WorldWideScience

Sample records for suppress opioid withdrawal

  1. Opioid withdrawal suppression efficacy of oral dronabinol in opioid dependent humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofwall, Michelle R; Babalonis, Shanna; Nuzzo, Paul A; Elayi, Samy Claude; Walsh, Sharon L

    2016-07-01

    The cannabinoid (CB) system is a rational novel target for treating opioid dependence, a significant public health problem around the world. This proof-of-concept study examined the potential efficacy of a CB1 receptor partial agonist, dronabinol, in relieving signs and symptoms of opioid withdrawal. Twelve opioid dependent adults participated in this 5-week, inpatient, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Volunteers were maintained on double-blind oxycodone (30mg oral, four times/day) and participated in a training session followed by 7 experimental sessions, each testing a single oral test dose (placebo, oxycodone 30 and 60mg, dronabinol 5, 10, 20, and 30mg [decreased from 40mg]). Placebo was substituted for oxycodone maintenance doses for 21h before each session in order to produce measurable opioid withdrawal. Outcomes included observer- and participant-ratings of opioid agonist, opioid withdrawal and psychomotor/cognitive performance. Oxycodone produced prototypic opioid agonist effects (i.e. suppressing withdrawal and increasing subjective effects indicative of abuse liability). Dronabinol 5 and 10mg produced effects most similar to placebo, while the 20 and 30mg doses produced modest signals of withdrawal suppression that were accompanied by dose-related increases in high, sedation, bad effects, feelings of heart racing, and tachycardia. Dronabinol was not liked more than placebo, showed some impairment in cognitive performance, and was identified as marijuana with increasing dose. CB1 receptor activation is a reasonable strategy to pursue for the treatment of opioid withdrawal; however, dronabinol is not a likely candidate given its modest withdrawal suppression effects of limited duration and previously reported tachycardia during opioid withdrawal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Opiate and opioid withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000949.htm Opiate and opioid withdrawal To use the sharing features on this page, ... or withdrawing from opiates. Alternative Names Withdrawal from opioids; Dopesickness; Substance use - opiate withdrawal; Substance abuse - opiate withdrawal; Drug abuse - opiate withdrawal; ...

  3. Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Mary Beth; Leeman, Lawrence; Hsi, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome is common due to the current opioid addiction epidemic. Infants born to women covertly abusing prescription opioids may not be identified as at risk until withdrawal signs present. Buprenorphine is a newer treatment for maternal opioid addiction and appears to result in a milder withdrawal syndrome than methadone. Initial treatment is with nonpharmacological measures including decreasing stimuli, however pharmacological treatment is commonly required. Opioid monotherapy is preferred, with phenobarbital or clonidine uncommonly needed as adjunctive therapy. Rooming-in and breastfeeding may decease the severity of withdrawal. Limited evidence is available regarding long-term effects of perinatal opioid exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Is this ?complicated? opioid withdrawal?

    OpenAIRE

    Parkar, S.R.; Seethalakshmi, R; Adarkar, S; Kharawala, S

    2006-01-01

    Seven patients with opioid dependence admitted in the de-addiction centre for detoxification developed convulsions and delirium during the withdrawal phase. After ruling out all other possible causes of these complications, opioid withdrawal seemed to emerge as the most likely explanation. The unpredictability of the course of opioid dependence and withdrawal needs to be considered when treating patients with opioid dependence.

  5. Buprenorphine for managing opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowing, Linda; Ali, Robert; White, Jason M; Mbewe, Dalitso

    2017-02-21

    Managed withdrawal is a necessary step prior to drug-free treatment or as the endpoint of substitution treatment. To assess the effects of buprenorphine versus tapered doses of methadone, alpha 2 -adrenergic agonists, symptomatic medications or placebo, or different buprenorphine regimens for managing opioid withdrawal, in terms of the intensity of the withdrawal syndrome experienced, duration and completion of treatment, and adverse effects. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 11, 2016), MEDLINE (1946 to December week 1, 2016), Embase (to 22 December 2016), PsycINFO (1806 to December week 3, 2016), and the Web of Science (to 22 December 2016) and handsearched the reference lists of articles. Randomised controlled trials of interventions using buprenorphine to modify the signs and symptoms of withdrawal in participants who were primarily opioid dependent. Comparison interventions involved reducing doses of methadone, alpha 2 -adrenergic agonists (clonidine or lofexidine), symptomatic medications or placebo, and different buprenorphine-based regimens. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included 27 studies involving 3048 participants. The main comparators were clonidine or lofexidine (14 studies). Six studies compared buprenorphine versus methadone, and seven compared different rates of buprenorphine dose reduction. We assessed 12 studies as being at high risk of bias in at least one of seven domains of methodological quality. Six of these studies compared buprenorphine with clonidine or lofexidine and two with methadone; the other four studies compared different rates of buprenorphine dose reduction.For the comparison of buprenorphine and methadone in tapered doses, meta-analysis was not possible for the outcomes of intensity of withdrawal or adverse effects. However, information reported by the individual studies was suggestive of buprenorphine and methadone having similar capacity to

  6. Prediction of withdrawal symptoms during opioid detoxification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Boukje A G; Krabbe, Paul F M; De Jong, Cor A J; van der Staak, Cees P F

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The severity of self-reported withdrawal symptoms varies during detoxification of opioid-dependent patients. The aim of this study is to identify subgroups of withdrawal symptoms within the detoxification trajectory and to predict the severity of withdrawal symptoms on the basis of

  7. Prediction of withdrawal symptoms during opioid detoxification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, B.A.G.; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Jong, C.A.J. de; Staak, C.P.F. van der

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The severity of self-reported withdrawal symptoms varies during detoxification of opioid-dependent patients. The aim of this study is to identify subgroups of withdrawal symptoms within the detoxification trajectory and to predict the severity of withdrawal symptoms on the basis of

  8. Reduction of opioid withdrawal and potentiation of acute opioid analgesia by systemic AV411 (ibudilast).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Mark R; Lewis, Susannah S; Coats, Benjamen D; Skyba, David A; Crysdale, Nicole Y; Berkelhammer, Debra L; Brzeski, Anita; Northcutt, Alexis; Vietz, Christine M; Judd, Charles M; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R; Johnson, Kirk W

    2009-02-01

    Morphine-induced glial proinflammatory responses have been documented to contribute to tolerance to opioid analgesia. Here, we examined whether drugs previously shown to suppress glial proinflammatory responses can alter other clinically relevant opioid effects; namely, withdrawal or acute analgesia. AV411 (ibudilast) and minocycline, drugs with distinct mechanisms of action that result in attenuation of glial proinflammatory responses, each reduced naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. Analysis of brain nuclei associated with opioid withdrawal revealed that morphine altered expression of glial activation markers, cytokines, chemokines, and a neurotrophic factor. AV411 attenuated many of these morphine-induced effects. AV411 also protected against spontaneous withdrawal-induced hyperactivity and weight loss recorded across a 12-day timecourse. Notably, in the spontaneous withdrawal study, AV411 treatment was delayed relative to the start of the morphine regimen so to also test whether AV411 could still be effective in the face of established morphine dependence, which it was. AV411 did not simply attenuate all opioid effects, as co-administering AV411 with morphine or oxycodone caused three-to-five-fold increases in acute analgesic potency, as revealed by leftward shifts in the analgesic dose response curves. Timecourse analyses revealed that plasma morphine levels were not altered by AV411, suggestive that potentiated analgesia was not simply due to prolongation of morphine exposure or increased plasma concentrations. These data support and extend similar potentiation of acute opioid analgesia by minocycline, again providing converging lines of evidence of glial involvement. Hence, suppression of glial proinflammatory responses can significantly reduce opioid withdrawal, while improving analgesia.

  9. Opioid antagonists with minimal sedation for opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowing, Linda; Ali, Robert; White, Jason M

    2017-05-29

    Managed withdrawal is a necessary step prior to drug-free treatment or as the endpoint of long-term substitution treatment. To assess the effects of opioid antagonists plus minimal sedation for opioid withdrawal. Comparators were placebo as well as more established approaches to detoxification, such as tapered doses of methadone, adrenergic agonists, buprenorphine and symptomatic medications. We updated our searches of the following databases to December 2016: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and Web of Science. We also searched two trials registers and checked the reference lists of included studies for further references to relevant studies. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical trials along with prospective controlled cohort studies comparing opioid antagonists plus minimal sedation versus other approaches or different opioid antagonist regimens for withdrawal in opioid-dependent participants. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Ten studies (6 randomised controlled trials and 4 prospective cohort studies, involving 955 participants) met the inclusion criteria for the review. We considered 7 of the 10 studies to be at high risk of bias in at least one of the domains we assessed.Nine studies compared an opioid antagonist-adrenergic agonist combination versus a treatment regimen based primarily on an alpha 2 -adrenergic agonist (clonidine or lofexidine). Other comparisons (placebo, tapered doses of methadone, buprenorphine) made by included studies were too diverse for any meaningful analysis. This review therefore focuses on the nine studies comparing an opioid antagonist (naltrexone or naloxone) plus clonidine or lofexidine versus treatment primarily based on clonidine or lofexidine.Five studies took place in an inpatient setting, two studies were in outpatients with day care, two used day care only for the first day of opioid antagonist administration, and one study described the setting as outpatient

  10. Opioid withdrawal signs and symptoms in children: frequency and determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Deborah; Grap, Mary Jo; Younger, Janet B; Ameringer, Suzanne; Elswick, R K

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to, in a pediatric population, describe the frequency of opioid withdrawal signs and symptoms and to identify factors associated with these opioid withdrawal signs and symptoms. Opioids are used routinely in the pediatric intensive care population for analgesia, sedation, blunting of physiologic responses to stress, and safety. In children, physical dependence may occur in as little as 2-3 days of continuous opioid therapy. Once the child no longer needs the opioid, the medications are reduced over time. A prospective, descriptive study was conducted. The sample of 26 was drawn from all patients, ages 2 weeks to 21 years admitted to the Children's Hospital of Richmond pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and who have received continuous infusion or scheduled opioids for at least 5 days. Data collected included: opioid withdrawal score (WAT-1), opioid taper rate (total dose of opioid per day in morphine equivalents per kilogram [MEK]), pretaper peak MEK, pretaper cumulative MEK, number of days of opioid exposure prior to taper, and age. Out of 26 enrolled participants, only 9 (45%) had opioid withdrawal on any given day. In addition, there was limited variability in WAT-1 scores. The most common symptoms notes were diarrhea, vomit, sweat, and fever. For optimal opioid withdrawal assessments, clinicians should use a validated instrument such as the WAT-1 to measure for signs and symptoms of opioid withdrawal. Further research is indicated to examine risk factors for opioid withdrawal in children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neurobiology of opioid withdrawal: Role of the endothelin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Shaifali; Andurkar, Shridhar V; Gulati, Anil

    2016-08-15

    Morphine and oxycodone are potent opioid analgesics most commonly used for the management of moderate to severe acute and chronic pain. Their clinical utility is limited by undesired side effects like analgesic tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal. We have previously demonstrated that endothelin-A (ETA) receptor antagonists potentiate opioid analgesia and eliminate analgesic tolerance. Mechanistically, G proteins and regulatory proteins such as β-arrestins have shown to play an important role in mediating opioid tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal. Recently, the involvement of central ET mechanisms in opioid withdrawal was investigated. ETA receptor antagonist was shown to block majority of the signs and symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal. This review focuses on ET as one of the potential novel strategies to manage the challenge of opioid withdrawal. An overview of additional players in this process (G proteins and β-arrestin2), and the possible therapeutic implications of these findings are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The role of opioid antagonist efficacy and constitutive opioid receptor activity in the opioid withdrawal syndrome in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Navani, Dipesh M.; Sirohi, Sunil; Madia, Priyanka A.; Yoburn, Byron C.

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of efficacy, opioid antagonists are classified as inverse opioid agonists (e.g. naltrexone) or neutral opioid antagonists (e.g. 6β-naltrexol). This study examined the interaction between naltrexone and 6β-naltrexol in the precipitated opioid withdrawal syndrome in morphine dependent mice. Furthermore, the possible contribution of constitutive opioid receptor activity to precipitated withdrawal was evaluated using increasing levels of morphine dependence. In the first experiment, ...

  13. Induction of synaptic long-term potentiation after opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drdla, Ruth; Gassner, Matthias; Gingl, Ewald; Sandkühler, Jürgen

    2009-07-10

    mu-Opioid receptor (MOR) agonists represent the gold standard for the treatment of severe pain but may paradoxically also enhance pain sensitivity, that is, lead to opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). We show that abrupt withdrawal from MOR agonists induces long-term potentiation (LTP) at the first synapse in pain pathways. Induction of opioid withdrawal LTP requires postsynaptic activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and a rise of postsynaptic calcium concentrations. In contrast, the acute depression by opioids is induced presynaptically at these synapses. Withdrawal LTP can be prevented by tapered withdrawal and shares pharmacology and signal transduction pathways with OIH. These findings provide a previously unrecognized target to selectively combat pro-nociceptive effects of opioids without compromising opioid analgesia.

  14. A case of rhabdomyolysis associated with severe opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangahar, Deepali

    2015-08-01

    While the risk of opioid overdose is widely accepted, the dangers of opioid withdrawal are far less clearly defined. The purpose of this publication is to provide evidence against the erroneous clinical dictum that opioid withdrawal is never life-threatening. This case report (N = 1) illustrates an unfortunate, common scenario of a man abusing prescription opioids and heroin. His attempt at self-detoxification with buprenorphine-naloxone resulted in life-threatening opioid withdrawal. A detailed account of each day of his withdrawal period was documented by patient and family report and review of all medical records. The patient was contacted three months after hospitalization to verify information and determine progress in treatment and abstinence from drugs and alcohol. A review of the literature was completed on severe cases of precipitated and spontaneous opioid withdrawal followed by a discussion of the significance as it relates to this case. Given the widespread use of prescription opioids and opioid maintenance treatment, physicians should be aware of the complications of acute opioid withdrawal and should be equipped to treat these complications. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  15. Opioid interruptions, pain, and withdrawal symptoms in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Sarah E; Liu, Sophia; Hung, William W; Boockvar, Kenneth S

    2014-11-01

    Interruptions in opioid use have the potential to cause pain relapse and withdrawal symptoms. The objectives of this study were to observe patterns of opioid interruption during acute illness in nursing home residents and examine associations between interruptions and pain and withdrawal symptoms. Patients from 3 nursing homes in a metropolitan area who were prescribed opioids were assessed for symptoms of pain and withdrawal by researchers blinded to opioid dosage received, using the Brief Pain Inventory Scale and the Clinical Opioid Withdrawal Scale, respectively, during prespecified time periods. The prespecified time periods were 2 weeks after onset of acute illness (eg, urinary tract infection), and 2 weeks after hospital admission and nursing home readmission, if they occurred. Opioid dosing was recorded and a significant interruption was defined as a complete discontinuation or a reduction in dose of >50% for ≥1 day. The covariates age, sex, race, comorbid conditions, initial opioid dose, and initial pain level were recorded. Symptoms pre- and post-opioid interruptions were compared and contrasted with those in a group without opioid interruptions. Sixty-six patients receiving opioids were followed for a mean of 10.9 months and experienced a total of 104 acute illnesses. During 64 (62%) illnesses, patients experienced any reduction in opioid dosing, with a mean (SD) dose reduction of 63.9% (29.9%). During 39 (38%) illnesses, patients experienced a significant opioid interruption. In a multivariable model, residence at 1 of the 3 nursing homes was associated with a lower risk of interruption (odds ratio = 0.073; 95% CI, 0.009 to 0.597; P withdrawal score (difference -0.91 [3.12]; 95% CI, -4.03 to 2.21) after the interruption as compared with before interruption. However, when compared with patients without interruptions, patients with interruptions experienced larger increases in pain scores during the follow-up periods (difference 0.09 points per day; 95

  16. Opioid withdrawal syndrome: emerging concepts and novel therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehni, Ashish K; Jaggi, Amteshwar S; Singh, Nirmal

    2013-02-01

    Opioid withdrawal syndrome is a debilitating manifestation of opioid dependence and responds poorly to the available clinical therapies. Studies from various in vivo and in vitro animal models of opioid withdrawal syndrome have led to understanding of its pathobiology which includes complex interrelated pathways leading to adenylyl cyclase superactivation based central excitation. Advancements in the elucidation of opioid withdrawal syndrome mechanisms have revealed a number of key targets that have been hypothesized to modulate clinical status. The present review discusses the neurobiology of opioid withdrawal syndrome and its therapeutic target recptors like calcitonin gene related peptide receptors (CGRP), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, gamma aminobutyric acid receptors (GABA), G-proteingated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels and calcium channels. The present review further details the potential role of second messengers like calcium (Ca2+) / calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII), nitric oxide synthase, cytokines, arachidonic acid metabolites, corticotropin releasing factor, fos and src kinases in causing opioid withdrawal syndrome. The exploitation of these targets may provide effective therapeutic agents for the management of opioid dependence-induced abstinence syndrome.

  17. Precipitated withdrawal during maintenance opioid blockade with extended release naltrexone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Marc

    2008-08-01

    Background There has been increasing interest in the use of extended release injectable naltrexone for the treatment of opioid dependence. Case description We report a case of precipitated withdrawal in a 17-year-old adolescent female receiving extended release naltrexone (Vivitrol) for opioid dependence, following her third serial monthly dose of the medication, several days after using oxycodone with mild intoxication. Conclusions This case suggests that, in some circumstances, the opioid blockade may be overcome when naltrexone levels drop towards the end of the dosing interval, producing vulnerability to subsequent naltrexone-induced withdrawal. This may provide cautionary guidance for clinical management and dosing strategies.

  18. Safety of oral dronabinol during opioid withdrawal in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jicha, Crystal J; Lofwall, Michelle R; Nuzzo, Paul A; Babalonis, Shanna; Elayi, Samy Claude; Walsh, Sharon L

    2015-12-01

    Opioid dependence remains a significant public health problem worldwide with only three FDA-approved treatments, all targeting the mu-opioid receptor. Dronabinol, a cannabinoid (CB) 1 receptor agonist, is currently under investigation as a novel opioid withdrawal treatment. This study reports on safety outcomes of dronabinol among adults in opioid withdrawal. Twelve adults physically dependent on short-acting opioids participated in this 5-week within-subject, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled inpatient study. Volunteers were maintained on oral oxycodone 30 mg qid. Double-blind placebo substitutions occurred for 21 h before each of 7 experimental sessions in order to produce opioid withdrawal. A single oral test dose was administered each session (placebo, oxycodone 30 and 60 mg, dronabinol 5, 10, 20, and 30 mg [decreased from 40 mg]). Heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory outcomes and pupil diameter were assessed repeatedly. Dronabinol 40 mg produced sustained sinus tachycardia accompanied by anxiety and panic necessitating dose reduction to 30 mg. Sinus tachycardia and anxiety also occurred in one volunteer after dronabinol 20mg. Compared to placebo, dronabinol 20 and 30 mg produced significant increases in heart rate beginning 1h after drug administration that lasted approximately 2h (popioid agonist effects (e.g., miosis). Dronabinol 20mg and higher increased heart rate among healthy adults at rest who were in a state of opioid withdrawal, raising concern about its safety. These results have important implications for future dosing strategies and may limit the utility of dronabinol as a treatment for opioid withdrawal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Managing Opioid Withdrawal for Hospital Patients in Custody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Connie R; Kandola, Manjinder S; Tobey, Matthew; Singer, Elizabeth

    2017-03-01

    Dr. Brown, a hospitalist, admits Mark, a patient transferred from a local jail for management of cellulitis. The patient, who was taken into custody two days prior to hospital admission, has a history of intravenous heroin use. Mark explains that he had been prescribed buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance therapy for opioid use disorder for several years prior to being arrested and had not used other opioids during that time. As a policy, the jail where Mark is detained does not prescribe opioid agonists, and his maintenance therapy was stopped upon his arrival there. Dr. Brown discovers that Mark is diaphoretic and appears distressed. Mark's symptoms suggest to Dr. Brown that, in addition to having cellulitis, Mark is actively withdrawing from opioids. Mark tells Dr. Brown that he has felt "horrible" since his buprenorphine-naloxone therapy was stopped and that he now has intense cravings for opioids. He asks Dr. Brown to help alleviate the withdrawal symptoms. Dr. Brown, who is accustomed to treating opioid withdrawal with opioid replacement therapy, wonders if she should initiate ORT for Mark while he is in the hospital. © 2017 The Hastings Center.

  20. The influence of propoxyphene withdrawal on opioid use in veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Corey J; Hudson, Teresa J; Phillips, Martha M; Bursac, Zoran; Williams, James S; Austin, Mark A; Edlund, Mark J; Martin, Bradley C

    2015-11-01

    Our aim is to determine if propoxyphene withdrawal from the US market was associated with opioid continuation, continued chronic opioid use, and secondary propoxyphene-related adverse events (emergency department visits, opioid-related events, and acetaminophen toxicity). Medical service use and pharmacy data from 19/11/08 to 19/11/11 were collected from the national Veterans Healthcare Administration healthcare databases. A quasi-experimental pre-post retrospective cohort design utilizing a historical comparison group provided the study framework. Logistic regression controlling for baseline covariates was used to estimate the effect of propoxyphene withdrawal. There were 24,328 subjects (policy affected n = 10,747; comparison n = 13,581) meeting inclusion criteria. In the policy-affected cohort, 10.6% of users ceased using opioids, and 26.6% stopped chronic opioid use compared with 3.8% and 13.5% in the historical comparison cohort, respectively. Those in the policy-affected cohort were 2.7 (95%CI: 2.5-2.8) and 3.2 (95%CI: 2.9-3.6) times more likely than those in the historical comparison cohort to discontinue chronic opioid and any opioid use, respectively. Changes in adverse events and Emergency Department (ED) visits were not different between policy-affected and historical comparison cohorts (p > 0.05). The withdrawal of propoxyphene-containing products resulted in rapid and virtually complete elimination in propoxyphene prescribing in the veterans population; however, nearly 90% of regular users of propoxyphene switched to an alternate opioid, and three quarters continued to use opioids chronically. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Tolerance and withdrawal from prolonged opioid use in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Kanwaljeet J S; Willson, Douglas F; Berger, John; Harrison, Rick; Meert, Kathleen L; Zimmerman, Jerry; Carcillo, Joseph; Newth, Christopher J L; Prodhan, Parthak; Dean, J Michael; Nicholson, Carol

    2010-05-01

    After prolonged opioid exposure, children develop opioid-induced hyperalgesia, tolerance, and withdrawal. Strategies for prevention and management should be based on the mechanisms of opioid tolerance and withdrawal. Relevant manuscripts published in the English language were searched in Medline by using search terms "opioid," "opiate," "sedation," "analgesia," "child," "infant-newborn," "tolerance," "dependency," "withdrawal," "analgesic," "receptor," and "individual opioid drugs." Clinical and preclinical studies were reviewed for data synthesis. Mechanisms of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance suggest important drug- and patient-related risk factors that lead to tolerance and withdrawal. Opioid tolerance occurs earlier in the younger age groups, develops commonly during critical illness, and results more frequently from prolonged intravenous infusions of short-acting opioids. Treatment options include slowly tapering opioid doses, switching to longer-acting opioids, or specifically treating the symptoms of opioid withdrawal. Novel therapies may also include blocking the mechanisms of opioid tolerance, which would enhance the safety and effectiveness of opioid analgesia. Opioid tolerance and withdrawal occur frequently in critically ill children. Novel insights into opioid receptor physiology and cellular biochemical changes will inform scientific approaches for the use of opioid analgesia and the prevention of opioid tolerance and withdrawal.

  2. Comparison of tincture of opium and methadone to control opioid withdrawal in a Thai treatment centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jittiwutikarn, Jaroon; Ali, Robert; White, Jason M; Bochner, Felix; Somogyi, Andrew A; Foster, David J R

    2004-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effectiveness of oral tincture of opium (TOP) and methadone to control opioid withdrawal in patients in northern Thailand. Methods Open label, parallel group study in an inpatient facility compared 15 former heroin users receiving methadone 5–20 mg 12 hourly with 15 former opium smokers receiving TOP (3.33–10 mg morphine equivalents 12 hourly). At 0, 1, 3 and 8 h, blood, withdrawal scores and subjective opioid effects were collected. Results There was a reciprocal association between withdrawal scores/direct subjective opioid effects and plasma (R)-methadone, but not plasma morphine, concentrations. Withdrawal scores at the time of dosing were higher in the TOP patients (9.1 ± 3) than in the methadone patients (4.5 ± 4.6) and in the TOP patients were significantly (P = 0.001) attenuated at 3 and 8 h. Conclusions At the doses used, TOP was inferior to methadone in suppressing withdrawal. It could prove to be a cost effective and valuable drug, but only after dose size and frequency are further investigated. PMID:15521902

  3. Opioid Withdrawal Presenting as Delirium and Role of Buprenorphine: A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Sourav; Sah, Divyashree; Nandi, Shiladitya; Das, Payel

    2017-01-01

    Opioid withdrawal is very rarely characterized by delirium unlike alcohol or benzodiazepine withdrawal. PubMed search through October 2016 reveals only two case series on delirium as feature of withdrawal in opioid dependence syndrome. We report two cases of opioid withdrawal (heroin) presenting with delirium when low-dose buprenorphine (2 mg/day) was added. Both the cases had no other substance abuse history and nil contributory past and family history. Both of them were improved after incre...

  4. Intentional intrathecal opioid detoxification in 3 patients: characterization of the intrathecal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Tracy P; Lonergan, Daniel F; Todd, R David; Martin, Peter R

    2013-04-01

    Intrathecal (IT) drug delivery systems for patients with chronic non-malignant pain are intended to improve pain and quality of life and reduce side effects of systemic use. A subset of patients may have escalating pain, functional decline, and/or intolerable side effects even as IT opioid doses are increased. Discontinuation of IT medications may represent a viable treatment option but strategies to accomplish this are needed. Three patients with intrathecal drug delivery systems (IDDS), inadequate pain control, and declining functionality underwent abrupt IT opioid cessation. This was accomplished through a standardized protocol with symptom-triggered administration of clonidine and buprenorphine, monitored using the clinical opiate withdrawal scale. Symptoms of IT withdrawal were similar in all patients and included diuresis, agitation, hyperalgesia, mild diarrhea, yawning, and taste and smell aversion. Hypertension and tachycardia were effectively controlled by clonidine administration. Classic symptoms of withdrawal, such as piloerection, chills, severe diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis, myoclonus, and mydriasis, were not noted. At 2 to 3 months follow-up, patients reported decreased, but ongoing pain, with improvements in functional capacity and quality of life. This preliminary work demonstrates the safety of abrupt IT opioid cessation utilizing standardized inpatient withdrawal protocols. To our knowledge, these are among the first reported cases of intentional, controlled IT opioid cessation without initiation of an opioid bridge: self-reported pain scores, functional capacity, and quality of life improved. The IT opioid withdrawal syndrome is characterized based upon our observations and a review of the literature. © 2012 The Authors. Pain Practice © 2012 World Institute of Pain.

  5. Cannabinoid and opioid interactions: implications for opiate dependence and withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavone, J L; Sterling, R C; Van Bockstaele, E J

    2013-09-17

    Withdrawal from opiates, such as heroin or oral narcotics, is characterized by a host of aversive physical and emotional symptoms. High rates of relapse and limited treatment success rates for opiate addiction have prompted a search for new approaches. For many opiate addicts, achieving abstinence may be further complicated by poly-drug use and co-morbid mental disorders. Research over the past decade has shed light on the influence of endocannabinoids (ECs) on the opioid system. Evidence from both animal and clinical studies point toward an interaction between these two systems, and suggest that targeting the EC system may provide novel interventions for managing opiate dependence and withdrawal. This review will summarize the literature surrounding the molecular effects of cannabinoids and opioids on the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system, a key circuit implicated in the negative sequelae of opiate addiction. A consideration of the trends and effects of marijuana use in those seeking treatment to abstain from opiates in the clinical setting will also be presented. In summary, the present review details how cannabinoid-opioid interactions may inform novel interventions in the management of opiate dependence and withdrawal. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dexmedetomidine infusion to facilitate opioid detoxification and withdrawal in a patient with chronic opioid abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surjya Prasad Upadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many patients are admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU for acute intoxication, serious complication of overdose, or withdrawal symptoms of illicit drugs. An acute withdrawal of drugs with addiction potential is associated with a sympathetic overactivity leading to marked psychomimetic disturbances. Acute intoxication or withdrawal of such drugs is often associated with life-threatening complications which require ICU admission and necessitate prolonged sedative analgesic medications, weaning from which is often complicated by withdrawal and other psychomimetic symptoms. Dexmedetomidine, an alpha-2 (α2 agonist, has been used successfully to facilitate withdrawal and detoxification of various drugs and also to control delirium in ICU patients. Herein, we report a case of a chronic opioid abuse (heroin patient admitted with acute overdose complications leading to a prolonged ICU course requiring sedative-analgesic medication; the drug withdrawal-related symptoms further complicated the weaning process. Dexmedetomidine infusion was successfully used as a sedative-analgesic to control the withdrawal-related psychomimetic symptoms and to facilitate smooth detoxification and weaning from opioid and other sedatives.

  7. A rare case of complicated opioid withdrawal in delirium without convulsions

    OpenAIRE

    B Neeraj Raj; N Manamohan; Divya Hegde; Chandrashekar B Huded; Johnson Pradeep

    2017-01-01

    Opioids are one of the commonly abused substances in India. Opioid withdrawal symptoms classically include severe muscle cramps, bone aches, autonomic symptoms, anxiety, restlessness, insomnia, and temperature dysregulation. However, reports of cases with delirium during withdrawal are few. A 25-year-old male with severe opioid withdrawal symptoms developed delirium. Investigations were normal. There were no comorbidities, no significant past history and family history. Patient treated for op...

  8. Transdermal buprenorphine, opioid rotation to sublingual buprenorphine, and the avoidance of precipitated withdrawal: a review of the literature and demonstration in three chronic pain patients treated with butrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornfeld, Howard; Reetz, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Buprenorphine is an opioid, used in the United States and abroad for both analgesia and addiction, with unique opioid receptor binding properties. There are several pharmacological features of buprenorphine that make it an emerging option for the long-term treatment of chronic pain-its respiratory suppression ceiling effect, its efficacy in neuropathic pain and hyperalgesic states, and its decreased suppression of the immune and endocrine systems compared with other long-acting opioids. Previous studies have shown that high-dose sublingual buprenorphine is an effective treatment of chronic pain patients not responding to other opioids. Guidelines for the introduction of sublingual buprenorphine, termed buprenorphine induction, include an opioid-free "withdrawal" period of 12-48 hours to avoid an anticipated and accelerated opioid withdrawal, a syndrome described in this article as precipitated withdrawal. The requirement of a period of opioid abstinence before buprenorphine use may present a significant barrier to its adoption for chronic pain. We present a case series of a novel method of sublingual buprenorphine introduction without an induction period, using the recently Food and Drug Administration-approved low-dose transdermal buprenorphine (Butrans; Purdue Pharma L.P.) as a bridge medication. In these cases, buprenorphine was started in opioid-dependent chronic noncancer pain patients who had taken short-acting opioid medications within hours of the initiation of the rotation. This method avoids the painful abstinence period and did not result in precipitated withdrawal or other significant adverse effects.

  9. The Relative Potency of Inverse Opioid Agonists and a Neutral Opioid Antagonist in Precipitated Withdrawal and Antagonism of Analgesia and Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Sirohi, Sunil; Dighe, Shveta V.; Madia, Priyanka A.; Yoburn, Byron C.

    2009-01-01

    Opioid antagonists can be classified as inverse agonists and neutral antagonists. In the opioid-dependent state, neutral antagonists are significantly less potent in precipitating withdrawal than inverse agonists. Consequently, neutral opioid antagonists may offer advantages over inverse agonists in the management of opioid overdose. In this study, the relative potency of three opioid antagonists to block opioid analgesia and toxicity and precipitate withdrawal was exa...

  10. Morphine withdrawal enhances constitutive μ-opioid receptor activity in the ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meye, Frank J; van Zessen, Ruud; Smidt, Marten P; Adan, Roger A H; Ramakers, Geert M J

    2012-11-14

    μ-Opioid receptors (MORs) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are pivotally involved in addictive behavior. While MORs are typically activated by opioids, they can also become constitutively active in the absence of any agonist. In the current study, we present evidence that MOR constitutive activity is highly relevant in the mouse VTA, as it regulates GABAergic input to dopamine neurons. Specifically, suppression of MOR constitutive activity with the inverse agonist KC-2-009 enhanced GABAergic neurotransmission onto VTA dopamine neurons. This inverse agonistic effect was fully blocked by the specific MOR neutral antagonist CTOP, which had no effect on GABAergic transmission itself. We next show that withdrawal from chronic morphine further increases the magnitude of inverse agonistic effects at the MOR, suggesting enhanced MOR constitutive activity. We demonstrate that this increase can be an adaptive response to the detrimental elevation in cAMP levels known to occur during morphine withdrawal. These findings offer important insights in the physiological occurrence and function of MOR constitutive activity, and have important implications for therapeutic strategies aimed at normalizing MOR signaling during addiction and opioid overdose.

  11. Experience of the use of Ketamine to manage opioid withdrawal in an addicted woman: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Lalanne, Laurence; Nicot, Chloe; Lang, Jean-Philippe; Bertschy, Gilles; Salvat, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background Opioids are good painkillers, but many patients treated with opioids as painkillers developed a secondary addiction. These patients need to stop misusing opioids, but the mild-to-severe clinical symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal risk increasing their existing pain. In such cases, ketamine, which is used by anaesthetists and pain physicians to reduce opioid medication, may be an effective agent for managing opioid withdrawal. Case presentation We describe the case of a woma...

  12. Iatrogenic Opioid Withdrawal in Critically Ill Patients: A Review of Assessment Tools and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ada W; Contreras, Sofia; Mehta, Sangeeta; Korman, Jennifer; Perreault, Marc M; Williamson, David R; Burry, Lisa D

    2017-12-01

    To (1) provide an overview of the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and risk factors of iatrogenic opioid withdrawal in critically ill patients and (2) conduct a literature review of assessment and management of iatrogenic opioid withdrawal in critically ill patients. We searched MEDLINE (1946-June 2017), EMBASE (1974-June 2017), and CINAHL (1982-June 2017) with the terms opioid withdrawal, opioid, opiate, critical care, critically ill, assessment tool, scale, taper, weaning, and management. Reference list of identified literature was searched for additional references as well as www.clinicaltrials.gov . We restricted articles to those in English and dealing with humans. We identified 2 validated pediatric critically ill opioid withdrawal assessment tools: (1) Withdrawal Assessment Tool-Version 1 (WAT-1) and (2) Sophia Observation Withdrawal Symptoms Scale (SOS). Neither tool differentiated between opioid and benzodiazepine withdrawal. WAT-1 was evaluated in critically ill adults but not found to be valid. No other adult tool was identified. For management, we identified 5 randomized controlled trials, 2 prospective studies, and 2 systematic reviews. Most studies were small and only 2 studies utilized a validated assessment tool. Enteral methadone, α-2 agonists, and protocolized weaning were studied. We identified 2 validated assessment tools for pediatric intensive care unit patients; no valid tool for adults. Management strategies tested in small trials included methadone, α-2 agonists, and protocolized sedation/weaning. We challenge researchers to create validated tools assessing specifically for opioid withdrawal in critically ill children and adults to direct management.

  13. A double blind, within subject comparison of spontaneous opioid withdrawal from buprenorphine versus morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, D Andrew; Smith, Michael T; Mintzer, Miriam Z; Campbell, Claudia M; Strain, Eric C

    2014-02-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests that there is minimal withdrawal after the cessation of chronically administered buprenorphine and that opioid withdrawal symptoms are delayed compared with those of other opioids. The present study compared the time course and magnitude of buprenorphine withdrawal with a prototypical μ-opioid agonist, morphine. Healthy, out-of-treatment opioid-dependent residential volunteers (N = 7) were stabilized on either buprenorphine (32 mg/day i.m.) or morphine (120 mg/day i.m.) administered in four divided doses for 9 days. They then underwent an 18-day period of spontaneous withdrawal, during which four double-blind i.m. placebo injections were administered daily. Stabilization and spontaneous withdrawal were assessed for the second opioid using the same time course. Opioid withdrawal measures were collected eight times daily. Morphine withdrawal symptoms were significantly (P withdrawal as measured by mean peak ratings of Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS), Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (SOWS), all subscales of the Profile of Mood States (POMS), sick and pain (0-100) Visual Analog Scales, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and pupil dilation. Peak ratings on COWS and SOWS occurred on day 2 of morphine withdrawal and were significantly greater than on day 2 of buprenorphine withdrawal. Subjective reports of morphine withdrawal resolved on average by day 7. There was minimal evidence of buprenorphine withdrawal on any measure. In conclusion, spontaneous withdrawal from high-dose buprenorphine appears subjectively and objectively milder compared with that of morphine for at least 18 days after drug cessation.

  14. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: management of opioid-induced constipation by peripheral opioid receptor antagonists: prevention or withdrawal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic action of opioid analgesics is compromised by peripheral adverse effects among which opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is the most disabling, with a prevalence reported to vary between 15 and 90 %. Although OIC is usually treated with laxatives, there is insufficient clinical evidence that laxatives are efficacious in this indication. In contrast, there is ample evidence from double- blind, randomized and placebo-controlled trials that peripheral opioid receptor antagonists (PORAs) counteract OIC. This specific treatment modality is currently based on subcutaneous methylnaltrexone for the interruption of OIC in patients with advanced illness, and a fixed combination of oral prolonged-release naloxone with prolonged-release oxycodone for the prevention of OIC in the treatment of non-cancer and cancer pain. Both drugs counteract OIC while the analgesic effect of opioids remains unabated. The clinical studies show that more than 50 % of the patients with constipation under opioid therapy may benefit from the use of PORAs, while PORA-resistant patients are likely to suffer from non-opioid-induced constipation, the prevalence of which increases with age. While the addition of naloxone to oxycodone seems to act by preventing OIC, the intermittent dosing of methylnaltrexone every other day seems to stimulate defaecation by provoking an intestinal withdrawal response. The availability of PORAs provides a novel opportunity to specifically control OIC and other peripheral adverse effects of opioid analgesics (e.g., urinary retention and pruritus). The continuous dosing of a PORA has the advantage of few adverse effects, while intermittent dosing of a PORA can be associated with abdominal cramp-like pain.

  15. Self-treatment of opioid withdrawal using kratom (Mitragynia speciosa korth).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Edward W; Babu, Kavita M; Adkins, Jessica E; McCurdy, Christopher R; Halpern, John H

    2008-06-01

    Kratom (Mitragynia speciosa korth) is recognized increasingly as a remedy for opioid withdrawal by individuals who self-treat chronic pain. A patient who had abruptly ceased injection hydromorphone abuse self-managed opioid withdrawal and chronic pain using kratom. After co-administering the herb with modafinil he experienced a tonic-clonic seizure, but he reported only modest abstinence once kratom administration stopped. We confirmed the identity of the plant matter he ingested as kratom and identified no contaminants or adulterants. We also conducted high-throughput molecular screening and the binding affinity at mu, delta and kappa receptors of mitragynine. We report the self-treatment of chronic pain and opioid withdrawal with kratom. The predominant alkaloid of kratom, mitragynine, binds mu- and kappa-opioid receptors, but has additional receptor affinities that might augment its effectiveness at mitigating opioid withdrawal. The natural history of kratom use, including its clinical pharmacology and toxicology, are poorly understood.

  16. Tramadol versus methadone for the management of acute opioid withdrawal: an add-on study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Salehi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Opioid agonists such as methadone have been used widely in controlling opioid withdrawal symptoms. Tramadol, a partial opioid agonist, also has been prescribed to manage acute and chronic pain. We sought to compare the efficacy of tramadol and methadone in reducing the severity of opioid withdrawal symptoms. METHODS: In a double blind clinical trial 70 opioid dependent patients who used daily opium equal to 15 mg methadone randomly were assigned in two groups. In one group, methadone was started at 15 mg/day while in the other group 450 mg/day tramadol was prescribed. Both drugs were tapered in a week and placebo was prescribed in the 2nd week. The severity of withdrawal symptoms were assessed five times by short opioid withdrawal scale (SOWS. Data were analyzed by Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance, Mann-Whitney U, and Wilcoxon tests. RESULTS: There were statistically significant differences between two groups in the severity of anxiety (P = 0.015, irritability (P = 0.044, palpitation (P = 0.018, agitation (P = 0.037, and dysphoria (P = 0.044 that all were more common in methadone group. Comparison of side effects revealed statistically significant differences in sweating (P = 0.003 and drowsiness (P = 0.019 between two groups that were more frequent in methadone group. DISCUSSION: Tramadol was more efficacious in controlling opioid withdrawal symptoms with lower side effects. KEYWORDS: Methadone, tramadol, opioid withdrawal.

  17. Experience of the use of Ketamine to manage opioid withdrawal in an addicted woman: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalanne, Laurence; Nicot, Chloe; Lang, Jean-Philippe; Bertschy, Gilles; Salvat, Eric

    2016-11-10

    Opioids are good painkillers, but many patients treated with opioids as painkillers developed a secondary addiction. These patients need to stop misusing opioids, but the mild-to-severe clinical symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal risk increasing their existing pain. In such cases, ketamine, which is used by anaesthetists and pain physicians to reduce opioid medication, may be an effective agent for managing opioid withdrawal. We describe the case of a woman who developed a severe secondary addiction to opioids in the context of lombo-sciatic pain. She presented a severe opioid addiction, and her physicians refused to prescribe such high doses of opioid treatment (oxycontin® extended-release 120 mg daily, oxycodone 60 mg daily, and acetaminophen/codeine 300 mg/25 mg 6 times per day). To assist her with her opioid withdrawal which risked increasing her existing pain, she received 1 mg/kg ketamine oral solution, and two days after ketamine initiation her opioid treatment was gradually reduced. The patient dramatically reduced the dosage of opioid painkillers and ketamine was withdrawn without any withdrawal symptoms. Ketamine displays many interesting qualities for dealing with all symptoms relating to opioid withdrawal. Accordingly, it could be used instead of many psychotropic treatments, which interact with each other, to help with opioid withdrawal. However, the literature describes addiction to ketamine. All in all, although potentially addictive, ketamine could be a good candidate for the pharmacological management of opioid withdrawal.

  18. Sleep-disordered breathing decreases after opioid withdrawal: results of a prospective controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, Andreas; Aichinger-Hinterhofer, Marie; Maier, Christoph; Vollert, Jan; Walther, Jörg Werner

    2015-11-01

    An increased cardiovascular event rate in elderly patients under opioid medications was recently reported. One reason for this increase could be the occurrence of nocturnal apnea and hypoxia, as a consequence of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Using a controlled study, we prospectively analyzed SDB using polysomnography in a total of 18 patients before and after opioid withdrawal (opioid withdrawal group [OG]) and 14 patients before and after comprehensive pain management (without any strong-acting opioids) who served as the control group (CG). To analyze the differences, unpaired/paired t tests and Mann-Whitney U tests/Wilcoxon rank tests were used. At baseline, the OG presented more nocturnal apneas/hypopneas than the CG with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 41.4 ± 27.8 vs 21.8 ± 15.9 (P = 0.018). After treatment, the AHI decreased significantly only in the withdrawal group (OG: 16.7 ± 8.9; CG: 20.1 ± 12.9) (P opioid withdrawal and in none of the patients after withdrawal (P opioid intake; these findings may explain the opioid-associated cardiovascular morbidity. Thus, SDB may be a risk at lower opioid doses than hitherto described, and particular caution should be exercised in patients with comorbidities that might make them vulnerable to the consequences of SDB.

  19. Self-treatment of opioid withdrawal with a dietary supplement, Kratom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Edward W; Babu, Kavita M; Macalino, Grace E; Compton, Wilson

    2007-01-01

    We examined the use of Kratom (Mitragyna sp.), a dietary supplement with mu-opioid agonist activity, by members of a cybercommunity who self-treat chronic pain with opioid analgesics from Internet pharmacies. Within one year, an increase in the number of mentions on Drugbuyers.com, a Web site that facilitates the online purchase of opioid analgesics, suggested that members began managing opioid withdrawal with Kratom. This study demonstrates the rapidity with which information on psychoactive substances disseminates through online communities and suggests that online surveillance may be important to the generation of effective opioid analgesic abuse prevention strategies.

  20. Opioid Withdrawal Presenting as Delirium and Role of Buprenorphine: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sourav; Sah, Divyashree; Nandi, Shiladitya; Das, Payel

    2017-01-01

    Opioid withdrawal is very rarely characterized by delirium unlike alcohol or benzodiazepine withdrawal. PubMed search through October 2016 reveals only two case series on delirium as feature of withdrawal in opioid dependence syndrome. We report two cases of opioid withdrawal (heroin) presenting with delirium when low-dose buprenorphine (2 mg/day) was added. Both the cases had no other substance abuse history and nil contributory past and family history. Both of them were improved after increasing the buprenorphine dosage to 6-8 mg/day. The possibility of delirium as a part of withdrawal symptom or as a phenomenon induced by buprenorphine or due to impurities in the heroin used is discussed.

  1. Pioglitazone attenuates the opioid withdrawal and vulnerability to relapse to heroin seeking in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guglielmo, Giordano; Kallupi, Marsida; Scuppa, Giulia; Demopulos, Gregory; Gaitanaris, George; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Relapse to opioids is often driven by the avoidance of the aversive states of opioid withdrawal. We recently demonstrated that activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) by pioglitazone reduces the motivation for heroin and attenuates its rewarding properties. However, the role of PPARγ in withdrawal and other forms of relapse to heroin is unknown. To further address this issue, we investigated the role of PPARγ on the development and expression of morphine withdrawal in mice and the effect of pioglitazone on several forms of heroin relapse in rats. We induced physical dependence to morphine in mice by injecting morphine twice daily for 6 days. Withdrawal syndrome was precipitated on day 6 with an injection of naloxone. In addition, different groups of rats were trained to self-administer heroin and, after the extinction, the relapse was elicited by cues, priming, or stress. The effect of different doses of pioglitazone was tested on these different paradigms. Data show that chronic and acute administration of pioglitazone attenuates morphine withdrawal symptoms, and these effects are mediated by activation of PPARγ receptors. Activation of PPARγ by pioglitazone also abolishes yohimbine-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking and reduces heroin-induced reinstatement, while it does not affect cue-induced relapse. These findings provide new insights on the role of PPARγ on opioid dependence and suggest that pioglitazone may be useful for the treatment of opioid withdrawal in opioid-addicted individuals.

  2. Withdrawal-associated injury site pain (WISP): a descriptive case series of an opioid cessation phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieb, Launette Marie; Norman, Wendy V; Martin, Ruth Elwood; Berkowitz, Jonathan; Wood, Evan; McNeil, Ryan; Milloy, M-J

    2016-12-01

    Withdrawal pain can be a barrier to opioid cessation. Yet, little is known about old injury site pain in this context. We conducted an exploratory mixed-methods descriptive case series using a web-based survey and in-person interviews with adults recruited from pain and addiction treatment and research settings. We included individuals who self-reported a past significant injury that was healed and pain-free before the initiation of opioids, which then became temporarily painful upon opioid cessation-a phenomenon we have named withdrawal-associated injury site pain (WISP). Screening identified WISP in 47 people, of whom 34 (72%) completed the descriptive survey, including 21 who completed qualitative interviews. Recalled pain severity scores for WISP were typically high (median: 8/10; interquartile range [IQR]: 2), emotionally and physically aversive, and took approximately 2 weeks to resolve (median: 14; IQR: 24 days). Withdrawal-associated injury site pain intensity was typically slightly less than participants' original injury pain (median: 10/10; IQR: 3), and more painful than other generalized withdrawal symptoms which also lasted approximately 2 weeks (median: 13; IQR: 25 days). Fifteen surveyed participants (44%) reported returning to opioid use because of WISP in the past. Participants developed theories about the etiology of WISP, including that the pain is the brain's way of communicating a desire for opioids. This research represents the first known documentation that previously healed, and pain-free injury sites can temporarily become painful again during opioid withdrawal, an experience which may be a barrier to opioid cessation, and a contributor to opioid reinitiation.

  3. Pleiotropic opioid regulation of spinal endomorphin 2 release and its adaptations to opioid withdrawal are sexually dimorphic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Sumita; Liu, Nai-Jiang; Zadina, James E; Sharma, Tarak; Gintzler, Alan R

    2012-01-01

    We studied adaptations to acute precipitated opioid withdrawal of spinal μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-coupled regulation of the release of endomorphin 2 (EM2). The release of this highly MOR-selective endogenous opioid from opioid-naive spinal tissue of male rats is subjected to MOR-coupled positive as well as negative modulation via cholera toxin-sensitive G(s) and pertussis toxin-sensitive G(i)/G(o), respectively. The net effect of this concomitant bidirectional modulation is inhibitory. MOR-coupled pleiotropic regulation of EM2 release is retained in opioid-withdrawn spinal tissue of male rats, but the balance of MOR-coupled inhibitory and facilitatory regulation shifted such that facilitatory regulation predominates. Augmented coupling of MOR to G(s) is causally associated with this change. Strikingly, pleiotropic characteristics of MOR-coupled regulation of spinal EM2 release and adaptations thereof to opioid withdrawal are male-specific. In females, MOR-coupled regulation of EM2 release from opioid-naive and -withdrawn spinal tissue does not have a significant G(s)-coupled facilitatory component, and MOR-coupled inhibition of EM2 release persists unabated in withdrawn preparations. The male-specific adaptations to chronic morphine that shift the relative predominance of opposing dual G protein-coupled MOR pathways provides a mechanism for mitigating inhibitory MOR signaling without losing MOR-coupled feedback regulation. These adaptations enable using endogenous EM2 as a substitute for morphine that had been precipitously removed. The sexually dimorphic functionality and regulation of spinal EM2/MOR-coupled signaling suggest the clinical utility of using sex-specific treatments for addiction that harness the activity of endogenous opioids.

  4. Opioid withdrawal presenting only nausea during tapering of oxycodone after celiac plexus block: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Akiyuki; Takayama, Hiroto; Mamiya, Keiko; Koizumi, Tomonobu

    2016-01-01

    Celiac plexus block (CPB) is an effective treatment for patients suffering pain. CPB may allow for a reduction in opioid dosage, and may alleviate some of the unwanted side effects of these drugs. However, there is a substantial risk of withdrawal symptoms after reduction of opioid dose. We describe a case of pancreatic cancer developing opioid withdrawal after CPB, who presented only nausea. A 70-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to severe pancreatic cancer pain. He was administered oxycodone (oxycontin®) at 240 mg per day, and presented nausea and anorexia as side effects. CPB was performed due to insufficient pain relief. His pain disappeared on the same day as treatment. Oxycodone was reduced to 160 mg/day, and further reduced two days later to 80 mg/day. However, he complained of more severe nausea and loss of appetite even after tapering of oxycodone. Physical examination, blood chemistry examination, and brain computed tomography (CT) showed no abnormalities. Administration of fast-release oxycodone (Oxinome®) at a dose of 10 mg immediately improved his nausea. There have been no previous reports of nausea as the sole symptom of opioid withdrawal. The present case indicates that unless opioid side effects improve after dosage reduction, the possibility that they may be withdrawal symptoms should also be considered.

  5. The relative potency of inverse opioid agonists and a neutral opioid antagonist in precipitated withdrawal and antagonism of analgesia and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Sunil; Dighe, Shveta V; Madia, Priyanka A; Yoburn, Byron C

    2009-08-01

    Opioid antagonists can be classified as inverse agonists and neutral antagonists. In the opioid-dependent state, neutral antagonists are significantly less potent in precipitating withdrawal than inverse agonists. Consequently, neutral opioid antagonists may offer advantages over inverse agonists in the management of opioid overdose. In this study, the relative potency of three opioid antagonists to block opioid analgesia and toxicity and precipitate withdrawal was examined. First, the potency of two opioid inverse agonists (naltrexone and naloxone) and a neutral antagonist (6beta-naltrexol) to antagonize fentanyl-induced analgesia and lethality was determined. The order of potency to block analgesia was naltrexone > naloxone > 6beta-naltrexol (17, 4, 1), which was similar to that to block lethality (13, 2, 1). Next, the antagonists were compared using withdrawal jumping in fentanyl-dependent mice. The order of potency to precipitate withdrawal jumping was naltrexone > naloxone 6beta-naltrexol (1107, 415, 1). The relative potencies to precipitate withdrawal for the inverse agonists compared with the neutral antagonist were dramatically different from that for antagonism of analgesia and lethality. Finally, the effect of 6beta-naltrexol pretreatment on naloxone-precipitated jumping was determined in morphine and fentanyl-dependent mice. 6beta-Naltrexol pretreatment decreased naloxone precipitated withdrawal, indicating that 6beta-naltrexol is a neutral antagonist. These data demonstrate that inverse agonists and neutral antagonists have generally comparable potencies to block opioid analgesia and lethality, whereas the neutral opioid antagonist is substantially less potent in precipitating opioid withdrawal. These results support suggestions that neutral antagonists may have advantages over inverse agonists in the management of opioid overdose.

  6. An Emerging New Paradigm in Opioid Withdrawal: A Critical Role for Glia-Neuron Signaling in the Periaqueductal Gray

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang, Handong; Liu, Shue; Zeng, Weian; Levitt, Roy C.; Candiotti, Keith A.; Hao, Shuanglin

    2012-01-01

    The chronic use of opiates (i.e., narcotics such as the natural derivatives of opium including morphine or codeine) or opioids (i.e., semisynthetic derivatives of opium and other molecules that activate opioid receptors) induces dependence, which is associated with various specific behavioral and somatic signs after their withdrawal or after the administration of an opioid antagonist. Among the brain regions implicated in opiate dependence and withdrawal, the periaqueductal gray area (PAG) ap...

  7. An Emerging New Paradigm in Opioid Withdrawal: A Critical Role for Glia-Neuron Signaling in the Periaqueductal Gray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handong Ouyang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The chronic use of opiates (i.e., narcotics such as the natural derivatives of opium including morphine or codeine or opioids (i.e., semisynthetic derivatives of opium and other molecules that activate opioid receptors induces dependence, which is associated with various specific behavioral and somatic signs after their withdrawal or after the administration of an opioid antagonist. Among the brain regions implicated in opiate dependence and withdrawal, the periaqueductal gray area (PAG appears to be critical in regulating the complex signs and symptoms of opioid withdrawal. Numerous neurochemical mechanisms in the PAG have been identified that may contribute to the opioid withdrawal syndrome. Accumulating evidence suggests that glial activation leading to the release of proinflammatory molecules acting on neurons is important in the complex syndrome of opioid dependence and withdrawal. This paper focuses on the recent advances in our understanding of the vital role that glia-neuron interactions play in opioid dependence and withdrawal within the PAG. We summarize those neurochemical mechanisms associated with opioid withdrawal including the recently defined importance of TNFα release from activated glial cells that communicate with TNF receptors on PAG neurons.

  8. Efficacy of extended-release tramadol for treatment of prescription opioid withdrawal: A two-phase randomized controlled trial*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofwall, Michelle R.; Babalonis, Shanna; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Siegel, Anthony; Campbell, Charles; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tramadol is an atypical analgesic with monoamine and modest mu opioid agonist activity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate: 1) the efficacy of extended-release (ER) tramadol in treating prescription opioid withdrawal and 2) whether cessation of ER tramadol produces opioid withdrawal. Methods Prescription opioid users with current opioid dependence and observed withdrawal participated in this inpatient, two-phase double blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial. In Phase 1 (days 1-7), participants were randomly assigned to matched oral placebo or ER tramadol (200 or 600 mg daily). In Phase 2 (days 8-13), all participants underwent double blind crossover to placebo. Breakthrough withdrawal medications were available for all subjects. Enrollment continued until 12 completers/group was achieved. Results Use of breakthrough withdrawal medication differed significantly (popioid withdrawal. Mild opioid withdrawal occurred after cessation of treatment with 600 mg tramadol. These data support the continued investigation of tramadol as a treatment for opioid withdrawal. PMID:23755929

  9. Efficacy of extended-release tramadol for treatment of prescription opioid withdrawal: a two-phase randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofwall, Michelle R; Babalonis, Shanna; Nuzzo, Paul A; Siegel, Anthony; Campbell, Charles; Walsh, Sharon L

    2013-11-01

    Tramadol is an atypical analgesic with monoamine and modest mu opioid agonist activity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate: (1) the efficacy of extended-release (ER) tramadol in treating prescription opioid withdrawal and (2) whether cessation of ER tramadol produces opioid withdrawal. Prescription opioid users with current opioid dependence and observed withdrawal participated in this inpatient, two-phase double blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial. In Phase 1 (days 1-7), participants were randomly assigned to matched oral placebo or ER tramadol (200 or 600 mg daily). In Phase 2 (days 8-13), all participants underwent double blind crossover to placebo. Breakthrough withdrawal medications were available for all subjects. Enrollment continued until 12 completers/group was achieved. Use of breakthrough withdrawal medication differed significantly (popioid withdrawal. Mild opioid withdrawal occurred after cessation of treatment with 600 mg tramadol. These data support the continued investigation of tramadol as a treatment for opioid withdrawal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Opioid therapy for chronic noncancer pain: retrospective analysis of patients hospitalized for withdrawal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Delinger; Giniès, Patrick; Eiden, Céline; Portet, Laure; Peyrière, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    The prescription of opioids for the treatment of chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) is not recommended for all of them, and can expose the patients to a benefit/risk ratio unfavorable. The objective of this study was to evaluate the management of patients hospitalized at the centre for evaluation and treatment of pain for opioid withdrawal, their outcome during hospitalization. This is a retrospective descriptive study. The medical record of each patient was consulted to identify relevant data (demographics, treatments at the entrance and discharge of hospitalization, comorbidities, rating scale of pain). During the study period (3 years), 53 patients (64% of women), with a median age of 52 years, were included. Pain was mainly back pain and neck pain (52%). Morphine (43%) and fentanyl (42%) were the most frequently used opioids. At admission, 62% of patients had a depressive state. At hospital discharge, withdrawal was total in 18 patients (34%) and a total improvement of pain was observed for 19% of them. In this study, 57% of patients received, at admission to hospital, an opioid other than morphine in the treatment of CNCP. The management of pain offered by the pain clinic led to a total or partial opioid withdrawal in 94% of patients. © 2013 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits opioid withdrawal-induced pain sensitization in rats by down-regulation of spinal calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hai-Yu; Wu, Zhi-Yuan; Bian, Jin-Song

    2014-09-01

    Hyperalgesia often occurs in opioid-induced withdrawal syndrome. In the present study, we found that three hourly injections of DAMGO (a μ-opioid receptor agonist) followed by naloxone administration at the fourth hour significantly decreased rat paw nociceptive threshold, indicating the induction of withdrawal hyperalgesia. Application of NaHS (a hydrogen sulfide donor) together with each injection of DAMGO attenuated naloxone-precipitated withdrawal hyperalgesia. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that NaHS significantly reversed the gene and protein expression of up-regulated spinal calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in naloxone-treated animals. NaHS also inhibited naloxone-induced cAMP rebound and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in rat spinal cord. In SH-SY5Y neuronal cells, NaHS inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production and adenylate cyclase (AC) activity. Moreover, NaHS pre-treatment suppressed naloxone-stimulated activation of protein kinase C (PKC) α, Raf-1, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in rat spinal cord. Our data suggest that H2S prevents the development of opioid withdrawal-induced hyperalgesia via suppression of synthesis of CGRP in spine through inhibition of AC/cAMP and PKC/Raf-1/ERK pathways.

  12. Amantadine as Augmentation in Managing Opioid Withdrawal with Clonidine: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrokh Amiri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Withdrawal symptoms are a main reason of continuous use of opioid. This study compares the efficacy of augmentation of amantadine with clonidine in decreasing opioid withdrawal symptoms.This double-blind randomized clinical trial was carried out in the detoxification and rehabilitation inpatient ward at Razi Hospital, Tabriz, Iran during 2012. The patients were randomly assigned to receive clonidine or clonidine plus amantadine; and withdrawal symptoms were evaluated in the admission day and 24, 48, and 72 hours later. Data were analyzed using SPSS by the 2*2 repeated analyses of variances (ANOVA.From the total of 69 participants, 30 patients completed the trial in each group. The severity of symptoms, however, had an increasing trend in both groups. Analysis of variance of the symptom severity score (by The Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale revealed a significant group-time interaction, and the patients who were receiving amantadine experienced milder symptoms.Treatment of opioid withdrawal symptoms with amantadine and clonidine would result in a better outcome compared with clonidine alone.

  13. Agmatine: identification and inhibition of methamphetamine, kappa opioid, and cannabinoid withdrawal in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Scott M; Gerber, Kristin; Ding, Zhe; Roth, Christopher; Raffa, Robert B

    2008-12-01

    Agmatine blocks morphine physical dependence in mammals, but its effects on withdrawal signs caused by other abused drugs have been less studied. One of the reasons is that withdrawal to some of these drugs is difficult to quantify in mammals. An alternative to mammals is planarians, a type of flatworm. Planarians possess mammalian-like neurotransmitters and display withdrawal from amphetamines, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, cocaine, and opioids. The withdrawal is manifested as a reduction in locomotor behavior following discontinuation of drug exposure. In the present study, our goal was to identify agmatine in planarians and to determine if planarians exposed to agmatine display withdrawal to methamphetamine, a cannabinoid receptor agonist (WIN 55,212-2), or a kappa-opioid receptor agonist (U-50,488H). Neurochemical experiments revealed that the concentration of agmatine in planarians was 185 +/- 33.7 pmol per mg of planarian weight (dry weight). In behavioral experiments, withdrawal (i.e., reduced locomotor activity) was observed when planarians exposed to each drug (10 microM) for 60 min were placed into water. The withdrawal was attenuated when methamphetamine- or U-50,488H-exposed planarians were tested in agmatine (100 microM). Withdrawal was inhibited similarly when planarians coexposed to agmatine (100 microM) plus methamphetamine (10 microM), WIN 55,212-2 (10 microM), or U-50,488H (10 microM) were tested in water. Arginine, the metabolic precursor to agmatine, was ineffective. Our results identify endogenous agmatine in planarians and demonstrate that agmatine exposure blocks withdrawal to three different drugs in planarians. This suggests that a change in agmatine signaling is a common mechanism in the withdrawal caused by these drugs, at least in planarians.

  14. Cholecystokinin octapeptide induces endogenous opioid-dependent anxiolytic effects in morphine-withdrawal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, D; Sun, D; Zang, G; Hao, L; Liu, X; Yu, F; Ma, C; Cong, B

    2014-09-26

    Cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8), a brain-gut peptide, plays an important role in several opioid addictive behaviors. We previously reported that CCK-8 attenuated the expression and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference. The possible effects of CCK-8 on the negative affective components of drug abstinence are not clear. There are no studies evaluating the effect of CCK-8 on emotional symptoms, such as anxiety, in morphine-withdrawal animals. We investigated the effects of CCK-8 on the anxiety-like behavior in morphine-withdrawal rats using an elevated plus-maze. Morphine withdrawal elicited time-dependent anxiety-like behaviors with peak effects on day 10 (5 days after induction of morphine dependence). Treatment with CCK-8 (0.1 and 1 μg, i.c.v.) blocked this anxiety in a dose-dependent fashion. A CCK1 receptor antagonist (L-364,718, 10 μg, i.c.v.) blocked the effect of CCK-8. Mu-opioid receptor antagonism with CTAP (10 μg, i.c.v.) decreased the 'anxiolytic' effect. CCK-8 inhibited anxiety-like behaviors in morphine-withdrawal rats by up-regulating endogenous opioids via the CCK1 receptor in rats. This study clearly identifies a distinct function of CCK-8 and a potential medication target of central CCK1 receptors for drugs aimed at ameliorating drug addiction. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Successful Treatment of Opioid Withdrawal-Induced Refractory Muscle Spasms with 5-HTP in a Patient Intolerant to Clonidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dais, Jennifer; Khosia, Ankur; Doulatram, Gulshan

    2015-01-01

    Instituting drug holidays for chronic opioid using patients is becoming commonplace for pain practitioners initiating procedures such as intrathecal pump or spinal cord stimulator trials. As such, pain practitioners need to be adept in their management of acute opioid withdrawal. Successfully weaning an opioid dependent patient off of chronic opioids requires a thorough knowledge of the available adjuvants to assist in this process. However, that selection can become exhausted by adjuvant side effects or by ineffective attenuation of opioid withdrawal symptoms. In that case, novel drugs, or novel application of currently available medications must be sought after to assist in the drug holiday. We present a case in which refractory muscle spasms secondary to opioid withdrawal were successfully treated with an over-the-counter supplement that is not typically used for the attenuation of opioid withdrawal symptoms. In a patient intolerant to the side effects of clonidine, we were able to successfully wean chronic opiates by treating refractory muscle spasms with the serotonin precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP). We hypothesize that our success with this medication gives further credence to the role of serotonin in opioid withdrawal somatic symptomatology, and supports the need for future research to clarify the role of serotonin precursors or serotonin modulating drugs as potential alternatives in those unable to follow standard treatment protocols.

  16. Opioid withdrawal, craving, and use during and after outpatient buprenorphine stabilization and taper: a discrete survival and growth mixture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, Thomas F; Stotts, Angela L; Green, Charles; Potter, Jennifer S; Marino, Elise N; Walker, Robrina; Weiss, Roger D; Trivedi, Madhukar

    2015-02-01

    Most patients relapse to opioids within one month of opioid agonist detoxification, making the antecedents and parallel processes of first use critical for investigation. Craving and withdrawal are often studied in relationship to opioid outcomes, and a novel analytic strategy applied to these two phenomena may indicate targeted intervention strategies. Specifically, this secondary data analysis of the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study used a discrete-time mixture analysis with time-to-first opioid use (survival) simultaneously predicted by craving and withdrawal growth trajectories. This analysis characterized heterogeneity among prescription opioid-dependent individuals (N=653) into latent classes (i.e., latent class analysis [LCA]) during and after buprenorphine/naloxone stabilization and taper. A 4-latent class solution was selected for overall model fit and clinical parsimony. In order of shortest to longest time-to-first use, the 4 classes were characterized as 1) high craving and withdrawal, 2) intermediate craving and withdrawal, 3) high initial craving with low craving and withdrawal trajectories and 4) a low initial craving with low craving and withdrawal trajectories. Odds ratio calculations showed statistically significant differences in time-to-first use across classes. Generally, participants with lower baseline levels and greater decreases in craving and withdrawal during stabilization combined with slower craving and withdrawal rebound during buprenorphine taper remained opioid-free longer. This exploratory work expanded on the importance of monitoring craving and withdrawal during buprenorphine induction, stabilization, and taper. Future research may allow individually tailored and timely interventions to be developed to extend time-to-first opioid use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Antagonist-precipitated opioid withdrawal in rats: evidence for dissociations between physical and motivational signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, G A; Sellers, E M

    1994-05-01

    In rats made opioid dependent by the implantation of a single morphine 75 mg base pellet, an attempt was made to determine whether any correlational existed between physical and motivational withdrawal signs by adjusting the dose of naloxone used to precipitate withdrawal. The models used to study motivational signs were taste (one- and two-bottle) conditioning and operant responding for food under an FR15 schedule of reinforcement. Naloxone at doses of 0.01 mg/kg and above produced both a conditioned taste aversion (two-bottle test only) and reduced food responding in morphine pellet, but not placebo pellet, implanted animals. No physical withdrawal signs, e.g., wet dog shakes, diarrhoea, were noted until naloxone doses of 0.05 mg/kg and above were used. It is concluded that the difference in naloxone doses required to elicit physical and motivational withdrawal components provides further support for their dissociation.

  18. Buprenorphine and Opioid Antagonism, Tolerance, and Naltrexone-Precipitated Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Jack

    2011-01-01

    The dual antagonist effects of the mixed-action μ-opioid partial agonist/κ-opioid antagonist buprenorphine have not been previously compared in behavioral studies, and it is unknown whether they are comparably modified by chronic exposure. To address this question, the dose-related effects of levorphanol, trans-(−)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl] benzeneacetamide (U50,488), heroin, and naltrexone on food-maintained behavior in rhesus monkeys were studied after acute and chronic treatment with buprenorphine (0.3 mg/kg/day). In acute studies, the effects of levorphanol and U50,488 were determined at differing times after buprenorphine (0.003–10.0 mg/kg i.m.). Results show that buprenorphine produced similar, dose-dependent rightward shifts of the levorphanol and U50,488 dose-response curves that persisted for ≥24 h after doses larger than 0.1 mg/kg buprenorphine. During chronic treatment with buprenorphine, the effects of levorphanol, U50,488, heroin, and naltrexone were similarly determined at differing times (10 min to 48 h) after intramuscular injection. Overall, results show that buprenorphine produced comparable 3- to 10-fold rightward shifts in the U50,488 dose-response curve under both acute and chronic conditions, but that chronic buprenorphine produced larger (10- to ≥30-fold) rightward shifts in the heroin dose-effect function than observed acutely. Naltrexone decreased operant responding in buprenorphine-treated monkeys, and the position of the naltrexone dose-effect curve shifted increasingly to the left as the time after daily buprenorphine treatment increased from 10 min to 48 h. These results suggest that the μ-antagonist, but not the κ-antagonist, effects of buprenorphine are augmented during chronic treatment. In addition, the leftward shift of the naltrexone dose-effect function suggests that daily administration of 0.3 mg/kg buprenorphine is adequate to produce opioid dependence. PMID:21051498

  19. [Cannabis withdrawal syndrome in patients with cannabis dependence only, and in patients with cannabis and opioid dependence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorspan, F; Guillem, E; Bloch, V; Bellais, L; Sicot, R; Noble, F; Lepine, J-P; Gorelick, D A

    2011-09-01

    The cannabis withdrawal syndrome occurs after cannabis cessation in more than 50% of dependent smokers. But although opioid-dependent patients are more frequently cannabis users and cannabis-dependent than the general population, the frequency and phenomenology of cannabis withdrawal symptoms in this specific population is unknown. Our hypothesis was that cannabis-dependent patients with current opioid dependence would experience the same withdrawal syndrome after cannabis cessation. To describe cannabis withdrawal symptoms in cannabis-only dependent patients and in cannabis-dependent patients with current opioid dependence. Using retrospective interviews, we evaluated the number and duration of six cannabis withdrawal symptoms in two groups: 56 cannabis-dependent patients without and 43 cannabis dependent patients with current opioid dependence. Cannabis and opioid dependence diagnoses were defined with DSM IV criteria using the MINI structured interview. The two groups were not different in terms of age of onset of cannabis use, and number of cannabis joints smoked at the time of the cannabis cessation attempt. The frequency of a cannabis withdrawal syndrome (defined as at least two different symptoms) did not differ in the two groups (65%). Neither was the proportion of subjects with the following symptoms: appetite or weight loss (30.8%), irritability (45.1%), anxiety (56%), aggression (36.3%) and restlessness (45.1%). Patients with cannabis dependence and current opioid dependence were more likely to report sleep disturbances (79.1 vs. 53.6%, chi(2)=6.91, P=0.007). The median duration of this cannabis withdrawal syndrome was 20 days post-cessation. This is, to our knowledge, the first study describing cannabis withdrawal syndrome in cannabis-dependent patients with current opioid dependence. These patients experience a cannabis withdrawal syndrome as often as cannabis-only dependent subjects, but describe more frequently sleep disturbances. This high rate of

  20. Recognition and management of iatrogenically induced opioid dependence and withdrawal in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinkin, Jeffrey; Koh, Jeffrey Lee

    2014-01-01

    Opioids are often prescribed to children for pain relief related to procedures, acute injuries, and chronic conditions. Round-the-clock dosing of opioids can produce opioid dependence within 5 days. According to a 2001 Consensus Paper from the American Academy of Pain Medicine, American Pain Society, and American Society of Addiction Medicine, dependence is defined as "a state of adaptation that is manifested by a drug class specific withdrawal syndrome that can be produced by abrupt cessation, rapid dose reduction, decreasing blood level of the drug, and/or administration of an antagonist." Although the experience of many children undergoing iatrogenically induced withdrawal may be mild or goes unreported, there is currently no guidance for recognition or management of withdrawal for this population. Guidance on this subject is available only for adults and primarily for adults with substance use disorders. The guideline will summarize existing literature and provide readers with information currently not available in any single source specific for this vulnerable pediatric population.

  1. Low pain intensity after opioid withdrawal as a first step of a comprehensive pain rehabilitation program predicts long-term nonuse of opioids in chronic noncancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumova, Elena K; Bennemann, Philipp; Kindler, Doris; Schwarzer, Andreas; Zenz, Michael; Maier, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    In specialized pain clinics there is an increasing number of patients with severe chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) despite long-term opioid medication. Few clinical studies show short-term pain relief after opioid withdrawal (OW). We have evaluated the relation between pain intensity after OW and long-term opioid nonuse. One hundred two consecutive patients with severe CNCP despite opioid medication (mean treatment duration, 43 mo) reported pain intensity (numerical rating scale, 0 to 10), Pain Disability Index, mood (CES-D), and quality of life (Short Form 36) before, shortly, and 12 to 24 months after inpatient OW. Total opioid withdrawal (n = 78) or significant dose reduction (DR; n = 24, mean reduction, 82%) was performed after individual decision. Opioid intake 12 to 24 months later, respectively dose increase ≥ 100% (DR group), was considered relapse. T tests, multivariable analysis of variance, logistic regression. After OW current pain intensity significantly decreased on an average by 41% (6.4 ± 2.4 vs. 3.8 ± 2.5), maximal and average pain by 18% and 24%, respectively. Twelve to 24 months later 42 patients (41%) relapsed (31 of the total opioid withdrawal group, 6 of the DR group, 5 lost). Patients without later relapse showed significantly lower pain scores than the later relapsed patients already shortly after OW (5.0 ± 2.2 vs. 5.9 ± 2.1) and 12 to 24 months later (5.5 ± 2.4 vs. 6.5 ± 2.0). There was a significant relation between relapse probability and pain intensity immediately after OW. In many patients with severe CNCP, despite opioid medication, sustainable pain relief can be achieved if OW is included in the rehabilitation program. Consequently, we recommend OW for opioid-resistant CNCP before any opioid escalation. Lower pain intensity shortly after OW may predict the long-term opioid nonuse probability.

  2. Opioid withdrawal increases transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 activity in a protein kinase A-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Viola; Fischer, Oliver; Endres-Becker, Jeannette; Schäfer, Michael; Stein, Christoph; Zöllner, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Hyperalgesia is a cardinal symptom of opioid withdrawal. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a ligand-gated ion channel expressed on sensory neurons responding to noxious heat, protons, and chemical stimuli such as capsaicin. TRPV1 can be inhibited via μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-mediated reduced activity of adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and decreased cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. In contrast, opioid withdrawal following chronic activation of MOR uncovers AC superactivation and subsequent increases in cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA) activity. Here we investigated (1) whether an increase in cAMP during opioid withdrawal increases the activity of TRPV1 and (2) how opioid withdrawal modulates capsaicin-induced nocifensive behavior in rats. We applied whole-cell patch clamp, microfluorimetry, cAMP assays, radioligand binding, site-directed mutagenesis, and behavioral experiments. Opioid withdrawal significantly increased cAMP levels and capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity in both transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells and dissociated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Inhibition of AC and PKA, as well as mutations of the PKA phosphorylation sites threonine 144 and serine 774, prevented the enhanced TRPV1 activity. Finally, capsaicin-induced nocifensive behavior was increased during opioid withdrawal in vivo. In summary, our results demonstrate an increased activity of TRPV1 in DRG neurons as a new mechanism contributing to opioid withdrawal-induced hyperalgesia. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Gradual withdrawal of remifentanil infusion may prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comelon, M; Raeder, J; Stubhaug, A; Nielsen, C S; Draegni, T; Lenz, H

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if gradual withdrawal of remifentanil infusion prevented opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) as opposed to abrupt withdrawal. OIH duration was also evaluated. Nineteen volunteers were enrolled in this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover study. All went through three sessions: abrupt or gradual withdrawal of remifentanil infusion and placebo. Remifentanil was administered at 2.5 ng ml(-1) for 30 min before abrupt withdrawal or gradual withdrawal by 0.6 ng ml(-1) every five min. Pain was assessed at baseline, during infusion, 45-50 min and 105-110 min after end of infusions using the heat pain test (HPT) and the cold pressor test (CPT). The HPT 45 min after infusion indicated OIH development in the abrupt withdrawal session with higher pain scores compared with the gradual withdrawal and placebo sessions (both Pwithdrawal compared with placebo (P=0.93). In the CPT 50 min after end of infusion there was OIH in both remifentanil sessions compared with placebo (gradual P=0.01, abrupt Pwithdrawal of remifentanil infusion in the HPT. After abrupt withdrawal OIH was present in the HPT. In the CPT there was OIH after both gradual and abrupt withdrawal of infusion. The duration of OIH was less than 105 min for both pain modalities. NCT 01702389. EudraCT number 2011-002734-39. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Efficacy of Tramadol Extended-Release for Opioid Withdrawal: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kelly E; Tompkins, D Andrew; Bigelow, George E; Strain, Eric C

    2017-09-01

    Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a significant public health problem. Supervised withdrawal (ie, detoxification) from opioids using clonidine or buprenorphine hydrochloride is a widely used treatment. To evaluate whether tramadol hydrochloride extended-release (ER), an approved analgesic with opioid and nonopioid mechanisms of action and low abuse potential, is effective for use in supervised withdrawal settings. A randomized clinical trial was conducted in a residential research setting with 103 participants with OUD. Participants' treatment was stabilized with morphine, 30 mg, administered subcutaneously 4 times daily. A 7-day taper using clonidine (n = 36), tramadol ER (n = 36), or buprenorphine (n = 31) was then instituted, and patients were crossed-over to double-blind placebo during a post-taper period. The study was conducted from October 25, 2010, to June 23, 2015. Retention, withdrawal symptom management, concomitant medication utilization, and naltrexone induction. Results were analyzed over time and using area under the curve for the intention-to-treat and completer groups. Of the 103 participants, 88 (85.4%) were men and 43 (41.7%) were white; mean (SD) age was 28.9 (10.4) years. Buprenorphine participants (28 [90.3%]) were significantly more likely to be retained at the end of the taper compared with clonidine participants (22 [61.1%]); tramadol ER retention was intermediate and did not differ significantly from that of the other groups (26 [72.2%]; χ2 = 8.5, P = .01). Time-course analyses of withdrawal revealed significant effects of phase (taper, post taper) for the Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS) score (taper mean, 5.19 [SE, .26]; post-taper mean, 3.97 [SE, .23]; F2,170 = 3.6, P = .03) and Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (SOWS) score (taper mean,8.81 [SE, .40]; post-taper mean, 4.14 [SE, .30]; F2,170 = 15.7, P withdrawal severity between the taper and post-taper periods for clonidine (taper mean, 13.1; post

  5. Acute detoxification of opioid-addicted patients with naloxone during propofol or methohexital anesthesia: a comparison of withdrawal symptoms, neuroendocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kienbaum, P.; Scherbaum, N.; Thürauf, N.; Michel, M. C.; Gastpar, M.; Peters, J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mu-Opioid receptor blockade during general anesthesia is a new treatment for detoxification of opioid addicted patients. We assessed catecholamine plasma concentrations, oxygen consumption, cardiovascular variables, and withdrawal symptoms after naloxone and tested the hypothesis that

  6. Varenicline for opioid withdrawal in patients with chronic pain: a randomized, single-blinded, placebo controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooten, W Michael; Warner, David O

    2015-03-01

    The objectives of this randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled pilot trial were to investigate the effects of varenicline on opioid withdrawal among chronic pain patients undergoing opioid detoxification in an interdisciplinary pain program and the feasibility of varenicline use in this population. Twenty-one patients were recruited (varenicline=10, placebo=11), and 7 patients in the varenicline and 11 in the placebo group completed the study. Opioid withdrawal was quantified using the Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale, and varenicline-related adverse effects were assessed. Opioid withdrawal scores tended to decrease over the course of opioid tapering in those receiving varenicline and increase in those receiving placebo. Varenicline was well-tolerated in this population, with no adverse drug effects (including nausea) observed and no effect on improvements in pain severity and depression. This randomized pilot study provides preliminary data for future trials of varenicline in opioid-dependent adults with chronic pain undergoing medically directed opioid detoxification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modulation of histone deacetylase attenuates naloxone-precipitated opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehni, Ashish K; Singh, Nirmal; Rachamalla, Mahesh; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2012-06-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of selective inhibitors of histone deacetylase and/or N-acetyl-Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-al (Ac-DEVD-CHO), a selective interleukin-1β converting enzyme inhibitor, on the development of naloxone-induced opioid withdrawal syndrome both in vitro and in vivo and the effect of histone deacetylase inhibition on histone H3 acetylation in brain. Sub-acute morphine administration followed by a single injection of naloxone (8 mg/kg, i.p.) was used to precipitate opioid withdrawal syndrome in mice. Behavioral observations were made immediately after naloxone treatment. Withdrawal syndrome was quantitatively assessed in terms of withdrawal severity score and frequency of jumping, rearing, fore paw licking and circling. Separately naloxone-induced contraction in morphine-dependent isolated rat ileum was employed as an in vitro model. An isobolographic study design was employed to assess potential synergistic activity between trichostatin A and Ac-DEVD-CHO. Brain histone acetylation status was examined by western blotting. Injection of naloxone precipitated a severe form of abstinence syndrome in morphine-dependent mice along with strong contracture in isolated rat ileum. Administration of tributyrin (1.5, 3 and 6 g/kg, p.o.), trichostatin A (0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg, p.o.) and Ac-DEVD-CHO (0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg, p.o.) markedly and dose dependently attenuated naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal syndrome in vivo as well as in vitro in rat ileum. Trichostatin A was also observed to exert a synergistic interaction with Ac-DEVD-CHO. Western blot analysis revealed that multiple administration with the effective dose of tributyrin or trichostatin A in the in vivo experiments induced hyperacetylation of histone H3 in the mouse brain. Thus, it is proposed that histone deacetylase activation linked mechanism might be involved in the development of opioid dependence and the precipitation of its withdrawal syndrome.

  8. β-Arrestin-2 knockout prevents development of cellular μ-opioid receptor tolerance but does not affect opioid-withdrawal-related adaptations in single PAG neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, M; Bagley, E E; Chieng, B C; Christie, M J

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance to the behavioural effects of morphine is blunted in β-arrestin-2 knockout mice, but opioid withdrawal is largely unaffected. The cellular mechanisms of tolerance have been studied in some neurons from β-arrestin-2 knockouts, but tolerance and withdrawal mechanisms have not been examined at the cellular level in periaqueductal grey (PAG) neurons, which are crucial for central tolerance and withdrawal phenomena. μ-Opioid receptor (MOPr) inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channel currents (ICa ) was examined by patch-clamp recordings from acutely dissociated PAG neurons from wild-type and β-arrestin-2 knockout mice treated chronically with morphine (CMT) or vehicle. Opioid withdrawal-induced activation of GABA transporter type 1 (GAT-1) currents was determined using perforated patch recordings from PAG neurons in brain slices. MOPr inhibition of ICa in PAG neurons was unaffected by β-arrestin-2 deletion. CMT impaired coupling of MOPrs to ICa in PAG neurons from wild-type mice, but this cellular tolerance was not observed in neurons from CMT β-arrestin-2 knockouts. However, β-arrestin-2 knockouts displayed similar opioid-withdrawal-induced activation of GAT-1 currents as wild-type PAG neurons. In β-arrestin-2 knockout mice, the central neurons involved in the anti-nociceptive actions of opioids also fail to develop cellular tolerance to opioids following chronic morphine. The results also provide the first cellular physiological evidence that opioid withdrawal is not disrupted by β-arrestin-2 deletion. However, the unaffected basal sensitivity to opioids in PAG neurons provides further evidence that changes in basal MOPr sensitivity cannot account for the enhanced acute nociceptive response to morphine reported in β-arrestin-2 knockouts. This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2. © 2014 The British

  9. Src‐dependent phosphorylation of μ‐opioid receptor at Tyr336 modulates opiate withdrawal

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lei; Kibaly, Cherkaouia; Wang, Yu‐Jun; Xu, Chi; Song, Kyu Young; McGarrah, Patrick W; Loh, Horace H; Liu, Jing‐Gen; Law, Ping‐Yee

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Opiate withdrawal/negative reinforcement has been implicated as one of the mechanisms for the progression from impulsive to compulsive drug use. Increase in the intracellular cAMP level and protein kinase A (PKA) activities within the neurocircuitry of addiction has been a leading hypothesis for opiate addiction. This increase requires the phosphorylation of μ‐opioid receptor (MOR) at Tyr336 by Src after prolonged opiate treatment in vitro. Here, we report that the Src‐mediated MOR p...

  10. Acute opioid withdrawal is associated with increased neural activity in reward-processing centers in healthy men: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Larry F; Lin, Joanne C; Clemenson, Anna; Encisco, Ellen; Sun, John; Hoang, Dan; Alva, Heather; Erlendson, Matthew; Clark, J David; Younger, Jarred W

    2015-08-01

    Opioid analgesics are frequently prescribed for chronic pain. One expected consequence of long-term opioid use is the development of physical dependence. Although previous resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have demonstrated signal changes in reward-associated areas following morphine administration, the effects of acute withdrawal on the human brain have been less well-investigated. In an earlier study by our laboratory, ondansetron was shown to be effective in preventing symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal. The purpose of this current study was to characterize neural activity associated with acute opioid withdrawal and examine whether these changes are modified by ondansetron. Ten participants were enrolled in this placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, crossover study and attended three acute opioid withdrawal sessions. Participants received either placebo or ondansetron (8Ymg IV) before morphine administration (10Ymg/70Ykg IV). Participants then underwent acute naloxone-precipitated withdrawal during a resting state fMRI scan. Objective and subjective opioid withdrawal symptoms were assessed. Imaging results showed that naloxone-precipitated opioid withdrawal was associated with increased neural activity in several reward processing regions, including the right pregenual cingulate, putamen, and bilateral caudate, and decreased neural activity in networks involved in sensorimotor integration. Ondansetron pretreatment did not have a significant effect on the imaging correlates of opioid withdrawal. This study presents a preliminary investigation of the regional changes in neural activity during acute opioid withdrawal. The fMRI acute opioid withdrawal model may serve as a tool for studying opioid dependence and withdrawal in human participants. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Supersensitive Kappa Opioid Receptors Promotes Ethanol Withdrawal-Related Behaviors and Reduce Dopamine Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jamie H; Karkhanis, Anushree N; Chen, Rong; Gioia, Dominic; Lopez, Marcelo F; Becker, Howard C; McCool, Brian A; Jones, Sara R

    2016-05-01

    Chronic ethanol exposure reduces dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens, which may contribute to the negative affective symptoms associated with ethanol withdrawal. Kappa opioid receptors have been implicated in withdrawal-induced excessive drinking and anxiety-like behaviors and are known to inhibit dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. The effects of chronic ethanol exposure on kappa opioid receptor-mediated changes in dopamine transmission at the level of the dopamine terminal and withdrawal-related behaviors were examined. Five weeks of chronic intermittent ethanol exposure in male C57BL/6 mice were used to examine the role of kappa opioid receptors in chronic ethanol-induced increases in ethanol intake and marble burying, a measure of anxiety/compulsive-like behavior. Drinking and marble burying were evaluated before and after chronic intermittent ethanol exposure, with and without kappa opioid receptor blockade by nor-binaltorphimine (10mg/kg i.p.). Functional alterations in kappa opioid receptors were assessed using fast scan cyclic voltammetry in brain slices containing the nucleus accumbens. Chronic intermittent ethanol-exposed mice showed increased ethanol drinking and marble burying compared with controls, which was attenuated with kappa opioid receptor blockade. Chronic intermittent ethanol-induced increases in behavior were replicated with kappa opioid receptor activation in naïve mice. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry revealed that chronic intermittent ethanol reduced accumbal dopamine release and increased uptake rates, promoting a hypodopaminergic state of this region. Kappa opioid receptor activation with U50,488H concentration-dependently decreased dopamine release in both groups; however, this effect was greater in chronic intermittent ethanol-treated mice, indicating kappa opioid receptor supersensitivity in this group. These data suggest that the chronic intermittent ethanol-induced increase in ethanol intake and anxiety

  12. A Review Study on the Effect of Iranian Herbal Medicines on Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimie, Marzieh; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Saki, Kourosh

    2015-10-01

    Addiction is a chronic and recurring disease that recurrence phenomenon is the most important challenge in treatment of this disease. Recent experiences have shown that synthetic drugs have undesirable side effects. Recent studies on medicinal plants have shown that they might be effective in treatment of different stages of addiction with lower side effects and costs. The aim of this study was to review the effects of medicinal plants in the treatment of morphine addiction in experimental animals. In this review article, by using keywords of morphine, withdrawal, and plants or herbal medicine in databases of indexing cites, desired articles were obtained since 1994. Inclusion criteria for selecting articles were the articles related to application of medicinal plants in decreasing symptoms resulting from morphine withdrawal were selected. Results of this study on experimental studies have shown that medicinal plants such as Trachyspermum copticum L and Melissa officinalis decrease the symptoms of withdrawal syndrome in a dose-dependent. Also, medicinal plants like Avena sativa, Hypericum perforatu, Passiflora incarnate, Valeriana officinalis, Satureja hortensis L, and Mentha piperita can have effects on behavior, emotions, and other problems of addicts, decreasing withdrawal symptoms. Results of this study showed that medicinal plants can be effective in controlling deprivation, decreasing dependency creation, and possibly DETOXIFICATION: of opioid addicts. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. A Review on Hematological Factors in Opioid-Dependent People (Opium and Heroin) after the Withdrawal Period

    OpenAIRE

    Haghpanah, Tahereh; Afarinesh, Mohammadreza; Divsalar, Kouros

    2010-01-01

    Background: Long-term use of opioids has acute effects on homeostasis of the body. Discovering the impacts of opioids on hematological parameters of narcotics withdrawal and dependents blood may be helpful in recognizing the homeostasis condition of their body for the useful treatment. Methods: In this study a cross-sectional method was applied. The abusers of opium and heroin for more than two consecutive years were considered as opium and heroin dependent groups, respectively. The dependent...

  14. Predictors of long term opioid withdrawal outcome after short-term stabilization with buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, M I

    2014-01-01

    We aim to examine predictors of opiate abstinence status 3 months after the end of buprenorphine/naloxone treatment for opioid-dependent participants. Participants (n= 516, age > 15 years) received buprenorphine/ naloxone treatment for 4 weeks and then randomly assigned to undergo dose tapering over either 7 days or 28 days. Bivariate analysis was performed to identify possible predictors of successful opiate abstinence outome (p-value opioid and drug urine tests result at the end taper; employment status, family problems, and alcohol use domains of addiction severity index (ASI) score; and clinical opiate withdrawal scale (COWS) at the end of stabilization. Final predictor list identified by logistic regression include: ASI score for family and alcohol problems, COWS at the end of stabilization and opiate urine test at the end of taper. Participants presenting with a negative urine test for opiate, more severe alcohol, more severe family problems, or more symptoms of opiate withdrawal at the end of stabilization were more likely to have a successful opiate abstinence.

  15. Risk factors associated with iatrogenic opioid and benzodiazepine withdrawal in critically ill pediatric patients: a systematic review and conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Kaitlin M; Boullata, Joseph I; Curley, Martha A Q

    2015-02-01

    Analgesia and sedation are common therapies in pediatric critical care, and rapid titration of these medications is associated with iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome. We performed a systematic review of the literature to identify all common and salient risk factors associated with iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome and build a conceptual model of iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome risk in critically ill pediatric patients. Multiple databases, including PubMed/Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Registry of Clinical Trials, were searched using relevant terms from January 1, 1980, to August 1, 2014. Articles were included if they were published in English and discussed iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome following either opioid or benzodiazepine therapy in children in acute or intensive care settings. Articles were excluded if subjects were neonates born to opioid- or benzodiazepine-dependent mothers, children diagnosed as substance abusers, or subjects with cancer-related pain; if data about opioid or benzodiazepine treatment were not specified; or if primary data were not reported. In total, 1,395 articles were evaluated, 33 of which met the inclusion criteria. To facilitate analysis, all opioid and/or benzodiazepine doses were converted to morphine or midazolam equivalents, respectively. A table of evidence was developed for qualitative analysis of common themes, providing a framework for the construction of a conceptual model. The strongest risk factors associated with iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome include duration of therapy and cumulative dose. Additionally, evidence exists linking patient, process, and system factors in the development of iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome. Most articles were prospective observational or interventional studies. Given the state of existing evidence, well-designed prospective studies are required to better characterize iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome in critically ill pediatric patients. This review provides data to support the

  16. Psychometric evaluation of the 10-item Short Opiate Withdrawal Scale-Gossop (SOWS-Gossop) in patients undergoing opioid detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Margaret K; Reinders, Stefan; Mannix, Sally; Gullo, Kristen; Gorodetzky, Charles W; Clinch, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The Short Opiate Withdrawal Scale (SOWS)-Gossop is a 10-item questionnaire developed to evaluate opioid withdrawal symptom severity. The scale was derived from the original 32-item Opiate Withdrawal Scale in order to reduce redundancy while providing an equally sensitive measure of opioid withdrawal symptom severity appropriate for research and clinical practice. The objective of this study was to examine the psychometric properties and provide score interpretation guidelines for the SOWS-Gossop 10-item version. Blinded, pooled data from two trials assessing the efficacy of lofexidine hydrochloride in reducing withdrawal symptoms in patients undergoing opioid detoxification were used to evaluate the quantitative psychometric properties and score interpretation of the SOWS-Gossop. Five hundred fifty-five (N=555) observations were available at baseline with numbers decreasing to n=213 at day 7. Mean (standard deviation) SOWS-Gossop scores were 10.4 (6.86) at baseline, 8.7 (6.49) on day 1, 10.5 (7.21) on day 2, and 3.1 (3.95) on day 7. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the SOWS-Gossop items loaded on a single factor consistent with a single total score. Intra-class correlations (95% confidence interval) were 0.78 (0.70-0.85) between baseline and day 1, 0.84 (0.79-0.89) between days 4 and 5, and 0.88 (0.83-0.91) between days 6 and 7, demonstrating good test-retest reliability. Mean SOWS-Gossop scores varied significantly (popioid withdrawal and has excellent psychometric properties. The SOWS-Gossop is an appropriate, precise, and sensitive measure to evaluate the symptoms of acute opioid withdrawal in research or clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Rapid detoxification from opioid dependence under general anaesthesia versus standard methadone tapering : abstinence rates and withdrawal distress experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbe, Paul F M; Koning, Jeroen P F; Heinen, Nadia; Laheij, Robert J F; van Cauter, R M Victory; De Jong, Cor A J

    The aim of this work was to study abstinence rates and withdrawal effects of rapid detoxification of opioid-dependents under general anaesthesia (RD-GA) compared to standard methadone tapering (SMT) using a prospective clinical trial with a follow-up of 3 months, as a preliminary study at the

  18. Rapid detoxification from opioid dependence under general anaesthesia versus standard methadone tapering: abstinence rates and withdrawal distress experiences.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbe, P.F.M.; Koning, J.P.; Heinen, N.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Cauter, R.M.V. van; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study abstinence rates and withdrawal effects of rapid detoxification of opioid-dependents under general anaesthesia (RD-GA) compared to standard methadone tapering (SMT) using a prospective clinical trial with a follow-up of 3 months, as a preliminary study at the

  19. Role of delta-opioid receptors in mediating the aversive stimulus effects of morphine withdrawal in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funada, M; Schutz, C G; Shippenberg, T S

    1996-04-04

    An unbiased place preference conditioning procedure was used to examine the role of delta-opioid receptors in mediating the aversive effects of opioid withdrawal. Rats were implanted s.c. with two pellets each containing placebo or 75 mg morphine. Single-trial conditioning sessions with saline and the opioid receptor antagonists naloxone (0.001-1.0 mg/kg, s.c.), naltrindole (0.01-3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) or naltriben (0.01-3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) commenced 4 days later. During these conditioning sessions, physical signs of withdrawal were also quantified. Tests of conditioning were conducted on day 5. Naloxone in doses of 0.01-1.0 mg/kg produced significant conditioned place aversions in morphine-implanted animals. A dose of 0.01 mg/kg produced few physical withdrawal signs whereas higher doses resulted in marked wet dog shakes, body weight loss ptosis and diarrhea. No such effects were observed in control (placebo-implanted) animals. Administration of the selective delta-opioid receptor antagonists naltrindole and naltriben produced dose-related place aversions in morphine-implanted animals. The magnitude of these effects did not differ from that observed with naloxone. The minimum effective doses of naltrindole and naltriben were 0.1 mg/kg. Doses of 0.1-1.0 mg/kg produced few, if any, somatic signs of withdrawal whereas higher doses of these antagonists only produced diarrhea and wet-dog shakes. Other withdrawal signs were absent. In contrast to the opioid receptor antagonists tested, the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 failed to produced conditioned place aversions or physical signs of withdrawal in morphine-pelleted animals. These data demonstrate that the selective blockade of either delta- or mu-opioid receptors is sufficient to induce conditioned aversive effects in morphine-dependent animals. They also indicate that physical symptoms associated with precipitated morphine withdrawal differ depending upon the opioid receptor antagonist employed.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Membranes for use in the Transdermal Treatment of Nicotine Addiction and Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audra L. Stinchcomb

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal systems are attractive methods of drug administration specifically when treating patients for drug addiction. Current systems however are deficient in therapies that allow variable flux values of drug, such as nicotine for smoking cessation or complex dosing regimens using clonidine when treating opioid withdrawal symptoms. Through the use of functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT membranes, drug delivery to the skin can be controlled by applying a small electrical bias to create a programmable drug delivery system. Clearly, a transdermal patch system that can be tailored to an individual’s needs will increase patient compliance as well as provide much more efficient therapy. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the applicability of using carbon nanotube membranes in transdermal systems for treatment of drug abuse.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Membranes for use in the Transdermal Treatment of Nicotine Addiction and Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline L. Strasinger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal systems are attractive methods of drug administration specifically when treating patients for drug addiction. Current systems however are deficient in therapies that allow variable flux values of drug, such as nicotine for smoking cessation or complex dosing regimens using clonidine when treating opioid withdrawal symptoms. Through the use of functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT membranes, drug delivery to the skin can be controlled by applying a small electrical bias to create a programmable drug delivery system. Clearly, a transdermal patch system that can be tailored to an individual's needs will increase patient compliance as well as provide much more efficient therapy. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the applicability of using carbon nanotube membranes in transdermal systems for treatment of drug abuse.

  2. Rates of opioid dispensing and overdose after introduction of abuse-deterrent extended-release oxycodone and withdrawal of propoxyphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larochelle, Marc R; Zhang, Fang; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Wharam, J Frank

    2015-06-01

    In the second half of 2010, abuse-deterrent extended-release oxycodone hydrochloride (OxyContin; Purdue Pharma) was introduced and propoxyphene was withdrawn from the US market. The effect of these pharmaceutical market changes on opioid dispensing and overdose rates is unknown. To evaluate the association between 2 temporally proximate changes in the opioid market and opioid dispensing and overdose rates. Claims from a large national US health insurer were analyzed, using an interrupted time series study design. Participants included an open cohort of 31.3 million commercially insured members aged 18 to 64 years between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2012, with median follow-up of 20 months (last follow-up, December 31, 2012). Introduction of abuse-deterrent OxyContin (resistant to crushing or dissolving) on August 9, 2010, and market withdrawal of propoxyphene on November 19, 2010. Standardized opioid dispensing rates and prescription opioid and heroin overdose rates were the primary outcomes. We used segmented regression to analyze changes in outcomes from 30 quarters before to 8 quarters after the 2 interventions. Two years after the opioid market changes, total opioid dispensing decreased by 19% from the expected rate (absolute change, -32.2 mg morphine-equivalent dose per member per quarter [95% CI, -38.1 to -26.3]). By opioid subtype, the absolute change in dispensing by milligrams of morphine-equivalent dose per member per quarter at 2 years was -11.3 (95% CI, -12.4 to -10.1) for extended-release oxycodone, 3.26 (95% CI, 1.40 to 5.12) for other long-acting opioids, -8.19 (95% CI, -9.30 to -7.08) for propoxyphene, and -16.2 (95% CI, -18.8 to -13.5) for other immediate-release opioids. Two years after the market changes, the estimated overdose rate attributed to prescription opioids decreased by 20% (absolute change, -1.10 per 100,000 members per quarter [95% CI, -1.47 to -0.74]), but heroin overdose increased by 23% (absolute change, 0.26 per 100

  3. Evaluation of the use of buprenorphine for opioid withdrawal in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, M L; Idrees, U; Ding, R; Nesbit, S A; Liang, H K; McCarthy, M L

    2007-01-12

    To examine the use of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid withdrawal (OW) in an emergency department (ED) setting. The medical records of all adult patients who presented to the study ED during a 10 week period for OW were abstracted. Subjects were categorized as receiving buprenorphine, symptomatic treatment or no pharmacologic treatment for their OW. The three groups were compared by patient and service characteristics, withdrawal symptoms and outcomes. Of the 11,019 patients who presented to the ED during the 10 week study period, 158 (1.4%) were eligible. Subjects were more likely to receive buprenorphine (56%) compared to symptomatic treatment only (26%) or no pharmacologic treatment (18%). Subjects who received buprenorphine were more likely to have a history of suicide ideation (34% versus 12% pbuprenorphine were less likely to return to the same ED within 30 days for a drug-related visit (8%) compared to those who received symptomatic treatment (17%) (pBuprenorphine was a common treatment for OW in this ED without any documented adverse outcomes. Given that it did not result in an increase in drug-related return ED visits and its proven efficacy in other settings, a prospective evaluation of its potential value to ED patients who present with OW is warranted.

  4. Potential risk factors associated with risk for drop-out and relapse during and following withdrawal of opioid prescription medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiwe, Susanne; Lönnquist, Ingeborg; Källmén, Håkan

    2011-10-01

    Withdrawal of opioid medication in patients with chronic pain has a drop-out and relapse problem. To evaluate if depressive symptoms, anxiety and pain intensity are potential risk factors for drop-out or relapse during the withdrawal process. Further, to assess internal consistency of scales for assessment of these potential risk factors. Twenty-nine patients were included. After 2 years 28 of these were followed-up. Those with depressive symptoms at baseline had a significant risk for drop-out from the withdrawal program (odds ratio 1.37) and relapse into use of opioids at follow-up (odds ratio 1.44). Drop-outs rated depressive symptoms significantly higher before detoxification. Those who relapsed rated significantly higher for pain intensity, depressive symptoms and abstinence prior to withdrawal. All scales had high reliability. To avoid drop-out and relapse clinical practice need to screen for depressive symptoms, pain intensity, and abstinence. This article presents significant reliability of scales useful within dependency centers. They can be used to identify these risk factors for drop-out and relapse, respectively, when initiating the withdrawal process. Taking these risk factors into consideration could improve the outcome of the withdrawal process by preventing drop-out and relapse. Copyright © 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Phase 3 Placebo-Controlled, Double Blind, Multi-Site Trial of the alpha-2-adrenergic Agonist, Lofexidine, for Opioid Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Elmer; Miotto, Karen; Akerele, Evaristo; Montgomery, Ann; Elkashef, Ahmed; Walsh, Robert; Montoya, Ivan; Fischman, Marian W.; Collins, Joseph; McSherry, Frances; Boardman, Kathy; Davies, David K.; O’Brien, Charles P.; Ling, Walter; Kleber, Herbert; Herman, Barbara H.

    2008-01-01

    Context Lofexidine is an alpha-2-A noradrenergic receptor agonist that is approved in the United Kingdom for the treatment of opioid withdrawal symptoms. Lofexidine has been reported to have more significant effects on decreasing opioid withdrawal symptoms with less hypotension than clonidine. Objective To demonstrate that lofexidine is well tolerated and effective in the alleviation of observationally-defined opioid withdrawal symptoms in opioid dependent individuals undergoing medically supervised opioid detoxification as compared to placebo. Design An inpatient, Phase 3, placebo-controlled, double blind, randomized multi-site trial with three phases: (1) Opioid Agonist Stabilization Phase (days 1–3), (2) Detoxification/Medication or Placebo Phase (days 4–8), and (3) Post Detoxification/Medication Phase (days 9–11). Subjects Sixty-eight opioid dependent subjects were enrolled at three sites with 35 randomized to lofexidine and 33 to placebo. Main Outcome Measure Modified Himmelsbach Opiate Withdrawal Scale (MHOWS) on study day 5 (2nd opioid detoxification treatment day). Results Due to significant findings, the study was terminated early. On the study day 5 MHOWS, subjects treated with lofexidine had significantly lower scores (equating to fewer/less severe withdrawal symptoms) than placebo subjects (Least squares means 19.5 ± 2.1 versus 30.9 ± 2.7; p=0.0019). Lofexidine subjects had significantly better retention in treatment than placebo subjects (38.2% versus 15.2%; Log rank test p=0.01). Conclusions Lofexidine is well tolerated and more efficacious than placebo for reducing opioid withdrawal symptoms in inpatients undergoing medically supervised opioid detoxification. Trial Registration trial registry name A Phase 3 Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Multi-Site Trial of Lofexidine for Opiate Withdrawal, registration number NCT00032942, URL for the registry http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct/show/NCT00032942?order=4. PMID:18508207

  6. Ketogenic Diet suppresses Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome in Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Molander, Anna; Thomsen, Morgane

    2018-01-01

    , we investigated the potential therapeutic benefit of a ketogenic diet in managing alcohol withdrawal symptoms during detoxification. METHODS: Male Sprague Dawley rats fed either ketogenic or regular diets were administered ethanol or water orally, twice daily for 6 days while the diet conditions were...... maintained. Abstinence symptoms were rated 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the last alcohol administration. RESULTS: Maintenance on a ketogenic diet caused a significant decrease in the alcohol withdrawal symptoms 'rigidity' and 'irritability'. CONCLUSION: Our preclinical pilot study suggests that a ketogenic...... diet may be a novel approach for treating alcohol withdrawal symptoms in humans. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  7. Acute opioid withdrawal precipitated by ingestion of crushed embeda (morphine extended release with sequestered naltrexone): case report and the focused review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiulu; Chen, Tao; Gudin, Jeff; Couch, John Patrick; Chiravuri, Srinivas

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of newly formulated extended release (ER) morphine with sequestered naltrexone (Embeda) has provided another treatment option for moderate to severe persistent pain. Embeda was designed to be an abuse-deterrent opioid formulation. Naltrexone is a centrally acting opioid receptor antagonist that blocks the action of opioid. When taken as directed, insignificant amount of sequestered naltrexone would reach systemic circulation, but upon tampering, the released naltrexone may blunt the euphoria of opioids, and possibly precipitate opioid withdrawal in opioid-dependent patient. To describe a case report ofa 50-year-old opioid-dependent male who developed acute opioid withdrawal after taking crushed Embeda. A 50-year-old male with severe, chronic low back pain due to degenerative disc disease was referred to our clinic for pain management. He was taking ER oxycodone 80 mg tid and Roxicodone 30 mg qid prn, with inadequate pain relief A trial of ER oxymorphone was decided, at 40 mg 1-2 doses bid. The patient returned to the clinic 1 week early, out of his ER oxymorphone. At this time, the decision to switch him to Embeda was made, at 80 mg/3.2 mg, 1-2 doses bid. The patient and his family members were counseled about risk involved with tampering with Embeda. A few hours later, our clinic was informed that the patient was brought to emergency room by ambulance, in severe opioid withdrawal. He was treated with IV fluid, antiemetics, clonidine, and IV hydromorphone. His condition improved and he was discharged home the next morning. Later on, the patient admitted that he took two prescribed Embeda within half an hour, the 1st one whole and the 2nd one crushed. He further admitted that he did so against our medical advice. CONCLUSION. Taking tampered Embeda may precipitate opioid withdrawal in opioid-tolerant patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of induced opioid withdrawal following consumption of crushed Embeda.

  8. Buprenorphine/naloxone as a promising therapeutic option for opioid abusing patients with chronic pain: reduction of pain, opioid withdrawal symptoms, and abuse liability of oral oxycodone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Perrine; Sullivan, Maria A; Cohen, Julien; Fugon, Lionel; Jones, Jermaine D; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Cooper, Ziva D; Manubay, Jeanne M; Mogali, Shanthi; Comer, Sandra D

    2013-08-01

    Few studies have examined abuse of prescription opioids among individuals with chronic pain under buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nx) maintenance. The current 7-week inpatient study assessed oral oxycodone self-administration by patients with chronic pain who had a history of opioid abuse. Participants (n=25) were transitioned from their preadmission prescribed opioid to Bup/Nx. All of the participants were tested under each of the sublingual Bup/Nx maintenance doses (2/0.5, 8/2 or 16/4 mg) in random order. During each maintenance period, participants could self-administer oxycodone orally (0, 10, 20, 40 or 60 mg prescription opioids) or receive money during laboratory sessions. Drug choice (percentage) was the primary dependent variable. Subjective ratings of clinical pain and withdrawal symptoms also were measured. Mann-Whitney tests compared percentage of drug choice for each active oxycodone dose to placebo. Logistic regression analyses identified correlates of oxycodone preference, defined as 60% or greater choice of oxycodone compared to money. Pain was significantly reduced while participants were maintained on Bup/Nx compared to preadmission ratings. No differences in percentage drug choice were observed between the active oxycodone doses and placebo under each Bup/Nx maintenance dose. However, factors associated with oxycodone preference were lower Bup/Nx maintenance dose, more withdrawal symptoms and more pain. These data suggest that Bup/Nx was effective in reducing pain and supplemental oxycodone use. Importantly, adequate management of pain and withdrawal symptoms by Bup/Nx may reduce oxycodone preference in this population. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Opioid withdrawal for 4 days prevents synaptic depression induced by low dose of morphine or naloxone in rat hippocampal CA1 area in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhifang; Han, Huili; Cao, Jun; Xu, Lin

    2010-02-01

    The formation of memory is believed to depend on experience- or activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, which is exquisitely sensitive to psychological stress since inescapable stress impairs long-term potentiation (LTP) but facilitates long-term depression (LTD). Our recent studies demonstrated that 4 days of opioid withdrawal enables maximal extents of both hippocampal LTP and drug-reinforced behavior; while elevated-platform stress enables these phenomena at 18 h of opioid withdrawal. Here, we examined the effects of low dose of morphine (0.5 mg kg(-1), i.p.) or the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (1 mg kg(-1), i.p.) on synaptic efficacy in the hippocampal CA1 region of anesthetized rats. A form of synaptic depression was induced by low dose of morphine or naloxone in rats after 18 h but not 4 days of opioid withdrawal. This synaptic depression was dependent on both N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and synaptic activity, similar to the hippocampal long-term depression induced by low frequency stimulation. Elevated-platform stress given 2 h before experiment prevented the synaptic depression at 18 h of opioid withdrawal; in contrast, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist RU38486 treatment (20 mg kg(-1), s.c., twice per day for first 3 days of withdrawal), or a high dose of morphine reexposure (15 mg kg(-1), s.c., 12 h before experiment), enabled the synaptic depression on 4 days of opioid withdrawal. This temporal shift of synaptic depression by stress or GR blockade supplements our previous findings of potentially correlated temporal shifts of LTP induction and drug-reinforced behavior during opioid withdrawal. Our results therefore support the idea that stress experience during opioid withdrawal may modify hippocampal synaptic plasticity and play important roles in drug-associated memory. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. High enhancer, downer, withdrawal helper: Multifunctional nonmedical benzodiazepine use among young adult opioid users in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Jessell, Lauren; Goodbody, Elizabeth; Kim, Dongah; Gile, Krista; Teubl, Jennifer; Syckes, Cassandra; Ruggles, Kelly; Lazar, Jeffrey; Friedman, Sam; Guarino, Honoria

    2017-08-01

    Benzodiazepines are a widely prescribed psychoactive drug; in the U.S., both medical and nonmedical use of benzodiazepines has increased markedly in the past 15 years. Long-term use can lead to tolerance and dependence, and abrupt withdrawal can cause seizures or other life-threatening symptoms. Benzodiazepines are often used nonmedically in conjunction with other drugs, and with opioids in particular-a combination that can increase the risk for fatal and non-fatal overdose. This mixed-methods study examines nonmedical use of benzodiazepines among young adults in New York City and its relationship with opioid use. For qualitative analysis, 46 90-minute semi-structured interviews were conducted with young adult opioid users (ages 18-32). Interviews were transcribed and coded for key themes. For quantitative analysis, 464 young adult opioid users (ages 18-29) were recruited using Respondent-Driven Sampling and completed structured interviews. Benzodiazepine use was assessed via a self-report questionnaire that included measures related to nonmedical benzodiazepine and opioid use. Participants reported using benzodiazepines nonmedically for a wide variety of reasons, including: to increase the high of other drugs; to lessen withdrawal symptoms; and to come down from other drugs. Benzodiazepines were described as readily available and cheap. There was a high prevalence (93%) of nonmedical benzodiazepine use among nonmedical opioid users, with 57% reporting regular nonmedical use. In bivariate analyses, drug-related risk behaviours such as polysubstance use, drug binging, heroin injection and overdose were strongly associated with regular nonmedical benzodiazepine use. In multivariate analysis, growing up in a middle-income household (earning between $51,000 and $100,000 annually), lifetime overdose experience, having ever used cocaine regularly, having ever been prescribed benzodiazepines, recent drug binging, and encouraging fellow drug users to use benzodiazepines to

  11. [Changes and the impact on immune function of opioid-dependent subjects by Jitai tabelets during the withdrawal stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X X; Fan, H Y; Sun, L; Liang, J C; Deng, Y P

    2017-04-10

    Objective: To detect the changes in the immune function of opioid-dependent subjects during the withdrawal stage through the administration of Jitai tablet. Methods: Subjects were treated as Jitai tablet alone, Jitai tablet plus buprenorphine and placebo, in a randomized,double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Before and after the 14(th) day of withdrawal, levels of immunoglobulin (IgM, IgA, IgG), T cell subsets (CD(3)(+), CD(4)(+), CD(8)(+), CD(4)(+)/CD(8)(+)) and cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-4, IFN-γ/IL-4) were detected. Results: Compared with healthy people, immunity function before withdrawal among the opioid abusers showed higher levels of IgM, IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-4 and lower level of CD(3)(+)T, as (1.67±0.87) g/L, (14.44±13.50) % , (20.23±15.10) % , (1.97±1.59) % , (47.01±13.62) % , respectively, with difference statistically significant ( P 0.05). At the 14(th) day of withdrawal in placebo group, levels of IL-4 returned to normal while IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio increased by 3.43 times ( P 0.05). Compared with placebo group, fluctuation of IgG and IgM decreased in Jitai group during withdrawal period, together with a normal level of IgM at the 14(th) day. Level of IL-4 abnormally rose up by 0.54 times in Jitai tablet plus buprenorphine group, while IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio been switched back at the 14(th) day of withdrawal. Other immune indicators were not affected by medical interventions. Conclusion: We noticed that certain impairment of the immune function might be restored by Jitai tablet during the withdrawal period.

  12. A phase III, randomized, multi-center, double blind, placebo controlled study of safety and efficacy of lofexidine for relief of symptoms in individuals undergoing inpatient opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetzky, Charles W; Walsh, Sharon L; Martin, Peter R; Saxon, Andrew J; Gullo, Kristen L; Biswas, Kousick

    2017-07-01

    Lofexidine is an alpha-2-adrenergic receptor agonist approved in the United Kingdom (UK) for the treatment of opioid withdrawal symptoms. Lofexidine has demonstrated better efficacy than placebo for reducing opioid withdrawal symptoms in patients undergoing opioid withdrawal with less reported hypotension than clonidine. Designed as an FDA registration trial, this 8-day, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study in 264 patients dependent on short-acting opioids evaluated the efficacy of lofexidine hydrochloride in reducing withdrawal symptoms in patients undergoing opioid withdrawal. The primary efficacy measures were SOWS-Gossop on Day 3 and time-to-dropout. Secondary endpoints included the proportion of participants who were completers; area under the 5-day SOWS-Gossop - time curve (i.e., AUC 1-5 ), and daily mean SOWS-Gossop, OOWS-Handelsman, MCGI (subject and rater), and VAS-E scores. Participants received lofexidine HCl 3.2mg daily in four divided doses or matching placebo on Days 1-5, followed by 2days of placebo. Lofexidine significantly decreased mean Day 3 SOWS scores compared to placebo, 6.32 versus 8.67, respectively, p=0.0212. Fewer lofexidine patients were early terminators compared to placebo (59 versus 80, respectively); and non-completers in the lofexidine group remained in the study longer than those assigned to placebo (p=0.0034). Secondary endpoints consistently favored lofexidine. Lofexidine was well tolerated in this trial. Lofexidine significantly decreased SOWS scores compared to placebo and demonstrated better retention rates in participants undergoing opioid withdrawal. Lofexidine potentially offers a useful non-opioid alternative to treat opioid withdrawal symptoms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Ketogenic Diet Suppresses Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dencker, Ditte; Molander, Anna; Thomsen, Morgane; Schlumberger, Chantal; Wortwein, Gitta; Weikop, Pia; Benveniste, Helene; Volkow, Nora D; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2018-02-01

    Alcohol use disorder is underdiagnosed and undertreated, and up to 50% of alcohol-abstinent patients diagnosed with alcohol dependence relapse within the first year of treatment. Current treatments for the maintenance of alcohol abstinence in patients with alcohol use disorder have limited efficacy, and there is an urgent need for novel treatment strategies. Decreased cerebral glucose metabolism and increased brain uptake of acetate were recently reported in heavy drinkers, relative to controls. Given the switch of metabolic fuel from glucose to acetate in the alcohol-dependent brain, we investigated the potential therapeutic benefit of a ketogenic diet in managing alcohol withdrawal symptoms during detoxification. Male Sprague Dawley rats fed either ketogenic or regular diet were administered ethanol or water orally, twice daily for 6 days while the diet conditions were maintained. Abstinence symptoms were rated 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the last alcohol administration. Maintenance on a ketogenic diet caused a significant decrease in the alcohol withdrawal symptoms' "rigidity" and "irritability." Our preclinical pilot study suggests that a ketogenic diet may be a novel approach for treating alcohol withdrawal symptoms in humans. Copyright © 2017 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  14. In vivo and in vitro attenuation of naloxone-precipitated experimental opioid withdrawal syndrome by insulin and selective KATP channel modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhat; Sharma, Bhupesh; Gupta, Surbhi; Sharma, B M

    2015-01-01

    Opiate exposure for longer duration develops state of dependence in humans and animals, which is revealed by signs and symptoms of withdrawal precipitated by opioid receptor antagonists. The sudden withdrawal of opioids produces a withdrawal syndrome in opioid-dependent subjects. Insulin and ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel-mediated glucose homeostasis have been shown to modulate morphine withdrawal. Present study has been structured to investigate the role of insulin and pharmacological modulator of KATP channel (gliclazide) in experimental morphine withdrawal syndrome, both invivo and invitro. In this study, naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal syndrome in mice (invivo) as well as in rat ileum (invitro) were utilized to assess opioid withdrawal phenomenon. Morphine withdrawal syndromes like jumping and rearing frequency, forepaw licking, circling, fore paw tremor, wet dog shake, sneezing, overall morphine withdrawal severity (OMWS), serum glucose, brain malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), nitrite/nitrate, and calcium (Ca(+2)) were assessed. Naloxone has significantly increased morphine withdrawal syndrome, both invivo and invitro. Insulin and gliclazide have significantly attenuated, naloxone induced behavioral changes like jumping and rearing frequency, forepaw licking, wet dog shake, sneezing, straightening, circling, OMWS, and various biochemical impairments such as serum glucose, brain MDA, GSH, nitrite/nitrate, and Ca(+2) in morphine-dependent animals (invivo). In vitro, insulin and gliclazide have significantly reduced naloxone-induced contraction in morphine-withdrawn rat ileum preparation. Insulin and gliclazide (KATP channel blocker) have attenuated naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal syndrome, both invivo and invitro. Thus, insulin and KATP channel modulation may provide new avenues for research in morphine withdrawal.

  15. Tachykinin NK₁ receptor antagonist co-administration attenuates opioid withdrawal-mediated spinal microglia and astrocyte activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumati, Suneeta; Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Keresztes, Attila I; Yamamoto, Takashi; Vanderah, Todd W; Roeske, William R; Hruby, Victor J; Varga, Eva V

    2012-06-05

    Prolonged morphine treatment increases pain sensitivity in many patients. Enhanced spinal Substance P release is one of the adaptive changes associated with sustained opioid exposure. In addition to pain transmitting second order neurons, spinal microglia and astrocytes also express functionally active Tachykinin NK₁ (Substance P) receptors. In the present work we investigated the role of glial Tachykinin NK₁ receptors in morphine withdrawal-mediated spinal microglia and astrocyte activation. Our data indicate that intrathecal co-administration (6 days, twice daily) of a selective Tachykinin NK₁ receptor antagonist (N-acetyl-L-tryptophan 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzylester (L-732,138; 20 μg/injection)) attenuates spinal microglia and astrocyte marker and pro-inflammatory mediator immunoreactivity as well as hyperalgesia in withdrawn rats. Furthermore, covalent linkage of the opioid agonist with a Tachykinin NK₁ antagonist pharmacophore yielded a bivalent compound that did not augment spinal microglia or astrocyte marker or pro-inflammatory mediator immunoreactivity and did not cause paradoxical pain sensitization upon drug withdrawal. Thus, bivalent opioid/Tachykinin NK₁ receptor antagonists may provide a novel paradigm for long-term pain management.

  16. Shortening Anesthesia Duration does not Affect Severity of Withdrawal Syndrome in Patients Undergoing Ultra Rapid Opioid Detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoaleh Shami

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Ultra rapid opioid detoxification (UROD is one of the new methods of detoxification. This method of detoxification involves putting patients under general anesthesia and actively giving them opioid antagonists. The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of anesthesia duration in UROD on severity of withdrawal syndrome. Sixty addicted patients seeking UROD procedure assigned randomly to one of the 2hr, 4hr or 6hr anesthesia duration groups. Premedication and anesthesia procedure (induction and maintenance were the same for three groups. Detoxification was done for all patients with 50 mg oral naltroxane (prior to induction and 20 mg intravenous naloxane (8 mg/bolus and 12 mg/infusion. Blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate were automatically measured and recorded every 5 minutes. The severity of withdrawal syndrome was measured and recorded every one hour during anesthesia, 2hours post-anesthesia, and 12 and 24 hours following the induction of anesthesia according to the Wang Scale modified by Lomier (WSMBL. Patients aged 20-58 in three groups. Three cases experienced delirium after detoxification that lasted 24 hours in one. Severity of withdrawal syndrome in patients of groups 2, 4 and 6 hour were 8.7, 7.4 and 5.1 respectively during anesthesia and 12.3, 11.1 and 13.9 after 18 hours of anesthesia. Results of this study showed that, in standard settings, UROD is a safe method for detoxification and has low complications. The withdrawal symptoms during and after anesthesia are low. Shortening the duration of anesthesia has no affect on severity of withdrawal syndrome during and after anesthesia.

  17. Morphine withdrawal enhances constitutive μ-opioid receptor activity in the ventral tegmental area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meye, F.J.; van Zessen, R.; Smidt, M.P.; Adan, R.A.H.; Ramakers, G.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    μ-opioid receptors (MORs) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are pivotally involved in addictive behavior. While MORs are typically activated by opioids, they can also become constitutively active in the absence of any agonist. In the current study, we present evidence that MOR constitutive

  18. Involvement of delta opioid receptors in alcohol withdrawal-induced mechanical allodynia in male C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alongkronrusmee, Doungkamol; Chiang, Terrance; van Rijn, Richard M

    2016-10-01

    As a legal drug, alcohol is commonly abused and it is estimated that 17 million adults in the United States suffer from alcohol use disorder. Heavy alcoholics can experience withdrawal symptoms including anxiety and mechanical allodynia that can facilitate relapse. The molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood, which stifles development of new therapeutics. Here we investigate whether delta opioid receptors (DORs) play an active role in alcohol withdrawal-induced mechanical allodynia (AWiMA) and if DOR agonists may provide analgesic relief from AWiMA. To study AWiMA, adult male wild-type and DOR knockout C57BL/6 mice were exposed to alcohol by a voluntary drinking model or oral gavage exposure model, which we developed and validated here. We also used the DOR-selective agonist TAN-67 and antagonist naltrindole to examine the involvement of DORs in AWiMA, which was measured using a von Frey model of mechanical allodynia. We created a robust model of alcohol withdrawal-induced anxiety and mechanical allodynia by orally gavaging mice with 3g/kg alcohol for three weeks. AWiMA was exacerbated and prolonged in DOR knockout mice as well as by pharmacological blockade of DORs compared to control mice. However, analgesia induced by TAN-67 was attenuated during withdrawal in alcohol-gavaged mice. DORs appear to play a protective role in the establishment of AWiMA. Our current results indicate that DORs could be targeted to prevent or reduce the development of AWiMA during alcohol use; however, DORs may be a less suitable target to treat AWiMA during active withdrawal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prescription Pain Medications (Opioids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who take them as prescribed by a doctor. Opioid withdrawal can cause: restlessness muscle and bone pain sleep ... View Online Download PDF Dramatic Increases in Maternal Opioid Use ... in a drug withdrawal syndrome in newborns called neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). ...

  20. Blockade of Serotonin 5-HT2AReceptors Suppresses Behavioral Sensitization and Naloxone-Precipitated Withdrawal Symptoms in Morphine-Treated Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Gang; Wu, Xian; Tao, Xinrong; Mao, Ruoying; Liu, Xueke; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Li, Guangwu; Stackman, Robert W; Dong, Liuyi; Zhang, Gongliang

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prescription of opioids is fueling an epidemic of addiction and overdose deaths. Morphine is a highly addictive drug characterized by a high relapse rate - even after a long period of abstinence. Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission participates in the development of morphine dependence, as well as the expression of morphine withdrawal. In this study, we examined the effect of blockade of 5-HT 2A receptors (5-HT 2A Rs) on morphine-induced behavioral sensitization and withdrawal in male mice. 5-HT 2A R antagonist MDL 11,939 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) suppressed acute morphine (5.0 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced increase in locomotor activity. Mice received morphine (10 mg/kg, s.c.) twice a day for 3 days and then drug treatment was suspended for 5 days. On day 9, a challenge dose of morphine (10 mg/kg) was administered to induce the expression of behavioral sensitization. MDL 11,939 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) pretreatment suppressed the expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. Another cohort of mice received increasing doses of morphine over a 7-day period to induce morphine-dependence. MDL 11,939 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) prevented naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in morphine-dependent mice on day 7. Moreover, chronic morphine treatment increased 5-HT 2A R protein level and decreased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases in the prefrontal cortex. Together, these results by the first time demonstrate that 5-HT 2A Rs modulate opioid dependence and blockade of 5-HT 2A R may represent a novel strategy for the treatment of morphine use disorders. (i)Blockade of 5-HT 2A receptors suppresses the expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization.(ii)Blockade of 5-HT 2A receptors suppresses naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in morphine-treated mice.(iii)Chronic morphine exposure induces an increase in 5-HT 2A receptor protein level and a decrease in ERK protein phosphorylation in prefrontal cortex.

  1. Palonosetron and hydroxyzine pre-treatment reduces the objective signs of experimentally-induced acute opioid withdrawal in humans: a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlendson, Matthew J; D'Arcy, Nicole; Encisco, Ellen M; Yu, Jeffrey J; Rincon-Cruz, Lorena; Peltz, Gary; Clark, J David; Chu, Larry F

    2017-01-01

    Treatments for reducing opioid withdrawal are limited and prone to problematic side effects. Laboratory studies, clinical observations, and limited human trial data suggest 5-HT3-receptor antagonists and antihistamines may be effective. This double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled study employing an acute physical dependence model evaluated whether (i) treatment with a 5-HT3-receptor antagonist (palonosetron) would reduce opioid withdrawal symptoms, and (ii) co-administration of an antihistamine (hydroxyzine) would enhance any treatment effect. At timepoint T = 0, healthy (non-opioid dependent, non-substance abuser) male volunteers (N = 10) were pre-treated with either a) placebo, b) palonosetron IV (0.75 mg), or c) palonosetron IV (0.75 mg) and hydroxyzine PO (100 mg) in a crossover study design. This was followed at T = 30 by intravenous morphine (10 mg/70kg). At T = 165, 10 mg/70kg naloxone IV was given to precipitate opioid withdrawal. The objective opioid withdrawal score (OOWS) and subjective opioid withdrawal score (SOWS) were determined 5 and 15 minutes after naloxone administration (T = 170, 180, respectively). Baseline measurements were recorded at T = -30 and T = -15. Comparison of average baseline OOWS scores with OOWS scores obtained 15 minutes after naloxone was significant (p = 0.0001). Scores from 15 minutes post-naloxone infusion showed significant differences in OOWS scores between treatment groups: placebo, 3.7 ± 2.4; palonosetron, 1.5 ± 0.97; and palonosetron with hydroxyzine, 0.2 ± 0.1333. Pretreatment with palonosetron significantly reduced many signs of experimentally-induced opioid withdrawal. Co-administration with hydroxyzine further reduced opioid withdrawal severity. These results suggest that 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, alone or in combination with an antihistamine, may be useful in the treatment of opioid withdrawal.

  2. Opioid system contribution to the antidepressant-like action of m-trifluoromethyl-diphenyl diselenide in mice: A compound devoid of tolerance and withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Suzan G; Pesarico, Ana P; Tagliapietra, Carolina F; da Luz, Sônia Ca; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2017-09-01

    Animal and clinical researches indicate that the opioid system exerts a crucial role in the etiology of mood disorders and is a target for intervention in depression treatment. This study investigated the contribution of the opioid system to the antidepressant-like action of acute or repeated m-trifluoromethyl-diphenyl diselenide administration to Swiss mice. m-Trifluoromethyl-diphenyl diselenide (50 mg/kg, intragastric) produced an antidepressant-like action in the forced swimming test from 30 min to 24 h after treatment. This effect was blocked by the µ and δ-opioid receptor antagonists, naloxonazine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and naltrindole (3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), and it was potentiated by a κ-opioid receptor antagonist, norbinaltrophimine (1 mg/kg, subcutaneously ). Combined treatment with subeffective doses of m-trifluoromethyl-diphenyl diselenide (10 mg/kg, intragastric) and morphine (1 mg/kg, subcutaneously) resulted in a synergistic antidepressant-like effect. The opioid system contribution to the m-trifluoromethyl-diphenyl diselenide antidepressant-like action was also demonstrated in the modified tail suspension test, decreasing mouse immobility and swinging time and increasing curling time, results similar to those observed using morphine, a positive control. Treatment with m-trifluoromethyl-diphenyl diselenide induced neither tolerance to the antidepressant-like action nor physical signs of withdrawal, which could be associated with the fact that m-trifluoromethyl-diphenyl diselenide did not change the mouse cortical and hippocampal glutamate uptake and release. m-Trifluoromethyl-diphenyl diselenide treatments altered neither locomotor nor toxicological parameters in mice. These findings demonstrate that m-trifluoromethyl-diphenyl diselenide elicited an antidepressant-like action by direct or indirect μ and δ-opioid receptor activation and the κ-opioid receptor blockade, without inducing tolerance, physical signs of withdrawal and

  3. Effects of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists on behavioural measures of naloxone-precipitated opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, G A; Nguyen, P; Joharchi, N; Sellers, E M

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, ondansetron and MDL 72,222, against various behaviours elicited by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal were examined. Rats made dependent upon morphine by the subcutaneous implantation of a 75 mg pellet, when challenged with naloxone (0.5 mg/kg SC), 3 or 4 days later exhibited a wide range of behaviours including wet dog shakes, paw shakes, salivation and a marked weight loss. Pre-treatment with ondansetron (0.01-1 mg/kg SC) or MDL 72,222 (1-3 mg/kg SC) failed to affect the incidence of these responses except weight loss, which was attenuated by both treatments. At doses similar to and below those required to elicit the withdrawal syndrome, naloxone produced a single-trial place aversion in morphine dependent rats. The place aversion produced by naloxone (0.05 mg/kg SC) was antagonized by pre-treatment of ondansetron (0.1-1 mg/kg SC) and MDL 72,222 (1 mg/kg SC) prior to conditioning. Chlordiazepoxide (10 mg/kg IP) but not gepirone (3-10 mg/kg SC) was similarly effective. It is concluded that 5-HT3 antagonists may attenuate some but not all behavioural signs associated with morphine withdrawal. Reasons for this apparent selectivity are discussed.

  4. Comparing methadone and buprenorphine maintenance with methadone-assisted withdrawal for the treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy: maternal and neonatal outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund IO

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ingunn O Lund1, Heather Fitzsimons2, Michelle Tuten2, Margaret S Chisolm2, Kevin E O’Grady3, Hendrée E Jones2,41SERAF-Norwegian Centre for Addiction Research, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; 3Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD; 4Substance Abuse Treatment Evaluations and Interventions Research Program, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, USAAbstract: Pregnancy can motivate opioid-dependent women to seek substance abuse treatment. Research has demonstrated that although prenatal exposure to buprenorphine results in less severe neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS relative to prenatal methadone exposure, the maternal and other neonatal outcomes are similar for the two medications. Maternal and neonatal outcomes for opioid-dependent pregnant women receiving these medications have not been systematically compared with methadone-assisted withdrawal. The present study provides an initial assessment of the relative efficacy of both methadone and buprenorphine maintenance versus methadone-assisted withdrawal in terms of neonatal and maternal delivery outcomes. Data were derived from (1 the MOTHER (Maternal Opioid Treatment: Human Experimental Research study at the Johns Hopkins University Bayview Medical Center (JHBMC, or (2 retrospective records review of women who underwent methadone-assisted withdrawal at the JHBMC during the time period in which participants were enrolled in the MOTHER study. Compared with the methadone maintenance group, the methadone-assisted withdrawal group had a significantly lower mean NAS peak score (Means = 13.7 vs 7.0; P = 0.002, required a significantly lower mean amount of morphine to treat NAS (Means = 82.8 vs 0.2; P < 0.001, had significantly fewer days medicated for NAS (Means = 31.5 vs 3.9; P < 0.001, and remained in the hospital for a significantly fewer number of

  5. Opioid intoxication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014:chap 162. Lank PM, Kusin S. Ethanol and opioid intoxication and withdrawal. In: Adams JG, ed. Emergency Medicine . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 154. National Institute on Drug Abuse. Opioids. National Institute on Drug Abuse Web site. Updated ...

  6. Opioid-dependent growth of glial cultures: Suppression of astrocyte DNA synthesis by met-enkephalin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiene-Martin, A.; Hauser, K.F. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The action of met-enkephalin on the growth of astrocytes in mixed-glial cultures was examined. Primary, mixed-glial cultures were isolated from 1 day-old mouse cerebral hemispheres and continuously treated with either basal growth media, 1 {mu}M met-enkephalin, 1 {mu}M met-enkephalin plus the opioid antagonist naloxone, or naloxone alone. Absolute numbers of neural cells were counted in unstained preparations, while combined ({sup 3}H)-thymidine autoradiography and glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) immunocytochemistry was performed to identify specific changes in astrocytes. When compared to control and naloxone treated cultures, met-enkephalin caused a significant decrease in both total cell numbers, and in ({sup 3}H)-thymidine incorporation by GFAP-positive cells with flat morphology. These results indicate that met-enkephalin suppresses astrocyte growth in culture.

  7. Prescription Opioids during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include codeine, morphine and oxycodone. If you take opioids during pregnancy, they can cause serious problems for your baby, like premature birth and drug withdrawal called NAS. Even if you use an opioid ...

  8. Ultra-low-dose naltrexone suppresses rewarding effects of opiates and aversive effects of opiate withdrawal in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Mary C; Burns, Lindsay H

    2005-09-01

    Ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists enhance opiate analgesia and attenuate tolerance and withdrawal. To determine whether ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX) coadministration alters the rewarding effects of opiates or the aversive effects of opiate withdrawal. We used the conditioned place preference (CPP) and conditioned place aversion (CPA) paradigms to assess whether ultra-low-dose NTX alters the acute rewarding effects of oxycodone or morphine, or the aversive aspect of withdrawal from either drug. To assess the dose response for ultra-low-dose NTX, a range of NTX doses (0.03-30 ng/kg) was tested in the oxycodone CPP experiment. In order to avoid tolerance or sensitization effects, we used single conditioning sessions and female rats, as females are more sensitive to the conditioning effects of these drugs. Ultra-low-dose NTX (5 ng/kg) blocked the CPP to morphine (5 mg/kg) and the CPA to withdrawal from chronic morphine (5 mg/kg, for 7 days). Coadministration of ultra-low-dose NTX (30 pg/kg) also blocked the CPA to withdrawal from chronic oxycodone administration (3 mg/kg, for 7 days). The effects of NTX on the CPP to oxycodone (3 mg/kg) revealed a biphasic dose response. The two lowest doses (0.03 and 0.3 ng/kg) blocked the CPP, the middle dose (3 ng/kg) was ineffective, and oxycodone combined with the highest dose (30 ng/kg) produced a trend toward a CPP. Ultra-low-dose NTX coadministration blocks the acute rewarding effects of analgesic doses of oxycodone or morphine as well as the anhedonia of withdrawal from chronic administration.

  9. The Impact of Saffron on Symptoms of Withdrawal Syndrome in Patients Undergoing Maintenance Treatment for Opioid Addiction in Sabzevar Parish in 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nemat Shahi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Drug dependence is one of the serious problems around the world. Saffron is one of those beneficial medicinal plants which is embedded with a similar mechanism to methadone (e.g., inhibition of serotonin reuptake. Thus, it can be helpful in reducing the withdrawal symptoms. The aim of this study was to reduce the daily dose of methadone usage and reduce its side effects using saffron in the form of medicinal supplements. Methodology. This study was categorized as a clinical trial. Accordingly, 44 clients of addiction treatment centers in Sabzevar parish were randomly selected to participate in this study in 2016–2017. While the experimental group was treated with methadone syrup and self-made saffron capsules, the control group received methadone syrup and placebo capsules. Results. The results showed that the use of saffron and methadone alleviated the symptoms of withdrawal syndrome (p<0.001. Conclusion. Having reviewed the research participants, it was indicated that the introduction of saffron alleviated the symptoms of withdrawal syndrome in patients undergoing maintenance treatment for opioid addiction. Thus, it seems rational to make use of saffron in combination with methadone in order to alleviate the symptoms of withdrawal syndrome.

  10. Tolerance and sensitization to chronic escalating-dose heroin following extended withdrawal in Fischer rats: possible role of mu-opioid receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seip-Cammack, Katharine M.; Reed, Brian; Zhang, Yong; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    Rationale/objectives Heroin addiction is characterized by recurrent cycles of drug use, abstinence and relapse. It is likely that neurobiological changes during chronic heroin exposure persist across withdrawal and impact behavioral responses to re-exposure. We hypothesized that, after extended withdrawal, heroin-withdrawn rats would express behavioral tolerance and/or sensitization in response to heroin re-exposure and that these responses might be associated with altered mu-opioid receptor (MOPr) activity. Methods Male Fischer rats were exposed chronically to escalating doses of heroin (7.5–75mg/kg/day), experienced acute spontaneous withdrawal and extended (10-day) abstinence, and were re-exposed chronically to heroin. Homecage behaviors and locomotor activity in response to heroin, as well as somatic withdrawal signs, were recorded. Separate groups of rats were sacrificed after extended abstinence and MOPr expression and G-protein coupling were analyzed using [3H]DAMGO and [35S]GTPγS assays. Results The depth of behavioral stupor was lower during the initial days of heroin re-exposure compared to the initial days of the first exposure period. Behavioral responses (e.g., stereotypy) and locomotion were elevated in response to heroin re-exposure at low doses. Rats conditioned for heroin place preference during the chronic re-exposure period expressed heroin preference during acute withdrawal; this preference was stronger than rats conditioned during chronic heroin exposure that followed chronic saline and injection-free periods. Extended withdrawal was associated with increased MOPr expression in the caudate-putamen and frontal and cingulate cortices. No changes in G-protein coupling were identified. Conclusions Aspects of tolerance/sensitization to heroin are present even after extended abstinence and may be associated with altered MOPr density. PMID:22829433

  11. The kappa-opioid receptor antagonist nor-BNI inhibits cocaine and amphetamine, but not cannabinoid (WIN 52212-2), abstinence-induced withdrawal in planarians: an instance of 'pharmacologic congruence'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Robert B; Stagliano, Gregory W; Ross, Geoffrey; Powell, Jenay A; Phillips, Austin G; Ding, Zhe; Rawls, Scott M

    2008-02-08

    The broad applicability of receptor theory to diverse species, from invertebrates to mammals, provides evidence for the evolution in complexity of pharmacologic receptor diversification and of receptor-effector signal transduction mechanisms. However, pre-mammalian species have less receptor subtype differentiation, and thus, might share signal transduction pathways to a greater extent than do mammals, a phenomenon that we term 'pharmacologic congruence'. We have demonstrated previously that the lowest species considered to have a centralized nervous system, planarians, display both abstinence-induced and antagonist-precipitated withdrawal signs, indicative of the development of physical dependence. We report here: (1) amphetamine abstinence-induced withdrawal, and (2) the attenuation of cocaine and amphetamine, but not cannabinoid agonist (WIN 52212-2), abstinence-induced withdrawal by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone and by the selective kappa-opioid receptor subtype antagonist nor-BNI (nor-Binaltorphimine), but not by the selective mu-opioid or the delta-opioid receptor subtype antagonists CTAP (D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2)) and naltrindole. These results provide evidence that the withdrawal from cocaine and amphetamine, but not cannabinoids, in planarians is mediated through a common nor-BNI-sensitive (kappa-opioid receptor-like) pathway.

  12. A clinical trial to determine if corelease of morphine and naltrexone from crushed extended-release capsules induces withdrawal in opioid-dependent patients: a descriptive analysis of six patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setnik, Beatrice; Roland, Carl L; Goli, Veeraindar; Sommerville, Kenneth; Webster, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate whether intact or crushed doses of an extended-release formulation of morphine sulfate surrounding an inner core of sequestered naltrexone (MSN) induces signs and symptoms of withdrawal in opioid-dependent patients. Randomized, double-blind, two-way crossover study. Single center. Fourteen patients with chronic moderate-to-severe noncancer pain receiving opioids were enrolled into the study; six completed the maintenance and treatment phases prior to early study discontinuation for issues with manufacturing; eight discontinued: adverse effects (4), noncompliance (1), patient decision (1), study termination (2). Patients were titrated to a stable dose of MSN (ranging from 30/1.2 to 100/4.0 mg of morphine/naltrexone) that was used in the single-dose crossover evaluation of crushed and intact MSN. Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS). Clinically significant withdrawal (COWS ≥ 13) was observed with rapid onset (≤0.8 hours postdose) in three patients (50 percent) following treatment with crushed MSN at the highest doses administered of ≥60/2.4 mg. Although naltrexone exposure was negligible following exposure to intact MSN, increasing plasma levels of naltrexone and 6-β-naltrexol were associated with COWS score ≥13 in patients who received crushed MSN. COWS ≥ 13 was observed in one patient receiving intact MSN without quantifiable naltrexone concentrations. Crushing the MSN capsule may precipitate moderate-to-severe signs and symptoms of opioid withdrawal in opioid-dependent individuals. The negligible exposure to naltrexone following exposure to intact MSN supports that intact capsules may be taken safely without precipitating withdrawal in opioid-dependent individuals.

  13. Effect of Potassium Channel Modulators on Morphine Withdrawal in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Seth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of potassium channel openers and blockers on morphine withdrawal syndrome. Mice were rendered dependent on morphine by subcutaneous injection of morphine; four hours later, withdrawal was induced by using an opioid antagonist, naloxone. Mice were observed for 30 minutes for the withdrawal signs ie, the characteristic jumping, hyperactivity, urination and diarrhea. ATP-dependent potassium (K + ATP channel modulators were injected intraperitoneally (i.p. 30 minutes before the naloxone. It was found that a K + ATP channel opener, minoxidil (12.5–50 mg/kg i.p., suppressed the morphine withdrawal significantly. On the other hand, the K + ATP channel blocker glibenclamide (12.5–50 mg/kg i.p. caused a significant facilitation of the withdrawal. Glibenclamide was also found to abolish the minoxidil's inhibitory effect on morphine withdrawal. The study concludes that K + ATP channels play an important role in the genesis of morphine withdrawal and K + ATP channel openers could be useful in the management of opioid withdrawal. As morphine opens K + ATP channels in neurons, the channel openers possibly act by mimicking the effects of morphine on neuronal K + currents.

  14. Activation of serotonin 5-HT(2C) receptor suppresses behavioral sensitization and naloxone-precipitated withdrawal symptoms in heroin-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xian; Pang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Li, Guangwu; Xu, Shengchun; Dong, Liuyi; Stackman, Robert W; Zhang, Gongliang

    2015-10-21

    Abuse and dependence to heroin has evolved into a global epidemic as a significant clinical and societal problem with devastating consequences. Repeated exposure to heroin can induce long-lasting behavioral sensitization and withdrawal. Pharmacological activation of 5-HT2C receptors (5-HT2CRs) suppresses psychostimulant-induced drug-seeking and behavioral sensitization. The present study examined the effect of a selective 5-HT2CR agonist lorcaserin on behavioral sensitization and naloxone-precipitated withdrawal symptoms in heroin-treated mice. Male mice received heroin (1.0 mg/kg, s.c.) twice a day for 3 days and then drug treatment was suspended for 5 days. On day 9, a challenge dose of heroin (1.0 mg/kg) was administered to examine the expression of behavioral sensitization. Lorcaserin administered during the development, withdrawal or expression stage suppressed heroin-induced behavioral sensitization on day 9. Another cohort of mice received increasing doses of heroin over a 4.5-day period. Lorcaserin, or the positive control clonidine (an α2-adrenoceptor agonist) suppressed naloxone-precipitated withdrawal symptoms in heroin-treated mice. These findings suggest that activation of 5-HT2CRs suppresses behavioral sensitization and withdrawal in heroin-treated mice. Thus, pharmacological activation of 5-HT2CRs may represent a new avenue for the treatment of heroin addiction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Activation of serotonin 5-HT2C receptor suppresses behavioral sensitization and naloxone-precipitated withdrawal symptoms in heroin-treated mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangwu; Xu, Shengchun; Dong, Liuyi; Stackman, Robert W.; Zhang, Gongliang

    2015-01-01

    Abuse and dependence to heroin has evolved into a global epidemic as a significant clinical and societal problem with devastating consequences. Repeated exposure to heroin can induce long-lasting behavioral sensitization and withdrawal. Pharmacological activation of 5-HT2C receptors (5-HT2CRs) suppresses psychostimulant-induced drug-seeking and behavioral sensitization. The present study examined the effect of a selective 5-HT2CR agonist lorcaserin on behavioral sensitization and naloxone-precipitated withdrawal symptoms in heroin-treated mice. Male mice received heroin (1.0 mg/kg, s.c.) twice a day for 3 days and then drug treatment was suspended for 5 days. On day 9, a challenge dose of heroin (1.0 mg/kg) was administered to examine the expression of behavioral sensitization. Lorcaserin administered during the development, withdrawal or expression stage suppressed heroin-induced behavioral sensitization on day 9. Another cohort of mice received increasing doses of heroin over a 4.5-day period. Lorcaserin, or the positive control clonidine (an α2-adrenoceptor agonist) suppressed naloxone-precipitated withdrawal symptoms in heroin-treated mice. These findings suggest that activation of 5-HT2CRs suppresses behavioral sensitization and withdrawal in heroin-treated mice. Thus, pharmacological activation of 5-HT2CRs may represent a new avenue for the treatment of heroin addiction. PMID:26375926

  16. Retention on buprenorphine is associated with high levels of maximal viral suppression among HIV-infected opioid dependent released prisoners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra A Springer

    Full Text Available HIV-infected prisoners lose viral suppression within the 12 weeks after release to the community. This prospective study evaluates the use of buprenorphine/naloxone (BPN/NLX as a method to reduce relapse to opioid use and sustain viral suppression among released HIV-infected prisoners meeting criteria for opioid dependence (OD.From 2005-2010, 94 subjects meeting DSM-IV criteria for OD were recruited from a 24-week prospective trial of directly administered antiretroviral therapy (DAART for released HIV-infected prisoners; 50 (53% selected BPN/NLX and were eligible to receive it for 6 months; the remaining 44 (47% selected no BPN/NLX therapy. Maximum viral suppression (MVS, defined as HIV-1 RNA<50 copies/mL, was compared for the BPN/NLX and non-BPN/NLX (N = 44 groups.The two groups were similar, except the BPN/NLX group was significantly more likely to be Hispanic (56.0% v 20.4%, from Hartford (74.4% v 47.7% and have higher mean global health quality of life indicator scores (54.18 v 51.40. MVS after 24 weeks of being released was statistically correlated with 24-week retention on BPN/NLX [AOR = 5.37 (1.15, 25.1], having MVS at the time of prison-release [AOR = 10.5 (3.21, 34.1] and negatively with being Black [AOR = 0.13 (0.03, 0.68]. Receiving DAART or methadone did not correlate with MVS.In recognition that OD is a chronic relapsing disease, strategies that initiate and retain HIV-infected prisoners with OD on BPN/NLX is an important strategy for improving HIV treatment outcomes as a community transition strategy.

  17. Efficacy and tolerability of buccal buprenorphine in opioid-experienced patients with moderate to severe chronic low back pain: results of a phase 3, enriched enrollment, randomized withdrawal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbel, Joseph; Spierings, Egilius L H; Katz, Nathaniel; Xiang, Qinfang; Tzanis, Evan; Finn, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    A buccal film of buprenorphine (BBUP) was evaluated for safety and efficacy in a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, enriched-enrollment, randomized-withdrawal study in opioid-experienced patients (30 to ≤160 mg/d morphine sulfate equivalent) with moderate to severe chronic low back pain taking around-the-clock opioid analgesics. Patients' opioid doses were tapered to ≤30 mg morphine sulfate equivalent before open-label titration with BBUP (range, 150-900 μg every 12 hours). Patients who responded (received adequate analgesia that was generally well tolerated for 14 days) were randomized to receive buprenorphine (n = 254) or placebo (n = 257) buccal film. The primary efficacy variable was the change from baseline to week 12 of double-blind treatment in mean average daily pain-intensity scores using a rating scale of 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain imaginable). In the intent-to-treat population, mean pain scores were 6.7 after opioid taper and declined to 2.8 after the BBUP titration period. After randomization, mean pain scores were lower in the BBUP group than in the placebo group; the difference between groups in the mean change from baseline to week 12 was -0.98 (95% CI, -1.32 to -0.64; P opioid-experienced patients taking around-the-clock opioid treatment for chronic low back pain.

  18. Determination of mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors in forebrain cortex of rats exposed to morphine for 10 days: Comparison with animals after 20 days of morphine withdrawal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ujčíková, Hana; Hloušková, Martina; Cechová, Kristina; Stolařová, Kateřina; Roubalová, Lenka; Svoboda, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 10 (2017), č. článku e0186797. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-05903S; GA ČR(CZ) GA17-07070S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : morphine * rat brain cortex * opioid receptors * drug withdrawal * cholesterol Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  19. Two placebo-controlled, randomized withdrawal studies to evaluate the fentanyl 1 day patch in opioid-naïve patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Tsutomu; Kashimoto, Yuji; Ukyo, Yoshifumi; Tominaga, Yushin; Imanaka, Keiichiro

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of fentanyl 1 day patch in opioid-naïve patients with non-cancer chronic pain insufficiently relieved by non-opioid analgesics. Two phase III placebo-controlled, double-blind, group-comparison, randomized withdrawal studies were conducted in patients with osteoarthritis and/or low back pain (N01 study) and post-herpetic neuralgia, complex regional pain syndrome, or chronic postoperative pain (N02) in Japan. Both studies consisted of period I (10-29 days of titration, fentanyl 12.5-50.0 µg/h) and period II (12 weeks double-blind). N01, NCT01008618; N02, NCT01008553 MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary endpoint was the number of days until study discontinuation due to insufficient pain relief in period II, and secondary endpoints included pain scored on visual analog scale (VAS), subject's overall assessment, the number of rescue dose, brief pain inventory short form score, score on short-form 36-item health survey version 2.0, physician's overall assessment, and assessment of adverse events. Of the 218 (N01) and 258 (N02) subjects who entered period I, 150 and 163 subjects entered period II, respectively. In the N01 study, the between-group difference was significant in the VAS score (95% CI: 7.3 [1.1, 13.5] mm, P = 0.0215) but not in the primary endpoint (P = 0.0846, log-rank test). In the N02 study, both primary efficacy (P = 0.0003) and VAS (8.7 [2.4, 15.0] mm, P = 0.0071) results showed that fentanyl was more effective than placebo. The major adverse events were nervous system and gastrointestinal disorders typically associated with opioid analgesic use. The incidence of adverse events in the fentanyl group was 68.5% to 85.7%. Although the primary efficacy results showed significant effects of fentanyl in the N02 but not the N01 study, overall results showed that fentanyl 1 day patch is effective and well tolerated.

  20. Ovarian Hormones and Transdermal Nicotine Administration Independently and Synergistically Suppress Tobacco Withdrawal Symptoms and Smoking Reinstatement in the Human Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Raina D; Liautaud, Madalyn M; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Huh, Jimi; Monterosso, John; Leventhal, Adam M

    2018-03-01

    Modeling intra-individual fluctuations in estradiol and progesterone may provide unique insight into the effects of ovarian hormones on the etiology and treatment of nicotine dependence. This randomized placebo-controlled laboratory study tested the independent and interactive effects of intra-individual ovarian hormone variation and nicotine on suppression of tobacco withdrawal symptoms and smoking behavior. Female smokers randomized to 21 mg nicotine (TNP; n=37) or placebo (PBO; n=43) transdermal patch following overnight abstinence completed three sessions occurring during hormonally distinct menstrual cycle phases. At each session, participants provided saliva for hormone assays and completed repeated self-report measures (ie, tobacco withdrawal symptoms, smoking urge, and negative affect (NA)) followed by an analog smoking reinstatement task for which participants could earn money to delay smoking and subsequently purchase cigarettes to smoke. Higher (vs lower) progesterone levels were associated with greater reductions in NA. Higher (vs lower) progesterone levels and progesterone to estradiol ratios were associated with reducing smoking urges over time to a greater extent with TNP compared to PBO. There was an interaction between Patch and estradiol on NA. With TNP, higher-than-usual estradiol was associated with greater decreases in NA. However with PBO, lower-than-usual estradiol was associated with greater decreases in NA. These results suggest that the effects of TNP on mood- and smoking-related outcomes may vary depending on the ovarian hormone levels.

  1. Opioid analgesics suppress male gonadal function but opioid use in males and females does not correlate with symptoms of sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Dana; Gray, Dan P; Simmonds, Mark; Rashiq, Saifee; Sobolev, Igor; Morrish, Donald W

    2011-01-01

    Opioid analgesia impairs gonadal function in men and women, but the correlation with symptoms and hormonal measurements of hypogonadism is not well established. To determine the frequency of impaired gonadal function in men and women using opioids for chronic pain, and to determine the correlation of symptoms with hormonal measurements of gonadal function. A prospective study of patients attending a multidisciplinary pain clinic was conducted. A total of 65 women (47 opioid users and 18 nonopioid analgesic controls) and 32 men (26 opioid users and six controls) were enrolled. Histories of sexual dysfunction and hormonal testing (men: total testosterone [TT], free testosterone [FT], prolactin and luteinizing hormone; women: FT, TT, prolactin, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, sex hormone- binding globulin, progesterone, luteinizing hormone and follicle- stimulating hormone, and estradiol) were obtained. In men, a low FT level was more common in opioid users (20⁄26; P=0.04). In men with abnormal hormone levels, there was no difference in the frequency of sexual dysfunction compared with men with normal hormone levels, and no difference in the frequency of opioid versus nonopioid use. In women, opioid users had lower FT levels (P=0.02). Low dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate was more frequent in women on opioids (P=0.03) in the menopausal group only (P=0.046). Premenopausal women taking opioids more frequently had a low TT level (P=0.03). The frequency of female sexual dysfunction was the same in opioid users (32⁄47) and controls (13⁄18; P=0.75), and also did not relate to any hormone abnormality. Men taking opioids had lower FT and higher prolactin levels, and women taking opioids had lower FT levels. Frequency of sexual dysfunction did not correlate with hormone levels in either men or women taking opioids. Opioids frequently cause low FT levels in men, but there is no relationship between abnormal hormone levels and symptoms of sexual dysfunction. Therefore, all

  2. Opioid Overdose Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use in helping to reduce the symptoms of opioid withdrawal (FDA, November 2017) Illicit Drug Use, Illicit Drug Use Disorders, and Drug Overdose Deaths in Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Areas — United ... opioid crisis (5:08) (Washington Post, September 2017) Contribution ...

  3. Suppression of Apoptosis by Basement Membrane Requires three-dimensional Tissue Organization and Withdrawal from the Cell Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreau, N.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

    1995-12-28

    The basement membrane (BM) extracellular matrix induces differentiation and suppresses apoptosis in mammary epithelial cells, whereas cells lacking BM lose their differentiated phenotype and undergo apoptosis. Addition of purified BM components, which are known to induce {beta}-casein expression, did not prevent apoptosis, indicating that a more complex BM was necessary. A comparison of culture conditions where apoptosis would or would not occur allowed us to relate inhibition of apoptosis to a complete withdrawal from the cell cycle, which was observed only when cells acquired a three-dimensional alveolar structure in response to BM. In the absence of this morphology, both the G1 cyclin kinase inhibitor p21/WAF-I and positive proliferative signals including c-myc and cyclin Dl were expressed and the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) continued to be hyperphosphorylated. When we overexpressed either c-myc in quiescent cells or p21 when cells were still cycling, apoptosis was induced. In the absence of three-dimensional alveolar structures, mammary epithelial cells secrete a number of factors including transforming growth factor a and tenascin, which when added exogenously to quiescent cells induced expression of c-myc and interleukin-{beta}1-converting enzyme (ICE) mRNA and led to apoptosis. These experiments demonstrate that a correct tissue architecture is crucial for long-range homeostasis, suppression of apoptosis, and maintenance of differentiated phenotype.

  4. Opium tincture versus methadone syrup in management of acute raw opium withdrawal: A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassomi, Farzaneh; Zarghami, Mehran; Shiran, Mohammad-Reza; Farnia, Samaneh; Davoodi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of opium tincture versus methadone syrup in the management of acute withdrawal syndrome in opium dependent patients during the detoxification period. In this double-blind randomized controlled study, a total of 74 adult male raw opium dependent patients were treated with opium tincture or methadone syrup 2 times daily for 5 consecutive days. Detoxification was initiated by tapered dose reductions to reach abstinence. At the end of the 10th day, the medications were discontinued. The Objective Opioid Withdrawal Scale was used to assess withdrawal symptoms every day. Significant decreases on the Objective Opioid Withdrawal Scale were found for both treatment methods during the study period (p Opium tincture can be considered as a potential substitute for methadone syrup for suppression of raw opium withdrawal symptoms, with minimal adverse effects.

  5. Opioid adjuvant strategy: improving opioid effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihel, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Opioid analgesics continue to be the mainstay of pharmacologic treatment of moderate to severe pain. Many patients, particularly those suffering from chronic pain, require chronic high-dose analgesic therapy. Achieving clinical efficacy and tolerability of such treatment regimens is hampered by the appearance of opioid-induced side effects such as tolerance, hyperalgesia and withdrawal syndrome. Among the therapeutic options to improve the opioid effectiveness, this current review focuses on strategies combining opioids to other drugs that can modulate opioid-mediated effects. We will discuss about experimental evidences reported for several potential opioid adjuvants, including N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, 5-HT7 agonists, sigma-1 antagonists, I2-R ligands, cholecystokinin antagonists, neuropeptide FF-R antagonists and toll-like receptor 4 antagonists.

  6. Medications Development for Opioid Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negus, S. Stevens; Banks, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe methods for preclinical evaluation of candidate medications to treat opioid abuse and dependence. Our perspective is founded on the propositions that (1) drug self-administration procedures provide the most direct method for assessment of medication effects, (2) procedures that assess choice between opioid and nondrug reinforcers are especially useful, and (3) the states of opioid dependence and withdrawal profoundly influence both opioid reinforcement and the effects of candidate medications. Effects of opioid medications on opioid choice in nondependent and opioid-dependent subjects are reviewed. Various nonopioid medications have also been examined, but none yet have been identified that safely and reliably reduce opioid choice. Future research will focus on (1) strategies for increasing safety and/or effectiveness of opioid medications, and (2) continued development of nonopioids such as inhibitors of endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes or inhibitors of opioid-induced glial activation. PMID:23125072

  7. Efficacy and tolerability of buccal buprenorphine in opioid-experienced patients with moderate to severe chronic low back pain: results of a phase 3, enriched enrollment, randomized withdrawal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbel, Joseph; Spierings, Egilius L.H.; Katz, Nathaniel; Xiang, Qinfang; Tzanis, Evan; Finn, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A buccal film of buprenorphine (BBUP) was evaluated for safety and efficacy in a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, enriched-enrollment, randomized-withdrawal study in opioid-experienced patients (30 to ≤160 mg/d morphine sulfate equivalent) with moderate to severe chronic low back pain taking around-the-clock opioid analgesics. Patients' opioid doses were tapered to ≤30 mg morphine sulfate equivalent before open-label titration with BBUP (range, 150-900 μg every 12 hours). Patients who responded (received adequate analgesia that was generally well tolerated for 14 days) were randomized to receive buprenorphine (n = 254) or placebo (n = 257) buccal film. The primary efficacy variable was the change from baseline to week 12 of double-blind treatment in mean average daily pain-intensity scores using a rating scale of 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain imaginable). In the intent-to-treat population, mean pain scores were 6.7 after opioid taper and declined to 2.8 after the BBUP titration period. After randomization, mean pain scores were lower in the BBUP group than in the placebo group; the difference between groups in the mean change from baseline to week 12 was −0.98 (95% CI, −1.32 to −0.64; P pain reductions ≥30% and ≥50% (P low back pain. PMID:27434505

  8. Opioid Basics: Prescription Opioids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Injury Violence Prevention WISQARS (Injury & Death Data) Prescription Opioids Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Prescription opioids ... Problem Risk Factors Addiction and Overdose About Prescription Opioids Side Effects In addition to the serious risks ...

  9. Gene Variants Reduce Opioid Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... morphine or methadone treatment to wean them off opioid dependence, and 21 (24 percent) were treated with additional medications to alleviate withdrawal symptoms. However, those infants with a guanine rs1799971 ...

  10. Peripheral opioid antagonist enhances the effect of anti-tumor drug by blocking a cell growth-suppressive pathway in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Suzuki

    Full Text Available The dormancy of tumor cells is a major problem in chemotherapy, since it limits the therapeutic efficacy of anti-tumor drugs that only target dividing cells. One potential way to overcome chemo-resistance is to "wake up" these dormant cells. Here we show that the opioid antagonist methylnaltrexone (MNTX enhances the effect of docetaxel (Doc by blocking a cell growth-suppressive pathway. We found that PENK, which encodes opioid growth factor (OGF and suppresses cell growth, is predominantly expressed in diffuse-type gastric cancers (GCs. The blockade of OGF signaling by MNTX releases cells from their arrest and boosts the effect of Doc. In comparison with the use of Doc alone, the combined use of Doc and MNTX significantly prolongs survival, alleviates abdominal pain, and diminishes Doc-resistant spheroids on the peritoneal membrane in model mice. These results suggest that blockade of the pathways that suppress cell growth may enhance the effects of anti-tumor drugs.

  11. Inhibition of opioid systems in the hypothalamus as well as the mesolimbic area suppresses feeding behavior of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, H; Ardianto, C; Yonemochi, N; Yang, L; Ohashi, T; Ikegami, M; Nagase, H; Kamei, J

    2015-12-17

    Opioid receptors, especially μ-opioid receptors, in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) are reported to regulate food motivation. However, the roles of μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors are not fully understood. Moreover, since μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors are reported to distribute in the hypothalamus, these receptors in the hypothalamus might regulate feeding behavior. Thus, the present study investigated the role of μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors in the VTA, the NAcc and the hypothalamus in the regulation of feeding behavior. Male ICR mice were subjected to a feeding test after food deprivation for 16h. The mRNA levels of proopiomelanocortin (POMC), preproenkephalin (PENK) and prodynorphin (PDYN), the precursors of endogenous opioid peptides, were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The systemic injection of non-selective (naloxone) and selective μ (β-funaltrexamine; β-FNA), δ (naltrindole) and κ (norbinaltorphimine; norBNI) opioid receptor antagonists markedly reduced food intake. In contrast, the systemic injection of preferential μ (morphine), selective δ (KNT-127) and κ (U-50,488) opioid receptor agonists did not change food intake. The mRNA levels of POMC, PENK and PDYN were decreased in the hypothalamus and the midbrain after food deprivation, whereas the mRNA levels of PENK and PDYN, but not POMC, were decreased in the ventral striatum. The injection of naloxone into the NAcc, VTA and lateral hypothalamus (LH), but not the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, significantly decreased food intake. The injection of β-FNA and naltrindole into the LH, but not the VTA or NAcc, decreased food intake. The injection of norBNI into the LH and VTA, but not the NAcc, decreased food intake. These results indicate that μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors in the LH play a more important role in the regulation of feeding behavior than those receptors in the VTA and the NAcc. Copyright © 2015

  12. Mechanisms of withdrawal-associated increases in heroin self-administration: pharmacologic modulation of heroin vs food choice in heroin-dependent rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negus, S Stevens; Rice, Kenner C

    2009-03-01

    Opioid withdrawal can produce a constellation of physiological and behavioral signs, including an increase in opioid self-administration. Different mechanisms mediate different withdrawal signs, and the present study used pharmacologic tools to assess mechanisms underlying withdrawal-associated increases in opioid reinforcement. Five rhesus monkeys were rendered heroin dependent via daily 21-h heroin self-administration sessions. One hour after each heroin self-administration session, monkeys chose between heroin (0-0.1 mg/kg per injection) and food (1 g pellets) during 2-h choice sessions. Under these conditions, heroin maintained a dose-dependent increase in heroin choice, such that monkeys responded primarily for food when low heroin doses were available (0-0.01 mg/kg per injection) and primarily for heroin when higher heroin doses were available (0.032-0.1 mg/kg per injection). Periods of spontaneous withdrawal were intermittently introduced by omitting one 21-h heroin self-administration session, and test drugs were administered during these withdrawal periods. Untreated withdrawal robustly increased heroin choice during choice sessions. Withdrawal-associated increases in heroin choice were completely suppressed by the mu opioid agonist morphine (0.032-0.32 mg/kg/h, i.v.), but not by the alpha-2 noradrenergic agonist clonidine (0.01-0.1 mg/kg/h, i.v.), the dopamine/norepinephrine releaser amphetamine (0.032-0.1 mg/kg/h, i.v.), or the kappa-opioid antagonist 5'-guanidinonaltrindole (1.0 mg/kg, i.m.). The corticotropin-releasing factor 1 antagonist antalarmin (1.0-10 mg/kg per day, i.m.) produced a morphine-like suppression of withdrawal-associated increases in heroin choice in one of three monkeys. These results suggest that mechanisms of withdrawal-associated increases in the relative reinforcing efficacy of opioid agonists may be different from mechanisms of many other somatic, mood-related, and motivational signs of opioid withdrawal.

  13. Recovering from Opioid Overdose: Resources for Overdose Survivors & Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and gratitude, all accompanied by the discomfort of opioid withdrawal. Most need the support of family and friends to take the next steps toward recovery. While many factors can contribute to opioid overdose, it is al most always an accident. ...

  14. Determination of μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors in forebrain cortex of rats exposed to morphine for 10 days: Comparison with animals after 20 days of morphine withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujcikova, Hana; Hlouskova, Martina; Cechova, Kristina; Stolarova, Katerina; Roubalova, Lenka; Svoboda, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Chronic exposure of mammalian organism to morphine results in adaption to persistent high opioid tone through homeostatic adjustments. Our previous results indicated that in the frontal brain cortex (FBC) of rats exposed to morphine for 10 days, such a compensatory adjustment was detected as large up-regulation of adenylylcyclases I (8-fold) and II (2.5-fold). The other isoforms of AC (III-IX) were unchanged. Importantly, the increase of ACI and ACII was reversible as it disappeared after 20 days of morphine withdrawal. Changes of down-stream signaling molecules such as G proteins and adenylylcyclases should respond to and be preceded by primary changes proceeding at receptor level. Therefore in our present work, we addressed the problem of reversibility of the long-term morphine effects on μ-, δ- and κ-OR protein levels in FBC. Rats were exposed to increasing doses of morphine (10-40 mg/kg) for 10 days and sacrificed either 24 h (group +M10) or 20 days (group +M10/-M20) after the last dose of morphine in parallel with control animals (groups -M10 and -M10/-M20). Post-nuclear supernatant (PNS) fraction was prepared from forebrain cortex, resolved by 1D-SDS-PAGE under non-dissociated (-DTT) and dissociated (+DTT) conditions, and analyzed for the content of μ-, δ- and κ-OR by immunoblotting with C- and N-terminus oriented antibodies. Significant down-regulation of δ-OR form exhibiting Mw ≈ 60 kDa was detected in PNS prepared from both (+M10) and (+M10/-M20) rats. However, the total immunoblot signals of μ-, δ- and κ-OR, respectively, were unchanged. Plasma membrane marker Na, K-ATPase, actin and GAPDH were unaffected by morphine in both types of PNS. Membrane-domain marker caveolin-1 and cholesterol level increased in (+M10) rats and this increase was reversed back to control level in (+M10/-M20) rats. In FBC, prolonged exposure of rats to morphine results in minor (δ-OR) or no change (μ- and κ-OR) of opioid receptor content. The reversible increases

  15. Determination of μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors in forebrain cortex of rats exposed to morphine for 10 days: Comparison with animals after 20 days of morphine withdrawal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Ujcikova

    Full Text Available Chronic exposure of mammalian organism to morphine results in adaption to persistent high opioid tone through homeostatic adjustments. Our previous results indicated that in the frontal brain cortex (FBC of rats exposed to morphine for 10 days, such a compensatory adjustment was detected as large up-regulation of adenylylcyclases I (8-fold and II (2.5-fold. The other isoforms of AC (III-IX were unchanged. Importantly, the increase of ACI and ACII was reversible as it disappeared after 20 days of morphine withdrawal. Changes of down-stream signaling molecules such as G proteins and adenylylcyclases should respond to and be preceded by primary changes proceeding at receptor level. Therefore in our present work, we addressed the problem of reversibility of the long-term morphine effects on μ-, δ- and κ-OR protein levels in FBC.Rats were exposed to increasing doses of morphine (10-40 mg/kg for 10 days and sacrificed either 24 h (group +M10 or 20 days (group +M10/-M20 after the last dose of morphine in parallel with control animals (groups -M10 and -M10/-M20. Post-nuclear supernatant (PNS fraction was prepared from forebrain cortex, resolved by 1D-SDS-PAGE under non-dissociated (-DTT and dissociated (+DTT conditions, and analyzed for the content of μ-, δ- and κ-OR by immunoblotting with C- and N-terminus oriented antibodies.Significant down-regulation of δ-OR form exhibiting Mw ≈ 60 kDa was detected in PNS prepared from both (+M10 and (+M10/-M20 rats. However, the total immunoblot signals of μ-, δ- and κ-OR, respectively, were unchanged. Plasma membrane marker Na, K-ATPase, actin and GAPDH were unaffected by morphine in both types of PNS. Membrane-domain marker caveolin-1 and cholesterol level increased in (+M10 rats and this increase was reversed back to control level in (+M10/-M20 rats.In FBC, prolonged exposure of rats to morphine results in minor (δ-OR or no change (μ- and κ-OR of opioid receptor content. The reversible increases

  16. The Impact of Saffron on Symptoms of Withdrawal Syndrome in Patients Undergoing Maintenance Treatment for Opioid Addiction in Sabzevar Parish in 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemat Shahi, Mohammad; Asadi, Atefeh; Behnam Talab, Elham; Nemat Shahi, Mahbobeh

    2017-01-01

    Drug dependence is one of the serious problems around the world. Saffron is one of those beneficial medicinal plants which is embedded with a similar mechanism to methadone (e.g., inhibition of serotonin reuptake). Thus, it can be helpful in reducing the withdrawal symptoms. The aim of this study was to reduce the daily dose of methadone usage and reduce its side effects using saffron in the form of medicinal supplements. This study was categorized as a clinical trial. Accordingly, 44 clients of addiction treatment centers in Sabzevar parish were randomly selected to participate in this study in 2016-2017. While the experimental group was treated with methadone syrup and self-made saffron capsules, the control group received methadone syrup and placebo capsules. The results showed that the use of saffron and methadone alleviated the symptoms of withdrawal syndrome ( paddiction. Thus, it seems rational to make use of saffron in combination with methadone in order to alleviate the symptoms of withdrawal syndrome.

  17. Cardiac adverse effects of naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal on right ventricle: Role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro-Zaragoza, J.; Martínez-Laorden, E.; Mora, L.; Hidalgo, J.; Milanés, M.V.; Laorden, M.L., E-mail: laorden@um.es

    2014-02-15

    Opioid addiction is associated with cardiovascular disease. However, mechanisms linking opioid addiction and cardiovascular disease remain unclear. This study investigated the role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 1 receptor in mediating somatic signs and the behavioural states produced during withdrawal from morphine dependence. Furthermore, it studied the efficacy of CRF1 receptor antagonist, CP-154,526 to prevent the cardiac sympathetic activity induced by morphine withdrawal. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylation pathways were evaluated. Like stress, morphine withdrawal induced an increase in the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis activity and an enhancement of noradrenaline (NA) turnover. Pre-treatment with CRF1 receptor antagonist significantly reduced morphine withdrawal-induced increases in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, NA turnover and TH phosphorylation at Ser31 in the right ventricle. In addition, CP-154,526 reduced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) after naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. In addition, CP-154,526 attenuated the increases in body weight loss during morphine treatment and suppressed some of morphine withdrawal signs. Altogether, these results support the idea that cardiac sympathetic pathways are activated in response to naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal suggesting that treatment with a CRF1 receptor antagonist before morphine withdrawal would prevent the development of stress-induced behavioural and autonomic dysfunction in opioid addicts. - Highlights: • Morphine withdrawal caused an increase in myocardial sympathetic activity. • ERK regulates TH phosphorylation after naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal. • CRF1R is involved in cardiac adaptive changes during morphine dependence.

  18. Cardiac adverse effects of naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal on right ventricle: Role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 1 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro-Zaragoza, J.; Martínez-Laorden, E.; Mora, L.; Hidalgo, J.; Milanés, M.V.; Laorden, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Opioid addiction is associated with cardiovascular disease. However, mechanisms linking opioid addiction and cardiovascular disease remain unclear. This study investigated the role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 1 receptor in mediating somatic signs and the behavioural states produced during withdrawal from morphine dependence. Furthermore, it studied the efficacy of CRF1 receptor antagonist, CP-154,526 to prevent the cardiac sympathetic activity induced by morphine withdrawal. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylation pathways were evaluated. Like stress, morphine withdrawal induced an increase in the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis activity and an enhancement of noradrenaline (NA) turnover. Pre-treatment with CRF1 receptor antagonist significantly reduced morphine withdrawal-induced increases in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, NA turnover and TH phosphorylation at Ser31 in the right ventricle. In addition, CP-154,526 reduced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) after naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. In addition, CP-154,526 attenuated the increases in body weight loss during morphine treatment and suppressed some of morphine withdrawal signs. Altogether, these results support the idea that cardiac sympathetic pathways are activated in response to naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal suggesting that treatment with a CRF1 receptor antagonist before morphine withdrawal would prevent the development of stress-induced behavioural and autonomic dysfunction in opioid addicts. - Highlights: • Morphine withdrawal caused an increase in myocardial sympathetic activity. • ERK regulates TH phosphorylation after naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal. • CRF1R is involved in cardiac adaptive changes during morphine dependence

  19. Reasons for opioid use among patients with dependence on prescription opioids: the role of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Roger D; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Griffin, Margaret L; McHugh, R Kathryn; Haller, Deborah; Jacobs, Petra; Gardin, John; Fischer, Dan; Rosen, Kristen D

    2014-08-01

    The number of individuals seeking treatment for prescription opioid dependence has increased dramatically, fostering a need for research on this population. The aim of this study was to examine reasons for prescription opioid use among 653 participants with and without chronic pain, enrolled in the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study, a randomized controlled trial of treatment for prescription opioid dependence. Participants identified initial and current reasons for opioid use. Participants with chronic pain were more likely to report pain as their primary initial reason for use; avoiding withdrawal was rated as the most important reason for current use in both groups. Participants with chronic pain rated using opioids to cope with physical pain as more important, and using opioids in response to social interactions and craving as less important, than those without chronic pain. Results highlight the importance of physical pain as a reason for opioid use among patients with chronic pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Intracoerulear microinjection of orexin-A induces morphine withdrawal-like signs in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi-Jandabi, Masoumeh; Azizi, Hossein; Ahmadi-Soleimani, S Mohammad; Semnanian, Saeed

    2017-04-01

    Orexin (hypocretin) neuropeptides play a pivotal role in expression of opioid withdrawal signs. Hypothalamic orexinergic neurons provide dense afferents for the nucleus locus coeruleus (LC). Somatic signs of opioid withdrawal are associated with the enhanced activity of LC neurons. In addition, intra-LC administration of orexin-A leads to the hyperactivity of LC neurons. The present study was an attempt to investigate whether intra-LC microinjection of orexin-A induces morphine withdrawal-like signs in both morphine dependent and control rats. To end this, adult male Wistar rats weighing 250-300g were used. For induction of morphine dependence, animals received morphine sulfate subcutaneously (10mg/kg, s.c.) at an interval of 12h for 9days. On day 10, intra-LC orexin injection (100μM, 200nl) was carried out two hours after last morphine administration. Morphine withdrawal-like signs were assessed in a transparent Plexiglas test chamber (30cm diameter, 50cm height) for 25min. Orexin-A microinjection induced some morphine withdrawal-like signs in both morphine dependent (chewing, scratching, rearing, teeth chattering, wet-dog shake and paw tremor) and control (chewing, scratching, rearing, sniffing, wet-dog shake and head tremor) rats. Furthermore, microinjection of SB-334867, a selective orexin type-1 receptor antagonist before orexin-A significantly suppressed orexin-induced morphine withdrawal-like signs. It seems that orexin-A, via increasing the activity of LC neurons, mediates the induction of some morphine withdrawal-like signs independent of morphine dependence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by acute heroin challenge in rats during acute and chronic withdrawal from chronic heroin administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Leri, Francesco; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    It is known that heroin dependence and withdrawal are associated with changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The objective of these studies in rats was to systematically investigate the level of HPA activity and response to a heroin challenge at two time points during heroin withdrawal, and to characterize the expression of associated stress-related genes 30 minutes after each heroin challenge. Rats received chronic (10-day) intermittent escalating-dose heroin administration (3×2.5 mg/kg/day on day 1; 3×20 mg/kg/day by day 10). Hormonal and neurochemical assessments were performed in acute (12 hours after last heroin injection) and chronic (10 days after the last injection) withdrawal. Both plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels were elevated during acute withdrawal, and heroin challenge at 20 mg/kg (the last dose of chronic escalation) at this time point attenuated this HPA hyperactivity. During chronic withdrawal, HPA hormonal levels returned to baseline, but heroin challenge at 5 mg/kg decreased ACTH levels. In contrast, this dose of heroin challenge stimulated the HPA axis in heroin naïve rats. In the anterior pituitary, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA levels were increased during acute withdrawal and retuned to control levels after chronic withdrawal. In the medial hypothalamus, however, the POMC mRNA levels were decreased during acute withdrawal, and increased after chronic withdrawal. Our results suggest a long-lasting change in HPA abnormal responsivity during chronic heroin withdrawal. PMID:23771528

  2. Newer approaches to opioid detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Sarkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Opioid use disorders present with distressing withdrawal symptoms at the time of detoxification. The pharmacological agents and methods currently in use for detoxification mainly include buprenorphine, methadone, and clonidine. Many other pharmacological agents have been tried for opioid detoxification. This review takes a look at the newer pharmacological options, both opioid agonists and non-agonist medications that have been utilized for detoxification. Peer reviewed articles were identified using PubMed and PsychInfo databases. The keywords included for the search were a combination of ′opioid′ and ′detoxification′ and their synonyms. All the articles published in the last 10 years were screened for. Relevant data was extracted from identified studies. Many newer pharmacological agents have been tried in detoxification of opioids. However, the quest for a safe, efficacious, cost-effective pharmacological option which requires minimal monitoring still continues. The role of non-pharmacological measures and alternative medicine needs further evaluation.

  3. Opioid Analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Robert N; Mao, Jianren

    2015-07-01

    Chronic pain is an international health issue of immense importance that is influenced by both physical and psychological factors. Opioids are useful in treating chronic pain but have accompanying complications. It is important for clinicians to understand the basics of opioid pharmacology, the benefits and adverse effects of opioids, and related problematic issues of tolerance, dependence, and opioid-induced hyperalgesia. In this article, the role of psychiatric comorbidity and the use of validated assessment tools to identify individuals who are at the greatest risk for opioid misuse are discussed. Additionally, interventional treatment strategies for patients with chronic pain who are at risk for opioid misuse are presented. Specific behavioral interventions designed to improve adherence with prescription opioids among persons treated for chronic pain, such as frequent monitoring, periodic urine screens, opioid therapy agreements, opioid checklists, and motivational counseling, are also reviewed. Use of state-sponsored prescription drug monitoring programs is also encouraged. Areas requiring additional investigation are identified, and the future role of abuse-deterrent opioids and innovative technology in addressing issues of opioid therapy and pain are presented. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dramatic Increases in Maternal Opioid Use and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Dramatic Increases in Maternal Opioid Use and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Email Facebook Twitter Text Description of Infographic Use of opiates during pregnancy can result in a drug withdrawal syndrome in newborns called neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). ...

  5. Long-term antagonism of κ opioid receptors prevents escalation of and increased motivation for heroin intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosburg, Joel E; Whitfield, Timothy W; Park, Paula E; Crawford, Elena F; George, Olivier; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Koob, George F

    2013-12-04

    The abuse of opioid drugs, both illicit and prescription, is a persistent problem in the United States, accounting for >1.2 million users who require treatment each year. Current treatments rely on suppressing immediate withdrawal symptoms and replacing illicit drug use with long-acting opiate drugs. However, the mechanisms that lead to preventing opiate dependence are still poorly understood. We hypothesized that κ opioid receptor (KOR) activation during chronic opioid intake contributes to negative affective states associated with withdrawal and the motivation to take increasing amounts of heroin. Using a 12 h long-access model of heroin self-administration, rats showed escalation of heroin intake over several weeks. This was prevented by a single high dose (30 mg/kg) of the long-acting KOR antagonist norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI), paralleled by reduced motivation to respond for heroin on a progressive-ratio schedule of reinforcement, a measure of compulsive-like responding. Systemic nor-BNI also significantly decreased heroin withdrawal-associated anxiety-like behavior. Immunohistochemical analysis showed prodynorphin content increased in the nucleus accumbens core in all heroin-exposed rats, but selectively increased in the nucleus accumbens shell in long-access rats. Local infusion of nor-BNI (4 μg/side) into accumbens core altered the initial intake of heroin but not the rate of escalation, while local injection into accumbens shell selectively suppressed increases in heroin intake over time without altering initial intake. These data suggest that dynorphin activity in the nucleus accumbens mediates the increasing motivation for heroin taking and compulsive-like responding for heroin, suggesting that KOR antagonists may be promising targets for the treatment of opioid addiction.

  6. Withdrawal Notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Zhi-Feng Xiang & Li-Xin Deng (2014): Complete mitochondrial genome of white Bengal tiger, Panthera tigris tigris, DOI: 10.3109/19401736.2013.873912. This article, published online ahead of print on 17 January 2014, has been withdrawn by the authors due to an error identified in the data. This updated withdrawal notice replaces the original withdrawal notice, which still included the published article in full.

  7. Effect of Buprenorphine Weekly Depot (CAM2038) and Hydromorphone Blockade in Individuals With Opioid Use Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sharon L; Comer, Sandra D; Lofwall, Michelle R; Vince, Bradley; Levy-Cooperman, Naama; Kelsh, Debra; Coe, Marion A; Jones, Jermaine D; Nuzzo, Paul A; Tiberg, Fredrik; Sheldon, Behshad; Kim, Sonnie

    2017-09-01

    Buprenorphine is an efficacious, widely used treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD). Daily oral transmucosal formulations can be associated with misuse, diversion, and nonadherence; these limitations may be obviated by a sustained release formulation. To evaluate the ability of a novel, weekly, subcutaneous buprenorphine depot formulation, CAM2038, to block euphorigenic opioid effects and suppress opioid withdrawal in non-treatment-seeking individuals with OUD. This multisite, double-blind, randomized within-patient study was conducted at 3 controlled inpatient research facilities. It involved 47 adults with DSM-V moderate-to-severe OUD. The study was conducted from October 12, 2015 (first patient enrolled), to April 21, 2016 (last patient visit). A total of five 3-day test sessions evaluated the response to hydromorphone (0, 6, and 18 mg intramuscular in random order; 1 dose/session/day). After the first 3-day session (ie, qualification phase), participants were randomized to either CAM2038 weekly at 24 mg (n = 22) or 32 mg (n = 25); the assigned CAM2038 dose was given twice, 1 week apart (day 0 and 7). Four sets of sessions were conducted after randomization (days 1-3, 4-6, 8-10, and 11-13). The primary end point was maximum rating on the visual analog scale for drug liking. Secondary end points included other visual analog scale (eg, high and desire to use), opioid withdrawal scales, and physiological and pharmacokinetic outcomes. A total of 46 of 47 randomized participants (mean [SD] age, 35.5 [9] years; 76% male [n = 35]) completed the study. Both weekly CAM2038 doses produced immediate and sustained blockade of hydromorphone effects (liking maximum effect, CAM2038, 24 mg: effect size, 0.813; P withdrawal (Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale, CAM2038, 24 mg: effect size, 0.617; P opioid blockade and withdrawal suppression. The results support the use of this depot formulation for treatment initiation and stabilization of patients with OUD, with

  8. Opioid Tapering in Fibromyalgia Patients: Experience from an Interdisciplinary Pain Rehabilitation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Julie L; Evans, Michele M; King, Susan M; Gehin, Jessica M; Loukianova, Larissa L

    2016-09-01

    Despite current guideline recommendations against the use of opioids for the treatment of fibromyalgia pain, opioid use is reported in approximately 30% of the patient population. There is a lack of information describing the process and results of tapering of chronic opioids. The purpose of this study is to describe opioid tapering and withdrawal symptoms in fibromyalgia patients on opioids. This retrospective research study included a baseline analysis of 159 patients consecutively admitted to the Mayo Clinic Pain Rehabilitation Center from 2006 through 2012 with a pain diagnosis of fibromyalgia completing a 3-week outpatient interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation program. Opioid tapering analysis included 55 (35%) patients using daily opioids. Opioid tapering was individualized to each patient based on interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation team determination. Opioid withdrawal symptoms were assessed daily, utilizing the Clinical Opioid Withdrawal Scale. Patients taking daily opioids had a morphine equivalent mean dose of 99 mg/day. Patients on  200 mg/day over a mean of 28 days (P 2 years duration. Patients had significant improvements in pain-related measures including numeric pain scores, depression catastrophizing, health perception, interference with life, and perceived life control at program completion. Fibromyalgia patients on higher doses of opioids were tapered off over a longer period of time but no differences in withdrawal symptoms were seen based on opioid dose. Duration of opioid use did not affect the time to complete opioid taper or withdrawal symptoms. Despite opioid tapering, pain-related measures improved at the completion of the rehabilitation program. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Prevalence of Opioid Dispensings and Concurrent Gastrointestinal Medications in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E Williams

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Opioids are frequently prescribed for moderate to severe pain. A side effect of opioid usage is the inhibition of gastrointestinal (GI motility, known as opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OBD. OBD is typically treated prophylactically with laxatives and/or acid suppressants.

  10. 42 CFR 8.6 - Withdrawal of approval of accreditation bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PROVISIONS CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Accreditation § 8.6 Withdrawal of approval of... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Withdrawal of approval of accreditation bodies. 8.6... to establish that the problems that were grounds for withdrawal of approval have been resolved. (2...

  11. Opioid tapering in hematopoietic progenitor cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, C; Parran, L

    2000-10-01

    To describe current opioid-tapering practice, patient pain levels and withdrawal symptoms, and nurse documentation during opioid tapers. Descriptive, exploratory, prospective, quantitative, and qualitative. A 32-bed blood and marrow transplant unit in a large, tertiary U.S. care center. 45 blood and marrow transplant recipients between the ages of 7-64. Types of transplant were autologous, allogeneic, and unrelated donor marrow; peripheral blood stem cell; and umbilical cord blood. In daily interviews, patients reported pain levels and withdrawal symptoms during opioid tapers. Demographic, medication, and nurse documentation data were obtained from patient hospital records. Taper length, daily opioid dosage, pain, withdrawal symptoms, and nurse documentation. Length of taper ranged from 1-17 days (X = 6.53, SD = 4.26). Analysis of variance indicated no difference by disease or transplant type in length of taper, cumulative opioids given pretaper or during taper, or number of self-reports of withdrawal symptoms. Daily changes in nurse-administered opioid dosage during tapers ranged from a decrease of 67% to an increase of 14%. Children received significantly more opioids/kg during taper than adults. Means of adults' and children's self-reports of pain were low. The means of patient-reported withdrawal symptoms were highest on taper days two through six. Nurse documentation was sparse. Daily taper rates vary widely, pain is well managed, and most patients experience several withdrawal symptoms. Use of an opioid-taper guideline may promote consistency of tapering while not increasing levels of pain or withdrawal symptoms.

  12. Mechanisms of Withdrawal-Associated Increases in Heroin Self-Administration: Pharmacologic Modulation of Heroin vs. Food Choice in Heroin-Dependent Rhesus Monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Negus, S. Stevens; Rice, Kenner C.

    2008-01-01

    Opioid withdrawal can produce a constellation of physiological and behavioral signs, including an increase in opioid self-administration. Different mechanisms mediate different withdrawal signs, and the present study used pharmacologic tools to assess mechanisms underlying withdrawal-associated increases in opioid reinforcement. Five rhesus monkeys were rendered heroin dependent via daily 21-hr heroin self-administration sessions. One hr after each heroin self-administration session, monkeys ...

  13. Yiguanjian cataplasm attenuates opioid dependence in a mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuai; Gao, Hong; Fan, Yuchen; Zhang, Guanghua; Sun, Fengkai; Zhao, Jing; Li, Feng; Yang, Yang; Wang, Kai

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effect of Yiguanjian (YGJ) cataplasm on the development of opioid dependence in a mouse model of naloxone-induced opioid withdrawal syndrome. One hundred Swiss albino mice, of equal male to female ratio, were randomly and equally divided into 10 groups. A portion (3 cm2) of the backside hair of the mice was removed 1 day prior to the experiment. Morphine (5 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally administered twice daily for 5 days. YGJ cataplasm was prepared and pasted on the bare region of the mice immediately before morphine administration on day 3 and subsequently removed at the end day 5. On day 6, naloxone (8 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected to precipitate opioid withdrawal syndrome. Behavioral observation was performed in two 30-min phases immediately after naloxone injection. The YGJ cataplasm significantly and dose-dependently attenuated morphine-naloxone- induced experimental opioid withdrawal, in terms of withdrawal severity score and the frequencies of jumping, rearing, forepaw licking, and circling behaviors. However, YGJ cataplasm treatment did not alter the acute analgesic effect of morphine. YGJ cataplasm could attenuate opioid dependence and its associated withdrawal symptoms. Therefore, YGJ cataplasm could serve as a potential therapy for opioid addiction in the future.

  14. Evaluation of the Tolerability of Switching Patients on Chronic Full ?-Opioid Agonist Therapy to Buccal Buprenorphine

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Lynn; Gruener, Daniel; Kirby, Todd; Xiang, Qinfang; Tzanis, Evan; Finn, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objective?Assess whether patients with chronic pain receiving 80 to 220?mg oral morphine sulfate equivalent of a full ?-opioid agonist could be transitioned to buccal buprenorphine at approximately 50% of their full dose without inducing opioid withdrawal or sacrificing analgesic efficacy. Methods.?A randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, active-controlled, two-period crossover study in adult patients receiving around-the-clock full opioid agonist therapy and confirmed to be opioid dependent...

  15. Alcohol withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... so they can monitor you for symptoms of alcohol withdrawal. Prevention Reduce or avoid alcohol. If you have a drinking problem, you should ... team. 02-05-18: Editorial update. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse Read more ... HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A. ...

  16. Buprenorphine and methadone for opioid addiction during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozurkewich, Ellen L; Rayburn, William F

    2014-06-01

    Buprenorphine and methadone are opioid-receptor agonists used as opioid substitution therapy during pregnancy to limit exposure of the fetus to cycles of opioid withdrawal and reduce the risk of infectious comorbidities of illicit opioid use. As part of a comprehensive care plan, such therapy may result in improved access to prenatal care, reduced illicit drug use, reduced exposure to infections associated with intravenous drug use, and improved maternal nutrition and infant birth weight. This article describes differences in patient selection between the two drugs, their relative safety during pregnancy, and changes in daily doses as a guide for prescribing clinicians. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Electroacupuncture Attenuates CFA-induced Inflammatory Pain by suppressing Nav1.8 through S100B, TRPV1, Opioid, and Adenosine Pathways in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hsien-Yin; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Huang, Chun-Ping; Lin, Yi-Wen

    2017-02-13

    Pain is associated with several conditions, such as inflammation, that result from altered peripheral nerve properties. Electroacupuncture (EA) is a common Chinese clinical medical technology used for pain management. Using an inflammatory pain mouse model, we investigated the effects of EA on the regulation of neurons, microglia, and related molecules. Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) injections produced a significant mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia that was reversed by EA or a transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) gene deletion. The expression of the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), the microglial marker Iba-1, S100B, receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), TRPV1, and other related molecules was dramatically increased in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) of CFA-treated mice. This effect was reversed by EA and TRPV1 gene deletion. In addition, endomorphin (EM) and N 6 -cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) administration reliably reduced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, thereby suggesting the involvement of opioid and adenosine receptors. Furthermore, blocking of opioid and adenosine A1 receptors reversed the analgesic effects of EA. Our study illustrates the substantial therapeutic effects of EA against inflammatory pain and provides a novel and detailed mechanism underlying EA-mediated analgesia via neuronal and non-neuronal pathways.

  18. Tincture of opium for treating opioid dependence: a systematic review of safety and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoo, Mohammadali; Nikoo, Nooshin; Anbardan, Sanam Javid; Amiri, Afshar; Vogel, Marc; Choi, Fiona; Sepehry, Amir Ali; Bagheri Valoojerdi, Amir Hooshang; Jang, Kerry; Schütz, Christian; Akhondzadeh, Shahin; Krausz, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in using opium tincture (OT) for treating opioid dependence in certain regions. We aimed to assess the evidence on its safety and efficacy for this indication. We searched several databases (CENTRAL, Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, PsychINFO, ProQuest Dissertation and Theses Database, Iran Medex, clinicaltrials.gov and who.int/trialsearch) with no language or publication date limitations. Two reviewers selected randomized controlled trials (RCT), cohort/case-control/cross-sectional studies and case-series on safety or efficacy of OT for treating opioid dependence and then extracted reported measures of mentioned outcomes from selected studies. We used the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) Quality Assessment tool for appraisal. From nine selected studies; in three RCTs and one cohort analytical analysis on detoxification, 110 patients were treated with 15-140 morphine equivalents/day (mEq/d) of OT; in four prospective and one retrospective uncontrolled case-series on long-term/maintenance treatment, 570 patients were treated with 100-400 mEq/d of OT. Only two studies on detoxification included a comparison: one concluded equal efficacy of OT and methadone in suppressing withdrawal symptoms (P = 0.32) and the other concluded OT to be less efficacious than buprenorphine/naloxone in suppressing withdrawal [OT = 12.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 11.00, 13.40]; control: 5.20 (95% CI = 4.69, 5.71) and craving (OT = 303.0, 95% CI = -144.664, 750.664; control: 0.0) but not significantly different (P = 0.26) in retaining participants in treatment. No major adverse events were reported. Conclusive recommendations about the safety and efficacy of opium tincture for treating opioid dependence are not possible at this time. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  19. Objective methods for the assessment of the spinal and supraspinal effects of opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Iben W; Hansen, Tine M; Lelic, Dina

    2017-01-01

    by their peak latencies and amplitudes, power spectrum, scalp topographies and brain source localization. For assessment of opioid effects at the spinal level, the following methods are evaluated: the nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) and spinal EPs. The nociceptive withdrawal reflex can be recorded from all......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Opioids are potent analgesics. Opioids exert effects after interaction with opioid receptors. Opioid receptors are present in the peripheral- and central nervous system (CNS), but the analgesic effects are primarily mediated via receptors in the CNS. Objective methods...... for assessment of opioid effects may increase knowledge on the CNS processes responsible for analgesia. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the most common objective methods for assessment of the spinal and supraspinal effects of opioids and discuss their advantages and limitations. METHOD...

  20. A new and novel treatment of opioid dependence: nigella sativa 500 mg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangi, S.; Ahmed, S.P.; Channa, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Opioid dependence is one of the major social and psychiatric problem of society. Unfortunately there is no non opiate treatment available. For centuries man has used plants for their healing proprieties. These plants play a fundamental part in all treatment modalities, both ancient and modern. This study was conducted to find non opiate treatment for opiate withdrawal. Total 35 known addicts of opiates were included in the study. This study was based on DSM IV criteria for opioid dependence. This study demonstrates that non opioid treatment for opioid addiction decreases the withdrawal effects significantly. It further demonstrates that there are no changes in physiological parameters of subjects during treatment (BP, Pulse rate etc.). There is increased appetite but no significant weight gain in the subjects. Non opioid drug Nigella sativa is effective in long term treatment of opioid dependence. It not merely cures the opioid dependence but also cures the infections and weakness from which majority of addicts suffer. (author)

  1. Non-medical use of opioids among HIV-infected opioid dependent individuals on opioid maintenance treatment: the need for a more comprehensive approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roux Perrine

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid maintenance treatment (OMT has a positive impact on substance use and health outcomes among HIV-infected opioid dependent patients. The present study investigates non-medical use of opioids by HIV-infected opioid-dependent individuals treated with buprenorphine or methadone. Methods The MANIF 2000 study is a longitudinal study that enrolled a cohort of 476 HIV-infected opioid-dependent individuals. Data were collected in outpatient hospital services delivering HIV care in France. The sample comprised all patients receiving OMT (either methadone or buprenorphine who attended at least one follow-up visit with data on adherence to OMT (N = 235 patients, 1056 visits. Non-medical use of opioids during OMT was defined as having reported use of opioids in a non-medical context, and/or the misuse of the prescribed oral OMT by an inappropriate route of administration (injection or sniffing. After adjusting for the non-random assignment of OMT type, a model based on GEE was then used to identify predictors of non-medical use of opioids. Results Among the 235 patients, 144 (61.3% and 91 (38.9% patients were receiving buprenorphine and methadone, respectively, at baseline. Non-medical use of opioids was found in 41.6% of visits for 83% of individual patients. In the multivariate analysis, predictors of non-medical use of opioids were: cocaine, daily cannabis, and benzodiazepine use, experience of opioid withdrawal symptoms, and less time since OMT initiation. Conclusions Non-medical use of opioids was found to be comparable in OMT patients receiving methadone or buprenorphine. The presence of opioid withdrawal symptoms was a determinant of non-medical use of opioids and may serve as a clinical indicator of inadequate dosage, medication, or type of follow-up. Sustainability and continuity of care with adequate monitoring of withdrawal symptoms and polydrug use may contribute to reduced harms from ongoing non-medical use of opioids.

  2. The impact of opioids on the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Nathaniel; Mazer, Norman A

    2009-02-01

    Opioids have been used for medicinal and analgesic purposes for centuries. However, their negative effects on the endocrine system, which have been known for some times, are barely discussed in modern medicine. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review of the impact of opioids on the endocrine system. A review of the English language literature on preclinical and clinical studies of any type on the influence of opioids on the endocrine system was conducted. Preliminary recommendations for monitoring and managing these problems were provided. Long-term opioid therapy for either addiction or chronic pain often induces hypogonadism owing to central suppression of hypothalamic secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone. Symptoms of opioid-induced hypogonadism include loss of libido, infertility, fatigue, depression, anxiety, loss of muscle strength and mass, osteoporosis, and compression fractures in both men and women; impotence in men; and menstrual irregularities and galactorrhea in women. In view of the increased use of opioids for chronic pain, it has become increasingly important to monitor patients taking opioids and manage endocrine complications. Therefore, patients on opioid therapy should be routinely screened for such symptoms and for laboratory abnormalities in sex hormones. Opioid-induced hypogonadism seems to be a common complication of therapeutic or illicit opioid use. Patients on long-term opioid therapy should be prospectively monitored, and in cases of opioid-induced hypogonadism, we recommend nonopioid pain management, opioid rotation, or sex hormone supplementation after careful consideration of the risks and benefits.

  3. Understanding the Opioid Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Opioid Overdose Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Opioid Overdose Opioid Basics Understanding the Epidemic Commonly Used ...

  4. Opioider påvirker immunsystemet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundestrup, Svend; Sjøgren, Per

    2014-01-01

    Opioids can modulate and suppress the immune system through central mediated mechanisms. Morphine increases replication and spread of HIV-1. Evidence suggests that morphine can also enhance growth and spread of some cancer diagnoses like breast-, prostate- and non-small cell lung cancer....... The mechanisms behind the effects of morphine are mainly mediated by inhibiting apoptosis of cancer cells and by stimulation of angiogenesis. Some other opioid agonists seem to be depleted from these effects. Prospective studies are needed to clarify the immunosuppressive effects of opioids in cancer pain...... management....

  5. Withdrawal Method (Coitus Interruptus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withdrawal method (coitus interruptus) Overview The withdrawal method of contraception, also known as coitus interruptus, is the practice of withdrawing the penis from the vagina and away from a woman's external ...

  6. PSYCHIATRIC COMORBIDITY IN PATIENTS WITH OPIOID DEPENDENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihab Kattukulathil

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Opioid dependence is a major public health problem in Kerala. Presence of psychiatric disorder among opioid dependent patients worsens the scenario. To date no attempts have been made to analyse the magnitude and pattern of comorbid psychiatric disorders in the state. MATERIALS AND METHODS We assessed 30 patients with ICD-10 diagnosis of opioid dependence syndrome for the presence of comorbid psychiatric disorders using structured clinical interview for DSM IV Axis 1 disorder (SCID-1. Patients with opioid withdrawal state, delirium and acute medical emergencies were excluded. RESULTS 56.7% of our subjects had a comorbid psychiatric disorder. Major depressive disorder was the most common one (n=7, 23.3%. Prevalence of other disorders were generalised anxiety disorder (n=6, 20%, bipolar affective disorder (n=3, 10% and schizophrenia (n=1, 3.3%. CONCLUSION Comorbid Psychiatric disorders are highly prevalent in opioid dependence. There is a need for further large sample studies in the areas of comorbidities and in the integrated strategies for the identification and management of both opioid dependence and comorbid psychiatric disorders.

  7. Understanding the demand side of the prescription opioid epidemic: Does the initial source of opioids matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, Theodore J; Ellis, Matthew S

    2017-04-01

    These studies were carried out to examine whether the onset and progression of an opioid substance use disorder (SUD) differed in those who first used opioids to get "high" compared to those who received a prescription from a doctor to relieve pain (Non-Rx vs. Rx groups, respectively). A subset of patients (N=214) from an ongoing larger study of patients entering one of 125 drug treatment programs for opioid use disorder across the country agreed to give up their anonymity and participate in structured and open-ended online interviews examining drug abuse patterns. With the exception that the Non-Rx group began their opioid abuse at a younger age than the Rx group and more quickly evolved from initial exposure to regular opioid abuse, there were relatively few differences in the characteristics, patterns and trajectories of opioid abuse. The vast majority of patients in both groups, most of whom had serious, antecedent psychiatric disorders, indicated that they used opioids to self-medicate psychological problems (67-73%) and/or stated that opioids provided a means to "escape" from the stresses of everyday life (79-85%). As the SUD progressed, for many individuals any "positive" attributes of opioids waned and avoidance of withdrawal became the overriding concern, often serving as the impetus for treatment. Our results suggest that self-treatment of co-morbid psychiatric disturbances is a powerful motivating force to initiate and sustain abuse of opioids and that the initial source of drugs-a prescription or experimentation-is largely irrelevant in the progression to a SUD. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Changing Trends in Opioid Use Among Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jeffrey R; Xie, Fenglong; Smith, Christian; Saag, Kenneth G; Chen, Lang; Beukelman, Timothy; Mannion, Melissa; Yun, Huifeng; Kertesz, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Opioid prescribing recently has come under intense scrutiny. However, longitudinal patterns of prescription opioid receipt in a population-based cohort of patients with chronic pain, such as those with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), have not been well characterized. The aim of this study was to examine both trends over time and variability in individual physician prescribing of short-term and long-term use of opioids. We identified a cohort of RA patients based on 2006-2014 Medicare data and evaluated longitudinal time trends in "regular" use of opioids. A separate analysis conducted in 2014 assessed rheumatologist-specific variability in regular use of opioid prescriptions in patients with RA. We identified 97,859 RA patients meeting the eligibility criteria. The mean age of the patients was 67 years, 80% were female, 82% were white, and 12% were African American. The most commonly used opioids were those that combined acetaminophen with hydrocodone or propoxyphene. Regular opioid prescribing increased slowly but peaked in 2010 before propoxyphene was withdrawn from the market. Following the withdrawal of propoxyphene, receipt of hydrocodone and tramadol increased commensurately, and overall opioid use declined only slightly. Factors associated with regular use of opioids included younger age, female sex, African American race, back pain, fibromyalgia, anxiety, and depression. Variability between US rheumatologists (n = 4,024) in prescribing the regular use of opioids for their RA patients was high; in the average rheumatologist's practice, 40% of RA patients used prescription opioids regularly. In almost half of the patients, at least some opioid prescriptions were written by a rheumatologist, and 14% received opioids that were co-prescribed concurrently by more than 1 physician. In the US, opioid use in older patients with RA peaked in 2010 and is now declining slightly. Withdrawal of propoxyphene from the US market in 2010 had minimal effect on overall opioid

  9. Modulatory effects of Gs-coupled excitatory opioid receptor functions on opioid analgesia, tolerance, and dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, S M; Shen, K F

    1996-11-01

    Electrophysiologic studies of opioid effects on nociceptive types of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in organotypic cultures have shown that morphine and most mu, delta, and kappa opioid agonists can elicit bimodal excitatory as well as inhibitory modulation of the action potential duration (APD) of these cells. Excitatory opioid effects have been shown to be mediated by opioid receptors that are coupled via Gs to cyclic AMP-dependent ionic conductances that prolong the APD, whereas inhibitory opioid effects are mediated by opioid receptors coupled via Gi/Go to ionic conductances that shorten the APD. Selective blockade of excitatory opioid receptor functions by low (ca. pM) concentrations of naloxone, naltrexone, etorphine and other specific agents markedly increases the inhibitory potency of morphine or other bimodally acting agonists and attenuates development of tolerance/dependence. These in vitro studies have been confirmed by tail-flick assays showing that acute co-treatment of mice with morphine plus ultra-low-dose naltrexone or etorphine remarkably enhances the antinociceptive potency of morphine whereas chronic co-treatment attenuates development of tolerance and naloxone-precipitated withdrawal-jumping symptoms.

  10. Psychometric evaluation of the Dutch version of the Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (SOWS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, B.A.G.; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Riezebos, T.G.M.; Staak, C.P.F. van der; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the 16-item Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (SOWS). The SOWS measures withdrawal symptoms at the time of assessment. METHODS: The Dutch SOWS was repeatedly administered to a sample of 272 opioid-dependent inpatients of four

  11. Opioid receptors and legal highs: Salvia divinorum and Kratom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Kavita M; McCurdy, Christopher R; Boyer, Edward W

    2008-02-01

    Salvia divinorum and Mitragyna speciosa ("Kratom"), two unscheduled dietary supplements whose active agents are opioid receptor agonists, have discrete psychoactive effects that have contributed to their increasing popularity. Salvia divinorum contains the highly selective kappa- opioid receptor agonist salvinorin A; this compound produces visual hallucinations and synesthesia. Mitragynine, the major alkaloid identified from Kratom, has been reported as a partial opioid agonist producing similar effects to morphine. An interesting minor alkaloid of Kratom, 7-hydroxymitragynine, has been reported to be more potent than morphine. Both Kratom alkaloids are reported to activate supraspinal mu- and delta- opioid receptors, explaining their use by chronic narcotics users to ameliorate opioid withdrawal symptoms. Despite their widespread Internet availability, use of Salvia divinorum and Kratom represents an emerging trend that escapes traditional methods of toxicologic monitoring. The purpose of this article is to familiarize toxicologists and poison control specialists with these emerging psychoactive dietary supplements.

  12. Nicotine and endogenous opioids: neurochemical and pharmacological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiconstantinou, Maria; Neff, Norton H

    2011-06-01

    Although the mesolimbic dopamine hypothesis is the most influential theory of nicotine reward and reinforcement, there has been a consensus that other neurotransmitter systems contribute to the addictive properties of nicotine as well. In this regard, the brain opioidergic system is of interest. Striatum is rich in opioid peptides and opioid receptors, and striatal opioidergic neurons are engaged in a bidirectional communication with midbrain dopaminergic neurons, closely regulating each other's activity. Enkephalins and dynorphins exert opposing actions on dopaminergic neurons, increasing and decreasing dopamine release respectively, and are components of circuits promoting positive or negative motivational and affective states. Moreover, dopamine controls the synthesis of striatal enkephalins and dynorphins. Evidence suggests that opioidergic function is altered after nicotine and endogenous opioids are involved in nicotine's behavioral effects. 1) The synthesis and release of β-endorphin, met-enkephalin and dynorphin in brain, especially nucleus accumbens (NAc), are altered after acute or chronic nicotine treatment and during nicotine withdrawal. 2) Although opioid receptor binding and mRNA do not appear to change in the striatum during nicotine withdrawal, the activity of κ-opioid (KOPr) and δ-opioid (DOPr) receptors is attenuated in NAc. 3) The nicotine withdrawal syndrome reminisces that of opiates, and naloxone precipitates some of its somatic, motivational, and affective signs. 4) Genetic and pharmacological studies indicate that μ-opioid (MOPr) receptors are mainly involved in nicotine reward, while DOPrs contribute to the emotional and KOPrs to the aversive responses of nicotine. 5) Finally, MOPrs and enkephalin, but not β-endorphin or dynorphin, are necessary for the physical manifestations of nicotine withdrawal. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Trends in neuropharmacology: in memory of Erminio Costa'. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier

  13. Methyl Parathion Masks Withdrawal from Physical Dependence on Morphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin W. Rockhold

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The cholinergic system has been proposed to participate in the development of dependence on opioids. The present study examined effects of dermal pretreatment with methyl parathion (MP, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, on the development of physical dependence on morphine. Opioid dependence was induced by continuous intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. infusion of morphine (26 nmol/μl/h for 3 days in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Each rat received two doses of MP, 12.5 mg/kg, dermally, initially, 3 days prior to initiation of i.c.v. morphine infusion and again on the first day of infusion. Withdrawal was precipitated after 3 days of infusion by administering an opioid antagonist, naloxone (48 nmol/5 μl, i.c.v.. Twelve of 23 MP-treated rats exhibited signs of acetylcholinesterase inhibitor intoxication (mild tremors and showed reduced spontaneous locomotor activity (tested by an open field test, prior to naloxone. The brain cholinesterase activity in these 12 rats was 13% of levels in control rats. Eleven rats that did not show toxic signs, exhibited cholinesterase activities that were 20% of control (not significant versus toxic group. The group that showed signs of MP intoxication exhibited a significantly lower incidence of opioid withdrawal jumping, rearing and wet dog shakes compared with the non-toxic group. No differences between quantal withdrawal signs (ptosis, penis-licking, and vocalization were noted between the two groups. The results suggest that toxic inhibition of acetylcholinesterase non-specifically reduces locomotor activity and may obscure certain behavioral signs of withdrawal from opioid dependence. This indicates that caution should be used in interpreting a direct involvement of acetylcholinesterase inhibition in preventing opioid dependence.

  14. Opioid and GABAB receptors differentially couple to an adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A downstream effector after chronic morphine treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Elizabeth Bagley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are intensely addictive, and cessation of their chronic use is associated with a highly aversive withdrawal syndrome. A cellular hallmark of withdrawal is an opioid sensitive protein kinase A-dependent increase in GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1 currents in periaqueductal gray (PAG neurons. Elevated GAT-1 activity directly increases GABAergic neuronal excitability and synaptic GABA release, which will enhance GABAergic inhibition of PAG output neurons. This reduced activity of PAG output neurons to several brain regions, including the hypothalamus and medulla, contributes to many of the PAG-mediated signs of opioid withdrawal. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen reduces some of the PAG mediated signs of opioid withdrawal. Like the opioid receptors the GABAB receptor is a Gi/Go coupled G-protein coupled receptor. This suggests it could be modulating GAT-1 activity in PAG neurons through its inhibition of the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A pathway. Opioid modulation of the GAT-1 activity can be detected by changes in the reversal potential of opioid membrane currents. We found that when opioids are reducing the GAT-1 cation conductance and increasing the GIRK conductance the opioid agonist reversal potential is much more negative than Ek. Using this approach for GABAB receptors we show that the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, does not couple to inhibition of GAT-1 currents during opioid withdrawal. It is possible this differential signaling of the two Gi/Go coupled G-protein coupled receptors is due to the strong compartmentalization of the GABAB receptor that does not favor signaling to the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A/GAT-1 pathway. This highlights the importance of studying the effects of G-protein coupled receptors in native tissue with endogenous G-protein coupled receptors and the full complement of relevant proteins and signaling molecules. This study suggests that baclofen reduces opioid withdrawal symptoms through a non-GAT-1

  15. Neurobiology of opioid dependence in creating addiction vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Christopher J; Cahill, Catherine M

    2016-01-01

    Opioid drugs are potent modulators of many physiological and psychological processes. When given acutely, they can elicit the signature responses of euphoria and analgesia that societies have coveted for centuries. Repeated, or chronic, use of opioids induces adaptive or allostatic changes that modify neuronal circuitry and create an altered normality - the "drug-dependent" state. This state, at least that exhibited by those maintained continuously on long-acting opioid drugs such as methadone or buprenorphine, is generally indistinguishable from the drug-naïve state for most overt behaviors. The consequences of the allostatic changes (cellular, circuit, and system adaptations) that accompany the drug-dependent state are revealed during drug withdrawal. Drug cessation triggers a temporally orchestrated allostatic re-establishment of neuronal systems, which is manifested as opposing physiological and psychological effects to those exhibited by acute drug intoxication. Some withdrawal symptoms, such as physical symptoms (sweating, shaking, and diarrhea) resolve within days, whilst others, such as dysphoria, insomnia, and anxiety, can linger for months, and some adaptations, such as learned associations, may be established for life. We will briefly discuss the cellular mechanisms and neural circuitry that contribute to the opioid drug-dependent state, inferring an emerging role for neuroinflammation. We will argue that opioid addictive behaviors result from a learned relationship between opioids and relief from an existing or withdrawal-induced anxiogenic and/or dysphoric state. Furthermore, a future stressful life event can recall the memory that opioid drugs alleviate negative affect (despair, sadness, and anxiety) and thereby precipitate craving, resulting in relapse. A learned association of relief of aversive states would fuel drug craving in vulnerable people living in an increasingly stressful society. We suggest that this route to addiction is contributive to

  16. Comparison of craving for opioid in opioid-dependent individuals and people under methadone maintenance treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azita Chehri

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methadone Maintenance Therapy (MMT is the most important treatment for opioid -dependency recurrence. The aim of this study was to compare the craving level in opioid-dependent individuals and people under methadone maintenance therapy. Methods: In this case – control study, 120 men with opioid dependency were selected through cluster sampling method. They were divided into two groups, 60 people in opioid-dependent group and 60 people in MMT group. Both groups were matched for age, sex, marital status, education, duration of opioid dependency and method of consumption. Then, they completed INCAS Substance Abuse Profile (ISAP, opiate withdrawal symptoms checklist, self–report of craving, Desire for Drug Questionnaire (DDQ, Obsessive Compulsive Drug Use Scale (OCDUS and visual cue-induced craving questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15 using t-test and ANOVA. Results: Mean craving for drug significantly was lower in MMT group comparing opioid-dependent group (P<0.01. Conclusion: Methadone Maintenance Therapy decreased the craving for drugs and substances This can have an important role in relapse prevention.

  17. Although Relatively Few, "Doctor Shoppers" Skew Opioid Prescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Behavior Smoking Stimulant Drug Therapy for ADHD Stress Withdrawal See All NIDA Notes Articles Get this Publication Cite this article APA Style MLA Style AMA Style NIDA. (2014, May 27). Although Relatively Few, “Doctor Shoppers” Skew Opioid Prescribing. Retrieved from https://www.drugabuse.gov/news- ...

  18. 78 FR 48177 - Purdue Pharma L.P.; Withdrawal of Approval of a New Drug Application for Oxycontin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ...] Purdue Pharma L.P.; Withdrawal of Approval of a New Drug Application for Oxycontin AGENCY: Food and Drug... or misuse. Both original and reformulated OxyContin are opioid agonist products. Original OxyContin was indicated for the management of moderate to severe pain when a continuous, around-the-clock opioid...

  19. Baclofen for maintenance treatment of opioid dependence: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial [ISRCTN32121581

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi-Abhari Seyed Ali

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Results of preclinical studies suggest that the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen may be useful in treatment of opioid dependence. This study was aimed at assessing the possible efficacy of baclofen for maintenance treatment of opioid dependence. Methods A total of 40 opioid-dependent patients were detoxified and randomly assigned to receive baclofen (60 mg/day or placebo in a 12-week, double blind, parallel-group trial. Primary outcome measure was retention in treatment. Secondary outcome measures included opioids and alcohol use according to urinalysis and self-report ratings, intensity of opioid craving assessed with a visual analogue scale, opioid withdrawal symptoms as measured by the Short Opiate Withdrawal Scale and depression scores on the Hamilton inventory. Results Treatment retention was significantly higher in the baclofen group. Baclofen also showed a significant superiority over placebo in terms of opiate withdrawal syndrome and depressive symptoms. Non-significant, but generally favorable responses were seen in the baclofen group with other outcome measures including intensity of opioid craving and self-reported opioid and alcohol use. However, no significant difference was seen in the rates of opioid-positive urine tests. Additionally, the drug side effects of the two groups were not significantly different. Conclusion The results support further study of baclofen in the maintenance treatment of opioid dependence.

  20. Pregabalin for Opioid-Refractory Pain in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos A. Kontoangelos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a systemic inflammatory disease with chronic back pain as the most common presenting symptom. We present a case of a male patient with AS reporting symptoms of severe low back pain, buttock pain, and limited spinal mobility. After chronic treatment with opioids, we administered pregabalin at a dose of 300 mg as an analgesic agent while opioids were discontinued. Findings. Pain symptoms improved progressively, and opioids were gradually discontinued without any withdrawal symptoms reported. Conclusions. Pregabalin is potentially useful in the management of pain in patients with AS while effectively managing the discontinuation of opioid treatment.

  1. Post-transplant withdrawal of lamivudine results in fatal hepatitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post-transplant withdrawal of lamivudine results in fatal hepatitis flares in kidney transplant recipients, under immune suppression, with inactive hepatitis B infection. Bin Miao, Xiang-Ming Lao, Guo-Li Lin ...

  2. Myoelectric activity of the small intestine during morphine dependence and withdrawal in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuperman, D.A.; Sninsky, C.A.; Lynch, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors investigated (1) the effect of morphine dependence on the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) of the small intestine, (2) whether bacterial overgrowth developed in morphine-dependent rats, and (3) the effect of naloxone and methylbromide naltrexone, a peripheral opioid antagonist, on the MMC in morphine-naive and morphine-dependent rats. They also evaluated intestinal motility during naloxone-induced withdrawal in animals pretreated with clonidine. Intestinal myoelectric activity was monitored by four indwelling electrodes in unanesthetized, fasted rats. D-[ 14 C]xylose breath tests were performed before and after morphine-pellet implantation to evaluate the presence of bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. Naloxone had no effect on myoelectric activity of the small intestine in morphine-naive rats. Cycling activity fronts were present in morphine-dependent animals, but there was a significant prolongation of activity front periodicity and slowing of the propagation velocity. No significant increase in 14 CO 2 excretion was noted in the morphine-dependent rats. They conclude from their studies that (1) myoelectric activity of the small intestine develops incomplete tolerance to morphine; (2) bacterial overgrowth is not a feature of morphine dependence in the rat; (3) alterations of intestinal myoelectric activity are a component of the opiate withdrawal syndrome, and they appear at least partially mediated by a peripheral mechanism that can be suppressed by an α 2 -adrenergic agonist

  3. Myoelectric activity of the small intestine during morphine dependence and withdrawal in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuperman, D.A.; Sninsky, C.A.; Lynch, D.F.

    1987-04-01

    The authors investigated (1) the effect of morphine dependence on the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) of the small intestine, (2) whether bacterial overgrowth developed in morphine-dependent rats, and (3) the effect of naloxone and methylbromide naltrexone, a peripheral opioid antagonist, on the MMC in morphine-naive and morphine-dependent rats. They also evaluated intestinal motility during naloxone-induced withdrawal in animals pretreated with clonidine. Intestinal myoelectric activity was monitored by four indwelling electrodes in unanesthetized, fasted rats. D-(/sup 14/C)xylose breath tests were performed before and after morphine-pellet implantation to evaluate the presence of bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. Naloxone had no effect on myoelectric activity of the small intestine in morphine-naive rats. Cycling activity fronts were present in morphine-dependent animals, but there was a significant prolongation of activity front periodicity and slowing of the propagation velocity. No significant increase in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ excretion was noted in the morphine-dependent rats. They conclude from their studies that (1) myoelectric activity of the small intestine develops incomplete tolerance to morphine; (2) bacterial overgrowth is not a feature of morphine dependence in the rat; (3) alterations of intestinal myoelectric activity are a component of the opiate withdrawal syndrome, and they appear at least partially mediated by a peripheral mechanism that can be suppressed by an ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonist.

  4. Withdrawal-like behavior in planarians is dependent on drug exposure duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacavage, Steve; Patel, Hiren; Zielinski, Mike; Acker, Jeneane; Phillips, Austin G; Raffa, Robert B; Rawls, Scott M

    2008-07-04

    Planarians display a concentration-related reduction in locomotor activity following their spontaneous withdrawal from opioids, cannabinoids, stimulants and benzodiazepines. This suggests that planarians display a withdrawal-like behavior that can be quantified as a reduction in locomotor activity. Because withdrawal-like behavior in previous studies has been quantified only following the cessation of a 60-min drug exposure, it is unclear whether the withdrawal response varies with drug exposure duration. Therefore, the goal of this study is to determine if the duration of drug exposure (0, 5, 15, 30, 45, 60min and 24h) to three different drugs - methamphetamine, cocaine and caffeine - affects the magnitude of withdrawal-like behavior (i.e., reduced locomotor activity) in planarians. Experiments revealed that methamphetamine (10microM) produced significant withdrawal-like behavior regardless of the exposure time (Pplanarians is dependent on both the duration and type of drug exposure, and that planarians do not display withdrawal to caffeine.

  5. Radioreceptor opioid assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.J.; Chang, K.-J.

    1981-01-01

    A radioreceptor assay is described for assaying opioid drugs in biological fluids. The method enables the assay of total opioid activity, being specific for opioids as a class but lacking specificity within the class. A radio-iodinated opioid and the liquid test sample are incubated with an opiate receptor material. The percentage inhibition of the binding of the radio-iodinated compound to the opiate receptor is calculated and the opioid activity of the test liquid determined from a standard curve. Examples of preparing radio-iodinated opioids and assaying opioid activity are given. A test kit for the assay is described. Compared to other methods, this assay is cheap, easy and rapid. (U.K.)

  6. A Case Report of Kratom Addiction and Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbis-Reig, David

    2016-02-01

    Kratom, a relatively unknown herb among physicians in the western world, is advertised on the Internet as an alternative to opioid analgesics, as a potential treatment for oploid withdrawal and as a "legal high" with minimal addiction potential. This report describes a case of kratom addiction in a 37-year-old woman with a severe oploid-like withdrawal syndrome that was managed successfully with symptom-triggered clonidine therapy and scheduled hydroxyzine. A review of other case reports of kratom toxicity, the herb's addiction potential, and the kratom withdrawal syndrome is discussed. Physicians in the United States should be aware of the growing availability and abuse of kratom and the herb's potential adverse health effects, with particular attention to kratom's toxicity, addictive potential, and associated withdrawal syndrome.

  7. Tolerance to non-opioid analgesics is opioid-sensitive in nucleus raphe magnus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merab G Tsagareli

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Repeated injection of opioid analgesics can lead to a progressive loss of its effect. This phenomenon is known as tolerance. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic, intraperitoneal administration or the microinjection of non-opioid analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. Our recent study has revealed that microinjection of three drugs analgin, ketorolac and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala produce tolerance to them and cross-tolerance to morphine. Here we report that repeated administrations of these NSAIDs into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM in the following four days result in progressively less antinociception, i.e. produce the development of tolerance to these drugs in mail rats. Special control experiments showed that post-treatment with μ-opioid antagonist naloxone in NRM significantly decreased antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs at the first day in behavioral tail flick reflex (TF and hot plate (HP latencies. At the second day, naloxone generally had trend effects in both TF and HP tests impeded the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of non-opioid analgesics. These findings strongly support the suggestion on endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain control system. Moreover, repeated injections of NSAIDs progressively lead to tolerance to them, cross-tolerance to morphine and the risk of a withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, these results are important for human medicine too.

  8. Comorbid Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Opioid Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rikinkumar S; Elmaadawi, Ahmed; Nasr, Suhayl; Haskin, John

    2017-09-03

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is predominant amongst individuals addicted to opioids and obscures the course of illness and the treatment outcome. We report the case of a patient with major depressive disorder and opioid dependence, who experienced post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms during a recent visit to the inpatient unit. The similarity of symptoms between post-traumatic stress disorder and opioid dependence is so high that, sometimes, it is a challenge to differentiate between these conditions. Since opioid withdrawal symptoms mimic hyper vigilance, this results in an exaggeration of the response of patients with post-traumatic stress disorder. This comorbidity is associated with worse health outcomes, as its pathophysiology involves a common neurobiological circuit. Opioid substitution therapy and psychotherapeutic medications in combination with evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy devised for individuals with comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder and opioid dependence may improve treatment outcomes in this population. Therefore, we conclude that the screening for post-traumatic stress disorder in the opioid-abusing population is crucial. To understand the underlying mechanisms for this comorbidity and to improve the treatment response, further research should be encouraged.

  9. Methylnaltrexone in the treatment of opioid-induced constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverley Greenwood-Van Meerveld

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Beverley Greenwood-Van Meerveld1, Kelly M Standifer21Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma Center for Neuroscience, Department of Physiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Oklahoma Center for Neuroscience, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USAAbstract: Constipation is a significant problem related to opioid medications used to manage pain. This review attempts to outline the latest findings related to the therapeutic usefulness of a μ opioid receptor antagonist, methylnaltrexone in the treatment of opioid-induced constipation. The review highlights methylnaltrexone bromide (RelistorTM; Progenics/Wyeth a quaternary derivative of naltrexone, which was recently approved in the United States, Europe and Canada. The Food and Drug Administration in the United States approved a subcutaneous injection for the treatment of opioid bowel dysfunction in patients with advanced illness who are receiving palliative care and when laxative therapy has been insufficient. Methylnaltrexone is a peripherally restricted, μ opioid receptor antagonist that accelerates oral–cecal transit in patients with opioidinduced constipation without reversing the analgesic effects of morphine or inducing symptoms of opioid withdrawal. An analysis of the mechanism of action and the potential benefits of using methylnaltrexone is based on data from published basic research and recent clinical studies.Keywords: methylnaltrexone, constipation, opioid

  10. Genetics Home Reference: opioid addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Opioid addiction Opioid addiction Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Opioid addiction is a long-lasting (chronic) disease that can ...

  11. Effect of Morphine Withdrawal Syndrome on Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Allahtavakoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sOpioid abuse is still remained a major mental health problem, a criminal legal issue and may cause ischemic brain changes including stroke and brain edema. In the present study, we investigated whether spontaneously withdrawal syndrome might affect stroke outcomes.Materials and MethodsAddiction was induced by progressive incremental doses of morphine over 7 days. Behavioral signs of withdrawal were observed 24, 48 and 72 hr after morphine deprivation and total withdrawal score was determined. Cerebral ischemia was induced 18-22 hr after the last morphine injection by placing a natural clot into the middle cerebral artery (MCA. Neurological deficits were evaluated at 2, 24 and 48 hr after ischemia induction, and infarct size and brain edema were determined at 48 hr after stroke.ResultsMorphine withdrawal animals showed a significant increase in total withdrawal score and decrease of weight gain during the 72 hr after the last morphine injection. Compared to the addicted and control animals, infarct volume and brain edema were significantly increased in the morphine deprived animals (P< 0.05 at 48 hr after cerebral ischemia. Also, neurological deficits were higher in the morphine-withdrawn rats at 48 hr after stroke (P< 0.05. ConclusionOur data indicates that spontaneous withdrawal syndrome may worsen stroke outcomes. Further investigations are necessary to elucidate mechanisms of opiate withdrawal syndrome on stroke.

  12. Variability in prescription opioid intake and reinforcement amongst 129 substrains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, S M; Healy, A F; Coelho, M A; Brown, C N; Kippin, T E; Szumlinski, K K

    2017-09-01

    Opioid abuse in the United States has reached epidemic proportions, with treatment admissions and deaths associated with prescription opioid abuse quadrupling over the past 10 years. Although genetics are theorized to contribute substantially to inter-individual variability in the development, severity and treatment outcomes of opioid abuse/addiction, little direct preclinical study has focused on the behavioral genetics of prescription opioid reinforcement and drug-taking. Herein, we employed different 129 substrains of mice currently available from The Jackson Laboratory (129S1/SvlmJ, 129X1/SvJ, 129S4/SvJaeJ and 129P3/J) as a model system of genetic variation and assayed mice for oral opioid intake and reinforcement, as well as behavioral and somatic signs of dependence. All substrains exhibited a dose-dependent increase in oral oxycodone and heroin preference and intake under limited-access procedures and all, but 129S1/SvlmJ mice, exhibited oxycodone reinforcement. Relative to the other substrains, 129P3/J mice exhibited higher heroin and oxycodone intake. While 129X1/SvJ exhibited the highest anxiety-like behavior during natural opioid withdrawal, somatic and behavior signs of precipitated withdrawal were most robust in 129P3/J mice. These results demonstrate the feasibility and relative sensitivity of our oral opioid self-administration procedures for detecting substrain differences in drug reinforcement/intake among 129 mice, of relevance to the identification of genetic variants contributing to high vs. low oxycodone reinforcement and intake. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  13. Post-operative Analgesia in Opioid Dependent Patients: Comparison of Intravenous Morphine and Sublingual Buprenorphine

    OpenAIRE

    Alizadeh, Shaabanali; Mahmoudi, Ghafar Ali; Solhi, Hassan; Sadeghi-Sedeh, Bahman; Behzadi, Reza; Kazemifar, Amir Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute and chronic pain is prevalent in patients with opioid dependence. Lack of knowledge concerning the complex relationship between pain, opioid use, and withdrawal syndrome can account for the barriers encountered for pain management. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of sublingual (SL) buprenorphine for post-operative analgesia, compared with intravenous (IV) morphine. Methods A total of 68 patients, aged 20-60 years were randomly selected from whom had been unde...

  14. Differences between opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Jensen, Rasmus D; Møller Nielsen, Lecia

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies comparing the response and side effects of various opioids have not been able to show robust differences between drugs. Hence, recommendations of the regulatory authorities have been driven by costs with a general tendency in many countries to restrict physician's use of opioids...... to morphine. Although this approach is recognized as cost-effective in most cases there is solid evidence that, on an individual patient basis, opioids are not all equal. Therefore it is important to have an armamentarium of strong analgesics in clinical practice to ensure a personalized approach in patients...... who do not respond to standard treatment. In this review we highlight differences between opioids in human studies from a pharmacological, experimental, clinical and health economics point of view. We provide evidence that individuals respond differently to opioids, and that general differences...

  15. Visualization of groundwater withdrawals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Richard B.; Goode, Daniel J.

    2017-12-21

    Generating an informative display of groundwater withdrawals can sometimes be difficult because the symbols for closely spaced wells can overlap. An alternative method for displaying groundwater withdrawals is to generate a “footprint” of the withdrawals. WellFootprint version 1.0 implements the Footprint algorithm with two optional variations that can speed up the footprint calculation. ModelMuse has been modified in order to generate the input for WellFootprint and to read and graphically display the output from WellFootprint.

  16. Selective review and commentary on emerging pharmacotherapies for opioid addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, Walter; Mooney, Larissa; Zhao, Min; Nielsen, Suzanne; Torrington, Matthew; Miotto, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Walter Ling1, Larissa Mooney1, Min Zhao2, Suzanne Nielsen1, Matthew Torrington1, Karen Miotto1 1Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China Abstract: Pharmacotherapies for opioid addiction under active development in the US include lofexidine (primarily for managing withdrawal symptoms) and Probuphine®, a distinctive mode of delivering buprenorphi...

  17. Withdrawal symptoms in children after long-term administration of sedatives and/or analgesics: A literature review. "Assessment remains troublesome"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Ista (Erwin); M. van Dijk (Monique); C. Gamel (Claudia); D. Tibboel (Dick); M. de Hoog (Matthijs)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Prolonged administration of benzodiazepines and/or opioids to children in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) may induce physiological dependence and withdrawal symptoms. Objective: We reviewed the literature for relevant contributions on the nature of these withdrawal

  18. Withdrawal Method (Coitus Interruptus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fluid and pregnancy Withdrawal method (coitus interruptus) About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  19. [Opioids and the heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, N A; Ashmarin, I P

    1992-01-01

    The possible role of the opioid system in the cardiovascular function is an area that attracted significant attention in recent years. In order to clarify the possible role of opioids in cardiac regulation we have studied the myocardial effects of some opioids and their antagonists. Our results show that in vitro some opioids (dermorphin, alpha- and gamma-endorphins, dalargin and other) may exert inotropic, but not chronotropic, action and may act as modulatory agents on the cholinergic myocardial effects. Some of the opioidergic effects were blocked by naloxone and some were not. The results of pharmacological and physiological analysis show that opioidergic-cholinergic interaction may occur at the postsynaptic myocardial level via different mechanisms. It is well known that in vivo opioids play a significant role in shock and stress; sometimes they act as positive and sometimes--as a negative factor; the mechanisms of these effects are still not clear. We have shown that the endogenous opioid antagonist tetrapeptide FMRFa (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2) acted as a preservative agent to the acute hypobaric hypoxia and hemorrhagic shock, blood pressure and respiration and also the time of life. The efficacy of FMRFa was higher than that of naloxone. It was suggested that one of the possible mechanism of FMRFa preservative action was the increasing of sympathetic nervous system activity mediated by the endogenous opioid system inhibition.

  20. Opioid Abuse after TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0373 TITLE: “Opioid Abuse after TBI” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Candace L. Floyd, Ph.D., and Katherine L. Nicholson...30Jun2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE “Opioid Abuse after TBI” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0373 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...secondly tested the hypothesis that moderate TBI increases the susceptibility for opioid abuse as measured by an alteration in the rewarding properties of

  1. Potential drug interaction with opioid agonist in the setting of chronic low-dose opioid antagonist use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, James B; Nair, Vidya; Diaz, Christopher J; Penoyar, Jonathan B; Goode, Penelope A

    2017-08-01

    Low dose naltrexone (LDN) has been evaluated in several small studies for the treatment of inflammatory conditions. It is thought to work through modulation of inflammatory mediators and upregulation of endogenous opioid receptors. This may hypersensitize patients to exogenous opioids. Drug-drug interaction screening tools built into electronic health records and other services identify the interaction as risk of opioid withdrawal rather than hypersensitivity. We present a case of a drug-drug interaction in a patient who was receiving LDN treatment of multiple sclerosis. The patient received a single dose of oxycodone 5mg that resulted in obtundation unresponsive to painful stimuli necessitating the administration of naloxone boluses and infusion along with admission to the intensive care unit for 1 night. The patient responded well to naloxone therapy. He was discharged in satisfactory condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Are peripheral opioid antagonists the solution to opioid side effects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bates, John J

    2012-02-03

    Opioid medication is the mainstay of therapy for severe acute and chronic pain. Unfortunately, the side effects of these medications can affect patient comfort and safety, thus limiting their proven therapeutic potential. Whereas the main analgesic effects of opioids are centrally mediated, many of the common side effects are mediated via peripheral receptors. Novel peripheral opioid antagonists have been recently introduced that can block the peripheral actions of opioids without affecting centrally mediated analgesia. We review the clinical and experimental evidence of their efficacy in ameliorating opioid side effects and consider what further information might be useful in defining their role. IMPLICATIONS: The major analgesic effects of opioid medication are mediated within the brain and spinal cord. Many of the side effects of opioids are caused by activation of receptors outside these areas. Recently developed peripherally restricted opioid antagonists have the ability to block many opioid side effects without affecting analgesia.

  3. [Opioid Therapy and Management of Side Effects Associated with Opioids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Toshihiko

    2017-04-01

    Opioids are very useful medications to reduce suffering of cancer patients such as refractory pain and dyspnea. We physicians have to use opioids to have good management of pain and suffering associated with cancer including management of side effects caused by opioids. Opioids couple opioid receptors and affect several pharmacological effects. Other than analgesic effect, opioids have some side effects of constipation, nausea and vomiting, respiratory depression. In this chapter, I take important side effects of constipation, nausea and vomiting and respiratory depression. Next, serotonin syndrome caused by tramadol combined with anti-depressants is remarked as assignable syndrome. As advancing in chemotherapy for cancer treatment, cancer survivors live longer with opioid therapy. We have to pay attention to the side effects and another dysfunction caused by long use of opioids. It is important that we physician use opioids effectively to keep activity of daily living(ADL) of patients and families as team approach.

  4. Sources of prescription opioids among diagnosed opioid abusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shei, Amie; Rice, J Bradford; Kirson, Noam Y; Bodnar, Katharine; Birnbaum, Howard G; Holly, Pamela; Ben-Joseph, Rami

    2015-04-01

    Diversion and abuse of prescription opioids are important public health concerns in the US. This study examined possible sources of prescription opioids among patients diagnosed with opioid abuse. Commercially insured patients aged 12-64 diagnosed with opioid abuse/dependence ('abuse') were identified in OptumHealth Reporting and Insights medical and pharmacy claims data, 2006-2012, and required to have continuous eligibility over an 18 month study period surrounding the first abuse diagnosis. We examined whether abusers had access to prescription opioids through their own prescriptions and/or to diverted prescription opioids through family members' prescriptions obtained prior to the abuser's first abuse diagnosis. For comparison, we examined access to prescription opioids of a reference population of non-abusers. Sensitivity analyses focused on patients initially diagnosed with opioid dependence and, separately, abusers not previously treated with buprenorphine. Of the 9291 abusers meeting the selection criteria, 79.9% had an opioid prescription prior to their first abuse diagnosis; 20.1% of abusers did not have an opioid prescription prior to their first abuse diagnosis, of whom approximately half (50.8%) had a family member who had an opioid prescription prior to the abuser's first abuse diagnosis (compared to 42.2% of non-abusers). Similar results were found among patients initially diagnosed with opioid dependence and among abusers not previously treated with buprenorphine. The study relied on the accuracy of claims data to identify abusers, but opioid abuse is often undiagnosed. In addition, only prescription claims that were reimbursed by a health plan were included in the analysis. While most abusers had access to prescription opioids through their own prescriptions, many abusers without their own opioid prescriptions had access to prescription opioids through family members and may have obtained prescription opioids that way. Given the study design and

  5. The relationship between primary prescription opioid and buprenorphine-naloxone induction outcomes in a prescription opioid dependent sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Suzanne; Hillhouse, Maureen; Weiss, Roger D; Mooney, Larissa; Sharpe Potter, Jennifer; Lee, Joshua; Gourevitch, Marc N; Ling, Walter

    2014-01-01

    This analysis aims to: (1) compare induction experiences among participants who self-reported using one of the four most commonly reported POs, and (2) examine factors associated with difficult bup-nx induction. Our hypothesis, based on previous research and current guidelines, is that those on longer-acting opioids will have experienced more difficult inductions. The Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS) was a multi-site, randomized clinical trial, using a two-phase adaptive treatment research design. This analysis examines bup-nx induction of participants who self-reported primary PO use of methadone, ER-oxycodone, IR-oxycodone, and hydrocodone (n = 69). Analyses examined characteristics associated with difficult induction, defined as increased withdrawal symptoms measured by the Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS) after the first bup-nx dose with higher scores denoting greater withdrawal symptoms/severity. Contrary to our hypothesis, difficult induction experiences did not differ by primary PO type. Those who experienced a post-induction increase in COWS score had lower pre-dose COWS scores compared to those who did not experience a post-induction increase in COWS score (10.09 vs. 12.77, t(624) = -13.56, p history did not predict a difficult induction. Difficult bup-nx inductions were not associated with participants' primary PO. Severity of withdrawal, measured with the COWS, was an important variable, reminding clinicians that bup-nx should not be commenced prior to evidence of moderate opioid withdrawal. These findings add to the evidence that with careful procedures, bup-nx can used with few difficulties in PO-dependent patients. (Am J Addict 2014;23:343-348). © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  6. Neurobiology of opioid dependence in creating addiction vulnerability [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Evans

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Opioid drugs are potent modulators of many physiological and psychological processes. When given acutely, they can elicit the signature responses of euphoria and analgesia that societies have coveted for centuries. Repeated, or chronic, use of opioids induces adaptive or allostatic changes that modify neuronal circuitry and create an altered normality — the “drug-dependent” state. This state, at least that exhibited by those maintained continuously on long-acting opioid drugs such as methadone or buprenorphine, is generally indistinguishable from the drug-naïve state for most overt behaviors. The consequences of the allostatic changes (cellular, circuit, and system adaptations that accompany the drug-dependent state are revealed during drug withdrawal. Drug cessation triggers a temporally orchestrated allostatic re-establishment of neuronal systems, which is manifested as opposing physiological and psychological effects to those exhibited by acute drug intoxication. Some withdrawal symptoms, such as physical symptoms (sweating, shaking, and diarrhea resolve within days, whilst others, such as dysphoria, insomnia, and anxiety, can linger for months, and some adaptations, such as learned associations, may be established for life. We will briefly discuss the cellular mechanisms and neural circuitry that contribute to the opioid drug-dependent state, inferring an emerging role for neuroinflammation. We will argue that opioid addictive behaviors result from a learned relationship between opioids and relief from an existing or withdrawal-induced anxiogenic and/or dysphoric state. Furthermore, a future stressful life event can recall the memory that opioid drugs alleviate negative affect (despair, sadness, and anxiety and thereby precipitate craving, resulting in relapse. A learned association of relief of aversive states would fuel drug craving in vulnerable people living in an increasingly stressful society. We suggest that this route to

  7. Nature cures nature: Hypericum perforatum attenuates physical withdrawal signs in opium dependent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Munasib; Subhan, Fazal; Khan, Arif-Ullah; Abbas, Muzaffar; Ali, Gowhar; Rauf, Khalid; Gilani, Anwarul Hassan

    2014-05-01

    Hypericum perforatum Linn. (Hypericaceae) (St. John's wort) attenuates opium withdrawal signs. To explore the therapeutic potential of Hypericum perforatum in the management of opium-induced withdrawal syndrome. The effect of the Hypericum perforatum hydro-ethanol extract was investigated for potential to reverse naloxone (0.25 mg/kg)-induced opium withdrawal physical signs. Rats received opium extract (80-650 mg/kg) twice daily for 8 days along with Hypericum perforatum (20 mg/kg, orally) twice daily in chronic treatment and the same single dose 1 h before induction of withdrawal syndrome in the acute treated group. Hypericum perforatum reduced stereotype jumps and wet dog shake number in the chronic treatment compared to the saline control group (F(2, 24) = 3.968, p opium withdrawal syndrome possibly through direct or indirect interaction with opioid receptors. Further study is needed to clarify its mechanism.

  8. Tolerance to Non-Opioid Analgesics is Opioid Sensitive in the Nucleus Raphe Magnus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagareli, Merab G; Nozadze, Ivliane; Tsiklauri, Nana; Gurtskaia, Gulnaz

    2011-01-01

    Repeated injection of opioid analgesics can lead to a progressive loss of effect. This phenomenon is known as tolerance. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic, intraperitoneal administration or the microinjection of non-opioid analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) into the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. Our recent study has revealed that microinjection of three drugs analgin, ketorolac, and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala produce tolerance to them and cross-tolerance to morphine. Here we report that repeated administrations of these NSAIDs into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) in the following 4 days result in progressively less antinociception compare to the saline control, i.e., tolerance develops to these drugs in male rats. Special control experiments showed that post-treatment with the μ-opioid antagonist naloxone into the NRM significantly decreased antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs on the first day of testing in the tail-flick (TF) reflex and hot plate (HP) latency tests. On the second day, naloxone generally had trend effects in both TF and HP tests and impeded the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of non-opioid analgesics. These findings strongly support the suggestion of endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain-control system. Moreover, repeated injections of NSAIDs progressively lead to tolerance to them, cross-tolerance to morphine, and the risk of a withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, these results are important for human medicine too.

  9. Depression of home cage wheel running is an objective measure of spontaneous morphine withdrawal in rats with and without persistent pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Ram; Lee, Andrea T; Morgan, Michael M

    2017-05-01

    Opioid withdrawal in humans is often subtle and almost always spontaneous. In contrast, most preclinical studies precipitate withdrawal by administration of an opioid receptor antagonist such as naloxone. These animal studies rely on measurement of physiological symptoms (e.g., wet dog shakes) in the period immediately following naloxone administration. To more closely model the human condition, we tested the hypothesis that depression of home cage wheel running will provide an objective method to measure the magnitude and duration of spontaneous morphine withdrawal. Rats were allowed access to a running wheel in their home cage for 8days prior to implantation of two 75mg morphine or placebo pellets. The pellets were removed 3 or 5days later to induce spontaneous withdrawal. In normal pain-free rats, removal of the morphine pellets depressed wheel running for 48h compared to rats that had placebo pellets removed. Morphine withdrawal-induced depression of wheel running was greatly enhanced in rats with persistent inflammatory pain induced by injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) into the hindpaw. Removal of the morphine pellets following 3days of treatment depressed wheel running in these rats for over 6days. These data demonstrate that home cage wheel running provides an objective and more clinically relevant method to assess spontaneous morphine withdrawal compared to precipitated withdrawal in laboratory rats. Moreover, the enhanced withdrawal in rats with persistent inflammatory pain suggests that pain patients may be especially susceptible to opioid withdrawal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Irradiation exposure modulates central opioid functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, P.M.; Dafny, N.

    1987-01-01

    Exposure to low doses of gamma irradiation results in the modification of both the antinociceptive properties of morphine and the severity of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in morphine-dependent rats. To better define the interactions between gamma irradiation and these opiate-mediated phenomena, dose-response studies were undertaken of the effect of irradiation on morphine-induced antinociception, and on the naloxone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome of morphine-dependent rats. In addition, electrophysiologic studies were conducted in rats after irradiation exposure and morphine treatment correlating with the behavioral studies. The observations obtained demonstrated that the antinociceptive effects of morphine as well as naloxone-precipitated withdrawal were modified in a dose-dependent manner by irradiation exposure. In addition, irradiation-induced changes in the evoked responses obtained from four different brain regions demonstrated transient alterations in both baseline and morphine-treated responses that may reflect the alterations observed in the behavioral paradigms. These results suggest that the effects of irradiation on opiate activities resulted from physiologic alterations of central endogenous opioid systems due to alterations manifested within peripheral targets

  11. Irradiation exposure modulates central opioid functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougherty, P.M.; Dafny, N.

    1987-11-01

    Exposure to low doses of gamma irradiation results in the modification of both the antinociceptive properties of morphine and the severity of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in morphine-dependent rats. To better define the interactions between gamma irradiation and these opiate-mediated phenomena, dose-response studies were undertaken of the effect of irradiation on morphine-induced antinociception, and on the naloxone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome of morphine-dependent rats. In addition, electrophysiologic studies were conducted in rats after irradiation exposure and morphine treatment correlating with the behavioral studies. The observations obtained demonstrated that the antinociceptive effects of morphine as well as naloxone-precipitated withdrawal were modified in a dose-dependent manner by irradiation exposure. In addition, irradiation-induced changes in the evoked responses obtained from four different brain regions demonstrated transient alterations in both baseline and morphine-treated responses that may reflect the alterations observed in the behavioral paradigms. These results suggest that the effects of irradiation on opiate activities resulted from physiologic alterations of central endogenous opioid systems due to alterations manifested within peripheral targets.

  12. Effects of naltrexone on pain sensitivity and mood in fibromyalgia: no evidence for endogenous opioid pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarred W Younger

    Full Text Available The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying fibromyalgia are still unknown, although some evidence points to endogenous opioid dysfunction. We examined how endogenous opioid antagonism affects pain and mood for women with and without fibromyalgia. Ten women with fibromyalgia and ten age- and gender-matched, healthy controls each attended two laboratory sessions. Each participant received naltrexone (50mg at one session, and placebo at the other session, in a randomized and double-blind fashion. Participants were tested for changes in sensitivity to heat, cold, and mechanical pain. Additionally, we collected measures of mood and opioid withdrawal symptoms during the laboratory sessions and at home the night following each session. At baseline, the fibromyalgia group exhibited more somatic complaints, greater sensory sensitivity, more opioid withdrawal somatic symptoms, and lower mechanical and cold pain-tolerance than did the healthy control group. Neither group experienced changes in pain sensitivity due to naltrexone administration. Naltrexone did not differentially affect self-reported withdrawal symptoms, or mood, in the fibromyalgia and control groups. Consistent with prior research, there was no evidence found for abnormal endogenous opioid activity in women with fibromyalgia.

  13. Opioid analgesics: does potency matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passik, Steven D; Webster, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Prescription opioid analgesics with a wide range of potencies are currently used for the treatment of chronic pain. Yet understanding the clinical relevance and therapeutic consequences of opioid potency remains ill defined. Both patients and clinicians alike have misperceptions about opioid potency, expecting that less-potent opioids will be less effective or fearing that more-potent opioids are more dangerous or more likely to be abused. In this review, common myths about the potency of opioid analgesics will be discussed. Clinicians should understand that pharmacologic potency per se does not necessarily imply more effective analgesia or higher abuse liability. Published dose conversion tables may not accurately calculate the dose for effective and safe rotation from one opioid to another in patients receiving long-term opioid therapy because they are based on limited data that may not apply to chronic pain. Differences in pharmacologic potency are largely accounted for by the actual doses prescribed, according to individualized patient need. Factors for achieving effective analgesia and reducing the risks involved with opioid use include careful medication selection based on patient characteristics, appropriate dosing titration and opioid rotation practices, knowledge of product formulation characteristics (eg, extended release, immediate release, and tamper-resistant features), and an awareness of differences in opioid pharmacokinetics and metabolism. Clinicians should remain vigilant in monitoring patients on any opioid medication, regardless of classification along the opioid potency continuum.

  14. The alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKeon, A

    2008-08-01

    The alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a common management problem in hospital practice for neurologists, psychiatrists and general physicians alike. Although some patients have mild symptoms and may even be managed in the outpatient setting, others have more severe symptoms or a history of adverse outcomes that requires close inpatient supervision and benzodiazepine therapy. Many patients with AWS have multiple management issues (withdrawal symptoms, delirium tremens, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, seizures, depression, polysubstance abuse, electrolyte disturbances and liver disease), which requires a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach. Although AWS may be complex, careful evaluation and available treatments should ensure safe detoxification for most patients.

  15. Analysis of opioid-mediated analgesia in Phase III studies of methylnaltrexone for opioid-induced constipation in patients with chronic noncancer pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster LR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lynn R Webster,1 Darren M Brenner,2 Andrew C Barrett,3 Craig Paterson,3 Enoch Bortey,3 William P Forbes3 1PRA Health Sciences, Salt Lake City, UT, 2Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, 3Salix, a Division of Valeant Pharmaceuticals North America LLC, Bridgewater, NJ, USA Background: Subcutaneous methylnaltrexone is efficacious and well tolerated for opioid-induced constipation (OIC but may theoretically disrupt opioid-mediated analgesia. Methods: Opioid use, pain intensity, and opioid withdrawal (Objective Opioid Withdrawal Scale [OOWS] and Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale [SOWS] scores were reported in a randomized, double-blind trial with an open-label extension (RCT and an open-label trial (OLT evaluating safety in adults with chronic noncancer pain. In the RCT, patients taking ≥50 mg of oral morphine equivalents daily with <3 rescue-free bowel movements weekly received methylnaltrexone 12 mg once daily (n=150, every other day (n=148, or placebo (n=162 for 4 weeks, followed by open-label methylnaltrexone 12 mg (as needed [prn]; n=364 for 8 weeks. In the OLT, patients (n=1,034 on stable opioid doses with OIC received methylnaltrexone 12 mg prn for up to 48 weeks. Results: Minimal fluctuations of median morphine equivalent dose from baseline (BL were observed in the RCT double-blind period (BL, 154.8–161.0 mg/d; range, 137.1–168.0 mg/d, RCT open-label period (BL, 156.3–174.6; range, 144.0–180.0 and OLT (BL, 120 mg/d; range, 117.3–121.1 mg/d. No significant change from BL in pain intensity score occurred in any group at weeks 2 or 4 (both P≥0.1 of the RCT double-blind period, and scores remained stable during the open-label period and in the OLT (mean change, —0.2 to 0.1. Changes from BL in OOWS and SOWS scores during the double-blind period were not significantly impacted by methylnaltrexone exposure at weeks 2 or 4 (P>0.05 for all. Conclusion: Methylnaltrexone did not affect

  16. Opioid-use disorder among patients on long-term opioid therapy: impact of final DSM-5 diagnostic criteria on prevalence and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscarino, Joseph A; Hoffman, Stuart N; Han, John J

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we estimated the prevalence and risk factors for prescription opioid-use disorder among outpatients on opioid therapy using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-5 and DSM-4 criteria. However, at the time, the DSM-5 criteria were not finalized. In the current study, we analyzed these data using the final DSM-5 criteria and compared these results. Using electronic records from a large US health care system, we identified outpatients receiving five or more prescription orders for opioid therapy in the past 12 months for noncancer pain (mean prescription orders =10.72; standard deviation =4.96). In 2008, we completed diagnostic interviews with 705 of these patients using the DSM-4 criteria. In the current study, we reassessed these results using the final DSM-5 criteria. The lifetime prevalence of DSM-5 opioid-use disorders using the final DSM-5 criteria was 58.7% for no or few symptoms (DSM-4 criteria indicated that the majority of patients with lifetime DSM-4 opioid dependence were now classified as having mild opioid-use disorder, based on the DSM-5 criteria (53.6%; 95% CI =44.1-62.8). In ordinal logistic regression predicting no/few, mild, moderate, and severe opioid-use disorder, the best predictors were age DSM-5 criteria, including the elimination of tolerance and withdrawal, inclusion of craving and abuse symptoms, and introduction of a new graded severity classification, the prevalence of opioid-use disorders has changed, while many of the DSM-4 risk factors for opioid dependence were similar. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to compare the final results for DSM-5 versus DSM-4 prescription opioid-use disorders among a high-risk patient population.

  17. Mycobacteria attenuate nociceptive responses by formyl peptide receptor triggered opioid peptide release from neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike L Rittner

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In inflammation, pain is regulated by a balance of pro- and analgesic mediators. Analgesic mediators include opioid peptides which are secreted by neutrophils at the site of inflammation, leading to activation of opioid receptors on peripheral sensory neurons. In humans, local opioids and opioid peptides significantly downregulate postoperative as well as arthritic pain. In rats, inflammatory pain is induced by intraplantar injection of heat inactivated Mycobacterium butyricum, a component of complete Freund's adjuvant. We hypothesized that mycobacterially derived formyl peptide receptor (FPR and/or toll like receptor (TLR agonists could activate neutrophils, leading to opioid peptide release and inhibition of inflammatory pain. In complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammation, thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds of the paw were quantified (Hargreaves and Randall-Selitto methods, respectively. Withdrawal time to heat was decreased following systemic neutrophil depletion as well as local injection of opioid receptor antagonists or anti-opioid peptide (i.e. Met-enkephalin, beta-endorphin antibodies indicating an increase in pain. In vitro, opioid peptide release from human and rat neutrophils was measured by radioimmunoassay. Met-enkephalin release was triggered by Mycobacterium butyricum and formyl peptides but not by TLR-2 or TLR-4 agonists. Mycobacterium butyricum induced a rise in intracellular calcium as determined by FURA loading and calcium imaging. Opioid peptide release was blocked by intracellular calcium chelation as well as phosphoinositol-3-kinase inhibition. The FPR antagonists Boc-FLFLF and cyclosporine H reduced opioid peptide release in vitro and increased inflammatory pain in vivo while TLR 2/4 did not appear to be involved. In summary, mycobacteria activate FPR on neutrophils, resulting in tonic secretion of opioid peptides from neutrophils and in a decrease in inflammatory pain. Future therapeutic strategies may aim

  18. The pharmacological basis of opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelardini, Carla; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Bianchi, Enrica

    2015-01-01

    An opioid is a chemical that binds to opioid receptors, which are widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous system and gastrointestinal tract. The different effects elicited by activation of these receptors are due to their specific neuronal and extraneuronal distribution. The painkiller effect of opioids is induced by the synergy of the two events, namely reduction of pain threshold and emotional detachment from pain. The opioid effects transcending analgesia include sedation, respiratory depression, constipation and a strong sense of euphoria. There are opioid-like substances endogenously produced by the body. Naturally occurring peptides, called enkephalins, have opioid-like activities but are not derived from opium and exert opioid-like effects by interacting with opioid receptors on cell membranes. Yet, animals do contain the same morphine precursors and metabolites as opium poppy and are able to synthesize endogenous morphine alkaloid. Experimental and clinical studies show that opioids, at doses comparable to those of endogenous opioids, can activate pronociceptive systems, leading to pain hypersensitivity and short-term tolerance, a phenomenon encountered in postoperative pain management by acute opioid administration. Whether endogenous opioids play a role in the acute pain necessary to the survival of the individual, remains an open question.

  19. Evaluation of Ashwagandha in alcohol withdrawal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby B

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of Ashwagandha (ASW in attenuation of alcohol withdrawal in ethanol withdrawal mice model. Methods: Alcohol dependence was induced in mice by the oral, once-daily administration of 10% v/v ethanol (2 g/kg for one week. Once the animals were withdrawn from alcohol, the efficacy of ASW (200mg/kg and 500mg/kg in comparison with diazepam (1 mg/kg in the attenuation of withdrawal was studied using, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ kindling test for seizure threshold, forced swim test (FST for depression and locomotor activity (LCA in open field test (OFT. 6 hours after the last ethanol administration, seizure threshold was measured in all the groups by administering the convulsant drug, PTZ with a subconvulsive dose of 30 mg/kg i.p. In FST, mice were forced to swim and the total duration of immobility (seconds was measured during the last 4 min of a single 6-min test session. In OFT, number of crossings of the lines marked on the floor was recorded for a period of 5 min. Results: Compared to ethanol group, ASW (500 mg/Kg has suppressed the PTZ kindling seizures in ethanol withdrawal animals [0% convulsion], FST has shown decreased immobility time and OFT has exhibited increase in the number of line crossing activity by mice which may be the consequence of anxiolytic activity of ASW similar to that of diazepam. Conclusions: The present study provides satisfactory evidence to use ASW as a safe and reliable alternative to diazepam in alcohol withdrawal conditions.

  20. Reduction of opioid dependence by the CB(1) antagonist SR141716A in mice: evaluation of the interest in pharmacotherapy of opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Nieto, M; Pommier, B; Tzavara, E T; Caneparo, A; Da Nascimento, S; Le Fur, G; Roques, B P; Noble, F

    2001-04-01

    Several compounds, mainly opioid agonists such as methadone, are currently used for long term medication of heroin addicts. Nevertheless, these maintenance treatments have the disadvantage to induce a dependence to another opiate. As interactions between opioid and cannabinoid systems have been demonstrated, the ability of the CB(1) antagonist, SR141716A to reduce morphine-induced addiction was investigated. The effects of SR141716A on the rewarding responses of morphine were evaluated in the place conditioning paradigm. No significant conditioned preference or aversion were observed after repeated treatment with the CB(1) antagonist alone. However, SR141716A was able to antagonize the acquisition of morphine-induced conditioned place preference. SR141716A was co-administered with morphine for 5 days, and the withdrawal syndrome was precipitated by naloxone administration. A reduction in the incidence of two main signs of abstinence: wet dog shakes and jumping was observed while the other were not significantly modified. In contrast, an acute injection of the CB(1) antagonist just before naloxone administration was unable to modify the incidence of the behavioural manifestations of the withdrawal, suggesting that only chronic blockade of CB(1) receptors is able to reduce morphine-induced physical dependence. Several biochemical mechanisms could explain the reduction of opioid dependence by CB(1) antagonists. Whatever the hypotheses, this study supports the reported interaction between the endogenous cannabinoid and opioid systems, and suggests that SR 141716A warrants further investigations for a possible use in opioid addiction.

  1. Sucrose ingestion causes opioid analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.N. Segato

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available The intake of saccharin solutions for relatively long periods of time causes analgesia in rats, as measured in the hot-plate test, an experimental procedure involving supraspinal components. In order to investigate the effects of sweet substance intake on pain modulation using a different model, male albino Wistar rats weighing 180-200 g received either tap water or sucrose solutions (250 g/l for 1 day or 14 days as their only source of liquid. Each rat consumed an average of 15.6 g sucrose/day. Their tail withdrawal latencies in the tail-flick test (probably a spinal reflex were measured immediately before and after this treatment. An analgesia index was calculated from the withdrawal latencies before and after treatment. The indexes (mean ± SEM, N = 12 for the groups receiving tap water for 1 day or 14 days, and sucrose solution for 1 day or 14 days were 0.09 ± 0.04, 0.10 ± 0.05, 0.15 ± 0.08 and 0.49 ± 0.07, respectively. One-way ANOVA indicated a significant difference (F(3,47 = 9.521, P<0.001 and the Tukey multiple comparison test (P<0.05 showed that the analgesia index of the 14-day sucrose-treated animals differed from all other groups. Naloxone-treated rats (N = 7 receiving sucrose exhibited an analgesia index of 0.20 ± 0.10 while rats receiving only sucrose (N = 7 had an index of 0.68 ± 0.11 (t = 0.254, 10 degrees of freedom, P<0.03. This result indicates that the analgesic effect of sucrose depends on the time during which the solution is consumed and extends the analgesic effects of sweet substance intake, such as saccharin, to a model other than the hot-plate test, with similar results. Endogenous opioids may be involved in the central regulation of the sweet substance-produced analgesia.

  2. Opioid Prescribing PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-06

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Higher opioid prescribing puts patients at risk for addiction and overdose. Learn what can be done about this serious problem.  Created: 7/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/6/2017.

  3. Remifentanil-induced tolerance, withdrawal or hyperalgesia in infants: a randomized controlled trial. RAPIP trial: remifentanil-based analgesia and sedation of paediatric intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzing, Lars; Link, Florian; Junghaenel, Shino; Oberthuer, Andre; Harnischmacher, Urs; Stuetzer, Hartmut; Roth, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Short-acting opioids like remifentanil are suspected of an increased risk for tolerance, withdrawal and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). These potential adverse effects have never been investigated in neonates. To compare remifentanil and fentanyl concerning the incidence of tolerance, withdrawal and OIH. 23 mechanically ventilated infants received up to 96 h either a remifentanil- or fentanyl-based analgesia and sedation regimen with low-dose midazolam. We compared the required opioid doses and the number of opioid dose adjustments. Following extubation, withdrawal symptoms were assessed by a modification of the Finnegan score. OIH was evaluated by the CHIPPS scale and by testing the threshold of the flexion withdrawal reflex with calibrated von Frey filaments. Remifentanil had to be increased by 24% and fentanyl by 47% to keep the infants adequately sedated during mechanical ventilation. Following extubation, infants revealed no pronounced opioid withdrawal and low average Finnegan scores in both groups. Only 1 infant of the fentanyl group and 1 infant of the remifentanil group required methadone for treatment of withdrawal symptoms. Infants also revealed no signs of OIH and low CHIPPS scores in both groups. The median threshold of the flexion withdrawal reflex was 4.5 g (IQR = 2.3) in the fentanyl group and 2.7 g (IQR = 3.3) in the remifentanil group (p = 0.312), which is within the physiologic range of healthy infants. Remifentanil does not seem to be associated with an increased risk for tolerance, withdrawal or OIH. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Illicit Use of Buprenorphine/Naloxone Among Injecting and Noninjecting Opioid Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazazi, Alexander R.; Yokell, Michael; Fu, Jeannia J.; Rich, Josiah D.; Zaller, Nickolas D.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We examined the use, procurement, and motivations for the use of diverted buprenorphine/naloxone among injecting and noninjecting opioid users in an urban area. Methods A survey was self-administered among 51 injecting opioid users and 49 noninjecting opioid users in Providence, RI. Participants were recruited from a fixed-site syringe exchange program and a community outreach site between August and November 2009. Results A majority (76%) of participants reported having obtained buprenorphine/naloxone illicitly, with 41% having done so in the previous month. More injection drug users (IDUs) than non-IDUs reported the use of diverted buprenorphine/naloxone (86% vs 65%, P = 0.01). The majority of participants who had used buprenorphine/naloxone reported doing so to treat opioid withdrawal symptoms (74%) or to stop using other opioids (66%) or because they could not afford drug treatment (64%). More IDUs than non-IDUs reported using diverted buprenorphine/naloxone for these reasons. Significantly more non-IDUs than IDUs reported ever using buprenorphine/naloxone to “get high” (69% vs 32%, P buprenorphine/naloxone than in methadone. Common reasons given for not being currently enrolled in a buprenorphine/naloxone program included cost and unavailability of prescribing physicians. Conclusions The use of diverted buprenorphine/naloxone was common in our sample. However, many opioid users, particularly IDUs, were using diverted buprenorphine/naloxone for reasons consistent with its therapeutic purpose, such as alleviating opioid withdrawal symptoms and reducing the use of other opioids. These findings highlight the need to explore the full impact of buprenorphine/naloxone diversion and improve the accessibility of buprenorphine/naloxone through licensed treatment providers. PMID:21844833

  5. Endogenous opioid activity in the anterior cingulate cortex is required for relief of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navratilova, Edita; Xie, Jennifer Yanhua; Meske, Diana; Qu, Chaoling; Morimura, Kozo; Okun, Alec; Arakawa, Naohisa; Ossipov, Michael; Fields, Howard L; Porreca, Frank

    2015-05-06

    Pain is aversive, and its relief elicits reward mediated by dopaminergic signaling in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a part of the mesolimbic reward motivation pathway. How the reward pathway is engaged by pain-relieving treatments is not known. Endogenous opioid signaling in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), an area encoding pain aversiveness, contributes to pain modulation. We examined whether endogenous ACC opioid neurotransmission is required for relief of pain and subsequent downstream activation of NAc dopamine signaling. Conditioned place preference (CPP) and in vivo microdialysis were used to assess negative reinforcement and NAc dopaminergic transmission. In rats with postsurgical or neuropathic pain, blockade of opioid signaling in the rostral ACC (rACC) inhibited CPP and NAc dopamine release resulting from non-opioid pain-relieving treatments, including peripheral nerve block or spinal clonidine, an α2-adrenergic agonist. Conversely, pharmacological activation of rACC opioid receptors of injured, but not pain-free, animals was sufficient to stimulate dopamine release in the NAc and produce CPP. In neuropathic, but not sham-operated, rats, systemic doses of morphine that did not affect withdrawal thresholds elicited CPP and NAc dopamine release, effects that were prevented by blockade of ACC opioid receptors. The data provide a neural explanation for the preferential effects of opioids on pain affect and demonstrate that engagement of NAc dopaminergic transmission by non-opioid pain-relieving treatments depends on upstream ACC opioid circuits. Endogenous opioid signaling in the ACC appears to be both necessary and sufficient for relief of pain aversiveness. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357264-08$15.00/0.

  6. Selective review and commentary on emerging pharmacotherapies for opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Walter; Mooney, Larissa; Zhao, Min; Nielsen, Suzanne; Torrington, Matthew; Miotto, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacotherapies for opioid addiction under active development in the US include lofexidine (primarily for managing withdrawal symptoms) and Probuphine®, a distinctive mode of delivering buprenorphine for six months, thus relieving patients, clinicians, and regulatory personnel from most concerns about diversion, misuse, and unintended exposure in children. In addition, two recently approved formulations of previously proven medications are in early phases of implementation. The sublingual film form of buprenorphine + naloxone (Suboxone®) provides a less divertible, more quickly administered, more child-proof version than the buprenorphine + naloxone sublingual tablet. The injectable depot form of naltrexone (Vivitrol®) ensures consistent opioid receptor blockade for one month between administrations, removing concerns about medication compliance. The clinical implications of these developments have attracted increasing attention from clinicians and policymakers in the US and around the world, especially given that human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and other infectious diseases are recognized as companions to opioid addiction, commanding more efforts to reduce opioid addiction. While research and practice improvement efforts continue, reluctance to adopt new medications and procedures can be expected, especially considerations in the regulatory process and in the course of implementation. Best practices and improved outcomes will ultimately emerge from continued development efforts that reflect input from many quarters.

  7. Post-operative Analgesia in Opioid Dependent Patients: Comparison of Intravenous Morphine and Sublingual Buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Shaabanali; Mahmoudi, Ghafar Ali; Solhi, Hassan; Sadeghi-Sedeh, Bahman; Behzadi, Reza; Kazemifar, Amir Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic pain is prevalent in patients with opioid dependence. Lack of knowledge concerning the complex relationship between pain, opioid use, and withdrawal syndrome can account for the barriers encountered for pain management. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of sublingual (SL) buprenorphine for post-operative analgesia, compared with intravenous (IV) morphine. A total of 68 patients, aged 20-60 years were randomly selected from whom had been underwent laparotomy due to acute abdomen in a University Teaching Hospital in Arak, Iran, and were also opioid (opium or heroin) abuser according to their history. After end of the surgery and patients' arousal, the patients were evaluated for abdominal pain and withdrawal syndrome by visual analog scale (VAS) and clinical opioid withdrawal score (COWS), respectively 1, 6, and 24 h after the surgery. They received either morphine 5 mg IV or buprenorphine 2 mg SL, 1 h after end of the surgery, and then every 6 h for 24 h. VAS was 4.47 ± 0.73 and 2.67 ± 0.53 at h 6 and 24 in buprenorphine group, respectively. The corresponding score was 5.88 ± 0.69 and 4.59 ± 0.74 in morphine group. At the same time, patients in buprenorphine experienced less severe withdrawal syndrome. The present study confirmed the efficacy of SL buprenorphine as a non-invasive, but effective method for management of post-operative pain in opioid dependent patients. Result of this study showed that physicians can rely on SL buprenorphine for post-operative analgesia.

  8. Kratom, an Emerging Drug of Abuse: A Case Report of Overdose and Management of Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, Jack; Chin, David Tian; Gupta, Somdatta; Syed, Faraz; Xiong, Ming; Cheng, Jianguo

    2017-10-26

    Kratom is an herb indigenous to Southeast Asia with psychoactive opioid compounds, often used as a treatment for chronic pain or opiate withdrawal symptoms. It is legally and readily available via Internet sales and has been identified as an emerging drug of abuse in the United States. Kratom use has been associated with psychosis, seizures, and even death. At lower doses, kratom acts as a stimulant, while at higher doses, it produces analgesia and euphoria. Here, we describe the successful management of kratom overdose and withdrawal in a young man with negative toxicology screens.

  9. Teens Mix Prescription Opioids with Other Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infographics » Teens Mix Prescription Opioids with Other Substances Teens Mix Prescription Opioids with Other Substances Email Facebook ... amphetamines (10.6%, 10.3%, and 9.5%). Teens who mix prescription opioids with other drugs are ...

  10. Peripheral Opioid Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-16

    well. Morphine was isolated in 1806 and as early as 1850 it was used medicinally in conjunction with anesthesia , and it continues to be used for pain...and morphine stimulate POMC expression which is probably mediated through CRH. In the periphery of humans, rats and cows the POMC mRNA is 200-300 base...use of any copyrighted material in the dissenation entitled: "Peripheral Opioid Analgesia" beyond brief excerpts is with the pennission of the

  11. 78 FR 65923 - Schedules of Controlled Substances: Placement of Tramadol Into Schedule IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... opioid withdrawal syndrome displayed by patients with mild to moderate addiction to heroin. Another study... opioid- dependent adults. A modest suppression of opioid withdrawal produced by tramadol was also...\\ See infra footnote 2. Background Tramadol is an opioid analgesic that produces its primary opioid...

  12. Opioid Abuse and Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... means feeling withdrawal symptoms when not taking the drug. Addiction is a chronic brain disease that causes a person to compulsively seek out drugs, even though they cause harm. The risks of dependence and addiction are higher if you abuse the medicines. Abuse ...

  13. Opioid-use disorder among patients on long-term opioid therapy: impact of final DSM-5 diagnostic criteria on prevalence and correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boscarino JA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Joseph A Boscarino,1 Stuart N Hoffman,1 John J Han2 1Center for Health Research, 2Department of Pain Medicine, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, PA, USAAims: Previously, we estimated the prevalence and risk factors for prescription opioid-use disorder among outpatients on opioid therapy using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5 and DSM-4 criteria. However, at the time, the DSM-5 criteria were not finalized. In the current study, we analyzed these data using the final DSM-5 criteria and compared these results.Methods: Using electronic records from a large US health care system, we identified outpatients receiving five or more prescription orders for opioid therapy in the past 12 months for noncancer pain (mean prescription orders =10.72; standard deviation =4.96. In 2008, we completed diagnostic interviews with 705 of these patients using the DSM-4 criteria. In the current study, we reassessed these results using the final DSM-5 criteria.Results: The lifetime prevalence of DSM-5 opioid-use disorders using the final DSM-5 criteria was 58.7% for no or few symptoms (<2, 28.1% for mild symptoms (2–3, 9.7% for moderate symptoms (4–5, and 3.5% for severe symptoms (six or more. Thus, the lifetime prevalence of “any” prescription opioid-use disorder in this cohort was 41.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] =37.6–45.0. A comparison to the DSM-4 criteria indicated that the majority of patients with lifetime DSM-4 opioid dependence were now classified as having mild opioid-use disorder, based on the DSM-5 criteria (53.6%; 95% CI =44.1–62.8. In ordinal logistic regression predicting no/few, mild, moderate, and severe opioid-use disorder, the best predictors were age <65 years, current pain impairment, trouble sleeping, suicidal thoughts, anxiety disorders, illicit drug use, and history of substance abuse treatment.Conclusion: Given the final DSM-5 criteria, including the elimination of tolerance and withdrawal, inclusion of

  14. Withdrawal from Buprenorphine/Naloxone and Maintenance with a Natural Dopaminergic Agonist: A Cautionary Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Femino, John; Waite, Roger L; Benya, Lisa; Giordano, John; Borsten, Joan; Downs, William B; Braverman, Eric R; Loehmann, Raquel; Dushaj, Kristina; Han, David; Simpatico, Thomas; Hauser, Mary; Barh, Debmalya; McLaughlin, Thomas

    2013-04-23

    While numerous studies support the efficacy of methadone and buprenorphine for the stabilization and maintenance of opioid dependence, clinically significant opioid withdrawal symptoms occur upon tapering and cessation of dosage. We present a case study of a 35 year old Caucasian female (Krissie) who was prescribed increasing dosages of prescription opioids after carpel tunnel surgery secondary to chronic pain from reflex sympathetic dystrophy and fibromyalgia. Over the next 5 years, daily dosage requirements increased to over 80 mg of Methadone and 300 ug/hr Fentanyl transdermal patches, along with combinations of 12-14 1600 mcg Actig lollipop and oral 100 mg Morphine and 30 mg oxycodone 1-2 tabs q4-6hr PRN for breakthrough pain. Total monthly prescription costs including supplemental benzodiazepines, hypnotics and stimulants exceeded $50,000. The patient was subsequently transferred to Suboxone® in 2008, and the dosage was gradually tapered until her admission for inpatient detoxification with KB220Z a natural dopaminergic agonist. We carefully documented her withdrawal symptoms when she precipitously stopped taking buprenorphine/naloxone and during follow-up while taking KB220Z daily. We also genotyped the patient using a reward gene panel including (9 genes 18 alleles): DRD 2,3,4; MOA-A; COMT; DAT1; 5HTTLLR; OPRM1; and GABRA3. At 432 days post Suboxone® withdrawal the patient is being maintained on KB220Z, has been urine tested and is opioid free. Genotyping data revealed a moderate genetic risk for addiction showing a hypodopaminergic trait. This preliminary case data suggest that the daily use of KB220Z could provide a cost effective alternative substitution adjunctive modality for Suboxone®. We encourage double-blind randomized -placebo controlled studies to test the proposition that KB220Z may act as a putative natural opioid substitution maintenance adjunct.

  15. Effect of Short-term Forced Exercise on Naloxone Induced Withdrawal Symptoms in Morphine Addicted Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KH Saadipour

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Opioid dependence has been causing limitation in usage of morphine and other opioid drugs in pain control. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of short-term forced exercise on withdrawal syndrome in morphine addicted male rats. Materials & Methods: This experimental study was done in the physiology research center of Ahwas Jondishapour University of Medical Sciences. Twenty four young male Wistar rats, weighing 200-300gr, were randomly divided into four groups: no addiction and no exercise, no addiction and exercise, addiction and no exercise and addiction and exercise. The exercise groups underwent treadmill forced exercise for ten days. The first five days morphine was administrated (ip twice daily with increasing dose (5، 10، 20، 40, 50 mg/kg to addicted groups. Also single dose (50mg/kg of morphine was administrated to them on the 10th day of exercise. After administration of naloxone hydrochloride the withdrawal symptoms were evaluated for 5 minutes. The findings of this study were analyzed by SPSS software and One- way ANOVA (Tukey test. Results: The findings of this study showed that the withdrawal symptoms was elevated in exercise and addicted groups in comparison with control group (p<0.05 , p<0.01. However, most of withdrawal symptoms decreased in addicted and exercise group in comparison with addicted and no exercise group (p<0.01, p<0.001. Conclusion: The exercise could increase endogenous opioid and withdrawal symptoms in animals but reduce withdrawal symptoms in addicted and exercise groups compared to addicted and no exercise group. Its mechanism might be related to down regulation and low sensitivity of opioid receptors

  16. Opioid-use disorder among patients on long-term opioid therapy: impact of final DSM-5 diagnostic criteria on prevalence and correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscarino, Joseph A; Hoffman, Stuart N; Han, John J

    2015-01-01

    Aims Previously, we estimated the prevalence and risk factors for prescription opioid-use disorder among outpatients on opioid therapy using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-5 and DSM-4 criteria. However, at the time, the DSM-5 criteria were not finalized. In the current study, we analyzed these data using the final DSM-5 criteria and compared these results. Methods Using electronic records from a large US health care system, we identified outpatients receiving five or more prescription orders for opioid therapy in the past 12 months for noncancer pain (mean prescription orders =10.72; standard deviation =4.96). In 2008, we completed diagnostic interviews with 705 of these patients using the DSM-4 criteria. In the current study, we reassessed these results using the final DSM-5 criteria. Results The lifetime prevalence of DSM-5 opioid-use disorders using the final DSM-5 criteria was 58.7% for no or few symptoms (DSM-5 criteria (53.6%; 95% CI =44.1–62.8). In ordinal logistic regression predicting no/few, mild, moderate, and severe opioid-use disorder, the best predictors were age DSM-5 criteria, including the elimination of tolerance and withdrawal, inclusion of craving and abuse symptoms, and introduction of a new graded severity classification, the prevalence of opioid-use disorders has changed, while many of the DSM-4 risk factors for opioid dependence were similar. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to compare the final results for DSM-5 versus DSM-4 prescription opioid-use disorders among a high-risk patient population. PMID:26316838

  17. Preoperative opioid use and its association with perioperative opioid demand and postoperative opioid independence in patients undergoing spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaghani, Sheyan J; Lee, Dennis S; Bible, Jesse E; Archer, Kristin R; Shau, David N; Kay, Harrison; Zhang, Chi; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2014-12-01

    Prospective cohort. To assess whether preoperative opioid use is associated with increased perioperative opioid demand and postoperative opioid independence in patients undergoing spine surgery. Previous work has demonstrated increased opioid requirements during the intraoperative and immediate postoperative period in patients with high levels of preoperative opioid use. Despite this, they remain a common agent class used for the management of pain in patients prior to spine surgery. A total of 583 patients were included. Self-reported daily opioid consumption was obtained preoperatively and converted into morphine equivalent amounts and opioid use was recorded at the 12-month postoperative time. Intraoperative and immediate postoperative opioid demand was calculated. Linear regression analyses for intraoperative and immediate postoperative opioid demand while logistic regression analyses for opioid independence at 12 months including relevant covariates such as depression and anxiety were performed. The median preoperative morphine equivalent amount for the cohort was 8.75 mg, with 55% of patients reporting some degree of opioid use. Younger age, more invasive surgery, anxiety, and primary surgery were significantly associated with increased intraoperative opioid demand (P spine surgery predicts increased immediate postoperative opioid demand and decreased incidence of postoperative opioid independence. Psychiatric diagnoses in those using preoperative opioids were predictors of continued opioid use at 12 months. Patients may benefit from preoperative counseling that emphasizes minimizing opioid use prior to undergoing spine surgery. 2.

  18. Influence of δ-Opioid Receptors in the Behavioral Effects of Nicotine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrendero, Fernando; Plaza-Zabala, Ainhoa; Galeote, Lola; Flores, África; Bura, S Andreea; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Maldonado, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Multiple studies in animal models and humans suggest that the endogenous opioid system is an important neurobiological substrate for nicotine addictive properties. In this study, we evaluated the participation of δ-opioid receptors in different behavioral responses of nicotine by using δ-opioid receptor knockout mice. Acute nicotine administration induced hypolocomotion and antinociception in wild-type mice, which were similar in knockout animals. The development of tolerance to nicotine-induced antinociception was also similar in both genotypes. In agreement, the expression and functional activity of δ-opioid receptors were not modified in the different layers of the spinal cord and brain areas evaluated after chronic nicotine treatment. The somatic manifestation of the nicotine withdrawal syndrome precipitated by mecamylamine was also similar in wild-type and δ-opioid receptor knockout mice. In contrast, nicotine induced a conditioned place preference in wild-type animals that was abolished in knockout mice. Moreover, a lower percentage of acquisition of intravenous nicotine self-administration was observed in mice lacking δ-opioid receptors as well as in wild-type mice treated with the selective δ-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole. Accordingly, in-vivo microdialysis studies revealed that the enhancement in dopamine extracellular levels induced by nicotine in the nucleus accumbens was reduced in mutant mice. In summary, the present results show that δ-opioid receptors are involved in the modulation of nicotine rewarding effects. However, this opioid receptor does not participate either in several acute effects of nicotine or in the development of tolerance and physical dependence induced by chronic nicotine administration. PMID:22669166

  19. Cortical and spinal assessment - a comparative study using encephalography and the nociceptive withdrawal reflex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, I W; Gram, M; Hansen, T M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Standardized objective methods to assess the analgesic effects of opioids, enable identification of underlying mechanisms of drug actions in the central nervous system. Opioids may exert their effect on both cortical and spinal levels. In this study actions of morphine at both levels...... solution in randomized order. The electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded during rest and during immersion of the hand into ice-water. Electrical stimulation of the sole of the foot was used to elicit the nociceptive withdrawal reflex and the reflex amplitude was recorded. RESULTS: Data from thirty...... morphine administration (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Cold pressor EEG and the nociceptive reflex were more sensitive to morphine analgesia than resting EEG and can be used as standardized objective methods to assess opioid effects. However, no correlation between the analgesic effect of morphine on the spinal...

  20. Opioid and nicotine receptors affect growth regulation of human lung cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maneckjee, R.; Minna, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Using specific radioactively-labeled ligands, the authors find that lung cancer cell lines of diverse histologic types express multiple, high-affinity membrane receptors for μ, δ, and κ opioid agonists and for nicotine and α-bungarotoxin. These receptors are biologically active because cAMP levels decreased in lung cancer cells after opioid and nicotine application. Nicotine at concentrations found in the blood of smokers had no effect on in vitro lung cancer cell growth, whereas μ, δ, and κ opioid agonists at low concentrations inhibited lung cancer growth in vitro. They also found that lung cancer cells expressed various combinations of immunoreactive opioid peptides (β-endorphin, enkephalin, or dynorphin), suggesting the participation of opioids in a negative autocrine loop or tumor-suppressing system. Due to the almost universal exposure of patients with lung cancer to nicotine, they tested whether nicotine affected the response of lung cancer cell growth to opioids and found that nicotine at concentrations of 100-200 nM partially or totally reversed opioid-induced growth inhibition in 9/14 lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro results for lung cancer cells suggest that opioids could function as part of a tumor suppressor system and that nicotine can function to circumvent this system in the pathogenesis of lung cancer

  1. Opioid and nicotine receptors affect growth regulation of human lung cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maneckjee, R.; Minna, J.D. (National Cancer Institute-Navy Medical Oncology Branch, Bethesda, MD (USA) Uniformed Services Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Using specific radioactively-labeled ligands, the authors find that lung cancer cell lines of diverse histologic types express multiple, high-affinity membrane receptors for {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists and for nicotine and {alpha}-bungarotoxin. These receptors are biologically active because cAMP levels decreased in lung cancer cells after opioid and nicotine application. Nicotine at concentrations found in the blood of smokers had no effect on in vitro lung cancer cell growth, whereas {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists at low concentrations inhibited lung cancer growth in vitro. They also found that lung cancer cells expressed various combinations of immunoreactive opioid peptides ({beta}-endorphin, enkephalin, or dynorphin), suggesting the participation of opioids in a negative autocrine loop or tumor-suppressing system. Due to the almost universal exposure of patients with lung cancer to nicotine, they tested whether nicotine affected the response of lung cancer cell growth to opioids and found that nicotine at concentrations of 100-200 nM partially or totally reversed opioid-induced growth inhibition in 9/14 lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro results for lung cancer cells suggest that opioids could function as part of a tumor suppressor system and that nicotine can function to circumvent this system in the pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  2. Emerging therapies for patients with symptoms of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leppert W

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Wojciech Leppert Chair and Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland Abstract: Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD comprises gastrointestinal (GI symptoms, including dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, gastric stasis, bloating, abdominal pain, and opioid-induced constipation, which significantly impair patients’ quality of life and may lead to undertreatment of pain. Traditional laxatives are often prescribed for OIBD symptoms, although they display limited efficacy and exert adverse effects. Other strategies include prokinetics and change of opioids or their administration route. However, these approaches do not address underlying causes of OIBD associated with opioid effects on mostly peripheral opioid receptors located in the GI tract. Targeted management of OIBD comprises purely peripherally acting opioid receptor antagonists and a combination of opioid receptor agonist and antagonist. Methylnaltrexone induces laxation in 50%–60% of patients with advanced diseases and OIBD who do not respond to traditional oral laxatives without inducing opioid withdrawal symptoms with similar response (45%–50% after an oral administration of naloxegol. A combination of prolonged-release oxycodone with prolonged-release naloxone (OXN in one tablet (a ratio of 2:1 provides analgesia with limited negative effect on the bowel function, as oxycodone displays high oral bioavailability and naloxone demonstrates local antagonist effect on opioid receptors in the GI tract and is totally inactivated in the liver. OXN in daily doses of up to 80 mg/40 mg provides equally effective analgesia with improved bowel function compared to oxycodone administered alone in patients with chronic non-malignant and cancer-related pain. OIBD is a common complication of long-term opioid therapy and may lead to quality of life deterioration and undertreatment of pain. Thus, a complex assessment and management that addresses underlying

  3. Afghanistan after NATO Withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojor Laviniu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The conclusion of a conflict, called by some American analysts as “America’s Longest War”, after the withdrawal of the majority of NATO military forces, requires a careful analysis of the conditions and security environment that ISAF mission, International Security Afghan Forces, leaves as legacy to the Afghan military forces. The transfer of authority towards a strong government, recognized by most Afghan provinces, and benefiting from the support of national military forces able to cope with terrorist and insurgent threats on its own, are the minimum and necessary conditions leading the country towards a stable and secure environment and towards a sustainable development. Given these realities, any approach on the consequences of the transition towards self-sustainable governance becomes interesting and timely for any military political study. These are the prospects that we propose in our paper.

  4. Nicotine Withdrawal; Measure Your Symptoms (Quiz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Free Resources Medications Can Help You Quit Using Nicotine Replacement Therapy Busting NRT Myths Smokefree Phone Apps ... Withdrawal Understanding Withdrawal Quiz: How Strong is Your Nicotine Addiction? Quiz: What Are Your Withdrawal Symptoms? Dealing ...

  5. Opioids and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe; Ahern, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids may alter immune function, thereby potentially affecting cancer recurrence. The authors investigated the association between postdiagnosis opioid use and breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: Patients with incident, early stage breast cancer who were diagnosed during 1996 through...... 2008 in Denmark were identified from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Registry. Opioid prescriptions were ascertained from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Follow-up began on the date of primary surgery for breast cancer and continued until breast cancer recurrence, death......, emigration, 10 years, or July 31, 2013, whichever occurred first. Cox regression models were used to compute hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals associating breast cancer recurrence with opioid prescription use overall and by opioid type and strength, immunosuppressive effect, chronic use (≥6 months...

  6. Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Papaver libanoticum Extract in Mice: Involvement of Opioids Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Ali Hijazi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Papaver libanoticum is an endemic plant to Lebanese region (family Papaveraceae that has not been investigated before. The present study aimed to explore the analgesic activity of dried ethanolic extract of Papaver libanoticum (PLE using tail flick, hot plate, and acetic acid induced writhing models in mice. The involvement of opioid receptors in the analgesic mechanism was investigated using naloxone antagonism. Results demonstrated that PLE exhibited a potent dose dependent analgesic activity in all tested models for analgesia. The analgesic effect involved activation of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, where both spinal and supraspinal components might be involved. The time course for analgesia revealed maximum activity after three hours in both tail flick and hot plate methods, which was prolonged to 24 hours. Metabolites of PLE could be responsible for activation of opioid receptors. The EC50 of PLE was 79 and 50 mg/kg in tail flick and hot plate tests, respectively. The total coverage of analgesia by PLE was double that of morphine in both tests. In conclusion, PLE proved to have opioid agonistic activity with a novel feature of slow and prolonged effect. The present study could add a potential tool in the armaments of opioid drugs as a natural potent analgesic and for treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome.

  7. Effects of acute withdrawal on ethanol-induced conditioned place preference in DBA/2J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreumont, Sarah E; Cunningham, Christopher L

    2014-02-01

    Reexposure to ethanol during acute withdrawal might facilitate the transition to alcoholism by enhancing the rewarding effect of ethanol. The conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure was used to test whether ethanol reward is enhanced during acute withdrawal. DBA/2J mice were exposed to an unbiased one-compartment CPP procedure. Ethanol (0.75, 1.0, or 1.5 g/kg IP) was paired with a distinctive floor cue (CS+), whereas saline was paired with a different floor cue (CS-). The withdrawal (W) group received CS+ trials during acute withdrawal produced by a large dose of ethanol (4 g/kg) given 8 h before each trial. The no-withdrawal (NW) group did not experience acute withdrawal during conditioning trials but was matched for acute withdrawal experience. Floor preference was tested in the absence of ethanol or acute withdrawal. All groups eventually showed a dose-dependent preference for the ethanol-paired cue, but development of CPP was generally more rapid and stable in the W groups than in the NW groups. Acute withdrawal suppressed the normal activating effect of ethanol during CS+ trials, but there were no group differences in test activity. Acute withdrawal enhanced ethanol's rewarding effect as indexed by CPP. Since this effect depended on ethanol exposure during acute withdrawal, the enhancement of ethanol reward was likely mediated by the alleviation of acute withdrawal, i.e., negative reinforcement. Enhancement of ethanol reward during acute withdrawal may be a key component in the shift from episodic to chronic ethanol consumption that characterizes alcoholism.

  8. Control rod withdrawal monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisuya, Mitsuo.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the power ramp even if a plurality of control rods are subjected to withdrawal operation at a time, by reducing the reactivity applied to the reactor. Constitution: The control rod withdrawal monitoring device is adapted to monitor and control the withdrawal of the control rods depending on the reactor power and the monitoring region thereof is divided into a control rod group monitoring region a transition region and a control group monitoring not interfere region. In a case if the distance between a plurality of control rods for which the withdrawal positions are selected is less than a limiting value, the coordinate for the control rods, distance between the control rods and that the control rod distance is shorter are displayed on a display panel, and the withdrawal for the control rods are blocked. Accordingly, even if a plurality of control rods are subjected successively to the withdrawal operation contrary to the control rod withdrawal sequence upon high power operation of the reactor, the power ramp can be prevented. (Kawakami, Y.)

  9. Opioids and immunosupression in oncological postoperative patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Bonilla-García

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Recent animal studies demonstrated immunosuppressive effects of opioid withdrawal resulting in a higher risk of infection. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of remifentanil discontinuation on Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU-acquired infection after a schedule of sedoanalgesia of at least 6 days. Method: All patients over 18 years of age with a unit admission of more than 4 days were consecutively selected. The study population was the one affected by surgical pathology of any origin where sedation was based on any hypnotic and the opioid remifentanil was used as analgesic for at least 96 hours in continuous perfusion. Patients who died during admission to the unit and those with combined analgesia (peripheral or neuroaxial blocks were excluded. Bivariate analysis was performed to determine risk factors for infection acquired in the unit. A comparative study between periods of 6 days before and after the cessation of remifentanil was performed. Paired samples test and McNemar test was used for quantitative and categorical variables, respectively. Results: There were 1,789 patients admitted to the PACU during the study and the population eligible was constituted for 102 patients. The incidence rate of PACU-acquired infection was 38 per 1,000 PACU days. Ventilator-associated pneumonia was the most frequently diagnosed PACU-acquired infection. Pseudomona aeruginosa was the most frequently isolated microorganism. Hospital mortality was 36.27%. No statistically significant differences were seen in the incidence of HAI in cancer patients in relation to discontinuation of remifentanil (p=0.068. Conclusion: The baseline state of immunosuppression of cancer patients does not imply a higher incidence of HAI in relation to the interruption of remifentanil. It would be of interest to carry out a multicenter PACU study that included immunological patterns.

  10. [Treatment of iatrogenic Cushing syndrome: questions of glucocorticoid withdrawal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igaz, Péter; Rácz, Károly; Tóth, Miklós; Gláz, Edit; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2007-02-04

    Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome is the most common form of hypercortisolism. Glucocorticoids are widely used for the treatment of various diseases, often in high doses that may lead to the development of severe hypercortisolism. Iatrogenic hypercortisolism is unique, as the application of exogenous glucocorticoids leads to the simultaneous presence of symptoms specific for hypercortisolism and the suppression of the endogenous hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The principal question of its therapy is related to the problem of glucocorticoid withdrawal. There is considerable interindividual variability in the suppression and recovery of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, therefore, glucocorticoid withdrawal and substitution can only be conducted in a stepwise manner with careful clinical follow-up and regular laboratory examinations regarding endogenous hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. Three major complications which can be associated with glucocorticoid withdrawal are: i. reactivation of the underlying disease, ii. secondary adrenal insufficiency, iii. steroid withdrawal syndrome. Here, the authors summarize the most important aspects of this area based on their clinical experience and the available literature data.

  11. Disruption of the CRF(2) receptor pathway decreases the somatic expression of opiate withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaleo, Francesco; Ghozland, Sandy; Ingallinesi, Manuela; Roberts, Amanda J; Koob, George F; Contarino, Angelo

    2008-11-01

    Escape from the extremely aversive opiate withdrawal symptoms powerfully motivates compulsive drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviors. The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system is hypothesized to mediate the motivational properties of drug dependence. CRF signaling is transmitted by two receptor pathways, termed CRF(1) and CRF(2). To investigate the role for the CRF(2) receptor pathway in somatic opiate withdrawal, in the present study we used genetically engineered mice deficient in the CRF(2) receptor (CRF(2)-/-). We employed a novel, clinically relevant mouse model of 'spontaneous' opiate withdrawal as well as a classical opioid receptor antagonist (naloxone)-precipitated opiate withdrawal paradigm. To induce opiate dependence, mice were treated with intermittent escalating morphine doses (20-100 mg/kg, i.p.). We found that 8-128 h after the last opiate injection, CRF(2)-/- mice showed decreased levels of major somatic signs of spontaneous opiate withdrawal, such as paw tremor and wet dog shake, as compared to wild-type mice. Similarly, challenge with naloxone 2 h after the last morphine injection induced lower levels of paw tremor and wet dog shake in CRF(2)-/- mice as compared to wild-type mice. Despite the differences in somatic signs, wild-type and CRF(2)-/- mice displayed similar plasma corticosterone responses to opiate dosing and withdrawal, indicating a marginal role for the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in the CRF(2) receptor mediation of opiate withdrawal. Our results unravel a novel role for the CRF(2) receptor pathway in opiate withdrawal. The CRF(2) receptor pathway might be a critical target of therapies aimed at alleviating opiate withdrawal symptoms and reducing relapse to drug intake.

  12. Opioid modulation of immunocompetence: Receptor characterization and second messenger involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmick, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to examine the effects of opioids on several indices of immunocompetence, determined the receptor specificity of these effects, and ascertain whether the actions of opioids on lymphocytes could be correlated with activation of second messenger systems. By measuring {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake into lymphocytes, it was demonstrated that {beta}-endorphin 1-31 ({beta}-END 1-31) enhanced rat thymocyte Ca{sup 2+} uptake in response to concanavalin A (Con A) but not phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Related opioid peptides and alkaloids were unable to mimic the effect, and naloxone did not block it, suggesting that {beta}-END 1-31 acted by binding to specific, non-opioid receptors on the thymocytes. Rat splenocyte Con A-stimulated Ca{sup 2+} uptake was not affected by {beta}-END 1-31. {beta}-END 1-31 did not affect basal Ca{sup 2+} uptake by either cell type. Using ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake as an index of lymphocyte proliferation, {beta}-END 1-31 and several related opioid peptides reversed prostaglandin E{sub 1} (PGE{sub 1}) suppression of rat lymph node cell Con A- and PHA-stimulated proliferation. Naloxone did not block the reversal. {beta}-END 1-31 was unable to reverse forskolin and cholera toxin suppression of proliferation, indicating that the lowering of cyclic AMP levels was not the mechanism involved. Verapamil inhibition of proliferation was also not reversed by {beta}-END 1-31, suggesting that promotion of Ca{sup 2+} influx was not a major mechanism involved.

  13. Abuse-deterrent Opioid Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litman, Ronald S; Pagán, Olivia H; Cicero, Theodore J

    2017-12-18

    Abuse-deterrent opioid formulations have been suggested as one way to decrease the abuse, addiction, and overdose of orally prescribed opioids. Ten oral opioid formulations have received abuse-deterrent labeling by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Their properties consist of physical and/or chemical means by which the pills resist manipulation and create a barrier to unintended administration, such as chewing, nasal snorting, smoking, and intravenous injection. In this review, we describe the mechanisms of abuse-deterrent technology, the types of premarketing studies required for FDA approval, the pharmacology of the currently approved abuse-deterrent opioid formulations, and the evidence for and against their influence on opioid abuse. We conclude that there is currently insufficient evidence to indicate that the availability of abuse-deterrent opioid formulations has altered the trajectory of opioid overdose and addiction; however, postmarketing studies are in their infancy, and novel deterrent formulations are continually being developed and submitted for marketing approval.

  14. Does the kappa opioid receptor system contribute to pain aversion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Cahill

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The kappa opioid receptor (KOR and the endogenous peptide-ligand dynorphin have received significant attention due the involvement in mediating a variety of behavioral and neurophysiological responses, including opposing the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse including opioids. Accumulating evidence indicates this system is involved in regulating states of motivation and emotion. Acute activation of the KOR produces an increase in motivational behavior to escape a threat, however, KOR activation associated with chronic stress leads to the expression of symptoms indicative of mood disorders. It is well accepted that KOR can produce analgesia and is engaged in chronic pain states including neuropathic pain. Spinal studies have revealed KOR-induced analgesia in reversing pain hypersensitivities associated with peripheral nerve injury. While systemic administration of KOR agonists attenuates nociceptive sensory transmission, this effect appears to be a stress-induced effect as anxiolytic agents, including delta opioid receptor agonists, mitigate KOR agonist-induced analgesia. Additionally, while the role of KOR and dynorphin in driving the dysphoric and aversive components of stress and drug withdrawal has been well characterized, how this system mediates the negative emotional states associated with chronic pain is relatively unexplored. This review provides evidence that dynorphin and the KOR system contribute to the negative affective component of pain and that this receptor system likely contributes to the high comorbidity of mood disorders associated with chronic neuropathic pain.

  15. Naloxone rapidly evokes endogenous kappa opioid receptor-mediated hyperalgesia in naïve mice pretreated briefly with GM1 ganglioside or in chronic morphine-dependent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Stanley M; Shen, Ke-Fei

    2007-09-05

    Low-dose naloxone-precipitated withdrawal hyperalgesia is a reliable indicator of physical dependence after chronic morphine treatment. A remarkably similar long-lasting (>3-4 h) hyperalgesia is evoked by injection of a low dose of naloxone (10 microg/kg, s.c.) in naïve mice after acute pretreatment with the glycolipid, GM1 ganglioside (1 mg/kg) (measured by warm-water-immersion tail-flick assays). GM1 treatment markedly increases the efficacy of excitatory Gs-coupled opioid receptor signaling in nociceptive neurons. Co-treatment with an ultra-low-dose (0.1 ng/kg, s.c.) of the broad-spectrum opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone or the selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine, blocks naloxone-evoked hyperalgesia in GM1-pretreated naïve mice and unmasks prominent, long-lasting (>4 h) inhibitory opioid receptor-mediated analgesia. This unmasked analgesia can be rapidly blocked by injection after 1-2 h of a high dose of naltrexone (10 mg/kg) or nor-binaltorphimine (0.1 mg/kg). Because no exogenous opioid is administered to GM1-treated mice, we suggest that naloxone may evoke hyperalgesia by inducing release of endogenous bimodally acting opioid agonists from neurons in nociceptive networks by antagonizing putative presynaptic inhibitory opioid autoreceptors that "gate" the release of endogenous opioids. In the absence of exogenous opioids, the specific pharmacological manipulations utilized in our tail-flick assays on GM1-treated mice provide a novel bioassay to detect the release of endogenous bimodally acting (excitatory/inhibitory) opioid agonists. Because mu excitatory opioid receptor signaling is blocked by ultra-low doses of naloxone, the higher doses of naloxone that evoke hyperalgesia in GM1-treated mice cannot be mediated by activation of mu opioid receptors. Co-treatment with ultra-low-dose naltrexone or nor-binaltorphimine may selectively block signaling by endogenous GM1-sensitized excitatory kappa opioid receptors, unmasking

  16. Inpatient versus other settings for detoxification for opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, E; Ison, J; Strang, J

    2005-04-18

    There are a complex range of variables that can influence the course and subjective severity of opioid withdrawal. There is a growing evidence for the effectiveness of a range of medically-supported detoxification strategies, but little attention has been paid to the influence of the setting in which the process takes place. To evaluate the effectiveness of any inpatient opioid detoxification programme when compared with all other time-limited detoxification programmes on the level of completion of detoxification, the intensity and duration of withdrawal symptoms, the nature and incidence of adverse effects, the level of engagement in further treatment post-detoxification, and the rates of relapse post-detoxification. Electronic databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL - The Cochrane Library Issue 3, 2004); MEDLINE (January 1966-March 2004); EMBASE (January 1988-March 2004); PsycInfo (January 1967-March 2004); CINAHL (January 1982-March 2004). In addition the Current Contents, Biological Abstracts, Science Citation Index and Social Sciences Index were searched. Randomised controlled clinical trials comparing inpatient opioid detoxification (any drug or psychosocial therapy) with other time-limited detoxification programmes (including residential units that are not staffed 24 hours per day, day-care facilities where the patient is not resident for 24 hours per day, and outpatient or ambulatory programmes, and using any drug or psychosocial therapy). All abstracts were independently inspected by two reviewers (ED & JI) and relevant papers were retrieved and assessed for methodological quality using Cochrane Reviewers' Handbook criteria. Only one study met the inclusion criteria. This did not explicitly report the number of participants in each group that successfully completed the detoxification process, but the published data allowed us to deduce that 7 out of 10 (70%) in the inpatient detoxification group were opioid-free on discharge

  17. Neurogenetics of acute and chronic opiate/opioid abstinence: treating symptoms and the cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Gold, Mark S; Jacobs, William; McCall, William Vaughn; Febo, Marcelo; Baron, David; Dushaj, Kristina; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D

    2017-03-01

    This review begins with a comprehensive history of opioid dependence and treatment in the United States. The focus is an evidence-based treatment model for opioid/opiate dependent individuals. The role of reward genetic polymorphisms and the epigenetic modifications that lead to vulnerability to use and misuse of opiates/opioid to treat pain are reviewed. The neurochemical mechanisms of acute opiate withdrawal and opiate/opioid reward mechanisms are explored with a goal of identifying specific treatment targets. Alterations in functional brain connectivity based on neurobiological mechanisms in heroin dependence and abstinence are also reviewed. A new clinical model an alternative to merely blocking acute withdrawal symptoms as identified in the DSM -5 is proposed. Genetic diagnosis at the onset of detoxification, to determine risk stratification, and identify polymorphic gene targets for pharmaceutical and nutraceutical interventions, followed by the simultaneous initiation of Medication Assisted Therapy (MAT), to enable psychological extinction, and steady pro-dopaminergic therapy with the goal of developing "dopamine homeostasis" is recommended. The objective of these interventions is to prevent future relapse by treating all "Reward Deficiency Syndrome" (RDS) behaviors and eventually make an addiction-free life possible .

  18. Housing equity withdrawal in Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, R.; Jefferson, T.; Austen, S.; Haffner, M.E.A.; Wood, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    More Australian home owners are using housing equity withdrawal to unlock financial resources to fund living expenses, especially in retirement. Policy is needed to address potential adverse consequences of these strategies.

  19. Neural substrates of opiate withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koob, G F; Maldonado, R; Stinus, L

    1992-05-01

    Drug withdrawal is an integral part of most types of dependence and, to a large extent, opiate withdrawal has been considered the prototypic, classic measure of opiate dependence. The opiate withdrawal syndrome is characterized by multiple behavioral and physiological signs such as behavioral activation, ptosis, diarrhea, 'wet dog' shakes and motivational dysfunction, which may be represented in the CNS at multiple sites. It seems that the activating effects associated with the opiate withdrawal syndrome may be mediated by the nucleus locus coeruleus. Other signs such as wet dog shakes may involve sites in the hypothalamus important for temperature regulation. Certain other signs such as diarrhea and lacrimation may be dependent on peripheral opiate receptors. The motivational aspects of opiate withdrawal as demonstrated by the aversive stimulus effects or negative reinforcing effects (e.g. disrupted lever-pressing for food and place aversions) may involve those elements of the nucleus accumbens that are known to be important for the acute reinforcing effects of opiates in nondependent rats. Evidence exists at the cellular and molecular level for both 'within-system' and 'between-system' adaptations to dependence. Elucidation of the neural networks, cellular mechanisms and molecular elements involved in opiate withdrawal may provide not only a model for our understanding of the adaptive processes associated with drug dependence but also of those associated with other chronic insults to CNS function.

  20. [Biosynthesis of opioid peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossier, J

    1988-01-01

    The endogenous opioid peptides all contain the enkephalin sequence Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met and Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu at their aminoterminus. Three distinct families of these peptides (endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins) are present in different neuronal pathways within the central nervous system. Molecular genetics have shown that these three families of opioid peptides are derived from three distinct precursors. Pro-opiomelanocortin gives rise to the endorphins, as well as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and the melanotropic hormones (MSH's). [Met] enkephalin, [Leu] enkephalin and the related heptapeptide [Met] enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7 and octapeptide [Met] enkephalin-Arg6-Gly7-Leu8 are derived from proenkephalin. The third family is derived from prodynorphin and includes dynorphin A, dynorphin B (also known as rimorphin) and alpha- and beta-neo-endorphin. The structure of the genes coding for these precursors are similar, suggesting the possibility of one common ancestral gene. The most common scheme for enzymatic maturation of precursors proposes the action of a trypsin-like endopeptidase followed by a carboxypeptidase B-like exopeptidase. However, we have provided evidence that this combination of trypsin-like and carboxypeptidase B-like enzymes may not be the only mechanism for liberating enkephalin from low molecular weight enkephalin-containing peptides. Indeed, endo-oligopeptidase A, an enzyme, known to hydrolyze the Phe5-Ser6 bond of bradykinin and the Arg8-Arg9 bond of neurotensin, has been shown to produce, by a single cleavage, [Leu] enkephalin or [Met] enkephalin from small enkephalin-containing peptides, (Camargo et al., 1987, J. Neurochem. 48, 1258-1263).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Distinct Mu, Delta, and Kappa Opioid Receptor Mechanisms Underlie Low Sociability and Depressive-Like Behaviors During Heroin Abstinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Pierre-Eric; Ayranci, Gulebru; Chu-Sin-Chung, Paul; Matifas, Audrey; Koebel, Pascale; Filliol, Dominique; Befort, Katia; Ouagazzal, Abdel-Mouttalib; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2014-01-01

    Addiction is a chronic disorder involving recurring intoxication, withdrawal, and craving episodes. Escaping this vicious cycle requires maintenance of abstinence for extended periods of time and is a true challenge for addicted individuals. The emergence of depressive symptoms, including social withdrawal, is considered a main cause for relapse, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we establish a mouse model of protracted abstinence to heroin, a major abused opiate, where both emotional and working memory deficits unfold. We show that delta and kappa opioid receptor (DOR and KOR, respectively) knockout mice develop either stronger or reduced emotional disruption during heroin abstinence, establishing DOR and KOR activities as protective and vulnerability factors, respectively, that regulate the severity of abstinence. Further, we found that chronic treatment with the antidepressant drug fluoxetine prevents emergence of low sociability, with no impact on the working memory deficit, implicating serotonergic mechanisms predominantly in emotional aspects of abstinence symptoms. Finally, targeting the main serotonergic brain structure, we show that gene knockout of mu opioid receptors (MORs) in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) before heroin exposure abolishes the development of social withdrawal. This is the first result demonstrating that intermittent chronic MOR activation at the level of DRN represents an essential mechanism contributing to low sociability during protracted heroin abstinence. Altogether, our findings reveal crucial and distinct roles for all three opioid receptors in the development of emotional alterations that follow a history of heroin exposure and open the way towards understanding opioid system-mediated serotonin homeostasis in heroin abuse. PMID:24874714

  2. δ-opioid receptor and somatostatin receptor-4 heterodimerization: possible implications in modulation of pain associated signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi K Somvanshi

    Full Text Available Pain relief is the principal action of opioids. Somatostatin (SST, a growth hormone inhibitory peptide is also known to alleviate pain even in cases when opioids fail. Recent studies have shown that mice are prone to sustained pain and devoid of analgesic effect in the absence of somatostatin receptor 4 (SSTR4. In the present study, using brain slices, cultured neurons and HEK-293 cells, we showed that SSTR4 and δ-Opioid receptor (δOR exist in a heteromeric complex and function in synergistic manner. SSTR4 and δOR co-expressed in cortical/striatal brain regions and spinal cord. Using cultured neuronal cells, we describe the heterogeneous complex formation of SSTR4 and δOR at neuronal cell body and processes. Cotransfected cells display inhibition of cAMP/PKA and co-activation of SSTR4 and δOR oppose receptor trafficking induced by individual receptor activation. Furthermore, downstream signaling pathways either associated with withdrawal or pain relief are modulated synergistically with a predominant role of SSTR4. Inhibition of cAMP/PKA and activation of ERK1/2 are the possible cellular adaptations to prevent withdrawal induced by chronic morphine use. Our results reveal direct intra-membrane interaction between SSTR4 and δOR and provide insights for the molecular mechanism for the anti-nociceptive property of SST in combination with opioids as a potential therapeutic approach to avoid undesirable withdrawal symptoms.

  3. Towards safer use of opioids.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carson, R W R

    2009-09-01

    The main aim of our work was to improve the safety of opioid use in our institution, an acute generalhospital with 620 beds. Initially, all reported opioid errors from 2001 - 2006 were audited. The findings directed a range of multidisciplinary staff educational inputs to improve opioid prescribing and administration practice, and encourage drug error reporting. 448 drug errors were reported, of which 54 (12%) involved opioids; of these, 43 (79%) involved codeine, morphine or oxycodone. 31 of the errors (57%) were associated with administration, followed by 12 (22%) with dispensing and 11 (20%) with prescribing. There were 2 reports of definite patient harm. A subsequent audit examined a 17-month period following the introduction of the above teaching: 17 errors were noted, of which 14 (83%) involved codeine, morphine or oxycodone. Again, drug administration was most error-prone, comprising 11 (65%) of reports. However, just 2 (12%) of the reported errors now involved prescribing, which was a reduction.

  4. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging of Opioid Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, Aren; Absalom, Anthony; Visser, Anniek; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; De Vries, Erik FJ; Van Waarde, Aren; Luiten, Paul GM

    2014-01-01

    The opioid system consists of opioid receptors (which mediate the actions of opium), their endogenous ligands (the enkephalins, endorphins, endomorphins, dynorphin, and nociceptin), and the proteins involved in opioid production, transport, and degradation. PET tracers for the various opioid

  5. Selective review and commentary on emerging pharmacotherapies for opioid addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miotto K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Walter Ling1, Larissa Mooney1, Min Zhao2, Suzanne Nielsen1, Matthew Torrington1, Karen Miotto1 1Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China Abstract: Pharmacotherapies for opioid addiction under active development in the US include lofexidine (primarily for managing withdrawal symptoms and Probuphine®, a distinctive mode of delivering buprenorphine for six months, thus relieving patients, clinicians, and regulatory personnel from most concerns about diversion, misuse, and unintended exposure in children. In addition, two recently approved formulations of previously proven medications are in early phases of implementation. The sublingual film form of buprenorphine + naloxone (Suboxone® provides a less divertible, more quickly administered, more child-proof version than the buprenorphine + naloxone sublingual tablet. The injectable depot form of naltrexone (Vivitrol® ensures consistent opioid receptor blockade for one month between administrations, removing concerns about medication compliance. The clinical implications of these developments have attracted increasing attention from clinicians and policymakers in the US and around the world, especially given that human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and other infectious diseases are recognized as companions to opioid addiction, commanding more efforts to reduce opioid addiction. While research and practice improvement efforts continue, reluctance to adopt new medications and procedures can be expected, especially considerations in the regulatory process and in the course of implementation. Best practices and improved outcomes will ultimately emerge from continued development efforts that reflect input from many quarters. Keywords: buprenorphine, naltrexone, probuphine, lofexidine, implant buprenorphine, buprenorphine film

  6. Management of opioid addiction with buprenorphine: French history and current management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poloméni P

    2014-03-01

    pathophysiologic mechanisms of the disease, better knowledge of the pharmacology of opioid substitution treatments, and clear definition of short-, medium- and long-term treatment objectives. Data related to the management of opioid addiction by general practitioners in France have been published in 2005. Since then, the context has changed, other drugs were launched on the market such as generics of buprenorphine, methadone capsule, and Suboxone. Thus, an update seems necessary. This paper provides a description of opioid addiction management objectives and treatment modalities for general practitioners, based on currently available knowledge. Keywords: opioid addiction, withdrawal, opioid substitution treatment, buprenorphine, naloxone, general medicine

  7. Oral opioid administration and hyperalgesia in patients with cancer or chronic nonmalignant pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznikov, Igor; Pud, Dorit; Eisenberg, Elon

    2005-09-01

    Previous research has reported on reduced paw withdrawal latencies to heat and mechanical stimuli after parenteral administration of opioids in animals and on increased pain sensitivity in humans subsequent to postoperative infusions of short-acting opioids or in drug addicts. The aim of the present study was to explore the possibility that oral opioid treated patients with cancer-related or chronic nonmalignant pain differ in their pain sensitivity from patients treated with non-opioid analgesics. The study population consisted of 224 patients, including 142 in the opioid-treated group and 82 in the non-opioid-treated group. Pain thresholds for punctuate measured by von Frey filaments (g), mechanical pressure measured by pressure algometer (mmHg), heat stimuli measured by quantitative sensory testing (degrees C), as well as suprathreshold tonic heat pain intensity (46.5 degrees C for 1 min) measured by 0-10 numerical pain scale (NPS) were obtained at a nonpainful site (thenar eminence) in all patients. No differences between the groups were found for gender, age, duration of pain, or duration of treatment (independent variables). No significant differences between the groups were found in punctuate (difference = 17.0 g (95% CI -8.8, 42.8), P = 0.19), pressure (2.2 mmHg (-28.7, 33.2), P = 0.89) and heat (-0.3 degrees C (-1.5, 0.9), P = 0.70) pain thresholds, or in suprathreshold heat pain intensity (difference between maximal pain intensities -0.4 NPS units (95% CI -1.2, 0.4), P = 0.31). Pearson correlations within the opioid-treated group failed to show significant relationships between any of the independent variables and the outcome measures. A further comparison of the outcomes between the 'weak' opioid-treated subgroup and the 'strong' opioid-treated subgroup again revealed insignificant results. These results suggest that the administration of 'commonly used' dosages of oral opioids does not result in abnormal pain sensitivity beyond that of patients

  8. Meperidine (pethidine versus morphine in acute pain management of opioid-dependent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solhi H

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hassan Solhi,1 Hossein Sanaei-Zadeh,2 Sadra Solhi,1 Mohammad Ali Azizi Nadian,1 Morteza Gharibi,3 Bahman Sadeghi Sedeh4 1Department of Internal Medicine, Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, 2Emergency Room, Division of Medical Toxicology, Hazrat Ali-Asghar (p Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, Arak University of Medical Sciences, 4Department of Social Medicine, Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Iran Abstract: The present study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of morphine and meperidine (pethidine as pain relief in opioid-dependent patients with acute pain. A total of 122 opioid-dependent patients with acute pain were included in the study. Their pain severity was assessed, using visual analog scale (VAS scores ranging from 0 to 10. The patients randomly received intravenous morphine (up to 0.15 mg/kg or meperidine (up to 1.5 mg/kg for pain control by patient control analgesia (PCA pump. The clinical opioid withdrawal scale (COWS was employed for the assessment of withdrawal symptoms. The pain relief and the emergence of withdrawal symptoms were measured at 15, 30, and 60 minutes after drug administration. The patients who received morphine reported a better pain control compared to those who received meperidine (mean ± standard deviation [SD] VAS scores 4.11±1.90 vs 5.85±2.08 at the end of the study; P<0.001. On the other hand, the patients who received meperidine indicated prominent withdrawal symptoms (mean ± SD COWS scores 4.80±2.18 vs. 1.98±0.82 at the end of the study; P<0.001. Our findings revealed that morphine can be recommended in acute pain management of opioid-dependent patients. In addition, emergency physicians should ask their patients about any drug dependence before selecting the appropriate drug for their acute pain management. Keywords: pain management, meperidine, morphine, opioid dependency, withdrawal symptoms

  9. Illicit Opioid Intoxication: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fareed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Opioid intoxications and overdose are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Opioid overdose may occur in the setting of intravenous or intranasal heroin use, illicit use of diverted opioid medications, intentional or accidental misuse of prescription pain medications, or iatrogenic overdose. In this review, we focused on the epidemiology of illict opioid use in the United States and on the mechanism of action of opioid drugs. We also described the signs and symptoms, and diagnoses of intoxication and overdose. Lastly, we updated the reader about the most recent recommendations for treatment and prevention of opioid intoxications and overdose.

  10. Effect of Iboga alkaloids on µ-opioid receptor-coupled G protein activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Antonio

    Full Text Available The iboga alkaloids are a class of small molecules defined structurally on the basis of a common ibogamine skeleton, some of which modify opioid withdrawal and drug self-administration in humans and preclinical models. These compounds may represent an innovative approach to neurobiological investigation and development of addiction pharmacotherapy. In particular, the use of the prototypic iboga alkaloid ibogaine for opioid detoxification in humans raises the question of whether its effect is mediated by an opioid agonist action, or if it represents alternative and possibly novel mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to independently replicate and extend evidence regarding the activation of μ-opioid receptor (MOR-related G proteins by iboga alkaloids.Ibogaine, its major metabolite noribogaine, and 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC, a synthetic congener, were evaluated by agonist-stimulated guanosine-5´-O-(γ-thio-triphosphate ([(35S]GTPγS binding in cells overexpressing the recombinant MOR, in rat thalamic membranes, and autoradiography in rat brain slices.In rat thalamic membranes ibogaine, noribogaine and 18-MC were MOR antagonists with functional Ke values ranging from 3 uM (ibogaine to 13 uM (noribogaine and 18MC. Noribogaine and 18-MC did not stimulate [(35S]GTPγS binding in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human or rat MORs, and had only limited partial agonist effects in human embryonic kidney cells expressing mouse MORs. Ibogaine did not did not stimulate [(35S]GTPγS binding in any MOR expressing cells. Noribogaine did not stimulate [(35S]GTPγS binding in brain slices using autoradiography. An MOR agonist action does not appear to account for the effect of these iboga alkaloids on opioid withdrawal. Taken together with existing evidence that their mechanism of action also differs from that of other non-opioids with clinical effects on opioid tolerance and withdrawal, these findings suggest a novel mechanism of action, and

  11. Kratom and Future Treatment for the Opioids Addiction and Chronic Pain: Periculo Beneficium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ismaliza; Wahab, Suzaily; Sidi, Hatta; Das, Srijit; Lin, Loo Jiann; Razali, Rosdinom

    2017-04-25

    Kratom (Mitragynaspeciosa), a natural existing plant found in South-East Asia, is tradi-tionally used as an herb to help to elevate a person's energy and also to treat numerous medical ailments. Other than the analgesic property, kratom has been used as an agent to overcome opioid withdrawal as it contains natural alkaloids, i.e. mitragynine, 7-hydroxymitragynine, and MGM-9, which has agonist affinity on the opioid receptors, including mu (μ) and kappa (κ). The role of neural reward pathway linked to μ-opioid receptors and both dopaminergic and GABA-ergic interneurons that express μ-opioid receptors were deliberated. However, kratom has been reported to be abused together with other illicit substances with high risk of potential addiction. There are also anecdotes of an adverse effect and toxicity of kratom, i.e. tremor, fatigue, seizure, and death. Different countries have distinctive regulation and policy on the plantation and use of this plant when most of the countries banned the use of it because of its addiction problems and side effects. The aim of this review is to highlight on the potential use of kratom, a unique 'herbs" as a substitution therapy for chronic pain and opioid addiction, based on the neurobiological perspective of pain and the underlying mechanism of actions of drug addiction. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Buprenorphine – an attractive opioid with underutilized potential in treatment of chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanna IK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ish K Khanna, Sivaram PillarisettiNeuroPn Therapeutics, Alpharetta, GA, USAAbstract: Despite proven clinical utility, buprenorphine has not been used widely for the treatment of chronic pain. Questions about “ceiling effect” or bell-shaped curve observed for analgesia in preclinical studies and potential withdrawal issues on combining with marketed µ-agonists continue to hinder progress in expanding full potential of buprenorphine in the treatment of cancer and noncancer pain. Mounting evidence from clinical studies and conclusions drawn by a panel of experts strongly support superior safety and efficacy profile of buprenorphine vs marketed opioids. No ceiling on analgesic effect has been reported in clinical studies. The receptor pharmacology and pharmacokinetics profile of buprenorphine is complex but unique and contributes to its distinct safety and efficacy. The buprenorphine pharmacology also allows it to be combined with other µ-receptor opioids for additivity in efficacy. Transdermal delivery products of buprenorphine have been preferred choices for the management of pain but new delivery options are under investigation for the treatment of both opioid dependence and chronic pain.Keywords: buprenorphine, opioids, opioid dependence, partial agonist, hyperalgesia, neuropathic pain

  13. Distinct Roles of Opioid and Dopamine Systems in Lateral Hypothalamic Intracranial Self-Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Soichiro; Takahashi, Takehiro; Takamatsu, Yukio; Uhl, George R; Niki, Hiroaki; Sora, Ichiro; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2017-05-01

    Opioid and dopamine systems play crucial roles in reward. Similarities and differences in the neural mechanisms of reward that are mediated by these 2 systems have remained largely unknown. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the differences in reward function in both µ-opioid receptor knockout mice and dopamine transporter knockout mice, important molecules in the opioid and dopamine systems. Mice were implanted with electrodes into the right lateral hypothalamus (l hour). Mice were then trained to put their muzzle into the hole in the head-dipping chamber for intracranial electrical stimulation, and the influences of gene knockout were assessed. Significant differences are observed between opioid and dopamine systems in reward function. µ-Opioid receptor knockout mice exhibited enhanced intracranial electrical stimulation, which induced dopamine release. They also exhibited greater motility under conditions of "despair" in both the tail suspension test and water wheel test. In contrast, dopamine transporter knockout mice maintained intracranial electrical stimulation responding even when more active efforts were required to obtain the reward. The absence of µ-opioid receptor or dopamine transporter did not lead to the absence of intracranial electrical stimulation responsiveness but rather differentially altered it. The present results in µ-opioid receptor knockout mice are consistent with the suppressive involvement of µ-opioid receptors in both positive incentive motivation associated with intracranial electrical stimulation and negative incentive motivation associated with depressive states. In contrast, the results in dopamine transporter knockout mice are consistent with the involvement of dopamine transporters in positive incentive motivation, especially its persistence. Differences in intracranial electrical stimulation in µ-opioid receptor and dopamine transporter knockout mice underscore the multidimensional nature of reward. © The Author

  14. Nature's first "atypical opioids": Kratom and mitragynines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, R B; Pergolizzi, J V; Taylor, R; Ossipov, M H

    2018-03-08

    Advances in pain research have led to an understanding that many pains are driven by more than one underlying (patho)physiologic cause (ie, they are "multimechanistic") and that better pain relief is obtained with fewer adverse effects when an analgesic is correspondingly multimechanistic. At least two of the more-modern analgesics combine opioid and non-opioid mechanisms, and have become known as "atypical opioids." Less well known is that just as Nature evolved opioids, it also evolved atypical opioids, presaging modern drug discovery efforts. Traditional (typical) opioids are extracts or analogs of substances derived from the poppy plant. They produce their analgesic and adverse effects primarily through a single, opioid mechanism (albeit with individual differences). Two most recent analgesics were developed to have both an opioid mechanism and, a second, non-opioid mechanism of action (inhibition of monoamine neurotransmitter reuptake). Little known is that Nature had already evolved a plant source of compounds with the same properties. As debate about the use and abuse potential of kratom swirls, conflicting, often contradicting, opinions are expressed. A review of the basic pharmacology of kratom reveals the explanation for the bifurcation in viewpoints: kratom has both opioid and non-opioid properties. Fascinatingly, just as the poppy plant (Papaver) evolved the typical opioids, Mitragyna evolved the mitragynines-Nature's "atypical opioids." © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Reward, addiction, withdrawal to nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Biasi, Mariella; Dani, John A

    2011-01-01

    Nicotine is the principal addictive component that drives continued tobacco use despite users' knowledge of the harmful consequences. The initiation of addiction involves the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system, which contributes to the processing of rewarding sensory stimuli during the overall shaping of successful behaviors. Acting mainly through nicotinic receptors containing the α4 and β2 subunits, often in combination with the α6 subunit, nicotine increases the firing rate and the phasic bursts by midbrain dopamine neurons. Neuroadaptations arise during chronic exposure to nicotine, producing an altered brain condition that requires the continued presence of nicotine to be maintained. When nicotine is removed, a withdrawal syndrome develops. The expression of somatic withdrawal symptoms depends mainly on the α5, α2, and β4 (and likely α3) nicotinic subunits involving the epithalamic habenular complex and its targets. Thus, nicotine taps into diverse neural systems and an array of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes to influence reward, addiction, and withdrawal.

  16. Microinjection of Orexin-A into the Locus Coeruleus Area Induces Morphine Withdrawal Behaviors in Morphine Independent Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosin Azizi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Orexin neuropeptide has a role in opioid withdrawal behaviors. Orexin-expressing neurons that are present in the hypothalamic nuclei send dense projections to the Locus Coeruleus (LC. Withdrawal syndrome is temporally associated with hyperactivity of LC neurons. LC neurons do not show withdrawal-induced hyperactivity in brain slices from morphine-dependent rats. Thus, it has been suggested that the increase in LC neuronal activity seen in vivo is mediated by extrinsic factors. Therefore, this study was carried out to find whether LC microinjection of orexin-A can induce withdrawal behaviors. Method: Adult male Wistar rats were used in this study. Intra-LC microinjection of orexin-A or orexin-A vehicle was performed one week after LC cannulation. Thereafter, somatic signs of withdrawal were evaluated during a period of 25 min.Findings: Orexin-A induced several signs of morphine withdrawal. Conclusion: It may be concluded that orexin at LC acts as an extrinsic factor in the expression of morphine withdrawal syndrome.

  17. Intranasal buprenorphine alone and in combination with naloxone: Abuse liability and reinforcing efficacy in physically dependent opioid abusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sharon L; Nuzzo, Paul A; Babalonis, Shanna; Casselton, Victoria; Lofwall, Michelle R

    2016-05-01

    Buprenorphine can be abused by the intranasal route. This study sought to examine the relative abuse liability and reinforcing efficacy of intranasal buprenorphine compared to intranasal buprenorphine/naloxone in opioid-dependent individuals. Eleven healthy male and female volunteers physically dependent on short-acting opioids resided as inpatients during participation in this double blind, within subject, placebo-controlled study. Participants were maintained on oxycodone (30 mg/q.i.d., p.o.) throughout the 6-week study. Eight pairs of experimental sessions were conducted at ≥48 h intervals to examine the pharmacodynamic profile (Sample) and reinforcing efficacy (Self-administration the following day) of intranasal placebo, oxycodone (60 mg), buprenorphine (2, 8 & 16 mg) and buprenorphine/naloxone (2/0.5, 8/2 & 16/4 mg). Subjective, observer-rated and physiological measures were collected to assess the magnitude of opioid agonist and antagonist effects. A progressive ratio self-administration procedure assessed choices for drug versus money. All active doses produced opioid agonist-like effects (e.g., increased ratings of "liking," and miosis) compared to placebo. The effects of buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone were not reliably dose-dependent. Intranasal buprenorphine/naloxone elicited modest and transient opioid withdrawal-like effects in the first hour post-drug administration, while simultaneously blunting or blocking the early onset of agonist effects seen with buprenorphine alone. All active doses of buprenorphine were self-administered more than placebo, but buprenorphine/naloxone doses were not. These data confirm that intranasal buprenorphine/naloxone has deterrent properties related to transient withdrawal effects that likely decrease its desirability for misuse compared to buprenorphine in opioid-dependent individuals maintained on short-acting opioids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Alcohol Withdrawal Mimicking Organophosphate Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezihat Rana Disel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphates, which can cause occupational poisoning due to inappropriate personal protective measures, are widely used insecticides in agricultural regions of southern Turkey. Therefore, the classical clinical findings of this cholinergic poisoning are myosis, excessive secretions, bradicardia and fasciculations are easy to be recognized by local medical stuff. Diseases and conditions related to alcoholism such as mental and social impairments, coma, toxicity, withdrawal, and delirium are frequent causes of emergency visits of chronic alcoholic patients. Here we present a case diagnosed and treated as organophosphate poisoning although it was an alcohol withdrawal in the beginning and became delirium tremens, due to similar symptoms.

  19. A Comparison of Buprenorphine + Naloxone to Buprenorphine and Methadone in the Treatment of Opioid Dependence during Pregnancy: Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingunn O. Lund

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Given that buprenorphine + naloxone is prescribed for opioid-dependent pregnant women, it is important to examine the extent to which it differs from buprenorphine alone, methadone, or methadone-assisted withdrawal on neonatal and maternal outcomes. Summary statistics on maternal and neonatal outcomes were collected from 7 previously published studies examining treatment for opioid-dependent pregnant women that represented a range of research methodologies. Outcomes from these studies were compared to the same outcomes for 10 women treated with the combined buprenorphine + naloxone product. There were no significant differences in maternal outcomes for buprenorphine + naloxone compared to buprenorphine, methadone, or methadone-assisted withdrawal. Preliminary findings suggest no significant adverse maternal or neonatal outcomes related to the use of buprenorphine + naloxone for the treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy. However, further research should examine possible differences between buprenorphine + naloxone and buprenorphine alone or methadone in fetal physical development.

  20. Opioids: The Prescription Drug & Heroin Overdose Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About the Epidemic Help, Resources and Information National Opioids Crisis Search Search National Helpline SAMHSA’s National Helpline ... 1-800-662-4357 Visit Helpline Website THE OPIOID EPIDEMIC IN NUMBERS 80% Nearly 80% of heroin ...

  1. Is Kratom the New 'Legal High' on the Block?: The Case of an Emerging Opioid Receptor Agonist with Substance Abuse Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang-Chien, George C; Odonkor, Charles A; Amorapanth, Prin

    2017-01-01

    Kratom is an unscheduled opioid receptor agonist that comes in the form of dietary supplements currently being abused by chronic pain patients on prescription opioids. Active alkaloids isolated from kratom such as mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine are thought to act on mu- and delta-opioid receptors as well as alpha-2 adrenergic and 5-HT2A receptors. Animal studies suggest that kratom may be more potent than morphine. Consequently, kratom consumption produces analgesic and euphoric feelings among users. In particular, some chronic pain patients on opioids take kratom to counteract the effects of opioid withdrawal. Although the Food and Drug Administration has banned its use as a dietary supplement, kratom continues to be widely available and easily accessible on the Internet at much less expensive rates than some opioid replacement therapies like buprenorphine. There are no federal regulations monitoring the sale and distribution of this drug, yet kratom has been associated with severe signs and symptoms such as hallucinations, delusions, depressions, myalgias, chills, nausea/vomiting, respiratory hepatoxicity, seizures, coma, and death. A search of the pain literature shows past research has not described the use and potential deleterious effects of this drug. Many pain physicians are not familiar with kratom and as providers who take care of high-risk chronic pain patients using prescribed opioids, knowledge of current unregulated opioid receptor agonists with abuse potential is of paramount importance. The goal of this article is to introduce kratom to pain specialists and to spur a conversation on how pain physicians may take the lead to help curb the opioid abuse and overdose epidemic. Further studies may be required to help better understand the clinical and long-term effects of kratom use among chronic pain patients.Key words: Opioid receptor agonist, Kratom, Mitragynine, opioid overdose, chronic pain, substance abuse.

  2. "I Kicked the Hard Way. I Got Incarcerated." Withdrawal from Methadone During Incarceration and Subsequent Aversion to Medication Assisted Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maradiaga, Jeronimo A; Nahvi, Shadi; Cunningham, Chinazo O; Sanchez, Jennifer; Fox, Aaron D

    2016-03-01

    Incarceration is a common experience for individuals with opioid use disorder, including those receiving medication assisted treatments (MAT), such as buprenorphine or methadone. In the United States, MAT is rarely available during incarceration. We were interested in whether challenges with methadone maintenance treatment during incarceration affected subsequent attitudes toward MAT following release. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 21 formerly incarcerated individuals with opioid use disorder in community substance abuse treatment settings. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Themes that emerged upon iterative readings of transcripts were discussed by the research team. The three main themes relating to methadone were: 1) rapid dose reduction during incarceration; 2) discontinuity of methadone during incarceration; and 3) post incarceration aversion to methadone. Participants who received methadone maintenance treatment prior to incarceration reported severe and prolonged withdrawal symptoms from rapid dose reductions or disruption of their methadone treatment during incarceration. The severe withdrawal during incarceration contributed to a subsequent aversion to methadone and adversely affected future decisions regarding reengagement in MAT. Though MAT is the most efficacious treatment for opioid use disorder, current penal policy, which typically requires cessation of MAT during incarceration, may dissuade individuals with opioid use disorder from considering and engaging in MAT after release from incarceration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Water withdrawals in Florida, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marella, Richard L.

    2015-09-01

    In 2012, the total amount of water withdrawn in Florida was estimated to be 14,237 million gallons per day (Mgal/d). Saline water accounted for 7,855 Mgal/d (55 percent), and freshwater accounted for 6,383 Mgal/d (45 percent). Groundwater accounted for 4,167 Mgal/d (65 percent) of freshwater withdrawals, and surface water accounted for the remaining 2,216 Mgal/d (35 percent). Surface water accounted for nearly all (99.9 percent) saline-water withdrawals. Freshwater withdrawals were greatest in Palm Beach County (682 Mgal/d), and saline-water withdrawals were greatest in Pasco County (1,822 Mgal/d). Fresh groundwater provided drinking water (through either public supply or private domestic wells) for 17.699 million residents (93 percent of Florida’s population), and fresh surface water provided drinking water for 1.375 million residents (7 percent). The statewide public-supply gross per capita water use for 2012 was estimated at 136 gallons per day.

  4. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia in clinical anesthesia practice: what has remained from theoretical concepts and experimental studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Lena; Yeomans, David C; Tzabazis, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    This article reviews the phenomenon of opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) and its implications for clinical anesthesia. The goal of this review is to give an update on perioperative prevention and treatment strategies, based on findings in preclinical and clinical research. Several systems have been suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of OIH with a focus on the glutaminergic system. Very recently preclinical data revealed that peripheral μ-opioid receptors (MORs) are key players in the development of OIH and acute opioid tolerance (AOT). Peripheral MOR antagonists could, thus, become a new prevention/treatment option of OIH in the perioperative setting. Although the impact of OIH on postoperative pain seems to be moderate, recent evidence suggests that increased hyperalgesia following opioid treatment correlates with the risk of developing persistent pain after surgery. In clinical practice, distinction among OIH, AOT and acute opioid withdrawal remains difficult, especially because a specific quantitative sensory test to diagnose OIH has not been validated yet. Since the immediate postoperative period is not ideal to initiate long-term treatment for OIH, the best strategy is to prevent its occurrence. A multimodal approach, including choice of opioid, dose limitations and addition of nonopioid analgesics, is recommended.

  5. Molecular characterization of opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this research was to purify and characterize active opioid receptors and elucidate molecular aspects of opioid receptor heterogeneity. Purification to apparent homogeneity of an opioid binding protein from bovine caudate was achieved by solubilization in the non-ionic detergent, digitonin, followed by sequential chromatography on the opiate affinity matrix, ..beta..-naltrexylethylenediamine-CH-Sepharose 4B, and on the lectine affinity matrix, wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) followed by autoradiography revealed that radioiodinated purified receptor gave a single band. Purified receptor preparations showed a specific activity of 12,000-15,000 fmol of opiate bound per mg of protein. Radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/) was used as a probe to investigate the ligand binding subunits of mu and delta opioid receptors. /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ was shown to bind to a variety of opioid receptor-containing tissues with high affinity and specificity with preference for mu and delta sites, and with little, if any, binding to kappa sites. Affinity crosslinking techniques were employed to covalently link /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ to opioid receptors, utilizing derivatives of bis-succinimidyl esters that are bifunctional crosslinkers with specificities for amino and sulfhydryl groups. This, and competition experiments with high type-selective ligands, permitted the assignment of two labeled peptides to their receptor types, namely a peptide of M/sub r/ = 65,000 for mu receptors and one of M/sub r/ = 53,000 for delta receptors.

  6. Suppressed Belief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komarine Romdenh-Romluc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Moran’s revised conception of conscious belief requires us to reconceptualise suppressed belief. The work of Merleau-Ponty offers a way to do this. His account of motor-skills allows us to understand suppressed beliefs as pre-reflective ways of dealing with the world.

  7. 21 CFR 314.620 - Withdrawal procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Efficacy Studies Are Not Ethical or Feasible § 314.620 Withdrawal procedures. (a) Reasons to withdraw... diligence; (3) Use after marketing demonstrates that postmarketing restrictions are inadequate to ensure...

  8. Alterations of rat corticostriatal synaptic plasticity after chronic ethanol exposure and withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jian Xun; Li, Jing; Zhou, Rong; Zhang, Xiao Hu; Ge, Yin Bing; Ru Yuan, Xiao

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic ethanol exposure (CEE) and withdrawal on corticostriatal plasticity in rats. We established an animal model of alcoholism using the method of Turchan et al. (1999). A synaptic model of long-term memory (long-term depression, LTD) was used as an index and the striatum, which is related to habit learning, was selected as a target region in the present study. The effects of CEE and withdrawal on the LTD were studied in striatal slices of ethanol-dependent rats using the extracellular recording method. A stable LTD can be induced after high-frequency stimulation (HFS) in the slices of control rats. Chronic ethanol exposure and withdrawal suppressed the induction of corticostriatal LTD to different extents, with the strongest suppressive effects on LTD occurring in the slices of rats exposed to ethanol for 10 days and in those withdrawn from ethanol for 1 day. Notably, 3 days of withdrawal resulted in the shift of corticostriatal synaptic plasticity from LTD to long-term potentiation, and the peak latencies of the population spikes were obviously shortened compared with those of control rats. After 7 days of withdrawal, ethanol's effects tended to disappear. These results suggest that the alterations of corticostriatal synaptic plasticity produced by CEE and withdrawal may play a prominent role in alcohol abuse and alcoholism.

  9. Pharmacology of kratom: an emerging botanical agent with stimulant, analgesic and opioid-like effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prozialeck, Walter C; Jivan, Jateen K; Andurkar, Shridhar V

    2012-12-01

    Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a plant indigenous to Thailand and Southeast Asia. Kratom leaves produce complex stimulant and opioid-like analgesic effects. In Asia, kratom has been used to stave off fatigue and to manage pain, diarrhea, cough, and opioid withdrawal. Recently, kratom has become widely available in the United States and Europe by means of smoke shops and the Internet. Analyses of the medical literature and select Internet sites indicate that individuals in the United States are increasingly using kratom for the self-management of pain and opioid withdrawal. Kratom contains pharmacologically active constituents, most notably mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine. Kratom is illegal in many countries. Although it is still legal in the United States, the US Drug Enforcement Administration has placed kratom on its "Drugs and Chemicals of Concern" list. Physicians should be aware of the availability, user habits, and health effects of kratom. Further research on the therapeutic uses, toxic effects, and abuse potential of kratom and its constituent compounds are needed.

  10. Alterations in opioid parameters in the hypothalamus of rats with estradiol-induced polycystic ovarian disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desjardins, G.C.; Beaudet, A.; Brawer, J.R. (McGill Univ., Quebec (Canada))

    1990-12-01

    The distribution and density of selectively labeled mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid binding sites were examined by in vitro radioautography in the hypothalamus of normal, estradiol valerate (EV)-injected, and estradiol (E2)-implanted female rats. Hypothalamic beta-endorphin concentration was also examined by RIA in these three groups of animals. Quantitative analysis of film radioautographs demonstrated a selective increase in mu-opioid binding in the medial preoptic area of EV-treated, but not of E2-implanted rats. However, both these estrogenized groups exhibited a reduction in the density of delta-opioid binding in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Statistically significant changes between either estrogenized groups were not observed for kappa-opioid binding. Results on the hypothalamic concentration of beta-endorphin indicated a marked reduction in EV-injected animals with respect to controls. In contrast, the E2-implanted animals exhibited beta-endorphin concentrations similar to controls. The present results confirm the increase in opioid receptor binding previously reported in the hypothalamus of EV-treated rats and further demonstrate that this increase is confined to the medial preoptic area and exclusively concerns mu-opioid receptors. The concomitant reduction in beta-endorphin levels observed in the same group of animals suggests that the observed increase in mu-opioid binding could reflect a chronic up-regulation of the receptor in response to compromised beta-endorphin input. Given the restriction of this effect to the site of origin of LHRH neurons and the demonstrated inhibitory role of opioids on LHRH release, it is tempting to postulate that such up-regulation could lead to the suppression of the plasma LH pattern that characterizes polycystic ovarian disease in the EV-treated rat.

  11. Alterations in opioid parameters in the hypothalamus of rats with estradiol-induced polycystic ovarian disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desjardins, G.C.; Beaudet, A.; Brawer, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The distribution and density of selectively labeled mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid binding sites were examined by in vitro radioautography in the hypothalamus of normal, estradiol valerate (EV)-injected, and estradiol (E2)-implanted female rats. Hypothalamic beta-endorphin concentration was also examined by RIA in these three groups of animals. Quantitative analysis of film radioautographs demonstrated a selective increase in mu-opioid binding in the medial preoptic area of EV-treated, but not of E2-implanted rats. However, both these estrogenized groups exhibited a reduction in the density of delta-opioid binding in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Statistically significant changes between either estrogenized groups were not observed for kappa-opioid binding. Results on the hypothalamic concentration of beta-endorphin indicated a marked reduction in EV-injected animals with respect to controls. In contrast, the E2-implanted animals exhibited beta-endorphin concentrations similar to controls. The present results confirm the increase in opioid receptor binding previously reported in the hypothalamus of EV-treated rats and further demonstrate that this increase is confined to the medial preoptic area and exclusively concerns mu-opioid receptors. The concomitant reduction in beta-endorphin levels observed in the same group of animals suggests that the observed increase in mu-opioid binding could reflect a chronic up-regulation of the receptor in response to compromised beta-endorphin input. Given the restriction of this effect to the site of origin of LHRH neurons and the demonstrated inhibitory role of opioids on LHRH release, it is tempting to postulate that such up-regulation could lead to the suppression of the plasma LH pattern that characterizes polycystic ovarian disease in the EV-treated rat

  12. EFFECTS OF LEVOTHYROXINE ADMINSTRATION AND WITHDRAWAL ON THE HYPOTHALAMIC-PITUITARY-THYROID AXIS IN EUTHYROID DOGS

    OpenAIRE

    Ziglioli, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Because of the vague clinical signs and limitations of thyroid function tests, misdiagnosis of hypothyroidism in dogs is common and leads to inappropriate treatment with levothyroxine. Chronic supplementation can suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis (HPTA) and make it difficult to assess thyroid function following withdrawal of levothyroxine. Objectives: To determine if the HPTA is suppressed following levothyroxine administration in euthyroid dogs and the time req...

  13. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: opioids and the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Jennifer A; Opper, Susan E; Agarwal, Sonali; Fibuch, Eugene E

    2012-01-01

    Opioids are among the oldest known and most widely used analgesics. The application of opioids has expanded over the last few decades, especially in the treatment of chronic non-malignant pain. This upsurge in opioid use has been accompanied by the increasingly recognized occurrence of opioid-associated endocrinopathy. This may arise after exposure to enteral, parenteral, or neuraxial opioids. Opioid-associated endocrinopathy consists primarily of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis or hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction and may manifest with symptoms of hypogonadism, adrenal dysfunction, and other hormonal disturbances. Additionally, opioid related endocrine dysfunction may be coupled with such disorders as osteoporosis and mood disturbances including depression. Undesirable changes in pain sensitivity such as opioid-induced hyperalgesia, and reduced potency of opioid analgesia may also be potential consequences of chronic opioid consumption. Few studies to date have been able to establish what degree of opioid exposure, in terms of dose or duration of therapy, may predispose patients to opioid-associated endocrinopathy. This article will review the currently available literature concerning opioid-associated endocrinopathy and will provide recommendations for the evaluation, monitoring, and management of opioid-associated endocrinopathy and its other accompanying undesired effects.

  14. Feed withdrawal and transportation effects on Salmonella enterica levels in market-weight pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, S D; Rostagno, M H; Lay, D C

    2017-07-01

    Feed withdrawal and transport commonly occur together in pigs. Objectives of this study were to determine if these preslaughter stressors, feed withdrawal and transportation, affect the levels of , stress hormone concentrations, and immune functions in infected market pigs. A 2 × 2 factorial analysis of a randomized complete block design with feed withdrawal and transport as fixed effects was used. Sixty market-weight pigs were individually inoculated with serovar Typhimurium. The experiment was replicated 3 times (blocking factor) with 20 pigs per replicate. Three days after inoculation, the pigs were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments (5 pigs per treatment in each/replicate), including 1) control (Control; or no stress), 2) feed withdrawal for 12 h (FW), 3) transportation for 2 h (T), and 4) feed withdrawal for 12 h followed by transportation for 2 h (FWT). Feed withdrawal by itself or followed by transportation caused an increase of levels in ileal contents ( 0.10). Cortisol increased in pigs from all 3 stress treatments ( 0.03). Each granulocyte percentage (neutrophil, eosinophils, and basophils) increased ( 0.05) by feed withdrawal with transport. Lymphocytes were suppressed ( market pigs and, consequently, to an increased food safety risk.

  15. Feeding Releases Endogenous Opioids in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuulari, Jetro J; Tuominen, Lauri; de Boer, Femke E; Hirvonen, Jussi; Helin, Semi; Nuutila, Pirjo; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2017-08-23

    The endogenous opioid system supports a multitude of functions related to appetitive behavior in humans and animals, and it has been proposed to govern hedonic aspects of feeding thus contributing to the development of obesity. Here we used positron emission tomography to investigate whether feeding results in hedonia-dependent endogenous opioid release in humans. Ten healthy males were recruited for the study. They were scanned with the μ-opioid-specific ligand [ 11 C]carfentanil three times, as follows: after a palatable meal, a nonpalatable meal, and after an overnight fast. Subjective mood, satiety, and circulating hormone levels were measured. Feeding induced significant endogenous opioid release throughout the brain. This response was more pronounced following a nonpalatable meal versus a palatable meal, and independent of the subjective hedonic responses to feeding. We conclude that feeding consistently triggers cerebral opioid release even in the absence of subjective pleasure associated with feeding, suggesting that metabolic and homeostatic rather than exclusively hedonic responses play a role in the feeding-triggered cerebral opioid release. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The endogenous opioid system supports both hedonic and homeostatic functions. It has been proposed that overeating and concomitant opioid release could downregulate opioid receptors and promote the development of obesity. However, it remains unresolved whether feeding leads to endogenous opioid release in humans. We used in vivo positron emission tomography to test whether feeding triggers cerebral opioid release and whether this response is associated with pleasurable sensations. We scanned volunteers using the μ-opioid receptor-specific radioligand [ 11 C]carfentanil three times, as follows: after an overnight fast, after consuming a palatable meal, and after consuming a nonpalatable meal. Feeding led to significant endogenous opioid release, and this occurred also in the absence of feeding

  16. Oxycodone combined with opioid receptor antagonists: efficacy and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mellar; Goforth, Harold W; Gamier, Pam

    2013-05-01

    A mu receptor antagonist combined with oxycodone (OXY) may improve pain control, reduce physical tolerance and withdrawal, minimizing opioid-related bowel dysfunction and act as an abuse deterrent. The authors cover the use of OXY plus ultra-low-dose naltrexone for analgesia and the use of sustained-release OXY plus sustained-release naloxone to reduce the opioid bowel syndrome. The authors briefly describe the use of sustained-release OXY and naltrexone pellets as a drug abuse deterrent formulation. Combinations of ultra-low-dose naltrexone plus OXY have been in separate trials involved in patients with chronic pain from osteoarthritis and idiopathic low back pain. High attrition and marginal differences between ultra-low-dose naltrexone plus OXY and OXY led to discontinuation of development. Prolonged-release (PR) naloxone combined with PR OXY demonstrates a consistent reduction in opioid-related bowel dysfunction in multiple randomized controlled trials. However, gastrointestinal side effects, including diarrhea, were increased in several trials with the combination compared with PR OXY alone. Analgesia appeared to be maintained although non-inferiority to PR OXY is not formally established. There were flaws to trial design and safety monitoring. Naltrexone has been combined with OXY in individual pellets encased in a capsule. This combination has been reported in a Phase II trial and is presently undergoing Phase III studies. Due to the lack of efficacy the combination of altered low-dose naltrexone with oxycodone should cease in development. The combination of sustained release oxycodone plus naloxone reduces constipation with a consistent benefit. Safety has been suboptimally evaluated which is a concern. Although the drug is commercially available in several countries, ongoing safety monitoring particularly high doses would be important.

  17. Differentiating Delirium From Sedative/Hypnotic-Related Iatrogenic Withdrawal Syndrome: Lack of Specificity in Pediatric Critical Care Assessment Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Kate; Burns, Michele M; Tasker, Robert C

    2017-06-01

    To identify available assessment tools for sedative/hypnotic iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome and delirium in PICU patients, the evidence supporting their use, and describe areas of overlap between the components of these tools and the symptoms of anticholinergic burden in children. Studies were identified using PubMed and EMBASE from the earliest available date until July 3, 2016, using a combination of MeSH terms "delirium," "substance withdrawal syndrome," and key words "opioids," "benzodiazepines," "critical illness," "ICU," and "intensive care." Review article references were also searched. Human studies reporting assessment of delirium or iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome in children 0-18 years undergoing critical care. Non-English language, exclusively adult, and neonatal intensive care studies were excluded. References cataloged by study type, population, and screening process. Iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome and delirium are both prevalent in the PICU population. Commonly used scales for delirium and iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome assess signs and symptoms in the motor, behavior, and state domains, and exhibit considerable overlap. In addition, signs and symptoms of an anticholinergic toxidrome (a risk associated with some common PICU medications) overlap with components of these scales, specifically in motor, cardiovascular, and psychiatric domains. Although important studies have demonstrated apparent high prevalence of iatrogenic withdrawal syndrome and delirium in the PICU population, the overlap in these scoring systems presents potential difficulty in distinguishing syndromes, both clinically and for research purposes.

  18. Buprenorphine-Mediated Transition from Opioid Agonist to Antagonist Treatment: State of the Art and New Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannelli, Paolo; Peindl, Kathleen S.; Lee, Tong; Bhatia, Kamal S.; Wu, Li-Tzy

    2012-01-01

    Constant refinement of opioid dependence (OD) therapies is a condition to promote treatment access and delivery. Among other applications, the partial opioid agonist buprenorphine has been studied to improve evidence-based interventions for the transfer of patients from opioid agonist to antagonist medications. This paper summarizes PubMed-searched clinical investigations and conference papers on the transition from methadone maintenance to buprenorphine and from buprenorphine to naltrexone, discussing challenges and advances. The majority of the 26 studies we examined were uncontrolled investigations. Many small clinical trials have demonstrated the feasibility of in- or outpatient transfer to buprenorphine from low to moderate methadone doses (up to 60–70 mg). Results on the conversion from higher methadone doses, on the other hand, indicate significant withdrawal discomfort, and need for ancillary medications and inpatient treatment. Tapering high methadone doses before the transfer to buprenorphine is not without discomfort and the risk of relapse. The transition buprenorphine-naltrexone has been explored in several pilot studies, and a number of treatment methods to reduce withdrawal intensity warrant further investigation, including the co-administration of buprenorphine and naltrexone. Outpatient transfer protocols using buprenorphine, and direct comparisons with other modalities of transitioning from opioid agonist to antagonist medications are limited. Given its potential salience, the information gathered should be used in larger clinical trials on short and long-term outcomes of opioid agonist-antagonist transition treatments. Future studies should also test new pharmacological mechanisms to help reduce physical dependence, and identify individualized approaches, including the use of pharmacogenetics and long-acting opioid agonist and antagonist formulations. PMID:22280332

  19. Patients at Risk: Preoperative Opioid Use Affects Opioid Prescribing, Refills, and Outcomes After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Nicholas M; Parry, Joshua A; Mabry, Tad M; Taunton, Michael J

    2018-01-16

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of preoperative opioid use on opioid prescriptions, refills, and clinical outcomes after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A retrospective review identified 53 patients on preoperative opioids who were matched 1:2 to 106 opioid-naive patients undergoing primary TKA with at least 2-year follow-up. Opioid refills, Knee Society Score (preoperative and follow-up), morphine equivalent dose (MED) prescribed, and persistent opioid use were compared between groups. The average total MED prescribed at discharge was 1248 mg, ranging from 0 to 5600 mg. The average daily MED used before discharge was greater in the preoperative opioid group compared to the opioid-naive group (90 ± 75 mg vs 54 ± 42 mg; P = .001). The preoperative opioid group and opioid-naive group differed in terms of refills (1.3 ± 1.6 vs 0.4 ± 0.6; P = .0001), persistent opioid use (21 [39%] vs 5 [4%], P = .0001), postoperative KSS (85 ± 11 vs 90 ± 13; P = .01), and manipulations under anesthesia (4 [8%] vs 1 [1%], P = .03). Preoperative tramadol users had the same risk of refills, persistent opioid use, reduced KSS, and manipulation under anesthesia as those taking other opioids. Preoperative opioid users were discharged with less opioids, required more refills, were more likely to remain on opioids, and required more manipulations under anesthesia than opioid-naive patients. These risks extended to preoperative tramadol users. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Using behavioral economics to predict opioid use during prescription opioid dependence treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Matthew J; Shoptaw, Steven J; Bickel, Warren K; Ling, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Research grounded in behavioral economics has previously linked addictive behavior to disrupted decision-making and reward-processing, but these principles have not been examined in prescription opioid addiction, which is currently a major public health problem. This study examined whether pre-treatment drug reinforcement value predicted opioid use during outpatient treatment of prescription opioid addiction. Secondary analyses examined participants with prescription opioid dependence who received 12 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone and counseling in a multi-site clinical trial (N=353). Baseline measures assessed opioid source and indices of drug reinforcement value, including the total amount and proportion of income spent on drugs. Weekly urine drug screens measured opioid use. Obtaining opioids from doctors was associated with lower pre-treatment drug spending, while obtaining opioids from dealers/patients was associated with greater spending. Controlling for demographics, opioid use history, and opioid source frequency, patients who spent a greater total amount (OR=1.30, peconomic resources to drugs, reflects propensity for continued opioid use during treatment among individuals with prescription opioid addiction. Future studies should examine disrupted decision-making and reward-processing in prescription opioid users more directly and test whether reinforcer pathology can be remediated in this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of Opioid Analgesics in Older Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veal, Felicity C; Bereznicki, Luke R E; Thompson, Angus J; Peterson, Gregory M

    2015-08-01

    To identify potential medication management issues associated with opioid use in older Australians. Retrospective cross-sectional review of the utilization of analgesics in 19,581 people who underwent a medication review in Australia between 2010 and 2012. Australian residents living in the community deemed at risk for adverse medication outcomes or any resident living fulltime in an aged care facility. Patient characteristics in those taking regularly dosed opioids and not and those taking opioid doses >120 mg and ≤120 mg MEQ/day were compared. Multivariable binary logistic regression was used to analyze the association between regular opioid and high dose opioid usage and key variables. Additionally, medication management issues associated with opioids were identified. Opioids were taken by 31.8% of patients, with 22.1% taking them regularly. Several major medication management issues were identified. There was suboptimal use of multimodal analgesia, particularly a low use of non-opioid analgesics, in patients taking regular opioids. There was extensive use (45%) of concurrent anxiolytics/hypnotics among those taking regular opioid analgesics. Laxative use in those prescribed opioids regularly was low (60%). Additionally, almost 12% of patients were taking doses of opioid that exceeded Australian recommendations. A significant evidence to practice gap exists regarding the use of opioids amongst older Australians. These findings highlight the need for a quick reference guide to support prescribers in making appropriate decisions regarding pain management in older patients with persistent pain. This should also be combined with patient and caregiver education about the importance of regular acetaminophen to manage persistent pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A Clinical Study on Administration of Opioid Antagonists in Terminal Cancer Patients: 7 Patients Receiving Opioid Antagonists Following Opioids among 2443 Terminal Cancer Patients Receiving Opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uekuzu, Yoshihiro; Higashiguchi, Takashi; Futamura, Akihiko; Ito, Akihiro; Mori, Naoharu; Murai, Miyo; Ohara, Hiroshi; Awa, Hiroko; Chihara, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    There have been few detailed reports on respiratory depression due to overdoses of opioids in terminal cancer patients. We investigated the situation of treatment with opioid antagonists for respiratory depression that occurred after administration of opioid at optimal doses in terminal cancer patients, to clarify pathological changes as well as causative factors. In 2443 terminal cancer patients receiving opioids, 7 patients (0.3%) received opioid antagonists: 6, morphine (hydrochloride, 5; sulfate, 1); 1, oxycodone. The median dosage of opioids was 13.3 mg/d, as converted to morphine injection. Respiratory depression occurred on this daily dose in 4 patients and after changed dose and route in 3 patients. Opioids were given through the vein in 6 patients and by the enteral route in 1 patient. Concomitant drugs included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in 3 patients and zoledronic acid in 2 patients. In morphine-receiving patients, renal functions were significantly worsened at the time of administration of an opioid antagonist than the day before the start of opioid administration. These findings indicate that the proper use of opioids was safe and acceptable in almost all terminal cancer patients. In rare cases, however, a risk toward respiratory depression onset is indicated because morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide become relatively excessive owing to systemic debility due to disease progression, especially respiratory and renal dysfunctions. At the onset of respiratory depression, appropriate administration of an opioid antagonist mitigated the symptoms. Thereafter, opioid switching or continuous administration at reduced dosages of the same opioids prevented the occurrence of serious adverse events.

  3. Micro1-opioid antagonist naloxonazine alters ethanol discrimination and consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhatre, Molina; Holloway, Frank

    2003-02-01

    The endogenous opioid system is implicated in excessive ethanol-drinking behavior. However, the role of individual opioid receptor subtypes in the mechanism underlying excessive ethanol-drinking behavior is not yet well understood. Therefore, we investigated the ability of a selective micro1-opioid antagonist, naloxonazine, to modulate ethanol-drinking behavior and ethanol discrimination in a rat model with the use of ethanol self-administration and drug discrimination paradigms. The effects of naloxonazine (0.001-10 mg/kg) on ethanol intake were examined in Sprague-Dawley rats under conditions of limited access to 10% (wt./vol.) ethanol and ad libitum access to food and water. Pretreatment with high doses of naloxonazine (1-10 mg/kg) significantly reduced ethanol consumption. When the effects of naloxonazine on food intake in free-feeding male rats were examined, naloxonazine (1.8-10 mg/kg) significantly suppressed 24-h food intake. Another group of rats was trained to discriminate ethanol (1.25 g/kg, i.p.) from saline on a fixed-ratio schedule (FR 10), and ethanol dose-response tests were conducted once rats had acquired ethanol-saline discrimination. Injections were given 15 min before ethanol dose-response tests were conducted, and after characterization of the ethanol dose-response curve, the effects of naloxonazine on ethanol discrimination were assessed by administering naloxonazine (0.001-10 mg/kg, i.p.) 15 min before ethanol administration. Treatment with naloxonazine (0.001-1.8 mg/kg, i.p.) before the ED(100) dose of ethanol partially antagonized the discriminative stimulus of ethanol without having any effect on the response rate. The results support the suggestion of involvement of micro1-opioid receptors in the discriminative effects of ethanol and ethanol-drinking behavior.

  4. Spontaneous withdrawal in intermittent morphine administration in rats and mice: effect of clonidine coadministration and sex-related differences

    OpenAIRE

    ALLAHVERDİYEV, ORUC; TÜRKMEN, ASLI ZENGİN; NURTEN, ASİYE; ŞEHİRLİ, İCLAL; ENGİNAR, NURHAN

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim: Treating animals repeatedly with intermittent and increasing morphine doses has been suggested to allow some withdrawal during each dosing interval, which causes repeated stress. The present study aimed to test this hypothesis and assess sex-related differences in withdrawal signs and their suppression by clonidine. Materials and methods: Male and female rats and mice were administered with increasing doses of morphine twice daily at different dosing intervals. Rats were give...

  5. Prevalence of prescription opioid use disorder among chronic opioid therapy patients after health plan opioid dose and risk reduction initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Korff, Michael; Walker, Rod L; Saunders, Kathleen; Shortreed, Susan M; Thakral, Manu; Parchman, Michael; Hansen, Ryan N; Ludman, Evette; Sherman, Karen J; Dublin, Sascha

    2017-08-01

    No studies have assessed the comparative effectiveness of guideline-recommended interventions to reduce risk of prescription opioid use disorder among chronic opioid therapy (COT) patients. We compared the prevalence of prescription opioid use disorder among COT patients from intervention clinics that had implemented opioid dose and risk reduction initiatives for more than 4 years relative to control clinics that had not. After a healthcare system in Washington State implemented interventions to reduce opioid dose and risks, we surveyed 1588 adult primary care COT patients to compare the prevalence of prescription opioid use disorder among COT patients from the intervention and control clinics. Intervention clinics managed COT patients at lower COT doses and with more consistent use of risk reduction practices. Control clinics cared for similar COT patients but prescribed higher opioid doses and used COT risk reduction practices inconsistently. Prescription opioid use disorder was assessed with the Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders. The prevalence of prescription opioid use disorder was 21.5% (95% CI=18.9% to 24.4%) among COT patients in the intervention clinics and 23.9% (95% CI=20.5% to 27.6%) among COT patients in the control clinics. The adjusted relative risk of prescription opioid use disorder was 1.08 (95% CI=0.89, 1.32) among the control clinic patients relative to the intervention clinic patients. Long-term implementation of opioid dose and risk reduction initiatives was not associated with lower rates of prescription opioid use disorder among prevalent COT patients. Extreme caution should be exercised by clinicians considering COT for patients with chronic non-cancer pain until benefits of this treatment and attendant risks are clarified. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Examining the factor structure of the Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale: A secondary data analysis from the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) 0003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; McPherson, Sterling; Mamey, Mary Rose; Burns, G Leonard; Layton, Matthew E; Roll, John; Ling, Walter

    2015-07-01

    The Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS) is used to assess withdrawal in clinical trials and practice. The aims of this study were to examine the inter-item correlations and factor structure of the COWS in opioid-dependent men and women. This is a secondary data analysis of the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network 0003, a randomized clinical trial that compared buprenorphine/naloxone tapering strategies. The trial included 11 sites in 10 US cities. Participants were opioid-dependent individuals (n=516) that had data on the COWS. The COWS at study baseline was analyzed in this study. Inter-item correlations showed weak to moderate relationships among the items. A 1-factor model did not fit the data for men (comparative fit index (CFI)=.801, root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA)=.073, weighted root mean square residual (WRMR)=1.132) or women (CFI=.694, RMSEA=.071, WRMR=.933), where resting pulse rate was not related to withdrawal for men, and yawning and gooseflesh skin was not related to withdrawal for women. A reduced model comprised of only the 8 items that were significantly related to the construct of withdrawal in both men and women, and an exploratory 2-factor model, were also assessed but not retained due to inconsistencies across gender. When traditional psychometric models are applied to the COWS, it appears that the scale may not relate to a single underlying construct of withdrawal. Further research testing the hypothesized factor structure in other opioid-dependent samples is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Opioid Addiction in Pregnancy: Does Depression Negatively Impact Adherence With Prenatal Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Lauren; Sulo, Suela; Kozmic, Sarah; Parilla, Barbara V

    We aimed to evaluate whether depression in pregnancy in women with opioid dependency negatively impacts adherence with prenatal care. This was a retrospective chart analysis of opioid-dependent pregnant women over a 6-year period at 2 large referral and tertiary care centers. The primary outcome was adherence with prenatal care based on the concurrent diagnosis of depression. Adherence was assessed by looking at the number of observed versus expected prenatal visits. Secondary outcomes included neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) stay, and incidence and severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). A total of 74 patient charts were reviewed. 45/74 (60.8%) of the opioid-dependent pregnant patients were either diagnosed with depression (n = 41), anxiety (n = 2), or scored >10 on the Edinburgh Prenatal Depression Scale (n = 1). Patients with a diagnosis of depression were significantly less adherent with prenatal care; 80% adherent (73% vs 93%; P = 0.03), 90% adherent (62% vs 93%; P = 0.003). A higher number of patients in the depression group had an infant treated for withdrawal (62% vs 38%; P = 0.041), and had longer NICU stays (27% vs 21%; P = 0.018). Analysis of the whole cohort of opioid dependent gravidas revealed Buprenorphine maintenance therapy had the lowest mean NAS score 6.5 ± 4.4, compared with methadone maintenance 10.6 ± 3.6, and no maintenance therapy 9.4 ± 4.0 (P = 0.008). Depression negatively impacts adherence with prenatal care and was significantly associated with a higher incidence of neonatal withdrawal and longer NICU stays. Buprenorphine therapy had the lowest incidence and severity of NAS when compared with methadone and no maintenance therapy.

  8. Control device for the withdrawal of control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masaki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To significantly suppress the maximum value of the control-rod worth upon control rod withdrawal. Constitution: At first, a signal for designating the first class is sent from a class-control section to the group-control section. In the group-control section, the peripheral group among the first class is designated by which the withdrawal of the control rods other than the peripheral group is inhibited and the control-rods in the peripheral group are withdrawn one by one. When all of them have been withdrawn, the group-control section designates the central group of the first class. All the control rods of the central group have been withdrawn, then the group-control section designates the peripheral group of the second class. Thereafter, the central group in the second class is designated. The control rods are thus withdrawn in the same manner hereinafter. The maximum value for the control-rod worth can be decreased by such a withdrawing sequence for the control rods. (Horiuchi, T.)

  9. Opioid research in amphibians: an alternative pain model yielding insights on the evolution of opioid receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2011-01-01

    This review summarizes the work from our laboratory investigating mechanisms of opioid analgesia using the Northern grass frog, Rana pipiens. Over the last dozen years, we have accumulated data on the characterization of behavioral effects after opioid administration on radioligand binding by using opioid agonist and antagonist ligands in amphibian brain and spinal cord homogenates, and by cloning and sequencing opioid-like receptor cDNA from amphibian central nervous system (CNS) tissues. The relative analgesic potency of mu, delta, and kappa opioids is highly correlated between frogs and other mammals, including humans. Radioligand binding studies using selective opioid agonists show a similar selectivity profile in amphibians and mammals. In contrast, opioid antagonists that are highly selective for mammalian mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors were not selective in behavioral and binding studies in amphibians. Three opioid-like receptor cDNAs were cloned and sequenced from amphibian brain tissues and are orthologs to mammalian mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors. Bioinformatics analysis of the three types of opioid receptor cDNAs from all vertebrate species with full datasets gave a pattern of the molecular evolution of opioid receptors marked by the divergence of mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptor sequences during vertebrate evolution. This divergence in receptor amino acid sequence in later-evolved vertebrates underlies the hypothesis that opioid receptors are more type-selective in mammals than in nonmammalian vertebrates. The apparent order of receptor type evolution is kappa, then delta, and, most recently, the mu opioid receptor. Finally, novel bioinformatics analyses suggest that conserved extracellular receptor domains determine the type selectivity of vertebrate opioid receptors. PMID:15464208

  10. Opioid-Induced Esophageal Dysfunction (OIED) in Patients on Chronic Opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratuapli, Shiva K; Crowell, Michael D; DiBaise, John K; Vela, Marcelo F; Ramirez, Francisco C; Burdick, George E; Lacy, Brian E; Murray, Joseph A

    2015-07-01

    Bowel dysfunction has been recognized as a predominant side effect of opioid use. Even though the effects of opioids on the stomach and small and large intestines have been well studied, there are limited data on opioid effects on esophageal function. The aim of this study was to compare esophageal pressure topography (EPT) of patients taking opioids at the time of the EPT (≤24 h) with chronic opioid users who were studied off opioid medications for at least 24 h using the Chicago classification v3.0. A retrospective review identified 121 chronic opioid users who completed EPT between March 2010 and August 2012. Demographic and manometric data were compared between the two groups using general linear models or χ(2). Of the 121 chronic opioid users, 66 were studied on opioid medications (≤24 h) and 55 were studied off opioid medications for at least 24 h. Esophagogastric junction (EGJ) outflow obstruction was significantly more prevalent in patients using opioids within 24 h compared with those who did not (27% vs. 7%, P=0.004). Mean 4 s integrated relaxation pressure was also significantly higher in patients studied on opioids (10.71 vs. 6.6 mm Hg, P=0.025). Resting lower esophageal sphincter pressures tended to be higher on opioids (31.61 vs. 26.98 mm Hg, P=0.25). Distal latency was significantly lower in patients studied on opioids (6.15 vs. 6.74 s, P=0.044). Opioid use within 24 h of EPT is associated with more frequent EGJ outflow obstruction and spastic peristalsis compared with when opioid use is stopped for at least 24 h before the study.

  11. Non-analgesic effects of opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Kurita, Geana Paula; Kendall, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Opioids constitute the basis for pharmacological treatment of moderate to severe pain in cancer pain and non-cancer pain patients. Their action is mediated by the activation of opioid receptors, which integrates the pain modulation system with other effects in the central nervous system including...... cognition resulting in complex interactions between pain, opioids and cognition. The literature on this complexity is sparse and information regarding the cognitive effects of opioids in chronic pain patients is substantially lacking. Two previous systematic reviews on cancer pain and non-cancer pain...... patients only using controlled studies were updated. Fourteen controlled studies on the cognitive effects of opioids in chronic non-cancer pain patients and eleven controlled studies in cancer pain patients were included and analyzed. Opioid treatment involved slightly opposite outcomes in the two patient...

  12. Opioid Addiction: Social Problems Associated and Implications of Both Current and Possible Future Treatments, including Polymeric Therapeutics for Giving Up the Habit of Opioid Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cristina Benéitez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Detoxification programmes seek to implement the most secure and compassionate ways of withdrawing from opiates so that the inevitable withdrawal symptoms and other complications are minimized. Once detoxification has been achieved, the next stage is to enable the patient to overcome his or her drug addiction by ensuring consumption is permanently and completely abandoned, only after which can the subject be regarded as fully recovered. Methods. A systematic search on the common databases of relevant papers published until 2016 inclusive. Results and Conclusion. Our study of the available oral treatments for opioid dependence has revealed that no current treatment can actually claim to be fully effective. These treatments require daily oral administration and, consequently, regular visits to dispensaries, which in most cases results in a lack of patient compliance, which causes fluctuations in drug plasma levels. We then reviewed alternative treatments in the available scientific literature on polymeric sustained release formulations. Research has been done not only on release systems for detoxification but also on release systems for giving up the habit of taking opioids. These efforts have obtained the recent authorization of polymeric systems for use in patients that could help them to reduce their craving for drugs.

  13. Randomized Phase III and Extension Studies of Naldemedine in Patients With Opioid-Induced Constipation and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakami, Nobuyuki; Harada, Toshiyuki; Murata, Toru; Shinozaki, Katsunori; Tsutsumi, Masakazu; Yokota, Takaaki; Arai, Masatsugu; Tada, Yukio; Narabayashi, Masaru; Boku, Narikazu

    2017-12-01

    Purpose Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is a frequent and debilitating adverse effect (AE) of opioids-common analgesics for cancer pain. We investigated the efficacy and safety of a peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonist, naldemedine (S-297995), for OIC, specifically in patients with cancer. Patients and Methods This phase III trial consisted of a 2-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (COMPOSE-4) and an open-label, 12-week extension study (COMPOSE-5). In COMPOSE-4, eligible adults with OIC and cancer were randomly assigned on a 1:1 basis to receive once-daily oral naldemedine 0.2 mg or placebo. The primary end point was the proportion of spontaneous bowel movement (SBM) responders (≥ 3 SBMs/week and an increase of ≥ 1 SBM/week from baseline). The primary end point of COMPOSE-5 was safety. Results In COMPOSE-4, 193 eligible patients were randomly assigned to naldemedine (n = 97) or placebo (n = 96). The proportion of SBM responders in COMPOSE-4 was significantly greater with naldemedine than with placebo (71.1% [69 of 97 patients] v 34.4% [33 of 96 patients]; P opioid withdrawal and had no notable impact on opioid-mediated analgesia. Conclusion Once-daily oral naldemedine 0.2 mg effectively treated OIC and was generally well tolerated in patients with OIC and cancer.

  14. Opioid Therapy for Chronic Nonmalignant Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell K Portenoy

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Long term administration of an opioid drug for chronic nonmalignant pain continues to be controversial, but is no longer uniformly rejected by pain specialists. This is true despite concerns that the regulatory agencies that oversee physician prescribing of opioid drugs continue to stigmatize the practice. The changing clinical perspective has been driven, in part, by widespread acknowledgement of the remarkably favourable outcomes achieved during opioid treatment of cancer pain. These outcomes contrast starkly with popular teaching about chronic opioid therapy and affirm the potential for prolonged efficacy, tolerable side effects, enhanced function associated with improved comfort and minimal risk of aberrant drug-related behaviours consistent with addiction. A large anecdotal experience in populations with nonmalignant pain suggests that these patients are more heterogeneous and that opioid therapy will greatly benefit some and will contribute to negative outcomes for others. The few controlled clinical trials that have been performed support the safety and efficacy of opioid therapy, but have been too limited to ensure generalization to the clinical setting. A critical review of the medical literature pertaining to chronic pain, opioid pharmacology and addiction medicine can clarify misconceptions about opioid therapy and provide a foundation for patient selection and drug administration. The available data support the view that opioids are no panacea for chronic pain, but should be considered in carefully selected patients using clinically derived guidelines that stress a structured approach and ongoing monitoring of efficacy, adverse effects, functional outcomes and the occurrence of aberrant drug-related behaviours.

  15. America's Opioid Epidemic: Supply and Demand Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David J; Schumacher, Mark A

    2017-11-01

    America is in the midst of an opioid epidemic characterized by aggressive prescribing practices, highly prevalent opioid misuse, and rising rates of prescription and illicit opioid overdose-related deaths. Medical and lay public sentiment have become more cautious with respect to prescription opioid use in the past few years, but a comprehensive strategy to reduce our reliance on prescription opioids is lacking. Addressing this epidemic through reductions in unnecessary access to these drugs while implementing measures to reduce demand will be important components of any comprehensive solution. Key supply-side measures include avoiding overprescribing, reducing diversion, and discouraging misuse through changes in drug formulations. Important demand-side measures center around educating patients and clinicians regarding the pitfalls of opioid overuse and methods to avoid unnecessary exposure to these drugs. Anesthesiologists, by virtue of their expertise in the use of these drugs and their position in guiding opioid use around the time of surgery, have important roles to play in reducing patient exposure to opioids and providing education about appropriate use. Aside from the many immediate steps that can be taken, clinical and basic research directed at understanding the interaction between pain and opioid misuse is critical to identifying the optimal use of these powerful pain relievers in clinical practice.

  16. Buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothby, Lisa A; Doering, Paul L

    2007-02-01

    The clinical issues surrounding the use of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid dependence are reviewed. Opioids continue to be some of the most frequently reported prescription medications in substance abuse- related cases. A semisynthetic derivative of thebaine, buprenorphine hydrochloride is a partial mu-opioid receptor agonist and kappa-receptor antagonist with a long duration of action. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of buprenorphine are not well characterized. The ethical and legal issues associated with the maintenance treatment of opioid dependence are complex. Clinical trials have compared the efficacy of methadone, buprenorphine, and buprenorphine-naloxone for the detoxification and maintenance treatment of opioid dependence. Based on the available literature, it appears that buprenorphine, buprenorphine-naloxone, and methadone are similarly efficacious for the treatment of opioid-dependent patients. Buprenorphine-naloxone has less potential for abuse and diversion. The adverse-effect profiles for buprenorphine, buprenorphine-naloxone, and methadone are similar. Once-weekly office visits for patient evaluation and dispensing of buprenorphine seem feasible and convenient for both practitioners and patients. The three phases of opioid maintenance treatment are induction, stabilization, and maintenance. It is good practice for the admitting physician to consult with the patient's addiction treatment provider, when possible, to obtain the patient's treatment history. Buprenorphine is an attractive option for the pharmacologic treatment of opioid dependence. Compliance and adherence to buprenorphine therapy for opioid-dependent patients remain clinical issues. Future research efforts should focus on improving compliance and adherence to buprenorphine therapy.

  17. Pharmacological studies on drug dependence in rodents: dependence on opioids and CNS depressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T

    1990-01-01

    Physical and psychic dependence on opioids and CNS depressants in rodents were examined using the drug-admixed food (DAF) method. A comparison of several methods for developing physical dependence on opioids was made. The DAF method has the advantage of rapidly inducing a high degree of physical dependence without causing morbidity or mortality. When morphine-dependent rats were pretreated with several opioids, naloxone-precipitated weight loss was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner. A procedure for the development of severe physical dependence on CNS depressants was also established. Drug concentrations were rapidly increased until animals showed moderate to severe CNS depression, and then this condition was maintained for at least 10 days. With this procedure, animals became severely dependent on CNS depressants. Another technique, intermittent infusion, was developed that has been used to quantify short-acting CNS depressant dependence potential. The sedative effects of pentobarbital were used as an index in the determination of the injection intervals. These results suggest that the DAF method and the new approaches are useful tools for assessing the physical dependence potential of new drugs. Moreover, oral self-administration and weight pulling procedures were utilized along with the DAF method. Procedures for the oral self-administration of opioids and CNS depressants were established. Opioid-dependent rats pulled the weight to obtain the DAF even though they had free access to normal food. This weight-pulling procedure may be useful for assessing the degree of reinforcing effects for drugs in rats.

  18. Antinociceptive tolerance to NSAIDs in the rat formalin test is mediated by the opioid mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiklauri, Nana; Nozadze, Ivliane; Gurtskaia, Gulnaz; Tsagareli, Merab G

    2017-02-01

    In the past decade it has been shown that tolerance develops to the antinociceptive effect of repeated systemic administration of commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in acute pain models using rats. This is similar to the tolerance observed with opioid-induced analgesia. In the present study, we investigated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effects of NSAIDs diclofenac, ketorolac and xefocam in a chronic inflammatory pain model, the formalin test. Male Wistar rats receiving intraplantar formalin were tested for antinociception following intraperitoneal injection of NSAIDs in thermal paw withdrawal (Hargreaves) test and mechanical paw withdrawal (von Frey) test. Repeated measures analysis of variance with post-hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests were used for statistical evaluations. Treatment with each NSAID significantly elevated the thermal paw withdrawal latency and mechanical paw withdrawal threshold on the first day, followed by a progressive decrease in the analgesic effect over a 4-day period, i.e., tolerance developed. With daily intraplantar injections of formalin, there was a trend toward reduced antinociceptive effects of diclofenac and ketorolac while xefocam exhibited a significant reduction (tolerance). It is noteworthy that the NSAID tolerant groups of rats still exhibited a strong hyperalgesia during phase I formalin following administration of each NSAID, an effect not observed in non-tolerant rats. Pretreatment with naloxone completely prevented the analgesic effects of these three NSAIDs in both behavioral assays. The present findings support the notion that the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs in an inflammatory pain model is mediated via an endogenous opioid system possibly involving descending pain modulatory systems. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  19. Stimulation of accumbal GABAAreceptors inhibits delta2-, but not delta1-, opioid receptor-mediated dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens of freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Yuri; Kiguchi, Yuri; Watanabe, Yuriko; Waddington, John L; Saigusa, Tadashi

    2017-11-15

    The nucleus accumbens contains delta-opioid receptors that may reduce inhibitory neurotransmission. Reduction in GABA A receptor-mediated inhibition of accumbal dopamine release due to delta-opioid receptor activation should be suppressed by stimulating accumbal GABA A receptors. As delta-opioid receptors are divided into delta2- and delta1-opioid receptors, we analysed the effects of the GABA A receptor agonist muscimol on delta2- and delta1-opioid receptor-mediated accumbal dopamine efflux in freely moving rats using in vivo microdialysis. Drugs were administered intracerebrally through the dialysis probe. Doses of compounds indicate total amount administered (mol) during 25-50min infusions. The delta2-opioid receptor agonist deltorphin II (25.0nmol)- and delta1-opioid receptor agonist DPDPE (5.0nmol)-induced increases in dopamine efflux were inhibited by the delta2-opioid receptor antagonist naltriben (1.5nmol) and the delta1-opioid receptor antagonist BNTX (150.0pmol), respectively. Muscimol (250.0pmol) inhibited deltorphin II (25.0nmol)-induced dopamine efflux. The GABA A receptor antagonist bicuculline (50.0pmol), which failed to affect deltorphin II (25.0nmol)-induced dopamine efflux, counteracted the inhibitory effect of muscimol on deltorphin II-induced dopamine efflux. Neither muscimol (250.0pmol) nor bicuculline (50.0 and 500.0pmol) altered DPDPE (5.0nmol)-induced dopamine efflux. The present results show that reduction in accumbal GABA A receptor-mediated inhibition of dopaminergic activity is necessary to produce delta2-opioid receptor-induced increase in accumbal dopamine efflux. This study indicates that activation of delta2- but not delta1-opioid receptors on the cell bodies and/or terminals of accumbal GABAergic interneurons inhibits GABA release and, accordingly, decreases GABA A receptor-mediated inhibition of dopaminergic terminals, resulting in enhanced accumbal dopamine efflux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Current Research on Opioid Receptor Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuan; He, Xiaozhou; Yang, Yilin; Chao, Dongman; Lazarus, Lawrence H.; Xia, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The use of opioid analgesics has a long history in clinical settings, although the comprehensive action of opioid receptors is still less understood. Nonetheless, recent studies have generated fresh insights into opioid receptor-mediated functions and their underlying mechanisms. Three major opioid receptors (μ-opioid receptor, MOR; δ-opioid receptor, DOR; and κ-opioid receptor, KOR) have been cloned in many species. Each opioid receptor is functionally sub-classified into several pharmacological subtypes, although, specific gene corresponding each of these receptor subtypes is still unidentified as only a single gene has been isolated for each opioid receptor. In addition to pain modulation and addiction, opioid receptors are widely involved in various physiological and pathophysiological activities, including the regulation of membrane ionic homeostasis, cell proliferation, emotional response, epileptic seizures, immune function, feeding, obesity, respiratory and cardiovascular control as well as some neurodegenerative disorders. In some species, they play an essential role in hibernation. One of the most exciting findings of the past decade is the opioid-receptor, especially DOR, mediated neuroprotection and cardioprotection. The up-regulation of DOR expression and DOR activation increase the neuronal tolerance to hypoxic/ischemic stress. The DOR signal triggers (depending on stress duration and severity) different mechanisms at multiple levels to preserve neuronal survival, including the stabilization of homeostasis and increased pro-survival signaling (e.g., PKC-ERK-Bcl 2) and anti-oxidative capacity. In the heart, PKC and KATP channels are involved in the opioid receptor-mediated cardioprotection. The DOR-mediated neuroprotection and cardioprotection have the potential to significantly alter the clinical pharmacology in terms of prevention and treatment of life-threatening conditions like stroke and myocardial infarction. The main purpose of this article

  1. An investigation into the receptor-regulating effects of the acute administration of opioid agonists and an antagonist on beta adrenergic receptors in the rat cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roper, I.

    1987-01-01

    Past and current research indicated that biochemical deviations which might be involved in the etiology and pathophysiology of depression, included abnormalities or imbalances in the noradrenergic, serotonergic, hormonal and possibly in the endogenous opioid, dopaminergic, histaminergic, cholinergic and trace amine systems. In order to investigate a possible link between the noradrenergic system and opioids, it was decided to test the acute effects of opioid administration on cortical beta adrenoceptor numbers and affinity. As these receptors have been most consistently downregulated by antidepressant treatment, they may be involved in the mechanism of antidepressant action of these agents. It was decided to investigate beta adrenoceptor-regulatory effects of opioid treatment. Naloxone was tested alone, with a view to suppressing any possible endogenous opioid influences upon beta receptor status and revealing an effect which would possibly be the opposite of that brought about by the administration of opioid agonists. Naloxone was administered together with morphine to demonstrate that any beta receptor up- or downregulation which might be measured, had indeed been opioid-receptor mediated. It was found that the acute administration of four different mu opioid agonists, naloxone and naloxone plus morphine, did not cause any statistically significant alterations in cortical beta adrenergic receptor numbers or affinity in the rat. A radioactive ligand, the beta adrenoceptor-labelling compound referred to as DHA (L-dihydroalprenolol HCI) was used in this study

  2. Craving and subsequent opioid use among opioid dependent patients who initiate treatment with buprenorphine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Judith I.; Anderson, Bradley J.; Strong, David R.; Stein, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have directly assessed associations between craving and subsequent opioid use among treated patients. Our objective was to prospectively evaluate the relative utility of two craving questionnaires to predict opioid use among opioid dependent patients in treatment. Method Opioid dependent patients (n=147) initiating buprenorphine treatment were assessed for three months. Craving was measured using: 1) the Desires for Drug Questionnaire (DDQ) and 2) the Penn Alcohol-Craving Scale adapted for opioid craving (PCS) for this study. Multi-level logistic regression models estimated the effects of craving on the likelihood of opioid use after adjusting for gender, age, ethnicity, education, opioid of choice, frequency of use, pain and depression. In these analyses craving assessed at time t was entered as a time-varying predictor of opioid use at time t+1. Results In adjusted regression models, a 1-point increase in PCS scores (on a 7-point scale) was associated with a significant increase in the odds of opioid use at the subsequent assessment (OR = 1.27, 95% CI 1.08; 1.49, p .05) or DDQ control (OR = 0.97, 95%CI 0.85; 1.11, p > .05) scores. Conclusion Self-reported craving for opioids was associated with subsequent lapse to opioid use among a cohort of patients treated with buprenorphine. PMID:24521036

  3. Dynorphin A (2-17) attenuates the unconditioned but not the conditioned effects of opiate withdrawal in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shippenberg, T S; Funada, M; Schutz, C G

    2000-09-01

    An unbiased place preference conditioning procedure was used to examine the influence of the non-opioid peptide, dynorphin A 2-17 (DYN 2-17), upon the conditioned and unconditioned effects of opiate withdrawal in the rat. Rats were implanted SC with two pellets containing 75 mg morphine or placebo. Single-trial place conditioning sessions with saline and the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (0.1-1.0 mg/kg; SC) commenced 4 days later. Ten minutes before SC injections, animals received an IV infusion of saline or DYN 2-17 (0.1-5.0 mg/kg). Additional groups of placebo- and morphine-pelleted animals were conditioned with saline and DYN 2-17. During each 30-min conditioning session, somatic signs of withdrawal were quantified. Tests of place conditioning were conducted in pelleted animals 24 h later. Naloxone produced wet-dog shakes, body weight loss, ptosis and diarrhea in morphine-pelleted animals. Morphine-pelleted animals also exhibited significant aversions for an environment previously associated with the administration of naloxone. These effects were not observed in placebo-pelleted animals. DYN 2-17 pretreatment resulted in a dose-related attenuation of somatic withdrawal signs. However, conditioned place aversions were still observed in morphine-pelleted animals that had received DYN 2-17 in combination with naloxone. Furthermore, the magnitude of this effect did not differ from control animals. These data demonstrate that the administration of DYN 2-17 attenuates the somatic, but not the conditioned aversive effects of antagonist-precipitated withdrawal from morphine in the rat. Differential effects of this peptide in modulating the conditioned and unconditioned effects of opiate withdrawal are suggested.

  4. Differential involvement of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors in the expression of morphine withdrawal signs in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funada, M.; Shippenberg, T.S.

    1996-10-01

    The role of dopamine (DA) receptors in the expression of opioid dependence was examined by use of an unbiased conditioned place preference paradigm. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted s.c. with two pellets containing placebo or 75mg morphine. Animals received one conditioning session with saline and one with the DA D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 (0.01-0.05mg, s.c.) or the DA D2 receptor antagonist raclopride (0.25-1.0mg/kg, s.c.). Conditioning sessions were conducted 4 days after pellet implantation. During each of these sessions, physical signs of withdrawal were quantified. In morphine-pelleted animals, the D2 receptor antagonist raclopride produced conditioned place aversions, with a minimum effective dose of 0.5mg/kg. Administration of a higher dose also resulted in wet-dog shakes, ptosis and diarrhea in morphine-pelleted animals. This effect was not observed in response to lower doses of raclopride or in placebo-pelleted animals. The D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 failed to produce conditioned place aversions in either morphine- or placebo-pelleted animals after single-trial conditioning. This antagonist was also ineffective in producing physical withdrawal signs. After two conditioning sessions with SCH23390, both the morphine- and placebo-pelleted animals exhibited a marked aversion for the SCH23390-paired place. However, there was no difference between groups in the magnitude of this effect. These data demonstrate that the acute blockade of D2 receptors produces aversive effects in opioid-dependent animals and that this effect occurs in the presence of few, if any, prototypic physical withdrawal signs. Furthermore, the inability of a selective D1 receptor antagonist to produce conditioned aversive effects or physical signs of withdrawal suggests an important role of D2 as compared to D1 receptors in the expression of morphine withdrawal signs.

  5. Antinociceptive effects of pluronic lecithin organo (PLO)-opioid gels in rats with thermal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, John L; Christy, Robert J; Cheppudira, Bopaiah P

    2017-12-01

    Opioids are extensively used as analgesics to control burn pain. However, systemic administration of opioids induces multiple adverse effects that are primarily CNS mediated. Alternately, topical application of low dose of opioids directly at the site of injury could attenuate pain while avoiding CNS-mediated side effects. Pluronic lecithin organogels (PLO) have been extensively used as vehicles to deliver topical drugs. In this study, we for the first time assessed the analgesic efficacy of three opioid-PLO formulations (fentanyl, methadone & morphine) in a rat full-thickness thermal injury (FTTI) pain model. Experiments were performed using 44 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. A single 0.1mL topical application of either morphine (5mg/mL, n=6), fentanyl (10μg/mL, n=8), methadone gel (5mg/mL, n=8), ketamine (50mg/mL, n=6), saline (0.1mL, n=8) or PLO gel alone (0.1mL, n=8) was administered to the plantar surface of the injured hindpaw on days 4 and 7 following thermal injury. The anti-hyperalgesic effects were then measured (5, 15, 30, 60 and 120min post-drug application) using the Hargreaves' thermal test. All three opioids produced statistically significant increases in paw withdrawal latency (PWL), taken as a measure of anti-hyperalgesia, in comparison to saline-treated group (Pthermal hyperalgesia in a rat hindpaw FTTI model, supporting the development of topical formulations of these drugs for burn pain treatment in the clinic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  6. Suppression chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Akio.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To miniaturize the storage tank of condensated water in BWR reactor. Constitution: A diaphragm is provided in a suppression chamber thereby to partition the same into an inner compartment and an outer compartment. In one of said compartments there is stored clean water to be used for feeding at the time of separating the reactor and for the core spray system, and in another compartment there is stored water necessary for accomplishing the depressurization effect at the time of coolant loss accident. To the compartment in which clean water is stored there is connected a water cleaning device for constantly maintaining water in clean state. As this cleaning device an already used fuel pool cleaning device can be utilized. Further, downcomers for accomplishing the depressurization function are provided in both inner compartment and outer compartment. The capacity of the storage tank can be reduced by the capacity of clean water within the suppression chamber. (Ikeda, J.)

  7. Use of prescription opioids with abuse-deterrent technology to address opioid abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michna, Edward; Kirson, Noam Y; Shei, Amie; Birnbaum, Howard G; Ben-Joseph, Rami

    2014-08-01

    The development of new formulations of extended-release (ER) opioids with abuse-deterrent technology attempts to deter prescription opioid abuse while maintaining appropriate access to care for pain patients. This study examined the degree to which some patients may avoid switching to reformulated ER opioids with abuse-deterrent technology and the extent to which those patients are more likely to be abusers. We analyzed Truven MarketScan pharmacy and medical claims data following the introduction of two reformulated ER opioids with abuse-deterrent technology. Adults aged 18-64 who were continuous users of extended-release oxycodone HCl (ER oxycodone) or extended-release oxymorphone HCl (ER oxymorphone) in a 6 month period prior to the introduction of the respective reformulations of those products were identified and categorized based on whether they switched to the reformulation, switched to other ER/long-acting (LA) opioids (without abuse-deterrent technology), or discontinued ER/LA opioid treatment in a 6 month post-reformulation period. Abusers were identified using ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes for opioid abuse/dependence. Pearson's chi-squared tests and Fisher's exact tests were then used to compare rates of abuse between patients who avoided switching to a reformulated ER opioid. Sensitivity analyses examined several definitions used in this analysis. ER/LA opioid utilization; rates of diagnosed opioid abuse. A total of 31%-50% of patients avoided switching to reformulated ER opioids. Rates of diagnosed opioid abuse were higher among these patients compared to patients who transitioned to the reformulated ER opioids. Due to the observational research design, caution is warranted in causal interpretation of the findings. The study was conducted among commercially insured continuous ER oxycodone or ER oxymorphone users; future research should consider additional patient populations, such as non-continuous users and those without commercial insurance (i.e., Medicare

  8. The opioid overdose epidemic: opportunities for pharmacists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu LT

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Li-Tzy Wu,1–4 Udi E Ghitza,5 Anne L Burns,6 Paolo Mannelli,1 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 2Department of Medicine, 3Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, 4Center for Child and Family Policy, Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, 5Center for Clinical Trials Network, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Bethesda, MD, 6American Pharmacists Association, Washington, DC, USA The USA is experiencing an opioid overdose epidemic. It has been driven largely by prescription opioids and intensified by a surge of illicit opioids (e.g., heroin and fentanyl.1,2 Drug-involved overdose, mainly opioids (e.g., prescription opioids and heroin, is a leading cause of accidental death in the USA. The opioid overdose epidemic has been escalating consistently for over a decade.2 Every day, an estimated 91 Americans die from opioid-related overdose.3 Opioid overdose appears to have disproportionally affected men, adults aged 25–64 years, and non-Hispanic whites.2

  9. Fatal poisonings involving propoxyphene before and after voluntary withdrawal from the United States' market: An analysis from the state of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcher, Chris; Chen, Guanming; Wang, Yanning; Slavova, Svetla; Goldberger, Bruce A

    2017-11-01

    The synthetic opioid propoxyphene was a schedule IV controlled substance with multiple reported health risks before the US Food and Drug Administration issued a request for voluntary market withdrawal in November 2010. The purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristics and occurrences of propoxyphene-related deaths in Florida before and after voluntary market removal. Decedent-level toxicology data from Florida's Medical Examiners Commission was used to compare the temporal, polysubstance use, sociodemographic, and geographic profiles associated with propoxyphene-involved deaths for a pre-withdrawal (November 2008-November 2010) and post-withdrawal (December 2010-December 2012) period. Sensitivity analyses using multiple data sources, including Florida's Prescription Drug Monitoring Program and other states' data, were conducted to examine potential reporting bias. Results showed that the number of propoxyphene-involved deaths declined by 84% from 580 deaths to 92 deaths after market withdrawal. The co-occurrence of other prevalent drugs, such as oxycodone (17.2% to 26.1%, p=0.0422) increased significantly in the post-withdrawal study period. A larger proportion of the propoxyphene-related deaths were reported from South Florida after the withdrawal (28.4% to 56.5%, pmarket withdrawal, as recently as 2016. Our findings are consistent with previous studies that propoxyphene was still available after removal from the US market. Continued surveillance is recommended after highly abused opioids are withdrawn from the market due to on-going safety risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. 42 CFR 457.170 - Withdrawal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Withdrawal process. 457.170 Section 457.170 Public... Plans for Child Health Insurance Programs and Outreach Strategies § 457.170 Withdrawal process. (a... amendment, or any portion of a proposed State plan or plan amendment, at any time during the review process...

  11. 76 FR 14592 - Safety Management System; Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ...-06A] RIN 2120-AJ15 Safety Management System; Withdrawal AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... (``product/ service providers'') to develop a Safety Management System (SMS). The FAA is withdrawing the... management with a set of robust decision-making tools to use to improve safety. The FAA received 89 comments...

  12. Florid opioid withdrawal-like reaction precipitated by naltrexone in a patient with chronic cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, E. A.; Dekker, L. R.

    2000-01-01

    Findings consistent with the hypothesis that increased central opioidergic tone contributes to the pruritus of cholestasis provide a rationale for treating this form of pruritus with opiate antagonists. However, initiation of therapy with an opiate antagonist in a cholestatic patient may precipitate

  13. Gut Homeostasis, Microbial Dysbiosis, and Opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuyuan; Roy, Sabita

    2017-01-01

    Gut homeostasis plays an important role in maintaining animal and human health. The disruption of gut homeostasis has been shown to be associated with multiple diseases. The mutually beneficial relationship between the gut microbiota and the host has been demonstrated to maintain homeostasis of the mucosal immunity and preserve the integrity of the gut epithelial barrier. Currently, rapid progress in the understanding of the host-microbial interaction has redefined toxicological pathology of opioids and their pharmacokinetics. However, it is unclear how opioids modulate the gut microbiome and metabolome. Our study, showing opioid modulation of gut homeostasis in mice, suggests that medical interventions to ameliorate the consequences of drug use/abuse will provide potential therapeutic and diagnostic strategies for opioid-modulated intestinal infections. The study of morphine's modulation of the gut microbiome and metabolome will shed light on the toxicological pathology of opioids and its role in the susceptibility to infectious diseases.

  14. Effect of peptide agonists of peripheral opioid receptors on operant feeding behavior and food motivation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova, N G; Kolpakov, A A; Sudakov, S K

    2015-03-01

    We studied the effect of intragastric administration of peptide agonists of μ-opioid receptors (DAMGO) and δ-opioid receptors (DADLE) on food consumption and food motivation during operant feeding behavior of different intensity and effectiveness. To obtain one food granule, trained rats should press a lever 1 time (day 1), 2 times (day 2), 4 times (day 3), 8 times (day 4), 16 times (day 5), or 32 times (day 6). Activation of δ-opioid receptors in the stomach was followed by suppression of feeding behavior at low energy expenditure. The level of food motivation under these conditions practically did not differ from the control. Activation of μ-opioid receptors in the stomach suppressed energy-consuming feeding behavior, which was accompanied by an increase in the level of food motivation. It can be hypothesized that protein metabolites exhibiting μ-opioid activity probably provide afferent signals into CNS via the vagus nerve to terminate energy expenditure under adverse conditions (although food motivation is not satisfied). Food motivation under these conditions probably contributes to the behavior aimed towards the search for more available food.

  15. Persistent increase in hypothalamic arginine vasopressin gene expression during protracted withdrawal from chronic escalating-dose cocaine in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Litvin, Yoav; Piras, Anna Paola; Pfaff, Donald W; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2011-09-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) from the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of hypothalamus has important roles in regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and stress-related behaviors during chronic stress. It is unknown, however, whether AVP in the PVN is involved in the modulation of HPA activity after chronic cocaine exposure. Here, we examined the gene expression alterations of AVP in the hypothalamus, and V1b receptor and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) in the anterior pituitary, as well as HPA hormonal changes, in Fischer rats after chronic cocaine and withdrawal, using two different chronic (14-day) 'binge' pattern administration regimens: steady-dose cocaine (SDC, 45 mg/kg/day) and escalating-dose cocaine (EDC, 45 up to 90 mg/kg/day). There was a significant (7-fold) plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) elevation after chronic EDC (but not SDC), coupled with increased V1b and POMC mRNA levels in the anterior pituitary. From acute (1-day) to protracted (14-day) withdrawal from chronic EDC (but not from SDC), we found persistent elevations of both plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels and AVP mRNA levels in the PVN. Selective V1b antagonist SSR149415 (5 mg/kg) attenuated acute withdrawal-induced HPA activation after EDC. To study potential roles of endogenous opioids in modulating the AVP gene, we administered naloxone (1 mg/kg); we found that opioid receptor antagonism increased AVP mRNA levels in cocaine-naive rats, but not in cocaine-withdrawn rats, suggesting less tonic opioid inhibition of PVN AVP neurons after chronic EDC. To assess the effects of cocaine withdrawal on sub-populations of PVN AVP neurons, we utilized AVP-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) promoter transgenic mice and found that acute withdrawal following chronic EDC increased the number of AVP-EGFP neurons in the parvocellular PVN (pPVN). These results suggest that during protracted withdrawal, enhanced pPVN AVP gene expression is associated with persistent elevations

  16. Why glucocorticoid withdrawal may sometimes be as dangerous as the treatment itself

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinsen, Stina; Baslund, Bo; Klose, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoid therapy is widely used, but withdrawal from glucocorticoids comes with a potential life-threatening risk of adrenal insufficiency. Recent case reports document that adrenal crisis after glucocorticoid withdrawal remains a serious problem in clinical practice. Partly due...... to difficulties in inter-study comparison the true prevalence of glucocorticoid-induced adrenal insufficiency is unknown, but it might be somewhere between 46 and 100% 24h after glucocorticoid withdrawal, 26-49% after approximately one week, and some patients show prolonged suppression lasting months to years....... Adrenal insufficiency might therefore be underdiagnosed in clinical practice. Clinical data do not permit accurate estimates of a lower limit of glucocorticoid dose and duration of treatment, where adrenal insufficiency will not occur. Due to individual variation, neither the glucocorticoid dose nor...

  17. Alcohol Withdrawal and Brain Injuries: Beyond Classical Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna E. Jung

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Unmanaged sudden withdrawal from the excessive consumption of alcohol (ethanol adversely alters neuronal integrity in vulnerable brain regions such as the cerebellum, hippocampus, or cortex. In addition to well known hyperexcitatory neurotransmissions, ethanol withdrawal (EW provokes the intense generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the activation of stress-responding protein kinases, which are the focus of this review article. EW also inflicts mitochondrial membranes/membrane potential, perturbs redox balance, and suppresses mitochondrial enzymes, all of which impair a fundamental function of mitochondria. Moreover, EW acts as an age-provoking stressor. The vulnerable age to EW stress is not necessarily the oldest age and varies depending upon the target molecule of EW. A major female sex steroid, 17β-estradiol (E2, interferes with the EW-induced alteration of oxidative signaling pathways and thereby protects neurons, mitochondria, and behaviors. The current review attempts to provide integrated information at the levels of oxidative signaling mechanisms by which EW provokes brain injuries and E2 protects against it. Unmanaged sudden withdrawal from the excessive consumption of alcohol (ethanol adversely alters neuronal integrity in vulnerable brain regions such as the cerebellum, hippocampus, or cortex. In addition to well known hyperexcitatory neurotransmissions, ethanol withdrawal (EW provokes the intense generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the activation of stress-responding protein kinases, which are the focus of this review article. EW also inflicts mitochondrial membranes/membrane potential, perturbs redox balance, and suppresses mitochondrial enzymes, all of which impair a fundamental function of mitochondria. Moreover, EW acts as an age-provoking stressor. The vulnerable age to EW stress is not necessarily the oldest age and varies depending upon the target molecule of EW. A major female sex steroid, 17

  18. Physician Introduction to Opioids for Pain Among Patients with Opioid Dependence and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Judith I.; Herman, Debra S.; Kettavong, Malyna; Alford, Daniel; Anderson, Bradley J.; Stein, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    This study determined the frequency of reporting being introduced to opioids by a physician among opioid dependent patients. Cross-sectional analyses were performed using baseline data from a cohort of opioid addicts seeking treatment with buprenorphine. The primary outcome was response to the question: “Who introduced you to opiates?” Covariates included sociodemographics, depression, pain, current and prior substance use. Of 140 participants, 29% reported that they had been introduced to opioids by a physician. Of those who were introduced to opioids by a physician, all indicated that they had initially used opioids for pain, versus only 11% of those who did not report being introduced to opioids by a physician (p<0.01). There was no difference in current pain (78% vs. 85%, p=0.29), however participants who were introduced to opioids by a physician were more likely to have chronic pain (63% vs. 43%, p=0.04). A substantial proportion of individuals with opioid dependence seeking treatment may have been introduced to opioids by a physician. PMID:20727704

  19. Impact of a Psychological Opioid-Risk Evaluation on Opioid Prescribing in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargovich, Alison M; McNeil, Daniel W; Foley, Kimberly P; Sperry, Jeannie

    2016-07-01

    The misuse and abuse of opioids has increased across the United States in recent years, associated with a rise in opioid-related overdose deaths. Physicians report having difficulty discerning substance abuse or drug diversion, which can lead to over- or under-prescribing of opioids and poor pain management. Additionally, research suggests that patient characteristics (eg, sex, ethnicity/race, age) may unduly influence the pain management decisions of health care providers. This investigation aimed to assist in physicians' prescribing decisions and reduce prescribing bias through the assistance of mental health professionals. This study utilized 151 chronic pain patients being considered for chronic opioid therapy to determine if a psychological opioid-risk evaluation influenced physicians' opioid prescribing. The evaluation resulted in an opioid-risk level (ie, low, moderate, high) being assigned to each patient representing their potential risk for misusing or abusing opioid medication. A record review was conducted on each patient, abstracting information about opioid prescribing, and several other factors, which were included in logistic regression analyses. Risk status and substance abuse history significantly predicted opioid prescribing, with a lower risk status associated with greater likelihood of opioid prescribing and those with a history of substance abuse being less likely to be prescribed an opioid; however, substance abuse did not significantly improve the overall model and was removed. Demographic variables were not significant predictors of prescribing contrary to findings in other studies. These findings suggest that providing physicians with additional information about their patients' opioid abuse potential aids in prescribing decisions and may reduce prescribing bias based on demographic factors.

  20. Participation of endogenous opioids in the antinociception induced by resistance exercise in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.S. Galdino

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Exercise is a low-cost intervention that promotes health and contributes to the maintenance of the quality of life. The present study was designed to investigate the influence of different resistance exercise protocols on the nociceptive threshold of rats. Female Wistar rats were used to perform exercises in a weight-lifting exercise model. The following groups were examined (N = 6 per group: untrained rats (control group; an acute protocol group consisting of rats submitted to 15 sets of 15 repetitions of resistance exercise (acute group; rats exercised with 3 sets of 10 repetitions, three times per week for 12 weeks (trained group, and a group consisting of trained rats that were further submitted to the acute protocol (trained-acute group. The nociceptive threshold was measured by the paw-withdrawal test, in which the withdrawal threshold (escape reaction was measured by an apparatus applying force to the plantar surface of the animal paw. The opioid antagonist naloxone (2 mg/kg was administered subcutaneously 10 min before the exercise protocols. The trained group demonstrated antinociception only up to day 45 of the 12-week training period. A significant increase (37%, P < 0.05 in the nociceptive threshold was produced immediately after exercise, decreasing to 15% after 15 min, when the acute exercise protocol was used. Naloxone reversed this effect. These data show that the acute resistance exercise protocol was effective in producing antinociception for 15 min. This antinociceptive effect is mediated by the activation of opioid receptors.

  1. Local analgesic effect of tramadol is not mediated by opioid receptors in early postoperative pain in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Sousa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Tramadol is known as a central acting analgesic drug, used for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. Local analgesic effect has been demonstrated, in part due to local anesthetic-like effect, but other mechanisms remain unclear. The role of peripheral opioid receptors in the local analgesic effect is not known. In this study, we examined role of peripheral opioid receptors in the local analgesic effect of tramadol in the plantar incision model. METHODS: Young male Wistar rats were divided into seven groups: control, intraplantar tramadol, intravenous tramadol, intravenous naloxone-intraplantar tramadol, intraplantar naloxone-intraplantar tramadol, intravenous naloxone-intravenous tramadol, and intravenous naloxone. After receiving the assigned drugs (tramadol 5 mg, naloxone 200 µg or 0.9% NaCl, rats were submitted to plantar incision, and withdrawal thresholds after mechanical stimuli with von Frey filaments were assessed at baseline, 10, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min after incision. RESULTS: Plantar incision led to marked mechanical hyperalgesia during the whole period of observation in the control group, no mechanical hyperalgesia were observed in intraplantar tramadol group, intraplantar naloxone-intraplantar tramadol group and intravenous naloxone-intraplantar tramadol. In the intravenous tramadol group a late increase in withdrawal thresholds (after 45 min was observed, the intravenous naloxone-intravenous tramadol group and intravenous naloxone remained hyperalgesic during the whole period. CONCLUSIONS: Tramadol presented an early local analgesic effect decreasing mechanical hyperalgesia induced by plantar incision. This analgesic effect was not mediated by peripheral opioid receptors.

  2. Curcumin Attenuates Opioid Tolerance and Dependence by Inhibiting Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II α Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Huang, Fang; Szymusiak, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic use of opioid analgesics has been hindered by the development of opioid addiction and tolerance. We have reported that curcumin, a natural flavonoid from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, attenuated opioid tolerance, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that curcumin may inhibit Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα), a protein kinase that has been previously proposed to be critical for opioid tolerance and dependence. In this study, we used state-of-the-art polymeric formulation technology to produce poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-curcumin nanoparticles (nanocurcumin) to overcome the drug’s poor solubility and bioavailability, which has made it extremely difficult for studying in vivo pharmacological actions of curcumin. We found that PLGA-curcumin nanoparticles reduced the dose requirement by 11- to 33-fold. Pretreatment with PLGA-curcumin (by mouth) prevented the development of opioid tolerance and dependence in a dose-dependent manner, with ED50 values of 3.9 and 3.2 mg/kg, respectively. PLGA-curcumin dose-dependently attenuated already-established opioid tolerance (ED50 = 12.6 mg/kg p.o.) and dependence (ED50 = 3.1 mg/kg p.o.). Curcumin or PLGA-curcumin did not produce antinociception by itself or affect morphine (1–10 mg/kg) antinociception. Moreover, we found that the behavioral effects of curcumin on opioid tolerance and dependence correlated with its inhibition of morphine-induced CaMKIIα activation in the brain. These results suggest that curcumin may attenuate opioid tolerance and dependence by suppressing CaMKIIα activity. PMID:25515789

  3. Contribution of positron emission tomography for the study of response variability to opioid drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auvity, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    There is a high variability between patients in the initial analgesic response to opioid drugs. The chronic use of opioids leads to tolerance and may induce dependence or addiction. Current Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging methods, focusing on the impact of opioids on neuronal and synaptic functions, have failed to elucidate the parameters that control this variability of therapeutic response. A wealth of preclinical studies has addressed the possibility for neuro-immune or neuro-pharmacokinetic parameters to control the response to opioid drugs. Dedicated tools are thus required to investigate their impact on the pharmacology of opioid drugs in vivo and test their implication for variability in therapeutic response. The aim of this PhD project was to develop or to evaluate original methods to study the neuro-immune and neuro-pharmacokinetic components of the variability of response to opioid drugs. Opioid drugs were shown to interact with the innate immune System in the central nervous System (CNS) and to modulate the activity of glial cells. Glial cell activity is often hypothesized to modulate the analgesic efficacy of opioids and account for the development of tolerance and dependence. PET imaging using TSPO (Translocator protein 18 kDa) radioligands such as 18 F-DPA-714 is the most advanced approach to non-invasively study glial cell activation. In nonhuman primates, we showed that acute morphine exposure increased the brain distribution of 18 F-DPA-714, suggesting glial cell activation. The extent of the increase was linked to the baseline brain distribution of 18 F-DPA-714, suggesting the presence of priming parameters in controlling the neuro-immune response to morphine exposure. In healthy rats, we showed that morphine-induced tolerance and withdrawal did not detectably increase the brain distribution of 18 F-DPA-714 as well as the expression of other bio-markers of glial/micro-glial activation. Dedicated methods were then proposed to investigate

  4. Conversion of chronic pain patients from full-opioid agonists to sublingual buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daitch, Jonathan; Frey, Michael E; Silver, David; Mitnick, Carol; Daitch, Danielle; Pergolizzi, Joseph

    2012-07-01

    Sublingual buprenorphine-naloxone (buprenorphine SL) is a preparation that is used to treat opioid dependence. In addition, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has acknowledged the legality of an off-label use to treat pain with a sublingual buprenorphine preparation. Buprenorphine SL is unique among the opioid class of analgesics; this compound has a high affinity for the mu-receptor, yet only partially activates it. Thus, buprenorphine SL can provide analgesia, yet minimize opioid side effects. Many patients on high doses of traditional opioid medication develop tolerance. Despite escalating medication dosage, a subset of patients had a paradoxical increase in pain, which has been characterized as opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH).  Buprenorphine SL, on the other hand, may even be anti-hyperalgesic and may have utility in treating these challenging patients. To determine the effectiveness of converting patients from traditional full agonist opioid medication to sublingual buprenorphine, as well as to identify patient groups that are most likely to benefit from this therapy. Patients who underwent conversion either had developed tolerance with diminished analgesia or were experiencing side effects on their opioid medications. An observational report of outcomes assessment. An interventional pain management practice setting in the United States. Retrospective data from clinical records was compiled on 104 de-identified chronic pain patients whose personal information had been redacted (60 men and 44 women, aged 21-78) and who had previously been treated with opioid-agonist drugs; they were converted to buprenorphine SL in tablet form during the study. Chronic pain was defined as persistent pain for at least 6 months. Data collected from patient profiles included age, sex, diagnosis, medication history, pre-induction opioid intake, reason for detoxification, pre-induction Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Score (COWS), and if applicable, cause of buprenorphine SL

  5. High-Dose Opioid Prescribing and Opioid-Related Hospitalization: A Population-Based Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Fernandes

    Full Text Available To examine the impact of national clinical practice guidelines and provincial drug policy interventions on prevalence of high-dose opioid prescribing and rates of hospitalization for opioid toxicity.Interventional time-series analysis.Ontario, Canada, from 2003 to 2014.Ontario Drug Benefit (ODB beneficiaries aged 15 to 64 years from 2003 to 2014.Publication of Canadian clinical practice guidelines for use of opioids in chronic non-cancer pain (May 2010 and implementation of Ontario's Narcotics Safety and Awareness Act (NSAA; November 2011.Three outcomes were explored: the rate of opioid use among ODB beneficiaries, the prevalence of opioid prescriptions exceeding 200 mg and 400 mg morphine equivalents per day, and rates of opioid-related emergency department visits and hospital admissions.Over the 12 year study period, the rate of opioid use declined 15.2%, from 2764 to 2342 users per 10,000 ODB eligible persons. The rate of opioid use was significantly impacted by the Canadian clinical practice guidelines (p-value = .03 which led to a decline in use, but no impact was observed by the enactment of the NSAA (p-value = .43. Among opioid users, the prevalence of high-dose prescribing doubled (from 4.2% to 8.7% over the study period. By 2014, 40.9% of recipients of long-acting opioids exceeded daily doses of 200 mg morphine or equivalent, including 55.8% of long-acting oxycodone users and 76.3% of transdermal fentanyl users. Moreover, in the last period, 18.7% of long-acting opioid users exceeded daily doses of 400 mg morphine or equivalent. Rates of opioid-related emergency department visits and hospital admissions increased 55.0% over the study period from 9.0 to 14.0 per 10,000 ODB beneficiaries from 2003 to 2013. This rate was not significantly impacted by the Canadian clinical practice guidelines (p-value = .68 or enactment of the NSAA (p-value = .59.Although the Canadian clinical practice guidelines for use of opioids in chronic non

  6. The Cannabis Withdrawal Scale development: patterns and predictors of cannabis withdrawal and distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsop, David J; Norberg, Melissa M; Copeland, Jan; Fu, Shanlin; Budney, Alan J

    2011-12-01

    Rates of treatment seeking for cannabis are increasing, and relapse is common. Management of cannabis withdrawal is an important intervention point. No psychometrically sound measure for cannabis withdrawal exists, and as a result treatment developments cannot be optimally targeted. The aim is to develop and test the psychometrics of the Cannabis Withdrawal Scale and use it to explore predictors of cannabis withdrawal. A volunteer sample of 49 dependent cannabis users provided daily scores on the Cannabis Withdrawal Scale during a baseline week and 2 weeks of abstinence. Internal reliability (Cronbach's alpha=0.91), test-retest stability (average intra-class correlation=0.95) and content validity analysis show that the Cannabis Withdrawal Scale has excellent psychometric properties. Nightmares and/or strange dreams was the most valid item (Wald χ²=105.6, Psleep was also an intense withdrawal symptom (Wald χ²=42.31, Pcannabis withdrawal. The Cannabis Withdrawal Scale can be used as a diagnostic instrument in clinical and research settings where regular monitoring of withdrawal symptoms is required. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantifying the clinical significance of cannabis withdrawal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Allsop

    Full Text Available Questions over the clinical significance of cannabis withdrawal have hindered its inclusion as a discrete cannabis induced psychiatric condition in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV. This study aims to quantify functional impairment to normal daily activities from cannabis withdrawal, and looks at the factors predicting functional impairment. In addition the study tests the influence of functional impairment from cannabis withdrawal on cannabis use during and after an abstinence attempt.A volunteer sample of 49 non-treatment seeking cannabis users who met DSM-IV criteria for dependence provided daily withdrawal-related functional impairment scores during a one-week baseline phase and two weeks of monitored abstinence from cannabis with a one month follow up. Functional impairment from withdrawal symptoms was strongly associated with symptom severity (p=0.0001. Participants with more severe cannabis dependence before the abstinence attempt reported greater functional impairment from cannabis withdrawal (p=0.03. Relapse to cannabis use during the abstinence period was associated with greater functional impairment from a subset of withdrawal symptoms in high dependence users. Higher levels of functional impairment during the abstinence attempt predicted higher levels of cannabis use at one month follow up (p=0.001.Cannabis withdrawal is clinically significant because it is associated with functional impairment to normal daily activities, as well as relapse to cannabis use. Sample size in the relapse group was small and the use of a non-treatment seeking population requires findings to be replicated in clinical samples. Tailoring treatments to target withdrawal symptoms contributing to functional impairment during a quit attempt may improve treatment outcomes.

  8. Quantifying the Clinical Significance of Cannabis Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsop, David J.; Copeland, Jan; Norberg, Melissa M.; Fu, Shanlin; Molnar, Anna; Lewis, John; Budney, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Questions over the clinical significance of cannabis withdrawal have hindered its inclusion as a discrete cannabis induced psychiatric condition in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV). This study aims to quantify functional impairment to normal daily activities from cannabis withdrawal, and looks at the factors predicting functional impairment. In addition the study tests the influence of functional impairment from cannabis withdrawal on cannabis use during and after an abstinence attempt. Methods and Results A volunteer sample of 49 non-treatment seeking cannabis users who met DSM-IV criteria for dependence provided daily withdrawal-related functional impairment scores during a one-week baseline phase and two weeks of monitored abstinence from cannabis with a one month follow up. Functional impairment from withdrawal symptoms was strongly associated with symptom severity (p = 0.0001). Participants with more severe cannabis dependence before the abstinence attempt reported greater functional impairment from cannabis withdrawal (p = 0.03). Relapse to cannabis use during the abstinence period was associated with greater functional impairment from a subset of withdrawal symptoms in high dependence users. Higher levels of functional impairment during the abstinence attempt predicted higher levels of cannabis use at one month follow up (p = 0.001). Conclusions Cannabis withdrawal is clinically significant because it is associated with functional impairment to normal daily activities, as well as relapse to cannabis use. Sample size in the relapse group was small and the use of a non-treatment seeking population requires findings to be replicated in clinical samples. Tailoring treatments to target withdrawal symptoms contributing to functional impairment during a quit attempt may improve treatment outcomes. PMID:23049760

  9. Effects of opioids on local anesthesia in the rat: a codeine and tramadol study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Girio Carnaval

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are central analgesics that act on the CNS (central nervous system and PNS (peripheral nervous system. We investigated the effects of codeine (COD and tramadol (TRAM on local anesthesia of the sciatic nerve. Eighty Wistar male rats received the following SC injections in the popliteal fossa: local anesthetic with epinephrine (LA; local anesthetic without vasoconstrictor (LA WV; COD; TRAM; LA + COD; LA + TRAM; COD 20 minutes prior to LA (COD 20' + LA or TRAM 20 minutes prior to LA (TRAM 20' + LA. As a nociceptive function, the blockade was considered the absence of a paw withdraw reflex. As a motor function, it was the absence of claudication. As a proprioceptive function, it was the absence of hopping and tactile responses. All data were compared using repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA. Opioids showed a significant increase in the level of anesthesia, and the blockade duration of LA + COD was greater than that of the remaining groups (p < 0.05. The associated use of opioids improved anesthesia efficacy. This could lead to a new perspective in controlling dental pain.

  10. Vibrotactile stimulation: A non-pharmacological intervention for opioid-exposed newborns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Zuzarte

    Full Text Available To examine the therapeutic potential of stochastic vibrotactile stimulation (SVS as a complementary non-pharmacological intervention for withdrawal in opioid-exposed newborns.A prospective, within-subjects single-center study was conducted in 26 opioid-exposed newborns (>37 weeks; 16 male hospitalized since birth and treated pharmacologically for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome. A specially-constructed mattress delivered low-level SVS (30-60Hz, 10-12μm RMS, alternated in 30-min intervals between continuous vibration (ON and no vibration (OFF over a 6-8 hr session. Movement activity, heart rate, respiratory rate, axillary temperature and blood-oxygen saturation were calculated separately for ON and OFF.There was a 35% reduction in movement activity with SVS (p30 sec duration for ON than OFF (p = 0.003. Incidents of tachypneic breaths and tachycardic heart beats were each significantly reduced with SVS, whereas incidents of eupneic breaths and eucardic heart beats each significantly increased with SVS (p<0.03. Infants maintained body temperature and arterial-blood oxygen level independent of stimulation condition.SVS reduced hyperirritability and pathophysiological instabilities commonly observed in pharmacologically-managed opioid-exposed newborns. SVS may provide an effective complementary therapeutic intervention for improving autonomic function in newborns with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome.

  11. Traditional Chinese and Indian medicine in the treatment of opioid-dependence: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Doosti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, the current literatures on the use of herbs and herbal preparations of Traditional Chinese and Indian Medicine for the treatment of opioid addiction were reviewed. Methods: Search was done in databases such as Pub Med, Science Direct, Scopus, Springer Link, and Google Scholar. Results: Among 18 retrieved studies, 3 studies were about asafetida extract, an approved preparation for ameliorating drug abstinence in China. Chinese preparations including Composite Dong Yuan Gao, Qingjunyin and TJ-97 (a water extract of dai-bofu-to as well as Indian ones, Mentate and Shilajit, were reported to have positive effects against opioid withdrawal, dependence, and tolerance. Moreover, Levo-tetrahydropalmatine and L-Stepholidine, in addition to extracts of Caulis Sinomenii and Sinomenium acutum showed similar effects. Banxia Houpu Decoction, Fu-Yuan pellet, Jinniu capsules, Qingjunyin, Tai-Kang-Ning capsule, and Xuan Xia Qudu Jiaonang (WeiniCom from Chinese preparations, showed anti-addiction effects in randomized, double-blind and, in some studies, multicenter clinical trials. Conclusion: Traditional herbal preparations of China and India have anti-addiction effects with less adverse effects than alpha2-adrenergic or opioid agonists.

  12. Effects of Ibudilast on the Subjective, Reinforcing, and Analgesic Effects of Oxycodone in Recently Detoxified Adults with Opioid Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Verena E; Jones, Jermaine D; Manubay, Jeanne; Sullivan, Maria A; Mogali, Shanthi; Segoshi, Andrew; Madera, Gabriela; Johnson, Kirk W; Comer, Sandra D

    2017-08-01

    Ibudilast, a nonselective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, is used clinically in Asia for the treatment of asthma and poststroke dizziness. Recent preclinical studies have suggested that it also inhibits glial cell activation in rodents, and may alter opioid-mediated effects, including analgesia and withdrawal symptoms. The effects of ibudilast on the abuse potential of opioids in humans are largely unknown. The present study was designed to examine the influence of ibudilast on subjective (including drug craving), reinforcing, and analgesic effects of oxycodone in human volunteers diagnosed with opioid dependence (equivalent to moderate-severe opioid use disorder). Non-treatment-seeking opioid-dependent male volunteers (n=11) underwent an in-patient detoxification with morphine, followed by maintenance on placebo (0 mg b.i.d.) and active ibudilast (50 mg b.i.d.). Under each maintenance dose, six experimental sample and choice sessions were completed involving oral oxycodone administration (0, 15, and 30 mg/70 kg, p.o.). Subjective effects of oxycodone and drug craving were measured with visual analog scales (VAS) and a Drug Effects Questionnaire. The cold pressor test was used to produce pain, and a modified progressive-ratio choice procedure was used to measure the reinforcing effects of oxycodone. Under the active ibudilast condition compared with the placebo condition, ratings of drug liking following 15 mg of oxycodone were decreased significantly. The mean drug breakpoint value was also significantly lower in the active vs the placebo ibudilast condition under the 15 mg oxycodone condition, but not significantly lower under the 30 mg oxycodone condition. Heroin craving was significantly reduced under active ibudilast vs placebo, and similar effects were observed for tobacco and cocaine craving. Furthermore, mean subjective ratings of pain were lower in the active ibudilast condition. Our data suggest that ibudilast may be useful for treating opioid

  13. Cardiovascular disorders associated with naloxone monotherapy and in fixed-dose combination with opioids: Data from international safety surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Amneet; Kao, David; Mehler, Philip S; Haigney, Mark C P; Krantz, Mori J

    2016-06-01

    The widespread use of opioids has resulted in sharp rise of associated complications, particularly opioid-induced constipation (OIC). Opioid receptor antagonists have been proposed to treat OIC, but could precipitate rapid opioid withdrawal. As cardiovascular safety data are lacking, we assessed disproportionate reporting of adverse cardiac events associated with naloxone across large, international pharmacovigilance systems. Post-marketing data from the World Health Organization (WHO) and FDA Adverse Events Reporting System (FAERS) were evaluated for naloxone and the synthetic opioids oxycodone and tilidine. The proportional reporting ratio (PRR), a measure of reporting frequency analogous to an odds ratio, was assessed. The primary outcome was reporting frequency of the MedDRA System Organ Class (SOC) 'Cardiac Disorders' for naloxone alone and in fixed-dose combination with opioids. Opioid mono-preparations served as quasi-experimental controls. A PRR greater than 2.0 was considered significant. In total, 14,827,374 million adverse drug event reports were reviewed. In WHO, there were 1757 reports of SOC cardiac disorders among 10,866 total reports for oxycodone (PRR 2.38 [95% CI 2.28-2.49, χ(2)=1504]). For oxycodone-naloxone, there were 43/453 reports of SOC cardiac disorders (PRR 1.45 [95% CI 1.09-1.92, χ(2)=6.4]). For the synthetic opioid tilidine there were 13/179 reports (PRR 1.13 [95% CI 0.67-1.91, χ(2)=0.2]) and for tilidine-naloxone, 30/505 reports (PRR 0.92 [95% CI 0.65-1.31, χ(2)=0.2]). In FAERS, the PRR for SOC cardiac disorders was 0.95 [95% CI 0.89-1.01, χ(2)=2.1] for naloxone (all administration routes) and 1.16 [95% CI 0.93-1.45, χ(2)=1.3] for naloxone (oral only). In comparison, the PRR was 1.66 [95% CI 1.63-1.69, χ(2)=4278] for oxycodone and 1.52 [CI 1.28-1.80, χ(2)=1500] for oxycodone-naloxone. Available pharmacovigilance data do not suggest disproportionate reporting of adverse cardiovascular events for opioid antagonists used to treat

  14. Hiperalgesia asociada al tratamiento con opioides

    OpenAIRE

    A. Gil Martín; M. Moreno García; J. Sánchez-Rubio Ferrández; T. Molina García

    2014-01-01

    La hiperalgesia inducida por opioides es una reacción paradójica caracterizada por una percepción intensificada de dolor relacionada con el uso de estos medicamentos en ausencia de progresión de la enfermedad o de síndrome de retirada. A diferencia de los casos de tolerancia, definida como pérdida de potencia analgésica durante el uso prolongado de opioides, no se produce mejoría con el escalado de dosis. La hiperalgesia inducida por opioides se ha manifestado en pacientes con dosis de manten...

  15. Neuraxial opioid-induced pruritus: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Szarvas, Szilvia

    2012-02-03

    When intrathecal and epidural opioids are administered, pruritus occurs as an unwanted and troublesome side effect. The reported incidence varies between 30% and 100%. The exact mechanisms of neuraxial opioid-induced pruritus remain unclear. Postulated mechanisms include the presence of an "itch center" in the central nervous system, medullary dorsal horn activation, and antagonism of inhibitory transmitters. The treatment of intrathecal opioid-induced pruritus remains a challenge. Many pharmacological therapies, including antihistamines, 5-HT(3)-receptor antagonists, opiate-antagonists, propofol, nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs, and droperidol, have been studied. In this review, we will summarize pathophysiological and pharmacological advances that will improve understanding and ultimately the management of this troublesome problem.

  16. Variants of opioid system genes are associated with non-dependent opioid use and heroin dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randesi, Matthew; van den Brink, Wim; Levran, Orna; Blanken, Peter; Butelman, Eduardo R; Yuferov, Vadim; da Rosa, Joel Correa; Ott, Jurg; van Ree, Jan M; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2016-11-01

    Heroin addiction is a chronic, relapsing brain disease. Genetic factors are involved in the development of drug addiction. The aim of this study was to determine whether specific variants in genes of the opioid system are associated with non-dependent opioid use and heroin dependence. Genetic information from four subject groups was collected: non-dependent opioid users (NOD) [n=163]; opioid-dependent (OD) patients in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) [n=143]; opioid-dependent MMT-resistant patients in heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) [n=138]; and healthy controls with no history of opioid use (HC) [n=153]. Eighty-two variants in eight opioid system genes were studied. To establish the role of these genes in (a) non-dependent opioid use, and (b) heroin dependence, the following groups were compared: HC vs. NOD; HC vs. OD (MMT+HAT); and NOD vs. OD (MMT+HAT). Five unique SNPs in four genes showed nominally significant associations with non-dependent opioid use and heroin dependence. The association of the delta opioid receptor (OPRD1) intronic SNP rs2236861 with non-dependent opioid use (HC vs. NOD) remained significant after correction for multiple testing (OR=0.032; p corrected =0.015). This SNP exhibited a significant gene-gene interaction with prepronociceptin (PNOC) SNP rs2722897 (OR=5.24; p corrected =0.041) (HC vs. NOD). This study identifies several new and some previously reported associations of variants with heroin dependence and with non-dependent opioid use, an important and difficult to obtain group not extensively studied previously. Further studies are warranted to confirm and elucidate the potential roles of these variants in the vulnerability to illicit drug use and drug addiction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Opioid tapering in patients with prescription opioid use disorder: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kehua; Jia, Peng; Bhargava, Swati; Zhang, Yong; Reza, Taslima; Peng, Yuan Bo; Wang, Gary G

    2017-10-01

    Opioid use disorder (OUD) refers to a maladaptive pattern of opioid use leading to clinically significant impairment or distress. OUD causes, and vice versa, misuses and abuse of opioid medications. Clinicians face daily challenges to treat patients with prescription opioid use disorder. An evidence-based management for people who are already addicted to opioids has been identified as the national priority in the US; however, options are limited in clinical practices. In this study, we aimed to explore the success rate and important adjuvant medications in the medication assisted treatment with temporary use of methadone for opioid discontinuation in patients with prescription OUD. This is a retrospective chart review performed at a private physician office for physical medicine and rehabilitation. We reviewed all medical records dated between December 1st, 2011 and August 30th, 2016. The initial evaluation of the included patients (N=140) was completed between December 1st, 2011 and December 31st, 2014. They all have concumittant prescription OUD and chronic non-cancer pain. The patients (87 female and 53 male) were 46.7±12.7 years old, and had a history of opioid use of 7.7±6.1 years. All patients received the comprehensive opioid taper treatments (including interventional pain management techniques, psychotherapy, acupuncture, physical modalities and exercises, and adjuvant medications) on top of the medication assisted treatment using methadone (transient use). Opioid tapering was considered successful when no opioid medication was used in the last patient visit. The 140 patients had pain of 9.6±8.4 years with 8/10 intensity before treatment which decreased after treatment in all comparisons (pOUD. For patients with OUD, indefinite opioid maintenance treatment may not be necessary. Considering the ethical values of autonomy, nonmaleficence, and beneficence, clinicians should provide patients with OUD the option of opioid tapering. Copyright © 2017

  18. Extended release naltrexone injection is performed in the majority of opioid dependent patients receiving outpatient induction: a very low dose naltrexone and buprenorphine open label trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannelli, Paolo; Wu, Li-Tzy; Peindl, Kathleen S; Swartz, Marvin S; Woody, George E

    2014-05-01

    The approval of extended release injectable naltrexone (XR-NTX; Vivitrol(®)) has introduced a new option for treating opioid addiction, but studies are needed to identify its place within the spectrum of available therapies. The absence of physiological opioid dependence is a necessary and challenging first step for starting XR-NTX. Outpatient detoxification gives poor results and inpatient detoxification is either unavailable or too brief for the physiological effects of opioids to resolve. Here we present findings from an open label study that tested whether the transition from opioid addiction to XR-NTX can be safely and effectively performed in an outpatient setting using very low dose naltrexone and buprenorphine. Twenty treatment seeking opioid addicted individuals were given increasing doses of naltrexone starting at 0.25mg with decreasing doses of buprenorphine starting at 4 mg during a 7-day outpatient XR-NTX induction procedure. Withdrawal discomfort, craving, drug use, and adverse events were assessed daily until the XR-NTX injection, then weekly over the next month. Fourteen of the 20 participants received XR-NTX and 13 completed weekly assessments. Withdrawal, craving, and opioid or other drug use were significantly lower during induction and after XR-NTX administration compared with baseline, and no serious adverse events were recorded. Outpatient transition to XR-NTX combining upward titration of very low dose naltrexone with downward titration of low dose buprenorphine was safe, well tolerated, and completed by most participants. Further studies with larger numbers of subjects are needed to see if this approach is useful for naltrexone induction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pseudopheochromocytoma induced by anxiolytic withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páll, Alida; Becs, Gergely; Erdei, Annamária; Sira, Lívia; Czifra, Arpád; Barna, Sándor; Kovács, Péter; Páll, Dénes; Pfliegler, György; Paragh, György; Szabó, Zoltán

    2014-10-08

    Symptomatic paroxysmal hypertension without significantly elevated catecholamine concentrations and with no evidence of an underlying adrenal tumor is known as pseudopheochromocytoma. We describe the case of a female patient with paroxysmal hypertensive crises accompanied by headache, vertigo, tachycardia, nausea and altered mental status. Previously, she was treated for a longer period with alprazolam due to panic disorder. Causes of secondary hypertension were excluded. Neurological triggers (intracranial tumor, cerebral vascular lesions, hemorrhage, and epilepsy) could not be detected. Setting of the diagnosis of pseudopheochromocytoma treatment was initiated with alpha- and beta-blockers resulting in reduced frequency of symptoms. Alprazolam was restarted at a daily dose of 1 mg. The patient's clinical condition improved rapidly and the dosage of alpha- and beta-blockers could be decreased. We conclude that the withdrawal of an anxiolytic therapeutic regimen may generate sympathetic overdrive resulting in life-threatening paroxysmal malignant hypertension and secondary encephalopathy. We emphasize that pseudopheochromocytoma can be diagnosed only after exclusion of the secondary causes of hypertension. We highlight the importance of a psychopharmacological approach to this clinical entity.

  20. Opioid overuse pain syndrome (OOPS): the story of opioids, prometheus unbound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehendale, Anand W; Goldman, Mark P; Mehendale, Rachel P

    2013-01-01

    Throughout history, opioids have effectively alleviated pain but not without the risk of addiction and death. Seductive and dangerous, full of promise and destruction, opioids are both revered and feared by Western culture. Their exponential use in "developed countries" is now an enormous public health problem and requires us to harness their properties with scientific rigor and adequate safeguards. The use of opioids for the treatment of chronic nonterminal pain (CNTP) has been a relatively new phenomenon which has coincided with the proclamation by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organization in 2000 that pain assessment be the "fifth vital sign," notwithstanding the fact that pain is a symptom and not a sign.(1) Nonetheless, this resulted in a culture of a marked increase in use of opioids for acute and chronic pain management. Consequently, there are many unintended outcomes which include opioid-induced hyperalgesia increased diversion, addiction, and death. Understandably, this has resulted in many regulatory responses from such agencies such as the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and state medical boards. This article proposes a clinically relevant paradigm of opioid overuse pain syndrome. The goal of this article is to inform the clinicians of the complicated neurobiology of opioids. It is our hope that scientists rather than government regulators dictate the appropriate response to the epidemic of over prescription of opioids. A similar designation of "medication overuse headache" has resulted in near extinction of excessive use of opioids in the field of headache medicine.

  1. Opioid-Induced Glial Activation: Mechanisms of Activation and Implications for Opioid Analgesia, Dependence, and Reward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Hutchinson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This review will introduce the concept of toll-like receptor (TLR–mediated glial activation as central to all of the following: neuropathic pain, compromised acute opioid analgesia, and unwanted opioid side effects (tolerance, dependence, and reward. Attenuation of glial activation has previously been demonstrated both to alleviate exaggerated pain states induced by experimental pain models and to reduce the development of opioid tolerance. Here we demonstrate that selective acute antagonism of TLR4 results in reversal of neuropathic pain as well as potentiation of opioid analgesia. Attenuating central nervous system glial activation was also found to reduce the development of opioid dependence, and opioid reward at a behavioral (conditioned place preference and neurochemical (nucleus accumbens microdialysis of morphine-induced elevations in dopamine level of analysis. Moreover, a novel antagonism of TLR4 by (+- and (˗-isomer opioid antagonists has now been characterized, and both antiallodynic and morphine analgesia potentiating activity shown. Opioid agonists were found to also possess TLR4 agonistic activity, predictive of glial activation. Targeting glial activation is a novel and as yet clinically unexploited method for treatment of neuropathic pain. Moreover, these data indicate that attenuation of glial activation, by general or selective TLR antagonistic mechanisms, may also be a clinical method for separating the beneficial (analgesia and unwanted (tolerance, dependence, and reward actions of opioids, thereby improving the safety and efficacy of their use.

  2. Systematic review and meta-analysis of opioid antagonists for smoking cessation

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Sean P; Chu, Isabella M; Lancaster, Tim; Stead, Lindsay F; Evins, A Eden; Prochaska, Judith J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This meta-analysis sought to evaluate the efficacy of opioid antagonists in promoting long-term smoking cessation. Post-treatment abstinence was examined as a secondary outcome and effects on withdrawal symptoms, craving and reduced consumption were also explored. Design The search strategy for this meta-analysis included clinical trials (published and unpublished data) in the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register and MEDLINE. Participants Adult smokers. Interventions We included randomised trials comparing opioid antagonists to placebo or an alternative therapy for smoking cessation and reported data on abstinence for a minimum of 6 months. Primary and secondary outcome measures Outcomes included smoking abstinence at long-term follow-up (primary); abstinence at end of treatment (secondary); and effects on withdrawal, craving and smoking consumption (exploratory). Results 8 trials with a total of 1213 participants were included. Half the trials examined the benefit of adding naltrexone versus placebo to nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). There was no significant difference between naltrexone and placebo alone (relative risk (RR) 1.00; 95% CI 0.66 to 1.51) or as an adjunct to NRT (RR 0.95; 95% CI 0.70 to 1.30), with an overall pooled estimate of RR 0.97; 95% CI 0.76 to 1.24. Findings for naltrexone effects on withdrawal, craving and reduced smoking were equivocal. Conclusions The findings indicate no beneficial effect of naltrexone alone or as an adjunct to NRT on short-term or long-term smoking abstinence. While further trials may narrow the confidence limits, they are unlikely to appreciably alter the conclusion. PMID:24633528

  3. Methadone continuation versus forced withdrawal on incarceration in a combined US prison and jail: a randomised, open-label trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Josiah D; McKenzie, Michelle; Larney, Sarah; Wong, John B; Tran, Liem; Clarke, Jennifer; Noska, Amanda; Reddy, Manasa; Zaller, Nickolas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Methadone is an effective treatment for opioid dependence. When people who are receiving methadone maintenance treatment for opioid dependence are incarcerated in prison or jail, most US correctional facilities discontinue their methadone treatment, either gradually, or more often, abruptly. This discontinuation can cause uncomfortable symptoms of withdrawal and renders prisoners susceptible to relapse and overdose on release. We aimed to study the effect of forced withdrawal from methadone upon incarceration on individuals’ risk behaviours and engagement with post-release treatment programmes. Methods In this randomised, open-label trial, we randomly assigned (1:1) inmates of the Rhode Island Department of Corrections (RI, USA) who were enrolled in a methadone maintenance-treatment programme in the community at the time of arrest and wanted to remain on methadone treatment during incarceration and on release, to either continuation of their methadone treatment or to usual care—forced tapered withdrawal from methadone. Participants could be included in the study only if their incarceration would be more than 1 week but less than 6 months. We did the random assignments with a computer-generated random permutation, and urn randomisation procedures to stratify participants by sex and race. Participants in the continued-methadone group were maintained on their methadone dose at the time of their incarceration (with dose adjustments as clinically indicated). Patients in the forced-withdrawal group followed the institution’s standard withdrawal protocol of receiving methadone for 1 week at the dose at the time of their incarceration, then a tapered withdrawal regimen (for those on a starting dose >100 mg, the dose was reduced by 5 mg per day to 100 mg, then reduced by 3 mg per day to 0 mg; for those on a starting dose ≤100 mg, the dose was reduced by 3 mg per day to 0 mg). The main outcomes were engagement with a methadone maintenance

  4. Medicare Part D Opioid Drug Mapping Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicare Part D opioid prescribing mapping tool is an interactive tool that shows geographic comparisons, at the state, county, and ZIP code levels, of...

  5. Opioid Use by Patients After Rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sagar; Sturm, Angela; Bobian, Michael; Svider, Peter F; Zuliani, Giancarlo; Kridel, Russell

    2018-01-01

    Given the increase in opioid addiction and overdose in the United States, reasoned opioid use after outpatient surgery may affect prescription medication abuse. To examine patient use of opioids after rhinoplasty and establish an optimal postrhinoplasty pain management regimen. In this case series, opioid use was evaluated in 62 patients who underwent rhinoplasty performed by 3 fellowship-trained facial plastic surgeons, 2 in private practice in Texas and 1 in an academic setting in Michigan, from February 2016 to September 2016. Opioid use, pain control, and adverse effects were examined and opioid use was compared across patient demographic and surgical procedure characteristics, including rhinoplasty and septoplasty, open vs closed techniques, revision vs primary operations, reduction of turbinates, and use of osteotomies. Opioid use was self-reported as the number of prescribed tablets containing a combination of hydrocodone bitartrate (5 mg) and acetaminophen (325 mg) that were consumed. The mean (SEM) age of the patients was 38.7 (16.4) years and included 50 female patients (81%). Of the initially prescribed 20 to 30 hydrocodone-acetaminophen combination tablets, the 62 patients included in this study used a mean (SEM) of 8.7 (0.9) tablets, only 40% of those prescribed after rhinoplasty. In addition, 46 patients (74%) consumed 15 or fewer tablets, whereas only 3 patients (5%) required refills of pain medication. Sex, age, concurrent septoplasty or turbinate reduction, use of osteotomy, and history of a rhinoplasty were not associated with the number of tablets used. The most common adverse effects included drowsiness in 22 patients (35%), nausea in 7 (11%), light-headedness in 3 (5%), and constipation in 3 (5%). To mitigate the misuse or diversion of physician-prescribed opioid medications, surgeons must be steadfast in prescribing an appropriate amount of pain medication after surgery. A multifaceted pain control program is proposed to manage postoperative

  6. 19 CFR 144.38 - Withdrawal for consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal for consumption. 144.38 Section 144.38... Withdrawal for consumption. (a) Form. Withdrawals for consumption of merchandise in bonded warehouses shall... considered a withdrawal for consumption pursuant to § 181.53 of this chapter. (c) Information to be shown on...

  7. 21 CFR 514.7 - Withdrawal of applications without prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal of applications without prejudice. 514... Withdrawal of applications without prejudice. The sponsor may withdraw his pending application from.... Such withdrawal may be made without prejudice to a future filing. Upon resubmission, the time...

  8. 19 CFR 144.27 - Withdrawal from warehouse by transferee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal from warehouse by transferee. 144.27...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) WAREHOUSE AND REWAREHOUSE ENTRIES AND WITHDRAWALS Transfer of Right To Withdraw Merchandise from Warehouse § 144.27 Withdrawal from warehouse by transferee. At any time within...

  9. Persistent opioid use following cesarean delivery: patterns and predictors among opioid-naïve women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Brian T; Franklin, Jessica M; Bykov, Katsiaryna; Avorn, Jerry; Shrank, William H; Brennan, Troyen A; Landon, Joan E; Rathmell, James P; Huybrechts, Krista F; Fischer, Michael A; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of opioid-related death in women has increased 5-fold over the past decade. For many women, their initial opioid exposure will occur in the setting of routine medical care. Approximately 1 in 3 deliveries in the United States is by cesarean, and opioids are commonly prescribed for postsurgical pain management. The objective of this study was to determine the risk that opioid-naïve women prescribed opioids after cesarean delivery will subsequently become consistent prescription opioid users in the year following delivery and to identify predictors for this behavior. We identified women in a database of commercial insurance beneficiaries who underwent cesarean delivery and who were opioid naïve in the year prior to delivery. To identify persistent users of opioids, we used trajectory models, which group together patients with similar patterns of medication filling during follow-up, based on patterns of opioid dispensing in the year following cesarean delivery. We then constructed a multivariable logistic regression model to identify independent risk factors for membership in the persistent user group. A total of 285 of 80,127 (0.36%, 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.40), opioid-naïve women became persistent opioid users (identified using trajectory models based on monthly patterns of opioid dispensing) following cesarean delivery. Demographics and baseline comorbidity predicted such use with moderate discrimination (c statistic = 0.73). Significant predictors included a history of cocaine abuse (risk, 7.41%; adjusted odds ratio, 6.11, 95% confidence interval, 1.03-36.31) and other illicit substance abuse (2.36%; adjusted odds ratio, 2.78, 95% confidence interval, 1.12-6.91), tobacco use (1.45%; adjusted odds ratio, 3.04, 95% confidence interval, 2.03-4.55), back pain (0.69%; adjusted odds ratio, 1.74, 95% confidence interval, 1.33-2.29), migraines (0.91%; adjusted odds ratio, 2.14, 95% confidence interval, 1.58-2.90), antidepressant use (1

  10. Attenuation of Morphine Withdrawal Syndrome by Various Dosages of Curcumin in Comparison with Clonidine in Mouse: Possible Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Motaghinejad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Herbal medical compounds and their major constituent have been used in the management and treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome and pain. This study was carried out to clarify the effect of curcumin, the major compound of turmeric, on morphine withdrawal syndrome in mouse model and its possible mechanisms of pain relieving activity by assessing in writhing test as a model of visceral pain. Methods: Due to two separate protocols (withdrawal syndrome and pain, 144 male albino mice were divided in two major groups. In withdrawal syndrome group, test effect of various dosages of curcumin (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg was assessed on withdrawal signs and compared with positive and negative control and standard treatment (clonidine 0.4 mg/kg groups. In pain groups, to determine the mechanism of pain relieving activity of curcumin, various dosages of curcumin (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg in three separated groups, were used against acetic acid induced writhing (which is a constriction test. The most effective dose (40 mg/kg was used in writhing test and compared with groups pretreated with antagonist of major neurotransmitters involved in pain; and compared with group pretreated with vehicle (DMSO, 0.05% as control. Results: Curcumin attenuates withdrawal syndrome in a dose dependent manner in comparison with the dependent positive control group (P<0.05. It also indicated that pretreatment with naloxone and cyproheptadine significantly attenuate antinociception effect of curcumin (P<0.05. Conclusion: This study advocate that antinociception of curcumin was mediated by opioidergic and adrenergic system.

  11. Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach implementation and treatment outcomes for youth with opioid problem use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godley, Mark D; Passetti, Lora L; Subramaniam, Geetha A; Funk, Rodney R; Smith, Jane Ellen; Meyers, Robert J

    2017-05-01

    This paper compares adolescents with primary opioid problem use (OPU) to those with primary marijuana or alcohol problem use (MAPU) who received up to six months of Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach (A-CRA), an empirically supported treatment. Intake clinical characteristics, treatment implementation measures, and clinical outcomes of two substance problem groups (OPU and MAPU) were compared using data from 1712 adolescents receiving A-CRA treatment. Data were collected at intake and 3, 6, and 12 months post-intake. At intake, adolescents in the OPU group were more likely than those in the MAPU group to be Caucasian, older, female, and not attending school; report greater substance and mental health problems; and engage in social and health risk behaviors. There was statistical equivalence between groups in rates of A-CRA treatment initiation, engagement, retention, and satisfaction. Both groups decreased significantly on most substance use outcomes, with the OPU group showing greater improvement; however, the OPU group had more severe problems at intake and continued to report higher frequency of opioid use and more days of emotional problems and residential treatment over 12 months. The feasibility and acceptability of A-CRA for OPUs was demonstrated. Despite significantly greater improvement by the OPU group, they did not improve to the level of the MAPU group over 12 months, suggesting that they may benefit from A-CRA continuing care up to 12 months, medication to address opioid withdrawal and craving, and the inclusion of opioid-focused A-CRA procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Gene expression profiling in the striatum of inbred mouse strains with distinct opioid-related phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piechota Marcin

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mouse strains with a contrasting response to morphine provide a unique model for studying the genetically determined diversity of sensitivity to opioid reward, tolerance and dependence. Four inbred strains selected for this study exhibit the most distinct opioid-related phenotypes. C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice show remarkable differences in morphine-induced antinociception, self-administration and locomotor activity. 129P3/J mice display low morphine tolerance and dependence in contrast to high sensitivity to precipitated withdrawal observed in SWR/J and C57BL/6J strains. In this study, we attempted to investigate the relationships between genetic background and basal gene expression profile in the striatum, a brain region involved in the mechanism of opioid action. Results Gene expression was studied by Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430v2.0 arrays with probes for over 39.000 transcripts. Analysis of variance with the control for false discovery rate (q Khdrbs1 and ATPase Na+/K+ alpha2 subunit (Atp1a2 with morphine self-administration and analgesic effects, respectively. Finally, the examination of transcript structure demonstrated a possible inter-strain variability of expressed mRNA forms as for example the catechol-O-methyltransferase (Comt gene. Conclusion The presented study led to the recognition of differences in the gene expression that may account for distinct phenotypes. Moreover, results indicate strong contribution of genetic background to differences in gene transcription in the mouse striatum. The genes identified in this work constitute promising candidates for further animal studies and for translational genetic studies in the field of addictive and analgesic properties of opioids.

  13. Patient Outcomes in Dose Reduction or Discontinuation of Long-Term Opioid Therapy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Joseph W; Lovejoy, Travis I; Becker, William C; Morasco, Benjamin J; Koenig, Christopher J; Hoffecker, Lilian; Dischinger, Hannah R; Dobscha, Steven K; Krebs, Erin E

    2017-08-01

    Expert guidelines recommend reducing or discontinuing long-term opioid therapy (LTOT) when risks outweigh benefits, but evidence on the effect of dose reduction on patient outcomes has not been systematically reviewed. To synthesize studies of the effectiveness of strategies to reduce or discontinue LTOT and patient outcomes after dose reduction among adults prescribed LTOT for chronic pain. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library from inception through April 2017; reference lists; and expert contacts. Original research published in English that addressed dose reduction or discontinuation of LTOT for chronic pain. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed study quality using the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force quality rating criteria. All authors assessed evidence quality using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. Prespecified patient outcomes were pain severity, function, quality of life, opioid withdrawal symptoms, substance use, and adverse events. Sixty-seven studies (11 randomized trials and 56 observational studies) examining 8 intervention categories, including interdisciplinary pain programs, buprenorphine-assisted dose reduction, and behavioral interventions, were found. Study quality was good for 3 studies, fair for 13 studies, and poor for 51 studies. Many studies reported dose reduction, but rates of opioid discontinuation ranged widely across interventions and the overall quality of evidence was very low. Among 40 studies examining patient outcomes after dose reduction (very low overall quality of evidence), improvement was reported in pain severity (8 of 8 fair-quality studies), function (5 of 5 fair-quality studies), and quality of life (3 of 3 fair-quality studies). Heterogeneous interventions and outcome measures; poor-quality studies with uncontrolled designs. Very low quality evidence suggests that several types of interventions may be effective to reduce or

  14. State Emergency Department Opioid Guidelines: Current Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broida, Robert I; Gronowski, Tanner; Kalnow, Andrew F; Little, Andrew G; Lloyd, Christopher M

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and categorize current state-sponsored opioid guidelines for the practice of emergency medicine (EM). We conducted a comprehensive search of EM-specific opioid prescribing guidelines and/or policies in each state to determine current state involvement in EM opioid prescribing, as well as to evaluate some of the specifics of each guideline or policy. The search was conducted using an online query and a follow-up email request to each state chapter of ACEP. We found that 17 states had emergency department-specific guidelines. We further organized the guidelines into four categories: limiting prescriptions for opioids with 67 total recommendations; preventing/diverting abuse with 56 total recommendations; addiction-related guidelines with 29 total recommendations; and a community resources section with 24 total recommendations. Our results showed that current state guidelines focus on providers limiting opioid pain prescriptions and vetting patients for possible abuse/diversion. This study highlights the 17 states that have addressed opioid prescribing guidelines and categorizes their efforts to date. It is hoped that this study will provide the basis for similar efforts in other states.

  15. Molecular Pharmacology of δ-Opioid Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Louis; Cahill, Catherine M.; von Zastrow, Mark; Schiller, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are among the most effective analgesics available and are the first choice in the treatment of acute severe pain. However, partial efficacy, a tendency to produce tolerance, and a host of ill-tolerated side effects make clinically available opioids less effective in the management of chronic pain syndromes. Given that most therapeutic opioids produce their actions via µ-opioid receptors (MOPrs), other targets are constantly being explored, among which δ-opioid receptors (DOPrs) are being increasingly considered as promising alternatives. This review addresses DOPrs from the perspective of cellular and molecular determinants of their pharmacological diversity. Thus, DOPr ligands are examined in terms of structural and functional variety, DOPrs’ capacity to engage a multiplicity of canonical and noncanonical G protein–dependent responses is surveyed, and evidence supporting ligand-specific signaling and regulation is analyzed. Pharmacological DOPr subtypes are examined in light of the ability of DOPr to organize into multimeric arrays and to adopt multiple active conformations as well as differences in ligand kinetics. Current knowledge on DOPr targeting to the membrane is examined as a means of understanding how these receptors are especially active in chronic pain management. Insight into cellular and molecular mechanisms of pharmacological diversity should guide the rational design of more effective, longer-lasting, and better-tolerated opioid analgesics for chronic pain management. PMID:27343248

  16. Increased opioid dependence in a mouse model of panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Gallego

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Panic disorder is a highly prevalent neuropsychiatric disorder that shows co-occurrence with substance abuse. Here, we demonstrate that TrkC, the high affinity receptor for neurotrophin-3, is a key molecule involved in panic disorder and opiate dependence, using a transgenic mouse model (TgNTRK3. Constitutive TrkC overexpression in TgNTRK3 mice dramatically alters spontaneous firing rates of locus coeruleus neurons and the response of the noradrenergic system to chronic opiate exposure, possibly related to the altered regulation of neurotrophic peptides observed. Notably, TgNTRK3 locus coeruleus neurons showed an increased firing rate in saline-treated conditions and profound abnormalities in their response to met5-enkephalin. Behaviorally, chronic morphine administration induced a significantly increased withdrawal syndrome in TgNTRK3 mice. In conclusion, we show here that the NT-3/TrkC system is an important regulator of neuronal firing in locus coeruleus and could contribute to the adaptations of the noradrenergic system in response to chronic opiate exposure. Moreover, our results indicate that TrkC is involved in the molecular and cellular changes in noradrenergic neurons underlying both panic attacks and opiate dependence and support a functional endogenous opioid deficit in panic disorder patients.

  17. Currently available cough suppressants for chronic cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kian Fan

    2008-01-01

    Chronic cough is a common symptom but only a fraction of patients seek medical attention. Addressing the causes of chronic cough may lead to control of cough; however, this approach is not always successful since there is a certain degree of failure even when the cause(s) of cough are adequately treated; in idiopathic cough, there is no cause to treat. Persistent cough may be associated with deterioration of quality of life, and treatment with cough suppressants is indicated. Currently available cough suppressants include the centrally acting opioids such as morphine, codeine, and dextromethorphan. Peripherally acting antitussives include moguisteine and levodropropizine. Early studies report success in reducing cough in patients with chronic bronchitis or COPD; however, a carefully conducted study showed no effect of codeine on cough of COPD. Success with these cough suppressants can be achieved at high doses that are associated with side effects. Slow-release morphine has been reported to be useful in controlling intractable cough with good tolerance to constipation and drowsiness. There have been case reports of the success of centrally acting drugs such as amitryptiline, paroxetine, gabapentin, and carbamezepine in chronic cough. New opioids such as nociceptin or antagonists of TRPV1 may turn out to be more effective. Efficacy of cough suppressants must be tested in double-blind randomised trials using validated measures of cough in patients with chronic cough not responding to specific treatments. Patients with chronic cough are in desperate need of effective antitussives that can be used either on demand or on a long-term basis.

  18. Sympathetic activity induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal is blocked in genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Martínez-Laorden, Elena; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-02-15

    There is large body evidence indicating that stress can lead to cardiovascular disease. However, the exact brain areas and the mechanisms involved remain to be revealed. Here, we performed a series of experiments to characterize the role of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) in the stress response induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. The experiments were performed in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) ventrolateral medulla (VLM), brain regions involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity, and in the right ventricle by using genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1R levels (KO). Mice were treated with increasing doses of morphine and withdrawal was precipitated by naloxone administration. Noradrenaline (NA) turnover, c-Fos, expression, PKA and TH phosphorylated at serine 40, was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Morphine withdrawal induced an enhancement of NA turnover in PVN in parallel with an increase in TH neurons expressing c-Fos in VLM in wild-type mice. In addition we have demonstrated an increase in NA turnover, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA levels in heart. The main finding of the present study was that NA turnover, TH positive neurons that express c-Fos, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA expression observed during morphine withdrawal were significantly inhibited in CRF1R KO mice. Our results demonstrate that CRF/CRF1R activation may contribute to the adaptive changes induced by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in the heart and in the brain areas which modulate the cardiac sympathetic function and suggest that CRF/CRF1R pathways could be contributing to cardiovascular disease associated to opioid addiction. - Highlights: • Naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal increases sympathetic activity in the PVN and heart. • Co-localization of TH phosphorylated at serine 40/c-Fos in the VLM after morphine withdrawal • Naloxone

  19. Sympathetic activity induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal is blocked in genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Martínez-Laorden, Elena; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-01-01

    There is large body evidence indicating that stress can lead to cardiovascular disease. However, the exact brain areas and the mechanisms involved remain to be revealed. Here, we performed a series of experiments to characterize the role of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) in the stress response induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. The experiments were performed in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) ventrolateral medulla (VLM), brain regions involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity, and in the right ventricle by using genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1R levels (KO). Mice were treated with increasing doses of morphine and withdrawal was precipitated by naloxone administration. Noradrenaline (NA) turnover, c-Fos, expression, PKA and TH phosphorylated at serine 40, was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Morphine withdrawal induced an enhancement of NA turnover in PVN in parallel with an increase in TH neurons expressing c-Fos in VLM in wild-type mice. In addition we have demonstrated an increase in NA turnover, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA levels in heart. The main finding of the present study was that NA turnover, TH positive neurons that express c-Fos, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA expression observed during morphine withdrawal were significantly inhibited in CRF1R KO mice. Our results demonstrate that CRF/CRF1R activation may contribute to the adaptive changes induced by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in the heart and in the brain areas which modulate the cardiac sympathetic function and suggest that CRF/CRF1R pathways could be contributing to cardiovascular disease associated to opioid addiction. - Highlights: • Naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal increases sympathetic activity in the PVN and heart. • Co-localization of TH phosphorylated at serine 40/c-Fos in the VLM after morphine withdrawal • Naloxone

  20. Alcohol Screening among Opioid Agonist Patients in a Primary Care Clinic and an Opioid Treatment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Jan; Muench, John; Wiest, Katharina; Croff, Raina; Rieckman, Traci; McCarty, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Problem alcohol use is associated with adverse health and economic outcomes, especially among people in opioid agonist treatment. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) are effective in reducing alcohol use; however, issues involved in SBIRT implementation among opioid agonist patients are unknown. To assess identification and treatment of alcohol use disorders, we reviewed clinical records of opioid agonist patients screened for an alcohol use disorder in a primary care clinic (n = 208) and in an opioid treatment program (n = 204) over a two-year period. In the primary care clinic, 193 (93%) buprenorphine patients completed an annual alcohol screening and six (3%) had elevated AUDIT scores. In the opioid treatment program, an alcohol abuse or dependence diagnosis was recorded for 54 (27%) methadone patients. Practitioner focus groups were completed in the primary care (n = 4 physicians) and the opioid treatment program (n = 11 counselors) to assess experience with and attitudes towards screening opioid agonist patients for alcohol use disorders. Focus groups suggested that organizational, structural, provider, patient, and community variables hindered or fostered alcohol screening. Alcohol screening is feasible among opioid agonist patients. Effective implementation, however, requires physician training and systematic changes in workflow.

  1. Antagonist-Elicited Cannabis Withdrawal in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, David A.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M.; Darwin, William D.; Kelly, Deanna L.; McMahon, Robert P.; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40–120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0–8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses. PMID:21869692

  2. Antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M; Darwin, William D; Kelly, Deanna L; McMahon, Robert P; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40-120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0-8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses.

  3. κ-Opioid Receptor Inhibition of Calcium Oscillations in Spinal Cord Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelamangalath, Lakshmi; Dravid, Shashank M.; George, Joju; Aldrich, Jane V.

    2011-01-01

    Mouse embryonic spinal cord neurons in culture exhibit spontaneous calcium oscillations from day in vitro (DIV) 6 through DIV 10. Such spontaneous activity in developing spinal cord contributes to maturation of synapses and development of pattern-generating circuits. Here we demonstrate that these calcium oscillations are regulated by κ opioid receptors (KORs). The κ opioid agonist dynorphin (Dyn)-A (1–13) suppressed calcium oscillations in a concentration-dependent manner, and both the nonselective opioid antagonist naloxone and the κ-selective blocker norbinaltorphimine eliminated this effect. The KOR-selective agonist (+)-(5α,7α,8β)-N-methyl-N-[7-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-1-oxaspiro[4.5]dec-8-yl]-benzeneacetamide (U69593) mimicked the effect of Dyn-A (1–13) on calcium oscillations. A κ-specific peptide antagonist, zyklophin, was also able to prevent the suppression of calcium oscillations caused by Dyn-A (1–13). These spontaneous calcium oscillations were blocked by 1 μM tetrodotoxin, indicating that they are action potential-dependent. Although the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel blocker nifedipine did not suppress calcium oscillations, the N-type calcium channel blocker ω-conotoxin inhibited this spontaneous response. Blockers of ionotropic glutamate receptors, 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo(f)quinoxaline and dizocilpine maleate (MK-801), also suppressed calcium oscillations, revealing a dependence on glutamate-mediated signaling. Finally, we have demonstrated expression of KORs in glutamatergic spinal neurons and localization in a presynaptic compartment, consistent with previous reports of KOR-mediated inhibition of glutamate release. The KOR-mediated inhibition of spontaneous calcium oscillations may therefore be a consequence of presynaptic inhibition of glutamate release. PMID:21422300

  4. Relationship of opioid prescription sales and overdoses, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarai, F; Mack, K; Hicks, P; Benoit, S; Park, S; Jones, C; Proescholdbell, S; Ising, A; Paulozzi, L

    2013-09-01

    In the United States, fatal drug overdoses have tripled since 1991. This escalation in deaths is believed to be driven primarily by prescription opioid medications. This investigation compared trends and patterns in sales of opioids, opioid drug overdoses treated in emergency departments (EDs), and unintentional overdose deaths in North Carolina (NC). Our ecological study compared rates of opioid sales, opioid related ED overdoses, and unintentional drug overdose deaths in NC. Annual sales data, provided by the Drug Enforcement Administration, for select opioids were converted into morphine equivalents and aggregated by zip code. These opioid drug sales rates were trended from 1997 to 2010. In addition, opioid sales were correlated and compared to opioid related ED visits, which came from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention syndromic surveillance system, and unintentional overdose deaths, which came from NC Vital Statistics, from 2008 to 2010. Finally, spatial cluster analysis was performed and rates were mapped by zip code in 2010. Opioid sales increased substantially from 1997 to 2010. From 2008 to 2010, the quarterly rates of opioid drug overdoses treated in EDs and opioid sales correlated (r=0.68, p=0.02). Specific regions of the state, particularly in the southern and western corners, had both high rates of prescription opioid sales and overdoses. Temporal trends in sales of prescription opioids correlate with trends in opioid related ED visits. The spatial correlation of opioid sales with ED visit rates shows that opioid sales data may be a timely way to identify high-risk communities in the absence of timely ED data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Opioid antagonists for alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösner, Susanne; Hackl-Herrwerth, Andrea; Leucht, Stefan; Vecchi, Simona; Srisurapanont, Manit; Soyka, Michael

    2010-12-08

    Alcohol dependence belongs to the globally leading health risk factors. Therapeutic success of psychosocial programs for relapse prevention is moderate and could be increased by an adjuvant treatment with the opioid antagonists naltrexone and nalmefene. To determine the effectiveness and tolerability of opioid antagonists in the treatment of alcohol dependence. We searched the Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group (CDAG) Specialized Register, PubMed, EMBASE and CINAHL in January 2010 and inquired manufacturers and researchers for unpublished trials. All double-blind randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which compare the effects of naltrexone or nalmefene with placebo or active control on drinking-related outcomes. Two authors independently extracted outcome data. Trial quality was assessed by one author and cross-checked by a second author. Based on a total of 50 RCTs with 7793 patients, naltrexone reduced the risk of heavy drinking to 83% of the risk in the placebo group RR 0.83 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.90) and decreased drinking days by about 4%, MD -3.89 (95% CI -5.75 to -2.04). Significant effects were also demonstrated for the secondary outcomes of the review including heavy drinking days, MD - 3.25 (95% CI -5.51 to -0.99), consumed amount of alcohol, MD - 10.83 (95% CI -19.69 to -1.97) and gamma-glutamyltransferase, MD - 10.37 (95% CI -18.99 to -1.75), while effects on return to any drinking, RR 0.96 (95 CI 0.92 to 1.00) missed statistical significance. Side effects of naltrexone were mainly gastrointestinal problems (e.g. nausea: RD 0.10; 95% CI 0.07 to 0.13) and sedative effects (e.g. daytime sleepiness: RD 0.09; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.14). Based on a limited study sample, effects of injectable naltrexone and nalmefene missed statistical significance. Effects of industry-sponsored studies, RR 0.90 (95% CI 0.78 to 1.05) did not significantly differ from those of non-profit funded trials, RR 0.84 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.91) and the linear regression test did not indicate publication

  6. Understanding opioid overdose characteristics involving prescription and illicit opioids: A mixed methods analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarborough, Bobbi Jo H; Stumbo, Scott P; Janoff, Shannon L; Yarborough, Micah T; McCarty, Dennis; Chilcoat, Howard D; Coplan, Paul M; Green, Carla A

    2016-10-01

    Opioid abuse and misuse are significant public health issues. The CDC estimated 72% of pharmaceutical-related overdose deaths in the US in 2012 involved opioids. While studies of opioid overdoses have identified sociodemographic characteristics, agents used, administration routes, and medication sources associated with overdoses, we know less about the context and life circumstances of the people who experience these events. We analyzed interviews (n=87) with survivors of opioid overdoses or family members of decedents. Individuals experiencing overdoses were members of a large integrated health system. Using ICD codes for opioid overdoses and poisonings, we identified participants from five purposefully derived pools of health-plan members who had: 1) prescriptions for OxyContin(®) or single-ingredient sustained-release oxycodone, 2) oxycodone single-ingredient immediate release, 3) other long-acting opioids, 4) other short-acting opioids, or 5) no active opioid prescriptions. Individuals who experienced opioid overdoses abused and misused multiple medications/drugs; experienced dose-related miscommunications or medication-taking errors; had mental health and/or substance use conditions; reported chronic pain; or had unstable resources or family/social support. Many had combinations of these risks. Most events involved polysubstance use, often including benzodiazepines. Accidental overdoses were commonly the result of abuse or misuse, some in response to inadequately treated chronic pain or, less commonly, medication-related mistakes. Suicide attempts were frequently triggered by consecutive negative life events. To identify people at greater risk of opioid overdose, efforts should focus on screening for prescribed and illicit polysubstance use, impaired cognition, and changes in life circumstances, psychosocial risks/supports, and pain control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy and safety of a sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone rapidly dissolving tablet for the treatment of adults with opioid dependence: A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Lynn; Hjelmström, Peter; Sumner, Michael; Gunderson, Erik W

    2016-01-01

    This prospective, randomized, active-controlled, non-inferiority study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone rapidly dissolving tablet (Zubsolv ® ; buprenorphine/naloxone rapidly dissolving tablet) versus generic buprenorphine for induction of opioid maintenance among dependent adults. The study, conducted at 13 sites from June 2013 to January 2014, included a 2-day blinded induction phase and a 27-day open-label stabilization/maintenance phase. During the blinded induction, patients received fixed doses of buprenorphine/naloxone rapidly dissolving tablets or generic buprenorphine. During open-label stabilization/early maintenance, all patients received buprenorphine/naloxone rapidly dissolving tablets. The primary efficacy assessment was treatment retention at day 3; buprenorphine/naloxone rapidly dissolving tablets were considered non-inferior to generic buprenorphine if the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval for the difference between the treatments was ≥-10% in patients retained on day 3. Secondary assessments included opioid withdrawal symptoms and cravings as measured using the Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale, the Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale, and the opioid cravings visual analogue scale. Safety was also assessed. A total of 313 patients were randomly assigned to induction with generic buprenorphine or buprenorphine/naloxone rapidly dissolving tablets. The mean age was 38.4 years, and the mean duration of opioid dependence was 12.4 years. For the primary efficacy assessment, 235 of 256 patients (91.8%) were retained at day 3 and continued to the maintenance phase. The lower limit of the 95% confidence interval was -13.7; thus, buprenorphine/naloxone rapidly dissolving tablets did not demonstrate non-inferiority to generic buprenorphine, and significantly more patients who received induction with generic buprenorphine (122/128 [95.3%]) were retained at day 3 compared with those who received induction with

  8. Polysubstance Abuse: Alcohol, Opioids and Benzodiazepines Require Coordinated Engagement by Society, Patients, and Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogbu, Uzor C

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC has published significant data trends related to substance abuse involving opioid pain relievers (OPR, benzodiazepines and alcohol in the United States. The CDC describes opioid misuse and abuse as an epidemic, with the use of OPR surpassing that of illicit drugs. Alcohol has also been a persistent problem and is associated with a number of emergency department visits and deaths independent of other substances. The use of these drugs in combination creates an additive effect with increased central nervous system suppression and a heightened risk of an overdose. We present a summary of the findings from the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR with commentary on strategies to combat prescription drug and alcohol abuse. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:76–79.

  9. Polysubstance abuse: alcohol, opioids and benzodiazepines require coordinated engagement by society, patients, and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbu, Uzor C; Lotfipour, Shahram; Chakravarthy, Bharath

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has published significant data trends related to substance abuse involving opioid pain relievers (OPR), benzodiazepines and alcohol in the United States. The CDC describes opioid misuse and abuse as an epidemic, with the use of OPR surpassing that of illicit drugs. Alcohol has also been a persistent problem and is associated with a number of emergency department visits and deaths independent of other substances. The use of these drugs in combination creates an additive effect with increased central nervous system suppression and a heightened risk of an overdose. We present a summary of the findings from the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) with commentary on strategies to combat prescription drug and alcohol abuse.

  10. MDAN-21: A Bivalent Opioid Ligand Containing mu-Agonist and Delta-Antagonist Pharmacophores and Its Effects in Rhesus Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario D. Aceto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MDAN-21, 7′-{2-[(7-{2-[({(5α,6α-4,5-Epoxy-3,14-dihydroxy-17-methylmorphin-6-yl}-aminocarbonylmetoxy]-acetylamino}-heptylaminocarbonyl-methoxy]-acetylamino}-naltrindole, a bivalent opioid ligand containing a mu-opioid receptor agonist (derived from oxymorphone linked to the delta-opioid receptor antagonist (related to naltrindole by a spacer of 21 atoms, was reported to have potent analgesic properties in mice. Tolerance, physical dependence, and conditioned place preference were not evident in that species. The finding that bivalent ligands in this series, with spacers 19 atoms or greater, were devoid of tolerance and dependence led to the proposal that MDAN-21 targets heteromeric mu-delta-opioid receptors. The present study focused on its effects in nonhuman primates (Macaca mulatta, a species with a physiology and behavioral repertoire not unlike humans. With regard to opioids, this species usually better predicts clinical outcomes. MDAN-21 substituted for morphine in morphine-dependent monkeys in the remarkably low dose range 0.006–0.032 mg/kg, subcutaneously. Although MDAN-21 failed to produce reliable thermal analgesia in the dose range 0.0032–0.032 mg/kg, intramuscularly, it was active in the same dose range and by the same route of administration, in the capsaicin-induced thermal allodynia assay. The results suggest that MDAN-21 may be useful in the treatment of opioid dependence and allodynia. The data provide additional evidence that opioid withdrawal is associated with sensitized pain.

  11. Control rod excess withdrawal prevention device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Yoshihito.

    1992-01-01

    Excess withdrawal of a control rod of a BWR type reactor is prevented. That is, the device comprises (1) a speed detector for detecting the driving speed of a control rod, (2) a judging circuit for outputting an abnormal signal if the driving speed is greater than a predetermined level and (3) a direction control valve compulsory closing circuit for controlling the driving direction of inserting and withdrawing a control rod based on an abnormal signal. With such a constitution, when the with drawing speed of a control rod is greater than a predetermined level, it is detected by the speed detector and the judging circuit. Then, all of the direction control valve are closed by way of the direction control valve compulsory closing circuit. As a result, the operation of the control rod is stopped compulsorily and the withdrawing speed of the control rod can be lowered to a speed corresponding to that upon gravitational withdrawal. Accordingly, excess withdrawal can be prevented. (I.S)

  12. Epidemiological and sociodemographic factors associated with complicated alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte-Secades, R; Blanco-Soto, M; Díaz-Peromingo, J A; Sanvisens-Bergé, A; Martín-González, M C; Barbosa, A; Rosón-Hernández, B; Tejero-Delgado, M A; Puerta-Louro, R; Rabuñal-Rey, R

    2017-10-01

    To analyse the influence of epidemiological and sociodemographic factors in complicated alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS). A multicentre, observational prospective study was conducted on consecutively added patients with AWS hospitalised in internal medicine departments. We recorded sociodemographic, epidemiological, clinical and progression data. Complicated AWS was defined as that which progressed with seizures or delirium tremens. We studied 228 episodes of AWS in 219 patients. The mean age was 54.5 years (SD, 11.5), and 90.8% were men. AWS was the cause for hospitalisation in 39.9% of the patients. Some 27.1% of the cases presented seizures, and 32.4% presented delirium tremens. The daily quantity of alcohol ingested was 17.8 standard drink units (SD, 21.4), with 16.6 years of dependence (SD, 11.3). The pattern of alcohol abuse was regular in 82.8% of the patients. Some 38.4% of the patients were married or had a partner, and 45.6% had children. Some 72.7% of the patients were unemployed or retired. Some 68.5% had only completed primary studies. Some 4.8% consumed cannabis, 5.2% consumed cocaine and 3% consumed opioids. The independent variables related to complicated AWS were consumption of a drug other than alcohol (OR, 5.3; 95% CI 1.5-18.7), low education level (OR, 3.4; 95% CI 1.6-7.3) and hospitalisation for AWS (OR, 2.9; 95% CI 1.5-5.6). The model's receiver operating characteristic area was 0.718 (95% CI 0.643-0.793). Concomitant drug abuse and a low educational level could help identify patients at risk of complicated AWS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  13. Methadone and buprenorphine for the management of opioid dependence in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hendrée E; Finnegan, Loretta P; Kaltenbach, Karol

    2012-04-16

    This article provides an overview and discussion of the collective maternal, fetal and neonatal outcome research on women maintained on methadone or buprenorphine during pregnancy. Its focus is on an assessment of the comparative effectiveness of methadone and buprenorphine pharmacotherapy, with particular attention given to recent findings from the literature. Recommendations for clinical practice are outlined, and directions for future research are presented. Findings from comparative studies of methadone and buprenorphine underscore the efficacy of both medications in preventing relapse to illicit opioid use in the treatment of opioid-dependent pregnant patients, as well as the simplicity of induction onto methadone and patient retention while receiving such therapy. Fetal monitoring suggests that buprenorphine results in less fetal cardiac and movement suppression than does methadone. The clinical implications of these findings need future exploration. For the neonate, evidence from studies using a wide range of designs, including retrospective chart reviews, prospective observational studies, and randomized clinical trials, show consistent results, with prenatal exposure to buprenorphine resulting in less severe neonatal abstinence syndrome relative to methadone. Any medication given to pregnant women should be prescribed only after considering the risk : benefit ratio for the maternal-fetal dyad. Medication choices for each opioid-dependent patient during pregnancy need to be made on a patient-by-patient basis, taking into consideration the patient's opioid dependence history, previous and current treatment experiences, medical circumstances and treatment preferences. Moreover, for a full remission of opioid addiction to be sustainable, both post-partum and across the lifespan, treatment providers must not rely solely on medication to treat their patients but should also utilize women-specific comprehensive treatment models that address the underlying

  14. The use of methadone to facilitate opioid weaning in pediatric critical care patients: a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervan, Leslie A; Yaghmai, Beryl; Watson, Robert Scott; Wolf, Fredric M

    2017-03-01

    Continuous opioid infusion therapy is commonly utilized in the pediatric intensive care setting to treat pain and facilitate tolerance of invasive therapies. Transitioning to methadone is one common strategy for weaning from continuous opioid infusions, but in practice this transition can be challenging, and many children still experience iatrogenic withdrawal. We reviewed the literature to evaluate the best available evidence to guide methadone therapy in this setting, and to summarize associated adverse events. We included all studies of methadone used to facilitate weaning from continuous opioid infusions in pediatric critical care patients, including medical, cardiac, and surgical patients, excluding case reports and studies treating neonatal abstinence syndrome, or acute or chronic pain. Medline, Embase, and CINAHL databases from inception to May 2015 were queried; references of included works and conference proceedings were also reviewed. Two authors independently extracted data from each study. Meta-analysis with fixed- and random-effects models was used to pool results of studies when applicable. Twelve studies involving 459 patients met criteria for inclusion. A wide variety of methadone dosing and taper strategies were reported. Mean inpatient methadone taper times varied widely, from 4.3 to 26.2 days. Excessive sedation was the most frequently reported adverse event, occurring in up to 16% of patients. Withdrawal occurred in 27% of patients among studies reporting this outcome. In three of three studies in which a new methadone protocol was introduced, a decreased proportion of patients experienced withdrawal (standardized mean difference, SMD = -0.60, 95% CI = -0.998 to -0.195, P = 0.004). We did not identify sufficient evidence to recommend any particular methadone weaning strategy, or to recommend methadone over other medications or prescribed infusion weaning, for successful weaning of continuous opioid infusions in the pediatric intensive care

  15. Problem Drug-related Behavior and Discontinuation of Opioids Following the Introduction of an Opioid Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Lucinda A; Thompson, Ellen Campbell; Au, Margaret A; Sawyer, Devin; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Rosenblatt, Roger

    Problem drug-related behavior (PDB) among patients on chronic opioid therapy may reflect an opioid use disorder. This study assessed PDB prevalence and the relationship between PDB and ongoing prescription of opioids at a primary care clinic that implemented a multifaceted opioid management program. A chart review of patients in a chronic opioid registry assessed prevalence of different types of PDB over 2 years, and whether opioids were prescribed during the last 3 months of the 2-year study period among patients with different levels of PDB. Among 233 registry patients, 84.1% exhibited PDB; 45.5% exhibited ≥3 types of PDB. At the end of 2 years, most registry patients were still prescribed opioids, though patients with ≥3 types of PDB were less likely than those without PDB to be prescribed opioids (62.3% vs. 78.4%, P = 0.016). PDB was pervasive in this population of patients on chronic opioid therapy. Those with the most PDB, and thus with the greatest likelihood of opioid use disorder and its social and medical consequences, were the least likely to be prescribed opioids by the clinic after 2 years. Given the rising rates of illicit opioid use in the U.S., it is important that clinics work closely with their patients who display PDB, systematically assess them for opioid use disorder, and offer evidence-based treatment. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  16. Opioid Receptors Blockade Modulates Apoptosis in a Rat Model of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of endogenous opioids in the apoptosis process in a rat model of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. Materials and Methods: Cirrhosis was ... Conclusion: Apoptosis occurs during cirrhotic cardiomyopathy and endogenous opioid receptors blockade using naltrexone ..... Further research would define the responsible pathways.

  17. Pain Management in the Opioid-Dependent Pregnant Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safley, Rebecca R; Swietlikowski, Jamie

    Opioid dependence is an epidemic in the United States, and the percentage of pregnant women who are opioid dependent has increased dramatically in the last decade. Pain management, already a concern for intrapartum and postpartum care, is complicated in the context of opioid dependence. This clinical review surveys the literature on pain management in opioid-dependent pregnant women to summarize current consensus and evidence to guide clinical practice. Points of consensus for pain management in opioid-dependent pregnant women include continual opioid maintenance therapy throughout the pregnancy and the postpartum period; adequate management of acute pain; the contraindication of opioid agonist-antagonists for pain management; and the need for interdisciplinary teams using a multimodal approach to provide optimal care to opioid-dependent pregnant women.

  18. Opioid Overdose Prevention: Safety Advice for Patients & Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAMHSA Opioid Overdose Prevention TOOLKIT: Safety Advice for Patients & Family Members TABLE OF CONTENTS Safety Advice for Patients & Family ... Advice for Patients & Family Members. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 What Are Opioids. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Preventing Overdose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 If You Suspect an ...

  19. Bias Factor and Therapeutic Window Correlate to Predict Safer Opioid Analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Cullen L; Kennedy, Nicole M; Ross, Nicolette C; Lovell, Kimberly M; Yue, Zhizhou; Morgenweck, Jenny; Cameron, Michael D; Bannister, Thomas D; Bohn, Laura M

    2017-11-16

    Biased agonism has been proposed as a means to separate desirable and adverse drug responses downstream of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) targets. Herein, we describe structural features of a series of mu-opioid-receptor (MOR)-selective agonists that preferentially activate receptors to couple to G proteins or to recruit βarrestin proteins. By comparing relative bias for MOR-mediated signaling in each pathway, we demonstrate a strong correlation between the respiratory suppression/antinociception therapeutic window in a series of compounds spanning a wide range of signaling bias. We find that βarrestin-biased compounds, such as fentanyl, are more likely to induce respiratory suppression at weak analgesic doses, while G protein signaling bias broadens the therapeutic window, allowing for antinociception in the absence of respiratory suppression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Low doses of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitors rapidly evoke opioid receptor-mediated thermal hyperalgesia in naïve mice which is converted to prominent analgesia by cotreatment with ultra-low-dose naltrexone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Stanley M; Shen, Ke-Fei

    2008-09-22

    Systemic (s.c.) injection in naïve mice of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase (cAMP-PDE) inhibitors, e.g. 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine [(IBMX) or caffeine, 10 mg/kg] or the more specific cAMP-PDE inhibitor, rolipram (1 mug/kg), rapidly evokes thermal hyperalgesia (lasting >5 h). These effects appear to be mediated by enhanced excitatory opioid receptor signaling, as occurs during withdrawal in opioid-dependent mice. Cotreatment of these mice with ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX, 0.1 ng/kg-1 pg/kg, s.c.) results in prominent opioid analgesia (lasting >4 h) even when the dose of rolipram is reduced to 1 pg/kg. Cotreatment of these cAMP-PDE inhibitors in naïve mice with an ultra-low-dose (0.1 ng/kg) of the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) or the mu-opioid receptor antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA) also results in opioid analgesia. These excitatory effects of cAMP-PDE inhibitors in naïve mice may be mediated by enhanced release of small amounts of endogenous bimodally-acting (excitatory/inhibitory) opioid agonists by neurons in nociceptive networks. Ultra-low-dose NTX, nor-BNI or beta-FNA selectively antagonizes high-efficacy excitatory (hyperalgesic) Gs-coupled opioid receptor-mediated signaling in naïve mice and results in rapid conversion to inhibitory (analgesic) Gi/Go-coupled opioid receptor-mediated signaling which normally requires activation by much higher doses of opioid agonists. Cotreatment with a low subanalgesic dose of kelatorphan, an inhibitor of multiple endogenous opioid peptide-degrading enzymes, stabilizes endogenous opioid agonists released by cAMP-PDE inhibitors, resulting in conversion of the hyperalgesia to analgesia without requiring selective blockade of excitatory opioid receptor signaling. The present study provides a novel pharmacologic paradigm that may facilitate development of valuable non-narcotic clinical analgesics utilizing cotreatment with ultra-low-dose rolipram plus ultra-low-dose NTX or related

  1. Exogenous Cushing's syndrome and glucocorticoid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Rachel L; Leinung, Matthew C

    2005-06-01

    Glucocorticoid therapy in various forms is extremely common for a wide range of inflammatory, autoimmune, and neoplastic disorders. It is therefore important for the physician to be aware of the possibility of both iatrogenic and factitious Cushing's syndrome. Although most common with oral therapy, it is also important to be alert to the fact that all forms of glucocorticoid delivery have the potential to cause Cushing's syndrome. Withdrawal from chronic glucocorticoid therapy presents significant challenges. These include the possibility of adrenal insufficiency after discontinuation of steroid therapy, recurrence of underlying disease as the glucocorticoid is being withdrawn, and the possibility of steroid withdrawal symptoms. Nonetheless, with patience and persistence, a reasonable approach to withdrawal of glucocorticoid therapy can be achieved.

  2. Antinociceptive Effect of Ghrelin in a Rat Model of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Involves TRPV1/Opioid Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing Mao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, defined as recurrent abdominal pain and changes in bowel habits, seriously affects quality of life and ability to work. Ghrelin is a brain-gut hormone, which has been reported to show antinociceptive effects in peripheral pain. We investigated the effect of ghrelin on visceral hypersensitivity and pain in a rat model of IBS. Methods: Maternal deprivation (MD was used to provide a stress-induced model of IBS in Wistar rats. Colorectal distension (CRD was used to detect visceral sensitivity, which was evaluated by abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR scores. Rats that were confirmed to have visceral hypersensitivity after MD were injected with ghrelin (10 µg/kg subcutaneously twice a week from weeks 7 to 8. [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 (100 nmol/L and naloxone (100 nmol/L were administered subcutaneously to block growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1α (GHS-R1α and opioid receptors, respectively. Expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1 and µ and κ opioid receptors (MOR and KOR in colon, dorsal root ganglion (DRG and cerebral cortex tissues were detected by western blotting, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, immunohistochemical analyses and immunofluorescence. Results: Ghrelin treatment increased expression of opioid receptors and inhibited expression of TRPV1 in colon, dorsal root ganglion (DRG and cerebral cortex. The antinociceptive effect of ghrelin in the rat model of IBS was partly blocked by both the ghrelin antagonist [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 and the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. Conclusion: The results indicate that ghrelin exerted an antinociceptive effect, which was mediated via TRPV1/opioid systems, in IBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity. Ghrelin might potentially be used as a new treatment for IBS.

  3. Hypoxia Induces Internalization of κ-Opioid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Chunhua; Liang, Xuan; Chen, Chunhua; Babazada, Hasan; Li, Tianzuo; Liu, Renyu

    2017-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that κ-opioid receptor agonists can reduce hypoxia-ischemia brain injury in animal models. However, it is unclear how the κ-opioid receptor responds to hypoxia-ischemia. In the current study, the authors used an in vitro model of oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation to explore how κ-opioid receptors respond to hypoxia and reoxygenation. Mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2A cells were stably transfected with mouse κ-opioid receptor-tdTomato fusion protein or Flag-tagged mouse κ-opioid receptor, divided into several groups (n = 6 to 12), and used to investigate the κ-opioid receptor movement. Observations were performed under normal oxygen, at 30 min to 1 h after oxygen-glucose deprivation and at 1 h after reoxygenation using high-resolution imaging techniques including immunoelectronmicroscopy in the presence and absence of κ-opioid receptor antagonist, dynamin inhibitors, potassium channel blockers, and dopamine receptor inhibitor. Hypoxic conditions caused the κ-opioid receptor to be internalized into the cells. Inhibition of dynamin by Dyngo-4a prevented the receptor internalization. Interestingly, a specific κ-opioid receptor antagonist norbinaltorphimine blocked internalization, suggesting the involvement of activation of a specific κ-opioid receptor. κ-Opioid receptor internalization appears to be reversed by reoxygenation. Quantities of intracellular κ-opioid receptor-associated gold particles as demonstrated by immunoelectron microscopy were increased from 37 to 85% (P internalization. Hypoxia induces reversible κ-opioid receptor internalization, which was inhibited by selective κ-opioid receptor antagonists or dynamin inhibitor, and can be reversed by reoxygenation in neuroblastoma cells, indicating the modulating effects between κ-opioid receptor and hypoxia via κ-opioid receptor activation and the dynamin-dependent mechanism.

  4. Chronic ethanol consumption in rats produces opioid antinociceptive tolerance through inhibition of mu opioid receptor endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li He

    Full Text Available It is well known that the mu-opioid receptor (MOR plays an important role in the rewarding properties of ethanol. However, it is less clear how chronic ethanol consumption affects MOR signaling. Here, we demonstrate that rats with prolonged voluntary ethanol consumption develop antinociceptive tolerance to opioids. Signaling through the MOR is controlled at many levels, including via the process of endocytosis. Importantly, agonists at the MOR that promote receptor endocytosis, such as the endogenous peptides enkephalin and β-endorphin, show a reduced propensity to promote antinociceptive tolerance than do agonists, like morphine, which do not promote receptor endocytosis. These observations led us to examine whether chronic ethanol consumption produced opioid tolerance by interfering with MOR endocytosis. Indeed, here we show that chronic ethanol consumption inhibits the endocytosis of MOR in response to opioid peptide. This loss of endocytosis was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2 protein levels after chronic drinking, suggesting that loss of this component of the trafficking machinery could be a mechanism by which endocytosis is lost. We also found that MOR coupling to G-protein was decreased in ethanol-drinking rats, providing a functional explanation for loss of opioid antinociception. Together, these results suggest that chronic ethanol drinking alters the ability of MOR to endocytose in response to opioid peptides, and consequently, promotes tolerance to the effects of opioids.

  5. Modulation of neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors influences the expression of amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference and amphetamine withdrawal anxiety-like behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlinska, J H; Gibula-Bruzda, E; Koltunowska, D; Raoof, H; Suder, P; Silberring, J

    2012-01-01

    Many data indicate that endogenous opioid system is involved in amphetamine-induced behavior. Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) possesses opioid-modulating properties. The aim of the present study was to determine whether pharmacological modulation of NPFF receptors modify the expression of amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) and amphetamine withdrawal anxiety-like behavior, both processes relevant to drug addiction/abuse. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of NPFF (5, 10, and 20 nmol) inhibited the expression of amphetamine CPP at the doses of 10 and 20 nmol. RF9, the NPFF receptors antagonist, reversed inhibitory effect of NPFF (20 nmol, i.c.v.) at the doses of 10 and 20 nmol and did not show any effect in amphetamine- and saline conditioned rats. Anxiety-like effect of amphetamine withdrawal was measured 24h after the last (14 days) amphetamine (2.5mg/kg, i.p.) treatment in the elevated plus-maze test. Amphetamine withdrawal decreased the percent of time spent by rats in the open arms and the percent of open arms entries. RF9 (5, 10, and 20 nmol, i.c.v.) significantly reversed these anxiety-like effects of amphetamine withdrawal and elevated the percent of time spent by rats in open arms at doses of 5 and 10 nmol, and the percent of open arms entries in all doses used. NPFF (20 nmol) pretreatment inhibited the effect of RF9 (10 nmol). Our results indicated that stimulation or inhibition of NPFF receptors decrease the expression of amphetamine CPP and amphetamine withdrawal anxiety, respectively. These findings may have implications for a better understanding of the processes involved in amphetamine dependence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Global Supply and Demand of Opioids for Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnumpurath, Sreekumar; Julien, Natasha; Kodumudi, Gopal; Kunnumpurath, Anamika; Kodumudi, Vijay; Vadivelu, Nalini

    2018-04-04

    The goal of this review is to evaluate the global supply and demand of opioids used for pain management and discuss how it relates to the utilization of opioids around the world. The purpose of the review is also to determine the factors that contribute to inappropriate pain management. The total global production of opium for opioid manufacturing is enough to supply the growing global demands. However, licit opioids are only consumed by 20% of the world population. Most people throughout the world had no access to opioid analgesics for pain relief in case of need. Opioid misuse and abuse is not only a phenomena plague by the USA but globally across many countries. Many countries have a lack of availability of opioids, contributing factors being strict government regulations limiting access, lack of knowledge of the efficacy of opioid analgesics in treating acute and chronic pain and palliative care, and the stigma that opioids are highly addictive. For the countries in which opioids are readily available and prescribed heavily, diversion, misuse, abuse, and the resurgence of heroin have become problems leading to morbidity and mortality. It is pertinent to find a balance between having opioids accessible to patients in need, with ensuring that opioids are regulated along with other illicit drugs to decrease abuse potential.

  7. Opioid Analgesics and Nicotine: More Than Blowing Smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin H; Lane, Scott D; Weaver, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    Practitioners are highly likely to encounter patients with concurrent use of nicotine products and opioid analgesics. Smokers present with more severe and extended chronic pain outcomes and have a higher frequency of prescription opioid use. Current tobacco smoking is a strong predictor of risk for nonmedical use of prescription opioids. Opioid and nicotinic-cholinergic neurotransmitter systems interact in important ways to modulate opioid and nicotine effects: dopamine release induced by nicotine is dependent on facilitation by the opioid system, and the nicotinic-acetylcholine system modulates self-administration of several classes of abused drugs-including opioids. Nicotine can serve as a prime for the use of other drugs, which in the case of the opioid system may be bidirectional. Opioids and compounds in tobacco, including nicotine, are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, but the metabolism of opioids and tobacco products can be complicated. Accordingly, drug interactions are possible but not always clear. Because of these issues, asking about nicotine use in patients taking opioids for pain is recommended. When assessing patient tobacco use, practitioners should also obtain information on products other than cigarettes, such as cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco, and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS, or e-cigarettes). There are multiple forms of behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy available to assist patients with smoking cessation, and opioid agonist maintenance and pain clinics represent underutilized opportunities for nicotine intervention programs.

  8. Recent advances in the use of opioids for cancer pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Droney

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Joanne Droney, Julia RileyPalliative Medicine Department, Royal Marsden Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Opioids are the mainstay of treatment for moderate to severe cancer pain. In recent years there have been many advances in the use of opioids for cancer pain. Availability and consumption of opioids have increased and opioids other than morphine (including methadone, fentanyl, oxycodone have become more widely used. Inter-individual variation in response to opioids has been identified as a significant challenge in the management of cancer pain. Many studies have been published demonstrating the benefits of opioid switching as a clinical maneuver to improve tolerability. Constipation has been recognized as a significant burden in cancer patients on opioids. Peripherally restricted opioid antagonists have been developed for the prevention and management of opioid induced constipation. The phenomenon of breakthrough pain has been characterized and novel modes of opioid administration (transmucosal, intranasal, sublingual have been explored to facilitate improved management of breakthrough cancer pain. Advances have also been made in the realm of molecular biology. Pharmacogenetic studies have explored associations between clinical response to opioids and genetic variation at a DNA level. To date these studies have been small but future research may facilitate prospective prediction of response to individual drugs.Keywords: opioids, cancer, pain, pharmacogenetics, constipation, breakthrough pain

  9. Endogenous opioid antagonism in physiological experimental pain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Pereira, Manuel P; Andersen, Lars Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Opioid antagonists are pharmacological tools applied as an indirect measure to detect activation of the endogenous opioid system (EOS) in experimental pain models. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effect of mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) antagonists in placebo-controlled, double...

  10. Opioids and spike-wave discharges in rats: Pharmacological studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Przewlocka, B.; Lason, W.; Coenen, A.; Przewlocki, R.

    1995-01-01

    Numerous studies have provided evidence for the involvement of opioids in the mechanisms of various forms of epilepsy. Most have investigated the effects of opioids in the control and genesis of convulsive epilepsy, whereas data on opioids mechanisms with respect to nonconvulsive epilepsy are almost

  11. L-theanine attenuates abstinence signs in morphine-dependent rhesus monkeys and elicits anxiolytic-like activity in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Laura E.; Premaratne, Ishani D.; Gamage, Thomas F.; Lichtman, Aron H.; Hughes, Larry D.; Harris, Louis S.; Aceto, Mario D.

    2012-01-01

    L-theanine, 2-Amino-4-(ethylcarbamoyl) butyric acid, an amino acid found in green tea (Camellia sinensis), is sold in the United States as a dietary supplement to reduce stress and improve cognition and mood. The observations that L-theanine has been shown to inhibit caffeine’s stimulatory effects and that caffeine produces precipitated withdrawal signs in opioid-addicted monkeys and some opioid withdrawal signs in some normal monkeys, suggest that L-theanine may suppress opioid withdrawal si...

  12. Post-Craniotomy Pain Management: Beyond Opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Lauren K; Naik, Bhiken I; Nemergut, Edward C; Durieux, Marcel E

    2016-10-01

    Craniotomy pain may be severe and is often undertreated. Pain management following craniotomy is a balancing act of achieving adequate analgesia but avoiding sedation, respiratory depression, hypercapnia, nausea and vomiting, and hypertension. Opioids are a first-line analgesic therapy; however, concern that opioid-related adverse effects (sedation, respiratory depression) may interfere with neurologic assessment and increase intracranial pressure has limited use of these drugs for intracranial surgery. Non-opioid analgesics avoid these effects and may be useful as part of a multimodal regimen for post-craniotomy pain. Regional scalp blocks, paracetamol, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are beneficial in the early post-operative period. Recent studies suggest a role for novel analgesics: dexmedetomidine, gabapentinoids, and ketamine, though additional studies are necessary.

  13. Novel Opioid Analgesics and Side Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, Giovanna; Spahn, Viola; Stein, Christoph

    2017-08-16

    Conventional opioids mediate analgesia as well as severe adverse effects via G-protein coupled opioid receptors (OR) in both inflamed (peripheral injured tissue) and healthy (brain, intestinal wall) environments. To exclude side effects, OR activation can be selectively achieved in damaged tissue by lowering the pK a of an opioid ligand to the acidic pH of inflammation. As a result, protonation of the ligand and consequent OR binding and activation of G-proteins is pH- and injury-specific. A novel compound (NFEPP) demonstrates the feasibility of this approach and displays blockade of pain transmission only at the peripheral site of injury, but with lack of central and gastrointestinal adverse effects. These findings suggest disease-specific receptor activation as a new strategy in drug design.

  14. Personality as a risk factor for illicit opioid use and a protective factor for illicit opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaaijer, Eline R; Bruijel, Jessica; Blanken, Peter; Hendriks, Vincent; Koeter, Maarten W J; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Booij, Jan; Goudriaan, Anna E; van Ree, Jan M; van den Brink, Wim

    2014-12-01

    Most studies investigating the role of personality as a risk factor for the development of opioid dependence compare dependent opioid users with healthy controls who never used heroin. In order to understand the potential protective role of personality, it is crucial to compare illicit opioid users who never became dependent with dependent opioid users. This study aims to examine the role of personality as a risk factor for opioid use and as a protective factor for the development of opioid dependence. Comparing personality factors between three groups: (1) 161 never-dependent illicit opioid users who have been using illicit opioids but never became opioid dependent; (2) 402 dependent opioid users in methadone maintenance treatment or heroin-assisted treatment; and (3) 135 healthy controls who never used heroin. Personality was assessed with a short version of Cloninger's Temperament and Character Inventory. Never-dependent opioid users reported more Novelty Seeking and Harm Avoidance and less Self-Directedness and Cooperativeness than healthy controls and more Reward Dependence and Self-Directedness, and less Harm Avoidance than dependent opioid users. Furthermore, never-dependent opioid users reported more Self-Transcendence than both dependent opioid users and healthy controls. Never-dependent opioid users may have started to use opioids partly due to their tendency to seek novel and/or spiritual experiences (high Novelty Seeking, high Self-Transcendence) and their tendency to avoid aversive stimuli (high Harm Avoidance), whereas they may have been protected against the development of dependence by their need for social approval (high Reward Dependence) and their self-efficacy (high Self-Directedness). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Past-year Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Opioid Prescriptions and Self-reported Opioid Use in an Emergency Department Population With Opioid Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Kathryn; D'Onofrio, Gail; Fiellin, David A; Chawarski, Marek C; O'Connor, Patrick G; Owens, Patricia H; Pantalon, Michael V; Bernstein, Steven L

    2017-11-22

    Despite increasing reliance on prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) as a response to the opioid epidemic, the relationship between aberrant drug-related behaviors captured by the PDMP and opioid use disorder is incompletely understood. How PDMP data should guide emergency department (ED) assessment has not been studied. The objective was to evaluate a relationship between PDMP opioid prescription records and self-reported nonmedical opioid use of prescription opioids in a cohort of opioid-dependent ED patients enrolled in a treatment trial. PDMP opioid prescription records during 1 year prior to study enrollment on 329 adults meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV criteria for opioid dependence entering a randomized clinical trial in a large, urban ED were cross-tabulated with data on 30-day nonmedical prescription opioid use self-report. The association among these two types of data was assessed by the Goodman and Kruskal's gamma; a logistic regression was used to explore characteristics of participants who had PDMP record of opioid prescriptions. During 1 year prior to study enrollment, 118 of 329 (36%) patients had at least one opioid prescription (range = 1-51) in our states' PDMP. Patients who reported ≥15 of 30 days of nonmedical prescription opioid use were more likely to have at least four PDMP opioid prescriptions (20/38; 53%) than patients reporting 1 to 14 days (14/38, 37%) or zero days of nonmedical prescription opioid use (4/38, 11%; p = 0.002). Female sex and having health insurance were significantly more represented in the PDMP (p < 0.05 for both). PDMPs may be helpful in identifying patients with certain aberrant drug-related behavior, but are unable to detect many patients with opioid use disorder. The majority of ED patients with opioid use disorder were not captured by the PDMP, highlighting the importance of using additional methods such as screening and clinical history to identify opioid use disorders in ED patients and the

  16. Primary care for opioid use disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannelli P

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Mannelli,1 Li-Tzy Wu1–41Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 2Department of Medicine, 3Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, 4Center for Child and Family Policy, Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USARecent reports on prescription opioid misuse and abuse have described unprecedented peaks of a national crisis and the only answer is to expand prevention and treatment, including different levels of care.1 Nonetheless, concerns remain about the ability of busy primary care settings to manage problem opioid users along with other patients. In particular, proposed extensions of buprenorphine treatment, a critically effective intervention for opioid use disorder (OUD, are cautiously considered due to the potential risk of misuse or abuse.2 General practitioners are already facing this burden daily in the treatment of chronic pain, and expert supervision and treatment model adjustment are needed to help improve outcomes. Approximately 20% of patients in primary care have noncancer pain symptoms, with most of them receiving opioid prescriptions by their physicians, and their number is increasing.3 Pain diagnoses are comparable in severity to those of tertiary centers and are complicated by significant psychiatric comorbidity, with a measurable lifetime risk of developing OUD.4,5 Some primary care physicians report frustration about opioid abuse and diversion by their patients; support from pain specialists would improve their competence, the quality f their performance, and the ability to identify patients at risk of opioid misuse.6 Thus, buprenorphine treatment should not be adding to a complex clinical scenario. To this end, the promising models of care emphasize the integration of medical with psychological and pharmacological expertise for the management of OUD. 

  17. Psychometric properties of the adjective rating scale for withdrawal across treatment groups, gender, and over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; McPherson, Sterling; Mamey, Mary Rose; Burns, G Leonard; Roll, John

    2014-02-01

    The adjective rating scale for withdrawal (ARSW) is commonly used to assess opiate withdrawal in clinical practice and research. The aims of this study were to examine the factor structure of the ARSW, test measurement invariance across gender and treatment groups, and assess longitudinal measurement invariance across the clinical trial. Secondary data analysis of the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network 000-3, a randomized clinical trial comparing two tapering strategies, was performed. The ARSW was analyzed at baseline, end of taper and 1-month follow-up (N=515 opioid-dependent individuals). A 1-factor model of the ARSW fit the data and demonstrated acceptable reliability. Measurement invariance was supported across gender and taper groups. Longitudinal measurement invariance was not found across the course of the trial, with baseline assessment contributing to the lack of invariance. If change over time is of interest, change from post-treatment through follow-up may offer the most valid comparison. © 2013.

  18. The opioid epidemic and national guidelines for opioid therapy for chronic noncancer pain: a perspective from different continents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winfried Häuser

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion:. Implementation of opioid prescribing guidelines should ensure that physicians prescribe opioids only for appropriate indications in limited doses for selected patients and advice patients on their safe use. These measures could contribute to reduce prescription opioid misuse/abuse and deaths.

  19. Personality as a risk factor for illicit opioid use and a protective factor for illicit opioid dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaaijer, Eline R.; Bruijel, Jessica; Blanken, Peter; Hendriks, Vincent; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Booij, Jan; Goudriaan, Anna E.; van Ree, Jan M.; van den Brink, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Most studies investigating the role of personality as a risk factor for the development of opioid dependence compare dependent opioid users with healthy controls who never used heroin. In order to understand the potential protective role of personality, it is crucial to compare illicit opioid users

  20. Impact of Preoperative Opioid Use After Emergency General Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young; Cortez, Alexander R; Wima, Koffi; Dhar, Vikrom K; Athota, Krishna P; Schrager, Jason J; Pritts, Timothy A; Edwards, Michael J; Shah, Shimul A

    2018-01-16

    Preoperative exposure to narcotics has recently been associated with poor outcomes after elective major surgery, but little is known as to how preoperative opioid use impacts outcomes after common, emergency general surgical procedures (EGS). A high-volume, single-center analysis was performed on patients who underwent EGS from 2012 to 2013. EGS was defined as the seven emergent operations that account for 80% of the national burden. Preoperative opioid use was defined as having an active opioid prescription within 7 days prior to surgery. Chronic opioid use was defined as having an opioid prescription concurrent with 90 days after discharge. A total of 377 patients underwent EGS during the study period. Preoperative opioid use was present in 84 patients (22.3%). Preoperative opioid users had longer hospital LOS (10.5 vs 6 days), higher costs of care ($25,331 vs $11,454), and higher 30-day readmission rates (22.6 vs 8.2%) compared with opioid-naïve patients (p preoperative opioid use was predictive of LOS (RR 1.19 [1.01-1.41]) and 30-day hospital readmission (OR 2.69 [1.25-5.75]) (p Preoperative opioid users required more narcotic refills compared with opioid-naïve patients (5 vs 0 refills, p preoperative opioid users (p Preoperative opioid use is associated with greater resource utilization after emergency general surgery, as well as vastly different postoperative opioid prescription patterns. These findings may help to inform the impact of preoperative opioid use on patient care, and its implications on hospital and societal cost.

  1. Prescription Opioid Analgesics Commonly Unused After Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicket, Mark C; Long, Jane J; Pronovost, Peter J; Alexander, G Caleb; Wu, Christopher L

    2017-11-01

    Prescription opioid analgesics play an important role in the treatment of postoperative pain; however, unused opioids may be diverted for nonmedical use and contribute to opioid-related injuries and deaths. To quantify how commonly postoperative prescription opioids are unused, why they remain unused, and what practices are followed regarding their storage and disposal. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from database inception to October 18, 2016, for studies describing opioid oversupply for adults after a surgical procedure. The primary outcome-opioid oversupply-was defined as the number of patients with either filled but unused opioid prescriptions or unfilled opioid prescriptions. Two reviewers independently screened studies for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed the study quality. Six eligible studies reported on a total of 810 unique patients (range, 30-250 patients) who underwent 7 different types of surgical procedures. Across the 6 studies, 67% to 92% of patients reported unused opioids. Of all the opioid tablets obtained by surgical patients, 42% to 71% went unused. Most patients stopped or used no opioids owing to adequate pain control, and 16% to 29% of patients reported opioid-induced adverse effects. In 2 studies examining storage safety, 73% to 77% of patients reported that their prescription opioids were not stored in locked containers. All studies reported low rates of anticipated or actual disposal, but no study reported US Food and Drug Administration-recommended disposal methods in more than 9% of patients. Postoperative prescription opioids often go unused, unlocked, and undisposed, suggesting an important reservoir of opioids contributing to nonmedical use of these products, which could cause injuries or even deaths.

  2. withdrawal of South African essential medicines EDITORIALS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-04-21

    Apr 21, 2006 ... mortality, as well as greater strain on already challenged health systems. Health authorities regulate pharmaceutical products coming onto the market through strict policing of safety, efficacy and quality. However, there is no control over the impact of subsequent withdrawal of the product by the Department.

  3. Withholding and withdrawing treatment: practical applications of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Withholding and withdrawing treatment: practical applications of ethical principles in end-of-life care. L Gwyther. Abstract. No Abstract South African Journal of Bioethics and Law Vol. 1 (1) 2008: pp. 24-26. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  4. Sodium Valproate Withdrawal Correlates with Reduced Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Duncan; Hoerger, Marguerite; Dyer, Tim; Graham, Nicola; Penney, Heather; Mace, F. Charles

    2014-01-01

    People with learning disabilities are sometimes prescribed psychotropic medication to help manage their challenging behaviour. This case study describes how a multicomponent behavioural intervention in conjunction with the systematic withdrawal of sodium valproate was strongly correlated with reduced aggression. No symptoms of bipolar disorder or…

  5. A qualitative assessment of attitudes about and preferences for extended-release naltrexone, a new pharmacotherapy to treat opioid use disorders in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Ruthanne; Bojko, Martha J; Mazhnaya, Alyona; Makarenko, Iuliia; Filippovych, Sergii; Dvoriak, Sergii; Altice, Frederick L; Springer, Sandra A

    2018-03-01

    Numerous individual barriers, including negative attitudes toward opioid agonist therapies (OAT), have undermined HIV prevention efforts in Ukraine where the epidemic is concentrated in people who inject drugs (PWID). The recent availability of extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX), an opioid antagonist, provides new opportunities for treatment and prevention, but little is known about patient preferences. We conducted qualitative analysis using focus groups (FG) of PWID recruited based on OAT experience: currently, previously, and never on OAT in five Ukrainian cities. FG included 199 PWID in 25 focus groups. Focus group transcripts were coded and analyzed using a modified grounded theory approach to identify common themes and domains related to attitudes about and preferences for XR-NTX, relative to other treatments. Interest in XR-NTX was supported if supervised opioid withdrawal and psychological support were assured. Other factors supporting XR-NTX included a focus on younger PWID early in their injection career and motivated for recovery. Perceptions of recovery included not receiving psychoactive medications like methadone or buprenorphine. With more information, XR-NTX could be a viable option for PWID in Ukraine, especially if concerns regarding withdrawal and psychological support are adequately addressed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Place of the opioid system in biology and treatment of Alcohol Use Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nubukpo, P

    2014-12-01

    While the DSM 5 has formalized the terminology "Alcohol Use Disorders" (AUD) or "disorders of the use of alcohol" (UAW French translation in progress), the term "alcohol dependence" still used in ICD-10, apriority in the future ICD-11 and above in clinical practice. Addiction to alcohol is the cause of mortality and major morbidity. In terms of therapeutic strategies for its management, alongside the maintenance of abstinence after withdrawal (with a high rate of relapse), the reduction of alcohol consumption below certain thresholds of intake is emerging in order to reduce risk, improve health and regain control of consumption even be an intermediate step towards abstinence. The role of the endogenous opioid system in the modulation of the activity of dopaminergic neurons from the circuit of reward and motivation is well established. An unsteadiness of this system has been described in the alcohol dependence. Indeed, a hypofunction of the endorphin pathway and its mu receptor and a hyperactivity of the dynorphin pathway and its kappa receptor participate in the alcohol reinforcing effects (especially positive and negative). The development of active molecules in this system allows better management of alcohol dependence. Besides naltrexone (mu antagonist) allowed in the maintenance of abstinence after withdrawal, another molecule (nalmefene) with modulating properties of μ and κ opioid receptors is the first drug having obtained an MA in reducing consumption in adult patients with alcohol dependence. Its modulating original pharmacological properties by targeting both the positive but also the negative reinforcing effects of alcohol, are responsible for its development in reducing consumption in the alcohol dependence. Copyright © 2014 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Analgesic tone conferred by constitutively active mu opioid receptors in mice lacking β-arrestin 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hales Tim G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hedonic reward, dependence and addiction are unwanted effects of opioid analgesics, linked to the phasic cycle of μ opioid receptor activation, tolerance and withdrawal. In vitro studies of recombinant G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs over expressed in cell lines reveal an alternative tonic signaling mechanism that is independent of agonist. Such studies demonstrate that constitutive GPCR signaling can be inhibited by inverse agonists but not by neutral antagonists. However, ligand-independent activity has been difficult to examine in vivo, at the systems level, due to relatively low levels of constitutive activity of most GPCRs including μ receptors, often necessitating mutagenesis or pharmacological manipulation to enhance basal signaling. We previously demonstrated that the absence of β-arrestin 2 (β-arr2 augments the constitutive coupling of μ receptors to voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in primary afferent dorsal root ganglion neurons from β-arr2-/- mice. We used this in vitro approach to characterize neutral competitive antagonists and inverse agonists of the constitutively active wild type μ receptors in neurons. We administered these agents to β-arr2-/- mice to explore the role of constitutive μ receptor activity in nociception and hedonic tone. This study demonstrates that the induction of constitutive μ receptor activity in vivo in β-arr2-/- mice prolongs tail withdrawal from noxious heat, a phenomenon that was reversed by inverse agonists, but not by antagonists that lack negative efficacy. By contrast, the aversive effects of inverse agonists were similar in β-arr2-/- and β-arr2+/+ mice, suggesting that hedonic tone was unaffected.

  8. Patterns of Opioid Prescription and Use After Cesarean Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Brian T; Cole, Naida M; Maeda, Ayumi; Burns, Sara M; Houle, Timothy T; Huybrechts, Krista F; Clancy, Caitlin R; Hopp, Stephanie B; Ecker, Jeffrey L; Ende, Holly; Grewe, Kasey; Raposo Corradini, Beatriz; Schoenfeld, Robert E; Sankar, Keerthana; Day, Lori J; Harris, Lynnette; Booth, Jessica L; Flood, Pamela; Bauer, Melissa E; Tsen, Lawrence C; Landau, Ruth; Leffert, Lisa R

    2017-07-01

    To define the amount of opioid analgesics prescribed and consumed after discharge after cesarean delivery. We conducted a survey at six academic medical centers in the United States from September 2014 to March 2016. Women who had undergone a cesarean delivery were contacted by phone 2 weeks after discharge and participated in a structured interview about the opioid prescription they received on discharge and their oral opioid intake while at home. A total of 720 women were enrolled; of these, 615 (85.4%) filled an opioid prescription. The median number of dispensed opioid tablets was 40 (interquartile range 30-40), the median number consumed was 20 (interquartile range 8-30), and leftover was 15 (interquartile range 3-26). Of those with leftover opioids, 95.3% had not disposed of the excess medication at the time of the interview. There was an association between a larger number of tablets dispensed and the number consumed independent of patient characteristics. The amount of opioids dispensed did not correlate with patient satisfaction, pain control, or the need to refill the opioid prescription. The amount of opioid prescribed after cesarean delivery generally exceeds the amount consumed by a significant margin, leading to substantial amounts of leftover opioid medication. Lower opioid prescription correlates with lower consumption without a concomitant increase in pain scores or satisfaction.

  9. A psychometric validation of the Short Alcohol Withdrawal Scale (SAWS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elholm, Bjarne; Larsen, Klaus; Hornnes, Nete

    2011-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate psychometrically a Danish translation of the Short Alcohol Withdrawal Scale (SAWS) in an outpatient setting in patients with Alcohol Dependence (AD) and Alcohol Withdrawal Symptoms/Syndrome (AWS).......The study aimed to evaluate psychometrically a Danish translation of the Short Alcohol Withdrawal Scale (SAWS) in an outpatient setting in patients with Alcohol Dependence (AD) and Alcohol Withdrawal Symptoms/Syndrome (AWS)....

  10. Improving Nursing Knowledge of Alcohol Withdrawal: Second Generation Education Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berl, Kimberly; Collins, Michelle L; Melson, Jo; Mooney, Ruth; Muffley, Cheryl; Wright-Glover, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Christiana Care Health System implemented a Care Management Guideline for Alcohol Withdrawal Symptom Management, which provided direction for inpatient screening for alcohol withdrawal risk, assessment, and treatment. Nurses educated on its use expressed confusion with the use of the assessment tools, pharmacokinetics, and pathophysiology of alcohol withdrawal and delirium tremens. Reeducation was provided by nursing professional development specialists. Pre- and postsurveys revealed that nurses were more confident in caring for patients with alcohol withdrawal.

  11. Biased Agonism of Endogenous Opioid Peptides at the μ-Opioid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Georgina L; Lane, J Robert; Coudrat, Thomas; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Canals, Meritxell

    2015-08-01

    Biased agonism is having a major impact on modern drug discovery, and describes the ability of distinct G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands to activate different cell signaling pathways, and to result in different physiologic outcomes. To date, most studies of biased agonism have focused on synthetic molecules targeting various GPCRs; however, many of these receptors have multiple endogenous ligands, suggesting that "natural" bias may be an unappreciated feature of these GPCRs. The μ-opioid receptor (MOP) is activated by numerous endogenous opioid peptides, remains an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of pain, and exhibits biased agonism in response to synthetic opiates. The aim of this study was to rigorously assess the potential for biased agonism in the actions of endogenous opioids at the MOP in a common cellular background, and compare these to the effects of the agonist d-Ala2-N-MePhe4-Gly-ol enkephalin (DAMGO). We investigated activation of G proteins, inhibition of cAMP production, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 phosphorylation, β-arrestin 1/2 recruitment, and MOP trafficking, and applied a novel analytical method to quantify biased agonism. Although many endogenous opioids displayed signaling profiles similar to that of DAMGO, α-neoendorphin, Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe, and the putatively endogenous peptide endomorphin-1 displayed particularly distinct bias profiles. These may represent examples of natural bias if it can be shown that they have different signaling properties and physiologic effects in vivo compared with other endogenous opioids. Understanding how endogenous opioids control physiologic processes through biased agonism can reveal vital information required to enable the design of biased opioids with improved pharmacological profiles and treat diseases involving dysfunction of the endogenous opioid system. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  12. The ‘Mystery’ of Opioid-Induced Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silviu Bril

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bowel dysfunction, mainly constipation, is a well-known and anticipated side effect of opioids. The physician prescribing an opioid frequently confronts the challenge of preventing and treating bowel dysfunction. Different strategies have emerged for managing opioid-induced constipation. These strategies include physical activity, maintaining adequate fluid intake, adhering to regular daily bowel habits, using laxatives and other anticonstipation medications and, recently, using a peripheral opioid antagonist, either as a separate drug or in the form of an opioid agonist-antagonist combination pill. What options exist for the physician when a patient receiving opioids complains of diarrhea, cramps and bloating, rather than the expected constipation? The present article describes a possible cause of opioid-induced diarrhea and strategies for management.

  13. 5 CFR 330.1001 - Withdrawal from competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Withdrawal from competition. 330.1001... RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, AND PLACEMENT (GENERAL) Prohibited Practices § 330.1001 Withdrawal from competition... applicant or eligible to withdraw from competition or eligibility, for a position in the competitive service...

  14. 75 FR 70044 - Withdrawal of Regulatory Guide 1.39

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2010-0354] Withdrawal of Regulatory Guide 1.39 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Withdrawal of a Regulatory Guide: Regulatory Guide 1.39, ``Housekeeping... U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is withdrawing Regulatory Guide 1.39, ``Housekeeping...

  15. Teachers' Withdrawal Behaviors and Their Relationship with Work Ethic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemli, Özge

    2015-01-01

    Problem Situation: People experience ups and downs in their job satisfaction and motivation levels at different points of their work lives for various reasons. One of the outputs of low job satisfaction and motivation is defined as "withdrawal behaviors" in the literature. Withdrawal behaviors are any employee behavior of withdrawal from…

  16. 21 CFR 171.7 - Withdrawal of petition without prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Withdrawal of petition without prejudice. 171.7... Withdrawal of petition without prejudice. (a) In some cases the Commissioner will notify the petitioner that... clarification or the obtaining of additional data. This withdrawal will be without prejudice to a future filing...

  17. 21 CFR 571.7 - Withdrawal of petition without prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal of petition without prejudice. 571.7... Withdrawal of petition without prejudice. (a) In some cases the Commissioner will notify the petitioner that... clarification or the obtaining of additional data. This withdrawal will be without prejudice to a future filing...

  18. 19 CFR 144.37 - Withdrawal for exportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Class 9 warehouse withdrawals for exportation—(1) Applicability of sales ticket procedure. Merchandise... be eligible for withdrawal under the sales ticket procedure specified in this paragraph. (2) Sales ticket content and handling. Sales ticket withdrawals must be made only under a blanket permit to...

  19. Cholera toxin-B subunit blocks excitatory opioid receptor-mediated hyperalgesic effects in mice, thereby unmasking potent opioid analgesia and attenuating opioid tolerance/dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, K F; Crain, S M

    2001-11-16

    In a previous study we demonstrated that injection (i.p.) of low doses of GM1 ganglioside in mice rapidly attenuates morphine's analgesic effects. This result is consonant with our electrophysiologic studies in nociceptive types of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in culture, which showed that exogenous GM1 rapidly increased the efficacy of excitatory (Gs-coupled) opioid receptor functions. By contrast, treatment of DRG neurons with the non-toxic B-subunit of cholera toxin (CTX-B) which binds selectively to GM1, blocked the excitatory, but not inhibitory, effects of morphine and other bimodally-acting opioid agonists, thereby resulting in a net increase in inhibitory opioid potency. The present study provides more direct evidence that endogenous GM1 plays a physiologic role in regulating excitatory opioid receptor functions in vivo by demonstrating that cotreatment with remarkably low doses of CTX-B (10 ng/kg, s.c.) selectively blocks hyperalgesic effects elicited by morphine or by a kappa opioid agonist, thereby unmasking potent opioid analgesia. These results are comparable to the effects of cotreatment of mice with morphine plus an ultra-low dose of the opioid antagonist, naltrexone (NTX) which blocks opioid-induced hyperalgesic effects, unmasking potent opioid analgesia. Low-dose NTX selectively blocks excitatory opioid receptors at their recognition site, whereas CTX-B binds to, and interferes with, a putative allosteric GM1 regulatory site on excitatory opioid receptors. Furthermore, chronic cotreatment of mice with morphine plus CTX-B attenuates development of opioid tolerance and physical dependence, as previously shown to occur during cotreatment with low-dose NTX.

  20. Characteristics of methadone maintenance treatment patients prescribed opioid analgesics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Matthew C.; Sohler, Nancy L.; Starrels, Joanna L.; Maradiaga, Jeronimo; Jost, John J.; Arnsten, Julia H.; Cunningham, Chinazo O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Opioid analgesic use and disorders have dramatically increased among the general American population and those receiving methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). Most research among MMT patients focuses on opioid analgesics misuse or disorders; few studies focus on MMT patients prescribed opioid analgesics. We describe demographic, clinical, and substance use characteristics of MMT patients prescribed opioid analgesics and compare them to MMT patients not prescribed opioid analgesics. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional secondary data analysis using screening interviews from a parent study. From 2012–2015, we recruited adults from 3 MMT Bronx clinics. Questionnaire data included: patterns of opioid analgesic use, substance use, comorbid illnesses, and demographic characteristics. Our main dependent variable was patients’ report of currently taking prescribed opioid analgesics. To compare characteristics between MMT patients prescribed and not prescribed opioid analgesics, we conducted chi-squared tests, t-tests, and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results Of 611 MMT patients, most reported chronic pain (62.0%), HCV infection (52.1%), and currently using illicit substances (64.2%). Of the 29.8% who reported currently taking prescribed opioid analgesics, most misused their opioid analgesics (57.5%). Patients prescribed (versus not prescribed) opioid analgesics were more likely to report HIV infection (aOR=1.6, 95% CI: 1.1–2.3) and chronic pain (aOR=7.6, 95% CI: 4.6–12.6). Conclusion Among MMT patients primarily in three Bronx clinics, nearly one-third reported taking prescribed opioid analgesics. Compared to patients not prescribed opioid analgesics, those prescribed opioid analgesics were more likely to report chronic pain and HIV infection. However, between these patients, there was no difference in illicit substance use. These findings highlight the complexity of addressing chronic pain in MMT patients. PMID:26731299

  1. Characteristics of methadone maintenance treatment patients prescribed opioid analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Matthew C; Sohler, Nancy L; Starrels, Joanna L; Maradiaga, Jeronimo; Jost, John J; Arnsten, Julia H; Cunningham, Chinazo O

    2016-01-01

    Opioid analgesic use and disorders have dramatically increased among the general American population and those receiving methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). Most research among MMT patients focuses on opioid analgesics misuse or disorders; few studies focus on MMT patients prescribed opioid analgesics. We describe demographic, clinical, and substance use characteristics of MMT patients prescribed opioid analgesics and compare them with MMT patients not prescribed opioid analgesics. We conducted a cross-sectional secondary data analysis using screening interviews from a parent study. From 2012 to 2015, we recruited adults from 3 MMT Bronx clinics. Questionnaire data included patterns of opioid analgesic use, substance use, comorbid illnesses, and demographic characteristics. Our main dependent variable was patients' report of currently taking prescribed opioid analgesics. To compare characteristics between MMT patients prescribed and not prescribed opioid analgesics, we conducted chi-square tests, t tests, and Mann-Whitney U tests. Of 611 MMT patients, most reported chronic pain (62.0%), hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (52.1%), and current use of illicit substances (64.2%). Of the 29.8% who reported currently taking prescribed opioid analgesics, most misused their opioid analgesics (57.5%). Patients prescribed (versus not prescribed) opioid analgesics were more likely to report human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-2.3) and chronic pain (aOR = 7.6, 95% CI: 4.6-12.6). Among MMT patients primarily in 3 Bronx clinics, nearly one third reported taking prescribed opioid analgesics. Compared with patients not prescribed opioid analgesics, those prescribed opioid analgesics were more likely to report chronic pain and HIV infection. However, between these patients, there was no difference in illicit substance use. These findings highlight the complexity of addressing chronic pain in MMT patients.

  2. Most drug overdose deaths from nonprescription opioids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC is reporting in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly that the number of people dying from an opioid overdose rose 15.5% from 2014 to 2015, but the increase had little to do with prescription painkillers such as oxycodone or hydrocodone (1. Roughly 52,000 people died from drug overdoses in 2015 and of those deaths 33,091 involved an opioid. The increases in “death rates were driven by synthetic opioids other than methadone (72.2%, most likely illicitly-manufactured fentanyl, and heroin (20.6%”. Deaths from methadone, which is usually prescribed by physicians, decreased 9.1%. The largest increase in deaths occurred in the South and Northeast with 3% and 24% increases in deaths from synthetic opioids from 2014 to 2015. In the Midwest and West, there were more modest 17% and 9% increases during the same period. States in the Southwest with “good” to “excellent” reporting included Colorado, Nevada, and New …

  3. Peripherally applied opioids for postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, B N; Henneberg, S W; Schmiegelow, K

    2015-01-01

    scores, consumption of supplemental analgesics and time to first analgesic were included. Trials with sample sizes of fewer than 10 patients per treatment group or trials with opioids administered intra-articularly or as peripheral nerve blocks were excluded. RESULTS: Data from 26 studies, including 1531...

  4. CDC Vital Signs: Prescription Painkiller Overdoses (Opioids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for substance abuse and mental health problems. Use prescription drug monitoring programs to identify patients who may be improperly obtaining ... treatment options, such as opioid agonist therapy. Use prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs)—electronic databases that track all controlled substance ...

  5. The Prescription Opioid Pain Medication Overdose Epidemic

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-04-19

    Overdose related to prescription opioids has become an epidemic. This podcast discusses the risks of this type of drug sometimes used to treat pain, and how to protect yourself. .  Created: 4/19/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/19/2016.

  6. Endogenous Opioid-Masked Latent Pain Sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Manuel P; Donahue, Renee R; Dahl, Jørgen B

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Following the resolution of a severe inflammatory injury in rodents, administration of mu-opioid receptor inverse agonists leads to reinstatement of pain hypersensitivity. The mechanisms underlying this form of latent pain sensitization (LS) likely contribute to the development of chr...

  7. Two cases of intranasal naloxone self-administration in opioid overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Traci C; Ray, Madeline; Bowman, Sarah E; McKenzie, Michelle; Rich, Josiah D

    2014-01-01

    Overdose is a leading cause of death for former prisoners, exacting its greatest toll during the first 2 weeks post release. Protective effects have been observed with training individuals at high risk of overdose and prescribing them naloxone, an opioid antagonist that reverses the effects of the opioid-induced respiratory depression that causes death. The authors report 2 people with opiate use histories who self-administered intranasal naloxone to treat their own heroin overdoses following release from prison. Patient A is a 34-year-old male, who reported having experienced an overdose on heroin the day after he was released from incarceration. Patient B is a 29-year-old female, who reported an overdose on her first injection of heroin, 17 days post release from incarceration. Both patients self-administered the medication but were assisted at some point during the injury by a witness whom they had personally instructed in how to prepare and administer the medication. Neither patient experienced withdrawal symptoms following exposure to naloxone. Self-administration of naloxone should not be a goal of overdose death prevention training. A safer, more reliable approach is to prescribe naloxone to at-risk patients and train and also equip members of their household and social or drug-using networks in overdose prevention and response.

  8. Persistent opioid use following Cesarean delivery: patterns and predictors among opioid naïve women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Brian T.; Franklin, Jessica M.; Bykov, Katsiaryna; Avorn, Jerry; Shrank, William H.; Brennan, Troyen A.; Landon, Joan E.; Rathmell, James P.; Huybrechts, Krista F.; Fischer, Michael A.; Choudhry, Niteesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of opioid-related death in women has increased five-fold over the past decade. For many women, their initial opioid exposure will occur in the setting of routine medical care. Approximately 1 in 3 deliveries in the U.S. is by Cesarean and opioids are commonly prescribed for post-surgical pain management. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the risk that opioid naïve women prescribed opioids after Cesarean delivery will subsequently become consistent prescription opioid users in the year following delivery, and to identify predictors for this behavior. Study Design We identified women in a database of commercial insurance beneficiaries who underwent Cesarean delivery and who were opioid-naïve in the year prior to delivery. To identify persistent users of opioids, we used trajectory models, which group together patients with similar patterns of medication filling during follow-up, based on patterns of opioid dispensing in the year following Cesarean delivery. We then constructed a multivariable logistic regression model to identify independent risk factors for membership in the persistent user group. Results 285 of 80,127 (0.36%, 95% confidence interval 0.32 to 0.40), opioid-naïve women became persistent opioid users (identified using trajectory models based on monthly patterns of opioid dispensing) following Cesarean delivery. Demographics and baseline comorbidity predicted such use with moderate discrimination (c statistic = 0.73). Significant predictors included a history of cocaine abuse (risk 7.41%; adjusted odds ratio 6.11, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 36.31) and other illicit substance abuse (2.36%; adjusted odds ratio 2.78, 95% confidence interval 1.12 to 6.91), tobacco use (1.45%; adjusted odds ratio 3.04, 95% confidence interval 2.03 to 4.55), back pain (0.69%; adjusted odds ratio 1.74, 95% confidence interval 1.33 to 2.29), migraines (0.91%; adjusted odds ratio 2.14, 95% confidence interval 1.58 to 2

  9. Peripheral endothelin B receptor agonist-induced antinociception involves endogenous opioids in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quang, Phuong N; Schmidt, Brian L

    2010-05-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) produced by various cancers is known to be responsible for inducing pain. While ET-1 binding to ETAR on peripheral nerves clearly mediates nociception, effects from binding to ETBR are less clear. The present study assessed the effects of ETBR activation and the role of endogenous opioid analgesia in carcinoma pain using an orthotopic cancer pain mouse model. mRNA expression analysis showed that ET-1 was nearly doubled while ETBR was significantly down-regulated in a human oral SCC cell line compared to normal oral keratinocytes (NOK). Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell culture treated with an ETBR agonist (10(-4)M, 10(-5)M, and 10(-6) M BQ-3020) significantly increased the production of beta-endorphin without any effects on leu-enkephalin or dynorphin. Cancer inoculated in the hind paw of athymic mice with SCC induced significant pain, as indicated by reduction of paw withdrawal thresholds in response to mechanical stimulation, compared to sham-injected and NOK-injected groups. Intratumor administration of 3mg/kg BQ-3020 attenuated cancer pain by approximately 50% up to 3h post-injection compared to PBS-vehicle and contralateral injection, while intratumor ETBR antagonist BQ-788 treatment (100 and 300microg/kg and 3mg/kg) had no effects. Local naloxone methiodide (500microg/kg) or selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist (CTOP, 500microg/kg) injection reversed ETBR agonist-induced antinociception in cancer animals. We propose that these results demonstrate that peripheral ETBR agonism attenuates carcinoma pain by modulating beta-endorphins released from the SCC to act on peripheral opioid receptors found in the cancer microenvironment. Copyright 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Exploring the Neuroimmunopharmacology of Opioids: An Integrative Review of Mechanisms of Central Immune Signaling and Their Implications for Opioid Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavit, Yehuda; Grace, Peter M.; Rice, Kenner C.; Maier, Steven F.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2011-01-01

    Vastly stimulated by the discovery of opioid receptors in the early 1970s, preclinical and clinical research was directed at the study of stereoselective neuronal actions of opioids, especially those played in their crucial analgesic role. However, during the past decade, a new appreciation of the non-neuronal actions of opioids has emerged from preclinical research, with specific appreciation for the nonclassic and nonstereoselective sites of action. Opioid activity at Toll-like receptors, newly recognized innate immune pattern recognition receptors, adds substantially to this unfolding story. It is now apparent from molecular and rodent data that these newly identified signaling events significantly modify the pharmacodynamics of opioids by eliciting proinflammatory reactivity from glia, the immunocompetent cells of the central nervous system. These central immune signaling events, including the release of cytokines and chemokines and the associated disruption of glutamate homeostasis, cause elevated neuronal excitability, which subsequently decreases opioid analgesic efficacy and leads to heightened pain states. This review will examine the current preclinical literature of opioid-induced central immune signaling mediated by classic and nonclassic opioid receptors. A unification of the preclinical pharmacology, neuroscience, and immunology of opioids now provides new insights into common mechanisms of chronic pain, naive tolerance, analgesic tolerance, opioid-induced hyperalgesia, and allodynia. Novel pharmacological targets for future drug development are discussed in the hope that disease-modifying chronic pain treatments arising from the appreciation of opioid-induced central immune signaling may become practical. PMID:21752874

  11. Thallium exists in opioid poisoned patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Amir; Vahdati-Mashhadian, Naser; Oghabian, Zohreh; Moradi, Valiallah; Afshari, Reza; Mehrpour, Omid

    2015-08-01

    Thallium (Tl) is a toxic heavy metal that exists in nature. Tl poisoning (thallotoxicosis) may occur in opioid addicts. This study was designed to evaluate the frequency and level of urinary Tl in opioid abusers. In addition, clinical findings were evaluated. A total of 150 subjects were examined. Cases with a history of at least 3 years of abuse were admitted in the Imam Reza Hospital as the case group; 50 non-opioid abusers from the target population were included as the control group. Twenty-four hour urinary qualitative and quantitative Tl analyses were performed on both groups. Out of the 150 subjects, 128 (85 %) were negative for qualitative urinary Tl, followed by 5 % (trace), 7 % (1+), 2 % (2+), and 1 % (3+). Mean (standard error (SE), Min-Max) quantitative urinary Tl level was 14 μg/L (3.5 μg/L, 0-346 μg/L). Mean urinary Tl level in the case group was 21 μg/L (5 μg/L, 0-346 μg/L) and that in the controls was 1 μg/L (0.14 μg/L, 0-26 μg/L), which were significantly different (P = 0.001). The most frequent clinical findings were ataxia (86 %), sweating (81 %), and constipation (54 %). In all cases (n = 150), the mean (SE) value for cases with positive qualitative urinary Tl was 26.8 μg/L (0.9 μg/L) and that in the negative cases was 2.3 μg/L (0.2 μg/L), which were significantly different (P = 0.002). This study showed that long-term opioid abuse may lead to Tl exposure. In opioid abusers with the clinical manifestation of thallotoxicosis, urinary Tl should be determined.

  12. Comparing withdrawal and not withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment among patients who died from stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helvig E

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Eirik Helvig,1 Lars Thomassen,2 Ulrike Waje-Andreassen,2 Halvor Naess3 1Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Jonas Liesgt, Bergen, 2Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, 3Centre for Age-related Medicine, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, NorwayBackground: In severe stroke, a decision to withdraw life-sustaining treatment is sometimes made in cooperation with the family. The aim of this study was to study the time from withdrawing life-sustaining treatment to death in patients with severe ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke.Methods: In total, 2,506 patients with stroke admitted to Haukeland University Hospital between 2006 and 2011 were prospectively registered in the Bergen NORSTROKE database. Risk factors, stroke severity, etiology, and blood analyses were registered. Retrospectively, the patients' records were examined to determine the number of days from withdrawing all life-sustaining treatment to death in patients who died from severe stroke during the hospital stay.Results: Life-sustaining treatment was withheld in 50 patients with severe stroke. Median time to death after withdrawing life-sustaining treatment was 4 days, and a quarter lived at least 1 week (range =1–11 days. Cox regression analyses showed that short time from withdrawing life-sustaining treatment to death was associated with high age (Hazard ratio [HR] =1.05, P=0.07, male sex (HR =2.9, P=0.01, high C-reactive protein on admission (HR =1.01, P=0.001, and hemorrhagic stroke (versus ischemic stroke, HR =1.5, P=0.03.Conclusion: One week after withdrawing life-sustaining treatment, a quarter of our patients with severe stroke remained alive. Short time to death was associated with high age, male sex, hemorrhagic stroke, and high C-reactive protein on admittance. Keywords: stroke, withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment, prognosis

  13. Opioid Misuse Trends in Treatment Seeking Populations: Revised Prescription Opioid Policy and Temporally Corresponding Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Lauren A; Lewis, Ben; Nixon, Sara Jo

    2017-12-06

    Over the last two decades, U.S. rates of prescription opioid (PO) misuse have risen drastically. In response, federal and state governments have begun to implement new PO policies. Recent legislative changes warrant up-to-date assessments of today's misuse rates. To explore potential changes in opioid misuse trends among substance-using treatment seekers, in temporal relation to legislative response. Substance-use data were collected from two cross-sectional Florida-based inpatient cohorts during periods preceding (pre-policy; n = 647) and following (post-policy; n = 396) statewide PO policy initiatives. Participants provided information concerning their most frequently used drugs before treatment. PO and illicit opioid (IO) use prevalence, frequency and route of administration were examined for pre-policy vs. post-policy cohort differences. Relative to the pre-policy cohort, a greater percentage of the post-policy cohort reported recent misuse, daily use, and intravenous administration of POs. IO use was also more frequently reported post-policy. Non-opioid drug use prevalence did not significantly differ between cohorts. Among the opioid-using subsample, equivalent percentages of the pre- and post-policy cohorts reported the use of POs without IOs, IOs without POs, and POs/IOs concurrently. Conclusions/Importance: Florida's PO policy amendments were temporally accompanied by a higher prevalence of PO misuse and IO use among treatment-seekers assessed in this study. Whether our data reflect increased awareness of and treatment seeking for opioid use disorders or insufficient efficacy of new policies to reduce opioid misuse remains in question. Regardless, findings suggest the need for enhanced emphasis on mitigating hazardous PO-use behaviors (e.g., IV use).

  14. The opioid rotation ratio of hydrocodone to strong opioids in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Akhila; Yennurajalingam, Sriram; Desai, Hem; Reddy, Suresh; de la Cruz, Maxine; Wu, Jimin; Liu, Diane; Rodriguez, Eden Mae; Waletich, Jessica; Shin, Seong Hoon; Gayle, Vicki; Patel, Pritul; Dalal, Shalini; Vidal, Marieberta; Tanco, Kimberson; Arthur, Joseph; Tallie, Kimmie; Williams, Janet; Silvestre, Julio; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-11-01

    Cancer pain management guidelines recommend initial treatment with intermediate-strength analgesics such as hydrocodone and subsequent escalation to stronger opioids such as morphine. There are no published studies on the process of opioid rotation (OR) from hydrocodone to strong opioids in cancer patients. Our aim was to determine the opioid rotation ratio (ORR) of hydrocodone to morphine equivalent daily dose (MEDD) in cancer outpatients. We reviewed the records of consecutive patient visits at our supportive care center in 2011-2012 for OR from hydrocodone to stronger opioids. Data regarding demographics, Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS), and MEDD were collected from patients who returned for follow-up within 6 weeks. Linear regression analysis was used to estimate the ORR between hydrocodone and MEDD. Successful OR was defined as 2-point or 30% reduction in the pain score and continuation of the new opioid at follow-up. Overall, 170 patients underwent OR from hydrocodone to stronger opioid. The median age was 59 years, and 81% had advanced cancer. The median time between OR and follow-up was 21 days. We found 53% had a successful OR with significant improvement in the ESAS pain and symptom distress scores. In 100 patients with complete OR and no worsening of pain at follow-up, the median ORR from hydrocodone to MEDD was 1.5 (quintiles 1-3: 0.9-2). The ORR was associated with hydrocodone dose (r = -.52; p < .0001) and was lower in patients receiving ≥40 mg of hydrocodone per day (p < .0001). The median ORR of hydrocodone to morphine was 1.5 (n = 44) and hydrocodone to oxycodone was 0.9 (n = 24). The median ORR from hydrocodone to MEDD was 1.5 and varied according to hydrocodone dose. ©AlphaMed Press.

  15. Growth hormone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  16. Dental opioid prescribing and multiple opioid prescriptions among dental patients: Administrative data from the South Carolina prescription drug monitoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Jenna L; Hyer, J Madison; Ramakrishnan, V Ramesh; Leite, Renata; Melvin, Cathy L; Fillingim, Roger B; Frick, Christie; Brady, Kathleen T

    2016-07-01

    Despite increased attention to dentists' roles in curbing opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion, information regarding prescribing practices and the frequency of multiple concurrent opioid prescriptions among dental patients is limited. The authors reviewed South Carolina prescription drug monitoring program data representing dispensed medication for patients prescribed at least 1 opioid by a dentist during the most recently available 2-year time frame (2012-2013). The authors used descriptive analyses to examine the types and frequency of dental opioid prescriptions and the frequency of existing multiple concurrent opioid prescriptions among dental patients. Nearly all dispensed dental opioid prescriptions (99.9%; n = 653,650) were for immediate-release opioids and were initial prescription fills (96.2%). Hydrocodone (76.1%) and oxycodone (12.2%) combination products were the most frequently dispensed opioids prescribed by dentists. People younger than 21 years received 11.2% of dentist-prescribed opioids dispensed. Patients with multiple concurrent opioid prescriptions were identified within 30-day (n = 113,818), 90-day (n = 166,124), and 180-day (n = 205,576) time frames. Dentists prescribed a high volume of the immediate-release opioids dispensed in South Carolina. A notable minority of dental patients had incidents of multiple preexisting opioid prescriptions, a factor implicated in patient misuse, abuse, overdose, and diversion. Use of a prescription drug monitoring program before prescribing provides a record of controlled substances dispensed to a patient and may inform prescribing, coordination of care, and addiction screening or referral. Patients should receive information regarding misuse behaviors and their risks, as well as the importan