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Sample records for suppress respiration control

  1. The Nucleus Retroambiguus Control of Respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subramanian, Hari H.; Holstege, Gert

    2009-01-01

    The role of the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) in the context of respiration control has been subject of debate for considerable time. To solve this problem, we chemically (using D, L-homocysteic acid) stimulated the NRA in unanesthetized precollicularly decerebrated cats and studied the respiratory

  2. A water soluble additive to suppress respirable dust from concrete-cutting chainsaws: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Michael P; Parmigiani, John P

    2015-01-01

    Respirable dust is of particular concern in the construction industry because it contains crystalline silica. Respirable forms of silica are a severe health threat because they heighten the risk of numerous respirable diseases. Concrete cutting, a common work practice in the construction industry, is a major contributor to dust generation. No studies have been found that focus on the dust suppression of concrete-cutting chainsaws, presumably because, during normal operation water is supplied continuously and copiously to the dust generation points. However, there is a desire to better understand dust creation at low water flow rates. In this case study, a water-soluble surfactant additive was used in the chainsaw's water supply. Cutting was performed on a free-standing concrete wall in a covered outdoor lab with a hand-held, gas-powered, concrete-cutting chainsaw. Air was sampled at the operator's lapel, and around the concrete wall to simulate nearby personnel. Two additive concentrations were tested (2.0% and 0.2%), across a range of fluid flow rates (0.38-3.8 Lpm [0.1-1.0 gpm] at 0.38 Lpm [0.1 gpm] increments). Results indicate that when a lower concentration of additive is used exposure levels increase. However, all exposure levels, once adjusted for 3 hours of continuous cutting in an 8-hour work shift, are below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 5 mg/m(3). Estimates were made using trend lines to predict the fluid flow rates that would cause respirable dust exposure to exceed both the OSHA PEL and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH®) threshold limit value (TLV).

  3. Cholera Toxin Production Induced upon Anaerobic Respiration is Suppressed by Glucose Fermentation in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Kang-Mu; Bari, Wasimul; Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, Hye Jin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2016-03-01

    The causative agent of pandemic cholera, Vibrio cholerae, infects the anaerobic environment of the human intestine. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly induced during anaerobic respiration with trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. However, the molecular mechanism of TMAO-stimulated CT production is not fully understood. Herein, we reveal that CT production during anaerobic TMAO respiration is affected by glucose fermentation. When the seventh pandemic V. cholerae O1 strain N16961 was grown with TMAO and additional glucose, CT production was markedly reduced. Furthermore, an N16961 Δcrp mutant, devoid of cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), was defective in CT production during growth by anaerobic TMAO respiration, further suggesting a role of glucose metabolism in regulating TMAO-mediated CT production. TMAO reductase activity was noticeably decreased when grown together with glucose or by mutation of the crp gene. A CRP binding region was identified in the promoter region of the torD gene, which encodes a structural subunit of the TMAO reductase. Gel shift assays further confirmed the binding of purified CRP to the torD promoter sequence. Together, our results suggest that the bacterial ability to respire using TMAO is controlled by CRP, whose activity is dependent on glucose availability. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of major virulence factor production by V. cholerae under anaerobic growth conditions.

  4. Burst Suppression for ICP Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, Frederick A; Akoth, Eva; Gillman, Lawrence M; West, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The goal of our study was to perform a systematic review of the literature to determine the effect that burst suppression has on intracranial pressure (ICP) control. All articles from MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Scopus, Cochrane Library, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (inception to January 2015), reference lists of relevant articles, and gray literature were searched. The strength of evidence was adjudicated using both the Oxford and the Grading of Recommendation Assessment Development and Education (GRADE) methodology. Seven articles were considered for review. A total of 108 patients were studied, all receiving burst suppression therapy. Two studies failed to document a decrease in ICP with burst suppression therapy. There were reports of severe hypotension and increased infection rates with barbiturate-based therapy. Etomidate-based suppressive therapy was linked to severe renal dysfunction. There currently exists both Oxford level 2b and GRADE C evidence to support that achieving burst suppression reduces ICP, and also has no effect on ICP, in severe traumatic brain injury. The literature suggests burst suppression therapy may be useful for ICP reduction in certain cases, although these situations are currently unclear. In addition, the impact on patient functional outcome is unclear. Further prospective study is warranted.

  5. Respirable crystalline silica - a failure to control exposure!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, J. R.

    2009-02-01

    Several sites were visited to monitor stonemason exposure to respirable crystalline silica (RCS), inhalable dust and respirable dust. At all sites, exposure to RCS exceeded the Workplace Exposure Limit of 0.1 mg/m3 8-hour TWA. There was therefore a continuing high risk of workers developing silicosis unless the appropriate measures were instigated to prevent or control exposure. Exposure control was ineffective at all sites e.g. water wall extraction systems were not well designed. There was evidence that foreign workers were at a greater exposure risk. But even with appropriate controls to mitigate exposure to RCS it may not be possible to sustain exposure to below 0.1 mg/m3 8-hour TWA without on-going HSE intervention.

  6. Fourteen Annually Repeated Droughts Suppressed Autotrophic Soil Respiration and Resulted in an Ecosystem Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopittke, G.R.; Tietema, A.; van Loon, E.; Asscheman, D.

    2014-01-01

    Predictions of future climate over the next 100 years show that the frequency of long periods of droughts in summer will increase in the Netherlands. This study investigated the effect of 14 annually repeated droughts on soil respiration at a Dutch heathland. Field measurements of total soil

  7. Evaluation of the approach to respirable quartz exposure control in U.S. coal mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Gerald J

    2012-01-01

    Occupational exposure to high levels of respirable quartz can result in respiratory and other diseases in humans. The Mine Safety and Health Adminstration (MSHA) regulates exposure to respirable quartz in coal mines indirectly through reductions in the respirable coal mine dust exposure limit based on the content of quartz in the airborne respirable dust. This reduction is implemented when the quartz content of airborne respirable dust exceeds 5% by weight. The intent of this dust standard reduction is to restrict miners' exposure to respirable quartz to a time-weighted average concentration of 100 μg/m(3). The effectiveness of this indirect approach to control quartz exposure was evaluated by analyzing respirable dust samples collected by MSHA inspectors from 1995 through 2008. The performance of the current regulatory approach was found to be lacking due to the use of a variable property-quartz content in airborne dust-to establish a standard for subsequent exposures. In one situation, 11.7% (4370/37,346) of samples that were below the applicable respirable coal mine dust exposure limit exceeded 100 μg/m(3) quartz. In a second situation, 4.4% (895/20,560) of samples with 5% or less quartz content in the airborne respirable dust exceeded 100 μg/m(3) quartz. In these two situations, the samples exceeding 100 μg/m(3) quartz were not subject to any potential compliance action. Therefore, the current respirable quartz exposure control approach does not reliably maintain miner exposure below 100 μg/m(3) quartz. A separate and specific respirable quartz exposure standard may improve control of coal miners' occupational exposure to respirable quartz.

  8. Controls on winter ecosystem respiration in temperate and boreal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Wang; P. Ciais; S.L. Piao; C. Ottle; P. Brender; F. Maignan; A. Arain; A. Cescatti; D. Gianelle; C. Gough; L Gu; P. Lafleur; T. Laurila; B. Marcolla; H. Margolis; L. Montagnani; E. Moors; N. Saigusa; T. Vesala; G. Wohlfahrt; C. Koven; A. Black; E. Dellwik; A. Don; D. Hollinger; A. Knohl; R. Monson; J. Munger; A. Suyker; A. Varlagin; S. Verma

    2011-01-01

    Winter CO2 fluxes represent an important component of the annual carbon budget in northern ecosystems. Understanding winter respiration processes and their responses to climate change is also central to our ability to assess terrestrial carbon cycle and climate feedbacks in the future. However, the factors influencing the spatial and temporal...

  9. Controls on winter ecosystem respiration in temperate and boreal ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciais, P.; Wang, T.; Piao, S.L.; Ottlé, C.; Brender, P.; Moors, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Winter CO2 fluxes represent an important component of the annual carbon budget in northern ecosystems. Understanding winter respiration processes and their responses to climate change is also central to our ability to assess terrestrial carbon cycle and climate feedbacks in the future. However, the

  10. Biophysical controls on soil respiration in the dominant patch types of an old-growth, mixed-conifer forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siyan Ma; Jiquan Chen; John R. Butnor; Malcolm North; Eugénie S. Euskirchen; Brian Oakley

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about biophysical controls on soil respiration in California's Sierra Nevada old-growth, mixed-conifer forests. Using portable and automated soil respiration sampling units, we measured soil respiration rate (SRR) in three dominant patch types: closed canopy (CC), ceanothus-dominated patches (CECO), and open canopy (OC). SRR varied significantly...

  11. Nonlinear effects of respiration on the crosstalk between cardiovascular and cerebrovascular control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Vlasta; Marchi, Andrea; De Maria, Beatrice; Rossato, Gianluca; Nollo, Giandomenico; Faes, Luca; Porta, Alberto

    2016-05-13

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems are vital control mechanisms responsible for guaranteeing homeostasis and are affected by respiration. This work proposes the investigation of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular control systems and the nonlinear influences of respiration on both regulations through joint symbolic analysis (JSA), conditioned or unconditioned on respiration. Interactions between cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems were evaluated as well by performing correlation analysis between JSA indexes describing the two control systems. Heart period, systolic and mean arterial pressure, mean cerebral blood flow velocity and respiration were acquired on a beat-to-beat basis in 13 subjects experiencing recurrent syncope episodes (SYNC) and 13 healthy individuals (non-SYNC) in supine resting condition and during head-up tilt test at 60° (TILT). Results showed that JSA distinguished conditions and groups, whereas time domain parameters detected only the effect of TILT. Respiration affected cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems in a nonlinear way and was able to modulate the interactions between the two control systems with different outcome in non-SYNC and SYNC groups, thus suggesting that the analysis of the impact of respiration on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular regulatory systems might improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the development of postural-related syncope. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. Disharmony between wake- and respiration-promoting activities: effects of modafinil on ventilatory control in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Jiro; Fukushi, Isato; Takeda, Kotaro; Hasebe, Yohei; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Okada, Yasumasa

    2016-11-14

    Modafinil is a wake-promoting drug and has been widely used for daytime sleepiness in patients with narcolepsy and other sleep disorders. A recent case series reported that daily oral modafinil alleviated hypercapnic respiratory failure in patients with COPD. However, the precise action of modafinil on respiration such as hypercapnic and/or hypoxic ventilatory responses remains unclear. The aim of this study is to clarify the effect of modafinil on the ventilatory control. We investigated the hypothesis that modafinil enhances resting ventilation as well as the stimulatory ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and hypoxia. We addressed the issue by examining minute ventilation, respiratory rate and volume components using plethysmography, combined with a concurrent EEG monitoring of the level of wakefulness before and after administration of modafinil in two doses of 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg in unanesthetized mice. In addition, we monitored the effect of the lower dose of modafinil on mice locomotor activity in a freely moving condition by video-recording. Wakefulness, locomotor activity and variability of the breathing pattern in tidal volume were promoted by both doses of modafinil. Neither dose of modafinil increased the absolute values of resting ventilation or promoted the ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and hypoxia. Rather, higher dose of modafinil slightly suppressed respiratory rate in room air condition. Modafinil is conducive to the state of wakefulness but does not augment resting ventilation or the hyperventilatory responses to chemical stimuli in unanesthetized rodents.

  13. Control of respiration in fish, amphibians and reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.W. Taylor

    Full Text Available Fish and amphibians utilise a suction/force pump to ventilate gills or lungs, with the respiratory muscles innervated by cranial nerves, while reptiles have a thoracic, aspiratory pump innervated by spinal nerves. However, fish can recruit a hypobranchial pump for active jaw occlusion during hypoxia, using feeding muscles innervated by anterior spinal nerves. This same pump is used to ventilate the air-breathing organ in air-breathing fishes. Some reptiles retain a buccal force pump for use during hypoxia or exercise. All vertebrates have respiratory rhythm generators (RRG located in the brainstem. In cyclostomes and possibly jawed fishes, this may comprise elements of the trigeminal nucleus, though in the latter group RRG neurons have been located in the reticular formation. In air-breathing fishes and amphibians, there may be separate RRG for gill and lung ventilation. There is some evidence for multiple RRG in reptiles. Both amphibians and reptiles show episodic breathing patterns that may be centrally generated, though they do respond to changes in oxygen supply. Fish and larval amphibians have chemoreceptors sensitive to oxygen partial pressure located on the gills. Hypoxia induces increased ventilation and a reflex bradycardia and may trigger aquatic surface respiration or air-breathing, though these latter activities also respond to behavioural cues. Adult amphibians and reptiles have peripheral chemoreceptors located on the carotid arteries and central chemoreceptors sensitive to blood carbon dioxide levels. Lung perfusion may be regulated by cardiac shunting and lung ventilation stimulates lung stretch receptors.

  14. Control of respiration in fish, amphibians and reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.W. Taylor

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fish and amphibians utilise a suction/force pump to ventilate gills or lungs, with the respiratory muscles innervated by cranial nerves, while reptiles have a thoracic, aspiratory pump innervated by spinal nerves. However, fish can recruit a hypobranchial pump for active jaw occlusion during hypoxia, using feeding muscles innervated by anterior spinal nerves. This same pump is used to ventilate the air-breathing organ in air-breathing fishes. Some reptiles retain a buccal force pump for use during hypoxia or exercise. All vertebrates have respiratory rhythm generators (RRG located in the brainstem. In cyclostomes and possibly jawed fishes, this may comprise elements of the trigeminal nucleus, though in the latter group RRG neurons have been located in the reticular formation. In air-breathing fishes and amphibians, there may be separate RRG for gill and lung ventilation. There is some evidence for multiple RRG in reptiles. Both amphibians and reptiles show episodic breathing patterns that may be centrally generated, though they do respond to changes in oxygen supply. Fish and larval amphibians have chemoreceptors sensitive to oxygen partial pressure located on the gills. Hypoxia induces increased ventilation and a reflex bradycardia and may trigger aquatic surface respiration or air-breathing, though these latter activities also respond to behavioural cues. Adult amphibians and reptiles have peripheral chemoreceptors located on the carotid arteries and central chemoreceptors sensitive to blood carbon dioxide levels. Lung perfusion may be regulated by cardiac shunting and lung ventilation stimulates lung stretch receptors.

  15. Control of respiration in fish, amphibians and reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, E W; Leite, C A C; McKenzie, D J; Wang, T

    2010-05-01

    Fish and amphibians utilise a suction/force pump to ventilate gills or lungs, with the respiratory muscles innervated by cranial nerves, while reptiles have a thoracic, aspiratory pump innervated by spinal nerves. However, fish can recruit a hypobranchial pump for active jaw occlusion during hypoxia, using feeding muscles innervated by anterior spinal nerves. This same pump is used to ventilate the air-breathing organ in air-breathing fishes. Some reptiles retain a buccal force pump for use during hypoxia or exercise. All vertebrates have respiratory rhythm generators (RRG) located in the brainstem. In cyclostomes and possibly jawed fishes, this may comprise elements of the trigeminal nucleus, though in the latter group RRG neurons have been located in the reticular formation. In air-breathing fishes and amphibians, there may be separate RRG for gill and lung ventilation. There is some evidence for multiple RRG in reptiles. Both amphibians and reptiles show episodic breathing patterns that may be centrally generated, though they do respond to changes in oxygen supply. Fish and larval amphibians have chemoreceptors sensitive to oxygen partial pressure located on the gills. Hypoxia induces increased ventilation and a reflex bradycardia and may trigger aquatic surface respiration or air-breathing, though these latter activities also respond to behavioural cues. Adult amphibians and reptiles have peripheral chemoreceptors located on the carotid arteries and central chemoreceptors sensitive to blood carbon dioxide levels. Lung perfusion may be regulated by cardiac shunting and lung ventilation stimulates lung stretch receptors.

  16. Slow and deep respiration suppresses steady-state sympathetic nerve activity in patients with chronic heart failure: from modeling to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Daisuke; Asanoi, Hidetsugu; Takagawa, Junya; Ishise, Hisanari; Ueno, Hiroshi; Oda, Yoshitaka; Goso, Yukiko; Joho, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2014-10-15

    Influences of slow and deep respiration on steady-state sympathetic nerve activity remain controversial in humans and could vary depending on disease conditions and basal sympathetic nerve activity. To elucidate the respiratory modulation of steady-state sympathetic nerve activity, we modeled the dynamic nature of the relationship between lung inflation and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in 11 heart failure patients with exaggerated sympathetic outflow at rest. An autoregressive exogenous input model was utilized to simulate entire responses of MSNA to variable respiratory patterns. In another 18 patients, we determined the influence of increasing tidal volume and slowing respiratory frequency on MSNA; 10 patients underwent a 15-min device-guided slow respiration and the remaining 8 had no respiratory modification. The model predicted that a 1-liter, step increase of lung volume decreased MSNA dynamically; its nadir (-33 ± 22%) occurred at 2.4 s; and steady-state decrease (-15 ± 5%), at 6 s. Actually, in patients with the device-guided slow and deep respiration, respiratory frequency effectively fell from 16.4 ± 3.9 to 6.7 ± 2.8/min (P steady-state MSNA was decreased by 31% (P steady-state MSNA. Thus slow and deep respiration suppresses steady-state sympathetic nerve activity in patients with high levels of resting sympathetic tone as in heart failure. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Controls on winter ecosystem respiration in temperate and boreal ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Winter CO2 fluxes represent an important component of the annual carbon budget in northern ecosystems. Understanding winter respiration processes and their responses to climate change is also central to our ability to assess terrestrial carbon cycle and climate feedbacks in the future. However, the factors influencing the spatial and temporal patterns of winter ecosystem respiration (Reco of northern ecosystems are poorly understood. For this reason, we analyzed eddy covariance flux data from 57 ecosystem sites ranging from ~35° N to ~70° N. Deciduous forests were characterized by the highest winter Reco rates (0.90 ± 0.39 g C m−2 d−1, when winter is defined as the period during which daily air temperature remains below 0 °C. By contrast, arctic wetlands had the lowest winter Reco rates (0.02 ± 0.02 g C m−2 d−1. Mixed forests, evergreen needle-leaved forests, grasslands, croplands and boreal wetlands were characterized by intermediate winter Reco rates (g C m−2 d−1 of 0.70(±0.33, 0.60(±0.38, 0.62(±0.43, 0.49(±0.22 and 0.27(±0.08, respectively. Our cross site analysis showed that winter air (Tair and soil (Tsoil temperature played a dominating role in determining the spatial patterns of winter Reco in both forest and managed ecosystems (grasslands and croplands. Besides temperature, the seasonal amplitude of the leaf area index (LAI, inferred from satellite observation, or growing season gross primary productivity, which we use here as a proxy for the amount of recent carbon available for Reco in the subsequent winter, played a marginal role in winter CO2 emissions from forest ecosystems. We found that winter Reco sensitivity to temperature variation across space (

  18. Endogenous nitric oxide formation in cardiac myocytes does not control respiration during β-adrenergic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlhaas, Michael; Nickel, Alexander G; Bergem, Stefanie; Casadei, Barbara; Laufs, Ulrich; Maack, Christoph

    2017-06-15

    In the heart, endothelial nitric oxide (NO) controls oxygen consumption in the working heart through paracrine mechanisms. While cardiac myocytes contain several isoforms of NO synthases, it is unclear whether these can control respiration in an intracrine fashion. A long-standing controversy is whether a NOS exists within mitochondria. By combining fluorescence technologies with electrical field stimulation or the patch-clamp technique in beating cardiac myocytes, we identified a neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) as the most relevant source of intracellular NO during β-adrenergic stimulation, while no evidence for a mitochondria-located NOS was obtained. The amounts of NO produced by non-mitochondrial nNOS were insufficient to regulate respiration during β-adrenergic stimulation, arguing against intracrine control of respiration by NO within cardiac myocytes. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) controls cardiac oxygen (O 2 ) consumption in a paracrine way by slowing respiration at the mitochondrial electron transport chain. While NO synthases (NOSs) are also expressed in cardiac myocytes, it is unclear whether they control respiration in an intracrine way. Furthermore, the existence of a mitochondrial NOS is controversial. Here, by combining fluorescence imaging with electrical field stimulation, the patch-clamp method and knock-out technology, we determined the sources and consequences of intracellular NO formation during workload transitions in isolated murine and guinea pig cardiac myocytes and mitochondria. Using 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF) as a fluorescent NO-sensor that locates to the cytosol and mitochondria, we observed that NO increased by ∼12% within 3 min of β-adrenergic stimulation in beating cardiac myocytes. This NO stems from neuronal NOS (nNOS), but not endothelial (eNOS). After patch clamp-mediated dialysis of cytosolic DAF, the remaining NO signals (mostly mitochondrial) were blocked by nNOS deletion, but not by

  19. Genetic Control of Mosquitoes: population suppression strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Barretto Bruno Wilke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, morbidity and mortality from malaria and dengue fever among other pathogens are an increasing Public Health problem. The increase in the geographic distribution of vectors is accompanied by the emergence of viruses and diseases in new areas. There are insufficient specific therapeutic drugs available and there are no reliable vaccines for malaria or dengue, although some progress has been achieved, there is still a long way between its development and actual field use. Most mosquito control measures have failed to achieve their goals, mostly because of the mosquito's great reproductive capacity and genomic flexibility. Chemical control is increasingly restricted due to potential human toxicity, mortality in no target organisms, insecticide resistance, and other environmental impacts. Other strategies for mosquito control are desperately needed. The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT is a species-specific and environmentally benign method for insect population suppression, it is based on mass rearing, radiation mediated sterilization, and release of a large number of male insects. Releasing of Insects carrying a dominant lethal gene (RIDL offers a solution to many of the drawbacks of traditional SIT that have limited its application in mosquitoes while maintaining its environmentally friendly and species-specific utility. The self-limiting nature of sterile mosquitoes tends to make the issues related to field use of these somewhat less challenging than for self-spreading systems characteristic of population replacement strategies. They also are closer to field use, so might be appropriate to consider first. The prospect of genetic control methods against mosquito vectored human diseases is rapidly becoming a reality, many decisions will need to be made on a national, regional and international level regarding the biosafety, social, cultural and ethical aspects of the use and deployment of these vector control methods.

  20. Pathogenic mitochondrial DNA-induced respiration defects in hematopoietic cells result in anemia by suppressing erythroid differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shin-Ichi; Yokota, Mutsumi; Nakada, Kazuto; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2007-05-01

    Anemia is a symptom in patients with Pearson syndrome caused by the accumulation of mutated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Such mutated mtDNAs have been detected in patients with anemia. This suggested that respiration defects due to mutated mtDNA are responsible for the anemia. However, there has been no convincing experimental evidence to confirm the pathophysiological relation between respiration defects in hematopoietic cells and expression of anemia. We address this issue by transplanting bone marrow cells carrying pathogenic mtDNA with a large-scale deletion (DeltamtDNA) into normal mice. The bone marrow-transplanted mice carried high proportion of DeltamtDNA only in hematopoietic cells, and resultant the mice suffered from macrocytic anemia. They show abnormalities of erythroid differentiation and weak erythropoietic response to a stressful condition. These observations suggest that hematopoietic cell-specific respiration defects caused by mtDNAs with pathogenic mutations are responsible for anemia by inducing abnormalities in erythropoiesis.

  1. Thoracic radiotherapy and breath control: current prospects; Radiotherapie thoracique et controle de la respiration: perspectives actuelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboul, F.; Mineur, L.; Paoli, J.B.; Bodez, V.; Oozeer, R.; Garcia, R. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France)

    2002-11-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) is adversely affected by setup error and organ motion. In thoracic 3D CRT, breathing accounts for most of intra-fraction movements, thus impairing treatment quality. Breath control clearly exhibits dosimetric improvement compared to free breathing, leading to various techniques for gated treatments. We review benefits of different breath control methods -i.e. breath-holding or beam gating, with spirometric, isometric or X-ray respiration sensor- and argument the choice of expiration versus inspiration, with consideration to dosimetric concerns. All steps of 3D-CRT can be improved with breath control. Contouring of organs at risk (OAR) and target are easier and more accurate on breath controlled CT-scans. Inter- and intra-fraction target immobilisation allows smaller margins with better coverage. Lung outcome predictors (NTCP, Mean Dose, LV20, LV30) are improved with breath-control. In addition, inspiration breath control facilitates beam arrangement since it widens the distance between OAR and target, and leaves less lung normal tissue within the high dose region. Last, lung density, as of CT scan, is more accurate, improving dosimetry. Our institutions choice is to use spirometry driven, patient controlled high-inspiration breath-hold; this technique gives excellent immobilization results, with high reproducibility, yet it is easy to implement and costs little extra treatment time. Breath control, whatever technique is employed, proves superior to free breathing treatment when using 3D-CRT. Breath control should then be used whenever possible, and is probably mandatory for IMRT. (authors)

  2. Disharmony between wake- and respiration-promoting activities: effects of modafinil on ventilatory control in rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Terada, Jiro; Fukushi, Isato; Takeda, Kotaro; Hasebe, Yohei; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Okada, Yasumasa

    2016-01-01

    Background Modafinil is a wake-promoting drug and has been widely used for daytime sleepiness in patients with narcolepsy and other sleep disorders. A recent case series reported that daily oral modafinil alleviated hypercapnic respiratory failure in patients with COPD. However, the precise action of modafinil on respiration such as hypercapnic and/or hypoxic ventilatory responses remains unclear. The aim of this study is to clarify the effect of modafinil on the ventilatory control. Methods ...

  3. ESTIMATION OF CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM REACTANCE OF SPORTSMEN AT USE OF TESTS WITH CONTROLLED RESPIRATION

    OpenAIRE

    Romanchuk, A.P,

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of changes of indicators of variability of a heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, breath in a condition of rest is carried out and at carrying out of tests with controlled respiration of 6 and 15 times in a minute, having vegetothrophy influence. Calculated earlier centile distribution of distribution of indicators of variability of the listed functions at spontaneous and adjustable breath have allowed to establish differences in a range of 25-75 % of occurrence. In...

  4. [Tests with controlled respiration in assessing the variability of the parameters of the cardiorespiratory system of athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Romanchuk, AP; Guziy, OV

    2017-01-01

    The features of the evaluation of the results of the study of the parameters of the variability of the cardiorespiratory system are shown using tests with controlled respiration 6 and 15 times per minute. As a result of the survey of 1930 male athletes, the ranges of normative values of heart rate variability, systolic and diastolic arterial pressure, as well as respiration in case of spontaneous and controlled breathing were determined.

  5. The Natural Product Osthole Attenuates Yeast Growth by Extensively Suppressing the Gene Expressions of Mitochondrial Respiration Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Shen, Yan

    2017-03-01

    The fast growing evidences have indicated that the natural product osthole is a promising drug candidate for fighting several serious human diseases, for example, cancer and inflammation. However, the mode-of-action (MoA) of osthole remains largely incomplete. In this study, we investigated the growth inhibition activity of osthole using fission yeast as a model, with the goal of understanding the osthole's mechanism of action, especially from the molecular level. Microarray analysis indicated that osthole has significant impacts on gene transcription levels (In total, 214 genes are up-regulated, and 97 genes are down-regulated). Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) indicated that 11 genes belong to the "Respiration module" category, especially including the components of complex III and V of mitochondrial respiration chain. Based on GSEA and network analysis, we also found that 54 up-regulated genes belong to the "Core Environmental Stress Responses" category, particularly including many transporter genes, which suggests that the rapidly activated nutrient exchange between cell and environment is part of the MoA of osthole. In summary, osthole can greatly impact on fission yeast transcriptome, and it primarily represses the expression levels of the genes in respiration chain, which next causes the inefficiency of ATP production and thus largely explains osthole's growth inhibition activity in Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S. pombe). The complexity of the osthole's MoA shown in previous studies and our current research demonstrates that the omics approach and bioinformatics tools should be applied together to acquire the complete landscape of osthole's growth inhibition activity.

  6. Difficulty adaptation in a competitive arm rehabilitation game using real-time control of arm electromyogram and respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darzi, A; Gorsic, M; Novak, D

    2017-07-01

    Rehabilitation robots are often combined with serious games that motivate patients and keep them exercising at high intensities. A promising type of game are competitive rehabilitation games, but few difficulty adaptation algorithms have been presented for them. This paper thus presents the adaptation of difficulty in a competitive arm rehabilitation game based on two physiological signals: respiration and electromyography of the posterior deltoid. It consists of three smaller studies: an open-loop respiration study, a closed-loop respiration study (where a controller attempts to maintain respiration rate at preset levels), and a closed-loop electromyogram study (where a controller attempts to keep the electromyogram at preset levels). The studies control two difficulty parameters based on the physiological responses of one of the two exercising participants, though the ultimate goal is to control the physiological responses of both participants. Furthermore, all three studies are done with unimpaired participants. The closed-loop controllers achieved high correlation coefficients between desired and measured levels of respiration rate (r = 0.83) and electromyogram (r = 0.89), demonstrating that it is possible to control the physiological responses of unimpaired participants in a competitive arm rehabilitation game, thus controlling their level of workload and exercise intensity. In the future, the proposed method will be tested with patients undergoing rehabilitation.

  7. Soil organic matter content: a non-liner control on microbial respiration in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnecker, Jörg; Grandy, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    It is widely assumed that microbial activity and respiration rates respond linearly to substrate concentrations, irrespective of substrate chemical characteristics, but this assumption remains largely untested. We know that microbial decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) and the amount of CO2 respired from soil depends on substrate availability. While soils with high SOM concentrations will have higher respiration rates than soils with low SOM concentrations, the specific relationship between substrate quantity and CO2 respired and its underlying mechanisms has robust theoretical, modeling, and management implications. In a lab incubation experiment, we amended a mixture of agricultural soil and sand with increasing amounts of one of three plant residues differing in their C/N ratio (clover C/N 14; rye C/N 23 and wheat straw C/N 110). Keeping the soil/sand mixture at a constant ratio, we obtained 9 levels of organic carbon (OC) content ranging from 0.25% to 5.7%. The sand-soil-residue mixtures were then incubated at constant temperature and water contents for a total of 63 days. Our results show that across substrates CO2 production increased with increasing OC content following a sigmoidal curve function instead of the expected linear one. A breakpoint analysis for the respiration curve of rye revealed two significant break points at 1.3 and 3.8 % OC. The three individual linear relations might be shaped by spatial separation of substrate and microbes and the interaction of the microbes themselves. In the first "survival" phase up to 1.3 % OC, more substrate leads to the survival of more microbes. However, microbial growth does not result in the discovery of new resources. In the "expansion" phase (1.3 % OC to 3.8 % OC), microbial growth is successful and microbes can exploit new resources. Finally, in the "competition" phase microbes start to compete for space and resources, which leads to a decrease in decomposition and respiration. While the results for

  8. Pilot-Induced Oscillation Suppression by Using 1 Adaptive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Wang

    2012-01-01

    research activities that aim to alleviate this problem. In this paper, the L1 adaptive controller has been introduced to suppress the PIO, which is caused by rate limiting and pure time delay. Due to its architecture, the L1 adaptive controller will achieve a desired response with fast adaptation. The analysis of PIO and its suppression by L1 adaptive controller are presented in detail in the paper. The simulation results indicate that the L1 adaptive control is efficient in solving this kind of problem.

  9. NF-κB controls energy homeostasis and metabolic adaptation by upregulating mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Claudio; Leow, Shi Chi; Anso, Elena; Rocha, Sonia; Thotakura, Anil K; Tornatore, Laura; Moretti, Marta; De Smaele, Enrico; Beg, Amer A; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Chandel, Navdeep S; Franzoso, Guido

    2011-08-28

    Cell proliferation is a metabolically demanding process. It requires active reprogramming of cellular bioenergetic pathways towards glucose metabolism to support anabolic growth. NF-κB/Rel transcription factors coordinate many of the signals that drive proliferation during immunity, inflammation and oncogenesis, but whether NF-κB regulates the metabolic reprogramming required for cell division during these processes is unknown. Here, we report that NF-κB organizes energy metabolism networks by controlling the balance between the utilization of glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. NF-κB inhibition causes cellular reprogramming to aerobic glycolysis under basal conditions and induces necrosis on glucose starvation. The metabolic reorganization that results from NF-κB inhibition overcomes the requirement for tumour suppressor mutation in oncogenic transformation and impairs metabolic adaptation in cancer in vivo. This NF-κB-dependent metabolic pathway involves stimulation of oxidative phosphorylation through upregulation of mitochondrial synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase 2 (SCO2; ref. ). Our findings identify NF-κB as a physiological regulator of mitochondrial respiration and establish a role for NF-κB in metabolic adaptation in normal cells and cancer.

  10. Experimental Evaluation of Respirable Dust and Crystalline Silica Controls During Simulated Performance of Stone Countertop Fabrication Tasks With Powered Hand Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David L; Phillips, Margaret L; Qi, Chaolong; Van, Anthony T; Hawley, Danielle A

    2017-07-01

    Workers who fabricate stone countertops using hand tools are at risk of silicosis from overexposure to respirable crystalline silica. This study explored the efficacy of simple engineering controls that can be used for dust suppression during use of hand tools by stone countertop fabricators. Controlled experiments were conducted to measure whether wet methods and on-tool local exhaust ventilation (LEV) reduced respirable dust (RD) exposures during use of various powered hand tools on quartz-rich engineered stone. RD samples collected during edge grinding with a diamond cup wheel and a silicon carbide abrasive wheel were analyzed gravimetrically as well as by X-ray diffraction to determine silica content. A personal optical aerosol monitor was used simultaneously with the RD samples and also for rapid assessment of controls for polishing, blade cutting, and core drilling. On-tool LEV and sheet-flow-wetting were effective in reducing exposures, especially when used in combination. Sheet-flow-wetting with LEV reduced geometric mean exposures by as much as 95%. However, typical water-spray-wetting on a grinding cup was less effective when combined with LEV than without LEV. Mean silica content of RD samples from grinding operations was 53%, and respirable mass and silica mass were very highly correlated (r = 0.980). Optical concentration measures were moderately well correlated with gravimetric measures (r = 0.817), but on average the optical measures during a single trial using the factory calibration were only one-fifth the simultaneous gravimetric measures. Sheet-flow-wetting combined with on-tool LEV is an effective engineering control for reducing RD exposures during engineered stone edge grinding and blade cutting. On the other hand, addition of LEV to some water-spray-wetted tools may reduce the effectiveness of the wet method. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  11. Voluntary driven elbow orthosis with speed controlled tremor suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil eHerrnstadt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Robotic technology is gradually becoming commonplace in the medical sector and in the service of patients. Medical conditions that have benefited from significant technological development include stroke, for which rehabilitation with robotic devices is administered, and surgery assisted by robots. Robotic devices have also been proposed for assistance of movement disorders. Pathological tremor, among the most common movement disorders, is such one example. In practice, the dissemination and availability of tremor suppression robotic systems has been limited. Devices in the marketplace tend to either be non-ambulatory or to target specific functions such as eating and drinking.We have developed a one degree-of-freedom (DOF elbow orthosis that could be worn by an individual with tremor. A speed controlled voluntary driven suppression approach is implemented with the orthosis. Typically tremor suppression methods estimate the tremor component of the signal and produce a canceling counterpart signal. The suggested approach, instead estimates the voluntary component of the motion. A controller then actuates the orthosis based on the voluntary signal while simultaneously rejecting the tremorous motion.In this work, we tested the suppressive orthosis using a 1 DOF robotic system that simulates the human arm. The suggested suppression approach does not require a model of the human arm. Moreover, the human input along with the orthosis forearm gravitational forces, of nonlinear nature, are considered as part of the disturbance to the suppression system. Therefore, the suppression system can be modeled linearly. Nevertheless, the orthosis forearm gravitational forces can be compensated by the suppression system.The electromechanical design of the orthosis is presented, and data from an Essential Tremor patient is used as the human input. Velocity tracking results demonstrate an RMS error of 0.31 rad/s, and a power spectral density shows a reduction of

  12. Soil Organic Matter Content: A Non-linear Control on Microbial Respiration in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnecker, J.; Grandy, S.

    2015-12-01

    Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) and the amount of CO2 respired from soil largely depends on the amount of substrate available to microbes. Soils with high SOM concentrations will have higher respiration rates than soils with low SOM concentrations given similar environmental conditions. It is widely assumed that microbial activity and respiration rates respond linearly to substrate concentrations. This assumption remains however largely untested. In a lab incubation experiment, we amended a mixture of agricultural soil and sand with increasing amounts of one of three plant residues differing in their C/N ratio (clover 14; rye 23 and wheat straw 110). We used 9 levels of organic carbon (OC) content ranging from 0.25% to 5.7%. The mixtures were then incubated at constant temperature and water contents for 63 days. Our results show that across substrates CO2 production increased with increasing OC content following a quadratic function instead of the expected linear one up to 2.2% OC. Above that point CO2 production leveled off and increased linearly. We hypothesize that the probability that a microbe meets a substrate also increases with increasing amounts of plant residues. At all substrate concentrations, samples amended with clover had the highest carbon losses, followed by rye and straw. Differences between the three kinds of plant residue might have been caused by their C/N ratios and thus the amount of available N. High amounts of N might have led to an increase in microbial biomass, which could occupy more space and is thus more likely to meet new substrate. Additional analysis of microbial biomass, enzyme activities and N pools will help to understand the mechanism leading to the observed CO2 patterns. A non-linear relation of CO2 production and OC content indicates that spatial separation as an inherent property of SOM content is an important control on decomposition at low OC contents. Knowledge of this controlling effect could be used to enhance

  13. Control of respirable particles and radon progeny with portable air cleaners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offermann, F.J.; Sextro, R.G.; Fisk, W.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-02-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles and radon progeny. Following injection of cigarette smoke and radon in a room-size chamber, decay rates for particles and radon progeny concentrations were measured with and without air cleaner operation. Particle concentrations were obtained for total number concentration and for number concentration by particle size. In tests with no air cleaner the natural decay rate for cigarette smoke was observed to be 0.2 hr -1 . Air cleaning rates for particles were found to be negligible for several small panel-filters, a residential ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans. The electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters tested had significant particle removal rates, and a HEPA-type filter was the most efficient air cleaner. The evaluation of radon progeny control produced similar results; the air cleaners which were effective in removing particles were also effective in removing radon progeny. At low particle concentrations plateout of the unattached radon progeny is an important removal mechanism. Based on data from these tests, the plateout rate for unattached progeny was found to be 15 hr -1 . The unattached fraction and the overall removal rate due to deposition of attached and unattached nuclides have been estimated for each radon decay product as a function of particle concentration. While air cleaning can be effective in reducing total radon progeny, concentrations of unattached radon progeny can increase with increasing air cleaning. 39 references, 26 figures, 9 tables

  14. Portal venous blood flow while breath-holding after inspiration or expiration and during normal respiration in controls and cirrhotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, Shigeo; Yamamoto, Kunihiro; Sasao, Ken-ichiro; Watanabe, Manabu

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to measure portal blood flow in 12 healthy controls and 17 cirrhotics while they were breath-holding after inspiration and after expiration. We then compared the results with measurements made during normal respiration in the healthy controls and cirrhotics. Blood flow in the main portal vein under basal fasting conditions was quantitated using the cine phase-contrast MR velocity mapping method. Three measurements were made on one occasion, as follows: throughout the cardiac cycle during normal respiration, with the subject breath-holding after maximal inspiration, and with the subject breath-holding after maximal expiration. During normal respiration, portal blood flow was 1.3±0.2 l/min in controls vs 1.0±0.1 l/min in cirrhotics (P<0.0001); while subjects were breath-holding after inspiration, portal blood flow was 1.0±0.2 l/min in controls vs 0.9±0.1 l/min in cirrhotics; and while subjects were breath-holding after expiration, portal blood flow was 1.5±0.2 l/min in controls vs 1.1±0.2 l/min in cirrhotics (P<0.0001). The differences were primarily due to changes in flow velocity. When the magnitude of these hemodynamic changes in the three respiratory conditions was compared in controls and cirrhotics, analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant difference (P<0.0001). In controls, portal blood flow decreased during maximal inspiration relative to flow during normal respiration (-24.6±8.3%). Changes in portal blood flow in controls were greater than in cirrhotics (-13.5±4.5%) (P<0.0001); however, the difference in blood flow increase associated with maximal expiration between the two groups (+11.8±9.4% vs +5.9±11.5%) was not significant. We found that the respiration-induced hemodynamic variation in portal blood flow was less in cirrhotics than in the healthy controls. Portal blood flow measurements made during normal respiration using MR imaging closely reflect nearly physiologic conditions

  15. Secondary Voltage Control for Harmonics Suppression in Islanded Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiongfei; Guerrero, Josep M.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a secondary voltage waveform control approach to suppress harmonics in islanded microgrids. Compared with the secondary control for traditional large power systems, the proposed control scheme can regulate the voltage waveform instead of voltage magnitude of sensitive buses...... in islanded microgrids. In addition to the centralized controller for fundamental frequency voltage component, a selective harmonic compensator is implemented in the secondary voltage control system. With the help of Park transformation, the cyclic references generated by the selective harmonic compensator...... passed through a low-bandwidth communication system to each primary control system for distributed generation units. Thus, combined with the high-bandwidth local voltage controllers in the primary control systems, harmonic voltage distortions in islanded microgrids are redistributed and reduced...

  16. The control of mitochondrial respiration in yeast: a possible role of the outer mitochondrial membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadeh, M; Horng, A; Colombini, M

    1996-09-01

    Mitochondrial respiration in yeast (S. cerevisiae) is regulated by the level of glucose in the medium. Glucose is known to inhibit respiration by repressing key enzymes in the respiratory chain. We present evidence that the early events in this inhibition include the closure of VDAC channels, the primary pathway for metabolite flow across the outer membrane. Aluminum hydroxide is known to inhibit the closure of VDAC. Addition of aluminum acetylacetonate to yeast cells, which should elevate the aluminum hydroxide concentrations in the cytoplasm, caused the inhibition of cell respiration by glucose to be delayed for up to 100 min. No significant effect of aluminum was observed in cells grown on glycerol. Yeast cells lacking the VDAC gene were also unresponsive to the addition of aluminum salt in the presence of glucose. Therefore, the closure of VDAC channels may be an early step in the inhibition of the respiration of yeast by glucose.

  17. Respiration-related cerebral blood flow variability increases during control-mode non-invasive ventilation in normovolemia and hypovolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skytioti, Maria; Søvik, Signe; Elstad, Maja

    2017-11-01

    Increased variability in cerebral blood flow (CBF) predisposes to adverse cerebrovascular events. Oscillations in arterial blood pressure and PaCO 2 induce CBF variability. Less is known about how heart rate (HR) variability affects CBF. We experimentally reduced respiration-induced HR variability in healthy subjects, hypothesizing that CBF variability would increase. Internal carotid artery (ICA) blood velocity was recorded by Doppler ultrasound in ten healthy subjects during baseline, control-mode, non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV), i.e., with fixed respiratory rate, hypovolemia induced by lower body negative pressure, and combinations of these. ICA beat volume (ICABV) and ICA blood flow (ICABF) were calculated. HR, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), respiratory frequency (RF), and end-tidal CO 2 were recorded. Integrals of power spectra at each subject's RF ± 0.03 Hz were used to measure variability. Phase angle/coherence measured coupling between cardiovascular variables. Control-mode NIV reduced HR variability (-56%, p = 0.002) and ICABV variability (-64%, p = 0.006) and increased ICABF variability (+140%, p = 0.002) around RF. NIV + hypovolemia reduced variability in HR and ICABV by 70-80% (p = 0.002) and doubled ICABF variability (p = 0.03). MAP variability was unchanged in either condition. Respiration-induced HR and ICABV oscillations were in inverse phase and highly coherent (coherence >0.9) during baseline, but this coherence decreased during NIV, in normovolemia and hypovolemia (p = 0.01). Controlling respiration in awake healthy humans reduced HR variability and increased CBF variability in hypovolemia and normovolemia. We suggest respiration-induced HR variability to be a mechanism in CBF regulation. Maintaining spontaneous respiration in patients receiving ventilatory support may be beneficial also for cerebral circulatory purposes.

  18. Kalman filtering to suppress spurious signals in Adaptive Optics control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poyneer, L; Veran, J P

    2010-03-29

    In many scenarios, an Adaptive Optics (AO) control system operates in the presence of temporally non-white noise. We use a Kalman filter with a state space formulation that allows suppression of this colored noise, hence improving residual error over the case where the noise is assumed to be white. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new filter in the case of the estimated Gemini Planet Imager tip-tilt environment, where there are both common-path and non-common path vibrations. We discuss how this same framework can also be used to suppress spatial aliasing during predictive wavefront control assuming frozen flow in a low-order AO system without a spatially filtered wavefront sensor, and present experimental measurements from Altair that clearly reveal these aliased components.

  19. Maturation of cognitive control: delineating response inhibition and interference suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R Brydges

    Full Text Available Cognitive control is integral to the ability to attend to a relevant task whilst suppressing distracting information or inhibiting prepotent responses. The current study examined the development of these two subprocesses by examining electrophysiological indices elicited during each process. Thirteen 18 year-old adults and thirteen children aged 8-11 years (mean=9.77 years completed a hybrid Go/Nogo flanker task while continuous EEG data were recorded. The N2 topography for both response inhibition and interference suppression changed with increasing age. The neural activation associated with response inhibition became increasingly frontally distributed with age, and showed decreases of both amplitude and peak latency from childhood to adulthood, possibly due to reduced cognitive demands and myelination respectively occurring during this period. Interestingly, a significant N2 effect was apparent in adults, but not observed in children during trials requiring interference suppression. This could be due to more diffuse activation in children, which would require smaller levels of activation over a larger region of the brain than is reported in adults. Overall, these results provide evidence of distinct maturational processes occurring throughout late childhood and adolescence, highlighting the separability of response inhibition and interference suppression.

  20. Decoherence suppression of excitons by bang-bang control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, T.; Hasegawa, A.; Mitsumori, Y.; Ishi-Hayase, J.; Sasaki, M.; Minami, F.

    2007-01-01

    We report the demonstration of decoherence control of excitons on a layered compound semiconductor GaSe by using successive three femtosecond pulses, i.e., the six-wave mixing configuration. The second pulse acts as a π pulse which reverses the time evolution of non-Markovian dynamics. By changing the pulse interval conditions, we confirmed for the first time the suppression of exciton decoherence by π pulse irradiation

  1. Control of Respirable Particles in Indoor Air with Portable AirCleaners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offermann, F.J.; Sextro, R.G.; Fisk, W.J.; Grimsrud, D.T.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-10-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles using in situ chamber decay tests. Following injection of cigarette smoke in a room-size chamber, decay rates for particle concentrations were obtained for total number concentration and for number concentration by particle size with and without air cleaner operation. The size distribution of the tobacco smoke particles was log normal with a count median diameter of 0.15 {micro}m and a geometric standard deviation of 2.0. Without air cleaner operation, the natural mass-averaged surface deposition rate of particles was observed to be 0.1 h{sup -1}. Air cleaning rates for particles were found to be negligible for several small panel-filter devices, a residential-sized ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans. Electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters removed particles at substantial rates, and a HEPA-type filter was the most efficient air cleaner studied.

  2. A Computer-Controlled SEM-EDX Routine for Characterizing Respirable Coal Mine Dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Johann-Essex

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent resurgence in coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (or “black lung” and concerns over other related respiratory illnesses have highlighted the need to elucidate characteristics of airborne particulates in occupational environments. A better understanding of particle size, aspect ratio, or chemical composition may offer new insights regarding causal factors of such illnesses. Scanning electron microscopy analysis using energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX can be used to estimate these particle characteristics. If conducted manually, such work can be very time intensive, limiting the number of particles that can be analyzed. Moreover, potential exists for user bias in interpretation of EDX spectra. A computer-controlled (CC routine, on the other hand, can allow similar analysis at a much faster rate, increasing total particle counts and reproducibility of results. This paper describes a CCSEM-EDX routine specifically developed for analysis of respirable dust samples from coal mines. The routine is verified based on reliability of results obtained on samples of known materials, and reproducibility of results obtained on a set of 10 dust samples collected in the field. The characteristics of the field samples are also discussed with respect to mine occupational environments.

  3. Nitrogen controls spatial and temporal variability of substrate-induced respiration within seven years of bare fallow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Nele; Bornemann, Ludger; Welp, Gerhard; Amelung, Wulf

    2015-04-01

    Bare fallow management goes along with lacking supply of new C sources; yet, little is known on the spatio-temporal controls of microbial adaptation processes. Here we hypothesized that microbial activity parameters decline upon bare fallow but that their spatial patterns are increasingly controlled by nutrient status as fallow management proceeds. To test these hypotheses, we investigated spatial and temporal patterns of substrate-induced respiration (SIR) and basal respiration curves in an arable field after 1, 3, and 7 years of bare fallow but with large within-field heterogeneity of physicochemical soil parameters. The analyses comprised the contents of SOC, mineral nitrogen (Nmin), particulate organic matter (POM), texture of the fine earth, and the proportion of rock fragments as well as basal respiration and several SIR fitting parameters (microbial biomass, microbial growth rates, peak respiration rates, cumulative CO2 release) each with and without additions of mineral N and P. We also repeated substrate (i.e. glucose) additions following the first SIR measurement. The results revealed that most respiration parameters like basal respiration, microbial biomass, and growth rates showed no or inconsistent responses to spatial and temporal patterns of basic soil properties like SOC, Nmin or texture. However, bare fallow changed the shape of the SIR curves; it developed two distinct microbial growth peaks at advanced stages of fallow, i.e. a delayed CO2 release. Likewise, the maximum respiration rate during the first growth phase declined during 7 years of fallow by 47% but its spatial distribution was always correlated with Nmin contents (r = 0.43 - 0.79). The nutrient additions suggested that these changes in SIR curves were caused by N deficiency; the first peak increased after N additions while the second growth phase diminished. Intriguingly, a repeated glucose addition had a similar effect on the SIR curves as the glucose+N addition. Thus, N deficiency

  4. Suppression of chaos via control of energy flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shengli; Ma, Jun; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2018-03-01

    Continuous energy supply is critical and important to support oscillating behaviour; otherwise, the oscillator will die. For nonlinear and chaotic circuits, enough energy supply is also important to keep electric devices working. In this paper, Hamilton energy is calculated for dimensionless dynamical system (e.g., the chaotic Lorenz system) using Helmholtz's theorem. The Hamilton energy is considered as a new variable and then the dynamical system is controlled by using the scheme of energy feedback. It is found that chaos can be suppressed even when intermittent feedback scheme is applied. This scheme is effective to control chaos and to stabilise other dynamical systems.

  5. Control of respirable particles and radon progeny with portable air cleaners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offermann, F.J.; Sextro, R.G.; Fisk, W.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-02-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles and radon progeny. Following injection of cigarette smoke and radon in a room-size chamber, decay rates for particles and radon progeny concentrations were measured with and without air cleaner operation. Particle concentrations were obtained for total number concentration and for number concentration by particle size. In tests with no air cleaner the natural decay rate for cigarette smoke was observed to be 0.2 hr/sup -1/. Air cleaning rates for particles were found to be negligible for several small panel-filters, a residential ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans. The electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters tested had significant particle removal rates, and a HEPA-type filter was the most efficient air cleaner. The evaluation of radon progeny control produced similar results; the air cleaners which were effective in removing particles were also effective in removing radon progeny. At low particle concentrations plateout of the unattached radon progeny is an important removal mechanism. Based on data from these tests, the plateout rate for unattached progeny was found to be 15 hr/sup -1/. The unattached fraction and the overall removal rate due to deposition of attached and unattached nuclides have been estimated for each radon decay product as a function of particle concentration. While air cleaning can be effective in reducing total radon progeny, concentrations of unattached radon progeny can increase with increasing air cleaning. 39 references, 26 figures, 9 tables.

  6. Some new and relatively infrequent phenomena by bronchography done under general venous anesthesia and monopulmonary controlled respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, G.; Nikolov, P.

    1977-01-01

    The authors share their experience in studying some new and comparatively rare phenomena found by bronchography done under general venous anestesia and succinylcholine controlled monopulmonary respiration. They discuss the false obturation of the left upper lobar bronchus, dislocation of the bronchi due to a raised diaphragm and a false obturation of a bronchus in a one act bronchoscopy-bronchography with taking of a specimen for a histologic examination. (author)

  7. Moisture Controls on Soil Respiration Sources in a Pine Forest on Santa Cruz Island, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, M. S.; Ambrose, A.; Boot, C. M.; Dawson, T. E.; Schaeffer, S. M.; Schimel, J.; Still, C. J.; Williams, P.

    2009-12-01

    This presentation will include results from a study in a coastal pine forest/chaparral ecosystem on Santa Cruz Island, California characterized by a Mediterranean type climate. However, in this coastal ecosystem, fog and low-level clouds enhance summertime moisture availability through shading and fog-drip. Thus, the summer has many small fog-drip events, while the winter has fewer, larger rain events. Not surprisingly, moisture and moisture pulses drive carbon fluxes and dynamics in this ecosystem. We used automated measurements of soil respiration, soil pore space CO2 profiles, pine sap flux, as well as targeted measurements of soil nutrient/microbial dynamics, radiocarbon soil respiration source partitioning, and manipulations of water to assess how moisture/moisture pulses influence ecosystem metabolism over diel, episodic (moisture pulse), and seasonal time scales. On the diel time scale, the fraction of soil respiration from autotrophic sources was generally greater during the day than at night. Seasonally, changes in soil respiration fluxes were largely determined by variation in autotrophic respiration, with autotrophic rates more than doubling in the winter versus summer. Pine sap flux responded to winter rain events but not to summer fog-drip, suggesting that summer fog-water inputs are insufficient to significantly affect belowground pine activity. In contrast, summertime fog-drip and cloud shading enhanced soil respiration primarily through microbial decomposition, by reducing microbial drought stress in surface soil/litter. Finally, moisture manipulations in the laboratory showed more soil carbon released following one large pulse (rain event) versus multiple smaller pulses (fog events) of moisture.

  8. Input-gain control produces feature-specific surround suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Alexander R; Born, Richard T

    2015-03-25

    In primary visual cortex (V1), neuronal responses are sensitive to context. For example, responses to stimuli presented within the receptive field (RF) center are often suppressed by stimuli within the RF surround, and this suppression tends to be strongest when the center and surround stimuli match. We sought to identify the mechanism that gives rise to these properties of surround modulation. To do so, we exploited the stability of implanted multielectrode arrays to record from neurons in V1 of alert monkeys with multiple stimulus sets that more exhaustively probed center-surround interactions. We first replicated previous results concerning center-surround similarity using gratings representing all combinations of center and surround orientation. With this stimulus set, the surround simply scaled population responses to the center, such that the overall population tuning curve had the same shape and peak response. However, when the center contained two superimposed gratings (i.e., a visual "plaid"), one component of which always matched the surround orientation, suppression selectively affected the portion of the response driven by the matching center component, thereby producing shifts in the peak of the population orientation tuning curve. In effect, the surround caused neurons to respond predominantly to the component grating of the center plaid that was unmatched to the surround grating, as if by reducing the effective strength of whichever stimulus attributes were matched to the surround. These results provide key physiological support for theoretical models that propose feature-specific, input-gain control as the mechanism underlying surround suppression. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354973-10$15.00/0.

  9. Nrf2 impacts cellular bioenergetics by controlling substrate availability for mitochondrial respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira M. Holmström

    2013-06-01

    Transcription factor Nrf2 and its repressor Keap1 regulate a network of cytoprotective genes involving more than 1% of the genome, their best known targets being drug-metabolizing and antioxidant genes. Here we demonstrate a novel role for this pathway in directly regulating mitochondrial bioenergetics in murine neurons and embryonic fibroblasts. Loss of Nrf2 leads to mitochondrial depolarisation, decreased ATP levels and impaired respiration, whereas genetic activation of Nrf2 increases the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels, the rate of respiration and the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation. We further show that Nrf2-deficient cells have increased production of ATP in glycolysis, which is then used by the F1Fo-ATPase for maintenance of the mitochondrial membrane potential. While the levels and in vitro activities of the respiratory complexes are unaffected by Nrf2 deletion, their activities in isolated mitochondria and intact live cells are substantially impaired. In addition, the rate of regeneration of NADH after inhibition of respiration is much slower in Nrf2-knockout cells than in their wild-type counterparts. Taken together, these results show that Nrf2 directly regulates cellular energy metabolism through modulating the availability of substrates for mitochondrial respiration. Our findings highlight the importance of efficient energy metabolism in Nrf2-mediated cytoprotection.

  10. The Role of Microbial Community Composition in Controlling Soil Respiration Responses to Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffret, Marc D; Karhu, Kristiina; Khachane, Amit; Dungait, Jennifer A J; Fraser, Fiona; Hopkins, David W; Wookey, Philip A; Singh, Brajesh K; Freitag, Thomas E; Hartley, Iain P; Prosser, James I

    2016-01-01

    Rising global temperatures may increase the rates of soil organic matter decomposition by heterotrophic microorganisms, potentially accelerating climate change further by releasing additional carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. However, the possibility that microbial community responses to prolonged warming may modify the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration creates large uncertainty in the strength of this positive feedback. Both compensatory responses (decreasing temperature sensitivity of soil respiration in the long-term) and enhancing responses (increasing temperature sensitivity) have been reported, but the mechanisms underlying these responses are poorly understood. In this study, microbial biomass, community structure and the activities of dehydrogenase and β-glucosidase enzymes were determined for 18 soils that had previously demonstrated either no response or varying magnitude of enhancing or compensatory responses of temperature sensitivity of heterotrophic microbial respiration to prolonged cooling. The soil cooling approach, in contrast to warming experiments, discriminates between microbial community responses and the consequences of substrate depletion, by minimising changes in substrate availability. The initial microbial community composition, determined by molecular analysis of soils showing contrasting respiration responses to cooling, provided evidence that the magnitude of enhancing responses was partly related to microbial community composition. There was also evidence that higher relative abundance of saprophytic Basidiomycota may explain the compensatory response observed in one soil, but neither microbial biomass nor enzymatic capacity were significantly affected by cooling. Our findings emphasise the key importance of soil microbial community responses for feedbacks to global change, but also highlight important areas where our understanding remains limited.

  11. Controls on winter ecosystem respiration at mid- and high-latitudes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wang, T.; Ciais, P.; Piao, S.; Ottle, C.; Brender, P.; Maignan, F.; Arain, A.; Gianelle, D.; Gu, L.; Lafleur, P.; Laurila, T.; Margolis, H.; Montagnani, L.; Moors, E.; Nobuko, S.; Vesala, T.; Wohlfahrt, G.; Reichstein, M.; Migliavacca, M.; Ammann, C.; Aubinet, M.; Barr, A.; Bernacchi, C.; Bernhofer, C.; Black, T.; Davis, K.; Dellwik, E.; Dragoni, D.; Don, A.; Flangan, L.; Foken, T.; Granier, A.; Hadley, J.; Hirata, R.; Hollinger, D.; Kato, T.; Kutsch, W.; Marek, Michal V.; Matamala, R.; Matteucci, G.; Meyers, T.; Monson, R.; Munger, J.; Oechel, W.; Paw U, K.T.; Rebmann, C.; Tuba, Z.; Valentini, R.; Varlagin, A.; Verma, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 5 (2010), s. 6997-7027 ISSN 1810-6277 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : winter ecosystem respiration * mid- and high-latitudes Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour www.biogeosciences-discuss.net/7/6997/2010/

  12. Field and controlled environment measurements show strong seasonal acclimation in photosynthesis and respiration potential in boreal Scots pine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi eKolari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the seasonality of photosynthesis in boreal evergreen trees and its control by the environment requires separation of the instantaneous and slow responses, as well as the dynamics of light reactions, carbon reactions, and respiration. We determined the seasonality of photosynthetic light response and respiration parameters of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. in the field in southern Finland and in controlled laboratory conditions. CO2 exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured in the field using a continuously operated automated chamber setup and fluorescence monitoring systems. We also carried out monthly measurements of photosynthetic light, CO2 and temperature responses in standard conditions with a portable IRGA and fluorometer instrument. The field and response measurements indicated strong seasonal variability in the state of the photosynthetic machinery with a deep downregulation during winter. Despite the downregulation, the photosynthetic machinery retained a significant capacity during winter, which was not visible in the field measurements. Light-saturated photosynthesis (Psat and the initial slope of the photosynthetic light response (α obtained in standard conditions were up to 20% of their respective summertime values. Respiration also showed seasonal acclimation with peak values of respiration in standard temperature in spring and decline in autumn. Spring recovery of all photosynthetic parameters could be predicted with temperature history. On the other hand, the operating quantum yield of photosystem II and the initial slope of photosynthetic light response stayed almost at the summertime level until late autumn while at the same time Psat decreased following the prevailing temperature. Comparison of photosynthetic parameters with the environmental drivers suggests that light and minimum temperature are also decisive factors in the seasonal acclimation of photosynthesis in boreal evergreen trees.

  13. Suppression and control of leakage field in electromagnetic helical microwiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohigashi, N. [Kansai Univ., Osaka (Japan); Tsunawaki, Y. [Osaka Sangyo Univ. (Japan); Imasaki, K. [Institute for Laser Technology, Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Shortening the period of electromagnetic wiggler introduces both the radical increase of the leakage field and the decrease of the field in the gap region. The leakage field is severer problem in planar electromagnetic wiggler than in helical wiggler. Hence, in order to develop a short period electromagnetic wiggler, we have adopted {open_quotes}three poles per period{close_quotes} type electromagnetic helical microwiggler. In this work, we inserted the permanent magnet (PM) blocks with specific magnetized directions in the space between magnetic poles, for suppressing the leakage field flowing out from a pole face to the neighboring pole face. These PM-blocks must have higher intrinsic coersive force than saturation field of pole material. The gap field due to each pole is adjustable by controlling the leakage fields, that is, controlling the position of each iron screw set in each retainer fixing the PM-blocks. At present time, a test wiggler with period 7.8mm, periodical number 10 and gap length 4.6mm has been manufactured. Because the ratio of PM-block aperture to gap length is important parameter to suppress the leakage field, the parameter has been surveyed experimentally for PM-blocks with several dimensions of aperture. The field strength of 3-5kG (K=0.2-0.4) would be expected in the wiggler.

  14. [Effects of mechanical ventilation and controlled spontaneous respiration on pulmonary function during short duration of general anesthesia with tracheal intubation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai; Jin, San-Qing; Lin, Shi-Qing; Jiang, Xiao-Pu; Chen, Xi-Hui

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of mechanical ventilation on pulmonary function during short duration of general anesthesia with tracheal intubation, and assess the safety of controlled spontaneous respiration during general anesthesia. Fifty-three adult patients (aged 18-55 years, ASA physical status I-II) scheduled for elective unilateral tympanoplasty were randomly assigned into mechanical ventilation group (group M, n=28) and spontaneous respiration group (group S, n=25). Anesthesia induction was performed in group M with intravenous propofol (2 mg/kg), fentanyl (3 microgmechanical ventilation began with VT 8 ml0.05). The pH and SpO(2) [ (97.9-/+1.00)% at the lowest] and PaO(2) in group S were significantly lower and the PaCO(2) was higher than those in group M (P0.05), nor were moving, bucking, swallowing and awareness recorded during the surgical procedures. In essentially normal lungs, short-term mechanical ventilation during general anesthesia with tracheal intubation does not damage the lung functions, and spontaneous respiration can offer sufficient oxygen supply without causing harmful carbon dioxide retention.

  15. Seasonal changes in temperature and nutrient control of photosynthesis, respiration and growth of natural phytoplankton communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, P. A.; Sand-Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    cultures in seasons of low ambient nutrient availability. 3. Temperature stimulation of growth and metabolism was higher at low than high ambient temperature showing that long-term temperature acclimation of the phytoplankton community before the experiments was of great importance for the measured rates...... +2, +4 and +6 °C for 2 weeks with and without addition of extra inorganic nutrients. 2. Rates of photosynthesis, respiration and growth generally increased with temperature, but this effect was strongly enhanced by high nutrient availability, and therefore was most evident for nutrient amended......1. To investigate the influence of elevated temperatures and nutrients on photosynthesis, respiration and growth of natural phytoplankton assemblages, water was collected from a eutrophic lake in spring, summer, autumn, winter and the following spring and exposed to ambient temperature and ambient...

  16. Controls on 13C of ecosystem respired CO2 in Southeastern US forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, B.; Chanton, J.; Smith, M.

    2006-12-01

    Pine-dominated southeastern United States forests constitute the largest documented carbon sink among North American or European forests. The extent of large-scale (hundreds of kilometers) spatial variability in the isotopic composition of ecosystem respired CO2 in this region is unresolved. We determined the δ13C of ecosystem (δCr), soil (δCs), and foliage (δCf) respired CO2 over a 2 year period (i) in a rotation-aged pine plantation and a (ii) 80 year old naturally regenerated pine forest in Florida, and contrasted our results with those from similar investigations in a pine plantation and naturally regenerated hardwood forest in North Carolina. We related δCr, δCf, and δCs to environmental factors using a time lag of 5 days. This time lag was based on metabolic pool turnover times determined with a year-long slash pine labeling experiment. Despite large variability in aboveground meteorological conditions, the isotopic composition of ecosystem respired carbon remained relatively constant. The isotopic composition of foliage soluble carbohydrates exhibited the same order of variability as δCr. Soil and stem water δ 18O profiles at both Florida sites indicate that the plants' primary water uptake zone is below the surficial layer of highly variable moisture content. This suggests that the plants are less responsive to variability in aboveground meteorological conditions due to reliable access to groundwater. In contrast, the forests studied in North Carolina derive water primarily from the variable surficial zone, and exhibited a time-lagged response to aboveground conditions. These results highlight that successful regional-scale generalizations of δCr based on local measurements must account for spatial variability in plant physiological responses to meteorological conditions and surface soil water conditions.

  17. Controlled Suppression of Wear on the Nanoscale by Ultrasonic Vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraz, Patricia; Wannemacher, Reinhold; Gnecco, Enrico

    2015-09-22

    Wear on the nanoscale, as evidenced by the formation of periodic ripples on a model polystyrene thin film while a sharp tip is sliding on it with a normal force in the μN range, is shown to be suppressed by the application of ultrasonic vibrations of amplitude Aexc. An accurate calibration of the transducer excitation amplitude is achieved by a home-built setup based on a laser Doppler vibrometer. The corrugation of the typical ripple pattern that is formed in the absence of vibrations is reduced when the excitation frequency matches the contact resonance of the system and Aexc progressively increases. Above a critical value of Aexc, the ripples completely disappear, while the friction levels off at a finite value determined by the normal force and the vibration amplitude. This value can be significantly smaller than the value of the macroscopic friction coefficient. In addition to the control of wear in general, this opens up the possibility of controlled nanolithography with improved accuracy.

  18. [New theory of holistic integrative physiology and medicine. III: New insight of neurohumoral mechanism and pattern of control and regulation for core axe of respiration, circulation and metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xing-guo

    2015-07-01

    Systemic mechanism of neurohumoral control and regulation for human is limited. We used the new theory of holistic integrative physiology and medicine to approach the mechanism and pattern of neurohumoral control and regulation for life. As the core of human life, there are two core axes of functions. The first one is the common goal of respiration and circulation to transport oxygen and carbon dioxide for cells, and the second one is the goal of gastrointestinal tract and circulation to transport energy material and metabolic product for cells. These two core axes maintain the metabolism. The neurohumoral regulation is holistically integrated and unified for all functions in human body. We simplified explain the mechanism of neurohumoral control and regulation life (respiration and circulation) as the example pattern of sound system. Based upon integrated regulation of life, we described the neurohumoral pattern to control respiration and circulation.

  19. Systematic design and simulation of a tearing mode suppression feedback control system for the TEXTOR tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennen, B.A.; Westerhof, E.; Nuij, Pwjm; M.R. de Baar,; Steinbuch, M.

    2012-01-01

    Suppression of tearing modes is essential for the operation of tokamaks. This paper describes the design and simulation of a tearing mode suppression feedback control system for the TEXTOR tokamak. The two main control tasks of this feedback control system are the radial alignment of electron

  20. Progesterone impairs cell respiration and suppresses a compensatory increase in glucose transport in isolated rat skeletal muscle: a non-genomic mechanism contributing to metabolic adaptation to late pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, F; Brunmair, B; Quarré, L; Szöcs, Z; Waldhäusl, W; Fürnsinn, C

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the study was to gain better insight into the mechanisms responsible for impaired glucose metabolism during late pregnancy. We explored the direct effects of progesterone on glucose metabolism of skeletal muscle. Specimens of skeletal muscle from untreated rats were incubated with progesterone and rates of substrate fluxes through the various pathways of glucose metabolism were analysed. Progesterone dose-dependently reduced the rates of glucose and pyruvate oxidation (insulin-stimulated rates after 5 h of exposure to 1 and 10 mumol/l progesterone: glucose oxidation, -6 +/- 4%, NS, and -39 +/- 4%, p respiration, e.g. by the specific inhibitor rotenone, is known to trigger a compensatory increase in glucose transport, but this response was blunted in the case of progesterone (change of glucose transport in response to 10 mumol/l progesterone vs 60 nmol/l rotenone, both causing a reduction in glucose oxidation by -39%: progesterone, +14 +/- 8% vs rotenone, +84 +/- 23%, p respiration and at the same time suppresses a compensatory increase in glucose transport, causing cellular carbohydrate deficiency in isolated rat skeletal muscle. This effect is mediated by a direct, rapid and non-genomic mechanism and could contribute to pregnancy-associated changes in glucose homeostasis.

  1. Hydrologic control of the oxygen isotope ratio of ecosystem respiration in a semi-arid woodland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Shim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We conducted high frequency measurements of the δ18O value of atmospheric CO2 from a juniper (Juniperus monosperma woodland in New Mexico, USA, over a four-year period to investigate climatic and physiological regulation of the δ18O value of ecosystem respiration (δR. Rain pulses reset δR with the dominant water source isotope composition, followed by progressive enrichment of δR. Transpiration (ET was significantly related to post-pulse δR enrichment because the leaf water δ18O value showed strong enrichment with increasing vapor pressure deficit that occurs following rain. Post-pulse δR enrichment was correlated with both ET and the ratio of ET to soil evaporation (ET/ES. In contrast, the soil water δ18O value was relatively stable and δR enrichment was not correlated with ES. Model simulations captured the large post-pulse δR enrichments only when the offset between xylem and leaf water δ18O value was modeled explicitly and when a gross flux model for CO2 retro-diffusion was included. Drought impacts δR through the balance between evaporative demand, which enriches δR, and low soil moisture availability, which attenuates δR enrichment through reduced ET. The net result, observed throughout all four years of our study, was a negative correlation of post-precipitation δR enrichment with increasing drought.

  2. On the relative roles of hydrology, salinity, temperature, and root productivity in controlling soil respiration from coastal swamps (freshwater)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Ken W.; Whitbeck, Julie L.; Howard, Rebecca J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Soil CO2 emissions can dominate gaseous carbon losses from forested wetlands (swamps), especially those positioned in coastal environments. Understanding the varied roles of hydroperiod, salinity, temperature, and root productivity on soil respiration is important in discerning how carbon balances may shift as freshwater swamps retreat inland with sea-level rise and salinity incursion, and convert to mixed communities with marsh plants. Methods We exposed soil mesocosms to combinations of permanent flooding, tide, and salinity, and tracked soil respiration over 2 1/2 growing seasons. We also related these measurements to rates from field sites along the lower Savannah River, Georgia, USA. Soil temperature and root productivity were assessed simultaneously for both experiments. Results Soil respiration from mesocosms (22.7-1678.2 mg CO2 m-2 h-1) differed significantly among treatments during four of the seven sampling intervals, where permanently flooded treatments contributed to low rates of soil respiration and tidally flooded treatments sometimes contributed to higher rates. Permanent flooding reduced the overall capacity for soil respiration as soils warmed. Salinity did reduce soil respiration at times in tidal treatments, indicating that salinity may affect the amount of CO2 respired with tide more strongly than under permanent flooding. However, soil respiration related greatest to root biomass (mesocosm) and standing root length (field); any stress reducing root productivity (incl. salinity and permanent flooding) therefore reduces soil respiration. Conclusions Overall, we hypothesized a stronger, direct role for salinity on soil respiration, and found that salinity effects were being masked by varied capacities for increases in respiration with soil warming as dictated by hydrology, and the indirect influence that salinity can have on plant productivity.

  3. Pulmonary and chest wall mechanics in the control of respiration in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, G M; Bureau, M A

    1987-09-01

    Although the respiratory system is not fully developed at birth, the human newborn infant has flexible strategies to sustain breathing and defend blood gas homeostasis in both health and disease conditions. Initially the thresholds for chemoreceptor response to PO2 and PCO2 closely mimic those of the fetus, but the threshold resets to sustain ventilation adequate for blood gas homeostasis appropriate to the extrauterine milieu. The muscles of respiration have been "trained" in utero and effectively assume the function of the respiratory pump, despite their marginal reserve against fatigue. The pliable chest wall is functionally stabilized by the tonic activity of the intercostal muscles, thereby allowing effective ventilation. Finally, expiration is prolonged by the postinspiratory activity of the diaphragm and laryngeal braking as a means of maintaining an elevated lung volume and augmenting FRC. The ventilatory response of the newborn to respiratory disease is limited. The magnitude of the VE response is smaller than that of the adult, and is characterized by an increase in the respiratory rate and a limited increase in the VT. The poor effort reserve of the muscles, especially the diaphragm, predisposes the newborn to muscle fatigue and ventilatory failure. To avoid fatigue, recruitment of accessory muscles occurs, along with laryngeal braking of expiration, thereby decreasing the work of the diaphragm, recruiting new alveoli by an auto-PEEP effect, increasing the FRC volume, and improving gas exchange by an increase in the pulmonary surface area. These mechanisms help to avoid muscle exhaustion and facilitate adequate gas exchange in the presence of lung disease. We do not know precisely the postconceptual age at which the newborn is sufficiently developed to adopt these various defensive strategies of breathing, but the presence of tachypnea and grunting in 28-week-old premature infants suggests that long before term the human infant is capable of remarkable

  4. A neuro-fuzzy controller for the estimation of tidal volume and respiration frequency ventilator settings for COPD patients ventilated in control mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzavaras, A; Weller, P R; Spyropoulos, B

    2007-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are characterized by increased work of breathing (WOB) and ventilatory muscle dysfunction. Mechanical ventilation is applied to unload the WOB; rest respiratory muscles decrease arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) and treat hypoxemia. Since patients' needs are not static, ventilator settings have to be adjusted regularly. The aim of the present study was the development and evaluation of a neuro-fuzzy controller, that utilizes non-invasively acquired parameters for the determination of the appropriate tidal volume (VT) and respiration frequency (RR) ventilator settings for COPD patients. Forty three (43) hours of non-invasively monitored physiology parameters and ventilator settings, from four (4) different COPD patients ventilated in control mode, were collected in two (2) General Hospitals in Greece. Recorded data were randomly allocated into two sets, namely training set (60%) and evaluation set (40%). A neuro-fuzzy controller was developed and trained, by employing the training set. The controller utilizes non-invasively measured parameters, namely oxygen saturation (SpO2), lung compliance (C) and resistance (R), Peak Inspiratory pressure (PIP) and Plateau pressure (Pplateau), for predicting appropriate VT and RR settings. The developed neuro-fuzzy controller was tested against evaluation set. The Mean Square Error of the tidal volume and the respiration rate was 0.222 ml/Kgr and 1.21 breaths per minute (bpm) respectively.

  5. Annual ecosystem respiration variability of alpine peatland on the eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and its controlling factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haijun; Hong, Bing; Hong, Yetang; Zhu, Yongxuan; Cai, Chen; Yuan, Lingui; Wang, Yu

    2015-09-01

    Peatlands are widely developed in the eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, but little is known about carbon budgets for these alpine peatland ecosystems. In this study, we used an automatic chamber system to measure ecosystem respiration in the Hongyuan peatland, which is located in the eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Annual ecosystem respiration measurements showed a typical seasonal pattern, with the peak appearing in June. The highest respiration was 10.43 μmol CO2/m(2)/s, and the lowest was 0.20 μmol CO2/m(2)/s. The annual average ecosystem respiration was 2.06 μmol CO2/m(2)/s. The total annual respiration was 599.98 g C/m(2), and respiration during the growing season (from May to September) accounted for 78 % of the annual sum. Nonlinear regression revealed that ecosystem respiration has a significant exponential correlation with soil temperature at 10-cm depth (R (2) = 0.98). The Q 10 value was 3.90, which is far higher than the average Q 10 value of terrestrial ecosystems. Ecosystem respiration had an apparent diurnal variation pattern in growing season, with peaks and valleys appearing at approximately 14:00 and 10:00, respectively, which could be explained by soil temperature and soil water content variation at 10-cm depth.

  6. Inter-relationships between light and respiration in the control of ascorbic acid synthesis and accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Carlos G; Yu, Jianping; Gómez, Facundo; Fernández, Laura; McIntosh, Lee; Foyer, Christine H

    2006-01-01

    The effects of growth irradiance and respiration on ascorbic acid (AA) synthesis and accumulation were studied in the leaves of wild-type and transformed Arabidopsis thaliana with modified amounts of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) protein. Plants were grown under low (LL; 50 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1)), intermediate (IL; 100 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1)), or high (HL; 250 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1)) light. Increasing growth irradiance progressively elevated leaf AA content and hence the values of dark-induced disappearance of leaf AA, which were 11, 55, and 89 nmol AA lost g(-1) fresh weight h(-1), from LL-, IL-, and HL-grown leaves, respectively. When HL leaves were supplied with L-galactone-1,4-lactone (L-GalL; the precursor of AA), they accumulated twice as much AA and had double the maximal L-galactone-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (L-GalLDH) activities of LL leaves. Growth under HL enhanced dehydroascorbate reductase and monodehydroascorbate reductase activities. Leaf respiration rates were highest in the HL leaves, which also had higher amounts of cytochrome c and cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) activities, as well as enhanced capacity of the AOX and CCO electron transport pathways. Leaves of the AOX-overexpressing lines accumulated more AA than wild-type or antisense leaves, particularly at HL. Intact mitochondria from AOX-overexpressing lines had higher AA synthesis capacities than those from the wild-type or antisense lines even though they had similar L-GalLDH activities. AOX antisense lines had more cytochrome c protein than wild-type or AOX-overexpressing lines. It is concluded that regardless of limitations on L-GalL synthesis by regulation of early steps in the AA synthesis pathway, the regulation of L-GalLDH activity via the interaction of light and respiratory controls is a crucial determinant of the overall ability of leaves to produce and accumulate AA.

  7. A Harmonic Current Suppression Control Strategy for Droop-Controlled Inverter Connected to the Distorted Grid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Feng; Sun, Kai; Guan, Yajuan

    2015-01-01

    The grid-feeding voltage controlled inverter (GF-VCI) based on droop control is vulnerable to the harmonic voltages of the utility grid. Because of the equivalent impedance of system is small, the slight distorted grid voltage will result in the harmonic component increasing of GF-VCI output...... currents. Therefore, the reason of generation of distorted grid-feeding current of GF-VCI under the distorted grid voltage is investigated firstly in this paper. Then, a harmonic grid-feeding current suppression control strategy for GF-VCI is proposed. Two different filters are compared and analysed before...... being adopted for abstracting the fundamental components of grid voltage. The injected fundamental power is controlled through droop controller, and a hybrid voltage controller of GF-VCI with PI and R regulators in rotary frame is adopted for improving of the tracking capability of the grid harmonic...

  8. WaterControl: self-diffusion based solvent signal suppression enhanced by selective inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Torres, Allan M; Price, William S

    2017-05-01

    Selective inversion/excitation based solvent signal suppression techniques are widely used in various NMR experiments because of their high efficiency and general applicability. However, these techniques generate a 'null'/suppression region containing (non-quantitatively) degraded solvent and desired resonances because of their reliance on the rejection of the coherence transfer pathway corresponding to all the resonances within the suppression region. To address this issue, the WaterControl technique was developed by inserting a (pulsed gradient - selective inversion pulse - pulsed gradient) unit into each 'transverse' period of a standard stimulated echo pulse sequence so that the coherence transfer pathways corresponding to both the suppression and non-suppression regions can be selected in one transient. The new sequence affords a diffusion based and quantifiable solvent signal suppression with no or minimal loss of features of interest. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Adaptive multimodal vibration suppression using fuzzy-based control with limited structural data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makihara, Kanjuro; Kuroishi, Chikako; Fukunaga, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel fuzzy-based method of adaptive multimodal vibration suppression with limited structural data. The adaptive control consists of fuzzy inference and a semi-active switching approach. We demonstrate it to be applicable to multimodal vibration suppression for vibrating structures, where a single piezoelectric actuator suppresses two modal vibrations simultaneously. Our fuzzy-based semi-active control requires only the structural information of natural frequencies for real-time adaptive feedback, whereas common adaptive controls require highly precise structural models or complete equations of motion. We conduct experiments in semi-active vibration suppression using the proposed fuzzy-based control, and compare the suppression performance of our fuzzy-based approach with conventional controls. The experiments indicate that the proposed fuzzy-based control demonstrates good adaptability when experiencing sudden changes in disturbance excitation, and also demonstrates high suppression performance. The fuzzy-based control can adapt to a wide range of disturbance conditions, both within and outside the range of vibration excitations assumed when the controller is designed. (paper)

  10. Temperature and substrate controls on intra-annual variation in ecosystem respiration in two subarctic vegetation types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grogan, Paul; Jonasson, Sven Evert

    2005-01-01

    Arctic ecosystems are important in the context of climate change because they are expected to undergo the most rapid temperature increases, and could provide a globally significant release of CO2 to the atmosphere from their extensive bulk soil organic carbon reserves. Understanding the relative...... contributions of bulk soil organic matter and plant-associated carbon pools to ecosystem respiration is critical to predicting the response of arctic ecosystem net carbon balance to climate change. In this study, we determined the variation in ecosystem respiration rates from birch forest understory and heath...... tundra vegetation types in northern Sweden through a full annual cycle. We used a plant biomass removal treatment to differentiate bulk soil organic matter respiration from total ecosystem respiration in each vegetation type. Plant-associated and bulk soil organic matter carbon pools each contributed...

  11. Experimental Model Based Feedback Control for Flutter Suppression and Gust Load Alleviation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology, Inc. (ZONA) proposes an R&D effort to develop an Experimental Model Based Feedback Control (EMBFC) Framework for the flutter suppression and...

  12. Songbird Respiration is Controlled by Multispike Patterns at Millisecond Temporal Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Caroline; Srivastava, Kyle; Vellema, Michiel; Elemans, Coen; Nemenman, Ilya; Sober, Samuel

    Although the importance of precise timing of neural action potentials (spikes) is well known in sensory systems, approaches to motor control have focused almost exclusively on firing rates. Here we examined whether precise timing of spikes in multispike patterns has an effect on the motor output in the respiratory system of the Bengalese finch, a songbird. By recording from single motor neurons and the muscle fibers they innervate in freely behaving birds, we find that the spike trains are significantly non-Poisson, suggesting that the precise timing of spikes is tightly controlled. We further find that even a one millisecond shift of an individual spike in a multispike pattern predicts a significantly different air sac pressure. Finally, we provide evidence for the causal relation between precise spike timing and the motor output in this organism by stimulating the motor system with precisely timed patterns of electrical impulses. We observe that shifting a single pulse by as little as two milliseconds elicits differences in resulting air sac pressure. These results demonstrate that the precise timing of spikes does play a role in motor control. This work was partially supported by NSF Grant IOS/1208126, NIH Grant 5R90DA033462 , NIH Grant R01NS084844, and NIH Grant F31DC013753.

  13. Soil water regulates the control of photosynthesis on diel hysteresis between soil respiration and temperature in a desert shrubland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ben; Zha, Tian Shan; Jia, Xin; Gong, Jin Nan; Bourque, Charles; Feng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Wu, Bin; Qing Zhang, Yu; Peltola, Heli

    2017-09-01

    Explanations for the occurrence of hysteresis (asynchronicity) between diel soil respiration (Rs) and soil temperature (Ts) have evoked both biological and physical mechanisms. The specifics of these explanations, however, tend to vary with the particular ecosystem or biome being investigated. So far, the relative degree of control of biological and physical processes on hysteresis is not clear for drylands. This study examined the seasonal variation in diel hysteresis and its biological control in a desert-shrub ecosystem in northwest (NW) China. The study was based on continuous measurements of Rs, air temperature (Ta), temperature at the soil surface and below (Tsurf and Ts), volumetric soil water content (SWC), and photosynthesis in a dominant desert shrub (i.e., Artemisia ordosica) over an entire year in 2013. Trends in diel Rs were observed to vary with SWC over the growing season (April to October). Diel variations in Rs were more closely associated with variations in Tsurf than with photosynthesis as SWC increased, leading to Rs being in phase with Tsurf, particularly when SWC > 0.08 m3 m-3 (ratio of SWC to soil porosity = 0.26). However, as SWC decreased below 0.08 m3 m-3, diel variations in Rs were more closely related to variations in photosynthesis, leading to pronounced hysteresis between Rs and Tsurf. Incorporating photosynthesis into a Q10-function eliminated 84.2 % of the observed hysteresis, increasing the overall descriptive capability of the function. Our findings highlight a high degree of control by photosynthesis and SWC in regulating seasonal variation in diel hysteresis between Rs and temperature.

  14. Systematic design and simulation of a tearing mode suppression feedback control system for the TEXTOR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennen, B.A.; Westerhof, E.; De Baar, M.R.; Nuij, P.W.J.M.; Steinbuch, M.

    2012-01-01

    Suppression of tearing modes is essential for the operation of tokamaks. This paper describes the design and simulation of a tearing mode suppression feedback control system for the TEXTOR tokamak. The two main control tasks of this feedback control system are the radial alignment of electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive (ECRH/ECCD) with a tearing mode and the stabilization of a mode at a specific width. In order to simulate these control tasks, the time evolution of a tearing mode subject to suppression by ECRH/ECCD and destabilization by a magnetic perturbation field is modelled using the generalized Rutherford equation. The model includes an equilibrium model and an ECRH/ECCD launcher model. The dynamics and static equilibria of this model are analysed. The model is linearized and based on the linearized model, linear feedback controllers are designed and simulated, demonstrating both alignment and width control of tearing modes in TEXTOR. (paper)

  15. Noncolocated Structural Vibration Suppression Using Zero Annihilation Periodic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayard, David S.; Boussalis, Dhemetrios

    1993-01-01

    The Zero Annihilation Periodic (ZAP) controller is applied to the problem of vibration control of a noncolocated flexible structure. It is shown that even though the transfer function is nonminimum-phase, a plant inverse controller can be designed which elicits a deadbeat closed-loop response.

  16. Adaptive Linear Parameter Varying Control for Aeroservoelastic Suppression, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Adaptive control offers an opportunity to fulfill aircraft safety objectives though automated vehicle recovery while maintaining performance and stability...

  17. Plant respiration under low oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Toro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Respiration is an oxidative process controlled by three pathways: glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. Respiratory metabolism is ubiquitous in all organisms, but with differences among each other. For example in plants, because their high plasticity, respiration involves metabolic pathways with unique characteristics. In this way, in order to avoid states of low energy availability, plants exhibit great flexibility to bypass conventional steps of glycolysis, TCA cycle, and OXPHOS. To understand the energetic link between these alternative pathways, it is important to know the growth, maintenance, and ion uptake components of the respiration in plants. Changes in these components have been reported when plants are subjected to stress, such as oxygen deficiency. This review analyzes the current knowledge on the metabolic and functional aspects of plant respiration, its components and its response to environmental changes.

  18. Chattering Suppression for DSP Based Sliding Mode Current Control of PM DC Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal, Mehmet; Teodorescu, Remus

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates several chattering suppression methods for DSP based implementation of sliding mode control (SMC). It concentrates on the ‘equivalent-control-dependent' and ‘state-dependent' gain adjustment methods proposed in recent theoretical studies, and tests the effectiveness...... (LPF). Experimental results demonstrating the effectiveness of each method as well as a combined chattering elimination method are presented and discussed....

  19. Control of skeletal muscle mitochondria respiration by adenine nucleotides: differential effect of ADP and ATP according to muscle contractile type in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, N; Lefaucheur, L; Fillaut, M; Vincent, A; Herpin, P

    2005-02-01

    Skeletal muscle exhibits considerable variation in mitochondrial content among fiber types, but it is less clear whether mitochondria from different fiber types also present specific functional and regulatory properties. The present experiment was undertaken on ten 170-day-old pigs to compare functional properties and control of respiration by adenine nucleotides in mitochondria isolated from predominantly slow-twitch (Rhomboideus (RM)) and fast-twitch (Longissimus (LM)) muscles. Mitochondrial ATP synthesis, respiratory control ratio (RCR) and ADP-stimulated respiration with either complex I or II substrates were significantly higher (25-30%, Prespiration. Based on mitochondrial enzyme activities (cytochrome c oxidase [COX], F0F1-ATPase, mitochondrial creatine kinase [mi-CK]), the higher ADP-stimulated respiration rate of RM mitochondria appeared mainly related to a higher maximal oxidative capacity, without any difference in the maximal phosphorylation potential. Mitochondrial K(m) for ADP was similar in RM (4.4+/-0.9 microM) and LM (5.9+/-1.2 microM) muscles (P>0.05) but the inhibitory effect of ATP was more marked in LM (Prespiration by ATP differs according to muscle contractile type and that absolute muscle oxidative capacity not only relies on mitochondrial density but also on mitochondrial functioning per se.

  20. Voluntary-Driven Elbow Orthosis with Speed-Controlled Tremor Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrnstadt, Gil; Menon, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Robotic technology is gradually becoming commonplace in the medical sector and in the service of patients. Medical conditions that have benefited from significant technological development include stroke, for which rehabilitation with robotic devices is administered, and surgery assisted by robots. Robotic devices have also been proposed for assistance of movement disorders. Pathological tremor, among the most common movement disorders, is one such example. In practice, the dissemination and availability of tremor suppression robotic systems has been limited. Devices in the marketplace tend to either be non-ambulatory or to target specific functions, such as eating and drinking. We have developed a one degree-of-freedom (DOF) elbow orthosis that could be worn by an individual with tremor. A speed-controlled, voluntary-driven suppression approach is implemented with the orthosis. Typically tremor suppression methods estimate the tremor component of the signal and produce a canceling counterpart signal. The suggested approach instead estimates the voluntary component of the motion. A controller then actuates the orthosis based on the voluntary signal, while simultaneously rejecting the tremorous motion. In this work, we tested the suppressive orthosis using a one DOF robotic system that simulates the human arm. The suggested suppression approach does not require a model of the human arm. Moreover, the human input along with the orthosis forearm gravitational forces, of non-linear nature, are considered as part of the disturbance to the suppression system. Therefore, the suppression system can be modeled linearly. Nevertheless, the orthosis forearm gravitational forces can be compensated by the suppression system. The electromechanical design of the orthosis is presented, and data from an essential tremor patient is used as the human input. Velocity tracking results demonstrate an RMS error of 0.31 rad/s, and a power spectral density shows a reduction of the tremor

  1. Voluntary-Driven Elbow Orthosis with Speed-Controlled Tremor Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrnstadt, Gil; Menon, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Robotic technology is gradually becoming commonplace in the medical sector and in the service of patients. Medical conditions that have benefited from significant technological development include stroke, for which rehabilitation with robotic devices is administered, and surgery assisted by robots. Robotic devices have also been proposed for assistance of movement disorders. Pathological tremor, among the most common movement disorders, is one such example. In practice, the dissemination and availability of tremor suppression robotic systems has been limited. Devices in the marketplace tend to either be non-ambulatory or to target specific functions, such as eating and drinking. We have developed a one degree-of-freedom (DOF) elbow orthosis that could be worn by an individual with tremor. A speed-controlled, voluntary-driven suppression approach is implemented with the orthosis. Typically tremor suppression methods estimate the tremor component of the signal and produce a canceling counterpart signal. The suggested approach instead estimates the voluntary component of the motion. A controller then actuates the orthosis based on the voluntary signal, while simultaneously rejecting the tremorous motion. In this work, we tested the suppressive orthosis using a one DOF robotic system that simulates the human arm. The suggested suppression approach does not require a model of the human arm. Moreover, the human input along with the orthosis forearm gravitational forces, of non-linear nature, are considered as part of the disturbance to the suppression system. Therefore, the suppression system can be modeled linearly. Nevertheless, the orthosis forearm gravitational forces can be compensated by the suppression system. The electromechanical design of the orthosis is presented, and data from an essential tremor patient is used as the human input. Velocity tracking results demonstrate an RMS error of 0.31 rad/s, and a power spectral density shows a reduction of the tremor

  2. Senataxin suppresses the antiviral transcriptional response and controls viral biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew S; Rialdi, Alexander; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Tilove, Micah; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Moshkina, Natasha P; Peralta, Zuleyma; Noel, Justine; Melegari, Camilla; Maestre, Ana M; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Madrenas, Joaquín; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; Young, John A T; Feagins, Alicia R; Basler, Christopher F; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Becherel, Olivier J; Lavin, Martin F; van Bakel, Harm; Marazzi, Ivan

    2015-05-01

    The human helicase senataxin (SETX) has been linked to the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4) and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Here we identified a role for SETX in controlling the antiviral response. Cells that had undergone depletion of SETX and SETX-deficient cells derived from patients with AOA2 had higher expression of antiviral mediators in response to infection than did wild-type cells. Mechanistically, we propose a model whereby SETX attenuates the activity of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) at genes stimulated after a virus is sensed and thus controls the magnitude of the host response to pathogens and the biogenesis of various RNA viruses (e.g., influenza A virus and West Nile virus). Our data indicate a potentially causal link among inborn errors in SETX, susceptibility to infection and the development of neurologic disorders.

  3. The development and testing of a prototype mini-baghouse to control the release of respirable crystalline silica from sand movers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Barbara M; Esswein, Eric J; Gressel, Michael G; Kratzer, Jerry L; Feng, H Amy; King, Bradley; Miller, Arthur L; Cauda, Emanuele

    2016-08-01

    Inhalation of respirable crystalline silica (RCS) is a significant risk to worker health during well completions operations (which include hydraulic fracturing) at conventional and unconventional oil and gas extraction sites. RCS is generated by pneumatic transfer of quartz-containing sand during hydraulic fracturing operations. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) researchers identified concentrations of RCS at hydraulic fracturing sites that exceed 10 times the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) and up to 50 times the NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limit (REL). NIOSH research identified at least seven point sources of dust release at contemporary oil and gas extraction sites where RCS aerosols were generated.  NIOSH researchers recommend the use of engineering controls wherever they can be implemented to limit the RCS released. A control developed to address one of the largest sources of RCS aerosol generation is the NIOSH mini-baghouse assembly, mounted on the thief hatches on top of the sand mover. This article details the results of a trial of the NIOSH mini-baghouse at a sand mine in Arkansas from November 18-21, 2013.  During the trial, area air samples were collected at 12 locations on and around a sand mover with and without the mini-baghouse control installed. Analytical results for respirable dust and RCS indicate the use of the mini-baghouse effectively reduced both respirable dust and RCS downwind of the thief hatches. Reduction of airborne respirable dust ranged from 85-98%; reductions in airborne RCS ranged from 79-99%. A bulk sample of dust collected by the baghouse assembly showed the likely presence of freshly fractured quartz, a particularly hazardous form of RCS.  Planned future design enhancements will increase the performance and durability of the mini-baghouse, including an improved bag clamp mechanism and upgraded filter fabric with a modified air-to-cloth ratio

  4. The Development and Testing of a Prototype Mini-Baghouse to Control the Release of Respirable Crystalline Silica from Sand Movers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Barbara M.; Esswein, Eric J.; Gressel, Michael G.; Kratzer, Jerry L.; Feng, H. Amy; King, Bradley; Miller, Arthur L.; Cauda, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of respirable crystalline silica (RCS) is a significant risk to worker health during well completions operations (which include hydraulic fracturing) at conventional and unconventional oil and gas extraction sites. RCS is generated by pneumatic transfer of quartz-containing sand during hydraulic fracturing operations. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) researchers identified concentrations of RCS at hydraulic fracturing sites that exceed 10 times the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) and up to 50 times the NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limit (REL). NIOSH research identified at least seven point sources of dust release at contemporary oil and gas extraction sites where RCS aerosols were generated. NIOSH researchers recommend the use of engineering controls wherever they can be implemented to limit the RCS released. A control developed to address one of the largest sources of RCS aerosol generation is the NIOSH mini-baghouse assembly, mounted on the thief hatches on top of the sand mover. This manuscript details the results of a trial of the NIOSH mini-baghouse at a sand mine in Arkansas, November 18 – 21, 2013. During the trial, area air samples were collected at 12 locations on and around a sand mover with and without the mini-baghouse control installed. Analytical results for respirable dust and RCS indicate the use of the mini-baghouse effectively reduced both respirable dust and RCS downwind of the thief hatches. Reduction of airborne respirable dust ranged from 85% to 98%; reductions in airborne RCS ranged from 79% to 99%. A bulk sample of dust collected by the baghouse assembly showed the likely presence of freshly fractured quartz, a particularly hazardous form of RCS. Planned future design enhancements will increase the performance and durability of the mini-baghouse, including an improved bag clamp mechanism and upgraded filter fabric with a modified air-to-cloth ratio

  5. Respirator Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to protect myself, my family, and/or my employees? If available and used correctly, a respirator can ... Respirator Fact Sheet [PDF - 706 KB] Follow NIOSH Facebook Flickr Pinterest Twitter YouTube NIOSH Homepage NIOSH A- ...

  6. Respirator field performance factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, B.J.; DeField, J.D.; Strandberg, S.W.; Sutcliffe, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Industrial Hygiene Group assisted OSHA and the NRC in measurements of respirator performance under field conditions. They reviewed problems associated with sampling aerosols within the respirator in order to determine fit factors (FFs) or field performance factor (FPF). In addition, they designed an environmental chamber study to determine the effects of temperature and humidity on a respirator wearer

  7. Cyclin F suppresses B-Myb activity to promote cell cycle checkpoint control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Ditte Kjærsgaard; Hoffmann, Saskia; Ahlskog, Johanna K

    2015-01-01

    an important role in checkpoint control following ionizing radiation. Cyclin F-depleted cells initiate checkpoint signalling after ionizing radiation, but fail to maintain G2 phase arrest and progress into mitosis prematurely. Importantly, cyclin F suppresses the B-Myb-driven transcriptional programme...... that promotes accumulation of crucial mitosis-promoting proteins. Cyclin F interacts with B-Myb via the cyclin box domain. This interaction is important to suppress cyclin A-mediated phosphorylation of B-Myb, a key step in B-Myb activation. In summary, we uncover a regulatory mechanism linking the F-box protein...

  8. SU-F-J-139: Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuation(ALFF) and Regional Homogeneity (ReHo) Study of the Respiration Motion Control Byhypnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y; Li, R; Xie, Y [Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen, Guangdong (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Respiration control by hypnosis is a method in reducing the detriment to the healthy organs or organizations for patients during radiotherapy, especially for lung and abdomen cancer (Fig.1). It’s hypothesized that there exists alterations neurological brain activity during the hypnosis state of respiratory motion control in comparison with resting state. Methods: Thirteen healthy volunteers were organized to participate in a hypnosis experiment that consisted of two sectional scans of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), rest state condition (RSC) scanning and hypnosis state condition (HSC) scanning. In addition, the coronal section of the lung was scanned during both conditions. During the hypnosis scan, the volunteers were under the hypnotists’ guidance to keep peace and stable respiration. To evaluate the altered physiological performance of hypnosis in the respiratory control, three conventional indicators ALFF/fALFF (0.01–0.08Hz) and ReHo, were applied to identify the difference. Results: Compared with RSC, HSC showed significant (p<0.05) higher ReHo in superior temporal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, frontal lobe, middle occipital gyrus, parietal lobe, cerebellum anterior Lobe and lingual gyrus, and left brainstem (Fig.2). While significant lower ReHo in middle frontal gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, inferior semi-lunar lobule, sub-lobar and limbic lobe (Fig.2). As for the ALFF results, significant higher value of HSC was observed in superior temporal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, cerebellum anterior lobe, lingual gyrus, sub-lobar, limbic lobe, and lower in cerebellum posterior lobe, inferior semi-lunar lobule, inferior parietal lobule right middle frontal gyrus, cerebellar tonsil (Fig.3). The results of fALFF were similar to ALFF (Fig.4). The above results demonstrated that most significant regions of brain were uniform between ReHo and ALFF/fALFF. Conclusion: Hypnosis is a new

  9. SU-F-J-139: Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuation(ALFF) and Regional Homogeneity (ReHo) Study of the Respiration Motion Control Byhypnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y; Li, R; Xie, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Respiration control by hypnosis is a method in reducing the detriment to the healthy organs or organizations for patients during radiotherapy, especially for lung and abdomen cancer (Fig.1). It’s hypothesized that there exists alterations neurological brain activity during the hypnosis state of respiratory motion control in comparison with resting state. Methods: Thirteen healthy volunteers were organized to participate in a hypnosis experiment that consisted of two sectional scans of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), rest state condition (RSC) scanning and hypnosis state condition (HSC) scanning. In addition, the coronal section of the lung was scanned during both conditions. During the hypnosis scan, the volunteers were under the hypnotists’ guidance to keep peace and stable respiration. To evaluate the altered physiological performance of hypnosis in the respiratory control, three conventional indicators ALFF/fALFF (0.01–0.08Hz) and ReHo, were applied to identify the difference. Results: Compared with RSC, HSC showed significant (p<0.05) higher ReHo in superior temporal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, frontal lobe, middle occipital gyrus, parietal lobe, cerebellum anterior Lobe and lingual gyrus, and left brainstem (Fig.2). While significant lower ReHo in middle frontal gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, inferior semi-lunar lobule, sub-lobar and limbic lobe (Fig.2). As for the ALFF results, significant higher value of HSC was observed in superior temporal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, cerebellum anterior lobe, lingual gyrus, sub-lobar, limbic lobe, and lower in cerebellum posterior lobe, inferior semi-lunar lobule, inferior parietal lobule right middle frontal gyrus, cerebellar tonsil (Fig.3). The results of fALFF were similar to ALFF (Fig.4). The above results demonstrated that most significant regions of brain were uniform between ReHo and ALFF/fALFF. Conclusion: Hypnosis is a new

  10. Study on Active Suppression Control of Drivetrain Oscillations in an Electric Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Cui, Ying

    2017-07-01

    Due to the low damping in a central driven electric vehicle and lack of passive damping mechanisms as compared with a conventional vehicle, the vehicle may endure torsional vibrations which may deteriorates the vehicle’s drivability. Thus active damping control strategy is required to reduce the undesirable oscillations in an EV. In this paper, the origin of the vibration and the design of a damping control method to suppress such oscillations to improve the drivability of an EV are studied. The traction motor torque that is given by the vehicle controller is adjusted according to the acceleration rate of the motor speed to attenuate the resonant frequency. Simulations and experiments are performed to validate the system. The results show that the proposed control system can effectively suppress oscillations and hence improve drivability.

  11. CTLA-4 (CD152) controls homeostasis and suppressive capacity of regulatory T cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Paula; Knieke, Karin; Hegel, J Kolja E; Quandt, Dagmar; Burmester, Gerd-R; Hoff, Holger; Brunner-Weinzierl, Monika C

    2009-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (known as Treg cells) suppress unwanted and autoreactive T cell responses. Treg cells express the costimulatory molecule CTLA-4 intracellularly, but the mechanisms by which Treg cells exploit CTLA-4 signaling remain unclear. The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of CTLA-4 in controlling the homeostasis and suppressive function of Treg cells. Murine Treg cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for coexpression of CTLA-4 and typical Treg cell-expressed molecules, and the influence of CTLA-4 on T cell proliferation, suppression, and apoptosis was investigated by in vitro assays. To analyze the importance of CTLA-4 in Treg cell-mediated suppression in vivo, wild-type Treg cells were transferred into CTLA-4-deficient mice displaying lymphoproliferation, and survival was monitored over time. A strong correlation between expression of forkhead box P3 and ex vivo expression of CTLA-4 in Treg cells was observed. Inhibition of CTLA-4 signaling in Treg cells during in vitro stimulation increased cell cycling and led to enhanced activation-induced cell death (AICD), which was mediated by CD95/CD95 ligand-induced activation of caspases. Blockade of CTLA-4 signaling resulted in impairment of the suppressive capacity of Treg cells. Despite these effects, high amounts of Treg cells persisted in CTLA-4-deficient mice. Results of transfer experiments in CTLA-4-deficient mice showed that the mice had a significantly prolonged lifespan when CTLA-4-competent Treg cells were injected. Expression of CTLA-4 on Treg cells serves to control T cell proliferation, to confer resistance against AICD, and to maintain the suppressive function of Treg cells.

  12. Active Vibration Suppression of a 3-DOF Flexible Parallel Manipulator Using Efficient Modal Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the dynamic modeling and efficient modal control of a planar parallel manipulator (PPM with three flexible linkages actuated by linear ultrasonic motors (LUSM. To achieve active vibration control, multiple lead zirconate titanate (PZT transducers are mounted on the flexible links as vibration sensors and actuators. Based on Lagrange’s equations, the dynamic model of the flexible links is derived with the dynamics of PZT actuators incorporated. Using the assumed mode method (AMM, the elastic motion of the flexible links are discretized under the assumptions of pinned-free boundary conditions, and the assumed mode shapes are validated through experimental modal test. Efficient modal control (EMC, in which the feedback forces in different modes are determined according to the vibration amplitude or energy of their own, is employed to control the PZT actuators to realize active vibration suppression. Modal filters are developed to extract the modal displacements and velocities from the vibration sensors. Numerical simulation and vibration control experiments are conducted to verify the proposed dynamic model and controller. The results show that the EMC method has the capability of suppressing multimode vibration simultaneously, and both the structural and residual vibrations of the flexible links are effectively suppressed using EMC approach.

  13. Analysis of Harmonics Suppression by Active Damping Control on Multi Slim DC-link Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Feng; Máthé, Lászlo; Lu, Kaiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Compared with conventional dc-link drive, slim dc-link drive is expected to achieve lower cost and longer life time. However, harmonics distortion problem may occur in such drive systems. This paper proposes to use an active damping control method to suppress the harmonic distortion...... with the benefit of low cost and also low loss. A new analysis method, based on the frequency domain impedance model, is presented to explore the mechanism of harmonics suppression. Also, a general method is presented to build the impedance model of a PMSM drive system using Field Oriented Control (FOC) method....... Some design issues, including power levels, current control bandwidth and harmonic interaction, are discussed when the drive system is fed by a weak grid. Case studies on a two-drive system composed by two slim dc-link drive units are provided to verify the proposed analysis method....

  14. Neural adaptive control for vibration suppression in composite fin-tip of aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, S; Kannan, N; Sundararajan, N; Saratchandran, P

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we present a neural adaptive control scheme for active vibration suppression of a composite aircraft fin tip. The mathematical model of a composite aircraft fin tip is derived using the finite element approach. The finite element model is updated experimentally to reflect the natural frequencies and mode shapes very accurately. Piezo-electric actuators and sensors are placed at optimal locations such that the vibration suppression is a maximum. Model-reference direct adaptive neural network control scheme is proposed to force the vibration level within the minimum acceptable limit. In this scheme, Gaussian neural network with linear filters is used to approximate the inverse dynamics of the system and the parameters of the neural controller are estimated using Lyapunov based update law. In order to reduce the computational burden, which is critical for real-time applications, the number of hidden neurons is also estimated in the proposed scheme. The global asymptotic stability of the overall system is ensured using the principles of Lyapunov approach. Simulation studies are carried-out using sinusoidal force functions of varying frequency. Experimental results show that the proposed neural adaptive control scheme is capable of providing significant vibration suppression in the multiple bending modes of interest. The performance of the proposed scheme is better than the H(infinity) control scheme.

  15. Force to Rebalance Control of HRG and Suppression of Its Errors on the Basis of FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingan Jiang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel design of force to rebalance control for a hemispherical resonator gyro (HRG based on FPGA is demonstrated in this paper. The proposed design takes advantage of the automatic gain control loop and phase lock loop configuration in the drive mode while making full use of the quadrature control loop and rebalance control loop in controlling the oscillating dynamics in the sense mode. First, the math model of HRG with inhomogeneous damping and frequency split is theoretically analyzed. In addition, the major drift mechanisms in the HRG are described and the methods that can suppress the gyro drift are mentioned. Based on the math model and drift mechanisms suppression method, four control loops are employed to realize the manipulation of the HRG by using a FPGA circuit. The reference-phase loop and amplitude control loop are used to maintain the vibration of primary mode at its natural frequency with constant amplitude. The frequency split is readily eliminated by the quadrature loop with a DC voltage feedback from the quadrature component of the node. The secondary mode response to the angle rate input is nullified by the rebalance control loop. In order to validate the effect of the digital control of HRG, experiments are carried out with a turntable. The experimental results show that the design is suitable for the control of HRG which has good linearity scale factor and bias stability.

  16. Force to rebalance control of HRG and suppression of its errors on the basis of FPGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Wu, Wenqi; Luo, Bing; Fang, Zhen; Li, Yun; Jiang, Qingan

    2011-01-01

    A novel design of force to rebalance control for a hemispherical resonator gyro (HRG) based on FPGA is demonstrated in this paper. The proposed design takes advantage of the automatic gain control loop and phase lock loop configuration in the drive mode while making full use of the quadrature control loop and rebalance control loop in controlling the oscillating dynamics in the sense mode. First, the math model of HRG with inhomogeneous damping and frequency split is theoretically analyzed. In addition, the major drift mechanisms in the HRG are described and the methods that can suppress the gyro drift are mentioned. Based on the math model and drift mechanisms suppression method, four control loops are employed to realize the manipulation of the HRG by using a FPGA circuit. The reference-phase loop and amplitude control loop are used to maintain the vibration of primary mode at its natural frequency with constant amplitude. The frequency split is readily eliminated by the quadrature loop with a DC voltage feedback from the quadrature component of the node. The secondary mode response to the angle rate input is nullified by the rebalance control loop. In order to validate the effect of the digital control of HRG, experiments are carried out with a turntable. The experimental results show that the design is suitable for the control of HRG which has good linearity scale factor and bias stability.

  17. Generalized-Disturbance Rejection Control for Vibration Suppression of Piezoelectric Laminated Flexible Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yu Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of disturbance rejection (DR control, the paper proposes a generalized-disturbance rejection (GDR control with proportional-integral (PI observer for vibration suppression of smart structures under any unknown continuous disturbances. In the proposed GDR-PI control, a refined state space model is first constructed, and a generalized disturbance including the disturbance influence matrices, unknown physical disturbances, and state variables is defined. In the closed loop of GDR-PI control, physical disturbances can be counteracted indirectly by feeding back estimated generalized disturbances. By this means, the GDR-PI control remedies most of the defects in conventional DR control and has excellent performances especially in the following situations: (i the disturbances are completely unknown; (ii the number of sensor signals is less than the number of disturbances; (iii the unknown disturbances vary fast. Finally, the GDR-PI control is validated and compared with H∞ state feedback control and conventional DR control available in the literature for vibration suppression of smart beams.

  18. Flood-controlled excess-air formation favors aerobic respiration and limits denitrification activity in riparian groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone ePeter

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The saturated riparian zones of rivers act as spatially and temporally variable biogeochemical reactors. This complicates the assessment of biogeochemical transport and transformation processes. During a flood event, excess-air formation, i.e. the inclusion and dissolution of air bubbles into groundwater, can introduce high amounts of dissolved O2 and thereby affect biogeochemical processes in groundwater. With the help of a field-installed membrane-inlet mass-spectrometer we resolved the effects of flood induced excess-air formationon organic carbon and nitrogen transformations in groundwater of different riparian zones of a restored section of the River Thur, Switzerland. The results show that the flood event triggered high aerobic respiration activity in the groundwater below a zone densely populated with willow plants. The flood introduced high concentrations of O2 (230 µmol L–1 to the groundwater through the formation of excess air and transported up to ~400 µmol L 1 organic carbon from the soil/root layer into groundwater during the movement of the water table. A rapid respiration process, quantified via the measurements of O2, CO2 and noble-gas concentrations, led to fast depletion of the introduced O2 and organic carbon and to high CO2 concentration (590 µmol L–1 in the groundwater shortly after the flood. The synchronous analysis of different nitrogen species allowed studying the importance of denitrification activity. The results indicate that in the willow zone excess-air formation inhibited denitrification through high O2 concentration input. Instead, the observed decrease in nitrate concentration (~50 µmol N L 1 may be related to fostered nitrate uptake by plants. In the other riparian zones closer to the river, no significant excess-air formation and corresponding respiration activity was observed. Overall, analyzing the dissolved gases in the groundwater significantly contributed to deciphering biogeochemical processes in

  19. Suppression of vortex-induced vibration of a circular cylinder with fixed and rotating control cylinders.

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Silva Ortega

    2015-01-01

    The offshore oil industry is engaged in the development of new floating platforms, such as Spar, semi-submersible, tension-leg, FPSO and monocolumn for the exploration of deep and ultra-deep waters. Some of these floating systems have circular cross sections (or cross sections of other bluff geometries) being susceptible to vortex-induced vibrations (VIV). Vortex shedding behind a bluff body can be altered, suppressed or controlled over a limited range of Reynolds numbers. Various flow-contro...

  20. Nonlinear State Estimation and Control for Chaos Suppression in MEMS Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Marcelo Tusset

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade the chaotic behavior in MEMS resonators have been reported in a number of works. Here, the chaotic behavior of a micro-mechanical resonator is suppressed. The aim is to control the system forcing it to an orbit of the analytical solution obtained by the multiple scales method. The State Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE and the Optimal Linear Feedback Control (OLFC strategies are used for controlling the trajectory of the system. Additionally, the SDRE technique is used in the state estimator design. The state estimation and the control techniques proved to be effective in controlling the trajectory of the system. Additionally, the robustness of the control strategies are tested considering parametric errors and measurement noise in the control loop.

  1. Multirate Flutter Suppression System Design for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology Wing. Part 2; Methodology Application Software Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Gregory S.; Berg, Martin C.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2002-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of various control system design methodologies, the NASA Langley Research Center initiated the Benchmark Active Controls Project. In this project, the various methodologies were applied to design a flutter suppression system for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) Wing. This report describes the user's manual and software toolbox developed at the University of Washington to design a multirate flutter suppression control law for the BACT wing.

  2. Robust H-infinity control in CD players to suppress external disturbances and defects on the disk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, E.; Andersen, B.; Karlsson, R.V.

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with the design and implementation of robust H8 controllers in order to suppress external disturbances and defects on the disk. Due to the conflictive requirements concerning the bandwidth of the closed loop to suppress external disturbances and defects on the disk, two independe...... H8 controllers are designed where norm-bounded uncertainties are assumed. The controllers are evaluated through an experiment showing better performance than a classical PID controller...

  3. Integrated RNA- and protein profiling of fermentation and respiration in diploid budding yeast provides insight into nutrient control of cell growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Emmanuelle; Liu, Yuchen; Lardenois, Aurélie; Walther, Thomas; Horecka, Joe; Stuparevic, Igor; Law, Michael J; Lavigne, Régis; Evrard, Bertrand; Demougin, Philippe; Riffle, Michael; Strich, Randy; Davis, Ronald W; Pineau, Charles; Primig, Michael

    2015-04-24

    Diploid budding yeast undergoes rapid mitosis when it ferments glucose, and in the presence of a non-fermentable carbon source and the absence of a nitrogen source it triggers sporulation. Rich medium with acetate is a commonly used pre-sporulation medium, but our understanding of the molecular events underlying the acetate-driven transition from mitosis to meiosis is still incomplete. We identified 263 proteins for which mRNA and protein synthesis are linked or uncoupled in fermenting and respiring cells. Using motif predictions, interaction data and RNA profiling we find among them 28 likely targets for Ume6, a subunit of the conserved Rpd3/Sin3 histone deacetylase-complex regulating genes involved in metabolism, stress response and meiosis. Finally, we identify 14 genes for which both RNA and proteins are detected exclusively in respiring cells but not in fermenting cells in our sample set, including CSM4, SPR1, SPS4 and RIM4, which were thought to be meiosis-specific. Our work reveals intertwined transcriptional and post-transcriptional control mechanisms acting when a MATa/α strain responds to nutritional signals, and provides molecular clues how the carbon source primes yeast cells for entering meiosis. Our integrated genomics study provides insight into the interplay between the transcriptome and the proteome in diploid yeast cells undergoing vegetative growth in the presence of glucose (fermentation) or acetate (respiration). Furthermore, it reveals novel target genes involved in these processes for Ume6, the DNA binding subunit of the conserved histone deacetylase Rpd3 and the co-repressor Sin3. We have combined data from an RNA profiling experiment using tiling arrays that cover the entire yeast genome, and a large-scale protein detection analysis based on mass spectrometry in diploid MATa/α cells. This distinguishes our study from most others in the field-which investigate haploid yeast strains-because only diploid cells can undergo meiotic development

  4. Control of respiration in flight muscle from the high-altitude bar-headed goose and low-altitude birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Graham R; Richards, Jeffrey G; Milsom, William K

    2009-10-01

    Bar-headed geese fly at altitudes of up to 9,000 m on their biannual migration over the Himalayas. To determine whether the flight muscle of this species has evolved to facilitate exercise at high altitude, we compared the respiratory properties of permeabilized muscle fibers from bar-headed geese and several low-altitude waterfowl species. Respiratory capacities were assessed for maximal ADP stimulation (with single or multiple inputs to the electron transport system) and cytochrome oxidase excess capacity (with an exogenous electron donor) and were generally 20-40% higher in bar-headed geese when creatine was present. When respiration rates were extrapolated to the entire pectoral muscle mass, bar-headed geese had a higher mass-specific aerobic capacity. This may represent a surplus capacity that counteracts the depressive effects of hypoxia on mitochondrial respiration. However, there were no differences in activity for mitochondrial or glycolytic enzymes measured in homogenized muscle. The [ADP] leading to half-maximal stimulation (K(m)) was approximately twofold higher in bar-headed geese (10 vs. 4-6 microM), and, while creatine reduced K(m) by 30% in this species, it had no effect on K(m) in low-altitude birds. Mitochondrial creatine kinase may therefore contribute to the regulation of oxidative phosphorylation in flight muscle of bar-headed geese, which could promote efficient coupling of ATP supply and demand. However, this was not based on differences in creatine kinase activity in isolated mitochondria or homogenized muscle. The unique differences in bar-headed geese existed without prior exercise or hypoxia exposure and were not a result of phylogenetic history, and may, therefore, be important evolutionary specializations for high-altitude flight.

  5. Motion Control of Industrial Robot by Considering Vibration Suppression and Fast Path Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Satoru; Miyazaki, Toshimasa; Ohishi, Kiyoshi

    This paper proposes a new motion control strategy for industrial robots. It is important to achieve rapid and accurate control of the motion of industrial robots. However, industrial robots often have vibration which is caused by the resonant frequency and nonlinear interference force from various joints of the robot. In this case, the notch filtering method for generating a reference is useful for suppressing the resonant phenomenon. However, the path tracking error of the robot motion increases because phase delay becomes large by using the notch filter. In order to overcome these problems, this paper proposes a zero-phase notch filter without phase delay for fast path tracking. Moreover, this paper proposes a fast position control method based on D-PD control with dynamic feed-forward compensation. Using these proposed strategies, this paper achieves fast and accurate robot motion control without vibration and overshoot.

  6. Choosing the right respirator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidwell, J.

    1997-01-01

    Selecting respirators to help protect workers from airborne contaminants can be a confusing process. The consequences of selecting the incorrect respirator can be intimidating, and worker safety and health may be dramatically and irreparably affected if an inappropriate respirator is chosen. When used in the workplace, a formal respiratory protection program must be established covering the basic requirements outlined in the OSHA Respiratory Protection Standard (29 CFR 1910.134). Education and training must be properly emphasized and conducted periodically. Maintenance, cleaning, and storage programs must be established and routinely followed for reusable respirators. The process of establishing a respiratory protection program can be broken down into four basic steps: Identify respiratory hazards and concentrations; understand the contaminants effects on workers' health; select appropriate respiratory protection; and train in proper respirator use and maintenance. These four steps are the foundation for establishing a basic respirator protection program. Be sure to consult state and federal OSHA requirements to ensure that the program complies. Leading industrial respirator manufacturers should be able to assist with on-site training and education in this four-step process, in addition to helping employers train their workers and conduct respirator fit testing

  7. Robust H-infinity control in CD players to suppress external disturbances and defects on the disk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, E.; Andersen, B.; Karlsson, R.V.

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with the design and implementation of robust H8 controllers in order to suppress external disturbances and defects on the disk. Due to the conflictive requirements concerning the bandwidth of the closed loop to suppress external disturbances and defects on the disk, two independe...... H8 controllers are designed where norm-bounded uncertainties are assumed. The controllers are evaluated through an experiment showing better performance than a classical PID controller......This paper deals with the design and implementation of robust H8 controllers in order to suppress external disturbances and defects on the disk. Due to the conflictive requirements concerning the bandwidth of the closed loop to suppress external disturbances and defects on the disk, two independent...

  8. Dynamics and vibration suppression of space structures with control moment gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Quan; Jia, Yinghong; Xu, Shijie

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a new and effective approach for vibration suppression of large space structures. Collocated pairs of control moment gyroscope (CMG) and angular rate sensor are adopted as actuators/sensors. The equations of motion of a flexible structure with a set of arbitrarily distributed CMGs are developed. The detailed dynamics of the CMGs and their interactions between the flexibilities of the structure are incorporated in the formulation. Then, the equations of motion are linearized to describe the small-scale motion of the system. The optimal placement problem of the actuators/sensors on the flexible structures is solved from the perspective of system controllability and observability. The controller for the vibration suppression is synthesized using the angular rates of the locations where the CMGs are mounted and the gimbal angles of the CMGs. The stability of the controller is proved by the Lyapunov theorem. Numerical examples of a beam structure and a plate structure validate the efficacy of the proposed method.

  9. Sensorless SPMSM Position Estimation Using Position Estimation Error Suppression Control and EKF in Wide Speed Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanshan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of a high performance alternative current (AC motor drive under sensorless operation needs the accurate estimation of rotor position. In this paper, one method of accurately estimating rotor position by using both motor complex number model based position estimation and position estimation error suppression proportion integral (PI controller is proposed for the sensorless control of the surface permanent magnet synchronous motor (SPMSM. In order to guarantee the accuracy of rotor position estimation in the flux-weakening region, one scheme of identifying the permanent magnet flux of SPMSM by extended Kalman filter (EKF is also proposed, which formed the effective combination method to realize the sensorless control of SPMSM with high accuracy. The simulation results demonstrated the validity and feasibility of the proposed position/speed estimation system.

  10. Vibration suppression control of smart piezoelectric rotating truss structure by parallel neuro-fuzzy control with genetic algorithm tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J.; Zheng, Y. B.

    2012-07-01

    The main goal of this paper is to develop a novel approach for vibration control on a piezoelectric rotating truss structure. This study will analyze the dynamics and control of a flexible structure system with multiple degrees of freedom, represented in this research as a clamped-free-free-free truss type plate rotated by motors. The controller has two separate feedback loops for tracking and damping, and the vibration suppression controller is independent of position tracking control. In addition to stabilizing the actual system, the proposed proportional-derivative (PD) control, based on genetic algorithm (GA) to seek the primary optimal control gain, must supplement a fuzzy control law to ensure a stable nonlinear system. This is done by using an intelligent fuzzy controller based on adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) with GA tuning to increase the efficiency of fuzzy control. The PD controller, in its assisting role, easily stabilized the linear system. The fuzzy controller rule base was then constructed based on PD performance-related knowledge. Experimental validation for such a structure demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed controller. The broad range of problems discussed in this research will be found useful in civil, mechanical, and aerospace engineering, for flexible structures with multiple degree-of-freedom motion.

  11. A Novel Adaptive Observer-Based Control Scheme for Synchronization and Suppression of a Class of Uncertain Chaotic Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Wang; Zhen-Yu, Tan; Xi-Kui, Ma; Jin-Feng, Gao

    2009-01-01

    A novel adaptive observer-based control scheme is presented for synchronization and suppression of a class of uncertain chaotic system. First, an adaptive observer based on an orthogonal neural network is designed. Subsequently, the sliding mode controllers via the proposed adaptive observer are proposed for synchronization and suppression of the uncertain chaotic systems. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. (general)

  12. Strong suppression of shot noise in a feedback-controlled single-electron transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Timo; Strasberg, Philipp; Bayer, Johannes C.; Rugeramigabo, Eddy P.; Brandes, Tobias; Haug, Rolf J.

    2017-03-01

    Feedback control of quantum mechanical systems is rapidly attracting attention not only due to fundamental questions about quantum measurements, but also because of its novel applications in many fields in physics. Quantum control has been studied intensively in quantum optics but progress has recently been made in the control of solid-state qubits as well. In quantum transport only a few active and passive feedback experiments have been realized on the level of single electrons, although theoretical proposals exist. Here we demonstrate the suppression of shot noise in a single-electron transistor using an exclusively electronic closed-loop feedback to monitor and adjust the counting statistics. With increasing feedback response we observe a stronger suppression and faster freezing of charge current fluctuations. Our technique is analogous to the generation of squeezed light with in-loop photodetection as used in quantum optics. Sub-Poisson single-electron sources will pave the way for high-precision measurements in quantum transport similar to optical or optomechanical equivalents.

  13. A sensorless control method for capacitor voltage balance and circulating current suppression of modular multilevel converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hui; Ma, Ke; Loh, Poh Chiang

    2015-01-01

    . As a result, a sensorless control method is proposed in this paper, which targets to improve the performances of MMC in respect to the above mentioned disadvantages: To decrease the cost and simplify the physical implementation, a state observer is proposed and designed to estimate both the capacitor voltages......There are several problems in the Modular Multilevel Converter (MMC), such as the appearance of circulating current, capacitor voltage unbalance and the requirement for a high number of sensors. All these problems will decrease the reliability and raise the cost/uncertainty of using MMC solutions...... and the circulating currents in order to replace the high numbers of sensors. Furthermore, a control method combining the circulating current suppression and the capacitor voltage balancing is conducted based on the proposed state observer. It is concluded that the proposed state observer and control method can...

  14. Dynamics modelling and Hybrid Suppression Control of space robots performing cooperative object manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarafshan, P.; Moosavian, S. Ali A.

    2013-10-01

    Dynamics modelling and control of multi-body space robotic systems composed of rigid and flexible elements is elaborated here. Control of such systems is highly complicated due to severe under-actuated condition caused by flexible elements, and an inherent uneven nonlinear dynamics. Therefore, developing a compact dynamics model with the requirement of limited computations is extremely useful for controller design, also to develop simulation studies in support of design improvement, and finally for practical implementations. In this paper, the Rigid-Flexible Interactive dynamics Modelling (RFIM) approach is introduced as a combination of Lagrange and Newton-Euler methods, in which the motion equations of rigid and flexible members are separately developed in an explicit closed form. These equations are then assembled and solved simultaneously at each time step by considering the mutual interaction and constraint forces. The proposed approach yields a compact model rather than common accumulation approach that leads to a massive set of equations in which the dynamics of flexible elements is united with the dynamics equations of rigid members. To reveal such merits of this new approach, a Hybrid Suppression Control (HSC) for a cooperative object manipulation task will be proposed, and applied to usual space systems. A Wheeled Mobile Robotic (WMR) system with flexible appendages as a typical space rover is considered which contains a rigid main body equipped with two manipulating arms and two flexible solar panels, and next a Space Free Flying Robotic system (SFFR) with flexible members is studied. Modelling verification of these complicated systems is vigorously performed using ANSYS and ADAMS programs, while the limited computations of RFIM approach provides an efficient tool for the proposed controller design. Furthermore, it will be shown that the vibrations of the flexible solar panels results in disturbing forces on the base which may produce undesirable errors

  15. Principle and Control Design of Active Ground-Fault Arc Suppression Device for Full Compensation of Ground Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wen; Zeng, Xiangjun; Yan, Lingjie

    2017-01-01

    . The commonly-used large-capacity reactive component may bring about overvoltage because of possible resonance with the distributed phase-to-ground capacitance. To solve these problems, an active ground-fault arc suppression device is presented. It employs a topology based on single-phase inverter to inject...... suppression without capacitive current detection. Its time-based feature also brings the benefit of fast response on ground-fault arc suppression. The principle of full current compensation is analyzed, together with the controller design method of the proposed device. Experiment on a prototype was carried......Traditional ground-fault arc suppression devices mainly deal with capacitive component of ground current and have weak effect on the active and harmonic ones, which limits the arc suppression performance. The capacitive current detection needed in them suffers from low accuracy and robustness...

  16. Backstepping boundary control: an application to the suppression of flexible beam vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonkumkrong, Nipon; Asadamongkon, Pichai; Chinvorarat, Sinchai

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a backstepping boundary control for vibration suppression of flexible beam. The applications are such as industrial robotic arms, space structures, etc. Most slender beams can be modelled using a shear beam. The shear beam is more complex than the conventional Euler-Bernoulli beam in that a shear deformation is additionally taken into account. At present, the application of this method in industry is rather limited, because the application of controllers to the beam is difficult. In this research, we use the shear beam with moving base as a model. The beam is cantilever type. This design method allows us to deal directly with the beam’s partial differential equations (PDEs) without resorting to approximations. An observer is used to estimate the deflections along the beam. Gain kernel of the system is calculated and then used in the control law design. The control setup is anti-collocation, i.e. a sensor is placed at the beam tip and an actuator is placed at the beam moving base. Finite difference equations are used to solve the PDEs and the partial integro-differential equations (PIDEs). Control parameters are varied to see their influences that affect the control performance. The results of the control are presented via computer simulation to verify that the control scheme is effective.

  17. Laboratory evaluation to reduce respirable crystalline silica dust when cutting concrete roofing tiles using a masonry saw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Rebecca V; Sheehy, John; Feng, H Amy; Sieber, William K

    2010-04-01

    Respirable crystalline silica dust exposure in residential roofers is a recognized hazard resulting from cutting concrete roofing tiles. Roofers cutting tiles using masonry saws can be exposed to high concentrations of respirable dust. Silica exposures remain a serious threat for nearly two million U.S. construction workers. Although it is well established that respiratory diseases associated with exposure to silica dust are preventable, they continue to occur and cause disability or death. The effectiveness of both a commercially available local exhaust ventilation (LEV) system and a water suppression system in reducing silica dust was evaluated separately. The LEV system exhausted 0.24, 0.13, or 0.12 m(3)/sec of dust laden air, while the water suppression system supplied 0.13, 0.06, 0.03, or 0.02 L/sec of water to the saw blade. Using a randomized block design, implemented under laboratory conditions, the aforementioned conditions were evaluated independently on two types of concrete roofing tiles (s-shape and flat) using the same saw and blade. Each engineering control (LEV or water suppression) was replicated eight times, or four times for each type of tile. Analysis of variance was performed by comparing the mean airborne respirable dust concentrations generated during each run and engineering control treatment. The use of water controls and ventilation controls compared with the "no control" treatment resulted in a statistically significant (p tile cut. The percent reduction for respirable dust concentrations was 99% for the water control and 91% for the LEV. Results suggest that water is an effective method for reducing crystalline silica exposures. However, water damage potential, surface discolorations, cleanup, slip hazards, and other requirements may make the use of water problematic in many situations. Concerns with implementing an LEV system to control silica dust exposures include sufficient capture velocity, additional weight of the saw with the LEV

  18. Suppressive composts from organic wastes as agents of biological control of fusariosis in Tatartan Republic (Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumerova, Raushaniya; Galitskaya, Polina; Beru, Franchesca; Selivanovskaya, Svetlana

    2015-04-01

    Plant diseases are one of the seriously limiting factors of agriculture efficiency around the world. Diseases caused by fungi are the major threat to plants. Crop protection in modern agriculture heavily depends on chemical fungicides. Disadvantages of chemical pesticides soon became apparent as damage to the environment and a hazard to human health. In this regard use of biopesticides becomes an attractive alternative method of plant protection. For biological control of fungal plant diseases, separate bacterial or fungal strains as well as their communities can be used. Biopreparations must consist of microbes that are typical for local climate and soil conditions and therefore are able to survive in environments for a long time. Another option of plant pests' biological control is implementation of suppressive composts made of agricultural or other organic wastes. These composts can not only prevent the development of plant diseases, but also improve the soil fertility. The objective of this work was estimation of potential of composts and strains isolated from these composts as means for biological control of fusariosis that is one of the most widespread plant soil born disease. The composts were made up of the commonly produced agricultural wastes produced in Tatarstan Republic (Russia). Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici was used as a model phytopathogen. Ten types of organic waste (Goat manure (GM), Chicken dung (CD), Chicken dung with straw addition (CS), Rabbit dung (RD), Cow manure (CM), Rerotting pork manure (RPM), Fresh pork manure (FPM), Pork manure with sawdust and straw (PMS), the remains of plants and leaves (PL), the vegetable waste (VW) were sampled in the big farms situated in Tatarstan Republic which is one of the main agricultural regions of Russia. The initial wastes were composted for 150 days. Further, the following characteristics of the composts were assessed: pH, electro conductivity, TOC, DOC, Ntot. On petri dishes with meat

  19. Bacterial chitinase with phytopathogen control capacity from suppressive soil revealed by functional metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjort, Karin; Presti, Ilaria; Elväng, Annelie; Marinelli, Flavia; Sjöling, Sara

    2014-03-01

    Plant disease caused by fungal pathogens results in vast crop damage globally. Microbial communities of soil that is suppressive to fungal crop disease provide a source for the identification of novel enzymes functioning as bioshields against plant pathogens. In this study, we targeted chitin-degrading enzymes of the uncultured bacterial community through a functional metagenomics approach, using a fosmid library of a suppressive soil metagenome. We identified a novel bacterial chitinase, Chi18H8, with antifungal activity against several important crop pathogens. Sequence analyses show that the chi18H8 gene encodes a 425-amino acid protein of 46 kDa with an N-terminal signal peptide, a catalytic domain with the conserved active site F175DGIDIDWE183, and a chitinase insertion domain. Chi18H8 was expressed (pGEX-6P-3 vector) in Escherichia coli and purified. Enzyme characterization shows that Chi18H8 has a prevalent chitobiosidase activity with a maximum activity at 35 °C at pH lower than 6, suggesting a role as exochitinase on native chitin. To our knowledge, Chi18H8 is the first chitinase isolated from a metagenome library obtained in pure form and which has the potential to be used as a candidate agent for controlling fungal crop diseases. Furthermore, Chi18H8 may also answer to the demand for novel chitin-degrading enzymes for a broad range of other industrial processes and medical purposes.

  20. LPV Modeling and Control for Active Flutter Suppression of a Smart Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hajjar, Ali M. H.; Al-Jiboory, Ali Khudhair; Swei, Sean Shan-Min; Zhu, Guoming

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a novel technique of linear parameter varying (LPV) modeling and control of a smart airfoil for active flutter suppression is proposed, where the smart airfoil has a groove along its chord and contains a moving mass that is used to control the airfoil pitching and plunging motions. The new LPV modeling technique is proposed that uses mass position as a scheduling parameter to describe the physical constraint of the moving mass, in addition the hard constraint at the boundaries is realized by proper selection of the parameter varying function. Therefore, the position of the moving mass and the free stream airspeed are considered the scheduling parameters in the study. A state-feedback based LPV gain-scheduling controller with guaranteed H infinity performance is presented by utilizing the dynamics of the moving mass as scheduling parameter at a given airspeed. The numerical simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed LPV control architecture by significantly improving the performance while reducing the control effort.

  1. The agony of agonal respiration: is the last gasp necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkin, R M; Resnik, D B

    2002-06-01

    Gasping respiration in the dying patient is the last respiratory pattern prior to terminal apnoea. The duration of the gasping respiration phase varies; it may be as brief as one or two breaths to a prolonged period of gasping lasting minutes or even hours. Gasping respiration is very abnormal, easy to recognise and distinguish from other respiratory patterns and, in the dying patient who has elected to not be resuscitated, will always result in terminal apnoea. Gasping respiration is also referred to as agonal respiration and the name is appropriate because the gasping breaths appear uncomfortable and raise concern that the patient is suffering and in agony. Enough uncertainty exists about the influence of gasping respiration on patient wellbeing, that it is appropriate to assume that the gasping breaths are burdensome to patients. Therefore, gasping respiration at the end of life should be treated. We propose that there is an ethical basis, in rare circumstances, for the use of neuromuscular blockade to suppress prolonged episodes of agonal respiration in the well-sedated patient in order to allow a peaceful and comfortable death.

  2. A New Framework For Helicopter Vibration Suppression; Time-Periodic System Identification and Controller Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulker, Fatma Demet

    In forward flight, helicopter rotor blades function within a highly complex aerodynamic environment that includes both near-blade and far-blade aerodynamic phenomena. These aerodynamic phenomena cause fluctuating aerodynamic loads on the rotor blades. These loads when coupled with the dynamic characteristics and elastic motion of the blade create excessive amount of vibration. These vibrations degrade helicopter performance, passenger comfort and contributes to high cost maintenance problems. In an effort to suppress helicopter vibration, recent studies have developed active control strategies using active pitch links, flaps, twist actuation and higher harmonic control of the swash plate. In active helicopter vibration control, designing a controller in a computationally efficient way requires accurate reduced-order models of complex helicopter aeroelasticity. In previous studies, controllers were designed using aeroelastic models that were obtained by coupling independently reduced aerodynamic and structural dynamic models. Unfortunately, these controllers could not satisfy stability and performance criteria when implemented in high-fidelity computer simulations or real-time experiments. In this thesis, we present a novel approach that provides accurate time-periodic reduced-order models and time-periodic H2 and H infinity controllers that satisfy the stability and performance criteria. Computational efficiency and the necessity of using the approach were validated by implementing an actively controlled flap strategy. In this proposed approach, the reduced-order models were directly identified from high-fidelity coupled aeroelastic analysis by using the time-periodic subspace identification method. Time-periodic H2 and Hinfinity controllers that update the control actuation at every time step were designed. The control synthesis problem was solved using Linear Matrix Inequality and periodic Riccati Equation based formulations, for which an in-house periodic

  3. Impact Force Suppression for Redundant Legged Biped Robot Based on Unified Decoupling Control Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Masaaki; Tasaki, Go; Natori, Takeshi

    A swinging leg of a biped robot landing, impact force usually occurs between the sole and the ground, and then it causes instability of the gait. The paper describes the advantages of adopting redundant legs to the robot in order to conquer the difficulty, and proposes a novel way of the motion control for the redundant legged biped robot. In general, each leg of a conventional biped robot consists of 3 joints, namely, hip, knee and ankle in the sagittal plane. On the other hand, the proposed robot has been added extra joints, and thereby has redundancy in terms of degrees-of-freedom. Since the redundant leg can select its arbitrary posture, regardless of the tip position, the structure enables to move the position of the center of mass (COM) of the leg independently. The impact force is suppressed by controlling the COM acceleration of the landing leg. In order to achieve the decoupled motions between the tip and the COM, the unified decoupling controller is introduced. The controller includes three types of the disturbance observers together, and both desired motions are realized consequently. The validity of the proposed approach is confirmed in physical experimental results.

  4. Similar mitochondrial activation kinetics in wild-type and creatine kinase-deficient fast-twitch muscle indicate significant Pi control of respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeneson, Jeroen A L; ter Veld, Frank; Schmitz, Joep P J; Meyer, Ronald A; Hilbers, Peter A J; Nicolay, Klaas

    2011-06-01

    Past simulations of oxidative ATP metabolism in skeletal muscle have predicted that elimination of the creatine kinase (CK) reaction should result in dramatically faster oxygen consumption dynamics during transitions in ATP turnover rate. This hypothesis was investigated. Oxygen consumption of fast-twitch (FT) muscle isolated from wild-type (WT) and transgenic mice deficient in the myoplasmic (M) and mitochondrial (Mi) CK isoforms (MiM CK(-/-)) were measured at 20°C at rest and during electrical stimulation. MiM CK(-/-) muscle oxygen consumption activation kinetics during a step change in contraction rate were 30% faster than WT (time constant 53 ± 3 vs. 69 ± 4 s, respectively; mean ± SE, n = 8 and 6, respectively). MiM CK(-/-) muscle oxygen consumption deactivation kinetics were 380% faster than WT (time constant 74 ± 4 s vs. 264 ± 4 s, respectively). Next, the experiments were simulated using a computational model of the oxidative ATP metabolic network in FT muscle featuring ADP and Pi feedback control of mitochondrial respiration (J. A. L. Jeneson, J. P. Schmitz, N. A. van den Broek, N. A. van Riel, P. A. Hilbers, K. Nicolay, J. J. Prompers. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 297: E774-E784, 2009) that was reparameterized for 20°C. Elimination of Pi control via clamping of the mitochondrial Pi concentration at 10 mM reproduced past simulation results of dramatically faster kinetics in CK(-/-) muscle, while inclusion of Pi control qualitatively explained the experimental observations. On this basis, it was concluded that previous studies of the CK-deficient FT muscle phenotype underestimated the contribution of Pi to mitochondrial respiratory control.

  5. The role of branchial and orobranchial O2 chemoreceptors in the control of aquatic surface respiration in the neotropical fish tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum): progressive responses to prolonged hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florindo, Luiz H; Leite, Cléo A C; Kalinin, Ana L; Reid, Stephen G; Milsom, William K; Rantin, F Tadeu

    2006-05-01

    The present study examined the role of branchial and orobranchial O(2) chemoreceptors in the cardiorespiratory responses, aquatic surface respiration (ASR), and the development of inferior lip swelling in tambaqui during prolonged (6 h) exposure to hypoxia. Intact fish (control) and three groups of denervated fish (bilateral denervation of cranial nerves IX+X (to the gills), of cranial nerves V+VII (to the orobranchial cavity) or of cranial nerves V alone), were exposed to severe hypoxia (Pw(O)2=10 mmHg) for 360 min. Respiratory frequency (fr) and heart rate (fh) were recorded simultaneously with ASR. Intact (control) fish increased fr, ventilation amplitude (V(AMP)) and developed hypoxic bradycardia in the first 60 min of hypoxia. The bradycardia, however, abated progressively and had returned to normoxic levels by the last hour of exposure to hypoxia. The changes in respiratory frequency and the hypoxic bradycardia were eliminated by denervation of cranial nerves IX and X but were not affected by denervation of cranial nerves V or V+VII. The V(AMP) was not abolished by the various denervation protocols. The fh in fish with denervation of cranial nerves V or V+VII, however, did not recover to control values as in intact fish. After 360 min of exposure to hypoxia only the intact and IX+X denervated fish performed ASR. Denervation of cranial nerve V abolished the ASR behavior. However, all (control and denervated (IX+X, V and V+VII) fish developed inferior lip swelling. These results indicate that ASR is triggered by O(2) chemoreceptors innervated by cranial nerve V but that other mechanisms, such as a direct effect of hypoxia on the lip tissue, trigger lip swelling.

  6. Suppression of Adverse Effects of GIC Using Controlled Variable Grounding Resistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhussein, A.; Ali, M. H.

    2016-12-01

    Geomagnetically induced current (GIC) has a harmful impact on power systems, with a large footprint. Mitigation strategies for the GIC are required to protect the integrity of the power system. To date, the adverse effects of GIC are being mitigated by either operational procedures or grounding fixed capacitors (GFCs). The operational procedures are uncertain, reduce systems' reliability, and increase energy losses. On the other hand, GFCs, incur voltage spikes, increase the transformer cost substantially, and require protection circuitry. This study investigates new possible approaches to cope with GIC, by using a controlled variable grounding resistor (CVGR), without interfering with the system's normal operation. In addition, the new techniques help suppress unsymmetrical faults in the power network. The controllability of the grounding resistor is applied using three different techniques: (1) a Parallel switch that is controlled by PI regulated duty cycle, (2) a Parallel switch that is triggered by a preset values in a look-up-table (LUT), and (3) a Mechanical resistor varied by a Fuzzy logic controller (FLC). The experimental results were obtained and validated using the MATLAB/SIMULINK software. A hypothetical power system that consists of a generator, a 765kv, 500 km long transmission lines connecting between a step-up, Δ-Yn, transformer, and a step-down, Yn-Δ, transformer, is considered. The performance of the CVGR is compared with that of the GFC under the cases of GIC event and unsymmetrical faults. From the simulation results, the following points are concluded: The CVGR effectively suppresses the GIC flowing in the system. Consequently, it protects the transformers from saturation and the rest of the system from collapsing. The CVGR also reduces the voltage and power swings associated with unsymmetrical faults and blocks the zero sequence current flowing through the neutral of the transformer. The performance of the CVGR surpasses that of the GFC in

  7. Respiration during sleep in Huntington's chorea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollen, E. L.; den Heijer, J. C.; Ponsioen, C.; Kramer, C.; van der Velde, E. A.; van Dijk, J. G.; Roos, R. A.; Kamphuisen, H. A.; Buruma, O. J.

    1988-01-01

    In view of recent reports on lower brainstem dysfunction in Huntington's chorea, we studied respiration during sleep in 12 patients with Huntington's chorea (HC) and in controls. There were no statistically significant differences between patients and controls with respect to apnea periods,

  8. Suppressing epileptic activity in a neural mass model using a closed-loop proportional-integral controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junsong; Niebur, Ernst; Hu, Jinyu; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Closed-loop control is a promising deep brain stimulation (DBS) strategy that could be used to suppress high-amplitude epileptic activity. However, there are currently no analytical approaches to determine the stimulation parameters for effective and safe treatment protocols. Proportional-integral (PI) control is the most extensively used closed-loop control scheme in the field of control engineering because of its simple implementation and perfect performance. In this study, we took Jansen’s neural mass model (NMM) as a test bed to develop a PI-type closed-loop controller for suppressing epileptic activity. A graphical stability analysis method was employed to determine the stabilizing region of the PI controller in the control parameter space, which provided a theoretical guideline for the choice of the PI control parameters. Furthermore, we established the relationship between the parameters of the PI controller and the parameters of the NMM in the form of a stabilizing region, which provided insights into the mechanisms that may suppress epileptic activity in the NMM. The simulation results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed closed-loop PI control scheme. PMID:27273563

  9. Vibration suppression in cutting tools using collocated piezoelectric sensors/actuators with an adaptive control algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radecki, Peter P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bement, Matthew T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The machining process is very important in many engineering applications. In high precision machining, surface finish is strongly correlated with vibrations and the dynamic interactions between the part and the cutting tool. Parameters affecting these vibrations and dynamic interactions, such as spindle speed, cut depth, feed rate, and the part's material properties can vary in real-time, resulting in unexpected or undesirable effects on the surface finish of the machining product. The focus of this research is the development of an improved machining process through the use of active vibration damping. The tool holder employs a high bandwidth piezoelectric actuator with an adaptive positive position feedback control algorithm for vibration and chatter suppression. In addition, instead of using external sensors, the proposed approach investigates the use of a collocated piezoelectric sensor for measuring the dynamic responses from machining processes. The performance of this method is evaluated by comparing the surface finishes obtained with active vibration control versus baseline uncontrolled cuts. Considerable improvement in surface finish (up to 50%) was observed for applications in modern day machining.

  10. Wind-tunnel evaluation of NASA developed control laws for flutter suppression on a DC-10 derivative wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, I.; Newsom, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Two flutter suppression control laws were synthesized, implemented, and tested on a low speed aeroelastic wing model of a DC-10 derivative. The methodology used to design the control laws is described. Both control laws demonstrated increases in flutter speed in excess of 25 percent above the passive wing flutter speed. The effect of variations in gain and phase on the closed loop performance was measured and compared with analytical predictions. The analytical results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  11. Plant Respiration and Climate Change Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhn, D.

    2002-04-01

    Plant respiration is one of the key processes in terms of an understanding of plant growth and functioning in a future climate. Short- and long-term effects of temperature and CO 2 on plant respiration were investigated in a number of plant species. The experiments tested effects of either temperature and/or CO 2 from the level of individual respiratory enzymes, isolated mitochondria, whole-tissue, and up to the whole canopy level. The short-term effects of elevated atmospheric CO 2 on plant respiration appeared to be less than suggested so far in the literature. This was true both at the tissue level and for intact mitochondria. Respiratory enzymes can, however, be affected already at low CO 2 . These effects did not manifest itself at the tissue level, though, due to low degrees of control on the whole respiratory process exerted by the particular enzymes. Plant respiration on the other hand was affected by long-term growth at elevated atmospheric CO 2 . The findings of the reduced plant respiration at the leaf level were consistent with the literature and potential causes are discussed. Short-term effects of temperature on plant respiration were demonstrated to be dependent on the actual measurement temperature. Further, it is shown that mitochondrial leaf respiration in darkness and light differ substantially in the temperature sensitivity with the former being the far most sensitive. This has implications for modelling CO 2 exchange between vegetation and atmosphere as demonstrated here, since this has so far been neglected. Long-term effects of temperature resulted in respiratory acclimation in a number of species. Respiratory acclimation appeared not to occur to any one single type of growth temperature. The implications of this finding in combination with the timing of acclimation are discussed for modelling respiratory CO 2 release. (au)

  12. Plant Respiration and Climate Change Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn, D.

    2002-04-01

    Plant respiration is one of the key processes in terms of an understanding of plant growth and functioning in a future climate. Short- and long-term effects of temperature and CO{sub 2} on plant respiration were investigated in a number of plant species. The experiments tested effects of either temperature and/or CO{sub 2} from the level of individual respiratory enzymes, isolated mitochondria, whole-tissue, and up to the whole canopy level. The short-term effects of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on plant respiration appeared to be less than suggested so far in the literature. This was true both at the tissue level and for intact mitochondria. Respiratory enzymes can, however, be affected already at low CO{sub 2}. These effects did not manifest itself at the tissue level, though, due to low degrees of control on the whole respiratory process exerted by the particular enzymes. Plant respiration on the other hand was affected by long-term growth at elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The findings of the reduced plant respiration at the leaf level were consistent with the literature and potential causes are discussed. Short-term effects of temperature on plant respiration were demonstrated to be dependent on the actual measurement temperature. Further, it is shown that mitochondrial leaf respiration in darkness and light differ substantially in the temperature sensitivity with the former being the far most sensitive. This has implications for modelling CO{sub 2} exchange between vegetation and atmosphere as demonstrated here, since this has so far been neglected. Long-term effects of temperature resulted in respiratory acclimation in a number of species. Respiratory acclimation appeared not to occur to any one single type of growth temperature. The implications of this finding in combination with the timing of acclimation are discussed for modelling respiratory CO{sub 2} release. (au)

  13. Glycolysis is dynamic and relates closely to respiration rate in stored sugarbeet roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although respiration is the principal cause of postharvest sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) sucrose loss, the internal mechanisms that control sugarbeet root respiration have not been established. Available evidence, however, indicates that respiration is likely to be controlled by the availability of r...

  14. Exosomes derived from human macrophages suppress endothelial cell migration by controlling integrin trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Doo; Kim, Yeon Hyang; Kim, Doo-Sik

    2014-04-01

    Integrin trafficking, including internalization, recycling, and lysosomal degradation, is crucial for the regulation of cellular functions. Exosomes, nano-sized extracellular vesicles, are believed to play important roles in intercellular communications. This study demonstrates that exosomes released from human macrophages negatively regulate endothelial cell migration through control of integrin trafficking. Macrophage-derived exosomes promote internalization of integrin β1 in primary HUVECs. The internalized integrin β1 persistently accumulates in the perinuclear region and is not recycled back to the plasma membrane. Experimental results indicate that macrophage-derived exosomes stimulate trafficking of internalized integrin β1 to lysosomal compartments with a corresponding decrease in the integrin destined for recycling endosomes, resulting in proteolytic degradation of the integrin. Moreover, ubiquitination of HUVEC integrin β1 is enhanced by the exosomes, and exosome-mediated integrin degradation is blocked by bafilomycin A, a lysosomal degradation inhibitor. Macrophage-derived exosomes were also shown to effectively suppress collagen-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway and HUVEC migration, which are both dependent on integrin β1. These observations provide new insight into the functional significance of exosomes in the regulation of integrin trafficking. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy suppresses dental plaque formation in healthy adults: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose-Tsuno, Akiko; Aoki, Akira; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Kirikae, Teruo; Shimbo, Takuro; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-Il; Yoshino, Fumihiko; Maruoka, Yutaka; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Ishikawa, Isao; Izumi, Yuichi

    2014-12-15

    Oral care is important for oral and systemic health, especially for elderly institutionalized individuals and compromised patients. However, conventional mechanical plaque control is often difficult for these patients because of the pain or the risk of aspiration. Although antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT), which is considered an alternative or adjunct to mechanical approaches, has potential application as a less stressful method of daily plaque control, no clinical application of this technique has been reported. We investigated the inhibitory effect of a combination of toluidine blue O (TBO), and a red light-emitting diode (LED) on dental plaque formation in healthy volunteers. The optimal concentration of TBO was determined in preliminary in vitro experiments to evaluate the bactericidal effect of aPDT on Streptococcus oralis and to clarify its safety in fibroblast cells. To survey the mechanism of TBO-mediated aPDT, the quality and quantity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during aPDT were also examined using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Subsequently, the inhibitory effect of aPDT on dental plaque formation was investigated in eleven subjects as a clinical pilot study. The right or left mandibular premolars were randomly assigned to the treatment (with aPDT) or control (without aPDT) groups. In total, aPDT was applied six times (twice per day) to the teeth in the test group over a period of four days. On the fourth day, the study concluded and the analyses were performed. A combination of 500 or 1000 μg/ml TBO and LED irradiation for 20 s significantly decreased the number of colony forming units of Streptococcus oralis. The cytotoxicity of aPDT was comparable to that of standard antiseptics used in the oral cavity. Hydroxyl radicals were detected by ESR analysis, but singlet oxygen was not. A randomized controlled trial demonstrated that aPDT with 1000 μg/ml TBO and red LED irradiation significantly suppressed dental plaque

  16. Control of plant mitochondrial respiration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Affourtit, C.; Krab, K.; Moore, A.L.

    2001-01-01

    Plant mitochondria are characterised by the presence of both phosphorylating (cytochrome) and non-phosphorylating (alternative) respiratory pathways, the relative activities of which directly affect the efficiency of mitochondrial energy conservation. Different approaches to study the regulation of

  17. Orthogonal on-off control of radar pulses for the suppression of mutual interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Cheol

    1998-10-01

    Intelligent vehicles of the future will be guided by radars and other sensors to avoid obstacles. When multiple vehicles move simultaneously in autonomous navigational mode, mutual interference among car radars becomes a serious problem. An obstacle is illuminated with electromagnetic pulses from several radars. The signal at a radar receiver is actually a mixture of the self-reflection and the reflection of interfering pulses emitted by others. When standardized pulse- type radars are employed on vehicles for obstacle avoidance and so self-pulse and interfering pulses have identical pulse repetition interval, this SI (synchronous Interference) is very difficult to separate from the true reflection. We present a method of suppressing such a synchronous interference. By controlling the pulse emission of a radar in a binary orthogonal ON, OFF pattern, the true self-reflection can be separated from the false one. Two range maps are generated, TRM (true-reflection map) and SIM (synchronous- interference map). TRM is updated for every ON interval and SIM is updated for every OFF interval of the self-radar. SIM represents the SI of interfering radars while TRM keeps a record of a mixture of the true self-reflection and SI. Hence the true obstacles can be identified by the set subtraction operation. The performance of the proposed method is compared with that of the conventional M of N method. Bayesian analysis shows that the probability of false alarm is improved by order of 103 to approximately 106 while the deterioration in the probability of detection is negligible.

  18. Control method for pool water of pressure suppression chamber in reactor container vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Tetsuo; Konomaru, Toshimi; Saito, Koichi.

    1996-01-01

    In a reactor container having a pressure suppression chamber in adjacent with the outer circumference of a pedestal of a reactor pressure vessel, at least a portion of pool water is provisionally transported from the pressure suppression chamber to the inner side surrounded by the pedestal of the pressure vessel, and stored therein. In addition, an opening of the side wall of the pedestal is closed to raise the water level of the provisionally stored water thereby increasing the amount of provisionally stored pool water. Predetermined operations are performed in the pressure suppression chamber after transporting the pool water to the inner side surrounded by the pedestal of the pressure vessel. Namely, a portion of the pool water of the pressure suppression chamber is transported to the inner space surrounded by the pedestal to provisionally store it thereby forming a circumstance for enabling predetermined operations such as inspection and re-coating in the pressure suppression chamber. Then, radiation contamination prevailing to the outer side of the reactor container can be reduced thereby enabling to obtain various effects, namely, reduction in the amount of equipments for provisional installment, shortening for construction term and decrease in the amount of waste materials. (I.S.)

  19. Respirable dust and respirable silica exposure in Ontario gold mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dave K; Rajhans, Gyan S; Malik, Om P; des Tombe, Karen

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of respirable dust and respirable silica in Ontario gold mines was conducted by the Ontario Ministry of Labor during 1978-1979. The aim was to assess the feasibility of introducing gravimetric sampling to replace the assessment method which used konimeters, a device which gave results in terms of number of particles per cubic centimeter (ppcc) of air. The study involved both laboratory and field assessments. The field assessment involved measurement of airborne respirable dust and respirable silica at all eight operating gold mines of the time. This article describes the details of the field assessment. A total of 288 long-term (7-8 hr) personal respirable dust air samples were collected from seven occupational categories in eight gold mines. The respirable silica (α-quartz) was determined by x-ray diffraction method. The results show that during 1978-1979, the industry wide mean respirable dust was about 1 mg/m(3), and the mean respirable silica was 0.08 mg/m(3.)The mean% silica in respirable dust was 7.5%. The data set would be useful in future epidemiological and health studies, as well as in assessment of workers' compensation claims for occupational diseases such as silicosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and autoimmune diseases such as renal disease and rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Development of a decentralized control system for operation of yeast fermentation in semi-continuous reactors. Control through respiration rate and role of the metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pons, M.N.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a control structure for the operation of a semi-continuous digester used for production fo (baker's) yeast by substrate supply: the system is composed of classical analogical controls when the algorithm is simple (pH, temperature, ...), or microcomputers for more complex controles such as dissolved oxygen content or feed flow regulation, and a minicomputer for coordination of the different elements and optimization of the whole process.

  1. Cattle respiration facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl; Lund, Peter; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis

    2012-01-01

    In Denmark, the emission rate of methane from dairy cows has been calculated using the IPCC standard values for dairy cows in Western countries, due to the lack of national data. Therefore, four respiration chambers for dairy cows were built with the main purpose of measuring methane, but also...... for dairy cows is between 800 to 1500 L/min depending on the milk production and liveweight. This gives an average concentration of 5000−6000 ppm of carbon dioxide and 500−600 ppm of methane in the chambers....

  2. Respirable dust measured downwind during rock dust application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M L; Organiscak, J; Klima, S; Perera, I E

    2017-05-01

    The Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted underground evaluations in an attempt to quantify respirable rock dust generation when using untreated rock dust and rock dust treated with an anticaking additive. Using personal dust monitors, these evaluations measured respirable rock dust levels arising from a flinger-type application of rock dust on rib and roof surfaces. Rock dust with a majority of the respirable component removed was also applied in NIOSH's Bruceton Experimental Mine using a bantam duster. The respirable dust measurements obtained downwind from both of these tests are presented and discussed. This testing did not measure miners' exposure to respirable coal mine dust under acceptable mining practices, but indicates the need for effective continuous administrative controls to be exercised when rock dusting to minimize the measured amount of rock dust in the sampling device.

  3. Topological material layout in plates for vibration suppression and wave propagation control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup; Laksafoss, B.; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2009-01-01

    We propose a topological material layout method to design elastic plates with optimized properties for vibration suppression and guided transport of vibration energy. The gradient-based optimization algorithm is based on a finite element model of the plate vibrations obtained using the Mindlin...

  4. Suppressed reflectivity due to spin-controlled localization in a magnetic semiconductor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mena, FP; DiTusa, JF; van der Marel, D; Aeppli, G; Young, DP; Damascelli, A; Mydosh, JA

    The narrow gap semiconductor FeSi owes its strong paramagnetism to electron-correlation effects. Partial Co substitution for Fe produces a spin-polarized doped semiconductor. The spin polarization causes suppression of the metallic reflectivity and increased scattering of charge carriers, in

  5. Respiration in neonate sea turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Edwin R; Paladino, Frank V; Strohl, Kingman P; Santidrián T, Pilar; Klann, Kenneth; Spotila, James R

    2007-03-01

    The pattern and control of respiration is virtually unknown in hatchling sea turtles. Using incubator-raised turtles, we measured oxygen consumption, frequency, tidal volume, and minute volume for leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) and olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) turtle hatchlings for the first six days after pipping. In addition, we tested the hatchlings' response to hypercapnic, hyperoxic, and hypoxic challenges over this time period. Hatchling sea turtles generally showed resting ventilation characteristics that are similar to those of adults: a single breath followed by a long respiratory pause, slow frequency, and high metabolic rate. With hypercapnic challenge, both species responded primarily by elevating respiratory frequency via a decrease in the non-ventilatory period. Leatherback resting tidal volume increased with age but otherwise, neither species' resting respiratory pattern nor response to gas challenge changed significantly over the first few days after hatching. At the time of nest emergence, sea turtles have achieved a respiratory pattern that is similar to that of actively diving adults.

  6. Sleep and Respiration in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Prisk, G. Kim; Paiva, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Sleep is often reported to be of poor quality in microgravity, and studies on the ground have shown a strong relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and sleep disruption. During the 16-day Neurolab mission, we studied the influence of possible changes in respiratory function on sleep by performing comprehensive sleep recordings on the payload crew on four nights during the mission. In addition, we measured the changes in the ventilatory response to low oxygen and high carbon dioxide in the same subjects during the day, hypothesizing that changes in ventilatory control might affect respiration during sleep. Microgravity caused a large reduction in the ventilatory response to reduced oxygen. This is likely the result of an increase in blood pressure at the peripheral chemoreceptors in the neck that occurs when the normally present hydrostatic pressure gradient between the heart and upper body is abolished. This reduction was similar to that seen when the subjects were placed acutely in the supine position in one-G. In sharp contrast to low oxygen, the ventilatory response to elevated carbon dioxide was unaltered by microgravity or the supine position. Because of the similarities of the findings in microgravity and the supine position, it is unlikely that changes in ventilatory control alter respiration during sleep in microgravity. During sleep on the ground, there were a small number of apneas (cessation of breathing) and hypopneas (reduced breathing) in these normal subjects. During sleep in microgravity, there was a reduction in the number of apneas and hypopneas per hour compared to preflight. Obstructive apneas virtually disappeared in microgravity, suggesting that the removal of gravity prevents the collapse of upper airways during sleep. Arousals from sleep were reduced in microgravity compared to preflight, and virtually all of this reduction was as a result of a reduction in the number of arousals from apneas and hypopneas. We conclude that any sleep

  7. Free-breathing radial 3D fat-suppressed T1-weighted gradient echo sequence: a viable alternative for contrast-enhanced liver imaging in patients unable to suspend respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandarana, Hersh; Block, Tobias K; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Lim, Ruth P; Kim, Danny; Mossa, David J; Babb, James S; Kiefer, Berthold; Lee, Vivian S

    2011-10-01

    : To compare free-breathing radially sampled 3D fat suppressed T1-weighted gradient-echo acquisitions (radial volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination [VIBE]) with breath-hold (BH) and free-breathing conventional (rectilinearly sampled k-space) VIBE acquisitions for postcontrast imaging of the liver. : Eighteen consecutive patients referred for clinically indicated liver magnetic resonance imaging were imaged at 3 T. Three minutes after a single dose of gadolinium contrast injection, free-breathing radial VIBE, BH VIBE, and free-breathing VIBE with 4 averages were acquired in random order with matching sequence parameters. Radial VIBE was acquired with the "stack-of-stars" scheme, which uses conventional sampling in the slice direction and radial sampling in-plane.All image data sets were evaluated independently by 3 radiologists blinded to patient and sequence information. Each reader scored the following parameters: overall image quality, respiratory motion artifact, pulsation artifact, liver edge sharpness, and hepatic vessel clarity using a 5-point scale, with the highest score indicating the most optimum examination. Mixed model analysis of variance was used to compare sequences in terms of each measure of image quality. : When scores were averaged over readers, there was no statistically significant difference between radial VIBE and BH VIBE regarding overall image quality (P = 0.1015), respiratory motion artifact (P = 1.0), and liver edge sharpness (P = 0.2955). Radial VIBE demonstrated significantly lower pulsation artifact (P breathing VIBE (P breathing radial VIBE and conventional VIBE with multiple averages was 56 seconds each. : Radial VIBE can be performed during free breathing for contrast-enhanced imaging of the liver with comparable image quality to BH VIBE. However, further work is necessary to shorten the acquisition time to perform dynamic imaging.

  8. Transient voltage control of a DFIG-based wind power plant for suppressing overvoltage using a reactive current reduction loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geon Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a transient voltage control scheme of a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG-based wind power plant (WPP using a reactive current reduction loop to suppress the overvoltage at a point of interconnection (POI and DFIG terminal after a fault clearance. The change of terminal voltage of a DFIG is monitored at every predefined time period to detect the fault clearance. If the voltage change exceeds a set value, then the reactive current reduction loop reduces the reactive current reference in the DFIG controller using the step function. The reactive current injection of DFIGs in a WPP is rapidly reduced, and a WPP can rapidly suppress the overvoltage at a fault clearance because the reactive current reference is reduced. Using an electromagnetic transients program–released version (EMTP–RV simulator, the performance of the proposed scheme was validated for a model system comprising 20 units of a 5-MW DFIG considering various scenarios, such as fault and wind conditions. Test results show that the proposed scheme enables a WPP to suppress the overvoltage at the POI and DFIG terminal within a short time under grid fault conditions.

  9. Application of chaotic pulse width modulation control for suppressing electromagnetic interference in a half-bridge converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong Song

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available It was proposed in the former research that chaos control can be used to suppress electromagnetic interference (EMI in DC–DC converters. Analysis on a half-bridge converter is detailed in this study. Here, the practical example of the power supply of personal computers is given to show that, with an external chaotic signal to a pulse width modulation control circuit, the proposed approach can reduce EMI by reducing the amplitudes of power signals such as transformer current and output inductor currents at multiples of fundamental frequency.

  10. Development of conformal respirator monitoring technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shonka, J.J.; Weismann, J.J.; Logan, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a Small Business Innovative Research Phase II project to develop a modular, surface conforming respirator monitor to improve upon the manual survey techniques presently used by the nuclear industry. Research was performed with plastic scintillator and gas proportional modules in an effort to find the most conducive geometry for a surface conformal, position sensitive monitor. The respirator monitor prototype developed is a computer controlled, position-sensitive detection system employing 56 modular proportional counters mounted in molds conforming to the inner and outer surfaces of a commonly used respirator (Scott Model 801450-40). The molds are housed in separate enclosures and hinged to create a open-quotes waffle-ironclose quotes effect so that the closed monitor will simultaneously survey both surfaces of the respirator. The proportional counter prototype was also designed to incorporate Shonka Research Associates previously developed charge-division electronics. This research provided valuable experience into pixellated position sensitive detection systems. The technology developed can be adapted to other monitoring applications where there is a need for deployment of many traditional radiation detectors

  11. PSEPLOT: a controller for plotting data from the Mark I Boiling Water Reactor Pressure Suppression Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, G.S.

    1978-01-01

    PSEPLOT is a computer routine that was developed for the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Octopus computer system to generate several thousand plots of engineering data in a consistent format for referencing and comparison. The time-dependent engineering data were recorded during each of 25 tests of the Mark I Pressure Suppression Experiment (PSE). Although PSEPLOT is restricted to PSE, its concept is applicable to any similar data management task

  12. An Experimental Study on What Controls the Ratios of 18O/16O and 17O/16O of O2 During Microbial Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, D. A.; Ward, B. B.; Fischer, W. W.; Bender, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    18O/16O and 17O/16O ratios of atmospheric and dissolved oceanic O2 are key biogeochemical tracers of total photosynthesis and respiration on global to local length scales and glacial/interglacial time scales (Luz et al., 1999). Critical to the use of these ratios as biogeochemical tracers is knowledge of how they are affected by production, consumption, and transport of O2. We present new measurements of O2 respiration by E. coli and N. oceanus, an ammonia oxidizing bacterium, to test three assumptions of isotopically enabled models of the O2 cycle: (i) laboratory-measured respiratory 18O/16O isotope effects (18α) of microorganisms are constant under all experimental and natural conditions (e.g., temperature and growth rate); (ii) the respiratory 'mass law' relationship between 18O/16O and 17O/16O [17α = (18α)β] is universal; and (iii) 18α and β for aerobic ammonia and organic carbon oxidation are identical. For E. coli, we find that both 18α and β are variable. From 37°C to 15°C, 18α varies linearly with temperature from 17 to 14‰, and β varies linearly from 0.513 to 0.508. 18α and β do not appear to vary with growth rate (as tested using different carbon sources). Both 18α and β are lower than previous observations for bacteria: 18α = 17-20‰ (Kiddon et al., 1993) and β = 0.515 (Luz and Barkan, 2005). We were able to simulate the observed temperature dependence of 18α and β using a model of respiration with two isotopically discriminating steps: O2 binding to cytochrome bo oxidase (the respiratory enzyme) and reduction of O2 to H2O. Finally, initial results on N. oceanus suggest it has similar values for 18α and β as previously studied aerobic bacteria that consume organic carbon, providing the first support for assumption (iii). Based on these results, isotopically constrained biogeochemical models of O2 cycling may need to consider a temperature dependence for 18α and β for microbial respiration. For example, these results may

  13. Supersonic flutter suppression of electrorheological fluid-based adaptive panels resting on elastic foundations using sliding mode control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasheminejad, Seyyed M; Nezami, M; Aryaee Panah, M E

    2012-01-01

    Brief reviews on suppressing panel flutter vibrations by various active control strategies as well as utilization tunable electrorheological fluids (ERFs) for vibration control of structural systems are presented. Active suppression of the supersonic flutter motion of a simply supported sandwich panel with a tunable ERF interlayer, and coupled to an elastic foundation, is subsequently investigated. The structural formulation is based on the classical beam theory along with the Winkler–Pasternak foundation model, the ER fluid core is modeled as a first-order Kelvin–Voigt material, and the quasi-steady first-order supersonic piston theory is employed to describe the aerodynamic loading. Hamilton’s principle is used to derive a set of fully coupled dynamic equations of motion. The generalized Fourier expansions in conjunction with the Galerkin method are then employed to formulate the governing equations in the state space domain. The critical dynamic pressures at which unstable panel oscillations (coalescence of eigenvalues) occur are obtained via the p-method for selected applied electric field strengths (E = 0,2,4 kV mm −1 ). The classical Runge–Kutta time integration algorithm is subsequently used to calculate the open-loop aeroelastic response of the system in various basic loading configurations (i.e. uniformly distributed blast, gust, sonic boom, and step loads), with or without an interacting soft/stiff elastic foundation. Finally, a sliding mode control synthesis (SMC) involving the first six natural modes of the structural system is set up to actively suppress the closed-loop system response in supersonic flight conditions and under the imposed excitations. Simulation results demonstrate performance, effectiveness, and insensitivity with respect to the spillover of the proposed SMC-based control system. Limiting cases are considered and good agreements with the data available in the literature as well as with the computations made by using the

  14. Chaos Suppression of an Electrically Actuated Microresonator Based on Fractional-Order Nonsingular Fast Terminal Sliding Mode Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxin Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on chaos suppression strategy of a microresonator actuated by two symmetrical electrodes. Dynamic behavior of this system under the case where the origin is the only stable equilibrium is investigated first. Numerical simulations reveal that system may exhibit chaotic motion under certain excitation conditions. Then, bifurcation diagrams versus amplitude or frequency of AC excitation are drawn to grasp system dynamics nearby its natural frequency. Results show that the vibration is complex and may exhibit period-doubling bifurcation, chaotic motion, or dynamic pull-in instability. For the suppression of chaos, a novel control algorithm, based on an integer-order nonsingular fast terminal sliding mode and a fractional-order switching law, is proposed. Fractional Lyapunov Stability Theorem is used to guarantee the asymptotic stability of the system. Finally, numerical results with both fractional-order and integer-order control laws show that our proposed control law is effective in controlling chaos with system uncertainties and external disturbances.

  15. Control of immune ligands by members of a cytomegalovirus gene expansion suppresses natural killer cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Ceri A; Weekes, Michael P; Nobre, Luis V; Ruckova, Eva; Wilkie, Gavin S; Paulo, Joao A; Chang, Chiwen; Suárez, Nicolás M; Davies, James A; Antrobus, Robin; Stanton, Richard J; Aicheler, Rebecca J; Nichols, Hester; Vojtesek, Borek; Trowsdale, John; Davison, Andrew J; Gygi, Steven P; Tomasec, Peter; Lehner, Paul J; Wilkinson, Gavin W G

    2017-02-10

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US12 family consists of ten sequentially arranged genes (US12-21) with poorly characterized function. We now identify novel natural killer (NK) cell evasion functions for four members: US12, US14, US18 and US20. Using a systematic multiplexed proteomics approach to quantify ~1300 cell surface and ~7200 whole cell proteins, we demonstrate that the US12 family selectively targets plasma membrane proteins and plays key roles in regulating NK ligands, adhesion molecules and cytokine receptors. US18 and US20 work in concert to suppress cell surface expression of the critical NKp30 ligand B7-H6 thus inhibiting NK cell activation. The US12 family is therefore identified as a major new hub of immune regulation.

  16. From breathing to respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitting, Jean-William

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of breathing remained an enigma for a long time. The Hippocratic school described breathing patterns but did not associate breathing with the lungs. Empedocles and Plato postulated that breathing was linked to the passage of air through pores of the skin. This was refuted by Aristotle who believed that the role of breathing was to cool the heart. In Alexandria, breakthroughs were accomplished in the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. Later, Galen proposed an accurate description of the respiratory muscles and the mechanics of breathing. However, his heart-lung model was hampered by the traditional view of two non-communicating vascular systems - veins and arteries. After a period of stagnation in the Middle Ages, knowledge progressed with the discovery of pulmonary circulation. The comprehension of the purpose of breathing progressed by steps thanks to Boyle and Mayow among others, and culminated with the contribution of Priestley and the discovery of oxygen by Lavoisier. Only then was breathing recognized as fulfilling the purpose of respiration, or gas exchange. A century later, a controversy emerged concerning the active or passive transfer of oxygen from alveoli to the blood. August and Marie Krogh settled the dispute, showing that passive diffusion was sufficient to meet the oxygen needs. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Light, Soil Temperature, and VPD as controls of flux-tower NEE partitioning into gross photosynthesis and respiration in grassland and agricultural ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmanov, T. G.

    2010-12-01

    Partitioning of the flux-tower net CO2 exchange measurements (NEE) into gross photosynthesis (Pg) and ecosystem respiration (Re) components is an essential step in post-processing flux tower data for analysis and modeling. We have developed a method of NEE = Pg - Re partitioning using photosynthetically active radiation (Q), soil temperature at 5 cm depth (Ts), and vapor pressure deficit at 2 m height (VPD) as factors in a nonrectangular hyperbolic model of net CO2 exchange in terrestrial ecosystems (Gilmanov et al. 2003, Bas. Appl. Ecol. 4: 167-183) modified to include the effect of vapor pressure deficit. In contrast to other VPD-based methods of NEE partitioning suggested in the literature, our method (i) describes combined effect of VPD on photosynthetic capacity (Amax) and apparent quantum yield (ALPHA) due to the special functional properties of the nonrectangular hyperbolic equation; (ii) delivers less biased estimates of light-response parameters due to explicit description of the convexity of the light-response compared to rectangular hyperbolic model, and (iii) generates more numerically robust and statistically significant estimates than methods using highly correlated predictors such as incoming radiation, air temperature and VPD. We demonstrate application of the method to flux-tower NEE data sets from grassland and agro-ecosystems of North America as a tool to estimate numerical values and uncertainty characteristics of productivity, respiration, and ecophysiological parameters (apparent quantum yield ALPHA, photosynthetic capacity Amax, gross ecological light-use efficiency LUE, carbon use efficiency CUE, and others). On a representative statistical material our results confirm earlier findings that gross photosynthesis estimates derived through partitioning of flux-tower NEE are significantly closer related to remote sensing indices (e.g., eMODIS NDVI) than variables directly provided by tower measurements such as day-time net CO2 flux totals. We

  18. Temperature response of soil respiration largely unaltered with experimental warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Joanna C.; Tang, Jianwu; Templer, Pamela H.; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Crowther, Thomas W.; Burton, Andrew J.; Dukes, Jeffrey S.; Emmett, Bridget; Frey, Serita D.; Heskel, Mary A.; Jiang, Lifen; Machmuller, Megan B.; Mohan, Jacqueline; Panetta, Anne Marie; Reich, Peter B.; Reinsch, Sabine; Wang, Xin; Allison, Steven D.; Bamminger, Chris; Bridgham, Scott; Collins, Scott L.; de Dato, Giovanbattista; Eddy, William C.; Enquist, Brian J.; Estiarte, Marc; Harte, John; Henderson, Amanda; Johnson, Bart R.; Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Luo, Yiqi; Marhan, Sven; Melillo, Jerry M.; Penuelas, Josep; Pfeifer-Meister, Laurel; Poll, Christian; Rastetter, Edward B.; Reinmann, Andrew B.; Reynolds, Lorien L.; Schmidt, Inger K.; Shaver, Gaius R.; Strong, Aaron L.; Suseela, Vidya; Tietema, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soil is a major yet poorly understood flux in the global carbon cycle. Climatic warming is hypothesized to increase rates of soil respiration, potentially fueling further increases in global temperatures. However, despite considerable scientific attention in recent decades, the overall response of soil respiration to anticipated climatic warming remains unclear. We synthesize the largest global dataset to date of soil respiration, moisture, and temperature measurements, totaling >3,800 observations representing 27 temperature manipulation studies, spanning nine biomes and over 2 decades of warming. Our analysis reveals no significant differences in the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration between control and warmed plots in all biomes, with the exception of deserts and boreal forests. Thus, our data provide limited evidence of acclimation of soil respiration to experimental warming in several major biome types, contrary to the results from multiple single-site studies. Moreover, across all nondesert biomes, respiration rates with and without experimental warming follow a Gaussian response, increasing with soil temperature up to a threshold of ∼25 °C, above which respiration rates decrease with further increases in temperature. This consistent decrease in temperature sensitivity at higher temperatures demonstrates that rising global temperatures may result in regionally variable responses in soil respiration, with colder climates being considerably more responsive to increased ambient temperatures compared with warmer regions. Our analysis adds a unique cross-biome perspective on the temperature response of soil respiration, information critical to improving our mechanistic understanding of how soil carbon dynamics change with climatic warming.

  19. Mitochondrial Respiration and Oxygen Tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Daniel S; Meitha, Karlia; Considine, Michael J; Foyer, Christine H

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of respiration and oxygen tension in plant organs allow a precise understanding of mitochondrial capacity and function within the context of cellular oxygen metabolism. Here we describe methods that can be routinely used for the isolation of intact mitochondria, and the determination of respiratory electron transport, together with techniques for in vivo determination of oxygen tension and measurement of respiration by both CO 2 production and O 2 consumption that enables calculation of the respiratory quotient [CO 2 ]/[O 2 ].

  20. Electrical coupling suppression and transient response improvement for a microgyroscope using ascending frequency drive with a 2-DOF PID controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, J; Guo, Z Y; Yang, Z C; Hao, Y L; Yan, G Z

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a novel control strategy for the drive mode of a microgyroscope using ascending frequency drive (AFD) with an AGC-2DOF PID controller, which drives a resonator with a modulation signal not at the resonant frequency and senses the vibration signal at the resonant frequency, thus realizing the isolation between the actual mechanical response and electrical coupling signal. This approach holds the following three advantages: (1) it employs the AFD signal instead of the resonant frequency drive signal to excite the gyroscope in the drive direction, suppressing the electrical coupling from the drive electrode to the sense electrode; (2) it can reduce the noise at low frequency and resonant frequency by shifting flicker noise to the high-frequency part; (3) it can effectively improve the performance of the transient response of the closed-loop control with a 2-DOF (degree of freedom) PID controller compared with the conventional 1-DOF PID. The stability condition of the whole loop is investigated by utilizing the averaging and linearization method. The control approach is applied to drive a lateral tuning fork microgyroscope. Test results show good agreement with the theoretical and simulation results. The non-ideal electrical antiresonance peak is removed and the resonant peak height increases by approximately 10 dB over a 400 Hz span with a flicker noise reduction of 30 dB within 100 Hz using AFD. The percent overshoot is reduced from 36.2% (1DOF PID) to 8.95% (2DOF PID, about 75.3% overshoot suppression) with 15.3% improvement in setting time

  1. Contribution of root respiration to soil respiration in a C3/C4 mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The spatial and temporal variations of soil respiration were studied from May 2004 to June 2005 in a C3/C4 mixed grassland of Japan. The linear regression relationship between soil respiration and root biomass was used to determine the contribution of root respiration to soil respiration. The highest soil respiration rate of ...

  2. Contribution of root respiration to soil respiration in a C3/C4 mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The spatial and temporal variations of soil respiration were studied from May 2004 to June 2005 in a C3/C4 mixed grassland of Japan. The linear regression relationship between soil respiration and root biomass was used to determine the contribution of root respiration to soil respiration. The highest soil respiration rate of.

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi regulate soil respiration and its response to precipitation change in a semiarid steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingwei; Li, Shan; Chen, Shiping; Ren, Tingting; Yang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Hanlin; Liang, Yu; Han, Xingguo

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are critical links in plant-soil continuum and play a critical role in soil carbon cycles. Soil respiration, one of the largest carbon fluxes in global carbon cycle, is sensitive to precipitation change in semiarid ecosystems. In this study, a field experiment with fungicide application and water addition was conducted during 2010-2013 in a semiarid steppe in Inner Mongolia, China, and soil respiration was continuously measured to investigate the influences of AMF on soil respiration under different precipitation regimes. Results showed that soil respiration was promoted by water addition treatment especially during drought seasons, which induced a nonlinear response of soil respiration to precipitation change. Fungicide application suppressed AMF root colonization without impacts on soil microbes. AMF suppression treatment accelerated soil respiration with 2.7, 28.5 and 37.6 g C m-2 across three seasons, which were mainly caused by the enhanced heterotrophic component. A steeper response of soil respiration rate to precipitation was found under fungicide application treatments, suggesting a greater dampening effect of AMF on soil carbon release as water availability increased. Our study highlighted the importance of AMF on soil carbon stabilization and sequestration in semiarid steppe ecosystems especially during wet seasons.

  4. Short-term suppression of Aedes aegypti using genetic control does not facilitate Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Kevin; Young, Josué; Pineda, Lleysa; Márquez, Ricardo; Sosa, Nestor; Bernal, Damaris; Torres, Rolando; Soto, Yamilitzel; Lacroix, Renaud; Naish, Neil; Kaiser, Paul; Tepedino, Karla; Philips, Gwilym; Kosmann, Cecilia; Cáceres, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    Under permit from the National Biosafety Commission for the use of genetically modified organisms, releases of a genetically engineered self-limiting strain of Aedes aegypti (OX513A) were used to suppress urban pest Ae. aegypti in West Panama. Experimental goals were to assess the effects on a coexisting population of Ae. albopictus and examine operational parameters with relevance to environmental impact. Ae. albopictus populations were shown to be increasing year upon year at each of three study sites, potentially reflecting a broader-scale incursion into the area. Ae. albopictus abundance was unaffected by a sustained reduction in Ae. aegypti by up to 93% through repeated releases of OX513A. Males accounted for 99.99% of released OX513A, resulting in a sustained mating fraction of 75%. Mean mating competitiveness of OX513A was 0.14. The proportion of OX513A in the local environment decreased by 95% within 25 days of the final release. There was no evidence for species replacement of Ae. aegypti by Ae. albopictus over the course of this study. No unintentional environmental impacts or elevated operational risks were observed. The potential for this emerging technology to mitigate against disease outbreaks before they become established is discussed. © 2015 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. A Coordinate Control Strategy for Circulating Current Suppression in Multiparalleled Three-Phase Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xueguang; Wang, Tianyi; Wang, Xiongfei

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the zero-sequence circulating current control in the multiparalleled three-phase voltage-source inverters. The model of the zero-sequence circulating current in the N-paralleled (N ≥ 3) inverters is derived. It is shown that the circulating current is not only susceptible...... to the mismatches of circuit parameters, but it is also influenced by the interactions of circulating current controllers used by other paralleled inverters. To eliminate these adverse effects on the circulating current control loop, a coordinate control strategy for the N-paralleled inverter is proposed based...... on the zero-vector feedforward method with the space-vector pulse width modulation. Moreover, a virtual inverter method is introduced to facilitate the implementation of the proposed controller, which decouples the interactions of circulating current controllers in the paralleled inverters. Finally...

  6. Suppression of Botrytis cinerea on necrotic grapevine tissues by early-season applications of natural products and biological control agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Garrido, Carlos; Viñas, Inmaculada; Elmer, Philip A G; Usall, Josep; Teixidó, Neus

    2014-04-01

    Necrotic tissues within grape (Vitis vinifera) bunches represent an important source of Botrytis cinerea inoculum for Botrytis bunch rot (BBR) at harvest in vineyards. This research quantified the incidence of B. cinerea on necrotic floral and fruit tissues and the efficacy of biologically based treatments for suppression of B. cinerea secondary inoculum within developing bunches. At veraison (2009 and 2010), samples of aborted flowers, aborted fruits and calyptras were collected, and the incidence and sporulation of B. cinerea were determined. Aborted fruits presented significantly higher incidence in untreated samples. Early-season applications of Candida sake plus Fungicover®, Fungicover alone or Ulocladium oudemansii significantly reduced B. cinerea incidence on aborted flowers and calyptras by 46-85%. Chitosan treatment significantly reduced B. cinerea incidence on calyptras. None of the treatments reduced B. cinerea incidence on aborted fruits. Treatments significantly reduced sporulation severity by 48% or more. Treatments were effective at reducing B. cinerea secondary inoculum on necrotic tissues, in spite of the variable control on aborted fruits. This is the first report to quantify B. cinerea on several tissues of bunch trash and to describe the effective suppression of saprophytic B. cinerea inoculum by biologically based treatments. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Nitric oxide and mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G C

    1999-05-05

    Nitric oxide (NO) and its derivative peroxynitrite (ONOO-) inhibit mitochondrial respiration by distinct mechanisms. Low (nanomolar) concentrations of NO specifically inhibit cytochrome oxidase in competition with oxygen, and this inhibition is fully reversible when NO is removed. Higher concentrations of NO can inhibit the other respiratory chain complexes, probably by nitrosylating or oxidising protein thiols and removing iron from the iron-sulphur centres. Peroxynitrite causes irreversible inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and damage to a variety of mitochondrial components via oxidising reactions. Thus peroxynitrite inhibits or damages mitochondrial complexes I, II, IV and V, aconitase, creatine kinase, the mitochondrial membrane, mitochondrial DNA, superoxide dismutase, and induces mitochondrial swelling, depolarisation, calcium release and permeability transition. The NO inhibition of cytochrome oxidase may be involved in the physiological regulation of respiration rate, as indicated by the finding that isolated cells producing NO can regulate cellular respiration by this means, and the finding that inhibition of NO synthase in vivo causes a stimulation of tissue and whole body oxygen consumption. The recent finding that mitochondria may contain a NO synthase and can produce significant amounts of NO to regulate their own respiration also suggests this regulation may be important for physiological regulation of energy metabolism. However, definitive evidence that NO regulation of mitochondrial respiration occurs in vivo is still missing, and interpretation is complicated by the fact that NO appears to affect tissue respiration by cGMP-dependent mechanisms. The NO inhibition of cytochrome oxidase may also be involved in the cytotoxicity of NO, and may cause increased oxygen radical production by mitochondria, which may in turn lead to the generation of peroxynitrite. Mitochondrial damage by peroxynitrite may mediate the cytotoxicity of NO, and may be

  8. Dynamic characteristics of soil respiration in Yellow River Delta wetlands, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Luo, Xianxiang; Jia, Hongli; Zheng, Hao

    2018-02-01

    The stable soil carbon (C) pool in coastal wetlands, referred to as "blue C", which has been extensively damaged by climate change and soil degradation, is of importance to maintain global C cycle. Therefore, to investigate the dynamic characteristics of soil respiration rate and evaluate C budgets in coastal wetlands are urgently. In this study, the diurnal and seasonal variation of soil respiration rate in the reed wetland land (RL) and the bare wetland land (BL) was measured in situ with the dynamic gas-infrared CO2 method in four seasons, and the factors impacted on the dynamic characteristics of soil respiration were investigated. The results showed that the diurnal variation of soil respiration rate consistently presented a "U" curve pattern in April, July, and September, with the maximum values at 12:00 a.m. and the minimum values at 6:00 a.m. In the same season, the diurnal soil respiration rate in RL was significantly greater than those in BL (P soil respiration rate was 0.14, 0.42, and 0.39 μmol m-2 s-1 in RL, 0.05, 0.22, 0.13, and 0.01 μmol m-2 s-1 in BL, respectively. Soil surface temperature was the primary factor that influenced soil respiration, which was confirmed by the exponential positive correlation between the soil respiration rate and soil surface temperature in BL and RL (P salinity of soils suppressed soil respiration, confirming by the significantly negative correlation between soil respiration rate and the content of soluble salt. These results will be useful for understanding the mechanisms underlying soil respiration and elevating C sequestration potential in the coastal wetlands.

  9. A centralized control architecture for harmonic voltage suppression in islanded microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede; Chen, Zhe

    2011-01-01

    Resource (DER) units. Thus the harmonic voltage distortion caused by the mismatch between the harmonic conductance and characteristic impedance of the distribution feeder can be reduced. Moreover, to overcome the constraint on transmitting harmonic signals by a low-bandwidth communication line, a Park...... transformation aided signal modulation method is integrated to the centralized control architecture. The operation principle and case studies based on computer simulations are presented in this paper and validate the proposed control architecture....

  10. Complex terrain alters temperature and moisture limitations of forest soil respiration across a semiarid to subalpine gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Erin Michele; Barnard, H.R.; Adams, H.R.; Burns, M.A.; Gallo, E.; Brooks, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Forest soil respiration is a major carbon (C) flux that is characterized by significant variability in space and time. We quantified growing season soil respiration during both a drought year and a nondrought year across a complex landscape to identify how landscape and climate interact to control soil respiration. We asked the following questions: (1) How does soil respiration vary across the catchments due to terrain-induced variability in moisture availability and temperature? (2) Does the relative importance of moisture versus temperature limitation of respiration vary across space and time? And (3) what terrain elements are important for dictating the pattern of soil respiration and its controls? Moisture superseded temperature in explaining watershed respiration patterns, with wetter yet cooler areas higher up and on north facing slopes yielding greater soil respiration than lower and south facing areas. Wetter subalpine forests had reduced moisture limitation in favor of greater seasonal temperature limitation, and the reverse was true for low-elevation semiarid forests. Coincident climate poorly predicted soil respiration in the montane transition zone; however, antecedent precipitation from the prior 10 days provided additional explanatory power. A seasonal trend in respiration remained after accounting for microclimate effects, suggesting that local climate alone may not adequately predict seasonal variability in soil respiration in montane forests. Soil respiration climate controls were more strongly related to topography during the drought year highlighting the importance of landscape complexity in ecosystem response to drought.

  11. Development of Tremor Suppression Control System Using Adaptive Filter and Its Application to Meal-assist Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Ken'ichi; Ohara, Eiichi; Horihata, Satoshi; Aoki, Takaaki; Nishimoto, Yutaka

    A robot that supports independent living by assisting with eating and other activities which use the operator's own hand would be helpful for people suffering from tremors of the hand or any other body part. The proposed system using adaptive filter estimates tremor frequencies with a time-varying property and individual differences online. In this study, the estimated frequency is used to adjusting the tremor suppression filter which insulates the voluntary motion signal from the sensor signal containing tremor components. These system are integrated into the control system of the Meal-Assist Robot. As a result, the developed system makes it possible for the person with a tremor to manipulate the supporting robot without causing operability to deteriorate and without hazards due to improper operation.

  12. Biological and application-oriented factors influencing plant disease suppression by biological control: a meta-analytical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojiambo, P S; Scherm, H

    2006-11-01

    ABSTRACT Studies to evaluate the effectiveness of biological control in suppressing plant disease often report inconsistent results, highlighting the need to identify general factors that influence the success or failure of biological control in plant pathology. We conducted a quantitative synthesis of previously published research by applying meta-analysis to determine the overall effectiveness of biocontrol in relation to biological and application-oriented factors. For each of 149 entries (antagonist-disease combinations) from 53 reports published in Biological & Cultural Tests between 2000 and 2005, an effect size was calculated as the difference in disease intensity expressed in standard deviation units between the biocontrol treatment and its corresponding untreated control. Effect sizes ranged from -1.15 (i.e., disease strongly enhanced by application of the biocontrol agent) to 4.83 (strong disease suppression by the antagonist) with an overall weighted mean of 0.62, indicating moderate effectiveness on average. There were no significant (P >0.05) differences in effect sizes between entries from studies carried out in the greenhouse versus the field, between those involving soilborne versus aerial diseases, or among those carried out in conditions of low, medium, or high disease pressure (expressed relative to the disease intensity in the untreated control). However, effect sizes were greater on annual than on perennial crops, regardless of whether the analysis was carried out for all entries (P = 0.0268) or for those involving only soilborne diseases (P = 0.0343). Effect sizes were not significantly different for entries utilizing fungal versus bacterial biocontrol agents or for those targeting fungal versus bacterial pathogens. However, entries that used r-selected biological control agents (i.e., those having short generation times and producing large numbers of short-lived offspring) were more effective than those that applied antagonists that were not

  13. Regulation and input disturbance suppression for port-controlled Hamiltonian systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gentili, L.; Astolfi, A.; van der Schaft, Arjan; Gordillo, F.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the output feedback regulation problem for port-controlled Hamiltonian systems (PCHS) is addressed. Following the nonlinear output regulation theory, the regulator which solves the problem is given by a parallel connection of two subcontrollers: an internal model unit and a regulator

  14. Controlling wildlife reproduction : reversible suppression of reproductive function or sex-related behaviour in wildlife species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertschinger, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Fertility control represents a proactive approach to population management for various mammalian wildlife species. In large predators, deslorelin implants have proven to be useful contraceptives in species such as lions, tigers and cheetahs. Although female lions and tigers responded well to various

  15. On the numerical simulation of flutter and its suppression by active control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, B.; Mook, D.T.

    1994-01-01

    The classic problem of predicting the motion (flutter) of a rigid airfoil mounted on an elastic support in a steady freestream is revisited. In the classic approach, the equations of motion were linearized, the supports were linear springs, the motion was assumed to be periodic, the aerodynamic loads were predicted by Wagner's function, and the solution was obtained in the so-called frequency domain. In the present approach, the equations of motion are in their fully nonlinear form, the supports may be nonlinear springs, the motion is not assumed to be periodic, the loads are predicted by a general unsteady vorticity-panel method, and the solution is obtained in the so-called time domain. After it is demonstrated that the present approach predicts the onset of flutter and the post-flutter behavior for flat-plate as well as thick airfoils, the airfoil -is modified by the addition of a flap at the trailing edge. The flap is part of an actively controlled servomechanism, and it is demonstrated that flutter can be readily controlled with very little effort by a variety of feedback-control laws. In the present approach, emphasis is placed on considering the airfoil, its supports, the flowing air and the control/servo mechanism collectively to be a single dynamic system. All the equations of motion and control laws are solved simultaneously and interactively; thus, complete interactions among the various subsystems are captured. The present simulation of an oscillating airfoil provides some characteristics of the flutter phenomenon that were missed in previous studies: for example, it is shown that, in the absence of flaps, the motion in heave (the translational part of the motion) is responsible for adding energy to (exciting) the structural subsystem while the motion in pitch is responsible for extracting energy from (damping) the structural subsystem. Below the critical speed, there is more dissipation than excitation and hence all initial disturbances decay

  16. Predicting soil respiration from peatlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowson, J G; Worrall, F; Evans, M G; Dixon, S D

    2013-01-01

    This study considers the relative performance of six different models to predict soil respiration from upland peat. Predicting soil respiration is important for global carbon budgets and gap filling measured data from eddy covariance and closed chamber measurements. Further to models previously published new models are presented using two sub-soil zones and season. Models are tested using data from the Bleaklow plateau, southern Pennines, UK. Presented literature models include ANOVA using logged environmental data, the Arrhenius equation, modified versions of the Arrhenius equation to include soil respiration activation energy and water table depth. New models are proposed including the introduction of two soil zones in the peat profile, and season. The first new model proposes a zone of high CO(2) productivity related to increased soil microbial CO(2) production due to the supply of labile carbon from plant root exudates and root respiration. The second zone is a deeper zone where CO(2) production is lower with less labile carbon. A final model allows the zone of high CO(2) production to become dormant during winter months when plants will senesce and will vary depending upon vegetation type within a fixed location. The final model accounted for, on average, 31.9% of variance in net ecosystem respiration within 11 different restoration sites whilst, using the same data set, the best fitting literature equation only accounted for 18.7% of the total variance. Our results demonstrate that soil respiration models can be improved by explicitly accounting for seasonality and the vertically stratified nature of soil processes. These improved models provide an enhanced basis for calculating the peatland carbon budgets which are essential in understanding the role of peatlands in the global C cycle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Novel insecticide strategies such as phototoxic dyes in adult fruit fly control and suppression programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Daniel S.; Mangan, Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    The problems of public acceptance, ecological impact, and integration with pest management programmes associated with use of broad spectrum insecticides in bait sprays for fruit flies are being addressed in our laboratory by our development of more precisely targeted bait systems which use insecticides which are less toxic to non-target organisms. Historically, bait and insecticide sprays to control fruit flies have been used since the beginning of the 20th century. Initially, inorganic insecticides were recommended. After the Second World War, chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides replaced inorganic ones only to be replaced by the organic ones that are used at present. Back and Pemberton (1918) stated that baits used for fruit fly control were first recommended by Mally in South Africa for the control of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), in 1908-1909 and by Berlese in Italy for the control of the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Gmelin). The methods were improved by Lounsboury in South Africa in 1912 for the control of C. capitata and by Newman during 1913-1914 in Australia for the control of the Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt). In 1910, Marsh used low-volume insecticide applications against the melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett), in Hawaii. Thereafter, other investigators adopted the low-volume approach to kill fruit flies. Whenever baits were used, they added carbohydrates and fermenting substances such as sugars, molasses, syrups, or fruit juices. In the 1930s, McPhail (1937), while working with attractants, found that sugar-yeast solutions attracted flies, and, in 1939 found that protein lures were attractive to Anastrepha species, especially to the guava fruit fly, A. striata Schiner (Baker et al. 1944). It was not until 1952, however, when Steiner demonstrated the use of hydrolysed proteins and partially hydrolysed yeast in combination with organophosphate insecticides to control fruit flies, that

  18. The helicase senataxin suppresses the antiviral transcriptional response and controls viral biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew S.; Rialdi, Alexander; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Tilove, Micah; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Moshkina, Natasha P.; Peralta, Zuleyma; Noel, Justine; Melegari, Camilla; Maestre, Ana; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Madrenas, Joaquín; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; Young, John A. T.; Feagins, Alicia R.; Basler, Christopher; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Becherel, Olivier J.; Lavin, Martin F.; van Bakel, Harm; Marazzi, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The human helicase senataxin (SETX) is implicated in the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4) and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Here, we reveal a role for SETX in controlling the antiviral response. Cells depleted for SETX and AOA2 patient-derived SETX-deficient cells exhibit increased expression of antiviral mediators in response to infection. Mechanistically, we propose a model whereby SETX attenuates RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) activity at genes stimulated upon viral sensing, thus controlling the magnitude of the host response to pathogens and the biogenesis of numerous RNA viruses (e. g. Influenza A virus and West Nile virus). Our data indicate a potentially causal link between SETX inborn errors, susceptibility to infection and development of neurologic disorders. PMID:25822250

  19. Suppression of Extinction with TMS in Humans: From Healthy Controls to Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveri, Massimiliano; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2006-01-01

    We review a series of studies exemplifying some applications of single-pulse and paired-transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the study of spatial attention and of its deficits. We will focus primarily on sensory extinction, the failure to consciously perceive a contralesional sensory stimulus only during bilateral stimulation of homologous surfaces. TMS studies in healthy controls show that it is possible either to interfere or modulate the excitability of the parietal cortex during sen...

  20. Effects of assimilate supply on root and microbial components of soil respiration in a mountain grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, M.; Siegwolf, R.; Ekblad, A.; Pfahringer, N.; Bahn, M.

    2012-04-01

    Soil respiration is the main source of carbon emitted from terrestrial ecosystems. Soil CO2 originates from multiple processes, comprising respiration by plant roots, mycorrhizae and microbes in the rhizosphere, as well as respiration due to soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition. Thus, components of soil respiration have different controls and show varying responses to changing environmental conditions and to the supply of fresh assimilates from photosynthesis. For grasslands there is still little information available as to what extent root and microbial respiration respond to reduced or enhanced assimilate supply. The aim of this study was to assess effects of assimilate supply on root and microbial components of soil respiration in a temperate mountain grassland. Root and microbial components were separated and quantified by applying the Substrate Induced Respiration method (SIR) in situ using a δ13C labelled sucrose solution, and analysing δ13C of the subsequently respired CO2. Assimilate supply was modified by clipping and shading treatments, which strongly reduced photosynthetic C supply, and by applying a sucrose solution 8 days after clipping and shading. We tested the hypotheses that (1) due to a reduction of assimilate supply, soil respiration would be lower in the clipped and shaded than in the control treatment, that (2) the microbial contribution to soil respiration would be lower in the assimilate-limited than in the control treatments, and that (3) priming effects following the addition of sucrose would be stronger in shaded and mowed treatments than in control plots. Our results showed that clipping and shading reduced soil respiration significantly. Whilst the microbial contribution to soil respiration was 61% in control plots, it amounted to only 50-48% in clipped and shaded plots, respectively. Sucrose application did not affect root respiration in any of the plots, but generally stimulated microbial respiration. The measured priming effect

  1. An adaptive vibration control method to suppress the vibration of the maglev train caused by track irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Danfeng; Yu, Peichang; Wang, Lianchun; Li, Jie

    2017-11-01

    The levitation gap of the urban maglev train is around 8 mm, which puts a rather high requirement on the smoothness of the track. In practice, it is found that the track irregularity may cause stability problems when the maglev train is traveling. In this paper, the dynamic response of the levitation module, which is the basic levitation structure of the urban maglev train, is investigated in the presence of track irregularities. Analyses show that due to the structural configuration of the levitation module, the vibration of the levitation gap may be amplified and "resonances" may be observed under some specified track wavelengths and train speeds; besides, it is found that the gap vibration of the rear levitation unit in a levitation module is more significant than that of the front levitation unit, which agrees well with practice. To suppress the vibration of the rear levitation gap, an adaptive vibration control method is proposed, which utilizes the information of the front levitation unit as a reference. A pair of mirror FIR (finite impulse response) filters are designed and tuned by an adaptive mechanism, and they produce a compensation signal for the rear levitation controller to cancel the disturbance brought by the track irregularity. Simulations under some typical track conditions, including the sinusoidal track profile, random track irregularity, as well as track steps, indicate that the adaptive vibration control scheme can significantly reduce the amplitude of the rear gap vibration, which provides a method to improve the stability and ride comfort of the maglev train.

  2. Light intensity controls anti-predator defences in Daphnia: the suppression of life-history changes

    OpenAIRE

    Effertz, Christoph; von Elert, Eric

    2014-01-01

    A huge variety of organisms respond to the presence of predators with inducible defences, each of which is associated with costs. Many genotypes have the potential to respond with more than one defence, and it has been argued that it would be maladaptive to exhibit all possible responses at the same time. Here, we test how a well-known anti-fish defence in Daphnia, life-history changes (LHC), is controlled by light. We show that the kairomone-mediated reduction in size at first reproduction i...

  3. Time-domain prefilter design for enhanced tracking and vibration suppression in machine motion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew O. T.; Shinonawanik, Praween; Wongratanaphisan, Theeraphong

    2018-05-01

    Structural flexibility can impact negatively on machine motion control systems by causing unmeasured positioning errors and vibration at locations where accurate motion is important for task execution. To compensate for these effects, command signal prefiltering may be applied. In this paper, a new FIR prefilter design method is described that combines finite-time vibration cancellation with dynamic compensation properties. The time-domain formulation exploits the relation between tracking error and the moment values of the prefilter impulse response function. Optimal design solutions for filters having minimum H2 norm are derived and evaluated. The control approach does not require additional actuation or sensing and can be effective even without complete and accurate models of the machine dynamics. Results from implementation and testing on an experimental high-speed manipulator having a Delta robot architecture with directionally compliant end-effector are presented. The results show the importance of prefilter moment values for tracking performance and confirm that the proposed method can achieve significant reductions in both peak and RMS tracking error, as well as settling time, for complex motion patterns.

  4. Placebo-Controlled Discontinuation of Long-Term Acid-Suppressant Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Jon Eik; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg

    2015-01-01

    -term basis were randomized to esomeprazole 40 mg or identical placebo. Outcome measures were time to discontinuation with trial medication due to failed symptom control analysed as survival data. The proportion of patients stopping trial medication during the one-year follow-up was estimated. Results....... A total of 171 patients were included with a median prior duration of antisecretory treatment of four years (range: 0.5 to 14.6 years). 86 patients received esomeprazole 40 mg and 85 patients received placebo. At 12 months, statistically significantly more patients in the placebo group had discontinued...... (73% (62/85)) compared with the esomeprazole group (21% (18/86); p

  5. General Instructions for Disposable Respirators

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-09

    This podcast, intended for the general public, demonstrates how to put on and take off disposable respirators that are to be used in areas affected by the influenza outbreak.  Created: 4/9/2009 by CDC, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 4/29/2009.

  6. Use of Facemasks and Respirators

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-05-15

    This program demonstrates the differences of facemasks and respirators that are to be used in public settings during an influenza pandemic.  Created: 5/15/2007 by CDC, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 5/25/2007.

  7. Light intensity controls anti-predator defences in Daphnia: the suppression of life-history changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effertz, Christoph; von Elert, Eric

    2014-05-07

    A huge variety of organisms respond to the presence of predators with inducible defences, each of which is associated with costs. Many genotypes have the potential to respond with more than one defence, and it has been argued that it would be maladaptive to exhibit all possible responses at the same time. Here, we test how a well-known anti-fish defence in Daphnia, life-history changes (LHC), is controlled by light. We show that the kairomone-mediated reduction in size at first reproduction is inversely coupled to the light intensity. A similar effect was found for the kairomone-mediated expression of candidate genes in Daphnia. We argue that the light intensity an individual is exposed to determines the degree of LHC, which allows for plastic adjustment to fluctuating environments and simultaneously minimizes the associated costs of multiple alternately deployable defences. It is hypothesized that this allows for a coupling of multiple defences, i.e. LHC and diel vertical migration.

  8. Involuntary symbol manipulation (Pig Latin) from external control: Implications for thought suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyein; Zarolia, Pareezad; Gazzaley, Adam; Morsella, Ezequiel

    2016-05-01

    In ironic processing, one is more likely to think about something (e.g., white bears) when instructed to not think about that thing. Entry into consciousness of such content may be automatic, reflecting the 'encapsulated' nature of the generation of conscious contents. Based on this research, the Reflexive Imagery Task (RIT) reveals that, following the activation of action sets, conscious contents can arise involuntarily and systematically in response to external stimuli. In the most basic version of this paradigm, participants are presented with visual objects and instructed to not think of the names of the objects, which is challenging. Here, we addressed one criticism of the RIT-that the effect arises only for automatic processes (e.g., forms of cued-memory retrieval) and not for more complex processes (e.g., symbol manipulation). Participants were first trained to perform a word-manipulation task similar to the game of Pig Latin (e.g., "CAR" becomes "AR-CAY"). Such a task involves complex symbol manipulations that are associated with processes in frontal cortex. After training, participants were instructed to not transform stimulus words in this way. The RIT effect still arose under these conditions. This striking finding is relevant to theories of cognitive control, psychopathology, and conscious/unconscious processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Contribution of root respiration to soil respiration in a C3/C4 mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Root respiration can be estimated by the differences between soil respiration and microbial respiration. 2.5 Statistical analysis. Coefficient of variation (CV) was calculated to provide a measure of within-site variation of soil respiration, soil temperature, soil moisture content, root biomass, micro- bial biomass carbon, and total ...

  10. Glycolysis Is Dynamic and Relates Closely to Respiration Rate in Stored Sugarbeet Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice A. Megguer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Although respiration is the principal cause of the loss of sucrose in postharvest sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L., the internal mechanisms that control root respiration rate are unknown. Available evidence, however, indicates that respiration rate is likely to be controlled by the availability of respiratory substrates, and glycolysis has a central role in generating these substrates. To determine glycolytic changes that occur in sugarbeet roots after harvest and to elucidate relationships between glycolysis and respiration, sugarbeet roots were stored for up to 60 days, during which activities of glycolytic enzymes and concentrations of glycolytic substrates, intermediates, cofactors, and products were determined. Respiration rate was also determined, and relationships between respiration rate and glycolytic enzymes and metabolites were evaluated. Glycolysis was highly variable during storage, with 10 of 14 glycolytic activities and 14 of 17 glycolytic metabolites significantly altered during storage. Changes in glycolytic enzyme activities and metabolites occurred throughout the 60 day storage period, but were greatest in the first 4 days after harvest. Positive relationships between changes in glycolytic enzyme activities and root respiration rate were abundant, with 10 of 14 enzyme activities elevated when root respiration was elevated and 9 glycolytic activities static during periods of unchanging respiration rate. Major roles for pyruvate kinase and phosphofructokinase in the regulation of postharvest sugarbeet root glycolysis were indicated based on changes in enzymatic activities and concentrations of their substrates and products. Additionally, a strong positive relationship between respiration rate and pyruvate kinase activity was found indicating that downstream TCA cycle enzymes were unlikely to regulate or restrict root respiration in a major way. Overall, these results establish that glycolysis is not static during sugarbeet root

  11. Suppressed Belief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komarine Romdenh-Romluc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Moran’s revised conception of conscious belief requires us to reconceptualise suppressed belief. The work of Merleau-Ponty offers a way to do this. His account of motor-skills allows us to understand suppressed beliefs as pre-reflective ways of dealing with the world.

  12. Bariatric surgery rapidly improves mitochondrial respiration in morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhawan, Sheetal; Richards, William; O'Hea, Martha F; Audia, Jonathon P; Alvarez, Diego F

    2013-12-01

    Obesity and its attendant comorbidities are an emerging epidemic. Chronic metabolic inflammation (metainflammation) is thought to precipitate obesity-associated morbidities; however, its mechanistic progression is poorly understood. Moreover, although interventions such as diet, exercise, and bariatric surgery can control body weight, their effects on metainflammation are also poorly understood. Recently, metainflammation and the pathobiology of obesity have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. Herein we examined the effects of bariatric surgery on mitochondrial respiration as an index of resolving metainflammation in morbidly obese patients. This institutional review board-approved study involved morbidly obese patients (body mass index > 35 kg/m(2)) undergoing sleeve gastrectomy or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed in peripheral blood monocytes and in skeletal muscle samples before surgery and at 12 weeks after surgery. Patient biometrics, homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) score, C-reactive protein, and lipid profile were analyzed. Twenty patients were enrolled and showed an average percent excess body weight loss of 30.3% weight loss at 12 weeks after surgery. Average HOMA-IR score decreased from 3.0 to 1.2 in insulin-resistant patients. C-reactive protein, an index of metainflammation, showed a modest decrease. Lipid profile remained stable. Intriguingly, mitochondrial basal and maximal respiration rates in peripheral blood monocytes increased after surgery. Basal rates of skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration were unchanged, but the maximal respiration rate trended toward an increase after surgery. Cellular and tissue mitochondrial respiration increased in a morbidly obese patient cohort after laparoscopic bariatric surgery. These changes were consistent in patients with postsurgical weight loss. Importantly, no significant changes or improvements occurred in canonical indices used to

  13. Seasonality of temperate forest photosynthesis and daytime respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, R.; Munger, J. W.; McManus, J. B.; Nelson, D. D.; Zahniser, M. S.; Davidson, E. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Saleska, S. R.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems currently offset one-quarter of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions because of a slight imbalance between global terrestrial photosynthesis and respiration. Understanding what controls these two biological fluxes is therefore crucial to predicting climate change. Yet there is no way of directly measuring the photosynthesis or daytime respiration of a whole ecosystem of interacting organisms; instead, these fluxes are generally inferred from measurements of net ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 exchange (NEE), in a way that is based on assumed ecosystem-scale responses to the environment. The consequent view of temperate deciduous forests (an important CO2 sink) is that, first, ecosystem respiration is greater during the day than at night; and second, ecosystem photosynthetic light-use efficiency peaks after leaf expansion in spring and then declines, presumably because of leaf ageing or water stress. This view has underlain the development of terrestrial biosphere models used in climate prediction and of remote sensing indices of global biosphere productivity. Here, we use new isotopic instrumentation to determine ecosystem photosynthesis and daytime respiration in a temperate deciduous forest over a three-year period. We find that ecosystem respiration is lower during the day than at night—the first robust evidence of the inhibition of leaf respiration by light at the ecosystem scale. Because they do not capture this effect, standard approaches overestimate ecosystem photosynthesis and daytime respiration in the first half of the growing season at our site, and inaccurately portray ecosystem photosynthetic light-use efficiency. These findings revise our understanding of forest-atmosphere carbon exchange, and provide a basis for investigating how leaf-level physiological dynamics manifest at the canopy scale in other ecosystems.

  14. A semi-active H∞ control strategy with application to the vibration suppression of nonlinear high-rise building under earthquake excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guiyun; Chen, Fuquan; Wu, Yingxiong

    2016-01-01

    Different from previous researches which mostly focused on linear response control of seismically excited high-rise buildings, this study aims to control nonlinear seismic response of high-rise buildings. To this end, a semi-active control strategy, in which H∞ control algorithm is used and magneto-rheological dampers are employed for an actuator, is presented to suppress the nonlinear vibration. In this strategy, a modified Kalman-Bucy observer which is suitable for the proposed semi-active strategy is developed to obtain the state vector from the measured semi-active control force and acceleration feedback, taking into account of the effects of nonlinearity, disturbance and uncertainty of controlled system parameters by the observed nonlinear accelerations. Then, the proposed semi-active H∞ control strategy is applied to the ASCE 20-story benchmark building when subjected to earthquake excitation and compared with the other control approaches by some control criteria. It is indicated that the proposed semi-active H∞ control strategy provides much better control performances by comparison with the semi-active MPC and Clipped-LQG control approaches, and can reduce nonlinear seismic response and minimize the damage in the buildings. Besides, it enhances the reliability of the control performance when compared with the active control strategy. Thus, the proposed semi-active H∞ control strategy is suitable for suppressing the nonlinear vibration of high-rise buildings.

  15. Do Children with Autism Use Inner Speech and Visuospatial Resources for the Service of Executive Control? Evidence From Suppression in Dual Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Lucy; Low, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments used dual-task suppression methodology to study the use of inner speech and visuospatial resources for mediating central executive performance by children with autism (CWA) and group-matched typically developing (TD) controls. Expt 1 revealed that CWA did not recruit inner speech to facilitate arithmetic task-switching…

  16. [Assessment of nociceptive suppression in laparoscopic postoperative status: prospective, randomized and comparative study with a control group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime, A; Hernández-Favela, P; Zamora, R; Nava, E; Barroso, G; Kably, A

    2001-08-01

    In recent years endoscopic surgery has became a highly demanded procedure because it is an easy method for diagnosis and treatment in gynecological field. Post-operative pain is considered as a condition in the morbidity status. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nociceptive suppression in laparoscopic surgery. A prospective randomized trial was performed in order to evaluate this condition. A total of 45 patients were included. Three groups were randomized using two different anesthetics applied in the cult-de-sac and uterine-bladder union. Group A (n-15) received bupivacaine, group B (n = 15) ropivacaine and group C (control) saline solution was instilled. The pain was scored using the visual analog scale as same as blood pressure and heart rate in a 15 minute intervals in the recovery room. For study design there were no differences in age, weight, height and body mass index (EMI). The surgical and anesthetic times were similar among groups. However there were significant differences when pain was evaluated. For a less toxic effects and good preventive analgesia we recommend to use ropivacaine in the postoperative status.

  17. Breathing simulator of workers for respirator performance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Hisashi; Kumita, Mikio; Honda, Takeshi; Kimura, Kazushi; Nozaki, Kosuke; Emi, Hitoshi; Otani, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Breathing machines are widely used to evaluate respirator performance but they are capable of generating only limited air flow patterns, such as, sine, triangular and square waves. In order to evaluate the respirator performance in practical use, it is desirable to test the respirator using the actual breathing patterns of wearers. However, it has been a difficult task for a breathing machine to generate such complicated flow patterns, since the human respiratory volume changes depending on the human activities and workload. In this study, we have developed an electromechanical breathing simulator and a respiration sampling device to record and reproduce worker's respiration. It is capable of generating various flow patterns by inputting breathing pattern signals recorded by a computer, as well as the fixed air flow patterns. The device is equipped with a self-control program to compensate the difference in inhalation and exhalation volume and the measurement errors on the breathing flow rate. The system was successfully applied to record the breathing patterns of workers engaging in welding and reproduced the breathing patterns.

  18. Hybrid PD and effective multi-mode positive position feedback control for slewing and vibration suppression of a smart flexible manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, Jun-qiang; Wei, Yan-ding; Yang, Yi-ling; Xie, Feng-ran

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid control strategy for slewing and vibration suppression of a smart flexible manipulator is presented in this paper. It consists of a proportional derivative controller to realize motion control, and an effective multi-mode positive position feedback (EMPPF) controller to suppress the multi-mode vibration. Rather than treat each mode equally as the standard multi-mode PPF, the essence of the EMPPF is that control forces of different modes are applied according to the mode parameters of the respective modes, so the vibration modes with less vibration energy receive fewer control forces. Stability conditions for the close loop system are established through stability analysis. Optimal parameters of the EMPPF controller are obtained using the method of root locus analysis. The performance of the proposed strategy is demonstrated by simulation and experiments. Experimental results show that the first two vibration modes of the manipulator are effectively suppressed. The setting time of the setup descends approximately 55%, reaching 3.12 s from 5.67 s. (paper)

  19. The Warburg effect suppresses oxidative stress induced apoptosis in a yeast model for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Büttner, Sabrina; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Eisenberg, Tobias; Kroemer, Guido; Sigrist, Stephan J; Fröhlich, Kai-Uwe; Madeo, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Otto Warburg observed that cancer cells are often characterized by intense glycolysis in the presence of oxygen and a concomitant decrease in mitochondrial respiration. Research has mainly focused on a possible connection between increased glycolysis and tumor development whereas decreased respiration has largely been left unattended. Therefore, a causal relation between decreased respiration and tumorigenesis has not been demonstrated. For this purpose, colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is suitable for manipulation of mitochondrial respiration and shows mitochondria-mediated cell death, were used as a model. Repression of respiration as well as ROS-scavenging via glutathione inhibited apoptosis and conferred a survival advantage during seeding and early development of this fast proliferating solid cell population. In contrast, enhancement of respiration triggered cell death. Thus, the Warburg effect might directly contribute to the initiation of cancer formation--not only by enhanced glycolysis--but also via decreased respiration in the presence of oxygen, which suppresses apoptosis.

  20. Exposures of geotechnical laboratory workers to respirable crystalline silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S K; Bigelow, P L; Sharp-Geiger, R; Buchan, R M

    1999-01-01

    Geotechnical laboratory testing involves the determination of the physical properties of soil, rock, and other building materials for engineering purposes. Individuals working in these laboratories are exposed to airborne soil, rock, and other dusts during the preparation and testing of these materials. Crystalline silica as quartz is a common constituent of these materials and represents a potential hazard to geotechnical laboratory workers when airborne as a respirable dust. The authors conducted an examination of the potential for geotechnical laboratory workers to be exposed to respirable dust and respirable quartz during the performance of three routine laboratory tasks. A task-based exposure assessment strategy was used. Although respirable dust was generated during the performance of each of these tasks, its impact on exposures was generally overridden by the presence of respirable quartz in the dust. Quartz content in the respirable dust ranged from below the detection limit to greater than 50 percent. Mean exposure to respirable quartz, based on the duration of the task and assuming no other exposures for the rest of the 8-hour day, exceeded the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) "action level" (the exposure level at which certain actions must be taken) of 0.025 mg/m3. If exposure was assumed to continue for the rest of the 8-hour day at the measured concentration, mean exposure to respirable quartz exceeded the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) time-weighted average (TWA), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) PEL, and the NIOSH REL. Seven percent of 57 individual task exposure measurements exceeded the TLV-TWA and the PEL, 18 percent exceeded the REL, and another 12 percent exceeded excursion limits as defined by ACGIH. The results of this study support the conclusion that geotechnical laboratory workers are potentially exposed to respirable

  1. Temperature response of soil respiration largely unaltered with experimental warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carey, Joanna C; Tang, Jianwu; Templer, Pamela H

    2016-01-01

    , spanning nine biomes and over 2 decades of warming. Our analysis reveals no significant differences in the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration between control and warmed plots in all biomes, with the exception of deserts and boreal forests. Thus, our data provide limited evidence of acclimation...

  2. Effect of Hyperglycemia on Mitochondrial Respiration in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Rasmus; Højberg, Patricia M V; Almdal, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    DM. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eleven patients with T2DM [9 males, 2 females; age, 52.8 +/- 2.5 yr (mean +/- se); body mass index, 30.2 +/- 1.1 kg/m(2)] in poor glycemic control were treated with insulin aspart and NPH insulin for a median period of 46 d (range, 31-59). Mitochondrial respiration...

  3. Effects of Long-Term Speech-in-Noise Training in Air Traffic Controllers and High Frequency Suppression. A Control Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Zaballos, María Teresa; Ramos de Miguel, Ángel; Pérez Plasencia, Daniel; Zaballos González, María Luisa; Ramos Macías, Ángel

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate 1) if air traffic controllers (ATC) perform better than non-air traffic controllers in an open-set speech-in-noise test because of their experience with radio communications, and 2) if high-frequency information (>8000 Hz) substantially improves speech-in-noise perception across populations. The control group comprised 28 normal-hearing subjects, and the target group comprised 48 ATCs aged between 19 and 55 years who were native Spanish speakers. The hearing -in-noise abilities of the two groups were characterized under two signal conditions: 1) speech tokens and white noise sampled at 44.1 kHz (unfiltered condition) and 2) speech tokens plus white noise, each passed through a 4th order Butterworth filter with 70 and 8000 Hz low and high cutoffs (filtered condition). These tests were performed at signal-to-noise ratios of +5, 0, and -5-dB SNR. The ATCs outperformed the control group in all conditions. The differences were statistically significant in all cases, and the largest difference was observed under the most difficult conditions (-5 dB SNR). Overall, scores were higher when high-frequency components were not suppressed for both groups, although statistically significant differences were not observed for the control group at 0 dB SNR. The results indicate that ATCs are more capable of identifying speech in noise. This may be due to the effect of their training. On the other hand, performance seems to decrease when the high frequency components of speech are removed, regardless of training.

  4. How to suppress obsessive thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Eric; Diepstraten, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Thought suppression (i.e. consciously trying to avoid certain thoughts from entering consciousness) has been argued to be an inadequate strategy in case of unwanted intrusions. That is, thought suppression seems to result in more rather than less intrusions. Although this experimental finding has been explained in terms of failing attempts to distract oneself from the target thought, the White Bear Suppression Inventory (WBSI; a scale that measures chronic thought suppression tendencies) does not address the means by which respondents try to suppress unwanted thoughts. To examine which strategies of mental control people use to suppress unwanted thoughts, obsessive-compulsive disorder patients (N=47) completed the WBSI, the Thought Control Questionnaire, and two measures of psychopathology. Results suggest that the crucial mechanism in thought suppression may not be distraction, but self-punishment.

  5. Betaine is a positive regulator of mitochondrial respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Icksoo, E-mail: icksoolee@dankook.ac.kr

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • Betaine enhances cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial respiration. • Betaine increases mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular energy levels. • Betaine’s anti-tumorigenic effect might be due to a reversal of the Warburg effect. - Abstract: Betaine protects cells from environmental stress and serves as a methyl donor in several biochemical pathways. It reduces cardiovascular disease risk and protects liver cells from alcoholic liver damage and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Its pretreatment can rescue cells exposed to toxins such as rotenone, chloroform, and LiCl. Furthermore, it has been suggested that betaine can suppress cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes generate the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is essential to produce cellular energy, ATP. Reduced mitochondrial respiration and energy status have been found in many human pathological conditions including aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease. In this study we investigated whether betaine directly targets mitochondria. We show that betaine treatment leads to an upregulation of mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome c oxidase activity in H2.35 cells, the proposed rate limiting enzyme of ETC in vivo. Following treatment, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and cellular energy levels were elevated. We propose that the anti-proliferative effects of betaine on cancer cells might be due to enhanced mitochondrial function contributing to a reversal of the Warburg effect.

  6. Quantitative change of EEG and respiration signals during mindfulness meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahani, Asieh; Wahbeh, Helane; Nezamfar, Hooman; Miller, Meghan; Erdogmus, Deniz; Oken, Barry

    2014-05-14

    This study investigates measures of mindfulness meditation (MM) as a mental practice, in which a resting but alert state of mind is maintained. A population of older people with high stress level participated in this study, while electroencephalographic (EEG) and respiration signals were recorded during a MM intervention. The physiological signals during meditation and control conditions were analyzed with signal processing. EEG and respiration data were collected and analyzed on 34 novice meditators after a 6-week meditation intervention. Collected data were analyzed with spectral analysis, phase analysis and classification to evaluate an objective marker for meditation. Different frequency bands showed differences in meditation and control conditions. Furthermore, we established a classifier using EEG and respiration signals with a higher accuracy (85%) at discriminating between meditation and control conditions than a classifier using the EEG signal only (78%). Support vector machine (SVM) classifier with EEG and respiration feature vector is a viable objective marker for meditation ability. This classifier should be able to quantify different levels of meditation depth and meditation experience in future studies.

  7. Quantitative change of EEG and respiration signals during mindfulness meditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background This study investigates measures of mindfulness meditation (MM) as a mental practice, in which a resting but alert state of mind is maintained. A population of older people with high stress level participated in this study, while electroencephalographic (EEG) and respiration signals were recorded during a MM intervention. The physiological signals during meditation and control conditions were analyzed with signal processing. Methods EEG and respiration data were collected and analyzed on 34 novice meditators after a 6-week meditation intervention. Collected data were analyzed with spectral analysis, phase analysis and classification to evaluate an objective marker for meditation. Results Different frequency bands showed differences in meditation and control conditions. Furthermore, we established a classifier using EEG and respiration signals with a higher accuracy (85%) at discriminating between meditation and control conditions than a classifier using the EEG signal only (78%). Conclusion Support vector machine (SVM) classifier with EEG and respiration feature vector is a viable objective marker for meditation ability. This classifier should be able to quantify different levels of meditation depth and meditation experience in future studies. PMID:24939519

  8. Inhibitory Effects of Respiration Inhibitors on Aflatoxin Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Sakuda

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin production inhibitors, which do not inhibit the growth of aflatoxigenic fungi, may be used to control aflatoxin without incurring a rapid spread of resistant strains. A respiration inhibitor that inhibits aflatoxin production was identified during a screening process for natural, aflatoxin-production inhibitors. This prompted us to evaluate respiration inhibitors as potential aflatoxin control agents. The inhibitory activities of four natural inhibitors, seven synthetic miticides, and nine synthetic fungicides were evaluated on aflatoxin production in Aspergillus parasiticus. All of the natural inhibitors (rotenone, siccanin, aptenin A5, and antimycin A inhibited fungal aflatoxin production with IC50 values around 10 µM. Among the synthetic miticides, pyridaben, fluacrypyrim, and tolfenpyrad exhibited strong inhibitory activities with IC50 values less than 0.2 µM, whereas cyflumetofen did not show significant inhibitory activity. Of the synthetic fungicides, boscalid, pyribencarb, azoxystrobin, pyraclostrobin, and kresoxim-methyl demonstrated strong inhibitory activities, with IC50 values less than 0.5 µM. Fungal growth was not significantly affected by any of the inhibitors tested at concentrations used. There was no correlation observed between the targets of respiration inhibitors (complexes I, II, and III and their IC50 values for aflatoxin-production inhibitory activity. This study suggests that respiration inhibitors, including commonly used pesticides, are useful for aflatoxin control.

  9. Diel hysteresis between soil respiration and soil temperature in a biological soil crust covered desert ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Chao; Li, Xinrong; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yongle

    2018-01-01

    Soil respiration induced by biological soil crusts (BSCs) is an important process in the carbon (C) cycle in arid and semi-arid ecosystems, where vascular plants are restricted by the harsh environment, particularly the limited soil moisture. However, the interaction between temperature and soil respiration remains uncertain because of the number of factors that control soil respiration, including temperature and soil moisture, especially in BSC-dominated areas. In this study, the soil respiration in moss-dominated crusts and lichen-dominated crusts was continuously measured using an automated soil respiration system over a one-year period from November 2015 to October 2016 in the Shapotou region of the Tengger Desert, northern China. The results indicated that over daily cycles, the half-hourly soil respiration rates in both types of BSC-covered areas were commonly related to the soil temperature. The observed diel hysteresis between the half-hourly soil respiration rates and soil temperature in the BSC-covered areas was limited by nonlinearity loops with semielliptical shapes, and soil temperature often peaked later than the half-hourly soil respiration rates in the BSC-covered areas. The average lag times between the half-hourly soil respiration rates and soil temperature for both types of BSC-covered areas were two hours over the diel cycles, and they were negatively and linearly related to the volumetric soil water content. Our results highlight the diel hysteresis phenomenon that occurs between soil respiration rates and soil temperatures in BSC-covered areas and the negative response of this phenomenon to soil moisture, which may influence total C budget evaluations. Therefore, the interactive effects of soil temperature and moisture on soil respiration in BSC-covered areas should be considered in global carbon cycle models of desert ecosystems.

  10. Effects of respirator use on worker performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardarelli, R. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In 1993, EPRI funded Yankee Atomic Electric Company to examine the effects of respirator use on worker efficiency. Phase I of Yankee`s effort was to develop a study design to determine respirator effects. Given success in Phase I, a larger population will be tested to determine if a stasitically significant respirator effect on performance can be measured. This paper summarizes the 1993 EPRI/Yankee Respirator Effects of Pilot Study, and describes the study design for the 1994 EPRI/Yankee Respirator Study to be conducted at the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant. Also described is a summary of respirator effect studies that have been conducted during the last ten (10) years.

  11. Nonlinear responses of soil respiration to precipitation changes in a semiarid temperate steppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yuan; Han, Hongyan; Du, Yue; Zhang, Qian; Jiang, Lin; Hui, Dafeng; Wan, Shiqiang

    2017-03-31

    Extreme precipitation events are predicted to occur more frequently and will have significant influences on terrestrial ecosystem carbon (C) cycling in the future. However, response patterns of soil respiration to precipitation changes remain uncertain in terrestrial ecosystems. A field experiment with seven precipitation treatments (i.e. from -60% to +60% of ambient precipitation to form a drought to wet precipitation gradient) was conducted over three growing seasons (2010-2012) in a semiarid temperate steppe of Northern China. Results showed a nonlinear response pattern of soil respiration along the experimental precipitation gradient, with soil respiration suppressed by decreased precipitation and enhanced by increased precipitation. Over the three growing seasons, soil respiration was reduced more under the three drought treatments (by 45.8, 32.8, and 15.9% under the -60, -40, and -20% treatments, respectively) than stimulated under the three wet treatments (by 8.9, 14.3, and 18.5% under the +20, +40, and +60% treatments, respectively). Our results indicate that soil respiration was more sensitive to decreased than increased precipitation treatments. The nonlinear and asymmetric responses of soil respiration to precipitation changes should be built into ecosystem models to project ecosystem C cycling associated with climate change.

  12. Respirators: Supervisors Self-Study #43442

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-20

    This course, Respirators: Supervisors Self-Study (#43442), addresses training requirements for supervisors of respirator wearers as specified by the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) Standard for Respiratory Protection, ANSI Z88.2, and as incorporated by reference in the Department of Energy (DOE) Worker Health and Safety Rule, 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 851. This course also presents the responsibilities of supervisors of respirator wearers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  13. [Therapy of Cheyne-Stokes respiration with nocturnal oxygen therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreas, S; von Breska, B; Clemens, C; Schulz, R; Kreuzer, H

    1995-01-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration is common in patients with severe congestive heart failure and is associated with significant nocturnal oxygen desaturation and sleep disruption. The pathogenesis of Cheyne-Stokes respiration in patients with congestive heart failure has been well described and is related to prolonged circulation time between the lung and the carotid body mainly due to increased cardiac dimensions, reduced body stores of oxygen and carbon dioxide, disturbance of ventilation and respiratory control due to arousals and a relatively high hypercapnic ventilatory response. Oxygen is likely to reduce Cheyne-Stokes respiration by increasing oxygen and carbon dioxide stores and reduces the hypercapnic ventilatory response. In the following paper we describe a study designed to determine the impact of nasal nocturnal oxygen on Cheyne-Stokes respiration, sleep, peak oxygen consumption during bicycle exercise, cognitive function evaluated by the trailmaking test and daytime symptoms in patients with severe congestive heart failure. The study is designed as a randomized, cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled protocol on about 20 patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction < 35%.

  14. Soil respiration in Mexico: Advances and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Cueva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil respiration (RS is a CO2 efflux from the soil to the atmosphere defined as the sum of autotrophic (respiration by roots and mycorrhizae, and heterotrophic (respiration of microorganisms that decompose fractions of organic matter and of soil fauna respiration. Globally, RS is considered to be the second largest flux of C to the atmosphere. From published literature it is clear that its main controls are soil temperature, soil moisture, photosynthesis, organic matter inputs and soil biota composition. Despite its relevance in C cycle science, there have been only twenty eight studies in Mexico in the last decade where direct measurement of gas exchange was conducted in the field. These studies were held mostly in agricultural and forest ecosystems, in Central and Southern Mexico where mild subtropical conditions prevail. However, arid, semi-arid, tropical and wetland ecosystems may have an important role in Mexico’s CO2 emissions because of their extent and extensive land use changes. From the twenty eight studies, only two provided continuous measurements of RS with high temporal resolution, highlighting the need for long-term studies to evaluate the complex biophysical controls of this flux and associated processes over different ecological succession stages. We conclude that Mexico represents an important opportunity to understand its complex dynamics, in national and global context, as ecosystems in the country cover a wide range of climatic conditions. This is particularly important because deforestation and degradation of Mexican ecosystems is rapidly increasing along with expected changes in climate.

  15. Suppression of Brillouin scattering in fibre-optical parametric amplifier by applying temperature control and phase modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Michael Rodas; Noordegraaf, Danny; Nielsen, Carsten Vandel

    2009-01-01

    An increased gain in a fibre-optical parametric amplifier through suppression of stimulated Brillouin scattering is demonstrated by applying a temperature distribution along the fibre for a fixed phase modulation of the pump. The temperature distribution slightly impacts the gain spectrum....

  16. Plastron Respiration Using Commercial Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Atherton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of insect and arachnid species are able to remain submerged in water indefinitely using plastron respiration. A plastron is a surface-retained film of air produced by surface morphology that acts as an oxygen-carbon dioxide exchange surface. Many highly water repellent and hydrophobic surfaces when placed in water exhibit a silvery sheen which is characteristic of a plastron. In this article, the hydrophobicity of a range of commercially available water repellent fabrics and polymer membranes is investigated, and how the surface of the materials mimics this mechanism of underwater respiration is demonstrated allowing direct extraction of oxygen from oxygenated water. The coverage of the surface with the plastron air layer was measured using confocal microscopy. A zinc/oxygen cell is used to consume oxygen within containers constructed from the different membranes, and the oxygen consumed by the cell is compared to the change in oxygen concentration as measured by an oxygen probe. By comparing the membranes to an air-tight reference sample, it was found that the membranes facilitated oxygen transfer from the water into the container, with the most successful membrane showing a 1.90:1 ratio between the cell oxygen consumption and the change in concentration within the container.

  17. Impact of some selected insecticides application on soil microbial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, M A; Razzaque, M A; Rahman, M M

    2008-08-15

    The aim of present study was to investigate the impact of selected insecticides used for controlling brinjal shoot and fruit borer on soil microorganisms and to find out the insecticides or nontoxic to soil microorganism the impact of nine selected insecticides on soil microbial respiration was studied in the laboratory. After injection of different insecticides solutions, the soil was incubated in the laboratory at room temperature for 32 days. The amount of CO2 evolved due to soil microbial respiration was determined at 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 and 32 days of incubation. Flubendiamide, nimbicidine, lambda-cyhalothrin, abamectin and thiodicarb had stimulatory effect on microbial respiration during the initial period of incubation. Chlorpyriphos, cartap and carbosulfan had inhibitory effect on microbial respiration and cypermethrin had no remarkable effect during the early stage of incubation. The negative effect of chlorpyriphos, cartap and carbosulfan was temporary, which was disappeared after 4 days of insecticides application. No effect of the selected insecticides on soil microorganisms was observed after 24 or 32 days of incubation.

  18. Respirators: APR Issuer Self Study 33461

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-07-13

    Respirators: APR Issuer Self-Study (course 33461) is designed to introduce and familiarize employees selected as air-purifying respirator (APR) issuers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with the responsibilities, limitations, procedures, and resources for issuing APRs at LANL. The goal is to enable these issuers to consistently provide proper, functioning APRs to authorized users

  19. Students' Chemical Knowledge in Photosynthesis and Respiration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Students' Chemical Knowledge in Photosynthesis and Respiration in Port Harcourt Metropolis of Rivers State of Nigeria. ... African Journal of Chemical Education ... Photosynthesis-Respiration Chemical Reaction Test (P-RCRT) and PLDRT-essay test on light and dark reactions of photosynthesis and fate of glucose in ...

  20. Management effects on European cropland respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eugster, W.; Moffat, A.M.; Ceschia, E.; Jacobs, C.M.J.; Moors, E.J.; Jans, W.W.P.

    2010-01-01

    Increases in respiration rates following management activities in croplands are considered a relevant anthropogenic source of CO2. In this paper, we quantify the impact of management events on cropland respiration fluxes of CO2 as they occur under current climate and management conditions. Our

  1. Suppression chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Akio.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To miniaturize the storage tank of condensated water in BWR reactor. Constitution: A diaphragm is provided in a suppression chamber thereby to partition the same into an inner compartment and an outer compartment. In one of said compartments there is stored clean water to be used for feeding at the time of separating the reactor and for the core spray system, and in another compartment there is stored water necessary for accomplishing the depressurization effect at the time of coolant loss accident. To the compartment in which clean water is stored there is connected a water cleaning device for constantly maintaining water in clean state. As this cleaning device an already used fuel pool cleaning device can be utilized. Further, downcomers for accomplishing the depressurization function are provided in both inner compartment and outer compartment. The capacity of the storage tank can be reduced by the capacity of clean water within the suppression chamber. (Ikeda, J.)

  2. Transcranial bright light exposure via ear canals does not suppress nocturnal melatonin in healthy adults--a single-blind, sham-controlled, crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurvelin, Heidi; Takala, Timo; Heberg, Lilli; Nissilä, Juuso; Rüger, Melanie; Leppäluoto, Juhani; Saarela, Seppo; Vakkuri, Olli

    2014-08-01

    We investigated whether transcranial bright light (TBL) affects nocturnal melatonin and cortisol secretion in sham-controlled crossover trial. Young healthy adults were exposed in random order to 24 minutes of TBL or sham exposure via ear canals at 01:10 h. Saliva and urine samples were collected hourly between 21 h-03 h and 06 h-09 h. There were no significant differences in melatonin or cortisol concentrations between TBL and sham exposures at any sampling point indicating that TBL via ear canals does not suppress nocturnal melatonin secretion. Thus, non-visual effects of TBL are mediated via a pathway not involving melatonin suppression.

  3. Residence time of carbon substrate for autotrophic respiration of a grassland ecosystem correlates with the carbohydrate status of its vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostler, Ulrike; Lehmeier, Christoph A.; Schleip, Inga; Schnyder, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Ecosystem respiration is composed of two component fluxes: (1) autotrophic respiration, which comprises respiratory activity of plants and plant-associated microbes that feed on products of recent photosynthetic activity and (2) heterotrophic respiration of microbes that decompose organic matter. The mechanistic link between the availability of carbon (C) substrate for ecosystem respiration and its respiratory activity is not well understood, particularly in grasslands. Here, we explore, how the kinetic features of the supply system feeding autotrophic ecosystem respiration in a temperate humid pasture are related to the content of water-soluble carbohydrates and remobilizable protein (as potential respiratory substrates) in vegetation biomass. During each September 2006, May 2007 and September 2007, we continuously labeled 0.8 m2 pasture plots with 13CO2/12CO2 and observed ecosystem respiration and its tracer content every night during the 14-16 day long labeling periods. We analyzed the tracer kinetics with a pool model, which allowed us to precisely partition ecosystem respiration into its autotrophic and heterotrophic flux components. At the end of a labeling campaign, we harvested aboveground and belowground plant biomass and analyzed its non-structural C contents. Approximately half of ecosystem respiration did not release any significant amount of tracer during the labeling period and was hence characterized as heterotrophic. The other half of ecosystem respiration was autotrophic, with a mean residence time of C in the respiratory substrate pool between 2 and 6 d. Both the rate of autotrophic respiration and the turnover of its substrate supply pool were correlated with plant carbohydrate content, but not with plant protein content. These findings are in agreement with studies in controlled environments that revealed water-soluble carbohydrates as the main substrate and proteins as a marginal substrate for plant respiration under favorable growth conditions

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Regulatory T Cells Reveals the Importance of Themis1 in the Control of Their Suppressive Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, Fanny; Locard-Paulet, Marie; Marcellin, Marlène; Chaoui, Karima; Bernard, Isabelle; Andreoletti, Olivier; Lesourne, Renaud; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Gonzalez de Peredo, Anne; Saoudi, Abdelhadi

    2017-08-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) represent a minor subpopulation of T lymphocytes that is crucial for the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Here, we present a large-scale quantitative mass spectrometry study that defines a specific proteomic "signature" of Treg. Treg and conventional T lymphocyte (Tconv) subpopulations were sorted by flow cytometry and subjected to global proteomic analysis by single-run nanoLC-MS/MS on a fast-sequencing Q-Exactive mass spectrometer. Besides "historical" proteins that characterize Treg, our study identified numerous new proteins that are up- or downregulated in Treg versus Tconv. We focused on Themis1, a protein particularly under-represented in Treg, and recently described as being involved in the pathogenesis of immune diseases. Using a transgenic mouse model overexpressing Themis1, we provided in vivo and in vitro evidence of its importance for Treg suppressive functions, in an animal model of inflammatory bowel disease and in coculture assays. We showed that this enhanced suppressive activity in vitro is associated with an accumulation of Tregs. Thus, our study highlights the usefulness of label free quantitative methods to better characterize the Treg cell lineage and demonstrates the potential role of Themis1 in the suppressive functions of these cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. 42 CFR 84.1131 - Respirators; required components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1131 Respirators; required components. (a) Each respirator described in § 84.1130 shall...

  6. Convergence in the temperature response of leaf respiration across biomes and plant functional types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heskel, Mary A; O'Sullivan, Odhran S; Reich, Peter B; Tjoelker, Mark G; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K; Penillard, Aurore; Egerton, John J G; Creek, Danielle; Bloomfield, Keith J; Xiang, Jen; Sinca, Felipe; Stangl, Zsofia R; Martinez-de la Torre, Alberto; Griffin, Kevin L; Huntingford, Chris; Hurry, Vaughan; Meir, Patrick; Turnbull, Matthew H; Atkin, Owen K

    2016-04-05

    Plant respiration constitutes a massive carbon flux to the atmosphere, and a major control on the evolution of the global carbon cycle. It therefore has the potential to modulate levels of climate change due to the human burning of fossil fuels. Neither current physiological nor terrestrial biosphere models adequately describe its short-term temperature response, and even minor differences in the shape of the response curve can significantly impact estimates of ecosystem carbon release and/or storage. Given this, it is critical to establish whether there are predictable patterns in the shape of the respiration-temperature response curve, and thus in the intrinsic temperature sensitivity of respiration across the globe. Analyzing measurements in a comprehensive database for 231 species spanning 7 biomes, we demonstrate that temperature-dependent increases in leaf respiration do not follow a commonly used exponential function. Instead, we find a decelerating function as leaves warm, reflecting a declining sensitivity to higher temperatures that is remarkably uniform across all biomes and plant functional types. Such convergence in the temperature sensitivity of leaf respiration suggests that there are universally applicable controls on the temperature response of plant energy metabolism, such that a single new function can predict the temperature dependence of leaf respiration for global vegetation. This simple function enables straightforward description of plant respiration in the land-surface components of coupled earth system models. Our cross-biome analyses shows significant implications for such fluxes in cold climates, generally projecting lower values compared with previous estimates.

  7. Dynamic Responses of Root, Mycorrhizal and Soil Heterotrophic Respiration to Temperature Increases in an Arid System of Southeast Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, C.; Pugnaire, F. I.

    2014-12-01

    Mycorrhizal and heterotrophic respiration may represent up to 80% of total soil respiration in temperate environments; however little is known about arid environments where the dynamics of carbon cycling is less known. To improve models of CO2 efflux to the atmosphere in these environments it is necessary to quantify the contribution of soil components (roots, mycorrhizas and heterotrophic respiration) to soil respiration and their response to temperature increases. We settled up a soil partitioning experiment in December 2013 to address this topic. Using a mesh-collar design we quantified soil respiration of the tree main components (roots, mycorrhiza and heterotrophic respiration) in a Mediterranean arid location dominated by the shrub Rethama sphaerocarpa under two temperature regimes, an increased air temperature using open-top chambers (OTC) and a control. For the firths 6 months of measurements, we recorded a decrease in annual species cover with increased temperature; total soil respiration varied between treatments, being higher in the control treatment while, contrary to our expectations, mycorrhizal and soil heterotrophic respiration did not vary between treatments. When looking at the relative contribution of the different soil components, the treatment enclosing both mycorrhizal and soil heterotrophic respiration represented more than half the total soil respiration. These results show that temperature affects total soil respiration and that, in our case, mycorrhizal and soil heterotrophic community were not major drivers of soil respiration responses to temperature. However, these data correspond to an abnormal dry period and data to be collected during the wet season would help us to better understand the contribution of the different soil components to temperature increases in arid environments.

  8. The proline metabolism intermediate Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate directly inhibits the mitochondrial respiration in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Akira; Nasuno, Ryo; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2012-07-30

    The proline metabolism intermediate Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) induces cell death in animals, plants and yeasts. To elucidate how P5C triggers cell death, we analyzed P5C metabolism, mitochondrial respiration and superoxide anion generation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Gene disruption analysis revealed that P5C-mediated cell death was not due to P5C metabolism. Interestingly, deficiency in mitochondrial respiration suppressed the sensitivity of yeast cells to P5C. In addition, we found that P5C inhibits the mitochondrial respiration and induces a burst of superoxide anions from the mitochondria. We propose that P5C regulates cell death via the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical pulmonary function and industrial respirator wear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raven, P.B. (Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth); Moss, R.F.; Page, K.; Garmon, R.; Skaggs, B.

    1981-12-01

    This investigation was the initial step in determining a clinical pulmonary test which could be used to evaluate workers as to their suitability to industrial respirator wear. Sixty subjects, 12 superior, 37 normal, and 11 moderately impaired with respect to lung function tests were evaluated with a battery of clinical pulmonary tests while wearing an industrial respirator. The respirator was a full-face mask (MSA-Ultravue) demand breathing type equipped with an inspiratory resistance of 85mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow and an expiratory resistance of 25mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow. Comparisons of these tests were made between the three groups of subjects both with and without a respirator. It appears that those lung tests which measure the flow characteristics of the lung especially those that are effort dependant are more susceptible to change as a result of respirator wear. Hence, the respirator affects the person with superior lung function to a greater degree than the moderately impaired person. It was suggested that the clinical test of 15 second maximum voluntary ventilations (MVV./sub 25/) may be the test of choice for determining worker capability in wearing an industrial respirator.

  10. Occupational exposures to respirable crystalline silica during hydraulic fracturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esswein, Eric J; Breitenstein, Michael; Snawder, John; Kiefer, Max; Sieber, W Karl

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a previously uncharacterized occupational health hazard: work crew exposures to respirable crystalline silica during hydraulic fracturing. Hydraulic fracturing involves high pressure injection of large volumes of water and sand, and smaller quantities of well treatment chemicals, into a gas or oil well to fracture shale or other rock formations, allowing more efficient recovery of hydrocarbons from a petroleum-bearing reservoir. Crystalline silica ("frac sand") is commonly used as a proppant to hold open cracks and fissures created by hydraulic pressure. Each stage of the process requires hundreds of thousands of pounds of quartz-containing sand; millions of pounds may be needed for all zones of a well. Mechanical handling of frac sand creates respirable crystalline silica dust, a potential exposure hazard for workers. Researchers at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health collected 111 personal breathing zone samples at 11 sites in five states to evaluate worker exposures to respirable crystalline silica during hydraulic fracturing. At each of the 11 sites, full-shift samples exceeded occupational health criteria (e.g., the Occupational Safety and Health Administration calculated permissible exposure limit, the NIOSH recommended exposure limit, or the ACGIH threshold limit value), in some cases, by 10 or more times the occupational health criteria. Based on these evaluations, an occupational health hazard was determined to exist for workplace exposures to crystalline silica. Seven points of dust generation were identified, including sand handling machinery and dust generated from the work site itself. Recommendations to control exposures include product substitution (when feasible), engineering controls or modifications to sand handling machinery, administrative controls, and use of personal protective equipment. To our knowledge, this represents the first systematic study of work crew exposures to crystalline silica during

  11. [Characteristics of Soil Respiration along Eroded Sloping Land with Different SOC Background on the Hilly Loess Plateau].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gai; Xu, Ming-xiang; Zhang, Ya-feng; Wang, Chao-hua; Fan, Hui-min; Wang, Shan-shan

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to characterize soil respiration along eroded sloping land at erosion and deposition area under different soil organic carbon(SOC) levels, and linked the relationship between soil respiration and soil temperature, soil moisture, SOC and slope position. Experiments were carried out in the plots of S type slopes include five different soil organic carbon levels in the Loess Hilly Region. The S type slopes were divided into control area at the top of the slope, erosion area at the middle of the slope and deposition area at the toe of the slope. We found that soil temperature had a greater impact on soil respiration in the deposition area, whereas soil moisture had a greater impact on soil respiration in the erosion area compared among control area, erosion area and deposition area. In addition, SOC was the most important factor affecting soil respiration, which can explain soil respiration variation 54. 72%, followed by soil moisture, slope position and soil temperature, which explain soil respiration variation 18. 86% , 16. 13% and 10. 29%, respectively. Soil respiration response to erosion showed obvious on-site and off-site effects along the eroded sloping land. Soil respiration in the erosion area was reduced by 21. 14% compared with control area, and soil respiration in the deposition area was increased by 21. 93% compared with control area. Erosion effect on source and sink of carbon emission was correlated with SOC content of the eroded sloping land. When SOC content was higher than 6. 82 g.kg-1, the slope. erosion tended to be a carbon sequestration process, and when SOC content was lower than 3.03 g.kg-1, the slope erosion tended to be a process of the carbon emission source. The model could reflect the relationship between soil respiration and independent variables of soil organic carbon content, soil temperature and moisture.

  12. Cheyne-Stokes respiration: hypoxia plus a deep breath that interrupts hypoxic drive, initiating cyclic breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntheroth, Warren G

    2011-11-01

    hypoxic drive, and the cycle of C-SR continues until the next large breath. This novel theory, that a pulse of oxygen interrupts hypoxic drive to cause the initiating apnea of C-SR, is compatible with the known causes of C-SR: onset of sleep, mild hypoxia with congestive heart failure, and neurologic disorders. It is also compatible with factors known to abolish C-SR: waking, oxygen supplementation, and drugs that increase alertness such as caffeine. Testing of the hypothesis would require beat by beat recording of respiration, and arterial oxygen with a response time fast enough to demonstrate the rapid suppression of hypoxic drive. Alternatively, using a different theoretical approach such as limit-cycle oscillators instead of control theory. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Forest soil respiration rate and delta13C is regulated by recent above ground weather conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekblad, Alf; Boström, Björn; Holm, Anders; Comstedt, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    Soil respiration, a key component of the global carbon cycle, is a major source of uncertainty when estimating terrestrial carbon budgets at ecosystem and higher levels. Rates of soil and root respiration are assumed to be dependent on soil temperature and soil moisture yet these factors often barely explain half the seasonal variation in soil respiration. We here found that soil moisture (range 16.5-27.6% of dry weight) and soil temperature (range 8-17.5 degrees C) together explained 55% of the variance (cross-validated explained variance; Q2) in soil respiration rate (range 1.0-3.4 micromol C m(-2) s(-1)) in a Norway spruce (Picea abies) forest. We hypothesised that this was due to that the two components of soil respiration, root respiration and decomposition, are governed by different factors. We therefore applied PLS (partial least squares regression) multivariate modelling in which we, together with below ground temperature and soil moisture, used the recent above ground air temperature and air humidity (vapour pressure deficit, VPD) conditions as x-variables. We found that air temperature and VPD data collected 1-4 days before respiration measurements explained 86% of the seasonal variation in the rate of soil respiration. The addition of soil moisture and soil temperature to the PLS-models increased the Q2 to 93%. delta13C analysis of soil respiration supported the hypotheses that there was a fast flux of photosynthates to root respiration and a dependence on recent above ground weather conditions. Taken together, our results suggest that shoot activities the preceding 1-6 days influence, to a large degree, the rate of root and soil respiration. We propose this above ground influence on soil respiration to be proportionally largest in the middle of the growing season and in situations when there is large day-to-day shifts in the above ground weather conditions. During such conditions soil temperature may not exert the major control on root respiration.

  14. Species identities, not functional groups, explain the effects of earthworms on litter carbon-derived soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil respiration is frequently measured as a surrogate for biological activities and is important in soil carbon cycling. The heterotrophic component of soil respiration is primarily driven by microbial decomposition of leaf litter and soil organic matter, and is partially controlled by resource ava...

  15. Light respiration by subtropical seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Matheus C; Eyre, Bradley D

    2017-06-01

    Here, we report the first-ever measurements of light CO 2 respiration rate (CRR) by seaweeds. We measured the influence of temperature (15-25°C) and light (irradiance from 60 to 670 μmol · m -2  · s -1 ) on the light CCR of two subtropical seaweed species, and measured the CRR of seven different seaweed species under the same light (150 μmol · m -2  · s -1 ) and temperature (25°C). There was little effect of irradiance on light CRR, but there was an effect of temperature. Across the seven species light CRR was similar to OCR (oxygen consumption rate in the dark), with the exception of a single species. The outlier species was a coralline alga, and the higher light CRR was probably driven by calcification. CRR could be estimated from OCR, as well as carbon photosynthetic rates from oxygen photosynthetic rates, which suggests that previous studies have probably provided good estimations of gross photosynthesis for seaweeds. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  16. Soil respiration in typical plant communities in the wetland surrounding the high-salinity Ebinur Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhong; Zhao, Mingliang; Li, Fadong

    2018-03-01

    Soil respiration in wetlands surrounding lakes is a vital component of the soil carbon cycle in arid regions. However, information remains limited on the soil respiration around highly saline lakes during the plant growing season. Here, we aimed to evaluate diurnal and seasonal variation in soil respiration to elucidate the controlling factors in the wetland of Ebinur Lake, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, western China. We used a soil carbon flux automatic analyzer (LI-840A) to measure soil respiration rates during the growing season (April to November) in two fields covered by reeds and tamarisk and one field with no vegetation (bare soil) from 2015 to 2016. The results showed a single peak in the diurnal pattern of soil respiration from 11:00 to 17:00 for plots covered in reeds, tamarisk, and bare soil, with minimum values being detected from 03:00 to 07:00. During the growing season, the soil respiration of reeds and tamarisk peaked during the thriving period (4.16 and 3.75 mmol•m-2•s-1, respectively), while that of bare soil peaked during the intermediate growth period (0.74 mmol•m-2•s-1). The soil respiration in all three plots was lowest during the wintering period (0.08, 0.09, and-0.87 mmol•m-2•s-1, respectively). Air temperature and relative humidity significantly influenced soil respiration. A significant linear relationship was detected between soil respiration and soil temperature for reeds, tamarisk, and bare soil. The average Q10 of reeds and tamarisk were larger than that of bare soil. However, soil moisture content was not the main factor controlling soil respiration. Soil respiration was negatively correlated with soil pH and soil salinity in all three plot types. In contrast, soil respiration was positively correlated with organic carbon. Overall, CO2 emissions and greenhouse gases had a relatively weak effect on the wetlands surrounding the highly saline Ebinur Lake.

  17. Quantitative Respirator Fit, Face Sizes, and Determinants of Fit in South African Diagnostic Laboratory Respirator Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganyi, Jeanneth; Wilson, Kerry S; Rees, David

    2017-11-10

    Respirators are widely used in health care settings but there is scant information on adequacy of fit and its determinants, particularly in resource-constrained settings. The aim of the study is to describe the proportion of South African diagnostic laboratory respirator users with adequate quantitative respirator fit while wearing their currently selected respirators which were generally supplied without regard to face size, and to identify determinants of fit test pass and fail. This was a cross-sectional study with 562 participants. Quantitative respirator fit testing was conducted using a PortaCount fit testing machine. Four facial dimensions were taken using callipers and a tape measure. STATA 14 was used to perform descriptive and inferential statistics. The effect of the independent variables including face dimensions, race, smoking, respirator make and size, and age group was explored using multiple logistic regression stratified by sex. Ninety one percent of the respirators supplied were medium-sized. Seventy eight percent of respirator users failed fit testing and were thus probably not protected by their currently supplied respirator. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that face length in mm (odds ratio [OR] = 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.00-1.09), nasal root breadth in mm (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.06-1.28), and respirator shape (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.39-0.78) were significant predictors of overall fit for all subjects and for women alone, but these factors explained only a small percentage of fit test outcomes. A large proportion of diagnostic laboratory employees were using poorly fitting respirators. This creates a false impression of protection. Fit testing of respirators is therefore important and recommended. The determinants evaluated described only a small portion of the variability in fit; important determinants were absent from the models. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British

  18. Cardiac, Skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I

    2014-01-01

    in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle suggest all mitochondria are created equal, the contrasting RCR and non-phosphorylating respiration highlight the existence of intrinsic functional differences between these muscle mitochondria. This likely influences the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation...

  19. Relationships between respiration, ethylene, and aroma production in ripening banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, J B; Shearer, D; McGlasson, W B; Wyllie, S G

    1999-04-01

    Mature green bananas were treated with the ethylene antagonist 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) at intervals during the 24 h period after initiation of ripening with propylene. Following 1-MCP treatment, the fruits were ripened in either air or propylene while ethylene, carbon dioxide, and volatile production and composition were monitored at regular intervals. The application of 1-MCP significantly delayed and suppressed the onset and magnitude of fruit respiration and volatile production. The 1-MCP treatments also caused a quantitative change in the composition of the aroma volatiles, resulting in a substantial increase in the concentration of alcohols and a decrease in their related esters. The results showed that ethylene has a continuing role in integrating many of the biochemical processes that take place during the ripening of bananas.

  20. Cisplatin cytotoxicity is dependent on mitochondrial respiration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhipriya Inapurapu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: To understand the role of mitochondrial respiration in cisplatin sensitivity, we have employed wild-type and mitochondrial DNA depleted Rho0 yeast cells. Materials and Methods: Wild type and Rho0 yeast cultured in fermentable and non-fermentable sugar containing media, were studied for their sensitivity against cisplatin by monitoring growth curves, oxygen consumption, pH changes in cytosol/mitochondrial compartments, reactive oxygen species production and respiratory control ratio. Results: Wild-type yeast grown on glycerol exhibited heightened sensitivity to cisplatin than yeast grown on glucose. Cisplatin (100 μM, although significantly reduced the growth of wild- type cells, only slightly altered the growth rate of Rho0 cells. Cisplatin treatment decreased both pHcyt and pHmit to a similar extent without affecting the pH difference. Cisplatin dose-dependently increased the oxidative stress in wild-type, but not in respiration-deficient Rho0 strain. Cisplatin decreased the respiratory control ratio. Conclusion: These results suggest that cisplatin toxicity is influenced by the respiratory capacity of the cells and the intracellular oxidative burden. Although cisplatin per se slightly decreased the respiration of yeast cells grown in glucose, it did not disturb the mitochondrial chemiosmotic gradient.

  1. Effect of Music on Emotions and Respiration

    OpenAIRE

    NOGUCHI Kengo:筆頭著者; MASAOKA Yuri; SATOH Kanako; KATO Nobumasa; HOMMA Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    In the present study we investigated whether the emotional state induced by music can change respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (VT), minute ventilation (VE), and end-tidal CO2concentration (ETCO2). In a pioneering study investigating the effect of music on respiration, the music of Stockhausen and Chopin was used. In the present study, we examined the effects of the same musical stimuli used in that study on respiration. Each stimulus (Stockhausen, Chopin, and silence) was delivered for 30 ...

  2. 42 CFR 84.134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.134... Respirators § 84.134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Supplied-air respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type and...

  3. 42 CFR 84.197 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.197... Cartridge Respirators § 84.197 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type and...

  4. 42 CFR 84.174 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.174... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.174 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except..., durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type of respirator it contains...

  5. Respirable crystalline silica: Analysis methodologies; Silice cristalina respirable: Metodologias de analisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Tena, M. P.; Zumaquero, E.; Ibanez, M. J.; Machi, C.; Escric, A.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes different analysis methodologies in occupational environments and raw materials. A review is presented of the existing methodologies, the approximations made, some of the constraints involved, as well as the best measurement options for the different raw materials. In addition, the different factors that might affect the precision and accuracy of the results are examined. With regard to the methodologies used for the quantitative analysis of any of the polymorph s, particularly of quartz, the study centres particularly on the analytical X-ray diffraction method. Simplified methods of calculation and experimental separation are evaluated for the estimation of this fraction in the raw materials, such as separation methods by centrifugation, sedimentation, and dust generation in controlled environments. In addition, a review is presented of the methodologies used for the collection of respirable crystalline silica in environmental dust. (Author)

  6. Effect of HSV-2 Suppressive Therapy on Genital Tract HIV-1 RNA Shedding among Women on HAART: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Nijhawan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The role of suppressive HSV therapy in women coinfected with HSV-2 and HIV-1 taking highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART is unclear. Methods. 60 women with HIV-1/HSV-2 coinfection on HAART with plasma HIV-1 viral load (PVL ≤75 copies/mL were randomized to receive acyclovir (N=30 or no acyclovir (N=30. PVL, genital tract (GT HIV-1, and GT HSV were measured every 4 weeks for one year. Results. Detection of GT HIV-1 was not significantly different in the two arms (OR 1.23, P=0.67, although this pilot study was underpowered to detect this difference. When PVL was undetectable, the odds of detecting GT HIV were 0.4 times smaller in the acyclovir arm than in the control arm, though this was not statistically significant (P=0.07. The odds of detecting GT HSV DNA in women receiving acyclovir were significantly lower than in women in the control group, OR 0.38, P<0.05. Conclusions. Chronic suppressive therapy with acyclovir in HIV-1/HSV-2-positive women on HAART significantly reduces asymptomatic GT HSV shedding, though not GT HIV shedding or PVL. PVL was strongly associated with GT HIV shedding, reinforcing the importance of HAART in decreasing HIV sexual transmission.

  7. Soil Respiration of Three Mangrove Forests on Sanibel Island, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, F.; Bovard, B. D.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon cycling studies conducted in mangrove forests have typically focused on aboveground processes. Our understanding of carbon storage in these systems is therefore limited by the lack information on belowground processes such as fine root production and soil respiration. To our knowledge there exist no studies investigating temporal patterns in and environmental controls on soil respiration in multiple types of mangrove ecosystems concurrently. This study is part of a larger study on carbon storage in three mangrove forests on Sanibel Island, Florida. Here we report on eight months of soil respiration data within these forests that will ultimately be incorporated into an annual carbon budget for each habitat type. Soil respiration was monitored in the following three mangrove habitat types: a fringe mangrove forest dominated by Rhizophora mangle, a basin mangrove forest dominated by Avicennia germinans, and a higher elevation forest comprised of a mix of Avicennia germinans and Laguncularia racemosa, and non-woody salt marsh species. Beginning in June of 2010, we measured soil emissions of carbon dioxide at 5 random locations within three-100 m2 plots within each habitat type. Sampling was performed at monthly intervals and conducted over the course of three days. For each day, one plot from each habitat type was measured. In addition to soil respiration, soil temperature, salinity and gravimetric moisture content were also measured. Our data indicate the Black mangrove forest, dominated by Avicennia germinans, experiences the highest rates of soil respiration with a mean rate of 4.61 ± 0.60 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. The mixed mangrove and salt marsh habitat has the lowest soil carbon emission rates with a mean of 2.78 ± 0.40 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. Soil carbon effluxes appear to peak in the early part of the wet season around May to June and are lower and relatively constant the remainder of the year. Our data also suggest there are important but brief periods where

  8. Approval tests and standards for closed-circuit escape respirators. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    This final rule announces updated requirements that the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH or Agency), located within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS or Department), will employ to test and approve closed-circuit respirators used for escaping atmospheres considered to be immediately dangerous to life and health, including such respirators required by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) for use in underground coal mines. NIOSH and MSHA jointly review and approve this type of respirator used for mine emergencies under regulations concerning approval of respiratory protective devices. NIOSH also approves these respirators for use in other work environments where escape equipment may be provided to workers, such as on vessels operated by U.S. Navy and Coast Guard personnel. The purpose of these updated requirements is to enable NIOSH and MSHA to more effectively ensure the performance, reliability, and safety of CCERs.

  9. Wind barriers suppress fugitive dust and soil-derived airborne particles in arid regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grantz, D.A.; Vaughn, D.L. [Univ. of California, Parlier, CA (United States). Kearney Agricultural Center; Farber, R.J. [SoCal Edison, Rosemead, CA (United States). Environmental Research Div.; Kim, B. [South Coast Air Quality Management District, Diamond Bar, CA (United States); Ashbaugh, L. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Crocker Nuclear Lab.; Van Curen, T. [California Air Resources Board, Sacramento, CA (United States); Campbell, R. [Antelope Valley Resources Conservation District, Lancaster, CA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Areas of abandoned agricultural land in the Antelope Valley, western Mojave (high) desert of California have proven in the previous studies to be recalcitrant to conventional tillage and revegetation strategies designed to suppress wind erosion of soil and transport of sediment and fugitive dust. These areas represented a continuing source of drifting sand and of coarse and respirable suspended particulate matter. The traditional techniques failed because furrows collapsed and the water holding capacity of the overburden was too low to support seed germination and transplant survival. In this study a variety of wind barriers were evaluated for suppression of sediment transport. Airborne particles were measured with an array of coarse particle samplers at heights of 0.2, 1.0, and 2.0 m above the soil surface. Discrete artificial wind barriers, consisting of widely spaced roughness elements were effective in suppressing fugitive emissions. Wind fences established along the leeward edge of an area of blowing sand, perpendicular to the prevailing wind, significantly decreased fugitive emissions. Control was greatest and precision of the measurements was highest under high wind conditions. These techniques provide rapid and effective suppression of fugitive emissions of soil-derived particles under conditions that resist conventional tillage and revegetation techniques. A simple, indirect procedure for determining local wind velocity erosion thresholds requiring only sampling of wind run and suspended particulate mass compared favorably with direct measurement of saltation as a function of wind velocity.

  10. Basic radiological studies contamination control experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duce, S.W.; Winberg, M.R.; Freeman, A.L.

    1989-09-01

    This report describes the results of experiments relating to contamination control performed in support of the Environmental Restoration Programs Retrieval Project. During the years 1950 to 1970 waste contaminated with plutonium and other transuranic radionuclides was disposed of in shallow land-filled pits and trenches at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Due to potential for migration of radionuclides to an existing aquifer the feasibility of retrieving and repackaging the waste for placement in a final repository is being examined as part of a retrieval project. Contamination control experiments were conducted to determine expected respirable and nonrespirable plutonium contaminated dust fractions and the effectiveness of various dust suppression techniques. Three soil types were tested to determine respirable fractions: Rocky Flats Plant generic soil, Radioactive Waste Management Complex generic soil, and a 1:1 blend of the two soil types. Overall, the average respirable fraction of airborne dust was 5.4% by weight. Three contamination control techniques were studied: soil fixative sprays, misting agents, and dust suppression agents. All of the tested agents proved to be effective in reducing dust in the air. Details of product performance and recommended usage are discussed

  11. Mitochondrial respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells correlates with depressive subsymptoms and severity of major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabatsiakis, A; Böck, C; Salinas-Manrique, J; Kolassa, S; Calzia, E; Dietrich, D E; Kolassa, I-T

    2014-06-10

    Mitochondrial dysfunction might have a central role in the pathophysiology of depression. Phenotypically, depression is characterized by lack of energy, concentration problems and fatigue. These symptoms might be partially explained by reduced availability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a consequence of impaired mitochondrial functioning. This study investigated mitochondrial respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), an established model to investigate the pathophysiology of depression. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed in intact PBMCs in 22 individuals with a diagnosis of major depression (MD) compared with 22 healthy age-matched controls using high-resolution respirometry. Individuals with MD showed significantly impaired mitochondrial functioning: routine and uncoupled respiration as well as spare respiratory capacity, coupling efficiency and ATP turnover-related respiration were significantly lower in the MD compared with the control group. Furthermore, mitochondrial respiration was significantly negatively correlated with the severity of depressive symptoms, in particular, with loss of energy, difficulties concentrating and fatigue. The results suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the biomolecular pathophysiology of depressive symptoms. The decreased immune capability observed in MD leading to a higher risk of comorbidities could be attributable to impaired energy supply due to mitochondrial dysfunction. Thus mitochondrial respiration in PBMCs and its functional consequences might be an interesting target for new therapeutical approaches in the treatment of MD and immune-related comorbidities.

  12. Convergence in the temperature response of leaf respiration across biomes and plant functional types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heskel, Mary A.; O’Sullivan, Odhran S.; Reich, Peter B.; Tjoelker, Mark G.; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K.; Penillard, Aurore; Egerton, John J. G.; Creek, Danielle; Bloomfield, Keith J.; Xiang, Jen; Sinca, Felipe; Stangl, Zsofia R.; Martinez-de la Torre, Alberto; Griffin, Kevin L.; Huntingford, Chris; Hurry, Vaughan; Meir, Patrick; Turnbull, Matthew H.; Atkin, Owen K.

    2016-01-01

    Plant respiration constitutes a massive carbon flux to the atmosphere, and a major control on the evolution of the global carbon cycle. It therefore has the potential to modulate levels of climate change due to the human burning of fossil fuels. Neither current physiological nor terrestrial biosphere models adequately describe its short-term temperature response, and even minor differences in the shape of the response curve can significantly impact estimates of ecosystem carbon release and/or storage. Given this, it is critical to establish whether there are predictable patterns in the shape of the respiration–temperature response curve, and thus in the intrinsic temperature sensitivity of respiration across the globe. Analyzing measurements in a comprehensive database for 231 species spanning 7 biomes, we demonstrate that temperature-dependent increases in leaf respiration do not follow a commonly used exponential function. Instead, we find a decelerating function as leaves warm, reflecting a declining sensitivity to higher temperatures that is remarkably uniform across all biomes and plant functional types. Such convergence in the temperature sensitivity of leaf respiration suggests that there are universally applicable controls on the temperature response of plant energy metabolism, such that a single new function can predict the temperature dependence of leaf respiration for global vegetation. This simple function enables straightforward description of plant respiration in the land-surface components of coupled earth system models. Our cross-biome analyses shows significant implications for such fluxes in cold climates, generally projecting lower values compared with previous estimates. PMID:27001849

  13. Long-term mindfulness training is associated with reliable differences in resting respiration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgosz, Joseph; Schuyler, Brianna S; Lutz, Antoine; Davidson, Richard J

    2016-06-07

    Respiration rate is known to correlate with aspects of psychological well-being, and attention to respiration is a central component of mindfulness meditation training. Both traditional contemplative systems and recent empirical evidence support an association between formal mindfulness practice and decreased respiration rate. However, the question of whether long-term mindfulness training is associated with stable, generalized changes in respiration has yet to be directly investigated. We analyzed respiration patterns across multiple time points, separated by two months or more, in a group of long-term mindfulness meditation practitioners (LTMs, n = 31) and a matched group of non-meditators (Controls, n = 38). On average, LTMs showed slower baseline respiration rate (RR) than Controls. Among LTMs, greater practice experience was associated with slower RR, independently of age and gender. Furthermore, this association was specific to intensive retreat practice, and was not seen for routine daily practice. Full days of meditation practice did not produce detectable changes in baseline RR, suggesting distal rather than immediate effects. All effects were independent of physiological characteristics including height, weight, body-mass index and waist-hip ratio. We discuss implications for continued study of the long-term effects of mindfulness training on health and well-being.

  14. Non-collocated fuzzy logic and input shaping control strategy for elastic joint manipulator: vibration suppression and time response analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashidifar, Mohammed Amin; Rashidifar, Ali Amin

    2014-01-01

    Conventional model-based control strategies are very complex and difficult to synthesize due to high complexity of the dynamics of robots manipulator considering joint elasticity. This paper presents investigations into the development of hybrid control schemes for trajectory tracking and vibration control of a flexible joint manipulator. To study the effectiveness of the controllers, initially a collocated proportional-derivative (P D)-type Fuzzy Logic Controller (FLC) is developed for tip angular position control of a flexible joint manipulator. This is then extended to incorporate a non-collocated Fuzzy Logic Controller and input shaping scheme for vibration reduction of the flexible joint system. The positive zero-vibration-derivative-derivative (ZVDD) shaper is designed based on the properties of the system. Simulation results of the response of the flexible joint manipulator with the controllers are presented in time and frequency domains. The performances of the hybrid control schemes are examined in terms of input tracking capability, level of vibration reduction and time response specifications. Finally, a comparative assessment of the control techniques is presented and discussed. (Author)

  15. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration: are all mitochondria created equal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Trinity, Joel D; Hyngstrom, John R; Garten, Ryan S; Diakos, Nikolaos A; Ives, Stephen J; Dela, Flemming; Larsen, Steen; Drakos, Stavros; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-08-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration. Therefore, the present study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscles. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles were harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53 ± 6 yr), and mitochondrial respiration was assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I + II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (54 ± 1, 39 ± 4, and 15 ± 1 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P muscles (222 ± 13, 115 ± 2, and 48 ± 2 μmol·g(-1)·min(-1), P respiration rates were normalized by CS (respiration per mitochondrial content), oxidative phosphorylation capacity was no longer different between the three muscle types. Interestingly, complex I state 2 normalized for CS activity, an index of nonphosphorylating respiration per mitochondrial content, increased progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles, such that the respiratory control ratio, state 3/state 2 respiration, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (5.3 ± 0.7, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 1.6 ± 0.3 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P muscles suggest all mitochondria are created equal, the contrasting respiratory control ratio and nonphosphorylating respiration highlight the existence of intrinsic functional differences between these muscle mitochondria. This likely influences the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation and could potentially alter ROS production.

  16. Micro-environmental mechanical stress controls tumor spheroid size and morphology by suppressing proliferation and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Cheng

    Full Text Available Compressive mechanical stress produced during growth in a confining matrix limits the size of tumor spheroids, but little is known about the dynamics of stress accumulation, how the stress affects cancer cell phenotype, or the molecular pathways involved.We co-embedded single cancer cells with fluorescent micro-beads in agarose gels and, using confocal microscopy, recorded the 3D distribution of micro-beads surrounding growing spheroids. The change in micro-bead density was then converted to strain in the gel, from which we estimated the spatial distribution of compressive stress around the spheroids. We found a strong correlation between the peri-spheroid solid stress distribution and spheroid shape, a result of the suppression of cell proliferation and induction of apoptotic cell death in regions of high mechanical stress. By compressing spheroids consisting of cancer cells overexpressing anti-apoptotic genes, we demonstrate that mechanical stress-induced apoptosis occurs via the mitochondrial pathway.Our results provide detailed, quantitative insight into the role of micro-environmental mechanical stress in tumor spheroid growth dynamics, and suggest how tumors grow in confined locations where the level of solid stress becomes high. An important implication is that apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, induced by compressive stress, may be involved in tumor dormancy, in which tumor growth is held in check by a balance of apoptosis and proliferation.

  17. Optimal control of quantum gates and suppression of decoherence in a system of interacting two-level particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grace, Matthew; Brif, Constantin; Rabitz, Herschel; Walmsley, Ian A; Kosut, Robert L; Lidar, Daniel A

    2007-01-01

    Methods of optimal control are applied to a model system of interacting two-level particles (e.g., spin-half atomic nuclei or electrons or two-level atoms) to produce high-fidelity quantum gates while simultaneously negating the detrimental effect of decoherence. One set of particles functions as the quantum information processor, whose evolution is controlled by a time-dependent external field. The other particles are not directly controlled and serve as an effective environment, coupling to which is the source of decoherence. The control objective is to generate target one- and two-qubit unitary gates in the presence of strong environmentally-induced decoherence and under physically motivated restrictions on the control field. The quantum-gate fidelity, expressed in terms of a novel state-independent distance measure, is maximized with respect to the control field using combined genetic and gradient algorithms. The resulting high-fidelity gates demonstrate the feasibility of precisely guiding the quantum evolution via optimal control, even when the system complexity is exacerbated by environmental coupling. It is found that the gate duration has an important effect on the control mechanism and resulting fidelity. An analysis of the sensitivity of the gate performance to random variations in the system parameters reveals a significant degree of robustness attained by the optimal control solutions

  18. Soil respiration response to climate change in Pacific Northwest prairies is mediated by a regional Mediterranean climate gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Lorien L; Johnson, Bart R; Pfeifer-Meister, Laurel; Bridgham, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    Soil respiration is expected to increase with rising global temperatures but the degree of response may depend on soil moisture and other local factors. Experimental climate change studies from single sites cannot discern whether an observed response is site-dependent or generalizable. To deconvolve site-specific vs. regional climatic controls, we examined soil respiration for 18 months along a 520 km climate gradient in three Pacific Northwest, USA prairies that represents increasingly severe Mediterranean conditions from north to south. At each site we implemented a fully factorial combination of 2.5-3 °C warming and 20% added precipitation intensity. The response of soil respiration to warming was driven primarily by the latitudinal climate gradient and not site-specific factors. Warming increased respiration at all sites during months when soil moisture was not limiting. However, these gains were offset by reductions in respiration during seasonal transitions and summer drought due to lengthened periods of soil moisture limitation. The degree of this offset varied along the north-south climate gradient such that in 2011 warming increased cumulative annual soil respiration 28.6% in the northern site, 13.5% in the central site, and not at all in the southern site. Precipitation also stimulated soil respiration more frequently in the south, consistent with an increased duration of moisture limitation. The best predictors of soil respiration in nonlinear models were the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), antecedent soil moisture, and temperature but these models provided biased results at high and low soil respiration. NDVI was an effective integrator of climate and site differences in plant productivity in terms of their combined effects on soil respiration. Our results suggest that soil moisture limitation can offset the effect of warming on soil respiration, and that greater growing-season moisture limitation would constrain cumulative annual

  19. Decadal warming causes a consistent and persistent shift from heterotrophic to autotrophic respiration in contrasting permafrost ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks Pries, Caitlin E; van Logtestijn, Richard S P; Schuur, Edward A G; Natali, Susan M; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Aerts, Rien; Dorrepaal, Ellen

    2015-12-01

    Soil carbon in permafrost ecosystems has the potential to become a major positive feedback to climate change if permafrost thaw increases heterotrophic decomposition. However, warming can also stimulate autotrophic production leading to increased ecosystem carbon storage-a negative climate change feedback. Few studies partitioning ecosystem respiration examine decadal warming effects or compare responses among ecosystems. Here, we first examined how 11 years of warming during different seasons affected autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration in a bryophyte-dominated peatland in Abisko, Sweden. We used natural abundance radiocarbon to partition ecosystem respiration into autotrophic respiration, associated with production, and heterotrophic decomposition. Summertime warming decreased the age of carbon respired by the ecosystem due to increased proportional contributions from autotrophic and young soil respiration and decreased proportional contributions from old soil. Summertime warming's large effect was due to not only warmer air temperatures during the growing season, but also to warmer deep soils year-round. Second, we compared ecosystem respiration responses between two contrasting ecosystems, the Abisko peatland and a tussock-dominated tundra in Healy, Alaska. Each ecosystem had two different timescales of warming (warming with increased respiration, increased autotrophic contributions to ecosystem respiration, and increased ratios of autotrophic to heterotrophic respiration. We did not detect an increase in old soil carbon losses with warming at either site. If increased autotrophic respiration is balanced by increased primary production, as is the case in the Healy tundra, warming will not cause these ecosystems to become growing season carbon sources. Warming instead causes a persistent shift from heterotrophic to more autotrophic control of the growing season carbon cycle in these carbon-rich permafrost ecosystems. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Effect of rotenone on gill-respiring and plastron-respiring insects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rotenone, a commonly-used piscicide, interferes with the cellular respiration of aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates by preventing the uptake of oxygen. While dose-response relationships have been developed for fish, there are limited comparative data available on aquatic insects that respire either with tracheal gills or ...

  1. Biological control agents for suppression of post-harvest diseases of potatoes: strategies on discovery and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    As used in plant pathology, the term "biological control" or its short form “biocontrol” commonly refers to the decrease in the inoculum or the disease-producing activity of a pathogen accomplished through one or more organisms, including the host plant but excluding man. Biological control of plant...

  2. Adaptive Vibration Suppression System: An Iterative Control Law for a Piezoelectric Actuator Shunted by a Negative Capacitor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodejska, M.; Mokrý, Pavel; Linhart, V.; Václavík, Jan; Sluka, T.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 12 (2012), s. 2785-2796 ISSN 0885-3010 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0079 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : ELASTICITY CONTROL * HARMONIC EXCITATIONS * STRUCTURAL VIBRATION * FEEDBACK-CONTROL * CIRCUITS * MEMBRANE Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.822, year: 2012

  3. Transcriptome analysis of the spalax hypoxia survival response includes suppression of apoptosis and tight control of angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Assaf

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of complex responses to hypoxia has played a key role in the evolution of mammals, as inadequate response to this condition is frequently associated with cardiovascular diseases, developmental disorders, and cancers. Though numerous studies have used mice and rats in order to explore mechanisms that contribute to hypoxia tolerance, these studies are limited due to the high sensitivity of most rodents to severe hypoxia. The blind subterranean mole rat Spalax is a hypoxia tolerant rodent, which exhibits unique longevity and therefore has invaluable potential in hypoxia and cancer research. Results Using microarrays, transcript abundance was measured in brain and muscle tissues from Spalax and rat individuals exposed to acute and chronic hypoxia for varying durations. We found that Spalax global gene expression response to hypoxia differs from that of rat and is characterized by the activation of functional groups of genes that have not been strongly associated with the response to hypoxia in hypoxia sensitive mammals. Using functional enrichment analysis of Spalax hypoxia induced genes we found highly significant overrepresentation of groups of genes involved in anti apoptosis, cancer, embryonic/sexual development, epidermal growth factor receptor binding, coordinated suppression and activation of distinct groups of transcription factors and membrane receptors, in addition to angiogenic related processes. We also detected hypoxia induced increases of different critical Spalax hub gene transcripts, including antiangiogenic genes associated with cancer tolerance in Down syndrome human individuals. Conclusions This is the most comprehensive study of Spalax large scale gene expression response to hypoxia to date, and the first to use custom Spalax microarrays. Our work presents novel patterns that may underlie mechanisms with critical importance to the evolution of hypoxia tolerance, with special relevance to

  4. A review on the effectiveness of street sweeping, washing and dust suppressants as urban PM control methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, F; Querol, X; Johansson, C; Nagl, C; Alastuey, A

    2010-07-15

    Given the absence of a definitive threshold for atmospheric particulate matter (PM)-induced adverse health effects and the evidence of road traffic as a main contributor to PM-urban levels, there is a general agreement in reducing PM-associated health risks by firstly focusing on vehicle traffic sector. Beside the reduction of primary exhaust emissions, recent potential measures are challenging to reduce emissions of particulate matter from abrasion and resuspension processes given the high potential health burden of heavy metals and metalloids sourced by vehicle-wear particles (brakes, tires, rotor, discs and catalysts) and of coarse particles (PM(2.5-10)). Some mitigating measures can be adopted in order to reduce road dust emissions from paved roads by removing or binding those particles already deposited and easy to be resuspended by traffic-generated turbulence. Sweeping, water flushing and use of chemical suppressants are usually more commonly employed to try to diminish emissions, but evaluating the effectiveness of preventive measures on improving air quality is a difficult task, consequently there is a general dearth of information about their effectiveness in reducing ambient PM concentrations. In particular, the scientific bibliography seems to be particularly scarce, whilst most of the information comes from local authorities committees. Consequently the existing reports are often aimed only to the municipalities and in the native language, with an objective difficulty for the international scientific community to access to them. For this review we have gathered contributions from some of major experts in this field, with the purpose of taking advantage of their background and personal awareness about any kind of related reports even not in English. Furthermore, the results we have gathered are often dissimilar, probably due to the different local conditions (weather, road pavement conditions etc.), therefore another objective of the review is to make a

  5. Substrate-specific changes in mitochondrial respiration in skeletal and cardiac muscle of hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jason C L; Staples, James F

    2014-04-01

    During torpor, the metabolic rate (MR) of thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) is considerably lower relative to euthermia, resulting in part from temperature-independent mitochondrial metabolic suppression in liver and skeletal muscle, which together account for ~40% of basal MR. Although heart accounts for very little (respiration rates were decreased up to 60% during torpor in both subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IM) mitochondria from cardiac muscle. We further demonstrated pronounced seasonal (summer vs. winter [i.e., interbout] euthermia) changes in respiration rates in both mitochondrial subpopulations in this tissue, consistent with a shift in fuel use away from carbohydrates and proteins and towards fatty acids and ketones. By contrast, these seasonal changes in respiration rates were not observed in either SS or IM mitochondria isolated from hind limb skeletal muscle. Both populations of skeletal muscle mitochondria, however, did exhibit metabolic suppression during torpor, and this suppression was 2- to 3-fold greater in IM mitochondria, which provide ATP for Ca(2+)- and myosin ATPases, the activities of which are likely quite low in skeletal muscle during torpor because animals are immobile. Finally, these changes in mitochondrial respiration rates were still evident when standardized to citrate synthase activity rather than to total mitochondrial protein.

  6. Assessment of half-mask elastomeric respirator and powered air-purifying respirator reprocessing for an influenza pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Caryn; Harnish, Delbert A; Sandoval-Powers, Megan; Mills, Devin; Bergman, Michael; Heimbuch, Brian K

    2017-12-01

    Health care facilities are considering the use of reusable respiratory protective devices (RPDs) to mitigate a potential N95 filtering facepiece respirator shortage caused by an influenza pandemic. US regulators are also considering stockpiling reusable RPDs for pandemic preparedness, but limited data exist on the effectiveness of cleaning and disinfection of these devices. This study defines reprocessing protocols and evaluates their effectiveness against a pandemic influenza strain in a laboratory setting. Five half-mask elastomeric respirator models and 3 powered air-purifying respirator models were contaminated with influenza virus and artificial skin oil on multiple surfaces. RPDs were then manually treated with 1 of 2 methods: cleaned or cleaned and disinfected. Presence of viable influenza was determined via swab sampling and a median tissue culture infectious dose assay. Across 41 RPD surfaces, a mean log reduction in viable influenza of 4.54 ± 0.97 log 10 median tissue culture infectious dose was achieved for all treated surfaces, which included both cleaned and cleaned and disinfected surfaces. The methods defined as part of this study are effective for eliminating viable influenza in the presence of artificial skin oil on most of the RPD surfaces tested. Material type and RPD design should be considered when implementing RPD reprocessing protocols. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Simplified pressure method for respirator fit testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, D; Xu, M; Foo, S; Pilacinski, W; Willeke, K

    1991-08-01

    A simplified pressure method has been developed for fit testing air-purifying respirators. In this method, the air-purifying cartridges are replaced by a pressure-sensing attachment and a valve. While wearers hold their breath, a small pump extracts air from the respirator cavity until a steady-state pressure is reached in 1 to 2 sec. The flow rate through the face seal leak is a unique function of this pressure, which is determined once for all respirators, regardless of the respirator's cavity volume or deformation because of pliability. The contaminant concentration inside the respirator depends on the degree of dilution by the flow through the cartridges. The cartridge flow varies among different brands and is measured once for each brand. The ratio of cartridge to leakflow is a measure of fit. This flow ratio has been measured on human subjects and has been compared to fit factors determined on the same subjects by means of photometric and particle count tests. The aerosol tests gave higher values of fit.

  8. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and tissue respiration of pea leaves under clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brykov, Vasyl

    2016-07-01

    Respiration is essential for growth, maintenance, and carbon balance of all plant cells. Mitochondrial respiration in plants provides energy for biosynthesis, and its balance with photosynthesis determines the rate of plant biomass accumulation (production). Mitochondria are not only the energetic organelles in a cell but they play an essential regulatory role in many basic cellular processes. As plants adapt to real and simulated microgravity, it is very important to understand the state of mitochondria in these conditions. Disturbance of respiratory metabolism can significantly affect the productivity of plants in long-term space flights. We have established earlier that the rate of respiration in root apices of pea etiolated seedlings rose after 7 days of clinorotation. These data indicate the oxygen increased requirement by root apices under clinorotation, that confirms the necessity of sufficient substrate aeration in space greenhouses to provide normal respiratory metabolism and supply of energy for root growth. In etiolated seedlings, substrate supply of mitochondria occurs at the expense of the mobilization of cotyledon nutrients. A goal of our work was to study the ultrastructure and respiration of mitochondria in pea leaves after 12 days of clinorotation during (2 rpm/min). Plants grew at a light level of 180 μµmol m ^{-2} s ^{-1} PAR and a photoperiod of 16 h light/4 h dark. It was showed an essential increase in the mitochondrion area on 53% in palisade parenchyma cells at the sections. Such phenomenon can not be described as swelling of mitochondria, since enlarged mitochondria contained a more quantity of crista 1.76 times. In addition, the cristae total area per organelle also increased in comparison with that in control. An increase in a size of mitochondria in the experimental conditions is supposed to occur by a partial alteration of the chondriom. Thus, a size of 49% mitochondria in control was 0.1 - 0.3 μµm ^{2}, whereas only 26

  9. Ecosystem warming does not affect photosynthesis or aboveground autotrophic respiration for boreal black spruce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronson, D.R. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Renewable Resources; Gower, S.T. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Forest Ecology and Management

    2010-04-15

    Substantial increases in climatic temperatures may cause boreal forests to become a carbon source. An improved understanding of the effect of climatic warming on photosynthesis and autotrophic respiration is needed in order to determine the impact of temperature increases on net carbon balances. This study measured the light-saturated photosynthesis foliage respiration and stem respiration of black spruce in heated and control plots during a 3-year period at a site located in Thompson, Manitoba. Greenhouses and soil-heating cables were used to maintain air and soil temperatures at 5 degrees C above ambient air and soil temperatures. Studies were conducted to determine the influence of soil and air warming; soil-only warming; and greenhouses maintained at ambient temperatures. The study showed that treatment differences for photosynthesis, foliage respiration, and stem respiration were not significant over the 3-year period. Results suggested that black spruce may not have significant changes in photosynthesis or respiration rates in warmer climates. 38 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  10. Effects of Vegetation Type and Management Practice on Soil Respiration of Grassland in Northern Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minaco Adachi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil respiration rate in two types of grassland dominated with Zoysia japonica and Miscanthus sinensis, respectively, and under two management practices (undisturbed and intentionally burned for the M. sinensis grassland was investigated for understanding the effects of grassland vegetation type and management practices on the relationship between soil temperature and soil respiration in northern Japan. Soil temperatures at depth of 1 cm in the Z. japonica (ZJ and burned M. sinensis (MSb plots had a larger temporal variation than that in the control M. sinensis (MSc plot prior to early July. However, the coefficient of temperature sensitivity ( values, based on soil respiration rates and soil temperatures at 5 cm depth in the ZJ and MSb plots, were 1.3 and 2.9. These rates were lower than that in the MSc plot (4.3, meaning that soil respiration showed lower activity to an increase in soil temperature in the ZJ and MSb plots. In addition, monthly carbon fluxes from soil in these plots were smaller than that in the MSc plot. These results suggested that artificial disturbance would decrease soil microbial or/and plant root respiration, and it would contribute to the plant productivity. Future studies should examine the effects of the intensity and period of management on the soil respiration rate.

  11. Carbon balance of a subarctic meadow under 3 r{ C warming - unravelling respiration}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvennoinen, Hanna; Bárcena, Téresa G.; Moni, Christophe; Szychowski, Marcin; Rajewicz, Paulina; Höglind, Mats; Rasse, Daniel P.

    2016-04-01

    Boreal and arctic terrestrial ecosystems are central to the climate change debate, as the warming is expected to be disproportionate as compared to world averages. Northern areas contain large terrestrial carbon (C) stocks further increasing the interest in the C cycle's fate in changing climate. In 2013, we started an ecosystem warming experiment at a meadow in Eastern Finnmark, NE Norway. The meadow was on a clay soil and its vegetation was common meadow grasses and clover. Typical local agronomy was applied. The study site featured ten 4m-wide hexagonal plots, five control and five actively warmed plots in randomized complete block design. Each of the warmed plots was continuously maintained 3 ° C above its associated control plot with infrared heaters controlled by canopy thermal sensors. In 2014-2015, we measured net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and respiration twice per week during growth seasons from preinstalled collars of each site with dynamic, temperature-controlled chambers combined to an infrared analyzer. Despite warming-induced differences in yield, species composition and root biomass, neither the NEE nor the respiration responded to the warming, all sites remaining equal sinks for C. Following this observation, we carried out an additional experiment in 2015 where we aimed at partitioning the total CO2 flux to microbial and plant respiration as well as at recording the growth season variation of those parameters in situ. Here, we used an approach based on natural abundances of 13C. The δ13C signature of both autotrophic plant respiration and heterotrophic microbial respiration were obtained in targeted incubations (Snell et al. 2014). Then, the δ13C -signature of the total soil respiration was determined in the field by Keeling approach with dynamic dark chambers combined to CRDS. Proportions of autotrophic and heterotrophic components in total soil respiration were then derived based on 13C mixing model. Incubations were repeated at early, mid and

  12. Effects of fire and harvest on soil respiration in a mixed-conifer forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, S.; Fry, D.; Stephens, S.

    2012-12-01

    Forest ecosystems, and in particular forest soils, constitute a major reservoir of global terrestrial carbon and soil respiration is the largest carbon loss from these ecosystems. Disturbances can affect soil respiration, causing physical and chemical changes in soil characteristics, adding both, above and belowground necromass, and changing microclimatic conditions. This could signify an important and long term carbon loss, even higher than the carbon directly removed by the harvest or during fire. These losses need to be included when quantifying the net carbon balance of forests. We measured the impacts of prescribed fire and clear-cut tree harvest on soil respiration in a mixed-conifer forest in the central Sierra Nevada. The prescribed fire treatment was implemented in 2002 and again in 2009. Four areas were clear-cut harvested in 2010. In half of these units the soils were mechanically ripped to reduce soil compaction, a common practice in the Sierra Nevada industrial forest lands. Soil respiration was measured using two different techniques: the chamber method and the gradient method. Soil respiration was affected by treatments in two different ways. First, treatments changed soil temperature and soil water content, the main abiotic factors controlling soil respiration. The clear cut and the prescribed fire treatments created higher maximum soil temperature and more available soil water content, environmental conditions favorable to soil respiration. However, the loss of trees and thus fine roots, and the decrease of soil litter and organic layers, because of their combustion or removal, had a negative effect on soil respiration that was stronger than the positive effect due to more favorable post disturbance environmental conditions. Soil respiration rates remained steady 1-2 years after treatments and no increase or spikes of soil respiration were measured after treatments. Continuous measurements of CO2 concentrations at different soil depths improved our

  13. [Soil respiration and carbon balance in wheat field under conservation tillage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sai; Wang, Long-Chang; Huang, Zhao-Cun; Jia, Hui-Juan; Ran, Chun-Yan

    2014-06-01

    In order to study the characteristics of carbon sources and sinks in the winter wheat farmland ecosystem in southwest hilly region of China, the LI6400-09 respiratory chamber was adopted in the experiment conducted in the experimental field in Southwest University in Chongqing. The soil respiration and plant growth dynamics were analyzed during the growth period of wheat in the triple intercropping system of wheat-maize-soybean. Four treatments including T (traditional tillage), R (ridge tillage), TS (traditional tillage + straw mulching), and RS (ridge tillage + straw mulching) were designed. Root biomass regression (RR) and root exclusion (RE) were used to compare the contribution of root respiration to total soil respiration. The results showed that the average soil respiration rate was 1.71 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1) with a variation of 0.62-2.91 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1). Significant differences in soil respiration rate were detected among different treatments. The average soil respiration rate of T, R, TS and RS were 1.29, 1.59, 1.99 and 1.96 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1), respectively. R treatment did not increase the soil respiration rate significantly until the jointing stage. Straw mulching treatment significantly increased soil respiration, with a steadily high rate during the whole growth period. During the 169 days of growth, the total soil respiration was 2 266.82, 2799.52, 3 483.73 and 3 443.89 kg x hm(-2) while the cumulative aboveground biomasses were 51 800.84, 59 563.20, 66 015.37 and 7 1331.63 kg x hm(-2). Compared with the control, the yield of R, TS and RS increased by 14.99%, 27.44% and 37.70%, respectively. The contribution of root respiration to total soil respiration was 47.05% by RBR, while it was 53.97% by RE. In the early growth period, the carbon source was weak. The capacity of carbon sink started to increase at the jointing stage and reached the maximum during the filling stage. The carbon budget of wheat field was 5 924.512, 6743.807, 8350

  14. Application of matrix singular value properties for evaluating gain and phase margins of multiloop systems. [stability margins for wing flutter suppression and drone lateral attitude control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, V.; Newsom, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    A stability margin evaluation method in terms of simultaneous gain and phase changes in all loops of a multiloop system is presented. A universal gain-phase margin evaluation diagram is constructed by generalizing an existing method using matrix singular value properties. Using this diagram and computing the minimum singular value of the system return difference matrix over the operating frequency range, regions of guaranteed stability margins can be obtained. Singular values are computed for a wing flutter suppression and a drone lateral attitude control problem. The numerical results indicate that this method predicts quite conservative stability margins. In the second example if the eigenvalue magnitude is used instead of the singular value, as a measure of nearness to singularity, more realistic stability margins are obtained. However, this relaxed measure generally cannot guarantee global stability.

  15. Soil respiration partition and its components in the total agro-ecosystem respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delogu, Emilie; LeDantec, Valerie; Mordelet, Patrick; Buysse, Pauline; Aubinet, Marc; Pattey, Elizabeth; Mary, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Close to 15% of the Earth's terrestrial surface is used for cropland. In the context of global warming, and acknowledged by the Kyoto Protocol, agricultural soils could be a significant sink for atmospheric CO2. Understanding the factors influencing carbon fluxes of agricultural soils is essential for implementing efficient mitigation practices. Most of the soil respiration modeling studies was carried out in forest ecosystems, but only a few was carried out in agricultural ecosystems. In the study, we evaluated simple formalisms to model soil respiration using wheat data from four contrasting geographical mi-latitude regions. Soil respiration were measured in three winter wheat fields at Lamasquère (43°49'N, 01°23'E, 2007) and Auradé (43°54'N, 01°10'E, 2008), South-West France and Lonzée (50°33'N, 4°44'E, 2007), Belgium, and in a spring wheat field at Ottawa (45°22'N, 75°43'W, 2007, 2011), Ontario, Canada. Manual closed chambers were used in the French sites. The Belgium and Canadian sites were equipped with automated closed chamber systems, which continuously collected 30-min soil respiration exchanges. All the sites were also equipped with eddy flux towers. When eddy flux data were collected over bare soil, the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was equal to soil respiration exchange. These NEE data were used to validate the model. Different biotic and abiotic descriptors were used to model daily soil respiration and its heterotrophic and autotrophic components: soil temperature, soil relative humidity, Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), shoot biomass, crop height, with different formalisms. It was interesting to conclude that using biotic descriptors did not improve the performances of the model. In fact, a combination of abiotic descriptors (soil humidity and soil temperature) allowed significant model formalism to model soil respiration. The simple soil respiration model was used to calculate the heterotrophic and autotrophic source contributions to

  16. The development of the DAST I remotely piloted research vehicle for flight testing an active flutter suppression control system. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The development of the DAST I (drones for aerodynamic and structural testing) remotely piloted research vehicle is described. The DAST I is a highly modified BQM-34E/F Firebee II Supersonic Aerial Target incorporating a swept supercritical wing designed to flutter within the vehicle's flight envelope. The predicted flutter and rigid body characteristics are presented. A description of the analysis and design of an active flutter suppression control system (FSS) designed to increase the flutter boundary of the DAST wing (ARW-1) by a factor of 20% is given. The design and development of the digital remotely augmented primary flight control system and on-board analog backup control system is presented. An evaluation of the near real-time flight flutter testing methods is made by comparing results of five flutter testing techniques on simulated DAST I flutter data. The development of the DAST ARW-1 state variable model used to generate time histories of simulated accelerometer responses is presented. This model uses control surface commands and a Dryden model gust as inputs. The feasibility of the concept of extracting open loop flutter characteristics from closed loop FSS responses was examined. It was shown that open loop characteristics can be determined very well from closed loop subcritical responses.

  17. Easy to Learn, Hard to Suppress: The Impact of Learned Stimulus-Outcome Associations on Subsequent Action Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wouwe, N.C.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.; Ridderinkhof, K. R.; Claassen, D.O.; Neimat, J.S.; Wylie, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of impulsive response tendencies that conflict with goal-directed action is a key component of executive control. An emerging literature reveals that the proficiency of inhibitory control is modulated by expected or unexpected opportunities to earn reward or avoid punishment. However, less is known about how inhibitory control is impacted by the processing of task-irrelevant stimulus information that has been associated previously with particular outcomes (reward or punishment) or response tendencies (action or inaction). We hypothesized that stimulus features associated with particular action-valence tendencies, even though task irrelevant, would modulate inhibitory control processes. Participants first learned associations between stimulus features (color), actions, and outcomes using an action-valence learning task that orthogonalizes action (action, inaction) and valence (reward, punishment). Next, these stimulus features were embedded in a Simon task as a task-irrelevant stimulus attribute. We analyzed the effects of action-valence associations on the Simon task by means of distributional analysis to reveal the temporal dynamics. Learning patterns replicated previously reported biases; inherent, Pavlovian-like mappings (action-reward, inaction-punishment avoidance) were easier to learn than mappings conflicting with these biases (action-punishment avoidance, inaction-reward). More importantly, results from two experiments demonstrated that the easier to learn, Pavlovian-like action-valence associations interfered with the proficiency of inhibiting impulsive actions in the Simon task. Processing conflicting associations led to more proficient inhibitory control of impulsive actions, similar to Simon trials without any association. Fast impulsive errors were reduced for trials associated with punishment in comparison to reward trials or trials without any valence association. These findings provide insight into the temporal dynamics of task

  18. Thresholds and interactive effects of soil moisture on the temperature response of soil respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lellei-Kovács, Eszter; Kovács-Láng, Edit; Botta-Dukát, Zoltán

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystem carbon exchange is poorly understood in low-productivity, semiarid habitats. Here we studied the controls of soil temperature and moisture on soil respiration in climate change field experiment in a sandy forest-steppe. Soil CO2 efflux was measured monthly from April to November in 2003......–2008 on plots receiving either rain exclusion or nocturnal warming, or serving as ambient control. Based on this dataset, we developed and compared empirical models of temperature and moisture effects on soil respiration. Results suggest that in this semiarid ecosystem the main controlling factor for soil CO2...... efflux is soil temperature, while soil moisture has less, although significant effect on soil respiration. Clear thresholds for moisture effects on temperature sensitivity were identified at 0.6, 4.0 and 7.0vol% by almost each model, which relate well to other known limits for biological activity...

  19. Tyrosine Pretreatment Alleviates Suppression of Schedule-Controlled Responding Produced by Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF) in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    controlled behavior can stimulate DA synthesis in the striatum, possibly by direct with CRF that are not largely schedule- or rate-dependent receptor...rate creased synthesis of DA. Clearly, further study of the neural of responding, total reinforcers earned in the FI component was mechanisms which...anorexia sistent with previous reports in which tyrosine either reduced or produced by phenylpropanolamine, ephedrine , or amphetamine. completely

  20. Evaluation of the efficacy and mode of action of biological control for suppression of ganoderma boninense in oil palm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, A.; Abdullah, S.; Rossall, S.; Chong, K.P.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of potential antagonists, a commercial product containing combinations of microorganisms (TR1) to control Ganoderma boninense growth was investigated in this research. TR1 contained multiple strains of Bacillus spp. and Trichoderma spp. The results from field experiments showed that TR1 was all able to reduce the colonization of G. boninense, based on re-isolation of the pathogen onto a selective medium and the reduction of ergosterol content compared to untreated controls. Effectiveness of TR1 was therefore further investigated for mode of action studies. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations of Ganoderma mycelium, recovered from bioassay plates on which TR1 had inhibited fungal growth, showed that the mycelium was highly disrupted and lysed after exposure to the treatment. The production of potentially antifungal components produced by TR1 microbes in broth cultures was further investigated using Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (LCMS). Several antimicrobial compounds, which could inhibit G. boninense were detected, including pyrene-1,6-dione, 12-deoxyaklanonic acid, N-methyl-a-aminoisobutyric acid, 4-O-8',5 - 5'-dehydrotriferulic acid, halstoctacosanolide A, N-acetyl-leu-leu-tyr-amide, 12-oxo-10Z-dodecenoic acid, Gly-Met-OH and lovastatin. These metabolites probably contribute to the antagonistic effect against G. boninense. The use of TR1 could offer an alternative to the use of fungicides and is worthy of further investigation for the control of Ganoderma infection of oil palm. (author)

  1. Droop Control of Solar PV, Grid and Critical Load using Suppressing DC Current Injection Technique without Battery Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dama Mr., Jayachandra; (Mrs. , Lini Mathew, Dr.; Srikanth Mr., G.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents design of a sustainable solar Photo voltaic system for an Indian cities based residential/community house, integrated with grid, supporting it as supplementary sources, to meet energy demand of domestic loads. The role of renewable energy sources in Distributed Generation (DG) is increasingly being recognized as a supplement and an alternative to large conventional central power supply. Though centralized economic system that solely depends on cities is hampered due to energy deficiency, the use of solar energy in cities is never been tried widely due to technical inconvenience and high installation cost. To mitigate these problems, this paper proposes an optimized design of grid-tied PV system without storage which is suitable for Indian origin as it requires less installallation cost and supplies residential loads when the grid power is unavailable. The energy requirement is mainly fulfilled from PV energy module for critical load of a city located residential house and supplemented by grid/DG for base and peak load. The system has been developed for maximum daily household demand of 50kWp and can be scaled to any higher value as per requirement of individual/community building ranging from 50kWp to 60kWp as per the requirement. A simplified control system model has been developed to optimize and control flow of power from these sources. The simulation work, using MATLAB Simulink software for proposed energy management, has resulted in an optimal yield leading efficient power flow control of proposed system.

  2. Soil Respiration Declines Following Beetle - Induced Forest Mortality in a Lodgepole Pine Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkhuu, B.; Peckham, S. D.; Norton, U.; Ewers, B. E.; Pendall, E.

    2014-12-01

    Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) forests in northern Colorado and southeast Wyoming have been undergoing a major mortality event owing to mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) infestation since 2007. We studied biotic and abiotic drivers of growing season soil respiration in four mature stands experiencing different levels of mortality between 2008 and 2012 in the Medicine Bow Mountains, southeastern Wyoming, USA. For five years, beetle infestation significantly altered forest structure. Stand mortality was 30% and more than 80% in stands with the lowest and highest mortality, respectively. Understory vegetation cover increased by 50% for five years following beetle infestation. Needlefall was increased by more than 50% during first two years of beetle infestation compared to the pre-disturbance period. We did not observe an immediate increase in soil respiration following beetle infestation as suggested by some researchers. Soil respiration rates in midsummer ranged from 1.4 ± 0.1 μmol m-2 s-1 in stands with highest mortality to 3.1 ± 0.2 μmol m-2s-1 in uninfested stand. Live tree basal area was the dominant factor controlling soil respiration, explaining more than 60% of the interannual and spatial variations in response to the disturbance. In addition, soil respiration was significantly correlated with fine root biomass, which explained 55% of variations, providing strong evidence that autotrophic respiration dominated the forest soil respiration flux. Furthermore, the seasonality of soil respiration was controlled mainly by mean monthly precipitation and mid-day photosynthetically active radiation. Each factor predicted from 30% to 50% of seasonal soil respiration variability with the highest correlation coefficients in stand with the lowest mortality. Our results clearly indicate that the reduction of photosynthesis in trees over the infestation period significantly reduced soil respiration. The remaining activity in dead stands may

  3. A computational study of drag reduction and vortex shedding suppression of flow past a square cylinder in presence of small control cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Shams-Ul.; Manzoor, Raheela; Islam, Zia-Ul.; Kalsoom, Shazia; Ying, Zhou Chao

    2017-04-01

    This article presents a two-dimensional numerical study of the unsteady laminar flow from a square cylinder in presence of multiple small control cylinders. The cylinders are placed in an unconfined medium at low Reynolds numbers (Re = 100 and 160). Different flow phenomena are captured for the gap spacings (g = s/D, where s is the surface-to-surface distance between the main cylinder and small control cylinders and D is the size of the main cylinder) between 0.25 - 3 and angle of attack (θ) ranging from 300 to 1800. Numerical calculations are performed by using a lattice Boltzmann method. In this paper, the important flow physics of different observed flow patterns in terms of instantaneous vorticity contours visualization, time-trace analysis of drag and lift coefficients and power spectra analysis of lift coefficient are presented and discussed. Drag reduction and suppression of vortex shedding is also discussed in detail and compared with the available experimental and numerical results qualitatively as well as quantitatively. In addition, the mean drag coefficient, Strouhal number, root-mean-square values of the drag and lift coefficients are determined and compared with a single square cylinder without small control cylinders. We found that the drag is reduced 99.8% and 97.6% for (θ, g) = (300, 3) at Re = 100 and 160, respectively.

  4. Efficacy of Glutamate Modulators in Tic Suppression: A Double-Blind, Randomized Control Trial of D-serine and Riluzole in Tourette Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, Monica E; Grados, Marco; Kline, Tina; Thompson, Carol B; Ali, Syed F; Singer, Harvey S

    2015-06-01

    It has been hypothesized that glutamatergic transmission may be altered in Tourette syndrome. In this study, we explored the efficacy of a glutamate agonist (D-serine) and antagonist (riluzole) as tic-suppressing agents in children with Tourette syndrome. We performed a parallel three-arm, 8-week, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled treatment study in children with Tourette syndrome. Each child received 6 weeks of treatment with D-serine (maximum dose 30 mg/kg/day), riluzole (maximum dose 200 mg/day), or placebo, followed by a 2-week taper. The primary outcome measure was effective tic suppression as determined by the differences in the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale score; specifically, the total tic score and the combined score (total tic score + global impairment) between treatment arms after 6 weeks of treatment. Mann-Whitney U tests were performed to analyze differences between each group and the placebo group. Twenty-four patients (males = 21, ages 9-18) enrolled in the study; one patient dropped out before completion. Combined Yale Global Tic Severity Scale score and total tic scores improved in all groups. The 6-week mean percent improvement of the riluzole (n = 10), D-serine (n = 9), and placebo (n = 5) groups in the combined Yale Global Tic Severity Scale score were 43.7, 39.5, and 30.2 and for total tic scores were 38.0, 25.0, and 34.0, respectively. There were no significant differences in Yale Global Tic Severity Scale score or total tic score, respectively, between the riluzole and placebo (P = 0.35, 0.85) or D-serine and placebo (P = 0.50, 0.69) groups. Tics diminished by comparable percentages in the riluzole, D-serine, and placebo groups. These preliminary data suggest that D-serine and riluzole are not effective in tic suppression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. LIMITATION OF SOIL RESPIRATION DURING DRY PERIOD

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Marian; Janouš, Dalibor; Acosta, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 16, - (2003), s. 47-52. ISBN 80-7157-297-7 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA AV ČR IBS6087005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : moisture * Norway spruce * precipitation * respiration * soil CO2 efflux Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  6. THE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL DAMAGE ON RESPIRATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The drops were meant to simulate handling, road and vehicle conditions that the tomatoes are subjected to from the areas of production to market outlets. Respiration, compositional ... The level of ripeness followed the reverse trend to that of chlorophyll as it was measured in terms of the attainment of red color. Decay was ...

  7. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4) Air...

  8. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic...

  9. Partitioning of ecosystem respiration in a beech forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brændholt, Andreas; Ibrom, Andreas; Larsen, Klaus Steenberg

    2018-01-01

    of Reco in a temperate beech forest at diel, seasonal and annual time scales. Reco was measured by eddy covariance while respiration rates from soil, tree stems and isolated coarse tree roots were measured bi-hourly by an automated closed-chamber system. Soil respiration (Rsoil) was measured in intact...... with the highest respiration rates around 13:00-15:00 CET for Rstem, and the highest respiration seen from 9:00–15:00 for Rroot. In contrast, Rsoil showed the lowest respiration during daytime with no clear difference in the diel pattern between the intact and trenched soil plots. Finally, we calculated annual......Terrestrial ecosystem respiration (Reco) represents a major component of the global carbon cycle. It consists of many sub-components, such as aboveground plant respiration and belowground root and microbial respiration, each of which may respond differently to abiotic factors, and thus to global...

  10. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic ...

  11. New Adaptive Algorithms for GOP Size Control with Return Channel Suppression in Wyner-Ziv Video Coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Yaacoub

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present novel algorithms for adaptive GOP size control in distributed Wyner-Ziv video coding, where an H.264 video codec is used for intracoding of key frames. The proposed algorithms rely on theoretical calculations to estimate the bit rate necessary for the successful decoding of Wyner-Ziv frames without the need for a feedback channel, which makes the system suitable for broadcasting applications. Additionally, in regions where H.264 intracoding outperforms Wyner-Ziv coding, the system automatically switches to intracoding mode in order to improve the overall performance. Simulations results show a significant gain in the average PSNR that can reach 3 dB compared to pure H.264 intracoding, and 0.8 dB compared to fixed-GOP Wyner-Ziv coding.

  12. MicroRNA-125b-5p suppresses Brucella abortus intracellular survival via control of A20 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Lin; Sun, Changjiang; Yang, Li; Sun, Wanchun; Peng, Qisheng

    2016-07-29

    Brucella may establish chronic infection by regulating the expression of miRNAs. However, the role of miRNAs in modulating the intracellular growth of Brucella remains unclear. In this study, we show that Brucella. abortus infection leads to downregulation of miR-125b-5p in macrophages. We establish that miR-125b-5p targets A20, an inhibitor of the NF-kB activation. Additionally, expression of miR-125b-5p decreases A20 expression in B. abortus-infected macrophages and leads to NF-kB activation and increased production of TNFα. Furthermore, B. abortus survival is attenuated in the presence of miR-125b-5p. These results uncover a role for miR-125b-5p in the regulation of B. abortus intracellular survival via the control of A20 expression.

  13. Discovery and therapeutic potential of drugs that shift energy metabolism from mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohil, Vishal M.; Sheth, Sunil A.; Nilsson, Roland; Wojtovich, Andrew P.; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Perocchi, Fabiana; Chen, William; Clish, Clary B.; Ayata, Cenk; Brookes, Paul S.; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2010-01-01

    Most cells can dynamically shift their relative reliance on glycolytic versus oxidative metabolism in response to nutrient availability, during development, and in disease. Studies in model systems have shown that re-directing energy metabolism from respiration to glycolysis can suppress oxidative damage and cell death in ischemic injury. At present we have a limited set of drugs that safely toggle energy metabolism in humans. Here, we introduce a quantitative, nutrient sensitized screening strategy that can identify such compounds based on their ability to selectively impair growth and viability of cells grown in galactose versus glucose. We identify several FDA approved agents never before linked to energy metabolism, including meclizine, which blunts cellular respiration via a mechanism distinct from canonical inhibitors. We further show that meclizine pretreatment confers cardioprotection and neuroprotection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in murine models. Nutrient-sensitized screening may offer a useful framework for understanding gene function and drug action within the context of energy metabolism. PMID:20160716

  14. Lipid peroxidation and cytotoxicity induced by respirable volcanic ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Gomez-Vidales, Virginia; Ramirez-Apan, María Teresa; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención; Kaufhold, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Respirable volcanic ash induces oxidative degradation of lipids in cell membranes. • Respirable volcanic ash triggers cytotoxicity in murin monocyle/macrophage cells. • Oxidative stress is surface controlled but not restricted by surface- Fe 3+ . • Surface Fe 3+ acts as a stronger inductor in allophanes vs phyllosilicates or oxides. • Registered cell-viability values were as low as 68.5 ± 6.7%. - Abstract: This paper reports that the main component of respirable volcanic ash, allophane, induces lipid peroxidation (LP), the oxidative degradation of lipids in cell membranes, and cytotoxicity in murin monocyle/macrophage cells. Naturally-occurring allophane collected from New Zealand, Japan, and Ecuador was studied. The quantification of LP was conducted using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) assay. The cytotoxic effect was determined by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay. Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) determinations of naturally-occurring allophane confirmed the incorporation in the structure and clustering of structural Fe 3+ , and nucleation and growth of small-sized Fe (oxyhydr)oxide or gibbsite. LP induced by allophane varied with time, and solid concentration and composition, reaching 6.7 ± 0.2 nmol TBARS mg prot −1 . LP was surface controlled but not restricted by structural or surface-bound Fe 3+ , because redox processes induced by soluble components other than perferryl iron. The reactivity of Fe 3+ soluble species stemming from surface-bound Fe 3+ or small-sized Fe 3+ refractory minerals in allophane surpassed that of structural Fe 3+ located in tetrahedral or octahedral sites of phyllosilicates or bulk iron oxides. Desferrioxamine B mesylate salt (DFOB) or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) inhibited LP. EDTA acted as a more effective inhibitor, explained by multiple electron transfer pathways. Registered cell-viability values were as low as 68.5

  15. Acceptable respiratory protection program and LASL respirator research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaggs, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    A short history is presented on the LASL Respiratory Protection Training Programs. Then a discussion is given on the major points of an acceptable respiratory protection program utilizing the points required by the Occupational, Safety, and Health Administration (OSHA) Regulation 29 CFR 1910.134. Contributions to respirator research are reviewed. Discussion is presented under the following section headings: program administration; respirator selection; respirator use; fitting and training; respirator maintenance; medical clearance and surveillance; special problems; program evaluation; and documentation (records).

  16. Contribution of root to soil respiration and carbon balance in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soil respiration varied from 2.5 to 11.9 g CO2 m-2 d-1 and from 1.5 to 9.3 g CO2 m-2 d-1, and the contribution of root respiration to total soil respiration from 38% to 76% and from 25% to 72% in Communities 1 and 2, respectively. During the growing season (May–September), soil respiration, shoot biomass, live root ...

  17. Acceptable respiratory protection program and LASL respirator research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    A short history is presented on the LASL Respiratory Protection Training Programs. Then a discussion is given on the major points of an acceptable respiratory protection program utilizing the points required by the Occupational, Safety, and Health Administration (OSHA) Regulation 29 CFR 1910.134. Contributions to respirator research are reviewed. Discussion is presented under the following section headings: program administration; respirator selection; respirator use; fitting and training; respirator maintenance; medical clearance and surveillance; special problems; program evaluation; and documentation

  18. Identification of Botrytis cinerea genes up-regulated during infection and controlled by the Galpha subunit BCG1 using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze Gronover, Christian; Schorn, Corinna; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2004-05-01

    The Galpha subunit BCG1 plays an important role during the infection of host plants by Botrytis cinerea. Delta bcg1 mutants are able to conidiate, penetrate host leaves, and produce small primary lesions. However, in contrast to the wild type, the mutants completely stop invasion of plant tissue at this stage; secondary lesions have never been observed. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to identify fungal genes whose expression on the host plant is specifically affected in bcg1 mutants. Among the 22 differentially expressed genes, we found those which were predicted to encode proteases, enzymes involved in secondary metabolism, and others encoding cell wall-degrading enzymes. All these genes are highly expressed during infection in the wild type but not in the mutant. However, the genes are expressed in both the wild type and the mutant under certain conditions in vitro. Most of the BCG1-controlled genes are still expressed in adenylate cyclase (bac) mutants in planta, suggesting that BCG1 is involved in at least one additional signaling cascade in addition to the cAMP-depending pathway. In a second SSH approach, 1,500 clones were screened for those that are specifically induced by the wild type during the infection of bean leaves. Of the 22 BCG1-controlled genes, 11 also were found in the in planta SSH library. Therefore, SSH technology can be successfully applied to identify target genes of signaling pathways and differentially expressed genes in planta.

  19. Control of a small working robot on a large flexible manipulator for suppressing vibrations: Development of a robust control law for flexible robot and it's stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Han Lee

    1991-01-01

    Researchers developed a robust control law for slow motions for the accurate trajectory control of a flexible robot. The control law does not need larger velocity gains than position gains, which some researchers need to ensure the stability of a rigid robot. Initial experimentation for the Small Articulated Manipulator (SAM) shows that control laws that use smaller velocity gains are more robust to signal noise than the control laws that use larger velocity gains. Researchers analyzed the stability of the composite control law, the robust control for the slow motion, and the strain rate feedback for the fast control. The stability analysis was done by using a quadratic Liapunov function. Researchers found that the flexible motion of links could be controlled by relating the input force to the flexible signals which are sensed at the near tip of each link. The signals are contaminated by the time delayed input force. However, the effect of the time delayed input force can be reduced by giving a certain configuration to the SAM.

  20. Separating autotrophic respiration due to roots from soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil respiration is the largest component of ecosystem respiration but little is known about it and its components in parkland systems. We therefore conducted an experiment to estimate the amount of CO2 respired and to partition it into soil, tree root and crop root contributions in parkland systems in Burkina Faso.

  1. 21 CFR 892.1970 - Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. 892.1970... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1970 Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. (a) Identification. A radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer is a device intended to be used to...

  2. 20 CFR 718.303 - Death from a respirable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Death from a respirable disease. 718.303... from a respirable disease. (a)(1) If a deceased miner was employed for ten or more years in one or more coal mines and died from a respirable disease, there shall be a rebuttable presumption that his or her...

  3. 20 CFR 410.462 - Presumption relating to respirable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Presumption relating to respirable disease... Pneumoconiosis § 410.462 Presumption relating to respirable disease. (a) Even though the existence of... was employed for 10 years or more in the Nation's coal mines and died from a respirable disease, it...

  4. Redefinition and global estimation of basal ecosystem respiration rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, C.M.J.; Yuan, W.

    2011-01-01

    Basal ecosystem respiration rate (BR), the ecosystem respiration rate at a given temperature, is a common and important parameter in empirical models for quantifying ecosystem respiration (ER) globally. Numerous studies have indicated that BR varies in space. However, many empirical ER models still

  5. Induction by ethylene of cyanide-resistant respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomos, T.; Laties, G.G.

    1976-05-17

    Ethylene and cyanide induce an increase in respiration in a variety of plant tissues, whereas ethylene has no effect on tissues whose respiration is strongly inhibited by cyanide. It is suggested that the existence of a cyanide-insensitive electron transport path is a prerequisite for stimulation of respiration by ethylene.

  6. Temporal Variability of Soil Respiration in Experimental Tree Plantations in Lowland Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W. Raich

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The principal objective of this study was to determine if there is consistent temporal variability in soil respiration from different forest plantations in a lowland tropical rainforest environment. Soil respiration was measured regularly over 2004 to 2010 in replicated plantations of 15- to 20-year-old evergreen tropical trees in lowland Costa Rica. Statistically significant but small differences in soil respiration were observed among hours of the day; daytime measurements were suitable for determining mean fluxes in this study. Fluxes varied more substantially among months, with the highest average emissions (5.9 μmol·m−2·s−1 occurring in September and low emissions (3.7 μmol·m−2·s−1 occurring in January. Three of the six tree species had significantly increasing rates of soil respiration across 2004–2010, with fluxes increasing at an average of 0.09 μmol·m−2·s−1 per year: the three other species had no long-term trends. It was hypothesized that there would be a tradeoff between carbon allocation aboveground, to produce new leaves, and belowground, to sustain roots and mycorrhizae, but the relationship between canopy leaf fall—a surrogate for canopy leaf flushing—and soil respiration was significantly positive. The similarities observed among temporal trends across plantation types, and significant relationships between soil respiration, soil water content and soil temperature, suggest that the physical environment largely controlled the temporal variability of soil respiration, but differences in flux magnitude among tree species were substantial and consistent across years.

  7. Review of economic evaluations of mask and respirator use for protection against respiratory infection transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukerji, Shohini; MacIntyre, C Raina; Newall, Anthony T

    2015-10-13

    There has been increasing debate surrounding mask and respirator interventions to control respiratory infection transmission in both healthcare and community settings. As decision makers are considering the recommendations they should evaluate how to provide the most efficient protection strategies with minimum costs. The aim of this review is to identify and evaluate the existing economic evaluation literature in this area and to offer advice on how future evaluations on this topic should be conducted. We searched the Scopus database for all literature on economic evaluation of mask or respirator use to control respiratory infection transmission. Reference lists from the identified studies were also manually searched. Seven studies met our inclusion criteria from the initial 806 studies identified by the search strategy and our manual search. Five studies considered interventions for seasonal and/or pandemic influenza, with one also considering SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome). The other two studies focussed on tuberculosis transmission control interventions. The settings and methodologies of the studies varied greatly. No low-middle income settings were identified. Only one of the reviewed studies cited clinical evidence to inform their mask/respirator intervention effectiveness parameters. Mask and respirator interventions were generally reported by the study authors to be cost saving or cost-effective when compared to no intervention or other control measures, however the evaluations had important limitations. Given the large cost differential between masks and respirators, there is a need for more comprehensive economic evaluations to compare the relative costs and benefits of these interventions in situations and settings where alternative options are potentially applicable. There are at present insufficient well conducted cost-effectiveness studies to inform decision-makers on the value for money of alternative mask/respirator options.

  8. Unilateral suppression of P/N13′ potential amplitude in young patients with persistent numbness due to cervical monoradiculopathy. A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Moschovos

    Full Text Available Objective: The utility of Dermatomal Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (DSEPs in the diagnostic workup of suspected cervical monoradiculopathy has been limited by significant overlap between measurements obtained from affected versus unaffected roots. In a case-control study, we explored whether, under certain conditions, asymmetry in DSEP parameters may offer significant help in the diagnosis of monoradiculopathy. Methods: DSEPs were obtained bilaterally from patients with persistent (age range 33–55, n = 10 or intermittent (age range 31–55, n = 7 unilateral sensory symptoms of less than one month duration due to MRI-confirmed cervical monoradiculopathy. DSEPs were also obtained bilaterally from aged-matched asymptomatic volunteers (age range 31–54, n = 8 and older asymptomatic volunteers (age range 57–77, n = 8. Amplitude and latency of the P/N13′ potential (negative peak at 13 ms were measured. Results: In all ten patients with persistent symptoms, the P/N13′ amplitude ratio, defined as P/N13′ amplitude on the symptomatic side divided by P/N13′ amplitude on the contralateral asymptomatic side, ranged between 0.0 and 0.50 (unilateral suppression. In all seven patients with intermittent symptoms, P/N13′ amplitude ratios ranged between 0.60 and 1.00. In all age-matched asymptomatic controls, P/N13′ amplitude ratio (side with lower divided by side with higher amplitude was always at least 0.80. Among older asymptomatic subjects, DSEPs had inconsistent characteristics. Conclusions: Cervical monoradiculopathy with persistent numbness in young patients (aged up to 55 years is very strongly associated with unilateral suppression of P/N13′ DSEP amplitude. No significant asymmetry is observed in cases of monoradiculopathy with intermittent numbness. Significance: In young patients with unilateral upper extremity persistent sensory complaints, DSEP amplitude asymmetry, as quantified by the P/N13′ ratio, may offer

  9. Technical note: A facility for respiration measurements in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, F S; Tomich, T R; Ferreira, A L; Cavalcanti, L F L; Campos, M M; Paiva, C A V; Ribas, M N; Pereira, L G R

    2016-06-01

    A respiration system consisting of 4 climate-controlled chambers and 1 set of flowmeters and analyzers was constructed and validated. Each chamber had volume of 21.10m(3) (3.68×2.56×2.24m) and was made from steel with double-glazed windows on either side enabling visual contact between animals. The chambers are independently climate-controlled and can maintain temperature and relative humidity in a range from 5 to 45°C and 30 to 80%, respectively. A flow generator and mass flowmeter continuously pull air from each chamber and a slight negative pressure inside the chamber is ensured. Air from all chambers and ambient air share a common gas analysis and data acquisition system for monitoring O2, CO2, and CH4 concentrations over the measurement period, with the cycle time set to 20min. Analyzers are regularly calibrated and the chambers have mean recoveries of 99.0 and 98.0% for CO2 and CH4, respectively. The chambers are equipped with infrared cameras and electronic feed and water bins for intake measurements, as well as sensors for monitoring animal position and heart rate. Data acquisition and analysis software is used to calculate the rate of consumption of O2 and production of CO2 and CH4. The dynamic respiration measurements are integrated with feed intake data and other sensors. The daily gas exchanges are estimated by integration to determine methane emission and heat production. We conducted a trial with 12 lactating 3/4 Holstein × 1/4 Gyr crossbred dairy cows (6 multiparous and 6 primiparous) under 2 feeding regimens (ad libitum or restricted) to validate the system. Two 22-h respiration measurements were obtained from each cow. Restricted-fed cows showed lower values for milk yield, methane emission, and heat production compared with ad libitum-fed animals. We found no difference between groups for CH4 produced per kilogram of dry matter intake. Repeatability for CH4 emission and heat production was high (0.97 and 0.92, respectively). The respiration

  10. Atividade respiratória, produção de etileno e vida útil de repolho (Brassica oleracea, var. capitata minimamente processado em atmosfera controlada Respiration rate, ethylene production and shelf life of minimally processed cabbage (Brassica oleracea, var. capitata under controlled atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria M. Rinaldi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a atividade respiratória e a produção de etileno do repolho inteiro e minimamente processado e a vida útil do repolho mimimamente processado em atmosfera controlada, realizaram-se dois experimentos em etapas seqüenciais. Na primeira etapa, avaliaram-se a atividade respiratória e a produção de etileno do repolho inteiro e minimamente processado, em sistema fechado, nas temperaturas de 5 ºC e 10 ºC. Na segunda etapa, avaliou-se a vida útil do repolho minimamente processado em atmosfera controlada. O produto foi submetido a fluxo contínuo de misturas gasosas ternárias, com concentrações de 2% a 10% de O2 e de 3% a 10% de CO2, previamente umidificadas, na temperatura de 5 ºC por 10 dias. Como controle, foi utilizado o ar atmosférico. A atividade respiratória do repolho inteiro e minimamente processado, armazenado a 5 ºC, foi significativamente menor que a do armazenado a 10 ºC, sendo que, em ambas as temperaturas, o repolho minimamente processado foi o que obteve a maior atividade respiratória com relação ao repolho inteiro. Não foi detectada a produção de etileno pelo método de análise utilizado. A atmosfera controlada não prolongou a vida útil do repolho minimamente processado nas concentrações de 2% a 10% de oxigênio e de 3% a 10% de dióxido de carbono.The objective of this work was to evaluate the respiration rate and ethylene production of whole and minimally processed cabbage as well as the shelf life of minimally processed cabbage stored under controlled atmosphere. Then, two sequential experiments were done. In the first one, the respiration rate and ethylene production of whole and minimally processed cabbage were evaluated in a closed system, at 5 ºC and 10 ºC. In the second experiment, the shelf life of minimally processed cabbage under controlled atmosphere was analyzed. The product was submitted to a continuous flow of ternary gaseous mixtures, previously humidifieds, with

  11. Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Respirable Dust After Blasting of Coal Roadway Driving Faces: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyong Hu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Coal roadway driving is an important part of the underground mining system, and very common in Chinese coal mines. However, the high concentration of respirable dust produced in the blasting operation poses a great hazard to miners’ health as well as the underground environment. In this paper, based on the direct simulation Monte Carlo method, the gas–solid two-phase flow model of particle movement is established to study the respirable dust distribution in blasting driving face. The results show that there is an obvious vortex region in which airflow velocity is lower than that close to the roadway wall and driving face. After blasting, respirable dust in the front of the dust group jet from the driving face cannot be discharged timely, with the result that its concentration is higher than the critical value until it is expelled from the roadway, whereas respirable dust concentration at the back of the dust group is gradually diluted and exhibits an alternate thin dense phase distribution. Meanwhile, respirable dust concentration in the breathing zone is relatively higher than that at the top and bottom of roadway. The accuracy of numerical simulation results is verified by field measurements. The research results are helpful for further understanding the evolution of respirable dust distribution after blasting, and are good for providing guidance for efficient controlling of respirable dust and improving the working environment for underground miners.

  12. The responses of soil and rhizosphere respiration to simulated climatic changes vary by season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suseela, Vidya; Dukes, Jeffrey S

    2013-02-01

    Responses of soil respiration (Rs) to anthropogenic climate change will affect terrestrial carbon storage and, thus, feed back to warming. To provide insight into how warming and changes in precipitation regimes affect the rate and temperature sensitivity of Rs and rhizosphere respiration (Rr) across the year, we subjected a New England old-field ecosystem to four levels of warming and three levels of precipitation (ambient, drought, and wet treatments). We measured Rs and heterotrophic respiration (Rh) monthly (in areas of the plots with and without plants, respectively) and estimated Rr by calculating the difference in respiration between Rs and Rh. Even in this mesic ecosystem, Rs and Rr responded strongly to the precipitation treatments. Drought reduced Rs and Rr, both annually and during the growing season. Annual cumulative Rs responded nonlinearly to precipitation treatments; both drought and supplemental precipitation suppressed Rs compared to the ambient treatment. Warming increased Rs and Rr in spring and winter when soil moisture was optimal but decreased these rates in summer when moisture was limiting. Cumulative winter Rr increased by about 200% in the high warming (approximately 3.5 degrees C) treatment. The effect of climate treatments on the temperature sensitivity of Rs depended on the season. In the fall, the drought treatment decreased apparent Q10 relative to the other precipitation treatments. The responses of Rs to warming and altered precipitation were largely driven by changes in Rr. We emphasize the importance of incorporating realistic soil moisture responses into simulations of soil carbon fluxes; the long-term effects of warming on carbon--climate feedback will depend on future precipitation regimes. Our results highlight the nonlinear responses of soil respiration to soil moisture and, to our knowledge, quantify for the first time the loss of carbon through winter rhizosphere respiration due to warming. While this additional loss is

  13. Plasma Amino Acids Stimulate Uncoupled Respiration of Muscle Subsarcolemmal Mitochondria in Lean but Not Obese Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kras, Katon A; Hoffman, Nyssa; Roust, Lori R; Patel, Shivam H; Carroll, Chad C; Katsanos, Christos S

    2017-12-01

    Obesity is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle. Increasing the plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations stimulates mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in lean individuals. To determine whether acute elevation in plasma AAs enhances muscle mitochondrial respiration and ATP production in subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria in obese adults. Assessment of SS and IMF mitochondrial function during saline (i.e., control) and AA infusions. Eligible participants were healthy lean (body mass index, 30 kg/m2; age 35 ± 3 years; n = 11) subjects. Single trial of saline infusion followed by AA infusion. SS and IMF mitochondria were isolated from muscle biopsies collected at the end of the saline and AA infusions. Mitochondrial respiration and ATP production. AA infusion increased adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)-stimulated respiration and ATP production rates of SS mitochondria in the lean (P lean subjects only (P lean or obese subjects (P > 0.05). Increasing the plasma AA concentrations enhances the capacity for respiration and ATP production of muscle SS, but not IMF, mitochondria in lean individuals, in parallel with increases in uncoupled respiration. However, neither of these parameters increases in muscle SS or IMF mitochondria in obese individuals. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  14. The real limits to marine life: a further critique of the Respiration Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Seibel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The recently proposed "Respiration Index" (RI = log PO2/PCO2 suggests that aerobic metabolism is limited by the ratio of reactants (oxygen to products (carbon dioxide according to the thermodynamics of cellular respiration. Here, we demonstrate further that, because of the large standard free energy change for organic carbon oxidation (ΔG° = −686 kcal mol−1, carbon dioxide can never reach concentrations that would limit the thermodynamics of this reaction. A PCO2 to PO2 ratio of 10503 would be required to reach equilibrium (equilibrium constant, Keq = 10503, where ΔG = 0. Thus, a Respiration Index of −503 would be the real thermodynamic limit to aerobic life. Such a Respiration Index is never reached, either in the cell or in the environment. Moreover, cellular respiration and oxygen provision are kinetically controlled such that, within limits, environmental oxygen and CO2 concentrations have little to do with intracellular concentrations. The RI is fundamentally different from the aragonite saturation state, a thermodynamic index used to quantify the potential effect of CO2 on calcification rates, because of its failure to incorporate the equilibrium constant of the reaction. Not only is the RI invalid, but its use leads to incorrect and misleading predictions of the threat of changing oxygen and carbon dioxide to marine life. We provide a physiological framework that identifies oxygen thresholds and allows for synergistic effects of ocean acidification and global warming.

  15. Age-associated decline in mitochondrial respiration and electron transport in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Melissa; Mockett, Robin J; Shen, Yi; Orr, William C; Sohal, Rajindar S

    2005-09-01

    The principal objective of the present study was to identify specific alterations in mitochondrial respiratory functions during the aging process. Respiration rates and the activities of electron transport chain complexes were measured at various ages in mitochondria isolated from thoraces of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, which consist primarily of flight muscles. The rates of state 3 respiration (ADP-stimulated), RCRs (respiratory control ratios) and uncoupled respiration rates decreased significantly as a function of age, using either NAD+- or FAD-linked substrates; however, there were no differences in state 4 respiration (ADP-depleted) rates. There was also a significant age-related decline in the activity of cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV), but not of the other mitochondrial oxidoreductases examined. Exposure of mitochondria isolated from young flies to low doses of KCN or NaAz (sodium azide), complex IV inhibitors, decreased cytochrome c oxidase activity and increased the production of H2O2. Collectively, these results support the hypothesis that impairment of mitochondrial respiration may be a causal factor in the aging process, and that such impairment may result from and contribute to increased H2O2 production in vivo.

  16. Submaximal ADP-stimulated respiration is impaired in ZDF rats and recovered by resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brennan K; Perry, Christopher G R; Herbst, Eric A F; Ritchie, Ian R; Beaudoin, Marie-Soleil; Smith, Jeffrey C; Neufer, P Darrell; Wright, David C; Holloway, Graham P

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the aetiology of skeletal muscle insulin resistance, although there is considerable controversy regarding these concepts. Mitochondrial function has been traditionally assessed in the presence of saturating ADP, but ATP turnover and the resultant ADP is thought to limit respiration in vivo. Therefore, we investigated the potential link between submaximal ADP-stimulated respiration rates, ROS generation and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in a model of type 2 diabetes mellitus, the ZDF rat. Utilizing permeabilized muscle fibres we observed that submaximal ADP-stimulated respiration rates (250-2000 μm ADP) were lower in ZDF rats than in lean controls, which coincided with decreased adenine nucleotide translocase 2 (ANT2) protein content. This decrease in submaximal ADP-stimulated respiration occurred in the absence of a decrease in electron transport chain function. Treating ZDF rats with resveratrol improved skeletal muscle insulin resistance and this was associated with elevated submaximal ADP-stimulated respiration rates as well as an increase in ANT2 protein content. These results coincided with a greater ability of ADP to attenuate mitochondrial ROS emission and an improvement in cellular redox balance. Together, these data suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction is present in skeletal muscle insulin resistance when assessed at submaximal ADP concentrations and that ADP dynamics may influence skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity through alterations in the propensity for mitochondrial ROS emission.

  17. Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration rates enhanced by microbial community response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhu, Kristiina; Auffret, Marc D; Dungait, Jennifer A J; Hopkins, David W; Prosser, James I; Singh, Brajesh K; Subke, Jens-Arne; Wookey, Philip A; Agren, Göran I; Sebastià, Maria-Teresa; Gouriveau, Fabrice; Bergkvist, Göran; Meir, Patrick; Nottingham, Andrew T; Salinas, Norma; Hartley, Iain P

    2014-09-04

    Soils store about four times as much carbon as plant biomass, and soil microbial respiration releases about 60 petagrams of carbon per year to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. Short-term experiments have shown that soil microbial respiration increases exponentially with temperature. This information has been incorporated into soil carbon and Earth-system models, which suggest that warming-induced increases in carbon dioxide release from soils represent an important positive feedback loop that could influence twenty-first-century climate change. The magnitude of this feedback remains uncertain, however, not least because the response of soil microbial communities to changing temperatures has the potential to either decrease or increase warming-induced carbon losses substantially. Here we collect soils from different ecosystems along a climate gradient from the Arctic to the Amazon and investigate how microbial community-level responses control the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration. We find that the microbial community-level response more often enhances than reduces the mid- to long-term (90 days) temperature sensitivity of respiration. Furthermore, the strongest enhancing responses were observed in soils with high carbon-to-nitrogen ratios and in soils from cold climatic regions. After 90 days, microbial community responses increased the temperature sensitivity of respiration in high-latitude soils by a factor of 1.4 compared to the instantaneous temperature response. This suggests that the substantial carbon stores in Arctic and boreal soils could be more vulnerable to climate warming than currently predicted.

  18. Effects of sulfur dioxide on microorganism respiration and acidity in Puerto Rican soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M.; Tio, M.A.; Byer, M.D.

    1978-01-01

    Two types of soil in Puerto Rico, Vega Baja silty clay and Tiburones muck, were put under different concentrationes of SO/sub 2/ different time exposure and two conditions of humidity. Changes taking place in the level of respiration of microorganisms and in soil acidity of the soil were measured. SO/sub 2/ concentrations and time exposure used were similar or smaller than those found in several industrialized areas, including some of Puerto Rico. In Vega Baja silty clay, a concentration of one ppM of SO/sub 2/ reduced respiration of 35% vis a vis control after 24 hours of exposure, and in 50% after 48 hours. With a concentration of 2 ppM and 24 hours of exposure, the reduction of respiration was in the order of 52%. In Tiburones muck the reduction of respiration was of 37% with 0.5 ppm of SO/sub 2/ and 24 hours of exposure. One ppm reduced it in 50% after six hours, and in 75% after 24. The acidity of soils became higher with increases of SO/sub 2/ concentrations and time exposures. It can be said that respiration of microorganisms is a good indicator of soil biological activity, and that it permits to carry out relatively simple studies on the effect of SO/sub 2/ in the soil ecosystem.

  19. The real limits to marine life: a further critique of the Respiration Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, B. A.; Childress, J. J.

    2013-05-01

    The recently proposed "Respiration Index" (RI = log PO2/PCO2) suggests that aerobic metabolism is limited by the ratio of reactants (oxygen) to products (carbon dioxide) according to the thermodynamics of cellular respiration. Here, we demonstrate further that, because of the large standard free energy change for organic carbon oxidation (ΔG° = -686 kcal mol-1), carbon dioxide can never reach concentrations that would limit the thermodynamics of this reaction. A PCO2 to PO2 ratio of 10503 would be required to reach equilibrium (equilibrium constant, Keq = 10503), where ΔG = 0. Thus, a Respiration Index of -503 would be the real thermodynamic limit to aerobic life. Such a Respiration Index is never reached, either in the cell or in the environment. Moreover, cellular respiration and oxygen provision are kinetically controlled such that, within limits, environmental oxygen and CO2 concentrations have little to do with intracellular concentrations. The RI is fundamentally different from the aragonite saturation state, a thermodynamic index used to quantify the potential effect of CO2 on calcification rates, because of its failure to incorporate the equilibrium constant of the reaction. Not only is the RI invalid, but its use leads to incorrect and misleading predictions of the threat of changing oxygen and carbon dioxide to marine life. We provide a physiological framework that identifies oxygen thresholds and allows for synergistic effects of ocean acidification and global warming.

  20. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Or Sperling

    Full Text Available Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0 °C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq. cm(-3 yr(-1 on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics.

  1. Did Respiration or Photosynthesis Come First

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1979-01-01

    The similarity of the mechanisms in photosynthetic and in oxidative phosphorylation suggests a common origin ( convers ion hypothesis). It is proposed that an early form of electron flow with oxidative phosphorylation ( p rerespiration ) , to terminal electron acceptors available in a reducing biosphere, was supplemented by a photocatalyst capable of a redox reaction. In this way, cyclic photophosphorylation arose. Further stages in evolution were reverse electron flow powered by ATP, to make NADH as a reductant for CO2 , and subsequently noncyclic electron flow. These processes concomitantly provided the oxidants indispensable for full development of oxidative phosphorylation, i.e. for normal respiration: sulphate, O2 and with participation of the nitrificants, nitrite and nitrate. Thus, prerespiration preceded photosynthesis, and this preceded respiration. It is also suggested that nonredox photoprocesses of the Halobacterium type are not part of the mainstream of bioenergetic evolution. They do not lead to photoprocesses with electron flow. (author)

  2. Suppression of exercise-induced neutrophilia and lymphopenia in athletes by cystine/theanine intake: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titchenal C Alan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intense exercise induces increased blood neutrophil counts and decreased lymphocyte counts, and leads to inflammation and immunosuppression. It was previously reported that cystine and theanine (CT supplementation by long-distance runners before a training camp suppressed the changes of these blood parameters observed in un-supplemented control subjects after the camp. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of CT supplementation on the inflammatory response and immune state before and after intense endurance exercise in long-distance runners at a training camp. Methods Sixteen long-distance runners were allocated to one of two groups given CT supplements (700 mg cystine + 280 mg theanine daily or placebo (8 in each group for 7 days prior to and during a 9-day training camp. Daily run training averaged 19.9 km/day prior to the camp and 28.6 km/day during the camp. On the initial and final days of the camp, blood samples were collected before and after 15 km morning interval running workouts (1000 m × 15 times and analyzed for neutrophil and lymphocyte counts and myoglobin. Results The relative change in exercise-induced blood neutrophil count (% of pre-exercise values was significantly lower in the CT group than in the placebo group (163.3 ± 43.2% vs. 200.4 ± 19.6%, p = 0.044 on the initial day of camp, but not on the last day. The decline in lymphocyte count (% of pre-exercise values was significantly less in the CT group than in the placebo group (60.2 ± 19.2% vs. 36.2 ± 12.0%, p = 0.010 on the initial day of camp, but not on the last day. In blood myoglobin, there was a trend toward lower % of pre-exercise values in the CT group (p Conclusion CT supplementation significantly attenuated the increase in neutrophil count and the reduction in lymphocyte count induced by intense endurance exercise. These results suggest that CT supplementation may suppress the exercise-induced fluctuation of the blood

  3. Ofloxacin induces cytoplasmic respiration-deficient mutants in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obernauerová, M; Subík, J; Ebringer, L

    1992-05-01

    Ofloxacin, a new quinolone with potent antibacterial activity, was also found to be effective against yeast. At relatively high concentrations, and at mild alkaline pH, ofloxacin inhibited the growth of yeast cells in medium containing glucose, and prevented growth on glycerol, as carbon and energy source. The cells growing in the presence of ofloxacin exhibited abberrantly budded forms, lost their viability and many of them converted to cytoplasmic respiration-deficient mutants. Induction of mutants was also observed under non-growing conditions. The petite clones analysed exhibited suppressiveness and contained different fragments of the wild-type mitochondrial genome.

  4. Mitochondrial respiration in hummingbird flight muscles.

    OpenAIRE

    Suarez, R K; Lighton, J R; Brown, G S; Mathieu-Costello, O

    1991-01-01

    Respiration rates of muscle mitochondria in flying hummingbirds range from 7 to 10 ml of O2 per cm3 of mitochondria per min, which is about 2 times higher than the range obtained in the locomotory muscles of mammals running at their maximum aerobic capacities (VO2max). Capillary volume density is higher in hummingbird flight muscles than in mammalian skeletal muscles. Mitochondria occupy approximately 35% of fiber volume in hummingbird flight muscles and cluster beneath the sarcolemmal membra...

  5. [Biomechanics and regulation of the external respiration in the conditions of 5-day dry immersion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Iu A; Suvorov, A V; D'iachenko, A I; Kolesnikov, V I

    2011-01-01

    The work was concerned with evaluation of the external respiration function and regulation in healthy human subjects participating in simulation of the microgravity effects by dry immersion (DI). In the baseline data collection period, in DI (days 2 and 4) and after DI completion pulmonary volumes were registered, the ratio of thoracic and abdominal components of quiet breathing and respiratory maneuvers calculated, and parameters of respiration regulation, i.e. length of breath-holding and ability to voluntary control breathing motions, were determined. It was shown that breathing pattern did not undergo gross changes in immersion as compared with pre-DI test data; however, inspiratory reserve volume grew (p immersion. We believe that similar to microgravity, exposure in DI produces regular alterations of pulmonary RV (partly because of changed body position), thoracic-abdominal ratio in breathing motions, and shifts in voluntary respiration regulation.

  6. The moisture response of soil heterotrophic respiration: interaction with soil properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moyano, F E; Vasilyeva, N; Bouckaert, L

    2012-01-01

    -driven analysis of soil moisture-respiration relations based on 90 soils. With the use of linear models we show how the relationship between soil heterotrophic respiration and different measures of soil moisture is consistently affected by soil properties. The empirical models derived include main effects......Soil moisture is of primary importance for predicting the evolution of soil carbon stocks and fluxes, both because it strongly controls organic matter decomposition and because it is predicted to change at global scales in the following decades. However, the soil functions used to model...... the heterotrophic respiration response to moisture have limited empirical support and introduce an uncertainty of at least 4% in global soil carbon stock predictions by 2100. The necessity of improving the representation of this relationship in models has been highlighted in recent studies. Here we present a data...

  7. Evaluation of organic amendments on microbial soil respiration and agronomic variables in banana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuellins Dennis Durango Cabanilla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the use of organic amendments on soil microbial respiration and agronomic variables in banana plants was studied, evaluating 22 treatments consisting of three amendments and four organic products, each in three doses and control treatmet (no amendment. The results showed significant increases in soil microbial respiration, with high doses of vinasse and mycorrhizae at 90 days after transplantation. In the agronomic variables were found significant differences of increase of height, diameter of pseudotallo and dry matter, with the amendments: vinaza, shrimp fluor, humus and biostimulant. Therefore, from the results obtained it can be concluded that the organic amendments increased the microbial respiration activity and stimulated the agronomic development of the banana plant.

  8. Respiring cellular nano-magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, Ayesha; Khan, Zanib; Bokhari, Habib; Hidayathula, Syed; Jilani, Ghulam; Khan, Abid Ali

    2017-11-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria provide an interesting example for the biosynthesis of magnetic (Fe 3 O 4 or Fe 3 S 4 ) nanoparticles, synthesized through a process known as biologically controlled mineralization, resulting in complex monodispersed, and nanostructures with unique magnetic properties. In this work, we report a novel aerobic bacterial strain isolated from sludge of an oil refinery. Microscopic and staining analysis revealed that it was a gram positive rod with the capability to thrive in a medium (9K) supplemented, with Fe 2+ ions at an acidic pH (~3.2). The magnetic behaviour of these cells was tested by their alignment towards a permanent magnet, and later on confirmed by magnetometry analysis. The X-ray diffraction studies proved the cellular biosynthesis of magnetite nanoparticles inside the bacteria. This novel, bio-nano-magnet, could pave the way for green synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles to be used in industrial and medical applications such as MRI, magnetic hyperthermia and ferrofluids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. System-level control to optimize glucagon counterregulation by switch-off of α-cell suppressing signals in β-cell deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhy, Leon S; McCall, Anthony L

    2009-01-01

    Glucagon counterregulation (GCR) is a key protection against hypoglycemia that is compromised in diabetes. In β-cell-deficient rats, GCR pulsatility can be amplified if insulin (INS) or somatostatin (SS) are infused in the pancreatic artery and then switched off during hypoglycemia. The data indicate that these signals act by different mechanisms, and here we analyze the differences between the two switch offs (SOs) and predict the GCR-amplifying effect of their individual or combined application. A minimal control network (MCN) of α/δ-cell interactions is approximated by differential equations to explain the GCR response to a SO and test in silico the hypotheses: (i) INS SO suppresses basal and pulsatile, while SS SO blocks only pulsatile glucagon release and (ii) simultaneous application of the two switch offs will augment the individual GCR response. The mechanism postulated in (i) explains the differences in the GCR responses between the SOs. The MCN predicts that simultaneous application of INS and SS decreases basal glucagon but increases post-SO amplitude, thus doubling the response of GCR achieved by each of the individual signals. The current analyses predict that INS and SS SOs improve defective GCR in β-cell deficiency through different but complementary mechanisms and suggest SO strategies to maximally enhance GCR in type 1 diabetes by simultaneous manipulation of the network control. These results are clinically relevant, as they could have application to design of an artificial pancreas by providing ways to augment GCR that would not require glucagon infusion. © Diabetes Technology Society

  10. Regulation of succinate-fuelled mitochondrial respiration in liver and skeletal muscle of hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jason C L; Chung, Dillon J; Cooper, Alex N; Staples, James F

    2013-05-01

    Hibernating ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) alternate between two distinct metabolic states throughout winter: torpor, during which metabolic rate (MR) and body temperature (Tb) are considerably suppressed, and interbout euthermia (IBE), during which MR and Tb briefly return to euthermic levels. Previous studies showed suppression of succinate-fuelled respiration during torpor in liver and skeletal muscle mitochondria; however, these studies used only a single, saturating succinate concentration. Therefore, they could not address whether mitochondrial metabolic suppression occurs under physiological substrate concentrations or whether differences in the kinetics of mitochondrial responses to changing substrate concentration might also contribute to mitochondrial metabolic regulation during torpor. The present study confirmed that succinate oxidation is reduced during torpor in liver and skeletal muscle at 37 and 10°C over a 100-fold range of succinate concentrations. At 37°C, this suppression resulted from inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), which had a greater affinity for oxaloacetate (an SDH inhibitor) during torpor. At 10°C, SDH was not inhibited, suggesting that SDH inhibition initiates but does not maintain mitochondrial suppression during torpor. Moreover, in both liver and skeletal muscle, mitochondria from torpid animals maintained relatively higher respiration rates at low succinate concentrations, which reduces the extent of energy savings that can be achieved during torpor, but may also maintain mitochondrial oxidative capacity above some lower critical threshold, thereby preventing cellular and/or mitochondrial injury during torpor and facilitating rapid recruitment of oxidative capacity during arousal.

  11. Growth hormone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  12. A flux-sensing mechanism could regulate the switch between respiration and fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huberts, Daphne H E W; Niebel, Bastian; Heinemann, Matthias

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can show different metabolic phenotypes (e.g. fermentation and respiration). Based on data from the literature, we argue that the substrate uptake rate is the core variable in the system that controls the global metabolic phenotype. Consequently the metabolic

  13. Effects of temperature on photosynthesis and respiration in hermatypic corals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, S.L.; Jokiel, P.L.

    1977-01-01

    Photosynthesis and respiration rates of the reef corals Pocillopora damicornis (Linn.), Montipora verrucosa (Lamarck), Porites compressa Dana and Fungia scutaria Lamarck were measured under controlled temperatures. Results indicate that coral metabolism is closely adapted to ambient temperature conditions. Tropical corals measured at Enewetak, Marshall Islands, showed greater primary production compared to maintenance requirements at elevated temperatures than did subtropical varieties of the same species in Hawaii. Photosynthesis:respiration (P:R) ratios were significantly and negatively related with temperature between 18/sup 0/ and 31/sup 0/C for all Hawaiian corals, whereas at Enewetak this ratio generally showed a curvilinear relationship for this temperature range. Extrapolations of P:R regressions on temperatures to a value of 2.0 (estimated as a minimum required for long-term functional autotrophy) coincide for Hawaiian specimens with published upper lethal temperatures. Extrapolation of P:R regressions for Enewetak specimens at temperatures above 25/sup 0/C suggests lethal temperatures for these corals to be 2 to 5 C/sup 0/ higher than for Hawaiian corals, in good agreement with recent experimental findings. Interspecific differences in P:R temperature regressions for Hawaiian corals corelating with upper lethal temperature tolerances are described.

  14. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Löscher, Carolin; Schunck, Harald; Desai, Dhwani K; Hauss, Helena; Kiko, Rainer; Holtappels, Moritz; LaRoche, Julie; Schmitz, Ruth A; Graco, Michelle I; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100%) in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein.

  15. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Kalvelage

    Full Text Available Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100% in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein.

  16. The Warburg effect suppresses oxidative stress induced apoptosis in a yeast model for cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Ruckenstuhl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Otto Warburg observed that cancer cells are often characterized by intense glycolysis in the presence of oxygen and a concomitant decrease in mitochondrial respiration. Research has mainly focused on a possible connection between increased glycolysis and tumor development whereas decreased respiration has largely been left unattended. Therefore, a causal relation between decreased respiration and tumorigenesis has not been demonstrated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For this purpose, colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is suitable for manipulation of mitochondrial respiration and shows mitochondria-mediated cell death, were used as a model. Repression of respiration as well as ROS-scavenging via glutathione inhibited apoptosis and conferred a survival advantage during seeding and early development of this fast proliferating solid cell population. In contrast, enhancement of respiration triggered cell death. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus, the Warburg effect might directly contribute to the initiation of cancer formation--not only by enhanced glycolysis--but also via decreased respiration in the presence of oxygen, which suppresses apoptosis.

  17. [Parameters of fibers cell respiration and desmin content in rat soleus muscle at early stages of gravitational unloading].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoev, T M; Biriukov, N S; Veselova, O M; Larina, I M; Shenkman, B S; Ogneva, I V

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study the parameters of fibers cell respiration and desmin content in Wistar rat soleus muscle after 1, 3, 7 and 14 days of gravitational unloading. Gravitational unloading was simulated by antiorthostatic hindlimb suspension. The parameters of cell respiration were determined using the polarography, and desmin content was assessed by means of Western blotting. The results showed that the intensity of cell respiration is reduced after three days of gravitational unloading, reaches a minimum level after seven days and slightly increases by the fourteenth day of hindlimb unloading, as well as the content of desmin, which, however, to the fourteenth day returns to the control level. Taking into account that mitochondrial function depends on the state of cytoskeleton the data allow us to assume that early reduction of the intensity of cell respiration under unloading could be caused by degradation of the protein desmin that determines intracellular localization of mitochondria.

  18. Separating the effect of respiration from the heart rate variability for cases of constant harmonic breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kircher Michael

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Heart Rate Variability studies are a known measure for the autonomous control of the heart rate. In special situations, its interpretation can be ambiguous, since the respiration has a major influence on the heart rate variability. For this reason it has often been proposed to measure Heart Rate Variability, while the subjects are breathing at a constant respiration rate. That way the spectral influence of the respiration is known. In this work we propose to remove this constant respiratory influence from the heart rate and the Heart Rate Variability parameters to gain respiration free autonomous controlled heart rate signal. The spectral respiratory component in the heart rate signal is detected and characterized. Subsequently the respiratory effect on Heart Rate Variability is removed using spectral filtering approaches, such as the Notch filter or the Raised Cosine filter. As a result new decoupled Heart Variability parameters are gained, which could lead to new additional interpretations of the autonomous control of the heart rate.

  19. Immunomodulation of antiretroviral drug-suppressed chronic HIV-1 infection in an oral probiotic double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Otto O; Kelesidis, Theodoros; Cordova, Robert; Khanlou, Homayoon

    2014-10-01

    A putative source of inappropriate immune activation that drives human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 immunopathogenesis is the gastrointestinal tract. Even with effective antiretroviral treatment, residual activation persists. We hypothesized that an oral probiotic could improve the residual immune activation in chronic treated HIV-1 infection, and tested a Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 capsule probiotic in HIV-1-infected persons with suppressed viremia on stable antiretroviral therapy in a 3-month double-blind placebo-controlled trial (10 probiotic, 7 placebo). The Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) was administered monthly. Blood was tested at the start and end of placebo/probiotic administration for viremia, CD4(+) T cell percentage/concentration, soluble (s)CD14, soluble intestinal fatty acid binding protein, sCD163, D-dimer, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α. All participants maintained viremia probiotic was safe and well tolerated, and appeared to improve chronic gastrointestinal symptoms. Its administration was associated with a significant increase in the percentage of blood CD4(+) T cells compared to placebo (+2.8% versus -1.8%, p=0.018) although CD4(+) T cell concentrations were generally unchanged in both groups. None of the biomarkers showed significant changes on probiotic treatment or between-group differences in change (although significance was borderline for a greater sCD163 drop in the probiotic versus placebo group, p=0.05). Some biomarkers showed significant correlations to each other, particularly D-dimer with CRP and sCD14 with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. These data demonstrate the safety and possible benefit of this probiotic for residual inflammation in treated HIV-1 infection, although further study will be required to determine the immune pathways involved.

  20. The Changing Energy Sources of Soil Respiration Seasonally and with Experimental Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks Pries, C.; Angert, A.; Castanha, C.; Hilman, B.; Torn, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Due to its importance in the global carbon cycle, soil respiration has been intensively measured. However, measurements are almost exclusively of CO2, which has limited our understanding of soil respiration's sources and its responses to climate change. Here, we show how dual CO2 and O2 measurements within the soil profile of a temperate forest can indicate how the energy sources driving soil respiration can change seasonally and with experimental warming. We calculated the apparent respiration quotient (ARQ), defined as CO2 produced/O2 consumed, calculated from gas soil concentrations and adjusted for differences in diffusion rates. The ARQ changes depending on the stoichiometry of the organic compounds utilized for energy by microbes and roots. Oxidation of carbohydrates and organic acids results in respiration quotients ≥1 while oxidation of lipids results in respiration quotients ≈0.7 with oxidation of proteins falling in between. We observed clear seasonal patterns in ARQ, with values ≈0.9 during the late spring and summer decreasing to 0.6-0.7 during the winter. These changes in ARQ imply carbohydrates are a more important energy source during the summer when trees are photosynthesizing and providing fresh substrate to both roots and microbes. During the winter, lipids, likely recycled within microbial biomass, are a more important energy source. Furthermore, winter ARQ was higher in heated plots (+4° relative to control) than in control plots, but only at 30 cm, possibly due to increased root activity with heating. These interpretations are supported by δ13CO2 values, which were relatively depleted in the winter and more enriched in the summer—lipids are more depleted in δ13C than are sugars. Consistent with the heating effect, there were strong correlations between temperature and ARQ and temperature and δ13C. Given the large differences in ARQ in this forest soil, we are looking into using ARQ to partition soil respiration fluxes based on

  1. Suppression of nighttime sap flux with lower stem photosynthesis in Eucalyptus trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianguo; Zhou, Juan; Sun, Zhenwei; Niu, Junfeng; Zhou, Cuiming; Gu, Daxing; Huang, Yuqing; Zhao, Ping

    2016-04-01

    It is widely accepted that substantial nighttime sap flux ( J s,n) or transpiration ( E) occurs in most plants, but the physiological implications are poorly known. It has been hypothesized that J s,n or E serves to enhance nitrogen uptake or deliver oxygen; however, no clear evidence is currently available. In this study, sap flux ( J s) in Eucalyptus grandis × urophylla with apparent stem photosynthesis was measured, including control trees which were covered by aluminum foil (approximately 1/3 of tree height) to block stem photosynthesis. We hypothesized that the nighttime water flux would be suppressed in trees with lower stem photosynthesis. The results showed that the green tissue degraded after 3 months, demonstrating a decrease in stem photosynthesis. The daytime J s decreased by 21.47 %, while J s,n decreased by 12.03 % in covered trees as compared to that of control, and the difference was statistically significant ( P < 0.01). The linear quantile regression model showed that J s,n decreased for a given daytime transpiration water loss, indicating that J s,n was suppressed by lower stem photosynthesis in covered trees. Predawn ( ψ pd) of covered trees was marginally higher than that of control while lower at predawn stomatal conductance ( g s), indicating a suppressed water flux in covered trees. There was no difference in leaf carbon content and δ13C between the two groups, while leaf nitrogen content and δ15N were significantly higher in covered trees than that of the control ( P < 0.05), indicating that J s,n was not used for nitrogen uptake. These results suggest that J s,n may act as an oxygen pathway since green tissue has a higher respiration or oxygen demand than non-green tissue. Thus, this study demonstrated the physiological implications of J s,n and the possible benefits of nighttime water use or E by the tree.

  2. Burst suppression probability algorithms: state-space methods for tracking EEG burst suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemali, Jessica; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with an isoelectric state. This pattern is commonly seen in states of severely reduced brain activity such as profound general anesthesia, anoxic brain injuries, hypothermia and certain developmental disorders. Devising accurate, reliable ways to quantify burst suppression is an important clinical and research problem. Although thresholding and segmentation algorithms readily identify burst suppression periods, analysis algorithms require long intervals of data to characterize burst suppression at a given time and provide no framework for statistical inference. Approach. We introduce the concept of the burst suppression probability (BSP) to define the brain's instantaneous propensity of being in the suppressed state. To conduct dynamic analyses of burst suppression we propose a state-space model in which the observation process is a binomial model and the state equation is a Gaussian random walk. We estimate the model using an approximate expectation maximization algorithm and illustrate its application in the analysis of rodent burst suppression recordings under general anesthesia and a patient during induction of controlled hypothermia. Main result. The BSP algorithms track burst suppression on a second-to-second time scale, and make possible formal statistical comparisons of burst suppression at different times. Significance. The state-space approach suggests a principled and informative way to analyze burst suppression that can be used to monitor, and eventually to control, the brain states of patients in the operating room and in the intensive care unit.

  3. Pollen tube energetics: respiration, fermentation and the race to the ovule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, Caleb M; Winship, Lawrence J; Hepler, Peter K

    2011-01-01

    Pollen tubes grow by transferring chemical energy from stored cellular starch and newly assimilated sugars into ATP. This drives myriad processes essential for cell elongation, directly or through the creation of ion gradients. Respiration plays a central role in generating and regulating this energy flow and thus in the success of plant reproduction. Pollen tubes are easily grown in vitro and have become an excellent model for investigating the contributions of respiration to plant cellular growth and morphogenesis at the molecular, biochemical and physiological levels. In recent decades, pollen tube research has become increasingly focused on the molecular mechanisms involved in cellular processes. Yet, effective growth and development requires an intact, integrated set of cellular processes, all supplied with a constant flow of energy. Here we bring together information from the current and historical literature concerning respiration, fermentation and mitochondrial physiology in pollen tubes, and assess the significance of more recent molecular and genetic investigations in a physiological context. The rapid growth of the pollen tube down the style has led to the evolution of high rates of pollen tube respiration. Respiration rates in lily predict a total energy turnover of 40-50 fmol ATP s(-1) per pollen grain. Within this context we examine the energetic requirements of cell wall synthesis, osmoregulation, actin dynamics and cyclosis. At present, we can only estimate the amount of energy required, because data from growing pollen tubes are not available. In addition to respiration, we discuss fermentation and mitochondrial localization. We argue that the molecular pathways need to be examined within the physiological context to understand better the mechanisms that control tip growth in pollen tubes.

  4. Temperature response of respiration across heterogeneous microtopography in the Arctic tundra, Utqiaġvik, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkman, E.; Zona, D.; Tang, Y.; Gioli, B.; Lipson, D.; Oechel, W. C.

    2017-12-01

    The response of ecosystem respiration to warming in the Arctic is not well constrained, partly due to the presence of ice-wedge polygons in continuous permafrost areas. These formations lead to substantial variation in vegetation, soil moisture, water table, and active layer depth over the meter scale that can drive respiratory carbon loss. Accurate calculations of in-situ temperature sensitivities (Q10) are vital for the prediction of future Arctic emissions, and while the eddy covariance technique has commonly been used to determine the diurnal and season patterns of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2, the lack of suitable dark periods in the Arctic summer has limited our ability to estimate and interpret ecosystem respiration. To therefore improve our understanding of and define controls on ecosystem respiration, we directly compared CO2 fluxes measured from automated chambers across the main local polygonised landscape forms (high and low centers, polygon rims, and polygon troughs) to estimates from an adjacent eddy covariance tower. Low-centered polygons and polygon troughs had the greatest cumulative respiration rates, and ecosystem type appeared to be the most important explanatory variable for these rates. Despite the difference in absolute respiration rates, Q10 was surprisingly similar across all microtopographic features, despite contrasting water levels and vegetation types. Conversely, Q10 varied temporally, with higher values during the early and late summer and lower values during the peak growing season. Finally, good agreement was found between chamber and tower based Q10 estimates during the peak growing season. Overall, this study suggests that it is possible to simplify estimates of the temperature sensitivity of respiration across heterogeneous landscapes, but that seasonal changes in Q10 should be incorporated into current and future model simulations.

  5. Effects of manipulated above- and belowground organic matter input on soil respiration in a Chinese pine plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Juan; Wang, Jinsong; Zhao, Bo; Wu, Lianhai; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhao, Xiuhai; Gadow, Klaus V

    2015-01-01

    Alteration in the amount of soil organic matter input can have profound effect on carbon dynamics in forest soils. The objective of our research was to determine the response in soil respiration to above- and belowground organic matter manipulation in a Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis) plantation. Five organic matter treatments were applied during a 2-year experiment: both litter removal and root trenching (LRRT), only litter removal (LR), control (CK), only root trenching (RT) and litter addition (LA). We found that either aboveground litter removal or root trenching decreased soil respiration. On average, soil respiration rate was significantly decreased in the LRRT treatment, by about 38.93% ± 2.01% compared to the control. Soil respiration rate in the LR treatment was 30.65% ± 1.87% and in the RT treatment 17.65% ± 1.95% lower than in the control. Litter addition significantly increased soil respiration rate by about 25.82% ± 2.44% compared to the control. Soil temperature and soil moisture were the main factors affecting seasonal variation in soil respiration. Up to the 59.7% to 82.9% seasonal variation in soil respiration is explained by integrating soil temperature and soil moisture within each of the various organic matter treatments. The temperature sensitivity parameter, Q10, was higher in the RT (2.72) and LA (3.19) treatments relative to the control (2.51), but lower in the LRRT (1.52) and LR treatments (1.36). Our data suggest that manipulation of soil organic matter input can not only alter soil CO2 efflux, but also have profound effect on the temperature sensitivity of organic carbon decomposition in a temperate pine forest.

  6. Tillage Effects on Soil Properties & Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Teodor; Bogdan, Ileana; Moraru, Paula; Pop, Adrian; Duda, Bogdan; Cacovean, Horea; Coste, Camelia

    2015-04-01

    Soil tillage systems can be able to influence soil compaction, water dynamics, soil temperature and soil structural condition. These processes can be expressed as changes of soil microbiological activity, soil respiration and sustainability of agriculture. Objectives of this study were: 1) to assess the effects of tillage systems (Conventional System-CS, Minimum Tillage-MT, No-Tillage-NT) on soil compaction, soil temperature, soil moisture and soil respiration and 2) to establish the relationship that exists in changing soil properties. Three treatments were installed: CS-plough + disc; MT-paraplow + rotary grape; NT-direct sowing. The study was conducted on an Argic-Stagnic Faeoziom. The MT and NT applications reduce or completely eliminate the soil mobilization, due to this, soil is compacted in the first year of application. The degree of compaction is directly related to soil type and its state of degradation. The state of soil compaction diminished over time, tending toward a specific type of soil density. Soil moisture was higher in NT and MT at the time of sowing and in the early stages of vegetation and differences diminished over time. Moisture determinations showed statistically significant differences. The MT and NT applications reduced the thermal amplitude in the first 15 cm of soil depth and increased the soil temperature by 0.5-2.20C. The determinations confirm the effect of soil tillage system on soil respiration; the daily average was lower at NT (315-1914 mmoli m-2s-1) and followed by MT (318-2395 mmoli m-2s-1) and is higher in the CS (321-2480 mmol m-2s-1). Comparing with CS, all the two conservation tillage measures decreased soil respiration, with the best effects of no-tillage. An exceeding amount of CO2 produced in the soil and released into the atmosphere, resulting from aerobic processes of mineralization of organic matter (excessive loosening) is considered to be not only a way of increasing the CO2 in the atmosphere, but also a loss of

  7. Real-time Modification of Music with Dancer's Respiration Pattern

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jeong-seob; Yeo, Woon Seung

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to improve the correspondence between music and dance, and explores the use of human respiration pattern for musical applications with focus on the motional aspect of breathing. While respiration is frequently considered as an indicator of the metabolic state of human body that contains meaningful information for medicine or psychology, motional aspect of respiration has been relatively unnoticed in spite of its strong correlation with muscles and the brain. This paper intr...

  8. Investigation of mitochondrial dysfunction by sequential microplate-based respiration measurements from intact and permeabilized neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascaline Clerc

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is a component of many neurodegenerative conditions. Measurement of oxygen consumption from intact neurons enables evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics under conditions that are more physiologically realistic compared to isolated mitochondria. However, mechanistic analysis of mitochondrial function in cells is complicated by changing energy demands and lack of substrate control. Here we describe a technique for sequentially measuring respiration from intact and saponin-permeabilized cortical neurons on single microplates. This technique allows control of substrates to individual electron transport chain complexes following permeabilization, as well as side-by-side comparisons to intact cells. To illustrate the utility of the technique, we demonstrate that inhibition of respiration by the drug KB-R7943 in intact neurons is relieved by delivery of the complex II substrate succinate, but not by complex I substrates, via acute saponin permeabilization. In contrast, methyl succinate, a putative cell permeable complex II substrate, failed to rescue respiration in intact neurons and was a poor complex II substrate in permeabilized cells. Sequential measurements of intact and permeabilized cell respiration should be particularly useful for evaluating indirect mitochondrial toxicity due to drugs or cellular signaling events which cannot be readily studied using isolated mitochondria.

  9. Lipid peroxidation and cytotoxicity induced by respirable volcanic ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera, E-mail: jcervini@correo.cua.uam.mx [Departamento de Procesos y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Unidad Cuajimalpa, México City (Mexico); Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Nieto-Camacho, Antonio [Laboratorio de Pruebas Biológicas, Instituto de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, México City (Mexico); Gomez-Vidales, Virginia [Laboratorio de Resonancia Paramagnética Electrónica, Instituto de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, México City (Mexico); Ramirez-Apan, María Teresa [Laboratorio de Pruebas Biológicas, Instituto de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, México City (Mexico); Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención [Dirección de Investigación y Posgrado, Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo (Mexico); Kaufhold, Stephan [BGR Bundesansaltfür Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany); and others

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Respirable volcanic ash induces oxidative degradation of lipids in cell membranes. • Respirable volcanic ash triggers cytotoxicity in murin monocyle/macrophage cells. • Oxidative stress is surface controlled but not restricted by surface- Fe{sup 3+}. • Surface Fe{sup 3+} acts as a stronger inductor in allophanes vs phyllosilicates or oxides. • Registered cell-viability values were as low as 68.5 ± 6.7%. - Abstract: This paper reports that the main component of respirable volcanic ash, allophane, induces lipid peroxidation (LP), the oxidative degradation of lipids in cell membranes, and cytotoxicity in murin monocyle/macrophage cells. Naturally-occurring allophane collected from New Zealand, Japan, and Ecuador was studied. The quantification of LP was conducted using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) assay. The cytotoxic effect was determined by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay. Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) determinations of naturally-occurring allophane confirmed the incorporation in the structure and clustering of structural Fe{sup 3+}, and nucleation and growth of small-sized Fe (oxyhydr)oxide or gibbsite. LP induced by allophane varied with time, and solid concentration and composition, reaching 6.7 ± 0.2 nmol TBARS mg prot{sup −1}. LP was surface controlled but not restricted by structural or surface-bound Fe{sup 3+}, because redox processes induced by soluble components other than perferryl iron. The reactivity of Fe{sup 3+} soluble species stemming from surface-bound Fe{sup 3+} or small-sized Fe{sup 3+} refractory minerals in allophane surpassed that of structural Fe{sup 3+} located in tetrahedral or octahedral sites of phyllosilicates or bulk iron oxides. Desferrioxamine B mesylate salt (DFOB) or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) inhibited LP. EDTA acted as a more effective inhibitor, explained by multiple electron transfer pathways. Registered cell

  10. [The development of a respiration and temperature monitor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X; Wu, B; Liu, Y; He, Q; Xiao, J

    2001-12-01

    This paper introduces the design of a monitoring system to measure the respiration and temperature of a body with an 8Xc196 single-chip microcomputer. This system can measure and display the respiration wave, respiration frequency and the body temperature in real-time with a liquid crystal display (LCD) and give an alarm when the parameters are beyond the normal scope. In addition, this device can provide a 24 hours trend graph of the respiration frequency and the body temperature parameters measured. Data can also be exchanged through serial communication interfaces (RS232) between the PC and the monitor.

  11. Respirator studies for the ERDA Division of Safety, Standards, and Compliance. Progress report, July 1, 1974--June 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, D.D.; Hack, A.L.; Davis, T.O.; Shafer, C.; Moore, T.O.; Richards, C.P.; Revoir, W.H.

    1976-08-01

    Major accomplishments during FY 1975 were the initiation of a respirator research program to investigate the physiological effects of wearing a respirator under stress, assisting ERDA contractors by providing information and training concerning respirator programs, quality assurance of respirators, and respirator applications. A newsletter of respirator developments for ERDA contractor personnel was published, and a Respirator Symposium was conducted

  12. Foliage, fine-root, woody-tissue and stand respiration in Pinus radiata in relation to nitrogen status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M G; Hubbard, R M; Pongracic, S; Raison, R J; McMurtrie, R E

    1996-03-01

    We measured respiration of 20-year-old Pinus radiata D. Don trees growing in control (C), irrigated (I), and irrigated + fertilized (IL) stands in the Biology of Forest Growth experimental plantation near Canberra, Australia. Respiration was measured on fully expanded foliage, live branches, boles, and fine and coarse roots to determine the relationship between CO(2) efflux, tissue temperature, and biomass or nitrogen (N) content of individual tissues. Efflux of CO(2) from foliage (dark respiration at night) and fine roots was linearly related to biomass and N content, but N was a better predictor of CO(2) efflux than biomass. Respiration (assumed to be maintenance) per unit N at 15 degrees C and a CO(2) concentration of 400 micro mol mol(-1) was 1.71 micro mol s(-1) mol(-1) N for foliage and 11.2 micro mol s(-1) mol(-1) N for fine roots. Efflux of CO(2) from stems, coarse roots and branches was linearly related to sapwood volume (stems) or total volume (branches + coarse roots) and growth, with rates for maintenance respiration at 15 degrees C ranging from 18 to 104 micro mol m(-3) s(-1). Among woody components, branches in the upper canopy and small diameter coarse roots had the highest respiration rates. Stem maintenance respiration per unit sapwood volume did not differ among treatments. Annual C flux was estimated by summing (1) dry matter production and respiration of aboveground components, (2) annual soil CO(2) efflux minus aboveground litterfall, and (3) the annual increment in coarse root biomass. Annual C flux was 24.4, 25.3 and 34.4 Mg ha(-1) year(-1) for the C, I and IL treatments, respectively. Total belowground C allocation, estimated as the sum of (2) and (3) above, was equal to the sum of root respiration and estimated root production in the IL treatment, whereas in the nutrient-limited C and I treatments, total belowground C allocation was greater than the sum of root respiration and estimated root production, suggesting higher fine root turnover

  13. Bile acids exert negative feedback control on bile acid synthesis in cultured pig hepatocytes by suppression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwekkeboom, J.; Princen, H.M.G.; Voorthuizen, E.M. van; Kempen, H.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis by its end products was studied in cultured hepatocytes of young weaned pigs. We previously showed that conversion of exogenous [14C] cholesterol into bile acids was suppressed by addition of bile acids to the culture medium. In the present study, the

  14. Changes in soil respiration after thinning activities in dense Aleppo pine forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llovet, Joan; Alonso, Macià; Cerdà, Artemi

    2015-04-01

    Forest fires are a widespread perturbation in Mediterranean areas, and they have tended to increase during the last decades (Pausas, 2004; Moreno et al, 1998). Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis Mill) is dominant specie in some forest landscapes of western Mediterranean Basin, due to its capacity to colonize abandoned fields, and also due to afforestation practices mainly performed during the 20th century (Ruiz Navarro et al., 2009). Aleppo pine tends to die as consequence of forest fires, although it is able to disperse a high quantity of seeds which easily germinates. These dispersion and germination can result in dense forests with high inter and intra-specific competition, low diversity, low growth, and high fuel accumulation, increasing the risk of new forest fires. These forests of high density present ecological problems and management difficulties that require preventive treatments. Thinning treatments are common in these types of communities, but the management has to be oriented towards strengthening their functions. In the context of global change, better understandings of the implications of forest management practices in the carbon cycle are necessary. The objective of this study was to examine the evolution of seasonal soil respiration after treatment of selective thinning in dense Aleppo pine forests. The study area covers three localities placed in the Valencian Community (E Spain) affected by a forest fire in 1994. Thinning activities were done 16 years after the fire, reducing pine density from around 100,000 individuals per hectare to around 900 individuals per hectare. Soil respiration was measured in situ with a portable soil respiration instrument (LI-6400, LiCor, Lincoln, NB, USA) fitted with a soil respiration chamber (6400-09, LiCor, Lincoln, NB, USA). We installed 12 plots per treatment (control and thinned) and locality, being a total of 72 plots. We carried out 13 measurements covering a period of one year. We also estimated other related

  15. Mitochondrial cytochrome redox states and respiration in acute pulmonary oxygen sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, N; Pak, O; Schörner, S; Derfuss, T; Krug, A; Gnaiger, E; Ghofrani, H A; Schermuly, R T; Huckstorf, C; Seeger, W; Grimminger, F; Weissmann, N

    2010-11-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an essential mechanism to optimise lung gas exchange. We aimed to decipher the proposed oxygen sensing mechanism of mitochondria in HPV. Cytochrome redox state was assessed by remission spectrophotometry in intact lungs and isolated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC). Mitochondrial respiration was quantified by high-resolution respirometry. Alterations were compared with HPV and hypoxia-induced functional and molecular readouts on the cellular level. Aortic and renal arterial smooth muscle cells (ASMC and RASMC, respectively) served as controls. The hypoxia-induced decrease of mitochondrial respiration paralleled HPV in isolated lungs. In PASMC, reduction of respiration and mitochondrial cytochrome c and aa3 (complex IV), but not of cytochrome b (complex III) matched an increase in matrix superoxide levels as well as mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarisation with subsequent cytosolic calcium increase. In contrast to PASMC, RASMC displayed a lower decrease in respiration and no rise in superoxide, membrane potential or intracellular calcium. Pharmacological inhibition of mitochondria revealed analogous kinetics of cytochrome redox state and strength of HPV. Our data suggest inhibition of complex IV as an essential step in mitochondrial oxygen sensing of HPV. Concomitantly, increased superoxide release from complex III and mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarisation may initiate the cytosolic calcium increase underlying HPV.

  16. Does high-sucrose diet alter skeletal muscle and liver mitochondrial respiration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, K; Py, G; Robert, E; Mercier, J

    2003-09-01

    A diet high in sucrose or fructose progressively impairs glucose and lipid metabolism, which leads to insulin resistance. As mitochondria are the sites of the oxidation and utilization of these substrates, we hypothesized that a high sucrose diet would alter mitochondrial respiration. Male Wistar rats were fed high-sucrose (SU) or control (CTL) diet for one week; mitochondrial respiration was investigated in mitochondria isolated from liver and both glycolytic and oxidative muscles, with pyruvate and palmitate as substrates. To test for metabolic disturbances, we measured not only glycogen content in muscles and liver, but also lactate, glucose and triglyceride blood concentrations. After one week of high-sucrose intake, we found no change in blood concentration of these variables, but glycogen content was significantly increased in liver (17.28 +/- 2.98 mg/g tissue SU vs 6.47 +/- 1.67 mg/g tissue CTL), oxidative muscle (1.59 +/- 0.21 mg/g tissue SU vs 0.70 +/- 0.24 mg/g tissue CTL) though not in glycolytic muscle (1.72 +/- 0.44 mg/g tissue SU vs 1.52 +/- 0.20 mg/g tissue CTL). State 3 mitochondrial respiration was significantly decreased in SU rats compared with CTL (p respiration could contributed to the development of insulin resistance.

  17. Analyses of Heart Rate, Respiration and Cardiorespiratory Coupling in Patients with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Schulz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder associated with a significantly increased cardiovascular mortality rate. However, the underlying mechanisms leading to this cardiovascular disease (CVD are not fully known. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the cardiorespiratory influence by investigating heart rate, respiration and the causal strength and direction of cardiorespiratory coupling (CRC, based mainly on entropy measures. We investigated 23 non-medicated patients with schizophrenia (SZ, comparing them to 23 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (CO. A significantly reduced complexity was found for the heart rate and a significantly increased complexity in respiration and CRC in SZ patients when compared to corresponding measurements from CO (p < 0.001. CRC analyses revealed a clear coupling, with a driver-responder relationship from respiration to heart rate in SZ patients. Moreover, a slight driver-responder relationship from heart rate to respiration could be recognized. These findings lead to the assumption that SZ should be considered to be a high-risk group for CVD. We hypothesize that the varying cardiorespiratory regulation contributes to the increased risk for cardiac mortality. Therefore, regular monitoring of the cardiorespiratory status of SZ is suggested to identify autonomic regulation impairment at an early stage—to develop timely and effective treatment and intervention strategies.

  18. Temperature response of soil respiration is dependent on concentration of readily decomposable C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionova, A. A.; Yevdokimov, I. V.; Bykhovets, S. S.

    2007-12-01

    Temperature acclimation of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is one of the major uncertainties in predicting soil CO2 efflux associated with the increase in global mean temperature. A reasonable explanation for an apparent acclimation proposed by Davidson and colleagues (2006) based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics suggests that temperature sensitivity decreases when both maximal activity of respiratory enzymes (Vmax) and half-saturation constant (Ks) cancel each other upon temperature increase. We tested the hypothesis of the canceling effect by the mathematical simulation of data obtained in incubation experiments with forest and arable soils. Our data support the hypothesis and suggest that concentration of readily decomposable C substrate (as glucose equivalents) and temperature dependent substrate release are the important factors controlling temperature sensitivity of soil respiration. The highest temperature sensitivity of soil respiration was observed when substrate release was temperature dependent and C substrate concentration was much lower than Ks. Increase of substrate content to the half-saturation constant by glucose addition resulted in temperature acclimation associated with the canceling effect. Addition of the substrate to the level providing respiration at a maximal rate Vmax leads to the acclimation of the whole microbial community as such. However, growing microbial biomass was more sensitive to the temperature alterations. This study improves our understanding of the instability of temperature sensitivity of soil respiration under field conditions, attributing this phenomenon to changes in concentration of readily decomposable C substrate.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Metabolic Suppression: Protein Synthesis and Mitochondrial Respiration in a Hibernating Ground Squirrel Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boyer, Bert B

    2005-01-01

    We have discovered that mitochondrial proton conductance is unchanged during hibernation and that the reduced metabolism observed in hibernators is a partial consequence of tissue specific depression...

  20. Contribution of root to soil respiration and carbon balance in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    Global soil respiration is estimated to be 76.5 Pg C yr-1, which is 30–60 Pg C yr-1 greater than the net primary productivity. (NPP) (Raich and Potter 1995). Therefore, soil respiration is a major pathway for carbon to move from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere and even small changes can strongly influence net ...

  1. Soil Respiration and Student Inquiry: A Perfect Match

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Catherine Marie; Wallenstein, Matthew David

    2011-01-01

    This activity explores the cycling of carbon between the atmosphere (primarily as CO[subscript 2]) and biomass in plants, animals, and microscopic organisms. Students design soil respiration experiments using a protocol that resembles current practice in soil ecology. Three methods for measuring soil respiration are presented. Student-derived…

  2. Simulation of Human Respiration with Breathing Thermal Manikin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Erik

    The human respiration contains carbon dioxide, bioeffluents, and perhaps virus or bacteria. People may also indulge in activities that produce contaminants, as for example tobacco smoking. For these reasons, the human respiration remains one of the main contributors to contamination of the indoor...

  3. respiration and transpiration characteristics of selected fresh fruits

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    Respiration and transpiration characteristics of mushrooms, strawberries, broccoli and tomatoes were determined under different temperature, atmospheric and humidity conditions in order to get information for modified humidity atmosphere conception. The respiration rate was determined using a static method. (scanning ...

  4. Interpreting diel hysteresis between soil respiration and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Phillips; N. Nickerson; D. Risk; B.J. Bond

    2011-01-01

    Increasing use of automated soil respiration chambers in recent years has demonstrated complex diel relationships between soil respiration and temperature that are not apparent from less frequent measurements. Soil surface flux is often lagged from soil temperature by several hours, which results in semielliptical hysteresis loops when surface flux is plotted as a...

  5. Respiration and transpiration characteristics of selected fresh fruits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Respiration and transpiration characteristics of mushrooms, strawberries, broccoli and tomatoes were determined under different temperature, atmospheric and humidity conditions in order to get information for modified humidity atmosphere conception. The respiration rate was determined using a static method (scanning ...

  6. Determination of radon gas and respirable ore dust concentrations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study has estimated the concentrations of radon gas and respirable ore dust in the Merelani underground tanzanite mines. Two different portable monitors were used to measure the radon gas and respirable ore dust concentrations respectively. The mean radon gas concentration (disintegrations per second per cubic ...

  7. Respirators: Air Purifying, Self-Study, Course 40723

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-21

    Respirators: Air Purifying Self-Study (COURSE 40723) is designed for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) workers, support services subcontractors, and other LANL subcontractors who work under the LANL Respiratory Protection Program (RPP). This course also meets the air-purifying respirators (APRs) retraining requirement.

  8. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except as provided in...) Containers for gas masks combinations shall be designed and constructed to permit easy removal of the mask. ...

  9. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general... gas mask 70 85 20 Chin-style gas mask 65 80 20 Powered air-purifying 2 2 50 2 70 20 Chemical Cartridge...

  10. Light-enhanced oxygen respiration in benthic phototrophic communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epping, EHG; Jørgensen, BB

    1996-01-01

    Two microelectrode studies demonstrate the effect of Light intensity and photosynthesis on areal oxygen respiration in a hypersaline mat at Guerrero Negro, Mexico, and in an intertidal sediment at Texel, The Netherlands. The hypersaline mat was studied in the laboratory at light intensities of 0...... light intensities. Areal respiration, calculated from the difference between areal gross and areal net photosynthesis, increased from 3.9 to 14.4 nmol O-2 cm(2) min(-1) with increasing surface irradiance. This light-enhanced areal respiration was related to an increase in oxygen penetration depth from 0.......2 to 2.0 mm, thus expanding the volume of sediment involved in oxygen respiration beneath the mat surface. The mean rate of oxygen respiration per volume of mat remained constant at a rate of similar to 100 nmol O-2 cm(-3) min(-1). Oxygen profiles for the intertidal sediment were recorded in situ during...

  11. CO(2) Inhibits Respiration in Leaves of Rumex crispus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amthor, J S; Koch, G W; Bloom, A J

    1992-02-01

    Curly dock (Rumex crispus L.) was grown from seed in a glasshouse at an ambient CO(2) partial pressure of about 35 pascals. Apparent respiration rate (CO(2) efflux in the dark) of expanded leaves was then measured at ambient CO(2) partial pressure of 5 to 95 pascals. Calculated intercellular CO(2) partial pressure was proportional to ambient CO(2) partial pressure in these short-term experiments. The CO(2) level strongly affected apparent respiration rate: a doubling of the partial pressure of CO(2) typically inhibited respiration by 25 to 30%, whereas a decrease in CO(2) elicited a corresponding increase in respiration. These responses were readily reversible. A flexible, sensitive regulatory interaction between CO(2) (a byproduct of respiration) and some component(s) of heterotrophic metabolism is indicated.

  12. A Global Database of Soil Respiration Data, Version 2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides an updated soil respiration database (SRDB), a near-universal compendium of published soil respiration (RS) data. Soil respiration,...

  13. A Global Database of Soil Respiration Data, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides a soil respiration data database (SRDB), a near-universal compendium of published soil respiration (RS) data. Soil respiration, the...

  14. Effects of prolonged mechanical ventilation on respiratory muscle ultrastructure and mitochondrial respiration in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Nathalie; Matecki, Stefan; Py, Guillaume; Lopez, Sandrine; Mercier, Jacques; Capdevila, Xavier

    2003-01-01

    To investigate in rabbits whether prolonged mechanical ventilation (PMV) leads to ultrastructural changes in respiratory muscles and alters diaphragm mitochondrial respiration. Experimental prospective study in a university laboratory. We studied respiratory muscles of seven rabbits after 49+/-1 h of controlled mechanical ventilation. Ten nonventilated rabbits were used as a control group. After mechanical ventilation electron-microscopic observations of the diaphragm and the external intercostal muscles revealed disrupted myofibrils, increased number of lipid vacuoles in the sarcoplasm, and smaller mitochondria with focal membrane disruptions. Volumetric and numerical densities of the mitochondria were significantly lower in the PMV group than the control group. Mitochondrial respiration was quantified in isolated diaphragm muscle-cell mitochondria using two respiratory substrates. There was no difference in oxygen consumption values in the three states of mitochondrial respiration between the two groups except for state 2 (basal state) with pyruvate/malate parameter (53.5+/-20 for the ventilated group vs. 33.8+/-10.2 nmol atom O/mg per minute for the control group). There was no significant difference between groups in ADP/O ratio or respiratory control ratio. PMV leads to respiratory muscle cell degeneration and minor changes in oxidative phosphorylation coupling in diaphragmatic mitochondria. These phenomena may mediate part of damage of respiratory muscles after inactivity related to PMV.

  15. Pressure suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Funahashi, Toshihiro.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a structure which permits the absorption of shocks and vibratory load produced on the floor of a pressure suppression chamber due to nitrogen gas or the like discharged into pool water in the pressure suppression chamber at the time of a loss-of-coolant accident. Constitution: A pressure suppression chamber accommodating pool water is comprised of a bottom wall and side walls constructed of concrete on the inner side of a liner. By providing concrete on the bottom surface and side wall surfaces of a pressure suppression chamber, it is possible to prevent non-condensing gas and steam exhausted from the vent duct and exhaust duct of a main vapor escapement safety valve exhaust duct from exerting impact forces and vibratory forces upon the bottom and side surfaces of the pressure suppression chamber. (Horiuchi, T.)

  16. Measurements of photosynthesis and respiration in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Stephen

    2003-03-01

    Methods for measuring the rates of photosynthesis and respiration in plants are reviewed. Closed systems that involve manometric techniques, 14CO2 fixation, O2 electrodes and other methods for measuring dissolved and gas phase O2 are described. These methods typically provide time-integrated rate measurements, and limitations to their use are discussed. Open gas exchange systems that use infra-red CO2 gas analysers and differential O2 analysers for measuring instantaneous rates of CO2 and O2 exchange are described. Important features of the analysers, design features of gas exchange systems, and sources of potential error are considered. The analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters for estimating the quantum yield for O2 evolution and CO2 fixation is described in relation to new fluorescence imaging systems for large scale screening of photosynthetic phenotypes, and the microimaging of individual chloroplasts.

  17. Management effects on European cropland respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugster, Werner; Moffat, Antje M.; Ceschia, Eric

    2010-01-01

    findings are based on all available CarboEurope IP eddy covariance flux measurements during a 4-year period (2004–2007). Detailed management information was available for 15 out of the 22 sites that contributed flux data, from which we compiled 30 types of management for European-scale comparison...... +83% (early season tillage) to -50% (rice paddy flooding and burning of rice residues) on the 28 days time scale,whenonlymanagementtypes with aminimumof 7 replications are considered. Most management types showed a large variationamongevents and between sites, indicating that additional factors other...... management types with adequate statistical coverage of at least 5 events during the years 2004–2007. In this comparison, late-season moldboard ploughing (30–45 cm) led to highest median increase in respiration on the 7 days timescale (+43%), which was still +15% in the 28 days comparison. On average, however...

  18. Suppression of integrin α3β1 by α9β1 in the epidermis controls the paracrine resolution of wound angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmate, Whitney M; Lyons, Scott P; Chittur, Sridar V; Pumiglia, Kevin M; Van De Water, Livingston; DiPersio, C Michael

    2017-05-01

    Development of wound therapies is hindered by poor understanding of combinatorial integrin function in the epidermis. In this study, we generated mice with epidermis-specific deletion of α3β1, α9β1, or both integrins as well as keratinocyte lines expressing these integrin combinations. Consistent with proangiogenic roles for α3β1, α3-null keratinocytes showed reduced paracrine stimulation of endothelial cell migration and survival, and wounds of epidermis-specific α3 knockout mice displayed impaired angiogenesis. Interestingly, α9β1 in keratinocytes suppressed α3β1-mediated stimulation of endothelial cells, and wounds of epidermis-specific α9 knockout mice displayed delayed vascular normalization and reduced endothelial apoptosis, indicating that α9β1 cross-suppresses α3β1 proangiogenic functions. Moreover, α9β1 inhibited α3β1 signaling downstream of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) autoactivation at the point of Src-mediated phosphorylation of FAK Y861/Y925. Finally, α9β1 cross-suppressed many α3β1-dependent genes, including the gene that encodes MMP-9, which we implicated as a regulator of integrin-dependent cross talk to endothelial cells. Our findings identify a novel physiological context for combinatorial integrin signaling, laying the foundation for therapeutic strategies that manipulate α9β1 and/or α3β1 during wound healing. © 2017 Longmate et al.

  19. Coarse woody debris and soil respiration 6 years post-tornado in a Piedmont forest blowdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, C.; Peterson, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Severe wind disturbances can rapidly change carbon pools and fluxes in forests, causing a site to switch from a carbon sink to a source in a matter of minutes. Moreover, salvage logging after a disturbance can result in disturbed and compacted soil, altered woody debris carbon pools, and seedling mortality, all of which may further alter carbon dynamics beyond that caused by the disturbance itself. We measured down dead wood and soil respiration in the summer of 2017 at Boggs Creek Recreation Area in the Piedmont of northeast Georgia, the site of a severe tornado in 2011. Down dead wood and soil respiration were compared in control (intact forest), salvaged, and unsalvaged areas. Megagrams per hectare of down dead wood was significantly higher in the unsalvaged condition than the control or salvage logging condition (ANOVAs, p<0.05 in both cases). Conversely, the volume of down dead wood was not significantly different in the control when compared to the salvage logging condition (p=0.99). Soil respiration was significantly higher in the salvage logged condition than the control (p<0.05), but was not significantly different between the unsalvaged condition and the control (p=0.30) or the unsalvaged condition and the salvaged condition (p=0.58). This research shows that wind disturbances have a lasting impact on the amount of down dead wood in a forest, and salvage logging may lead to greater soil respiration years after the initial disturbance, both of which will influence the time elapsed before a disturbed forest switches from carbon source to carbon sink. Further research is needed to determine the duration of these effects, along with the carbon consequences for other forest carbon pools.

  20. Mitochondrial dynamics and respiration within cells with increased open pore cytoskeletal meshes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Jang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The cytoskeletal architecture directly affects the morphology, motility, and tensional homeostasis of the cell. In addition, the cytoskeleton is important for mitosis, intracellular traffic, organelle motility, and even cellular respiration. The organelle responsible for a majority of the energy conversion for the cell, the mitochondrion, has a dependence on the cytoskeleton for mobility and function. In previous studies, we established that cytoskeletal inhibitors altered the movement of the mitochondria, their morphology, and their respiration in human dermal fibroblasts. Here, we use this protocol to investigate applicability of power law diffusion to describe mitochondrial locomotion, assessment of rates of fission and fusion in healthy and diseased cells, and differences in mitochondria locomotion in more open networks either in response to cytoskeletal destabilizers or by cell line. We found that mitochondria within fibrosarcoma cells and within fibroblast cells treated with an actin-destabilizing toxin resulted in increased net travel, increased average velocity, and increased diffusion of mitochondria when compared to control fibroblasts. Although the mitochondria within the fibrosarcoma travel further than mitochondria within their healthy counterparts, fibroblasts, the dependence on mitochondria for respiration is much lower with higher rates ofhydrogen peroxide production and was confirmed using the OROBOROS O2K. We also found that rates of fission and fusion of the mitochondria equilibrate despite significant alteration of the cytoskeleton. Rates ranged from 15% to 25%, where the highest rates were observed within the fibrosarcoma cell line. This result is interesting because the fibrosarcoma cell line does not have increased respiration metrics including when compared to fibroblast. Mitochondria travel further, faster, and have an increase in percent mitochondria splitting or joining while not dependent on the mitochondria for a

  1. Permafrost collapse alters soil carbon stocks, respiration, CH4 , and N2O in upland tundra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Benjamin W; Jones, Jeremy B

    2015-12-01

    Release of greenhouse gases from thawing permafrost is potentially the largest terrestrial feedback to climate change and one of the most likely to occur; however, estimates of its strength vary by a factor of thirty. Some of this uncertainty stems from abrupt thaw processes known as thermokarst (permafrost collapse due to ground ice melt), which alter controls on carbon and nitrogen cycling and expose organic matter from meters below the surface. Thermokarst may affect 20-50% of tundra uplands by the end of the century; however, little is known about the effect of different thermokarst morphologies on carbon and nitrogen release. We measured soil organic matter displacement, ecosystem respiration, and soil gas concentrations at 26 upland thermokarst features on the North Slope of Alaska. Features included the three most common upland thermokarst morphologies: active-layer detachment slides, thermo-erosion gullies, and retrogressive thaw slumps. We found that thermokarst morphology interacted with landscape parameters to determine both the initial displacement of organic matter and subsequent carbon and nitrogen cycling. The large proportion of ecosystem carbon exported off-site by slumps and slides resulted in decreased ecosystem respiration postfailure, while gullies removed a smaller portion of ecosystem carbon but strongly increased respiration and N2 O concentration. Elevated N2 O in gully soils persisted through most of the growing season, indicating sustained nitrification and denitrification in disturbed soils, representing a potential noncarbon permafrost climate feedback. While upland thermokarst formation did not substantially alter redox conditions within features, it redistributed organic matter into both oxic and anoxic environments. Across morphologies, residual organic matter cover, and predisturbance respiration explained 83% of the variation in respiration response. Consistent differences between upland thermokarst types may contribute to the

  2. Do traits of invasive species influence decomposition and soil respiration of disturbed ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, A. J.; Balster, N. J.

    2009-12-01

    Large-scale landscape disturbances typically alter the terrestrial carbon cycle leading to shifts in pools of soil carbon. Restoration of disturbed landscapes with prairie vegetation has thus been practiced with the intent of increasing carbon accrual in soils. However, since disturbed soils are prone to invasion by non-native invasive species, many ecological restorations have resulted in unexpected outcomes, which may be explained by differences in plant traits such as tissue quality and biomass allocation. Typically, the tissue of invasive species has lower C:N ratios relative to native species, and consequently, faster decomposition rates, which potentially can alter the balance in soil carbon. The primary objective of this research was to compare the effects of native prairie species versus non-native invasive species on the carbon cycling within a novel environment: a recently dewatered basin in southwestern Wisconsin following dam removal. We hypothesized that a higher invasive to native species ratio would result in faster litter decomposition and a higher rate of soil respiration. To test this hypothesis, we seeded newly exposed sediments with native prairie seeds in 2005, annually collected aboveground plant biomass (by species per plot), calculated decomposition rate of native and invasive litter (underneath both canopy types), and measured soil respiration during the growing season of 2009. After four years of seeding, the aboveground biomass of the native vegetation has increased significantly (p explained 20% of the variation in soil respiration. However, the vegetation type did not have a significant effect on the respiration rate. Our results suggest that vegetation traits may be influencing the cycling of carbon at this site, but that spatial variation in abiotic conditions above and belowground appear to control decomposition and soil respiration at a local scale. Moreover, the ecophysiological interactions measured here may have practical

  3. Workplace Breathing Rates: Defining Anticipated Values and Ranges for Respirator Certification Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caretti, David M; Gardner, Paul D; Coyne, Karen M

    2004-01-01

    .... For air-purifying respirators (APRs), the primary performance tests most affected by airflow rate are filter gas-life capacity, particulate filter efficiency, and respirator breathing resistances...

  4. Regional anatomic differences in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration in type 2 diabetes and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, R; Larsen, S; Højberg, P M V

    2010-01-01

    respiration and markers of mitochondrial content in skeletal muscle of arm and leg in patients with T2DM and obese control subjects. Patients: Ten patients with T2DM (age, 52.3 +/- 2.7 yr; body mass index, 30.1 +/- 1.2 kg/m(2)) (mean +/- se) were studied after a 2-wk washout period of oral antihyperglycemic...... agents. Ten control subjects (age, 54.3 +/- 2.8 yr; body mass index, 30.4 +/- 1.2 kg/m(2)) with normal fasting and 2-h oral glucose tolerance test blood glucose levels were also included. Main Outcome Measure: We measured mitochondrial respiration in saponin-treated skinned muscle fibers from biopsies...

  5. Compost made of organic wastes suppresses fusariosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuryntseva, Polina; Galitskaya, Polina; Biktasheva, Liliya; Selivanovkaya, Svetlana

    2017-04-01

    Fungal plant diseases cause dramatic yield losses worldwide. Usually, pesticides are used for soil sanitation, and it results in practically pest-free soils, although pesticides cause a biological vacuum, which present many horticultural disadvantages. Suppressive composts, which possess both fertilizing properties for plants and inhibiting properties for plant pathogens, represent an effective and environmentally friendly alternative to conventional pesticides. In this study, composts obtained from agricultural organic wastes were applied to suppress Fusarium oxysporum of tomato plants in model experiments. Composts were made of mixtures of the widespread organic wastes sampled in Tatarstan (Russia): straw (SW), corn wastes (CW), chicken manure (ChM), cattle manure (CM) and swine manure (SM). 11 two- and three-component mixtures were prepared to obtain the optimal carbon-nitrogen, moisture and pH balances, and composted for 210 days. It was found that the thermophilic phase of composting in all the mixtures lasted from 2 to 35 days, and was characterized by significant fluctuations in temperature, i.e. from 27°C to 59°C. In the initial mixtures, the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content was between 10 and 62 mg kg-1; it fell significantly on day 13, and then continuously decreased up to day 102, and subsequently remained low. For all the mixtures, maximal respiration activity was observed in the beginning of composting (231.9 mg CO2-C g-1 day-1). After 23 days, this parameter decreased significantly, and fluctuations subsided. The phytotoxicity of the initial compost mixtures varied from 18% (SW+SM) to 100% (CW+ChM+SM, CW+ChM); however, the trends in the dynamics were similar. After 120 days of composting, 5 of 11 samples were not phytotoxic. After 120 days of composting, each mixture was divided into two parts; one was inoculated with a biopreparation consisting of four microbial strains (Trichoderma asperellum, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas fluorescens and

  6. Microbial respiration per unit microbial biomass increases with carbon-to-nutrient ratios in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spohn, Marie; Chodak, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    The ratio of carbon-to-nutrient in forest floors is usually much higher than the ratio of carbon-to-nutrient that soil microorganisms require for their nutrition. In order to understand how this mismatch affects carbon cycling, the respiration rate per unit soil microbial biomass carbon - the metabolic quotient (qCO2) - was studied. This was done in a field study (Spohn and Chodak, 2015) and in a meta-analysis of published data (Spohn, 2014). Cores of beech, spruce, and mixed spruce-beech forest soils were cut into slices of 1 cm from the top of the litter layer down to 5 cm in the mineral soil, and the relationship between the qCO2 and the soil carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) and the soil carbon-to-phosphorus (C:P) ratio was analyzed. We found that the qCO2 was positively correlated with soil C:N ratio in spruce soils (R = 0.72), and with the soil C:P ratio in beech (R = 0.93), spruce (R = 0.80) and mixed forest soils (R = 0.96). We also observed a close correlation between the qCO2 and the soil C concentration in all three forest types. Yet, the qCO2 decreased less with depth than the C concentration in all three forest types, suggesting that the change in qCO2 is not only controlled by the soil C concentration. We conclude that microorganisms increase their respiration rate per unit biomass with increasing soil C:P ratio and C concentration, which adjusts the substrate to their nutritional demands in terms of stoichiometry. In an analysis of literature data, I tested the effect of the C:N ratio of soil litter layers on microbial respiration in absolute terms and per unit microbial biomass C. For this purpose, a global dataset on the microbial respiration rate per unit microbial biomass C - termed the metabolic quotient (qCO2) - was compiled form literature data. It was found that the qCO2 in the soil litter layers was positively correlated with the litter C:N ratio and negatively related with the litter nitrogen (N) concentration. The positive relation between the qCO2

  7. Soil Respiration in Semiarid Temperate Grasslands under Various Land Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Ji, Lei; Hou, Xiangyang; Schellenberg, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration, a major component of the global carbon cycle, is significantly influenced by land management practices. Grasslands are potentially a major sink for carbon, but can also be a source. Here, we investigated the potential effect of land management (grazing, clipping, and ungrazed enclosures) on soil respiration in the semiarid grassland of northern China. Our results showed the mean soil respiration was significantly higher under enclosures (2.17 μmol.m(-2).s(-1)) and clipping (2.06 μmol.m(-2).s(-1)) than under grazing (1.65 μmol.m-(2).s(-1)) over the three growing seasons. The high rates of soil respiration under enclosure and clipping were associated with the higher belowground net primary productivity (BNPP). Our analyses indicated that soil respiration was primarily related to BNPP under grazing, to soil water content under clipping. Using structural equation models, we found that soil water content, aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and BNPP regulated soil respiration, with soil water content as the predominant factor. Our findings highlight that management-induced changes in abiotic (soil temperature and soil water content) and biotic (ANPP and BNPP) factors regulate soil respiration in the semiarid temperate grassland of northern China.

  8. Plankton Respiration from the Cellular to the Basin Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C.; Garcia-Martin, E. E.; Hull, T.; Kitidis, V. A.; Ostle, C.; Serret, P.; Tilstone, G.

    2016-02-01

    Estimates of marine plankton respiration provide an important constraint on the magnitude of the biological carbon pump and global elemental nutrient cycles, yet respiration remains one of the least constrained terms in models of metabolism, gas exchange and carbon mass balance. This is due in part to the difficulty in measuring both total oceanic respiration and that attributable to specific plankton groups or size classes and the resulting lack of earth observation algorithms. Respiration in the surface layer of the ocean is usually estimated from either the consumption of dissolved oxygen in a contained sample volume or from enzymatic proxies such as INT, and is less frequently determined from mixed layer oxygen utilisation, allometric equations or biomass / abundance spectra.As part of a tracer release (SF6) experiment in the Mauritanian upwelling and a seasonal study of UK shelf sea biogeochemistry, we measured plankton respiration using a range of methods which span time and space scales from cells to the mixed layer and hours to years. This presentation will compare and contrast these concurrent measurements with a view to assessing the range of variability in respiration relative to that in primary production alongside measures of parameters such as plankton community structure and organic carbon availability which may lead to this variability. In addition, by comparing between systems and between seasons in the same system, and utilising the available global dataset, we aim to test predictive empirical models of respiration in an attempt to extrapolate to the basin scale.

  9. Soil Respiration in Semiarid Temperate Grasslands under Various Land Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wang

    Full Text Available Soil respiration, a major component of the global carbon cycle, is significantly influenced by land management practices. Grasslands are potentially a major sink for carbon, but can also be a source. Here, we investigated the potential effect of land management (grazing, clipping, and ungrazed enclosures on soil respiration in the semiarid grassland of northern China. Our results showed the mean soil respiration was significantly higher under enclosures (2.17 μmol.m(-2.s(-1 and clipping (2.06 μmol.m(-2.s(-1 than under grazing (1.65 μmol.m-(2.s(-1 over the three growing seasons. The high rates of soil respiration under enclosure and clipping were associated with the higher belowground net primary productivity (BNPP. Our analyses indicated that soil respiration was primarily related to BNPP under grazing, to soil water content under clipping. Using structural equation models, we found that soil water content, aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP and BNPP regulated soil respiration, with soil water content as the predominant factor. Our findings highlight that management-induced changes in abiotic (soil temperature and soil water content and biotic (ANPP and BNPP factors regulate soil respiration in the semiarid temperate grassland of northern China.

  10. Alternative respiration and fumaric acid production of Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shuai; Xu, Qing; Huang, He; Li, Shuang

    2014-06-01

    Under the conditions of fumaric acid fermentation, Rhizopus oryzae ME-F14 possessed at least two respiratory systems. The respiration of mycelia was partially inhibited by the cytochrome respiration inhibitor antimycin A or the alternative respiration inhibitor salicylhydroxamic acid and was completely inhibited in the presence of both antimycin A and salicylhydroxamic acid. During fumaric acid fermentation process, the activity of alternative respiration had a great correlation with fumaric acid productivity; both of them reached peak at the same time. The alternative oxidase gene, which encoded the mitochondrial alternative oxidase responsible for alternative respiration in R. oryzae ME-F14, was cloned and characterized in Escherichia coli. The activity of alternative respiration, the alternative oxidase gene transcription level, as well as the fumaric acid titer were measured under different carbon sources and different carbon-nitrogen ratios. The activity of alternative respiration was found to be comparable to the transcription level of the alternative oxidase gene and the fumaric acid titer. These results indicated that the activity of the alternative oxidase was regulated at the transcription stage under the conditions tested for R. oryzae ME-F14.

  11. Soil Respiration and Bacterial Structure and Function after 17 Years of a Reciprocal Soil Transplant Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Bolton, Harvey; Fansler, Sarah; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Liu, Chongxuan; McCue, Lee Ann; Smith, Jeffrey; Bailey, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    The effects of climate change on soil organic matter-its structure, microbial community, carbon storage, and respiration response-remain uncertain and widely debated. In addition, the effects of climate changes on ecosystem structure and function are often modulated or delayed, meaning that short-term experiments are not sufficient to characterize ecosystem responses. This study capitalized on a long-term reciprocal soil transplant experiment to examine the response of dryland soils to climate change. The two transplant sites were separated by 500 m of elevation on the same mountain slope in eastern Washington state, USA, and had similar plant species and soil types. We resampled the original 1994 soil transplants and controls, measuring CO2 production, temperature response, enzyme activity, and bacterial community structure after 17 years. Over a laboratory incubation of 100 days, reciprocally transplanted soils respired roughly equal cumulative amounts of carbon as non-transplanted controls from the same site. Soils transplanted from the hot, dry, lower site to the cooler and wetter (difference of -5°C monthly maximum air temperature, +50 mm yr-1 precipitation) upper site exhibited almost no respiratory response to temperature (Q10 of 1.1), but soils originally from the upper, cooler site had generally higher respiration rates. The bacterial community structure of transplants did not differ significantly from that of untransplanted controls, however. Slight differences in local climate between the upper and lower Rattlesnake locations, simulated with environmental control chambers during the incubation, thus prompted significant differences in microbial activity, with no observed change to bacterial structure. These results support the idea that environmental shifts can influence soil C through metabolic changes, and suggest that microbial populations responsible for soil heterotrophic respiration may be constrained in surprising ways, even as shorter- and

  12. Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Respiration on Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, Robert C.

    2013-04-26

    The overall aim of this project was to contribute to our fundamental understanding of proteins and biological processes under extreme environmental conditions. We sought to define the biochemical and physiological mechanisms that underlie biodegradative and other cellular processes in normal, extreme, and engineered environments. Toward that end, we sought to understand the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during respiration by bacteria on soluble iron and insoluble sulfide minerals. In accordance with these general aims, the specific aims were two-fold: To identify, separate, and characterize the extracellular biomolecules necessary for aerobic respiration on iron under strongly acidic conditions; and to elucidate the molecular principles whereby these bacteria recognize and adhere to their insoluble mineral substrates under harsh environmental conditions. The results of these studies were described in a total of nineteen manuscripts. Highlights include the following: 1. The complete genome of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 (type strain) was sequenced in collaboration with the DOE Joint Genome Institute; 2. Genomic and mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods were used to evaluate gene expression and in situ microbial activity in a low-complexity natural acid mine drainage microbial biofilm community. This was the first effort to successfully analyze a natural community using these techniques; 3. Detailed functional and structural studies were conducted on rusticyanin, an acid-stable electron transfer protein purified from cell-free extracts of At. ferrooxidans. The three-dimensional structure of reduced rusticyanin was determined from a combination of homonuclear proton and heteronuclear 15N- and 13C-edited NMR spectra. Concomitantly, the three-dimensional structure of oxidized rusticyanin was determined by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.9 A by multiwavelength

  13. Menstrual suppression for adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Anna Lea; Hillard, Paula J Adams

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the recent literature and emerging data describing clinical situations in which menstrual suppression may improve symptoms and quality of life for adolescents. A variety of conditions occurring frequently in adolescents and young adults, including heavy menstrual bleeding, and dysmenorrhea as well as gynecologic conditions such as endometriosis and pelvic pain, can safely be improved or alleviated with appropriate menstrual management. Recent publications have highlighted the efficacy and benefit of extended cycle or continuous combined oral contraceptives, the levonorgestrel intrauterine device, and progestin therapies for a variety of medical conditions. This review places menstrual suppression in an historical context, summarizes methods of hormonal therapy that can suppress menses, and reviews clinical conditions for which menstrual suppression may be helpful.

  14. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A proof-of-concept method utilizing a cryogenic fluid for acoustic suppression in rocket engine testing environments will be demonstrated. It is hypothesized that...

  15. [Factors influencing the variability in soil heterotrophic respiration from terrestrial ecosystem in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Chen, Shu-Tao; Hu, Zheng-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Soil heterotrophic respiration is one of the key factors for estimating ecosystem carbon balance. Measurement data of soil heterotrophic respiration from terrestrial ecosystem in China were collected. Climate data (annual precipitation and annual mean air temperature) and relevant environmental factors (e. g. tree age) were also collected. Results indicated that the relationship between heterotrophic respiration and soil respiration could be explained by a power function. Heterotrophic respiration increased with the increase of soil respiration. The power function explained 73% of the variability (R2 = 0.730, P power function could be used to explain the relationship between the ratio of heterotrophic respiration to soil respiration and tree age. Further investigation showed that the relationship between measured annual heterotrophic respiration and modeled heterotrophic respiration by using an empirical model could be described by a linear function, indicating that the empirical model well fitted the variability in heterotrophic respiration.

  16. Suppression of nighttime sap flux with lower stem photosynthesis in Eucalyptus trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianguo; Zhou, Juan; Sun, Zhenwei; Niu, Junfeng; Zhou, Cuiming; Gu, Daxing; Huang, Yuqing; Zhao, Ping

    2016-04-01

    It is widely accepted that substantial nighttime sap flux (J s,n) or transpiration (E) occurs in most plants, but the physiological implications are poorly known. It has been hypothesized that J s,n or E serves to enhance nitrogen uptake or deliver oxygen; however, no clear evidence is currently available. In this study, sap flux (J s) in Eucalyptus grandis × urophylla with apparent stem photosynthesis was measured, including control trees which were covered by aluminum foil (approximately 1/3 of tree height) to block stem photosynthesis. We hypothesized that the nighttime water flux would be suppressed in trees with lower stem photosynthesis. The results showed that the green tissue degraded after 3 months, demonstrating a decrease in stem photosynthesis. The daytime J s decreased by 21.47%, while J s,n decreased by 12.03% in covered trees as compared to that of control, and the difference was statistically significant (P photosynthesis in covered trees. Predawn (ψ pd) of covered trees was marginally higher than that of control while lower at predawn stomatal conductance (g s), indicating a suppressed water flux in covered trees. There was no difference in leaf carbon content and δ(13)C between the two groups, while leaf nitrogen content and δ(15)N were significantly higher in covered trees than that of the control (P < 0.05), indicating that J s,n was not used for nitrogen uptake. These results suggest that J s,n may act as an oxygen pathway since green tissue has a higher respiration or oxygen demand than non-green tissue. Thus, this study demonstrated the physiological implications of J s,n and the possible benefits of nighttime water use or E by the tree.

  17. Respirator studies for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, B.J.; Fairchild, C.I.; DeField, J.D.; Hack, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    A project of the Health, Safety and Environment Division is described. The project provides the NRC with information of respiratory protective devices and programs for their licensee personnel. The following activities were performed during FY 1983: selection of alternate test aerosols for quality assurance testing of high-efficiency particulate air respirator filters; evaluation of MAG-1 spectacles for use with positive and negative-pressure respirators; development of a Manual of Respiratory Protection in Emergencies Involving Airborne Radioactive Materials, and technical assistance to NRC licensees regarding respirator applications. 2 references, 1 figure

  18. The effects on the pulmonary function of normal adults proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation respiration pattern exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, KyoChul; Cho, MiSuk

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) respiration exercise increases the pulmonary function of normal adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight normal adults in their 20s were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=14) or control group (n=14). Over the course of four weeks, the experimental group participated in PNF respiration pattern exercises for 30 minutes three times per week. Subjects were assessed pre-test and post-test by measurement of pulmonary function (tidal volume, inspiratory reserve volume, expiratory reserve volume, inspiratory capacity, and vital capacity). [Results] Our findings show that the experimental group had significant improvements in expiratory reserve volume and vital capacity. In the comparison of the two groups, the experimental group had higher pulmonary function than the control group. [Conclusion] In this study, the experimental group showed greater improvement in pulmonary function than the control group, which indicates that the PNF respiration exercise is effective at increasing the pulmonary function of normal adults.

  19. Sodium fire suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Ignition and combustion studies have provided valuable data and guidelines for sodium fire suppression research. The primary necessity is to isolate the oxidant from the fuel, rather than to attempt to cool the sodium below its ignition temperature. Work along these lines has led to the development of smothering tank systems and a dry extinguishing powder. Based on the results obtained, the implementation of these techniques is discussed with regard to sodium fire suppression in the Super-Phenix reactor. (author)

  20. Residual organic matter and microbial respiration in bottom ash: Effects on metal leaching and eco-toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, A; Persson, K M; Persson, M

    2015-09-01

    A common assumption regarding the residual organic matter, in bottom ash, is that it does not represent a significant pool of organic carbon and, beyond metal-ion complexation process, it is of little consequence to evolution of ash/leachate chemistry. This article evaluates the effect of residual organic matter and associated microbial respiratory processes on leaching of toxic metals (i.e. arsenic, copper, chromium, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony and zinc), eco-toxicity of ash leachates. Microbial respiration was quantified with help of a respirometric test equipment OXITOP control system. The effect of microbial respiration on metal/residual organic matter leaching and eco-toxicity was quantified with the help of batch leaching tests and an eco-toxicity assay - Daphnia magna. In general, the microbial respiration process decreased the leachate pH and eco-toxicity, indicating modification of bioavailability of metal species. Furthermore, the leaching of critical metals, such as copper and chromium, decreased after the respiration in both ash types (fresh and weathered). It was concluded that microbial respiration, if harnessed properly, could enhance the stability of fresh bottom ash and may promote its reuse. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Dicarbanonaborates in yeast respiration and membrane transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotyk, A; Lapathitis, G

    1997-04-01

    Two derivatives of carborates, sodium 5,6-dichloro-7,8-dicarbanonaborate (CB-Cl) and sodium 5-mercapto-7,8-dicarbanonaborate (CB-SH) were found to inhibit endogenous as well as glucose-induced respiration of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both substances slightly increased endogenous acid production, were neutral toward H(+)-ATPase-associated acidification but pronouncedly inhibited the K(+)-stimulated acidification. The same effects were observed also with an ATPase-deficient mutant of the yeast. The ATP-hydrolyzing activity of yeast plasma membranes in vitro was severely reduced. The membrane potential was substantially increased toward more negative values. The H(+)-symporting uptake of glutamic acid was considerably decreased, that of adenine was diminished much less. The effects of the dicarbanonaborates are obviously pleiotropic but their inhibition of ATP hydrolysis and of uptake of H(+)-symported substances, on the one hand, and absolute lack of effect on ATPase-catalyzed acidification, on the other, pose an unresolved problem.

  2. A regulated response to impaired respiration slows behavioral rates and increases lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cristina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available When mitochondrial respiration or ubiquinone production is inhibited in Caenorhabditis elegans, behavioral rates are slowed and lifespan is extended. Here, we show that these perturbations increase the expression of cell-protective and metabolic genes and the abundance of mitochondrial DNA. This response is similar to the response triggered by inhibiting respiration in yeast and mammalian cells, termed the "retrograde response". As in yeast, genes switched on in C. elegans mitochondrial mutants extend lifespan, suggesting an underlying evolutionary conservation of mechanism. Inhibition of fstr-1, a potential signaling gene that is up-regulated in clk-1 (ubiquinone-defective mutants, and its close homolog fstr-2 prevents the expression of many retrograde-response genes and accelerates clk-1 behavioral and aging rates. Thus, clk-1 mutants live in "slow motion" because of a fstr-1/2-dependent pathway that responds to ubiquinone. Loss of fstr-1/2 does not suppress the phenotypes of all long-lived mitochondrial mutants. Thus, although different mitochondrial perturbations activate similar transcriptional and physiological responses, they do so in different ways.

  3. Characterization of respirable mine dust and diesel particulate matter

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mahlangu, Vusi J

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the preliminary outcomes to develop and optimize methods to characterize DPM and respirable dust samples for the following: Crystalline compounds Common mineral analyses Particle size distribution Elemental Carbon (EC...

  4. Redefinition and global estimation of basal ecosystem respiration rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Wenping [College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China; Luo, Yiqi [Department of Botany and Microbiology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA; Li, Xianglan [College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China; Liu, Shuguang; Yu, Guirui [Key Laboratory of Ecosystem Network Observation and Modeling, Synthesis Research Center of Chinese Ecosystem Research Network, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Zhou, Tao [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China; Bahn, Michael [Institute of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria; Black, Andy [Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B. C., Canada; Desai, Ankur R. [Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Department, Center for Climatic Research, Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; Cescatti, Alessandro [Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Ispra, Italy; Marcolla, Barbara [Sustainable Agro-ecosystems and Bioresources Department, Fondazione Edmund Mach-IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, San Michele all' Adige, Italy; Jacobs, Cor [Alterra, Earth System Science-Climate Change, Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands; Chen, Jiquan [Department of Earth, Ecological, and Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio, USA; Aurela, Mika [Climate and Global Change Research, Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland; Bernhofer, Christian [Chair of Meteorology, Institute of Hydrology and Meteorology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; Gielen, Bert [Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium; Bohrer, Gil [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Geodetic Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA; Cook, David R. [Climate Research Section, Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, USA; Dragoni, Danilo [Department of Geography, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA; Dunn, Allison L. [Department of Physical and Earth Sciences, Worcester State College, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA; Gianelle, Damiano [Sustainable Agro-ecosystems and Bioresources Department, Fondazione Edmund Mach-IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, San Michele all' Adige, Italy; Grünwald, Thomas [Chair of Meteorology, Institute of Hydrology and Meteorology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; Ibrom, Andreas [Risø DTU National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Biosystems Division, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde, Denmark; Leclerc, Monique Y. [Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of Georgia, Griffin, Georgia, USA; Lindroth, Anders [Geobiosphere Science Centre, Physical Geography and Ecosystems Analysis, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Liu, Heping [Laboratory for Atmospheric Research, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA; Marchesini, Luca Belelli [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-Food and Forest Systems, University of Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy; Montagnani, Leonardo; Pita, Gabriel [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisbon, Portugal; Rodeghiero, Mirco [Sustainable Agro-ecosystems and Bioresources Department, Fondazione Edmund Mach-IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, San Michele all' Adige, Italy; Rodrigues, Abel [Unidade de Silvicultura e Produtos Florestais, Instituto Nacional dos Recursos Biológicos, Oeiras, Portugal; Starr, Gregory [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA; Stoy, Paul C. [Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana, USA

    2011-10-13

    Basal ecosystem respiration rate (BR), the ecosystem respiration rate at a given temperature, is a common and important parameter in empirical models for quantifying ecosystem respiration (ER) globally. Numerous studies have indicated that BR varies in space. However, many empirical ER models still use a global constant BR largely due to the lack of a functional description for BR. In this study, we redefined BR to be ecosystem respiration rate at the mean annual temperature. To test the validity of this concept, we conducted a synthesis analysis using 276 site-years of eddy covariance data, from 79 research sites located at latitudes ranging from ~3°S to ~70°N. Results showed that mean annual ER rate closely matches ER rate at mean annual temperature. Incorporation of site-specific BR into global ER model substantially improved simulated ER compared to an invariant BR at all sites. These results confirm that ER at the mean annual

  5. Influence of vestibular activation on respiration in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Kevin D.; Sharpe, Melissa K.; Drury, Daniel; Ertl, Andrew C.; Ray, Chester A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the semicircular canals and otolith organs on respiration in humans. On the basis of animal studies, we hypothesized that vestibular activation would elicit a vestibulorespiratory reflex. To test this hypothesis, respiratory measures, arterial blood pressure, and heart rate were measured during engagement of semicircular canals and/or otolith organs. Dynamic upright pitch and roll (15 cycles/min), which activate the otolith organs and semicircular canals, increased respiratory rate (Delta2 +/- 1 and Delta3 +/- 1 breaths/min, respectively; P respiration similarly (Delta3 +/- 1 and Delta2 +/- 1, respectively; P muscle afferent, increased respiration (Delta3 +/- 1; P muscle afferents, mediate increased ventilation in humans and support the concept that vestibular activation alters respiration in humans.

  6. Global Annual Soil Respiration Data (Raich and Schlesinger 1992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set is a compilation of soil respiration rates (g C m-2 yr-1) from terrestrial and wetland ecosystems reported in the literature prior to 1992....

  7. Ecosystem respiration depends strongly on photosynthesis in a temperate heath

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Klaus Steenberg; Ibrom, A.; Beier, C.

    2007-01-01

    We measured net ecosystem CO2 flux (F-n) and ecosystem respiration (R-E), and estimated gross ecosystem photosynthesis (P-g) by difference, for two years in a temperate heath ecosystem using a chamber method. The exchange rates of carbon were high and of similar magnitude as for productive forest...... respiration from October to March was 22% and 30% of annual flux, respectively, suggesting that both cold-season carbon gain and loss were important in the annual carbon cycle of the ecosystem. Model fit of R-E of a classic, first-order exponential equation related to temperature ( second year; R-2 = 0......) of 2.5 by the modified model. The model introduces R-photo, which describes the part of respiration being tightly coupled to the photosynthetic rate. It makes up 5% of the assimilated carbon dioxide flux at 0 degrees C and 35% at 20 degrees C implying a high sensitivity of respiration to photosynthesis...

  8. Global Annual Soil Respiration Data (Raich and Schlesinger 1992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is a compilation of soil respiration rates (g C m-2 yr-1) from terrestrial and wetland ecosystems reported in the literature prior to 1992. These rates...

  9. Respiration in the yeast and mycelial phases of Histoplasma capsulatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, B; Lambowitz, A M; Kobayashi, G S; Medoff, G

    1979-05-01

    Respiration in the yeast and mycelial phases of Histoplasma capsulatum proceeds via a cytochrome system and an alternate oxidase, both present constitutively. The mycelial cytochrome system is distinguished by an additional partial shunt around the antimycin-sensitive site.

  10. A practical mechanical respirator, 1929: the "iron lung".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J A

    1990-09-01

    No satisfactory mechanical respirator existed before 1929, when Philip Drinker and Louis Shaw described an apparatus of their own design. This machine was in the form of a cylindrical tank enclosing the patient's body and chest, leaving the head outside the chamber under atmospheric pressure. Air pumps, later a bellows, raised and lowered pressure within the tank to assume the entire work of breathing. Popularly named the iron lung, the Drinker respirator supported thousands of patients afflicted with respiratory paralysis during the polio era. It was being superseded by positive-pressure airway ventilators just as the polio era came to a close. Today the Drinker respirator has disappeared virtually without a trace. Although its disadvantage was its cumbersome size, we must concede that it supported patients over the long term with fewer complications than do the respirators of today.

  11. SAFARI 2000 Annual Soil Respiration Data (Raich and Schlesinger 1992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is a compilation of soil respiration rates (g C m-2 yr-1) from terrestrial and wetland ecosystems reported in the literature prior to 1992 subset for...

  12. SAFARI 2000 Annual Soil Respiration Data (Raich and Schlesinger 1992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set is a compilation of soil respiration rates (g C m-2 yr-1) from terrestrial and wetland ecosystems reported in the literature prior to 1992...

  13. Performance of mechanical filters and respirators for capturing nanoparticles--limitations and future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostofi, Reza; Wang, Bei; Haghighat, Fariborz; Bahloul, Ali; Jaime, Lara

    2010-01-01

    There is an increasing concern about the health hazard posed to workers exposed to inhalation of nanoparticles. Inhaling nanoparticles possess an occupational hazard due to elevated amount emitted to the atmosphere and working environment. Nanoparticles have potential toxic properties: the high particle surface area, number concentration, and surface reactivity. Inhalation, the most common route of nanoparticle exposure, has been shown to cause adverse effects on pulmonary functions and the deposited particles in the lung can be translocated to the blood system by passing through the pulmonary protection barriers. Filtration is the simplest and most common method of aerosol control. It is widely used in mechanical ventilation and respiratory protection. However, concerns have been raised regarding the effectiveness of the filters for capturing nanoparticles. This paper reviews the literature on the filtration performance of mechanical filters and respirators against nanoparticles. It includes the discussion about filtration mechanisms, theoretical models, affecting factors of the filtration efficiency, and testing protocols for respirator and filter certification.

  14. Carbon dioxide titration method for soil respiration measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Rubio, Luis

    2017-01-01

    This thesis was commissioned by Tampere University of Applied Sciences, which was interested in studying and developing a titration measurement method for soil respiration and biodegradability. Some experiments were carried out measuring soil respiration for testing the method and others adding some biodegradable material like polylactic acid compressed material and 100% biodegradable plastic bags to test its biodegradability and the possibility to measure it via titration. The thesi...

  15. The classic: The chemical constitution of respiration ferment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburg, Otto Heinrich

    2010-11-01

    This Classic Article is a reprint of the original work by Otto Heinrich Warburg, The Chemical Constitution of Respiration Ferment. An accompanying biographical sketch of Otto Heinrich Warburg, PhD, MD, is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-010-1533-z . The Classic Article is from Warburg O. The chemical constitution of respiration ferment. Science. 1928;68:437-443. Reprinted with permission from AAAS.

  16. The Classic: The Chemical Constitution of Respiration Ferment

    OpenAIRE

    Warburg, Otto Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    This Classic Article is a reprint of the original work by Otto Heinrich Warburg, The Chemical Constitution of Respiration Ferment. An accompanying biographical sketch of Otto Heinrich Warburg, PhD, MD, is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-010-1533-z. The Classic Article is from Warburg O. The chemical constitution of respiration ferment. Science. 1928;68:437–443. Reprinted with permission from AAAS.

  17. 78 FR 54432 - Development of Inward Leakage Standards for Half-Mask Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ...)? 3. Does your company use a panel or portion of a panel to develop respirators for a defined user... implementation of fit testing standards for defined user groups? 4. Does your company use a panel or a portion of... Control and Prevention (CDC) announces a public meeting concerning inward leakage performance requirements...

  18. Use of respirators for protection of workers against airborne radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revoir, W.H.

    1990-01-01

    The various types of respirators and the requirements for an effective respirator program are outlined. The use of specific types of respirators to protect workers against inhalation of airborne radioactive materials is discussed. Problems encountered in using respirators in the nuclear industry which have resulted in worker injury and death are described

  19. Respiration during Postharvest Development of Soursop Fruit, Annona muricata L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, Johan; Paull, Robert E.

    1984-01-01

    Fruit of soursop, Annona muricata L., showed increased CO2 production 2 days after harvest, preceding the respiratory increase that coincided with autocatalytic ethylene evolution and other ripening phenomena. Experiments to alter gas exchange patterns of postharvest fruit parts and tissue cylinders had little success. The respiratory quotient of tissue discs was near unity throughout development. 2,4-Dinitrophenol uncoupled respiration more effectively than carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone; 0.4 millimolar KCN stimulated, 4 millimolar salicylhydroxamic acid slightly inhibited, and their combination strongly inhibited respiration, as did 10 millimolar NaN3. Tricarboxylic acid cycle members and ascorbate were more effective substrates than sugars, but acetate and glutarate strongly inhibited. Disc respiration showed the same early peak as whole fruit respiration; this peak is thus an inherent characteristic of postharvest development and cannot be ascribed to differences between ovaries of the aggregatetype fruit. The capacity of the respiratory apparatus did not change during this preclimacteric peak, but the contents of rate-limiting malate and citrate increased after harvest. It is concluded that the preclimacteric rise in CO2 evolution reflects increased mitochondrial respiration because of enhanced supply of carboxylates as a substrate, probably induced by detachment from the tree. The second rise corresponds with the respiration during ripening of other climacteric fruits. PMID:16663783

  20. Two Proximal Skin Electrodes — A Respiration Rate Body Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Avbelj

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new body sensor for extracting the respiration rate based on the amplitude changes in the body surface potential differences between two proximal body electrodes. The sensor could be designed as a plaster-like reusable unit that can be easily fixed onto the surface of the body. It could be equipped either with a sufficiently large memory for storing the measured data or with a low-power radio system that can transmit the measured data to a gateway for further processing. We explore the influence of the sensor’s position on the quality of the extracted results using multi-channel ECG measurements and considering all the pairs of two neighboring electrodes as potential respiration-rate sensors. The analysis of the clinical measurements, which also include reference thermistor-based respiration signals, shows that the proposed approach is a viable option for monitoring the respiration frequency and for a rough classification of breathing types. The obtained results were evaluated on a wireless prototype of a respiration body sensor. We indicate the best positions for the respiration body sensor and prove that a single sensor for body surface potential difference on proximal skin electrodes can be used for combined measurements of respiratory and cardiac activities.

  1. The sensitivity of soil respiration to soil temperature, moisture, and carbon supply at the global scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hursh, Andrew; Ballantyne, Ashley; Cooper, Leila; Maneta, Marco; Kimball, John; Watts, Jennifer

    2017-05-01

    Soil respiration (Rs) is a major pathway by which fixed carbon in the biosphere is returned to the atmosphere, yet there are limits to our ability to predict respiration rates using environmental drivers at the global scale. While temperature, moisture, carbon supply, and other site characteristics are known to regulate soil respiration rates at plot scales within certain biomes, quantitative frameworks for evaluating the relative importance of these factors across different biomes and at the global scale require tests of the relationships between field estimates and global climatic data. This study evaluates the factors driving Rs at the global scale by linking global datasets of soil moisture, soil temperature, primary productivity, and soil carbon estimates with observations of annual Rs from the Global Soil Respiration Database (SRDB). We find that calibrating models with parabolic soil moisture functions can improve predictive power over similar models with asymptotic functions of mean annual precipitation. Soil temperature is comparable with previously reported air temperature observations used in predicting Rs and is the dominant driver of Rs in global models; however, within certain biomes soil moisture and soil carbon emerge as dominant predictors of Rs. We identify regions where typical temperature-driven responses are further mediated by soil moisture, precipitation, and carbon supply and regions in which environmental controls on high Rs values are difficult to ascertain due to limited field data. Because soil moisture integrates temperature and precipitation dynamics, it can more directly constrain the heterotrophic component of Rs, but global-scale models tend to smooth its spatial heterogeneity by aggregating factors that increase moisture variability within and across biomes. We compare statistical and mechanistic models that provide independent estimates of global Rs ranging from 83 to 108 Pg yr -1 , but also highlight regions of uncertainty

  2. Surfactants and the Mechanics of Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jbaily, Abdulrahman; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Alveoli are small sacs found at the end of terminal bronchioles in human lungs with a mean diameter of 200 μm. A thin layer of fluid (hypophase) coats the inner face of an alveolus and is in contact with the air in the lungs. The thickness of this layer varies among alveoli, but is in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 μm for many portions of the alveolar network. The interfacial tension σ at the air-hypophase interface tends to favor collapse of the alveolus, and resists its expansion during inhalation. Type II alveolar cells synthesize and secrete a mixture of phospholipids and proteins called pulmonary surfactant. These surfactant molecules adsorb to the interface causing σ of water at body temperature is 70 mN/m and falls to an equilibrium value of 25 mN/m when surfactants are present. Also, in a dynamic sense, it is known that σ is reduced to near 0 during exhalation when the surfactant film compresses. In this work, the authors develop a mechanical and transport model of the alveolus to study the effect of surfactants on various aspects of respiration. The model is composed of three principal parts: (i) air movement into and out of the alveolus; (ii) a balance of linear momentum across the two-layered membrane of the alveolus (hypophase and elastic wall); and (iii) a pulmonary surfactant transport problem in the hypophase. The goal is to evaluate the influence of pulmonary surfactant on respiratory mechanics.

  3. Pressure suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumachi, Wataru; Fukuda, Akira; Kitaguchi, Hidemi; Shimizu, Toshiaki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To relieve and absorb impact wave vibrations caused by steam and non-condensed gases releasing into the pressure suppression chamber at the time of an accident. Structure: The reactor container is filled with inert gases. A safety valve attached main steam pipe is provided to permit the excessive steam to escape, the valve being communicated with the pressure suppression chamber through an exhaust pipe. In the pressure suppression chamber, a doughnut-like cylindrical outer wall is filled at its bottom with pool water to condense the high temperature vapor released through the exhaust pipe. A head portion of a vent tube which leads the exhaust pipe is positioned at the top, and a down comer and an exhaust vent tube are locked by means of steady rests. At the bottom is mounted a pressure adsorber device which adsorbs a pressure from the pool water. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. Increased suppression of negative and positive emotions in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beblo, Thomas; Fernando, Silvia; Klocke, Sabrina; Griepenstroh, Julia; Aschenbrenner, Steffen; Driessen, Martin

    2012-12-10

    Patients with major depression (MDD) show increased suppression of negative emotions. Emotion suppression is related to depressive symptoms such as depressive mood and anhedonia. It is not clear whether MDD patients also suppress positive emotions. In the present study we aim to investigate suppression of both negative and positive emotions in MDD patients as well as the relation between emotion suppression and depressive symptoms. In addition, we suggest that emotion suppression might be associated with fear of emotions. 39 MDD patients and 41 matched healthy control subjects were investigated for emotion suppression and fear of emotions with the Emotion Acceptance Questionnaire (EAQ). In addition, we applied additional questionnaires to validate emotion suppression findings and to assess depressive symptoms. MDD patients reported increased suppression of both negative and positive emotions. Suppression of negative and positive emotions was related to depressive symptoms. Patients also reported more fear of emotions than healthy subjects and this fear was related to emotion suppression in both study samples. Due to the cross-sectional and correlational study design, causal directions between the variables tested cannot be stated. Fear of emotion might be one reason why MDD patients suppress emotions. With regard to positive emotions, our results strongly suggest that therapeutic approaches should not only encourage patients to participate in potentially enjoyable situations but that patients may also benefit from practicing the allowance of pleasant emotions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Physiological quality and seed respiration of primed Jatropha curcas seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheli Angelica Horbach

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Seed deterioration is a natural and irreversible process. Nevertheless, seed priming with water and antioxidants can minimize oxidative damage in oilseeds, resulting in attenuation of seed deterioration. The objective of this assay was to evaluate seed priming on respiratory activity of Jatropha curcas submitted to accelerated aging. Seeds from two provenances (Janauba and Pedro J. Caballero were submitted to three priming treatments (control, immersion in deionized water, and with 750 µmol L-1 of ascorbic acid and treated for accelerated aging at 41 °C for 72 h. The results showed that the priming of J. curcas seeds promoted tolerance to accelerated aging. Primed seeds, with ascorbic acid from Janauba and deionized water from Pedro J. Caballero, resulted in a higher percentage of normal seedlings, and increased germination speed index and seed respiration. The decline of physiological quality of J. curcas seeds after accelerated aging is directly associated with a reduction in respiratory activity that is related to seed moisture content.

  6. Nuclear reactor scram suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshi, Hiroshi; Ozawa, Hisamitsu.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention suppresses reactor scram due to increase of neutrons caused by pressure elevation in the reactor even when a portion of main steam pipes is closed by some or other causes such as closure of a main steam isolation valve in a BWR type power plant. That is, when a flow channel is closed, such as upon closure of a main steam isolation valve, a flow rate signal sent from each of main steam flow rate detection means is inputted to a selective circuit of a pressure control device, from which a normal value is obtained. A deviation value for each of the main steam flow rate values is determined from the value described above and a flow rate average value obtained in an averaging circuit. Abnormality in the main steam pipelines is judged if a level for each of the deviation values is greater than a predetermined value. Further, the insertion of selective control rods and trip and run back instructions for recycling pumps are controlled by output signals of the deviation value detection circuit, to decrease the reactor power and prevent elevation in the reactor. As a result, reactor scram due to increase of neutron fluxes is suppressed. (I.S.)

  7. Thyroxin hormone suppression treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the important modalities of treatment of thyroid cancer (TC) after surgery is the administration of thyroxin as an adjuvant treatment. The analysis supports the theory that thyroid suppression plays an important role in patient management. 300 μg of thyroxin, as this is an adequate dose for suppression is given. Ideally the dose should be tailored by testing s-TSH levels. However, since a large number of the patients come from out station cities and villages this is impractical. We therefore depend on clinical criteria of hyperthyroid symptoms and adjust the dose. Very few patients need such adjustment

  8. Respirator studies for the ERDA Division of Safety, Standards, and Compliance, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976. [Physiological effects of wearing respirators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, T.O.; Raven, P.B.; Shafer, C.L.; Linnebur, A.C.; Bustos, J.M.; Wheat, L.D.; Douglas, D.D.

    1977-03-01

    Results of a study to determine what effect wearing a respirator has on worker performance, and which physiological parameters an industrial physician should consider when examining an employee who will be wearing a respirator while working are presented. (TFD)

  9. Effect of two organophosphorus insecticides on the growth, respiration and (14C)-glucose metabolism of Azobacter chroococcum Beij

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, A.; Narayanan, R.

    1980-01-01

    The two organophosphorus insecticides, commonly applied to soil, viz., disulfoton (0,0-diethyl S-2-ethyl thio ethyl phosphorodithioate) and fensulfothion (0,0-diethyl 0-4-methyl sulphinyl phenyl phosphorothioate) did not affect the in vitro growth of Azotobacter chroococcum Beij., the free-living, nitrogen fixing soil bacterium, at 2 ppm (lower level), while the normal dose (5 ppm) and the higher level (10 ppm) suppressed the growth. Respiration of the organism (glucose oxidation) was adversely affected by the insecticides in the growth medium and the inhibition increased with the concentration of the chemical. Both the insecticides suppressed the assimilation of ( 14 C)-glucose in the cold-TCA soluble, hot-TCA soluble fractions and insoluble residue of the cells whereas the 14 C-incorporation in the alcohol soluble and alcohol-ether soluble fractions was enhanced indicating that the insecticides considerably altered the glucose metabolism of the bacterium. (author)

  10. Why expressive suppression does not pay? Cognitive costs of negative emotion suppression: The mediating role of subjective tense-arousal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczygieł Dorota

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to contribute to a broader understanding of the cognitive consequences of expressive suppression. Specifically, we examined whether the deteriorating effect of expressive suppression on cognitive functioning is caused by tense arousal enhanced by suppression. Two experiments were performed in order to test this prediction. In both studies we tested the effect of expressive suppression on working memory, as measured with a backwards digit-span task (Study 1, N = 43 and anagram problem-solving task (Study 2, N = 60. In addition, in Study 2 we tested whether expressive suppression degrades memory of the events that emerged during the period of expressive suppression. Both studies were conducted in a similar design: Participants watched a film clip which evoked negative emotions (i.e. disgust in Study 1 and a combination of sadness and anxiety in Study 2 under the instruction to suppress those negative emotions or (in the control condition to simply watch the film. The results of these experiments lead to three conclusions. First, the results reveal that expressive suppression degrades memory of the events that emerged during the period of expressive suppression and leads to poorer performance on working memory tasks, as measured with a backwards digit-span task and anagram problem-solving task. Second, the results indicate that expressive suppression leads to a significant increase in subjective tense arousal. Third, the results support our prediction that expressive suppression decreases cognitive performance through its effects on subjective tense arousal. The results of the Study 1 show that tense arousal activated during expressive suppression of disgust fully mediates the negative effect of suppression on working memory as measured with a backwards digit-span task. The results of Study 2 reveal that subjective tense arousal elicited while suppressing sadness and anxiety mediates both the effect of suppression on

  11. Increased heme synthesis in yeast induces a metabolic switch from fermentation to respiration even under conditions of glucose repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Bu, Pengli; Zeng, Joey; Vancura, Ales

    2017-10-13

    Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is a complex process that involves several signaling pathways and transcription factors as well as communication between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Under aerobic conditions, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolizes glucose predominantly by glycolysis and fermentation. We have recently shown that altered chromatin structure in yeast induces respiration by a mechanism that requires transport and metabolism of pyruvate in mitochondria. However, how pyruvate controls the transcriptional responses underlying the metabolic switch from fermentation to respiration is unknown. Here, we report that this pyruvate effect involves heme. We found that heme induces transcription of HAP4 , the transcriptional activation subunit of the Hap2/3/4/5p complex, required for growth on nonfermentable carbon sources, in a Hap1p- and Hap2/3/4/5p-dependent manner. Increasing cellular heme levels by inactivating ROX1 , which encodes a repressor of many hypoxic genes, or by overexpressing HEM3 or HEM12 induced respiration and elevated ATP levels. Increased heme synthesis, even under conditions of glucose repression, activated Hap1p and the Hap2/3/4/5p complex and induced transcription of HAP4 and genes required for the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, electron transport chain, and oxidative phosphorylation, leading to a switch from fermentation to respiration. Conversely, inhibiting metabolic flux into the TCA cycle reduced cellular heme levels and HAP4 transcription. Together, our results indicate that the glucose-mediated repression of respiration in budding yeast is at least partly due to the low cellular heme level. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Measurement of Lung Cancer Tumor Markers in a Glass Wool Company Workers Exposed to Respirable Synthetic Vitreous Fiber and Dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Abtahi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational exposures to respirable synthetic vitreous fiber (SVF and dust are associated with many lung diseases including lung cancer. Low-dose computed tomography is used for screening patients who are highly suspicious of having lung carcinoma. However, it seems not to be cost-effective. Serum biomarkers could be a useful tool for the surveillance of occupational exposure, by providing the possibility of diagnosing lung cancer in its early stages. Objective: To determine if serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA and cytokeratin fragment (CYFRA 21-1 levels in workers exposed more than normal population to respirable SVF and dust may be used as indicators of progression towards lung cancer. Methods: An analytic cross-sectional study, including 145 personnel of a glass wool company, along with 25 age-matched healthy individuals, was conducted to investigate the relationship between occupational exposure to respirable SVFs and dust and serum levels of two lung/pleura serum tumor markers, CEA and CYFRA 21-1, measured by ELISA. Results: Individuals exposed to higher than the recommended levels of respirable SVF had higher serum concentrations of CEA and CYFRA 21-1, compared to controls (p=0.008 and 0.040, respectively, as well as in comparison to those exposed to lower than recommended OSHA levels (p=0.046 and 0.033, respectively. Workers with >9 years work experience, had significantly (p=0.045 higher levels of serum CYFRA 21-1 than those with ≤9 years of experience. Conclusion: It seems that working for >9 years in sites with detectable levels of respirable SVF and dust would increase the levels of known lung cancer serum tumor markers. Transferring these workers to sites with respirable SVF concentrations lower than the limit of detection in the air is recommended.

  13. Soil moisture sensitivity of autotrophic and heterotrophic forest floor respiration in boreal xeric pine and mesic spruce forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ťupek, Boris; Launiainen, Samuli; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Heikkinen, Jukka; Lehtonen, Aleksi

    2016-04-01

    Litter decomposition rates of the most process based soil carbon models affected by environmental conditions are linked with soil heterotrophic CO2 emissions and serve for estimating soil carbon sequestration; thus due to the mass balance equation the variation in measured litter inputs and measured heterotrophic soil CO2 effluxes should indicate soil carbon stock changes, needed by soil carbon management for mitigation of anthropogenic CO2 emissions, if sensitivity functions of the applied model suit to the environmental conditions e.g. soil temperature and moisture. We evaluated the response forms of autotrophic and heterotrophic forest floor respiration to soil temperature and moisture in four boreal forest sites of the International Cooperative Programme on Assessment and Monitoring of Air Pollution Effects on Forests (ICP Forests) by a soil trenching experiment during year 2015 in southern Finland. As expected both autotrophic and heterotrophic forest floor respiration components were primarily controlled by soil temperature and exponential regression models generally explained more than 90% of the variance. Soil moisture regression models on average explained less than 10% of the variance and the response forms varied between Gaussian for the autotrophic forest floor respiration component and linear for the heterotrophic forest floor respiration component. Although the percentage of explained variance of soil heterotrophic respiration by the soil moisture was small, the observed reduction of CO2 emissions with higher moisture levels suggested that soil moisture response of soil carbon models not accounting for the reduction due to excessive moisture should be re-evaluated in order to estimate right levels of soil carbon stock changes. Our further study will include evaluation of process based soil carbon models by the annual heterotrophic respiration and soil carbon stocks.

  14. How does warming affect carbon allocation, respiration and residence time in trees? An isotope tracer approach in a eucalypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendall, E.; Drake, J. E.; Furze, M.; Barton, C. V.; Carillo, Y.; Richter, A.; Tjoelker, M. G.

    2017-12-01

    Climate warming has the potential to alter the balance between photosynthetic carbon assimilation and respiratory losses in forest trees, leading to uncertainty in predicting their future physiological functioning. In a previous experiment, warming decreased canopy CO2 assimilation (A) rates of Eucalyptus tereticornis trees, but respiration (R) rates were usually not significantly affected, due to physiological acclimation to temperature. This led to a slight increase in (R/A) and thus decrease in plant carbon use efficiency with climate warming. In contrast to carbon fluxes, the effect of warming on carbon allocation and residence time in trees has received less attention. We conducted a study to test the hypothesis that warming would decrease the allocation of C belowground owing to reduced cost of nutrient uptake. E. parramattensis trees were grown in the field in unique whole-tree chambers operated at ambient and ambient +3 °C temperature treatments (n=3 per treatment). We applied a 13CO2 pulse and followed the label in CO2 respired from leaves, roots, canopy and soil, in plant sugars, and in rhizosphere microbes over a 3-week period in conjunction with measurements of tree growth. The 9-m tall, 57 m3 whole-tree chambers were monitored for CO2 concentrations in independent canopy and below ground (root and soil) compartments; periodic monitoring of δ13C values in air in the compartments allowed us to quantify the amount of 13CO2 assimilated and respired by each tree. Warmed trees grew faster and assimilated more of the label than control trees, but the 13C allocation to canopy, root and soil respiration was not altered. However, warming appeared to reduce the residence time of carbon respired from leaves, and especially from roots and soil, indicating that autotrophic respiration has the potential to feedback to climate change. This experiment provides insights into how warming may affect the fate of assimilated carbon from the leaf to the ecosystem scale.

  15. Impact of Land Use on Soil Respiration in Southwestern Victoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodosio, B.; Daly, E.; Pauwels, V. R. N.

    2015-12-01

    Land use management is one of the key contributors to the global environmental change. Considerable changes in landscapes have been experienced in Southwestern Victoria, Australia in the past two decades. Eucalyptus globulus (blue gum) plantations have expanded, resulting in possible changes in the water and carbon balances of catchments. The shift from pastures to plantations could have a significant impact on the local carbon balance with possible effects on atmospheric CO2 concentration and vegetation productivity. We present preliminary measurements from a field study comparing soil respiration in a plantation and a pasture. Adjacent catchments in Southwestern Victoria, near Gatum, were used as study areas; the prominent difference between the two catchments is the land use, with one catchment being used as a pasture for livestock grazing and the other catchment being mainly planted with blue gums. The variability of soil respiration in the pasture is governed by differences in soil moisture and substrate content due to local features of the topography and livestock grazing. Soil respiration measurements in the plantation were taken on mounds, access tracks, and open spaces. Most observations on mounds had higher soil respiration possibly due to root and mycorrhizal respiration. The measurements in open spaces had comparable values with mound measurements; this might be due to a less limited radiation. The soil respiration between trees had lower values, possibly because of radiation limitation due to the canopy cover. These preliminary measurements allow us to compare soil respiration variability across catchments with different land uses. This is important to estimate CO2 fluxes from soil to the atmosphere in large areas and will be valuable in estimating gross primary production from measurements of net ecosystem exchange.

  16. Mitochondrial respiration as a target for neuroprotection and cognitive enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Lima, F; Barksdale, Bryan R; Rojas, Julio C

    2014-04-15

    This paper focuses on brain mitochondrial respiration as a therapeutic target for neuroprotection and cognitive enhancement. We propose that improving brain mitochondrial respiration is an important future direction in research and treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other conditions associated with cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration. The central thesis is that supporting and improving brain mitochondrial respiration constitutes a promising neurotherapeutic principle, with potential applications in AD as well as in a wide variety of neuropsychological conditions. We propose three different interventional approaches to improve brain mitochondrial respiration based on (a) pharmacology, (b) photobiomodulation and (c) nutrition interventions, and provide detailed examples for each type of intervention. First, low-dose USP methylene blue is described as a pharmacological intervention that can successfully increase mitochondrial respiration and result in memory enhancement and neuroprotection. Second, transcranial low-level light/laser therapy with near-infrared light is used to illustrate a photobiomodulation intervention with similar neurometabolic mechanisms of action as low-dose methylene blue. Finally, a nutrition intervention to improve mitochondrial respiration is proposed by increasing ketone bodies in the diet. The evidence discussed for each intervention supports a fundamental neurotherapeutic strategy based on improving oxidative energy metabolism while at the same time reducing the pro-oxidant tendencies of the nervous system. Targeting brain mitochondrial respiration with these three types of interventions is proposed as part of a holistic neurotherapeutic approach to improve brain energy metabolism and antioxidant defenses. This strategy represents a promising new bioenergetics direction for treatment of AD and other neuropsychological disorders featuring cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Soil microbial respiration beneath Stipa tenacissima L. and in surrounding bare soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Novosádová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Open steppes dominated by Stipa tenacissima L. constitute one of the most representative ecosystems of the semi-arid zones of Eastern Mediterranean Basin (Iberian Peninsula, North of Africa. Ecosystem functioning of these steppes is strongly related to the spatial pattern of grass tussocks. Soils beneath Stipa tenacissima L. grass show different fertility and different microclimatic conditions than in surrounding bare soil. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of Stipa tenacissima L. on the key soil microbial activities under controlled incubation conditions (basal and potential respiration. Basal and potential microbial respirations in the soils beneath Stipa tenacissima L. were, in general, not significantly different from the bare soils. The differences were less than 10%. Significantly less ethylene produced by microbial activity in soils beneath Stipa tenacissima L. after the addition of glucose could indicate the dependence of rhizospheric microbial communities on available carbon compounds. It can be concluded, that the soil respiration in semi-arid Mediterranean ecosystems is not necessarily associated with the patchy plant distribution and that some microbial activities characteristics can be unexpectedly homogenous.

  18. Recommendations concerning an interim annual individual exposure limit for respirable quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocker, H.; Horvath, F.J.; Napier, W.

    1983-07-01

    This paper presents AECB staff recommendations on the desirability of an annual individual occupational exposure limit for respirable quartz and on the magnitude of this limit, for uranium miners. Justifications are presented for the magnitude of this suggested limit for respirable quartz, drawing on experience gained in Ontario uranium and non-uranium mines and on that in other countries. The suggestion is made that an exposure limit be set for an interim period in order that additional information on the adequacy of the magnitude of the limit may be acquired. To complement the suggested exposure limit, it is proposed that a co-existing control program of action levels, to be triggered at various respirable quartz concentrations, be set up. It is the contention of this paper that the degree of protection afforded to individuals by the suggested exposure limit would be equivalent to the time-weighted average threshold limit value derived from recommendations, based on group average exposures, of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists

  19. Improvement of the respiration efficiency of Lactococcus lactis by decreasing the culture pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Weijia; Li, Yu; Gao, Xueling; Fu, Ruiyan

    2016-03-01

    The growth characteristics and intracellular hemin concentrations of Lactococcus lactis grown under different culture pH and aeration conditions were examined to investigate the effect of culture pH on the respiration efficiency of L. lactis NZ9000 (pZN8148). Cell biomass and biomass yield of L. lactis grown with 4 μg hemin/ml and O2 were higher than those without aeration when the culture pH was controlled at 5-6.5. The culture pH affected the respiratory efficiency in the following order of pH: 5 > 5.5 > 6 > 6.5; the lag phase increased as the culture pH decreased. Hemin accumulation was sensitive to culture pH. Among the four pH conditions, pH 5.5 was optimal for hemin accumulation in the cells. The highest intracellular hemin level in L. lactis resting cells incubated at different pH saline levels (5-6.5) was at pH 5.5. The respiration efficiency of L. lactis under respiration-permissive conditions increases markedly as the culture pH decreases. These results may help develop high cell-density L. lactis cultures. Thus, this microorganism may be used for industrial applications.

  20. Selection of non-Saccharomyces yeast strains for reducing alcohol levels in wine by sugar respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós, Manuel; Rojas, Virginia; Gonzalez, Ramon; Morales, Pilar

    2014-07-02

    Respiration of sugars by non-Saccharomyces yeasts has been recently proposed for lowering alcohol levels in wine. Development of industrial fermentation processes based on such an approach requires, amongst other steps, the identification of yeast strains which are able to grow and respire under the relatively harsh conditions found in grape must. This work describes the characterization of a collection of non-Saccharomyces yeast strains in order to identify candidate yeast strains for this specific application. It involved the estimation of respiratory quotient (RQ) values under aerated conditions, at low pH and high sugar concentrations, calculation of yields of ethanol and other relevant metabolites, and characterization of growth responses to the main stress factors found during the first stages of alcoholic fermentation. Physiological features of some strains of Metschnikowia pulcherrima or two species of Kluyveromyces, suggest they are suitable for lowering ethanol yields by respiration. The unsuitability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for this purpose was not due to ethanol yields (under aerated conditions they are low enough for a significant reduction in final ethanol content), but to the high acetic acid yields under these growth conditions. According to results from controlled aeration fermentations with one strain of M. pulcherrima, design of an aeration regime allowing for lowering ethanol yields though preserving grape must components from excessive oxidation, would be conceivable. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Plasma suppression of beamstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.; Stewart, J.J.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We investigate the use of a plasma at the interaction point of two colliding beams to suppress beamsstrahlung and related phenomena. We derive conditions for good current cancellation via plasma return currents and report on numerical simulations conducted to confirm our analytic results. 10 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Development of respiration gating RT technique using moving phantom and ultrasound sensor: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Suk; Yang, Dae Sik; Choi, Myung Sun; Kim, Chul Yong [Korea University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Hoon [Ilsan Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong Ho [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    In radiotherapy of tumors in liver, enough planning target volume (PTV) margins are necessary to compensate breathing-related movement of tumor volumes. To overcome the problems, this study aims to obtain patients' body movements by using a moving phantom and an ultrasonic sensor, and to develop respiration gating techniques that can adjust patients' beds by using reversed values of the data obtained. The phantom made to measure patients' body movements is composed of a micorprocessor (BS II, 20 MHz, 8K Byte), a sensor (Ultra-Sonic, range 3 {approx} 3 m), host computer (RS232C) and stepping motor (torque 2.3 Kg) etc., and the program to control and operate it was developed. The program allows the phantom to move within the maximum range of 2 cm, its movements and corrections to take place in order, and x, y and z to move successively. After the moving phantom was adjusted by entering random movement data (three dimensional data from with distance of 2 cm), and the phantom movements were acquired using the ultra sonic sensor, the two data were compared and analyzed. And then, after the movements by respiration were acquired by using guinea pigs, the real-time respiration gating techniques were drawn by operating the phantom with the reversed values of the data. The result of analyzing the acquisition-correction delay time for the three types of data values and about each value separately shows that the data values coincided with one another within 1% and that the acquisition-correction delay time was obtained real-time (2.34 x 10{sup -4} sec). This study successfully confirms the clinic application possibility of respiration gating techniques by using a moving phantom and an ultrasonic sensor. With ongoing development of additional analysis system, which can be used in real-time set-up reproducibility analysis, it may be beneficially used in radiotherapy of moving tumors.

  3. [MITOCHONDRIA RESPIRATION AND OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORILATION OF RAT TISSUES AT TAURINE PER ORAL INJECTION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostapiv, R D; Manko, V V

    2015-01-01

    Taurine--sulphur-containing amino acid is a necessary component of mitochondrial matrix, where it maintains pH and is included in mitochondrial transport RNA. But still it is unclear how taurine influences on ATP synthesis and mitochondrial respiration chain components activity. Thus, the aim of the work was to study the effect of long-term per oral taurine injection on mitochondrial respiration intensity in rat tissues: liver, brain, testes and thigh muscle. For this purpose male Wistar rats, that weighted 190-220 g, were divided in three groups, daily during 28 days they were injected drinking water (control group) or taurine solution 40 and 100 mg per kg of body weight (I and II research groups, correspondingly). Respiration intensity was measured polarogrifically with use of Clark electrode at endogenic substrates oxidation (V₁), with exogenic α-ketoglutarate (5 mmol/l) or succinate (1 mmol/l;V₄S) addition, at ADP addition to concentration 200 µmol/l (V₃), and after ADP depletion (V₄ATP). Phosphorylation time, oxidative phosphorilation efficacy (ADP/O), respiratory controls by Lardy (V₃/V₄S) and Chance (V₃/V₄ATP) were calculated. It was found that long term taurine injection increased V₁ in animal brain and liver of both research groups, but it decreased in testes and muscles of I research group. In liver of I research group animals, when both α-ketoglutarate and succinate were oxidated, V₄S, V₃ and V₄ATP were 4-7 times larger than in control. At the same time, Lardy respiratory control increased at succinate oxidation, this may indirectly point on increased coupling between respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. In liver of II research group animals V₄S, V₃ and V₄/ATP when α-ketoglutarate was oxidated were significantly higher than in control. In muscles of I research group V₄S, V₃ and V₄ATP when α-ketoglutarate and succinate was added were lower than in control. In thigh muscle of II research group animals at

  4. A global database of soil respiration data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bond-Lamberty

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil respirationRS, the flux of CO2 from the soil to the atmosphere – is probably the least well constrained component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Here we introduce the SRDB database, a near-universal compendium of published RS data, and make it available to the scientific community both as a traditional static archive and as a dynamic community database that may be updated over time by interested users. The database encompasses all published studies that report one of the following data measured in the field (not laboratory: annual RS, mean seasonal RS, a seasonal or annual partitioning of RS into its sources fluxes, RS temperature response (Q10, or RS at 10 °C. Its orientation is thus to seasonal and annual fluxes, not shorter-term or chamber-specific measurements. To date, data from 818 studies have been entered into the database, constituting 3379 records. The data span the measurement years 1961–2007 and are dominated by temperate, well-drained forests. We briefly examine some aspects of the SRDB data – its climate space coverage, mean annual RS fluxes and their correlation with other carbon fluxes, RS variability, temperature sensitivities, and the partitioning of RS source flux – and suggest some potential lines of research that could be explored using these data. The SRDB database is available online in a permanent archive as well as via a project-hosting repository; the latter source leverages open-source software technologies to encourage wider participation in the database's future development. Ultimately, we hope that the updating of, and corrections to, the SRDB will become a shared project, managed by the users of these data in the scientific community.

  5. Secretoneurin suppresses cardiac hypertrophy through suppression of oxidant stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-Li; Liu, Yan; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Yuan, Guo-Lin; Zhao, Yi-Lin; Yu, Chao

    2018-03-05

    The neuropeptide secretoneurin (SN) plays protective roles in myocardial ischemia. In the present study, the effect of SN in cardiac hypertrophy was investigated. We observed that, in isoproterenol (ISO) treatment induced cardiac or cardiomyocytes hypertrophy, a marked increase in the expression of endogenous SN in mouse plasma, myocardium and primary-cultured cardiomyocytes occurs. In hypertrophic mice, the heart size, heart weight/body weight (HW/BW) ratio, cardiomyocyte size, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) expression were significantly higher than those in controls but were effectively suppressed by SN gene therapy. Similarly, the protective effects of SN were also observed in cultured cardiomyocytes following ISO treatment. SN significantly increased the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in parallel with the decrease in reactive oxygen species levels in cardiomyocytes. We observed that SN evoked the activation of all of the AMPK, P38/MAPK and ERK/MAPK pathways in cardiomyocytes, but pretreatment with only AMPK inhibitor (compound C) and ERK1/2/MAPK inhibitor (PD98059) counteracted the protective effects of SN against cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and the suppressive effects of SN on oxidant stress in cardiomyocytes. These results indicated that endogenous SN is induced in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes, and may play a protective role in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. These results suggest that exogenous SN supplementation protects the cardiac hypertrophy induced by ISO treatment through the activation of AMPK and ERK/MAPK pathways, thus upregulating antioxidants and suppressing oxidative stress. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Automatic respiration tracking for radiotherapy using optical 3D camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tuotuo; Geng, Jason; Li, Shidong

    2013-03-01

    Rapid optical three-dimensional (O3D) imaging systems provide accurate digitized 3D surface data in real-time, with no patient contact nor radiation. The accurate 3D surface images offer crucial information in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) treatments for accurate patient repositioning and respiration management. However, applications of O3D imaging techniques to image-guided radiotherapy have been clinically challenged by body deformation, pathological and anatomical variations among individual patients, extremely high dimensionality of the 3D surface data, and irregular respiration motion. In existing clinical radiation therapy (RT) procedures target displacements are caused by (1) inter-fractional anatomy changes due to weight, swell, food/water intake; (2) intra-fractional variations from anatomy changes within any treatment session due to voluntary/involuntary physiologic processes (e.g. respiration, muscle relaxation); (3) patient setup misalignment in daily reposition due to user errors; and (4) changes of marker or positioning device, etc. Presently, viable solution is lacking for in-vivo tracking of target motion and anatomy changes during the beam-on time without exposing patient with additional ionized radiation or high magnet field. Current O3D-guided radiotherapy systems relay on selected points or areas in the 3D surface to track surface motion. The configuration of the marks or areas may change with time that makes it inconsistent in quantifying and interpreting the respiration patterns. To meet the challenge of performing real-time respiration tracking using O3D imaging technology in IGRT, we propose a new approach to automatic respiration motion analysis based on linear dimensionality reduction technique based on PCA (principle component analysis). Optical 3D image sequence is decomposed with principle component analysis into a limited number of independent (orthogonal) motion patterns (a low dimension eigen-space span by eigen-vectors). New

  7. Respiration and heartbeat signal detection from airflow at airway in rat by catheter flow sensor with temperature compensation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Y.; Kawaoka, H.; Yamada, T.; Matsushima, M.; Kawabe, T.; Shikida, M.

    2017-12-01

    We previously proposed an evaluation method for detecting both respiration and heartbeat signals from the airflow at the mouth (Kawaoka et al 201518th Int. Conf. on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems; Kawaoka et al 2015 IEEE Sensors; Kawaoka et al 2016 Technical Digest IEEE Micro Electro Mechanical Systems Conf.). In the current study, we developed a catheter flow sensor with temperature compensation that uses MEMS technologies and used it to directly detect the breathing airflow in the airway of a rat. The temperature sensors were integrated with the catheter flow sensor. Heaters working as airflow and temperature sensors were produced on polymer film by using the same fabrication process so that the temperature coefficients of their resistances would coincide. As a result, the variation in sensor outputs due to the airflow temperature changes ranging from 20 °C to 34 °C was suppressed to less than 2.5%. The developed catheter flow sensor was inserted into the airway of a rat to detect both respiration and heartbeat signals. The accuracy of the breathing airflow measurements was improved thanks to the temperature compensation. The tidal volume variations between the expired and inspired air were suppressed to within 5%. Heartbeat signal information was extracted from the measured breathing waveforms by applying a discrete Fourier transform.

  8. Improvements of Shooting Performance in Adolescent Air Rifle Athletes After a 6-week Balance and Respiration Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Han-Kyu; Kim, Dong-Woo; Kim, Tae-Ho

    2018-03-27

    Several factors, such as balance and respiration training programs, have been identified as contributing to the establishment of a shooting performance. However, little is known about the benefits of these programs on the shooting record, among adolescent air rifle athletes. To determine whether there is a gain in the shooting record, among adolescent air rifle athletes, after participation in balance and respiration training programs. Case-control study. Shooting range. Twenty-one adolescent air rifle athletes were recruited from the local school community and assigned to an experimental (n=11; EG) or control (n=10; CG) group. The EG performed respiration and balance training for 30 min, three times a week for 6 weeks, and the CG performed balance training only. Data were collected on the respiratory function, muscle activity, and shooting record, before and after the 6-week intervention. The forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expired volume in one second (FEV 1 ), FEV 1 as a percentage of FVC (FEV 1 /FVC), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) were significantly increased in the EG, and FEV 1 /FVC was significantly increased in the CG (pshooting records. The experiment demonstrates that the balance and respiration training programs may help improve the respiratory function and muscle activity other than the shooting record.

  9. Exposure to inhalable, respirable, and ultrafine particles in welding fume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Martin; Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Pelzer, Johannes; Kendzia, Benjamin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Punkenburg, Ewald; Weiss, Tobias; Mattenklott, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Möhlmann, Carsten; Berges, Markus; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m(-3) for inhalable and 1.29 mg m(-3) for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m(-3)). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements welding fume. Concentrations were mainly predicted by the welding process and were significantly higher when local exhaust ventilation (LEV) was inefficient or when welding was performed in confined spaces. Substitution of high-emission techniques like FCAW, efficient LEV, and using PAPRs where applicable can reduce exposure to welding fume. However, harmonizing the different exposure metrics for UFP (as particle counts) and for the respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging.

  10. Scaling relationship between tree respiration rates and biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dong-Liang; Li, Tao; Zhong, Quan-Lin; Wang, Gen-Xuan

    2010-10-23

    The WBE theory proposed by West, Brown and Enquist predicts that larger plant respiration rate, R, scales to the three-quarters power of body size, M. However, studies on the R versus M relationship for larger plants (i.e. trees larger than saplings) have not been reported. Published respiration rates of field-grown trees (saplings and larger trees) were examined to test this relationship. Our results showed that for larger trees, aboveground respiration rates RA scaled as the 0.82-power of aboveground biomass MA, and that total respiration rates RT scaled as the 0.85-power of total biomass MT, both of which significantly deviated from the three-quarters scaling law predicted by the WBE theory, and which agreed with 0.81-0.84-power scaling of biomass to respiration across the full range of measured tree sizes for an independent dataset reported by Reich et al. (Reich et al. 2006 Nature 439, 457-461). By contrast, R scaled nearly isometrically with M in saplings. We contend that the scaling exponent of plant metabolism is close to unity for saplings and decreases (but is significantly larger than three-quarters) as trees grow, implying that there is no universal metabolic scaling in plants.

  11. Respirable dust and quartz exposure from three South African farms with sandy, sandy loam, and clay soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanepoel, Andrew J; Kromhout, Hans; Jinnah, Zubair A; Portengen, Lützen; Renton, Kevin; Gardiner, Kerry; Rees, David

    2011-07-01

    To quantify personal time-weighted average respirable dust and quartz exposure on a sandy, a sandy loam, and a clay soil farm in the Free State and North West provinces of South Africa and to ascertain whether soil type is a determinant of exposure to respirable quartz. Three farms, located in the Free State and North West provinces of South Africa, had their soil type confirmed as sandy, sandy loam, and clay; and, from these, a total of 298 respirable dust and respirable quartz measurements were collected between July 2006-November 2009 during periods of major farming operations. Values below the limit of detection (LOD) (22 μg · m(-3)) were estimated using multiple 'imputation'. Non-parametric tests were used to compare quartz exposure from the three different soil types. Exposure to respirable quartz occurred on all three farms with the highest individual concentration measured on the sandy soil farm (626 μg · m(-3)). Fifty-seven, 59, and 81% of the measurements on the sandy soil, sandy loam soil, and clay soil farm, respectively, exceeded the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value (TLV) of 25 μg · m(-3). Twelve and 13% of respirable quartz concentrations exceeded 100 μg · m(-3) on the sandy soil and sandy loam soil farms, respectively, but none exceeded this level on the clay soil farm. The proportions of measurements >100 μg · m(-3) were not significantly different between the sandy and sandy loam soil farms ('prop.test'; P = 0.65), but both were significantly larger than for the clay soil farm ('prop.test'; P = 0.0001). The percentage of quartz in respirable dust was determined for all three farms using measurements > the limit of detection. Percentages ranged from 0.5 to 94.4% with no significant difference in the median quartz percentages across the three farms (Kruskal-Wallis test; P = 0.91). This study demonstrates that there is significant potential for over-exposure to respirable quartz in

  12. Nitrogen deposition may enhance soil carbon storage via change of soil respiration dynamic during a spring freeze-thaw cycle period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guoyong; Xing, Yajuan; Xu, Lijian; Wang, Jianyu; Meng, Wei; Wang, Qinggui; Yu, Jinghua; Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Zhidong; Jiang, Siling; Liu, Boqi; Han, Shijie

    2016-06-30

    As crucial terrestrial ecosystems, temperate forests play an important role in global soil carbon dioxide flux, and this process can be sensitive to atmospheric nitrogen deposition. It is often reported that the nitrogen addition induces a change in soil carbon dioxide emission in growing season. However, the important effects of interactions between nitrogen deposition and the freeze-thaw-cycle have never been investigated. Here we show nitrogen deposition delays spikes of soil respiration and weaken soil respiration. We found the nitrogen addition, time and nitrogen addition×time exerted the negative impact on the soil respiration of spring freeze-thaw periods due to delay of spikes and inhibition of soil respiration (p nitrogen), 39% (medium-nitrogen) and 36% (high-nitrogen) compared with the control. And the decrease values of soil respiration under medium- and high-nitrogen treatments during spring freeze-thaw-cycle period in temperate forest would be approximately equivalent to 1% of global annual C emissions. Therefore, we show interactions between nitrogen deposition and freeze-thaw-cycle in temperate forest ecosystems are important to predict global carbon emissions and sequestrations. We anticipate our finding to be a starting point for more sophisticated prediction of soil respirations in temperate forests ecosystems.

  13. Suppressing unwanted memories: where there is a will, there is a way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, E; van Brakel, A; Diederen, E

    2003-06-01

    Research suggests that suppressing unwanted thoughts, generally, is an ineffective thought control strategy, because suppression attempts oftentimes fail, and, furthermore, result in a paradoxical increase of unwanted thoughts, later on. The present study sought to investigate whether manipulated expectations about suppression efficacy determine actual effects of suppression attempts. To test this hypothesis, participants listened to an audiotaped story, and were subsequently appointed to one of four conditions: a no-instruction-control (n = 20), suppression (n = 20), suppression-works (n = 20; participants were told that suppression generally is a fruitful strategy), or suppression-does-not-work (n = 25; participants were told that suppression primarily has paradoxical effects) condition. Two hours later, participants' memories of the story were tested, and several metamemory questions were answered. Induced expectations actually determined the perceived efficacy of suppression attempts, as well as thought frequency, although perceived or actual accuracy of recollections was not affected by the instructions.

  14. Opposite effects of pioglitazone and rosiglitazone on mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle of patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabøl, R; Boushel, R; Almdal, T; Hansen, C N; Ploug, T; Haugaard, S B; Prats, C; Madsbad, S; Dela, F

    2010-09-01

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance has been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. We examined how improvements in muscular insulin sensitivity following rosiglitazone (ROSI) or pioglitazone (PIO) treatment would affect muscle mitochondrial function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Muscle biopsies were obtained from 21 patients with T2DM before and after 12 weeks on either ROSI (4 mg once daily) [n = 12; age, 59.2 +/- 2.2 years; body mass index (BMI), 29.6 +/- 0.7 kg/m(2)] or PIO (30 mg once daily) (n = 9; age, 56.3 +/- 2.4 years; BMI, 29.5 +/- 1.5 kg/m(2)). An age- and BMI-matched control group was also included (n = 8; age, 61.8 +/- 2.3 years; BMI, 28.4 +/- 0.6 kg/m(2)). Insulin sensitivity, citrate synthase- and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA-dehydrogenase (HAD) activity, intramuscular triglyceride (IMTG) and protein content of complexes I-IV were measured, while mitochondrial respiration per milligram muscle was measured in saponin-treated skinned muscle fibres using high-resolution respirometry. Mitochondrial respiration per milligram muscle was lower in T2DM compared to controls at baseline and decreased during ROSI treatment but increased during PIO treatment. Citrate synthase activity and average protein content of complexes I-IV were unchanged in the ROSI group, but protein content of complexes II and III increased during PIO treatment. Insulin sensitivity improved in all patients, but IMTG levels were unchanged. We show opposite effects of ROSI and PIO on mitochondrial respiration, and also show that insulin sensitivity can be improved independently of changes in mitochondrial respiration. We confirm that mitochondrial respiration is reduced in T2DM compared to age- and BMI-matched control subjects.

  15. Test results of lithium pool-air reaction suppression systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppson, D.W.

    1987-02-01

    Engineered reaction suppression systems were demonstrated to be effective in suppressing lithium pool-air reactions for lithium quantities up to 100 kg. Lithium pool-air reaction suppression system tests were conducted to evaluate suppression system effectiveness for potential use in fusion facilities in mitigating consequences of postulated lithium spills. Small-scale perforated and sacrificial cover plate suppression systems with delayed inert gas purging proved effective in controlling the lithium-air interaction for lithium quantities near 15 kg at initial temperatures up to 450 0 C. A large-scale suppression system with a sacrificial cover, a diverter plate, an inert gas atmosphere, and remotely retrievable catch pans proved effective in controlling lithium pool-air interaction for a 100-kg lithium discharge at an initial temperature of 550 0 C. This suppression system limited the maximum pool temperature to about 600 0 C less than that expected for a similar lithium pool-air reaction without a suppression system. Lithium aerosol release from this large-scale suppression system was a factor of about 10,000 less than that expected for a lithium pool-air reaction with no suppression system. Remote retrieval techniques for lithium cleanup, such as (1) in-place lithium siphoning and overhead crane dismantling, and (2) lithium catch pan removal by use of an overhead crane, were demonstrated as part of this large-scale test

  16. J/Ψ suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubellino, P.; Abreu, M.C.; Alessandro, B.; Alexa, C.; Arnaldi, R.; Astruc, J.; Atayan, M.; Baglin, C.; Baldit, A.; Bedjidian, M.; Bellaiche, F.; Beole, S.; Boldea, V.; Bordalo, P.; Bussiere, A.; Capony, V.; Casagrande, L.; Castor, J.; Chambon, T.; Chaurand, B.; Chevrot, I.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalo, C.; Comets, M.P.; Constantinescu, S.; Cruz, J.; De Falco, A.; De Marco, N.; Dellacasa, G.; Devaux, A.; Dita, S.; Drapier, O.; Espagnon, B.; Fargeix, J.; Filippov, S.N.; Fleuret, F.; Force, P.; Gallio, M.; Gavrilov, Y.K.; Gerschel, C.; Giubellino, P.; Golubeva, M.B.; Gonin, M.; Grigorian, A.A.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Guber, F.F.; Guichard, A.; Gulkaninan, H.; Hakobyan, R.; Haroutunian, R.; Idzik, M.; Jouan, D.; Karavitcheva, T.L.; Kluberg, L.; Kurepin, A.B.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lourenco, C.; Mac Cormick, M.; Macciotta, P.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mourgues, S.; Musso, A.; Ohlsson-Malek, F.; Petiau, P.; Piccotti, A.; Pizzi, J.R.; Prado da Silva, W.L.; Puddu, G.; Quintans, C.; Racca, C.; Ramello, L.; Ramos, S.; Rato-Mendes, P.; Riccati, L.; Romana, A.; Sartori, S.; Saturnini, P.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Shahoyan, R.; Silva, S.; Soave, C.; Sonderegger, P.; Tarrago, X.; Temnikov, P.; Topilskaya, N.S.; Usai, G.; Vale, C.; Vercellin, E.; Willis, N.

    1999-01-01

    The cross section for J/Ψ production in Pb-Pb interactions at 158 GeV per nucleon is measured at the CERN SPS by the NA50 experiment. The final results from the 1995 run are presented here together with preliminary ones from the high-statistics 1996 run. An anomalous J/Ψ suppression is observed in Pb-Pb collisions as compared to extrapolations of the previous results obtained by the NA38 experiment with proton and lighter ion beams. The results of the two runs are in good agreement. The results from the 1996 run allow the study of the onset of the anomalous suppression within the same set of data, showing evidence of a sharp change of behaviour around a value of neutral transverse energy, as measured by our electromagnetic calorimeter, of about 50 GeV

  17. The effects of some prostaglandins on respiration in anaesthetized cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, D.S.

    1974-01-01

    1 Some prostaglandins have been found to be capable of affecting respiration in anaesthetized cats. 2 Prostaglandins E1, E2, F2α, A1 and A2 all elicited increases in respiratory frequency when administered to cats anaesthetized with either pentobarbitone or α-chloralose. This effect was abolished by bilateral vagotomy. 3 Prostaglandins of the E and A series, but not prostaglandin F2α, elicited increases in tidal volume which were accompanied by falls in systemic blood pressure in cats anaesthetized with pentobarbitone. The changes in blood pressure were also obtained in cats anaesthetized with α-chloralose, but not the tidal volume changes. 4 It is unlikely that the prostaglandins influenced respiration by direct actions on arterial chemoreceptors or baroreceptors. 5 Mechanisms by which the prostaglandins may be acting to affect respiration are discussed. PMID:4447858

  18. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis VII. Respiration and Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, A. A.; Calvin, M.

    1949-07-21

    The relationship of respiration to photosynthesis in barley seedling leaves and the algae, Chlorella and Scenedesmus, has been investigated using radioactive carbon dioxide and the techniques of paper chromatography and radioautography. The plants are allowed to photosynthesize normally for thirty seconds in c{sup 14}O{sub 2} after which they are allowed to respire in air or helium in the light or dark. Respiration of photosynthetic intermediates as evidenced by the appearance of labeled glutomic, isocitric, fumaric and succinic acids is slower in the light than in the dark. Labeled glycolic acid is observed in barley and algae. It disappears rapidly in the dark and is maintained and increased in quantity in the light in C0{sub 2}-free air.

  19. Effect of organic synthetic food colours on mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, F G; Valim, M F; Vercesi, A E

    1996-01-01

    Eleven organic synthetic dyes, currently or formerly used as food colours in Brazil, were tested to determine their effect on mitochondrial respiration in mitochondria isolated from rat liver and kidney. The compounds tested were: Erythrosine, Ponceau 4R, Allura Red, Sunset yellow, Tartrazine, Amaranth, Brilliant Blue, Blue, Fast Red E, Orange GGN and Scarlet GN. All food colours tested inhibited mitochondrial respiration (State III respiration, uncoupled) supported either by alpha-ketoglutarate or succinate. This inhibition varied largely, e.g. from 100% to 16% for Erythrosine and Tartrazine respectively, at a concentration of 0.1 mg food colour per mitochondrial protein. Both rat liver and kidney mitochondria showed similar patterns of inhibition among the food colours tested. This effect was dose related and the concentration to give 50% inhibition was determined for some of the dyes. The xanthene dye Erythrosine, which showed the strongest effect, was selected for further investigation on mitochondria in vivo.

  20. [Histomorphologic lung findings in long-term artificial respiration with special reference to extreme continuous artificial respiration using pure oxygen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, C; Weiler, G; Adebahr, G

    1985-01-01

    The respirator lung is characterized histologically in the first exudative phase by capillary congestion, intra-alveolary edema, hyaline membranes and in most cases by concomitant inflammatory alterations. In the following irreversible phase, fibrous organization processes dominate and show a variable tendency towards pulmonary fibrosis. In 27 cases with long-term artificial respiration from 4 days to 12 weeks, mainly the proliferative alterations were investigated. In 18 cases, the histopathological findings indicated fibrosis of the alveolar septa with disseminated distribution. In 9 cases, focal fibrosis with obliterations of alveoli prevailed. The extent of pathological results in the lungs does not correlate with the duration of artificial respiration. In cases of artificial respiration with pure oxygen, there is a special toxic component, which is illustrated by a young woman with polytraumatism who was administered artificial respiration for 5 weeks with pure oxygen. She died from respiratory insufficiency with severe pulmonary fibrosis. As different pathogenetic factors may cause irreversible pulmonary fibrosis, histomorphological classification is difficult later and, moreover, forensic problems result.

  1. Cyanide-insensitive respiration in Acanthamoeba castellanii. Changes in sensitivity of whole cell respiration during exponential growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, S.W.; Lloyd, D.

    1977-01-01

    Respiration of Acanthamoeba castellanii shows varying sensitivity to cyanide during exponential growth in a medium containing proteose peptone, glucose and yeast extract. After 20 h growth, respiration was stimulated up to 40% by I mM-cyanide; sensitivity to cyanide then gradually increased until 90% inhibition of respiration was attained in late exponential phase cultures. Salicyl hydroxamic acid alone never stimulated or inhibited respiration by more than 20% but, when added together with cyanide, inhibition was always 70 to 100% from 3 h onward. Sensitivity to antimycin A was similar, but not identical to that shown to cyanide; when antimycin A was added together with salicyl hydroxamic acid, the inhibition was greater. Increased sensitivities to arsenite and malonate were also observed in late-exponential phase cultures. These changes in sensitivities were not associated with alterations in the growth medium since similar changes in sensitivity to inhibitors were observed during growth in conditioned medium. A rotenone-sensitive site is associated with cyanide-stimulated respiration and the results suggest that A. castellanii possesses a branched electron transport system.

  2. Cheyne-Stokes respiration in patients hospitalised for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mared Lena

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showing a strong relationship between Cheyne-Stokes respiration and the severity of left ventricular systolic dysfunction have usually been done in selected patient populations with lower age and a higher proportion of males than the "typical" in-hospital patient with heart failure. The purpose of the present study was test the strength of this relationship in unselected patients admitted to hospital due to decompensated chronic heart failure. Methods We evaluated 191 patients (32% women, mean age 73 years, ready for discharge from the heart failure unit in the University Hospital of Malmö, Sweden. The patients underwent echocardiography for determination of left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular inner diastolic diameter. A respiratory investigation during sleep was performed the last night before discharge. Results We found that 66% of the patients had Cheyne-Stokes respiration more than 10% of the total recording time. Only 7 (3.6% of the patients had predominantly obstructive apnoeas. There was a significant but very weak relationship between left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular inner diastolic diameter on one hand and Cheyne-Stokes respiration on the other. Age was a stronger determinant of Cheyne-Stokes respiration than any of the cardiac or other clinical variables. Conclusion Although presence of Cheyne-Stokes respiration indicates left ventricular dysfunction, its severity seems only weakly related to the severity of heart failure. Age was found to be a stronger determinant, which may reflect the underlying age-dependency found also in healthy subjects. Due to age restrictions or other selection criteria, the importance of age may have been underestimated in many previous studies on factors associated with Cheyne-Stokes respiration.

  3. Evaluation of Five Decontamination Methods for Filtering Facepiece Respirators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Michael S.; Eimer, Benjamin C.; Shaffer, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding the availability of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-certified N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) during an influenza pandemic. One possible strategy to mitigate a respirator shortage is to reuse FFRs following a biological decontamination process to render infectious material on the FFR inactive. However, little data exist on the effects of decontamination methods on respirator integrity and performance. This study evaluated five decontamination methods [ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI), ethylene oxide, vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP), microwave oven irradiation, and bleach] using nine models of NIOSH-certified respirators (three models each of N95 FFRs, surgical N95 respirators, and P100 FFRs) to determine which methods should be considered for future research studies. Following treatment by each decontamination method, the FFRs were evaluated for changes in physical appearance, odor, and laboratory performance (filter aerosol penetration and filter airflow resistance). Additional experiments (dry heat laboratory oven exposures, off-gassing, and FFR hydrophobicity) were subsequently conducted to better understand material properties and possible health risks to the respirator user following decontamination. However, this study did not assess the efficiency of the decontamination methods to inactivate viable microorganisms. Microwave oven irradiation melted samples from two FFR models. The remainder of the FFR samples that had been decontaminated had expected levels of filter aerosol penetration and filter airflow resistance. The scent of bleach remained noticeable following overnight drying and low levels of chlorine gas were found to off-gas from bleach-decontaminated FFRs when rehydrated with deionized water. UVGI, ethylene oxide (EtO), and VHP were found to be the most promising decontamination methods; however, concerns remain about the throughput capabilities for EtO and VHP

  4. Antoine Lavoisier and the study of respiration: 200 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, M A

    1991-03-01

    Antoine Lavoisier has been called the father of modern chemistry. From a medical point of view, he introduced the study of respiration and metabolism and so founded biochemistry. With his experiments, our knowledge of how the body works made immense strides forward. Two hundred years ago, he wrote his last authentic and untouched account of his views on respiration, in a letter to Joseph Black in Edinburgh. This opportunity has been taken to briefly review this work and the life of a man who did much to improve our understanding of ourselves.

  5. Emotions shape memory suppression in trait anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa eMarzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The question that motivated this study was to investigate the relation between trait anxiety, emotions and memory control. To this aim, memory suppression was explored in high and low trait anxiety individuals with the Think/No-think paradigm. After learning associations between neutral words and emotional scenes (negative, positive and neutral, participants were shown a word and were requested either to think about the associated scene or to block it out from mind. Finally, in a test phase, participants were again shown each word and asked to recall the paired scene. The results show that memory control is influenced by high trait anxiety and emotions. Low trait anxiety individuals showed a memory suppression effect, whereas there was a lack of memory suppression in high trait anxious individuals, especially for emotionally negative scenes. Thus, we suggest that individuals with anxiety may have difficulty exerting cognitive control over memories with a negative valence. These findings provide evidence that memory suppression can be impaired by anxiety thus highlighting the crucial relation between cognitive control, emotions and individual differences in regulating emotions.

  6. In vivo assessment of plant extracts for control of plant diseases: A sesquiterpene ketolactone isolated from Curcuma zedoaria suppresses wheat leaf rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jae Woo; Shim, Sang Hee; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Choi, Yong Ho; Dang, Quang Le; Kim, Hun; Choi, Gyung Ja

    2018-02-01

    As an alternative to synthetic pesticides, natural materials such as plant extracts and microbes have been considered to control plant diseases. In this study, methanol extracts of 120 plants were explored for in vivo antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani, Botrytis cinerea, Phytophthora infestans, Puccinia triticina, and Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. Of the 120 plant extracts, eight plant extracts exhibited a disease control efficacy of more than 90% against at least one of five plant diseases. In particular, a methanol extract of Curcuma zedoaria rhizomes exhibited strong activity against wheat leaf rust caused by P. triticina. When the C. zedoaria methanol extracts were partitioned with various solvents, the layers of n-hexane, methylene chloride, and ethyl acetate showed disease control values of 100, 80, and 43%, respectively, against wheat leaf rust. From the C. zedoaria rhizome extracts, an antifungal substance was isolated and identified as a sesquiterpene ketolactone based on the mass and nuclear magnetic resonance spectral data. The active compound controlled the development of rice sheath blight, wheat leaf rust, and tomato late blight. Considering the in vivo antifungal activities of the sesquiterpene ketolactone and the C. zedoaria extracts, these results suggest that C. zedoaria can be used as a potent fungicide in organic agriculture.

  7. Variation in Metabolic Rate among Individuals Is Related to Tissue-Specific Differences in Mitochondrial Leak Respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salin, Karine; Auer, Sonya K; Rudolf, Agata M; Anderson, Graeme J; Selman, Colin; Metcalfe, Neil B

    Standard metabolic rate (SMR) and maximum metabolic rate (MMR) typically vary two- or threefold among conspecifics, with both traits assumed to significantly impact fitness. However, the underlying mechanisms that determine such intraspecific variation are not well understood. We examined the influence of mitochondrial properties on intraspecific variation in SMR and MMR and hypothesized that if SMR supports the cost of maintaining the metabolic machinery required for MMR, then the mitochondrial properties underlying these traits should be shared. Mitochondrial respiratory capacity (leak and phosphorylating respiration) and mitochondrial content (cytochrome c oxidase activity) were determined in the liver and white muscle of brown trout Salmo trutta of similar age and maintenance conditions. SMR and MMR were uncorrelated across individuals and were not associated with the same mitochondrial properties, suggesting that they are under the control of separate physiological processes. Moreover, tissue-specific relationships between mitochondrial properties and whole-organism metabolic traits were observed. Specifically, SMR was positively associated with leak respiration in liver mitochondria, while MMR was positively associated with muscle mitochondrial leak respiration and mitochondrial content. These results suggest that a high SMR or MMR, rather than signaling a higher ability for respiration-driven ATP synthesis, may actually reflect greater dissipation of energy, driven by proton leak across the mitochondrial inner membrane. Knowledge of these links should aid interpretation of the potential fitness consequences of such variation in metabolism, given the importance of mitochondria in the utilization of resources and their allocation to performance.

  8. Reducing Uncertainty in the Daycent Model of Heterotrophic Respiration with a More Mechanistic Representation of Microbial Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardi, D.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Hudiburg, T. W.

    2017-12-01

    Improving the certainty of ecosystem models is essential to ensuring their legitimacy, value, and ability to inform management and policy decisions. With more than a century of research exploring the variables controlling soil respiration, a high level of uncertainty remains in the ability of ecosystem models to accurately estimate respiration with changing climatic conditions. Refining model estimates of soil carbon fluxes is a high priority for climate change scientists to determine whether soils will be carbon sources or sinks in the future. We found that DayCent underestimates heterotrophic respiration by several magnitudes for our temperate mixed conifer forest site. While traditional ecosystem models simulate decomposition through first order kinetics, recent research has found that including microbial mechanisms explains 20 percent more spatial heterogeneity. We manipulated the DayCent heterotrophic respiration model to include a more mechanistic representation of microbial dynamic and compared the new model with continuous and survey observations from our experimental forest site in the Northern Rockies ecoregion. We also calibrated the model's sensitivity to soil moisture and temperature to our experimental data. We expect to improve the accuracy of the model by 20-30 percent. By using a more representative and calibrated model of soil carbon dynamics, we can better predict feedbacks between climate and soil carbon pools.

  9. Influence of liming on residual soil respiration and chemical properties in a tropical no-tillage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Valente Marcelo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Because of the climate changes occurring across the planet, especially global warming, the different forms of agricultural soil use have attracted researchers´ attention. Changes in soil management may influence soil respiration and, consequently, C sequestration. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the long-term influence of liming on soil respiration and correlate it with soil chemical properties after two years of liming in a no-tillage system. A randomized complete block design was used with six replications. The experimental treatments consisted of four lime rates and a control treatment without lime. Two years after liming, soil CO2 emission was measured and the soil sampled (layers 0-5, 5-10, 10-20, and 20-30 cm. The P, Ca2+ e Mg2+ soil contents and pH and base saturation were determined. CO2 emission from soil limed at the recommended rate was 24.1 % higher, and at twice the recommended rate, 47.4 % higher than from unlimed soil. Liming improved the chemical properties, and the linear increase in soil respiration rate correlated positively with the P, Ca2+ and Mg2+ soil contents, pH and base saturation, and negatively with H + Al and Al3+ contents. The correlation coefficient between soil respiration rate and chemical properties was highest in the 10-20 cm layer.

  10. A study of porcine liver motion during respiration for improving targeting in image-guided needle placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimathveeravalli, G; Leger, J; Ezell, P; Maybody, M; Gutta, N; Solomon, S B

    2013-01-01

    Liver motion due to respiration restricts targeting and needle placement accuracy during image-guided interventional procedures. Breath holds, imaging techniques, and navigation systems are used to improve targeting accuracy. Data of in-vivo liver behavior under respiration can enhance these approaches. An experimental study was performed using the swine model to capture the dynamics of liver motion during respiration using needles tipped with electromagnetic sensors. The swine liver was segmented into four lobes (right lateral, right medial, left medial and left lateral), and two sensor-tipped needles were placed in each location to acquire representative displacement data. Maximum displacement was found to occur in the left medial and left lateral lobes, in the anterior-posterior direction. Significant lobe-dependent variation in motion behavior was recorded, but a variation within a lobe was minimal and independent of needle approach. Magnitude of displacement in all lobes was found to be monotonically correlated to breathing volume. Displacement of liver was found to be out of phase with breathing by approximately 2 Hz. The positioning of the animal was also found to influence direction and magnitude of liver displacement in different lobes. We have presented previously unavailable data and insight into the role of easily controllable parameters such as breathing volume, patient positioning, and lobe-specific heterogeneity in the displacement of liver due to respiration.

  11. Respirable concrete dust--silicosis hazard in the construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linch, Kenneth D

    2002-03-01

    Concrete is an extremely important part of the infrastructure of modern life and must be replaced as it ages. Many of the methods of removing, repairing, or altering existing concrete structures have the potential for producing vast quantities of respirable dust. Since crystalline silica in the form of quartz is a major component of concrete, airborne respirable quartz dust may be produced during construction work involving the disturbance of concrete, thereby producing a silicosis hazard for exposed workers. Silicosis is a debilitating and sometimes fatal lung disease resulting from breathing microscopic particles of crystalline silica. Between 1992 and 1998, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) made visits to construction projects where concrete was being mechanically disturbed in order to obtain data concerning respirable crystalline silica dust exposures. The construction activities studied included: abrasive blasting, concrete pavement sawing and drilling, and asphalt/concrete milling. Air samples of respirable dust were obtained using 10-mm nylon cyclone pre-separators, 37-mm polyvinyl chloride (PVC) filters, and constant-flow pumps calibrated at 1.7 L/min. In addition, high-volume respirable dust samples were obtained on 37-mm PVC filters using 1/2" metal cyclones (Sensidyne model 18) and constant-flow pumps calibrated at 9.0 L/min. Air sample analysis included total weight gain by gravimetric analysis according to NIOSH Analytical Method 600 and respirable crystalline silica (quartz and cristobalite) using x-ray diffraction, as per NIOSH Analytical Method 7500. For abrasive blasting of concrete structures, the respirable crystalline silica (quartz) concentration ranged up to 14.0 mg/m3 for a 96-minute sample resulting in an eight-hour time-weighted average (TWA) of 2.8 mg/m3. For drilling concrete highway pavement the respirable quartz concentrations ranged up to 4.4 mg/m3 for a 358-minute sample, resulting in an eight-hour TWA

  12. The measurement respiration selected mutants at a fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster)

    OpenAIRE

    DOULOVÁ, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    The Bachelor´s thesis is concentrated in an experimental way. The main target was to compare the respiration and to find out the differences in the quantity of the produced carbon dioxide at the chosen lines of a fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (class insect, order dipterous). Two concrete checking lines CantonS (a wild type) and White eyed (a white-eyed line) were compared with a mutant line AdoR- (a fruit fly with the mutation in adenosine receptor). It was supposed the control lines wil...

  13. The respiration of cells and mitochondria of porin deficient yeast mutants is coupled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michejda, J; Guo, X J; Lauquin, G J

    1990-08-31

    Several mutants of yeast lacking the porin gene have been found stable and viable on glucose or glycerol media. Ethanol-supported respiration of porin-free mutant and wild cells appeared equally coupled in vivo being similarly depressed by inhibitors of ADP/ATP translocase or of ATP synthase and stimulated by the uncoupler FCCP. The absence of porin in isolated mutant mitochondria hardly impaired the electron flux but increased the requirement for Mg2+ (or Ca2+) and for ADP and carboxyatractylate concentrations necessary to drive effectively state 3 - state 4 and state 4 - state 3 transitions, respectively. The existence of another porin species, possibly controlled by bivalent cations, is postulated.

  14. Landscape structure, groundwater dynamics, and soil water content influence soil respiration across riparian-hillslope transitions in the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent J. Pacific; Brian L. McGlynn; Diego A. Riveros-Iregui; Daniel L. Welsch; Howard E. Epstein

    2011-01-01

    Variability in soil respiration at various spatial and temporal scales has been the focus of much research over the last decade aimed to improve our understanding and parameterization of physical and environmental controls on this flux. However, few studies have assessed the control of landscape position and groundwater table dynamics on the spatiotemporal variability...

  15. Deciphering the RhizosphereMicrobiome for Disease-Suppressive Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, R.; Kruijt, M.; Bruijn, de I.; Dekkers, E.; Voort, van der M.; Schneider, J.H.M.; Piceno, Y.M.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Andersen, G.L.; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Disease-suppressive soils are exceptional ecosystems in which crop plants suffer less from specific soil-borne pathogens than expected owing to the activities of other soil microorganisms. For most disease-suppressive soils, the microbes and mechanisms involved in pathogen control are unknown. By

  16. Effects of thought suppression on episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, E; Merckelbach, H; Muris, P

    1997-11-01

    Subjects were shown a short film fragment. Following this, one group of subjects (n = 26) was instructed to suppress their thoughts about the film, while the other group (n = 24) received no instructions. After 5 hrs subjects returned to the laboratory and completed a questionnaire testing their memory about the film. Results showed that suppression subjects reported a higher frequency of thoughts about the film than control subjects. No evidence was obtained for Wegner, Quillian, and Houston's (1996; Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 71, 680-691) claim that suppression has an undermining effect on memory for chronology. Possible causes for the differences between the results as obtained by Wegner et al., and those found in the present study are discussed. These causes may pertain to the experimental design, but also to differences in emotional impact of the stimulus material that was used in both studies.

  17. Regional Suppression of Bactrocera Fruit Flies (Diptera: Tephritidae in the Pacific through Biological Control and Prospects for Future Introductions into Other Areas of the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger I. Vargas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bactrocera fruit fly species are economically important throughout the Pacific. The USDA, ARS U.S. Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center has been a world leader in promoting biological control of Bactrocera spp. that includes classical, augmentative, conservation and IPM approaches. In Hawaii, establishment of Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett in 1895 resulted in the introduction of the most successful parasitoid, Psyttalia fletcheri (Silvestri; similarly, establishment of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel in 1945 resulted in the introduction of 32 natural enemies of which Fopius arisanus (Sonan, Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead and Fopius vandenboschi (Fullaway were most successful. Hawaii has also been a source of parasitoids for fruit fly control throughout the Pacific region including Australia, Pacific Island Nations, Central and South America, not only for Bactrocera spp. but also for Ceratitis and Anastrepha spp. Most recently, in 2002, F. arisanus was introduced into French Polynesia where B. dorsalis had invaded in 1996. Establishment of D. longicaudata into the new world has been important to augmentative biological control releases against Anastrepha spp. With the rapid expansion of airline travel and global trade there has been an alarming spread of Bactrocera spp. into new areas of the world (i.e., South America and Africa. Results of studies in Hawaii and French Polynesia, support parasitoid introductions into South America and Africa, where B. carambolae and B. invadens, respectively, have become established. In addition, P. fletcheri is a candidate for biological control of B. cucurbitae in Africa. We review past and more

  18. Pulmonary inflammation and crystalline silica in respirable coal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    This study demonstrates dose-response relationships between respirable crystalline silica in coal mine dust and pulmonary inflammation, antioxidant production, and radiographic small opacities. [Kuempel E D, Attfield M D, Vallyathan V, Lapp N L, Hale J M, Smith R J and Castranova V 2003 Pulmonary inflammation and ...

  19. Engineered sodium hyaluronate respirable dry powders for pulmonary drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Francesco; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Kumar, Abhinav; Sonvico, Fabio; Forbes, Ben; Bettini, Ruggero; Buttini, Francesca

    2017-01-30

    Sodium hyaluronate (HYA) warrants attention as a material for inhalation due to its (i) therapeutic potential, (ii) utility as a formulation excipient or drug carrier, and (iii) ability to target lung inflammation and cancer. This study aimed to overcome formulation and manufacturing impediments to engineer biocompatible spray-dried HYA powders for inhalation. Novel methodology was developed to produce HYA microparticles by spray drying. Different types of surfactant were included in the formulation to improve powder respirability, which was evaluated in vitro using cascade impactors. The individual formulation components and formulated products were evaluated for their biocompatibility with A549 respiratory epithelial cells. The inclusion of stearyl surfactants, 5% w/v, produced the most respirable HYA-powders; FPF 59.0-66.3%. A trend to marginally higher respirability was observed for powders containing stearylamine>stearyl alcohol>cetostearyl alcohol. Pure HYA was biocompatible with A549 cells at all concentrations measured, but the biocompatibility of the stearyl surfactants (based on lethal concentration 50%; LC 50 ) in the MTT assay ranked stearyl alcohol>cetostearyl alcohol>stearylamine with LC 50 of 24.7, 13.2 and 1.8μg/mL, respectively. We report the first respirable HYA powders produced by spray-drying. A lead formulation containing 5% stearyl alcohol was identified for further studies aimed at translating the proposed benefits of inhaled HYA into safe and clinically effective HYA products. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Plant species richness regulates soil respiration through changes in productivity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavares Correa Dias, A.; van Ruijven, J.; Berendse, F.

    2010-01-01

    Soil respiration is an important pathway of the C cycle. However, it is still poorly understood how changes in plant community diversity can affect this ecosystem process. Here we used a long-term experiment consisting of a gradient of grassland plant species richness to test for effects of

  1. Temperature response of soil respiration largely unaltered with experimental warming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carey, Joanna C.; Tang, Jianwu; Templer, Pamela H.; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Crowther, Thomas W.; Burton, Andrew J.; Dukes, Jeffrey S.; Emmett, Bridget; Frey, Serita D.; Heskel, Mary A.; Jiang, Lifen; Machmuller, Megan B.; Mohan, Jacqueline; Panetta, Anne Marie; Reich, Peter B.; Reinsch, Sabine; Wang, Xin; Allison, Steven D.; Bamminger, Chris; Bridgham, Scott; Collins, Scott L.; de Dato, Giovanbattista; Eddy, William C.; Enquist, Brian J.; Estiarte, Marc; Harte, John; Henderson, Amanda; Johnson, Bart R.; Larsen, Klaus Steenberg; Luo, Yiqi; Marhan, Sven; Melillo, Jerry M.; Peñuelas, Josep; Pfeifer-Meister, Laurel; Poll, Christian; Rastetter, Edward; Reinmann, Andrew B.; Reynolds, Lorien L.; Schmidt, Inger K.; Shaver, Gaius R.; Strong, Aaron L.; Suseela, Vidya; Tietema, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soil is a major yet poorly understood flux in the global carbon cycle. Climatic warming is hypothesized to increase rates of soil respiration, potentially fueling further increases in global temperatures. However, despite considerable scientific

  2. Plant species richness regulates soil respiration through changes in productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dias, A.A.; Ruijven, van J.; Berendse, F.

    2010-01-01

    Soil respiration is an important pathway of the C cycle. However, it is still poorly understood how changes in plant community diversity can affect this ecosystem process. Here we used a long-term experiment consisting of a gradient of grassland plant species richness to test for effects of

  3. Ecophysiology and environmental distribution of organohalide-respiring bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Organohalide-respiring bacteria (OHRB) are able to breathe natural and anthropogenically  produced organohalides persistent in a broad range of oxygen-depleted environments. Therefore, these microorganisms are of high interest for organohalide-contaminated site bioremediation and natural

  4. Tillage and manure effect on soil microbial biomass and respiration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of both tillage and liquid pig manure application on soil microbial biomass, enzyme activities and microbial respiration in a meadow soil. The results obtained did not show any significant effect of tillage and manure on microbial biomass carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) ...

  5. Divergent apparent temperature sensitivity of terrestrial ecosystem respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing Song; Shuli Niu; Ruise Luo; Yiqi Luo; Jiquan Chen; Guirui Yu; Janusz Olejnik; Georg Wohlfahrt; Gerard Kiely; Ako Noormets; Leonardo Montagnani; Alessandro Cescatti; Vincenzo Magliulo; Beverly Elizabeth Law; Magnus Lund; Andrej Varlagin; Antonio Raschi; Matthias Peichl; Mats B. Nilsson; Lutz Merbold

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies revealed convergent temperature sensitivity of ecosystem respiration (Re) within aquatic ecosystems and between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We do not know yet whether various terrestrial ecosystems have consistent or divergent temperature sensitivity. Here, we synthesized 163 eddy covariance flux sites across the world and...

  6. Estimating daytime ecosystem respiration from eddy-flux data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Herbst, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    based on whole ecosystem fluxes from a linear regression of photosynthetic photon flux density data vs. daytime net ecosystem exchange data at forest ecosystem level. This method is based on the principles of the Kok-method applied at leaf level for estimating daytime respiration. We demonstrate...

  7. ECG-derived respiration methods: adapted ICA and PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiinanen, Suvi; Noponen, Kai; Tulppo, Mikko; Kiviniemi, Antti; Seppänen, Tapio

    2015-05-01

    Respiration is an important signal in early diagnostics, prediction, and treatment of several diseases. Moreover, a growing trend toward ambulatory measurements outside laboratory environments encourages developing indirect measurement methods such as ECG derived respiration (EDR). Recently, decomposition techniques like principal component analysis (PCA), and its nonlinear version, kernel PCA (KPCA), have been used to derive a surrogate respiration signal from single-channel ECG. In this paper, we propose an adapted independent component analysis (AICA) algorithm to obtain EDR signal, and extend the normal linear PCA technique based on the best principal component (PC) selection (APCA, adapted PCA) to improve its performance further. We also demonstrate that the usage of smoothing spline resampling and bandpass-filtering improve the performance of all EDR methods. Compared with other recent EDR methods using correlation coefficient and magnitude squared coherence, the proposed AICA and APCA yield a statistically significant improvement with correlations 0.84, 0.82, 0.76 and coherences 0.90, 0.91, 0.85 between reference respiration and AICA, APCA and KPCA, respectively. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pulmonary inflammation and crystalline silica in respirable coal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    silica in coal mine dust and pulmonary inflammation, antioxidant production, and radiographic small opacities. [Kuempel E D, Attfield M D, Vallyathan V, Lapp N L, Hale J M, Smith R J and Castranova V 2003 Pulmonary inflammation and crystal- line silica in respirable coal mine dust: dose-response; J. Biosci. 28 61–69]. 1.

  9. Respirable dust meter locates super polluters in traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt-Ott's, A.; Kurniawan, A.; Schrauwers, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Netherlands is having trouble with the EU standards for respirable dust (PM 10). The Dutch Council of State recently blocked a number of residential development projects because local conditions failed to meet the PM 10 standard. Research by the Nano Structured Materials group at TU Delft shows

  10. Connecting Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration: Preservice Teachers' Conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mary H.; Schwartz, Renee S.

    2009-01-01

    The biological processes of photosynthesis and plant cellular respiration include multiple biochemical steps, occur simultaneously within plant cells, and share common molecular components. Yet, learners often compartmentalize functions and specialization of cell organelles relevant to these two processes, without considering the interconnections…

  11. Misconceptions about Photosynthesis and Respiration held by 'O ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Misconceptions about Photosynthesis and Respiration held by 'O' Level Students in Gweru Urban High Schools. Alois S Chiromo. Abstract. No Abstract Available Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research Vol.14(2) 2002: 156-166. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ...

  12. Divergent apparent temperature sensitivity of terrestrial ecosystem respiration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Song, B.; Niu, S.; Luo, R.; Chen, J.; Yu, G.; Olejnik, Janusz; Wohlfahrt, G.; Kiely, G.; Noormels, A.; Montagnani, L.; Cescatti, A.; Magliulo, V.; Law, B. E.; Lund, M.; Varlagin, A.; Raschi, A.; Peichl, M.; Nilsson, M.; Merbold, L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 5 (2014), s. 419-428 ISSN 1752-9921 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : activation energy * ecosystem respiration * index of water availability * gross primary productivity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.646, year: 2014

  13. 42 CFR 84.1140 - Dust, fume, and mist respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1140 Dust, fume, and mist respirators; performance requirements...

  14. Long-term mindfulness training is associated with reliable differences in resting respiration rate

    OpenAIRE

    Wielgosz, Joseph; Schuyler, Brianna S.; Lutz, Antoine; Davidson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Respiration rate is known to correlate with aspects of psychological well-being, and attention to respiration is a central component of mindfulness meditation training. Both traditional contemplative systems and recent empirical evidence support an association between formal mindfulness practice and decreased respiration rate. However, the question of whether long-term mindfulness training is associated with stable, generalized changes in respiration has yet to be directly investigated. We an...

  15. Metformin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes have normal mitochondrial complex I respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, S; Rabøl, R; Hansen, C N; Madsbad, S; Helge, J W; Dela, F

    2012-02-01

    The glucose-lowering drug metformin has been shown to inhibit complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in skeletal muscle. To investigate this effect in vivo we studied skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity and content from patients with type 2 diabetes treated with metformin (n = 14) or sulfonylurea (n = 8) and healthy control (n = 18) participants. Mitochondrial respiratory capacity was measured ex vivo in permeabilised muscle fibres obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of all participants. The respiratory response to in vitro titration with metformin was measured in controls. Citrate synthase (CS) activity, and fasting plasma glucose, insulin and HbA(1c) levels were measured and body composition was determined. Participants were matched for age, BMI and percentage body fat. Fasting plasma glucose concentrations were higher (p muscle at suprapharmacological concentrations. Metformin treatment does not inhibit mitochondrial complex I respiration in the electron transport chain in human skeletal muscle of patients with type 2 diabetes when measured ex vivo. Inhibition of complex I and II respiration in controls was demonstrated by metformin titration in vitro at doses well above those observed during metformin treatment.

  16. Availability, consistency and evidence-base of policies and guidelines on the use of mask and respirator to protect hospital health care workers: a global analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chughtai, Abrar Ahmad; Seale, Holly; MacIntyre, Chandini Raina

    2013-05-31

    Currently there is an ongoing debate and limited evidence on the use of masks and respirators for the prevention of respiratory infections in health care workers (HCWs). This study aimed to examine available policies and guidelines around the use of masks and respirators in HCWs and to describe areas of consistency between guidelines, as well as gaps in the recommendations, with reference to the WHO and the CDC guidelines. Policies and guidelines related to mask and respirator use for the prevention of influenza, SARS and TB were examined. Guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO), the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), three high-income countries and six low/middle-income countries were selected. Uniform recommendations are made by the WHO and the CDC in regards to protecting HCWs against seasonal influenza (a mask for low risk situations and a respirator for high risk situations) and TB (use of a respirator). However, for pandemic influenza and SARS, the WHO recommends mask use in low risk and respirators in high risk situations, whereas, the CDC recommends respirators in both low and high risk situations. Amongst the nine countries reviewed, there are variations in the recommendations for all three diseases. While, some countries align with the WHO recommendations, others align with those made by the CDC. The choice of respirator and the level of filtering ability vary amongst the guidelines and the different diseases. Lastly, none of the policies discuss reuse, extended use or the use of cloth masks. Currently, there are significant variations in the policies and recommendations around mask and respirator use for protection against influenza, SARS and TB. These differences may reflect the scarcity of level-one evidence available to inform policy development. The lack of any guidelines on the use of cloth masks, despite widespread use in many low and middle-income countries, remains a policy gap. Health organizations and countries should

  17. In situ respiration measurements of megafauna in the Kermadec Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunnally, Clifton C.; Friedman, Jason R.; Drazen, Jeffrey C.

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to measure metabolic rates of megafauna living in depths greater than 6000 m. Echinoderms, actinarians and a polychaete were captured by remotely operated vehicle (ROV) and inserted into respiration chambers in situ at depths of 4049 m, 7140 m and 8074 m in the region of the Kermadec Trench SW Pacific Ocean. Hadal research has moved into a new frontier as technological improvements now allow for a meticulous investigation of trench ecology in depths greater than 6000 m. The development of an in situ respirometer for use in these studies was deployed in the Kermadec Trench to obtain the first ever rates of basal metabolic rates of hadal megafauna. Typical deep-sea experiments of individual animal physiology must deal with covarying factors of pressure, temperature, light and food supply in this study investigated the effects of pressure and increased food supply on overall animal metabolism. In the Kermadec Trench, holothurian respiration rates (n=4), 0.079±0.011 (mean±SE) μmol-O2 g-1 h-1, were higher than those captured at abyssal depths (n=2), 0.018±0.002 μmol-O2 g-1h-1, in the same region (p<0.001). When Q10 adjusted to a common temperature of 2.5 °C trench holothurian respiration rates ranged between 0.068 and 0.119 μmol-O2 g-1 h-1. Anemone respiration rates were remarkably similar between abyssal and hadal specimens, 0.110 and 0.111 μmol-O2 g-1 h-1, respectively. Our results on echinoderm respiration when corrected for temperature and mass fall below the slope regression when compared with other in situ measurements at shallower ocean depths.

  18. Redefinition and global estimation of basal ecosystem respiration rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, W.; Luo, Y.; Li, X.; Liu, S.; Yu, G.; Zhou, T.; Bahn, M.; Black, A.; Desai, A.R.; Cescatti, A.; Marcolla, B.; Jacobs, C.; Chen, J.; Aurela, M.; Bernhofer, C.; Gielen, B.; Bohrer, G.; Cook, D.R.; Dragoni, D.; Dunn, A.L.; Gianelle, D.; Grnwald, T.; Ibrom, A.; Leclerc, M.Y.; Lindroth, A.; Liu, H.; Marchesini, L.B.; Montagnani, L.; Pita, G.; Rodeghiero, M.; Rodrigues, A.; Starr, G.; Stoy, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Basal ecosystem respiration rate (BR), the ecosystem respiration rate at a given temperature, is a common and important parameter in empirical models for quantifying ecosystem respiration (ER) globally. Numerous studies have indicated that BR varies in space. However, many empirical ER models still use a global constant BR largely due to the lack of a functional description for BR. In this study, we redefined BR to be ecosystem respiration rate at the mean annual temperature. To test the validity of this concept, we conducted a synthesis analysis using 276 site-years of eddy covariance data, from 79 research sites located at latitudes ranging from ∼3°S to ∼70°N. Results showed that mean annual ER rate closely matches ER rate at mean annual temperature. Incorporation of site-specific BR into global ER model substantially improved simulated ER compared to an invariant BR at all sites. These results confirm that ER at the mean annual temperature can be considered as BR in empirical models. A strong correlation was found between the mean annual ER and mean annual gross primary production (GPP). Consequently, GPP, which is typically more accurately modeled, can be used to estimate BR. A light use efficiency GPP model (i.e., EC-LUE) was applied to estimate global GPP, BR and ER with input data from MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications) and MODIS (Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). The global ER was 103 Pg C yr −1, with the highest respiration rate over tropical forests and the lowest value in dry and high-latitude areas.

  19. Potency of Bacillus thuringiensis isolates from bareng Tenes-Malang City as a biological control agent for suppressing third instar of Aedes aegypti larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfiana, Nihayatul; Gama, Zulfaidah Penata

    2017-11-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease that is transmitted by the female Aedes species. The number of dengue fever cases has increased in many geographic regions including Indonesia and one of them occurred in Bareng Tenes, Malang City, East Java Province. The objective of this research was to identify the potency of B. thuringeinsis isolates from Bareng Tenes, Malang, as the biological agent to control third instar Ae. aegypti larvae and to identify the potential B. thuringiensis isolates based on 16S rDNA sequence. B. thuringiensis was isolated from water and soil from 12 sites in the Bareng Tenes area. Bacterial isolation was performed using B. thuringiensis selective media. Several isolates had similar phenotypic characters with B. thuringiensis used to toxicity test against third instar Ae. aegypti larvae. The LC50-96h value was determined using probit regression. The most effective isolate was identified based on the 16S rDNA sequence, then aligned to the reference isolate using the BLAST program. A phylogeny tree was constructed using the Maximum Likelihood method. This study showed that among 22 isolates of B. thuringiensis, only BA02b, BS04a, and BA03a isolates have similar phenotypic characters with B. thuringiensis. Based on the toxicity test of B. thuringiensis against the third instar of Ae. aegypti larvae, it was indicated that BA02b and BA03a isolates were the potential agents to control Ae. aegypti larvae. BA02b isolate was the most effective B. thuringiensis (LC50-96h = 2,75 x 107 cell/mL). Based on 16S rDNA sequence, BA02b was identified as Bacillus thuringiensis var. Israelensis BGSC4Q2 (99 % similarities).

  20. Central command does not suppress baroreflex control of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity at the onset of spontaneous motor activity in the decerebrate cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukawa, Kanji; Ishii, Kei; Asahara, Ryota; Idesako, Mitsuhiro

    2016-10-01