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Sample records for suppress ovalbumin-sensitization airway

  1. A geranyl acetophenone targeting cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis prevents allergic airway inflammation in ovalbumin-sensitized mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, Norazren; Jambari, Nuzul Nurahya; Zareen, Seema; Akhtar, Mohamad Nadeem; Shaari, Khozirah; Zamri-Saad, Mohamad; Tham, Chau Ling; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan; Lajis, Nordin Hj; Israf, Daud Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is associated with increased pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. The current use of corticosteroids in the management of asthma has recently raised issues regarding safety and lack of responsiveness in 5–10% of asthmatic individuals. The aim of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of a non-steroidal small molecule that has cysteinyl leukotriene (cysLT) inhibitory activity, upon attenuation of allergic lung inflammation in an acute murine model. Mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and treated with several intraperitoneal doses (100, 20, 2 and 0.2 mg/kg) of 2,4,6,-trihydroxy-3-geranylacetophenone (tHGA). Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed, blood and lung samples were obtained and respiratory function was measured. OVA sensitization increased pulmonary inflammation and pulmonary allergic inflammation was significantly reduced at doses of 100, 20 and 2 mg/kg with no effect at the lowest dose of 0.2 mg/kg. The beneficial effects in the lung were associated with reduced eosinophilic infiltration and reduced secretion of Th2 cytokines and cysLTs. Peripheral blood reduction of total IgE was also a prominent feature. Treatment with tHGA significantly attenuated altered airway hyperresponsiveness as measured by the enhanced pause (Penh) response to incremental doses of methacholine. These data demonstrate that tHGA, a synthetic non-steroidal small molecule, can prevent acute allergic inflammation. This proof of concept opens further avenues of research and development of tHGA as an additional option to the current armamentarium of anti-asthma therapeutics. -- Highlights: ► Safer and effective anti-asthmatic drugs are in great demand. ► tHGA is a new 5-LO/cysLT inhibitor that inhibits allergic asthma in mice. ► tHGA is a natural compound that can be synthesized. ► Doses as low as 2 mg/kg alleviate lung pathology in experimental asthma. ► tHGA is a potential drug lead for the treatment of allergic asthma.

  2. Kaempferol Inhibits Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Mucus Hypersecretion in Airway Epithelial Cells And Ovalbumin-Sensitized Mice.

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    Park, Sin-Hye; Gong, Ju-Hyun; Choi, Yean-Jung; Kang, Min-Kyung; Kim, Yun-Ho; Kang, Young-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is an important pathological feature of chronic airway diseases, such as asthma and pulmonary diseases. MUC5AC is a major component of the mucus matrix forming family of mucins in the airways. The initiation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mediated stress responses contributes to the pathogenesis of airway diseases. The present study investigated that ER stress was responsible for airway mucus production and this effect was blocked by the flavonoid kaempferol. Oral administration of ≥10 mg/kg kaempferol suppressed mucus secretion and goblet cell hyperplasia observed in the bronchial airway and lung of BALB/c mice sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA). TGF-β and tunicamycin promoted MUC5AC induction after 72 h in human bronchial airway epithelial BEAS-2B cells, which was dampened by 20 μM kaempferol. Kaempferol inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress of airway epithelial cells through disturbing the activation of the ER transmembrane sensor ATF6 and IRE1α. Additionally, this compound demoted the induction of ER chaperones such as GRP78 and HSP70 and the splicing of XBP-1 mRNA by tunicamycin. The in vivo study further revealed that kaempferol attenuated the induction of XBP-1 and IRE1α in epithelial tissues of OVA-challenged mice. TGF-β and tunicamycin induced TRAF2 with JNK activation and such induction was deterred by kaempferol. The inhibition of JNK activation encumbered the XBP-1 mRNA splicing and MUC5AC induction by tunicamycin and TGF-β. These results demonstrate that kaempferol alleviated asthmatic mucus hypersecretion through blocking bronchial epithelial ER stress via the inhibition of IRE1α-TRAF2-JNK activation. Therefore, kaempferol may be a potential therapeutic agent targeting mucus hypersecretion-associated pulmonary diseases.

  3. Inhibition of airway epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis by kaempferol in endotoxin-induced epithelial cells and ovalbumin-sensitized mice.

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    Gong, Ju-Hyun; Cho, In-Hee; Shin, Daekeun; Han, Seon-Young; Park, Sin-Hye; Kang, Young-Hee

    2014-03-01

    Chronic airway remodeling is characterized by structural changes within the airway wall, including smooth muscle hypertrophy, submucosal fibrosis and epithelial shedding. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a fundamental mechanism of organ fibrosis, which can be induced by TGF-β. In the in vitro study, we investigated whether 1-20 μM kaempferol inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bronchial EMT in BEAS-2B cells. The in vivo study explored demoting effects of 10-20 mg/kg kaempferol on airway fibrosis in BALB/c mice sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA). LPS induced airway epithelial TGF-β1 signaling that promoted EMT with concurrent loss of E-cadherin and induction of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Nontoxic kaempferol significantly inhibited TGF-β-induced EMT process through reversing E-cadherin expression and retarding the induction of N-cadherin and α-SMA. Consistently, OVA inhalation resulted in a striking loss of epithelial morphology by displaying myofibroblast appearance, which led to bronchial fibrosis with submucosal accumulation of collagen fibers. Oral administration of kaempferol suppressed collagen deposition, epithelial excrescency and goblet hyperplasia observed in the lung of OVA-challenged mice. The specific inhibition of TGF-β entailed epithelial protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) as with 20 μM kaempferol. The epithelial PAR-1 inhibition by SCH-79797 restored E-cadherin induction and deterred α-SMA induction, indicating that epithelial PAR-1 localization was responsible for resulting in airway EMT. These results demonstrate that dietary kaempferol alleviated fibrotic airway remodeling via bronchial EMT by modulating PAR1 activation. Therefore, kaempferol may be a potential therapeutic agent targeting asthmatic airway constriction.

  4. Comparison of airway response in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized mice during short-term inhalation exposure to chlorine.

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    Johansson, Mia; Gustafsson, Åsa; Johanson, Gunnar; Öberg, Mattias

    2017-02-01

    It has been suggested that asthmatics are more susceptible than healthy individuals to airborne irritating chemicals in general. However, there is limited human data available to support this hypothesis due to ethical and practical difficulties. We explored a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway inflammation to study susceptibility during acute exposure to chemicals with chlorine as a model substance. Naïve and OVA sensitized female BALB/c mice were exposed to chlorine at four different concentrations (0, 5, 30 and 80 ppm) for 15 minutes with online recording of the respiratory function by plethysmography. The specific effects on respiratory mechanics, inflammatory cells and inflammatory mediators (cytokines and chemokines) of the airways were measured 24 hours after the chlorine exposure as well as histopathological examination of the lungs. Similar concentration-dependent reductions in respiratory frequency were seen in the two groups, with a 50% reduction (RD 50 ) slightly above 5 ppm. Decreased body weight 24 hours after exposure to 80 ppm was also observed in both groups. Naïve, but not OVA-sensitized, mice showed increased bronchial reactivity and higher number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at 80 ppm. The results do not support an increased susceptibility to chlorine among OVA-sensitized mice. This animal model, which represents a phenotype of eosinophilic airway inflammation, seems unsuitable to study susceptibility to inhalation of irritants in relation to asthma.

  5. Des-Arg9-bradykinin increases intracellular Ca2+ in bronchoalveolar eosinophils from ovalbumin-sensitized and -challenged mice.

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    Eric, Jadranka; Bkaily, Ghassan; Bkaily, Ghassan B; Volkov, Leonid; Gabra, Bichoy H; Sirois, Pierre

    2003-08-15

    The effects of the selective bradykinin B1 receptor agonist, des-Arg9-bradykinin and the bradykinin B2 receptor agonist, bradykinin were studied on the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in murine bronchoalveolar lavage cells from control and ovalbumin-sensitized mice using fura-2 microfluorimetry. The bronchoalveolar lavage cells of control mice, which were predominantly alveolar macrophages, showed an increase in [Ca2+]i in response to bradykinin (1 microM) but not to des-Arg9-bradykinin (1 microM), indicating the presence of functional bradykinin B2 receptors and the absence of B1 receptors. Such elevation in [Ca2+]i induced by bradykinin was totally inhibited by the selective bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist, D-Arg0-Hyp3-Thi5-D-Tic7-Oic8-bradykinin (HOE-140; 10 microM). In contrast, bronchoalveolar lavage cells from ovalbumin-sensitized and -challenged mice significantly responded to both bradykinin and des-Arg9-bradykinin, indicating the presence of both functional bradykinin B1 and B2 receptors. Eosinophils exhibited higher response to des-Arg9-bradykinin (1 microM; 485% increase in [Ca2+]i) compared to bradykinin (1 microM; 163% increase in [Ca2+]i). This des-Arg9-bradykinin-induced [Ca2+]i increase was markedly inhibited by the selective bradykinin B1 receptor antagonist, Ac-Lys-[D-betaNal7, Ile8]des-Arg9-bradykinin (R-715; 10 microM). Des-Arg9-bradykinin neither modified the basal [Ca2+]i in lymphocytes nor in mononuclear cells from ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged mice, while bradykinin produced a [Ca2+]i increase in both cell types. Our results further support the implication of the inducible bradykinin B1 receptors in airway inflammatory response in ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged mice.

  6. Olodaterol Attenuates Citric Acid-Induced Cough in Naïve and Ovalbumin-Sensitized and Challenged Guinea Pigs

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    Wex, Eva; Bouyssou, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Excessive coughing is a common feature of airway diseases. Different G-protein coupled receptors, including β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-AR), have been implicated in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cough reflex. However, the potential antitussive property of β2-AR agonists in patients with respiratory disease is a matter of ongoing debate. The aim of our study was to test the efficacy of the long-acting β2-AR agonist olodaterol with regard to its antitussive property in a pre-clinical model of citric acid-induced cough in guinea pigs and to compare the results to different clinically relevant β2-AR agonists. In our study β2-AR agonists were intratracheally administered, as dry powder, into the lungs of naïve or ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs 15 minutes prior to induction of cough by exposure to citric acid. Cough events were counted over 15 minutes during the citric acid exposure. Olodaterol dose-dependently inhibited the number of cough events in naïve and even more potently and with a greater maximal efficacy in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs (p citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. This is in agreement with pre-clinical and clinical studies showing antitussive efficacy of β2-AR agonists. Indacaterol increased the number of coughs in this model, which concurs with clinical data where a transient cough has been observed after indacaterol inhalation. While the antitussive properties of β2-AR agonists can be explained by their ability to lead to the cAMP-induced hyperpolarization of the neuron membrane thereby inhibiting sensory nerve activation and the cough reflex, the mechanism underlying the pro-tussive property of indacaterol is not known. PMID:25781609

  7. Suppression of Th17-polarized airway inflammation by rapamycin.

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    Joean, Oana; Hueber, Anja; Feller, Felix; Jirmo, Adan Chari; Lochner, Matthias; Dittrich, Anna-Maria; Albrecht, Melanie

    2017-11-10

    Because Th17-polarized airway inflammation correlates with poor control in bronchial asthma and is a feature of numerous other difficult-to-treat inflammatory lung diseases, new therapeutic approaches for this type of airway inflammation are necessary. We assessed different licensed anti-inflammatory agents with known or expected efficacy against Th17-polarization in mouse models of Th17-dependent airway inflammation. Upon intravenous transfer of in vitro derived Th17 cells and intranasal challenge with the corresponding antigen, we established acute and chronic murine models of Th17-polarised airway inflammation. Consecutively, we assessed the efficacy of methylprednisolone, roflumilast, azithromycin, AM80 and rapamycin against acute or chronic Th17-dependent airway inflammation. Quantifiers for Th17-associated inflammation comprised: bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) differential cell counts, allergen-specific cytokine and immunoglobulin secretion, as well as flow cytometric phenotyping of pulmonary inflammatory cells. Only rapamycin proved effective against acute Th17-dependent airway inflammation, accompanied by increased plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and reduced neutrophils as well as reduced CXCL-1 levels in BAL. Chronic Th17-dependent airway inflammation was unaltered by rapamycin treatment. None of the other agents showed efficacy in our models. Our results demonstrate that Th17-dependent airway inflammation is difficult to treat with known agents. However, we identify rapamycin as an agent with inhibitory potential against acute Th17-polarized airway inflammation.

  8. Localization of quantitative changes in pulmonary beta-receptors in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs

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    Gatto, C.; Green, T.P.; Johnson, M.G.; Marchessault, R.P.; Seybold, V.; Johnson, D.E.

    1987-07-01

    Impaired beta-receptor function has been postulated as one factor contributing to airway hyperreactivity in asthmatic patients. Although numerous indirect studies have cast doubt on this theory, none of these previous investigations has been able to directly measure changes in beta-receptor number on intrapulmonary structures capable of affecting the physiologic changes seen in this disease state. To help clarify the intrapulmonary location of such changes, a model of allergic bronchoconstriction was prepared by sensitizing guinea pigs to ovalbumin intraperitoneally (ip) 2 wk prior to testing (Group S). A second group of animals was sensitized to ovalbumin, then 2 wk later partially desensitized (Group D) during a 4- to 6-wk period by repeated exposure to increasing doses of nebulized ovalbumin with epinephrine rescue. Control animals received ip administered and nebulized normal saline alone. Pulmonary function assessed by plethysmography revealed an increase in airway resistance to 294 +/- 42% (SE) of control in Group S (p less than 0.005) and a decrease in dynamic compliance to 76 +/- 8% of control in Group D and 39 +/- 10% of control in Group S (p less than 0.002) after exposure to nebulized ovalbumin. Using L-(/sup 3/H) dihydroalprenolol ((/sup 3/H) DHA), beta-receptors were autoradiographically localized and quantitated in lung sections from all 3 groups. Significant decreases (p less than 0.02) in /sup 3/H-DHA binding were noted in alveolar and conducting airway epithelium, and bronchiolar and vascular smooth muscle in ovalbumin-exposed animals.

  9. Cough and expiration reflexes elicited by inhaled irritant gases are intensified in ovalbumin-sensitized mice.

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    Zhang, Cheng; Lin, Ruei-Lung; Hong, Jeff; Khosravi, Mehdi; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2017-05-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of active sensitization with ovalbumin (Ova) on cough responses to inhaled irritant gases in mice. Conscious mice moved freely in a recording chamber, while the pressure change in the chamber and audio and video signals of the mouse movements were recorded simultaneously to measure the frequencies of cough reflex (CR) and expiration reflex (ER). To further verify the accuracy of cough analysis, the intrapleural pressure was also recorded by a telemetry sensor surgically implanted in the intrapleural space in a subgroup of mice. During the irritant gas inhalation challenge, sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ; 200 and 400 ppm) or ammonia (NH 3 ; 0.1% and 0.2%) was drawn into the chamber at a constant flow rate for 8 min. Ova sensitization and sham sensitization with vehicle (Veh) were performed over a 25-day period in separate groups of mice. Our results showed that 1 ) both SO 2 and NH 3 inhalation challenges increased CR and ER frequencies in a concentration-dependent manner before Ova sensitization; 2 ) the baseline CR frequency was significantly elevated after Ova sensitization, accompanied by pronounced airway inflammation; and 3 ) Ova sensitization also markedly augmented the responses of CR and ER to both SO 2 and NH 3 inhalation challenges; in sharp contrast, the cough responses did not change after sham sensitization in the Veh group. In conclusion, Ova sensitization caused distinct and lingering increases in baseline cough frequency, and also intensified both CR and ER responses to inhaled irritant gases, which probably resulted from an allergic inflammation-induced hypersensitivity of airway sensory nerves. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Low-dose salbutamol suppresses airway responsiveness to histamine but not methacholine in subjects with asthma.

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    Matsumoto, Koichiro; Aizawa, Hisamichi; Fukuyama, Satoru; Yoshida, Makoto; Komori, Masashi; Takata, Syohei; Koto, Hiroshi; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2013-09-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness is a cardinal feature of asthma. Although the modulation of cholinergic neuroeffector transmission may play a role in airway responsiveness, in vivo evidence remains scarce. It is well known that histamine causes bronchoconstriction partly via vagal reflex, whereas methacholine does not. To investigate the significance of modulating neuroeffector transmission, we compared the effect of low-dose salbutamol-a β2-adrenoceptor agonist-on airway responsiveness to histamine with that to methacholine. We enrolled 12 subjects with stable asthma. After screening confirmed that inhalation of low-dose salbutamol (1μg) did not change their basic pulmonary function, subjects underwent measurement of airway responsiveness to inhaled histamine and methacholine with or without pretreatment with low-dose salbutamol, in a randomized, crossover fashion. Airway responsiveness was measured by an astograph by which respiratory conductance (Grs) was assessed by the forced oscillation method during continuous inhalation of histamine or methacholine in stepwise incremental concentrations. Airway responsiveness was calculated as the cumulative dose of bronchoconstrictors that induced a decrease of 35% in Grs. Inhalation of 1μg of salbutamol significantly attenuated airway responsiveness to histamine but not methacholine. This selective attenuation was observed irrespective of disease severity or phenotype, namely atopy or non-atopy. Low-dose salbutamol suppresses airway responsiveness to histamine but not methacholine in subjects with asthma. The present study may provide a novel insight into the bronchoprotective mechanism of β2-adorenoceptor agonist in clinical settings. © 2013 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of Valeriana officinalis L. hydro-alcoholic extract on depression like behavior in ovalbumin sensitized rats

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    Neamati, Ali; Chaman, Fariba; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neuroimmune factors have been considered as contributors to the pathogenesis of depression. Beside other therapeutic effects, Valeriana officinalis L., have been suggested to have anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, the effects of V. officinalis L. hydro alcoholic extract was investigated on depression like behavior in ovalbumin sensitized rats. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 Wistar rats were divided into five groups: Group 1 (control group) received saline instead of Valeriana officinalis L. extract. The animals in group 2 (sensitized) were treated by saline instead of the extract and were sensitized using the ovalbumin. Groups 3-5 (Sent - Ext 50), (Sent - Ext 100) and (Sent - Ext 200) were treated by 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg of V. officinalis L. hydro-alcoholic extract respectively, during the sensitization protocol. Forced swimming test was performed for all groups and immobility time was recorded. Finally, the animals were placed in the open-field apparatus and the crossing number on peripheral and central areas was observed. Results: The immobility time in the sensitized group was higher than that in the control group (P < 0.01). The animals in Sent-Ext 100 and Sent-Ext 200 groups had lower immobility times in comparison with sensitized group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). In the open field test, the crossed number in peripheral by the sensitized group was higher than that of the control one (P < 0.01) while, the animals of Sent-Ext 50, Sent-Ext 100 and Sent-Ext 200 groups had lower crossing number in peripheral compared with the sensitized group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01 respectively). Furthermore, in the sensitized group, the central crossing number was lower than that of the control group (P < 0.001). In the animals treated by 200 mg/kg of the extract, the central crossing number was higher than that of the sensitized group (P < 0. 05). Conclusions: The results of the present study showed that the hydro-alcoholic extract of V. officinalis

  12. The effects of Valeriana officinalis L. hydro-alcoholic extract on depression like behavior in ovalbumin sensitized rats

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    Ali Neamati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neuroimmune factors have been considered as contributors to the pathogenesis of depression. Beside other therapeutic effects, Valeriana officinalis L., have been suggested to have anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, the effects of V. officinalis L. hydro alcoholic extract was investigated on depression like behavior in ovalbumin sensitized rats. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 Wistar rats were divided into five groups: Group 1 (control group received saline instead of Valeriana officinalis L. extract. The animals in group 2 (sensitized were treated by saline instead of the extract and were sensitized using the ovalbumin. Groups 3-5 (Sent - Ext 50, (Sent - Ext 100 and (Sent - Ext 200 were treated by 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg of V. officinalis L. hydro-alcoholic extract respectively, during the sensitization protocol. Forced swimming test was performed for all groups and immobility time was recorded. Finally, the animals were placed in the open-field apparatus and the crossing number on peripheral and central areas was observed. Results: The immobility time in the sensitized group was higher than that in the control group (P < 0.01. The animals in Sent-Ext 100 and Sent-Ext 200 groups had lower immobility times in comparison with sensitized group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01. In the open field test, the crossed number in peripheral by the sensitized group was higher than that of the control one (P < 0.01 while, the animals of Sent-Ext 50, Sent-Ext 100 and Sent-Ext 200 groups had lower crossing number in peripheral compared with the sensitized group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01 respectively. Furthermore, in the sensitized group, the central crossing number was lower than that of the control group (P < 0.001. In the animals treated by 200 mg/kg of the extract, the central crossing number was higher than that of the sensitized group (P < 0. 05. Conclusions: The results of the present study showed that the hydro-alcoholic extract of V

  13. Suppression of adenosine-activated chloride transport by ethanol in airway epithelia.

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    Sammeta V Raju

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse is associated with increased lung infections. Molecular understanding of the underlying mechanisms is not complete. Airway epithelial ion transport regulates the homeostasis of airway surface liquid, essential for airway mucosal immunity and lung host defense. Here, air-liquid interface cultures of Calu-3 epithelial cells were basolaterally exposed to physiologically relevant concentrations of ethanol (0, 25, 50 and 100 mM for 24 hours and adenosine-stimulated ion transport was measured by Ussing chamber. The ethanol exposure reduced the epithelial short-circuit currents (I(SC in a dose-dependent manner. The ion currents activated by adenosine were chloride conductance mediated by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, a cAMP-activated chloride channel. Alloxazine, a specific inhibitor for A(2B adenosine receptor (A(2BAR, largely abolished the adenosine-stimulated chloride transport, suggesting that A(2BAR is a major receptor responsible for regulating the chloride transport of the cells. Ethanol significantly reduced intracellular cAMP production upon adenosine stimulation. Moreover, ethanol-suppression of the chloride secretion was able to be restored by cAMP analogs or by inhibitors to block cAMP degradation. These results imply that ethanol exposure dysregulates CFTR-mediated chloride transport in airways by suppression of adenosine-A(2BAR-cAMP signaling pathway, which might contribute to alcohol-associated lung infections.

  14. Components of Streptococcus pneumoniae suppress allergic airways disease and NKT cells by inducing regulatory T cells.

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    Thorburn, Alison N; Foster, Paul S; Gibson, Peter G; Hansbro, Philip M

    2012-05-01

    Asthma is an allergic airways disease (AAD) caused by dysregulated immune responses and characterized by eosinophilic inflammation, mucus hypersecretion, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). NKT cells have been shown to contribute to AHR in some mouse models. Conversely, regulatory T cells (Tregs) control aberrant immune responses and maintain homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that Streptococcus pneumoniae induces Tregs that have potential to be harnessed therapeutically for asthma. In this study, mouse models of AAD were used to identify the S. pneumoniae components that have suppressive properties, and the mechanisms underlying suppression were investigated. We tested the suppressive capacity of type-3-polysaccharide (T3P), isolated cell walls, pneumolysoid (Ply) and CpG. When coadministered, T3P + Ply suppressed the development of: eosinophilic inflammation, Th2 cytokine release, mucus hypersecretion, and AHR. Importantly, T3P + Ply also attenuated features of AAD when administered during established disease. We show that NKT cells contributed to the development of AAD and also were suppressed by T3P + Ply treatment. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of NKT cells induced AHR, which also could be reversed by T3P + Ply. T3P + Ply-induced Tregs were essential for the suppression of NKT cells and AAD, which was demonstrated by Treg depletion. Collectively, our results show that the S. pneumoniae components T3P + Ply suppress AAD through the induction of Tregs that blocked the activity of NKT cells. These data suggest that S. pneumoniae components may have potential as a therapeutic strategy for the suppression of allergic asthma through the induction of Tregs and suppression of NKT cells.

  15. Schistosoma mansoni-mediated suppression of allergic airway inflammation requires patency and Foxp3+ Treg cells.

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    Laura E Layland

    Full Text Available The continual rise of asthma in industrialised countries stands in strong contrast to the situation in developing lands. According to the modified Hygiene Hypothesis, helminths play a major role in suppressing bystander immune responses to allergens, and both epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that the tropical parasitic trematode Schistosoma mansoni elicits such effects. The focus of this study was to investigate which developmental stages of schistosome infection confer suppression of allergic airway inflammation (AAI using ovalbumin (OVA as a model allergen. Moreover, we assessed the functional role and localization of infection-induced CD4(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells (Treg in mediating such suppressive effects. Therefore, AAI was elicited using OVA/adjuvant sensitizations with subsequent OVA aerosolic challenge and was induced during various stages of infection, as well as after successful anti-helminthic treatment with praziquantel. The role of Treg was determined by specifically depleting Treg in a genetically modified mouse model (DEREG during schistosome infection. Alterations in AAI were determined by cell infiltration levels into the bronchial system, OVA-specific IgE and Th2 type responses, airway hyper-sensitivity and lung pathology. Our results demonstrate that schistosome infection leads to a suppression of OVA-induced AAI when mice are challenged during the patent phase of infection: production of eggs by fecund female worms. Moreover, this ameliorating effect does not persist after anti-helminthic treatment, and depletion of Treg reverts suppression, resulting in aggravated AAI responses. This is most likely due to a delayed reconstitution of Treg in infected-depleted animals which have strong ongoing immune responses. In summary, we conclude that schistosome-mediated suppression of AAI requires the presence of viable eggs and infection-driven Treg cells. These data provide evidence that helminth derived products

  16. Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases-1 and -2 in Interleukin-13–Suppressed Elastin in Airway Fibroblasts in Asthma

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    Slade, David; Church, Tony D.; Francisco, Dave; Heck, Karissa; Sigmon, R. Wesley; Ghio, Michael; Murillo, Anays; Firszt, Rafael; Lugogo, Njira L.; Que, Loretta; Sunday, Mary E.; Kraft, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Elastin synthesis and degradation in the airway and lung parenchyma contribute to airway mechanics, including airway patency and elastic recoil. IL-13 mediates many features of asthma pathobiology, including airway remodeling, but the effects of IL-13 on elastin architecture in the airway wall are not known. We hypothesized that IL-13 modulates elastin expression in airway fibroblasts from subjects with allergic asthma. Twenty-five subjects with mild asthma (FEV1, 89 ± 3% predicted) and 30 normal control subjects (FEV1, 102 ± 2% predicted) underwent bronchoscopy with endobronchial biopsy. Elastic fibers were visualized in airway biopsy specimens using Weigert’s resorcin-fuchsin elastic stain. Airway fibroblasts were exposed to IL-13; a pan-matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor (GM6001); specific inhibitors to MMP-1, -2, -3, and -8; and combinations of IL-13 with MMP inhibitors in separate conditions in serum-free media for 48 hours. Elastin (ELN) expression as well as MMP secretion and activity were quantified. Results of this study show that elastic fiber staining of airway biopsy tissue was significantly associated with methacholine PC20 (i.e., the provocative concentration of methacholine resulting in a 20% fall in FEV1 levels) in patients with asthma. IL-13 significantly suppressed ELN expression in asthmatic airway fibroblasts as compared with normal control fibroblasts. The effect of IL-13 on ELN expression was significantly correlated with postbronchodilator FEV1/FVC in patients with asthma. MMP inhibition significantly stimulated ELN expression in patients with asthma as compared with normal control subjects. Specific inhibition of MMP-1 and MMP-2, but not MMP-3 or MMP-8, reversed the IL-13–induced suppression of ELN expression. In asthma, MMP-1 and MMP-2 mediate IL-13–induced suppression of ELN expression in airway fibroblasts. PMID:26074138

  17. Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases-1 and -2 in Interleukin-13-Suppressed Elastin in Airway Fibroblasts in Asthma.

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    Ingram, Jennifer L; Slade, David; Church, Tony D; Francisco, Dave; Heck, Karissa; Sigmon, R Wesley; Ghio, Michael; Murillo, Anays; Firszt, Rafael; Lugogo, Njira L; Que, Loretta; Sunday, Mary E; Kraft, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Elastin synthesis and degradation in the airway and lung parenchyma contribute to airway mechanics, including airway patency and elastic recoil. IL-13 mediates many features of asthma pathobiology, including airway remodeling, but the effects of IL-13 on elastin architecture in the airway wall are not known. We hypothesized that IL-13 modulates elastin expression in airway fibroblasts from subjects with allergic asthma. Twenty-five subjects with mild asthma (FEV1, 89 ± 3% predicted) and 30 normal control subjects (FEV1, 102 ± 2% predicted) underwent bronchoscopy with endobronchial biopsy. Elastic fibers were visualized in airway biopsy specimens using Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin elastic stain. Airway fibroblasts were exposed to IL-13; a pan-matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor (GM6001); specific inhibitors to MMP-1, -2, -3, and -8; and combinations of IL-13 with MMP inhibitors in separate conditions in serum-free media for 48 hours. Elastin (ELN) expression as well as MMP secretion and activity were quantified. Results of this study show that elastic fiber staining of airway biopsy tissue was significantly associated with methacholine PC20 (i.e., the provocative concentration of methacholine resulting in a 20% fall in FEV1 levels) in patients with asthma. IL-13 significantly suppressed ELN expression in asthmatic airway fibroblasts as compared with normal control fibroblasts. The effect of IL-13 on ELN expression was significantly correlated with postbronchodilator FEV1/FVC in patients with asthma. MMP inhibition significantly stimulated ELN expression in patients with asthma as compared with normal control subjects. Specific inhibition of MMP-1 and MMP-2, but not MMP-3 or MMP-8, reversed the IL-13-induced suppression of ELN expression. In asthma, MMP-1 and MMP-2 mediate IL-13-induced suppression of ELN expression in airway fibroblasts.

  18. Airway epithelium mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of exercise on asthma.

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    Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Toledo, Alessandra Choqueta de; Ferreira, Sérgio César; Santos, Angela Batista Gomes dos; Medeiros, Maria Cristina Rodrigues; Hage, Márcia; Mauad, Thaís; Martins, Milton de Arruda; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Carvalho, Celso Ricardo Fernandes de

    2011-03-15

    Airway epithelium plays an important role in the asthma physiopathology. Aerobic exercise decreases Th2 response in murine models of allergic asthma, but its effects on the structure and activation of airway epithelium in asthma are unknown. BALB/c mice were divided into control, aerobic exercise, ovalbumin-sensitized and ovalbumin-sensitized plus aerobic exercise groups. Ovalbumin sensitization occurred on days 0, 14, 28, 42, and aerosol challenge from day 21 to day 50. Aerobic exercise started on day 22 and ended on day 50. Total cells and eosinophils were reduced in ovalbumin-sensitized group submitted to aerobic exercise. Aerobic exercise also reduced the oxidative and nitrosative stress and the epithelial expression of Th2 cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, growth factors and NF-kB and P2X7 receptor. Additionally, aerobic exercise increased the epithelial expression of IL-10 in non-sensitized and sensitized animals. These findings contribute to the understanding of the beneficial effects of aerobic exercise for chronic allergic airway inflammation, suggesting an immune-regulatory role of exercise on airway epithelium. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Raf-1 inhibitor GW5074 and dexamethasone suppress sidestream smoke-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Ying; Cao, Yong-Xiao; Xu, Cang-Bao; Zhang, Yaping

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Sidestream smoke is closely associated with airway inflammation and hyperreactivity. The present study was designed to investigate if the Raf-1 inhibitor GW5074 and the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone suppress airway hyperreactivity in a mouse model of sidestream smoke exposure. Methods Mice were repeatedly exposed to smoke from four cigarettes each day for four weeks. After the first week of the smoke exposure, the mice received either dexamethasone intraperitoneally...

  20. Effect of VCO to leucocyte differential count, glucose levels and blood creatinine of hyperglycemic and ovalbumin sensitized Mus musculus Balb/c

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    RUBEN DHARMAWAN

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Handajani NS, Dharmawan R. 2009. Effect of VCO to leucocyte differential count, glucose levels and blood creatinine of hyperglycemic and ovalbumin sensitized Mus musculus Balb/c. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 1-8. Chemical medicines and insulin can decrease glucose blood level on hyperglycemic patients with macro vascular side effect. Diabetes and allergy incidences are influenced by quality and quantity of leucocytes. Lauric acid within VCO reports decreased glucose blood level of diabetes and some allergy incidents. The purpose of the study is to know the effect of VCO on glucose blood level, differential leucocytes count and creatinine blood level on hyperglycemic and normoglicemic ovalbumin sensitized mice. Forty five (45 male (mice of Mus musculus Balb/c with average weight of 35 g are divided into 9 groups with 5 repetitions, those are 4 non alloxan groups and 5 alloxan induced hyperglycemic groups. On 22nd day to 36th day they are sensitize to ovalbumin as allergen. Blood sample was obtained by orbital vena using heparin as anti coagulant in order measuring glucose blood level by GOD method to 6 times, on 1st, 4th, 18th, 22nd, 32nd and 37th days, then are tested by ANOVA followed by DMRT 0.05. On 37th day, differential leucocytes are determined, blood level are counted, and then compared to normal value. The result of this study were that within differential leucocytes count of hyperglycemic mice, neutrophile percentage were much lower than the normal value (3.22%, and lymphocyte percentage were much higher than the normal value (94.54%. Consumed 0.003 mL/35 g VCO more 18 days decreased glucose blood level on hyperglycemic mice, decreased basophile percentage of ovalbumin sensitized mice, normalized neutrophile percentage no increased creatinine blood level.

  1. Suppression of IL-8 production from airway cells by tiotropium bromide in vitro

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    Suzaki I

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Isao Suzaki1, Kazuhito Asano2, Yusuke Shikama3, Taisuke Hamasaki1, Ayako Kanei1, Harumi Suzaki11Department of Otorhinolaryngology, School of Medicine, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan; 2Division of Physiology, School of Nursing and Rehabilitation Sciences, Showa University, Yokohama, Japan; 3Department of Respiratory Diseases, Showa University Northern Yokohama Hospital, Yokohama, JapanBackground: COPD is characterized by persistent and progressive airway inflammation. Although neutrophilic airway inflammation is generally accepted to be a major factor in the pathogenesis of COPD, the influence of the agents used for the treatment of COPD on neutrophil functions such as chemotaxis is not fully understood.Purpose: The present study aimed to examine the influence of tiotropium bromide on the production of interleukin (IL-8 from human airway epithelial cells and lung fibroblasts (LFs after lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation in vitro.Methods: BEAS-2B cells, human bronchial epithelial cell line, and LFs, at a concentration of 5 × 105 cells/mL, were stimulated with LPS in the presence of various concentrations of tiotropium bromide. IL-8 in culture supernatants was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. IL-8 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA expression was examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The influence of tiotropium bromide on LPS-induced signaling pathways was also analyzed by examining nuclear factor-kappa (NF-κB activation and signaling protein phosphorylation by ELISA.Results: Tiotropium bromide at >15 pg/mL inhibited IL-8 production from both BEAS-2B cells and LFs after LPS stimulation. Tiotropium bromide also suppressed IL-8 mRNA expression through the inhibition of NF-κB activation and signaling protein, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, phosphorylation.Conclusion: The present results strongly suggest that tiotropium bromide exerts the inhibitory effect on neutrophilic

  2. Matrine suppresses airway inflammation by downregulating SOCS3 expression via inhibition of NF-κB signaling in airway epithelial cells and asthmatic mice

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    Sun, Daqing [Department of Respiration, Xi’an Children’s Hospital, Xi’an 710003 (China); Wang, Jing [Department of Neonatology, Xi’an Children’s Hospital, Xi’an 710003 (China); Yang, Niandi [Outpatient Department, School of Aerospace Engineering, Air Force Engineering University, Xi’an 710038 (China); Ma, Haixin, E-mail: drhaixinma@163.com [Department of Quality Control, Xi’an Children’s Hospital, Xi’an 710003 (China)

    2016-08-12

    Matrine has been demonstrated to attenuate allergic airway inflammation. Elevated suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) was correlated with the severity of asthma. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of matrine on SOCS3 expression in airway inflammation. In this study, we found that matrine significantly inhibited OVA-induced AHR, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell differentiation, and mucous production in a dose-dependent manner in mice. Matrine also abrogated the level of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, but enhanced interferon (IFN)-γ expression, both in BALF and in lung homogenates. Furthermore, matrine impeded TNF-α-induced the expression of IL-6 and adhesion molecules in airway epithelial cells (BEAS-2B and MLE-12). Additionally, we found that matrine inhibited SOCS3 expression, both in asthmatic mice and TNF-α-stimulated epithelial cells via suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway by using pcDNA3.1-SOCS3 plasmid, SOCS3 siRNA, or nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) inhibitor PDTC. Conclusions: Matrine suppresses airway inflammation by downregulating SOCS3 expression via inhibition of NF-κB signaling in airway epithelial cells and asthmatic mice. - Highlights: • Matrine attenuates asthmatic symptoms and regulates Th1/Th2 balance in vivo. • Matrine suppresses inflammation responses in vitro. • Matrine decreases SOCS3 expression both in vivo and in vitro. • Matrine inhibits SOCS3 expression by suppressing NF-κB signaling.

  3. Toxoplasma gondii infection induces suppression in a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation.

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    Ignacio M Fenoy

    Full Text Available Allergic asthma is an inflammatory disorder characterized by infiltration of the airway wall with inflammatory cells driven mostly by activation of Th2-lymphocytes, eosinophils and mast cells. There is a link between increased allergy and a reduction of some infections in Western countries. Epidemiological data also show that respiratory allergy is less frequent in people exposed to orofecal and foodborne microbes such as Toxoplasma gondii. We previously showed that both acute and chronic parasite T. gondii infection substantially blocked development of airway inflammation in adult BALB/c mice. Based on the high levels of IFN-γ along with the reduction of Th2 phenotype, we hypothesized that the protective effect might be related to the strong Th1 immune response elicited against the parasite. However, other mechanisms could also be implicated. The possibility that regulatory T cells inhibit allergic diseases has received growing support from both animal and human studies. Here we investigated the cellular mechanisms involved in T. gondii induced protection against allergy. Our results show for the first time that thoracic lymph node cells from mice sensitized during chronic T. gondii infection have suppressor activity. Suppression was detected both in vitro, on allergen specific T cell proliferation and in vivo, on allergic lung inflammation after adoptive transference from infected/sensitized mice to previously sensitized animals. This ability was found to be contact-independent and correlated with high levels of TGF-β and CD4(+FoxP3(+ cells.

  4. Tomatidine Attenuates Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Inflammation by Suppressing Th2 Cytokines in a Mouse Model of Asthma

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    Chieh-Ying Kuo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tomatidine is isolated from the fruits of tomato plants and found to have anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages. In the present study, we investigated whether tomatidine suppresses airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR and eosinophil infiltration in asthmatic mice. BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin and treated with tomatidine by intraperitoneal injection. Airway resistance was measured by intubation analysis as an indication of airway responsiveness, and histological studies were performed to evaluate eosinophil infiltration in lung tissue. Tomatidine reduced AHR and decreased eosinophil infiltration in the lungs of asthmatic mice. Tomatidine suppressed Th2 cytokine production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Tomatidine also blocked the expression of inflammatory and Th2 cytokine genes in lung tissue. In vitro, tomatidine inhibited proinflammatory cytokines and CCL11 production in inflammatory BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells. These results indicate that tomatidine contributes to the amelioration of AHR and eosinophil infiltration by blocking the inflammatory response and Th2 cell activity in asthmatic mice.

  5. T cells suppress memory-dependent rapid mucous cell metaplasia in mouse airways

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    Hitendra S. Chand

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway epithelial cells (AECs are crucial for mucosal and adaptive immunity but whether these cells respond in a memory-dependent manner is poorly studied. Previously, we have reported that LPS intratracheal instillation in rodents causes extensive neutrophilic inflammation and airway epithelial cell hyperplasia accompanied by mucous cell metaplasia (MCM. And the resolution process required a period of 40 d for the inflammation to subside and the lung epithelia to resemble the non-exposed condition. Therefore, the present study investigated the memory-dependent response of airway epithelial cells to a secondary LPS challenge after the initial inflammation was resolved. Methods Airway epithelial and mucous cells were assessed in response to a secondary LPS challenge in F344/N rats, and in C57BL/6 wild-type (Foxn1WT and T cell-deficient athymic (Foxn1nu mice that were instilled with LPS or saline 40 d earlier. Epithelial expression of TLR4, EGFR, and phosphorylated-ERK1/2 (pERK were also analyzed. Results LPS-pretreated F344/N rats responded with elevated numbers of AECs after saline challenge and with 3-4-fold increased MCM following the LPS challenge in LPS- compared with saline-pretreated rats. LPS-pretreated rats showed 5-fold higher number of AECs expressing TLR4 apically than saline-pretreated rats. Also, the expression of EGFR was increased in LPS-pretreated rats along with the number of AECs with active or nuclear pERK, and the levels were further increased upon LPS challenge. LPS-pretreated Foxn1nu compared with Foxn1WT mice showed increased MCM and elevated levels of TLR4, EGFR, and nuclear pERK at 40 d after LPS instillation. LPS challenge further augmented MCM rapidly in Foxn1nu compared with Foxn1WT mice. Conclusion Together, these data suggest that AECs preserve an ‘innate memory’ that drives a rapid mucous phenotype via spatiotemporal regulation of TLR4 and EGFR. Further, T cells may suppress the sustained

  6. Effect of combined nitrogen dioxide and carbon nanoparticle exposure on lung function during ovalbumin sensitization in Brown Norway rat.

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    Skander Layachi

    Full Text Available The interaction of particulate and gaseous pollutants in their effects on the severity of allergic inflammation and airway responsiveness are not well understood. We assessed the effect of exposure to NO(2 in the presence or absence of repetitive treatment with carbon nanoparticle (CNP during allergen sensitization and challenges in Brown-Norway (BN rat, in order to assess their interactions on lung function and airway responses (AR to allergen and methacholine (MCH, end-expiratory lung volume (EELV, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF cellular content, serum and BALF cytokine levels and histological changes. Animals were divided into the following groups (n = 6: Control; CNP (Degussa-FW2: 13 nm, 0.5 mg/kg instilled intratracheally ×3 at 7-day intervals; OVA: ovalbumin-sensitised; OVA+CNP: both sensitized and exposed to CNP. Rats were divided into equal groups exposed either to air or to NO(2, 10 ppm, 6 h/d, 5d/wk for 4 weeks. Exposure to NO(2, significantly enhanced lung inflammation and airway reactivity, with a significantly larger effect in animals sensitized to allergen, which was related to a higher expression of TH1 and TH2-type cytokines. Conversely, exposure to NO(2 in animals undergoing repeated tracheal instillation of CNP alone, increased BALF neutrophilia and enhanced the expression of TH1 cytokines: TNF-α and IFN-γ, but did not show an additive effect on airway reactivity in comparison to NO(2 alone. The exposure to NO(2 combined with CNP treatment and allergen sensitization however, unexpectedly resulted in a significant decrease in both airway reactivity to allergen and to methacholine, and a reduction in TH2-type cytokines compared to allergen sensitization alone. EELV was significantly reduced with sensitization, CNP treatment or both. These data suggest an immunomodulatory effect of repeated tracheal instillation of CNP on the proinflammatory effects of NO(2 exposure in sensitized BN rat. Furthermore, our findings suggest

  7. Late airway obstruction and neutrophil infiltration in sensitized mice after antigen provocation were suppressed by selective and non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors

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    Osamu Kaminuma

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of antigen-induced late airway obstruction associated with neutrophilic inflammation by selective and non-selective phosphodiesterase (PDE inhibitors was investigated in mice. Respiratory resistance (Rrs increased in sensitized BDF1 mice 4-6 h after antigen provocation, whereas no obvious immediate reaction was observed. This reaction was associated with marked airway neutrophilia without significant infiltration of eosinophils. A selective PDE IV inhibitor, T-440 (10-30 mg/kg, and a non-selective PDE inhibitor, theophylline (10 mg/kg, significantly inhibited airway obstruction and neutrophilia when administered orally. An anti-allergic drug, ketotifen (1 mg/kg, caused slight inhibition of airway obstruction, whereas it did not affect airway neutrophilia. These results suggest that neutrophilic inflammation plays a role in the airway obstructive reaction and that PDE has a regulatory role in obstructive airway disease associated with airway inflammation.

  8. Triptolide inhibits TGF-β1-induced cell proliferation in rat airway smooth muscle cells by suppressing Smad signaling

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    Chen, Ming; Lv, Zhiqiang; Huang, Linjie [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Institute for Respiratory disease of Sun Yat-sen University, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province 510120 (China); Zhang, Wei [Department of Geratology, the Second People' s Hospital of Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518000 (China); Lin, Xiaoling; Shi, Jianting; Zhang, Wei; Liang, Ruiyun [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Institute for Respiratory disease of Sun Yat-sen University, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province 510120 (China); Jiang, Shanping, E-mail: shanpingjiang@126.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Institute for Respiratory disease of Sun Yat-sen University, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province 510120 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Background: We have reported that triptolide can inhibit airway remodeling in a murine model of asthma via TGF-β1/Smad signaling. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of triptolide on airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) proliferation and the possible mechanism. Methods: Rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized, then pretreated with different concentration of triptolide before stimulated by TGF-β1. Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay. Flow cytometry was used to study the influence of triptolide on cell cycle and apoptosis. Signal proteins (Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7) were detected by western blotting analysis. Results: Triptolide significantly inhibited TGF-β1-induced ASMC proliferation (P<0.05). The cell cycle was blocked at G1/S-interphase by triptolide dose dependently. No pro-apoptotic effects were detected under the concentration of triptolide we used. Western blotting analysis showed TGF-β1 induced Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation was inhibited by triptolide pretreatment, and the level of Smad7 was increased by triptolide pretreatment. Conclusions: Triptolide may function as an inhibitor of asthma airway remodeling by suppressing ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway. - Highlights: • In this study, rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized. • Triptolide inhibited TGF-β1-induced airway smooth muscle cells proliferation. • Triptolide inhibited ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway.

  9. Intratracheal Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulates Tachykinin System, Suppresses Airway Remodeling and Reduces Airway Hyperresponsiveness in an Animal Model.

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    Konrad Urbanek

    Full Text Available The need for new options for chronic lung diseases promotes the research on stem cells for lung repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can modulate lung inflammation, but the data on cellular processes involved in early airway remodeling and the potential involvement of neuropeptides are scarce.To elucidate the mechanisms by which local administration of MSCs interferes with pathophysiological features of airway hyperresponsiveness in an animal model.GFP-tagged mouse MSCs were intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin mouse model with subsequent functional tests, the analysis of cytokine levels, neuropeptide expression and histological evaluation of MSCs fate and airway pathology. Additionally, MSCs were exposed to pro-inflammatory factors in vitro.Functional improvement was observed after MSC administration. Although MSCs did not adopt lung cell phenotypes, cell therapy positively affected airway remodeling reducing the hyperplastic phase of the gain in bronchial smooth muscle mass, decreasing the proliferation of epithelium in which mucus metaplasia was also lowered. Decrease of interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and increase of interleukin-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage was also observed. Exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines, MSCs upregulated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Moreover, asthma-related in vivo upregulation of pro-inflammatory neurokinin 1 and neurokinin 2 receptors was counteracted by MSCs that also determined a partial restoration of VIP, a neuropeptide with anti-inflammatory properties.Intratracheally administered MSCs positively modulate airway remodeling, reduce inflammation and improve function, demonstrating their ability to promote tissue homeostasis in the course of experimental allergic asthma. Because of a limited tissue retention, the functional impact of MSCs may be attributed to their immunomodulatory response combined with the interference of neuropeptide system activation and tissue

  10. The Effect of Acid Suppression on Upper Airway Anatomy and Obstruction in Patients with Sleep Apnea and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, William C.; Robert, Jennifer J.T.; Houck, John R.; Giddens, Cheryl L.; Tawk, Maroun M.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: This study was designed to assess the effect of acid suppression on upper airway structure and function in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Methods: This is a single-site within-subjects design. Twenty five patients with documented mild OSAS and objectively documented GERD via 24-hour pH measurement were included in the study. Patients were studied before and after 8 weeks of treatment with rabeprazole, 20 mg, twice a day. Subjects underwent laryngoscopy, polysomnography, and 24-hour pH monitoring. Subjective assessments of sleep obtained included the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Results: Posterior commissure edema was significantly reduced (p Giddens CL; Tawk MM. The effect of acid suppression on upper airway anatomy and obstruction in patients with sleep apnea and gastroesophageal reflux disease. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(4):330-334. PMID:19968010

  11. Suppression of Eosinophil Integrins Prevents Remodeling of Airway Smooth Muscle in Asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Januskevicius, Andrius; Gosens, Reinoud; Sakalauskas, Raimundas; Vaitkiene, Simona; Janulaityte, Ieva; Halayko, Andrew J; Hoppenot, Deimante; Malakauskas, Kestutis

    2017-01-01

    Background: Airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling is an important component of the structural changes to airways seen in asthma. Eosinophils are the prominent inflammatory cells in asthma, and there is some evidence that they contribute to ASM remodeling via released mediators and direct contact

  12. Hesperetin, a Selective Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitor, Effectively Suppresses Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness without Influencing Xylazine/Ketamine-Induced Anesthesia

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    Chung-Hung Shih

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hesperetin, a selective phosphodiesterase (PDE4 inhibitor, is present in the traditional Chinese medicine, “Chen Pi.” Therefore, we were interested in investigating its effects on ovalbumin- (OVA- induced airway hyperresponsiveness, and clarifying its rationale for ameliorating asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Hesperetin was revealed to have a therapeutic (PDE4H/PDE4L ratio of >11. Hesperetin (10 ~ 30 μmol/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p. dose-dependently and significantly attenuated the airway hyperresponsiveness induced by methacholine. It also significantly suppressed the increases in total inflammatory cells, macrophages, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils, and levels of cytokines, including interleukin (IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF. It dose-dependently and significantly suppressed total and OVA-specific immunoglobulin E levels in the BALF and serum. However, hesperetin did not influence xylazine/ketamine-induced anesthesia, suggesting that hesperetin has few or no emetic effects. In conclusion, the rationales for ameliorating allergic asthma and COPD by hesperetin are anti-inflammation, immunoregulation, and bronchodilation.

  13. Bromodomain and Extra Terminal (BET Inhibitor Suppresses Macrophage-Driven Steroid-Resistant Exacerbations of Airway Hyper-Responsiveness and Inflammation.

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    Thi Hiep Nguyen

    Full Text Available Exacerbations of asthma are linked to significant decline in lung function and are often poorly controlled by corticosteroid treatment. Clinical investigations indicate that viral and bacterial infections play crucial roles in the onset of steroid-resistant inflammation and airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR that are hallmark features of exacerbations. We have previously shown that interferon γ (IFNγ and lipopolysaccharide (LPS cooperatively activate pulmonary macrophages and induce steroid-resistant airway inflammation and AHR in mouse models. Furthermore, we have established a mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV-induced exacerbation of asthma, which exhibits macrophage-dependent, steroid-resistant lung disease. Emerging evidence has demonstrated a key role for bromo- and extra-terminal (BET proteins in the regulation of inflammatory gene expression in macrophages. We hypothesised that BET proteins may be involved in the regulation of AHR and airway inflammation in our steroid-resistant exacerbation models.We investigated the effects of a BET inhibitor (I-BET-762 on the development of steroid-resistant AHR and airway inflammation in two mouse models. I-BET-762 administration decreased macrophage and neutrophil infiltration into the airways, and suppressed key inflammatory cytokines in both models. I-BET treatment also suppressed key inflammatory cytokines linked to the development of steroid-resistant inflammation such as monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1, keratinocyte-derived protein chemokine (KC, IFNγ, and interleukin 27 (IL-27. Attenuation of inflammation was associated with suppression of AHR.Our results suggest that BET proteins play an important role in the regulation of steroid-resistant exacerbations of airway inflammation and AHR. BET proteins may be potential targets for the development of future therapies to treat steroid-resistant inflammatory components of asthma.

  14. Acrolein inhalation suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cytokine production but does not affect acute airways neutrophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, David Itiro; Poynter, Matthew E; Othman, Ziryan; Hemenway, David; van der Vliet, Albert

    2008-07-01

    Acrolein is a reactive unsaturated aldehyde that is produced during endogenous oxidative processes and is a major bioactive component of environmental pollutants such as cigarette smoke. Because in vitro studies demonstrate that acrolein can inhibit neutrophil apoptosis, we evaluated the effects of in vivo acrolein exposure on acute lung inflammation induced by LPS. Male C57BL/6J mice received 300 microg/kg intratracheal LPS and were exposed to acrolein (5 parts per million, 6 h/day), either before or after LPS challenge. Exposure to acrolein either before or after LPS challenge did not significantly affect the overall extent of LPS-induced lung inflammation, or the duration of the inflammatory response, as observed from recovered lung lavage leukocytes and histology. However, exposure to acrolein after LPS instillation markedly diminished the LPS-induced production of several inflammatory cytokines, specifically TNF-alpha, IL-12, and the Th1 cytokine IFN-gamma, which was associated with reduction in NF-kappaB activation. Our data demonstrate that acrolein exposure suppresses LPS-induced Th1 cytokine responses without affecting acute neutrophilia. Disruption of cytokine signaling by acrolein may represent a mechanism by which smoking contributes to chronic disease in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma.

  15. The effects of cannabidiol on the antigen-induced contraction of airways smooth muscle in the guinea-pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudášová, A; Keir, S D; Parsons, M E; Molleman, A; Page, C P

    2013-06-01

    (-)-Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol has been demonstrated to have beneficial effects in the airways, but its psychoactive effects preclude its therapeutic use for the treatment of airways diseases. In the present study we have investigated the effects of (-)-cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive component of cannabis for its actions on bronchial smooth muscle in vitro and in vivo. Guinea-pig bronchial smooth muscle contractions induced by exogenously applied spasmogens were measured isometrically. In addition, contractile responses of bronchial smooth muscle from ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs were investigated in the absence or presence of (-)-cannabidiol. Furthermore, the effect of (-)-cannabidiol against ovalbumin-induced airway obstruction was investigated in vivo in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs. (-)-Cannabidiol did not influence the bronchial smooth muscle contraction induced by carbachol, histamine or neurokinin A. In contrast, (-)-cannabidiol inhibited anandamide- and virodhamine-induced responses of isolated bronchi. A fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride reversed the inhibitory effect of (-)-cannabidiol on anandamide-induced contractions. In addition, (-)-cannabidiol inhibited the contractile response of bronchi obtained from allergic guinea-pigs induced by ovalbumin. In vivo, (-)-cannabidiol reduced ovalbumin-induced airway obstruction. In conclusion, our results suggest that cannabidiol can influence antigen-induced airway smooth muscle tone suggesting that this molecule may have beneficial effects in the treatment of obstructive airway disorders. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Prostaglandin E2 and Transforming Growth Factor-β Play a Critical Role in Suppression of Allergic Airway Inflammation by Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

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    Kyu-Sup Cho

    Full Text Available The role of soluble factors in the suppression of allergic airway inflammation by adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs remains to be elucidated. Moreover, the major soluble factors responsible for the immunomodulatory effects of ASCs in allergic airway diseases have not been well documented. We evaluated the effects of ASCs on allergic inflammation in asthmatic mice treated with a prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 inhibitor or transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β neutralizing antibodies.Asthmatic mice were injected intraperitoneally with a PGE2 inhibitor or TGF-β neutralizing antibodies at approximately the same time as ASCs injection and were compared with non-treated controls. In asthmatic mice, ASCs significantly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, the number of total inflammatory cells and eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, eosinophilic inflammation, goblet cell hyperplasia, and serum total and allergen-specific IgE and IgG1. ASCs significantly inhibited Th2 cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, and enhanced the Th1 cytokine (Interferon-γ and regulatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β in the BALF and lung draining lymph nodes (LLNs. ASCs engraftment caused significant increases in the regulatory T cell (Treg and IL-10+ T cell populations in LLNs. However, blocking PGE2 or TGF-β eliminated the immunosuppressive effect of ASCs in allergic airway inflammation.ASCs are capable of secreting PGE2 and TGF-β, which may play a role in inducing Treg expansion. Furthermore, treatment with a PGE2 inhibitor or TGF-β neutralizing antibodies eliminated the beneficial effect of ASCs treatment in asthmatic mice, suggesting that PGE2 and TGF-β are the major soluble factors responsible for suppressing allergic airway inflammation.

  17. Neonatal respiratory syncytial virus infection has an effect on lung inflammation and the CD4(+) CD25(+) T cell subpopulation during ovalbumin sensitization in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas-García, A; López-Pacheco, C P; García-Zepeda, E A; Soldevila, G; Ramos-Martínez, P; Ramos-Castañeda, J

    2016-08-01

    In BALB/c adult mice, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection enhances the degree of lung inflammation before and/or after ovalbumin (OVA) respiratory sensitization. However, it is unclear whether RSV infection in newborn mice has an effect on the immune response to OVA respiratory sensitization in adult mice. The aim of this study was to determine if RSV neonatal infection alters T CD4(+) population and lung inflammation during OVA respiratory sensitization in adult mice. BALB/c mice were infected with RSV on the fourth day of life and challenged by OVA 4 weeks later. We found that in adult mice, RSV neonatal infection prior to OVA sensitization reduces the CD4(+) CD25(+) and CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead protein 3 (FoxP3)(+) cell populations in the lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage. Furthermore, it also attenuates the inflammatory infiltrate and cytokine/chemokine expression levels in the mouse airways. In conclusion, the magnitude of the immune response to a non-viral respiratory perturbation in adult mice is not enhanced by a neonatal RSV infection. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  18. Beta-escin has potent anti-allergic efficacy and reduces allergic airway inflammation

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    Unger Hermann

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type I hypersensitivity is characterized by the overreaction of the immune system against otherwise innocuous substances. It manifests as allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, allergic asthma or atopic dermatitis if mast cells are activated in the respective organs. In case of systemic mast cell activation, life-threatening anaphylaxis may occur. Currently, type I hypersensitivities are treated either with glucocorticoids, anti-histamines, or mast cell stabilizers. Although these drugs exert a strong anti-allergic effect, their long-term use may be problematic due to their side-effects. Results In the course of a routine in vitro screening process, we identified beta-escin as a potentially anti-allergic compound. Here we tested beta-escin in two mouse models to confirm this anti-allergic effect in vivo. In a model of the early phase of allergic reactions, the murine passive cutaneous anaphylaxis model, beta-escin inhibited the effects of mast cell activation and degranulation in the skin and dose-dependently prevented the extravasation of fluids into the tissue. Beta-escin also significantly inhibited the late response after antigen challenge in a lung allergy model with ovalbumin-sensitized mice. Allergic airway inflammation was suppressed, which was exemplified by the reduction of leucocytes, eosinophils, IL-5 and IL-13 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Histopathological examinations further confirmed the reduced inflammation of the lung tissue. In both models, the inhibitory effect of beta-escin was comparable to the benchmark dexamethasone. Conclusions We demonstrated in two independent murine models of type I hypersensitivity that beta-escin has potent anti-allergic properties. These results and the excellent safety profile of beta-escin suggest a therapeutic potential of this compound for a novel treatment of allergic diseases.

  19. Beta-escin has potent anti-allergic efficacy and reduces allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Ines; Meier, Christiane; Url, Angelika; Unger, Hermann; Grassauer, Andreas; Prieschl-Grassauer, Eva; Doerfler, Petra

    2010-05-21

    Type I hypersensitivity is characterized by the overreaction of the immune system against otherwise innocuous substances. It manifests as allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, allergic asthma or atopic dermatitis if mast cells are activated in the respective organs. In case of systemic mast cell activation, life-threatening anaphylaxis may occur. Currently, type I hypersensitivities are treated either with glucocorticoids, anti-histamines, or mast cell stabilizers. Although these drugs exert a strong anti-allergic effect, their long-term use may be problematic due to their side-effects. In the course of a routine in vitro screening process, we identified beta-escin as a potentially anti-allergic compound. Here we tested beta-escin in two mouse models to confirm this anti-allergic effect in vivo. In a model of the early phase of allergic reactions, the murine passive cutaneous anaphylaxis model, beta-escin inhibited the effects of mast cell activation and degranulation in the skin and dose-dependently prevented the extravasation of fluids into the tissue. Beta-escin also significantly inhibited the late response after antigen challenge in a lung allergy model with ovalbumin-sensitized mice. Allergic airway inflammation was suppressed, which was exemplified by the reduction of leucocytes, eosinophils, IL-5 and IL-13 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Histopathological examinations further confirmed the reduced inflammation of the lung tissue. In both models, the inhibitory effect of beta-escin was comparable to the benchmark dexamethasone. We demonstrated in two independent murine models of type I hypersensitivity that beta-escin has potent anti-allergic properties. These results and the excellent safety profile of beta-escin suggest a therapeutic potential of this compound for a novel treatment of allergic diseases.

  20. Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Regulatory T Cells Suppress Experimental Allergic Airway Inflammation, a Model of Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Skuljec

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cellular therapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected cytotoxic T cells has shown impressive efficacy in the treatment of hematologic malignancies. We explored a regulatory T cell (Treg-based therapy in the treatment of allergic airway inflammation, a model for asthma, which is characterized by an airway hyper-reactivity (AHR and a chronic, T helper-2 (Th2 cell-dominated immune response to allergen. To restore the immune balance in the lung, we redirected Tregs by a CAR toward lung epithelia in mice upon experimentally induced allergic asthma, closely mimicking the clinical situation. Adoptively transferred CAR Tregs accumulated in the lung and in tracheobronchial lymph nodes, reduced AHR and diminished eosinophilic airway inflammation, indicated by lower cell numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and decreased cell infiltrates in the lung. CAR Treg cells furthermore prevented excessive pulmonary mucus production as well as increase in allergen-specific IgE and Th2 cytokine levels in exposed animals. CAR Tregs were more efficient in controlling asthma than non-modified Tregs, indicating the pivotal role of specific Treg cell activation in the affected organ. Data demonstrate that lung targeting CAR Treg cells ameliorate key features of experimental airway inflammation, paving the way for cell therapy of severe allergic asthma.

  1. A single exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles attenuates antigen-specific antibody production and T-cell reactivity in ovalbumin-sensitized BALB/c mice

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    Shen CC

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Chien-Chang Shen1, Chia-Chi Wang1, Mei-Hsiu Liao2, Tong-Rong Jan11Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Division of Isotope Application, Institute of Energy Research, Taoyuan, TaiwanBackground: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been used in clinical applications as a diagnostic contrasting agent. Previous studies showed that iron oxide nanoparticles deposited in the liver and spleen after systemic administration. The present study investigated the effect of iron oxide nanoparticles on antigen-specific immune responses in mice sensitized with the T cell-dependent antigen ovalbumin (OVA.Methods: BALB/c mice were intravenously administered with a single dose of iron oxide nanoparticles (10-60 mg Fe/kg 1 hour prior to OVA sensitization, and the serum antibody production and splenocyte reactivity were examined 7 days later.Results: The serum levels of OVA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a were significantly attenuated by treatment with iron oxide nanoparticles. The production of interferon-γ and interleukin-4 by splenocytes re-stimulated with OVA in culture was robustly suppressed in mice administered with iron oxide nanoparticles. The viability of OVA-stimulated splenocytes was also attenuated. In contrast, treatment with iron oxide nanoparticles did not affect the viability of splenocytes stimulated with concanavalin A, a T-cell mitogen.Conclusion: Collectively, these data indicate that systemic exposure to a single dose of iron oxide nanoparticles compromises subsequent antigen-specific immune reactions, including the serum production of antigen-specific antibodies, and the functionality of T cells.Keywords: iron oxide nanoparticle, antigen-specific, immune, ovalbumin

  2. Inhibition of protein kinase C delta attenuates allergic airway inflammation through suppression of PI3K/Akt/mTOR/HIF-1 alpha/VEGF pathway.

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    Yun Ho Choi

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is supposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of allergic airway disease. VEGF expression is regulated by a variety of stimuli such as nitric oxide, growth factors, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α. Recently, inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR has been shown to alleviate cardinal asthmatic features, including airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic inflammation, and increased vascular permeability in asthma models. Based on these observations, we have investigated whether mTOR is associated with HIF-1α-mediated VEGF expression in allergic asthma. In studies with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, we have elucidated the stimulatory role of a mTOR-HIF-1α-VEGF axis in allergic response. Next, the mechanisms by which mTOR is activated to modulate this response have been evaluated. mTOR is known to be regulated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt or protein kinase C-delta (PKC δ in various cell types. Consistent with these, our results have revealed that suppression of PKC δ by rottlerin leads to the inhibition of PI3K/Akt activity and the subsequent blockade of a mTOR-HIF-1α-VEGF module, thereby attenuating typical asthmatic attack in a murine model. Thus, the present data indicate that PKC δ is necessary for the modulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling cascade, resulting in a tight regulation of HIF-1α activity and VEGF expression. In conclusion, PKC δ may represent a valuable target for innovative therapeutic treatment of allergic airway disease.

  3. Effects of Flavin7 on allergen induced hyperreactivity of airways

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    Franova S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Some studies have suggested that the polyphenolic compounds might reduce the occurrence of asthma symptoms. The aim of our experiments was to evaluate the effects of 21 days of the flavonoid Flavin7 administration on experimentally induced airway inflammation in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. We assessed tracheal smooth muscle reactivity by an in vitro muscle-strip method; changes in airway resistance by an in vivo plethysmographic method; histological picture of tracheal tissue; and the levels of interleukin 4 (IL-4, and interleukin 5 (IL-5 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF. Histological investigation of tracheal tissue and the concentrations of the inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 in BALF were used as indices of airway inflammation. Administration of Flavin7 caused a significant decrease of specific airway resistance after histamine nebulization and a decline in tracheal smooth muscle contraction amplitude in response to bronchoconstricting mediators. Flavin7 minimized the degree of inflammation estimated on the basis of eosinophil calculation and IL-4 and IL-5 concentrations. In conclusion, administration of Flavin7 showed bronchodilating and anti-inflammatory effects on allergen-induced airway inflammation.

  4. Does unrestrained single-chamber plethysmography provide a valid assessment of airway responsiveness in allergic BALB/c mice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guoqin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unrestrained plethysmography has been used to monitor bronchoconstriction because of its ease of use and ability to measure airway responsiveness in conscious animals. However, its reliability remains controversial. Objective To investigate if unrestrained plethysmography could provide a valid interpretation of airway responsiveness in allergic BALB/c mice. Methods Ovalbumin sensitized BALB/c mice were randomized to receive either a single-dose Ovalbumin challenge (OVA-1D group or a three-dose Ovalbumin challenge (OVA-3D group. The OVA-1D group was further divided into OVA-1D-I (measured invasively, using lung resistance as the index of responsiveness and OVA-1D-N group (measured non-invasively, using Penh as the index of responsiveness. Similarly the OVA-3D group was divided into OVA-3D-I and OVA-3D-N groups based on the above methods. The control groups were sensitized and challenged with normal saline. Bronchial alveolar lavage fluid was taken and airway histopathology was evaluated for airway inflammation. Nasal responsiveness was tested with histamine challenge. Results Compared with controls, a significant increase in airway responsiveness was shown in the OVA-1D-N group (P Conclusion Penh can not be used as a surrogate for airway resistance. The invasive measurement is specific to lower airway. Penh measurement (done as a screening procedure, must be confirmed by a direct invasive measurement specific to lower airway in evaluating lower airway responsiveness.

  5. Dioscin and methylprotodioscin isolated from the root of Asparagus cochinchinensis suppressed the gene expression and production of airway MUC5AC mucin induced by phorbol ester and growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jae; Park, Jin Sung; Yoon, Yong Pill; Shin, Ye Jin; Lee, Sang Kook; Kim, Yeong Shik; Hong, Jang-Hee; Son, Kun Ho; Lee, Choong Jae

    2015-05-15

    The root of Asparagus cochinchinensis (Lour.) Merr. has been utilized as mucoregulators and expectorants for controlling the airway inflammatory diseases in folk medicine. We investigated whether dioscin and methylprotodioscin isolated from the root of Asparagus cochinchinensis (Lour.) Merr. suppress the gene expression and production of airway MUC5AC mucin induced by phorbol ester and growth factor. Confluent NCI-H292 cells were pretreated with dioscin or methylprotodioscin for 30 min and then stimulated with EGF or PMA for 24 h. The MUC5AC mucin gene expression was measured by RT-PCR. Production of MUC5AC mucin protein was measured by ELISA. (1) Dioscin and methylprotodioscin suppressed the expression of MUC5AC mucin gene induced by EGF or PMA; (2) dioscin suppressed the production of MUC5AC mucin induced by either EGF at 10(-5) M (p Asparagus cochinchinensis suppress the gene expression and production of MUC5AC mucin, by directly acting on airway epithelial cells, and the results are consistent with the traditional use of Asparagus cochinchinensis as remedy for diverse inflammatory pulmonary diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Suppression of the increasing level of acetylcholine-stimulated intracellular Ca2+ in guinea pig airway smooth muscle cells by mabuterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xirui; Zhao, Chao; Dai, Cailing; Ren, Yanxin; An, Nan; Wen, Huimin; Pan, L I; Cheng, Maosheng; Zhang, Yuyang

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to establish an effective method for the in vitro culture of guinea pig airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, and also investigate the suppressive effect of mabuterol hydrochloride (Mab) on the increased level of intracellular Ca 2+ in ASM cells induced with acetylcholine (Ach). Two different methods, i.e. with or without collagenase to pretreat tracheal tissues, were applied to the manufacture of ASM cells. Cell viability was determined with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthinazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence were used for the identification of ASM cells. Different concentration levels (10 -3 , 10 -4 , 10 -5 , 10 -6 and 10 -7 mmol/l) of Mab were administered 5 min before Ach (10 -4 M) treatment, respectively. The Ca 2+ fluorescent probe, Fura-2/AM or Fluo-3/AM were applied to the inspection of Ca 2+ fluorescent intensity with Varioskan Flash, immunocytometry systems and an inverted system microscope, respectively. The results showed that the fresh method, in which isolated tracheal tissues were previously treated with collagenase for 20 min, was more advantageous for the preparation of guinea pig ASM cells compared to when the enzyme was not used. The time for the ASM cells to initially migrate out of the 'tissue blocks' and the culture having to be generated due to the thick cell density was significantly less. On identification with immunocytochemistry or immunofluorescent staining, >95% of the cells were ASM cells. Mab (10 -3 -10 -7 mmol/l) significantly suppressed the elevation of intracellular Ca 2+ induced by Ach in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory rates of intracellular Ca 2+ by different concentrations of Mab, from low to high, were 14.93, 24.73, 40.06, 48.54 and 57.13%, respectively, when Varioskan Flash was used for determination. In conclusion, this novel method has a shorter harvesting period for ASM cells. Mab can suppress the increasing level of intracellular Ca 2

  7. Type 2 innate lymphoid cell suppression by regulatory T cells attenuates airway hyperreactivity and requires inducible T-cell costimulator-inducible T-cell costimulator ligand interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, Diamanda; Lewis, Gavin; Aron, Jennifer L; Wang, Bowen; Banie, Homayon; Sankaranarayanan, Ishwarya; Galle-Treger, Lauriane; Maazi, Hadi; Lo, Richard; Freeman, Gordon J; Sharpe, Arlene H; Soroosh, Pejman; Akbari, Omid

    2017-05-01

    Atopic diseases, including asthma, exacerbate type 2 immune responses and involve a number of immune cell types, including regulatory T (Treg) cells and the emerging type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s). Although ILC2s are potent producers of type 2 cytokines, the regulation of ILC2 activation and function is not well understood. In the present study, for the first time, we evaluate how Treg cells interact with pulmonary ILC2s and control their function. ILC2s and Treg cells were evaluated by using in vitro suppression assays, cell-contact assays, and gene expression panels. Also, human ILC2s and Treg cells were adoptively transferred into NOD SCID γC-deficient mice, which were given isotype or anti-inducible T-cell costimulator ligand (ICOSL) antibodies and then challenged with IL-33 and assessed for airway hyperreactivity. We show that induced Treg cells, but not natural Treg cells, effectively suppress the production of the ILC2-driven proinflammatory cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, our data reveal the necessity of inducible T-cell costimulator (ICOS)-ICOS ligand cell contact for Treg cell-mediated ILC2 suppression alongside the suppressive cytokines TGF-β and IL-10. Using a translational approach, we then demonstrate that human induced Treg cells suppress syngeneic human ILC2s through ICOSL to control airway inflammation in a humanized ILC2 mouse model. These findings suggest that peripheral expansion of induced Treg cells can serve as a promising therapeutic target against ILC2-dependent asthma. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An aqueous Chlorella extract inhibits IL-5 production by mast cells in vitro and reduces ovalbumin-induced eosinophil infiltration in the airway in mice in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralovec, J A; Power, M R; Liu, F; Maydanski, E; Ewart, H S; Watson, L V; Barrow, C J; Lin, T J

    2005-04-01

    An aqueous extract of the edible microalga (CP) (1), has recently been tested for its immunomodulatory effects in a human clinical trial. Here, the CP extract was dialyzed and fractionated using Sephadex G 100 chromatography. The effects of a dialyzed aqueous CP extract, fraction 2 , on mast cell mediator release in vitro and ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation in vivo were examined. In vitro, treatment of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells with 2 for 18 h significantly inhibited antigen (trinitrophenyl-BSA)-induced IL-5 production. In vivo, treatment of mice with 2 during ovalbumin sensitization and stimulation process significantly reduced eosinophil and neutrophil infiltration in the airways. Moreover, fractions obtained by size exclusion chromatography of 2 inhibited IgE-dependent cytokine GM-CSF production from human cord blood-derived mast cells. Taken together, these results suggest that 2 is composed of biopolymers with anti-allergic potential.

  9. Allergic Airway Inflammation Decreases Lung Bacterial Burden following Acute Klebsiella pneumoniae Infection in a Neutrophil- and CCL8-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulek, Daniel E.; Newcomb, Dawn C.; Goleniewska, Kasia; Cephus, Jaqueline; Zhou, Weisong; Reiss, Sara; Toki, Shinji; Ye, Fei; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Sherrill, Taylor P.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Moore, Martin L.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Kolls, Jay K.

    2014-01-01

    The Th17 cytokines interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-17F, and IL-22 are critical for the lung immune response to a variety of bacterial pathogens, including Klebsiella pneumoniae. Th2 cytokine expression in the airways is a characteristic feature of asthma and allergic airway inflammation. The Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 diminish ex vivo and in vivo IL-17A protein expression by Th17 cells. To determine the effect of IL-4 and IL-13 on IL-17-dependent lung immune responses to acute bacterial infection, we developed a combined model in which allergic airway inflammation and lung IL-4 and IL-13 expression were induced by ovalbumin sensitization and challenge prior to acute lung infection with K. pneumoniae. We hypothesized that preexisting allergic airway inflammation decreases lung IL-17A expression and airway neutrophil recruitment in response to acute K. pneumoniae infection and thereby increases the lung K. pneumoniae burden. As hypothesized, we found that allergic airway inflammation decreased the number of K. pneumoniae-induced airway neutrophils and lung IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 expression. Despite the marked reduction in postinfection airway neutrophilia and lung expression of Th17 cytokines, allergic airway inflammation significantly decreased the lung K. pneumoniae burden and postinfection mortality. We showed that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden was independent of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-17A and partially dependent on IL-13 and STAT6. Additionally, we demonstrated that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden associated with allergic airway inflammation was both neutrophil and CCL8 dependent. These findings suggest a novel role for CCL8 in lung antibacterial immunity against K. pneumoniae and suggest new mechanisms of orchestrating lung antibacterial immunity. PMID:24958709

  10. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy ... to loosen mucus from airway walls. See how different airway clearance techniques work to help you clear ...

  11. Azithromycin ameliorates airway remodeling via inhibiting airway epithelium apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanqi; Pu, Yue; Li, Diandian; Zhou, Liming; Wan, Lihong

    2017-02-01

    Azithromycin can benefit treating allergic airway inflammation and remodeling. In the present study, we hypothesized that azithromycin alleviated airway epithelium injury through inhibiting airway epithelium apoptosis via down regulation of caspase-3 and Bax/Bcl2 ratio in vivo and in vitro. Ovalbumin induced rat asthma model and TGF-β1-induced BEAS-2B cell apoptosis model were established, respectively. In vivo experiments, airway epithelium was stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) to histologically evaluate the airway inflammation and remodeling. Airway epithelium apoptotic index (AI) was further analyzed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), while expression of apoptosis related gene (Bax, Bcl2, Caspase-3) in lungs were measured by qRT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. In vitro experiments, apoptosis were evaluated by Flow cytometry (FCM) and TUNEL. Above apoptosis related gene were also measured by qRT-PCR and western blotting. Compared with the OVA group, azithromycin significantly reduced the inflammation score, peribronchial smooth muscle layer thickness, epithelial thickening and goblet cell metaplasia (Pazithromycin-treated rats (Pazithromycin significantly suppressed TGF-β1-induced BEAS-2B cells apoptosis (PAzithromycin is an attractive treatment option for reducing airway epithelial cell apoptosis by improving the imbalance of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and inhibiting Caspase-3 level in airway epithelium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. High dose vitamin C supplementation increases the Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion ratio, but decreases eosinophilic infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hui-Hsiang; Chen, Chin-Shuh; Lin, Jin-Yuarn

    2009-11-11

    Vitamin C is traditionally regarded to be beneficial for asthma, however the benefit is still controversial. In the present study, high dose vitamin C was supplemented to ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized and challenged mice to evaluate the effects of dietary vitamin C on allergic asthma. In this study, the experimental mice were divided into four groups, including nonsensitized control, dietary control, positive control (cured ip with dexamethasone), and high dose vitamin C supplementation (130 mg of vitamin C/kg bw/day by gavage for 5 weeks). Differential leukocyte counts, levels of inflammatory mediators, as well as type 1 T-helper lymphocytes (Th1)-type and type 2 T-helper lymphocytes (Th2)-type cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined. The results showed that both high dose vitamin C supplementation and dexamethasone treatments significantly (P < 0.05) decreased eosinophilic infiltration into BALF. High dose vitamin C supplementation significantly increased the secretion ratio of interferon (IFN)-gamma/interleukin (IL)-5 cytokines. This study suggests that high dose vitamin C supplementation might attenuate allergic inflammation in vivo via modulating the Th1/Th2 balance toward the Th1 pole during the Th2-skewed allergic airway inflammation and decreasing eosinophilic infiltration into BALF.

  13. Acrolein and thiol-reactive electrophiles suppress allergen-induced innate airway epithelial responses by inhibition of DUOX1 and EGFR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danyal, Karamatullah; de Jong, Willem; O'Brien, Edmund; Bauer, Robert A; Heppner, David E; Little, Andrew C; Hristova, Milena; Habibovic, Aida; van der Vliet, Albert

    2016-11-01

    Acrolein is a major thiol-reactive component of cigarette smoke (CS) that is thought to contribute to increased asthma incidence associated with smoking. Here, we explored the effects of acute acrolein exposure on innate airway responses to two common airborne allergens, house dust mite and Alternaria alternata, and observed that acrolein exposure of C57BL/6 mice (5 ppm, 4 h) dramatically inhibited innate airway responses to subsequent allergen challenge, demonstrated by attenuated release of the epithelial-derived cytokines IL-33, IL-25, and IL-1α. Acrolein and other anti-inflammatory thiol-reactive electrophiles, cinnamaldehyde, curcumin, and sulforaphane, similarly inhibited allergen-induced production of these cytokines from human or murine airway epithelial cells in vitro. Based on our previous observations indicating the importance of Ca 2+ -dependent signaling, activation of the NADPH oxidase DUOX1, and Src/EGFR-dependent signaling in allergen-induced epithelial secretion of these cytokines, we explored the impact of acrolein on these pathways. Acrolein and other thiol-reactive electrophiles were found to dramatically prevent allergen-induced activation of DUOX1 as well as EGFR, and acrolein was capable of inhibiting EGFR tyrosine kinase activity via modification of C797. Biotin-labeling strategies indicated increased cysteine modification and carbonylation of Src, EGFR, as well as DUOX1, in response to acrolein exposure in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that direct alkylation of these proteins on accessible cysteine residues may be responsible for their inhibition. Collectively, our findings indicate a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism of CS-derived acrolein and other thiol-reactive electrophiles, by directly inhibiting DUOX1- and EGFR-mediated airway epithelial responses to airborne allergens. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. CpG in Combination with an Inhibitor of Notch Signaling Suppresses Formalin-Inactivated Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Enhanced Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Inflammation by Inhibiting Th17 Memory Responses and Promoting Tissue-Resident Memory Cells in Lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Hongyong; Hai, Yan; Yin, Wei; Li, Wenjian; Zheng, Boyang; Du, Xiaomin; Li, Na; Zhang, Zhengzheng; Deng, Yuqing; Zeng, Ruihong; Wei, Lin

    2017-05-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of childhood hospitalizations. The formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease (ERD) has been an obstacle to the development of a safe and effective killed RSV vaccine. Agonists of Toll-like receptor (TLR) have been shown to regulate immune responses induced by FI-RSV. Notch signaling plays critical roles during the differentiation and effector function phases of innate and adaptive immune responses. Cross talk between TLR and Notch signaling pathways results in fine-tuning of TLR-triggered innate inflammatory responses. We evaluated the impact of TLR and Notch signaling on ERD in a murine model by administering CpG, an agonist of TLR9, in combination with L685,458, an inhibitor of Notch signaling during FI-RSV immunization. Activation with CpG or deficiency of MyD88-dependent TLR signaling did not alleviate airway inflammation in FI-RSV-immunized mice. Activation or inhibition of Notch signaling with Dll4, one of the Notch ligands, or L685,458 did not suppress FI-RSV-enhanced airway inflammation either. However, the CpG together with L685,458 markedly inhibited FI-RSV-enhanced airway hyperresponsiveness, weight loss, and lung inflammation. Interestingly, CpG plus L685,458 completely inhibited FI-RSV-associated Th17 and Th17-associated proinflammatory chemokine responses in lungs following RSV challenge but not Th1 or Th2, memory responses. In addition, FI-RSV plus CpG plus L685,458 promoted protective CD8 + lung tissue-resident memory (TRM) cells. These results indicate that activation of TLR signaling combined with inhibition of Notch signaling prevent FI-RSV ERD, and the mechanism appears to involve suppressing proinflammatory Th17 memory responses and promoting protective TRM in lungs. IMPORTANCE RSV is the most important cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants. The FI-RSV-enhanced respiratory disease (ERD) is a major impediment to the development of a safe and

  15. A Recombinant DNA Plasmid Encoding the sIL-4R-NAP Fusion Protein Suppress Airway Inflammation in an OVA-Induced Mouse Model of Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Fu, Guo; Ji, Zhenyu; Huang, Xiabing; Ding, Cong; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Xiaolong; Du, Mingxuan; Wang, Ting; Kang, Qiaozhen

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease. It was prevalently perceived that Th2 cells played the crucial role in asthma pathogenesis, which has been identified as the important target for anti-asthma therapy. The soluble IL-4 receptor (sIL-4R), which is the decoy receptor for Th2 cytokine IL-4, has been reported to be effective in treating asthma in phase I/II clinical trail. To develop more efficacious anti-asthma agent, we attempt to test whether the Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP), a novel TLR2 agonist, would enhance the efficacy of sIL-4R in anti-asthma therapy. In our work, we constructed a pcDNA3.1-sIL-4R-NAP plasmid, named PSN, encoding fusion protein of murine sIL-4R and HP-NAP. PSN significantly inhibited airway inflammation, decreased the serum OVA-specific IgE levels and remodeled the Th1/Th2 balance. Notably, PSN is more effective on anti-asthma therapy comparing with plasmid only expressing sIL-4R.

  16. Airway Mucosal Immune-suppression in Neonates of Mothers Receiving A(H1N1)pnd09 Vaccination During Pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Bischoff, Anne L.; Folsgaard, Nilofar V.

    2015-01-01

    N1) pnd09 vaccination during pregnancy. Methods: One hundred and fifty-six women from the unselected Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC 2010) received Influenza A(H1N1) pnd09-vaccination during the 2009 pandemic. Fifty-one mothers received the vaccine during pregnancy......Background: It is recommended to vaccinate pregnant women against influenza. A possible impact on the immune expression of the fetus has never been studied. We aim to study the immune signature in the upper airways and the incidence of infections in neonates born to mothers receiving Influenza A(H1......, IL-5, IL-13, eotaxin-1, eotaxin-3, TARC, MDC, IL-17, IL-1 beta, IL-8, transforming growth factor beta (TGF)-beta 1, IL-10 and IL-2. Infections were monitored the first year of life by daily diary cards and clinical controls. Results: Neonates of mothers vaccinated during pregnancy had significant up...

  17. In vivo micro-CT assessment of airway remodeling in a flexible OVA-sensitized murine model of asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Lederlin

    Full Text Available Airway remodeling is a major pathological feature of asthma. Up to now, its quantification still requires invasive methods. In this study, we aimed at determining whether in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT is able to demonstrate allergen-induced airway remodeling in a flexible mouse model of asthma. Sixty Balb/c mice were challenged intranasally with ovalbumin or saline at 3 different endpoints (Days 35, 75, and 110. All mice underwent plethysmography at baseline and just prior to respiratory-gated micro-CT. Mice were then sacrificed to assess bronchoalveolar lavage and lung histology. From micro-CT images (voxel size = 46×46×46 µm, the numerical values of total lung attenuation, peribronchial attenuation (PBA, and PBA normalized by total lung attenuation were extracted. Each parameter was compared between OVA and control mice and correlation coefficients were calculated between micro-CT and histological data. As compared to control animals, ovalbumin-sensitized mice exhibited inflammation alone (Day 35, remodeling alone (Day 110 or both inflammation and remodeling (Day 75. Normalized PBA was significantly greater in mice exhibiting bronchial remodeling either alone or in combination with inflammation. Normalized PBA correlated with various remodeling markers such as bronchial smooth muscle size or peribronchial fibrosis. These findings suggest that micro-CT may help monitor remodeling non-invasively in asthmatic mice when testing new drugs targeting airway remodeling in pre-clinical studies.

  18. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... Twitter YouTube Instagram Email DONATE Breadcrumb Navigation Home Life With CF Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy to ...

  19. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your airways. ... or caregiver. Older kids and adults can choose ACTs that they can do on their own. Share ...

  20. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... CF Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your ... for fitting ACTs into daily life Airway Clearance Techniques | Webcast To learn more about how you can ...

  1. Airway distensibility in Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde Marie; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Dirksen, Asger

    2013-01-01

    Rationale – Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a combination of chronic bronchitis and emphysema, which both may lead to airway obstruction. Under normal circumstances, airway dimensions vary as a function of inspiration level. We aim to study the influence of COPD and emphysema on t...... in causing airway narrowing, the latter most likely due to loss of elastic recoil of surrounding tissue....

  2. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... of treatment options. Airway Clearance Active Cycle of Breathing Technique Airway Clearance Techniques Autogenic Drainage Basics of ... Pulmonary Exacerbations Clinical Care Guidelines SCREENING & TREATING DEPRESSION & ANXIETY GUIDELINES Clinician Resources As a clinician, you’re ...

  3. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Ho [Department of Anatomy, Medical School, Institute for Medical Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Guang Yu [Department of Radiology, Yanbian University Hospital, YanJi 133002 (China); Guo, Hui Shu [Centralab, The First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116011 (China); Piao, Hong Mei [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Yanbian University Hospital, YanJi 133000 (China); Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao [Department of Anatomy and Histology and Embryology, Yanbian University School of Basic Medical Sciences, 977 Gongyuan Road, YanJi 133002, Jilin (China); Lin, Zhen Hua [Department of Pathology, Yanbian University School of Basic Medical Sciences, YanJi 133000 (China); Yan, Guang Hai, E-mail: ghyan@ybu.edu.cn [Department of Anatomy and Histology and Embryology, Yanbian University School of Basic Medical Sciences, 977 Gongyuan Road, YanJi 133002, Jilin (China)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  4. Denervation of nasal mucosa induced by posterior nasal neurectomy suppresses nasal secretion, not hypersensitivity, in an allergic rhinitis rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Hironobu; Kondo, Kenji; Toma-Hirano, Makiko; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Kikuta, Shu; Fujimoto, Chisato; Ueha, Rumi; Kagoya, Ryoji; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-09-01

    The posterior nasal nerve is the dominant source of the parasympathetic, sympathetic, and sensory fibers that innervate the nasal respiratory mucosa. Therefore, a posterior nasal neurectomy (PNN) is thought to induce denervation of the nasal mucosa and relieve the nasal symptoms of allergic rhinitis. However, the underlying mechanisms and therapeutic action of PNN remain unknown. To investigate the impact of PNN-induced denervation of the nasal mucosa on allergic rhinitis, we developed a rat model of PNN and examined the effects of PNN on allergic rhinitis in ovalbumin-sensitized rats. This rat model of PNN was characterized by the depletion of nerve fibers, choline acetyltransferase, and neuropeptides (eg, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and neuropeptide Y) in the nasal respiratory mucosa. These animals exhibited nasal gland and goblet cell hypertrophy in the septal mucosa and atrophy of the submucosal gland in the lateral nasal wall, as well as reduced nasal secretion due to deficient acetylcholine synthesis. In an ovalbumin-sensitized model of allergic rhinitis, PNN also induced the depletion of nerve fibers, choline acetyltransferase, and neuropeptides in the nasal mucosa and suppressed nasal secretion. However, PNN did not affect mucosal thickening, eosinophil and mast cell infiltration, interleukin-4 and interferon-γ mRNA expression, and allergic symptoms (ie, sneezing and nasal scratching). These results suggest that the peripheral nerves and corresponding neuropeptides regulate nasal secretion, but not hypersensitivity, in allergic rhinitis, and that allergic rhinitis-related mucosal reactions occur in a highly denervated mucosa after PNN. Posterior nasal neurectomy may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of hyperrhinorrhea, but not allergic rhinitis hypersensitivity.

  5. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Soleas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990. In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium.

  6. Human airway smooth muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Jongste, Johan

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe function of airway smooth muscle in normal subjects is not evident. Possible physiological roles include maintenance of optimal regional ventilation/perfusion ratios, reduction of anatomic dead space, stabilisation of cartilaginous bronchi, defense against impurities and, less likely, squeezing mucus out of mucous glands and pulling open the alveoli next to the airways1 . Any role of airway smooth muscle is necessarily limited, because an important degree of contraction will l...

  7. Rhinovirus and airway allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutsuo Yamaya

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhinoviruses cause the majority of common colds, which often provoke wheezing in patients with asthma. The precise mechanisms responsible for the rhinovirus infection-induced exacerbations of bronchial asthma remain uncertain. However, several reports have demonstrated airway hyperresponsiveness, increases in chemical mediators in airway secretions, such as kinin and histamine, and airway inflammation in patients with bronchial asthma after rhinovirus infection. Rhinovirus infection induces the accumulation of inflammatory cells in airway mucosa and submucosa, including neutrophils, lymphocytes and eosinophils. Rhinovirus affects the barrier function of airway epithelial cells and activates airway epithelial cells and other cells in the lung to produce proinflammatory cytokines, including various types of interleukins, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor and RANTES, and histamine. Rhinovirus also stimulates the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and low-density lipoprotein receptors in the airway epithelium, receptors for major and minor rhinoviruses. Rhinovirus infection is inhibited by treatment with soluble ICAM-1 and by the reduction of ICAM-1 expression in airway epithelial cells after treatment with either glucocorticoid or erythromycin. Both soluble ICAM-1 and erythromycin have been reported to reduce the symptoms of common colds. Herein, we review the pathogenesis and management of rhinovirus infection-induced exacerbation of bronchial asthma and the relationship between rhinovirus infection and airway allergy.

  8. [Regeneration of airway epithelium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, D; Perotin, J-M; Lebargy, F; Birembaut, P; Deslée, G; Coraux, C

    2014-04-01

    Epithelial regeneration is a complex process. It can lead to the remodeling of the airway epithelium as in asthma, COPD or cystic fibrosis. The development of in vivo and in vitro models has allowed the analysis of remodeling mechanisms and showed the role of components of extracellular matrix, proteases, cytokines and growth factors. Airway epithelial progenitors and stems cells have been studied in these models. However, their identification remains difficult. Identification and characterization of airway epithelial progenitor/stem-cells, and a better knowledge of the regeneration process may allow the development of new therapeutic strategies for airway epithelial reconstitution. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Airway distensibility in Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde Marie; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Dirksen, Asger

    2013-01-01

    -20% (mild), 20%-30% (moderate) or >30% (severe). Spirometry was performed annually and participants were divided into severity groups according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). Data were analysed in a mixed effects regression model with log(airway lumen diameter...... the interior and exterior airway wall surface in three dimensions, and branches were matched in consecutive scans by image registration. Emphysema was defined as attenuation referred to as % low-attenuation area 910 (%LAA910). Emphysema limits were set at

  10. Airway smooth muscle cells : regulators of airway inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuyderduyn, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    Airways from asthmatic subjects are more responsive to bronchoconstrictive stimuli than airways from healthy subjects. Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells mediate contraction of the airways by responding to the bronchoconstrictive stimuli, which was thought to be the primary role of ASM cells. In this

  11. Relationship between airway pathophysiology and airway inflammation in older asthmatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, Celeste M; Gibson, Peter G; Pretto, Jeffrey J

    2013-01-01

    , neutrophil airway inflammation increases airway closure during bronchoconstriction, while eosinophil airway inflammation increases airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). METHODS: Asthmatic subjects (n = 26), aged ≥55 years (68% female), were studied, and AHR to 4.5% saline challenge was measured by the response...... or eNO. CONCLUSIONS: In older patients with asthma, airway inflammatory cells are linked to abnormal airway physiology. Eosinophilic airway inflammation is associated with AHR while neutrophilic inflammation may be an important determinant of airflow limitation at rest and airway closure during......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Asthma-related morbidity is greater in older compared with younger asthmatics. Airway closure is also greater in older asthmatics, an observation that may be explained by differences in airway inflammation. We hypothesized that in older adult patients with asthma...

  12. Upper Airway Control in Airway Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliacek I

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Upper airways (UA are an organic component of the respiratory tract, they serve to respiration, respiratory tract protection and defense, phonation, deglutition, etc. The functions of UA are regulated by motor control of the oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeal muscles.

  13. Airway distensibility in Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde Marie; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Dirksen, Asger

    2013-01-01

    on the airway distensibility, defined as the ratio of relative change in lumen diameter to the relative change in total lung volume (TLV) divided by predicted total lung capacity (pTLC) . Methods – We included 1900 participants from the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST); all randomized to annual low...

  14. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... people with cystic fibrosis so that they make smart decisions about CF-related research, treatment, and access ... Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram Email DONATE Breadcrumb Navigation Home Life With CF Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance ...

  15. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... Clinician Career Development Awards Clinician Training Awards Mutation Analysis Program Network News Network News: January 2018 Network ... for airway clearance. Facebook Twitter Email More Related Content Medications Autogenic Drainage Positive Expiratory Pressure High-Frequency ...

  16. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... a Family Parenting as an Adult With CF Treatments & Therapies People with cystic fibrosis are living longer ... to specialized CF care and a range of treatment options. Airway Clearance Active Cycle of Breathing Technique ...

  17. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... another member of your CF care team can show you how to perform many different ACTs and ... of children with CF and a respiratory therapist talk about the different techniques they use for airway ...

  18. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... There are different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy to do. Infants and toddlers will ... best ACT is the one that you are most likely to perform as part of your daily ...

  19. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... CYSTIC FIBROSIS Learn about cystic fibrosis, a genetic lung disorder that affects the pancreas and other organs, ... Technique Airway Clearance Techniques Autogenic Drainage Basics of Lung Care Chest Physical Therapy Coughing and Huffing High- ...

  20. Airway protective mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Teresa

    2014-02-01

    Cough and swallow are highly coordinated reflex behaviors whose common purpose is to protect the airway. The pharynx is the common tube for air and food/liquid movement from the mouth into the thorax, has been largely overlooked, and is potentially seen as just a passive space. The thyropharyngeus muscle responds to cough inducing stimuli to prepare a transient holding area for material that has been removed from the subglottic airway. The cricopharyngeus muscle participates with the larynx to ensure regulation of pressure when a bolus/air is moving from the upper airway through to the thorax (i.e., inspiration or swallow) or the reverse (i.e., expiration reflex or vomiting). These vital mechanisms have not been evaluated in clinical conditions but could be impaired in many neurodegenerative diseases, leading to aspiration pneumonia. These newly described airway protective mechanisms need further study, especially in healthy and pathologic human populations.

  1. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... Clinical Care Guidelines Liver Disease Clinical Care Guidelines Respiratory Care Guidelines CF Airway Clearance Therapies Clinical Care ... attack bacteria. Choose What's Best for You Your respiratory therapist or another member of your CF care ...

  2. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... Cycle of Breathing Technique Airway Clearance Techniques Autogenic Drainage Basics of Lung Care Chest Physical Therapy Coughing ... Facebook Twitter Email More Related Content Medications Autogenic Drainage Positive Expiratory Pressure High-Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation ( ...

  3. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... CFTR Modulator Therapies Mucus Thinners Nebulizer Care at Home Vascular Access Devices PICCs and Ports Partnerships for ... Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram Email DONATE Breadcrumb Navigation Home Life With CF Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance ...

  4. Human airway smooth muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. de Jongste (Johan)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe function of airway smooth muscle in normal subjects is not evident. Possible physiological roles include maintenance of optimal regional ventilation/perfusion ratios, reduction of anatomic dead space, stabilisation of cartilaginous bronchi, defense against impurities and, less

  5. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... many challenges, including medical, social, and financial. By learning more about how you can manage your disease every day, you can ultimately help find a ... Cycle of Breathing Technique Airway Clearance Techniques Autogenic ...

  6. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... today. ANNUAL FUND Become a Corporate Supporter Cause Marketing Make a Charitable Gift Our Corporate Supporters Workplace ... for airway clearance. Facebook Twitter Email More Related Content Medications Autogenic Drainage Positive Expiratory Pressure High-Frequency ...

  7. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... the smaller airways to attack bacteria. Choose What's Best for You Your respiratory therapist or another member ... specific ACTs for you to try. However, the best ACT is the one that you are most ...

  8. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... in CF Clinical Care Guidelines Cystic Fibrosis-Related Diabetes Clinical Care Guidelines Liver Disease Clinical Care Guidelines Respiratory Care Guidelines CF Airway Clearance Therapies Clinical Care Guidelines Chronic Medications to Maintain Lung ...

  9. Airway Protective Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Pitts, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Cough and swallow are highly coordinated reflex behaviors whose common purpose is to protect the airway. The pharynx is the common tube for air and food/liquid movement from the mouth into the thorax, has been largely overlooked, and is potentially seen as just a passive space. The thyropharyngeus muscle responds to cough inducing stimuli to prepare a transient holding area for material that has been removed from the subglottic airway. The cricopharyngeus muscle participates with the larynx t...

  10. New airways for resuscitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, T M; Hommers, C

    2006-06-01

    Over the last 15 years supraglottic airway devices (SADs), most notably the classic laryngeal mask airway (LMA) have revolutionised airway management in anaesthesia. In contrast for resuscitation, both in and outside hospital, facemask ventilation and tracheal intubation remain the mainstays of airway management. However there is evidence that both these techniques have complications and are often poorly performed by inexperienced personnel. Tracheal intubation also has the potential to cause serious harm or death through unrecognised oesophageal intubation. SADs may have a role in airway management for resuscitation as first responder devices, rescue devices or for use during patient extraction. In particular they may be beneficial as the level of skill required to use the device safely may be less than for the tracheal tube. Concerns have been expressed over the ability to ventilate the lungs successfully and also the risk of aspiration with SADs. The only SADs recommended by ILCOR in its current guidance are the classic LMA and combitube. Several SADs have recently been introduced with claims that ventilation and airway protection is improved. This pragmatic review examines recent developments in SAD technology and the relevance of this to the potential for using SADs during resuscitation. In addition to examining research directly related to resuscitation both on bench models and in patients the review also examines evidence from anaesthetic practice. SADS discussed include the classic, intubating and Proseal LMAs, the combitube, the laryngeal tube, laryngeal tube sonda mark I and II and single use laryngeal masks.

  11. Airway management in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration.

  12. Extubation of the difficult airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Khaldoun; Zayaruzny, Maksim; Spanakis, Spiro

    2011-01-01

    Managing the airway in the intensive care unit (ICU) is complicated by a wide array of physiologic factors. Difficult airway may be a consequence of patient’s anatomy or airway edema developed during the ICU stay and mechanical ventilation. The incidence of failed airways and of cardiac arrest related to airway instrumentation in the ICU is much higher than that of elective intubations performed in the operating room. In this article, we will provide a framework for identifying a difficult airway, criteria for safe extubation, as well as review the devices that are available for airway management in the ICU. Proficiency in identifying a potentially difficult airway and thorough familiarity with strategies and techniques of securing the airway are necessary for safe practice of critical care medicine

  13. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Addis, A.; Adcock, I.; Agache, I.; Agusti, A.; Alonso, A.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Anto, J. M.; Bachert, C.; Baena-Cagnani, C. E.; Bai, C.; Baigenzhin, A.; Barbara, C.; Barnes, P. J.; Bateman, E. D.; Beck, L.; Bedbrook, A.; Bel, E. H.; Benezet, O.; Bennoor, K. S.; Benson, M.; Bernabeu-Wittel, M.; Bewick, M.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Blain, H.; Blasi, F.; Bonini, M.; Bonini, S.; Boulet, L. P.; Bourdin, A.; Bourret, R.; Bousquet, P. J.; Brightling, C. E.; Briggs, A.; Brozek, J.; Buh, R.; Bush, A.; Caimmi, D.; Calderon, M.; Calverley, P.; Camargos, P. A.; Camuzat, T.; Canonica, G. W.; Carlsen, K. H.; Casale, T. B.; Cazzola, M.; Sarabia, A. M. Cepeda; Cesario, A.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chavannes, N. H.; Chiron, R.; Chuchalin, A.; Chung, K. F.; Cox, L.; Crooks, G.; Crooks, M. G.; Cruz, A. A.; Custovic, A.; Dahl, R.; Dahlen, S. E.; De Blay, F.; Dedeu, T.; Deleanu, D.; Demoly, P.; Devillier, P.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A. T.; Djukanovic, R.; Dokic, D.; Douagui, H.; Dubakiene, R.; Eglin, S.; Elliot, F.; Emuzyte, R.; Fabbri, L.; Wagner, A. Fink; Fletcher, M.; Fokkens, W. J.; Fonseca, J.; Franco, A.; Frith, P.; Furber, A.; Gaga, M.; Garces, J.; Garcia-Aymerich, J.; Gamkrelidze, A.; Gonzales-Diaz, S.; Gouzi, F.; Guzman, M. A.; Haahtela, T.; Harrison, D.; Hayot, M.; Heaney, L. G.; Heinrich, J.; Hellings, P. W.; Hooper, J.; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M.; Iaccarino, G.; Jakovenko, D.; Jardim, J. R.; Jeandel, C.; Jenkins, C.; Johnston, S. L.; Jonquet, O.; Joos, G.; Jung, K. S.; Kalayci, O.; Karunanithi, S.; Keil, T.; Khaltaev, N.; Kolek, V.; Kowalski, M. L.; Kull, I.; Kuna, P.; Kvedariene, V.; Le, L. T.; Carlsen, K. C. Lodrup; Louis, R.; MacNee, W.; Mair, A.; Majer, I.; Manning, P.; Keenoy, E. de Manuel; Masjedi, M. R.; Meten, E.; Melo-Gomes, E.; Menzies-Gow, A.; Mercier, G.; Mercier, J.; Michel, J. P.; Miculinic, N.; Mihaltan, F.; Milenkovic, B.; Molimard, M.; Mamas, I.; Montilla-Santana, A.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Morgan, M.; N'Diaye, M.; Nafti, S.; Nekam, K.; Neou, A.; Nicod, L.; O'Hehir, R.; Ohta, K.; Paggiaro, P.; Palkonen, S.; Palmer, S.; Papadopoulos, N. G.; Papi, A.; Passalacqua, G.; Pavord, I.; Pigearias, B.; Plavec, D.; Postma, D. S.; Price, D.; Rabe, K. F.; Pontal, F. Radier; Redon, J.; Rennard, S.; Roberts, J.; Robine, J. M.; Roca, J.; Roche, N.; Rodenas, F.; Roggeri, A.; Rolland, C.; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Ryan, D.; Samolinski, B.; Sanchez-Borges, M.; Schunemann, H. J.; Sheikh, A.; Shields, M.; Siafakas, N.; Sibille, Y.; Similowski, T.; Small, I.; Sola-Morales, O.; Sooronbaev, T.; Stelmach, R.; Sterk, P. J.; Stiris, T.; Sud, P.; Tellier, V.; To, T.; Todo-Bom, A.; Triggiani, M.; Valenta, R.; Valero, A. L.; Valiulis, A.; Valovirta, E.; Van Ganse, E.; Vandenplas, O.; Vasankari, T.; Vestbo, J.; Vezzani, G.; Viegi, G.; Visier, L.; Vogelmeier, C.; Vontetsianos, T.; Wagstaff, R.; Wahn, U.; Wallaert, B.; Whalley, B.; Wickman, M.; Williams, D. M.; Wilson, N.; Yawn, B. P.; Yiallouros, P. K.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Yusuf, O. M.; Zar, H. J.; Zhong, N.; Zidarn, M.; Zuberbier, T.

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will

  14. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J.; Addis, A.; Adcock, I.; Agache, I.; Agusti, A.; Alonso, A.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Anto, J. M.; Bachert, C.; Baena-Cagnani, C. E.; Bai, C.; Baigenzhin, A.; Barbara, C.; Barnes, P. J.; Bateman, E. D.; Beck, L.; Bedbrook, A.; Bel, E. H.; Benezet, O.; Bennoor, K. S.; Benson, M.; Bernabeu-Wittel, M.; Bewick, M.; Bindslev-Jensen, C.; Blain, H.; Blasi, F.; Bonini, M.; Bonini, S.; Boulet, L. P.; Bourdin, A.; Bourret, R.; Bousquet, P. J.; Brightling, C. E.; Briggs, A.; Brozek, J.; Buhl, R.; Bush, A.; Caimmi, D.; Calderon, M.; Calverley, P.; Camargos, P. A.; Camuzat, T.; Canonica, G. W.; Carlsen, K. H.; Casale, T. B.; Cazzola, M.; Cepeda Sarabia, A. M.; Cesario, A.; Chen, Y. Z.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chavannes, N. H.; Chiron, R.; Chuchalin, A.; Chung, K. F.; Cox, L.; Crooks, G.; Crooks, M. G.; Cruz, A. A.; Custovic, A.; Dahl, R.; Dahlen, S. E.; de Blay, F.; Dedeu, T.; Deleanu, D.; Demoly, P.; Devillier, P.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A. T.; Djukanovic, R.; Dokic, D.; Douagui, H.; Dubakiene, R.; Eglin, S.; Elliot, F.; Emuzyte, R.; Fabbri, L.; Fink Wagner, A.; Fletcher, M.; Fokkens, W. J.; Fonseca, J.; Franco, A.; Frith, P.; Furber, A.; Gaga, M.; Garcés, J.; Garcia-Aymerich, J.; Gamkrelidze, A.; Gonzales-Diaz, S.; Gouzi, F.; Guzmán, M. A.; Haahtela, T.; Harrison, D.; Hayot, M.; Heaney, L. G.; Heinrich, J.; Hellings, P. W.; Hooper, J.; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M.; Iaccarino, G.; Jakovenko, D.; Jardim, J. R.; Jeandel, C.; Jenkins, C.; Johnston, S. L.; Jonquet, O.; Joos, G.; Jung, K. S.; Kalayci, O.; Karunanithi, S.; Keil, T.; Khaltaev, N.; Kolek, V.; Kowalski, M. L.; Kull, I.; Kuna, P.; Kvedariene, V.; Le, L. T.; Lodrup Carlsen, K. C.; Louis, R.; MacNee, W.; Mair, A.; Majer, I.; Manning, P.; de Manuel Keenoy, E.; Masjedi, M. R.; Melen, E.; Melo-Gomes, E.; Menzies-Gow, A.; Mercier, G.; Mercier, J.; Michel, J. P.; Miculinic, N.; Mihaltan, F.; Milenkovic, B.; Molimard, M.; Momas, I.; Montilla-Santana, A.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Morgan, M.; N'Diaye, M.; Nafti, S.; Nekam, K.; Neou, A.; Nicod, L.; O'Hehir, R.; Ohta, K.; Paggiaro, P.; Palkonen, S.; Palmer, S.; Papadopoulos, N. G.; Papi, A.; Passalacqua, G.; Pavord, I.; Pigearias, B.; Plavec, D.; Postma, D. S.; Price, D.; Rabe, K. F.; Radier Pontal, F.; Redon, J.; Rennard, S.; Roberts, J.; Robine, J. M.; Roca, J.; Roche, N.; Rodenas, F.; Roggeri, A.; Rolland, C.; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Ryan, D.; Samolinski, B.; Sanchez-Borges, M.; Schünemann, H. J.; Sheikh, A.; Shields, M.; Siafakas, N.; Sibille, Y.; Similowski, T.; Small, I.; Sola-Morales, O.; Sooronbaev, T.; Stelmach, R.; Sterk, P. J.; Stiris, T.; Sud, P.; Tellier, V.; To, T.; Todo-Bom, A.; Triggiani, M.; Valenta, R.; Valero, A. L.; Valiulis, A.; Valovirta, E.; van Ganse, E.; Vandenplas, O.; Vasankari, T.; Vestbo, J.; Vezzani, G.; Viegi, G.; Visier, L.; Vogelmeier, C.; Vontetsianos, T.; Wagstaff, R.; Wahn, U.; Wallaert, B.; Whalley, B.; Wickman, M.; Williams, D. M.; Wilson, N.; Yawn, B. P.; Yiallouros, P. K.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Yusuf, O. M.; Zar, H. J.; Zhong, N.; Zidarn, M.; Zuberbier, T.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will

  15. Equine recurrent airway obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Niedźwiedź

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Equine Recurrent Airway Obstruction (RAO, also known as heaves or broken wind, is one of the most common disease in middle-aged horses. Inflammation of the airway is inducted by organic dust exposure. This disease is characterized by neutrophilic inflammation, bronchospasm, excessive mucus production and pathologic changes in the bronchiolar walls. Clinical signs are resolved in 3-4 weeks after environmental changes. Horses suffering from RAO are susceptible to allergens throughout their lives, therefore they should be properly managed. In therapy the most importanthing is to eliminate dustexposure, administration of corticosteroids and use bronchodilators to improve pulmonary function.

  16. Advanced Pediatric Airway Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Charles M; Jabbour, Noel

    2017-10-01

    Simulation is an emerging and viable means to increase pediatric airway surgical training. A variety of simulators currently exist that may be used or modified for laryngoscopy, bronchoscopy, and endoscopic intervention, although anatomic realism and utility for complex procedures are limited. There is a need for further development of improved endoscopic and anatomic models. Innovative techniques are enabling small-scale manufacturing of generalizable and patient-specific simulators. The high acuity of the pediatric airway patient makes the use of simulation an attractive modality for training, competency maintenance, and patient safety quality-improvement studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NACFC Carolyn and C Richard Mattingly Leadership in Mental Health Care Award Mary M. Kontos Award NACFC Reflections ... help your infant or child manage their lung health, watch parents of children with CF and a respiratory therapist talk about the different techniques they use for airway clearance. ... Instagram Email Find a Clinical Trial Help us blaze ...

  18. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... center. Carrier Testing for Cystic Fibrosis CFTR-Related Metabolic Syndrome (CRMS) How Babies Are Screened in IRT-Only ... Nutrition in Children and Adults Clinical Care Guidelines Nutrition in Pediatrics Clinical ... Airway Clearance Therapies Clinical Care Guidelines Chronic Medications to Maintain Lung ...

  19. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Leaders About Us News Blog Chapters ... different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy to do. Infants and toddlers will need help from a parent or caregiver. Older kids and adults can choose ACTs that they can ...

  20. Upper airway evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.A.; Gefter, W.B.; Schnall, M.; Nordberg, J.; Listerud, J.; Lenkinski, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The authors are evaluating upper-airway sleep disorders with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and x-ray cine computed tomography (CT). Fixed structural anatomy is visualized with multisection spin-echo MR imaging, the dynamic component with cine CT. Unique aspects of the study are described in this paper

  1. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Their Families When There's More Than One Person With CF in the Same School Daily Life ... Awards and Grants Career Development Awards Research Awards Training Awards CF ... Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your ...

  2. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be taken through a nebulizer during ACTs. Inhaled antibiotics should be taken after ACTs are finished and the lungs are as clear of mucus as possible. This will allow the medication to reach deeply into the smaller airways to attack bacteria. Choose What's Best for You Your respiratory therapist ...

  3. Obstetric airway management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    face mask. There were 66 cases of aspiration (0.15%) and two mortalities. Both of the mortalities occurred secondary to solid food aspiration. Mendelson correctly identified delayed gastric emptying in the labouring patient, coupled with the loss of airway reflexes during general anaesthesia, as contributory factors to the ...

  4. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Team Your cystic fibrosis care team includes a group of CF health care professionals who partner with ... Awards and Grants Career Development Awards Research Awards Training Awards CF ... Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your ...

  5. Positive airway pressure treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and depression and a better mood Normal sleep patterns Lower blood pressure (in people with high blood pressure) Your health care provider will prescribe the type of PAP machine that ... patterns. Bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP or BIPAP) has ...

  6. Extraglottic airway devices: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma B

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bimla Sharma, Chand Sahai, Jayashree Sood Department of Anaesthesiology, Pain and Perioperative Medicine, Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi, India Abstract: Extraglottic airway devices (EADs have revolutionized the field of airway management. The invention of the laryngeal mask airway was a game changer, and since then, there have been several innovations to improve the EADs in design, functionality, safety and construction material. These have ranged from changes in the shape of the mask, number of cuffs and material used, like rubber, polyvinylchloride and latex. Phthalates, which were added to the construction material in order to increase device flexibility, were later omitted when this chemical was found to have serious adverse reproductive outcomes. The various designs brought out by numerous companies manufacturing EADs resulted in the addition of several devices to the airway market. These airway devices were put to use, many of them with inadequate or no evidence base regarding their efficacy and safety. To reduce the possibility of compromising the safety of the patient, the Difficult Airway Society (DAS formed the Airway Device Evaluation Project Team (ADEPT to strengthen the evidence base for airway equipment and vet the new extraglottic devices. A preuse careful analysis of the design and structure may help in better understanding of the functionality of a particular device. In the meantime, the search for the ideal EAD continues. Keywords: extraglottic airway devices, laryngeal mask airway, other extraglottic airway devices, safety, technology update

  7. Selection and fabrication of a non-woven polycarbonate urethane cover for a tissue engineered airway stent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Weiluan; Clauser, Johanna; Thiebes, Anja Lena; McGrath, Donnacha J.; McHugh, Peter E.; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Hennink, Wim E.; Kok, Robbert Jan

    2016-01-01

    One of the major problems in end-stage bronchotracheal cancer is stenosis of the upper airways, either due to luminal ingrowth of the tumor or mucus plugging. Airway stents that suppress tumor ingrowth and sustain mucociliary transport can alleviate these problems in end-stage bronchial cancer. We

  8. Biomarkers in Airway Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M Leung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inherent limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted clinicians and scientists to search for surrogate markers of airway diseases. Although few biomarkers have been widely accepted into the clinical armamentarium, the authors explore three sources of biomarkers that have shown promise as indicators of disease severity and treatment response. In asthma, exhaled nitric oxide measurements can predict steroid responsiveness and sputum eosinophil counts have been used to titrate anti-inflammatory therapies. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory plasma biomarkers, such as fibrinogen, club cell secretory protein-16 and surfactant protein D, can denote greater severity and predict the risk of exacerbations. While the multitude of disease phenotypes in respiratory medicine make biomarker development especially challenging, these three may soon play key roles in the diagnosis and management of airway diseases.

  9. Lipids in airway secretions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaskar, K.R.; DeFeudis O'Sullivan, D.; Opaskar-Hincman, H.; Reid, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Lipids form a significant portion of airway mucus yet they have not received the same attention that epithelial glycoproteins have. We have analysed, by thin layer chromatography, lipids present in airway mucus under 'normal' and hypersecretory (pathological) conditions.The 'normals' included (1) bronchial lavage obtained from healthy human volunteers and from dogs and (2) secretions produced ''in vitro'' by human (bronchial) and canine (tracheal) explants. Hypersecretory mucus samples included (1) lavage from dogs made bronchitic by exposure to SO 2 , (2) bronchial aspirates from acute and chronic tracheostomy patients, (3) sputum from patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis and (4) postmortem secretions from patients who died from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or from status asthmaticus. Cholesterol was found to be the predominant lipid in 'normal' mucus with lesser amounts of phospholipids. No glycolipids were detected. In the hypersecretory mucus, in addition to neutral and phospholipids, glycolipids were present in appreciable amounts, often the predominant species, suggesting that these may be useful as markers of disease. Radioactive precursors 14 C acetate and 14 C palmitate were incorporated into lipids secreted ''in vitro'' by canine tracheal explants indicating that they are synthesised by the airway. (author)

  10. Causes of the difficult airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanos, John G; Quereshy, Faisal A

    2010-03-01

    Recognizing a potentially difficult airway is important in avoiding a life-threatening emergency. There are 2 separate scenarios for considering the difficult airway: difficult mask ventilation (DMV) and difficult tracheal intubation (DTI). DMV can be described as lacking the ability to maintain oxygen saturation or lacking the ability to reverse signs of inadequate ventilation with positive-pressure mask ventilation under general anesthesia. DTI remains constant among anesthesia-related patient injuries, and is the third most common respiratory-related episode leading to death and possible brain damage. It is important to preoperatively assess every patient by completing a full history and physical. A thorough history can provide clues in detecting a possible difficult airway. Airway impairment has been further subdivided into the anatomic regions that affect the airway, namely above the larynx, supraglottic, glottic, subglottic, and tracheobronchial. This article discusses the factors that can result in a difficult airway. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Anticholinergic treatment in airways diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flynn, Robert A

    2009-10-01

    The prevalence of chronic airways diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma is increasing. They lead to symptoms such as a cough and shortness of breath, partially through bronchoconstriction. Inhaled anticholinergics are one of a number of treatments designed to treat bronchoconstriction in airways disease. Both short-acting and long-acting agents are now available and this review highlights their efficacy and adverse event profile in chronic airways diseases.

  12. Suppressed Belief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komarine Romdenh-Romluc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Moran’s revised conception of conscious belief requires us to reconceptualise suppressed belief. The work of Merleau-Ponty offers a way to do this. His account of motor-skills allows us to understand suppressed beliefs as pre-reflective ways of dealing with the world.

  13. The Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA) as an alternative to airway ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: To evaluate the possibility of airway management using a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) during dental procedures on mentally retarded (MR) patients and patients with genetic diseases. Design: A prospective pilot study. Setting: University Hospital. Methods: A pilot study was designed to induce general ...

  14. Incidence of unanticipated difficult airway using an objective airway score versus a standard clinical airway assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Anders Kehlet; Rosenstock, Charlotte Valentin; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    -specific assessment. Data from patients' pre-operative airway assessment are registered in the Danish Anaesthesia Database. Objective scores for intubation and mask ventilation grade the severity of airway managements. The accuracy of predicting difficult intubation and mask ventilation is measured for each group...... the examination and registration of predictors for difficult mask ventilation with a non-specified clinical airway assessment on prediction of difficult mask ventilation.Method/Design: We cluster-randomized 28 Danish departments of anaesthesia to airway assessment either by the SARI or by usual non...... that registration of the SARI and predictors for difficult mask ventilation are mandatory for the intervention group but invisible to controls....

  15. Rhinosinusitis and the lower airways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellings, Peter W.; Hens, Greet

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between upper and lower airway disease has been recognized for centuries, with recent studies showing a direct link between upper and airway inflammation in allergic patients. The mechanisms underlying the interaction between nasal and bronchial inflammation have primarily been

  16. Allergic Fungal Airway Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick, E M; Woolnough, K; Pashley, C H; Wardlaw, A J

    Fungi are ubiquitous and form their own kingdom. Up to 80 genera of fungi have been linked to type I allergic disease, and yet, commercial reagents to test for sensitization are available for relatively few species. In terms of asthma, it is important to distinguish between species unable to grow at body temperature and those that can (thermotolerant) and thereby have the potential to colonize the respiratory tract. The former, which include the commonly studied Alternaria and Cladosporium genera, can act as aeroallergens whose clinical effects are predictably related to exposure levels. In contrast, thermotolerant species, which include fungi from the Candida, Aspergillus, and Penicillium genera, can cause a persistent allergenic stimulus independent of their airborne concentrations. Moreover, their ability to germinate in the airways provides a more diverse allergenic stimulus, and may result in noninvasive infection, which enhances inflammation. The close association between IgE sensitization to thermotolerant filamentous fungi and fixed airflow obstruction, bronchiectasis, and lung fibrosis suggests a much more tissue-damaging process than that seen with aeroallergens. This review provides an overview of fungal allergens and the patterns of clinical disease associated with exposure. It clarifies the various terminologies associated with fungal allergy in asthma and makes the case for a new term (allergic fungal airway disease) to include all people with asthma at risk of developing lung damage as a result of their fungal allergy. Lastly, it discusses the management of fungirelated asthma.

  17. An interventional airway delivery service for congenital high airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaneza, M M C; Cameron, A; Clement, W A; Fairgrieve, R; Ledingham, M A; Morrissey, M S; Simpson, J; Wynne, D M; Kubba, H

    2015-08-01

    Congenital airway obstruction is rare but potentially fatal. We developed a complex airways interventional delivery team to manage such cases. Antenatal imaging detects airway compromise at an early stage and facilitates the planning of delivery procedures ('ex utero intrapartum treatment' and 'operation on placental support') which maintain feto-placental circulation whilst an airway is secured. A retrospective review was performed of cases in which ENT input was required at birth for airway obstruction. Four neonates were delivered before implementation of the service: two were intubated and another two underwent tracheostomy but died in the peri-natal period. Seven neonates were delivered after implementation of the service: six were intubated and one underwent immediate tracheostomy. Five subsequently underwent tracheostomy (three have since been decannulated). One child with multiple congenital anomalies died due to respiratory failure. Airway obstruction was caused by lymphatic malformation, teratoma, costo-craniomandibular syndrome and choristoma. In the absence of other anomalies, interventional airway delivery led to reduced mortality and improved outcomes.

  18. Airway necrosis after salvage esophagectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Norimitsu; Hokamura, Nobukazu; Tachimori, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    Salvage esophagectomy is the sole curative intent treatment for patients with persistent or recurrent locoregional disease after definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for esophageal carcinoma. However, salvage esophagectomy is a very high-risk operation, and airway necrosis is a fatal complication. Between 1997 and 2007, 49 patients with thoracic esophageal cancer underwent salvage esophagectomy after definitive CRT. We retrospectively compared patients with and without airway necrosis, and investigated operative procedures related to airway necrosis. Airway necrosis occurred in five patients (10.2%), of four patients (80%) died during their hospitalization. Airway necrosis seemed to be closely related to operative procedures, such as resection of bronchial artery and cervical and subcarinal lymph node dissection. Bronchogastric fistula following necrosis of gastric conduit occured in 2 patients reconstructed through posterior mediastinal route. Airway necrosis is a highly lethal complication after salvage esophagectomy. It is important in salvage esophagectomy to take airway blood supply into consideration sufficiently and to reconstruct through retrosternal route to prevent bronchogastric fistula. (author)

  19. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Oh; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Harada, Hiroaki; Kawahata, Kimito; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Dohi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4 + T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4 + T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects

  20. Effect of anti-IL-5 and IL-5 on airway hyperreactivity and eosinophils in guinea pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhout, A.J.M.; Ladenius, A.R.C.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Ark, van I.; Delsman, K.C.; Nijkamp, F.P.

    1993-01-01

    Chronic ovalbumin challenge of sensitized guinea pigs induces bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) eosinophilia, neutrophilia, and tracheal hyperreactivity. In the present study, the influence of monoclonal antibody to murine interleukin-5 (anti-IL-5) on these phenomena is examined. In ovalbumin-sensitized

  1. Airway fibroepithelial polyposis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Labarca

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroepithelial polyps are benign lesions, frequently found in the skin and genitourinary tract. Airway involvement is rare, and few case reports have been published. Our patient was a 79 y.o. male smoker, who was referred to us with a 3-month history of dry cough. At physical examination, the patient looked well, but a chest CT showed a 6-mm polyp lesion in his trachea. A flexible bronchoscopy confirmed this lesion, and forceps biopsies were performed. Argon plasma coagulation was used to completely resect and treat the lesion. Pathological analysis revealed a fibroepithelial polyp (FP. The aim of this manuscript is to report a case of FP with bronchoscopic management and to review the current literature about this condition.

  2. Airway Complications After Lung Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Laura; Machuzak, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Airway complications remain a significant source of morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation. The incidence of complications is wide-ranging depending on the definition of the event, and there is still no universally accepted grading system for airway findings after transplantation. Additionally, although surgical technique and organ preservation have improved, other modifiable risk factors remain unclear. The management is as wide-ranging as the definitions. A multimodality approach is often needed with airway stenting reserved for refractory cases and stent management by a transplant team with expertise in placement and management of long-term complications." Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Dexmedetomidine sedation for awake fiberoptic intubation of patients with difficult airways due to severe odontogenic cervicofacial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Barry C; Sutter, Steven J

    2011-06-01

    Odontogenic infections present challenging airway scenarios to surgeons and anesthesiologists. Among specialists, there is controversy over airway management for those patients with airways made difficult by trismus and swelling with anatomic impingement and derangement. Awake fiberoptic intubation has achieved favor in the oral and maxillofacial surgery and anesthesiology communities for management of such difficult airways, but patient comfort and anxiety management with traditional agents may prove hazardous because of potential suppression of protective mechanisms and respiratory depression. Three cases are presented showing the utility and safety of the use of dexmedetomidine sedation for presurgical airway instrumentation and insertion in patients with challenging airways because of severe cervicofacial odontogenic infections. Dexmedetomidine administration provided safe and effective sedation and anxiolysis for awake fiberoptic airway instrumentation and airway insertion in patients presenting with severe cervicofacial infections with difficult airways because of anatomic obstruction. Dexmedetomidine sedation is advocated for use in awake fiberoptic intubation of patients with cervicofacial infections and difficult airways because of its ability to provide sedation, analgesia, reversible anterograde amnesia, and anxiolysis without impairment of protective reflexes, respiratory depression, or hemodynamic compromise. One of the most significant challenges facing oral and maxillofacial surgeons is the difficult airway. Anatomically compromised airways present unique clinically daunting situations to both surgeon and anesthesiologist, who are both charged with the provision of safe, effective preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative airway management. Among these conditions, odontogenic infections and patients with head and neck trauma, temporomandibular disorders, orofacial tumors, and severe craniofacial anomalies present for surgical treatment by the

  4. Stenting of major airway constriction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiaomei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlated issues in the stenting treatment of major airway constriction. Methods: Nineteen cases of major airway stenting procedure were studied retrospectively. The clinical choice of stents of different advantages or deficiencies were discussed. The importance of intravenous anesthesia supporting, life-parameters monitoring during the procedures and the prevention of complications were analysed. Results: Under intravenous and local anesthesia, 19 Wallstents had been successively placed and relieved 19 cases of major airway constrictions due to malignant or benign diseases (15 of tumors, 3 of tuberculosis, 1 of tracheomalacia). Intravenous anesthesia and life-parameters monitoring had made the procedures more safe and precise. Conclusions: Major airway stenting is an reliable method for relieving tracheobronchial stenosis; and intravenous anesthesia supporting and life-parameters monitoring guarantee the satisfactions of procedures

  5. Airway management and morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    Morbidly obese patients present with excess fatty tissue externally on the breast, neck, thoracic wall and abdomen and internally in the mouth, pharynx and abdomen. This excess tissue tends to make access (intubation, tracheostomy) to and patency (during sedation or mask ventilation) of the upper...... in morbidly obese patients and should be followed by actions to counteract atelectasis formation. The decision as to weather to use a rapid sequence induction, an awake intubation or a standard induction with hypnotics should depend on the thorough airway examination and comorbidity and should not be based...... solely on whether morbid obesity is present or not. It is important to ensure sufficient depth of anaesthesia before initiating manipulation of the airway because inadequate anaesthesia depth predisposes to aspiration if airway management becomes difficult. The intubating laryngeal mask airway is more...

  6. Antimicrobial peptides in the airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, D M; Yim, S; Ryan, L K; Kisich, K O; Diamond, G

    2006-01-01

    The airway provides numerous defense mechanisms to prevent microbial colonization by the large numbers of bacteria and viruses present in ambient air. An important component of this defense is the antimicrobial peptides and proteins present in the airway surface fluid (ASF), the mucin-rich fluid covering the respiratory epithelium. These include larger proteins such as lysozyme and lactoferrin, as well as the cationic defensin and cathelicidin peptides. While some of these peptides, such as human beta-defensin (hBD)-1, are present constitutively, others, including hBD2 and -3 are inducible in response to bacterial recognition by Toll-like receptor-mediated pathways. These peptides can act as microbicides in the ASF, but also exhibit other activities, including potent chemotactic activity for cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems, suggesting they play a complex role in the host defense of the airway. Inhibition of antimicrobial peptide activity or gene expression can result in increased susceptibility to infections. This has been observed with cystic fibrosis (CF), where the CF phenotype leads to reduced antimicrobial capacity of peptides in the airway. Pathogenic virulence factors can inhibit defensin gene expression, as can environmental factors such as air pollution. Such an interference can result in infections by airway-specific pathogens including Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and influenza virus. Research into the modulation of peptide gene expression in animal models, as well as the optimization of peptide-based therapeutics shows promise for the treatment and prevention of airway infectious diseases.

  7. Vessel-guided airway tree segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Sporring, Jon; Ashraf, Haseem

    2010-01-01

    method is evaluated on 250 low dose computed tomography images from a lung cancer screening trial. Our experiments showed that applying the region growing algorithm on the airway appearance model produces more complete airway segmentations, leading to on average 20% longer trees, and 50% less leakage......This paper presents a method for airway tree segmentation that uses a combination of a trained airway appearance model, vessel and airway orientation information, and region growing. We propose a voxel classification approach for the appearance model, which uses a classifier that is trained...... to differentiate between airway and non-airway voxels. This is in contrast to previous works that use either intensity alone or hand crafted models of airway appearance. We show that the appearance model can be trained with a set of easily acquired, incomplete, airway tree segmentations. A vessel orientation...

  8. Suppression chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Akio.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To miniaturize the storage tank of condensated water in BWR reactor. Constitution: A diaphragm is provided in a suppression chamber thereby to partition the same into an inner compartment and an outer compartment. In one of said compartments there is stored clean water to be used for feeding at the time of separating the reactor and for the core spray system, and in another compartment there is stored water necessary for accomplishing the depressurization effect at the time of coolant loss accident. To the compartment in which clean water is stored there is connected a water cleaning device for constantly maintaining water in clean state. As this cleaning device an already used fuel pool cleaning device can be utilized. Further, downcomers for accomplishing the depressurization function are provided in both inner compartment and outer compartment. The capacity of the storage tank can be reduced by the capacity of clean water within the suppression chamber. (Ikeda, J.)

  9. Multiscale Vessel-guided Airway Tree Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Sporring, Jon; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a method for airway tree segmentation that uses a combination of a trained airway appearance model, vessel and airway orientation information, and region growing. The method uses a voxel classification based appearance model, which involves the use of a classifier that is trai......This paper presents a method for airway tree segmentation that uses a combination of a trained airway appearance model, vessel and airway orientation information, and region growing. The method uses a voxel classification based appearance model, which involves the use of a classifier...

  10. Membrane Currents in Airway Smooth Muscle: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke J Janssen

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological and pharmacological techniques were used to characterize the membrane conductance changes underlying spasmogen-evoked depolarization in airway smooth muscle (ASM. Changes included a transient activation of chloride ion channels and prolonged suppression of potassium ion channels; both changes are triggered by release of internally sequestered calcium ion and in turn cause opening of voltage-dependent calcium channels. The resultant influx of calcium ions contributes to contraction as well as to refilling of the internal calcium ion pool. Bronchodilators, on the other hand, act in part through activation of potassium channels, with consequent closure of calcium channels. The tools used to study ion channels in ASM are described, and the investigations of the roles of ion channels in ASM physiology (autacoid-evoked depolarization and hyperpolarization and pathophysiology (airway hyperresponsiveness are summarized. Finally, how the relationship between ion channels and ASM function/dysfunction may relate to the treatment of asthma and related breathing disorders is discussed.

  11. Summative interaction between astaxanthin, Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb761) and vitamin C in suppression of respiratory inflammation: a comparison with ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, David D; Varga, Balazs; Bak, Istvan; Juhasz, Bela; Mahmoud, Fadia F; Kalantari, Heybatullah; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Lekli, Istvan; Czompa, Attila; Tosaki, Arpad

    2011-01-01

    In this study, combinations of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract (EGb761) plus the carotenoid antioxidant astaxanthin (ASX) and vitamin C were evaluated for a summative dose effect in the inhibition of asthma-associated inflammation in asthmatic guinea-pigs. Ovalbumin-sensitized Hartley guinea-pigs challenged with ovalbumin aerosol to induce asthma, were administered EGb761, ASX, vitamin C or ibuprofen. Following killing, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was evaluated for inflammatory cell infiltrates and lung tissue cyclic nucleotide content. Each parameter measured was significantly altered to a greater degree by drug combinations, than by each component acting independently. An optimal combination was identified that included astaxanthin (10 mg/kg), vitamin C (200 mg/kg) and EGb761 (10 mg/kg), resulting in counts of eosinophils and neutrophils each 1.6-fold lower; macrophages 1.8-fold lower, cAMP 1.4-fold higher; and cGMP 2.04-fold higher than levels in untreated, asthmatic animals (p ASX and vitamin C are shown here to interact summatively to suppress inflammation with efficacy equal to or better than ibuprofen, a widely used non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID). Such combinations of non-toxic phytochemicals constitute powerful tools for the prevention of onset of acute and chronic inflammatory disease if consumed regularly by healthy individuals; and may also augment the effectiveness of therapy for those with established illness. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Arsenic trioxide, a potent inhibitor of NF-κB, abrogates allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Wei-Ping

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overactivation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB orchestrates airway eosinophilia, but does not dampen airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma. NF-κB repression by arsenic trioxide (As2O3 contributes to apoptosis of eosinophils (EOS in airways. Here we provide evidence that As2O3 abrogates allergen (OVA-induced airway eosinophilia by modulating the expression of IκBα, an NF-κB inhibitory protein, and decreases the airway hyperresponsiveness. Methods Using a murine model of asthma, the airway hyperresponsiveness was conducted by barometric whole-body plethysmography. Airway eosinophilia, OVA-specific IgE in serum, and chemokine eotaxin and RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were measured by lung histology, Diff-Quick staining, and ELISA. Chemokine-induced EOS chemotactic activity was evaluated using EOS chemotaxis assay. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and Western blot analysis were performed to assess pulmonary NF-κB activation and IκBα expression, respectively. Results As2O3 attenuated the allergen-induced serum IgE, chemokine expression of eotaxin and RANTES, and the EOS recruitment in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which is associated with an increased IκBα expression as well as a decreased NF-κB activation. Also, As2O3 suppressed the chemotaxis of EOS dose-dependently in vitro. Additionally, As2O3 significantly ameliorated the allergen-driven airway hyperresponsiveness, the cardinal feature underlying asthma. Conclusion These findings demonstrate an essential role of NF-κB in airway eosinophilia, and illustrate a potential dissociation between airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. As2O3 likely exerts its broad anti-inflammatory effects by suppression of NF-κB activation through augmentation of IκBα expression in asthma.

  13. Inhalation of inactivated‑Mycobacterium phlei prevents asthma‑mediated airway hyperresponsiveness and airway eosinophilia in mice by reducing IL‑5 and IL‑13 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Moyu; Luo, Zhixi; Lv, Shengqiu; Li, Chaoqian

    2016-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether inhalation of inactivated‑Mycobacterium phlei could prevent airway hyperresponsiveness and airway eosinophilia. A total of 24 male Balb/c mice were randomly divided into three groups: Normal control group (group A), asthma model group (group B) and the intervention group (group C), (8 mice/group). Group A mice were sensitized and with challenged saline and group B with ovalbumin (OVA). Group C mice were administered with aerosol Mycobacterium phlei once daily prior to the allergen challenge. Airway responsiveness in each group was assessed. All the animals were sacrificed and lung tissues, blood samples and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were harvested. Cell fractionation and differential cells were counted in serum and BALF. HE staining and alcian blue/periodic acid Schiff staining were used to measure airway eosinophilic inflammation and mucus production. The levels of the cytokines IL‑5, IL‑13 and IgE were measured in lung and BALF as determined by ELISA and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The results indicated that inactivated‑Mycobacterium phlei suppressed the airway hyperresponsiveness and mitigated airway eosinophilia induced by a methacholine challenge, and significantly reduced the levels of cytokines IL‑5 and IL‑13 in lung tissue and IgE level in BALF when compared with the OVA‑sensitized mice. In conclusion, inhalation of inactivated‑Mycobacterium phlei could reduce OVA‑induced airway hyperresponsiveness and may be a potential alternative therapy for allergic airway diseases.

  14. Purinergic signaling in the airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey; Brouns, Inge; Adriaensen, Dirk; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre

    2012-10-01

    Evidence for a significant role and impact of purinergic signaling in normal and diseased airways is now beyond dispute. The present review intends to provide the current state of knowledge of the involvement of purinergic pathways in the upper and lower airways and lungs, thereby differentiating the involvement of different tissues, such as the epithelial lining, immune cells, airway smooth muscle, vasculature, peripheral and central innervation, and neuroendocrine system. In addition to the vast number of well illustrated functions for purinergic signaling in the healthy respiratory tract, increasing data pointing to enhanced levels of ATP and/or adenosine in airway secretions of patients with airway damage and respiratory diseases corroborates the emerging view that purines act as clinically important mediators resulting in either proinflammatory or protective responses. Purinergic signaling has been implicated in lung injury and in the pathogenesis of a wide range of respiratory disorders and diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammation, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, and pulmonary hypertension. These ostensibly enigmatic actions are based on widely different mechanisms, which are influenced by the cellular microenvironment, but especially the subtypes of purine receptors involved and the activity of distinct members of the ectonucleotidase family, the latter being potential protein targets for therapeutic implementation.

  15. Postoperative Airway Obstruction by a Bone Fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Schober

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative airway obstructions are potentially life-threatening complications. These obstructions may be classified as functional (sagging tongue, laryngospasm, or bronchospasm, pathoanatomical (airway swelling or hematoma within the airways, or foreign body-related. Various cases of airway obstruction by foreign bodies have previously been reported, for example, by broken teeth or damaged airway instruments. Here we present the exceptional case of a postoperative airway obstruction due to a large fragment of the patient’s maxillary bone, left accidentally in situ after transoral surgical tumor resection. Concerning this type of airway obstruction, we discuss possible causes, diagnosis, and treatment options. Although it is an exceptional case after surgery, clinicians should be aware of this potentially life-threatening complication. In summary, this case demonstrates that the differential diagnosis of postoperative airway obstructions should include foreign bodies derived from surgery, including tissue and bone fragments.

  16. Clinical review: Management of difficult airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeron, Olivier; Amour, Julien; Vivien, Benoît; Aubrun, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Difficulties or failure in airway management are still important factors in morbidity and mortality related to anesthesia and intensive care. A patent and secure airway is essential to manage anesthetized or critically ill patients. Oxygenation maintenance during tracheal intubation is the cornerstone of difficult airway management and is always emphasized in guidelines. The occurrence of respiratory adverse events has decreased in claims for injuries due to inadequate airway management mainly at induction of anesthesia. Nevertheless, claim reports emphasize that airway emergencies, tracheal extubation and/or recovery of anesthesia phases are still associated with death or brain damage, indicating that additional educational support and management strategies to improve patient safety are required. The present brief review analyses specific problems of airway management related to difficult tracheal intubation and to difficult mask ventilation prediction. The review will focus on basic airway management including preoxygenation, and on some oxygenation and tracheal intubation techniques that may be performed to solve a difficult airway. PMID:17184555

  17. Clinical review: management of difficult airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeron, Olivier; Amour, Julien; Vivien, Benoît; Aubrun, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Difficulties or failure in airway management are still important factors in morbidity and mortality related to anesthesia and intensive care. A patent and secure airway is essential to manage anesthetized or critically ill patients. Oxygenation maintenance during tracheal intubation is the cornerstone of difficult airway management and is always emphasized in guidelines. The occurrence of respiratory adverse events has decreased in claims for injuries due to inadequate airway management mainly at induction of anesthesia. Nevertheless, claim reports emphasize that airway emergencies, tracheal extubation and/or recovery of anesthesia phases are still associated with death or brain damage, indicating that additional educational support and management strategies to improve patient safety are required. The present brief review analyses specific problems of airway management related to difficult tracheal intubation and to difficult mask ventilation prediction. The review will focus on basic airway management including preoxygenation, and on some oxygenation and tracheal intubation techniques that may be performed to solve a difficult airway.

  18. Extraction of Airways from CT (EXACT'09)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo, P.; Ginneken, B. van; Reinhardt, J.M.; Tarunashree, Y.; Jong, P.A. de; Irving, B.; Fetita, C.; Ortner, M.; Pinho, R.; Sijbers, J.; Feuerstein, M.; Fabijanska, A.; Bauer, C.; Beichel, R.; Mendoza, C.S.; Wiemker, R.; Lee, J. van der; Reeves, A.P.; Born, S.; Weinheimer, O.; Rikxoort, E.M. van; Tschirren, J.; Mori, K.; Odry, B.; Naidich, D.P.; Hartmann, I.J.; Hoffman, E.A.; Prokop, M.; Pedersen, J.H.; de Bruijne, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for establishing a reference airway tree segmentation, which was used to quantitatively evaluate fifteen different airway tree extraction algorithms in a standardized manner. Because of the sheer difficulty involved in manually constructing a complete reference

  19. Airway management and morbid obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    airway and the function of the lungs (decreased residual capacity and aggravated ventilation perfusion mismatch) worse than in lean patients. Proper planning and preparation of airway management is essential, including elevation of the patient's upper body, head and neck. Preoxygenation is mandatory......Morbidly obese patients present with excess fatty tissue externally on the breast, neck, thoracic wall and abdomen and internally in the mouth, pharynx and abdomen. This excess tissue tends to make access (intubation, tracheostomy) to and patency (during sedation or mask ventilation) of the upper...... in morbidly obese patients and should be followed by actions to counteract atelectasis formation. The decision as to weather to use a rapid sequence induction, an awake intubation or a standard induction with hypnotics should depend on the thorough airway examination and comorbidity and should not be based...

  20. Comparing the Laryngeal Mask Airway, Cobra Perilaryngeal Airway and Face Mask in Children Airway Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Beyza; Hatipoğlu, Zehra; Türktan, Mediha; Özcengiz, Dilek

    2016-04-01

    We compared the effects of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), face mask and Cobra perilaryngeal airway (PLA) in the airway management of spontaneously breathing paediatric patients undergoing elective inguinal surgery. In this study, 90 cases of 1-14-year-old children undergoing elective inguinal surgery were scheduled. The patients were randomly divided into three groups. Anaesthesia was provided with sevoflurane and 50%-50% nitrous oxide and oxygen. After providing an adequate depth of anaesthesia, supraglottic airway devices were inserted in the group I and II patients. The duration and number of insertion, haemodynamic parameters, plateau and peak inspiratory pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure of the patients were recorded preoperatively, after induction and at 5, 10, 15 and 30 min peroperatively. There were no statistical differences between the groups in terms of haemodynamic parameters (p>0.05). In group II, instrumentation success was higher and instrumentation time was shorter than group II. The positive end-expiratory pressure and plateau and peak inspiratory pressure values were statistically lower in group II (pairway safety and to avoid possible complications, LMA and Cobra PLA could be alternatives to face mask and that the Cobra PLA provided lower airway pressure and had a faster and more easy placement than LMA.

  1. Clinical review: Management of difficult airways

    OpenAIRE

    Langeron, Olivier; Amour, Julien; Vivien, Benoît; Aubrun, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Difficulties or failure in airway management are still important factors in morbidity and mortality related to anesthesia and intensive care. A patent and secure airway is essential to manage anesthetized or critically ill patients. Oxygenation maintenance during tracheal intubation is the cornerstone of difficult airway management and is always emphasized in guidelines. The occurrence of respiratory adverse events has decreased in claims for injuries due to inadequate airway management mainl...

  2. Airway management in Ludwig's angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, S P; Merry, A F; Anderson, B

    1999-12-01

    A 37-year-old 91 kg man presented with features of Ludwig's angina. Anaesthesia for incision and drainage of his submandibular abscess was undertaken by two specialist anaesthetists with an otorhinolaryngological surgeon prepared for immediate tracheostomy. After preoxygenation, gas induction with sevoflurane in oxygen was followed by a gush of pus into the oral cavity and laryngospam causing acute upper airway obstruction. This resolved with 25 mg of suxamethonium and an endotracheal tube was passed into the trachea with difficulty. Options for management of the difficult airway in Ludwig's angina are discussed.

  3. Emergency surgical airway management in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, C V; Nørskov, A K; Wetterslev, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The emergency surgical airway (ESA) is the final option in difficult airway management. We identified ESA procedures registered in the Danish Anaesthesia Database (DAD) and described the performed airway management. METHODS: We extracted a cohort of 452 461 adult patients undergoing...

  4. Airway Complications following ingestion of corrosive | Ezike ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Corrosive ingestion is a major health problem in our environment. The proximal third of the oesophagus and the upper airway are mostly affected. These frequently result in life threatening airway complications demanding urgent tracheostomy. Key words: Corrosives, Burns, Airway, Respiratory distress.

  5. Functional phenotype of airway myocytes from asthmatic airways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, David B.; Trian, Thomas; Siddiqui, Sana; Pascoe, Chris D.; Ojo, Oluwaseun O.; Johnson, Jill R.; Dekkers, Bart G. J.; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala; Bagchi, Rushita; Burgess, Janette K.; Kanabar, Varsha

    In asthma, the airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell plays a central role in disease pathogenesis through cellular changes which may impact on its microenvironment and alter ASM response and function. The answer to the long debated question of what makes a 'healthy' ASM cell become 'asthmatic' still

  6. Prolonged ozone exposure in an allergic airway disease model: Adaptation of airway responsiveness and airway remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Chang-Soo

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short-term exposure to high concentrations of ozone has been shown to increase airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR. Because the changes in AHR and airway inflammation and structure after chronic ozone exposure need to be determined, the goal of this study was to investigate these effects in a murine model of allergic airway disease. Methods We exposed BALB/c mice to 2 ppm ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks. We measured the enhanced pause (Penh to methacholine and performed cell differentials in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. We quantified the levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ in the supernatants of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids using enzyme immunoassays, and examined the airway architecture under light and electron microscopy. Results The groups exposed to ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks demonstrated decreased Penh at methacholine concentrations of 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/ml, with a dose-response curve to the right of that for the filtered-air group. Neutrophils and eosinophils increased in the group exposed to ozone for 4 weeks compared to those in the filtered-air group. The ratio of IL-4 to INF-γ increased significantly after exposure to ozone for 8 and 12 weeks compared to the ratio for the filtered-air group. The numbers of goblet cells, myofibroblasts, and smooth muscle cells showed time-dependent increases in lung tissue sections from the groups exposed to ozone for 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the increase in AHR associated with the allergic airway does not persist during chronic ozone exposure, indicating that airway remodeling and adaptation following repeated exposure to air pollutants can provide protection against AHR.

  7. Is surgical airway necessary for airway management in deep neck infections and Ludwig angina?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Mary M; Davis, James W; Parks, Steven N

    2011-02-01

    Deep neck infections are potentially life-threatening conditions because of airway compromise. Management requires early recognition, antibiotics, surgical drainage, and effective airway control. The Surgical Education and Self-Assessment Program 12 states that awake tracheostomy is the treatment of choice for these patients. With advanced airway control techniques such as retrograde intubation, GlideScope, and fiberoptic intubation, surgical airway is not required. A retrospective analysis of all deep neck abscesses treated from December 1999 to July 2006 was performed. All patients who underwent urgent or emergent surgery for Ludwig angina and submental, submandibular, sublingual, and parapharyngeal abscesses (Current Procedural Terminology codes 41015, 41016, 41017, 42320, and 42725) were included in our review. Charts were studied for age, presence of true Ludwig angina, presence of airway compromise, airway management, morbidity/mortality, and the requirement for surgical airway. Of 29 patients, 6 (20%) had symptoms consistent with true Ludwig angina. Nineteen (65.5%) had evidence of airway compromise. Eight (42%) of these 19 patients required advanced airway control techniques. No patient required a surgical airway, and no mortality resulted from airway compromise. Advance airway control techniques were required more often in patients with airway compromise (P Ludwig angina and deep neck abscesses requires good clinical judgment. Patients with deep neck infections and symptoms of airway compromise may be safely managed with advanced airway control techniques. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Alternaria extract activates autophagy that induces IL-18 release from airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Hiroki; Okazaki, Shintaro; Hayashi, Hisako; Kawakita, Akiko; Hosoki, Koa; Yasutomi, Motoko; Sur, Sanjiv; Ohshima, Yusei

    2015-09-04

    Alternaria alternata is a major outdoor allergen that causes allergic airway diseases. Alternaria extract (ALT-E) has been shown to induce airway epithelial cells to release IL-18 and thereby initiate Th2-type responses. We investigated the underlying mechanisms involved in IL-18 release from ALT-E-stimulated airway epithelial cells. Normal human bronchial epithelial cells and A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells were stimulated with ALT-E in the presence of different inhibitors of autophagy or caspases. IL-18 levels in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. The numbers of autophagosomes, an LC3-I to LC3-II conversion, and p62 degradation were determined by immunofluorescence staining and immunoblotting. 3-methyladenine and bafilomycin, which inhibit the formation of preautophagosomal structures and autolysosomes, respectively, suppressed ALT-E-induced IL-18 release by cells, whereas caspase 1 and 8 inhibitors did not. ALT-E-stimulation increased autophagosome formation, LC-3 conversion, and p62 degradation in airway epithelial cells. LPS-stimulation induced the LC3 conversion in A549 cells, but did not induce IL-18 release or p62 degradation. Unlike LPS, ALT-E induced airway epithelial cells to release IL-18 via an autophagy dependent, caspase 1 and 8 independent pathway. Although autophagy has been shown to negatively regulate canonical inflammasome activity in TLR-stimulated macrophages, our data indicates that this process is an unconventional mechanism of IL-18 secretion by airway epithelial cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Anaesthesia and subglottic airway obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: shared airway; jet ventilation; TIVA/TCI; laser excision; monitoring. Abstract. In this article, we describe the anaesthetic ... (Submitted: 2009-07-14, Accepted: 2010-10-04). S Afr J Anaesth Analg 2011;17(2):182-184 ... Jet ventilation and TCI/TIVA (total intravenous anaesthesia) are our techniques of choice for ...

  10. allergy, asthma airway and anaphylaxis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The perioperative preparation of children presenting for surgery aims to identify medical problems that might influence the outcome and to institute management strategies to reduce those risks. Respiratory and airway complications remain the most significant cause of morbidity and mortality in modern paediatric ...

  11. Pharyngeal airway changes following mandibular setback surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Ramesh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of dentofacial deformities with jaw osteotomies has an effect on airway anatomy and therefore mandibular setback surgery has the potential to diminish airway size. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of mandibular setback surgery on airway size. 8 consecutive patients were examined prospectively. All patients underwent mandibular setback surgery. Cephalometric analysis was performed preoperatively and 3 months post operatively with particular attention to pharyngeal airway changes. Pharyngeal airway size decreased considerably in all, patients thus predisposing to development of obstructive sleep apnea. Therefore, large anteroposterior discrepancies should be corrected by combined maxillary and mandibular osteotomies.

  12. Surgical airway in emergency department intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Lindsay A; Dunn, Mark; Mckeown, Dermot W; Oglesby, Angela J

    2011-06-01

    To determine the frequency of and primary indication for surgical airway during emergency department intubation. Prospectively collected data from all intubations performed in the emergency department from January 1999 to July 2007 were analysed to ascertain the frequency of surgical airway access. Original data were collected on a structured proforma, entered into a regional database and analysed. Patient records were then reviewed to determine the primary indication for a surgical airway. Emergency department intubation was undertaken in 2524 patients. Of these, only five patients (0.2%) required a surgical airway. The most common indication for a surgical airway was trauma in four of the five patients. Two patients had attempted rapid sequence induction before surgical airway. Two patients had gaseous inductions and one patient received no drugs. In all five patients, surgical airway was performed secondary to failed endotracheal intubation attempt(s) and was never the primary technique used. In our emergency department, surgical airway is an uncommon procedure. The rate of 0.2% is significantly lower than rates quoted in other studies. The most common indication for surgical airway was severe facial or neck trauma. Our emergency department has a joint protocol for emergency intubation agreed by the Departments of Emergency Medicine, Anaesthesia and Critical Care at the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary. We believe that the low surgical airway rate is secondary to this collaborative approach. The identified low rate of emergency department surgical airway has implications for training and maintenance of skills for emergency medicine trainees and physicians.

  13. Effect of Bronchial Thermoplasty on Airway Closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Brown

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Bronchial Thermoplasty, a procedure that applies thermal energy to the airway wall has been shown to impair the ability of airway to contract in response to methacholine chloride (Mch. The technique has been advocated as an alternative treatment for asthma that may permanently limit airway narrowing. In previous experimental studies in dogs and humans, it was shown that those airways treated with bronchial thermoplasty had significant impairment of Mch responsiveness. Methods In the present study, we investigated the ability of canine airways to close completely with very high concentrations of Mch after bronchial thermoplasty. Bronchial thermoplasty was performed on dogs using the Alair System, comprising a low power RF controller and a basket catheter with four electrodes. A local atomization of Mch agonist was delivered directly to the epithelium of the same airway locations with repeated challenges. Airway size was measured with computed tomography, and closure was considered to occur in any airway where the lumen fell below the resolution of the scanner (< 1 mm. Results Our results show that, while treated airways still have the capacity to close at very high doses of Mch, this ability is seriously impaired after treatment, requiring much higher doses. Conclusions Bronchial thermoplasty as currently applied seems to simply shift the entire dose response curve toward increasing airway size. Thus, this procedure simply serves to minimize the ability of airways to narrow under any level of stimulation.

  14. Airway malacia in children with achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoffy, Kimberly E; Modaff, Peggy; Pauli, Richard M

    2014-02-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the frequency of airway malacia in infants and young children with achondroplasia, a population well known to be at risk for a variety of respiratory problems. We also wished to evaluate what, if any, contribution airway malacia makes to the complex respiratory issues that may be present in those with achondroplasia. Retrospective chart review of all infants and young children with achondroplasia who were assessed through the Midwest Regional Bone Dysplasia Clinics from 1985 through 2012 (n = 236) was completed. Records of comprehensive clinical examinations, polysomnographic assessments, and airway visualization were reviewed and abstracted using a data collection form. Analyses were completed comparing the group with and those without evidence for airway malacia. Thirteen of 236 patients (5.5%) were found to have airway malacia. Most of those affected had lower airway involvement (9/13). The presence of airway malacia was correlated with an increased occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea as well as need for oxygen supplementation, airway surgeries and tracheostomy placement. Although estimates of the frequency of airway malacia in the general population are limited, its frequency in children with achondroplasia appears to be much higher than any published general population estimate. The presence of airway malacia appears to confound other breathing abnormalities in this population and results in the need for more invasive airway treatments. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Analysis of airways in computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is major cause of death and disability world-wide. It affects lung function through destruction of lung tissue known as emphysema and inflammation of airways, leading to thickened airway walls and narrowed airway lumen. Computed Tomography (CT) imaging...... have become the standard with which to assess emphysema extent but airway abnormalities have so far been more challenging to quantify. Automated methods for analysis are indispensable as the visible airway tree in a CT scan can include several hundreds of individual branches. However, automation...... the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial. This includes methods for extracting airway surfaces from the images and ways of achieving comparable measurements in airway branches through matching and anatomical labelling. The methods were used to study effects of differences in inspiration level at the time...

  16. Effects of Corni fructus on ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Seung-Hyung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease that is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR to allergens, airway oedema, increased mucus secretion, excess production of T helper-2 (Th2 cytokines, and eosinophil accumulation in the lungs. Corni fructus (CF is a fruit of Cornus officinalis Sieb. Et. Zucc. (Cornaceae and has been used in traditional Korean medicine as an anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and diuretic agent. To investigate the anti-asthmatic effects of CF and their underlying mechanism, we examined the influence of CF on the development of pulmonary eosinophilic inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma. Methods In this study, BALB/c mice were systemically sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA by intraperitoneal (i.p., intratracheal (i.t. injections and intranasal (i.n. inhalation of OVA. We investigated the effect of CF on airway hyperresponsiveness, pulmonary eosinophilic infiltration, various immune cell phenotypes, Th2 cytokine production, and OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE production. Results The CF-treated groups showed suppressed eosinophil infiltration, allergic airway inflammation, and AHR via reduced production of interleuin (IL -5, IL-13, and OVA-specific IgE. Conclusions Our data suggest that the therapeutic effects of CF in asthma are mediated by reduced production of Th2 cytokines (IL-5, eotaxin, and OVA-specific IgE and reduced eosinophil infiltration.

  17. Effect of Bronchial Thermoplasty on Airway Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert; Wizeman, William; Danek, Christopher; Mitzner, Wayne

    2007-10-12

    BACKGROUND: Bronchial Thermoplasty, a procedure that applies thermal energy to the airway wall has been shown to impair the ability of airway to contract in response to methacholine chloride (Mch). The technique has been advocated as an alternative treatment for asthma that may permanently limit airway narrowing. In previous experimental studies in dogs and humans, it was shown that those airways treated with bronchial thermoplasty had significant impairment of Mch responsiveness. METHODS: In the present study, we investigated the ability of canine airways to close completely with very high concentrations of Mch after bronchial thermoplasty. Bronchial thermoplasty was performed on dogs using the Alair System, comprising a low power RF controller and a basket catheter with four electrodes. A local atomization of Mch agonist was delivered directly to the epithelium of the same airway locations with repeated challenges. Airway size was measured with computed tomography, and closure was considered to occur in any airway where the lumen fell below the resolution of the scanner (Bronchial thermoplasty as currently applied seems to simply shift the entire dose response curve toward increasing airway size. Thus, this procedure simply serves to minimize the ability of airways to narrow under any level of stimulation.

  18. House dust mite allergen induces asthma via TLR4 triggering of airway structural cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAMMAD, Hamida; CHIEPPA, Marcello; PERROS, Frederic; WILLART, Monique A.; GERMAIN, Ronald N.; LAMBRECHT, Bart N.

    2009-01-01

    Barrier epithelial cells and airway dendritic cells (DC) make up the first line of defence against inhaled substances like house dust mite (HDM) allergen and endotoxin. We hypothesized that these cells need to communicate to cause allergic disease. Using irradiated chimeric mice, we demonstrate that TLR4 expression on radioresistant lung structural cells is required and sufficient for DC activation in the lung and for priming of effector T helper responses to HDM. TLR4 triggering on structural cells caused production of the innate proallergic cytokines thymic stromal lymphopoietin, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, interleukin-25 and IL-33. The absence of TLR4 on structural cells, but not on hematopoietic cells, abolished HDM driven allergic airway inflammation. Finally, inhalation of a TLR4 antagonist to target exposed epithelial cells suppressed the salient features of asthma including bronchial hyperreactivity. Our data identify an innate immune function of airway epithelial cells that drives allergic inflammation via activation of mucosal DCs. PMID:19330007

  19. Airway injury during emergency transcutaneous airway access: a comparison at cricothyroid and tracheal sites.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Salah, Nazar

    2009-12-01

    Oxygenation via the cricothyroid membrane (CTM) may be required in emergencies, but inadvertent tracheal cannulation may occur. In this study, we compared airway injury between the tracheal and CTM sites using different techniques for airway access.

  20. 75 FR 13079 - Action Affecting Export Privileges; MAHAN AIRWAYS; Mahan Airways, Mahan Tower, No. 21, Azadegan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... Regulations and TDO, a United Kingdom court found Mahan Airways in contempt of court on February 1, 2010, for... contempt finding against Mahan Airways in the U.K. litigation, which I understand is still ongoing. I note...

  1. Mediators on human airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, C; Johnson, P; Anticevich, S; Ammit, A; McKay, K; Hughes, M; Black, J

    1997-01-01

    1. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in asthma may be due to several abnormalities, but must include alterations in the airway smooth muscle responsiveness and/or volume. 2. Increased responsiveness of airway smooth muscle in vitro can be induced by certain inflammatory cell products and by induction of sensitization (atopy). 3. Increased airway smooth muscle growth can also be induced by inflammatory cell products and atopic serum. 4. Mast cell numbers are increased in the airways of asthmatics and, in our studies, in airway smooth muscle that is sensitized and hyperresponsive. 5. We propose that there is a relationship between mast cells and airway smooth muscle cells which, once an allergic process has been initiated, results in the development of critical features in the lungs in asthma.

  2. Extraction of airways from CT (EXACT’09)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Ginneken, Bram van; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a framework for establishing a reference airway tree segmentation, which was used to quantitatively evaluate 15 different airway tree extraction algorithms in a standardized manner. Because of the sheer difficulty involved in manually constructing a complete reference standard...... from scratch, we propose to construct the reference using results from all algorithms that are to be evaluated. We start by subdividing each segmented airway tree into its individual branch segments. Each branch segment is then visually scored by trained observers to determine whether...... or not it is a correctly segmented part of the airway tree. Finally, the reference airway trees are constructed by taking the union of all correctly extracted branch segments. Fifteen airway tree extraction algorithms from different research groups are evaluated on a diverse set of 20 chest computed tomography (CT) scans...

  3. Airway injury during high-level exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippelen, Pascale; Anderson, Sandra D

    2012-05-01

    Airway epithelial cells act as a physical barrier against environmental toxins and injury, and modulate inflammation and the immune response. As such, maintenance of their integrity is critical. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that exercise can cause injury to the airway epithelium. This seems the case particularly for competitive athletes performing high-level exercise, or when exercise takes place in extreme environmental conditions such as in cold dry air or in polluted air. Dehydration of the small airways and increased forces exerted on to the airway surface during severe hyperpnoea are thought to be key factors in determining the occurrence of injury of the airway epithelium. The injury-repair process of the airway epithelium may contribute to the development of the bronchial hyper-responsiveness that is documented in many elite athletes.

  4. Perillyl alcohol suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Oh; Okunishi, Katsuhide; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Harada, Hiroaki; Kawahata, Kimito; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko [Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Dohi, Makoto, E-mail: mdohi-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Institute of Respiratory Immunology, Shibuya Clinic for Respiratory Diseases and Allergology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits the mevalonate pathway. •We examined whether POH suppresses immune responses with a mouse model of asthma. •POH treatment during sensitization suppressed Ag-induced priming of CD4{sup +} T cells. •POH suppressed airway eosinophila and cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes. -- Abstract: Perillyl alcohol (POH) is an isoprenoid which inhibits farnesyl transferase and geranylgeranyl transferase, key enzymes that induce conformational and functional changes in small G proteins to conduct signal production for cell proliferation. Thus, it has been tried for the treatment of cancers. However, although it affects the proliferation of immunocytes, its influence on immune responses has been examined in only a few studies. Notably, its effect on antigen-induced immune responses has not been studied. In this study, we examined whether POH suppresses Ag-induced immune responses with a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. POH treatment of sensitized mice suppressed proliferation and cytokine production in Ag-stimulated spleen cells or CD4{sup +} T cells. Further, sensitized mice received aerosolized OVA to induce allergic airway inflammation, and some mice received POH treatment. POH significantly suppressed indicators of allergic airway inflammation such as airway eosinophilia. Cytokine production in thoracic lymph nodes was also significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate that POH suppresses antigen-induced immune responses in the lung. Considering that it exists naturally, POH could be a novel preventive or therapeutic option for immunologic lung disorders such as asthma with minimal side effects.

  5. Improvised bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvised bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP) device at the National Hospital Abuja gives immediate improvement in respiratory rate and oxygenation in neonates with respiratory distress.

  6. Cholinergic Regulation of Airway Inflammation and Remodelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Kolahian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine is the predominant parasympathetic neurotransmitter in the airways that regulates bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion. Recent findings suggest that acetylcholine regulates additional functions in the airways, including inflammation and remodelling during inflammatory airway diseases. Moreover, it has become apparent that acetylcholine is synthesized by nonneuronal cells and tissues, including inflammatory cells and structural cells. In this paper, we will discuss the regulatory role of acetylcholine in inflammation and remodelling in which we will focus on the role of the airway smooth muscle cell as a target cell for acetylcholine that modulates inflammation and remodelling during respiratory diseases such as asthma and COPD.

  7. Airway contractility and remodeling : Links to asthma symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    West, Adrian R.; Syyong, Harley T.; Siddiqui, Sana; Pascoe, Chris D.; Murphy, Thomas M.; Maarsingh, Harm; Deng, Linhong; Maksym, Geoffrey N.; Bosse, Ynuk

    Respiratory symptoms are largely caused by obstruction of the airways. In asthma, airway narrowing mediated by airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction contributes significantly to obstruction. The spasmogens produced following exposure to environmental triggers, such as viruses or allergens, are

  8. Effect of sildenafil on acrolein-induced airway inflammation and mucus production in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T; Liu, Y; Chen, L; Wang, X; Hu, X-R; Feng, Y-L; Liu, D-S; Xu, D; Duan, Y-P; Lin, J; Ou, X-M; Wen, F-Q

    2009-05-01

    Airway inflammation with mucus overproduction is a distinguishing pathophysiological feature of many chronic respiratory diseases. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors have shown anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, the effect of sildenafil, a potent inhibitor of PDE5 that selectively degrades cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), on acrolein-induced inflammation and mucus production in rat airways was examined. Rats were exposed to acrolein for 14 and 28 days. Sildenafil or distilled saline was administered intragastrically prior to acrolein exposure. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was acquired for cell count and the detection of pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Lung tissue was examined for cGMP content, nitric oxide (NO)-metabolite levels, histopathological lesion scores, goblet cell metaplasia and mucin production. The results suggested that sildenafil pretreatment reversed the significant decline of cGMP content in rat lungs induced by acrolein exposure, and suppressed the increase of lung NO metabolites, the BALF leukocyte influx and pro-inflammatory cytokine release. Moreover, sildenafil pretreatment reduced acrolein-induced Muc5ac mucin synthesis at both mRNA and protein levels, and attenuated airway inflammation, as well as epithelial hyperplasia and metaplasia. In conclusion, sildenafil could attenuate airway inflammation and mucus production in the rat model, possibly through the nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate pathway, and, thus, might have a therapeutic potential for chronic airway diseases.

  9. Curcumin regulates airway epithelial cell cytokine responses to the pollutant cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennolds, Jessica; Malireddy, Smitha; Hassan, Fatemat; Tridandapani, Susheela; Parinandi, Narasimham [Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Boyaka, Prosper N. [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle, E-mail: Estelle.boyaka@osumc.edu [Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium induces secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 by two distinct pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium increases NAPDH oxidase activity leading to Erk activation and IL-8 secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Curcumin prevents cadmium-induced secretion of both IL-6 and IL-8 by airway cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Curcumin could be use to suppress lung inflammation due to cadmium inhalation. -- Abstract: Cadmium is a toxic metal present in the environment and its inhalation can lead to pulmonary disease such as lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These lung diseases are characterized by chronic inflammation. Here we show that exposure of human airway epithelial cells to cadmium promotes a polarized apical secretion of IL-6 and IL-8, two pivotal pro-inflammatory cytokines known to play an important role in pulmonary inflammation. We also determined that two distinct pathways controlled secretion of these proinflammatory cytokines by human airway epithelial cells as cadmium-induced IL-6 secretion occurs via an NF-{kappa}B dependent pathway, whereas IL-8 secretion involves the Erk1/2 signaling pathway. Interestingly, the natural antioxidant curcumin could prevent both cadmium-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by human airway epithelial cells. In conclusion, curcumin could be used to prevent airway inflammation due to cadmium inhalation.

  10. Curcumin regulates airway epithelial cell cytokine responses to the pollutant cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennolds, Jessica; Malireddy, Smitha; Hassan, Fatemat; Tridandapani, Susheela; Parinandi, Narasimham; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cadmium induces secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 by two distinct pathways. ► Cadmium increases NAPDH oxidase activity leading to Erk activation and IL-8 secretion. ► Curcumin prevents cadmium-induced secretion of both IL-6 and IL-8 by airway cells. ► Curcumin could be use to suppress lung inflammation due to cadmium inhalation. -- Abstract: Cadmium is a toxic metal present in the environment and its inhalation can lead to pulmonary disease such as lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These lung diseases are characterized by chronic inflammation. Here we show that exposure of human airway epithelial cells to cadmium promotes a polarized apical secretion of IL-6 and IL-8, two pivotal pro-inflammatory cytokines known to play an important role in pulmonary inflammation. We also determined that two distinct pathways controlled secretion of these proinflammatory cytokines by human airway epithelial cells as cadmium-induced IL-6 secretion occurs via an NF-κB dependent pathway, whereas IL-8 secretion involves the Erk1/2 signaling pathway. Interestingly, the natural antioxidant curcumin could prevent both cadmium-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by human airway epithelial cells. In conclusion, curcumin could be used to prevent airway inflammation due to cadmium inhalation.

  11. GS143, an IκB ubiquitination inhibitor, inhibits allergic airway inflammation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Koichi; Wakashin, Hidefumi; Oki, Mie; Kagami, Shin-ichiro; Suto, Akira; Ikeda, Kei; Watanabe, Norihiko; Iwamoto, Itsuo; Furuichi, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation with intense eosinophil infiltration and mucus hyper-production, in which antigen-specific Th2 cells play critical roles. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway has been demonstrated to be essential for the production of Th2 cytokines and chemokines in the airways in murine asthma models. In the present study, we examined the effect of GS143, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of IκB ubiquitination, on antigen-induced airway inflammation and Th2 cytokine production in mice. Intranasal administration of GS143 prior to antigen challenge suppressed antigen-induced NF-κB activation in the lung of sensitized mice. Intranasal administration of GS143 also inhibited antigen-induced eosinophil and lymphocyte recruitment into the airways as well as the expression of Th2 cytokines and eotaxin in the airways. Moreover, GS143 inhibited antigen-induced differentiation of Th2 cells but not of Th1 cells in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that IκB ubiquitination inhibitor may have therapeutic potential against asthma

  12. Teaching consultants airway management skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nargozian, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Airway management skills are integral to the practice of anaesthesiology and also to the practice of emergency medicine and allied health professions such as respiratory care, emergency medical technology, and emergency and critical care nursing. The basic information to be taught is the same but the level of detail will vary depending on the audience. The learning process usually involves progression from didactic lessons to skills training on inanimate models to supervised clinical practice. Modalities that may be used for skills training include cadavers, recently dead patients, videotapes, mannequins, simulators and virtual reality trainers. To maintain knowledge and skills, review and possible retraining should be conducted on an approximately annual basis.

  13. Airway management: induced tension pneumoperitoneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khedher; Amine, El Ghali Mohamed; Abdelbaki, Azouzi; Jihene, Ayachi; Khaoula, Meddeb; Yamina, Hamdaoui; Mohamed, Boussarsar

    2016-01-01

    Pneumoperitoneum is not always associated with hollow viscus perforation. Such condition is called non-surgical or spontaneous pneumoperitoneum. Intrathoracic causes remain the most frequently reported mechanism inducing this potentially life threatening complication. This clinical condition is associated with therapeutic dilemma. We report a case of a massive isolated pneumoperitoneum causing acute abdominal hypertension syndrome, in a 75 year female, which occurred after difficult airway management and mechanical ventilation. Emergent laparotomy yielded to full recovery. The recognition of such cases for whom surgical management can be avoided is primordial to avoid unnecessary laparotomy and its associated morbidity particularly in the critically ill.

  14. Native Small Airways Secrete Bicarbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Shamsuddin, A. K. M.; Quinton, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of Cl− impermeability in cystic fibrosis (CF) and the cloning of the responsible channel, CF pathology has been widely attributed to a defect in epithelial Cl− transport. However, loss of bicarbonate (HCO3−) transport also plays a major, possibly more critical role in CF pathogenesis. Even though HCO3− transport is severely affected in the native pancreas, liver, and intestines in CF, we know very little about HCO3− secretion in small airways, the principle site of morbidi...

  15. Airway management in spontaneously breathing anaesthetized children: comparison of the Laryngeal Mask Airway with the cuffed oropharyngeal airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamaya, Biruta

    2002-06-01

    The efficacy and safety of the smallest size of the cuffed oropharyngeal airway (COPA) for school age, spontaneously breathing children was investigated and compared with the Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA). Seventy children of school age (7-16 years) were divided into two groups: the COPA (n=35) and the LMA (n=35). Induction was with propofol i.v. or halothane, nitrous oxide, oxygen and fentanyl. After depression of laryngopharyngeal reflexes, a COPA size 8 cm or an LMA was inserted. Ventilation was manually assisted until spontaneous breathing was established. For maintenance, propofol i.v. and fentanyl or halothane with nitrous oxide were used. Local anaesthesia or peripheral blocks were also used. Both extratracheal airways had a highly successful insertion rate, but more positional manoeuvres to achieve a satisfactory airway were required with the COPA, 28.6% versus LMA 2.9%. The need to change the method of airway management was higher (8.6%) in the COPA group. After induction, the need for assisted ventilation was higher in the LMA group 54.3% versus 20% in the COPA group. Airway reaction to cuff inflation was higher in the LMA group 14.3% versus COPA 5.7%. Problems during surgery were similar, except continuous chin support to establish an effective airway was more frequent (11.4%) in the COPA group. In the postoperative period, blood on the device and incidence of sore throat were detected less in the COPA group. The COPA is a good extratracheal airway that provides new possibilities for airway management in school age children with an adequate and well sealed airway, during spontaneous breathing or during short-term assisted manual ventilation.

  16. Bronchology Treatment Of The Malignant Airway Stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slivka, R. et al

    2007-01-01

    Central airway stenosis is benign or malignant etiology. Multidiscplinary approach is useful in treatment central airway stenosis. In inoperable cases, interventional bronchology is good therapeutic alternative. We can use NdYAG laser, argon plasma coagulation, elektrocautery, cryotherapy, photodynamic therapy and stents for obstruction release. In malignant stenosis, we combine often methods of the interventional bronchology with brachytherapy, chemotherapy and external radiotherapy. (author)

  17. Intravenous lidocaine suppresses fentanyl-induced cough in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Gecaj-Gashi, Agreta; Nikolova-Todorova, Zorica; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Gashi, Musli

    2013-01-01

    Objective Fentanyl-induced cough is usually mild and transitory, but it can be undesirable in patients with increased intracranial pressure, open wounds of the eye, dissecting aortic aneurism, pneumothorax, and reactive airway disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of lidocaine in suppressing fentanyl-induced cough in children during induction in general anesthesia. Methods One hundred and eighty-six children of both sexes, aged between 4?10?years, ASA physical status I an...

  18. Difficult airway response team: a novel quality improvement program for managing hospital-wide airway emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Lynette J; Herzer, Kurt R; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I; Berkow, Lauren C; Haut, Elliott R; Hillel, Alexander T; Miller, Christina R; Feller-Kopman, David J; Schiavi, Adam J; Xie, Yanjun J; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W; Mirski, Marek A

    2015-07-01

    Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. We developed a quality improvement program-the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)-to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had 3 core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a Web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index >40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous or current tracheostomy. Twenty

  19. Video laryngoscopes and the obstetric airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Brown, S; Russell, R

    2015-05-01

    The pitfalls surrounding securing the airway in the obstetric patient are well documented. From Tunstall's original failed intubation drill onwards, there has been progress both in recognition of the difficulties of airway management in the pregnant patient and development of algorithms to enhance patient safety. Current trends in obstetric anaesthesia have resulted in a significant decrease in exposure of anaesthetists, especially trainees, to caesarean section under general anaesthesia, compounding the difficulties in safely managing the airway. Video laryngoscopes have recently appeared in airway algorithms. They improve glottic visualisation and are useful in the management of the difficult non-obstetric airway, including those in morbidly obese patients and in the setting of a rapid-sequence induction. There is growing interest in the potential use of video laryngoscopes in the obstetric population and as a teaching tool to maximise training opportunities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Laryngeal tube II : alternative airway for children?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalk, R; Scheller, B; Peter, N; Rosskopf, W; Byhahn, C; Zacharowski, K; Meininger, D

    2011-06-01

    Difficult airway situations both expected and unexpected, present major challenges to every anesthesiologist, especially in pediatric anesthesia. However, the integration of extraglottic airway devices, such as the laryngeal mask, into the algorithm of difficult airways has improved the handling of difficult airway situations. A device for establishing a supraglottic airway, the laryngeal tube (LT), was introduced in 1999. The LT is an extraglottic airway designed to secure a patent airway during either spontaneous breathing or controlled ventilation. The design of the device has been revised several times and a further development is the LTS II/LTS-D, which provides an additional channel for the insertion of a gastric drain tube. This article reports on the successful use of the LTS II in 12 children aged from 2 days to 6 years when endotracheal intubation, alternative mask or laryngeal mask ventilation failed. Use of the LTS II was associated with a high level of success, securing the airway when other techniques had failed. The potential advantage of the LTS II over the standard LT is an additional suction port, which allows gastric tube placement and can be used as an indirect indicator of correct placement. With a modified insertion technique using an Esmarch manoeuvre, placement was simple and fast to perform. In emergency situations when direct laryngoscopy fails or is too time-consuming the LTS II tube is recommended as an alternative device to secure the airway. As with all extraglottic airway devices, familiarity and clinical experience with the respective device and the corresponding insertion technique are essential for safe and successful use, especially in emergency situations.

  1. Vaccination against IL-33 Inhibits Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Inflammation in a House Dust Mite Model of Asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Lei

    Full Text Available In several clinical and experimental studies IL-33 and its receptor have been found to play important roles in the development of asthma and allergic airway inflammation. We evaluated the effects of vaccination against IL-33 in a mouse model of airway inflammation induced by house dust mite (HDM allergen. Balb/c mice received the IL-33 vaccine subcutaneously, followed by intranasal administration of HDM for up to six weeks. Vaccination against IL-33 induced high titers of specific anti-IL-33 IgG antibodies that inhibited HDM-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR in the conducting airways and tissue damping. The vaccination also attenuated the HDM-induced elevation in the numbers of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and suppressed the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the airways. Furthermore, the levels of IL-17A, IL-25, IL-33 and TSLP in lung tissue homogenates were reduced by vaccination against IL-33. These observations demonstrate that vaccination against IL-33 inhibits HDM-induced development of AHR, airway inflammation and production of inflammatory cytokines. The results also indicate an important role of IL-33 in the regulation of AHR of the distal lung compartments. Thus, administration of such a vaccine is potentially an effective therapeutic tool for treating allergic asthma.

  2. Nicotine impairs cyclooxygenase-2-dependent kinin-receptor-mediated murine airway relaxations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuan, E-mail: yuan.xu@ki.se; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Cigarette smoke induces local inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. In asthmatics, it worsens the symptoms and increases the risk for exacerbation. The present study investigates the effects of nicotine on airway relaxations in isolated murine tracheal segments. Methods: Segments were cultured for 24 h in the presence of vehicle, nicotine (10 μM) and/or dexamethasone (1 μM). Airway relaxations were assessed in myographs after pre-contraction with carbachol (1 μM). Kinin receptors, cyclooxygenase (COX) and inflammatory mediator expressions were assessed by real-time PCR and confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Results: The organ culture procedure markedly increased bradykinin- (selective B{sub 2} receptor agonist) and des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin- (selective B{sub 1} receptor agonist) induced relaxations, and slightly increased relaxation induced by isoprenaline, but not that induced by PGE{sub 2}. The kinin receptor mediated relaxations were epithelium-, COX-2- and EP2-receptor-dependent and accompanied by drastically enhanced mRNA levels of kinin receptors, as well as inflammatory mediators MCP-1 and iNOS. Increase in COX-2 and mPGES-1 was verified both at mRNA and protein levels. Nicotine selectively suppressed the organ-culture-enhanced relaxations induced by des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin and bradykinin, at the same time reducing mPGES-1 mRNA and protein expressions. α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitors α-bungarotoxin and MG624 both blocked the nicotine effects on kinin B{sub 2} receptors, but not those on B{sub 1}. Dexamethasone completely abolished kinin-induced relaxations. Conclusion: It is tempting to conclude that a local inflammatory process per se could have a bronchoprotective component by increasing COX-2 mediated airway relaxations and that nicotine could impede this safety mechanism. Dexamethasone further reduced airway inflammation together with relaxations. This might contribute to the steroid resistance seen in

  3. Nicotine impairs cyclooxygenase-2-dependent kinin-receptor-mediated murine airway relaxations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yuan; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cigarette smoke induces local inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. In asthmatics, it worsens the symptoms and increases the risk for exacerbation. The present study investigates the effects of nicotine on airway relaxations in isolated murine tracheal segments. Methods: Segments were cultured for 24 h in the presence of vehicle, nicotine (10 μM) and/or dexamethasone (1 μM). Airway relaxations were assessed in myographs after pre-contraction with carbachol (1 μM). Kinin receptors, cyclooxygenase (COX) and inflammatory mediator expressions were assessed by real-time PCR and confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Results: The organ culture procedure markedly increased bradykinin- (selective B 2 receptor agonist) and des-Arg 9 -bradykinin- (selective B 1 receptor agonist) induced relaxations, and slightly increased relaxation induced by isoprenaline, but not that induced by PGE 2 . The kinin receptor mediated relaxations were epithelium-, COX-2- and EP2-receptor-dependent and accompanied by drastically enhanced mRNA levels of kinin receptors, as well as inflammatory mediators MCP-1 and iNOS. Increase in COX-2 and mPGES-1 was verified both at mRNA and protein levels. Nicotine selectively suppressed the organ-culture-enhanced relaxations induced by des-Arg 9 -bradykinin and bradykinin, at the same time reducing mPGES-1 mRNA and protein expressions. α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitors α-bungarotoxin and MG624 both blocked the nicotine effects on kinin B 2 receptors, but not those on B 1 . Dexamethasone completely abolished kinin-induced relaxations. Conclusion: It is tempting to conclude that a local inflammatory process per se could have a bronchoprotective component by increasing COX-2 mediated airway relaxations and that nicotine could impede this safety mechanism. Dexamethasone further reduced airway inflammation together with relaxations. This might contribute to the steroid resistance seen in some patients with asthma

  4. Effects of Ex Vivo y-Tocopherol on Airway Macrophage ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated inflammation and altered immune responses are features found in atopic asthmatic airways. Recent studies indicate y-tocopherol (GT) supplementation can suppress airway inflammation in allergic asthma. We studied the effects of in vitro GT supplementation on receptor-mediated phagocytosis and expression of cell surface molecules associated with innate and adaptive immunity on sputum-derived macrophages. Cells from nonsmoking healthy (n = 6)and mild house dust mite-sensitive allergic asthmatics (n =6) were treated ex vivo with GT (300 uM) or saline (control). Phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan A bioparticles (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and expression of surface molecules associated with innate and adaptive immunity were assessed using flow cytometry. GT caused significantly decreased (p innate and adaptive immune response elements, and atopic status appears to be an important factor. Recent studies on the effects of the fat-soluble steriod hormone vitamins D and E suggest that dietary suplementation with these vitamins may be helpful for the prevention or in the treatment of inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases, including atopic asthma.

  5. Post-extubation airway obstruction. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro SÁNCHEZ-TABERNERO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: airway obstruction after extubation in any surgery is a critical event with low incidence, which may require reintubation or tracheostomy, which often otolaryngologist is required. Objective: To determine the prevalence of BVA and its causes through systematic literature review. Method: Literature review in PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane clinical trials, meta-analysis, reviews and case series and control over airway obstruction after extubation that requires reintubation in adults. Results: 6 studies and one clinical practice guidelines were selected. The most common cause of extubation failure is blocking the airway for various reasons (pharyngeal muscle weakness residual effect -often farmacologycal-, laryngospasm, vocal cord paralysis, edema of upper respiratory tract, cervical postoperative hematoma, foreign bodies or secretions. Most cases of re-intubation occurred within 2 hours after extubation. Conclusions: The most common cause of failure after general anesthesia extubation is blocking the airway generally caused by residual neuromuscular blocking effect. Airway obstruction risk increases in airway and head and neck surgery. Difficult intubation guidlines have improved performance and reduced adverse events and similar strategies must be implemented in extubation. The procedure extubation and reintubation should be documented. Working groups airway must be multidisciplinary and include specialists in otolaryngology.

  6. Color analysis of the human airway wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Deepa; McLennan, Geoffrey; Donnelley, Martin; Delsing, Angela; Suter, Melissa; Flaherty, Dawn; Zabner, Joseph; Hoffman, Eric A.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2002-04-01

    A bronchoscope can be used to examine the mucosal surface of the airways for abnormalities associated with a variety of lung diseases. The diagnosis of these abnormalities through the process of bronchoscopy is based, in part, on changes in airway wall color. Therefore it is important to characterize the normal color inside the airways. We propose a standardized method to calibrate the bronchoscopic imaging system and to tabulate the normal colors of the airway. Our imaging system consists of a Pentium PC and video frame grabber, coupled with a true color bronchoscope. The calibration procedure uses 24 standard color patches. Images of these color patches at three different distances (1, 1.5, and 2 cm) were acquired using the bronchoscope in a darkened room, to assess repeatability and sensitivity to illumination. The images from the bronchoscope are in a device-dependent Red-Green-Blue (RGB) color space, which was converted to a tri-stimulus image and then into a device-independent color space sRGB image by a fixed polynomial transformation. Images were acquired from five normal human volunteer subjects, two cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and one normal heavy smoker subject. The hue and saturation values of regions within the normal airway were tabulated and these values were compared with the values obtained from regions within the airways of the CF patients and the normal heavy smoker. Repeated measurements of the same region in the airways showed no measurable change in hue or saturation.

  7. Nurses' Awareness about Principles of Airway Suctioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad; Shahbazi, Sara

    2017-08-01

    Airway suctioning is one of the most common interventions for patients with respiratory disorders and having adequate knowledge in implementing this technique is quite crucial for nurses. To assess the nurses' awareness about principles of airway suctioning. This study was a cross-sectional study done on 85 staff nurses' in Vali-Asr hospital. Sampling was based on census data collection. A researcher made questionnaire was used for assessment of nurses' awareness about the principles of airway suctioning. The validity and reliability (Cronbach's alpha=0.78) of the questionnaire have been examined and proved. The level of nurses' awareness about airway suctioning was measured based on the questionnaire that includes demographic and specialty information in the form of eight questions of 3-selection-item. The maximum and minimum score of knowledge ranged between 0-8. The data obtained was statistically analysed using SPSS software Version 16.0 and was analysed using descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation coefficient. The results reveal that the nurses' awareness about principles of airway suctioning was average. There was a significant association between knowledge and gender of nurses (pprinciples of airway suctioning was more than men. The results indicate that nurses' awareness of airway suctioning technique was in an average state. Considering the importance of this technique and the effects this technique has on the patients' haemodynamic status, we recommend in-service courses.

  8. Educating the Educator: Teaching Airway Adjunct Techniques in Athletic Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" ("Competencies") now requires athletic training educators (ATEs) to introduce into the curriculum various types of airway adjuncts including: (1) oropharyngeal airways (OPA), (2) nasopharyngeal airways (NPA), (3) supraglottic airways (SGA), and (4) suction. The addition of these…

  9. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Lamwers, Stephanie; Tepel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is linked to increased cardiovascular risk. This risk can be reduced by nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) treatment. As OSA is associated with an increase of several vasoconstrictive factors, we investigated whether nCPAP influences the digital volume...... pulse wave. We performed digital photoplethysmography during sleep at night in 94 consecutive patients who underwent polysomnography and 29 patients treated with nCPAP. Digital volume pulse waves were obtained independently of an investigator and were quantified using an algorithm for continuous.......01; n = 94) and the arousal index (Spearman correlation, r = 0.21; p CPAP treatment, the AHI was significantly reduced from 27 ± 3 events · h(-1) to 4 ± 2 events · h(-1) (each n = 29; p

  10. Different regulation of cigarette smoke induced inflammation in upper versus lower airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bracke Ken R

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoke (CS is known to initiate a cascade of mediator release and accumulation of immune and inflammatory cells in the lower airways. We investigated and compared the effects of CS on upper and lower airways, in a mouse model of subacute and chronic CS exposure. Methods C57BL/6 mice were whole-body exposed to mainstream CS or air, for 2, 4 and 24 weeks. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL was obtained and tissue cryosections from nasal turbinates were stained for neutrophils and T cells. Furthermore, we evaluated GCP-2, KC, MCP-1, MIP-3α, RORc, IL-17, FoxP3, and TGF-β1 in nasal turbinates and lungs by RT-PCR. Results In both upper and lower airways, subacute CS-exposure induced the expression of GCP-2, MCP-1, MIP-3α and resulted in a neutrophilic influx. However, after chronic CS-exposure, there was a significant downregulation of inflammation in the upper airways, while on the contrary, lower airway inflammation remained present. Whereas nasal FoxP3 mRNA levels already increased after 2 weeks, lung FoxP3 mRNA increased only after 4 weeks, suggesting that mechanisms to suppress inflammation occur earlier and are more efficient in nose than in lungs. Conclusions Altogether, these data demonstrate that CS induced inflammation may be differently regulated in the upper versus lower airways in mice. Furthermore, these data may help to identify new therapeutic targets in this disease model.

  11. Downregulation of integrin β4 decreases the ability of airway epithelial cells to present antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Liu

    Full Text Available Airway epithelial cells have been demonstrated to be accessory antigen presentation cells (APC capable of activating T cells and may play an important role in the development of allergic airway inflammation of asthma. In asthmatic airways, loss of expression of the adhesion molecule integrin β4 (ITGB4 and an increase in Th2 inflammation bias has been observed in our previous study. Given that ITGB4 is engaged in multiple signaling pathways, we studied whether disruption of ITGB4-mediated cell adhesion may contribute to the adaptive immune response of epithelial cells, including their ability to present antigens, induce the activate and differentiate of T cells. We silenced ITGB4 expression in bronchial epithelial cells with an effective siRNA vector and studied the effects of ITGB4 silencing on the antigen presentation ability of airway epithelial cells. T cell proliferation and cytokine production was investigated after co-culturing with ITGB4-silenced epithelial cells. Surface expression of B7 homologs and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II was also detected after ITGB4 was silenced. Our results demonstrated that silencing of ITGB4 resulted in impaired antigen presentation processes and suppressed T cell proliferation. Meanwhile, decrease in Th1 cytokine production and increase in Th17 cytokine production was induced after co-culturing with ITGB4-silenced epithelial cells. Moreover, HLA-DR was decreased and the B7 homologs expression was different after ITGB4 silencing. Overall, this study suggested that downregulation of ITGB4 expression in airway epithelial cells could impair the antigen presentation ability of these cells, which further regulate airway inflammation reaction in allergic asthma.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pediatric airway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auringer, S.T.; Bisset, G.S. III; Myer, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Evaluation of the pediatric airway is often complex and may require multiple imaging techniques and invasive procedures. We performed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the airway in 34 children with clinical evidence of chronic airway obstruction and compared MR findings with those obtained by surgery and/or endoscopy. MR diagnoses included vascular compression in 15 patients, primary tracheomalacic states in 12 patients, and mediastinal masses in 4 patients. Findings were normal for 3 patients. The MR findings were in agreement with the endoscopic findings in 25 to 28 cases and in agreement with the surgical findings in 21 to 21 cases. (orig./GDG)

  13. Predictors of Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Elite Athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toennesen, Louise L; Porsbjerg, Celeste; Pedersen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Elite athletes frequently experience asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). We aimed to investigate predictors of airway pathophysiology in a group of unselected elite summer-sport athletes, training for the summer 2008 Olympic Games, including markers of airway inflammation......, systemic inflammation, and training intensity. METHODS: Fifty-seven Danish elite summer-sport athletes with and without asthma symptoms all gave a blood sample for measurements of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF...

  14. Eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthmatic patients is associated with an altered airway microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrild, Asger; Kiilerich, Pia; Brejnrod, Asker Daniel

    2017-01-01

    of eosinophilic airway inflammation correlates with variations in the microbiome across asthmatic patients, whereas neutrophilic airway inflammation does not. This warrants further investigation on molecular pathways involved in both patients with eosinophilic and those with noneosinophilic asthma.......BACKGROUND: Asthmatic patients have higher microbiome diversity and an altered composition, with more Proteobacteria and less Bacteroidetes compared with healthy control subjects. Studies comparing airway inflammation and the airway microbiome are sparse, especially in subjects not receiving anti......-inflammatory treatment. OBJECTIVE: We sought to describe the relationship between the airway microbiome and patterns of airway inflammation in steroid-free patients with asthma and healthy control subjects. METHODS: Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected from 23 steroid-free nonsmoking patients with asthma and 10...

  15. Growth hormone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  16. Effects of nebulized ketamine on allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in actively sensitized Brown-Norway rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yan

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR and allergic inflammatory changes are regarded as the primary manifestations of asthma, the main goals of asthma treatment are to decrease inflammation and maximize bronchodilation. These goals can be achieved with aerosol therapy. Intravenous administration of the anesthetic, ketamine, has been shown to trigger bronchial smooth muscle relaxation. Furthermore, increasing evidence suggests that the anti-inflammatory properties of ketamine may protect against lung injury. However, ketamine inhalation might yield the same or better results at higher airway and lower ketamine plasma concentrations for the treatment of asthma. Here, we studied the effect of ketamine inhalation on bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in a Brown-Norway rat model of ovalbumin(OVA-induced allergic asthma. Animals were actively sensitized by subcutaneous injection of OVA and challenged by repeated intermittent (thrice weekly exposure to aerosolized OVA for two weeks. Before challenge, the sensitizened rats received inhalation of aerosol of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS or aerosol of ketamine or injection of ketamine respectivity. Airway reactivity to acetylcholine (Ach was measured in vivo, and various inflammatory markers, including Th2 cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, as well as induciable nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and nitric oxide (NO in lungs were examined. Our results revealed that delivery of aerosolized ketamine using an ultrasonic nebulizer markedly suppressed allergen-mediated airway hyperreactivity, airway inflammation and airway inflammatory cell infiltration into the BALF, and significantly decreased the levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4 in the BALF and expression of iNOS and the concentration of NO in the inflamed airways from OVA-treated rats. These findings collectively indicate that nebulized ketamine attenuated many of the central components of inflammatory changes and AHR in

  17. Airway Remodelling in Asthma: From Benchside to Clinical Practice

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    Céline Bergeron

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway remodelling refers to the structural changes that occur in both large and small airways relevant to miscellaneous diseases including asthma. In asthma, airway structural changes include subepithelial fibrosis, increased smooth muscle mass, gland enlargement, neovascularization and epithelial alterations. Although controversial, airway remodelling is commonly attributed to an underlying chronic inflammatory process. These remodelling changes contribute to thickening of airway walls and, consequently, lead to airway narrowing, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, airway edema and mucous hypersecretion. Airway remodelling is associated with poor clinical outcomes among asthmatic patients. Early diagnosis and prevention of airway remodelling has the potential to decrease disease severity, improve control and prevent disease expression. The relationship between structural changes and clinical and functional abnormalities clearly deserves further investigation. The present review briefly describes the characteristic features of airway remodelling observed in asthma, its clinical consequences and relevance for physicians, and its modulation by therapeutic approaches used in the treatment of asthmatic patients.

  18. Airway resistance at maximum inhalation as a marker of asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connor George T

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthmatics exhibit reduced airway dilation at maximal inspiration, likely due to structural differences in airway walls and/or functional differences in airway smooth muscle, factors that may also increase airway responsiveness to bronchoconstricting stimuli. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that the minimal airway resistance achievable during a maximal inspiration (Rmin is abnormally elevated in subjects with airway hyperresponsiveness. Methods The Rmin was measured in 34 nonasthmatic and 35 asthmatic subjects using forced oscillations at 8 Hz. Rmin and spirometric indices were measured before and after bronchodilation (albuterol and bronchoconstriction (methacholine. A preliminary study of 84 healthy subjects first established height dependence of baseline Rmin values. Results Asthmatics had a higher baseline Rmin % predicted than nonasthmatic subjects (134 ± 33 vs. 109 ± 19 % predicted, p = 0.0004. Sensitivity-specificity analysis using receiver operating characteristic curves indicated that baseline Rmin was able to identify subjects with airway hyperresponsiveness (PC20 min % predicted, FEV1 % predicted, and FEF25-75 % predicted, respectively. Also, 80% of the subjects with baseline Rmin min > 145% predicted had hyperresponsive airways, regardless of clinical classification as asthmatic or nonasthmatic. Conclusions These findings suggest that baseline Rmin, a measurement that is easier to perform than spirometry, performs as well as or better than standard spirometric indices in distinguishing subjects with airway hyperresponsiveness from those without hyperresponsive airways. The relationship of baseline Rmin to asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness likely reflects a causal relation between conditions that stiffen airway walls and hyperresponsiveness. In conjunction with symptom history, Rmin could provide a clinically useful tool for assessing asthma and monitoring response to treatment.

  19. Comprehensive airway management of patients with maxillofacial trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellman, Robert M; Losquadro, William D

    2008-11-01

    Airway management in patients with maxillofacial trauma is complicated by injuries to routes of intubation, and the surgeon is frequently asked to secure the airway. Airway obstruction from hemorrhage, tissue prolapse, or edema may require emergent intervention for which multiple intubation techniques exist. Competing needs for both airway and surgical access create intraoperative conflicts during repair of maxillofacial fractures. Postoperatively, edema and maxillomandibular fixation place the patient at risk for further airway compromise.

  20. Critical Airway Team: A Retrospective Study of an Airway Response System in a Pediatric Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterrett, Emily C; Myer, Charles M; Oehler, Jennifer; Das, Bobby; Kerrey, Benjamin T

    2017-12-01

    Objective Study the performance of a pediatric critical airway response team. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Freestanding academic children's hospital. Subjects and Methods A structured review of the electronic medical record was conducted for all activations of the critical airway team. Characteristics of the activations and patients are reported using descriptive statistics. Activation of the critical airway team occurred 196 times in 46 months (March 2012 to December 2015); complete data were available for 162 activations (83%). For 49 activations (30%), patients had diagnoses associated with difficult intubation; 45 (28%) had a history of difficult laryngoscopy. Results Activation occurred at least 4 times per month on average (vs 3 per month for hospital-wide codes). The most common reasons for team activation were anticipated difficult intubation (45%) or failed intubation attempt (20%). For 79% of activations, the team performed an airway procedure, most commonly direct laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. Bronchoscopy was performed in 47% of activations. Surgical airway rescue was attempted 4 times. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation occurred in 41 activations (25%). Twenty-nine patients died during or following team activation (18%), including 10 deaths associated with the critical airway event. Conclusion Critical airway team activation occurred at least once per week on average. Direct laryngoscopy, tracheal intubation, and bronchoscopic procedures were performed frequently; surgical airway rescue was rare. Most patients had existing risk factors for difficult intubation. Given our rate of serious morbidity and mortality, primary prevention of critical airway events will be a focus of future efforts.

  1. Upper airway obstruction in canine laryngeal paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amis, T C; Smith, M M; Gaber, C E; Kurpershoek, C

    1986-05-01

    The type and the severity of airway obstruction in 30 dogs with bilateral laryngeal paralysis was assessed, using tidal breathing flow-volume loop (TBFVL) analysis. The dogs had clinical evidence of mild-to-severe upper airway obstruction (ie, respiratory distress, exercise intolerance, stridor). Seventeen dogs had TBFVL consistent with a nonfixed (inspiratory) obstruction, 10 had TBFVL indicative of a fixed (inspiratory/expiratory) obstruction, and 3 had normal TBFVL. Analysis of TBFVL confirmed that dogs with laryngeal paralysis have upper airway obstruction that differs in type and severity. Use of TBFVL provided a quantitative evaluation of airway obstruction and demonstrated the effects of bilateral laryngeal paralysis on the breathing patterns of dogs.

  2. Airway Tree Extraction with Locally Optimal Paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Sporring, Jon; Pedersen, Jesper Johannes Holst

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to extract the airway tree from CT images by continually extending the tree with locally optimal paths. This is in contrast to commonly used region growing based approaches that only search the space of the immediate neighbors. The result is a much more robust method...... for tree extraction that can overcome local occlusions. The cost function for obtaining the optimal paths takes into account of an airway probability map as well as measures of airway shape and orientation derived from multi-scale Hessian eigen analysis on the airway probability. Significant improvements...... were achieved compared to a region growing based method, with up to 36% longer trees at a slight increase of false positive rate....

  3. Routine airway surveillance in pediatric tracheostomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergin, Ozgul; Adil, Eelam; Kawai, Kosuke; Watters, Karen; Moritz, Ethan; Rahbar, Reza

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to review airway findings in children with tracheostomies who underwent surveillance direct laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy (DLB) to determine the yield of routine airway evaluation in these patients. Retrospective chart review at tertiary referral children's hospital. A retrospective chart review was conducted of all of the children with tracheostomies who underwent DLB after tracheostomy between 1984 and 2015. A total of 303 patients met inclusion criteria. The median time interval between tracheostomy and first follow-up DLB was 12.0 months (IQR 4.8-28.9 months). There was no significant difference in the incidence of airway lesions between patients who underwent endoscopy tracheostomy versus those who had a longer time interval between tracheostomy and DLB (p = 0.16). One hundred sixty seven patients (55.1%) were diagnosed with lesions, with suprastomal granulation (39.9%) being the most common. Symptomatic patients were significantly more likely to have an airway lesion identified (69.9% versus 42.0%; p tracheostomy were significantly more likely to have an airway lesion (p = 0.01). The high incidence of airway lesions noted during surveillance DLB support the utility of routine airway endoscopy in pediatric tracheostomy patients. Symptomatic patients, those with ventilator dependence, or cardiopulmonary or trauma indications for tracheostomy are more likely to have airway lesions and should be monitored closely. The ideal time interval between surveillance endoscopies needs to be examined further. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Impending Airway Compromise due to Cystic Hygroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Shavit

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on a 3-month-old infant, who arrived in the pediatric emergency department (ED with a cervical cystic hygroma causing an impending compromise of the airway. We recognize that such a lesion can rapidly progress, and the judicious use of imaging in the ED may help to avoid airway compromise and possibly fatal complications. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:368–369.

  5. Airways obstruction, coal mining, and disability.

    OpenAIRE

    Lapp, N L; Morgan, W K; Zaldivar, G

    1994-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that the inhalation of coal in the absence of complicated coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) or smoking can lead to disabling airways obstruction. The cause of such obstruction has been variously attributed to emphysema or bronchitis. The frequency of significant airways obstruction in a group of United States coal miners seeking compensation for occupationally induced pulmonary impairment was therefore determined. In a sample of 611 "Black Lung" claimants there...

  6. Airway Management in Athletes Wearing Lacrosse Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G; Boergers, Richard J; Lininger, Monica R

    2018-03-01

      Patient ventilation volume and rate have been found to be compromised due to the inability to seal a pocket mask over the chinstrap of football helmets. The effects of supraglottic airway devices such as the King LT and of lacrosse helmets on these measures have not been studied.   To assess the effects of different airway management devices and helmet conditions on producing quality ventilations while performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation on simulation manikins.   Crossover study.   Simulation laboratory.   Thirty-six athletic trainers (12 men, 24 women) completed this study.   Airway-management device (pocket mask, oral pharyngeal airway, King LT airway [KA]) and helmet condition (no helmet, Cascade helmet, Schutt helmet, Warrior helmet) served as the independent variables. Participant pairs performed 2 minutes of 2-rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation under 12 trial conditions.   Ventilation volume (mL), ventilation rate (ventilations/min), rating of perceived difficulty (RPD), and percentage of quality ventilations were the dependent variables.   A significant interaction was found between type of airway-management device and helmet condition on ventilation volume and rate ( F 12,408 = 2.902, P < .0001). In addition, a significant interaction was noted between airway-management device and helmet condition on RPD scores ( F 6,204 = 3.366, P = .003). The no-helmet condition produced a higher percentage of quality ventilations compared with the helmet conditions ( P ≤ .003). Also, the percentage of quality ventilations differed, and the KA outperformed each of the other devices ( P ≤ .029).   The helmet chinstrap inhibited quality ventilation (rate and volume) in airway procedures that required the mask to be sealed on the face. However, the KA allowed quality ventilation in patients wearing a helmet with the chinstrap fastened. If a KA is not available, the helmet may need to be removed to provide quality ventilations.

  7. Trichobezoar Causing Airway Compromise during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Y. Kao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. (1 Report the case of a 5-year-old female with trichotillomania and trichophagia that suffered airway compromise during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for removal of a trichobezoar. (2 Provide management recommendations for an unusual foreign body causing extubation and partial airway obstruction. Methods. Case report of a rare situation of airway compromise caused by a trichobezoar. Results. A 5-year-old patient underwent endoscopic retrieval of a gastric trichobezoar (hairball by the gastroenterology service under general endotracheal anesthesia in a sedation unit. During removal, the hairball, due to its large size, dislodged the endotracheal tube, effectively extubating the patient. The bezoar became lodged at the cricopharyngeus muscle. Attempts to remove the bezoar or reintubation were unsuccessful. The child was able to be mask ventilated while the otolaryngology service was called. Direct laryngoscopy revealed a hairball partially obstructing the view of the glottis from its position in the postcricoid area. The hairball, still entrapped in the snare from the esophagoscope, was grasped with Magill forceps and slowly extracted. The patient was then reintubated and the airway and esophagus were reevaluated. Conclusions. Trichobezoar is an uncommon cause of airway foreign body. Careful attention to airway management during these and similar foreign body extractions can prevent inadvertent extubations.

  8. Glutamate receptors and the airways hyperreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strapkova, Anna; Antosova, Martina

    2012-03-01

    It is proposed the link between the hyperactivity of NMDA receptors and airway hyperresponsiveness. We investigated the effect of agents modulating the activity of NMDA receptors in the ovalbumin-induced airway hyperreactivity in guinea pigs. The airways hyperreactivity was influenced by the agonist (NMDA) and selective antagonist - competitive (AP-5) and non-competitive (MK-801) of NMDA receptors. Airway responsiveness to histamine or acetylcholine was evaluated in in vitro conditions. NMDA administration caused the increase of tracheal smooth muscle response in ovalbumin-induced hyperreactivity to acetylcholine. MK 801 as well as AP-5 provoked the decrease of reactivity mainly to acetylcholine in tracheal smooth muscle, while the former, non-competitive antagonist was more effective. We recorded more pronounced response in tracheal than in lung tissue smooth muscle with more considerable response to acetylcholine than to histamine. The results of experiments show the modification of airway smooth muscles responses by agents modulating the activity of NMDA receptors. They confirm the possibility of NMDA receptors participation in experimental airway hyperreactivity. The results enlarge information regarding the link of the inflammatory diseases and glutamatergic system.

  9. Link between vitamin D and airway remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berraies A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anissa Berraies, Kamel Hamzaoui, Agnes HamzaouiPediatric Respiratory Diseases Department, Abderrahmen Mami Hospital, Ariana, and Research Unit 12SP15 Tunis El Manar University, Tunis, TunisiaAbstract: In the last decade, many epidemiologic studies have investigated the link between vitamin D deficiency and asthma. Most studies have shown that vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of asthma and allergies. Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with asthma severity and loss of control, together with recurrent exacerbations. Remodeling is an early event in asthma described as a consequence of production of mediators and growth factors by inflammatory and resident bronchial cells. Consequently, lung function is altered, with a decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second and exacerbated airway hyperresponsiveness. Subepithelial fibrosis and airway smooth muscle cell hypertrophy are typical features of structural changes in the airways. In animal models, vitamin D deficiency enhances inflammation and bronchial anomalies. In severe asthma of childhood, major remodeling is observed in patients with low vitamin D levels. Conversely, the antifibrotic and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D in smooth muscle cells have been described in several experiments. In this review, we briefly summarize the current knowledge regarding the relationship between vitamin D and asthma, and focus on its effect on airway remodeling and its potential therapeutic impact for asthma.Keywords: vitamin D, asthma, airway remodeling, airway smooth muscle, supplementation

  10. Ultrasound: A novel tool for airway imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharthkumar Bhikhabhai Parmar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The scope of ultrasound is emerging in medical science, particularly outside traditional areas of radiology practice. Aims: We designed this study to evaluate feasibility of bedside sonography as a tool for airway assessment and to describe sonographic anatomy of airway. Settings and Design: A prospective, clinical study. Materials and Methods: We included 100 adult, healthy volunteers of either sex to undergo airway imaging systemically starting from floor of the mouth to the sternal notch in anterior aspect of neck by sonography. Results: We could visualize mandible and hyoid bone as a bright hyperechoic structure with hypoechoic acoustic shadow underneath. Epiglottis, thyroid cartilage, cricoid cartilage, and tracheal rings appeared hypoechoic. Vocal cords were visualized through thyroid cartilage. Interface between air and mucosa lining the airway produced a bright hyperechoic linear appearance. Artifacts created by intraluminal air prevented visualization of posterior pharynx, posterior commissure, and posterior wall of trachea. Conclusions: Ultrasound is safe, quick, noninvasive, repeatable, and bedside tool to assess the airway and can provide real-time dynamic images relevant for several aspects of airway management.

  11. Airway foreign body in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina GONZÁLEZ-HERRERO

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The aspiration of a foreign body in children is a frequent emergency in pediatrics, being potentially lethal. Method: Narrative review. Results: This pathology mainly affects children under 5 years of age with a peak of incidence between the first and third years of life. The clinic will depend on the type of foreign body (size, shape, possibility of breaking, organic or not, the age of the child and the location of the object. In our environment, the most frequent is the aspiration of nuts (peanuts and sunflower seeds. After the initial picture, an asymptomatic period tends to occur, which favors delayed diagnosis and leads to possible errors in the diagnosis. Discussion: An adequate clinical history and a high diagnostic suspicion are fundamental to favor an early treatment. The presence of a normal chest X-ray does not exclude the presence of a foreign body in the airway, so a bronchoscopy is indicated if the diagnostic suspicion is high. The treatment of choice is extraction by rigid bronchoscopy, being controversial the use of flexible fibrobronchoscope. Conclusions: Conclusions: The aspiration of a foreign body is a pediatric emergency that requires a diagnosis and early treatment. The highest incidence occurs in children under 3 years and more frequently in men. The most commonly aspirated material in our environment are nuts, mainly located in the bronchial tree. The initial episode may go unnoticed, delaying the diagnosis and may lead to progressive respiratory distress in the child. A detailed clinical history and suspicion of this pathology are essential in children at risk age who present with cough and dyspnea of sudden onset. The existence of a normal chest radiograph should not postpone bronchoscopy when there is high clinical suspicion. The treatment of choice for the extraction of foreign bodies in airways in children is rigid bronchoscopy, being controversial the use of the flexible fibrobronchoscope

  12. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping, E-mail: wpxie@njmu.edu.cn; Wang, Hong, E-mail: hongwang@njmu.edu.cn

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that K{sub ATP} channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K{sup +} channels triggers K{sup +} efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca{sup 2+}entry through closing voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K{sup +} efflux decreases Ca{sup 2+} influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a K{sub ATP} channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective K{sub ATP} channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt

  13. Roxithromycin inhibits VEGF-induced human airway smooth muscle cell proliferation: Opportunities for the treatment of asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Qing-Mei; Jiang, Ping; Yang, Min; Qian, Xue-Jiao; Liu, Jiang-Bo; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by reversible airway obstruction with persistent airway inflammation and airway remodelling, which is associated with increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. Roxithromycin (RXM) has been widely used in asthma treatment; however, its mechanism of action is poorly understood. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in inflammatory and airway blood vessel remodelling in patients with asthma, and shown to promote ASM cell proliferation. Here, we investigated the effect of RXM on VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation and attempted to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action. We tested the effect of RXM on proliferation and cell cycle progression, as well as on the expression of phospho-VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), phospho-Akt, and caveolin-1 in VEGF-stimulated ASM cells. RXM inhibited VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest. Additionally, VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation was suppressed by inhibiting the activity of ERK1/2, but not that of Akt. Furthermore, RXM treatment inhibits VEGF-induced activation of VEGFR2 and ERK and downregulation of caveolin-1 in a dose-dependent manner. RXM also inhibited TGF-β-induced VEGF secretion by ASM cells and BEAS-2B cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that RXM inhibits VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation by suppression of VEGFR2 and ERK1/2 activation and caveolin-1 down-regulation, which may be involved in airway remodelling. Further elucidation of the mechanisms underlying these observations should enable the development of treatments for smooth muscle hyperplasia-associated diseases of the airway such as asthma. - Highlights: • RXM inhibited VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest. • VEGF-induced cell proliferation was suppressed by inhibiting the activity of ERK1/2. • RXM inhibits activation of VEGFR2 and ERK and downregulation

  14. Roxithromycin inhibits VEGF-induced human airway smooth muscle cell proliferation: Opportunities for the treatment of asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Qing-Mei, E-mail: 34713316@qq.com [Department of Radiology, Tianjin Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Tianjin (China); Jiang, Ping, E-mail: jiangping@163.com [Department of Respiration, Tianjin First Central Hospital, Tianjin (China); Yang, Min, E-mail: YangMin@163.com [Department of Respiration, Tianjin First Central Hospital, Tianjin (China); Qian, Xue-Jiao, E-mail: qianxuejiao@163.com [Department of Respiration, Tianjin First Central Hospital, Tianjin (China); Liu, Jiang-Bo, E-mail: LJB1984@163.com [Department of Respiration, Tianjin First Central Hospital, Tianjin (China); Kim, Sung-Ho, E-mail: chenghao0726@hotmail.com [Department of Respiration, Tianjin First Central Hospital, Tianjin (China)

    2016-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by reversible airway obstruction with persistent airway inflammation and airway remodelling, which is associated with increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. Roxithromycin (RXM) has been widely used in asthma treatment; however, its mechanism of action is poorly understood. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in inflammatory and airway blood vessel remodelling in patients with asthma, and shown to promote ASM cell proliferation. Here, we investigated the effect of RXM on VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation and attempted to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action. We tested the effect of RXM on proliferation and cell cycle progression, as well as on the expression of phospho-VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), phospho-Akt, and caveolin-1 in VEGF-stimulated ASM cells. RXM inhibited VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest. Additionally, VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation was suppressed by inhibiting the activity of ERK1/2, but not that of Akt. Furthermore, RXM treatment inhibits VEGF-induced activation of VEGFR2 and ERK and downregulation of caveolin-1 in a dose-dependent manner. RXM also inhibited TGF-β-induced VEGF secretion by ASM cells and BEAS-2B cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that RXM inhibits VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation by suppression of VEGFR2 and ERK1/2 activation and caveolin-1 down-regulation, which may be involved in airway remodelling. Further elucidation of the mechanisms underlying these observations should enable the development of treatments for smooth muscle hyperplasia-associated diseases of the airway such as asthma. - Highlights: • RXM inhibited VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest. • VEGF-induced cell proliferation was suppressed by inhibiting the activity of ERK1/2. • RXM inhibits activation of VEGFR2 and ERK and downregulation

  15. Mechanical interactions between adjacent airways in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baoshun; Bates, Jason H T

    2014-03-15

    The forces of mechanical interdependence between the airways and the parenchyma in the lung are powerful modulators of airways responsiveness. Little is known, however, about the extent to which adjacent airways affect each other's ability to narrow due to distortional forces generated within the intervening parenchyma. We developed a two-dimensional computational model of two airways embedded in parenchyma. The parenchyma itself was modeled in three ways: 1) as a network of hexagonally arranged springs, 2) as a network of triangularly arranged springs, and 3) as an elastic continuum. In all cases, we determined how the narrowing of one airway was affected when the other airway was relaxed vs. when it narrowed to the same extent as the first airway. For the continuum and triangular network models, interactions between airways were negligible unless the airways lay within about two relaxed diameters of each other, but even at this distance the interactions were small. By contrast, the hexagonal spring network model predicted that airway-airway interactions mediated by the parenchyma can be substantial for any degree of airway separation at intermediate values of airway contraction forces. Evidence to date suggests that the parenchyma may be better represented by the continuum model, which suggests that the parenchyma does not mediate significant interactions between narrowing airways.

  16. SIMPLE, TIMELY, SAFELY? LARYNGEAL MASK AND PEDIATRIC AIRWAY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karišik, Marijana

    2016-03-01

    Laryngeal mask airway (LMA) was a useful, powerful airway management device for routine pediatric airway management, pediatric difficult airway, and in pediatric emergency situations. Over years, various designs, induction and insertion techniques have been described. LMA provides ease of placement and removal as compared with endotracheal intubation, less traumatism for the respiratory tract, better tolerability by patients, improved hemodynamic stability during emergency, less coughing, less sore throat, avoidance of laryngoscopy, and hands free airway. On the other hand, LMA is not suitable to overcome functional airway problems and mechanical airway obstruction in children. Simple airway management in pediatric patients is normally easy in experienced hands, for anesthesiologists working in specialized hospitals with appropriate personnel and equipment that guarantee optimal safety in these patients. On the other hand, pediatric airway management is a great challenge for anesthesiologists working in departments with a small number of pediatric surgical procedures. Careful preoperative evaluation, preparation and training in the recognition of challenges in pediatric airway are essential for the management of the airway in children. LMA plays a special role in the management of difficult pediatric airway; as a supraglottic airway device, it is incorporated into difficult pediatric airway algorithms.

  17. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, R; Wung, J T

    1998-01-01

    Progress in neonatal intensive care is closely linked to improvements in the management of respiratory failure in small infants. This applies to the care of the preterm infants with immature lungs, and also to treatment of the preterm or full term infants with specific diseases that are associated with respiratory failure. Respiratory distress of the newborn continues to account for significant morbidity in the intensive care unit. The spectrum of disease ranges from mild distress to severe respiratory failure requiring varying degrees of support. The current modalities of ventilatory assistance range from the more benign continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to conventional mechanical ventilation, and on to high frequency ventilation. It is a reasonable supposition that the type of ventilatory assistance provided to these infants should be graded according to the severity of the disease. However, the principal objective in selecting the mode of respiratory support should be to use a modality which results in minimal volo- or barotrauma to the infant. The following detailed description on CPAP explains its physiological effects, delivery system, indications for use, application, maintenance, and associated complications. The equipment described is simple to use, has a greater cost benefit, and has a more universal application, which is of help to smaller units including those in the developing parts of the world. We have also included our institutional clinical experience of CPAP usage in very low birth weight infants from the periods before and after commercial availability of surfactant in the United States.

  18. Lower airway papillomatosis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzka-Głos, Lidia; Jakubowska, Anna; Chmielik, Mieczysław; Bielicka, Anna; Brzewski, Michał

    2003-10-01

    Laryngeal papilloma in children is a frequent disease caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) type 6 or type 11. This disease has a tendency to recur and the changes are histologically benign. In some cases papilloma may affect the lower levels of the respiratory tract. In this study, among 90 patients treated for laryngeal papillomatosis, in four children papilloma of trachea, bronchi and lung tissue were detected in endoscopic and radiological examination. This constitutes 4.4% of all patients. Compact nodules and acquired cysts between 5 and 50 mm long were found in chest X-rays and in computerised tomography. These cysts appeared from 4 to 8 years after establishing a diagnosis of laryngeal papilloma, and 1 year after recognising papilloma in the trachea. In all four children the presence of nodules and cysts in the lungs was preceded by recurrent pneumonia, emphysema or atelectasis of the lungs. All children with laryngeal papillomatosis should have a chest X-ray. Detection of acquired cyst-like changes in lung tissue in children with laryngeal papillomatosis is a warning of future papilloma in the trachea and bronchi, with involvement of lung tissue. In differential diagnosis of these changes in the lungs we should take into consideration the presence of papilloma in the bronchi. A prognosis of papillomatosis in the lower airways in children is always serious.

  19. Automatic airway-artery analysis on lung CT to quantify airway wall thickening and bronchiectasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez-Rovira, Adria; Kuo, Wieying; Petersen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Bronchiectasis and airway wall thickening are commonly assessed in computed tomography (CT) by comparing the airway size with the size of the accompanying artery. Thus, in order to automate the quantification of bronchiectasis and wall thickening following a similar principle, there is a...

  20. SLOWLY ADAPTING SENSORY UNITS HAVE MORE RECEPTORS IN LARGE AIRWAYS THAN IN SMALL AIRWAYS IN RABBITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sensory units of pulmonary slowly adapting receptors (SARs are more active in large airways than in small airways. However, there is no explanation for this phenomenon. Although sensory structures in large airways resemble those in small airways, they are bigger and more complex. Possibly, a larger receptor provides greater surface area for depolarization, and thus has a lower activating threshold and/or a higher sensitivity to stretch, leading to more nerve electrical activities. Recently, a single sensory unit has been reported to contain multiple receptors. Therefore, sensory units in large airways may contain more SARs, which may contribute to high activities. To test this hypothesis, we used a double staining technique to identify sensory receptor sizes. We labeled the sensory structure with Na+/K+-ATPase antibodies and the myelin sheath with myelin basic protein (MBP antibodies. A SAR can be defined as the end formation beyond MBP labeling. Thus, we are able to compare sizes of sensory structures and SARs in large (trachea and bronchi vs small (bronchioles 0.05. However, the sensory structure contains more SARs in large airways than in small airways (9.6±0.6 vs 3.6±0.3; P<0.0001. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that greater numbers of SARs in sensory units of large airways may contribute to higher activities.

  1. Extracellular matrix in airway smooth muscle is associated with dynamics of airway function in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yick, C. Y.; Ferreira, D. S.; Annoni, R.; von der Thüsen, J. H.; Kunst, P. W.; Bel, E. H.; Lutter, R.; Mauad, T.; Sterk, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Altered deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the airway smooth muscle (ASM) layer as observed in asthma may influence ASM mechanical properties. We hypothesized that ECM in ASM is associated with airway function in asthma. First, we investigated the difference in ECM expression in

  2. Laryngotracheal anomalies and airway fluoroscopy in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaiah, Amal; Pereira, Kevin D

    2017-06-01

    The role of airway fluoroscopy in the diagnosis of laryngotracheal anomalies in infants is controversial. We aimed to (i) compare airway fluoroscopic characteristics with endoscopic findings in infants presenting for evaluation of upper airway obstruction and (ii) assess the as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) status for airway fluoroscopy as an initial diagnostic test in suspected laryngotracheal anomalies. We performed a retrospective review of children who underwent fluoroscopy and endoscopic evaluation of the airway in the operating room for suspected laryngotracheal anatomic abnormalities. Thirty-four infants who underwent both procedures at a tertiary level university-based children's hospital from January 1, 2008 to December 1, 2013 were included. Infants with suspected foreign bodies or an existing tracheostomy were excluded. Intraoperative findings from endoscopy and radiologic interpretation from fluoroscopy were compared using standard tools for validation of a diagnostic test. These metrics were compared with historic data that suggested good correlation between radiologic and endoscopic findings in older children. The median age was 3.6 months (range 1-8 months). The sensitivity of airway fluoroscopy for determining laryngotracheal pathology was 18%. Specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 83%, 67% and 35%, respectively. Although each fluoroscopic exposure was optimized for pediatric patients, the median cumulative exposure to ionizing radiation was 19 mR (range 10-34 mR). Airway fluoroscopy yields metrics that are overall poor to be considered a valid and accurate universal radiologic diagnostic test in infants evaluated for laryngotracheal pathology. The cumulative exposure to ionizing radiation from use of a fluoroscope cannot be justified by the sensitivity of the test and may not conform to ALARA standards for imaging in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Tedizolid inhibits MUC5AC production induced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kazuaki; Kaku, Norihito; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Kosai, Kosuke; Uno, Naoki; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Miyazaki, Taiga; Izumikawa, Koichi; Mukae, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Katsunori

    2017-09-01

    The innate immune system plays an important role in early immunity against respiratory tract infection. Although airway epithelial cells produce mucus to eliminate pathogens and irritants, hypersecretion of mucus is harmful for the host as it may cause airway obstruction and inhibit influx of antimicrobial agents. It has been reported that several antimicrobial agents have an immunomodulatory effect in vitro and in vivo, but little is known about whether tedizolid, a novel oxazolidinone, can modulate immune responses. In this study, we evaluated whether tedizolid can suppress MUC5AC production in human airway epithelial cells stimulated by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Compared with the control, tedizolid significantly inhibited MUC5AC protein production and mRNA overexpression at concentrations of both 2 and 10 μg/mL (representative of trough and peak concentrations in human epithelial lining fluid). Among the mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors tested, only extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation was inhibited by tedizolid as indicated by western blot analysis. These results indicate that tedizolid inhibits the overproduction of MUC5AC protein by inhibiting phosphorylation of ERK1/2. This study revealed that tedizolid suppresses excessive mucin production in human airway epithelial cells. The immunomodulatory effect of tedizolid may improve outcomes in patients with severe respiratory infectious diseases caused by MRSA. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Optical coherence tomography of the newborn airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, James M; Su, Jianping; Wright, Ryan; Guo, Shuguang; Kim, David C; Barretto, Roberto; Ahuja, Gurpreet; Sepehr, Ali; Perez, Jorge; Sills, Jack H; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J F

    2008-05-01

    Acquired subglottic stenosis in a newborn is often associated with prolonged endotracheal intubation. This condition is generally diagnosed during operative endoscopy after airway injury has occurred. Unfortunately, endoscopy is unable to characterize the submucosal changes observed in such airway injuries. Other modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and ultrasound, do not possess the necessary level of resolution to differentiate scar, neocartilage, and edema. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging modality that produces high-resolution, cross-sectional images of living tissue (8 to 20 microm). We examined the ability of this noninvasive technique to characterize the newborn airway in a prospective clinical trial. Twelve newborn patients who required ventilatory support underwent OCT airway imaging. Comparative analysis of intubated and non-intubated states was performed. Imaging of the supraglottis, glottis, subglottis, and trachea was performed in 12 patients, revealing unique tissue characteristics as related to turbidity, signal backscattering, and architecture. Multiple structures were identified, including the vocal folds, cricoid cartilage, tracheal rings, ducts, glands, and vessels. Optical coherence tomography clearly identifies in vivo tissue layers and regional architecture while offering detailed information concerning tissue microstructures. The diagnostic potential of this technology makes OCT a promising modality in the study and surveillance of the neonatal airway.

  5. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, D.L.

    1992-11-01

    Laboratory experimental studies were carried out to investigate the factors influencing the deposition of aerosols ranging in size from 1 nm to 10 [mu]m in the human nasal, oral, pharyngeal and laryngeal airways. These experimental studies were performed in replicate upper airway physical models and in human volunteer subjects. New replicate models of the oral passage of an infant, the oral passage of an adult at two openings and the combined nasal and oral airways of an adult were constructed during the period, adding to the existing models of adult, child and infant nasal and oral airways models. Deposition studies in the adult oral and adult nasal models were performed under simulated cyclic flow conditions with 1 nm particles to compare with previously measured constant flow studies. Similar studies with inertial particles (1--10 [mu]m diameter) were performed with the adult nasal model; in both instances, results with cyclic flow were similar to constant flow results using a simple average flow rate based on inspiratory volume and time of inspiration. Human subject studies were performed with particle sizes 5--20 nm for nasal inspiration; preliminary analysis shows good agreement with model studies at several representative flow rates. Nasal inspiratory inertial deposition of 1--4 [mu]m diameter particles was measured in several adults as a function of airway dimensions; dimensional changes of the valve area by decongestion did not produce concomitant deposition changes.

  6. Unexpected difficult airway with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaman F

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ferda Yaman,1 Bengi Arslan,2 Ercan Yuvanç,3 Ünase Büyükkoçak1 1Anesthesiology and Reanimation Department, 2Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Department, 3Urology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Kirikkale University, Kirikkale, Turkey Background: A critical aspect of safe general anesthesia is providing adequate ventilation and oxygenation. Failed endotracheal intubation and inadequate ventilation with insufficient oxygenation may lead to serious complications, even death. Anesthesiologists rarely encounter unexpected difficult airway problems in daily routine. Management of an unexpectedly difficult airway consists of laryngeal mask ventilation, gum-elastic bougie and video laryngoscopy-assisted intubation. Gum-elastic bougie is the easiest and cheapest tool used in case of an unexpected difficult intubation occurring in the operating room. Case: A 53-year-old male patient with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism presented as an unexpected difficult intubation after the induction of anesthesia. No pathological finding or predictor of difficult intubation was present. In addition, bag-mask ventilation was poor and inadequate. The patient was finally successfully intubated with a gum-elastic bougie. Conclusion: A difficult airway has been described in patients with a variety of endocrine disorders, including pituitary diseases, but not with hypogonadism. There may be an unrevealed relationship between hypogonadism and difficult airway. Gum-elastic bougie is still the most attainable and effective tool in the operation room in this situation. Keywords: airway management, intubation, hypogonadism

  7. Synergistic mucus secretion by histamine and IL-4 through TMEM16A in airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ju Wan; Lee, Yong Hyuk; Kang, Min Jeong; Lee, Hyun Jae; Oh, Ryung; Min, Hyun Jin; Namkung, Wan; Choi, Jae Young; Lee, Sang Nam; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Cho, Hyung-Ju

    2017-09-01

    Histamine is an important mediator of allergic reactions, and mucus hypersecretion is a major allergic symptom. However, the direct effect of histamine on mucus secretion from airway mucosal epithelia has not been clearly demonstrated. TMEM16A is a Ca 2+ -activated chloride channel, and it is closely related to fluid secretion in airway mucosal epithelia. We investigated whether histamine directly induces fluid secretion from epithelial cells or submucosal glands (SMG) and mechanisms related, therewith, in allergic airway diseases. In pig airway tissues from the nose or trachea, histamine was a potent secretagogue that directly induced strong responses. However, gland secretion from human nasal tissue was not induced by histamine, even in allergic rhinitis patients. Histamine type 1 receptor (H1R) and histamine type 2 receptor (H2R) were not noted in SMG by in situ hybridization. Cultured primary human nasal epithelial (NHE) cells were used for the measurement of short-circuit current changes with the Ussing chamber. Histamine-induced slight responses of anion secretions under normal conditions. The response was enhanced by IL-4 stimulation through TMEM16A, which might be related to fluid hypersecretion in allergic rhinitis. Pretreatment with IL-4 augmented the histamine response that was suppressed by a TMEM16A inhibitor. TMEM16A expression was enhanced by 24-h treatment of IL-4 in human nasal epithelial cells. The expression of TMEM16A was significantly elevated in an allergic rhinitis group, compared with a control group. We elucidated histamine-induced fluid secretions in synergy with IL-4 through TMEM16A in the human airway epithelium. In addition, we observed species differences between pigs and humans in terms of gland secretion of histamine. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness after chlorine exposure are prolonged by Nrf2 deficiency in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ano, Satoshi; Panariti, Alice; Allard, Benoit; O'Sullivan, Michael; McGovern, Toby K; Hamamoto, Yoichiro; Ishii, Yukio; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Powell, William S; Martin, James G

    2017-01-01

    Chlorine gas (Cl 2 ) is a potent oxidant and trigger of irritant induced asthma. We explored NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-dependent mechanisms in the asthmatic response to Cl 2 , using Nrf2-deficient mice, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione (GSH) synthesis and sulforaphane (SFN), a phytochemical regulator of Nrf2. Airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) were assessed 24 and 48h after a 5-min nose-only exposure to 100ppm Cl 2 of Nrf2-deficient and wild type Balb/C mice treated with BSO or SFN. Animals were anesthetized, paralyzed and mechanically ventilated (FlexiVent™) and challenged with aerosolized methacholine. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and lung tissues were harvested for assessment of gene expression. Cl 2 exposure induced a robust AHR and an intense neutrophilic inflammation that, although similar in Nrf2-deficient mice and wild-type mice at 24h after Cl 2 exposure, were significantly greater at 48h post exposure in Nrf2-deficient mice. Lung GSH and mRNA for Nrf2-dependent phase II enzymes (NQO-1 and GPX2) were significantly lower in Nrf2-deficient than wild-type mice after Cl 2 exposure. BSO reduced GSH levels and promoted Cl 2 -induced airway inflammation in wild-type mice, but not in Nrf2-deficient mice, whereas SFN suppressed Cl 2 -induced airway inflammation in wild-type but not in Nrf2-deficient mice. AHR was not affected by either BSO or SFN at 48h post Cl 2 exposure. Nrf2-dependent phase II enzymes play a role in the resolution of airway inflammation and AHR after Cl 2 exposure. Moderate deficiency of GSH affects the magnitude of acute inflammation but not AHR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Host–microbe interactions in distal airways: relevance to chronic airway diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Martin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is the summary of a workshop, which took place in November 2013, on the roles of microorganisms in chronic respiratory diseases. Until recently, it was assumed that lower airways were sterile in healthy individuals. However, it has long been acknowledged that microorganisms could be identified in distal airway secretions from patients with various respiratory diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF and non-CF bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and other chronic airway diseases (e.g. post-transplantation bronchiolitis obliterans. These microorganisms were sometimes considered as infectious agents that triggered host immune responses and contributed to disease onset and/or progression; alternatively, microorganisms were often considered as colonisers, which were considered unlikely to play roles in disease pathophysiology. These concepts were developed at a time when the identification of microorganisms relied on culture-based methods. Importantly, the majority of microorganisms cannot be cultured using conventional methods, and the use of novel culture-independent methods that rely on the identification of microorganism genomes has revealed that healthy distal airways display a complex flora called the airway microbiota. The present article reviews some aspects of current literature on host–microbe (mostly bacteria and viruses interactions in healthy and diseased airways, with a special focus on distal airways.

  10. Airway Science curriculum demonstration project : summary of initial evaluation findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-01

    The performance, perceptions, and characteristics of Airway Science hires were compared with those of traditional hires. As of May 12, 1987. a total of 197 Airway Science candidates had been selected into FAA occupations. The demographic characterist...

  11. Unmet needs in severe chronic upper airway disease (SCUAD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, Jean; Bachert, Claus; Canonica, Giorgio W.; Casale, Thomas B.; Cruz, Alvaro A.; Lockey, Richard J.; Zuberbier, Torsten; Akdis, C. A.; Baena-Cagnani, C.; Bateman, E. D.; Bonini, S.; Boulet, L. P.; Bousquet, P. J.; Burney, P. G.; Cardell, L. O.; Carlsen, K. H.; Carsten-Jensens, B.; Chen, Y.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chuchalin, A.; Cox, L.; Custovic, A.; Dahl, R.; Delgado, L.; Demoly, P.; Denburg, J.; Dolen, W. K.; Dubakiene, R.; El-Gamal, Y.; Fokkens, W. J.; Fukuda, T.; Gerth van Wiijk, R.; Gjomarkaj, M.; Haahtela, T.; Hamelmann, E.; Holgate, S. T.; Howarth, P.; Ivancevich, J. C.; Jensen-Jarolim, E.; Kalayci, O.; Kaliner, M.; Kim, Y. Y.; Kowalski, M. L.; Le, L.; Lee, B. W.; Leynaert, B.; Lodrup-Carlsen, K.; Meltzer, E. O.; Mohammad, Y.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Mullol, J.; Nizankowska-Mogilnicka, E.; O'Hehir, R. E.; Ohta, K.; Okamoto, Y.; Papadopoulos, N.; Park, H. S.; Passalacqua, G.; Pawankar, R.; Popov, T.; Potter, P.; Price, D.; Rabe, K. F.; Rodriguez Perez, N.; Romano, A.; Rosenwasser, L.; Ryan, D.; Salapatas, M.; Sanchez-Borges, M.; Scadding, G.; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P. D.; Simons, F. E. R.; Todo-Bom, A.; Toskala, E.; Valovirta, E.; van Cauwenberge, P.; van Weel, C.; Vandenplas, O.; Vichyanond, P.; Wang, D. Y.; Wickman, M.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Yusuf, O.; Zar, H.; Zhong, N.; Zitt, M.; Zock, P.

    2009-01-01

    Although the majority of patients with chronic upper airway diseases have controlled symptoms during treatment, many patients have severe chronic upper airway diseases (SCUADs). SCUAD defines those patients whose symptoms are inadequately controlled despite adequate (ie, effective, safe, and

  12. Pressure suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Funahashi, Toshihiro.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a structure which permits the absorption of shocks and vibratory load produced on the floor of a pressure suppression chamber due to nitrogen gas or the like discharged into pool water in the pressure suppression chamber at the time of a loss-of-coolant accident. Constitution: A pressure suppression chamber accommodating pool water is comprised of a bottom wall and side walls constructed of concrete on the inner side of a liner. By providing concrete on the bottom surface and side wall surfaces of a pressure suppression chamber, it is possible to prevent non-condensing gas and steam exhausted from the vent duct and exhaust duct of a main vapor escapement safety valve exhaust duct from exerting impact forces and vibratory forces upon the bottom and side surfaces of the pressure suppression chamber. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. Dilemmas, Confusion, and Misconceptions Related to Small Airways Directed Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorini, Federico; Pedersen, Søren; Usmani, Omar S

    2017-06-01

    During the past decade, there has been increasing evidence that the small airways (ie, airways misconceptions related to small airways directed therapy. To this end, we have reviewed all studies on small-particle aerosol therapy systematically to address the dilemmas, confusion, and misconceptions related to small airways directed therapy. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impossible Airway Requiring Venovenous Bypass for Tracheostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnathan Gardes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The elective surgical airway is the definitive management for a tracheal stenotic lesion that is not a candidate for tracheal resection, or who has failed multiple-tracheal dilations. This case report details the management of a patient who has failed an elective awake tracheostomy secondary to the inability to be intubated as well as severe scar tissue at the surgical site. A combination of regional anesthesia and venovenous bypass is used to facilitate the surgical airway management of this patient. Cerebral oximetry and a multidisciplinary team approach aid in early detection of an oxygenation issue, as well as the emergent intervention that preserved this patient’s life.

  15. Water permeability in human airway epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peter Steen; Procida, Kristina; Larsen, Per Leganger

    2005-01-01

    of those seen in AQP-associated water transport. Together, these results indicate the presence of an AQP in the apical membrane of the spheroids. Notably, identical values for P(f) were found in CF and non-CF airway preparations, as was the case also for the calculated spontaneous fluid absorption rates.......Osmotic water permeability (P(f)) was studied in spheroid-shaped human airway epithelia explants derived from nasal polyps by the use of a new improved tissue collection and isolation procedure. The fluid-filled spheroids were lined with a single cell layer with the ciliated apical cell membrane...

  16. Rigid fibrescope Bonfils: use in simulated difficult airway by novices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piepho Tim

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bonfils intubation fibrescope is a promising alternative device for securing the airway. We examined the success rate of intubation and the ease of use in standardized simulated difficult airway scenarios by physicians. We compared the Bonfils to a classical laryngoscope with Macintosh blade. Methods 30 physicians untrained in the use of rigid fibrescopes but experienced in airway management performed endotracheal intubation in an airway manikin (SimMan, Laerdal, Kent, UK with three different airway conditions. We evaluated the success rate using the Bonfils (Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany or the Macintosh laryngoscope, the time needed for securing the airway, and subjective rating of both techniques. Results In normal airway all intubations were successful using laryngoscope (100% vs. 82% using the Bonfils (p Conclusion The Bonfils can be successfully used by physicians unfamiliar with this technique in an airway manikin. The airway could be secured with at least the same success rate as using a Macintosh laryngoscope in difficult airway scenarios. Use of the Bonfils did not delay intubation in the presence of a difficult airway. These results indicate that intensive special training is advised to use the Bonfils effectively in airway management.

  17. Occupational upper airway disease: how work affects the nose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hox, V.; Steelant, B.; Fokkens, W.; Nemery, B.; Hellings, P. W.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the upper airways is common and can arbitrarily be divided into rhinitis and rhinosinusitis. Infection and allergy represent two well-characterized and most frequently diagnosed etiologies of upper airway inflammation. Persistent upper airway inflammation caused by agents

  18. Airway management: A survey of training and practices of Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Airway management is an integral part of anesthetist's training and clinical practice. Studies have suggested that opportunities for anesthesia trainees to ... There is increased use of simple airway devices with deskilling in complex airway management. Resource limitation means that very few individuals have ...

  19. Long-term nicotine exposure dampens LPS-induced nerve-mediated airway hyperreactivity in murine airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2017-09-01

    Nicotine is a major component of cigarette smoke. It causes addiction and is used clinically to aid smoke cessation. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of nicotine on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and to explore the potential involvement of neuronal mechanisms behind nicotine's effects in murine models in vivo and in vitro. BALB/c mice were exposed to nicotine in vivo via subcutaneous Alzet osmotic minipumps containing nicotine tartate salt solution (24 mg·kg -1 ·day -1 ) for 28 days. LPS (0.1 mg/ml, 20 µl) was administered intranasally for 3 consecutive days during the end of this period. Lung functions were measured with flexiVent. For the in vitro experiments, mice tracheae were organcultured with either nicotine (10 μM) or vehicle (DMSO, 0.1%) for 4 days. Contractile responses of the tracheal segments were measured in myographs following electric field stimulation (EFS; increasing frequencies of 0.2 to 12.8 Hz) before and after incubation with 10 µg/ml LPS for 1 h. Results showed that LPS induced AHR to methacholine in vivo and increased contractile responses to EFS in vitro. Interestingly, long-term nicotine exposure markedly dampened this LPS-induced AHR both in vitro and in vivo. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) inhibited LPS-induced AHR but did not further inhibit nicotine-suppressed AHR in vivo. In conclusion, long-term nicotine exposure dampened LPS-induced AHR. The effect of nicotine was mimicked by TTX, suggesting the involvement of neuronal mechanisms. This information might be used for evaluating the long-term effects of nicotine and further exploring of how tobacco products interact with bacterial airway infections. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. A randomised trial comparing the laryngeal mask airway Supreme™ with the laryngeal mask airway Unique™ in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, N; Sohn, L E; Sawardekar, A; Chang, E; Langen, K E; Anderson, K

    2012-02-01

    We conducted a randomised controlled trial comparing the laryngeal mask airway Supreme(™) with the laryngeal mask airway Unique(™) in children. Fifty children presenting for elective surgery were randomly assigned to receive either the laryngeal mask airway Supreme or laryngeal mask airway Unique. The outcomes measured were airway leak pressure, ease and time for insertion, insertion success rate, fibreoptic examination, incidence of gastric insufflation, ease of gastric tube placement through the laryngeal mask airway Supreme, quality of airway during anaesthetic maintenance and complications. Median (IQR [range]) time to successful device placement was shorter with the laryngeal mask airway Unique, 14.5 [13.5-16.3 (10.0-23.6)] s than with the laryngeal mask airway Supreme, 17.4 [14.8-19.8 (11.5-29.2)] s; p = 0.007. Median (IQR [range]) airway leak pressures for the laryngeal mask airway Supreme and laryngeal mask airway Unique were 20 [16-21 (12-22)] cmH(2)O and 15 [14-18 (10-24)] cmH(2)O, respectively (p = 0.001). The incidence of gastric insufflation was lower with the laryngeal mask airway Supreme (zero vs six patients), p = 0.01. In conclusion, the laryngeal mask airway Supreme performed as well as the laryngeal mask airway Unique and is a useful alternative for airway maintenance, particularly in children who require evacuation of gastric contents during anaesthesia. Anaesthesia © 2011 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. A Zinc Chelator TPEN Attenuates Airway Hyperresponsiveness Airway Inflammation in Mice In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Fukuyama

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: In pulmonary allergic inflammation induced in mice immunized with antigen without alum, zinc chelator inhibits airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. These findings suggest that zinc may be a therapeutic target of allergic asthma.

  2. Airway Inflammation in Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps and Asthma: The United Airways Concept Further Supported

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Kåre; Bachert, Claus; Konge, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been established that patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) often have co-existing asthma. Objective We aimed to test two hypotheses: (i) upper and lower airway inflammation in CRSwNP is uniform in agreement with the united airways concept; and (ii......) bronchial inflammation exists in all CRSwNP patients irrespective of clinical asthma status. Methods We collected biopsies from nasal polyps, inferior turbinates and bronchi of 27 CRSwNP patients and 6 controls. All participants were evaluated for lower airway disease according to international guidelines...... cytokines measured, IL-13 was significantly increased in bronchial biopsies from CRSwNP patients with, but not without asthma. Conclusion Our findings support the united airways concept; however, we did not find evidence for subclinical bronchial inflammation in CRSwNP patients without asthma. Finally...

  3. Removal of an Airway Foreign Body via Flexible Endoscopy Through a Laryngeal Mask Airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Flores, Manuel; Cortright, Catherine C; Koba, Samantha J

    2015-01-01

    A Silky terrier weighing 4.7 kg was presented with an airway foreign body after having aspirated a fragment of an orotracheal tube that was identified on radiological examination. Due to the small size of the patient, flexible endoscopy could not be performed through the lumen of a tracheal tube. Following IV induction of general anesthesia, the airway was instrumented with a laryngeal mask airway that was attached via a three-way connector to an anesthesia breathing circuit. A flexible endoscope was passed through the free port of the connector. That arrangement allowed for the passage of an endoscope through the lumen of the laryngeal mask airway and into the trachea without interrupting the continuous supply of O2 and sevoflurane.

  4. Airway function and markers of airway inflammation in patients with treated hypothyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Birring, S; Patel, R; Parker, D; Mckenna, S; Hargadon, B; Monteiro, W; Falconer, S; Pavord, I

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is increasing evidence of an association between organ specific autoimmune diseases, particularly autoimmune thyroid disease and respiratory morbidity. A study was undertaken to determine whether patients with autoimmune thyroid disease have objective evidence of airway inflammation and dysfunction.

  5. Airborne infectious disease and the suppression of pulmonary bioaerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegel, Jennifer; Clarke, Robert; Edwards, David A

    2006-01-01

    The current understanding of airborne pathogen spread in relation to the new methods of suppressing exhaled bioaerosols using safe surface-active materials, such as isotonic saline, is reviewed here. We discuss the physics of bioaerosol generation in the lungs, what is currently known about the relationship between expired bioaerosols and airborne infectious disease and current methods of airborne infectious disease containment. We conclude by reviewing recent experiments that suggest the delivery of isotonic saline can significantly diminish exhaled aerosol--generated from airway lining fluid in the course of natural breathing. We also discuss these implications in relation to airborne infectious disease control.

  6. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Seung Hyun; Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja; Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min; Lee, Sang Eun

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Treatment with Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation and AHR to methacholine. → Induction of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + T cells and IL-10 along with suppression of splenocyte proliferation by C. sinensis-derived total protein. → C. sinensis-derived total protein interferes with the expression of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naive T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical relationship between the allergic immune

  7. Quantitative analysis of airway abnormalities in CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Nielsen, Mads

    2010-01-01

    A coupled surface graph cut algorithm for airway wall segmentation from Computed Tomography (CT) images is presented. Using cost functions that highlight both inner and outer wall borders, the method combines the search for both borders into one graph cut. The proposed method is evaluated on 173 ...

  8. COLCHICINE DECREASES AIRWAY HYPERACTIVITY AFTER PHOSGENE EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phosgene (COCl(2)) exposure affects an influx of inflammatory cells into the lung, which can be reduced in an animal model by pretreatment with colchicine. Inflammation in the respiratory tract can be associated with an increase in airway hyperreactivity. We tested the hypotheses...

  9. Trauma unit emergency doctor airway management | Hardcastle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A data collection proforma was completed either at the time of intubation or from medical records. Results. Fifty-seven patients required definitive airway management. In the unit 32 patients (56%) were intubated by emergency medicine registrars or medical officers, with rapidsequence intubations (RSIs) in all 32 (100%).

  10. Postoperative upper airway problems | Zuccherelli | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 2 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Postoperative upper airway ...

  11. Essential ultrasound techniques of the pediatric airway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stafrace, Samuel; Engelhardt, Thomas; Teoh, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound of the airways is a technique which has been described in a number of recent articles and reviews highlighting the diagnostic possibilities and simple methodology. However, there is a paucity of information focusing specifically on such methods in children where equipment, technique, a...

  12. Insulin induces airway smooth muscle contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, D.; Gosens, R.; Ris, J. M.; Zaagsma, J.; Meurs, H.; Nelemans, S. A.

    Background and purpose: Recently, the use of inhaled insulin formulations for the treatment of type I and type II diabetes has been approved in Europe and in the United States. For regular use, it is critical that airway function remains unimpaired in response to insulin exposure. Experimental

  13. Progressive Dysphagia Post Laryngeal Mask Airway Intubation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is an important addition to the anaesthetic equipments; however its use may involve some important complications. We report an unusual and potentially serious complication arising from the use of this equipment. A 58 year old man underwent cataract surgery under general anaesthesia ...

  14. Improvised bubble continuous positive airway pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2014-08-15

    Aug 15, 2014 ... ous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is often sufficient to tide a preterm infant through RDS. ... eration in BCPAP and arrived at a modification of the existing bubble CPAP device which is effective, ..... gestational age dependent, oxygen induced retinopathy. Conclusion. The NHA-BCPAP device produces ...

  15. Outcomes following prehospital airway management in severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Backgound. Prevention of hypoxia and thus secondary brain injury in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is critical. However there is controversy regarding the role of endotracheal intubation in the prehospital management of TBI. Objective. To describe the outcome of TBI with various airway management methods employed in the ...

  16. Viruses in cystic fibrosis patients' airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billard, Lisa; Le Berre, Rozenn; Pilorgé, Léa; Payan, Christopher; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Vallet, Sophie

    2017-11-01

    Although bacteria have historically been considered to play a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) airway damage, a strong impact of respiratory viral infections (RVI) is also now recognized. Emerging evidence confirms that respiratory viruses are associated with deterioration of pulmonary function and exacerbation and facilitation of bacterial colonization in CF patients. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on respiratory viruses in CF airways, to discuss the resulting inflammation and RVI response, to determine how to detect the viruses, and to assess their clinical consequences, prevalence, and interactions with bacteria. The most predominant are Rhinoviruses (RVs), significantly associated with CF exacerbation. Molecular techniques, and especially multiplex PCR, help to diagnose viral infections, and the coming rise of metagenomics will extend knowledge of viral populations in the complex ecosystem of CF airways. Prophylaxis and vaccination are currently available only for Respiratory syncytial and Influenza virus (IV), but antiviral molecules are being tested to improve CF patients' care. All the points raised in this review highlight the importance of taking account of RVIs and their potential impact on the CF airway ecosystem.

  17. Airway inflammation in mild cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckrich, Jonas; Zissler, Ulrich M; Serve, Friederike; Leutz, Patricia; Smaczny, Christina; Schmitt-Grohé, Sabina; Fussbroich, Daniela; Schubert, Ralf; Zielen, Stefan; Eickmeier, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Airway infection and inflammation play major roles in the progression of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. In patients with mild disease, airway inflammation is a clinically relevant and often underdiagnosed feature. Lung function, sputum cell counts, and cytokine profiles in CF with mild disease might be different in patients with and without involvement of small airway disease (SAD). Patients with mild CF (n=32) and 22 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Patients with CF were assigned to two groups: (1) patients without SAD (n=19, median age 12.3years, MEF 25 >50% predicted), and (2) patients with SAD (n=13 median age, 13.2years, MEF 25 inflammation compared to controls as indicated by elevated levels of sputum biomarkers like total cells, neutrophils, and IL6. Our study demonstrated that patients with CF with mild disease defined by lung function might be further endotyped according to their involvement of SAD. In patients with CF and SAD, airway neutrophilic inflammation is more pronounced and is in part distinct from that seen in patients without SAD. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. CT quantification of central airway in tracheobronchomalacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Won Hyeong; Jin, Gong Yong; Han, Young Min; Kim, Eun Young [Dept. of Radiology, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To know which factors help to diagnose tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) using CT quantification of central airway. From April 2013 to July 2014, 19 patients (68.0 ± 15.0 years; 6 male, 13 female) were diagnosed as TBM on CT. As case-matching, 38 normal subjects (65.5 ± 21.5 years; 6 male, 13 female) were selected. All 57 subjects underwent CT with end-inspiration and end-expiration. Airway parameters of trachea and both main bronchus were assessed using software (VIDA diagnostic). Airway parameters of TBM patients and normal subjects were compared using the Student t-test. In expiration, both wall perimeter and wall thickness in TBM patients were significantly smaller than normal subjects (wall perimeter: trachea, 43.97 mm vs. 49.04 mm, p = 0.020; right main bronchus, 33.52 mm vs. 42.69 mm, p < 0.001; left main bronchus, 26.76 mm vs. 31.88 mm, p = 0.012; wall thickness: trachea, 1.89 mm vs. 2.22 mm, p = 0.017; right main bronchus, 1.64 mm vs. 1.83 mm, p = 0.021; left main bronchus, 1.61 mm vs. 1.75 mm, p = 0.016). Wall thinning and decreased perimeter of central airway of expiration by CT quantification would be a new diagnostic indicators in TBM.

  19. Dilemmas, Confusion, and Misconceptions Related to Small Airways Directed Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavorini, Federico; Pedersen, Søren; Usmani, Omar S.

    2017-01-01

    During the past decade, there has been increasing evidence that the small airways (ie, airways < 2 mm in internal diameter) contribute substantially to the pathophysiologic and clinical expression of asthma and COPD. The increased interest in small airways is, at least in part, a result of innova......, confusion, and misconceptions related to small airways directed therapy. To this end, we have reviewed all studies on small-particle aerosol therapy systematically to address the dilemmas, confusion, and misconceptions related to small airways directed therapy....

  20. PPARγ as a Potential Target to Treat Airway Mucus Hypersecretion in Chronic Airway Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchun Shen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway mucus hypersecretion (AMH is a key pathophysiological feature of chronic airway inflammatory diseases such as bronchial asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. AMH contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic airway inflammatory diseases, and it is associated with reduced lung function and high rates of hospitalization and mortality. It has been suggested that AMH should be a target in the treatment of chronic airway inflammatory diseases. Recent evidence suggests that a key regulator of airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, and remodeling is peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates adipocyte differentiation and lipid metabolism. PPARγ is expressed in structural, immune, and inflammatory cells in the lung. PPARγ is involved in mucin production, and PPARγ agonists can inhibit mucin synthesis both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that PPARγ is a novel target in the treatment of AMH and that further work on this transcription factor may lead to new therapies for chronic airway inflammatory diseases.

  1. Indications of airway stenting for severe central airway obstruction due to advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Hiroaki; Kishaba, Tomoo; Nei, Yuichirou; Yamashiro, Shin; Takara, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Management of severe central airway obstruction due to advanced cancer is a medical and technical challenge. The impact of airway stenting on the clinical outcome of such patients is unclear. This single-center, retrospective study evaluated 21 patients who underwent airway stenting for advanced cancer. We examined predictors of the post-stenting mortality, including age, serum albumin, tracheal diameter, smoking, opioid use, respiratory failure, and performance status (PS). We also compared survival according to the PS. The mean survival period after stenting was 85.2 days. On univariate analysis, age, albumin, PS before airway stenting, respiratory failure, admission route, and PS grade were the candidates as possible predictors of prognosis after the procedure. On multivariate analysis, PS before airway stenting was identified as possible predictor of prognosis after stenting (HR 1.6180, 95% CI 0.969 to 2.7015, p = 0.066). The mean survival period after stenting was significantly longer in the good PS group, compared to the poor PS group (147.8 days vs. 38.2 days,p = 0.0346). Airway stenting for advanced cancer may be more effective for patients in good general condition than in those with poor performance status.

  2. Indications of airway stenting for severe central airway obstruction due to advanced cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Nagano

    Full Text Available Management of severe central airway obstruction due to advanced cancer is a medical and technical challenge. The impact of airway stenting on the clinical outcome of such patients is unclear.This single-center, retrospective study evaluated 21 patients who underwent airway stenting for advanced cancer. We examined predictors of the post-stenting mortality, including age, serum albumin, tracheal diameter, smoking, opioid use, respiratory failure, and performance status (PS. We also compared survival according to the PS.The mean survival period after stenting was 85.2 days. On univariate analysis, age, albumin, PS before airway stenting, respiratory failure, admission route, and PS grade were the candidates as possible predictors of prognosis after the procedure. On multivariate analysis, PS before airway stenting was identified as possible predictor of prognosis after stenting (HR 1.6180, 95% CI 0.969 to 2.7015, p = 0.066. The mean survival period after stenting was significantly longer in the good PS group, compared to the poor PS group (147.8 days vs. 38.2 days,p = 0.0346.Airway stenting for advanced cancer may be more effective for patients in good general condition than in those with poor performance status.

  3. Menstrual suppression for adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Anna Lea; Hillard, Paula J Adams

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the recent literature and emerging data describing clinical situations in which menstrual suppression may improve symptoms and quality of life for adolescents. A variety of conditions occurring frequently in adolescents and young adults, including heavy menstrual bleeding, and dysmenorrhea as well as gynecologic conditions such as endometriosis and pelvic pain, can safely be improved or alleviated with appropriate menstrual management. Recent publications have highlighted the efficacy and benefit of extended cycle or continuous combined oral contraceptives, the levonorgestrel intrauterine device, and progestin therapies for a variety of medical conditions. This review places menstrual suppression in an historical context, summarizes methods of hormonal therapy that can suppress menses, and reviews clinical conditions for which menstrual suppression may be helpful.

  4. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A proof-of-concept method utilizing a cryogenic fluid for acoustic suppression in rocket engine testing environments will be demonstrated. It is hypothesized that...

  5. Sodium fire suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Ignition and combustion studies have provided valuable data and guidelines for sodium fire suppression research. The primary necessity is to isolate the oxidant from the fuel, rather than to attempt to cool the sodium below its ignition temperature. Work along these lines has led to the development of smothering tank systems and a dry extinguishing powder. Based on the results obtained, the implementation of these techniques is discussed with regard to sodium fire suppression in the Super-Phenix reactor. (author)

  6. Airway oxidative stress in chronic cough

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of chronic cough are unclear. Many reactive oxygen species affect airway sensory C-fibres which are capable to induce cough. Several chronic lung diseases are characterised by cough and oxidative stress. In asthma, an association between the cough severity and airway oxidative stress has been demonstrated. The present study was conducted to investigate whether airway oxidative stress is associated with chronic cough in subjects without chronic lung diseases. Methods Exhaled breath condensate samples were obtained in 43 non-smoking patients with chronic cough and 15 healthy subjects. Exclusion criteria included a doctor’s diagnosis of any lung disorders and any abnormality in lung x-ray. The concentration of 8-isoprostane was measured. In addition, the patients filled in Leicester Cough Questionnaire and underwent hypertonic saline cough provocation test, spirometry, ambulatory peak flow monitoring, nitric oxide measurement, and histamine airway challenge. In a subgroup of patients the measurements were repeated during 12 weeks’ treatment with inhaled budesonide, 800 ug/day. Results The 8-isoprostane concentrations were higher in the cough patients than in the healthy subjects (24.6 ± 1.2 pg/ml vs. 10.1 ± 1.7 pg/ml, p = 0.045). The 8-isoprostane concentration was associated with the Leicester Cough Questionnaire total score (p = 0.044) but not with the cough sensitivity to saline or other tests. Budesonide treatment did not affect the 8-isoprostane concentrations. Conclusions Chronic cough seems to be associated with airway oxidative stress in subjects with chronic cough but without chronic lung diseases. This finding may help to develop novel antitussive drugs. Trial registration The study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov database (KUH5801112), identifier NCT00859274. PMID:24294924

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Airway Walls Using CT Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Jung; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Kyung Won; Lee, Hyun Ju; Kim, Kwang Gi; Im, Jung Gi [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop dedicated software for quantitative analysis of the airways and to validate the software using airway phantoms and excised swine lung. The dedicated software was validated in airway phantoms and excised swine lung through comparison of the actual values with the measurements acquired with dedicated software. The accuracy of the measurements according to the reconstruction methods (standard, lung, sharp) and spatial resolution were compared using airway phantoms. Repeatability of the measurement of airway phantoms was assessed with follow-up CT scans three months later. Airway dimension measurements obtained in airway phantoms and excised swine lung showed good agreements with actual values. Airway measurements were more accurate when the sharp reconstruction algorithm was used and when the spatial resolution was improved using pixels smaller than conventional size. There was good agreement between the initial airway measurements and those obtained three months later. We developed and validated dedicated software for quantitative airway measurement. Reconstruction with sharp algorithms and high spatial resolution images is recommended for obtaining airway measurements.

  8. On the relation of nasal cycling with nasal airway dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilmette, R.A.; Wolff, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    The size and configuration of the nasal airways of humans change with time as a result of the normal process of congestion/decongestion of the erectile tissue of the nasal mucosa. To determine the extent to which airway areas change in vivo, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantitate both the cross-sectional area and perimeter of coronal sections of the entire nasal airway of a human subject. Changes in airway size or patency were indexed to measured changes in unilateral nasal airway resistance determined by posterior rhino manometry. The results of this study in which two MRI scans were performed for presumed left-side patency and two for right-side patency, showed that changes in nasal airway resistance were difficult to ascribe to systematic changes In the sizes of the airways. (author)

  9. BLUNTING AIRWAYS EOSINOPHILIC INFLAMMATION RESULTS IN A DECREASED AIRWAY NEUTROPHIL RESPONSE TO INHALED LPS IN ATOPIC ASTHMATICS A ROLE FOR CD-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent data demonstrate that atopic inflammation might enhance airway responses to inhaled LPS in individuals with atopic asthma by increasing CD14 expression on airway macrophages. We sought to determine whether blunting airway eosinophilic inflammation decreases CD14 expressio...

  10. Dietary Compound Kaempferol Inhibits Airway Thickening Induced by Allergic Reaction in a Bovine Serum Albumin-Induced Model of Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Daekeun; Park, Sin-Hye; Choi, Yean-Jung; Kim, Yun-Ho; Antika, Lucia Dwi; Habibah, Nurina Umy; Kang, Min-Kyung; Kang, Young-Hee

    2015-12-16

    Asthma is characterized by aberrant airways including epithelial thickening, goblet cell hyperplasia, and smooth muscle hypertrophy within the airway wall. The current study examined whether kaempferol inhibited mast cell degranulation and prostaglandin (PG) release leading to the development of aberrant airways, using an in vitro model of dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA)-sensitized rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) mast cells and an in vivo model of BSA-challenged asthmatic mice. Nontoxic kaempferol at 10-20 μM suppressed β-hexosaminidase release and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2)-mediated production of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) in sensitized mast cells. Oral administration of ≤20 mg/kg kaempferol blocked bovine serum albumin (BSA) inhalation-induced epithelial cell excrescence and smooth muscle hypertrophy by attenuating the induction of COX2 and the formation of PGD2 and PGF2α, together with reducing the anti-α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in mouse airways. Kaempferol deterred the antigen-induced mast cell activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) responsive to protein kinase Cμ (PKCμ) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Furthermore, the antigen-challenged activation of Syk-phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) pathway was dampened in kaempferol-supplemented mast cells. These results demonstrated that kaempferol inhibited airway wall thickening through disturbing Syk-PLCγ signaling and PKCμ-ERK-cPLA2-COX2 signaling in antigen-exposed mast cells. Thus, kaempferol may be a potent anti-allergic compound targeting allergic asthma typical of airway hyperplasia and hypertrophy.

  11. The operative cooperation and nursing in performing airway stent placement under DSA guidance for treating airway stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Baojun; Wu Gang; Han Xinwei; Wang Nan; Shi Jin; Si Wenfeng; Wang Kai; Su Ning; Liu Jia; Hai Dandan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the key points of the nursing care for effectively performing airway stent placement under DSA monitoring for airway stenosis. Methods: Corresponding nursing care measures were carried out for 118 patients with airway stenosis who were treated with airway stent placement. Results: The symptom of dyspnea was markedly relieved after stent implantation in all 118 patients with airway stenosis. Conclusion: To strengthen the preoperative psychological nursing and operative posture training, to make close postoperative watch on vital signs, to adopt some prevention measures for possible complications and to give necessary medical advises at the time of discharge are very helpful for patient's recovery after the surgery. (authors)

  12. Innate Immune Responses to Engineered Nanomaterials During Allergic Airway Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipkowski, Kelly Anne

    disease would modulate the innate immune response to MWCNTs. We hypothesized that Th2 cytokines and the allergic asthmatic microenvironment would alter MWCNT-induced inflammasome activation and IL- 1beta secretion both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were differentiated into macrophages and exposed to MWCNTs and or recombinant Th2 cytokines, specifically IL-4 and/or IL-13. Exposure of THP-1 cells to MWCNTs alone caused dose-dependent secretion of IL-1beta, while co-exposure to IL-4 and/or IL-13 suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Further analysis determined that IL-4 and IL-13 were phosphorylating the protein signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) and subsequently inhibiting inflammasome activation and function through suppression of caspase-1, a cysteine protease responsible for cleavage of pro-IL-1beta into an active, secretable form. In vivo, wild-type C57BL6 mice were sensitized intranasally with HDM allergen and exposed to MWCNTs via oropharyngeal aspiration. Treatment with MWCNTs alone induced secretion of IL-1beta in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) one day post-exposure, while sensitization with HDM prior to MWCNT exposure suppressed MWCNT-induced IL-1beta. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of lung sections from exposed animals showed that HDM sensitization inhibited MWCNT-induced pro-casapse-1 protein expression, responsible for inflammasome activation, in the airway epithelium and macrophages. MWCNT exposure combined with HDM sensitization increased inflammatory cell infiltration and subsequent acute lung inflammation and chronic fibrosis. Analysis of the systemic effects of MWCNT exposure during allergic airway sensitization showed that MWCNTs and/or HDM allergen upregulated STAT3 mRNA expression in the lungs, liver, and spleen of exposed animals, and at the same induced mixed T helper (Th) responses in the different tissues. Collectively, these data suggest that the allergic microenvironment

  13. Predominant constitutive CFTR conductance in small airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lytle Christian

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathological hallmarks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are inflammation of the small airways (bronchiolitis and destruction of lung parenchyma (emphysema. These forms of disease arise from chronic prolonged infections, which are usually never present in the normal lung. Despite the fact that primary hygiene and defense of the airways presumably requires a well controlled fluid environment on the surface of the bronchiolar airway, very little is known of the fluid and electrolyte transport properties of airways of less than a few mm diameter. Methods We introduce a novel approach to examine some of these properties in a preparation of minimally traumatized porcine bronchioles of about 1 mm diameter by microperfusing the intact bronchiole. Results In bilateral isotonic NaCl Ringer solutions, the spontaneous transepithelial potential (TEP; lumen to bath of the bronchiole was small (mean ± sem: -3 ± 1 mV; n = 25, but when gluconate replaced luminal Cl-, the bionic Cl- diffusion potentials (-58 ± 3 mV; n = 25 were as large as -90 mV. TEP diffusion potentials from 2:1 NaCl dilution showed that epithelial Cl- permeability was at least 5 times greater than Na+ permeability. The anion selectivity sequence was similar to that of CFTR. The bionic TEP became more electronegative with stimulation by luminal forskolin (5 μM+IBMX (100 μM, ATP (100 μM, or adenosine (100 μM, but not by ionomycin. The TEP was partially inhibited by NPPB (100 μM, GlyH-101* (5–50 μM, and CFTRInh-172* (5 μM. RT-PCR gave identifying products for CFTR, α-, β-, and γ-ENaC and NKCC1. Antibodies to CFTR localized specifically to the epithelial cells lining the lumen of the small airways. Conclusion These results indicate that the small airway of the pig is characterized by a constitutively active Cl- conductance that is most likely due to CFTR.

  14. Role of eosinophilic airway inflammation in models of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lapa e Silva José R

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils play a central role in the establishment and outcome of bronchial inflammation in asthma. Animal models of allergy are useful to answer questions related to mechanisms of allergic inflammation. We have used models of sensitized and boosted guinea pigs to investigate the nature of bronchial inflammation in allergic conditions. These animals develop marked bronchial infiltration composed mainly of CD4+ T-lymphocytes and eosinophils. Further provocation with antigen leads to degranulation of eosinophils and ulceration of the bronchial mucosa. Eosinophils are the first cells to increase in numbers in the mucosa after antigen challenge and depend on the expression of alpha 4 integrin to adhere to the vascular endothelium and transmigrate to the mucosa. Blockage of alpha4 integrin expression with specific antibody prevents not only the transmigration of eosinophils but also the development of bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR to agonists in sensitized and challenged animals, clearly suggesting a role for this cell type in this altered functional state. Moreover, introduction of antibody against Major Basic Protein into the airways also prevents the development of BHR in similar model. BHR can also be suppressed by the use of FK506, an immunosuppressor that reduces in almost 100% the infiltration of eosinophils into the bronchi of allergic animals. These data support the concept that eosinophil is the most important pro-inflammatory factor in bronchial inflammation associated with allergy.

  15. Human airway eosinophils exhibit preferential reduction in STAT signaling capacity and increased CISH expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Mandy E; Koziol-White, Cynthia J; Esnault, Stephane; Bates, Mary E; Evans, Michael D; Bertics, Paul J; Denlinger, Loren C

    2013-09-15

    Allergic asthma, a chronic respiratory disorder marked by inflammation and recurrent airflow obstruction, is associated with elevated levels of IL-5 family cytokines and elevated numbers of eosinophils (EOS). IL-5 family cytokines elongate peripheral blood EOS (EOS(PB)) viability, recruit EOS(PB) to the airways, and, at higher concentrations, induce degranulation and reactive oxygen species generation. Although airway EOS (EOS(A)) remain signal ready in that GM-CSF treatment induces degranulation, treatment of EOS(A) with IL-5 family cytokines no longer confers a survival advantage. Because the IL-5 family receptors have common signaling capacity, but are uncoupled from EOS(A) survival, whereas other IL-5 family induced endpoints remain functional, we tested the hypothesis that EOS(A) possess a JAK/STAT-specific regulatory mechanism (because JAK/STAT signaling is critical to EOS survival). We found that IL-5 family-induced STAT3 and STAT5 phosphorylation is attenuated in EOS(A) relative to blood EOS from airway allergen-challenged donors. However, IL-5 family-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation is not altered between EOS(A) and EOS from airway allergen-challenged donors. These observations suggest EOS(A) possess a regulatory mechanism for suppressing STAT signaling distinct from ERK1/2 activation. Furthermore, we found, in EOS(PB), IL-5 family cytokines induce members of the suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) genes, CISH and SOCS1. Additionally, following allergen challenge, EOS(A) express significantly more CISH and SOCS1 mRNA and CISH protein than EOS(PB) counterparts. In EOS(PB), long-term pretreatment with IL-5 family cytokines, to varying degrees, attenuates IL-5 family-induced STAT5 phosphorylation. These data support a model in which IL-5 family cytokines trigger a selective downregulation mechanism in EOS(A) for JAK/STAT pathways.

  16. Update on the roles of distal airways in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Roche

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This review is the summary of a workshop on the role of distal airways in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, which took place in 2009 in Vence, France. The evidence showing inflammation and remodelling in distal airways and the possible involvement of these in the pathobiology, physiology, clinical manifestations and natural history of COPD were examined. The usefulness and limitations of physiological tests and imaging techniques for assessing distal airways abnormalities were evaluated. Ex vivo studies in isolated lungs and invasive measurements of airway resistance in living individuals have revealed that distal airways represent the main site of airflow limitation in COPD. Structural changes in small conducting airways, including increased wall thickness and obstruction by muco-inflammatory exudates, and emphysema (resulting in premature airway closure, were important determinants of airflow limitation. Infiltration of small conducting airways by phagocytes (macrophages and neutrophils, dendritic cells and T and B lymphocytes increased with airflow limitation. Distal airways abnormalities were associated with patient-related outcomes (e.g. dyspnoea and reduced health-related quality of life and with the natural history of the disease, as reflected by lung function decline and mortality. These data provide a clear rationale for targeting distal airways in COPD.

  17. Role of airway epithelial barrier dysfunction in pathogenesis of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gon, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Shu

    2018-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is characterized by persistent cough, increased sputum, and repeated wheezing. The pathophysiology underlying these symptoms is the hyper-responsiveness of the airway along with chronic airway inflammation. Repeated injury, repair, and regeneration of the airway epithelium following exposure to environmental factors and inflammation results in histological changes and functional abnormalities in the airway mucosal epithelium; such changes are believed to have a significant association with the pathophysiology of asthma. Damage to the barrier functions of the airway epithelium enhances mucosal permeability of foreign substances in the airway epithelium of patients with asthma. Thus, epithelial barrier fragility is closely involved in releasing epithelial cytokines (e.g., TSLP, IL-25, and IL-33) because of the activation of airway epithelial cells, dendritic cells, and innate group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2). Functional abnormalities of the airway epithelial cells along with the activation of dendritic cells, Th2 cells, and ILC2 form a single immunopathological unit that is considered to cause allergic airway inflammation. Here we use the latest published literature to discuss the potential pathological mechanisms regarding the onset and progressive severity of asthma with regard to the disruption of the airway epithelial function. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Selection and fabrication of a non-woven polycarbonate urethane cover for a tissue engineered airway stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiluan; Clauser, Johanna; Thiebes, Anja Lena; McGrath, Donnacha J; McHugh, Peter E; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Hennink, Wim E; Kok, Robbert Jan

    2016-11-30

    One of the major problems in end-stage bronchotracheal cancer is stenosis of the upper airways, either due to luminal ingrowth of the tumor or mucus plugging. Airway stents that suppress tumor ingrowth and sustain mucociliary transport can alleviate these problems in end-stage bronchial cancer. We evaluated different types of polymeric covers for a tissue engineered airway stent. The distinguishing feature of this stent concept is that respiratory epithelial cells can grow on the luminal surface of the stent which facilitates mucociliary clearance. To facilitate growth of epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface of the stent, we developed a polyurethane cover that allows transport of nutrients to the cells. Nonwoven polycarbonate urethane (PCU) covers were prepared by a spraying process and evaluated for their porosity and glucose permeability. Respiratory epithelial cells harvested from sheep trachea were cultured onto the selected PCU cover and remained viable at the air-liquid interface when cultured for 21days. Lastly, we evaluated the radial force of a PCU-covered nitinol stent, and showed the PCU covers did not adversely affect the mechanical properties of the stents for their intended application in the smaller bronchi. These in vitro data corroborate the design of a novel airway stent for palliative treatment of bronchotracheal stenosis by combination of stent-technology with tissue-engineered epithelial cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Oligo Fucoidan Inhibits Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Stimulated Proliferation of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Huei Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the pathogenesis of asthma, the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs is a key factor in airway remodeling and causes airway narrowing. In addition, ASMCs are also the effector cells of airway inflammation. Fucoidan extracted from marine brown algae polysaccharides has antiviral, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticlotting, and anticancer properties; however, its effectiveness for asthma has not been elucidated thus far. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-treated primary ASMCs were cultured with or without oligo-fucoidan (100, 500, or 1000 µg/mL to evaluate its effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and Akt, ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We found that PDGF (40 ng/mL increased the proliferation of ASMCs by 2.5-fold after 48 h (p < 0.05. Oligo-fucoidan reduced the proliferation of PDGF-stimulated ASMCs by 75%–99% after 48 h (p < 0.05 and induced G1/G0 cell cycle arrest, but did not induce apoptosis. Further, oligo-fucoidan supplementation reduced PDGF-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2, Akt, and nuclear factor (NF-κB phosphorylation. Taken together, oligo-fucoidan supplementation might reduce proliferation of PDGF-treated ASMCs through the suppression of ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. The results provide basis for future animal experiments and human trials.

  20. A key role for STIM1 in store operated calcium channel activation in airway smooth muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peel Samantha E

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control of cytosolic calcium plays a key role in airway myocyte function. Changes in intracellular Ca2+ stores can modulate contractile responses, modulate proliferation and regulate synthetic activity. Influx of Ca2+ in non excitable smooth muscle is believed to be predominantly through store operated channels (SOC or receptor operated channels (ROC. Whereas agonists can activate both SOC and ROC in a range of smooth muscle types, the specific trigger for SOC activation is depletion of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores. The mechanism underlying SOC activation following depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores in smooth muscle has not been identified. Methods To investigate the roles of the STIM homologues in SOC activation in airway myocytes, specific siRNA sequences were utilised to target and selectively suppress both STIM1 and STIM2. Quantitative real time PCR was employed to assess the efficiency and the specificity of the siRNA mediated knockdown of mRNA. Activation of SOC was investigated by both whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology and a fluorescence based calcium assay. Results Transfection of 20 nM siRNA specific for STIM1 or 2 resulted in robust decreases (>70% of the relevant mRNA. siRNA targeted at STIM1 resulted in a reduction of SOC associated Ca2+ influx in response to store depletion by cyclopiazonic acid (60% or histamine but not bradykinin. siRNA to STIM2 had no effect on these responses. In addition STIM1 suppression resulted in a more or less complete abrogation of SOC associated inward currents assessed by whole cell patch clamp. Conclusion Here we show that STIM1 acts as a key signal for SOC activation following intracellular Ca2+ store depletion or following agonist stimulation with histamine in human airway myocytes. These are the first data demonstrating a role for STIM1 in a physiologically relevant, non-transformed endogenous expression cell model.

  1. Pressure suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumachi, Wataru; Fukuda, Akira; Kitaguchi, Hidemi; Shimizu, Toshiaki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To relieve and absorb impact wave vibrations caused by steam and non-condensed gases releasing into the pressure suppression chamber at the time of an accident. Structure: The reactor container is filled with inert gases. A safety valve attached main steam pipe is provided to permit the excessive steam to escape, the valve being communicated with the pressure suppression chamber through an exhaust pipe. In the pressure suppression chamber, a doughnut-like cylindrical outer wall is filled at its bottom with pool water to condense the high temperature vapor released through the exhaust pipe. A head portion of a vent tube which leads the exhaust pipe is positioned at the top, and a down comer and an exhaust vent tube are locked by means of steady rests. At the bottom is mounted a pressure adsorber device which adsorbs a pressure from the pool water. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. The Diacetyl-Exposed Human Airway Epithelial Secretome: New Insights into Flavoring-Induced Airways Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brass, David M; Gwinn, William M; Valente, Ashlee M; Kelly, Francine L; Brinkley, Christie D; Nagler, Andrew E; Moseley, M Arthur; Morgan, Daniel L; Palmer, Scott M; Foster, Matthew W

    2017-06-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) is an increasingly important lung disease characterized by fibroproliferative airway lesions and decrements in lung function. Occupational exposure to the artificial food flavoring ingredient diacetyl, commonly used to impart a buttery flavor to microwave popcorn, has been associated with BO development. In the occupational setting, diacetyl vapor is first encountered by the airway epithelium. To better understand the effects of diacetyl vapor on the airway epithelium, we used an unbiased proteomic approach to characterize both the apical and basolateral secretomes of air-liquid interface cultures of primary human airway epithelial cells from four unique donors after exposure to an occupationally relevant concentration (∼1,100 ppm) of diacetyl vapor or phosphate-buffered saline as a control on alternating days. Basolateral and apical supernatants collected 48 h after the third exposure were analyzed using one-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Paired t tests adjusted for multiple comparisons were used to assess differential expression between diacetyl and phosphate-buffered saline exposure. Of the significantly differentially expressed proteins identified, 61 were unique to the apical secretome, 81 were unique to the basolateral secretome, and 11 were present in both. Pathway enrichment analysis using publicly available databases revealed that proteins associated with matrix remodeling, including degradation, assembly, and new matrix organization, were overrepresented in the data sets. Similarly, protein modifiers of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling were significantly altered. The ordered changes in protein expression suggest that the airway epithelial response to diacetyl may contribute to BO pathogenesis.

  3. Tachykinin receptors mediating airway marcomolecular secretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, S.E. (Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Three tachykinin receptor types, termed NK1, NK2, and NK3, can be distinguished by the relative potency of various peptides in eliciting tissue responses. Airway macromolecular secretion is stimulated by the tachykinin substance P (SP). The purposes of this study were to determine the tachykinin receptor subtype responsible for this stimulation, and to examine the possible involvement of other neurotransmitters in mediating this effect. Ferret tracheal explants maintained in organ culture were labeled with {sup 3}H-glucosamine, a precursor of high molecular weight glycoconjugates (HMWG) which are released by airway secretory cells. Secretion of labeled HMWG then was determined in the absence and presence of the tachykinins SP, neurokinin A (NKA), neurokinin B (NKB), physalaemin (PHY), and eledoisin (ELE). To evaluate the possible contribution of other mediators, tachykinin stimulation was examined in the presence of several receptor blockers.

  4. Improving Customer Satisfaction, case Tiger Airways

    OpenAIRE

    Ngo, Thi

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of the thesis was to assess the level of customer satisfaction of the airline company Tiger Airways, which is a low-cost airline with a considerable number of dissatisfied customers. In the study the theories of customer satisfaction were reviewed for providing solutions for the airline to reduce the number of discontented customers. To analyze the current situation of the airline company’s customer satisfaction the quantitative research method was used. The research ma...

  5. Recent Developments in United Airways Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ciprandi, Giorgio; Caimmi, Davide; Miraglia del Giudice, Michele; La Rosa, Mario; Salpietro, Carmelo; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2012-01-01

    The nose and lung are both part of the respiratory tract. Often the diseases affecting the nose and/or the bronchi are treated separately. However, in recent years, numerous studies have highlighted the fact that the respiratory system is a single entity and the concept of "united airway disease" has become more and more important. The unity of the respiratory tract is confirmed both from a morphological and from a functional point of view. Nevertheless, this concept is also confirmed for the...

  6. Th17 cells in airway diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traves, Suzanne L; Donnelly, Louise E

    2008-08-01

    Chronic inflammation is a key feature of many airway diseases. Leukocyte accumulation in the lung has the capacity to mediate many aspects of the pathophysiology of such diseases including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Until recently, the CD4+ lymphocyte component of these inflammatory influxes was thought to consist of Th1 or Th2 type cells, however a third group of cells termed Th17 have been identified. These cells follow a distinct differentiation profile requiring TGFbeta and IL-6 leading to the expression of the Th17 selective transcription factor, RORgammat. Differentiation of these cells is restricted by Th1 and Th2 cytokines including IFNgamma and IL-4 which attenuate Th17 cell differentiation. The presence of Th17 cells in the airway has yet to be confirmed, yet IL-17 is expressed in both asthma and COPD. Many of the inflammatory effects of Th17 cells are attributed to the expression of this cytokine. For example, IL-17 up-regulates the expression of a number of CXCR2 chemokines including CXCL1, CXCL6 and CXCL8 together with neutrophil survival factors GM-CSF and G-CSF from the airway epithelium. This would suggest that Th17 cells are important in promoting and sustaining neutrophilic inflammation as observed in severe asthma and COPD. In addition, IL-17 can act synergistically with viral infection or other inflammatory mediators including TNF-alpha to potentiate these responses. Confirmation of the presence of Th17 cells in the airways in disease warrants further investigation since these cells would present a novel therapeutic opportunity to reduce neutrophilic inflammation in the lung.

  7. Thyroxin hormone suppression treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the important modalities of treatment of thyroid cancer (TC) after surgery is the administration of thyroxin as an adjuvant treatment. The analysis supports the theory that thyroid suppression plays an important role in patient management. 300 μg of thyroxin, as this is an adequate dose for suppression is given. Ideally the dose should be tailored by testing s-TSH levels. However, since a large number of the patients come from out station cities and villages this is impractical. We therefore depend on clinical criteria of hyperthyroid symptoms and adjust the dose. Very few patients need such adjustment

  8. Clinical application of expectorant therapy in chronic inflammatory airway diseases (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, TING; ZHOU, XIANGDONG

    2014-01-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a significant clinical and pathological feature of chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Its clinical presentations include recurrent coughing and phlegm. Airway mucus is closely associated with the occurrence, development and prognosis of chronic inflammatory airway diseases and critically affects the lung function, quality of life, hospitalization rate and mortality of patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Therefore, expectorant therapies targeti...

  9. Percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy with repetitive airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswald, M; Ong, G; Yeoh, E

    1995-11-01

    To develop a technique for needle cricothyrotomy that mimics the normal respiratory cycle (using repetitive obstruction of the upper airway and relatively low flow oxygen through small catheters), a controlled trial in three anesthetized dogs was performed. Oxygen from a standard bottle and pressure reducer was delivered through the cricothyroid membrane at 0.36 L/kg/min, which is metabolically equivalent to 0.2 L/kg/min in an adult human. The upper airway was obstructed until the chest rose and then was unobstructed to allow exhalation. The animals were ventilated for 5 minutes to allow equilibration. Arterial PCO2 was measured after 2-minute periods of apnea and 3 minutes of ventilation, each repeated four times. The procedure was repeated in three other dogs at a flow of 0.18 L/kg/min to simulate a 50% air leak. Cricothyroid ventilation at 0.36 L/kg/min lowered the PCO2 from 65 mm Hg to 43 mm Hg, F = 258, P = .004. All PCO2 after 25 minutes were in the normal range. Ventilation at 0.18 L/kg/min stabilized the PCO2 at approximately 1.5 times normal (67 mm Hg versus 79 mm Hg for the preceding apnea, F = 77, P = .013). Flow rates achievable with 18- to 20-gauge catheters and standard oxygen sources are adequate for cricothyroid ventilation when the airway is repetitively obstructed to allow a normal respiratory cycle.

  10. Nonallergic rhinitis and lower airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondón, C; Bogas, G; Barrionuevo, E; Blanca, M; Torres, M J; Campo, P

    2017-01-01

    In the past years, several investigators have demonstrated the existence of local nasal responses in some patients with typical allergic rhinitis symptoms but without atopy and have defined a new phenotype called local allergic rhinitis (LAR) or 'entopy'. In a percentage of LAR subjects, the upper airway disease is also associated with lower airway symptoms. After the description of this phenotype, the differential diagnosis between LAR and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) has become a challenge for the clinician. To correctly identify LAR patients is of high importance for treatment and management of these patients, and for an appropriate inclusion of patients in clinical trials and genetics studies. The treatment of LAR patients, in contrast with NAR, is oriented to allergen avoidance and specific treatment. Allergen immunotherapy, the aetiological treatment for allergic respiratory diseases, has demonstrated to be an effective and safe treatment in LAR, increasing immunological tolerance, and reducing the clinical symptoms and the use of medication. In this article, the important and novel aspects of LAR in terms of mechanisms, diagnosis and treatment will be discussed. Also, the involvement of the lower airway and the potential role of IgE in the bronchial disease will be also reviewed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Lentiviral Vector Gene Transfer to Porcine Airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick L Sinn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated lentiviral vector development and transduction efficiencies in well-differentiated primary cultures of pig airway epithelia (PAE and wild-type pigs in vivo. We noted gene transfer efficiencies similar to that observed for human airway epithelia (HAE. Interestingly, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV-based vectors transduced immortalized pig cells as well as pig primary cells more efficiently than HIV-1–based vectors. PAE express TRIM5α, a well-characterized species-specific lentiviral restriction factor. We contrasted the restrictive properties of porcine TRIM5α against FIV- and HIV-based vectors using gain and loss of function approaches. We observed no effect on HIV-1 or FIV conferred transgene expression in response to porcine TRIM5α overexpression or knockdown. To evaluate the ability of GP64-FIV to transduce porcine airways in vivo, we delivered vector expressing mCherry to the tracheal lobe of the lung and the ethmoid sinus of 4-week-old pigs. One week later, epithelial cells expressing mCherry were readily detected. Our findings indicate that pseudotyped FIV vectors confer similar tropisms in porcine epithelia as observed in human HAE and provide further support for the selection of GP64 as an appropriate envelope pseudotype for future preclinical gene therapy studies in the porcine model of cystic fibrosis (CF.

  12. [Comparison of efficacy for laryngeal mask airway-Supreme(TM) versus common laryngeal mask airway in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Wang-ning; You, Shan; He, Wei; DI, Mei-qin; Xu, Jian; Li, Jun; Lian, Qing-quan

    2013-11-19

    To compare the efficacy of laryngeal mask airway-Supreme(TM) versus common laryngeal mask airway in children with general anesthesia. With local research ethics committee's approval and written informed parental consent, 100 children were randomly divided into groups L (size 2.0 common laryngeal mask airway) and S (size 2.0 laryngeal mask airway-Supreme(TM)) according to random number (n = 50 each). After anesthesia induction, a common laryngeal mask airway or laryngeal mask airway-Supreme(TM) was inserted and mechanically ventilated. Time and ease for insertion, insertion success rate, airway leak pressure, success rate and ease of disposal sputum collecting tube insertion in group S, quality of airway during anesthetic maintenance, abdominal circumference changes and complications within 24 h post-operation were measured. Compared with group L, abdominal circumference increased less in group S (0.90 ± 0.35 vs 0.43 ± 0.18 cm, n = 46, P children with mechanical ventilation, laryngeal mask airway-Supreme(TM) can be effectively applied to maintain a good airway. And the incidence of gastric insufflation is lower. It is particularly useful for those requiring evacuation of gastric contents during general anesthesia.

  13. Impact of airway morphological changes on pulmonary flows in scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, James; Garrido, Enrique; Valluri, Prashant

    2016-11-01

    The relationship between thoracic deformity in scoliosis and lung function is poorly understood. In a pilot study, we reviewed computed tomography (CT) routine scans of patients undergoing scoliosis surgery. The CT scans were processed to segment the anatomy of the airways, lung and spine. A three-dimensional model was created to study the anatomical relationship. Preliminary analysis showed significant airway morphological differences depending on the anterior position of the spine. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study was also conducted on the airway geometry using the inspiratory scans. The CFD model assuming non-compliant airway walls was capable of showing pressure drops in areas of high airway resistance, but was unable to predict regional ventilation differences. Our results indicate a dependence between the dynamic deformation of the airway during breathing and lung function. Dynamic structural deformation must therefore be incorporated within any modelling approaches to guide clinicians on the decision to perform surgical correction of the scoliosis.

  14. A framework for understanding shared substrates of airway protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Shevon TROCHE

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Deficits of airway protection can have deleterious effects to health and quality of life. Effective airway protection requires a continuum of behaviors including swallowing and cough. Swallowing prevents material from entering the airway and coughing ejects endogenous material from the airway. There is significant overlap between the control mechanisms for swallowing and cough. In this review we will present the existing literature to support a novel framework for understanding shared substrates of airway protection. This framework was originally adapted from Eccles' model of cough28 (2009 by Hegland, et al.42 (2012. It will serve to provide a basis from which to develop future studies and test specific hypotheses that advance our field and ultimately improve outcomes for people with airway protective deficits.

  15. Airway, responsiveness and inflammation in adolescent elite swimmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lise; Lund, T.K.; Barnes, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Whereas increased airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation are well documented in adult elite athletes, it remains uncertain whether the same airway changes are present in adolescents involved in elite sport. Objective: To investigate airway responsiveness and airway...... inflammation in adolescent elite swimmers. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study on adolescent elite swimmers (n = 33) and 2 control groups: unselected adolescents (n = 35) and adolescents with asthma (n = 212). The following tests were performed: questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), spirometry...... at airway responsiveness as a continuous variable, the swimmers were more responsive to EVH than unselected subjects, but less responsive to metbacholine compared with subjects with asthma. We found no differences in the prevalence of respiratory symptoms between the swimmers and the unselected adolescents...

  16. Plasma suppression of beamstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.; Stewart, J.J.; Yu, S.S.

    1988-06-01

    We investigate the use of a plasma at the interaction point of two colliding beams to suppress beamsstrahlung and related phenomena. We derive conditions for good current cancellation via plasma return currents and report on numerical simulations conducted to confirm our analytic results. 10 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Ludwig's angina and airway considerations: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Anand H; Pai, Swarupa D; Bhattarai, Basant; Rao, Sumesh T; Ambareesha, M

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Patients with deep neck infections present challenging airways for an anesthesiologist. Patients with Ludwig's angina may die as a result of the inability to effectively manage the airway. Case presentation Here we discuss the anesthetic management with fiberoptic intubation of a 45-year-old man with Ludwig's angina scheduled for emergency drainage. Conclusion Awake fiberoptic intubation under topical anesthesia may be the ideal method to secure the airway in advanced cases of Lu...

  18. Zinc supplementation alters airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness to a common allergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Carrie I

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zinc supplementation can modulate immunity through inhibition of NF-κB, a transcription factor that controls many immune response genes. Thus, we sought to examine the mechanism by which zinc supplementation tempers the response to a common allergen and determine its effect on allergic airway inflammation. Methods Mice were injected with zinc gluconate prior to German cockroach (GC feces (frass exposure and airway inflammation was assessed. Primary bone marrow-derived neutrophils and DMSO-differentiated HL-60 cells were used to assess the role of zinc gluconate on tumor necrosis factor (TNFα expression. NF-κB:DNA binding and IKK activity were assessed by EMSA and in vitro kinase assay. Protein levels of A20, RIP1 and TRAF6 were assessed by Western blot analysis. Establishment of allergic airway inflammation with GC frass was followed by administration of zinc gluconate. Airway hyperresponsiveness, serum IgE levels, eosinophilia and Th2 cytokine production were assessed. Results Administration of zinc gluconate prior to allergen exposure resulted in significantly decreased neutrophil infiltration and TNFα cytokine release into the airways. This correlated with decreased NF-κB activity in the whole lung. Treatment with zinc gluconate significantly decreased GC frass-mediated TNFα production from bone-marrow derived neutrophils and HL-60 cells. We confirmed zinc-mediated decreases in NF-κB:DNA binding and IKK activity in HL-60 cells. A20, a natural inhibitor of NF-κB and a zinc-fingered protein, is a potential target of zinc. Zinc treatment did not alter A20 levels in the short term, but resulted in the degradation of RIP1, an important upstream activator of IKK. TRAF6 protein levels were unaffected. To determine the application for zinc as a therapeutic for asthma, we administered zinc following the establishment of allergic airway inflammation in a murine model. Zinc supplementation decreased airway hyperresponsiveness

  19. Airway management in a patient with bullous pemphigoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasir, M.; Khan, F.A.

    2013-01-01

    Airway management in patients with pemphigoid lesions has anaesthetic implications. We report a case of a 23 years old female with bullous pemphigoid who presented with laryngeal stenosis and critical airway narrowing. The airway was initially managed with jet ventilation. Anaesthesia was maintained with propofol infusion and ventilation was performed by introducing a size 10 French gauge suction catheter through the stenotic laryngeal orifice. Thirty minutes into anaesthesia, she developed subcutaneous emphysema and decreased air entry on right side of the chest but remained hemodynamically stable. The airway was further managed by tracheostomy. This case report highlights complications that can occur during the anaesthetic management of such cases. (author)

  20. Inherent and antigen-induced airway hyperreactivity in NC mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuto Kobayashi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to clarify the airway physiology of NC mice, the following experiments were carried out. To investigate inherent airway reactivity, we compared tracheal reactivity to various chemical mediators in NC, BALB/c, C57BL/6 and A/J mice in vitro. NC mice showed significantly greater reactivity to acetylcholine than BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice and a reactivity comparable to that of A/J mice, which are known as high responders. Then, airway reactivity to acetylcholine was investigated in those strains in vivo. NC mice again showed comparable airway reactivity to that seen in A/J mice and a significantly greater reactivity than that seen in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. To investigate the effects of airway inflammation on airway reactivity to acetylcholine in vivo, NC and BALB/c mice were sensitized to and challenged with antigen. Sensitization to and challenge with antigen induced accumulation of inflammatory cells, especially eosinophils, in lung and increased airway reactivity in NC and BALB/c mice. These results indicate that NC mice exhibit inherent and antigen-induced airway hyperreactivity. Therefore, NC mice are a suitable strain to use in investigating the mechanisms underlying airway hyperreactivity and such studies will provide beneficial information for understanding the pathophysiology of asthma.

  1. Transient Mechanical Response of Lung Airway Tissue during Mechanical Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israr Bin Muhammad Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with acute lung injury, airway and other pulmonary diseases often require Mechanical Ventilation (MV. Knowledge of the stress/strain environment in lung airway tissues is very important in order to avoid lung injuries for patients undergoing MV. Airway tissue strains responsible for stressing the lung’s fiber network and rupturing the lung due to compliant airways are very difficult to measure experimentally. Multi-level modeling is adopted to investigate the transient mechanical response of the tissue under MV. First, airflow through a lung airway bifurcation (Generation 4–6 is modeled using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD to obtain air pressure during 2 seconds of MV breathing. Next, the transient air pressure was used in structural analysis to obtain mechanical strain experienced by the airway tissue wall. Structural analysis showed that airway tissue from Generation 5 in one bifurcation can stretch eight times that of airway tissue of the same generation number but with different bifurcation. The results suggest sensitivity of load to geometrical features. Furthermore, the results of strain levels obtained from the tissue analysis are very important because these strains at the cellular-level can create inflammatory responses, thus damaging the airway tissues.

  2. Airway somatosensory deficits and dysphagia in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Michael J; Murphy, Caitlin A; Abrams, Trisha M

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) often experience substantial impairment of swallow control, and are typically unaware of the presence or severity of their impairments suggesting that these individuals may also experience airway sensory deficits. However, the degree to which impaired swallow function in PD may relate to airway sensory deficits has yet to be formally tested. The purpose of this study was to examine whether airway sensory function is associated with swallow impairment in PD. Eighteen PD participants and 18 healthy controls participated in this study and underwent endoscopic assessment of airway somatosensory function, endoscopic assessment of swallow function, and clinical ratings of swallow and disease severity. PD participants exhibited abnormal airway somatosensory function and greater swallow impairment compared with healthy controls. Swallow and sensory deficits in PD were correlated with disease severity. Moreover, PD participants reported similar self-rated swallow function as healthy controls, and swallow deficits were correlated with sensory function suggesting an association between impaired sensory function and poor self-awareness of swallow deficits in PD. These results suggest that control of swallow is influenced by airway somatosensory function, that swallow-related deficits in PD are related to abnormal somatosensation, and that swallow and airway sensory function may degrade as a function of disease severity. Therefore, the basal ganglia and related neural networks may play an important role to integrate airway sensory input for swallow-related motor control. Furthermore, the airway deficits observed in PD suggest a disintegration of swallow-related sensory and motor control.

  3. New frontiers in CT imaging of airway disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, Philippe A.; Beigelman-Aubry, Catherine; Fetita, Catalin; Preteux, Francoise; Brauner, Michel W.; Lenoir, Stephane

    2002-01-01

    Combining helical volumetric CT acquisition and thin-slice thickness during breath hold provides an accurate assessment of both focal and diffuse airway diseases. With multiple detector rows, compared with single-slice helical CT, multislice CT can cover a greater volume, during a simple breath hold, and with better longitudinal and in-plane spatial resolution and improved temporal resolution. The result in data set allows the generation of superior multiplanar and 3D images of the airways, including those obtained from techniques developed specifically for airway imaging, such as virtual bronchography and virtual bronchoscopy. Complementary CT evaluation at suspended or continuous full expiration is mandatory to detect air trapping that is a key finding for depicting an obstruction on the small airways. Indications for CT evaluation of the airways include: (a) detection of endobronchial lesions in patients with an unexplained hemoptysis; (b) evaluation of extent of tracheobronchial stenosis for planning treatment and follow-up; (c) detection of congenital airway anomalies revealed by hemoptysis or recurrent infection; (d) detection of postinfectious or postoperative airway fistula or dehiscence; and (e) diagnosis and assessment of extent of bronchiectasis and small airway disease. Improvement in image analysis technique and the use of spirometrically control of lung volume acquisition have made possible accurate and reproducible quantitative assessment of airway wall and lumen areas and lung density. This contributes to better insights in physiopathology of obstructive lung disease, particularly in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. (orig.)

  4. Reduction of Eosinophils in Small Airways by Inhaled Steroids is Insufficient in Patients with Adult Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Tanaka

    2006-01-01

    Conclusions: It was speculated that inhaled CFC-BDP and DP-FP might deposit mainly in large airways and fail to fully reach small airways, consequently allowing eosinophilic inflammation to continue in small airways.

  5. Intra-luminal exposure of murine airways to peroxynitrite causes inflammation but not hyperresponsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijsers, RBR; van der Veeken, A; Habernickel, J; Folkerts, G; Postma, DS; Nijkamp, FP

    Objective and design: There is increasing evidence for the involvement of reactive nitrogen species like peroxynitrite (ONOO-) in airway pathology, for example during allergic airway inflammation. Therefore, the effect of peroxynitrite exposure on airway responsiveness and inflammation was studied.

  6. NEUROTROPHIN MEDIATION OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS RESPONSES TO INHALED DIESEL PARTICLES IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airway hyper-responsiveness. Diesel exhaust particulates (DEP) associated with the combustion of diesel fuel exacerbate many of these allergic airways respons...

  7. Avian Influenza Virus Glycoproteins Restrict Virus Replication and Spread through Human Airway Epithelium at Temperatures of the Proximal Airways

    OpenAIRE

    Scull, Margaret A.; Gillim-Ross, Laura; Santos, Celia; Roberts, Kim L.; Bordonali, Elena; Subbarao, Kanta; Barclay, Wendy S.; Pickles, Raymond J.

    2009-01-01

    Transmission of avian influenza viruses from bird to human is a rare event even though avian influenza viruses infect the ciliated epithelium of human airways in vitro and ex vivo. Using an in vitro model of human ciliated airway epithelium (HAE), we demonstrate that while human and avian influenza viruses efficiently infect at temperatures of the human distal airways (37 degrees C), avian, but not human, influenza viruses are restricted for infection at the cooler temperatures of the human p...

  8. Airway smooth muscle cell culture: application to studies of airway wall remodelling and phenotype plasticity in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, S J

    1996-04-01

    Chronic persistent asthma is characterized by poorly reversible airway obstruction. Histopathological studies of airways removed postmortem from patients with severe asthma reveal marked inflammatory and architectural changes associated with airway wall thickening. Increased airway smooth muscle content, occurring as a result of hyperplastic and/or hypertrophic growth, is believed to be one of the principal contributors to airway wall thickening. Intense interest is building to discover the mechanisms responsible for these long-term structural changes. In vitro cell culture offers a powerful and exacting approach to cellular and molecular studies of the long-term regulation of airway smooth muscle function. This review discusses the methodologies for establishing and maintaining cell cultures of airway smooth muscle. It also describes the characteristics of these cells in culture and addresses the potential importance of phenotype plasticity and its possible relationship to altered smooth muscle function in vivo. Drawing on parallels from vascular studies, this review focuses, in particular, on the synthetic nature of the airway smooth muscle cell, emphasizing its potential to alter the composition of the extracellular matrix environment and orchestrate key events in the process of chronic airway remodelling.

  9. Diesel exhaust augments allergen-induced lower airway inflammation in allergic individuals: a controlled human exposure study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, Chris; Blomberg, Anders; Pui, Mandy; Sandstrom, Thomas; Wong, Sze Wing; Alexis, Neil; Hirota, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Traffic-related air pollution has been shown to augment allergy and airway disease. However, the enhancement of allergenic effects by diesel exhaust in particular is unproven in vivo in the human lung, and underlying details of this apparent synergy are poorly understood. To test the hypothesis that a 2 h inhalation of diesel exhaust augments lower airway inflammation and immune cell activation following segmental allergen challenge in atopic subjects. 18 blinded atopic volunteers were exposed to filtered air or 300 µg PM(2.5)/m(3) of diesel exhaust in random fashion. 1 h post-exposure, diluent-controlled segmental allergen challenge was performed; 2 days later, samples from the challenged segments were obtained by bronchoscopic lavage. Samples were analysed for markers and modifiers of allergic inflammation (eosinophils, Th2 cytokines) and adaptive immune cell activation. Mixed effects models with ordinal contrasts compared effects of single and combined exposures on these end points. Diesel exhaust augmented the allergen-induced increase in airway eosinophils, interleukin 5 (IL-5) and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and the GSTT1 null genotype was significantly associated with the augmented IL-5 response. Diesel exhaust alone also augmented markers of non-allergic inflammation and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and suppressed activity of macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells. Inhalation of diesel exhaust at environmentally relevant concentrations augments allergen-induced allergic inflammation in the lower airways of atopic individuals and the GSTT1 genotype enhances this response. Allergic individuals are a susceptible population to the deleterious airway effects of diesel exhaust. NCT01792232. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. J/Ψ suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubellino, P.; Abreu, M.C.; Alessandro, B.; Alexa, C.; Arnaldi, R.; Astruc, J.; Atayan, M.; Baglin, C.; Baldit, A.; Bedjidian, M.; Bellaiche, F.; Beole, S.; Boldea, V.; Bordalo, P.; Bussiere, A.; Capony, V.; Casagrande, L.; Castor, J.; Chambon, T.; Chaurand, B.; Chevrot, I.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalo, C.; Comets, M.P.; Constantinescu, S.; Cruz, J.; De Falco, A.; De Marco, N.; Dellacasa, G.; Devaux, A.; Dita, S.; Drapier, O.; Espagnon, B.; Fargeix, J.; Filippov, S.N.; Fleuret, F.; Force, P.; Gallio, M.; Gavrilov, Y.K.; Gerschel, C.; Giubellino, P.; Golubeva, M.B.; Gonin, M.; Grigorian, A.A.; Grossiord, J.Y.; Guber, F.F.; Guichard, A.; Gulkaninan, H.; Hakobyan, R.; Haroutunian, R.; Idzik, M.; Jouan, D.; Karavitcheva, T.L.; Kluberg, L.; Kurepin, A.B.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lourenco, C.; Mac Cormick, M.; Macciotta, P.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mourgues, S.; Musso, A.; Ohlsson-Malek, F.; Petiau, P.; Piccotti, A.; Pizzi, J.R.; Prado da Silva, W.L.; Puddu, G.; Quintans, C.; Racca, C.; Ramello, L.; Ramos, S.; Rato-Mendes, P.; Riccati, L.; Romana, A.; Sartori, S.; Saturnini, P.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Shahoyan, R.; Silva, S.; Soave, C.; Sonderegger, P.; Tarrago, X.; Temnikov, P.; Topilskaya, N.S.; Usai, G.; Vale, C.; Vercellin, E.; Willis, N.

    1999-01-01

    The cross section for J/Ψ production in Pb-Pb interactions at 158 GeV per nucleon is measured at the CERN SPS by the NA50 experiment. The final results from the 1995 run are presented here together with preliminary ones from the high-statistics 1996 run. An anomalous J/Ψ suppression is observed in Pb-Pb collisions as compared to extrapolations of the previous results obtained by the NA38 experiment with proton and lighter ion beams. The results of the two runs are in good agreement. The results from the 1996 run allow the study of the onset of the anomalous suppression within the same set of data, showing evidence of a sharp change of behaviour around a value of neutral transverse energy, as measured by our electromagnetic calorimeter, of about 50 GeV

  11. Sleep apnea is associated with bronchial inflammation and continuous positive airway pressure-induced airway hyperresponsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devouassoux, Gilles; Lévy, Patrick; Rossini, Eliane; Pin, Isabelle; Fior-Gozlan, Michèle; Henry, Mireille; Seigneurin, Daniel; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2007-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is associated with systemic and upper airway inflammation. Pharyngeal inflammation has a potential role in upper airway collapse, whereas systemic inflammation relates to cardiovascular morbidity. However, the presence of an inflammatory involvement of lower airway has been poorly investigated. The aim of the study was to demonstrate an inflammatory process at the bronchial level in patients with OSA and to analyze effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) application and humidification on bronchial mucosa. The study was conducted by using sequential induced sputum for cell analysis and IL-8 production, nitric oxide exhalation measurement, and methacholine challenge before and after CPAP. Bronchial neutrophilia and a high IL-8 concentration were observed in untreated OSA compared with controls (75% +/- 20% vs 43% +/- 12%, P Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is associated with bronchial inflammation. Our data demonstrate CPAP effect on the development of AHR, possibly facilitated by the pre-existing inflammation. Both issues should be evaluated during long-term CPAP use. Results showing a spontaneous bronchial inflammation in OSA and the development of a CPAP-related AHR require a long-term follow-up to evaluate consequences on chronic bronchial obstruction.

  12. Allergen-induced changes in airway responsiveness are related to baseline airway responsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBruinWeller, MS; Weller, FR; RijssenbeekNouwens, LHM; Jansen, HM; deMonchy, JGR

    In the literature, bronchial allergen challenge is usually reported to result in an increase in histamine-induced airway responsiveness (AR). The present study investigated the relation between baseline AR and allergen-induced changes in AR. The effect of allergen challenge on AR was investigated in

  13. Serine protease inhibitor attenuates ovalbumin induced inflammation in mouse model of allergic airway disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Saw

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serine proteases promote inflammation and tissue remodeling by activating proteinase-activated receptors, urokinase, metalloproteinases and angiotensin. In the present study, 4-(2-Aminoethyl benzenesulfonyl fluoride (AEBSF a serine protease inhibitor was evaluated for prophylactic and therapeutic treatment in mouse model of airway allergy. METHODS: BALB/c mice were sensitized by i.p route and challenged with ovalbumin. They were treated i.n. with 2, 10 and 50 µg of AEBSF, one hour before or after challenge and euthanized to collect BALF (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, blood and lungs. Proteolytic activity, total cell/eosinophil/neutrophil count eosinophil peroxidase activity (EPO, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, cysteinyl leukotrienes and 8-isoprostane were determined in BALF and immunoglobulins were measured in serum. H&E and PAS stained lung sections were examined for cellular infiltration and airway inflammation. RESULTS: Mice exposed to ovalbumin and treated with PBS showed increased cellular infiltration in lungs and higher serum IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a levels as compared to sham mice. Treatment with AEBSF reduced total cells/eosinophil/neutrophil infiltration. Both prophylactic and therapeutic AEBSF treatment of 10 or 50 µg reduced serum IgE and IgG1 significantly (p<0.05 than control. AEBSF treatment reduced the proteolytic activity in BALF. IL-4 IL-5 and IL-13 levels decreased significantly (p<0.05 after AEBSF treatment while IL-10 levels increased significantly (p<0.05 in BALF. Airway inflammation and goblet cell hyperplasia reduced as demonstrated by lung histopathology, EPO activity and cysteinyl leukotrienes in BALF after treatment. AEBSF treatment also suppressed oxidative stress in terms of 8-isoprostane in BALF. Among the treatment doses, 10 or 50 µg of AEBSF were most effective in reducing the inflammatory parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with serine protease inhibitor attenuates the airway

  14. Morin Attenuates Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Inflammation by Modulating Oxidative Stress-Responsive MAPK Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the most common inflammatory diseases characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling. Morin, an active ingredient obtained from Moraceae plants, has been demonstrated to have promising anti-inflammatory activities in a range of disorders. However, its impacts on pulmonary diseases, particularly on asthma, have not been clarified. This study was designed to investigate whether morin alleviates airway inflammation in chronic asthma with an emphasis on oxidative stress modulation. In vivo, ovalbumin- (OVA- sensitized mice were administered with morin or dexamethasone before challenge. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and lung tissues were obtained to perform cell counts, histological analysis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In vitro, human bronchial epithelial cells (BECs were challenged by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. The supernatant was collected for the detection of the proinflammatory proteins, and the cells were collected for reactive oxygen species (ROS/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK evaluations. Severe inflammatory responses and remodeling were observed in the airways of the OVA-sensitized mice. Treatment with morin dramatically attenuated the extensive trafficking of inflammatory cells into the BALF and inhibited their infiltration around the respiratory tracts and vessels. Morin administration also significantly suppressed goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition/fibrosis and dose-dependently inhibited the OVA-induced increases in IgE, TNF-α, interleukin- (IL- 4, IL-13, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and malondialdehyde. In human BECs challenged by TNF-α, the levels of proteins such as eotaxin-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-8 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, were consistently significantly decreased by morin. Western blotting and the 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein assay revealed that the increases in intracellular ROS and MAPK phosphorylation were

  15. Recurrent upper airway infections and bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, J; Ardito, F; Calò, L; Mancinelli, L; Imperiali, M; Parrilla, C; Picciotti, P M; Fadda, G

    2007-04-01

    Bacterial biofilms identified in various medical devices used in otorhinolaryngology, including tympanostomy tubes, voice prostheses, and cochlear implants, can directly colonise mucosal tissues. The upper airways seem to be at high risk for this type of colonisation. Chronic and/or recurrent upper airway infections may be related to the complex structural and biochemical (quorum sensing) organisation of the biofilm which interferes with the activity of antibiotics (including those with proven in vitro efficacy), thus promoting the establishment of a chronic infection eradicable only by surgical treatment. Biofilm formation plays a role in upper respiratory infections: it not only explains the resistance of these infections to antibiotic therapy but it also represents an important element that contributes to the maintenance of a chronic inflammatory reaction. To document the presence of biofilms in surgical tissue specimens from patients with recurrent infection diseases, and identify their possible role in the chronicity of these infectious processes. We examined 32 surgical specimens from the upper respiratory tract (tonsils, adenoids, mucosa from the ethmoid and maxillary sinuses) of 28 patients (20 adults, eight children) with upper airway infections that had persisted despite repeated treatment with anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics with demonstrated in vitro efficacy. Tissues were cultured using conventional methods and subjected to scanning electron microscopy for detection of biofilm formation. Over 80 per cent (26/32; 81.3 per cent) of the tissue specimens were culture-positive. Bacterial biofilms (associated in most cases with coccoid bacteria) were observed in 65.6 per cent of the tissue samples.

  16. Airway Measurement for Airway Remodeling Defined by Post-Bronchodilator FEV1/FVC in Asthma: Investigation Using Inspiration-Expiration Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Chae, Eun Jin; Kim, Tae-Bum; Cho, You Sook; Park, Chan-Sun; Seo, Joon Beom; Kim, Namkug; Moon, Hee-Bom

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Airway remodeling may be responsible for irreversible airway obstruction in asthma, and a low post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio can be used as a noninvasive marker of airway remodeling. We investigated correlations between airway wall indices on computed tomography (CT) and various clinical indices, including post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio, in patients with asthma. Methods Volumetric CT was performed on 22 stable asthma patients who were taking inhaled corticosteroids. Airway dim...

  17. Ozone-induced airway inflammation in human subjects as determined by airway lavage and biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aris, R.M.; Christian, D.; Hearne, P.Q.; Kerr, K.; Finkbeiner, W.E.; Balmes, J.R. (San Francisco General Hospital, CA (United States))

    1993-11-01

    Ozone (O3) is a major constituent of urban air pollution. The acute effects of the inhalation of O3 at ambient or near-ambient concentrations on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) end points consistent with a distal lung inflammatory response have been well documented in human subjects. Animal toxicologic studies have shown that the airway is also a major site of O3-induced injury and inflammation. To date, no studies have confirmed this finding in human subjects. Effects of O3 on the proximal airways are not adequately studied by BAL, which is primarily influenced by events occurring in the terminal bronchioles and alveoli. We hypothesized that O3 causes injury and inflammation in the airways in addition to that previously documented to occur in the distal lung. We performed isolated lavage of the left mainstem bronchus and forceps biopsy of the bronchial mucosa in a group of 14 healthy, athletic subjects 18 h after exposure to 0.20 ppm O3 for 4 h during moderate exercise in order to assess this possibility. We followed an identical protocol in a similar group of 12 subjects exposed to filtered air. The mean (SD) total cell count and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) concentration in the isolated airway lavage were significantly greater after O3 than after air, 13.9 (20.5) versus 4.9 (5.4) cells/ml x 10(4) and 18.9 (11.2) versus 9.6 (9.0) U/L, respectively. Morphometry (2,070 neutrophils/cm2 of tissue for O3 and 330 neutrophils/cm2 of tissue for air) demonstrated that O3 exposure induced an acute inflammatory cell influx into the airway.

  18. A 'Good' muscle in a 'Bad' environment: the importance of airway smooth muscle force adaptation to airway hyperresponsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, Ynuk; Chapman, David G; Paré, Peter D; King, Gregory G; Salome, Cheryl M

    2011-12-15

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, with a consequent increase in spasmogens, and exaggerated airway narrowing in response to stimuli, termed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). The nature of any relationship between inflammation and AHR is less clear. Recent ex vivo data has suggested a novel mechanism by which inflammation may lead to AHR, in which increased basal ASM-tone, due to the presence of spasmogens in the airways, may "strengthen" the ASM and ultimately lead to exaggerated airway narrowing. This phenomenon was termed "force adaptation" [Bossé, Y., Chin, L.Y., Paré, P.D., Seow, C.Y., 2009. Adaptation of airway smooth muscle to basal tone: relevance to airway hyperresponsiveness. Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 40, 13-18]. However, it is unknown whether the magnitude of the effect of force adaptation ex vivo could contribute to exaggerated airway narrowing in vivo. Our aim was to utilize a computational model of ASM shortening in order to quantify the potential effect of force adaptation on airway narrowing when all other mechanical factors were kept constant. The shortening in the model is dictated by a balance between physiological loads and ASM force-generating capacity at different lengths. The results suggest that the magnitude of the effect of force adaptation on ASM shortening would lead to substantially more airway narrowing during bronchial challenge at any given airway generation. We speculate that the increased basal ASM-tone in asthma, due to the presence of inflammation-derived spasmogens, produces an increase in the force-generating capacity of ASM, predisposing to AHR during subsequent challenge. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Airway status in civilian maxillofacial gunshot Injuries in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The airway was threatened in 20/92 cases at admission; 12/20 cases were treated with oro-or nasotracheal intubation, and 9/12 later had elective tracheostomies; 8/20 needed immediate surgical airways, 5 tracheostomies and 3 cricothyroidotomies (all later converted to tracheostomies). Three of thirty-seven patients with ...

  20. Airway Management Dilemma in a Patient with Maxillofacial Injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    He had tracheostomy and repair of the laceration under general anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was induced with intravenous ketamine with the patient in the left lateral position while traction on the tongue using a Magill's forceps ensured patency of the airway. A classical laryngeal mask airway was subsequently inserted to ...

  1. Plethysmographic measurements of specific airway resistance in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Nielsen, Kim G

    2005-01-01

    Validated methods for lung function measurements in young children are lacking. Plethysmographic measurement of specific airway resistance (sRaw) provides such a method applicable from 2 years of age. sRaw gauges airway resistance from the measurements of the pressure changes driving the airflow ...

  2. Desmin modulates lung elastic recoil and airway responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shardonofsky, Felix R; Capetanaki, Yassemi; Boriek, Aladin M

    2006-05-01

    Desmin is a structural protein that is expressed in smooth muscle cells of both airways and alveolar ducts. Therefore, desmin could be well situated to participate in passive and contractile force transmission in the lung. We hypothesized that desmin modulates lung compliance, lung recoil pressure, and airway contractile response. To test this hypothesis, respiratory system complex impedance (Zin,rs) at different positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels and quasi-static pressure-volume data were obtained in desmin-null and wild-type mice at baseline and during methacholine administration. Airways and lung tissue properties were partitioned by fitting Zin,rs to a constant-phase model. Relative to controls, desmin-null mice showed 1) lower values for lung stiffness and recoil pressure at baseline and induced airway constriction, 2) greater negative PEEP dependence of H and airway resistance under baseline conditions and cholinergic stimulation, and 3) airway hyporesponsiveness. These results demonstrate that desmin is a load-bearing protein that stiffens the airways and consequently the lung and modulates airway contractile response.

  3. Airway and Respiratory Complications in Children Undergoing Cleft ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... SUMMARY. Objectives: Anatomical abnormalities associated with cleft lip and palate increase the risk of airway complications. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of intra-operative airway and respiratory complications during cleft lip and palate repair and identify risk factors. Design: ...

  4. A clinical comparison of disposable airway devices | Strydom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cuff pressures were significantly higher in the Ambu™ and LMA Unique™ (p = 0.001). Maximum airway pressure attainable after 5 minutes was significantly higher in the Ambu™ (p = 0.036). Airway trauma as graded by visible blood on the device was low, and similar between groups (p = 0.237). Secretions were negligible ...

  5. Bacteria isolated from the airways of paediatric patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge of which bacteria are found in the airways of paediatric patients with bronchiectasis unrelated to cystic fibrosis. (CF) is important in defining empirical antibiotic guidelines for the treatment of acute infective exacerbations. Objective. To describe the bacteria isolated from the airways of children with non-CF ...

  6. Radiation induced changes in the airway - anaesthetic implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radiation induced changes in the airway - anaesthetic implications: case report. Mallika Balakrishnan, Renju Kuriakose, Rachel Cherian Koshy. Abstract. Radiation induces a variety of changes in the airway that can potentially lead to difficult intubation. Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the mandible, a severe consequence of ...

  7. A hierarchical scheme for geodesic anatomical labeling of airway trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feragen, Aasa; Petersen, Jens; Owen, Megan

    2012-01-01

    . In tree-space, the airway tree topology and geometry change continuously, giving a natural way to automatically handle anatomical differences and noise. The algorithm is made efficient using a hierarchical approach, in which labels are assigned from the top down. We only use features of the airway...

  8. Difficult airways: a reliable “Plan B”

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-11-15

    Nov 15, 2010 ... supraglottic airway (SGA) or cricothyroidotomy is anticipated to be difficult. We describe the transtracheal placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) as a means to establish rescue jet ventilation in a patient with a difficult airway who was unwilling to undergo a tracheostomy under local anaesthesia.

  9. Plethysmographic measurements of specific airway resistance in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Nielsen, Kim G

    2005-01-01

    Validated methods for lung function measurements in young children are lacking. Plethysmographic measurement of specific airway resistance (sRaw) provides such a method applicable from 2 years of age. sRaw gauges airway resistance from the measurements of the pressure changes driving the airflow...

  10. Perioperative adverse airway events in cleft lip and palate repair ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Airway-related problems account for the majority of anaesthetic morbidity in paediatric anaesthesia, but more so for cleft lip and palate repair. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency, pattern, management and outcome of adverse airway events during the perioperative period in cleft lip and palate ...

  11. Airway skills training using a human patient simulator | Moodley ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of airway management skills using the simulator. Participant satisfaction was much better in the simulator group. The importance of psychomotor reinforcement should be borne in mind when designing simulation courses. Keywords: human patient simulator, simulation, airway management, psychomotor skills ...

  12. Acetylcholine : a novel regulator of airway smooth muscle remodelling?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, R; Zaagsma, J; Bromhaar, MG; Nelemans, A; Meurs, H

    2004-01-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle mass is a pathological feature that asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have in common. This increase has gained renewed interest in view of recent developments showing that airway smooth muscle, instead of solely being a contractile partner, is

  13. Prone surgery and laryngeal mask airways: an overview of recent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-17

    Aug 17, 2013 ... patient trauma. • Effective laryngeal mask airway (LMA) placement in the prone position may suggest a rescue airway in the event of endotracheal .... Facet infiltrations. • Rhizotomy. • Spinal decompression. • Spinal fusion. • Pilonidal sinus. • Melanoma excision on the back. • Bone marrow aspiration.

  14. Radiation induced changes in the airway - anaesthetic implications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    patient had no history of airway compromise during sleep or in the supine position, intramuscular morphine 4.5mg and ... he gave a history of having had radiotherapy for carcinoma of the lip, detected 7 years previously. He had .... tubation; an approach to airway assessment. Ma Zui Xue Za Zhi 1993;. 31 (3): 165 – 78. 4.

  15. Upper and lower airway patency are associated in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Bisgaard, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Although allergic rhinitis and asthma frequently coexist, the nature of this association is poorly understood. Therefore, we examined whether upper and lower airway patency are associated.......Although allergic rhinitis and asthma frequently coexist, the nature of this association is poorly understood. Therefore, we examined whether upper and lower airway patency are associated....

  16. A clinical comparison of disposable airway devices | Strydom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They all received a standardised anaesthetic with propofol, fentanyl and isoflurane in 40% O2/N2O. Insertion technique, mask sizes and maximum cuff volumes were per manufacturer's instructions. The cuff was inflated to achieve an adequate airway seal (no audible leak at an airway pressure of 20cm H2O), or to the ...

  17. Airway and respiratory complications in children undergoing cleft lip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Anatomical abnormalities associated with cleft lip and palate increase the risk of airway complications. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of intra-operative airway and respiratory complications during cleft lip and palate repair and identify risk factors. Design: Observational study in which fifty ...

  18. Airways inflammatory and atopy-related responses in athletes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The prevalence of asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in highly trained endurance athletes is rising. The type of training (i.e. endurance, or speed and power) seems to influence the airway symptoms. High-intensity exercise and training might contribute to the development of asthma or AHR in athletes ...

  19. Endotracheal tube connector defect causing airway obstruction in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... airway obstruction should be considered when the airway pressures increase, compliance of the breathing bag declines or when ventilation becomes inadequate. There are reported cases of obstruction from manufacturing defects such as intra-lumi- nal plastic meniscus, and defective ET cuff and connector.1–4 As defect.

  20. Inflammatory cells and airway defense against Aspergillus fumigatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauffman, HF; Tomee, JFC

    The authors offer a summary of the attack strategies of A. fumigatus and interactions with the airway defense system. The possible role of proteolytic enzymes from Aspergillus in the inflammatory response of the airways is also discussed. Evidence is given for the in vivo production of these

  1. PKC-dependent regulation of Kv7.5 channels by the bronchoconstrictor histamine in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haick, Jennifer M; Brueggemann, Lioubov I; Cribbs, Leanne L; Denning, Mitchell F; Schwartz, Jeffrey; Byron, Kenneth L

    2017-06-01

    Kv7 potassium channels have recently been found to be expressed and functionally important for relaxation of airway smooth muscle. Previous research suggests that native Kv7 currents are inhibited following treatment of freshly isolated airway smooth muscle cells with bronchoconstrictor agonists, and in intact airways inhibition of Kv7 channels is sufficient to induce bronchiolar constriction. However, the mechanism by which Kv7 currents are inhibited by bronchoconstrictor agonists has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, native Kv7 currents in cultured human trachealis smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs) were observed to be inhibited upon treatment with histamine; inhibition of Kv7 currents was associated with membrane depolarization and an increase in cytosolic Ca 2+ ([Ca 2+ ] cyt ). The latter response was inhibited by verapamil, a blocker of L-type voltage-sensitive Ca 2+ channels (VSCCs). Protein kinase C (PKC) has been implicated as a mediator of bronchoconstrictor actions, although the targets of PKC are not clearly established. We found that histamine treatment significantly and dose-dependently suppressed currents through overexpressed wild-type human Kv7.5 (hKv7.5) channels in cultured HTSMCs, and this effect was inhibited by the PKC inhibitor Ro-31-8220 (3 µM). The PKC-dependent suppression of hKv7.5 currents corresponded with a PKC-dependent increase in hKv7.5 channel phosphorylation. Knocking down or inhibiting PKCα, or mutating hKv7.5 serine 441 to alanine, abolished the inhibitory effects of histamine on hKv7.5 currents. These findings provide the first evidence linking PKC activation to suppression of Kv7 currents, membrane depolarization, and Ca 2+ influx via L-type VSCCs as a mechanism for histamine-induced bronchoconstriction. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Fungal glycan interactions with epithelial cells in allergic airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, René M; Klein, Bruce S

    2013-08-01

    Human exposure to fungi results in a wide range of health outcomes, from invasive disease or allergy to immune tolerance. Inhaled fungi contact airway epithelial cells as an early event, and this host:fungal interaction can shape the eventual immunological outcome. Emerging evidence points to exposure to fungal cell wall carbohydrates in the development of allergic airway disease. Herein, we describe determinants of fungal allergenicity, and review the responses of airway epithelial cells to fungal carbohydrates. A greater understanding of the recognition of and response to fungal carbohydrates by airway epithelial cells may lead to the development of targeted therapies that ameliorate allergic airway disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Airway Management of Two Patients with Penetrating Neck Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Bhattacharya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct trauma to the airway is a rare injury which can lead to disastrous consequences due to compounding effect of bleeding, aspiration of blood, airway obstruction and severe sympathetic stimulation. Here we are presenting two cases of open tracheal injury in two adult males following assault with sharp weapon. Two different techniques of securing the airways were employed depending upon the severity and urgency of the situation. In the first case, orotracheal intubation helped the surgeon to repair airway around the endotracheal tube whereas in the second patient this stenting effect was absent as he was intubated through the distal cut-end of trachea in the face of airway emergency.

  4. Lack of national consensus in preoperative airway assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Anders Kehlet; Rosenstock, Charlotte Vallentin; Lundstrøm, Lars Hyldborg

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Difficult airway management is associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Several preoperative risk factors associated with airway management difficulties have been proposed; however, no clear guideline for airway assessments exists. We therefore hypothesised...... that Danish airway assessment was lacking uniformity. We aimed to examine whether multivariable risk assessment tools and predictors for difficult intubation and mask ventilation were used systematically. METHODS: Heads of anaesthesia departments were sent a six-question survey at the beginning of 2012. We...... asked if systematic risk assessment tools, particularly the Simplified Airway Risk Index (SARI), and predictors for difficult intubation and mask ventilation were used. Additionally, we asked if any risk factors were pre-printed on the anaesthesia record. RESULTS: In all, 29 of 31 (94%) departments...

  5. Vessel-guided airway segmentation based on voxel classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Sporring, Jon; Ashraf, Haseem

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a method for improving airway tree segmentation using vessel orientation information. We use the fact that an airway branch is always accompanied by an artery, with both structures having similar orientations. This work is based on a  voxel classification airway segmentation...... method proposed previously. The probability of a voxel belonging to the airway, from the voxel classification method, is augmented with an orientation similarity measure as a criterion for region growing. The orientation similarity measure of a voxel indicates how similar is the orientation...... of the surroundings of a voxel, estimated based on a tube model, is to that of a neighboring vessel. The proposed method is tested on 20 CT images from different subjects selected randomly from a lung cancer screening study. Length of the airway branches from the results of the proposed method are significantly...

  6. Epiglottic abscess causing acute airway obstruction in an adult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasileiadis, I.; Kapetanakis, S.; Vasileiadis, D.; Petousis, A.

    2013-01-01

    Acute epiglottitis is an acute inflammation in the supraglottic region of the oropharynx which is a potentially life-threatening condition leading to rapid upper airway obstruction. An infrequent sequel of acute epiglottitis is the epiglottic abscess. Less than 50 cases have been reported in the international literature and even less are the cases that acute surgical intervention was necessary to secure the airway. We report a young man with sudden onset of odynophagia, dysphonia and dyspnea and rapidly progression of upper airway obstruction. Clinical examination with fiberoptic nasopharyngolaryngoscope in emergency department demonstrated an epiglottic abscess. An urgent tracheostomy was performed in order to secure patient's airway and afterward, the patient underwent direct laryngoscopy and drainage of abscess and intravenous antibiotics were administrated. The diagnosis of epiglottic abscess should be considered in adult patients with odynophagia and dysphonia. Principles of treatment include aggressive airway management, surgical drainage of abscess and intravenous antibiotics. (author)

  7. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy: new generations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Garvey, John F

    2012-02-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the treatment of choice for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). However, CPAP is not tolerated by all patients with OSAS and alternative modes of pressure delivery have been developed to overcome pressure intolerance, thereby improving patient comfort and adherence. Auto-adjustable positive airway pressure (APAP) devices may be utilised for the long-term management of OSAS and may also assist in the initial diagnosis of OSAS and titration of conventional CPAP therapy. Newer modalities such as C-Flex and A-Flex also show promise as treatment options in the future. However, the evidence supporting the use of these alternative modalities remains scant, in particular with regard to long-term cardiovascular outcomes. In addition, not all APAP devices use the same technological algorithms and data supporting individual APAP devices cannot be extrapolated to support all. Further studies are required to validate the roles of APAP, C-Flex and A-Flex. In the interim, standard CPAP therapy should continue as the mainstay of OSAS management.

  8. Mode of Glucocorticoid Actions in Airway Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Ito

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic glucocorticoids are the most potent anti-inflammatory agents used to treat chronic inflammatory disease, such as asthma. However, a small number (<5% of asthmatic patients and almost all patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD do not respond well, or at all, to glucocorticoid therapy. If the molecular mechanism of glucocorticoid insensitivity is uncovered, it may in turn provide insight into the key mechanism of glucocorticoid action and allow a rational way to implement treatment regimens that restore glucocorticoid sensitivity. Glucocorticoids exert their effects by binding to a cytoplasmic glucocorticoid receptor (GR, which is subjected to post-translational modifications. Receptor phosphorylation, acetylation, nitrosylation, ubiquitinylation, and other modifications influence hormone binding, nuclear translocation, and protein half-life. Analysis of GR interactions to other molecules, such as coactivators or corepressors, may explain the genetic specificity of GR action. Priming with inflammatory cytokine or oxidative/nitrative stress is a mechanism for the glucocorticoid resistance observed in chronic inflammatory airway disease via reduction of corepressors or GR modification. Therapies targeting these aspects of the GR activation pathway may reverse glucocorticoid resistance in patients with glucocorticoid-insensitive airway disease and some patients with other inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. [Airway injuries due to blunt chest trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Kan; Hamatake, D; Yoshida, Y; Nakajima, H; Shirakusa, T; Yamasaki, S

    2006-10-01

    Although the incidence of blunt chest trauma is very high, the mediastinal tracheobronchial injuries are quite rare. The airway injuries are thought to be one of the most urgent clinical conditions in thoracic surgery, and we are requested to make not only a rapid and sharp diagnosis but also an appropriate treatment plan considering combined injuries. We present 9 cases of tracheobronchial injuries due to blunt chest trauma in recent years. The average age of these patients is 26.1 years, and they are consisted of 6 male and 3 female. The cause of trauma is traffic accident in 7, and occupational crane accident in 2. Bronchoplasty were done in 5 cases (right main bronchus in 2, left main bronchus in 1, trunks intermediate bronchus in 1, and the spur between middle and lower lobe in 1), membranous-tracheoplasty with right pneumonectomy in 1, left pneumonectomy in 1, conservative treatment in 2. Postoperative mortality is occurred in 1 case who was suffering from multiple injuries including severe head injury and contralateral lung contusion. Tracheobronchial plasties should be chosen if possible to preserve lung function for the patient suffering from airway injuries.

  10. An upper airway obstruction emergency: Ludwig angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yu-Kung; Lee, Chao-Yi; Chao, Hai-Hsuan

    2007-12-01

    Ludwig angina remains a potentially lethal disease, rapidly spreading bilateral cellulitis of the submental, sublingual, and submandibular spaces, which bears the threat for rapid airway obstruction. Since the introduction of antibiotics in 1940s, the mortality was reduced significantly. This resulted in the rare occurrence of the disease, leaving many physicians with limited experience of Ludwig angina. Although the occurrence of Ludwig angina in adults is rare, its presence in the pediatric edentulous population is even more uncommon. Because the unfamiliarity with this disease is now increasing, unnecessary delaying diagnosis or inadequate management may occur and may result in serious complications. This presentation will consist of a historical review, discussion of pathophysiology, followed by clinical presentation, etiology, bacteriology, and management. With early diagnosis, airway observation and management, aggressive intravenous antibiotic therapy, and judicious surgical intervention, the disease should resolve without complications. In addition, the source of infection should be determined and eliminated if possible. A thoughtful, individualized management strategy seems to be the most reasonable approach to the disease.

  11. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy: new generations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Garvey, John F

    2010-02-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the treatment of choice for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). However, CPAP is not tolerated by all patients with OSAS and alternative modes of pressure delivery have been developed to overcome pressure intolerance, thereby improving patient comfort and adherence. Auto-adjustable positive airway pressure (APAP) devices may be utilised for the long-term management of OSAS and may also assist in the initial diagnosis of OSAS and titration of conventional CPAP therapy. Newer modalities such as C-Flex and A-Flex also show promise as treatment options in the future. However, the evidence supporting the use of these alternative modalities remains scant, in particular with regard to long-term cardiovascular outcomes. In addition, not all APAP devices use the same technological algorithms and data supporting individual APAP devices cannot be extrapolated to support all. Further studies are required to validate the roles of APAP, C-Flex and A-Flex. In the interim, standard CPAP therapy should continue as the mainstay of OSAS management.

  12. Mucociliary clearance, airway inflammation and nasal symptoms in urban motorcyclists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza C.S. Brant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: There is evidence that outdoor workers exposed to high levels of air pollution exhibit airway inflammation and increased airway symptoms. We hypothesized that these workers would experience increased airway symptoms and decreased nasal mucociliary clearance associated with their exposure to air pollution. METHODS: In total, 25 non-smoking commercial motorcyclists, aged 18-44 years, were included in this study. These drivers work 8-12 hours per day, 5 days per week, driving on urban streets. Nasal mucociliary clearance was measured by the saccharine transit test; airway acidification was measured by assessing the pH of exhaled breath condensate; and airway symptoms were measured by the Sino-nasal Outcome Test-20 questionnaire. To assess personal air pollution exposure, the subjects used a passive-diffusion nitrogen dioxide (NO2 concentration-monitoring system during the 14 days before each assessment. The associations between NO2 and the airway outcomes were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test and the Chi-Square test. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01976039. RESULTS: Compared with clearance in healthy adult males, mucociliary clearance was decreased in 32% of the motorcyclists. Additionally, 64% of the motorcyclists had airway acidification and 92% experienced airway symptoms. The median personal NO2 exposure level was 75 mg/m3 for these subjects and a significant association was observed between NO2 and impaired mucociliary clearance (p = 0.036. CONCLUSION: Non-smoking commercial motorcyclists exhibit increased airway symptoms and airway acidification as well as decreased nasal mucociliary clearance, all of which are significantly associated with the amount of exposure to air pollution.

  13. Airway Responsiveness to Psychological Processes in Asthma and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eRitz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Psychosocial factors have been found to impact airway pathophysiology in respiratory disease with considerable consistency. Influences on airway mechanics have been studied particularly well. The goal of this article is to review the literature on airway responses to psychological stimulation, discuss potential pathways of influence, and present a well-established emotion-induction paradigm to study airway obstruction elicited by unpleasant stimuli. Observational studies have found systematic associations between lung function and daily mood changes. The laboratory –based paradigm of bronchoconstrictive suggestion has been used successfully to elicit airway obstruction in a substantial proportion of asthmatic individuals. Other studies have demonstrated an enhancement of airway responses to standard airway challenges with exercise, allergens, or methacholine. Standardized emotion-induction techniques have consistently shown airway constriction during unpleasant stimulation, with surgery, blood and injury stimuli being particularly powerful. Findings with various forms of stress induction have been more mixed. A number of methodological factors may account for variability across studies, such as choice of measurement technique, temporal association between stimulation and measurement, and the specific quality and intensity of the stimulus material, in particular the extent of implied action-orientation. Research has also begun to elucidate physiological processes associated with psychologically induced airway responses, with vagal excitation and ventilatory influences being the most likely candidate pathways, whereas the role of specific central nervous system pathways and inflammatory processes has been less studied. The technique of emotion-induction using films has the potential to become a standardized challenge paradigm for the further exploration of airway hyperresponsiveness mediated by central nervous system processes.

  14. Buffering airway acid decreases exhaled nitric oxide in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Benjamin; Kelly, Robin; Urban, Peter; Liu, Lei; Henderson, Edward M; Doctor, Allan; Teague, W Gerald; Fitzpatrick, Anne; Erzurum, Serpil; Hunt, John F

    2006-10-01

    The human airway is believed to be acidified in asthma. In an acidic environment nitrite is converted to nitric oxide (NO). We hypothesized that buffering airway lining fluid acid would decrease the fraction of exhaled NO (F(ENO)). We treated 28 adult nonsmoking subjects (9 healthy control subjects, 11 subjects with mild intermittent asthma, and 8 subjects with persistent asthma) with 3 mL of 10 mmol/L phosphate buffered saline (PBS) through a nebulizer and then serially measured F(ENO) levels. Six subjects also received PBS mouthwash alone. F(ENO) levels decreased after buffer inhalation. The maximal decrease occurred between 15 and 30 minutes after treatment; F(ENO) levels returned to pretreatment levels by 60 minutes. The decrease was greatest in subjects with persistent asthma (-7.1 +/- 1.0 ppb); this was more than in those with either mild asthma (-2.9 +/- 0.3 ppb) or healthy control subjects (-1.7 +/- 0.3 ppb, P mouthwash. Neutralizing airway acid decreases F(ENO) levels. The magnitude of this change is greatest in persistent asthma. These data suggest that airway pH is a determinant of F(ENO) levels downstream from NO synthase activation. Airway biochemistry modulates F(ENO) levels. For example, nitrite is converted to NO in the airway, particularly the inflamed airway, by means of acid-based chemistry. Thus airway pH should be considered in interpreting clinical F(ENO) values. In fact, PBS challenge testing integrates airway pH and F(ENO) analysis, potentially improving the utility of F(ENO) as a noninvasive test for the type and severity of asthmatic airway inflammation.

  15. Acrolein exposure suppresses antigen-induced pulmonary inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Adverse health effects of tobacco smoke arise partly from its influence on innate and adaptive immune responses, leading to impaired innate immunity and host defense. The impact of smoking on allergic asthma remains unclear, with various reports demonstrating that cigarette smoke enhances asthma development but can also suppress allergic airway inflammation. Based on our previous findings that immunosuppressive effects of smoking may be largely attributed to one of its main reactive electrophiles, acrolein, we explored the impact of acrolein exposure in a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma. Methods C57BL/6 mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) by intraperitoneal injection with the adjuvant aluminum hydroxide on days 0 and 7, and challenged with aerosolized OVA on days 14–16. In some cases, mice were also exposed to 5 ppm acrolein vapor for 6 hrs/day on days 14–17. Lung tissues or brochoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) were collected either 6 hrs after a single initial OVA challenge and/or acrolein exposure on day 14 or 48 hrs after the last OVA challenge, on day 18. Inflammatory cells and Th1/Th2 cytokine levels were measured in BALF, and lung tissue samples were collected for analysis of mucus and Th1/Th2 cytokine expression, determination of protein alkylation, cellular thiol status and transcription factor activity. Results Exposure to acrolein following OVA challenge of OVA-sensitized mice resulted in markedly attenuated allergic airway inflammation, demonstrated by decreased inflammatory cell infiltrates, mucus hyperplasia and Th2 cytokines. Acrolein exposure rapidly depleted lung tissue glutathione (GSH) levels, and induced activation of the Nrf2 pathway, indicated by accumulation of Nrf2, increased alkylation of Keap1, and induction of Nrf2-target genes such as HO-1. Additionally, analysis of inflammatory signaling pathways showed suppressed activation of NF-κB and marginally reduced activation of JNK in acrolein

  16. How to suppress obsessive thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Eric; Diepstraten, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Thought suppression (i.e. consciously trying to avoid certain thoughts from entering consciousness) has been argued to be an inadequate strategy in case of unwanted intrusions. That is, thought suppression seems to result in more rather than less intrusions. Although this experimental finding has been explained in terms of failing attempts to distract oneself from the target thought, the White Bear Suppression Inventory (WBSI; a scale that measures chronic thought suppression tendencies) does not address the means by which respondents try to suppress unwanted thoughts. To examine which strategies of mental control people use to suppress unwanted thoughts, obsessive-compulsive disorder patients (N=47) completed the WBSI, the Thought Control Questionnaire, and two measures of psychopathology. Results suggest that the crucial mechanism in thought suppression may not be distraction, but self-punishment.

  17. Airway responsiveness to mannitol in asthma is associated with chymase-positive mast cells and eosinophilic airway inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrild, Asger; Bergqvist, A; Baines, K J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to inhaled mannitol is associated with indirect markers of mast cell activation and eosinophilic airway inflammation. It is unknown how AHR to mannitol relates to mast cell phenotype, mast cell function and measures of eosinophilic inflammation in airway...... tissue. We compared the number and phenotype of mast cells, mRNA expression of mast cell-associated genes and number of eosinophils in airway tissue of subjects with asthma and healthy controls in relation to AHR to mannitol. METHODS: Airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled mannitol was measured in 23 non......-smoking, corticosteroid-free asthmatic individuals and 10 healthy controls. Mast cells and eosinophils were identified in mucosal biopsies from all participants. Mast cells were divided into phenotypes based on the presence of chymase. mRNA expression of mast cell-associated genes was measured by real-time PCR. RESULTS...

  18. The Tulip GT® airway versus the facemask and Guedel airway: a randomised, controlled, cross-over study by Basic Life Support-trained airway providers in anaesthetised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, A; Robinson, P N; Hasan, M

    2016-03-01

    We performed a randomised, controlled, cross-over study of lung ventilation by Basic Life Support-trained providers using either the Tulip GT® airway or a facemask with a Guedel airway in 60 anaesthetised patients. Successful ventilation was achieved if the provider produced an end-tidal CO2 > 3.5 kPa and a tidal volume > 250 ml in two of the first three breaths, within 60 sec and within two attempts. Fifty-seven (95%) providers achieved successful ventilation using the Tulip GT compared with 35 (58%) using the facemask (p Tulip GT and facemask, the mean (SD) end-tidal CO2 was 5.0 (0.7) kPa vs 2.5 (1.5) kPa, tidal volume was 494 (175) ml vs 286 (186) ml and peak inspiratory pressure was 18.3 (3.4) cmH2 O vs 13.6 (7) cmH2 O respectively (all p Tulip GT airway. These results are similar to a previous manikin study using the same protocol, suggesting a close correlation between human and manikin studies for this airway device. We conclude that the Tulip GT should be considered as an adjunct to airway management both within and outside hospitals when ventilation is being undertaken by Basic Life Support-trained airway providers. © 2015 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. Responsiveness to oral prednisolone in severe asthma is related to the degree of eosinophilic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, A R; Marshall, R P; Warnock, L C; Bolton, S; Hastie, A; Symon, F; Hargadon, B; Marshall, H; Richardson, M; Brightling, C E; Haldar, P; Milone, R; Chalk, P; Williamson, R; Panettieri, R; Knowles, R; Bleecker, E R; Wardlaw, A J

    2017-07-01

    Patients with severe asthma appear relatively corticosteroid resistant. Corticosteroid responsiveness is closely related to the degree of eosinophilic airway inflammation. The extent to which eosinophilic airway inflammation in severe asthma responds to treatment with systemic corticosteroids is not clear. To relate the physiological and inflammatory response to systemic corticosteroids in asthma to disease severity and the baseline extent of eosinophilic inflammation. Patients with mild/moderate and severe asthma were investigated before and after 2 weeks of oral prednisolone (Clintrials.gov NCT00331058 and NCT00327197). We pooled the results from two studies with common protocols. The US study contained two independent centres and the UK one independent centre. The effect of oral corticosteroids on FEV 1 , Pc20, airway inflammation and serum cytokines was investigated. Baseline measurements were compared with healthy subjects. Thirty-two mild/moderate asthmatics, 50 severe asthmatics and 35 healthy subjects took part. At baseline, both groups of asthmatics had a lower FEV 1 and Pc20 and increased eosinophilic inflammation compared to healthy subjects. The severe group had a lower FEV 1 and more eosinophilic inflammation compared to mild/moderate asthmatics. Oral prednisolone caused a similar degree of suppression of eosinophilic inflammation in all compartments in both groups of asthmatics. There were small improvements in FEV 1 and Pc20 for both mild/ moderate and severe asthmatics with a correlation between the baseline eosinophilic inflammation and the change in FEV 1 . There was a ~50% reduction in the serum concentration of CXCL10 (IP-10), CCL22 (MDC), CCL17 (TARC), CCL-2 (MCP-1) and CCL-13 (MCP-4) in both asthma groups after oral corticosteroids. Disease severity does not influence the response to systemic corticosteroids. The study does not therefore support the concept that severe asthma is associated with corticosteroid resistance. Only baseline

  20. Pediatric Trainees Managing a Difficult Airway: Comparison of Laryngeal Mask Airway, Direct, and Video-Assisted Laryngoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Art Ambrosio MD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective Difficult airway management is a key skill required by all pediatric physicians, yet training on multiple modalities is lacking. The objective of this study was to compare the rate of, and time to, successful advanced infant airway placement with direct laryngoscopy, video-assisted laryngoscopy, and laryngeal mask airway (LMA in a difficult airway simulator. This study is the first to compare the success with 3 methods for difficult airway management among pediatric trainees. Study Design Randomized crossover pilot study. Setting Tertiary academic medical center. Methods Twenty-two pediatric residents, interns, and medical students were tested. Participants were provided 1 training session by faculty using a normal infant manikin. Subjects then performed all 3 of the aforementioned advanced airway modalities in a randomized order on a difficult airway model of a Robin sequence. Success was defined as confirmed endotracheal intubation or correct LMA placement by the testing instructor in ≤120 seconds. Results Direct laryngoscopy demonstrated a significantly higher placement success rate (77.3% than video-assisted laryngoscopy (36.4%, P = .0117 and LMA (31.8%, P = .0039. Video-assisted laryngoscopy required a significantly longer amount of time during successful intubations (84.8 seconds; 95% CI, 59.4-110.1 versus direct laryngoscopy (44.9 seconds; 95% CI, 33.8-55.9 and LMA placement (36.6 seconds; 95% CI, 24.7-48.4. Conclusions Pediatric trainees demonstrated significantly higher success using direct laryngoscopy in a difficult airway simulator model. However, given the potential lifesaving implications of advanced airway adjuncts, including video-assisted laryngoscopy and LMA placement, more extensive training on adjunctive airway management techniques may be useful for trainees.

  1. Unihemispheric burst suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C. Mader Jr.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression (BS consists of bursts of high-voltage slow and sharp wave activity alternating with periods of background suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG. When induced by deep anesthesia or encephalopathy, BS is bihemispheric and is often viewed as a non-epileptic phenomenon. In contrast, unihemispheric BS is rare and its clinical significance is poorly understood. We describe here two cases of unihemispheric BS. The first patient is a 56-year-old woman with a left temporoparietal tumor who presented in convulsive status epilepticus. EEG showed left hemispheric BS after clinical seizure termination with lorazepam and propofol. The second patient is a 39-year-old woman with multiple medical problems and a vague history of seizures. After abdominal surgery, she experienced a convulsive seizure prompting treatment with propofol. Her EEG also showed left hemispheric BS. In both cases, increasing the propofol infusion rate resulted in disappearance of unihemispheric BS and clinical improvement. The prevailing view that typical bihemispheric BS is non-epileptic should not be extrapolated automatically to unihemispheric BS. The fact that unihemispheric BS was associated with clinical seizure and resolved with propofol suggests that, in both cases, an epileptic mechanism was responsible for unihemispheric BS.

  2. Airway changes in children with mucopolysaccharidoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, S.L.; Sheu, C.Y.; Lee, Y.J.; Lin, S.P.; Blickman, J.G.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess the CT findings of the airway in children with mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS). Material and Methods: The study included 13 patients (9 boys, 4 girls; age range 2-17 years; mean age 9.2 years) with MPS: 6 with Hunter syndrome, 3 with Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome, 2 with Sanfilippo syndrome, 1 with Hurler/Scheie syndrome and 1 with Morquio syndrome. CT of the airways was done in the axial section with 3-mm collimation from the oropharynx at the level of C3 to the base of the lung. The shape of the vocal cords and trachea at the level of T1 was evaluated. The tracheal surface area (TSA) at the level of T1 was measured both in patients and in age-matched subjects. Results: CT showed an abnormality of the vocal cords in 7 of the 13 patients. Six patients had an abnormal shape and 7 had an inhomogeneous density. The abnormalities included elliptical (5 of 6) and star-shaped (1 of 6) cords. Eight of 13 tracheas were also abnormal, either U-shaped (6 of 8) or worm-shaped (2 of 8). The TSA was significantly smaller in patients (79.6±28.9 mm 2 ) than in control subjects (138.1±50.1 mm 2 ). The TSA of those 9 years was 61.4±15.2 mm 2 as compared with 99.9±23.5 mm 2 for the control group. The TSA of patients 11 years was 107.1±25.3 mm 2 as compared with 187.6±32.0 mm 2 for the control group. Conclusion: Significant changes in the shape of the vocal cords and trachea in patients with MPS were found. The most common abnormal configuration of trachea was the U-shape. The TSA was smaller in patients with MPS than in controls. The airway changes may be due to abnormal submucosal storage of substances such as keratan or dermatan sulfate

  3. [Effects of shivering on airway rewarming].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Ying; Yan, Pei-Hua; Yang, Zeng-Ren; Sun, Fang-Ren; Shan, Qiu-Ling; Li, Yu-Qing

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the effects of shivering on airway rewarming. The hypothermic dog model without shivering was established by immersing an anesthetized dog in cold water and administering atracurium to inhibit the dog shivering. The model dog respired warm fully humidified (40-45 degrees C, RH 99.9%) air and room temperature air(19 +/- 1 degrees C, RH 30% - 75%) to rewarm each for 2 hours, the priority of different temperature air respired was arranged randomly. After rewarming for 4 hours, the relaxed dog breathed warm humidified air by positive pressure ventilation in order to restore its spontaneous respiratory. Then the dog continued to respire warm humidified air spontaneously until the esophageal (Te) and rectal temperature (Tr) of the dog achieved the same degrees as the dog was immersed in the water. The metabolic heat production was detected by indirect calorimetry during the experiment. (1) When the shivering was inhibited, inhaling warm humidified air for 2 hours made the Tr and Te of the dogs increase 0.26-0.39 degrees C and 0.44-1.11 degrees C per hour respectively, inhaling air at room temperature for 2 hours made Tr and Te of the dogs decrease 0.24-0.51 degrees C and 0.58-0.67 degrees C per hour, respectively. And the changes in Tr and Te of the dogs were unrelated to the priority of inhaling air at different temperature. (2) When the dog with shivering respired spontaneously warm humidified air, the rewarming rates of Tr and Te were 2.26-2.33 degrees C/h and 1.96-2.38 degrees C/h respectively, quicker than those of the dogs whose shivering was inhibited. (3) Compared with metabolic heat production of the unshivering dog respiring warm humidified air by positive pressure ventilation, that of the shivering dog respiring warm humidified air spontaneously increased outstandingly, shivering thermogenesis made the rewarming rates increased obviously. Airway rewarming is a method conducive to rewarming of hypothermia. When the body is shivering, the

  4. A comparison of supraglottic airway i-gel™ vs. classic laryngeal mask airway in small children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Hyun; Cho, Hyun-Seok; Shin, Won-Jung; Yang, Hong-Seuk

    2014-02-01

    i-gel™ is a new single-use supraglottic airway device without an inflatable cuff. This study was designed to compare the usefulness of i-gel™ versus a classic laryngeal mask airway (cLMA) in small children. Sixty-three children (age range : 4-72 months) were randomly assigned to an i-gel™ or cLMA group. We evaluated hemodynamic data, airway sealing ability, the success rate of insertion, and adverse events including an inadvertent sliding out during ventilation. Demographic data and hemodynamic data obtained immediately after the insertion of these devices did not differ between the two groups. The success rates for insertion on the first attempt were 77 and 84% for i-gel™ and cLMA, respectively (P = 0.54), and the overall success rates were 87 and 100% respectively (P = 0.14). There were no significant differences in terms of airway leak pressure. The inserted i-gel™ inadvertently slid out in 8 of 31 patients but only one sliding out case occurred in the cLMA group (P = 0.02). There were no differences between the groups in terms of other side effects (e.g., coughing, bleeding) associated with the use of i-gel™ and cLMA (P = 0.75 and 0.49, respectively). Oropharyngeal leak pressure and insertion success rate of i-gel™ are similar to those of cLMA. However, i-gel™ is prone to inadvertent sliding out of the mouth in small children. Therefore, it is recommended that the i-gel™ should be secured more tightly to avoid displacement of the device.

  5. Coupled cellular therapy and magnetic targeting for airway regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordidge, Katherine L; Gregori, Maria; Kalber, Tammy L; Lythgoe, Mark F; Janes, Sam M; Giangreco, Adam

    2014-06-01

    Airway diseases including COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), cystic fibrosis and lung cancer are leading causes of worldwide morbidity and mortality, with annual healthcare costs of billions of pounds. True regeneration of damaged airways offers the possibility of restoring lung function and protecting against airway transformation. Recently, advances in tissue engineering have allowed the development of cadaveric and biosynthetic airway grafts. Although these have produced encouraging results, the ability to achieve long-term functional airway regeneration remains a major challenge. To promote regeneration, exogenously delivered stem and progenitor cells are being trialled as cellular therapies. Unfortunately, current evidence suggests that only small numbers of exogenously delivered stem cells engraft within lungs, thereby limiting their utility for airway repair. In other organ systems, magnetic targeting has shown promise for improving long-term robust cell engraftment. This technique involves in vitro cell expansion, magnetic actuation and magnetically guided cell engraftment to sites of tissue damage. In the present paper, we discuss the utility of coupling stem cell-mediated cellular therapy with magnetic targeting for improving airway regeneration.

  6. L-ornithine derived polyamines in cystic fibrosis airways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmut Grasemann

    Full Text Available Increased arginase activity contributes to airway nitric oxide (NO deficiency in cystic fibrosis (CF. Whether down-stream products of arginase activity contribute to CF lung disease is currently unknown. The objective of this study was to test whether L-ornithine derived polyamines are present in CF airways and contribute to airway pathophysiology. Polyamine concentrations were measured in sputum of patients with CF and in healthy controls, using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The effect of spermine on airway smooth muscle mechanical properties was assessed in bronchial segments of murine airways, using a wire myograph. Sputum polyamine concentrations in stable CF patients were similar to healthy controls for putrescine and spermidine but significantly higher for spermine. Pulmonary exacerbations were associated with an increase in sputum and spermine levels. Treatment for pulmonary exacerbations resulted in decreases in arginase activity, L-ornithine and spermine concentrations in sputum. The changes in sputum spermine with treatment correlated significantly with changes in L-ornithine but not with sputum inflammatory markers. Incubation of mouse bronchi with spermine resulted in an increase in acetylcholine-induced force and significantly reduced nitric oxide-induced bronchial relaxation. The polyamine spermine is increased in CF airways. Spermine contributes to airways obstruction by reducing the NO-mediated smooth muscle relaxation.

  7. Optimizing education in difficult airway management: meeting the challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myatra, Sheila N; Kalkundre, Rupali S; Divatia, Jigeeshu V

    2017-12-01

    The last 2 decades have seen a vast change in the science and technology of airway management. As a result, there is an increasing need to equip anesthesiologists with the new knowledge and skills for the safe management of a difficult airway. In addition to knowledge and expertise, human factors and nontechnical skills (NTS), including situational awareness, communication and team work, play an important role during difficult airway management and contribute to the outcome. Didactic sessions are useful to impart knowledge. Self-learning, interactive discussions, simulation and debriefing are important tools for teaching and training in difficult airway management. Manikin training and simulation enable development of technical as well as NTS without subjecting patients to risk and allow multiple training sessions of relatively uncommon scenarios. Guidelines are useful teaching tools, whereas cognitive tools such as the Vortex approach may be useful during a difficult airway. There is need for research on difficult airway management and optimized training methods. Research is also required to determine the barriers to adoption of guidelines and strategies to ensure widespread dissemination and implementation of guidelines and best practices for difficult airway management.

  8. Airway complications following pediatric lung and heart-lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaditis, A G; Gondor, M; Nixon, P A; Webber, S; Keenan, R J; Kaye, R; Kurland, G

    2000-07-01

    Obstruction at the airway anastomosis is a recognized complication of adult heart-lung transplantation (HLT) and lung transplantation (LT). Data for pediatric transplantation have been scarce. We reviewed our experience in pediatric HLT and LT to determine the frequency of airway complications and to document the therapeutic modalities used for their treatment. Fifty-three patients (median age: 13.8 yr; range: 1.3 to 28.2 yr) underwent HLT (n = 25), SLT (n = 3), DLT (n = 25), or repeat DLT (n = 3) and survived for more than 72 h. Major anastomotic airway complications requiring intervention affected one of the 25 HLT (4%) and seven of the 28 LT (SLT + DLT) patients (25%) (p = 0.05). Four patients with granulation tissue occluding the airway were treated with forceps resection, laser ablation, or balloon dilatation. Three patients with fibrotic strictures received silicone stents, laser ablation, or balloon dilatation. Two patients with bronchomalacia or diffuse stricture below the anastomosis underwent metal stent placement. Five of seven patients who were treated for anastomotic complications had satisfactory relief of airway obstruction. As compared with previously studied adults, pediatric heart-lung transplant recipients had the same or a lower frequency, and pediatric lung transplant recipients had a higher frequency of major anastomotic airway complications. A variety of treatment modalities were necessary to achieve adequate relief of airway obstruction.

  9. Positive Airway Pressure Device Technology Past and Present: What's in the "Black Box"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lee K; Javaheri, Shahrokh

    2017-12-01

    Since the introduction of continuous positive airway pressure (PAP) for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in 1981, PAP technology has diversified exponentially. Compact and quiet fixed continuous PAP flow generators, autotitrating PAP devices, and bilevel PAP devices that can treat multiple sleep-disordered breathing phenotypes including OSA, central sleep apnea (CSA), combinations of OSA and CSA, and hypoventilation are available. Adaptive servo-ventilators can suppress Hunter-Cheyne-Stokes breathing and CSA and treat coexisting obstructive events. Volume-assured pressure support PAP apparatus purports to provide a targeted degree of ventilatory assistance while also treating cooccurring OSA and/or CSA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Successful difficult airway management of a child with Coffin-siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Ahmet Selim; Akbas, Sedat; Yalin, Mehmet Ridvan; Ozdemir, Emine; Koylu, Zeynep

    2017-08-01

    Management of airway in patients who have Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is often problematic because most of these patients have difficult airway. NTI via C-MAC VL is an useful alternative to direct laryngoscope for orotracheal intubation in airway and anesthetic management in a case of CSS. Alternative airway devices should be readily available.

  11. Successful difficult airway management of a child with Coffin?siris syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ozkan, Ahmet Selim; Akbas, Sedat; Yalin, Mehmet Ridvan; Ozdemir, Emine; Koylu, Zeynep

    2017-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Management of airway in patients who have Coffin?Siris syndrome (CSS) is often problematic because most of these patients have difficult airway. NTI via C?MAC VL is an useful alternative to direct laryngoscope for orotracheal intubation in airway and anesthetic management in a case of CSS. Alternative airway devices should be readily available.

  12. The actin regulator zyxin reinforces airway smooth muscle and accumulates in airways of fatal asthmatics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia R Rosner

    Full Text Available Bronchospasm induced in non-asthmatic human subjects can be easily reversed by a deep inspiration (DI whereas bronchospasm that occurs spontaneously in asthmatic subjects cannot. This physiological effect of a DI has been attributed to the manner in which a DI causes airway smooth muscle (ASM cells to stretch, but underlying molecular mechanisms-and their failure in asthma-remain obscure. Using cells and tissues from wild type and zyxin-/- mice we report responses to a transient stretch of physiologic magnitude and duration. At the level of the cytoskeleton, zyxin facilitated repair at sites of stress fiber fragmentation. At the level of the isolated ASM cell, zyxin facilitated recovery of contractile force. Finally, at the level of the small airway embedded with a precision cut lung slice, zyxin slowed airway dilation. Thus, at each level zyxin stabilized ASM structure and contractile properties at current muscle length. Furthermore, when we examined tissue samples from humans who died as the result of an asthma attack, we found increased accumulation of zyxin compared with non-asthmatics and asthmatics who died of other causes. Together, these data suggest a biophysical role for zyxin in fatal asthma.

  13. Airway management of a difficult airway due to prolonged enlarged goiter using loco-sedative technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate airway management is an essential part of anesthesiologist′s role. Huge goiters can lead to distorted airway and difficulty in endotracheal intubation. In this report, we present a case of a 67-year-old woman with a huge toxic multinodular thyroid swelling, gradually increasing in size for last 20 years, where trachea was successfully intubated. She had a history of deferred surgery in June 2007 due to inability to intubate, despite 5-6 attempts using different laryngoscopes, bougie, and stylet. Patient was re-admitted in December 2011 for the surgery and was successfully intubated this time with help of fiberoptic intubation using loco-sedative technique. Patient was electively kept intubated postoperatively in view of chances of tracheomalacia due to prolonged large goiter. She was extubated successfully on post-op day 2 after demonstration of leak around trachea following tracheal tube cuff deflation. The different techniques of managing the difficult airway in these patients are discussed.

  14. Airway function and markers of airway inflammation in patients with treated hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birring, S S; Patel, R B; Parker, D; McKenna, S; Hargadon, B; Monteiro, W R; Falconer Smith, J F; Pavord, I D

    2005-03-01

    There is increasing evidence of an association between organ specific autoimmune diseases, particularly autoimmune thyroid disease and respiratory morbidity. A study was undertaken to determine whether patients with autoimmune thyroid disease have objective evidence of airway inflammation and dysfunction. Twenty six non-smoking women with treated hypothyroidism and 19 non-smoking controls completed a symptom questionnaire and underwent full lung function tests, capsaicin cough reflex sensitivity measurement, methacholine challenge test, and sputum induction over two visits. Symptoms of cough (p = 0.01), dyspnoea (p = 0.01), sputum production (p = 0.004), and wheeze (p = 0.04) were reported more commonly in patients than controls. Patients with hypothyroidism had heightened cough reflex sensitivity compared with controls (geometric mean concentration of capsaicin causing five coughs: 40 v 108 mmol/l; mean difference 1.4 doubling doses; 95% confidence interval of difference 0.4 to 2.5; p = 0.008) and a significantly higher proportion of patients had airway hyperresponsiveness (methacholine provocative concentration (PC(20)) <8 mg/ml: 38% v 0%; p = 0.016). Patients with hypothyroidism also had a significantly higher induced sputum total neutrophil cell count (p = 0.01), total lymphocyte count (p = 0.02), and sputum supernatant interleukin-8 concentrations (p = 0.048). Patients with treated hypothyroidism report more respiratory symptoms and have objective evidence of airway dysfunction and inflammation.

  15. Classification of pulmonary airway disease based on mucosal color analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Melissa; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Riker, David; Ferguson, John Scott; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    Airway mucosal color changes occur in response to the development of bronchial diseases including lung cancer, cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma. These associated changes are often visualized using standard macro-optical bronchoscopy techniques. A limitation to this form of assessment is that the subtle changes that indicate early stages in disease development may often be missed as a result of this highly subjective assessment, especially in inexperienced bronchoscopists. Tri-chromatic CCD chip bronchoscopes allow for digital color analysis of the pulmonary airway mucosa. This form of analysis may facilitate a greater understanding of airway disease response. A 2-step image classification approach is employed: the first step is to distinguish between healthy and diseased bronchoscope images and the second is to classify the detected abnormal images into 1 of 4 possible disease categories. A database of airway mucosal color constructed from healthy human volunteers is used as a standard against which statistical comparisons are made from mucosa with known apparent airway abnormalities. This approach demonstrates great promise as an effective detection and diagnosis tool to highlight potentially abnormal airway mucosa identifying a region possibly suited to further analysis via airway forceps biopsy, or newly developed micro-optical biopsy strategies. Following the identification of abnormal airway images a neural network is used to distinguish between the different disease classes. We have shown that classification of potentially diseased airway mucosa is possible through comparative color analysis of digital bronchoscope images. The combination of the two strategies appears to increase the classification accuracy in addition to greatly decreasing the computational time.

  16. Airway remodeling and its reversibility in equine asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Lavoie

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite effective therapies for controlling its clinical manifestations, human asthma remains an incurable disease. It is now recognized that inflammation induced structural changes (remodeling of the airways are responsible for the progressive loss of lung function in asthmatic patients. However, the peripheral airways, where most of the remodeling occurs in severe asthmatic patients, cannot be safely sampled in humans, and therefore, little is known of the effects of current therapies at reversing the established asthmatic remodeling, especially those occurring in the peripheral airways. Animal models have been studied to unravel etiological, immunopathological, and genetic attributes leading to asthma. However, experiments in which the disease is artificially induced have been shown to have limited translational potential for humans. To the contrary, horses naturally suffer from an asthma-like condition which shares marked similarities with human asthma making this model unique to investigate the kinetics, reversibility, as well as the physiological consequences of tissue remodeling (Bullone and Lavoie 2015. We reported an increased deposition of smooth muscle, collagen and elastic fibers in the peripheral airways of affected horses, which was correlated with the lung function (Herszberg et al., 2006; Setlakwe et al., 2014. The airway subepithelial collagen depositions were almost completely reversed with 6 to 12 months of treatment with either antigen avoidance or inhaled corticosteroids (ICS administration, and there was a modest (30% on average decrease in airway smooth muscle (Leclere et al., 2011. A recent study also found that ICS combined with long-acting ß2-agonists drugs (LABA and ICS monotherapy similarly induced a 30% decrease of the airway smooth muscle mass at 3 months (Buollone, 2017. However, only ICS/LABA and antigen avoidance decreased airway luminal neutrophilia. The findings indicate the enhance therapeutic effect of ICS

  17. Ultrasonography - A viable tool for airway assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi B Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Accurate prediction of the Cormack-Lehane (CL grade preoperatively can help in better airway management of the patient during induction of anaesthesia. Our aim was to determine the utility of ultrasonography in predicting CL grade. Methods: We studied 100 patients undergoing general endotracheal anaesthesia. Mallampati (MP class, thyromental distance (TMD and sternomental distance (SMD were noted. Ultrasound measurements of the anterior neck soft tissue thickness at the level of the hyoid (ANS-Hyoid, anterior neck soft tissue thickness at the level of the vocal cords (ANS-VC and ratio of the depth of the pre-epiglottic space (Pre-E to the  distance from the epiglottis to the mid-point of the distance between the vocal cords (E-VC were obtained. CL grade was noted during intubation. Chi-square test was employed to determine if there was any statistical difference in the measurements of patients with different CL grades. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV and accuracy were calculated for the various parameters. Results: The incidence of difficult intubation was 14%. An ANS-VC >0.23 cm had a sensitivity of 85.7% in predicting a CL Grade of 3 or 4, which was higher than that of MP class, TMD and SMD. However, the specificity, PPV and accuracy were lower than the physical parameters. The NPV was comparable. Conclusion: Ultrasound is a useful tool in airway assessment. ANS-VC >0.23 cm is a potential predictor of difficult intubation. ANS-Hyoid is not indicative of difficult intubation. The ratio Pre-E/E-VC has a low to moderate predictive value.

  18. Ultrasonography - A viable tool for airway assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Preethi B; Punetha, Pankaj; Chalam, Kolli S

    2016-11-01

    Accurate prediction of the Cormack-Lehane (CL) grade preoperatively can help in better airway management of the patient during induction of anaesthesia. Our aim was to determine the utility of ultrasonography in predicting CL grade. We studied 100 patients undergoing general endotracheal anaesthesia. Mallampati (MP) class, thyromental distance (TMD) and sternomental distance (SMD) were noted. Ultrasound measurements of the anterior neck soft tissue thickness at the level of the hyoid (ANS-Hyoid), anterior neck soft tissue thickness at the level of the vocal cords (ANS-VC) and ratio of the depth of the pre-epiglottic space (Pre-E) to the distance from the epiglottis to the mid-point of the distance between the vocal cords (E-VC) were obtained. CL grade was noted during intubation. Chi-square test was employed to determine if there was any statistical difference in the measurements of patients with different CL grades. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy were calculated for the various parameters. The incidence of difficult intubation was 14%. An ANS-VC >0.23 cm had a sensitivity of 85.7% in predicting a CL Grade of 3 or 4, which was higher than that of MP class, TMD and SMD. However, the specificity, PPV and accuracy were lower than the physical parameters. The NPV was comparable. Ultrasound is a useful tool in airway assessment. ANS-VC >0.23 cm is a potential predictor of difficult intubation. ANS-Hyoid is not indicative of difficult intubation. The ratio Pre-E/E-VC has a low to moderate predictive value.

  19. Regulated Mucin Secretion from Airway Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Bruce Adler

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Secretory epithelial cells of the proximal airways synthesize and secrete gel-forming polymeric mucins. The secreted mucins adsorb water to form mucus that is propelled by neighboring ciliated cells, providing a mobile barrier which removes inhaled particles and pathogens from the lungs. Several features of the intracellular trafficking of mucins make the airway secretory cell an interesting comparator for the cell biology of regulated exocytosis. Polymeric mucins are exceedingly large molecules (up to 3x10^6 D per monomer whose folding and initial polymerization in the ER requires the protein disulfide isomerase Agr2. In the Golgi, mucins further polymerize to form chains and possibly branched networks comprising more than 20 monomers. The large size of mucin polymers imposes constraints on their packaging into transport vesicles along the secretory pathway. Sugar side chains account for >70% of the mass of mucins, and their attachment to the protein core by O-glycosylation occurs in the Golgi. Mature polymeric mucins are stored in large secretory granules ~1 um in diameter. These are translocated to the apical membrane to be positioned for exocytosis by cooperative interactions among MARCKS, cysteine string protein (CSP, HSP70 and the cytoskeleton. Mucin granules undergo exocytic fusion with the plasma membrane at a low basal rate and a high stimulated rate. Both rates are mediated by a regulated exocytic mechanism as indicated by phenotypes in both basal and stimulated secretion in mice lacking Munc13-2, a sensor of the second messengers calcium and diacylglycerol (DAG. Basal secretion is induced by low levels of activation of P2Y2 purinergic and A3 adenosine receptors by extracellular ATP released in paracrine fashion and its metabolite adenosine. Stimulated secretion is induced by high levels of the same ligands, and possibly by inflammatory mediators as well. Activated receptors are coupled to phospholipase C by Gq, resulting in the

  20. Sex differences in emphysema and airway disease in smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Camp, Pat G; Coxson, Harvey O; Levy, Robert D

    2009-01-01

    -resolution CT (HRCT) scanning in male and female smokers with and without COPD. METHODS: All subjects completed spirometry and answered an epidemiologic respiratory questionnaire. Inspiratory HRCT scans were obtained on 688 smokers enrolled in a family-based study of COPD. Emphysema was assessed by using...... by calculating the square root of the airway wall area (SQRTWA) and the percentage of the total airway area taken by the airway wall (WA%) relative to the internal perimeter. RESULTS: Women had a similar FEV(1) (women, 65.5% +/- 31.9% predicted; men, 62.1% +/- 30.4% predicted; p = 0.16) but fewer pack...

  1. Airway management in a bronchoscopic simulator based setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeser, Karin; Konge, Lars; Kristensen, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several simulation-based possibilities for training flexible optical intubation have been developed, ranging from non-anatomical phantoms to high-fidelity virtual reality simulators. These teaching devices might also be used to assess the competence of trainees before allowing them...... to practice on patients. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the validity of airway simulation as an assessment tool for the acquisition of the preclinical basic skills in flexible optical intubation and to investigate anaesthetists' opinion on airway simulation. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: International airway...

  2. Airway Management Approach in Nasocutaneous Fistula: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanoja, Ivanna A; Toth, Kenneth S

    2018-01-15

    We present a case of a 63-year-old man with nasocutaneous fistula located outside the area covered by a large adult facemask. The patient was uncooperative for the standard airway assessment and any attempt at awake intubation. Positive pressure ventilation was compromised by the fistula. Although the incidence of overall complications, including fistula formation, following free flap reconstruction for oropharyngeal cancer is reported as high as 20%, few case reports detailing airway management exist. We demonstrate that it is possible to use conventional techniques to induce and ventilate a patient with a large, externalized, airway fistula by covering the defect with an occlusive transparent dressing.

  3. Airway Management in a Patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, John F; Kurian, Dinesh J; Udani, Andrea G; Greene, Nathaniel H

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 3-month-old female with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) undergoing general anesthesia for laparoscopic gastrostomy tube placement with a focus on airway management. WHS is a rare 4p microdeletion syndrome resulting in multiple congenital abnormalities, including craniofacial deformities. Microcephaly, micrognathia, and glossoptosis are common features in WHS patients and risk factors for a pediatric airway that is potentially difficult to intubate. We discuss anesthesia strategies for airway preparation and management in a WHS patient requiring general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation.

  4. Airway Management in a Patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Gamble

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 3-month-old female with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS undergoing general anesthesia for laparoscopic gastrostomy tube placement with a focus on airway management. WHS is a rare 4p microdeletion syndrome resulting in multiple congenital abnormalities, including craniofacial deformities. Microcephaly, micrognathia, and glossoptosis are common features in WHS patients and risk factors for a pediatric airway that is potentially difficult to intubate. We discuss anesthesia strategies for airway preparation and management in a WHS patient requiring general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation.

  5. Management of airway obstruction and stridor in pediatric patients [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese, Ashley; Langhan, Melissa L; Pade, Kathryn H

    2017-11-22

    Stridor is a result of turbulent air-flow through the trachea from upper airway obstruction, and although in children it is often due to croup, it can also be caused by noninfectious and/or congenital conditions as well as life-threatening etiologies. The history and physical examination guide initial management, which includes reduction of airway inflammation, treatment of bacterial infection, and, less often, imaging, emergent airway stabilization, or surgical management. This issue discusses the most common as well as the life-threatening etiologies of acute and chronic stridor and its management in the emergency department. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  6. Ludwig's angina and airway considerations: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand H; Pai, Swarupa D; Bhattarai, Basant; Rao, Sumesh T; Ambareesha, M

    2008-06-20

    Patients with deep neck infections present challenging airways for an anesthesiologist. Patients with Ludwig's angina may die as a result of the inability to effectively manage the airway. Here we discuss the anesthetic management with fiberoptic intubation of a 45-year-old man with Ludwig's angina scheduled for emergency drainage. Awake fiberoptic intubation under topical anesthesia may be the ideal method to secure the airway in advanced cases of Ludwig's angina. When fiberoptic bronchoscopy is not feasible, not available or has failed, an awake tracheostomy may be the preferred option.

  7. Role of dystrophin in airway smooth muscle phenotype, contraction and lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pawan; Basu, Sujata; Mitchell, Richard W; Stelmack, Gerald L; Anderson, Judy E; Halayko, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Dystrophin links the transmembrane dystrophin-glycoprotein complex to the actin cytoskeleton. We have shown that dystrophin-glycoprotein complex subunits are markers for airway smooth muscle phenotype maturation and together with caveolin-1, play an important role in calcium homeostasis. We tested if dystrophin affects phenotype maturation, tracheal contraction and lung physiology. We used dystrophin deficient Golden Retriever dogs (GRMD) and mdx mice vs healthy control animals in our approach. We found significant reduction of contractile protein markers: smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (smMHC) and calponin and reduced Ca2+ response to contractile agonist in dystrophin deficient cells. Immunocytochemistry revealed reduced stress fibers and number of smMHC positive cells in dystrophin-deficient cells, when compared to control. Immunoblot analysis of Akt1, GSK3β and mTOR phosphorylation further revealed that downstream PI3K signaling, which is essential for phenotype maturation, was suppressed in dystrophin deficient cell cultures. Tracheal rings from mdx mice showed significant reduction in the isometric contraction to methacholine (MCh) when compared to genetic control BL10ScSnJ mice (wild-type). In vivo lung function studies using a small animal ventilator revealed a significant reduction in peak airway resistance induced by maximum concentrations of inhaled MCh in mdx mice, while there was no change in other lung function parameters. These data show that the lack of dystrophin is associated with a concomitant suppression of ASM cell phenotype maturation in vitro, ASM contraction ex vivo and lung function in vivo, indicating that a linkage between the DGC and the actin cytoskeleton via dystrophin is a determinant of the phenotype and functional properties of ASM.

  8. Somatic extracts of Marshallagia marshalli downregulate the Th2 associated immune responses in ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parande Shirvan, Sima; Ebrahimby, Azadeh; Dousty, Arezoo; Maleki, Mohsen; Movassaghi, Ahmadreza; Borji, Hassan; Haghparast, Alireza

    2017-05-12

    Recently the role of gastrointestinal nematodes in modulating the immune responses in inflammatory and immune-mediated conditions such as allergy and autoimmune diseases has been introduced. This is mainly due to the suppressive effects of somatic and excretory secretory (ES) products of nematodes on the immune responses. In this study, we evaluated the immunomodulatory potentials of somatic products of Marshallagia marshalli, a gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep, to suppress the immune-mediated responses in a murine model of allergic airway inflammation. BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally (IP) sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA)/Alum and then challenged with 1% OVA. Somatic products of M. marshalli were administered during each sensitization. The effects of somatic products on development of allergic airway inflammation were evaluated by analyzing inflammatory cells recruitment, histopathological changes, cytokines production (IL-4, IL-13, IL-10, TGF-β) and serum antibody titers (IgG1, IgG2a). Somatic products of M. marshalli were able to suppress the induction of allergic airway inflammation in mice. Modulation of Th2 type responses (IL-4, IL-13, IgG1) via upregulations of IL-10 and TGF-β production was observed after injection of somatic products of M. marshalli. In addition, inflammatory cells infiltration and pathological disorders were significantly diminished following administration of somatic products. Our data raised the possibility that helminths could be a potential therapeutic candidate to alleviate the inflammatory conditions in allergic asthma. According to these results, we concluded that M. marshalli may contain immune-modulatory molecules that attenuate allergic airway inflammation via induction of regulatory cytokines. Further investigations are required to identify molecules that might have potentials for development of novel therapeutic targets.

  9. Suppression of sympathetic detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C., Jr.; Gunger, M. E.; Craig, B. G.; Parsons, G. H.

    1984-08-01

    There are two basic approaches to suppression of sympathetic detonation. Minimizing the shock sensitivity of the explosive to long duration pressure will obviously reduce interround separation distances. However, given that the explosive sensitivity is fixed, then much can be gained through the use of simple barriers placed between the rounds. Researchers devised calculational methods for predicting shock transmission; experimental methods have been developed to characterize explosive shock sensitivity and observe the response of acceptors to barriers. It was shown that both EAK and tritonal can be initiated to detonation with relatively low pressure shocks of long durations. It was also shown that to be an effective barrier between the donor and acceptor, the material must attenuate shock and defect fragments. Future actions will concentrate on refining the design of barriers to minimize weight, volume, and cost.

  10. Diagnosis of bronchiectasis and airway wall thickening in children with cystic fibrosis. Objective airway-artery quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, Wieying; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M.; Bruijne, Marleen de; Petersen, Jens; Nasserinejad, Kazem; Ozturk, Hadiye; Chen, Yong; Perez-Rovira, Adria

    2017-01-01

    To quantify airway and artery (AA)-dimensions in cystic fibrosis (CF) and control patients for objective CT diagnosis of bronchiectasis and airway wall thickness (AWT). Spirometer-guided inspiratory and expiratory CTs of 11 CF and 12 control patients were collected retrospectively. Airway pathways were annotated semi-automatically to reconstruct three-dimensional bronchial trees. All visible AA-pairs were measured perpendicular to the airway axis. Inner, outer and AWT (outer-inner) diameter were divided by the adjacent artery diameter to compute A in A-, A out A- and A WT A-ratios. AA-ratios were predicted using mixed-effects models including disease status, lung volume, gender, height and age as covariates. Demographics did not differ significantly between cohorts. Mean AA-pairs CF: 299 inspiratory; 82 expiratory. Controls: 131 inspiratory; 58 expiratory. All ratios were significantly larger in inspiratory compared to expiratory CTs for both groups (p<0.001). A out A- and A WT A-ratios were larger in CF than in controls, independent of lung volume (p<0.01). Difference of A out A- and A WT A-ratios between patients with CF and controls increased significantly for every following airway generation (p<0.001). Diagnosis of bronchiectasis is highly dependent on lung volume and more reliably diagnosed using outer airway diameter. Difference in bronchiectasis and AWT severity between the two cohorts increased with each airway generation. (orig.)

  11. Divergent effects of urban particulate air pollution on allergic airway responses in experimental asthma: a comparison of field exposure studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, James G; Morishita, Masako; Keeler, Gerald J; Harkema, Jack R

    2012-07-06

    Increases in ambient particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm (PM2.5) are associated with asthma morbidity and mortality. The overall objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that PM2.5 derived from two distinct urban U.S. communities would induce variable responses to aggravate airway symptoms during experimental asthma. We used a mobile laboratory to conduct community-based inhalation exposures to laboratory rats with ovalbumin-induced allergic airways disease. In Grand Rapids exposures were conducted within 60 m of a major roadway, whereas the Detroit was located in an industrial area more than 400 m from roadways. Immediately after nasal allergen challenge, Brown Norway rats were exposed by whole body inhalation to either concentrated air particles (CAPs) or filtered air for 8 h (7:00 AM - 3:00 PM). Both ambient and concentrated PM2.5 was assessed for mass, size fractionation, and major component analyses, and trace element content. Sixteen hours after exposures, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung lobes were collected and evaluated for airway inflammatory and mucus responses. Similar CAPs mass concentrations were generated in Detroit (542 μg/m3) and Grand Rapids (519 μg/m3). Exposure to CAPs at either site had no effects in lungs of non-allergic rats. In contrast, asthmatic rats had 200% increases in airway mucus and had more BALF neutrophils (250% increase), eosinophils (90%), and total protein (300%) compared to controls. Exposure to Detroit CAPs enhanced all allergic inflammatory endpoints by 30-100%, whereas inhalation of Grand Rapids CAPs suppressed all allergic responses by 50%. Detroit CAPs were characterized by high sulfate, smaller sized particles and were derived from local combustion sources. Conversely Grand Rapids CAPs were derived primarily from motor vehicle sources. Despite inhalation exposure to the same mass concentration of urban PM2.5, disparate health effects can be elicited in the airways of

  12. Divergent effects of urban particulate air pollution on allergic airway responses in experimental asthma: a comparison of field exposure studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner James G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increases in ambient particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm (PM2.5 are associated with asthma morbidity and mortality. The overall objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that PM2.5 derived from two distinct urban U.S. communities would induce variable responses to aggravate airway symptoms during experimental asthma. Methods We used a mobile laboratory to conduct community-based inhalation exposures to laboratory rats with ovalbumin-induced allergic airways disease. In Grand Rapids exposures were conducted within 60 m of a major roadway, whereas the Detroit was located in an industrial area more than 400 m from roadways. Immediately after nasal allergen challenge, Brown Norway rats were exposed by whole body inhalation to either concentrated air particles (CAPs or filtered air for 8 h (7:00 AM - 3:00 PM. Both ambient and concentrated PM2.5 was assessed for mass, size fractionation, and major component analyses, and trace element content. Sixteen hours after exposures, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and lung lobes were collected and evaluated for airway inflammatory and mucus responses. Results Similar CAPs mass concentrations were generated in Detroit (542 μg/m3 and Grand Rapids (519 μg/m3. Exposure to CAPs at either site had no effects in lungs of non-allergic rats. In contrast, asthmatic rats had 200% increases in airway mucus and had more BALF neutrophils (250% increase, eosinophils (90%, and total protein (300% compared to controls. Exposure to Detroit CAPs enhanced all allergic inflammatory endpoints by 30-100%, whereas inhalation of Grand Rapids CAPs suppressed all allergic responses by 50%. Detroit CAPs were characterized by high sulfate, smaller sized particles and were derived from local combustion sources. Conversely Grand Rapids CAPs were derived primarily from motor vehicle sources. Conclusions Despite inhalation exposure to the same mass concentration of urban PM2

  13. Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates airway inflammation in murine asthma model by inducing regulatory T cells and modulating dendritic cell functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Young-Il [Div. of Malaria and Parasitic Diseases, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Osong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Hyun [Div. of AIDS, National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Osong (Korea, Republic of); Ju, Jung Won; Cho, Shin Hyeong; Lee, Won Ja [Div. of Malaria and Parasitic Diseases, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Osong (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin Wook; Park, Yeong-Min [Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yang-San (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Eun, E-mail: ondalgl@cdc.go.kr [Div. of Malaria and Parasitic Diseases, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Osong (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Clonorchis sinensis-derived total protein attenuates OVA-induced airway inflammation and AHR to methacholine. {yields} Induction of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} T cells and IL-10 along with suppression of splenocyte proliferation by C. sinensis-derived total protein. {yields} C. sinensis-derived total protein interferes with the expression of co-stimulatory molecules in DCs. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by Th2-mediated inflammation, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) through airway remodeling. Recent epidemiological and experimental reports have suggested an inverse relationship between the development of allergy and helminth infections. Infection by Clonorchis sinensis, a liver fluke that resides in the bile duct of humans, is endemic predominantly in Asia including Korea and China. Using a murine model for asthma, we investigated the effects of C. sinensis-derived total protein (Cs-TP) on allergen-induced airway inflammation and the mechanism underlying the protective effects of Cs-TP administration on asthma. Treatment with Cs-TP attenuated OVA-induced airway inflammation and methacholine-induced AHR, as well as eosinophilia development, lymphocyte infiltration into the lung, and goblet cell metaplasia. This protective effect of Cs-TP is associated with markedly reduced OVA-specific IgE and Th1/Th2 cytokine production. Moreover, Cs-TP increased the number of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T (Treg) cells as well as their suppressive activity. In fact, proliferation of OVA-restimulated splenocytes was suppressed significantly. Cs-TP also inhibited the expression of such co-stimulatory molecules as CD80, CD86, and CD40 in LPS- or OVA-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that Cs-TP could interfere with the capacity of airway DCs to prime naive T cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of C. sinensis to ameliorate allergic asthma and broaden our understanding of the paradoxical

  14. Airway management of a rare huge-size supraglottic mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Zeid, Haitham A.; Al-Ghamdi, Abdel Mohsin A.; Al-Qurain, Abdel-Aziz A.; Mokhazy, Khalid M.

    2006-01-01

    Laser excision of a huge-sized supraglottic mass nearly obstructing the airway passage is a real challenge to anesthesiologists. Upper airway obstruction due to neoplasm in supraglottic region, is traditionally managed by preoperative tracheostomy, however, such a common procedure can potentially have an impact on long-term outcome. A 26-year-old patient presented with dysphagia caused by left cystic vallecular synovial sarcoma. The airway was successfully secured via fiberoptic bronchoscopy, followed by excision of the supraglottic tumor with CO2 laser surgery. Tracheostomy was not required. The patient was discharged from the hospital on the 4th day of surgery. This case, highlights the possibility to secure the airway passage without performing preoperative tracheostomy resulting in good outcome and short hospital stay. (author)

  15. Radiographic anatomy and pathology of the child's airway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, B.B. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The laryngotracheal airway has been considered the ''bottle-neck'' of the lungs. Any compromise of this already rather small pathway can easily result in a life-threatening situation. Rapid, accurate diagnosis is essential for proper clinical management of a compromised airway. Radiologic studies play a major role in the clinical investigation of patients with serious airway problems. There are notable differences between the anatomy of the upper airway of the adult and that of the young child or infant. In the infant, however, some differences in the radiographic patterns must be kept in mind. In the first 6 months of life, the adenoid shadow is not well defined and is normally absent until 1 month of age. During swallowing there is a lack of air in the pharynx with elevation of the larynx. Air may be seen in the cervical esophagus. All of these physiologic variations must be considered when interpreting radiographs of the neck in the young child

  16. Surface Airways Observations (SAO) Hourly Data 1928-1948 (CDMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset consists of hourly U.S. surface airways observations (SAO). These observations extend as far back as 1928, from the time when commercial aviation began...

  17. Surface Airways Observations (SAO) Hourly Data (1965-1981) (CDMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset consists primarily of U.S. surface airways observations (SAO) data beginning in 1965 and extending through 1981. Note that a few stations have already...

  18. Mechanics of airflow in the human nasal airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorly, D J; Taylor, D J; Schroter, R C

    2008-11-30

    The mechanics of airflow in the human nasal airways is reviewed, drawing on the findings of experimental and computational model studies. Modelling inevitably requires simplifications and assumptions, particularly given the complexity of the nasal airways. The processes entailed in modelling the nasal airways (from defining the model, to its production and, finally, validating the results) is critically examined, both for physical models and for computational simulations. Uncertainty still surrounds the appropriateness of the various assumptions made in modelling, particularly with regard to the nature of flow. New results are presented in which high-speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) and direct numerical simulation are applied to investigate the development of flow instability in the nasal cavity. These illustrate some of the improved capabilities afforded by technological developments for future model studies. The need for further improvements in characterising airway geometry and flow together with promising new methods are briefly discussed.

  19. Modeling airflow and particle transport/deposition in pulmonary airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstreuer, Clement; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Zheng

    2008-11-30

    A review of research papers is presented, pertinent to computer modeling of airflow as well as nano- and micron-size particle deposition in pulmonary airway replicas. The key modeling steps are outlined, including construction of suitable airway geometries, mathematical description of the air-particle transport phenomena and computer simulation of micron and nanoparticle depositions. Specifically, diffusion-dominated nanomaterial deposits on airway surfaces much more uniformly than micron particles of the same material. This may imply different toxicity effects. Due to impaction and secondary flows, micron particles tend to accumulate around the carinal ridges and to form "hot spots", i.e., locally high concentrations which may lead to tumor developments. Inhaled particles in the size range of 20nm< or =dp< or =3microm may readily reach the deeper lung region. Concerning inhaled therapeutic particles, optimal parameters for mechanical drug-aerosol targeting of predetermined lung areas can be computed, given representative pulmonary airways.

  20. Airway efficiency during the use of SCUBA diving mouthpieces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, R S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of varying interdental bite platform thickness of the scuba mouthpiece on airway efficiency. METHODS: 10 male divers had their mean peak flow measured for free breathing, maximum flow with diving mouthpiece, teeth in occlusion, and for five experimental mouthpieces with different thickness of interdental bite platform (1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm). RESULTS: The connecting airway between the demand valve and mouthpiece was found to be a major limiting factor in airway efficiency. An interdental bite platform of 4 mm resulted in the greatest air flow with a further increase in thickness resulting in air flow restriction. CONCLUSIONS: The use of an interdental bite platform of 4 mm placed between the premolar and molar teeth ensures the greatest airway efficiency and also results in a design which provides the least temporomandibular joint discomfort for the diver. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8799600

  1. Airway dysfunction in elite swimmers: prevalence, impact, and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomax M

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitch Lomax Department of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK Abstract: The prevalence of airway dysfunction in elite swimmers is among the highest in elite athletes. The traditional view that swimmers naturally gravitate toward swimming because of preexisting respiratory disorders has been challenged. There is now sufficient evidence that the higher prevalence of bronchial tone disorders in elite swimmers is not the result of a natural selection bias. Rather, the combined effects of repeated chlorine by-product exposure and chronic endurance training can lead to airway dysfunction and atopy. This review will detail the underpinning causes of airway dysfunction observed in elite swimmers. It will also show that airway dysfunction does not prevent success in elite level swimming. Neither does it inhibit lung growth and might be partially reversible when elite swimmers retire from competition. Keywords: exercise, aquatic athletes, bronchoconstriction

  2. Spirometry screening for airway obstruction in asymptomatic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisnivesky, Juan; Skloot, Gwen; Rundle, Andrew; Revenson, Tracey A; Neugut, Alfred

    2014-07-01

    Screening spirometry might help identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at an earlier stage. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of airway obstruction in a cohort of asymptomatic smokers who underwent spirometry as part of a routine health maintenance examination. The study cohort consisted of a consecutive sample of 386 asymptomatic smokers (≥5 pack-years) without a history of COPD or asthma, who completed spirometry testing as part of a routine health maintenance examination. Overall, 9 study subjects (2.3%, 95% confidence interval: 1.1-4.4%) had evidence of airway obstruction on spirometry. Univariate and multiple regression analyses showed that the risk of airway obstruction was not significantly associated with age, sex, race, smoking history or past history of respiratory symptoms. Spirometry screening of asymptomatic smokers may help detect a small number of patients with airway obstruction who are at high risk for COPD.

  3. Human airway xenograft models of epithelial cell regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puchelle Edith

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Regeneration and restoration of the airway epithelium after mechanical, viral or bacterial injury have a determinant role in the evolution of numerous respiratory diseases such as chronic bronchitis, asthma and cystic fibrosis. The study in vivo of epithelial regeneration in animal models has shown that airway epithelial cells are able to dedifferentiate, spread, migrate over the denuded basement membrane and progressively redifferentiate to restore a functional respiratory epithelium after several weeks. Recently, human tracheal xenografts have been developed in immunodeficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID and nude mice. In this review we recall that human airway cells implanted in such conditioned host grafts can regenerate a well-differentiated and functional human epithelium; we stress the interest in these humanized mice in assaying candidate progenitor and stem cells of the human airway mucosa.

  4. Respiration and heartbeat signal detection from airflow at airway in rat by catheter flow sensor with temperature compensation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Y.; Kawaoka, H.; Yamada, T.; Matsushima, M.; Kawabe, T.; Shikida, M.

    2017-12-01

    We previously proposed an evaluation method for detecting both respiration and heartbeat signals from the airflow at the mouth (Kawaoka et al 201518th Int. Conf. on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems; Kawaoka et al 2015 IEEE Sensors; Kawaoka et al 2016 Technical Digest IEEE Micro Electro Mechanical Systems Conf.). In the current study, we developed a catheter flow sensor with temperature compensation that uses MEMS technologies and used it to directly detect the breathing airflow in the airway of a rat. The temperature sensors were integrated with the catheter flow sensor. Heaters working as airflow and temperature sensors were produced on polymer film by using the same fabrication process so that the temperature coefficients of their resistances would coincide. As a result, the variation in sensor outputs due to the airflow temperature changes ranging from 20 °C to 34 °C was suppressed to less than 2.5%. The developed catheter flow sensor was inserted into the airway of a rat to detect both respiration and heartbeat signals. The accuracy of the breathing airflow measurements was improved thanks to the temperature compensation. The tidal volume variations between the expired and inspired air were suppressed to within 5%. Heartbeat signal information was extracted from the measured breathing waveforms by applying a discrete Fourier transform.

  5. Bronchoscopic guidance of endovascular stenting limits airway compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Mohammad; Hagood, James; Moore, John; El-Said, Howaida

    2015-04-01

    Bronchial compression as a result of pulmonary artery and aortic arch stenting may cause significant respiratory distress. We set out to limit airway narrowing by endovascular stenting, by using simultaneous flexible bronchoscopy and graduated balloon stent dilatation, or balloon angioplasty to determine maximum safe stent diameter. Between August 2010 and August 2013, patients with suspected airway compression by adjacent vascular structures, underwent CT or a 3D rotational angiogram to evaluate the relationship between the airway and the blood vessels. If these studies showed close proximity of the stenosed vessel and the airway, simultaneous bronchoscopy and graduated stent re-dilation or graduated balloon angioplasty were performed. Five simultaneous bronchoscopy and interventional catheterization procedures were performed in four patients. Median age/weight was 33 (range 9-49) months and 14 (range 7.6-24) kg, respectively. Three had hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and one had coarctation of the aorta (CoA). All had confirmed or suspected left main stem bronchial compression. In three procedures, serial balloon dilatation of a previously placed stent in the CoA was performed and bronchoscopy was used to determine the safest largest diameter. In the other two procedures, balloon testing with simultaneous bronchoscopy was performed to determine the stent size that would limit compression of the adjacent airway. In all cases, simultaneous bronchoscopy allowed selection of an ideal caliber of the stent that optimized vessel diameter while minimizing compression of the adjacent airway. In cases at risk for airway compromise, flexible bronchoscopy is a useful tool to guide endovascular stenting. Maximum safe stent diameter can be determined without risking catastrophic airway compression. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Removal of Laryngeal Mask Airway: Awake or Deep Anesthesia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Heidari

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to study the influence of depth of anesthesia (awake or deep anesthesia and choice of anesthetic drug (halothane or propofol on the incidence and severity of airway hyperreactivity associated with Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA removal. Methods: A prospective, randomized, double blind study was done in 156 ASA physical status I and II patients, aged 18-65 years, who had under gone short time elective surgery (<1 hour. Patients were randomly assigned in one of the four subgroups: Hal-Aw (anesthesia maintenance with halothane and LMA removal in awaked state, Hal-Deep (anesthesia maintenance with halothane and LMA removal in deep anesthesia, Pro-Aw (anesthesia maintenance with propofol and LMA removal in awaked state, and Pro-Deep (anesthesia maintenance with propofol and LMA removal in deep anesthesia. The incidence of cough and straining, bronchospasm, laryngospasm, breathholding, vomiting, oxygen desaturation, and severity of airway hyperreactivity (mild, moderate, severe with LMA removal were evaluated. Results: There were no significant differences in bronchospasm, larynchospasm, oxygen desaturation among four subgroups. Significant differences were in cough and straining, breath holding, vomiting, and finally severity of airway hyperreactivity among four subgroups. Depth of anesthesia didn’t have any effect on incidence and severity of airway hyperreactivity but in those with propofol, they were lower than those with halothane. Conclusion: In short time surgery and with use of LMA, anesthesia with propofol is associated with lower incidence and severity of airway hyperreactivity than halothane. Keywords: propofol, halothane, airway hyperreactivity, Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA.

  7. Culture Enriched Molecular Profiling of the Cystic Fibrosis Airway Microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Sibley, Christopher D.; Grinwis, Margot E.; Field, Tyler R.; Eshaghurshan, Christina S.; Faria, Monica M.; Dowd, Scot E.; Parkins, Michael D.; Rabin, Harvey R.; Surette, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    The microbiome of the respiratory tract, including the nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal microbiota, is a dynamic community of microorganisms that is highly diverse. The cystic fibrosis (CF) airway microbiome refers to the polymicrobial communities present in the lower airways of CF patients. It is comprised of chronic opportunistic pathogens (such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and a variety of organisms derived mostly from the normal microbiota of the upper respiratory tract. The complexity of t...

  8. Nasopharyngeal encephalocele: a rare cause of upper airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Gokhan; Paksu, Sukru; Asilioglu, Nazik; Kiliç, Mehmet

    2013-04-01

    Nasopharyngeal encephalocele is a rare, benign congenital anomaly. It has the potential to be fatal due to airway obstruction. Here, we report on a 34-day-old infant with pneumonia who underwent mechanical ventilation. An upper airway evaluation was performed due to prolonged intubation, and revealed the presence of a nasopharyngeal encephalocele. The patient tolerated extubation and oral feeding after surgical resection of the lesion. Awareness of the condition can help clinicians arrive at an earlier diagnosis and enhance management.

  9. Lingual Tonsil Hypertrophy: rescuing the airway with videolaryngoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souki, Fouad Ghazi; Yemul-Golhar, Shweta Rahul; Zeyed, Yosaf; Pretto, Ernesto A

    2016-12-01

    Lingual tonsils are lymphatic tissues located at the base of the tongue that may hypertrophy causing difficulty and sometimes inability to ventilate or intubate during anesthesia. Routine airway assessment fails to diagnose lingual tonsil hypertrophy. There is limited experience with use of videolaryngoscopy in cases of lingual tonsil hypertrophy. We present a case of difficult airway due to unanticipated lingual tonsil hypertrophy successfully managed by atypical video laryngoscope positioning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intraoperative endobronchial rupture of pulmonary hydatid cyst: An airway catastrophe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid cyst disease of lungs may not be symptomatic. It may present as spontaneous rupture in pleura or a bronchus. During spontaneous breathing, cyst content of endobronchially ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst is mostly evacuated by coughing. However, during positive pressure ventilation such extruded fragments may lodge into smaller airway leading to an airway catastrophe. We present such accidental endobronchial rupture of pulmonary hydatid cyst during surgery, its prompt detection, and management by rigid bronchoscopy.

  11. Postpartum airway responsiveness and exacerbation of asthma during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Nilas, Lisbeth; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Airway responsiveness and inflammation are associated with the clinical manifestations of asthma and the response to pharmacological therapy. OBJECTIVE: To investigate if airway responsiveness and inflammatory characteristics are related to asthma exacerbations during pregnancy....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: In women with asthma who were prescribed controller medication and monitored closely during pregnancy, the risk of exacerbations was analyzed in relation to postpartum measures of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO), skin prick test reactivity, static and dynamic lung volumes...

  12. Airway management in Ludwig's angina – a challenge: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Fellini, Roberto Taboada; Volquind, Daniel; Schnor, Otávio Haygert; Angeletti, Marcelo Gustavo; Souza, Olívia Egger de

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Ludwig's angina (LA) is an infection of the submandibular space, first described by Wilhelm Frederick von Ludwig in 1836. It represents an entity difficult to manage due to the rapid progression and difficulty in maintaining airway patency, a major challenge in medical practice, resulting in asphyxia and death in 8-10% of patients. Objective Describe a case of a patient with Ludwig's angina undergoing surgery, with emphasis on airway management, in addition to reviewing ...

  13. Translating Cough Mechanisms Into Better Cough Suppressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Jennifer A; McGovern, Alice E; Mazzone, Stuart B

    2017-10-01

    Chronic cough is a significant problem, and in many patients cough remains refractive to both disease-specific therapies and current cough-suppressing medicines, creating a need for improved antitussive therapies. Most patients with chronic cough also display heightened sensitivity so that they experience a persistent sense of the need to cough, and often innocuous stimuli can trigger their coughing. This hypersensitivity underpins the newly described concept of cough hypersensitivity syndrome (CHS), a term that encapsulates the notion of common underlying mechanisms producing neuronal activation, sensitization and/or dysfunction, which are at the core of excessive coughing. Understanding these mechanisms has been a focus of recent research efforts in the field in the hope that new therapies can be developed to selectively target sensitized unproductive cough while maintaining the reflexive cough essential for airway protection. However, efforts to achieve this have been slower than expected, in part because of some significant challenges and limitations translating current cough models. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the sensory circuits innervating the respiratory system that are important for cough, how cough sensory pathways become hypersensitive, and some of the recently described neural targets under development for treating chronic cough. We present the case that better use of current cough models or the development of new models, or both, is ultimately needed to advance our efforts to translate the discovery of basic cough mechanisms into effective medicines for treating patients with chronic cough. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of Radix Adenophorae and Cyclosporine A on an OVA-Induced Murine Model of Asthma by Suppressing to T Cells Activity, Eosinophilia, and Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Soo Roh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of Radix Adenophorae extract (RAE on ovalbumin-induced asthma murine model. To study the anti-inflammatory and antiasthmatic effects of RAE, we examined the development of pulmonary eosinophilic inflammation and inhibitory effects of T cells in murine by RAE and cyclosporine A (CsA. We examined determination of airway hyperresponsiveness, flow cytometric analysis (FACS, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, quantitative real time (PCR, hematoxylin-eosin staining, and Masson trichrome staining in lung tissue, lung weight, total cells, and eosinophil numbers in lung tissue. We demonstrated how RAE suppressed development on inflammation and decreased airway damage.

  15. Anti-allergic effect of intranasal administration of type-A procyanidin polyphenols based standardized extract of cinnamon bark in ovalbumin sensitized BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswar, Urmila M; Kandhare, Amit D; Mohan, Vishwaraman; Thakurdesai, Prasad A

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate anti-allergic effects of intranasal administration of type-A procynidines polyphenols (TAPP) based standardized hydroalcoholic extract of Cinnamomum zeylanicum bark (TAPP-CZ) in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced experimental allergic rhinitis (AR) in BALB/c mice. Sixty male BALB/c mice were divided into six groups of ten each (G1-G6). The mice from G1 were nonsensitized and maintained as normal group. Remaining mice (G2-G6) were sensitized with OVA (500 μL solution, intraperitoneal) on alternate days for 13 days and had twice daily intranasal treatment from day 14-21 as follows: G2 (AR control) received saline, G3 (positive control, XLY) received xylometazoline (0.5 mg/mL, 20 μL/nostril) and G4-G6 received TAPP-CZ (3, 10 and 30 µg/kg in nostril), respectively. On day 21, mice were challenged with OVA (5 μL/nostril, 5% solution) and assessments (nasal signs, biochemical and histopathological) were performed. Treatment with TAPP-CZ (10 and 30 µg/kg in nostril) showed significant attenuation in OVA-induced alterations of the nasal (number of nasal rubbing and sneezing), biochemical markers (serum IgE and histamine), haematological, morphological (relative organ weight of spleen and lung) and histopathological (nasal mucosa and spleen) parameters. In conclusion, TAPP-CZ showed anti-allergic efficacy in animal model of AR. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. THIOL ANTIOXIDANTS INHIBIT THE ADJUVANT EFFECTS OF AEROSOLIZED DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES IN A MURINE MODEL FOR OVALBUMIN SENSITIZATION. (R827352C008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  17. Health Impact of Retinoic Acid (ATRA) on Ovalbumin-Sensitized F344 Rat Lung and Improvement of Tissue Pathology by Citral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Ibrahim O; Holt-Gray, Carlene; Cameron, Joseph A; Tucci, Michelle; Cason, Zelma; Benghuzzi, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    The health impact of retinoic acid (All Trans Retinoic Acid; ATRA) in the development of lung pathology and tissue remodeling has not been well established in the literature. Equally, the role of Citral (inhibitor of retinoid function) in the improvement of lung pathology has not been ascertained in vivo. Therefore, it is hypothesized that ATRA and Ovalbumin (Egg albumin; OVA) exposure will sensitize lung tissues leading to lung tissue pathology and that citrals (C1 and C2) will reverse or ameliorate the related pathological damage to lung tissues. The study used an IACUC approved between-subject in vivo randomized split plot factorial design (F344 rat model; N=35). Animals were sensitized to OVA and then exposed to six different treatments; negative control (-ve), ATRA, Citrals (C1 and C2) and their triple combinations (OVA+ ATRA + C1, OVA+ ATRA + C2), by intra-peritoneal route. Rat weight data and blood were collected on Days 1 and 21, all animals were sacrificed on day 21, and lung tissues were processed for histopathology. Results from rat weights and blood (ANOVA and Duncan) as well as from the histopathological analysis of exposing the F344 rats to OVA in combinations with ATRA and citrals, revealed various levels of lung tissue damage that was impacted by exposure to citral. We conclude that OVA+ATRA+C1 combination treatment did improve lung pathology as compared to single individual treatments. However, the OVA+ATRA+C2 combination not only failed to improve these parameters, but even worsened the lung pathology of this model. This promising study showed variable responses on the interaction of Ovalbumin, citrals, and ATRA as related to their damage/improvement of related lung tissue pathologies.

  18. Immune-mediated effects upon oral challenge of ovalbumin-sensitized Brown Norway rats: Further characterization of a rat food allergy model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, L.M.J.; Penninks, A.H.; Smit, J.J.; Houben, G.F.

    1999-01-01

    Although several in vivo antigenicity assays using parenteral immunization are operational, no full validated enteral models are available to study food allergy and allergenicity of food proteins. To further validate a developed enteral Brown Norway (BN) rat food allergy model, systemic and local

  19. An Alternative to Thought Suppression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boice, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Setting free the bears: Escape from thought suppression," by D. M. Wegner (see record 2011-25622-008). While Wegner supposed that we might have to learn to live with bad thoughts, the present author discusses the use of imagination and guided imagery as an alternative to forced thought suppression.

  20. [Changes in small airway function in rhinitis without asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Junfeng; Wang, Qiuping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Zhiyi; Shi, Xu; Guan, Weijie; Wu, Kunmin; Xu, Li; Chen, Wei; Xue, Fei; Jiang, Manjie; Cheng, You; Wang, Tianyou; Zhong, Nanshan

    2015-11-01

    Observe the changes of small airway function in patients with rhinitis but without asthma and/or lower airway symptoms. Between June 2008 and December 2012, we recruited 903 subjects, including 377 with allergic rhinitis (AR), 262 with non-allergic rhinitis (NAR) and 264 healthy subjects. All subjects underwent meticulous history taking, nasal examination, allergen skin prick test, blood routine test, serum total immunoglobin E assay, pulmonary ventilation function test and bronchial challenge test. The indices of FEV1/FVC%, MEF25pred% and MMEFpred% were lower in AR group than in the control group (P rhinitis group and the control group (P > 0.05). The positive rate of airway hyperresponsiveness(AHR) in AR group and in NAR group was 12.2%, 6.1% respectively. Indices of small airway function were all lower in the AHR group than NAHR group in rhinitis. Compared with healthy controls, small airway function in patients with rhinitis has apparent changes, part of rhinitis patients has AHR, and is associated with small airway function changes.

  1. A passive quantitative measurement of airway resistance using depth data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadabbas, Sarah; Bulach, Christoph; Ku, David N; Anderson, Larry J; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    The Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the most common cause of serious lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children. RSV often causes increased airway resistance, clinically detected as wheezing by chest auscultation. In this disease, expiratory flows are significantly reduced due to the high resistance in patient's airway passages. A quantitative method for measuring resistance can have a great benefit to diagnosis and management of children with RSV infections as well as with other lung diseases. Airway resistance is defined as the lung pressure divided by the airflow. In this paper, we propose a method to quantify resistance through a simple, non-contact measurement of chest volume that can act as a surrogate measure of the lung pressure and volumetric airflow. We used depth data collected by a Microsoft Kinect camera for the measurement of the lung volume over time. In our experimentation, breathing through a number of plastic straws induced different airway resistances. For a standard spirometry test, our volume/flow estimation using Kinect showed strong correlation with the flow data collected by a commercially-available spirometer (five subjects, each performing 20 breathing trials, correlation coefficient = 0.88, with 95% confidence interval). As the number of straws decreased, emulating a higher airway obstruction, our algorithm was sufficient to distinguish between several levels of airway resistance.

  2. Temporal dynamics of recurrent airway symptoms and cellular random walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suki, Béla; Frey, Urs

    2003-11-01

    Asthma is a complex chronic inflammatory disease of the small airways that has dramatically increased in prevalence in industrialized countries during the last decades. Risk factors for adult asthma have been related to the complex array of gene-environment interactions and exposure of the immune system to allergens in early childhood. In genetically predisposed subjects, continuous exposure to environmental agents such as allergens or infections can lead to recurrent airway symptoms characterized by recurrent episodes of airway inflammation and bronchoconstriction with clinical symptoms of cough, dyspnea, or wheezing. In this study, we report that the longterm temporal dynamics of recurrent airway symptoms in a population of unselected infants display a complex intermittent pattern and that the distribution of interepisode intervals follows a power law. We interpret the data by using a model of the dynamics of attack episodes in which an attack is triggered by an avalanche of airway constrictions. We map the dynamics of this model to the known problem of a random walk in the presence of an absorbing boundary in which the walker corresponds to the fluctuations in contractile state of airway smooth muscle cells. These findings may provide new insight into the mechanisms of otherwise unexplained symptom episodes.

  3. Computational fluid dynamics evaluation of excessive dynamic airway collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherian, Shahab; Rahai, Hamid; Gomez, Bernardo; Waddington, Thomas; Mazdisnian, Farhad

    2017-12-01

    Excessive dynamic airway collapse, which is often caused by the collapse of the posterior membrane wall during exhalation, is often misdiagnosed with other diseases; stents can provide support for the collapsing airways. The standard pulmonary function tests do not necessarily show change in functional breathing condition for evaluation of these type of diseases. Flow characteristics through a patient's airways with excessive dynamic airway collapse have been numerically investigated. A stent was placed to support the collapsing airway and to improve breathing conditions. Computed tomography images of the patient's pre- and post-stenting were used for generating 3-Dimensional models of the airways, and were imported into a computational fluid dynamics software for simulation of realistic air flow behavior. Unsteady simulations of the inspiratory phase and expiratory phase were performed with patient-specific boundary conditions for pre- and post-intervention cases to investigate the effect of stent placement on flow characteristic and possible improvements. Results of post-stent condition show reduced pressure, velocity magnitude and wall shear stress during expiration. The variation in wall shear stress, velocity magnitude and pressure drop is negligible during inspiration. Although Spirometry tests do not show significant improvements, computational fluid dynamics results show significant improvements in pre- and post-treatment results, suggesting improvement in breathing condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Airway management for intubation in newborns with Pierre Robin sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Alexander P; Lander, Timothy A; Tibesar, Robert J; Sidman, James D

    2012-06-01

    To review airway management in Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) newborns undergoing general anesthesia and to determine if endotracheal intubation is safe in this population. Case series and retrospective chart review at a tertiary children's hospital. PRS newborns who underwent endotracheal intubation or other airway intervention before 3 months of age between January 2000 and July 2011 were identified from a pediatric otolaryngology practice database. Indications for airway intervention, anesthetic management, method of intubation, and comorbid conditions were collected. Thirty-three PRS newborns were identified. Twenty had isolated PRS, and 13 had PRS related to a coexisting syndrome. Thirteen of 35 (37%) endotracheal intubations performed in PRS newborns prior to mandibular distraction osteogenesis were accomplished with direct laryngoscopy. The remaining 22 of 35 (63%) who failed intubation with direct laryngoscopy were intubated over a flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope. No significant difference was observed between the isolated and syndromic PRS newborns with regard to technique utilized for intubation. No patient required rescue laryngeal mask airway or emergent tracheotomy, and no case resulted in death. This series demonstrates that endotracheal intubation is safe and effective in PRS newborns. In patients who failed intubation with direct laryngoscopy, intubation over a flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope provided a reliable alternative method. Although airway management in PRS newborns poses a significant challenge, experienced otolaryngologists and anesthesiologists can successfully manage these difficult airway cases. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. L-arginine supplementation and experimental airway hyperreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosova, M; Strapkova, A

    2013-01-01

    The interest in L-arginine metabolism was triggered primarily by the discovery of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in mammals and its remarkable biological roles. The real role of L-arginine in the airway hyperreactivity (AHR) has not been established yet. Therefore, we studied whether supplementation of L-arginine can influence the experimental AHR evoked by two different triggers - allergen and exogenous irritant (toluene vapours). Male TRIK strain guinea pigs were used in the study. We used two patterns of pretreatment with L-arginine in vivo, short- and long-term, in a dose of 300 mg/kg administered i.p., after which we studied reactivity of airway smooth muscles in vitro. Pretreatment with L-arginine for 3 days decreased the airway smooth muscle reactivity induced by toluene vapour, whereas pretreatment for 17 days was without any additional effect on smooth muscle reactivity. The short-term pretreatment in ovalbumin-induced hyperreactivity caused an increase in airway smooth muscle reactivity to lower concentrations of both bronchoconstrictors. On the other side, this pretreatment significantly decreased smooth muscle reactivity to high concentrations of both bronchoconstrictors. Supplementation of L-arginine resulted in a modification of the airway smooth muscle response. The effect of supplementation was different depending on the AHR trigger, airway region and pretreatment duration. The results also underscore the importance of an optimal L-arginine level for the control of bronchial tone.

  6. Reinforced laryngeal mask airway compared with endotracheal tube for adenotonsillectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doksrød, Simen; Løfgren, Brith; Nordhammer, Anita; Svendsen, Martin V; Gisselsson, Lars; Raeder, Johan

    2010-11-01

    The endotracheal tube (ETT) has traditionally been considered the best airway device during adenotonsillectomy because a well protected and secured airway is provided. This has been challenged by the introduction of the reinforced laryngeal mask airway (RLMA). It does not kink, is less traumatic during insertion and better tolerated during emergence. The purpose of this study was to compare the use of the RLMA with ETT with regards to postoperative pain, nausea, vomiting and perioperative efficacy in a series of children due for adenotonsillectomy. One hundred and thirty-four children, aged 3-16 years and scheduled for ambulatory adenotonsillectomies, were randomly assigned to two groups where the airways were secured with either the ETT (n = 62) or the RLMA (n = 69). We registered the incidence of peroperative and postoperative anaesthesiological complications and time consume, in addition to postoperative pain, nausea and overall satisfaction. The Group RLMA scored significantly lower for maximal pain during the first 4 h postoperatively (P = 0.015). There were no significant differences in pain scores at 24 h or rescue pain medication postoperatively. The Group RLMA spent mean 4.2 min less in the operating room after surgery (P = 0.001). There were no significant differences in postoperative nausea. In those patients finally treated with ETT, including five conversions from RLMA, significantly more patients (10 vs. 2) had airway irritations (P children, with beneficial effects on airway irritations, operating room efficiency and early postoperative pain.

  7. Wogonin Induces Eosinophil Apoptosis and Attenuates Allergic Airway Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorward, David A.; Sharma, Sidharth; Rennie, Jillian; Felton, Jennifer M.; Alessandri, Ana L.; Duffin, Rodger; Schwarze, Jurgen; Haslett, Christopher; Rossi, Adriano G.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Eosinophils are key effector cells in allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, eczema, and asthma. Their tissue presence is regulated by both recruitment and increased longevity at inflamed sites. Objectives: To investigate the ability of the flavone wogonin to induce eosinophil apoptosis in vitro and attenuate eosinophil-dominant allergic inflammation in vivo in mice. Methods: Human and mouse eosinophil apoptosis in response to wogonin was investigated by cellular morphology, flow cytometry, mitochondrial membrane permeability, and pharmacological caspase inhibition. Allergic lung inflammation was modeled in mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue were examined for inflammation, mucus production, and inflammatory mediator production. Airway hyperresponsiveness to aerosolized methacholine was measured. Measurements and Main Results: Wogonin induced time- and concentration-dependent human and mouse eosinophil apoptosis in vitro. Wogonin-induced eosinophil apoptosis occurred with activation of caspase-3 and was inhibited by pharmacological caspase inhibition. Wogonin administration attenuated allergic airway inflammation in vivo with reductions in BAL and interstitial eosinophil numbers, increased eosinophil apoptosis, reduced airway mucus production, and attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness. This wogonin-induced reduction in allergic airway inflammation was prevented by concurrent caspase inhibition in vivo. Conclusions: Wogonin induces eosinophil apoptosis and attenuates allergic airway inflammation, suggesting that it has therapeutic potential for the treatment of allergic inflammation in humans. PMID:25629436

  8. Models to study airway smooth muscle contraction in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro : Implications in understanding asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, David; Sharma, Pawan; Ryu, Min-Hyung; Risse, Paul-Andre; Ngo, Melanie; Maarsingh, Harm; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Jha, Aruni; Halayko, Andrew J.; West, Adrian R.

    Asthma is a chronic obstructive airway disease characterised by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway wall remodelling. The effector of airway narrowing is the contraction of airway smooth muscle (ASM), yet the question of whether an inherent or acquired dysfunction in ASM contractile function

  9. Airway branching morphogenesis in three dimensional culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudjonsson Thorarinn

    2010-11-01

    form branching bronchioalveolar-like structures in 3-D culture. This novel model of human airway morphogenesis can be used to study critical events in human lung development and suggests a supportive role for the endothelium in promoting branching of airway epithelium.

  10. Prevention of Asthma Exacerbation in a Mouse Model by Simultaneous Inhibition of NF-κB and STAT6 Activation Using a Chimeric Decoy Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Miyake

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Transactivation of inflammatory and immune mediators in asthma is tightly regulated by nuclear factor κB (NF-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of simultaneous inhibition of NF-κB and STAT6 using a chimeric decoy strategy to prevent asthma exacerbation. The effects of decoy oligodeoxynucleotides were evaluated using an ovalbumin-induced mouse asthma model. Ovalbumin-sensitized mice received intratracheal administration of decoy oligodeoxynucleotides 3 days before ovalbumin challenge. Fluorescent-dye-labeled decoy oligodeoxynucleotides could be detected in lymphocytes and macrophages in the lung, and activation of NF-κB and STAT6 was inhibited by chimeric decoy oligodeoxynucleotide transfer. Consequently, treatment with chimeric or NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides protected against methacholine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, whereas the effect of chimeric decoy oligodeoxynucleotides was significantly greater than that of NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides. Treatment with chimeric decoy oligodeoxynucleotides suppressed airway inflammation through inhibition of overexpression of interleukin-4 (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 and inflammatory infiltrates. Histamine levels in the lung were reduced via suppression of mast cell accumulation. A significant reduction in mucin secretion was observed due to suppression of MUC5AC gene expression. Interestingly, the inhibitory effects on IL-5, IL-13, and histamine secretion were achieved by transfer of chimeric decoy oligodeoxynucleotides only. This novel therapeutic approach could be useful to treat patients with various types of asthma.

  11. Alternaria induces STAT-6 dependent acute airway eosinophila and epithelial FIZZ1 expression that promotes airway fibrosis and epithelial thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Taylor A.; Khorram, Naseem; Sugimoto, Kotaro; Sheppard, Dean; Rosenthal, Peter; Youn Cho, Jae; Pham, Alexa; Miller, Marina; Croft, Michael; Broide, David H.

    2012-01-01

    The fungal allergen, Alternaria, is specifically associated with severe asthma, including life-threatening exacerbations. To better understand the acute innate airway response to Alternaria, naïve WT mice were challenged once intranasally with Alternaria. Naïve WT mice developed significant BAL eosinophila following Alternaria challenge when analyzed 24 hours later. In contrast to Alternaria, neither Aspergillus nor Candida induced BAL eosinophilia. Gene microarray analysis of airway epithelial cell brushings demonstrated that Alternaria-challenged naïve WT mice had an over 20 fold increase level of expression of “Found in Inflammatory Zone 1” (FIZZ1/Retnla), a resistin-like molecule. Lung immunostaining confirmed strong airway epithelial FIZZ1 expression present as early as 3 hours after a single Alternaria challenge that persisted for at least 5 days and was significantly reduced in STAT6-deficient, but not PAR-2-deficient mice. Bone marrow chimera studies revealed that STAT6 expressed in lung cells was required for epithelial FIZZ1 expression, while in contrast, STAT6 present in bone marrow derived cells contributed to airway eosinophilia. Studies investigating which cells in the non-challenged lung bind FIZZ1 demonstrated that CD45+CD11c+ (macrophages and dendritic cells) as well as collagen-1 producing CD45 negative cells (fibroblasts) can bind to FIZZ1. Importantly, direct administration of recombinant FIZZ1 to naïve WT mice led to airway eosinophilia, peribronchial fibrosis, and increased thickness of the airway epithelium. Thus, Alternaria induces STAT-6 dependent acute airway eosinophila and epithelial FIZZ1 expression that promotes airway fibrosis and epithelial thickness. This may provide some insight into the uniquely pathogenic aspects of Alternaria-associated asthma. PMID:22327070

  12. Role of IRE1α/XBP-1 in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla M. P. Ribeiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF pulmonary disease is characterized by chronic airway infection and inflammation. The infectious and inflamed CF airway environment impacts on the innate defense of airway epithelia and airway macrophages. The CF airway milieu induces an adaptation in these cells characterized by increased basal inflammation and a robust inflammatory response to inflammatory mediators. Recent studies have indicated that these responses depend on activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR. This review discusses the contribution of airway epithelia and airway macrophages to CF airway inflammatory responses and specifically highlights the functional importance of the UPR pathway mediated by IRE1/XBP-1 in these processes. These findings suggest that targeting the IRE1/XBP-1 UPR pathway may be a therapeutic strategy for CF airway disease.

  13. Computational Flow Modeling of Human Upper Airway Breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylavarapu, Goutham

    Computational modeling of biological systems have gained a lot of interest in biomedical research, in the recent past. This thesis focuses on the application of computational simulations to study airflow dynamics in human upper respiratory tract. With advancements in medical imaging, patient specific geometries of anatomically accurate respiratory tracts can now be reconstructed from Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) or Computed Tomography (CT) scans, with better and accurate details than traditional cadaver cast models. Computational studies using these individualized geometrical models have advantages of non-invasiveness, ease, minimum patient interaction, improved accuracy over experimental and clinical studies. Numerical simulations can provide detailed flow fields including velocities, flow rates, airway wall pressure, shear stresses, turbulence in an airway. Interpretation of these physical quantities will enable to develop efficient treatment procedures, medical devices, targeted drug delivery etc. The hypothesis for this research is that computational modeling can predict the outcomes of a surgical intervention or a treatment plan prior to its application and will guide the physician in providing better treatment to the patients. In the current work, three different computational approaches Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Flow-Structure Interaction (FSI) and Particle Flow simulations were used to investigate flow in airway geometries. CFD approach assumes airway wall as rigid, and relatively easy to simulate, compared to the more challenging FSI approach, where interactions of airway wall deformations with flow are also accounted. The CFD methodology using different turbulence models is validated against experimental measurements in an airway phantom. Two case-studies using CFD, to quantify a pre and post-operative airway and another, to perform virtual surgery to determine the best possible surgery in a constricted airway is demonstrated. The unsteady

  14. Prehospital airway management: A prospective case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbers, N E R; Hamaekers, A E W; Jansen, J; Wijering, S C; Thomas, O; Wilbers-van Rens, R; van Zundert, A A J

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a one-year prospective study involving a prehospital Emergency Medical Service in the Netherlands to investigate the incidence of failed or difficult prehospital endotracheal intubation. During the study period the paramedics were asked to fill in a registration questionnaire after every endotracheal intubation. Of the 26,271 patient contacts, 256 endotracheal intubations were performed by paramedics in one year. Endotracheal intubation failed in 12 patients (4.8%). In 12.0% of 249 patients, a Cormack and Lehane grade III laryngoscopy was reported and a grade IV laryngoscopy was reported in 10.4%. The average number of endotracheal intubations per paramedic in one year was 4.2 and varied from zero to a maximum of 12. The median time between arrival on the scene and a positive capnograph was 7 min.38 s in the case of a Cormack and Lehane grade I laryngoscopy and 14 min.58 s in the case of a Cormack and Lehane grade 4 laryngoscopy. The incidence of endotracheal intubations performed by Dutch paramedics in one year was low, but endotracheal intubation was successful in 95.2%, which is comparable with findings in international literature. Early capnography should be used consistently in prehospital airway management.

  15. A randomized comparison of the laryngeal mask airway supreme™ and laryngeal mask airway unique™ in infants and children: does cuff pressure influence leak pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Narasimhan; Sohn, Lisa; Sommers, Katherine; Belvis, Dawn; Shah, Ravi D; Sawardekar, Amod; Eidem, Jami; Dagraca, Justin; Mukherji, Isabella

    2013-10-01

    The cuff pressure for optimal airway sealing with first-generation laryngeal mask airway has been shown to be 40 cm H(2)O in children. Currently, there are no data regarding the ideal intracuff pressure for the laryngeal mask airway Supreme (Supreme) in children. To compare the clinical performance of the laryngeal mask airway supreme with the laryngeal mask airway unique in infants and children. One hundred eighty children were assigned to receive either a Supreme or a laryngeal mask airway-U. We hypothesized higher airway leak pressure with the Supreme at both 40 cm H(2)O and 60 cm H(2)O, when compared with the laryngeal mask airway-U. Ease and time of insertion, insertion attempts, fiber optic examination, quality of airway, efficacy of mechanical ventilation, success of gastric tube placement (Supreme), incidence of gastric insufflation, and complications were also assessed. Airway leak pressure at an intracuff pressure of 60 cm H(2)O for the Supreme was 17.4 (5.2) vs laryngeal mask airway-U at 18.4 (6.6) cm H(2)O and did not differ when compared to an intracuff pressure of 40 cm H(2)O for both devices; Supreme at 17.2 (5) vs laryngeal mask airway-U at 17.7 (6) cm H(2)O. The laryngeal mask airway-U was associated with higher first-attempt success rates. The Supreme was associated with less gastric insufflation than the laryngeal mask airway-U. Intracuff pressures of 40 cm H(2)O may be sufficient for the Supreme in children, and there may be no added benefit of an intracuff pressure of 60 cm H(2)O, as leak pressures were similar. The Supreme may be preferred over the laryngeal mask airway-U for its lower rates of gastric insufflation and provision for gastric access when mechanical ventilation is utilized. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Response of Differentiated Human Airway Epithelia to Alcohol Exposure and Klebsiella pneumoniae Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammeta V. Raju

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse has been associated with increased susceptibility to pulmonary infection. It is not fully defined how alcohol contributes to the host defense compromise. Here primary human airway epithelial cells were cultured at an air-liquid interface to form a differentiated and polarized epithelium. This unique culture model allowed us to closely mimic lung infection in the context of alcohol abuse by basolateral alcohol exposure and apical live bacterial challenge. Application of clinically relevant concentrations of alcohol for 24 h did not significantly alter epithelial integrity or barrier function. When apically challenged with viable Klebsiella pneumoniae, the cultured epithelia had an enhanced tightness which was unaffected by alcohol. Further, alcohol enhanced apical bacterial growth, but not bacterial binding to the cells. The cultured epithelium in the absence of any treatment or stimulation had a base-level IL-6 and IL-8 secretion. Apical bacterial challenge significantly elevated the basolateral secretion of inflammatory cytokines including IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and TNF-α. However, alcohol suppressed the observed cytokine burst in response to infection. Addition of adenosine receptor agonists negated the suppression of IL-6 and TNF-α. Thus, acute alcohol alters the epithelial cytokine response to infection, which can be partially mitigated by adenosine receptor agonists.

  17. TRIM37 inhibits PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying; Li, Ying; Cheng, Ruiduo; Gao, Jie; Li, Yanyang; Lou, Chunyan

    2018-02-21

    Tripartite motif 37 (TRIM37) belongs to the TRIM family of proteins and has been reported to be involved in the progression of asthma. However, the effects of TRIM37 on airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) proliferation and migration are still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of TRIM37 on cell proliferation and migration in platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-stimulated ASMCs, and the potential molecular mechanisms was also explored. Our data demonstrated that the expression of TRIM37 was significantly decreased in ASMCs stimulated with PDGF-BB. In addition, overexpression of TRIM37 efficiently suppressed PDGF-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation and migration. Furthermore, overexpression of TRIM37 obviously inhibited the protein expression levels of β-catenin, c-Myc and cyclinD1 in PDGF-BB-stimulated ASMCs. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway activator LiCl significantly reversed the inhibitory effects of TRIM37 on cell proliferation and migration in PDGF-BB-stimulated ASMCs. Taken together, these results demonstrate that TRIM37 inhibits the proliferation and invasion of ASMCs cultured with PDGF-BB through suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Laryngeal mask airway and bougie intubation failures: the Combitube as a secondary rescue device for in-hospital emergency airway management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mort, Thomas C

    2006-11-01

    When conventional intubation methods fail, an accessory rescue airway device must be immediately available and rapidly deployed to assist the clinician in managing the airway. I reviewed an emergency intubation database to determine what airway devices were used as a backup to rescue the primary rescue device failures. The bougie and the laryngeal mask airway each have an intrinsic failure rate. The Combitube(R), commonly used in the emergency prehospital setting, appeared to be a useful secondary rescue device in the hospital setting when the bougie and laryngeal mask airway failed.

  19. Menstrual suppression in the adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantartzis, Kelly L; Sucato, Gina S

    2013-06-01

    Menstrual suppression, the use of contraceptive methods to eliminate or decrease the frequency of menses, is often prescribed for adolescents to treat menstrual disorders or to accommodate patient preference. For young women using hormonal contraceptives, there is no medical indication for menstruation to occur monthly, and various hormonal contraceptives can be used to decrease the frequency of menstruation with different side effect profiles and rates of amenorrhea. This article reviews the different modalities for menstrual suppression, common conditions in adolescents which may improve with menstrual suppression, and strategies for managing common side effects. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Integrin-blocking Peptide RGDS Inhibits Airway Smooth Muscle Remodeling in a Guinea Pig Model of Allergic Asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, Bart G. J.; Bos, I. Sophie T.; Gosens, Reinoud; Halayko, Andrew J.; Zaagsma, Johan; Meurs, Herman

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Airway remodeling, including increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and contractility, contributes to airway hyper-responsiveness in asthma. The mechanisms driving these changes are, however, incompletely understood. Recently, an important role for extracellular matrix proteins in

  1. Comparison of airway diameter measurements from an anthropomorphic airway tree phantom using hyperpolarized 3He MRI and high-resolution computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yang-Sheng; Hoffman, Eric; Cook-Granroth, Janice; Maurer, Rie; Shah, Niral; Mansour, Joey; Tschirren, Juerg; Albert, Mitchell

    2007-09-01

    An anthropomorphic airway tree phantom was imaged with both hyperpolarized (HP) 3He MRI using a dynamic projection scan and computed tomography (CT). Airway diameter measurements from the HP 3He MR images obtained using a newly developed model-based algorithm were compared against their corresponding CT values quantified with a well-established method. Of the 45 airway segments that could be evaluated with CT, only 14 airway segments (31%) could be evaluated using HP 3He MRI. No airway segments smaller than approximately 4 mm in diameter and distal to the fourth generation were adequate for analysis in MRI. For the 14 airway segments measured, only two airway segments yielded a non-equivalent comparison between the two imaging modalities, while eight more had inconclusive comparison results, leaving only four airway segments (29%) that satisfied the designed equivalence criteria. Some of the potential problems in airway diameter quantification described in the formulation of the model-based algorithm were observed in this study. These results suggest that dynamic projection HP 3He MRI may have limited utility for measuring airway segment diameters, particularly those of the central airways. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Reversible control by vitamin D of granulocytes and bacteria in the lungs of mice: an ovalbumin-induced model of allergic airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Shelley; Weeden, Clare E; Tan, Daryl H W; Scott, Naomi M; Hart, Julie; Foong, Rachel E; Mok, Danny; Stephens, Nahiid; Zosky, Graeme; Hart, Prue H

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D may be essential for restricting the development and severity of allergic diseases and asthma, but a direct causal link between vitamin D deficiency and asthma has yet to be established. We have developed a 'low dose' model of allergic airway disease induced by intraperitoneal injection with ovalbumin (1 µg) and aluminium hydroxide (0.2 mg) in which characteristics of atopic asthma are recapitulated, including airway hyperresponsiveness, antigen-specific immunoglobulin type-E and lung inflammation. We assessed the effects of vitamin D deficiency throughout life (from conception until adulthood) on the severity of ovalbumin-induced allergic airway disease in vitamin D-replete and -deficient BALB/c mice using this model. Vitamin D had protective effects such that deficiency significantly enhanced eosinophil and neutrophil numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of male but not female mice. Vitamin D also suppressed the proliferation and T helper cell type-2 cytokine-secreting capacity of airway-draining lymph node cells from both male and female mice. Supplementation of initially vitamin D-deficient mice with vitamin D for four weeks returned serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D to levels observed in initially vitamin D-replete mice, and also suppressed eosinophil and neutrophil numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of male mice. Using generic 16 S rRNA primers, increased bacterial levels were detected in the lungs of initially vitamin D-deficient male mice, which were also reduced by vitamin D supplementation. These results indicate that vitamin D controls granulocyte levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in an allergen-sensitive manner, and may contribute towards the severity of asthma in a gender-specific fashion through regulation of respiratory bacteria.

  3. Compton suppression gamma ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsberger, S.; Iskander, F.Y.; Niset, M.; Heydorn, K.

    2002-01-01

    In the past decade there have been many studies to use Compton suppression methods in routine neutron activation analysis as well as in the traditional role of low level gamma ray counting of environmental samples. On a separate path there have been many new PC based software packages that have been developed to enhance photopeak fitting. Although the newer PC based algorithms have had significant improvements, they still suffer from being effectively used in weak gamma ray lines in natural samples or in neutron activated samples that have very high Compton backgrounds. We have completed a series of experiments to show the usefulness of Compton suppression. As well we have shown the pitfalls when using Compton suppression methods for high counting deadtimes as in the case of neutron activated samples. We have also investigated if counting statistics are the same both suppressed and normal modes. Results are presented in four separate experiments. (author)

  4. Diagnosis of bronchiectasis and airway wall thickening in children with cystic fibrosis. Objective airway-artery quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Wieying; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Erasmus MC - Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bruijne, Marleen de [Erasmus MC, Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Medical Informatics and Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University of Copenhagen, Department of Computer Science, Copenhagen (Denmark); Petersen, Jens [University of Copenhagen, Department of Computer Science, Copenhagen (Denmark); Nasserinejad, Kazem [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, HOVON Data Center, Clinical Trial Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Department of Biostatistics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Ozturk, Hadiye [Erasmus MC - Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Chen, Yong [General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University, Department of Radiology, Yinchuan (China); Perez-Rovira, Adria [Erasmus MC - Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Medical Informatics and Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-11-15

    To quantify airway and artery (AA)-dimensions in cystic fibrosis (CF) and control patients for objective CT diagnosis of bronchiectasis and airway wall thickness (AWT). Spirometer-guided inspiratory and expiratory CTs of 11 CF and 12 control patients were collected retrospectively. Airway pathways were annotated semi-automatically to reconstruct three-dimensional bronchial trees. All visible AA-pairs were measured perpendicular to the airway axis. Inner, outer and AWT (outer-inner) diameter were divided by the adjacent artery diameter to compute A{sub in}A-, A{sub out}A- and A{sub WT}A-ratios. AA-ratios were predicted using mixed-effects models including disease status, lung volume, gender, height and age as covariates. Demographics did not differ significantly between cohorts. Mean AA-pairs CF: 299 inspiratory; 82 expiratory. Controls: 131 inspiratory; 58 expiratory. All ratios were significantly larger in inspiratory compared to expiratory CTs for both groups (p<0.001). A{sub out}A- and A{sub WT}A-ratios were larger in CF than in controls, independent of lung volume (p<0.01). Difference of A{sub out}A- and A{sub WT}A-ratios between patients with CF and controls increased significantly for every following airway generation (p<0.001). Diagnosis of bronchiectasis is highly dependent on lung volume and more reliably diagnosed using outer airway diameter. Difference in bronchiectasis and AWT severity between the two cohorts increased with each airway generation. (orig.)

  5. Thyroid suppression test with dextrothyroxine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, D.; Fridman, J.; Ribeiro, H.B.

    1978-01-01

    The classic thyroid suppression test with triiodothyronine (l-T 3 ) has been shown to be efficient as an auxiliary method in the diagnosis of thyroid diseases, but should not be performed on elderly patients or on those with heart disease or a tendency to tachycardia. Since these subjects seem able to support a short period of dextro-thyronine (d-T 4 ) feeding, we compared the effect of d-T 4 and l-T 3 on the 24 hours thyroid uptake in euthyroid and hyperthyroid subjects. After basal radio-iodine uptake determination, 99 patients without hyperthyroidism and 27 with Graves' disease were randomly divided in 2 groups; one received 100μg of l-T 3 per day and the other 4 mg of d-T 4 per day, both groups being treated for a period of 10 days. At the end of this suppression period the 24 hours radio-iodine uptake was measured again and the percentual suppression index (S.I.) calculated. Since the comparison of the two groups showed no difference between the suppressive effect of l-T 3 and d-T 4 in euthyroid subjects, while dextro-thyronine, as levo-triiodothyronine, did not suppress the 24 hours uptake of hyperthyroid patients, l-T 3 or d-T 4 can be used interchangeably to test thyroid suppressibility. In the euthyroid subjects the normal range for the post-suppression uptake was 0-17.1% and for the suppression index 54,7.100% [pt

  6. In vivo Treg suppression assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Creg J; Collison, Lauren W; Bettini, Maria; Pillai, Meenu R; Rehg, Jerold E; Vignali, Dario A A

    2011-01-01

    To fully examine the functionality of a regulatory T cell (T(reg)) population, one needs to assess their ability to suppress in a variety of in vivo models. We describe five in vivo models that examine the suppressive capacity of T(regs) upon different target cell types. The advantages and disadvantages of each model including resources, time, and technical expertise required to execute each model are also described.

  7. In Vivo Treg Suppression Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Workman, Creg J.; Collison, Lauren W.; Bettini, Maria; Pillai, Meenu R.; Rehg, Jerold E.; Vignali, Dario A.A.

    2011-01-01

    To fully examine the functionality of a regulatory T cell (Treg) population, one needs to assess their ability to suppress in a variety of in vivo models. We describe five in vivo models that examine the suppressive capacity of Tregs upon different target cell types. The advantages and disadvantages of each model includ ing resources, time, and technical expertise required to execute each model are also described.

  8. Secondhand smoke exposure induces acutely airway acidification and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostikas, Konstantinos; Minas, Markos; Nikolaou, Eftychia; Papaioannou, Andriana I; Liakos, Panagiotis; Gougoura, Sofia; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Dinas, Petros C; Metsios, Giorgos S; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Flouris, Andreas D; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2013-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that secondhand smoke induces lung function impairment and increases proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the acute effects of secondhand smoke on airway acidification and airway oxidative stress in never-smokers. In a randomized controlled cross-over trial, 18 young healthy never-smokers were assessed at baseline and 0, 30, 60, 120, 180 and 240 min after one-hour secondhand smoke exposure at bar/restaurant levels. Exhaled NO and CO measurements, exhaled breath condensate collection (for pH, H(2)O(2) and NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) measurements) and spirometry were performed at all time-points. Secondhand smoke exposure induced increases in serum cotinine and exhaled CO that persisted until 240 min. Exhaled breath condensate pH decreased immediately after exposure (p secondhand smoke induced airway acidification and increased airway oxidative stress, accompanied by significant impairment of lung function. Despite the reversal in EBC pH and lung function, airway oxidative stress remained increased 4 h after the exposure. Clinical trial registration number (EudraCT): 2009-013545-28. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Registry of emergency airways arriving at combat hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bruce D; Cuniowski, Peter A; Muck, Andrew; De Lorenzo, Robert A

    2008-06-01

    Prehospital Emergency Medical Services have demonstrated variable success with regards to prehospital airway management in U.S. civilian settings. We attempted to identify the incidence of successful prehospital endotracheal intubations in the modern combat environment. This was a prospective, observational study. Data collection occurred at Combat Support Hospitals (CSH) within Operation Iraqi Freedom locations between January 2005 and March 2007. Military trauma physicians systematically examined casualties presenting to the CSH that received advanced prehospital airway management. Correct endotracheal tube (ETT) positioning was verified using an explicit combination of clinical findings and colorimetric end-tidal carbon dioxide detection. The primary outcome was correct placement of the ETTs by combat prehospital providers. A total of 6,875 combat casualties presented to participating CSHs during the study period, of which there were 293 (4.2%) advanced prehospital airways, of which 282 (97.3%) were trauma patients. Prehospital airway management included: 253 endotracheal intubations (86.6%); 23 supraglottic airways (7.5%), and 17 cricothyrotomies (5.8%). Of the ETTs, upon arrival to the CSH, 242 (95.7%) were determined to be correctly placed. There were 11 incorrectly placed ETTs: 10 were in the right mainstem bronchus, and 1 was found to be dislodged in the hypopharynx. There were no unrecognized battlefield esophageal intubations. Under combat conditions, the overall rate of correctly placed ETTs performed by military prehospital providers was comparable with that of published U.S. civilian paramedic data.

  10. VIRTUAL 3-D MODELLING OF AIRWAYS IN CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Speggiorin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of the airway is not uncommon in the presence of complex cardiovascular malformations. In these cases, a careful inspection of the relationship between the airway and the vasculature is paramount to plan the surgical procedure. Three-dimentional printing enhanced the visualization of the cardio-vascualr structure. Unfortunately IT does not allow to remove selected anatomy to improve the visualization of the surrounding ones. Computerized modelling (CM of has the potential to fill this gap by allowing a dynamic handling of different anatomies, increasing the exposure of vessels or bronchi to show their relationship.. We started to use this technique to plan the surgical repair in these complex cases where the airway is affected. This technique is routinely used in our Institution as an additional tool in the pre-surgical assessment. We report 4 cases in which the airways were compressed by vascular structures : ascending aorta in 1, left pulmonary artery sling in 1, Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA in 1 and major aorto-pulmonary collateral artery in 1. We believe this technique can enhance the understanding of the causes of airway involvement and facilitate the creation of an appropriate surgical plan.

  11. Virtual 3D Modeling of Airways in Congenital Heart Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speggiorin, Simone; Durairaj, Saravanan; Mimic, Branko; Corno, Antonio F

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of the airway is not uncommon in the presence of complex cardiovascular malformations. In these cases, a careful inspection of the relationship between the airway and the vasculature is paramount to plan the surgical procedure. Three-dimensional printing enhanced the visualization of the cardiovascular structure. Unfortunately, IT does not allow to remove selected anatomy to improve the visualization of the surrounding ones. Computerized modeling has the potential to fill this gap by allowing a dynamic handling of different anatomies, increasing the exposure of vessels or bronchi to show their relationship. We started to use this technique to plan the surgical repair in these complex cases where the airway is affected. This technique is routinely used in our Institution as an additional tool in the presurgical assessment. We report four cases in which the airways were compressed by vascular structures - ascending aorta in one, left pulmonary artery sling in one, patent ductus arteriosus in one, and major aorto-pulmonary collateral artery in one. We believe this technique can enhance the understanding of the causes of airway involvement and facilitate the creation of an appropriate surgical plan.

  12. Assessment of nasopharyngeal airway and adenoid by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Myung Suk; Hur, Gham; Kim, Yong Hoon; Joe, Eun Ok; Lee, Seong Sook [Sanggae Paik Hospital, College of Medicine, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-09-15

    Adenoid is a kind of tonsil located in the posterior wall of nasopharynx. Enlargement of the adenoid can produce obstruction of the nasopharynx and Eustachian tube. Disturbance in discharge of nasal and paranasal secretions can be a cause of chronic rhinitis, sinusitis, and otitis media. Diagnosis of enlarged adenoid simply by inspection is different due to its location. Measurement of nasopharyngeal airway and adenoid using lateral radiographs of nasopharynx may be inaccurate for magnification and rotation. It was some limitations in demonstrating the actual state of nasopharyngeal airway and adenoid because it gives only two dimensional information. The authors measured the size and areas of nasopharyngeal airway and adenoid using MRI with sagittal and oblique coronal pilot views of T1 weighted spin echo. We categorized the patients into 4 groups according to the scoring system by symptoms such as apnea, mouth breathing, and snoring. The results of several measurment and their ratios were evaluated in these 4 categorized patients. The ratios of area of adenoid and nasopharyngeal airway (AA/Na) in each patient group were 6.52, 7.76, 10.53, 15.93, respectively. And the ratios of adenoid and nasopharyngeal airway (A/N) by Fujioka's method were 0.6, 0.65, 0.69, 0.71, respectively. We found that AA/Na might be the most effective index as an objective indicator in the evaluation of nasopharyngeal obstruction by the enlarged adenoid.

  13. [Airway management in Ludwig's angina - a challenge: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellini, Roberto Taboada; Volquind, Daniel; Schnor, Otávio Haygert; Angeletti, Marcelo Gustavo; Souza, Olívia Egger de

    Ludwig's angina (LA) is an infection of the submandibular space, first described by Wilhelm Frederick von Ludwig in 1836. It represents an entity difficult to manage due to the rapid progression and difficulty in maintaining airway patency, a major challenge in medical practice, resulting in asphyxia and death in 8-10% of patients. Describe a case of a patient with Ludwig's angina undergoing surgery, with emphasis on airway management, in addition to reviewing the articles published in the literature on this topic. Male patient, 21 years, drug addict, admitted by the emergency department and diagnosed with LA. Difficult airway was identified during the anesthetic examination. In additional tests, significant deviation from the tracheal axis was seen. Undergoing bilateral thoracoscopic pleural drainage, we opted for airway management through tracheal intubation using fiberoptic bronchoscopy, and balanced general anesthesia was proposed. There were no complications during the surgical-anesthetic act. After the procedure, the patient remained intubated and mechanically ventilated in the intensive care unit. Airway management in patients with Ludwig's angina remains challenging. The choice of the safest technique should be based on clinical signs, technical conditions available, and the urgent need to preserve the patient's life. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Airway management in Ludwig's angina - a challenge: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Taboada Fellini

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ludwig's angina (LA is an infection of the submandibular space, first described by Wilhelm Frederick von Ludwig in 1836. It represents an entity difficult to manage due to the rapid progression and difficulty in maintaining airway patency, a major challenge in medical practice, resulting in asphyxia and death in 8-10% of patients. Objective Describe a case of a patient with Ludwig's angina undergoing surgery, with emphasis on airway management, in addition to reviewing the articles published in the literature on this topic. Case report Male patient, 21 years, drug addict, admitted by the emergency department and diagnosed with LA. Difficult airway was identified during the anesthetic examination. In additional tests, significant deviation from the tracheal axis was seen. Undergoing bilateral thoracoscopic pleural drainage, we opted for airway management through tracheal intubation using fiberoptic bronchoscopy, and balanced general anesthesia was proposed. There were no complications during the surgical-anesthetic act. After the procedure, the patient remained intubated and mechanically ventilated in the intensive care unit. Conclusions Airway management in patients with Ludwig's angina remains challenging. The choice of the safest technique should be based on clinical signs, technical conditions available, and the urgent need to preserve the patient's life.

  15. Flexible CO2 Laser Fiber in the Pediatric Airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly K. Caperton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Our institution has been using a novel flexible laser fiber in pediatric surgical airway procedures, which has been quite successful. The purpose of this paper is to present our preliminary experience in the treatment of pediatric airway lesions using this laser technique. Methods. A case series reviewing 40 patients undergoing 95 laser procedures is reported. Indications included removal of suprastomal granulation tissue, removal of granulation after laryngotracheal reconstruction, subglottic and supraglottic stenoses, recurrent respiratory papillomas, subglottic hemangioma, laryngeal cleft, and left main stem bronchus stenosis. Procedures were performed via microdirect laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy. Results. No complications including postoperative glottic webs, concentric scar formation, or airway fires occurred in any of the patients (after the series was completed, we did experience an airway fire. It was a flash flame that was self-limited and caused no long-term tissue injury. Conclusions. The endoscopic application of a new flexible carbon dioxide laser fiber for management of pediatric airways lesions provides good outcomes in selected patients. Distal respiratory papillomas, subglottic stenosis, and granulation tissue are, in our experience, appropriate indications.

  16. Effects of pentobarbital on upper airway patency during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikermann, M; Eckert, D J; Chamberlin, N L; Jordan, A S; Zaremba, S; Smith, S; Rosow, C; Malhotra, A

    2010-09-01

    We hypothesised that pentobarbital would improve upper airway mechanics based on an increase in latency to arousal and amplitude of the phasic genioglossus electromyogram (EMG), and a decrease in the active upper airway critical closing pressure (P(crit)). 12 healthy subjects received pentobarbital (100 mg) or placebo in a double-blind, crossover protocol. During wakefulness, we measured the genioglossus reflex response to negative pressure pulses. During sleep, carbon dioxide was insufflated into the inspired air. Airway pressure was then decreased in a stepwise fashion until arousal from sleep. With basal breathing during sleep: flow rate was lower in volunteers given pentobarbital; end-tidal CO(2) concentration and upper airway resistance were greater; and P(crit) was unaffected (pentobarbital mean ± SD -11.7 ± 4.5 versus placebo -10.25 ± 3.6 cmH(2)O; p = 0.11). Pentobarbital increased the time to arousal (297 ± 63s versus 232 ± 67 s; ppentobarbital versus placebo. Pentobarbital did not affect the genioglossus negative-pressure reflex. Pentobarbital increases the time to arousal and stimulates genioglossus muscle activity, but it also increases upper airway resistance during sleep.

  17. Measuring airway surface liquid depth in ex vivo mouse airways by x-ray imaging for the assessment of cystic fibrosis airway therapies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaye S Morgan

    Full Text Available In the airways of those with cystic fibrosis (CF, the leading pathophysiological hypothesis is that an ion channel defect results in a relative decrease in airway surface liquid (ASL volume, producing thick and sticky mucus that facilitates the establishment and progression of early fatal lung disease. This hypothesis predicts that any successful CF airway treatment for this fundamental channel defect should increase the ASL volume, but up until now there has been no method of measuring this volume that would be compatible with in vivo monitoring. In order to accurately monitor the volume of the ASL, we have developed a new x-ray phase contrast imaging method that utilizes a highly attenuating reference grid. In this study we used this imaging method to examine the effect of a current clinical CF treatment, aerosolized hypertonic saline, on ASL depth in ex vivo normal mouse tracheas, as the first step towards non-invasive in vivo ASL imaging. The ex vivo tracheas were treated with hypertonic saline, isotonic saline or no treatment using a nebuliser integrated within a small animal ventilator circuit. Those tracheas exposed to hypertonic saline showed a transient increase in the ASL depth, which continued for nine minutes post-treatment, before returning to baseline by twelve minutes. These findings are consistent with existing measurements on epithelial cell cultures, and therefore suggest promise for the future development of in vivo testing of treatments. Our grid-based imaging technique measures the ASL depth with micron resolution, and can directly observe the effect of treatments expected to increase ASL depth, prior to any changes in overall lung health. The ability to non-invasively observe micron changes in the airway surface, particularly if achieved in an in vivo setting, may have potential in pre-clinical research designed to bring new treatments for CF and other airway diseases to clinical trials.

  18. Burst Suppression for ICP Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, Frederick A; Akoth, Eva; Gillman, Lawrence M; West, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The goal of our study was to perform a systematic review of the literature to determine the effect that burst suppression has on intracranial pressure (ICP) control. All articles from MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Scopus, Cochrane Library, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (inception to January 2015), reference lists of relevant articles, and gray literature were searched. The strength of evidence was adjudicated using both the Oxford and the Grading of Recommendation Assessment Development and Education (GRADE) methodology. Seven articles were considered for review. A total of 108 patients were studied, all receiving burst suppression therapy. Two studies failed to document a decrease in ICP with burst suppression therapy. There were reports of severe hypotension and increased infection rates with barbiturate-based therapy. Etomidate-based suppressive therapy was linked to severe renal dysfunction. There currently exists both Oxford level 2b and GRADE C evidence to support that achieving burst suppression reduces ICP, and also has no effect on ICP, in severe traumatic brain injury. The literature suggests burst suppression therapy may be useful for ICP reduction in certain cases, although these situations are currently unclear. In addition, the impact on patient functional outcome is unclear. Further prospective study is warranted.

  19. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoek, Hella Leonie [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  20. GITR signaling potentiates airway hyperresponsiveness by enhancing Th2 cell activity in a mouse model of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Oosterhout Antoon JM

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergic asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR and allergic inflammation of the airways, driven by allergen-specific Th2 cells. The asthma phenotypes and especially AHR are sensitive to the presence and activity of regulatory T (Treg cells in the lung. Glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor (GITR is known to have a co-stimulatory function on effector CD4+ T cells, rendering these cells insensitive to Treg suppression. However, the effects of GITR signaling on polarized Th1 and Th2 cell effector functions are not well-established. We sought to evaluate the effect of GITR signaling on fully differentiated Th1 and Th2 cells and to determine the effects of GITR activation at the time of allergen provocation on AHR and airway inflammation in a Th2-driven mouse model of asthma. Methods CD4+CD25- cells were polarized in vitro into Th1 and Th2 effector cells, and re-stimulated in the presence of GITR agonistic antibodies to assess the effect on IFNγ and IL-4 production. To evaluate the effects of GITR stimulation on AHR and allergic inflammation in a mouse asthma model, BALB/c mice were sensitized to OVA followed by airway challenges in the presence or absence of GITR agonist antibodies. Results GITR engagement potentiated cytokine release from CD3/CD28-stimulated Th2 but not Th1 cells in vitro. In the mouse asthma model, GITR triggering at the time of challenge induced enhanced airway hyperresponsiveness, serum IgE and ex vivo Th2 cytokine release, but did not increase BAL eosinophilia. Conclusion GITR exerts a differential effect on cytokine release of fully differentiated Th1 and Th2 cells in vitro, potentiating Th2 but not Th1 cytokine production. This effect on Th2 effector functions was also observed in vivo in our mouse model of asthma, resulting in enhanced AHR, serum IgE responses and Th2 cytokine production. This is the first report showing the effects of GITR activation on cytokine

  1. Endotracheal intubation in patients with difficult airway: Using laryngeal mask airway with bougie versus video laryngoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesameddin Modir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway management is essential for safe anesthesia and endotracheal intubation is the most important procedure by which critically ill patients can be better managed, especially if done quickly and successfully. This study aimed to compare the techniques of intubation through laryngeal mask airway (LMA using a bougie versus video laryngoscopy (VL regarding to intubation success and the quality of intubation indices in patients with difficult airways. This randomized clinical trial was performed on 96 patients aged 16–76 years with Mallampati class 3 or 4 who underwent elective surgery. Once the demographics were recorded, patients were randomly divided into two groups and the first group intubated with VL, and the second group intubated through laryngeal mask using a bougie. Then vital signs, arterial oxygen saturation, the time required for successful intubation, and ease of intubation were recorded. Here t-tests, chi-square, Fisher exact tests, and analysis of variance for repeated measurement were used to analyze the data in SPSS software. The overall success rates of intubation in VL and LMA groups were 46 (96% and 44 (92%, respectively. The mean duration of intubation for the LMA and VL groups was 18.70 ± 6.73 and 14.21 ± 4.14 seconds, respectively (P < 0.001. Moreover, visual analogue scale score for pain in throat was significantly lower in VL group than LMA (1.65 ± 0.76 vs. 1.33 ± 0.52. Moreover, easy intubation in bougie group was 50%, while the easy intubation in VL was 73% (P = 0.023. In addition, incidence of cough was 31% in the LMA with bougie group and 9% in VL group (P = 0.005. The VL technique is an easier method and has a shorter intubation time than LMA using bougie, and causes a lower incidence of coughing, laryngospasm in patients that need intubation. Moreover, cough and discomfort in the throat tend to be less in VL, and the LMA could be used as replacement of VL in hard situations.

  2. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson KN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen N Johnson,1 Daniel B Botros,1 Leanne Groban,1–4 Yvon F Bryan11Department of Anesthesiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 2Section on Molecular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 3Sticht Center on Aging, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 4Hypertension and Vascular Research Center, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USAAbstract: There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the

  3. The Effects of the Heat and Moisture Exchanger on Humidity, Airway Temperature, and Core Body Temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delventhal, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Findings from several studies have demonstrated that the use of a heat and moisture exchanger increases airway humidity, which in turn increases mean airway temperature and prevents decreases in core body temperature...

  4. A functional role for WNT-5A in driving airway myocyte proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Tim; Kumawat, Kuldeep; Van Den Berge, Maarten; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2013-01-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass is a common pathological feature associated with chronic airway diseases, notably asthma. The mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. The WNT (Wingless/integrase-1) signaling pathway has been implicated in various proliferative diseases, including

  5. Conventional chest physiotherapy compared to other airway clearance techniques for cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Main, Eleanor; Prasad, Ammani; van der Schans, Cees P

    2005-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis is an inherited life-limiting disorder, characterised by pulmonary infections and thick airway secretions. Chest physiotherapy has been integral to clinical management in facilitating removal of airway secretions. Conventional chest physiotherapy techniques (CCPT) have

  6. Effects of Pranlukast Hydrate on Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Non-Asthmatic Patients with Japanese Cedar Pollinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Sagara

    2009-01-01

    Conclusions: The results indicate that pranlukast hydrate inhibits airway hyperresponsiveness in non-asthmatic patients with Japanese cedar pollinosis. In turn, this suggests that cysteinyl leukotrienes have a role in increased airway responsiveness.

  7. Upper and lower airway pathology in young children with allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo

    2011-01-01

    and epidemiological surveys have suggested a close connection between upper and lower airway diseases expressed as the "united airways concept". Furthermore, an association between upper and lower airway diseases also seems to exist in non-atopic individuals. Nevertheless, the nature of this association is poorly...... understood and there is a paucity of data objectivizing this association in young children. The aim of this thesis was to describe pathology in the upper and lower airways in young children from the COPSAC birth cohort with investigator-diagnosed allergic- and non-allergic rhinitis. Nasal congestion is a key...... airway patency end-points derived from paper I to examine whether upper and lower airway patency are associated. Upper airway patency was assessed by acoustic rhinometry before and after intranasal α-agonist and lower airway patency by spirometry before and after inhaled β2-agonist. Upper and lower...

  8. Management of airway foreign body using flexible bronchoscopy: Experience with 80 cases during 2011–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safy Kaddah

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Flexible bronchoscopy is successful in retrieving airway foreign bodies (88.8%. With skilled personnel and perfect equipments, flexible bronchoscopy could be considered as the first choice for the removal of airway foreign body.

  9. Airway wall thickening and emphysema show independent familial aggregation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Bipen D; Coxson, Harvey O; Pillai, Sreekumar G

    2008-01-01

    RATIONALE: It is unclear whether airway wall thickening and emphysema make independent contributions to airflow limitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and whether these phenotypes cluster within families. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether airway wall thickening and emphysema (1...

  10. Airway management using transmylohyoid oroendotracheal (submental) intubation in maxillofacial trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imran; Sybil, Deborah; Singh, Anurag; Aggarwal, Tarun; Khan, Rizwan

    2014-01-01

    Successful management of airway in complex maxillofacial injuries is quite challenging. The complications and the post-operative care associated with tracheotomy makes it an unpopular choice for airway management meant solely for surgery in these patients. A retrospective analysis of 12 patients from June 2008 to December 2011, seeking treatment for pan facial fractures who underwent transmylohyoid oroendotracheal (submental) intubation is discussed here. The stepwise procedure is explained along with problems of intubation in pan facial fractures. The advantages, disadvantages and complications of transmylohyoid intubation are discussed and compared with alternative methods of air way management in such cases. This reliable, safe and easy method of airway management gives sterile surgical field without a change of tube.

  11. A hierarchical scheme for geodesic anatomical labeling of airway trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feragen, Aasa; Petersen, Jens; Owen, Megan; Lo, Pechin; Thomsen, Laura H; Wille, Mathilde M W; Dirksen, Asger; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2012-01-01

    We present a fast and robust supervised algorithm for labeling anatomical airway trees, based on geodesic distances in a geometric tree-space. Possible branch label configurations for a given tree are evaluated based on distances to a training set of labeled trees. In tree-space, the tree topology and geometry change continuously, giving a natural way to automatically handle anatomical differences and noise. The algorithm is made efficient using a hierarchical approach, in which labels are assigned from the top down. We only use features of the airway centerline tree, which are relatively unaffected by pathology. A thorough leave-one-patient-out evaluation of the algorithm is made on 40 segmented airway trees from 20 subjects labeled by 2 medical experts. We evaluate accuracy, reproducibility and robustness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Performance is statistically similar to the inter- and intra-expert agreement, and we found no significant correlation between COPD stage and labeling accuracy.

  12. European symposium on precision medicine in allergy and airways diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muraro, A; Fokkens, W J; Pietikainen, S

    2015-01-01

    the epidemic of Allergy and Asthma in Europe. The socio-economic impact of allergies and chronic airways diseases cannot be underestimated, as they represent the most frequently diagnosed chronic non-communicable diseases in the EU. Despite the fact that 30% of the total European population is nowadays......On 14 October 2015, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the European Rhinologic Society (ERS) and the European Medical Association (EMA) organized a symposium in the European Parliament in Brussels on Precision Medicine in Allergy and Airways Diseases, hosted by MEP...... David Borrelli and with active participation of the European Respiratory Society (ERS), the European Federations of Allergy and Airways Diseases Patients Associations (EFA), the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (Ga2len), Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) and the Respiratory...

  13. Managing dysphonia in paediatric patients with complex airway conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, S; Setlur, J; Bunting, G; Hartnick, C J

    2015-08-01

    To suggest a phonosurgical management strategy that can be used for children who have previously undergone laryngotracheal reconstruction. This cases series describes three children who presented with complex, multi-level airway stenosis and marked dysphonia. Phonosurgical intervention involved endoscopic and open approaches, and was combined with voice therapy. A phonosurgical reconstruction management algorithm is suggested for evaluating and treating these complex conditions. Pre-operative assessment is critical, and should involve voice analysis and glottal anatomy assessment using office laryngoscopy and stroboscopy. The risks must be weighed up against the benefit of vocal improvement. Surgical intervention should involve combined endoscopic and open approaches. Voice restoration after paediatric airway reconstruction is a complex challenge. Surgical intervention should be conducted in a step-by-step manner to reduce the risk of worsening dysphonia and airway compromise. The risks and benefits must be carefully explored and discussed.

  14. Management of difficult airway in intratracheal tumor surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Surendra K

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracheal malignancies are usual victim of delay in diagnosis by virtue of their symptoms resembling asthma. Sometimes delayed diagnosis may lead to almost total airway obstruction. For difficult airways, not leaving any possibility of manipulation into neck region or endoscopic intervention, femorofemoral cardiopulmonary bypass can be a promising approach. Case Presentation We are presenting a case of tracheal adenoid cystic carcinoma (cylindroma occupying about 90% of the tracheal lumen. It was successfully managed by surgical excision of mass by sternotomy and tracheotomy under femorofemoral cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. Conclusion Any patient with recurrent respiratory symptoms should be evaluated by radiological and endoscopic means earlier to avoid delay in diagnosis of such conditions. Femorofemoral cardiopulmonary bypass is a relatively safe way of managing certain airway obstructions.

  15. [Role of the i-gel in emergency airway management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueshima, Hironobu; Asai, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    The i-gel is a relatively new supraglottic airway, which has been shown to be useful during general anesthesia, and it may have a potential role during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In a manikin study, we have found that, compared with laryngeal mask airways, the i-gel was significantly easier and faster to insert, due mainly to no-necessity of cuff inflation. One possible difficulty in using the i-gel during cardiopulmonary resuscitation is that the device cannot be fixed with the Thomas Tube Holder (Laerdal Medical Japan KK, Tokyo, Japan). A specially tailored device for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, recently has become available. The pack includes the i-gel O2 (which has a side port for oxygen delivery), a suction catheter, a sachet containing lubrication jelly, and a fixation strap. We describe the role of the i-gel during emergency airway management.

  16. Acutely Obstructed Airway Resulting from Complications of a Laryngopyocoele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind Mole

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngocoeles are rare cystic dilatations of the laryngeal ventricle. Obstruction of its outlet can cause entrapment of mucus and superimposed infection causes a laryngopyocoele. Such presentations, although rare, have potential to cause airway obstruction. A 67-year-old lady presented with a one-week history of hoarseness and shortness of breath. On examination, she was stridulous and had fullness of the left side of the neck. Nasendoscopy revealed large bilateral vocal cord polyps and near-complete glottis obstruction. She was taken to emergency theatre for restoration of a viable airway. Upon excision of the polyps, pus was visualised originating from the laryngeal ventricle. Literature proposes that laryngocoeles develop secondary to a one-way valve caused by an obstructing lesion distorting the saccule neck. We propose that the laryngocoele developed secondary to large obstructing polyps. Urgent excision of the polyps allowed decompression of the laryngopyocoele and reestablishment of a patent airway.

  17. Cigarette smoke modulates expression of human rhinovirus-induced airway epithelial host defense genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Proud

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV infections trigger acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and asthma. The human airway epithelial cell is the primary site of HRV infection and responds to infection with altered expression of multiple genes, the products of which could regulate the outcome to infection. Cigarette smoking aggravates asthma symptoms, and is also the predominant risk factor for the development and progression of COPD. We, therefore, examined whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE modulates viral responses by altering HRV-induced epithelial gene expression. Primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to medium alone, CSE alone, purified HRV-16 alone or to HRV-16+ CSE. After 24 h, supernatants were collected and total cellular RNA was isolated. Gene array analysis was performed to examine mRNA expression. Additional experiments, using real-time RT-PCR, ELISA and/or western blotting, validated altered expression of selected gene products. CSE and HRV-16 each induced groups of genes that were largely independent of each other. When compared to gene expression in response to CSE alone, cells treated with HRV+CSE showed no obvious differences in CSE-induced gene expression. By contrast, compared to gene induction in response to HRV-16 alone, cells exposed to HRV+CSE showed marked suppression of expression of a number of HRV-induced genes associated with various functions, including antiviral defenses, inflammation, viral signaling and airway remodeling. These changes were not associated with altered expression of type I or type III interferons. Thus, CSE alters epithelial responses to HRV infection in a manner that may negatively impact antiviral and host defense outcomes.

  18. Cigarette smoke modulates expression of human rhinovirus-induced airway epithelial host defense genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proud, David; Hudy, Magdalena H; Wiehler, Shahina; Zaheer, Raza S; Amin, Minaa A; Pelikan, Jonathan B; Tacon, Claire E; Tonsaker, Tabitha O; Walker, Brandie L; Kooi, Cora; Traves, Suzanne L; Leigh, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections trigger acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. The human airway epithelial cell is the primary site of HRV infection and responds to infection with altered expression of multiple genes, the products of which could regulate the outcome to infection. Cigarette smoking aggravates asthma symptoms, and is also the predominant risk factor for the development and progression of COPD. We, therefore, examined whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) modulates viral responses by altering HRV-induced epithelial gene expression. Primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to medium alone, CSE alone, purified HRV-16 alone or to HRV-16+ CSE. After 24 h, supernatants were collected and total cellular RNA was isolated. Gene array analysis was performed to examine mRNA expression. Additional experiments, using real-time RT-PCR, ELISA and/or western blotting, validated altered expression of selected gene products. CSE and HRV-16 each induced groups of genes that were largely independent of each other. When compared to gene expression in response to CSE alone, cells treated with HRV+CSE showed no obvious differences in CSE-induced gene expression. By contrast, compared to gene induction in response to HRV-16 alone, cells exposed to HRV+CSE showed marked suppression of expression of a number of HRV-induced genes associated with various functions, including antiviral defenses, inflammation, viral signaling and airway remodeling. These changes were not associated with altered expression of type I or type III interferons. Thus, CSE alters epithelial responses to HRV infection in a manner that may negatively impact antiviral and host defense outcomes.

  19. Human Airway Eosinophils Exhibit Preferential Reduction in STAT Signaling Capacity and Increased CISH Expression1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Mandy E.; Koziol-White, Cynthia J.; Esnault, Stephane; Bates, Mary E.; Evans, Michael D.; Bertics, Paul J.; Denlinger, Loren C.

    2013-01-01

    Allergic asthma, a chronic respiratory disorder marked by inflammation and recurrent airflow obstruction, is associated with elevated levels of Interleukin-5 (IL-5) family cytokines, and elevated numbers of eosinophils (EOS). IL-5 family cytokines elongate peripheral blood EOS (EOSPB) viability, recruit EOSPB to the airways, and at higher concentrations, induce degranulation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. While, EOSA remain signal ready in that GM-CSF treatment induces degranulation, treatment of EOSA with IL-5 family cytokines no longer confers a survival advantage. Since the IL-5 family receptors have common signaling capacity, but are uncoupled from EOSA survival while other IL-5 family induced endpoints remain functional, we tested the hypothesis that EOSA possess a JAK/STAT specific regulatory mechanism (since JAK/STAT signaling is critical to EOS survival). We found that IL-5 family-induced STAT3 and STAT5 phosphorylation is attenuated in EOSA relative to blood EOS from airway allergen-challenged donors (EOSCPB). However, IL-5 family induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation is not altered between EOSA and EOSCPB. These observations suggest EOSA possess a regulatory mechanism for suppressing STAT signaling distinct from ERK1/2 activation. Furthermore, we found, in EOSPB, IL-5 family cytokines induce members of the suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) genes, CISH and SOCS1. Additionally, following allergen challenge, EOSA express significantly more CISH and SOCS1 mRNA and CISH protein than EOSPB counterparts. In EOSPB, long-term pretreatment with IL-5 family cytokines, to varying degrees, attenuates IL-5 family induced STAT5 phosphorylation. These data support a model wherein IL-5 family cytokines trigger a selective down-regulation mechanism in EOSA for JAK/STAT pathways. PMID:23956426

  20. Multitissue Transcriptomics Delineates the Diversity of Airway T Cell Functions in Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhania, Akul; Wallington, Joshua C; Smith, Caroline G; Horowitz, Daniel; Staples, Karl J; Howarth, Peter H; Gadola, Stephan D; Djukanović, Ratko; Woelk, Christopher H; Hinks, Timothy S C

    2018-02-01

    Asthma arises from the complex interplay of inflammatory pathways in diverse cell types and tissues. We sought to undertake a comprehensive transcriptomic assessment of the epithelium and airway T cells that remain understudied in asthma and investigate interactions between multiple cells and tissues. Epithelial brushings and flow-sorted CD3 + T cells from sputum and BAL were obtained from healthy subjects (n = 19) and patients with asthma (mild, moderate, and severe asthma; n = 46). Gene expression was assessed using Affymetrix HT HG-U133 + PM GeneChips, and results were validated by real-time quantitative PCR. In the epithelium, IL-13 response genes (POSTN, SERPINB2, and CLCA1), mast cell mediators (CPA3 and TPSAB1), inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cystatins (CST1, CST2, and CST4) were upregulated in mild asthma, but, except for cystatins, were suppressed by corticosteroids in moderate asthma. In severe asthma-with predominantly neutrophilic phenotype-several distinct processes were upregulated, including neutrophilia (TCN1 and MMP9), mucins, and oxidative stress responses. The majority of the disease signature was evident in sputum T cells in severe asthma, where 267 genes were differentially regulated compared with health, highlighting compartmentalization of inflammation. This signature included IL-17-inducible chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, IL8, and CSF3) and chemoattractants for neutrophils (IL8, CCL3, and LGALS3), T cells, and monocytes. A protein interaction network in severe asthma highlighted signatures of responses to bacterial infections across tissues (CEACAM5, CD14, and TLR2), including Toll-like receptor signaling. In conclusion, the activation of innate immune pathways in the airways suggests that activated T cells may be driving neutrophilic inflammation and steroid-insensitive IL-17 response in severe asthma.

  1. Macrolides inhibit Fusobacterium nucleatum-induced MUC5AC production in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Harada, Yosuke; Yamada, Koichi; Migiyama, Yohei; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2013-04-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most common anaerobic bacteria in periodontitis and is responsible for several extraoral infections, including respiratory tract diseases. In this study, we examined whether F. nucleatum induces mucin secretion in airway epithelial cells. We also examined the effects of macrolides on F. nucleatum-induced mucus production compared with the effects of other antibiotics that exert anti-anaerobic activities. The production of MUC5AC, the major core protein of mucin secreted from the airway surface epithelium, in bronchial epithelial cells after stimulation with culture supernatants (Sup) of F. nucleatum was analyzed by performing enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantitative RT-PCR. The cell-signaling pathway of F. nucleatum Sup stimulation was also analyzed by Western blotting. For inhibition studies, cells were treated with azithromycin, clarithromycin, clindamycin (CLDM), and metronidazole (MTZ). The F. nucleatum Sup induced NCI-H292 cells to express MUC5AC at both the protein level and the mRNA level in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. Macrolides inhibited F. nucleatum Sup-induced MUC5AC production, while CLDM and MTZ were less effective. F. nucleatum Sup induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and this induction was suppressed by macrolides. F. nucleatum Sup-induced MUC5AC production was blocked by the ERK pathway inhibitor U0126. F. nucleatum is likely to contribute to excessive mucin production, which suggests that periodontitis may correlate with the pathogenesis of chronic respiratory tract infection. Macrolides seem to reduce this mucin production and might represent an additional means of therapeutic intervention for F. nucleatum respiratory tract infections other than CLDM and MTZ.

  2. Management of a posterior mediastinal Gardner fibroma causing critical airway stenosis in a resource limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Clouthier, DO

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In developed countries, surgeons and anesthesiologists approach the mediastinal mass causing airway compression with prudence and trepidation. Resource-limited settings provide unique challenges in the diagnosis and management of patients with critical airway compression. We report the successful treatment of a patient in Port-au-Prince, Haiti with a posterior mediastinal mass that filled the left chest cavity and caused critical airway stenosis. The pathology revealed a Gardner Fibroma, which is rarely associated with mediastinal airway obstruction.

  3. MR evaluation of right pulmonary agenesis and vascular airway compression in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, B; Gondor, M

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the spectrum of airway and vascular anomalies in agenesis of the right lung and to assess the role of imaging in defining the anatomy. Symptomatic children with right lung agenesis often have anatomic distortion of the airway with vascular compression, and occasionally they have intrinsic airway stenosis. MR imaging most accurately defines the entire spectrum of airway and vascular anatomic abnormalities. Precise delineation of the anatomy is essential in patient management and surgical planning.

  4. Regulating cough through modulation of sensory nerve function in the airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, D; Page, C P

    2013-10-01

    Whilst local anaesthetics when applied directly to laryngeal nerves or topically to the lung can suppress cough, their chronic use is constrained because of dose limiting side effects. However, the effectiveness of local anaesthetics suggests that selectivity targeting nerves in the airway may provide novel approaches for the treatment of cough in the future. There is a considerable wealth of evidence showing that there are different afferent nerve subtypes in the airways. Traditionally C-fibres have been the focus of much research in the cough field since the stimulation of these afferents by capsaicin is able to elicit cough in guinea-pigs and in man, and drugs targeting various proteins expressed in these nerves (e.g. mu-opioid, NOP1, TRPV1, sodium channels) have been shown to be anti-tussive in preclinical models of cough. However, interest in Aδ fibres has increased recently in light of the discovery of a specific cough receptor in the guinea-pig that is provoked by citric acid and punctate stimulation, but not capsaicin and which has been anatomically linked to Aδ fibres. There is also some evidence that as a result of inflammation in the airways, Aδ fibres can begin to express neuropeptides and TRPV1 receptors so that they can become responsive to endogenous activators of this ion channel and to irritants like capsaicin. Consequently, there is considerable interest in targeting either one or both afferent nerve types for the treatment of chronic cough. However, to date the translation of preclinical studies into man has largely been disappointing and certainly there is a need for better preclinical models in this field. There also remain many challenges to overcome at a clinical level, such as what patient group(s) should be used to assess anti-tussive drugs and whether the use of irritants that induce cough in healthy volunteers (such as citric acid or capsaicin) is of any value in the assessment of novel anti-tussive drugs. The development of several

  5. National survey on airway and difficult airway management in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Prieto, M G; Míguez-Crespo, M R; Jiménez-Del-Valle, J R; González-Caro, M D; Marmesat-Ríos, I; Garnacho-Montero, J

    2018-02-18

    To know organization, management and training in airway (AW) in Spanish Intensive Care Units (ICUs), with special interest in difficult airway (DAW). Descriptive cross-sectional study and χ 2 subanalysis, conducted through a national survey from november 1th to december 15th, 2016. With the SEMICYUC's support, an online questionnaire of 27 items was sent to 179 ICUs. ICUs of public, private centers, and consortia. In total, 101 units responded (56.4%), corresponding to 1,827 beds and almost 95,000 incomes/year. The 85.1% are public hospitals, and 83.2% had residents. Of the responders, 22.8% don't use routinely AW assessment scales, being the most frequently used the Cormack-Mallampati association (35.6%). There's not intubation (IOT) protocol in 77.2%, nor DAW protocol in 75.2%. An 82.2% have a DAW cart. The 48.5% have training in IOT, and in VAD 53.5%. Having a DAW expert is significantly associated with greater training in IOT (60% vs. 39.3%; P=.03), DAW (64.4% vs. 44.6%; P=.04), and more AW protocols (73.4% vs. 37.5%; P=.000). Having an specific guideline for DAW management in UCI is considered necessary in 99%. There is room for improvement in AW management. It's necessary to identify an expert in DAW in each Unit, and the development of an specific guideline for DAW management in critical care. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of airway surface liquid height on the kinetics of extracellular nucleotides in airway epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarante, Tauanne D; da Silva, Jafferson K L; Garcia, Guilherme J M

    2014-12-21

    Experimental techniques aimed at measuring the concentration of signaling molecules in the airway surface liquid (ASL) often require an unrealistically large ASL volume to facilitate sampling. This experimental limitation, prompted by the difficulty of pipetting liquid from a very shallow layer (~15 μm), leads to dilution and the under-prediction of physiologic concentrations of signaling molecules that are vital to the regulation of mucociliary clearance. Here, we use a computational model to describe the effect of liquid height on the kinetics of extracellular nucleotides in the airway surface liquid coating respiratory epithelia. The model consists of a reaction-diffusion equation with boundary conditions that represent the enzymatic reactions occurring on the epithelial surface. The simulations reproduce successfully the kinetics of extracellular ATP following hypotonic challenge for ASL volumes ranging from 25 μl to 500 μl in a 12-mm diameter cell culture. The model reveals that [ATP] and [ADO] reach 1200 nM and 2200 nM at the epithelial surface, respectively, while their volumetric averages remain less than 200 nM at all times in experiments with a large ASL volume (500 μl). These findings imply that activation of P2Y2 and A2B receptors is robust after hypotonic challenge, in contrast to what could be concluded based on experimental measurements of volumetric concentrations in large ASL volumes. Finally, given the central role that ATP and ADO play in regulating mucociliary clearance, we investigated which enzymes, when inhibited, provide the greatest increase in ATP and ADO concentrations. Our findings suggest that inhibition of NTPDase1/highTNAP would cause the greatest increase in [ATP] after hypotonic challenge, while inhibition of the transporter CNT3 would provide the greatest increase in [ADO]. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of spatially matched airways reveals thinner airway walls in COPD. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) COPD Study and the Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcomes in COPD Study (SPIROMICS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin M; Hoffman, Eric A; Rabinowitz, Dan; Bleecker, Eugene; Christenson, Stephanie; Couper, David; Donohue, Kathleen M; Han, Meilan K; Hansel, Nadia N; Kanner, Richard E; Kleerup, Eric; Rennard, Stephen; Barr, R Graham

    2014-11-01

    COPD is characterised by reduced airway lumen dimensions and fewer peripheral airways. Most studies of airway properties sample airways based upon lumen dimension or at random, which may bias comparisons given reduced airway lumen dimensions and number in COPD. We sought to compare central airway wall dimensions on CT in COPD and controls using spatially matched airways, thereby avoiding selection bias of airways in the lung. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) COPD Study and Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcomes in COPD Study (SPIROMICS) recruited smokers with COPD and controls aged 50-79 years and 40-80 years, respectively. COPD was defined by current guidelines. Using CT image data, airway dimensions were measured for all central airway segments (generations 0-6) following 5 standardised paths into the lungs. Case-control airway comparisons were spatially matched by generation and adjusted for demographics, body size, smoking, CT dose, per cent emphysema, airway length and lung volume. Among 311 MESA COPD participants, airway wall areas at generations 3-6 were smaller in COPD compared with controls (all pcentral airways. Other approaches to airway sampling result in comparisons of more proximal to more distal airways and potentially biased assessment of airway properties in COPD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) of the upper airway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    You-Ten, Kong Eric; Siddiqui, Naveed; Teoh, Wendy H

    2018-01-01

    of single-lumen endotracheal tubes (ETTs), double-lumen ETTs, and tracheostomy tubes. Ultrasonography can differentiate tracheal, esophageal, and endobronchial intubation. Ultrasonography of the neck can accurately localize the cricothyroid membrane for emergency airway access and similarly identify...... tracheal rings for US-guided tracheostomy. In addition, US can identify vocal cord dysfunction and pathology before induction of anesthesia. A rapidly growing body of evidence showing ultrasonography used in conjunction with hands-on management of the airway may benefit patient care. Increasing awareness...

  9. Robot-Assisted Airway Support: A Simulated Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighe, Patrick J.; Badiyan, S. J.; Luria, I.; Lampotang, S.; Parekattil, S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in telemedicine and robotically assisted telesurgery may offer advanced surgical care for the geographically remote patient. Similar advances in tele-anesthesia will be necessary to optimize perioperative care for these patients. Although many preliminary investigations into tele-anesthesia are underway, none involves remote performance of anesthesia-related procedures. Here we describe simulated robotically assisted fiberoptic intubations using an airway simulation mannequin. Both oral and nasal approaches to fiberoptic intubation were successful, but presented unique opportunities and challenges inherent to the robot’s design. Robotically assisted airway management is feasible using multipurpose surgical robotic systems. PMID:20870983

  10. Two cases of airway obstruction after radiation therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yuki; Hashimoto, Kazuyoshi; Yoshida, Ryu; Shimazu, Yuzou; Hattori, Hisashi; Kan, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of airway obstruction due to several radiotherapies. In the first case, although a “cannot ventilate, cannot intubate” (CVCI) situation arose, we performed cricothyrotomy, thus saving the patient. In the second case, we were able to perform bronchoscopy early to assess her laryngeal edema before nasal intubation and tracheotomy were performed. As a result, a potentially distressing situation for the patient was prevented. We must be careful of airway obstructions that can occur in patients after several radiotherapies. (author)

  11. Airway inflammation in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, F G; Carpagnano, E; Guido, P; Bonsignore, M R; Roberti, A; Aliani, M; Vignola, A M; Spanevello, A

    2004-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been shown to be associated to upper airway inflammation. The object of the present study was to establish the presence of bronchial inflammation in OSAS subjects. In 16 subjects affected by OSAS, and in 14 healthy volunteers, airway inflammation was detected by the cellular analysis of the induced sputum. OSAS patients, as compared to control subjects, showed a higher percentage of neutrophils (66.7+/-18.9 vs. 25.8+/-15.6) (Pbronchial inflammation characterized by a significant increase in neutrophils.

  12. Foreign bodies in the lactant airway, Report of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arango L, Magnolia

    1999-01-01

    We report the case of a lactant who aspired (popcorn) fragments of popcorn into his airway. Immediately the patient developed respiratory difficulty, he was remitted to a specialized hospital until 72 hours after. In this hospital the fragments of popcorn were removed by bronchoscopic procedure with posterior improvement. The aspiration of foreign bodies into the airway is a frequent accident in the early childhood. The clinical picture may be confounded specially with asthma attacks or simple acute respiratory infections. It is very important to recognize this condition because of the foreign bodies can cause severe complications and sequels, and occasionally the death

  13. Predictors of neutrophilic airway inflammation in young smokers with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Christian Grabow; Munck, Christian; Helby, Jens

    2014-01-01

    and methacholine challenge. A sample from the sputum induction was taken for bacterial analysis using 16S gene PCR technique and sequencing. Results: Using one-way analysis of variance and binary and linear regression models, only age and ACQ6 score were found to be significant predictors for airway neutrophilia......Introduction: Asthma is one of the most widespread chronic diseases worldwide. In spite of numerous detrimental effects on asthma, smoking is common among asthma patients. These smoking-induced aggravations of asthma may be attributed to changes in airway inflammation, which is characterized...

  14. Upper airway obstruction. General principles and selected conditions in the dog and cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, D N; Crowe, D T

    1985-09-01

    This article presents an overview of the clinical features of upper airway obstructive disorders. It includes more detailed discussions of certain common conditions such as brachycephalic airway syndrome, laryngeal paralysis, and upper airway obstruction due to trauma, foreign bodies, extraluminal masses, and tumours of the larynx and trachea.

  15. Automated quantification of bronchiectasis, airway wall thickening and lumen tapering in chest CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez-Rovira, Adria; Kuo, Wieying; Petersen, Jens

    Purpose: To automatically quantify airway structural properties visualised on CT in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) and controls, including: bronchiectasis, airway wall thickening, and lumen tapering. Methods and materials: The 3D surface of the airway lumen, outer wall, and bronchial arteries...

  16. Indications and results of emergency surgical airways performed by a physician-staffed helicopter emergency service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.; Bruijstens, L.; Ploeg, J. van der; Tan, E.; Hoogerwerf, N.; Edwards, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Airway management is essential in critically ill or injured patients. In a "can't intubate, can't oxygenate" scenario, an emergency surgical airway (ESA), similar to a cricothyroidotomy, is the final step in airway management. This procedure is infrequently performed in the prehospital

  17. 75 FR 32317 - Proposed Revocation of Colored Federal Airway G-4; AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ...-0453; Airspace Docket No. 10-AAL-14] Proposed Revocation of Colored Federal Airway G-4; AK AGENCY... action proposes to remove Colored Federal Airway Green 4 (G-4) from the National Airspace System (NAS) in...) part 71 by removing Colored Federal airway G-4 associated with the planned BTS NDB decommissioning near...

  18. 75 FR 47737 - Proposed Revocation of Colored Federal Airway G-4; AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ...-0453; Airspace Docket No. 10-AAL-14] RIN 2120-AA66 Proposed Revocation of Colored Federal Airway G-4... Register on June 8, 2010 (75 FR 32317). In that action, the FAA proposed to remove Federal Airway Green (G... NPRM proposing to remove Federal Airway G-4 (75 FR 32317), Docket No. FAA- 2010-0453. A review of...

  19. The Association between Maxillomandibular Sagittal Relationship and Pharyngeal Airway Passage Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhurima Nanda

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion : Sagittal skeletal pattern had a close association between the pharyngeal airway passage and the dimensions of the pharyngeal airway passage. The dimensions of pharyngeal airway passage were decreased from Class III to Class I and Class I to Class II subjects.

  20. Failed obstetric tracheal intubation and postoperative respiratory support with the ProSeal laryngeal mask airway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, Christian; Brimacombe, Joseph; Lirk, Philipp; Pühringer, Fritz

    2004-01-01

    The ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (ProSeal LMA) provides a better seal and probably better airway protection than the classic laryngeal mask airway (classic LMA). We report the use of the ProSeal LMA in a 26-yr-old female with HELLP syndrome for failed obstetric intubation and postoperative