Pediatric physical therapists use SWs to increase postural control, mobility, and children's participation in school.

  9. Intellectual prognosis of the Dandy-Walker malformation in children: the importance of vermian lobulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boddaert, N.; Brunelle, F. [Paediatric Radiology Department, Hopital Necker Enfants-Malades, 149 rue de Sevres, 75015, Paris (France); ERM 0205 INSERM-CEA, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA, Orsay (France); Klein, O.; Parisot, D.; Pierre-Kahn, A. [Neurosurgical Department, Hopital Necker Enfants-Malades, 149 rue de Sevres, 75015, Paris (France); Ferguson, N.; Sonigo, P.; Hertz-Pannier, L.; Baraton, J.; Emond, S.; Simon, I.; Chigot, V.; Schmit, P. [Paediatric Radiology Department, Hopital Necker Enfants-Malades, 149 rue de Sevres, 75015, Paris (France)

    2003-05-01

    Half of patients with the Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) have normal intellectual development. We aimed to identify feature on MRI associated with good intellectual prognosis. We reviewed 20 patients with DWM diagnosed on MRI, mean age 14.6{+-}9.9 years. We assessed their intellectual development and related it to the MRI features. We found two groups with a statistically different intellectual outcome. All 14 patients with normal intellectual development had a normal lobulation of the vermis, without supratentorial anomalies. Of the six patients with mental retardation, three had an abnormal vermis, together with dysgenesis of the corpus callosum. In the other three, there were normal vermian anatomy with associated anomalies. Normal lobulation of the vermis, in the absence of any supratentorial anomaly, appears to be a good prognostic factor in DWM. Preservation of cerebrocerebellar pathways and neonatal plasticity could explain the normal intellectual development. These findings might be useful in prenatal diagnosis. (orig.)

  10. Intellectual prognosis of the Dandy-Walker malformation in children: the importance of vermian lobulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boddaert, N.; Brunelle, F.; Klein, O.; Parisot, D.; Pierre-Kahn, A.; Ferguson, N.; Sonigo, P.; Hertz-Pannier, L.; Baraton, J.; Emond, S.; Simon, I.; Chigot, V.; Schmit, P.

    2003-01-01

    Half of patients with the Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) have normal intellectual development. We aimed to identify feature on MRI associated with good intellectual prognosis. We reviewed 20 patients with DWM diagnosed on MRI, mean age 14.6±9.9 years. We assessed their intellectual development and related it to the MRI features. We found two groups with a statistically different intellectual outcome. All 14 patients with normal intellectual development had a normal lobulation of the vermis, without supratentorial anomalies. Of the six patients with mental retardation, three had an abnormal vermis, together with dysgenesis of the corpus callosum. In the other three, there were normal vermian anatomy with associated anomalies. Normal lobulation of the vermis, in the absence of any supratentorial anomaly, appears to be a good prognostic factor in DWM. Preservation of cerebrocerebellar pathways and neonatal plasticity could explain the normal intellectual development. These findings might be useful in prenatal diagnosis. (orig.)

  11. The development of a radioimmunological assay for parathormone formed from the hypercalcemic Walker carcinosarcoma 256

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weise, D.

    1981-01-01

    Specific antibodies to Walker Carcinosomal tissue could be produced by immunizing goats with a hypercalcemically active extract of this tumor tissue. These served the stablishment of a radioimmunoassay. The tracer used was 125-iodine labelled borine parathormone. Various parathormone standards were measured in this system. Here it was found that with this new system a specific assay had been developed which measures immunoreactive parathormone. Preliminary serum analyses indicated that endogenous human parathormone is also detected by this new radioimmunoassay. On the basis of comparative measurements with the old antibody directed towards human extractive parathormone and the new antibody for tumor parathormone only limited conclusions are possible. It could, however, be shown that the new antibody is an anti-parathormone-antibody. (orig./MG) [de

  12. NMR images of non-communicating hydrocephalus associated with Dandy-Walker variant and achondroplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Masaharu; Kuroda, Ryotaro; Watanabe, Masaru; Nakatani, Jiro; Ioku, Masahiko; Irisawa, Minoru; Hamada, Tatsumi; Ishida, Osamu

    1988-06-01

    Two cases of non-communicating hydrocephalus caused by a relatively rare etiology were reported. They were both diagnosed by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The first patient, a 4-month-old boy, had Dandy-Walker variant, showing hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and the inferior vermis, and a large cyst behind the vermis, communicating with the subarachnoid space, as well as hydrocephalus; the fourth ventricle was partially reserved. The second patient, also a 4-month-old boy, had achondroplasia, resulting in a narrow foramen magnum; the disturbance of the outflow of the cerebro-spinal fluid around the cisterna magna was thought to be the cause of hydrocephalus in his case. The validity of NMR was demonstrated in the diagnoses of these conditions, for a high resolution was needed in examining the complicated structure of the posterior fossa.

  13. Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, P.J.

    2001-09-04

    This numeric data package provides data sets, and accompanying documentation, on site characterization, system performance, weather, species composition, and growth for the Throughfall Displacement Experiment, which was established in the Walker Branch Watershed of East Tennessee to provide data on the responses of forests to altered precipitation regimes. The specific data sets include soil water content and potential, coarse fraction of the soil profile, litter layer temperature, soil temperature, monthly weather, daily weather, hourly weather, species composition of trees and saplings, mature tree and sapling annual growth, and relative leaf area index. Fortran and SAS{trademark} access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

  14. ENSO impacts on the South American rainfall during 1980s: Hadley and Walker circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Souza, E.B.; Ambrizzi, T. [Departamento de Ciencias Atmosfericas, Instituto Astronomico y Geofisico, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2002-04-01

    The changes in the Hadley and Walter cells and their respective impacts on the South American rainfall during the ENSO episodes observed in the decade of 80, were investigated through cross-sections analyses of the atmospheric circulation in altitude, averaged in the zonal and meridional planes. Such large-scale cells almost inverted their climatological circulation pattern, during El Nino events (1982-83 and 1986-87). In these years, manifestation of the anomalous descending branch of the Hadley and Walker cells affects most of the north-northeast of South America, which inhibited the convective activity associated to the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and caused drought conditions in the rainy seasons of the Guyana, Surinam, French Guyana, center-east of the Amazon and most of the Northeast Brazil. On the other hand, conditions of excess of precipitation observed in the south-southeast of South America, were favored by the anomalous ascending branch of the Hadley cell. During La Nina events (1984-85 and 1988-89), it was observed an intensification of the ascending and descending branches associated to the Walker and Hadley cells. The anomalous large-scale ascending movement associated to these cells, was extended to the Northeast of Brazil and equatorial South Atlantic, favoring ITCZ to become more active than the normal, which resulted in an above normal rainy season in these areas. An intense subsidence was noticed in the mid latitudes of South America, which inhibited the large-scale convection in the region, explaining the deficient rainy season observed in most of the south-southeast of South America. [Spanish] Los cambios en las celulas de Hadley y Walker y sus respectivos impactos en Suramerica, en las lluvias, durante los episodios en ENOS, observados en la decada de los 80, son investigados a traves de analisis de reacciones cruzadas de la circulacion atmosferica en altitudes promediadas en planos zonal y meridional. Tales celulas de gran escala

  15. Binding of formyl peptides to Walker 256 carcinosarcoma cells and the chemotactic response of these cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayner, D.C.; Orr, F.W.; Shiu, R.P.

    1985-05-01

    N-Formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (fMLP) induces chemotaxis in leukocytes, the response being mediated by peptide binding to a receptor on the plasma membrane. In tumor cells, this peptide has been reported to induce cellular swelling and chemotaxis in vitro and to enhance the localization of circulating tumor cells in vivo. In the Boyden chamber, the authors evaluated the migratory responses of Walker carcinosarcoma 256 cells to varying concentrations of fMLP. Sigmoidal dose-response curves were obtained with the dose of chemotactic factor that elicits a half-maximal chemotactic response of 5.0 +/- 2.5 X 10(-8) M. Checkerboard analysis indicated that these responses were dependent upon a concentration gradient of fMLP with increases in migration of circa 2 to 2.5 times that of random movement. To examine the binding of fMLP, the tumor cells were incubated with 5 X 10(-9) M fML-(/sup 3/H)P in Hanks balanced salt solution. Specific binding (0.5 to 1% of total radioligand, to whole cells inhibited by 5 X 10(-6) M fMLP) approached equilibrium after 4 to 6 h at 4 degrees C and after 6 to 10 h at 22 degrees C. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated heterogeneous binding of the peptide by tumor cells and also showed its intracellular localization. In homogenates of Walker cells prepared in 0.1 M Tris HCl, pH 7.4, with 10 mM MgCl2 and bovine serum albumin (1 mg/ml), specific binding of approximately 0.5% of total fML-(/sup 3/H)P reached equilibrium after 60 min at 4 degrees C. In whole cells and homogenates, binding was reversible by addition of unlabeled fMLP.

  16. Participation of the NO/cGMP/K+ATP pathway in the antinociception induced by Walker tumor bearing in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, A.L.R.; Pinheiro, C.A.; Oliveira, G.J.; Torres, J.N.L.; Moraes, M.O.; Ribeiro, R.A.; Vale, M.L.; Souza, M.H.L.P.

    2012-01-01

    Implantation of Walker 256 tumor decreases acute systemic inflammation in rats. Inflammatory hyperalgesia is one of the most important events of acute inflammation. The L-arginine/NO/cGMP/K + ATP pathway has been proposed as the mechanism of peripheral antinociception mediated by several drugs and physical exercise. The objective of this study was to investigate a possible involvement of the NO/cGMP/K + ATP pathway in antinociception induced in Walker 256 tumor-bearing male Wistar rats (180-220 g). The groups consisted of 5-6 animals. Mechanical inflammatory hypernociception was evaluated using an electronic version of the von Frey test. Walker tumor (4th and 7th day post-implantation) reduced prostaglandin E 2 - (PGE 2 , 400 ng/paw; 50 µL; intraplantar injection) and carrageenan-induced hypernociception (500 µg/paw; 100 µL; intraplantar injection). Walker tumor-induced analgesia was reversed (99.3% for carrageenan and 77.2% for PGE 2 ) by a selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (L-NAME; 90 mg/kg, ip) and L-arginine (200 mg/kg, ip), which prevented (80% for carrageenan and 65% for PGE 2 ) the effect of L-NAME. Treatment with the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ (100% for carrageenan and 95% for PGE 2 ; 8 µg/paw) and the ATP-sensitive K + channel (KATP) blocker glibenclamide (87.5% for carrageenan and 100% for PGE 2 ; 160 µg/paw) reversed the antinociceptive effect of tumor bearing in a statistically significant manner (P < 0.05). The present study confirmed an intrinsic peripheral antinociceptive effect of Walker tumor bearing in rats. This antinociceptive effect seemed to be mediated by activation of the NO/cGMP pathway followed by the opening of KATP channels

  17. “Ancestors We Didn’t Even Know We Had”: Alice Walker, Asian Religion, and Ethnic Authenticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Garton-Gundling

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent debates about the ethics of identity in a global age have dealt with how to prioritize conflicting local and global allegiances. Guided by these concerns, the fiction of Alice Walker develops a distinctive view of how local cultures and global movements can fruitfully interact. This vision depends on concepts from Asian religions, a major influence that critics of Walker have largely overlooked. Walker promotes Hindu and Buddhist meditation in a context of widespread African American skepticism toward Asian religions. According to widespread notions of cultural authenticity, Asian religions cannot nourish an African American connection to ethnic roots. In response to this challenge, Alice Walker’s fiction portrays Hindu and Buddhist mystics as African Americans’ ancestors, thus positioning these faiths as authentically black. By creatively enfolding Asian religions into her sense of African American heritage, Walker builds a spiritual cosmopolitanism that relies on claims of ancestral affiliation even when these claims are not literal. This strategy is Walker’s effort to create a new paradigm of cultural authenticity, one that allows individuals and groups to choose their ancestors. Walker’s approach seeks to incorporate disparate global influences while still valorizing the figure of the ancestor. This innovative approach places Walker at the forefront of a growing number of African American artists and intellectuals who promote Asian religions to American minorities. Walker’s work vividly dramatizes larger concerns in transnational American Studies: Eastern philosophy’s relevance to identity politics, the tensions between universal ideals and cultural specifics, and the ethics of cross-cultural appropriation.

  18. Impact of pesticide resistance on toxicity and tolerance of hostplant phytochemicals in Amyelois transitella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    For some polyphagous insects adaptation to phytochemically novel plants confers enhanced resistance to insecticides, but whether insecticide resistance enhances tolerance to novel phytochemicals has not been assessed. We used Amyelois transitella Walker (navel orangeworm), an economically important ...

  19. A molecular analysis of the Gelechiidae (Lepidoptera, Gelechioidea) with an interpretative grouping of its taxa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsholt, Ole; Mutanen, Marko; Lee, Sangmi

    2013-01-01

    We re-examine the higher level phylogeny and evolutionary affinities of the family Gelechiidae (Lepidoptera: Gelechioidea) based on DNA sequence data for one mitochondrial gene (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I ) and seven nuclear genes (Elongation Factor-1α, wingless, Ribosomal protein S5, Isocitr......We re-examine the higher level phylogeny and evolutionary affinities of the family Gelechiidae (Lepidoptera: Gelechioidea) based on DNA sequence data for one mitochondrial gene (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I ) and seven nuclear genes (Elongation Factor-1α, wingless, Ribosomal protein S5...

  20. Note on gynandromorphism in the eucalyptus defoliator Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll, 1782 (Lepidoptera: Geometridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline S. Bernardino

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The brown moth Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll, 1872 (Lepidoptera: Geometridae is an important pest in Brazilian eucalyptus plantations. A gynandromorph individual of T. arnobia was found in a population of this pest in a laboratory rearing and it is described.A mariposa marrom Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll, 1872 (Lepidoptera: Geometridae é uma praga importante em plantios de eucalipto no Brasil. Um indivíduo ginandromorfo de T. arnobia foi encontrado em uma população desta praga em criação de laboratório e descrito nesta nota.

  1. The Role of Walkers’ Needs and Expectations in Supporting Maintenance of Attendance at Walking Groups: A Longitudinal Multi-Perspective Study of Walkers and Walk Group Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassavou, Aikaterini; Turner, Andrew; French, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is good evidence that when people’s needs and expectations regarding behaviour change are met, they are satisfied with that change, and maintain those changes. Despite this, there is a dearth of research on needs and expectations of walkers when initially attending walking groups and whether and how these needs and expectations have been satisfied after a period of attendance. Equally, there is an absence of research on how people who lead these groups understand walkers’ needs and walk leaders’ actions to address them. The present study was aimed at addressing both of these gaps in the research. Methods Two preliminary thematic analyses were conducted on face-to-face interviews with (a) eight walkers when they joined walking groups, five of whom were interviewed three months later, and (b) eight walk leaders. A multi-perspective analysis building upon these preliminary analyses identified similarities and differences within the themes that emerged from the interviews with walkers and walk leaders. Results Walkers indicated that their main needs and expectations when joining walking groups were achieving long-term social and health benefits. At the follow up interviews, walkers indicated that satisfaction with meeting similar others within the groups was the main reason for continued attendance. Their main source of dissatisfaction was not feeling integrated in the existing walking groups. Walk leaders often acknowledged the same reasons for walkers joining and maintaining attendance at walking. However, they tended to attribute dissatisfaction and drop out to uncontrollable environmental factors and/or walkers’ personalities. Walk leaders reported a lack of efficacy to effectively address walkers’ needs. Conclusions Interventions to increase retention of walkers should train walk leaders with the skills to help them modify the underlying psychological factors affecting walkers’ maintenance at walking groups. This should result in

  2. The butterfly fauna of the Nizhny Novgorod Region inventarisation experience (Insecta: Lepidoptera and its use for the regional Red Data Book building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav K. Korb

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Discussed is an inventory of the Lepidoptera fauna of the Nizhny Novgorod region, its current status and prospects of its study. At the moment 1412 species of Lepidoptera are known from this area, but according to preliminary estimates the total number of species of Lepidoptera in this area amounts probably between 1800 and 2000. The necessity of the inclusion of 66 species of Lepidoptera in the Red Data Book of the Nizhny Novgorod region (approximately 4.5% of its current fauna and about 3.2% of its expected fauna is discussed. The necessity of the exception of 49 species of Lepidoptera by the Red Data Book of Nizhny Novgorod region is shown. The prospects for the protection of the Lepidoptera fauna within this area are discussed. Proposed is the usage of the IUCN status criteria for regional Red List with their modification in the area of the species.

  3. Parasitoid complex of Zygaena filipendulae L. (Lepidoptera: Zygaenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žikić V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Caterpillars of Zygaena filipendulae Linnaeus were sampled during May and June in the Sićevo Gorge in southern Serbia. All parasitized larvae were found on grey elm trees (Ulmus canescens. During the short period before metamorphosis of Z. filipendulae, we found the whole specter of parasitoid wasps: Cotesia zygaenarum Marshall (Braconidae, Gelis agilis (Fabricius and Mesochorus velox Holmgren (Ichneumonidae, Elasmus platyedrae Ferrière and Pediobius sp. (Eulophidae, Eupelmus vesicularis (Retzius (Eupelmidae and Brachymeria tibialis (Walker (Chalcididae. Beside hymenopteran parasitoids, we found parasitoid flies from the family Tachinidae, Phryxe nemea (Meigen (Diptera. All 46 observed Z. filipendulae larvae found on grey elm trees were parasitized, but three pupae were found directly on Lotus corniculatus. Two species are newly reported as parasitoids of Z. filipendulae: E. platyedrae and Eupelmus vesicularis and three species (G. agilis, M. velox and E. platyedrae are new to the fauna of Serbia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 43001

  4. Field Studies of Streamflow Generation Using Natural and Injected Tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genereux, D.

    1992-01-01

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate [Rn]{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and {sup 222}Rn volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of [Rn]{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach. The method was first applied to a 34 m stream reach at Bickford during baseflow; results suggested that {ge} 70% of the lateral inflow could be considered vadose zone water (water which had been in a saturated zone for less than a few days), and the remainder ''soil groundwater'' or ''saturated zone water'' (which had a longer residence time in a soil saturated zone). The method was then applied to two stream reaches on the West Fork of Walker Branch over a wide range of flow conditions; four springs were also investigated. It was found that springwater and inflow to the stream could be viewed as a mixture of water from three end members: the two defined at Bickford (vadose zone water and soil groundwater) and a third (bedrock groundwater) to account for the movement of water through fractured dolomite bedrock. Calcium was used as a second naturally-occurring tracer to distinguish bedrock groundwater from the other two end members. The behavior

  5. 500 kyr of Indian Ocean Walker Circulation Variability Using Foraminiferal Mg/Ca and Stable Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneveld, J.; Mohtadi, M.; Lückge, A.; Pätzold, J.

    2017-12-01

    The tropical Indian Ocean is a key location for paleoclimate research affected by different oceanographic and atmospheric processes. Annual climate variations are strongly controlled by the Indian and Asian Monsoon characterized by bi-annually reversing trade winds. Inter-annual climate variations in the Walker circulation are caused by the Indian Ocean Dipole and El Niño-Southern Oscillation resulting in either heavy flooding or severe droughts like for example the famine of 2011 in eastern Africa. Oceanographically the tropical western Indian Ocean receives water masses from the Indonesian Gateway area, sub-Antarctic waters that upwell south of the equator, and the outflow waters from the highly saline Red Sea. On the other hand, the tropical western Indian Ocean is a major source for providing water masses to the Agulhas Current system. Although the eastern Indian Ocean has been studied extensively, the tropical western Indian Ocean is still lacking in high quality climate-archives that have the potential to provide important information to understand how the ocean and atmospheric zonal circulation have changed in the past, and possibly will change in the future. Until now there were no long sediment cores available covering several glacial-interglacial cycles in the tropical western Indian Ocean. Core GeoB 12613-1, recovered during RV Meteor Cruise M75/2 east of the island of Pemba off Tanzania, provides an open-ocean core with well-preserved sediments covering the last five glacial-interglacial cycles ( 500 kyr). Mg/Ca and stable isotopes on both surface- and thermocline dwelling foraminifera have been performed to test how changes in sea water temperatures and relative sea water salinity were coupled on orbital time scales. The results are compared with similar records generated for the tropical eastern Indian Ocean in core SO139-74KL off Sumatra. Water column stratification on both sides of the Indian Ocean and the cross-basin gradients in sea water

  6. Nasonia vitripennis (Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae parasitóide de dípteros muscóides coletado em Itumbiara, Goiás Nasonia vitripennis (Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae parasitoid of muscoids dipterous collected in Itumbiara, Goias, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.H. Marchiori

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the occurrence of parasitoid Nasonia vitripennis (Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae parasitizing pupae of flies (Diptera in different substrata in Itumbiara, Goiás. The pupae were obtained by the flotation method. They were individually placed in gelatin capsules until the emergence of flies or their parasitoids. From May 1998 through April 2002, 737 parasitoids were collected in human feces, cattle liver, chicken, fish and cattle kidney. The prevalence of parasitism was 67.8%.

  7. A global phylogeny of leafmining Ectoedemia moths (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae): host plant family shifts and allopatry as drivers of speciation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorenweerd, C.; van Nieukerken, E.J.; Menken, S.B.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Host association patterns in Ectoedemia (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae) are also encountered in other insect groups with intimate plant relationships, including a high degree of monophagy, a preference for ecologically dominant plant families (e.g. Fagaceae, Rosaceae, Salicaceae, and

  8. A global phylogeny of leafmining Ectoedemia moths (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae): exploring host plant family shifts and allopatry as drivers of speciation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorenweerd, C.; Nieukerken, van E.J.; Menken, S.B.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Host association patterns in Ectoedemia (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae) are also encountered in other insect groups with intimate plant relationships, including a high degree of monophagy, a preference for ecologically dominant plant families (e.g. Fagaceae, Rosaceae, Salicaceae, and

  9. A new species of Lioptilodes Zimmerman (Lepidoptera, Pterophoridae from northern Chile Uma nova espécie de Lioptilodes Zimmerman (Lepidoptera, Pterophoridae do norte do Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor A. Vargas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Male and female adults of a new species of Lioptilodes Zimmerman (Lepidoptera, Pterophoridae are described and illustrated. Immature stages are associated with Baccharis scandens (Ruiz & Pav. Pers. (Asteraceae. The species was collected in two localities of northern Chile: near sea level in the Azapa valley, in the coastal desert of Arica Province and at 3000 m elevation in Socoroma, Parinacota Province.Os adultos macho e fêmea de uma nova espécie de Lioptilodes Zimmerman (Lepidoptera, Pterophoridae são descritos e ilustrados. Os estágios imaturos estão associados com Baccharis scandens (Ruiz & Pav. Pers. (Asteraceae. A espécie foi coletada em duas localidades do norte do Chile: vale de Azapa, perto do nível do mar, no deserto litoral da Província de Arica, e aos 3000 m de altitude em Socoroma, na Província de Parinacota.

  10. Sighting of Elymnias panthera (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae in West Bengal, eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Roy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tawny Palmfly butterfly, Elymnias panthera (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae, is a Malayan species that is also known from the Nicobar Islands. Here we report sighting of E. panthera from the Bethuadahari Wildlife Sanctuary in West Bengal, eastern India. This is the first sighting of the species from mainland India, and is a possible range extension of the species into northeastern India.

  11. Phylogeography of Koramius charltonius (Gray, 1853) (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae): a case of too many poorly circumscribed subspecies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Korb, S. K.; Faltýnek Fric, Zdeněk; Bartoňová, Alena

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 2 (2016), s. 169-191 ISSN 0342-7536 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36098G Grant - others:GA JU(CZ) 168/2013/P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Koramius charltonius * Lepidoptera * Central Asia Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  12. First record of Ectomyelois muriscis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) on physic nut (Jatropha curcas), a biofuel plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    The natural infestation of fruits and stems of Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae) by larvae of the pyralid moth Ectomyelois muriscis (Dyar) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) is reported for the first time. Populations of E. muriscis on J. curcas were observed in various parts of the state of Chiapas, souther...

  13. Mass migration of Chrysodeixis chalcites (Esper, 1789) in Tenerife, Canary Islands (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spitzer, Karel; Jaroš, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 125 (2004), s. 19-22 ISSN 0300-5267 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5007015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Lepidoptera * Noctuidae * Chrysodeixis chalcites Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  14. Impact of temperature and relative humidity on life history parameters of adult Sitotroga cerealella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Angoumois grain moth, Sitotroga cerealella (Olivier) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), is a pest of stored corn, Zea mays L., and other grains throughout the world. S. cerealella are routinely exposed to temperatures below 20°C in regions of the U.S. where corn is grown, yet there are no data describi...

  15. PECULIARITIES OF THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF THE NOCTUIDAE (LEPIDOPTERA, NOCTUIDAE OF THE ISLAND OF CHECHEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Abdurakhmanov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the species composition of the noctuidae (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae of the island of Chechen of the North-West Caspian sea, their spatial distribution,  dissemination  and analysis of the most common and indigenous species.

  16. Een ontdekking in de Peel: de uil Xestia stigmatica nieuw voor Nederland (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, F.A.H.E.

    2007-01-01

    A discovery in De Peel: the noctuid moth Xestia stigmatica new for the Netherlands (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Xestia stigmatica is present all over Europe, but was not recorded in the Netherlands. In 2001 a single female was caught at light, in the commune of Deurne (province of Noord-Brabant). The

  17. Digestive peptidase evolution in holometabolous insects led to a divergent group of enzymes in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Renata O; Via, Allegra; Brandão, Marcelo M; Tramontano, Anna; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2015-03-01

    Trypsins and chymotrypsins are well-studied serine peptidases that cleave peptide bonds at the carboxyl side of basic and hydrophobic L-amino acids, respectively. These enzymes are largely responsible for the digestion of proteins. Three primary processes regulate the activity of these peptidases: secretion, precursor (zymogen) activation and substrate-binding site recognition. Here, we present a detailed phylogenetic analysis of trypsins and chymotrypsins in three orders of holometabolous insects and reveal divergent characteristics of Lepidoptera enzymes in comparison with those of Coleoptera and Diptera. In particular, trypsin subsite S1 was more hydrophilic in Lepidoptera than in Coleoptera and Diptera, whereas subsites S2-S4 were more hydrophobic, suggesting different substrate preferences. Furthermore, Lepidoptera displayed a lineage-specific trypsin group belonging only to the Noctuidae family. Evidence for facilitated trypsin auto-activation events were also observed in all the insect orders studied, with the characteristic zymogen activation motif complementary to the trypsin active site. In contrast, insect chymotrypsins did not seem to have a peculiar evolutionary history with respect to their mammal counterparts. Overall, our findings suggest that the need for fast digestion allowed holometabolous insects to evolve divergent groups of peptidases with high auto-activation rates, and highlight that the evolution of trypsins led to a most diverse group of enzymes in Lepidoptera. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A new species of Stenoloba Staudinger, 1892 from China (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Bryophilinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekarsky, Oleg; Saldaitis, Aidas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Stenoloba from the olivacea species group, Stenoloba solaris, sp. n. (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae), is described from Yunnan, China. Illustrations of the male holotype and its genitalia are provided. A diagnostic comparison is made with Stenoloba albistriata Kononenko & Ronkay, 2000, Stenoloba olivacea (Wileman, 1914), and Stenoloba benedeki Ronkay, 2001 (Fig. 4). PMID:23805047

  19. A new species of Stenoloba Staudinger, 1892 from China (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Bryophilinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Pekarsky

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Stenoloba from the olivacea species group, S. solaris, sp. n. (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, is described from Yunnan, China. Illustrations of the male holotype and its genitalia are provided. A diagnostic comparison is made with Stenoloba albistriata Kononenko & Ronkay, 2000, Stenoloba olivacea (Wileman, 1914, and Stenoloba benedeki Ronkay, 2001 (Fig. 4.

  20. Eurema brigitta (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) – a new record of butterfly for Socotra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Faltýnek Fric, Zdeněk; Rindoš, Michal; Hula, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 3 (2017), s. 221-225 ISSN 0374-1036 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36098G Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Lepidoptera * Rhopalocera * Papilionoidea Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 0.632, year: 2016 https://www.biotaxa.org/AEMNP/article/view/35064

  1. Large-Scale Evolutionary Patterns of Host Plant Associations in the Lepidoptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menken, S.B.J.; Boomsma, J.J.; van Nieukerken, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    We characterized evolutionary patterns of host plant use across about 2500 species of British Lepidoptera, using character optimization and independent phylogenetic contrasts among 95 operational taxa, and evaluated the extent to which caterpillars are monophagous, use woody host plants, and feed...

  2. Aggregation and foraging behavior of imported cabbageworm (Lepidoptera: pieridae) adults on blue vervain flowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The imported cabbageworm [Pieris rapae (L.) (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)], also known as the cabbage white butterfly, is an important specialized pest on cruciferous plants (Brassicales: Brassicaceae) worldwide. an unusual aggregation of the cabbage white butterflies was observed on a patch of flowering...

  3. A new species of the genus Acria Stephens, 1834 (Lepidoptera: Depressariidae: Acriinae) from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashank, P R; Saravanan, L; Kalidas, P; Phanikumar, T; Ramamurthy, V V; Chandra Bose, N S

    2015-05-14

    A new species, Acria meyricki sp. nov. (Lepidoptera: Depressariidae: Acriinae) occurring on oil palm, is described from India. The status and nomenclature of the genus is reviewed and an annotated checklist of species is given. A key to the seven species known so far from the Indian subcontinent is provided.

  4. Fund af småsommerfugle fra Danmark i 2009 (Lepidoptera)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Otto; Falck, Per; Karsholt, Ole

    2010-01-01

    ; Coleophoridae 118; Tortricidae 383 and of Pyralidae 196; this results in a total of 1560 species of Microlepidoptera (families Micropterigidae-Pyralidae) found in Denmark. The total amount of Macrolepidoptera mentioned from Denmark is now 962, bringing the number of Danish Lepidoptera to a total of 2522 species....

  5. Host range of Secusio extensa (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae), and potential for biological control of Senecio madagascariensis (Asteraceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. M. Ramadan; K. T. Murai; T. Johnson

    2010-01-01

    Secusio extensa (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) was evaluated as a potential biological control agent for Madagascar fireweed, Senecio madagascariensis (Asteraceae), which has invaded over 400 000 acres of rangeland in the Hawaiian Islands and is toxic to cattle and horses. The moth was introduced from southeastern Madagascar...

  6. Laboratory Assessment of the Effects of Bacillus thuringiensis on Native Lepidoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Peacock; Dale F. Schweitzer; Jane L. Carter; Normand R. Dubois

    1998-01-01

    The effect of 2 formulations of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (Foray 48B and Dipel 8AF) was evaluated on 42 species of native Lepidoptera in laboratory bioassays using instars that are present in the field at the time of gypsy moth suppression applications. Mortality was significant for 27 of the 42 species evaluated...

  7. Current and Future Potential Risk of Establishment of Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    The oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), is a primary pest of stone fruits in many countries, including the United States. The distribution of this pest is concentrated in areas receiving higher than lower rainfall. It prefers sites where stone fruits and apple...

  8. Additional three new species of Anarsia Meyrick (Lepidoptera, Gelechiidae) from Cambodia and Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyu-Tek; Bae, Yang-Seop

    2017-04-12

    Three new species of the genus Anarsia Zeller (Lepidoptera, Gelechiidae) are described: A. huensis Park, sp. nov. from Vietnam, and A. pursatica Park, sp. nov. and A. degeneralis Park, sp. nov. from Cambodia. Images of adults and genitalia for the new species are illustrated. A check list of the known species from both countries is provided.

  9. Fund af småsommerfugle fra Danmark i 2010 (Lepidoptera)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Otto; Falck, Per; Karsholt, Ole

    2011-01-01

    ; Tortricidae 384; Epermeniidae 7; Pterophoridae 46 and Pyralidae 197; this results in a total of 1574 species of Microlepidoptera (families Micropterigidae-Pyralidae) found in Denmark. The total amount of Macrolepidoptera mentioned from Denmark is now 965, bringing the number of Danish Lepidoptera to a total...

  10. Digestive peptidase evolution in holometabolous insects led to a divergent group of enzymes in Lepidoptera

    KAUST Repository

    Dias, Renata O.

    2015-03-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Trypsins and chymotrypsins are well-studied serine peptidases that cleave peptide bonds at the carboxyl side of basic and hydrophobic l-amino acids, respectively. These enzymes are largely responsible for the digestion of proteins. Three primary processes regulate the activity of these peptidases: secretion, precursor (zymogen) activation and substrate-binding site recognition. Here, we present a detailed phylogenetic analysis of trypsins and chymotrypsins in three orders of holometabolous insects and reveal divergent characteristics of Lepidoptera enzymes in comparison with those of Coleoptera and Diptera. In particular, trypsin subsite S1 was more hydrophilic in Lepidoptera than in Coleoptera and Diptera, whereas subsites S2-S4 were more hydrophobic, suggesting different substrate preferences. Furthermore, Lepidoptera displayed a lineage-specific trypsin group belonging only to the Noctuidae family. Evidence for facilitated trypsin auto-activation events were also observed in all the insect orders studied, with the characteristic zymogen activation motif complementary to the trypsin active site. In contrast, insect chymotrypsins did not seem to have a peculiar evolutionary history with respect to their mammal counterparts. Overall, our findings suggest that the need for fast digestion allowed holometabolous insects to evolve divergent groups of peptidases with high auto-activation rates, and highlight that the evolution of trypsins led to a most diverse group of enzymes in Lepidoptera.

  11. The first record of the butterfly Memphis d. dia(Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Charaxinae in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Córdoba-Alfaro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Memphis diain Costa Rica (Godman & Salvin, 1884 (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Charaxinae is reported herein, based on a specimen collected El Rodeo (09 ° 54’ 76.6”N; 84 ° 16’ 89.5”W on April 4, 2012.

  12. Comparative transcriptome analysis of lufenuron-resistant and susceptible strains of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento, Antonio Rog?rio Bezerra do; Fresia, Pablo; C?nsoli, Fernando Luis; Omoto, Celso

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The evolution of insecticide resistance in Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) has resulted in large economic losses and disturbances to the environment and agroecosystems. Resistance to lufenuron, a chitin biosynthesis inhibitor insecticide, was recently documented in Brazilian populations of S. frugiperda. Thus, we utilized large-scale cDNA sequencing (RNA-Seq analysis) to compare the pattern of gene expr...

  13. [Accidents due to Lepidoptera: Hylesia nigricans (Berg, 1875) or "mariposa negra"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrerizo, Silvia; Spera, Marina; de Roodt, Adolfo

    2014-04-01

    Lepidoptera (butterflies, caterpillars and moths) biologic features make possible the contact between different instars and humans. The moth Hylesia nigricans is responsible for epidemic outbreaks in our country. It is called erucism when the contact is with caterpillars and lepidopterism when the contact is with moths. We perform an update of these important medical lepidopters.

  14. Postharvest irradiation treatment for quarantine control of the invasive Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of irradiation on egg, larval, and pupal development in European grapevine moth, Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), were examined. Eggs, neonates, third instars, fifth instars, and early and late stage pupae were irradiated at target doses of 50, 100, 150, or 200 Gy or left untr...

  15. A new species of Eupithecia Curtis (Lepidoptera, Geometridae from the Azapa Valley, northern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor A. Vargas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Eupithecia Curtis (Lepidoptera, Geometridae from the Azapa Valley, northern Chile. Male and female adults of a new species of Eupithecia Curtis from the Arica Province, Chile are described and illustrated. The species is compared with E. yubitzae Vargas & Parra, 2004, from the same locality, and E. galapagosata Landry & Rindge 1995, from the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador.

  16. Evaluation of traps and lures for codling moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in apple orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the use of several trap – lure combinations to improve monitoring of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), in apple, Malus domestica Bordk. Treatments included the use of clear, orange and white traps baited with one or more of the followin...

  17. Before harvest survival of codling moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in artificially infested sweet cherries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to the 2009 season, sweet cherries, Prunus avium (L.) L., from North America were required to be fumigated with methyl bromide before being exported to Japan to eliminate possible infestation by codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). However, based on recent biological...

  18. Extrafloral nectar feeding by Strymon jacqueline Nicolay & Robbins, 2005 (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae: Eumaeini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Vila

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Adults of the dry area specialist Strymon jacqueline Nicolay & Robbins, 2005 (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae: Eumaeini are here recorded feeding on extrafloral nectar of the large cactus Neoraimondia arequipensis var. gigantea (Werdermann & Backeberg Ritter. The significance of these observations is discussed in relation to lycaenid survival in a xeric environment, pollination and mate location.

  19. On the status and position of Melitaea minerva var. palamedes Groum-Grshimailo, 1890 (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Korb, S. K.; Fric, Zdeněk; Bartoňová, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 177 (2017), s. 17-22 ISSN 0300-5267 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36098G Grant - others:GA JU(CZ) 168/2013/P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Lepidoptera * Nymphalidae * Melitaea palamedes Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 0.264, year: 2016

  20. Effects of elevated CO2 leaf diet on gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) respiration rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anita R. Foss; William J. Mattson; Terry M. Trier

    2013-01-01

    Elevated levels of CO2 affect plant growth and leaf chemistry, which in turn can alter host plant suitability for insect herbivores. We examined the suitability of foliage from trees grown from seedlings since 1997 at Aspen FACE as diet for the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae: paper birch (...

  1. Post-glacial dispersal strategies of Orthoptera and Lepidoptera in Europe and in the Carpathian basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varga, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Post-glacial dispersal strategies of Orthoptera and Lepidoptera in Europe and in the Carpathian basin Ecologically transitional regions are characterised by high species diversity due to the overlap of species with different geographical origins caused by dispersal processes along gradients, e.g.

  2. Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) thrived in gymnosperm forests following the end-Triassic extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Schootbrugge, Bas; van Eldijk, Timo; Wappler, Torsten; Strother, Paul; van der Weijst, Carolien; Rajaei, Hossein; Visscher, Henk

    2017-04-01

    The oldest evidence for Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies) and the Coelolepida (hollow-scaled moths and butterflies) is presented based on an assemblage of fossilized scales encountered in uppermost Triassic and lowermost Jurassic sediments from a core drilled in northern Germany. The diverse assemblage of scales points to a Triassic origin of the Lepidoptera and a radiation of some lineages just before or right after the end-Triassic mass extinction (201 Ma). These findings confirm molecular clock estimates for splits within the Amphiesmenoptera that led to the evolution of true butterflies. Not only did Lepidoptera survive the end-Triassic extinction, they also appear to have radiated directly following this environmental crisis, which could be related to the dramatic changes in paleoclimate triggered by the eruption of the CAMP, especially an increase in humidity. Seen in combination with high-resolution palynological records that show an Early Jurassic dominance of conifer pollen, the presence of scales derived from angiospermivorous Coelolepida likely signifies a host-shift (for multiple lineages of crown group Lepidoptera) from gymnosperms to angiosperms during the Mesozoic.

  3. Review of Lepidoptera with trophic relationships to Picea abies (L. in the conditions of Czechia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modlinger Roman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Trophic relationships of Lepidoptera (Insecta occurring in the territory of Czechia to the Norway spruce (Picea abies L. was evaluated on the basis of the excerption and critical evaluation of literature. Each species was classified into the following categories – spruce as the host plant, regular development on spruce, narrow trophic relationship, indirect relationship and episodical occurrence. The particular taxa were also characterized according to their distribution and the form of larval life was specified. The development on spruce was documented in 96 species of Lepidoptera, which represented less than 3% of taxa belonging to this group and being reported from Czechia. Of that, spruce was a common host plant for 67 species, 23 species were polyphagous and might develop on spruce, and 6 species belonged to soil species damaging spruce roots, mainly in forest nurseries. Among the species of Lepidoptera, which regularly develop on spruce in the Czech conditions, 55 species were classified. As narrow specialists with special trophic relationship to spruce, 33 taxa could be considered. There were 15 spruce species with forestry importance, which were able to outbreak their populations regularly or irregularly. Among spruce species it was possible to classify 16 taxa as rare. The provided information on Lepidoptera with trophic relationship to spruce is applicable also for other Central European areas. Besides the species with importance for forest pest management, also rare taxa, which can become endangered by climate change or by forest management, were indicated.

  4. Molecular phylogeny of the small ermine moth genus Yponomeuta (Lepidoptera, Yponomeutidae) in the Palaearctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, H.; Lieshout, N.; van Ginkel, W.E.; Menken, S.B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The small ermine moth genus Yponomeuta (Lepidoptera, Yponomeutidae) contains 76 species that are specialist feeders on hosts from Celastraceae, Rosaceae, Salicaceae, and several other plant families. The genus is a model for studies in the evolution of phytophagous insects and their

  5. Development of Sparganothis sulfureana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) on Cranberry Cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Erin E.; Guédot, Christelle

    2018-01-01

    Sparganothis fruitworm (Sparganothis sulfureana Clemens) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) is a serious pest of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton), a native North American fruit cultivated in northern regions of the United States and southeastern Canada. This study assessed antibiosis in several cranberry cultivars commonly grown in Wisconsin. Five cultivars previously shown to host different levels of populations of S. sulfureana in commercial cranberry were assessed in this study to evaluate the performance of S. sulfureana amongst these cultivars. We measured growth and time to developmental stages of newly emerged larvae to adulthood on selected cranberry cultivars in the laboratory. There was no difference in the rates of survival to pupation and to adult emergence among any of the cultivars tested. Mid-instar larvae that fed on the cultivar ‘Ben Lear’ were heavier than those feeding on ‘GH-1’, ‘Stevens’, or ‘HyRed’, and larvae that fed on ‘Mullica Queen’ were heavier than those feeding on ‘HyRed’. However, there were no significant differences in pupal weights or in the number of days from neonate to adult emergence among varieties. Therefore, this study did not provide evidence of antibiosis among the cultivars tested, and found that larval weight was not correlated with other measurements of performance. PMID:29301287

  6. Influence of killing method on Lepidoptera DNA barcode recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willows-Munro, Sandi; Schoeman, M Corrie

    2015-05-01

    The global DNA barcoding initiative has revolutionized the field of biodiversity research. Such large-scale sequencing projects require the collection of large numbers of specimens, which need to be killed and preserved in a way that is both DNA-friendly and which will keep voucher specimens in good condition for later study. Factors such as time since collection, correct storage (exposure to free water and heat) and DNA extraction protocol are known to play a role in the success of downstream molecular applications. Limited data are available on the most efficient, DNA-friendly protocol for killing. In this study, we evaluate the quality of DNA barcode (cytochrome oxidase I) sequences amplified from DNA extracted from specimens collected using three different killing methods (ethyl acetate, cyanide and freezing). Previous studies have suggested that chemicals, such as ethyl acetate and formaldehyde, degraded DNA and as such may not be appropriate for the collection of insects for DNA-based research. All Lepidoptera collected produced DNA barcodes of good quality, and our study found no clear difference in nucleotide signal strength, probability of incorrect base calling and phylogenetic utility among the three different treatment groups. Our findings suggest that ethyl acetate, cyanide and freezing can all be used to collect specimens for DNA analysis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of Tyspanodes hypsalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Li, Pengfei; You, Ping

    2016-05-01

    The size of Tyspanodes hypsalis (Warren, 1891) mitogenome was 15,329 bp in which the base composition of mitogenome was 40.0% A, 41.4% T, 11.9% G and 7.7% C. All protein-coding genes (PCGs) utilized the standard ATN, while COI used CGA as the initial codon. In addition, all PCGs had the common stop codon (TAN), except COI and ND5 respectively used incomplete termination codon T and TA. All tRNAs had the typical cloverleaf structure of mitochondrial tRNAs, with the exception of tRNASer(AGN), the dihydrouridine (DHU) arm of which forms a simple loop. The A + T-rich region of 350 bp contains several features common to the Lepidoptera insects. Including the motif "ATAGA" followed by a 17-bp poly-T stretch, a microsatellite-like (AT)8 element preceded by the ATTTA motif, and a 12 bp polyA-like stretch (AAATAAAAAAAAA) present immediately upstream tRNAMet.

  8. Evolution of extreme proboscis lengths in Neotropical Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauder, J. A.-S.; Warren, A. D.; Krenn, H. W.

    2015-01-01

    Exaggerated morphologies have evolved in insects as adaptations to nectar feeding by natural selection. For example, the suctorial mouthparts of butterflies enable these insects to gain access to floral nectar concealed inside deep floral tubes. Proboscis length in Lepidoptera is known to scale with body size, but whether extreme absolute proboscis lengths of nectar feeding butterflies result from a proportional or disproportional increase with body size that differs between phylogenetic lineages remains unknown. We surveyed the range of variation that occurs in scaling relationships between proboscis length and body size against a phylogenetic background among Costa Rican Hesperiidae. We obtained a new record holder for the longest proboscis in butterflies and showed that extremely long proboscides evolved at least three times independently within Neotropical Hesperiidae. We conclude that the evolution of extremely long proboscides results from allometric scaling with body size, as demonstrated in hawk moths. We hypothesize that constraints on the evolution of increasingly long butterfly proboscides may come from (1) the underlying scaling relationships, i.e., relative proboscis length, combined with the butterfly’s flight style and flower-visiting behaviour and/or (2) developmental constraints during the pupal phase. Lastly, we discuss why butterflies did not evolve similar scaling relationships as hawk moths. PMID:25937673

  9. The complete mitochondrial genome of Parnassius imperator (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae: Parnassiinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunliang; Chen, Yanhong; Xia, Chenchen; Xia, Xueqin; Chen, Xiao; Hao, Jiasheng

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Parnassius imperator (Lepidoptera: Parnassiinae) is a circular molecule of 15,424 bp in length, containing 37 typical insect mitochondrial genes and one non-coding A + T-rich region. Its gene order and arrangement are identical to the common type found in most lepidopteran mitogenomes. All protein-coding genes (PCGs) start with a typical ATN initiation codon, except for the cox1, which is initiated by the CGA codon as observed in other lepidopteran species. Some PCGs use standard TAA, while others use TAG (nad1) or incomplete codon T (cox1 and cox2), as their termination codons. 15 intergenic spacers (175 bp in total) and 10 overlapping sequences (29 bp in total) are dispersed throughout the whole genome. The 491 bp long A+ T-rich region contains some conserved structures similar to those found in other lepidopteran mitogenomes, such as the motif ATAGA followed by an 18-bp poly-T stretch, a microsatellite-like (AT)6 element preceded by the ATTTA motif. In addition, a 36 bp sequence stretch potential to form stem-loop structures is also found in the A+ T-rich region.

  10. [Origin of Lepidoptera fauna of the Southern Transural region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkin, N A

    2000-01-01

    The butterfly fauna of the Southern Transural region began mainly through the migration of insects from the Urals and Kazakhstan, since the end of the Cretaceous Period to the end of Paleogen, the Transural region was covered by an epiplatform sea. As this sea was retreating, the first regions of dry land appeared, which had boundaries with Kazakhstan and the Urals. They were the first to be populated by Lepidoptera. During the Pleocene and then after the Pleistocene cooling events, insects settled generally along the valley of the Tobol River and the Turgai depression, because these territories belong to intrazonal elements. At the present time, the greatest species diversity among insects in the southern Transural area is observed specifically in the Turgai depression and in areas directly adjacent to it. This territory is mainly occupied by populations unique to the Transural regions and belonging to the following species: Mantis religiosa (praying mantis), Saga pedo, Parnassius apollo (apollo), Neolycaena rhymnus, Hyponephele lupina (oriental meadow brown), Chazara persephone (dark rockbrown), Epicallia villica (cream-spot tiger), etc.

  11. Morphological outcomes of gynandromorphism in Lycaeides butterflies (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahner, Joshua P; Lucas, Lauren K; Wilson, Joseph S; Forister, Matthew L

    2015-01-01

    The genitalia of male insects have been widely used in taxonomic identification and systematics and are potentially involved in maintaining reproductive isolation between species. Although sexual selection has been invoked to explain patterns of morphological variation in genitalia among populations and species, developmental plasticity in genitalia likely contributes to observed variation but has been rarely examined, particularly in wild populations. Bilateral gynandromorphs are individuals that are genetically male on one side of the midline and genetically female on the other, while mosaic gynandromorphs have only a portion of their body developing as the opposite sex. Gynandromorphs might offer unique insights into developmental plasticity because individuals experience abnormal cellular interactions at the genitalic midline. In this study, we compare the genitalia and wing patterns of gynandromorphic Anna and Melissa blue butterflies, Lycaeides anna (Edwards) (formerly L. idas anna) and L. melissa (Edwards) (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae), to the morphology of normal individuals from the same populations. Gynandromorph wing markings all fell within the range of variation of normal butterflies; however, a number of genitalic measurements were outliers when compared with normal individuals. From these results, we conclude that the gynandromorphs' genitalia, but not wing patterns, can be abnormal when compared with normal individuals and that the gynandromorphic genitalia do not deviate developmentally in a consistent pattern across individuals. Finally, genetic mechanisms are considered for the development of gynandromorphism in Lycaeides butterflies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  12. Prof. John Wood, Chief Executive Designate, Dr Gordon Walker, Directorate, Chief Executive, Prof. Ken J. Peach, Head of the Particle Physics Department, CLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, United Kingdom

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    L. to. r.: Dr. Ian Wilson, CLIC Deputy Study Leader, Prof. Ken J. Peach, Head of the Particle Physics Department, Prof. John Wood, Chief Executive Designate, Dr. Gordon Walker, Directorate, Chief Executive

  13. Abscopal antitumor immune effects of magnet-mediated hyperthermia at a high therapeutic temperature on Walker-256 carcinosarcomas in rats

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, HUI; ZHANG, LI; SHI, YINGRUI; JAVIDIPARSIJANI, SARA; WANG, GUIRONG; LI, XIAO; OUYANG, WEIWEI; ZHOU, JUMEI; ZHAO, LINGYUN; WANG, XIAOWEN; ZHANG, XIAODONG; GAO, FUPING; LIU, JINGSHI; LUO, JUNMING; TANG, JINTIAN

    2014-01-01

    The abscopal effect has previously been described in various tumors and is associated with radiation therapy and hyperthermia, with possible underlying mechanisms explaining each observed case. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the antitumor effects of magnet-mediated hyperthermia on Walker-256 carcinosarcomas in rats at two different temperature ranges (42–46°C and 50–55°C). We also aimed to identify whether a higher therapeutic temperature of magnetic-mediated hyperthermia impro...

  14. Low carbohydrate, high fat diet impairs exercise economy and negates the performance benefit from intensified training in elite race walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Louise M; Ross, Megan L; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Welvaert, Marijke; Heikura, Ida A; Forbes, Sara G; Mirtschin, Joanne G; Cato, Louise E; Strobel, Nicki; Sharma, Avish P; Hawley, John A

    2017-05-01

    Three weeks of intensified training and mild energy deficit in elite race walkers increases peak aerobic capacity independent of dietary support. Adaptation to a ketogenic low carbohydrate, high fat (LCHF) diet markedly increases rates of whole-body fat oxidation during exercise in race walkers over a range of exercise intensities. The increased rates of fat oxidation result in reduced economy (increased oxygen demand for a given speed) at velocities that translate to real-life race performance in elite race walkers. In contrast to training with diets providing chronic or periodised high carbohydrate availability, adaptation to an LCHF diet impairs performance in elite endurance athletes despite a significant improvement in peak aerobic capacity. We investigated the effects of adaptation to a ketogenic low carbohydrate (CHO), high fat diet (LCHF) during 3 weeks of intensified training on metabolism and performance of world-class endurance athletes. We controlled three isoenergetic diets in elite race walkers: high CHO availability (g kg -1  day -1 : 8.6 CHO, 2.1 protein, 1.2 fat) consumed before, during and after training (HCHO, n = 9); identical macronutrient intake, periodised within or between days to alternate between low and high CHO availability (PCHO, n = 10); LCHF (diets providing chronic or periodised high-CHO availability, and despite a significant improvement in V̇O2 peak , adaptation to the topical LCHF diet negated performance benefits in elite endurance athletes, in part due to reduced exercise economy. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological Society.

  15. Preparation of carbon-11 labelled proline for positron emission tomography. Preliminary distribution studies in rats with Walker 256 carcinosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolster, J.M.; Hoeve, W. ten; Vaalburg, W.; Dijk, T.H. van; Zijlstra, J.B.; Paans, A.M.J.; Wynberg, H.; Woldring, M.G. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen Hospital (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Organisch Chemisch Lab.)

    1985-05-01

    DL-(1-/sup 11/C)Proline has been synthesized by carboxylation of ..cap alpha..-lithiopyrrolidyl-N-tert-butyl-formamidine with a radiochemical yield of up to 18% without correction for decay. The total synthesis time is 45 min. Accumulation of DL-(1-/sup 11/C)proline has been shown in Walker 256 carcinosarcoma transplanted in rats. A tumor/non-tumor ratio of 5.9 was found at 45 min after i.v. injection.

  16. Syntheses of carbon-11 labelled ornithine and lysine. Preliminary accumulation studies in rats with Walker 256 carcinosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolster, J.M.; Vaalburg, W.; Dijk, T.H. van; Zijlstra, J.B.; Paans, A.M.J.; Wynberg, H.; Woldring, M.G. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands))

    1985-04-01

    DL-(1-/sup 11/C)ornithine and lysine have been synthesized by carboxylation of the corresponding ..cap alpha..-lithioisocyanide with a radiochemical yield of up to 14% without correction for decay. The total preparation time is 50 min. Accumulation of both DL-(1-/sup 11/C)ornithine and lysine in Walker 256 carcinosarcoma is observed, with a tumour/non-tumor ratio of 4.9 and 4.5 respectively, at 45 min after intravenous injection.

  17. Description and field performance of the Walker Branch throughfall displacement experiment: 1993--1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, P.J.; Todd, D.E.; Huston, M.A. [Oak Ridge National lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Joslin, J.D. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Norris, TN (United States); Croker, J.L.; Auge, R.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Inst. of Agriculture

    1998-04-01

    The authors are conducting a large-scale manipulative field experiment in an upland oak forest on the Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee to identify important ecosystem responses that might result from future precipitation changes. The manipulation of soil water content is being implemented by a gravity-driven transfer of throughfall from one 6400-m{sup 2} treatment plot to another. Throughfall is intercepted in {approx}1850 subcanopy troughs suspended above the forest floor of the dry plot and transferred by gravity flow across an ambient plot for subsequent distribution onto the wet treatment plot. Soil water content is being monitored at two depths with time domain reflectometers at 310 sampling locations across the site. The experimental system is able to produce statistically significant differences in soil water content in years having both dry and wet conditions. Maximum soil water content differentials between wet and dry plots in the 0- to 0.35-m horizon were 8 to 10% during summers with abundant precipitation and 3 to 5% during drought periods. Treatment impacts on soil water potential were restricted to the surface soil layer. Comparisons of pre- and post-installation soil and litter temperature measurements showed the ability of the experimental design to produce changes in soil water content and water potential without creating large artifacts in the forest understory environment.

  18. A large-scale throughfall manipulation experiment on Walker Branch Watershed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, R.S.; Hanson, P.J.; Huston, M.A.; Garten, C.T. Jr.; Mulholland, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    A throughfall displacement experiment is being performed in a mixed-age upland-oak forest on the upper slopes of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee to investigate the effects of decreased and increased rainfall on individual species and ecosystem processes at the spatial scale of forest stands. Approximately 25% of the throughfall on the ''dry'' plot will be collected in polyethylene troughs suspended above the forest floor and the water transferred by gravity through pipes across the control plot for distribution onto the ''wet'' plot. Each plot is approximately 0.6 ha in size. The 25% reduction in soil moisture anticipated for the dry plot is equivalent to the driest growing season of the 1980's drought, which was correlated with sapling mortality and reduced growth of yellow poplar on the watershed. The experimental treatments will last at least 5 years. A wide range of biological and chemical characteristics of forest stands win be investigated, including: forest growth and physiological responses of major tree and understory species, leaf area index, herbivory, litter fall, understory competition, litter decomposition, soil organic matter and microbial populations, nutrient availability, soil and soil solution chemistry, and biogeochemical cycling processes. Data on vegetation growth, mortality, and reproduction will be used in existing models of community structure to produce estimates of potential changes in species composition over longer time periods resulting from wet versus dry experimental scenarios

  19. Dispersion, Topological Scattering, and Self-Interference in Multiply Connected Robertson-Walker Cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    1994-01-01

    We investigate scattering effects in open Robertson-Walker cosmologies whose spacelike slices are multiply connected hyperbolic manifolds. We work out an example in which the 3-space is infinite and has the topology of a solid torus. The world-lines in these cosmologies are unstable, and classical probability densities evolving under the horospherical geodesic flow show dispersion, as do the densities of scalar wave packets. The rate of dispersion depends crucially on the expansion factor, and we calculate the time evolution of their widths. We find that the cosmic expansion can confine dispersion: The diameter of the domain of chaoticity in the 3-manifold provides the natural, time-dependent length unit in an infinite, multiply connected universe. In a toroidal 3-space manifold this diameter is just the length of the limit cycle. On this scale we find that the densities take a finite limit width in the late stage of the expansion. In the early stage classical densities and conformally coupled fields approach...

  20. Prenatal MR imaging of Dandy-Walker complex: Midline sagittal area analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Alex M.; Bilaniuk, Larissa T.; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Liu, P.L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To measure the mid-sagittal areas of vermis (VA) and of posterior fossa (PFA) and determine their differences among fetuses with various Dandy-Walker (DW) entities and control subjects. Methods: We reviewed data in 25 fetal patients with a MR diagnosis of DW complex including hypoplastic vermis (HV), HV with rotation (HVR), and mega cistern magna (MCM), and in 85 fetal controls with normal CNS. PFA and VA of each subject were manually traced on mid-sagittal MR images. Regarding each of VA and PFA, after age correction, we determined statistically significant differences among HVR, HV, MCM, and control groups. Results: The mean VA residue of MCM was greater than that of the control, which was in turn greater than those of HVR and HV. The mean PF residue of the control was smaller than all other groups. Conclusion: Fetuses with HVR or HV had smaller VA than fetuses with MCM or control subjects. Fetuses with MCM, HVR, or HV had larger PFA than control subjects. These results may be an early step leading to better understanding of the confusion about the PF anomalies in future.

  1. Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Mulholland, P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-05-01

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

  2. Modelling the effects of the sterile insect technique applied to Eldana saccharina Walker in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Potgieter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model is formulated for the population dynamics of an Eldana saccharina Walker infestation of sugarcane under the influence of partially sterile released insects. The model describes the population growth of and interaction between normal and sterile E.saccharina moths in a temporally variable, but spatially homogeneous environment. The model consists of a deterministic system of difference equations subject to strictly positive initial data. The primary objective of this model is to determine suitable parameters in terms of which the above population growth and interaction may be quantified and according to which E.saccharina infestation levels and the associated sugarcane damage may be measured. Although many models have been formulated in the past describing the sterile insect technique, few of these models describe the technique for Lepidopteran species with more than one life stage and where F1-sterility is relevant. In addition, none of these models consider the technique when fully sterile females and partially sterile males are being released. The model formulated is also the first to describe the technique applied specifically to E.saccharina, and to consider the economic viability of applying the technique to this species. Pertinent decision support is provided to farm managers in terms of the best timing for releases, release ratios and release frequencies.

  3. Chronic Glibenclamide Treatment Attenuates Walker-256 Tumour Growth in Prediabetic Obese Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudinéia Conationi da Silva Franco

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The sulphonylurea glibenclamide (Gli is widely used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In addition to its antidiabetic effects, low incidences of certain types of cancer have been observed in Gli-treated diabetic patients. However, the mechanisms underlying this observation remain unclear. The aim of the present work was to evaluate whether obese adult rats that were chronically treated with an antidiabetic drug, glibenclamide, exhibit resistance to rodent breast carcinoma growth. Methods: Neonatal rats were treated with monosodium L-glutamate (MSG to induce prediabetes. Control and MSG groups were treated with Gli (2 mg/kg body weight/day from weaning to 100 days old. After Gli treatment, the control and MSG rats were grafted with Walker-256 tumour cells. After 14 days, grafted rats were euthanized, and tumour weight as well as glucose homeostasis were evaluated. Results: Treatment with Gli normalized tissue insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, suppressed fasting hyperinsulinaemia, reduced fat tissue accretion in MSG rats, and attenuated tumour growth by 27% in control and MSG rats. Conclusions: Gli treatment also resulted in a large reduction in the number of PCNA-positive tumour cells. Although treatment did improve the metabolism of pre-diabetic MSG-rats, tumour growth inhibition may be a more direct effect of glibenclamide.

  4. The “tightrope walker love”. Contradictions emotional political relations new loving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta García Faet

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is, on the one hand, to describe what I call “tightrope walker love” –the contemporary model of love in Western societies−; on the other, I aim to examine critically its contradictions. This new style of love, which has transcended, but not totally overcome, traditional romanticism, and which is near A. Giddens’ “confluent love” and “pure relation”, has the following features: in relation to its predecessors, it is more democratic; more individualistic; more intimate; more sophisticated from the point of view of emotional intelligence and pliable sexuality; more egalitarian; more utilitarian; and more legalist. However, two kinds of contradictions may be raised: external and internal. External contradictions involve, firstly, the flexibility of the labor market and the economy, in contrast with the psychological assumption of couples and families; and secondly, gender inequality, which denies the whole project. The internal contradictions –those that affect its self-description− may be summed up in the antinomy “liquidity” versus “attachment”. I will conclude arguing in favor of this new style of love, which is morally superior to the other models available, and contend that is contradictions, even if not completely solved, may be softened to a great extent.

  5. Giant congenital melanocytic naevus associated with Dandy-Walker malformation, lipomatosis and hemihypertrophy of the leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönül, M; Soylu, S; Gül, U; Aslan, E; Unal, T; Ergül, G

    2009-07-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented with congenital hyperpigmented plaques and multiple tumoral lesions. Her left leg was hypertrophic, although the bones were normal. Dermatological examination revealed hyperpigmented macules and plaques with hair on the legs, abdominal and lumbar areas (covering > 60% of the total body surface) and multiple naevi on the face, arms, back and chest. Multiple soft masses of various sizes, some of which colocalized with hyperpigmented plaques, were seen on the trunk and legs. Malignant melanoma was excluded by histopathological examinations of multiple biopsy specimens obtained from the pigmented lesions. Histopathological examination of one of the soft masses showed that it was a lipoma. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans showed an enlarged fourth ventricule and vermis hypoplasia (Dandy-Walker malformation; DWM). Neurocutaneous melanosis is a rare combined abnormality of the skin and central nervous system. A few case reports relating to the coexistence of giant congenital melanocytic naevus, lipomatosis and hemihypertrophy have been published in the literature. We report this very rare case of giant melanocytic naevus with lipomatosis, hemihypertrophy of the leg, and DWM.

  6. Optical Coherence Tomography in an Infant with Walker-Warburg Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuko Mano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS is a type of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD characterised by severe brain malformation, lissencephaly, and congenital eye abnormalities. Despite the coexistence of various eye abnormalities, results from optical coherence tomography (OCT in WWS have not previously been reported. We herein report specific OCT findings in an infant with WWS. Patients and Methods: The patient was a 14-day-old boy delivered by caesarean section at 38 weeks and 4 days of gestation and with a birth weight of 2,543 g. A cranial MRI showed lissencephaly, hydrocephalus, an encephalocele, and cerebellar hypoplasia, consistent with the diagnosis of WWS. Results: A bilateral ocular examination showed no abnormalities of the anterior eye segment. A fundus examination showed a persistent hyaloid artery in the vitreous cavity, a widespread loss of fundus pigmentation, transparent choroidal vessels (some choroidal vessel sections were visible, and the absence of a distinct macular reflex. OCT showed no foveal pit and an indistinct laminar structure of the retina. The infant subsequently developed congenital glaucoma and he then died of respiratory failure at the age of 8 months. Conclusions: WWS is associated with a high incidence of congenital eye abnormalities, and this infant showed findings consistent with WWS. OCT revealed a marked retinal dysplasia.

  7. Safe childbirth: Concept Analysis According to the Walker and Avant Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Maria Carvalho Fontenele

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study analyzed the concept of "Safe delivery" using the method proposed by Walker and Avant, which establishes eight steps for the construction of a concept. Method: Literature search was carried out in the Virtual Health Library (VHL and the Scientific Electronic Library Online (Scielo in the period from April to July 2016. Controlled descriptors were: "Parturition", "Safety" and "Patient safety", in Portuguese and English.  The compound term "Safe Delivery" was also used.  Thirty two productions were included in this analysis. Results: Among the attributes, maternal and fetal monitoring stand out and, as antecedent, the identification of risks for preventing damage. The reduction of maternal and infant mortality and the well-being of the mother-child binomial were evident in this work. Following the establishment of model case and opposite case, the definition of safe delivery was obtained: "the set of care measures that seek to identify risks, prevent damage and/or complications during delivery, ensuring maternal and fetal monitoring in favor of the welfare of mother and child ". Conclusion: The analysis of the essential attributes, its antecedents and consequences made it possible to define the concept of safe delivery. However, it is considered that this concept is changeable bearing in mind that there is a lack of randomized studies to identify potential risks to childbirth.

  8. Effect of methotrexate on perfusion and nitrogen-13 glutamate uptake in the Walker-256 carcinosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, W.H.; Panzer, M.; Helus, F.; Layer, K.; Sinn, H.J.; Ostertag, H.

    1988-02-01

    The tissue uptake of (/sup 13/N)glutamate (glu) was related to that of (/sup 11/C)butanol (but), a highly diffusible perfusion tracer. In 25 rats bearing Walker-256 carcinomas tumor-to-muscle glu uptake averaged 6.34 +/- 2.84 (s.d.) prior to interventions and the respective uptake of but was 6.79 +/- 3.08 (y = 0.03 + 0.94x). One hour after selective intraarterial administration of methotrexate (mtx), glu uptake fell by 47%, whereas blood flow remained within the pretreatment range (N = 9). Four hours after mtx, perfusion was reduced by approximately 40%, and 2 days later both perfusion and glu uptake reached extremely low levels. No significant difference in the effect of 10 and 50 mg/kg mtx was observed. Regional tissue mtx uptake estimations using /sup 77/Br-labeled bromomethotrexate did not reveal any significant uptake in muscle. The relationship between tumor-to-muscle uptake of glu and but (/sup 13/N//sup 11/C-index) was 0.94 +/- 0.015 (s.e.m., N = 25) before intervention. After methotrexate (1 hr, 4 hr, and 2 days) this index was 0.58 +/- 0.06 (N = 9), and 0.85 +/- 0.04 (N = 11) and 1.03 +/- 0.05 (N = 5), respectively. These values demonstrate an early mtx-induced uncoupling of glu uptake with respect to perfusion.

  9. Synopsis of the 6th Walker's Cay Colloquium on Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincola Francesco M

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 6th annual Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy Colloquium at Walker's Cay was held under the auspices of the Albert B. Sabin Vaccine Institute on March 10–13, 2004. The Colloquium consisted of a select group of 34 scientists representing academia, biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry. The main goal of this gathering was to promote in a peaceful and comfortable environment exchanges between basic and clinical science. The secondary benefit was to inspire novel bench to bedside ventures and at the same time provide feed back about promising and/or disappointing clinical results that could help re-frame some scientific question or guide the design of future trials. Several topics were covered that included tumor antigen discovery and validation, platforms for vaccine development, tolerance, immune suppression and tumor escape mechanisms, adoptive T cell therapy and dendritic cell-based therapies, clinical trials and assessment of response. Here we report salient points raised by speakers or by the audience during animated discussion that followed each individual presentation.

  10. Interacting cosmic fluids in power-law Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Mella, Patricio; Minning, Paul; Saavedra, Joel

    2008-01-01

    We provide a detailed description for power-law scaling Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological scenarios dominated by two interacting perfect fluid components during the expansion. As a consequence of the mutual interaction between the two fluids, neither component is conserved separately and the energy densities are proportional to 1/t 2 . It is shown that in flat FRW cosmological models there can exist interacting superpositions of two perfect fluids (each of them having a positive energy density) which accelerate the expansion of the universe. In this family there also exist flat power-law cosmological scenarios where one of the fluids may have a 'cosmological constant' or 'vacuum energy' equation of state (p=-ρ) interacting with the other component; this scenario exactly mimics the behavior of the standard flat Friedmann solution for a single fluid with a barotropic equation of state. These possibilities of combining interacting perfect fluids do not exist for the non-interacting mixtures of two perfect cosmic fluids, where the general solution for the scale factor is not described by power-law expressions and has a more complicated behavior. In this study is considered also the associated single fluid model interpretation for the interaction between two fluids

  11. [Spectral features analysis of Pinus massoniana with pest of Dendrolimus punctatus Walker and levels detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhang-Hua; Liu, Jian; Yu, Kun-Yong; Gong, Cong-Hong; Xie, Wan-Jun; Tang, Meng-Ya; Lai, Ri-Wen; Li, Zeng-Lu

    2013-02-01

    Taking 51 field measured hyperspectral data with different pest levels in Yanping, Fujian Province as objects, the spectral reflectance and first derivative features of 4 levels of healthy, mild, moderate and severe insect pest were analyzed. On the basis of 7 detecting parameters construction, the pest level detecting models were built. The results showed that (1) the spectral reflectance of Pinus massoniana with pests were significantly lower than that of healthy state, and the higher the pest level, the lower the reflectance; (2) with the increase in pest level, the spectral reflectance curves' "green peak" and "red valley" of Pinus massoniana gradually disappeared, and the red edge was leveleds (3) the pest led to spectral "green peak" red shift, red edge position blue shift, but the changes in "red valley" and near-infrared position were complicated; (4) CARI, RES, REA and REDVI were highly relevant to pest levels, and the correlations between REP, RERVI, RENDVI and pest level were weak; (5) the multiple linear regression model with the variables of the 7 detection parameters could effectively detect the pest levels of Dendrolimus punctatus Walker, with both the estimation rate and accuracy above 0.85.

  12. An Acquired Form of Dandy-Walker Malformation with Enveloping Hemosiderin Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Shiohama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM is a posterior fossa anomaly characterized by hypoplasia and upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis and cystic dilation of the fourth ventricle. The cyst of DWM rarely extends posteriorly to almost completely fill the entire posterior fossa, which mimics primary cerebellar agenesis, a cerebellar porencephalic cyst, and an arachnoid cyst due to the lack of clarity of the thin cystic wall. A 10-month-old female born at 23 weeks’ gestation with cerebellar hemorrhage in the neonatal period was admitted to our hospital with dysphagia and side-to-side head bobbing. The detection of hemosiderin deposits enveloping the cyst wall by T2 star-weighted angiography (SWAN was useful for the differential diagnosis of an acquired form of DWM from primary cerebellar agenesis. Cyst fenestration successfully improved dysphagia and head bobbing. A pathological specimen of the perforated cyst consisted of collagen fibers with hemosiderin deposits but lacked congenital cyst components. In infants with posterior fossa cysts, SWAN will be useful for a differential diagnosis between DWM and primary cerebellar agenesis.

  13. Approximate KMS states for scalar and spinor fields in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dappiaggi, Claudio; Hack, Thomas-Paul; Pinamonti, Nicola

    2010-09-01

    We construct and discuss Hadamard states for both scalar and Dirac spinor fields in a large class of spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes characterised by an initial phase either of exponential or of power-law expansion. The states we obtain can be interpreted as being in thermal equilibrium at the time when the scale factor a has a specific value a = a 0 . In the case a 0 = 0, these states fulfil a strict KMS condition on the boundary of the spacetime, which is either a cosmological horizon, or a Big Bang hypersurface. Furthermore, in the conformally invariant case, they are conformal KMS states on the full spacetime. However, they provide a natural notion of an approximate KMS state also in the remaining cases, especially for massive fields. On the technical side, our results are based on a bulk-to-boundary reconstruction technique already successfully applied in the scalar case and here proven to be suitable also for spinor fields. The potential applications of the states we find range over a broad spectrum, but they appear to be suited to discuss in particular thermal phenomena such as the cosmic neutrino background or the quantum state of dark matter. (orig.)

  14. Approximate KMS states for scalar and spinor fields in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dappiaggi, Claudio; Hack, Thomas-Paul [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Pinamonti, Nicola [Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Matematica

    2010-09-15

    We construct and discuss Hadamard states for both scalar and Dirac spinor fields in a large class of spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes characterised by an initial phase either of exponential or of power-law expansion. The states we obtain can be interpreted as being in thermal equilibrium at the time when the scale factor a has a specific value a = a{sub 0}. In the case a{sub 0} = 0, these states fulfil a strict KMS condition on the boundary of the spacetime, which is either a cosmological horizon, or a Big Bang hypersurface. Furthermore, in the conformally invariant case, they are conformal KMS states on the full spacetime. However, they provide a natural notion of an approximate KMS state also in the remaining cases, especially for massive fields. On the technical side, our results are based on a bulk-to-boundary reconstruction technique already successfully applied in the scalar case and here proven to be suitable also for spinor fields. The potential applications of the states we find range over a broad spectrum, but they appear to be suited to discuss in particular thermal phenomena such as the cosmic neutrino background or the quantum state of dark matter. (orig.)

  15. How do walkers behave when crossing the way of a mobile robot that replicates human interaction rules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassallo, Christian; Olivier, Anne-Hélène; Souères, Philippe; Crétual, Armel; Stasse, Olivier; Pettré, Julien

    2018-02-01

    Previous studies showed the existence of implicit interaction rules shared by human walkers when crossing each other. Especially, each walker contributes to the collision avoidance task and the crossing order, as set at the beginning, is preserved along the interaction. This order determines the adaptation strategy: the first arrived increases his/her advance by slightly accelerating and changing his/her heading, whereas the second one slows down and moves in the opposite direction. In this study, we analyzed the behavior of human walkers crossing the trajectory of a mobile robot that was programmed to reproduce this human avoidance strategy. In contrast with a previous study, which showed that humans mostly prefer to give the way to a non-reactive robot, we observed similar behaviors between human-human avoidance and human-robot avoidance when the robot replicates the human interaction rules. We discuss this result in relation with the importance of controlling robots in a human-like way in order to ease their cohabitation with humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Bicycle helmet wearing is not associated with close motor vehicle passing: a re-analysis of Walker, 2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake Olivier

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To re-analyse bicycle overtaking data collected by Walker (2007 with a view to assess factors associated with close passing (<1 m, to adjust for other observed factors in a multivariable analysis, and to assess the extent to which the sample size in the original analysis may have contributed to spurious results. METHOD: A re-analysis of 2,355 motor vehicle passing events recorded by Walker that includes information on cyclist's distance to the kerb, vehicle size and colour, city of observation, time of day, whether the event occurred while in a bikelane and helmet wearing. Each variable was considered for a final, multivariable model using purposeful selection of variables. The analysis was repeated using multiple logistic regression with passing distance dichotomised by the one metre rule. Bootstrap p-values were computed using sample sizes computed from conventional values of power and effect size. RESULTS: The previously observed significant association between passing distance and helmet wearing was not found when dichotomised by the one metre rule. Other factors were found to be significantly associated with close passing including cyclists' distance to the kerb, vehicle size and city of observation (Salisbury or Bristol, UK. P-values from bootstrap samples indicate the significance of helmet wearing resulted from an overly large sample size. CONCLUSIONS: After re-analysis of Walker's data, helmet wearing is not associated with close motor vehicle passing. The results, however, highlight other more important factors that may inform effective bicycle safety strategies.

  17. Mitochondrial genome of the sweet potato hornworm, Agrius convolvuli (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae), and comparison with other Lepidoptera species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Li-Shang; Li, Sheng; Yu, Hui-Min; Wei, Guo-Qing; Wang, Lei; Qian, Cen; Zhang, Cong-Fen; Li, Jun; Sun, Yu; Zhao, Yue; Zhu, Bao-Jian; Liu, Chao-Liang

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Agrius convolvuli (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae) and compared it with previously sequenced mitogenomes of lepidopteran species. The mitogenome was a circular molecule, 15 349 base pairs (bp) long, containing 37 genes. The order and orientation of genes in the A. convolvuli mitogenome were similar to those in sequenced mitogenomes of other lepidopterans. All 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs) were initiated by ATN codons, except for the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene, which seemed to be initiated by the codon CGA, as observed in other lepidopterans. Three of the 13 PCGs had the incomplete termination codon T, while the remainder terminated with TAA. Additionally, the codon distributions of the 13 PCGs revealed that Asn, Ile, Leu2, Lys, Phe, and Tyr were the most frequently used codon families. All transfer RNAs were folded into the expected cloverleaf structure except for tRNA Ser (AGN), which lacked a stable dihydrouridine arm. The length of the adenine (A) + thymine (T)-rich region was 331 bp. This region included the motif ATAGA followed by a 19-bp poly-T stretch and a microsatellite-like (TA) 8 element next to the motif ATTTA. Phylogenetic analyses (maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods) showed that A. convolvuli belongs to the family Sphingidae.

  18. New insights on Lepidoptera of Southern Italy with description of the male of Coenotephria antonii Hausmann 2011 (Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Infusino

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Southern Italy is of particular biogeographic interest due to the location at the center of the Mediterranean Basin and its great environmental heterogeneity. Despite the faunistic interest of this territory, many insect taxa are still little investigated. Among insects, Lepidoptera have a relatively well known fauna, significantly increased in recent years, but there are still some gaps of knowledge in several habitats. The aim of this work was to contribute to the knowledge of the Macrolepidoptera of Southern Italy, focusing our study in Calabria, and to offer some thoughts on the role played by the Mediterranean mountain forests for the biodiversity conservation. Samplings were carried out in three mountainous areas of Calabria (Pollino Massif, Sila Massif and Serre Mountains in May-November 2015 and in April-November 2016, using UV-LED light traps. We found ten species of high faunistic interest. Three species, Nebula senectaria, Perizoma lugdunaria and Acasis appensata, were for the first time recorded from Southern Italy, while seven were for the first time recorded from Calabria: Coenotephria antonii, Thera obeliscata, Triphosa dubitata, Trichopteryx carpinata, Asteroscopus sphinx, Lithophane semibrunnea and Sideridis reticulata. Of great interest was the discovery of the first male certainly attributable to Coenotephria antonii, endemic of Southern Italy, here described for the first time. The results exposed confirm that the fauna of Southern Italy is of great conservation value, hosting endemisms and several relict populations of European and Asiatic species with differentiated genetic lineages highly vulnerable to the climate change expected for the coming decades.

  19. Safety in numbers: more walkers and bicyclists, safer walking and bicycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, P L

    2015-08-01

    To examine the relationship between the numbers of people walking or bicycling and the frequency of collisions between motorists and walkers or bicyclists. The common wisdom holds that the number of collisions varies directly with the amount of walking and bicycling. However, three published analyses of collision rates at specific intersections found a non-linear relationship, such that collisions rates declined with increases in the numbers of people walking or bicycling. This paper uses five additional data sets (three population level and two time series) to compare the amount of walking or bicycling and the injuries incurring in collisions with motor vehicles. The likelihood that a given person walking or bicycling will be struck by a motorist varies inversely with the amount of walking or bicycling. This pattern is consistent across communities of varying size, from specific intersections to cities and countries, and across time periods. This result is unexpected. Since it is unlikely that the people walking and bicycling become more cautious if their numbers are larger, it indicates that the behavior of motorists controls the likelihood of collisions with people walking and bicycling. It appears that motorists adjust their behavior in the presence of people walking and bicycling. There is an urgent need for further exploration of the human factors controlling motorist behavior in the presence of people walking and bicycling. A motorist is less likely to collide with a person walking and bicycling if more people walk or bicycle. Policies that increase the numbers of people walking and bicycling appear to be an effective route to improving the safety of people walking and bicycling. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Recurrent pseudo-TORCH appearances of the brain presenting as "Dandy-Walker" malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marta C; Karaman, Ilgin; Squier, Waney; Farrel, Tom; Whitby, Elspeth H

    2012-01-01

    Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) is a developmental abnormality characterized by cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, complete or partial agenesis of the cerebellar vermis, and enlarged posterior fossa with upward displacement of the lateral sinuses, tentorium, and torcula. Calcification of brain tissue is a feature of congenital infection, particularly those involving the TORCH ( Toxoplasma gondii , rubella virus, Cytomegalovirus, and herpesvirus) group. An autosomal-recessive congenital infection-like syndrome with intracranial and extracranial calcifications has been categorized as pseudo-TORCH syndrome. We describe two male siblings diagnosed as DWM by ultrasound and by in utero and postmortem magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) but in whom the neuropathology revealed features of intracranial necrosis and calcification in the absence of extracranial calcific deposition. The fetal anomaly was identified by routine prenatal ultrasound scan at 16 weeks. In both cases the postmortem MRI showed bilateral ventriculomegaly with distortion of the overlying cortices, enlarged posterior fossa with a cyst related to small cerebellar hemispheres, and an incomplete cerebellar vermis. The diagnosis of DWM was offered. The histology revealed hypoplastic cerebral hemispheres with poorly cellular developing cortex. The white matter and periventricular matrix were disrupted by areas of necrosis and calcification not associated with any inflammatory infiltration, organisms, inclusions, or giant cells. To our knowledge, these two male siblings are the 1st cases that show pseudo-TORCH syndrome with distinctive intracranial calcification presenting as DWM. An autosomal-recessive or X-linked inheritance needs to be considered. Our study confirms the relevance of the multidisciplinary teamwork involved in the diagnosis of these complex cases.

  1. Increased thermal response to ultrasound in the Walker carcinosarcoma treated with vasoactive drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, W.H.; Debatin, J.; Helus, F.; Sinn, H.J.; Ostertag, H.

    1989-04-01

    In order to evaluate the potential of a highly selective Ca2+ entry blocker (nisoldipine) and of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) as adjuvant in hyperthermia treatment, we studied the differential flow response and time-course of tumor and normal tissue temperature following the administration of the two substances and during ultrasound heating. In 12 rats bearing Walker 256 carcinomas i.p. injection of 0.2-0.4 mg/kg nisoldipine caused a reduction in the tumor-to-muscle flow relationship of 4.4 +/- 1.9 (SD) to 1.74 +/- 0.86 as determined by intraarterial 133Xe injection; i.p. injection of 2-8 mg/kg 5-HT (N = 13) caused a respective reduction from 3.9 +/- 2.67 to 1.3 +/- 1.59. During a 20-min period of 41 degrees C normal tissue temperature-controlled ultrasound heating without drugs, tumor temperature attained 40.8 +/- 0.9 degrees C (N = 16). Nisoldipine or 5-HT injection at continuing 41 degrees C normal tissue temperature controlled energy delivery produced an instantaneous further increment of tumor temperature, eventually to 44.0 +/- 1.14 degrees C or 44.2 +/- 1.26 degrees C, respectively, after a period of 20 min. Injection of 0.9% NaCl (N = 4) solution caused only insignificant changes. Blood pressure and muscle perfusion were distinctly influenced by nisoldipine, but not by 5-HT. Since both drugs instantaneously increased the temperature differential between tumor and normal tissue, though by different vasoaction, they should be considered as adjuvants in hyperthermia.

  2. Casimir effect for parallel plates in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra de Mello, E. R.; Saharian, A. A.; Setare, M. R.

    2017-03-01

    We evaluate the Hadamard function, the vacuum expectation values (VEVs) of the field squared and the energy-momentum tensor for a massive scalar field with a general curvature coupling parameter in the geometry of two parallel plates on a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background with a general scale factor. On the plates, the field operator obeys the Robin boundary conditions with the coefficients depending on the scale factor. In all the spatial regions, the VEVs are decomposed into the boundary-free and boundary-induced contributions. Unlike the problem with the Minkowski bulk, in the region between the plates, the normal stress is not homogeneous and does not vanish in the geometry of a single plate. Near the plates, it has different signs for accelerated and decelerated expansions of the Universe. The VEV of the energy-momentum tensor, in addition to the diagonal components, has a nonzero off-diagonal component describing an energy flux along the direction normal to the boundaries. Expressions are derived for the Casimir forces acting on the plates. Depending on the Robin coefficients and on the vacuum state, these forces can be either attractive or repulsive. An important difference from the corresponding result in the Minkowski bulk is that the forces on the separate plates, in general, are different if the corresponding Robin coefficients differ. We give the applications of general results for the class of α vacua in the de Sitter bulk. It is shown that, compared with the Bunch-Davies vacuum state, the Casimir forces for a given α vacuum may change the sign.

  3. Síndrome de Dandy-Walker: a propósito de 4 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Machado de Almeida

    1960-09-01

    Full Text Available Dá-se o nome de síndrome de Dandy-Walker a um tipo de hidrocefalia cuja principal característica é a transformação do IV ventrículo em um grande cisto, que ocupa quase tôda a fossa posterior; esta, por sua vez, está aumentada, devido à elevação da tenda do cerebelo e abaulamento do occipital. A patogenia do processo é discutida; admite-se geralmente que se trate de um vício de desenvolvimento determinado pela falta de abertura dos orifícios de Luschka e Magendie. Em revisão bibliográfica foram encontrados 60 casos. São apresentados mais 4, dois dos quais foram submetidos à derivação ventrículo-jugular pela técnica de Spitz-Holter. São discutidos os principais sinais clínicos, os exames subsidiários e a terapêutica. A posição anormalmente alta dos seios transversos, observada no craniograma ou na sinugrafia, é considerada como sinal patognomônico. A transiluminação do crânio também pode apresentar aspecto característico. Êstes exames, quando típicos, permitem evitar a realização de exames mais traumatizantes, como as ventriculografias. A terapêutica mais empregada tem sido a abertura da parede do cisto. Não há na literatura referência à operação de Spitz que, em nossa opinião, é a melhor forma de tratamento.

  4. Instrumented gait analysis: a measure of gait improvement by a wheeled walker in hospitalized geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schülein, Samuel; Barth, Jens; Rampp, Alexander; Rupprecht, Roland; Eskofier, Björn M; Winkler, Jürgen; Gaßmann, Karl-Günter; Klucken, Jochen

    2017-02-27

    In an increasing aging society, reduced mobility is one of the most important factors limiting activities of daily living and overall quality of life. The ability to walk independently contributes to the mobility, but is increasingly restricted by numerous diseases that impair gait and balance. The aim of this cross-sectional observation study was to examine whether spatio-temporal gait parameters derived from mobile instrumented gait analysis can be used to measure the gait stabilizing effects of a wheeled walker (WW) and whether these gait parameters may serve as surrogate marker in hospitalized patients with multifactorial gait and balance impairment. One hundred six patients (ages 68-95) wearing inertial sensor equipped shoes passed an instrumented walkway with and without gait support from a WW. The walkway assessed the risk of falling associated gait parameters velocity, swing time, stride length, stride time- and double support time variability. Inertial sensor-equipped shoes measured heel strike and toe off angles, and foot clearance. The use of a WW improved the risk of spatio-temporal parameters velocity, swing time, stride length and the sagittal plane associated parameters heel strike and toe off angles in all patients. First-time users (FTUs) showed similar gait parameter improvement patterns as frequent WW users (FUs). However, FUs with higher levels of gait impairment improved more in velocity, stride length and toe off angle compared to the FTUs. The impact of a WW can be quantified objectively by instrumented gait assessment. Thus, objective gait parameters may serve as surrogate markers for the use of walking aids in patients with gait and balance impairments.

  5. Segmental duplications: evolution and impact among the current Lepidoptera genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Ma, Dongna; Vasseur, Liette; You, Minsheng

    2017-07-06

    results provide a valuable resource beyond the genetic mutation to explore the genome structure for future Lepidoptera research.

  6. Review of the Blastobasinae of Costa Rica (Lepidoptera: Gelechioidea: Blastobasidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamski, David

    2013-02-25

    The Blastobasinae (Lepidoptera: Gelechioidea: Blastobasidae) of Costa Rica are reviewed. Five new genera, Barbaloba, Hallicis, Koleps, Pheos, and Pseudokoleps, and 101 new species are described. They include: Barbaloba jubae, B. meleagrisellae, Hallicis bisetosellus, H. calvicula, Koleps angulatus, Pheos aculeatus, Pseudokoleps akainae, Blastobasis abollae, B. achaea, B. aedes, B. babae, B. balucis, B. beo, B. caetrae, B. chanes, B. custodis, B. dapis, B. deae, B. deliciolarum, B. dicionis, B. echus, B. erae, B. fax, B. furtivus, B. iuanae, B. lex, B. litis, B. lygdi, B. manto, B. neniae, B. nivis, B. orithyia, B. paludis, B. phaedra, B. rotae, B. rotullae, B. tapetae, B. thyone, B. usurae, B. vesta, B. xiphiae, Hypatopa actes, H. acus, H. agnae, H. arxcis, H. bilobata, H. caedis, H. caepae, H. cladis, H. cotis, H. cotytto, H. crux, H. cyane, H. dicax, H. dolo, H. dux, H. edax, H. eos, H. erato, H. fio, H. gena, H. hecate, H. hera, H. hora, H. io, H. ira, H. leda, H. limae, H. lucina, H. joniella, H. juno, H. manus, H. mora, H. musa, H. nex, H. nox, H. phoebe, H. pica, H. plebis, H. rabio, H. rea, H. rego, H. rudis, H. sais, H. scobis, H. semela, H. solea, H. styga, H. texla, H. texo, H. umbra, H. verax, H. vitis, H. vox, Pigritia dido, P. faux, P. gruis, P. haha, P. sedis, P. stips, and P. ululae. Diagnoses, descriptions, and type data are provided for each species. Photographs of imagos, illustrations of wing venation for selected species, male and female genitalia, and distribution maps are furnished. Keys to all genera in Blastobasinae and keys to all species within each genus are provided to assist with identifications. In addition, scanning electron micrographs of the inner surface of the dilated first antennal flagellomere and associated sex scales for all Blastobasis are provided. Blastobasis coffeaella (Busck, 1925), B. graminea Adamski, 1999, Hypatopa tapadulcea Adamski, 1999, and Pigritia marjoriella Adamski, 1998 are redescribed.

  7. Fossil butterflies, calibration points and the molecular clock (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Rienk DE

    2017-05-25

    Fossil butterflies are extremely rare. Yet, they are the only direct evidence of the first appearance of particular characters and as such, they are crucial for calibrating a molecular clock, from which divergence ages are estimated. In turn, these estimates, in combination with paleogeographic information, are most important in paleobiogeographic considerations. The key issue here is the correct allocation of fossils on the phylogenetic tree from which the molecular clock is calibrated.The allocation of a fossil on a tree should be based on an apomorphic character found in a tree based on extant species, similar to the allocation of a new extant species. In practice, the latter is not done, at least not explicitly, on the basis of apomorphy, but rather on overall similarity or on a phylogenetic analysis, which is not possible for most butterfly fossils since they usually are very fragmentary. Characters most often preserved are in the venation of the wings. Therefore, special attention is given to possible apomorphies in venational characters in extant butterflies. For estimation of divergence times, not only the correct allocation of the fossil on the tree is important, but also the tree itself influences the outcome as well as the correct determination of the age of the fossil. These three aspects are discussed.        All known butterfly fossils, consisting of 49 taxa, are critically reviewed and their relationship to extant taxa is discussed as an aid for correctly calibrating a molecular clock for papilionoid Lepidoptera. In this context some aspects of age estimation and biogeographic conclusions are briefly mentioned in review. Specific information has been summarized in four appendices.

  8. Sublethal effects of diazinon, fenitrothion and chlorpyrifos on the functional response of predatory bug, Andrallus spinidens Fabricius (Hem.: Pentatomidae in the laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moloud GholamzadehChitgar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The sublethal effects of diazinon, fenitrothion and chlorpyrifos on the functional response of predatory bug, Andrallus spinidens Fabricius (Hem.: Pentatomidae, a potential biological control agent, were studied on 5th-instar nymphs. The experiment was conducted in varying densities (2, 4, 8, 16, 32 and 64 of last instars larvae of Chilo suppressalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae as prey at 25 ± 2 °C, 60% ± 10% relative humidity (RH and a photoperiod of 16:8 h (L: D. The results of logistic regressions revealed a type II functional response in the control and all insecticide treatments. Comparison of functional response curves revealed that tested insecticides markedly decreased the mean of preys consumed by A. spinidens. Among them, functional response curve of A. spinidens in chlorpyrifos treatment was significantly lower than the other treatments. In this study, application of insecticides caused a decrease in the attack rate and an increase in the handling time of exposed bugs compared with the control. The longest handling time (3.97 ± 0.62 and the lowest attack rate (0.023 ± 0.007 were observed in chlorpyrifos and fenitrothion treatments, respectively. The results suggested that the adverse effect of these insecticides on A. spinidens should be considered in integrated pest management programs (IPM.

  9. Quantifying seepage using heat as a tracer in selected irrigation canals, Walker River Basin, Nevada, 2012 and 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Ramon C.; Smith, David W.

    2016-11-16

    The Walker River is an important source of water for western Nevada. The river provides water for agriculture and recharge to local aquifers used by several communities. Farmers began diverting water from the Walker River in the 1860s to support growing agricultural development. Over time, the reduced inflows into Walker Lake from upstream reservoirs and diversions have resulted in 170 feet of lake level decline and increased dissolved-solids concentrations to levels that threaten aquatic ecosystems, including survival of Lahonton cutthroat trout, a native species listed in the Endangered Species Act. Investigations of the water-budget components in the Walker River Basin have revealed uncertainty in the recharge to aquifers from irrigation canals. To address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted an extensive field study from March 2012 through October 2013 to quantify seepage losses in selected canals in the Smith Valley, Mason Valley, and Walker Lake Valley irrigation areas.The seepage rates estimated for the 2012 and 2013 irrigation seasons in the Smith Valley transect sites (Saroni and Plymouth canals) ranged between 0.01 to 2.5 feet per day (ft/d) (0.01 to 0.68 cubic feet per second per mile [ft3/s-mi]). From 2012 to 2013, the average number of days the canals had flowing water decreased from 190 to 125 due to drier climate and lack of water available for diversion from the Walker River. The nearly 50-percent reductions in volumetric loss rates between 2012 and 2013 were associated with less than average diversions into canals from the Walker River and reductions in infiltration rates following routine canal maintenance.Models developed for the Saroni canal in 2012 were recalibrated in 2013 to evaluate changes in seepage as a result of siltation. Just prior to the 2012 irrigation season, nearly the entire length of the canal was cleared of vegetation and debris to improve flow conveyance. In 2013, following the first year of maintenance, a 90-percent

  10. The effects of strawberry cropping practices on the strawberry tortricid (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), its natural enemies, and the presence of nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigsgaard, Lene; Naulin, Cyril; Haukeland, Solveig; Kristensen, Kristian; Enkegaard, Annie; Jensen, Nauja Lisa; Eilenberg, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Cropping practice can affect pests and natural enemies. A three-year study of the strawberry tortricid, Acleris comariana (Lienig and Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), its parasitoid Copidosoma aretas Walker (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), and its entomopathogenic fungi was conducted in seven pairs of organic and conventional farms to test the hypothesis that farming practice (organic versus conventional) will affect the level of pest infestation and will affect the natural enemies. In addition, the number of years with strawberries on the farm, field age, and other factors that may affect pests and their natural enemies were considered. Farms were characterized by their cropping practices, cropping history, and other parameters. Field-collected larvae were laboratory reared to assess mortality from parasitoids and entomopathogenic fungi. In 2010, a survey of nematodes was made to assess the response of an unrelated taxonomic group to cropping practice. 2,743 larvae were collected. Of those, 2,584 were identified as A. comariana. 579 A. comariana were parasitized by C. aretas and 64 A. comariana were parasitized by other parasitoid species. Finally, 28% of the larvae and pupae of A. comariana died from unknown causes. Only two of the field-collected A. comariana larvae were infected by entomopathogenic fungi; one was infected by Isaria sp. and the other by Beauvaria sp. The density of A. comariana was on average four times lower in organic farms, which was significantly lower than in conventional farms. A. comariana was more dominant on conventional farms than on organic farms. The effect of crop age (One, two, or three years) on A. comariana infestation was significant, with higher infestations in older fields. Crop age had no effect on A. comariana infestation in a comparison of first- and second-year fields in 2010. Cropping practice did not lead to significant differences in the level of total parasitism or in C. aretas parasitism; however, C. aretas contributed

  11. The Effects of Strawberry Cropping Practices on the Strawberry Tortricid (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), Its Natural Enemies, and the Presence of Nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigsgaard, Lene; Naulin, Cyril; Haukeland, Solveig; Kristensen, Kristian; Enkegaard, Annie; Jensen, Nauja Lisa; Eilenberg, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Cropping practice can affect pests and natural enemies. A three-year study of the strawberry tortricid, Acleris comariana (Lienig and Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), its parasitoid Copidosoma aretas Walker (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), and its entomopathogenic fungi was conducted in seven pairs of organic and conventional farms to test the hypothesis that farming practice (organic versus conventional) will affect the level of pest infestation and will affect the natural enemies. In addition, the number of years with strawberries on the farm, field age, and other factors that may affect pests and their natural enemies were considered. Farms were characterized by their cropping practices, cropping history, and other parameters. Field-collected larvae were laboratory reared to assess mortality from parasitoids and entomopathogenic fungi. In 2010, a survey of nematodes was made to assess the response of an unrelated taxonomic group to cropping practice. 2,743 larvae were collected. Of those, 2,584 were identified as A. comariana. 579 A. comariana were parasitized by C. aretas and 64 A. comariana were parasitized by other parasitoid species. Finally, 28% of the larvae and pupae of A. comariana died from unknown causes. Only two of the field-collected A. comariana larvae were infected by entomopathogenic fungi; one was infected by Isaria sp. and the other by Beauvaria sp. The density of A. comariana was on average four times lower in organic farms, which was significantly lower than in conventional farms. A. comariana was more dominant on conventional farms than on organic farms. The effect of crop age (One, two, or three years) on A. comariana infestation was significant, with higher infestations in older fields. Crop age had no effect on A. comariana infestation in a comparison of first- and second-year fields in 2010. Cropping practice did not lead to significant differences in the level of total parasitism or in C. aretas parasitism; however, C. aretas contributed

  12. Beliefs about the use of baby walkers Crenças sobre o uso do andador infantil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula S. C. Chagas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To understand the opinion of the parents about the baby walker and compare the age of gait acquisition between infants that used a walker and those that did not. METHODS: In this quali-quantitative study, an interview involving a semi-structured questionnaire was carried out with 26 parents, 14 of whose infants used the equipment (BWG and 12 of whose infants did not (NBWG prior to gait acquisition. After extensive content analysis, categories for interpreting the results emerged. For data triangulation, the age of gait acquisition was documented by weekly telephone contact. Student's t-test was used for comparison between groups with a significance level of α=0.05. RESULTS: The following categories were identified in the parents' reports: a information about the baby walker; b doubt/decision to use it vs. certainty about not using it; c beliefs about the use of a baby-walker; and d benefits and harm from use. The age of independent gait acquisition did not differ between groups (p=0.837: BWG initiated gait at 376.17 (SD=32.62 days and NBWG did so at 378.75 (SD=27.99 days. CONCLUSIONS: The beliefs and feelings that permeate the decision to use a baby walker illustrate the different rationales adopted by parents about the role of this equipment in the child's development of gait and autonomy. The use of a baby walker did not influence the age of gait acquisition. The results broaden the understanding of choices that influence child-rearing practices prior to gait acquisition.OBJETIVOS: Conhecer a opinião dos pais sobre o uso do andador infantil e comparar a idade de aquisição da marcha independente entre os lactentes que usaram e os que não usaram o andador. MÉTODOS: Neste estudo qualiquantitativo, realizou-se entrevista com questionário semiestruturado com 26 pais, 14 de lactentes que usaram (GUAI e 12 dos que não usaram o equipamento (GNUAI antes da aquisição da marcha. Empregou-se análise de conteúdo, a partir da qual

  13. Evidence for Interannual to Decadal Variations in Hadley and Walker Circulations and Links to Water and Energy Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Franklin; Bosilovich, Michael; Miller, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Mass and energy transports associated with the Hadley and Walker circulations are important components of the earth s climate system and are strongly linked to hydrologic processes. Interannual to decadal variation in these flows likely signify a combination of natural climate noise as well as a response to anthropgenic forcing. There remains considerable uncertainty in quantifying variations in these flows. Evidence in the surface pressure record supports a weakening of the Walker circulation over the Pacific in recent decades. Conversely the NCEP / NCAR and ERA 40 reanalyses indicate that the Hadley circulation has increased in strength over the last two decades, though these analyses depict significantly different mass circulation changes. Interestingly, the NCEP - II / DOE reanalysis contains essentially no Hadley circulation changes. Most climate model integrations anticipate a weakening of both tropical circulations associated with stronger static stability. Clearly there is much uncertainty not only with the mass transports, but also how they are linked to water and energy balance of the planet through variations in turbulent heat and radiative fluxes and horizontal exports / imports of energy. Here we examine heat and water budget variations from a number of reanalysis products and focus on the linear and nonlinear response of ENSO warm and cold events as opportunities to study budget variations over the past 15-20 years. Our analysis addresses such questions as To what extent do Hadley and Walker Cell variations compensate each other on mass and energy transport? Do static stability adjustments appear to constrain fractional precipitation response vs. fractional water vapor response? We appeal to constraints offered by GPCP precipitation, SSWI ocean evaporation estimates, and ISCCP-FD radiative fluxes, and other satellite data sets to interpret and confirm reanalysis-based diagnostics. Using our findings we also attempt to place in context the recent

  14. [Fragile X syndrome with Dandy-Walker variant: a clinical study of oral and written communicative manifestations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamônica, Dionísia Aparecida Cusin; Ferraz, Plínio Marcos Duarte Pinto; Ferreira, Amanda Tragueta; Prado, Lívia Maria do; Abramides, Dagma Venturini Marquez; Gejão, Mariana Germano

    2011-01-01

    The Fragile X syndrome is the most frequent cause of inherited intellectual disability. The Dandy-Walker variant is a specific constellation of neuroradiological findings. The present study reports oral and written communication findings in a 15-year-old boy with clinical and molecular diagnosis of Fragile X syndrome and neuroimaging findings consistent with Dandy-Walker variant. The speech-language pathology and audiology evaluation was carried out using the Communicative Behavior Observation, the Phonology assessment of the ABFW - Child Language Test, the Phonological Abilities Profile, the Test of School Performance, and the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities. Stomatognathic system and hearing assessments were also performed. It was observed: phonological, semantic, pragmatic and morphosyntactic deficits in oral language; deficits in psycholinguistic abilities (auditory reception, verbal expression, combination of sounds, auditory and visual sequential memory, auditory closure, auditory and visual association); and morphological and functional alterations in the stomatognathic system. Difficulties in decoding the graphical symbols were observed in reading. In writing, the subject presented omissions, agglutinations and multiple representations with the predominant use of vowels, besides difficulties in visuo-spatial organization. In mathematics, in spite of the numeric recognition, the participant didn't accomplish arithmetic operations. No alterations were observed in the peripheral hearing evaluation. The constellation of behavioral, cognitive, linguistic and perceptual symptoms described for Fragile X syndrome, in addition to the structural central nervous alterations observed in the Dandy-Walker variant, caused outstanding interferences in the development of communicative abilities, in reading and writing learning, and in the individual's social integration.

  15. DIVERSIDADE DE LEPIDOPTERA EM UM FRAGMENTO FLORESTAL EM MUZAMBINHO, MINAS GERAIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirlene Aparecida de Andrade

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring Lepidoptera populations provides important information to assess the dynamics and ecological changes in ecosystems. In this work, it was evaluated and characterized the Lepidoptera fauna of forest fragment of the IFSULDEMINAS - Campus Muzambinho, MG state. Throughout 12 months, 590 Individuals of 69 species belonging to 10 families were captured. The most abundant family was Nymphalidae (73.56% of subjects. The most abundant species were Godartiana muscosa , Mechanitis lysimnia , Hermeuptychia sp and Mechanitis polymnia casabranca , which are bio-indicators of disturbed and/or urban environments. On the other hand, it was found rare species, such as Notascea brevispula . Different species were constant and others occurred in only a short period of the year. The diversity and abundance were higher in hot and rainy months. The diversity index Shannon-Wiener and Simpsom indicate a median diversity and equitability index point absence of dominance.

  16. Feeding Mechanisms of Adult Lepidoptera: Structure, Function, and Evolution of the Mouthparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, Harald W.

    2014-01-01

    The form and function of the mouthparts in adult Lepidoptera and their feeding behavior are reviewed from evolutionary and ecological points of view. The formation of the suctorial proboscis encompasses a fluid-tight food tube, special linking structures, modified sensory equipment, and novel intrinsic musculature. The evolution of these functionally important traits can be reconstructed within the Lepidoptera. The proboscis movements are explained by a hydraulic mechanism for uncoiling, whereas recoiling is governed by the intrinsic proboscis musculature and the cuticular elasticity. Fluid uptake is accomplished by the action of the cranial sucking pump, which enables uptake of a wide range of fluid quantities from different food sources. Nectar-feeding species exhibit stereotypical proboscis movements during flower handling. Behavioral modifications and derived proboscis morphology are often associated with specialized feeding preferences or an obligatory switch to alternative food sources. PMID:19961330

  17. The complete mitochondrial genome of the codling moth Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bao-Cai; Liu, Wei; Wei, Shu-Jun

    2013-02-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the codling moth Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) was determined. The genome is 15,253 bp long with 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes and an A+T-rich region. All genes are arranged in their conserved positions compared with the pupative ancestral arrangement of insects except for trnM, which was translocated to the upstream of the transfer RNA cluster trnI-trnQ as in all previously reported lepidopteran mitochondiral genomes. Seven portein-coding genes use ATG start codon and five use ATT. However, the cox1 gene uses the CGA start codon as it is found in all previous reported mitochondrial genomes of Lepidoptera. Nine protein-coding genes stop with termination codon TAA. Four protein-coding genes use incomplete stop codons TA or T. The A+T region is located between rrnS and trnM with a length of 331 bp.

  18. Parasitism and Food Web Structure in Defoliating Lepidoptera - Parasitoid Communities on Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, D S; Mangeaud, A; Valladares, G R

    2016-12-01

    Food webs are usually regarded as snapshots of community feeding interactions. Here, we describe the yearly and cumulative structure of parasitoid-caterpillar food webs on soybean in central Argentina, analyzing parasitism rates and their variability in relation to parasitoid diversity and food web vulnerability in the system. Lepidoptera larvae were collected along four seasons from soybean crops and reared in laboratory to obtain and identify adults and parasitoids. Eleven species of defoliating Lepidoptera and ten parasitoid species were recorded. Food web statistics showed rather low annual variability, with most variation coefficients in the order of 0.20 and generality showing the most stable values. Parasitism showed the highest variability, which was independent of parasitoid diversity and food web vulnerability, although parasitism rates were negatively related to parasitoid richness. Our study highlights the need to consider food web structure and variability in order to understand the functioning of ecological communities in general and in extensive agricultural ecosystems in particular.

  19. Overwintering physiology of the rice stem borer larvae, Chilo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker), is a major rice pest around the world. A strong ability of the rice stem borer to adapt/resist cold temperature (cold hardiness) contributes to its survival through winter. However, the physiological mechanism of its cold hardiness is poorly understood. In this study, we ...

  20. Comment on 'Quantization of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes in the presence of a negative cosmological constant and radiation'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amore, Paolo; Aranda, Alfredo; Cervantes, Mayra; Diaz-Cruz, J. L.; Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2007-01-01

    The quantization of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime in the presence of a negative cosmological constant was used in a recent paper to conclude that there are solutions that avoid singularities (big bang-big crunch) at the quantum level. We show that a proper study of their model does not indicate that it prevents the occurrence of singularities at the quantum level, in fact the quantum probability of such event is larger than the classical one. Our numerical simulations based on the powerful variational sinc collocation method (VSCM) also show that the precision of the results of that paper is much lower than the 20 significant digits reported by the authors

  1. Departures from the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertston-Walker Cosmological Model in an Inhomogeneous Universe: A Numerical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, John T; Mertens, James B; Starkman, Glenn D

    2016-06-24

    While the use of numerical general relativity for modeling astrophysical phenomena and compact objects is commonplace, the application to cosmological scenarios is only just beginning. Here, we examine the expansion of a spacetime using the Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura formalism of numerical relativity in synchronous gauge. This work represents the first numerical cosmological study that is fully relativistic, nonlinear, and without symmetry. The universe that emerges exhibits an average Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) behavior; however, this universe also exhibits locally inhomogeneous expansion beyond that expected in linear perturbation theory around a FLRW background.

  2. Effect of Walker A mutation (K86M) on oligomerization and surface targeting of the multidrug resistance transporter ABCG2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ulla Birk; Gether, Ulrik; Litman, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) known to be critical for ATP binding and/or hydrolysis in ABC transporters. The mutant (ABCG2-K86M) was inactive as expected but was expressed at similar levels as the wild-type (wt) protein. The mutation did not affect the predicted oligomerization properties......The ATP binding cassette (ABC) half-transporter ABCG2 (MXR/BCRP/ABCP) is associated with mitoxantrone resistance accompanied by cross-resistance to a broad spectrum of cytotoxic drugs. Here we investigate the functional consequences of mutating a highly conserved lysine in the Walker A motif...... of the NBDs in assisting proper surface targeting of ABC transporters....

  3. The complete mitochondrial genomes of two ghost moths, Thitarodes renzhiensis and Thitarodes yunnanensis: the ancestral gene arrangement in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yong-Qiang; Ma, Chuan; Chen, Ji-Yue; Yang, Da-Rong

    2012-06-22

    Lepidoptera encompasses more than 160,000 described species that have been classified into 45-48 superfamilies. The previously determined Lepidoptera mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) are limited to six superfamilies of the lineage Ditrysia. Compared with the ancestral insect gene order, these mitogenomes all contain a tRNA rearrangement. To gain new insights into Lepidoptera mitogenome evolution, we sequenced the mitogenomes of two ghost moths that belong to the non-ditrysian lineage Hepialoidea and conducted a comparative mitogenomic analysis across Lepidoptera. The mitogenomes of Thitarodes renzhiensis and T. yunnanensis are 16,173 bp and 15,816 bp long with an A + T content of 81.28 % and 82.34 %, respectively. Both mitogenomes include 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and the A + T-rich region. Different tandem repeats in the A + T-rich region mainly account for the size difference between the two mitogenomes. All the protein-coding genes start with typical mitochondrial initiation codons, except for cox1 (CGA) and nad1 (TTG) in both mitogenomes. The anticodon of trnS(AGN) in T. renzhiensis and T. yunnanensis is UCU instead of the mostly used GCU in other sequenced Lepidoptera mitogenomes. The 1,584-bp sequence from rrnS to nad2 was also determined for an unspecified ghost moth (Thitarodes sp.), which has no repetitive sequence in the A + T-rich region. All three Thitarodes species possess the ancestral gene order with trnI-trnQ-trnM located between the A + T-rich region and nad2, which is different from the gene order trnM-trnI-trnQ in all previously sequenced Lepidoptera species. The formerly identified conserved elements of Lepidoptera mitogenomes (i.e. the motif 'ATAGA' and poly-T stretch in the A + T-rich region and the long intergenic spacer upstream of nad2) are absent in the Thitarodes mitogenomes. The mitogenomes of T. renzhiensis and T. yunnanensis exhibit unusual features compared with the previously determined

  4. Development of genetic sexing strains in Lepidoptera: from traditional to transgenic approaches

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marec, František; Neven, L. G.; Robinson, A. S.; Vreysen, M.; Goldsmith, M. R.; Nagaraju, J.; Franz, G.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 2 (2005), s. 248-259 ISSN 0022-0493 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA6007307 Grant - others:IAEA(AT) 12055/R; IAEA(AT) 12619/R Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Lepidoptera * codling moth * sterile insect technique Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.205, year: 2005

  5. Parasitoids and Hyperparasitoids of Erannis Defoliaria CL. (Lepidoptera, Geometridae) in Oak Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Glavendekić, Milka

    2010-01-01

    The research on biology and ecology of Mottled Umber Moth–Erannis defoliaria Cl. (Lepidoptera, Geometridae) was carried out in the period 1985–2009 in oak forests in Serbia. Mottled Umber Moth was mainly in the latency during the investigation. Only at the locality Miroč in East Serbia and in Forest unit Zlatica (National Park Djerdap), it was dominant in the complex of early defoliators. Natural enemies ofE. defoliariaand especially parasitoids and hyperparasitoids are important mortality fa...

  6. Fund af småsommerfugle fra Danmark i 2011 (Lepidoptera)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Otto; Falck, Per; Karsholt, Ole

    2012-01-01

    This article reports and comments on interesting Danish Microlepidoptera collected in 2011 and include remarkable findings from previous years. The classification and nomenclature follow the new Danish checklist (Karsholt & Stadel Nielsen, in press). Ten species are reported as new to the Danish ...... the number of Danish Lepidoptera to a total of 2551 species. There are moreover 10 species on the so-called observation list, containing species of uncertain status, which was erected in 2009....

  7. Silk recycling in larvae of the wax moth, Galleria mellonella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shaik, Haq Abdul; Mishra, Archana; Sehnal, František

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 114, JAN 27 (2017), s. 61-65 E-ISSN 1802-8829 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 907 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Lepidoptera * Pyralidae * silk recycling Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 1.167, year: 2016 http://www.eje.cz/pdfs/eje/2017/01/09.pdf

  8. The taxonomic placement and provenance of Hypopyra inconspicua Herrich-Schäffer (Lepidoptera, Thyrididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor O. Becker

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic placement and provenance of Hypopyra inconspicua Herrich-Schäffer (Lepidoptera, Thyrididae. Tanyodes inconspicua (Herrich-Schäffer comb. nov. is transferred from Spirama Guenée (Noctuidae, Catocalinae to Striglininae (Thyrididae, as a senior synonym of Ortogramma rufitibia R. Felder & Rogenhofer syn. nov. and Tanyodes ochracea Möschler syn. nov., and from the African to the Neotropical fauna.

  9. Imaturos de Sarsina violascens (Herrich-Schäffer (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Lymantriinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Moraes C.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaturos de Sarsina violascens (Herrich-Schäffer (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Lymantriinae. Sarsina violascens é uma espécie polífaga que eventualmente se alimenta de P. cattleianum Sabine (Myrtaceae durante sua fase larval. Neste estudo são descritas a morfologia e o comportamento dos imaturos, com ilustrações, fotografias e imagens de microscopia eletrônica de varredura.

  10. Description of male of the rarest European Carpenter-moth Stygioides persephone (Reisser, 1962) (Lepidoptera: Cossidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenhöle, Arthur; Friedrich, Egbert; Yakovlev, Roman V

    2017-12-12

    Despite the generally good knowledge of the European fauna of Cossidae, several new species (Lepidoptera) have been described in recent years: Dyspessa kostyuki Yakovlev, 2005 (type locality Ukraine, [Lugansk region], "Proval'skaya Stepp" Naturschutsgebiete), D. aphrodite Yakovlev & Witt, 2007 (type locality Greece, Peloponnes, Mega Spileon), and Stygia nilssoni Saldaitis & Yakovlev, 2008 (type locality Islas Canarias, Gran Canaria, Puerto de Mogan) (Yakovlev 2005; Yakovlev & Witt 2007; Saldaitis & Yakovlev 2008). However, a number of European cossids are still poorly known.

  11. First records of Hypolycaena anara Larsen, 1986 from Cameroon (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tropek, Robert; Leština, D.; Janšta, P.; Brattström, O.; Espeland, M.; Sáfián, Sz.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 170 (2015), s. 235-239 ISSN 0300-5267 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36098G Grant - others:GA JU(CZ) 168/2013/P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Lepidoptera * Lycaenidae * faunistics Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.408, year: 2015 http://www.redalyc.org/ articulo .oa?id=45541421008

  12. Fate of Ingested Aristolactams from Aristolochia chilensis in Battus polydamas archidamas (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Urzúa, Alejandro; Olguín, Angel; Santander, Rocío

    2013-01-01

    We performed a sequestration study of aristolactams (ALs) from Aristolochia chilensis in Battus polydamas archidamas (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) by examining the AL content of the plant, fifth instar larvae, osmeterial secretion, pupae, exuviae and feces. Aristolactam-I (AL-I) and aristolactam-II (AL-II) present in A. chilensis are sequestered by fifth instar larvae of B. polydamas archidamas. There is a preferential sequestration of AL-II, or a more efficient metabolization and excretion of ...

  13. Low host specificity and abundance of frugivorous lepidoptera in the lowland rain forests of Papua New Guinea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Sam

    Full Text Available We studied a community of frugivorous Lepidoptera in the lowland rainforest of Papua New Guinea. Rearing revealed 122 species represented by 1,720 individuals from 326 woody plant species. Only fruits from 52% (171 of the plant species sampled were attacked. On average, Lepidoptera were reared from 1 in 89 fruits and a kilogram of fruit was attacked by 1.01 individuals. Host specificity of Lepidoptera was notably low: 69% (33 of species attacked plants from >1 family, 8% (4 fed on single family, 6% (3 on single genus and 17% (8 were monophagous. The average kilogram of fruits was infested by 0.81 individual from generalist species (defined here as feeding on >1 plant genus and 0.07 individual from specialist species (feeding on a single host or congeneric hosts. Lepidoptera preferred smaller fruits with both smaller mesocarp and seeds. Large-seeded fruits with thin mesocarp tended to host specialist species whereas those with thick, fleshy mesocarp were often infested with both specialist and generalist species. The very low incidence of seed damage suggests that pre-dispersal seed predation by Lepidoptera does not play a major role in regulating plant populations via density-dependent mortality processes outlined by the Janzen-Connell hypothesis.

  14. Recurrent Domestication by Lepidoptera of Genes from Their Parasites Mediated by Bracoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasmi, Laila; Boulain, Helene; Gauthier, Jeremy; Hua-Van, Aurelie; Musset, Karine; Jakubowska, Agata K.; Aury, Jean-Marc; Volkoff, Anne-Nathalie; Huguet, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Bracoviruses are symbiotic viruses associated with tens of thousands of species of parasitic wasps that develop within the body of lepidopteran hosts and that collectively parasitize caterpillars of virtually every lepidopteran species. Viral particles are produced in the wasp ovaries and injected into host larvae with the wasp eggs. Once in the host body, the viral DNA circles enclosed in the particles integrate into lepidopteran host cell DNA. Here we show that bracovirus DNA sequences have been inserted repeatedly into lepidopteran genomes, indicating this viral DNA can also enter germline cells. The original mode of Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) unveiled here is based on the integrative properties of an endogenous virus that has evolved as a gene transfer agent within parasitic wasp genomes for ≈100 million years. Among the bracovirus genes thus transferred, a phylogenetic analysis indicated that those encoding C-type-lectins most likely originated from the wasp gene set, showing that a bracovirus-mediated gene flux exists between the 2 insect orders Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera. Furthermore, the acquisition of bracovirus sequences that can be expressed by Lepidoptera has resulted in the domestication of several genes that could result in adaptive advantages for the host. Indeed, functional analyses suggest that two of the acquired genes could have a protective role against a common pathogen in the field, baculovirus. From these results, we hypothesize that bracovirus-mediated HGT has played an important role in the evolutionary arms race between Lepidoptera and their pathogens. PMID:26379286

  15. The case for a generic phytosanitary irradiation dose of 250 Gy for Lepidoptera eggs and larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Guy J.; Arthur, Valter; Blackburn, Carl M.; Parker, Andrew G.

    2013-08-01

    The literature on ionizing irradiation of Lepidoptera is critically examined for a dose that could serve as a generic phytosanitary treatment for all eggs and larvae of that order, which contains many quarantine pests that inhibit trade in fresh agricultural commodities. The measure of efficacy used in deriving this dose is the prevention of emergence of normal-looking adults that are assumed not able to fly. A dose of 250 Gy is supported by many studies comprising 34 species in 11 lepidopteran families, including those of significant quarantine importance. Two studies with two different species found that doses >250 Gy were necessary, but both of these are contradicted by other studies showing that 10,000 individuals) testing for families other than Tortricidae (the most important quarantine family in the Lepidoptera). Because several large-scale studies have been done with tortricids a dose of 250 Gy could be justifiable for Tortricidae if it is not acceptable for the entire Lepidoptera at this time.

  16. Recurrent Domestication by Lepidoptera of Genes from Their Parasites Mediated by Bracoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasmi, Laila; Boulain, Helene; Gauthier, Jeremy; Hua-Van, Aurelie; Musset, Karine; Jakubowska, Agata K; Aury, Jean-Marc; Volkoff, Anne-Nathalie; Huguet, Elisabeth; Herrero, Salvador; Drezen, Jean-Michel

    2015-09-01

    Bracoviruses are symbiotic viruses associated with tens of thousands of species of parasitic wasps that develop within the body of lepidopteran hosts and that collectively parasitize caterpillars of virtually every lepidopteran species. Viral particles are produced in the wasp ovaries and injected into host larvae with the wasp eggs. Once in the host body, the viral DNA circles enclosed in the particles integrate into lepidopteran host cell DNA. Here we show that bracovirus DNA sequences have been inserted repeatedly into lepidopteran genomes, indicating this viral DNA can also enter germline cells. The original mode of Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) unveiled here is based on the integrative properties of an endogenous virus that has evolved as a gene transfer agent within parasitic wasp genomes for ≈100 million years. Among the bracovirus genes thus transferred, a phylogenetic analysis indicated that those encoding C-type-lectins most likely originated from the wasp gene set, showing that a bracovirus-mediated gene flux exists between the 2 insect orders Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera. Furthermore, the acquisition of bracovirus sequences that can be expressed by Lepidoptera has resulted in the domestication of several genes that could result in adaptive advantages for the host. Indeed, functional analyses suggest that two of the acquired genes could have a protective role against a common pathogen in the field, baculovirus. From these results, we hypothesize that bracovirus-mediated HGT has played an important role in the evolutionary arms race between Lepidoptera and their pathogens.

  17. Aucula magnifica (Schaus, 1904 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Agaristinae: morphology of egg and last instar larvae Aucula magnifica (Schaus, 1904 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Agaristinae: morfologia do ovo e da larva de último ínstar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Poletto

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to contribute to knowledge of the immature instars of Neotropical Lepidoptera, this study details the morphology of the egg and last instar larvae of Aucula magnifica (Schaus, 1904 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Agaristinae, emphasising the structures of the corium and the chaetotaxy. There is also a report of the occurrence of entomopathogenic action of Nomuraea rileyi (Farlow Samson fungi on the larva.Este estudo objetiva contribuir para o conhecimento dos estágios imaturos dos lepidópteros neotropicais. Nele é feito o detalhamento da morfologia das fases de ovo e de larva de Aucula magnifica (Schaus, 1904 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Agaristinae, dando ênfase ao estudo das estruturas do córion e da quetotaxia da larva de último ínstar. Além disso é relatada a ocorrência da ação entomopatogênica do fungo Nomuraea rileyi (Farlow Samson sobre suas larvas.

  18. Buses, cars, bicycles and walkers: the influence of the type of human transport on the flight responses of waterbirds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily M McLeod

    Full Text Available One way to manage disturbance to waterbirds in natural areas where humans require access is to promote the occurrence of stimuli for which birds tolerate closer approaches, and so cause fewer responses. We conducted 730 experimental approaches to 39 species of waterbird, using five stimulus types (single walker, three walkers, bicycle, car and bus selected to mimic different human management options available for a controlled access, Ramsar-listed wetland. Across species, where differences existed (56% of 25 cases, motor vehicles always evoked shorter flight-initiation distances (FID than humans on foot. The influence of stimulus type on FID varied across four species for which enough data were available for complete cross-stimulus analysis. All four varied FID in relation to stimuli, differing in 4 to 7 of 10 possible comparisons. Where differences occurred, the effect size was generally modest, suggesting that managing stimulus type (e.g. by requiring people to use vehicles may have species-specific, modest benefits, at least for the waterbirds we studied. However, different stimulus types have different capacities to reduce the frequency of disturbance (i.e. by carrying more people and vary in their capacity to travel around important habitat.

  19. Disparate requirements for the Walker A and B ATPase motifs ofhuman RAD51D in homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiese, Claudia; Hinz, John M.; Tebbs, Robert S.; Nham, Peter B.; Urbin, Salustra S.; Collins, David W.; Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2006-04-21

    In vertebrates, homologous recombinational repair (HRR) requires RAD51 and five RAD51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D) that all contain conserved Walker A and B ATPase motifs. In human RAD51D we examined the requirement for these motifs in interactions with XRCC2 and RAD51C, and for survival of cells in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks. Ectopic expression of wild type human RAD51D or mutants having a non-functional A or B motif was used to test for complementation of a rad51d knockout hamster CHO cell line. Although A-motif mutants complement very efficiently, B-motif mutants do not. Consistent with these results, experiments using the yeast two- and three-hybrid systems show that the interactions between RAD51D and its XRCC2 and RAD51C partners also require a functional RAD51D B motif, but not motif A. Similarly, hamster Xrcc2 is unable to bind to the non-complementing human RAD51D B-motif mutants in co-immunoprecipitation assays. We conclude that a functional Walker B motif, but not A motif, is necessary for RAD51D's interactions with other paralogs and for efficient HRR. We present a model in which ATPase sites are formed in a bipartite manner between RAD51D and other RAD51 paralogs.

  20. Increased H(max):M(max) ratio in community walkers poststroke without increase in ankle plantarflexion during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, M; Caulfield, B

    2001-08-01

    To investigate whether changes in H-reflex response at midswing and midstance are related to excessive plantarflexion during walking in community walkers poststroke compared with control subjects without stroke. Survey of functional walking handicap in a random sample of an annual stroke cohort followed by H-reflex and M(max) testing of a smaller sample. Community and laboratory testing. Forty individuals with stroke (IWS group) completed the functional walking handicap survey, 10 of whom agreed (with 10 age-matched controls) to enroll in a study of of the H(max):M(max) ratio in soleus during walking. Electromyography during treadmill walking. Functional Walking Handicap Scale, soleus H(max):M(max) ratio, and the ankle joint's angle of displacement. Nine of the 10 stroke patients were community walkers. All had significantly (p .05) increase in H(max) response. Individuals with community-level walking ability after stroke have significantly (p <.05) less repeatability of ankle joint movement than controls at both midswing and midstance. Simultaneous soleus H(max) and M(max) testing showed a significant (p <.01) reduction in the H(max) and H(max):M(max) ratio at midswing in controls only. This inhibition at midswing was lost by the IWS group without significant increase in H(max), suggesting that central synaptic excitability was within the normal range, and possibly accounting for the absence of excessive ankle plantarflexion during walking in the IWS group with community level walking ability.

  1. Diagnosis of Van den Ende-Gupta syndrome: Approach to the Marden-Walker-like spectrum of disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhoffer, Karen Y; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Eydoux, Patrice; Mawson, John; Nishimura, Gen; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A; Patel, Millan S

    2016-09-01

    Marden-Walker syndrome is challenging to diagnose, as there is significant overlap with other multi-system congenital contracture syndromes including Beals congenital contractural arachnodactyly, D4ST1-Deficient Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (adducted thumb-clubfoot syndrome), Schwartz-Jampel syndrome, Freeman-Sheldon syndrome, Cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal syndrome, and Van den Ende-Gupta syndrome. We discuss this differential diagnosis in the context of a boy from a consanguineous union with Van den Ende-Gupta syndrome, a diagnosis initially confused by the atypical presence of intellectual disability. SNP microarray and whole exome sequencing identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (p.L870V) in SCARF2 and predicted damaging mutations in several genes, most notably DGCR2 (p.P75L) and NCAM2 (p.S147G), both possible candidates for this child's intellectual disability. We review distinguishing features for each Marden-Walker-like syndrome and propose a clinical algorithm for diagnosis among this spectrum of disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A new genus and species of leaf miner (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae for Chile associated to the native tree Lithraea caustica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique A. Mundaca

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A new genus and species of leaf miner (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae for Chile associated to the native tree Lithraea caustica. We propose the new genus and species of Gracillariidae (Lepidoptera Hualpenia lithraeophaga Mundaca, Parra &Vargas gen. nov., sp. nov., leaf miner of Lithraea caustica (Mol. H. et Arn (Anacardiaceae occurring in southern central Chile. Aspects of the life cycle, adult and larval morphology, development and feeding habits of the new genus and species are also presented. We emphasise the uniqueness and importance of this new species for broadening the current knowledge on the Chilean fauna of Gracillariidae.

  3. Interpretation of simple and cloud-resolving simulations of moist convection radiation interaction with a mock-Walker circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretherton, Christopher S.; Blossey, Peter N.; Peters, Matthew E.

    2006-11-01

    An idealized two-dimensional mock-Walker circulation in the tropical atmosphere forced by prescribed horizontal gradients in sea-surface temperature (SST) is discussed. This model problem includes feedbacks between cumulus convection and tropical large-scale circulations that have proved challenging for global climate models to predict accurately. Three-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations that explicitly simulate turbulent circulations within individual cloud systems across 4,096 and 1,024 km-wide Walker circulations are compared with a simple theoretical model, the Simplified Quasiequilibrium Tropical Circulation Model (SQTCM). This theoretical model combines the weak-temperature-gradient approximation with a unimodal truncation of tropospheric vertical structure coupled to highly simplified formulations of moist precipitating cumulus convection and its cloud-radiative feedbacks. The rainfall, cloud and humidity distribution, circulation strength, energy fluxes and scaling properties are compared between the models. The CRM-simulated horizontal distribution of rainfall and energy fluxes are adequately predicted by the SQTCM. However, the humidity distribution (drier subsidence regions and high-humidity boundary layers in the CRM), vertical structure and domain-size scaling of the circulation differ significantly between the models. For the SQTCM, the concept of gross moist stability related to advection of moist static energy (MSE) out of tropospheric columns by the mean divergent circulation is used to explain the width and intensity of the rainy region. Column MSE budgets averaged across the ascent branch of the simulated Walker circulation provide similar insight into the cloud-resolving simulations after consideration of the more complex horizontal and vertical circulation structure and the role of transient eddies. A nondimensional ascent-region moist stability ratio α, analogous to the SQTCM gross moist stability, is developed. One term of

  4. Action of tacrolimus on Wistar rat kidneys implanted with Walker 256 carcinosarcoma Estudo da ação do tacrolimus em rins de ratos Wistar implantados com carcinossarcoma de Walker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Machado Inácio

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the development of Walker 256 tumor in male Wistar rats treated with tacrolimus using an experimental kidney tumor model. METHODS: 40 male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: Tumor group (TU (n=10, Tacrolimus-Tumor group (TT (n=10, Tacrolimus group (TC (n=10 and Control group (C (n=10. Treatment with tacrolimus was performed in groups TT and TC. Under anesthesia, the right kidney of each animal of TU and TT was accessed through a supraumbilical incision and inoculated with a 0.1mL solution containing 2x10(6 tumor cells (Walker 256 carcinosarcoma tumor cells. Group TC was treated with a saline solution. All the animals of groups TC and TT were treated with tacrolimus (5mg/kg/day by gavage for 15 days. TU group animals received saline by gavage for 15 days. On the 15th postoperative day, all animals were submitted to euthanasia and blood sampling for analysis of serum creatinine (Cr and blood urea nitrogen (BUN. Abdominal gross examination was performed, the right kidney removed and prepared for histological analysis by hematoxylin-eosin staining. The resulting data were submitted to statistical analysis by ANOVA. RESULTS: Statistical significance was found when comparing creatinine level between groups TU, TT and TC -TT group culminated with a marked increased in creatinine levels (Cr=1.013 ± 0.3028 mg/mL, TU group (Cr=0.5670 ± 0.03536 mg/dL P=0.00256, TC group (Cr =0.711 ± 0.1653 mg/mL P= 0.02832. Statistical significance was found when comparing BUN levels in TT group (71.32 ± 17.14 mg/mL, compared with TU group (45.83 ± 5.046 mg/dL, P=0.000318. There were no statistically significant differences between groups TT and TC (61.23 ± 9.503 mg/mL P=0.7242. Histological analysis showed a poor evolution in TT group with multiple foci of hemorrhage and cortical invasion by the Walker tumor. CONCLUSION: The Tacrolimus-treated group developed a more aggressive tumor and a drug-related nephrotoxic effect.OBJETIVO: Avaliar

  5. First, you need a Gestalt: An interaction of bottom-up and top-down streams during the perception of the ambiguously rotating human walker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukhov, Alexander

    2017-04-25

    Our visual system combines sensory evidence with prior knowledge to produce a representation of an outside world. Here, we explored the limits of the feedforward computation using an ambiguously rotating human biological motion. Specifically, we investigated whether an overall rotation, which was added to all the displays used in the study, would be perceived when the point-light walker was presented upside-down, a condition that typically obliterates perception of a human Gestalt. We report that inversion of the point-light walker or the absence of an identifiable Gestalt abolished the perception of an overall rotation. Perception of rotation was restored if the human walker Gestalt could be identified (an upright walker), if observers were informed about the nature of the motion display, or if observers expected to see the rotation of an unknown dynamic object. This implies that a mathematically more complex human motion was accounted for before the remaining motion components could be used to infer an overall rotation. Our results indicate that the perceptual inference does not proceed in a hierarchical manner with the simpler components being identified first. Instead, prior knowledge acts as a starting point for the decomposition of an even relatively simple combination of two motions.

  6. Laminin beta 2 chain and adhalin deficiency in the skeletal muscle of Walker-Warburg syndrome (cerebro-ocular dysplasia-muscular dystrophy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Durkin, M E; Zhang, X

    1995-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy may be caused by disturbances in a number of muscle proteins that appear to be part of a chain of interacting molecules that includes cytoskeletal, cell membrane, and basement membrane components. We found that the skeletal muscle cells in two cases of Walker-Warburg syndrome w...

  7. Analog model of a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe in Bose-Einstein condensates: Application of the classical field method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Piyush; Weinfurtner, Silke; Visser, Matt; Gardiner, C. W.

    2007-01-01

    Analog models of gravity have been motivated by the possibility of investigating phenomena not readily accessible in their cosmological counterparts. In this paper, we investigate the analog of cosmological particle creation in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe by numerically simulating a Bose-Einstein condensate with a time-dependent scattering length. In particular, we focus on a two-dimensional homogeneous condensate using the classical field method via the truncated Wigner approximation. We show that for various forms of the scaling function the particle production is consistent with the underlying theory in the long wavelength limit. In this context, we further discuss the implications of modified dispersion relations that arise from the microscopic theory of a weakly interacting Bose gas

  8. Le syndrome de Dandy-Walker: étude anatomo-clinique d'un cas adulte

    OpenAIRE

    Ebbing, Karsten; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon

    2004-01-01

    Le syndrome de Dandy-Walker est une malformation congénitale du système nerveux central, située dans la fosse postérieure. Ce syndrome provoque généralement une clinique bruyante dès la naissance, sous forme d'hydrocéphalie aiguë ou chronique. Quelques rares cas adultes asymptomatiques, dont le diagnostic a été posé fortuitement, sont décrits. Ce travail présente les caractéristiques neuropathologiques et les corrélations clinico-anatomiques relatives à un cas adulte asymptomatique découvert ...

  9. Le syndrome de Dandy-Walker : (étude anatomo-clinique d'un cas adulte)

    OpenAIRE

    Ebbing, Karsten

    2004-01-01

    Le syndrome de Dandy-Walker est une malformation congénitale du système nerveux central, située dans la fosse postérieure. Ce syndrome provoque généralement une clinique bruyante dès la naissance, sous forme d'hydrocéphalie aiguë ou chronique. Quelques rares cas adultes asymptomatiques, dont le diagnostic a été posé fortuitement, sont décrits. Ce travail présente les caractéristiques neuropathologiques et les corrélations clinico-anatomiques relatives à un cas adulte asymptomatique découvert ...

  10. Secondary 1 Program of Project P.A.T.H.S.: Process Evaluation Based on the Co-Walker Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the implementation quality of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum delivered in the second year of the Full Implementation Phase of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes. Under the “Co-Walker Scheme”, systematic observation of curriculum units was conducted in 138 schools. Results indicated that the overall level of program adherence was high, with an average of 82.9%. The mean ratings of the program implementation quality were also high. Despite limitations, the findings of this study suggest that the implementation of the Secondary 1 Program (Tier 1 Program of the Full Implementation Phase was of very high quality. The present findings also provide strong evidence to account for the successful and encouraging outcomes of a major positive youth development program in Hong Kong.

  11. Unusual Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) Shunt Tube Extrusion through Anus in a Child with Dandy Walker Malformation: A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Hanish; Gupta, Gulzar; Gupta, Mayank; Kaushal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this paper is to report a case of extrusion of Ventriculo peritoneal shunt tube through anus in a one year female child ( k/c/o dandy walker malformation ) treated with placement of ventriculo peritoneal shunt for post operative hydrocephalus after excision of Subtorcular occipital meningocoel. The exact cause of such extrusion is not known. Unusual migration of distal catheter tip of VP shunt is a rare and bowel perforation is reported to occur between 0.1% and 0.7%. The possible factors responsible for this complication are thin bowel wall in children, sharp and stiff end of the VP shunt, use of trocar by some surgeons, chronic irritation by the shunt, previous surgery, infection and silicone allergy. In view of the potential for meningitis prompt and aggressive management is essential to avoid morbidity and mortality.

  12. X-derived marker chromosome in patient with mosaic Turner syndrome and Dandy-Walker syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telepova, Alena S; Romanenko, Svetlana A; Lemskaya, Natalya A; Maksimova, Yulia V; Shorina, Asia R; Yudkin, Dmitry V

    2017-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes can be derived from autosomes and sex chromosomes and can accompany chromosome pathologies, such as Turner syndrome. Here, we present a case report of a patient with mosaic Turner syndrome and Dandy-Walker syndrome carrying a marker chromosome. We showed the presence of the marker chromosome in 33.8% of blood cells. FISH of the probe derived from the marker chromosome by microdissection revealed that it originated from the centromeric region of chromosome X. Additionally, we showed no telomeric sequences and no XIST sequence in the marker chromosome. This is the first report of these two syndromes accompanied by the presence of a marker chromosome. Marker chromosome was X-derived and originated from centromeric region. Patient has mild symptoms but there is no XIST gene in marker chromosome. CPG137. Registered 03 March 2017.

  13. How do ants make sense of gravity? A Boltzmann Walker analysis of Lasius niger trajectories on various inclines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaïs Khuong

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to describe accurately how the directional information given by support inclinations affects the ant Lasius niger motion in terms of a behavioral decision. To this end, we have tracked the spontaneous motion of 345 ants walking on a 0.5×0.5 m plane canvas, which was tilted with 5 various inclinations by [Formula: see text] rad ([Formula: see text] data points. At the population scale, support inclination favors dispersal along uphill and downhill directions. An ant's decision making process is modeled using a version of the Boltzmann Walker model, which describes an ant's random walk as a series of straight segments separated by reorientation events, and was extended to take directional influence into account. From the data segmented accordingly ([Formula: see text] segments, this extension allows us to test separately how average speed, segments lengths and reorientation decisions are affected by support inclination and current walking direction of the ant. We found that support inclination had a major effect on average speed, which appeared approximately three times slower on the [Formula: see text] incline. However, we found no effect of the walking direction on speed. Contrastingly, we found that ants tend to walk longer in the same direction when they move uphill or downhill, and also that they preferentially adopt new uphill or downhill headings at turning points. We conclude that ants continuously adapt their decision making about where to go, and how long to persist in the same direction, depending on how they are aligned with the line of maximum declivity gradient. Hence, their behavioral decision process appears to combine klinokinesis with geomenotaxis. The extended Boltzmann Walker model parameterized by these effects gives a fair account of the directional dispersal of ants on inclines.

  14. Protected species of butterflies (Lepidoptera in the National Nature Park “Velyky Lug”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Goloborodko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Velyky Lug is a unique natural complex which has a large biogeographical, ecological, environmental, historical and recreational value. The National Nature Park “Velyky Lug” was only created as recently as 2006.The park is located in Zaporizhzhya region, 15–18 km south of the city Zaporizhzhya, within the limits of floodplain area of the Dnepr river, which broadens to a width of over 20 kmbetween Bilen’ke and Vasilivka (north-eastern part of the Kakhovskoe reservoir. This enormous expansion of the floodplain (about 80,000 ha which is situated between the Dnepr river and its tributary the Kins’ka was in historical times was called the Kin’ski Floodplain or Great Meadow. In modern times this territory is almost completely flooded by the waters of the Kakhovskoe reservoir. Remnants of natural habitats have been preserved along the river banks – in the form of little valleys and ravines which extend all the shore and also islands which appeared in 1956 when the reservoir was flooded. The overall area of the park “Velyky Lug” is 16,756 ha. Within the territory of the park “Velyky Lug” we have recorded 27 species of Lepidoptera which have various levels of conservation status. The taxonomical structure of the complex varies and included representatives of all basic families of moth and day butterflies which have species that are protected by law. In a taxonomical relation this complex is formed by the representatives of 11 families (Zygaenidae, Saturniidae, Sphingidae, Noctuidae, Arctiidae, Hesperiidae, Papilionidae, Pieridae, Nymphalidae, Satyridae, Lycaenidae. Zoogeographical analysis of the species that are protected in the territory of the park can be classified into 5 basic groups (Palearctic – 26%, Pontokazach – 26%, Mediterranean– 22%, Eurosiberian – 15%, European – 11%. Analysis of the biotopic advantages of the protected Lepidoptera species present in the territory of the park showed representatives from all

  15. The influence of vegetation and landscape structural connectivity on butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperiidae), Carabids (Coleoptera: Carabidae), Syrphids (Diptera: Syrphidae), and sawflies (Hymenoptera: Symphyta) in Northern Italy farmland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgio, G.; Sommaggio, D.; Marini, M.; Chiarucci, A.; Landi, S.; Fabbri, R.; Pesarini, F.; Genghini, M.; Ferrari, R.; Muzzi, E.; Lenteren, van J.C.; Masetti, A.

    2015-01-01

    Landscape structure as well as local vegetation influence biodiversity in agroecosystems. A study was performed to evaluate the effect of floristic diversity, vegetation patterns, and landscape structural connectivity on butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperiidae), carabids (Coleoptera:

  16. Participation of the NO/cGMP/K{sup +}ATP pathway in the antinociception induced by Walker tumor bearing in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, A.L.R.; Pinheiro, C.A.; Oliveira, G.J.; Torres, J.N.L.; Moraes, M.O.; Ribeiro, R.A.; Vale, M.L.; Souza, M.H.L.P. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2012-03-30

    Implantation of Walker 256 tumor decreases acute systemic inflammation in rats. Inflammatory hyperalgesia is one of the most important events of acute inflammation. The L-arginine/NO/cGMP/K{sup +}ATP pathway has been proposed as the mechanism of peripheral antinociception mediated by several drugs and physical exercise. The objective of this study was to investigate a possible involvement of the NO/cGMP/K{sup +}ATP pathway in antinociception induced in Walker 256 tumor-bearing male Wistar rats (180-220 g). The groups consisted of 5-6 animals. Mechanical inflammatory hypernociception was evaluated using an electronic version of the von Frey test. Walker tumor (4th and 7th day post-implantation) reduced prostaglandin E{sub 2}- (PGE{sub 2}, 400 ng/paw; 50 µL; intraplantar injection) and carrageenan-induced hypernociception (500 µg/paw; 100 µL; intraplantar injection). Walker tumor-induced analgesia was reversed (99.3% for carrageenan and 77.2% for PGE{sub 2}) by a selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (L-NAME; 90 mg/kg, ip) and L-arginine (200 mg/kg, ip), which prevented (80% for carrageenan and 65% for PGE{sub 2}) the effect of L-NAME. Treatment with the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ (100% for carrageenan and 95% for PGE{sub 2}; 8 µg/paw) and the ATP-sensitive K{sup +} channel (KATP) blocker glibenclamide (87.5% for carrageenan and 100% for PGE{sub 2}; 160 µg/paw) reversed the antinociceptive effect of tumor bearing in a statistically significant manner (P < 0.05). The present study confirmed an intrinsic peripheral antinociceptive effect of Walker tumor bearing in rats. This antinociceptive effect seemed to be mediated by activation of the NO/cGMP pathway followed by the opening of KATP channels.

  17. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases as a detoxification mechanism in insects: new insights from the arctiids (lepidoptera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Sehlmeyer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Insects experience a wide array of chemical pressures from plant allelochemicals and pesticides and have developed several effective counterstrategies to cope with such toxins. Among these, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are crucial in plant-insect interactions. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs seem not to play a central role in xenobiotic detoxification in insects, in contrast to mammals. However, the previously identified senecionine N-oxygenase of the arctiid moth Tyria jacobaeae (Lepidoptera indicates that FMOs have been recruited during the adaptation of this insect to plants that accumulate toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Identification of related FMO-like sequences of various arctiids and other Lepidoptera and their combination with expressed sequence tag (EST data and sequences emerging from the Bombyx mori genome project show that FMOs in Lepidoptera form a gene family with three members (FMO1 to FMO3. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that FMO3 is only distantly related to lepidopteran FMO1 and FMO2 that originated from a more recent gene duplication event. Within the FMO1 gene cluster, an additional gene duplication early in the arctiid lineage provided the basis for the evolution of the highly specific biochemical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations of these butterflies to pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-producing plants. The genes encoding pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-N-oxygenizing enzymes (PNOs are transcribed in the fat body and the head of the larvae. An N-terminal signal peptide mediates the transport of the soluble proteins into the hemolymph where PNOs efficiently convert pro-toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids into their non-toxic N-oxide derivatives. Heterologous expression of a PNO of the generalist arctiid Grammia geneura produced an N-oxygenizing enzyme that shows noticeably expanded substrate specificity compared with the related enzyme of the specialist Tyria jacobaeae. The data about the evolution of FMOs within lepidopteran insects

  18. First record Cydia alazon (Diakonoff, 1976) from La Palma Islands (Canary Islands, Spain) with taxonomic and ecological notes (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spitzer, Karel; Jaroš, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 136 (2006), s. 371-378 ISSN 0300-5267 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS500070505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Lepidoptera * Tortricidae * Cydia alazon Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  19. Genetic divergence and evidence for sympatric host-races in the highly polyphagous brown tail moth, Euproctis chrysorrhoea (Lepidoptera: Erebidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marques, J.F.; Wang, H.L.; Svensson, G.P.; Frago Clols, E.; Anderbrant, O.

    2014-01-01

    The brown tail moth (BTM) Euproctis chrysorrhoea (Linnaeus 1758) (Lepidoptera: Erebidae) is a forest and ornamental pest in Europe and the United States. Its extreme polyphagy, and documented phenological shift associated with host use suggest the presence of distinct host-races. To test this

  20. Sphragis in Parnassius mnemosyne (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae): male-derived insemination plugs loose efficiency with progress of female flight

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlašánek, Petr; Konvička, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 6 (2009), s. 1206-1211 ISSN 0006-3088 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073; GA ČR GD206/08/H044 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Apollo butterflies * insect behaviour * Lepidoptera ecology Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.617, year: 2009