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Sample records for supports close clinical

  1. Off-label psychopharmacologic prescribing for children: History supports close clinical monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fegert Joerg M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The review presents pediatric adverse drug events from a historical perspective and focuses on selected safety issues associated with off-label use of medications for the psychiatric treatment of youth. Clinical monitoring procedures for major psychotropic drug classes are reviewed. Prior studies suggest that systematic treatment monitoring is warranted so as to both minimize risk of unexpected adverse events and exposures to ineffective treatments. Clinical trials to establish the efficacy and safety of drugs currently being used off-label in the pediatric population are needed. In the meantime, clinicians should consider the existing evidence-base for these drugs and institute close clinical monitoring.

  2. Closed metal supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolotov, N P; Afanas' yev, Yu V; Brednev, V A; Nuzhadikhin, A G; Tsiplakov, B V; Uskov, I T

    1980-08-30

    A closed metal support system that has a specific profile includes roof timber, ledger and roof timber. For convenience of transport, assembly, disassembly and repeated use during operation of an extraction powered system, the uprights in the central part are made sectional and are connected to one another by a hinge for folding into transport position. Longitudinal openings are made at the ends of the uprights in order to provide strength by creating flexibility in the hinged connections. The hinged connections of the sectional uprights have elastic gaskets. For convenience in folding the reinforcement, the ends of the uprights of the roof timber and ledger have the shape of a channel at junctions of their hinged connection.

  3. [Which research is needed to support clinical decision-making on integrative medicine? Can comparative effectiveness research close the gap?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Claudia M; Huang, Wen-jing; Lao, Lixing; Berman, Brian M

    2013-08-01

    In clinical research on complementary and integrative medicine, experts and scientists have often pursued a research agenda in spite of an incomplete understanding of the needs of end users. Consequently, the majority of previous clinical trials have mainly assessed the efficacy of interventions. Scant data is available on their effectiveness. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) promises to support decision makers by generating evidence that compares the benefits and harms of best care options. This evidence, more generalizable than evidence generated by traditional randomized clinical trials (RCTs), is better suited to inform real-world care decisions. An emphasis on CER supports the development of the evidence base for clinical and policy decision-making. Whereas in most areas of complementary and integrative medicine data on CER is scarce, available acupuncture research already contributes to CER evidence. This paper will introduce CER and make suggestions for future research.

  4. Which research is needed to support clinical decision-making on integrative medicine?- Can comparative effectiveness research close the gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Claudia M; Huang, Wen-jing; Lao, Lixing; Bm, Berman

    2012-10-01

    In clinical research on complementary and integrative medicine, experts and scientists have often pursued a research agenda in spite of an incomplete understanding of the needs of end users. Consequently, the majority of previous clinical trials have mainly assessed the efficacy of interventions. Scant data is available on their effectiveness. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) promises to support decision makers by generating evidence that compares the benefits and harms of the best care options. This evidence, more generalizable than the evidence generated by traditional randomized controlled trials (RCTs), is better suited to inform real-world care decisions. An emphasis on CER supports the development of the evidence base for clinical and policy decision-making. Whereas in most areas of complementary and integrative medicine data on comparative effectiveness is scarce, available acupuncture research already contributes to CER evidence. This paper will introduce CER and make suggestions for future research.

  5. Creation of closed life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitelson, I.

    The 40-year-long experience in devising ecological systems with a significantly closed material cycling (CES), which are intended for human life support outside the Earth's biosphere, allows us to state that this problem has been largely solved technically. To test the terrestrial prototypes of these systems: Bios in Krasnoyarsk, the Terrestrial Ecological System (TES) in Moscow, and Bioplex in Houston, crews of humans stayed inside them over long periods of time. In Bios-3 humans could be fully (100%) provided with regenerated air and water and with a vegetable part (80%) of their diet. One human requires 4.5 kW of light energy, which is equal to the light energy incident on an 8-m2 surface perpendicular to solar rays in the Earth's orbit. The regeneration of air and water can be alternatively performed by a 17-L2 microalgal cultivator with a light-receiving surface of 8 m at 2 kW of light energy or by a conveyer culture of agricultural plants. To regenerate the vegetable part of2 the diet to the full, the area must increase to 31.5 m per person. Similar values have been obtained in the TES and in Bioplex. It can be concluded that the system is ready to be implemented in the engineering-technical designs of specific versions: for orbital flights, for missions to Mars and other planets, and for stations on the Moon and Mars. To improve the CES further, a number of new key problems should be resolved. The first of them are: to robotize the technological processes and to establish an optimized system of the internal control of the CES by the crew working in it; to develop a hybrid physicochemical-biological technology for returning the dead-end products of biosynthesis into the system's cycling; to solve the fundamental problem of regenerating the human ration completely inside the CES by the autotrophic chemo - and photosynthesis. Once this problem is solved, the energy requirements for life support in space will be significantly reduced. This will also considerably

  6. Ionic Liquids Enabling Revolutionary Closed-Loop Life Support

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is to utilize ionic liquids with the Bosch process to achieve closed-loop life support. Specific tasks are to: 1) Advance the technology readiness of...

  7. Clinical Decision Support (CDS) Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Clinical Decision Support (CDS) Inventory contains descriptions of past and present CDS projects across the Federal Government. It includes Federal projects,...

  8. Clinical Information Support System (CISS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Clinical Information Support System (CISS) is a web-based portal application that provides a framework of services for the VA enterprise and supplies an integration...

  9. Close Air Support in a Joint Environment: Disconnect Between the Services and How Can Close Air Support Be Improved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    military expecting technology to close the gap between the lack of CAS training and the expected pilot proficiency in multiple roles? To be an... Research Project. Carlisle Barracks: U.S. Army War College, 19 March 2004. McGrath, John. Fire for Effect: Field Artillery and Close Air Support in...including suggestions for reducing this burden to Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations

  10. Closed bioregenerative life support systems: Applicability to hot deserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, Yuriy S.; Musaev, Ibrahim; Polyakov, Sergey V.

    2010-09-01

    Water scarcity in hot deserts, which cover about one-fifth of the Earth's land area, along with rapid expansion of hot deserts into arable lands is one of the key global environmental problems. As hot deserts are extreme habitats characterized by the availability of solar energy with a nearly complete absence of organic life and water, space technology achievements in designing closed ecological systems may be applicable to the design of sustainable settlements in the deserts. This review discusses the key space technology findings for closed biogenerative life support systems (CBLSS), which can simultaneously produce food, water, nutrients, fertilizers, process wastes, and revitalize air, that can be applied to hot deserts. Among them are the closed cycle of water and the acceleration of the cycling times of carbon, biogenic compounds, and nutrients by adjusting the levels of light intensity, temperature, carbon dioxide, and air velocity over plant canopies. Enhanced growth of algae and duckweed at higher levels of carbon dioxide and light intensity can be important to provide complete water recycling and augment biomass production. The production of fertilizers and nutrients can be enhanced by applying the subsurface flow wetland technology and hyper-thermophilic aerobic bacteria for treating liquid and solid wastes. The mathematical models, optimization techniques, and non-invasive measuring techniques developed for CBLSS make it possible to monitor and optimize the performance of such closed ecological systems. The results of long-duration experiments performed in BIOS-3, Biosphere 2, Laboratory Biosphere, and other ground-based closed test facilities suggest that closed water cycle can be achieved in hot-desert bioregenerative systems using the pathways of evapotranspiration, condensation, and biological wastewater treatment technologies. We suggest that the state of the art in the CBLSS design along with the possibility of using direct sunlight for

  11. Closed ecological life-support systems and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitelson, Josef I.

    The advent of man-made closed ecosystems (CES) is a solution of the fundamental problem-egress of humans beyond the Earth's biosphere, providing biological basis for exploitation of Space and celestial bodies. Yet, before proceeding to these ambitious project elements of closed life-support biotechnologies, there can be found diverse applications on Earth in human settlements providing for high quality of life under extreme environment conditions: high latitudes, deserts, mountains and industrially polluted areas. This presentation considers these variations of terrestrial applications of CELSS technologies. The version of CES under development is based on making direct use of the light energy in plant photosynthesis. In this case life support of one man on the Earth orbit requires solar light collected from 5-10m2. Among terrestrial applications of prime importance is the development of an ecohome designed to provide people with a high quality of life in Arctic and Antarctic territories. The developed technology of cascade employment of energy makes possible (expending 10-15 kw of installed power per a house-3-5 member family) to provide for: permanent supply of fresh vitamin-full vegetables, absorption and processing oaf excreta, purification of water and air in the living quarters, habitual colour and light conditions in the premises in winter making up to sensorial deprivation and, finally, psychological comfort of close contact with the plants during the long polar night. Ecohabitat based on the technology described in realistic today and depends only on the energy available and the resolution and readiness (sagacity) of the decision-makers to be committed with ecohome assigning. The ecological and economical significance of construction of ecohabitats for the northern territories of Canada, Alaska and Russia is apparent. This principle can be used (with considerable economy of energy and construction costs) to maintain normal partial pressure of oxygen inside

  12. The Guardian: Preliminary design of a close air support aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Jonathan; Huber, David; Mcinerney, Kelly; Mulligan, Greg; Pessin, David; Seelos, Michael

    1991-01-01

    One design is presented of a Close Air Support (CAS) aircraft. It is a canard wing, twin engine, twin vertical tail aircraft that has the capability to cruise at 520 knots. The Guardian contains state of the art flight control systems. Specific highlights of the Guardian include: (1) low cost (the acquisition cost per airplane is $13.6 million for a production of 500 airplanes); (2) low maintenance (it was designed to be easily maintainable in unprepared fields); and (3) high versatility (it can perform a wide range of missions). Along with being a CAS aircraft, it is capable of long ferry missions, battlefield interdiction, maritime attack, and combat rescue. The Guardian is capable of a maximum ferry of 3800 nm, can takeoff in a distance of 1700 ft, land in a ground roll distance of 1644 ft. It has a maximum takeoff weight of 48,753 lbs, and is capable of carrying up to 19,500 lbs of ordinance.

  13. Help From Above: Air Force Close Air Support of the Army. 1946-1973

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    support as but one ele- ment within a larger package called tactical air support challenges the researcher . Even though close air support is but one of...of the prewar gaps in the close air support picture. Of all the close air support developments that emerged from the war, however, airmen looked upon...to reduce the AAF’s impressive World War II close air support capabilities to a token force in the short space of five years, these budgetary

  14. Closed Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macelroy, Robert D.

    1992-01-01

    The CELSS Test Facility (CTF) is being developed for installation on Space Station Freedom (SSF) in August 1999. It is designed to conduct experiments that will determine the effects of microgravity on the productivity of higher (crop) plants. The CTF will occupy two standard SSF racks and will accommodate approximately one square meter of growing area and a canopy height of 80 cm. The growth volume will be isolated from the external environment, allowing stringent control of environmental conditions. Temperature, humidity, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and light levels will all be closely controlled to prescribed set points and monitored. This level of environmental control is needed to prevent stress and allow accurate assessment of microgravity effect (10-3 to 10-6 x g). Photosynthetic rates and respiration rates, calculated through continuous recording of gas concentrations, transpiration, and total and edible biomass produced will be measured. Toxic byproducts will be monitored and scrubbed. Transpiration water will be collected within the chamber and recycled into the nutrient solution. A wide variety of crop plants, e.g., wheat, soy beans, lettuce, potatoes, can be accommodated and various nutrient delivery systems and light delivery systems will be available. In the course of its development, the CTF will exploit fully, and contribute importantly, to the state-of-art in closed system technology and plant physiology.

  15. Ultra Reliable Closed Loop Life Support for Long Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harry W.; Ewert, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    Spacecraft human life support systems can achieve ultra reliability by providing sufficient spares to replace all failed components. The additional mass of spares for ultra reliability is approximately equal to the original system mass, provided that the original system reliability is not too low. Acceptable reliability can be achieved for the Space Shuttle and Space Station by preventive maintenance and by replacing failed units. However, on-demand maintenance and repair requires a logistics supply chain in place to provide the needed spares. In contrast, a Mars or other long space mission must take along all the needed spares, since resupply is not possible. Long missions must achieve ultra reliability, a very low failure rate per hour, since they will take years rather than weeks and cannot be cut short if a failure occurs. Also, distant missions have a much higher mass launch cost per kilogram than near-Earth missions. Achieving ultra reliable spacecraft life support systems with acceptable mass will require a well-planned and extensive development effort. Analysis must determine the reliability requirement and allocate it to subsystems and components. Ultra reliability requires reducing the intrinsic failure causes, providing spares to replace failed components and having "graceful" failure modes. Technologies, components, and materials must be selected and designed for high reliability. Long duration testing is needed to confirm very low failure rates. Systems design should segregate the failure causes in the smallest, most easily replaceable parts. The system must be designed, developed, integrated, and tested with system reliability in mind. Maintenance and reparability of failed units must not add to the probability of failure. The overall system must be tested sufficiently to identify any design errors. A program to develop ultra reliable space life support systems with acceptable mass should start soon since it must be a long term effort.

  16. Closed-eye orbital prosthesis: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamleh, Muhanad M; Watson, Jason; Srinivasan, Dilip

    2015-03-01

    One of the most challenging prostheses to fabricate is an acceptable orbital prosthesis. Successful reconstruction of the complex missing tissues, the globe, muscle, skin, and bony elements requires time and high levels of practical skill. A good match to the contralateral nondefect side will help mask the underlying defect and give the patient confidence to return to normal, routine life. The contralateral eye opening will commonly dictate the eye opening of such a prosthesis, but because of the expressive nature of the eye and its high levels of mobility, this can be difficult to achieve. This clinical report presents a patient who had an extended orbital exenteration and right maxillectomy to remove a maxillary squamous cell carcinoma. An alternative approach to constructing an orbital prosthesis was undertaken with the eye closed. Compared to the normal method of fabrication, this process was less complex and quicker, made the prosthesis less "staring," camouflaged the defect, and reduced the detection of the prosthesis because of movements in the remaining eye. The patient engaged in his routine daily life, which reinforced his self-esteem, confidence, and reintegration into the community. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Do Close Supportive Relationships Moderate the Effect of Depressive Symptoms on Suicidal Ideation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Aja L.; McKenzie, Karen; Murray, Kara R.; Richelieu, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Depressive symptoms, a lack of close supportive relationships and suicidal ideation are important risk factors for suicidal acts. Previous studies have primarily focused on the additive effects of close relationships and depressive symptoms on suicide risk. Here we explored whether, in addition, close relationships moderated the impact of…

  18. Impella ventricular support in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burzotta, Francesco; Trani, Carlo; Doshi, Sagar N

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support represents an evolving field of clinical research and practice. Currently, several cardiac assist devices have been developed but, among different institutions and countries, a large variation in indications for use and device selection exists. The Impella platform...... is an easy to use percutaneous circulatory support device which is increasingly used worldwide. During 2014, we established a working group of European physicians who have collected considerable experience with the Impella device in recent years. By critically comparing the individual experiences...

  19. Using Social Media to Support Clinical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jennifer

    2017-12-01

    Social media has been used increasingly as part of nursing education. Nurse educators at a large, multisite teaching hospital used social media to support clinical teaching. A series of educational images was created by nurse educators and shared across Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. This campaign coincided with in-unit clinical education. Nurse educators can consider using social media as an adjunct to clinical teaching, especially in large hospital settings. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(12):541-542. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Retooling Institutional Support Infrastructure for Clinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Denise C.; Brouwer, Rebecca N.; Ennis, Cory L.; Spangler, Lindsey L.; Ainsworth, Terry L.; Budinger, Susan; Mullen, Catherine; Hawley, Jeffrey; Uhlenbrauck, Gina; Stacy, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research activities at academic medical centers are challenging to oversee. Without effective research administration, a continually evolving set of regulatory and institutional requirements can detract investigator and study team attention away from a focus on scientific gain, study conduct, and patient safety. However, even when the need for research administration is recognized, there can be struggles over what form it should take. Central research administration may be viewed negatively, with individual groups preferring to maintain autonomy over processes. Conversely, a proliferation of individualized approaches across an institution can create inefficiencies or invite risk. This article describes experiences establishing a unified research support office at the Duke University School of Medicine based on a framework of customer support. The Duke Office of Clinical Research was formed in 2012 with a vision that research administration at academic medical centers should help clinical investigators navigate the complex research environment and operationalize research ideas. The office provides an array of services that have received high satisfaction ratings. The authors describe the ongoing culture change necessary for success of the unified research support office. Lessons learned from implementation of the Duke Office of Clinical Research may serve as a model for other institutions undergoing a transition to unified research support. PMID:27125563

  1. Cookery demonstrations in GOAL supported clinics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    stunting are high, and various micronutrient deficiencies, including those of ... the household are the underlying causes seen in GOAL- assisted areas. ... feeding. Thus, the nutrition cookery demonstration activity has come to play an important role in mother and child health activities in GOAL-supported clinics and GOAL's.

  2. Wireless Handhelds to Support Clinical Nursing Practicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Chih; Lai, Chin-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports our implementation and evaluation of a wireless handheld learning environment used to support a clinical nursing practicum course. The learning environment was designed so that nursing students could use handhelds for recording information, organizing ideas, assessing patients, and also for interaction and collaboration with…

  3. Anonymization of Electronic Medical Records to Support Clinical Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gkoulalas-Divanis, Aris

    2013-01-01

    Anonymization of Electronic Medical Records to Support Clinical Analysis closely examines the privacy threats that may arise from medical data sharing, and surveys the state-of-the-art methods developed to safeguard data against these threats. To motivate the need for computational methods, the book first explores the main challenges facing the privacy-protection of medical data using the existing policies, practices and regulations. Then, it takes an in-depth look at the popular computational privacy-preserving methods that have been developed for demographic, clinical and genomic data sharing, and closely analyzes the privacy principles behind these methods, as well as the optimization and algorithmic strategies that they employ. Finally, through a series of in-depth case studies that highlight data from the US Census as well as the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, the book outlines a new, innovative class of privacy-preserving methods designed to ensure the integrity of transferred medical data for su...

  4. An Argument for the Keyhole Template for Close Air Support on the Urban Battlefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-04

    An Argument for the Keyhole Template for Close Air Support on the Urban Battlefield Captain BT Taggart Major RC... Keyhole Template for Close Air Support on the Urban Battlefield 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...graphic (GRG). Using the target building as the keyhole , or center of the engagement area, Lightning 62 requested a laser guided Maverick to destroy

  5. Context based support for Clinical Reasoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilstrup Pedersen, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    In many areas of the medical domain, the decision process i.e. reasoning, involving health care professionals is distributed, cooperative and complex. Computer based decision support systems has usually been focusing on the outcome of the decision making and treated it as a single task....... In this paper a framework for a Clinical Reasoning Knowledge Warehouse (CRKW) is presented, intended to support the reasoning process, by providing the decision participants with an analysis platform that captures and enhances information and knowledge. The CRKW mixes theories and models from Artificial...... Intelligence, Knowledge Management Systems and Business Intelligence to make context sensitive, patient case specific analysis and knowledge management. The knowledge base consists of patient health records, reasoning process information and clinical guidelines. Patient specific information and knowledge...

  6. Computerized Clinical Decision Support: Contributions from 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaud, J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective To summarize recent research and select the best papers published in 2015 in the field of computerized clinical decision support for the Decision Support section of the IMIA yearbook. Method A literature review was performed by searching two bibliographic databases for papers related to clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems. The aim was to identify a list of candidate best papers from the retrieved papers that were then peer-reviewed by external reviewers. A consensus meeting between the two section editors and the IMIA editorial team was finally conducted to conclude in the best paper selection. Results Among the 974 retrieved papers, the entire review process resulted in the selection of four best papers. One paper reports on a CDSS routinely applied in pediatrics for more than 10 years, relying on adaptations of the Arden Syntax. Another paper assessed the acceptability and feasibility of an important CPOE evaluation tool in hospitals outside the US where it was developed. The third paper is a systematic, qualitative review, concerning usability flaws of medication-related alerting functions, providing an important evidence-based, methodological contribution in the domain of CDSS design and development in general. Lastly, the fourth paper describes a study quantifying the effect of a complex, continuous-care, guideline-based CDSS on the correctness and completeness of clinicians’ decisions. Conclusions While there are notable examples of routinely used decision support systems, this 2015 review on CDSSs and CPOE systems still shows that, despite methodological contributions, theoretical frameworks, and prototype developments, these technologies are not yet widely spread (at least with their full functionalities) in routine clinical practice. Further research, testing, evaluation, and training are still needed for these tools to be adopted in clinical practice and, ultimately, illustrate

  7. U.S. Ebola Treatment Center Clinical Laboratory Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelden, Katelyn C; Iwen, Peter C; Herstein, Jocelyn J; Biddinger, Paul D; Kraft, Colleen S; Saiman, Lisa; Smith, Philip W; Hewlett, Angela L; Gibbs, Shawn G; Lowe, John J

    2016-04-01

    Fifty-five hospitals in the United States have been designated Ebola treatment centers (ETCs) by their state and local health authorities. Designated ETCs must have appropriate plans to manage a patient with confirmed Ebola virus disease (EVD) for the full duration of illness and must have these plans assessed through a CDC site visit conducted by an interdisciplinary team of subject matter experts. This study determined the clinical laboratory capabilities of these ETCs. ETCs were electronically surveyed on clinical laboratory characteristics. Survey responses were returned from 47 ETCs (85%). Forty-one (87%) of the ETCs planned to provide some laboratory support (e.g., point-of-care [POC] testing) within the room of the isolated patient. Forty-four (94%) ETCs indicated that their hospital would also provide clinical laboratory support for patient care. Twenty-two (50%) of these ETC clinical laboratories had biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) containment. Of all respondents, 34 (72%) were supported by their jurisdictional public health laboratory (PHL), all of which had available BSL-3 laboratories. Overall, 40 of 44 (91%) ETCs reported BSL-3 laboratory support via their clinical laboratory and/or PHL. This survey provided a snapshot of the laboratory support for designated U.S. ETCs. ETCs have approached high-level isolation critical care with laboratory support in close proximity to the patient room and by distributing laboratory support among laboratory resources. Experts might review safety considerations for these laboratory testing/diagnostic activities that are novel in the context of biocontainment care. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Close Reading and Creative Writing in Clinical Education: Teaching Attention, Representation, and Affiliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, Rita; Hermann, Nellie; Devlin, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Medical educators increasingly have embraced literary and narrative means of pedagogy, such as the use of learning portfolios, reading works of literature, reflective writing, and creative writing, to teach interpersonal and reflective aspects of medicine. Outcomes studies of such pedagogies support the hypotheses that narrative training can deepen the clinician's attention to a patient and can help to establish the clinician's affiliation with patients, colleagues, teachers, and the self. In this article, the authors propose that creative writing in particular is useful in the making of the physician. Of the conceptual frameworks that explain why narrative training is helpful for clinicians, the authors focus on aesthetic theories to articulate the mechanisms through which creative and reflective writing may have dividends in medical training. These theories propose that accurate perception requires representation and that representation requires reception, providing a rationale for teaching clinicians and trainees how to represent what they perceive in their clinical work and how to read one another's writings. The authors then describe the narrative pedagogy used at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. Because faculty must read what their students write, they receive robust training in close reading. From this training emerged the Reading Guide for Reflective Writing, which has been useful to clinicians as they develop their skills as close readers. This institution-wide effort to teach close reading and creative writing aims to equip students and faculty with the prerequisites to provide attentive, empathic clinical care.

  9. Close Reading and Creative Writing in Clinical Education: Teaching Attention, Representation, and Affiliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, Rita; Hermann, Nellie; Devlin, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical educators increasingly have embraced literary and narrative means of pedagogy, such as the use of learning portfolios, reading works of literature, reflective writing, and creative writing, to teach interpersonal and reflective aspects of medicine. Outcomes studies of such pedagogies support the hypotheses that narrative training can deepen the clinician's attention to a patient and can help to establish the clinician's affiliation with patients, colleagues, teachers, and the self. In this article, the authors propose that creative writing in particular is useful in the making of the physician. Of the conceptual frameworks that explain why narrative training is helpful for clinicians, the authors focus on aesthetic theories to articulate the mechanisms through which creative and reflective writing may have dividends in medical training. These theories propose that accurate perception requires representation and that representation requires reception, providing a rationale for teaching clinicians and trainees how to represent what they perceive in their clinical work and how to read one another's writings. The authors then describe the narrative pedagogy used at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. Since faculty must read what their students write, they receive robust training in close reading. From this training emerged the Reading Guide for Reflective Writing, which has been useful to clinicians as they develop their skills as close readers. This institution-wide effort to teach close reading and creative writing aims to equip students and faculty with the pre-requisites to provide attentive, empathic clinical care. PMID:26200577

  10. Modelling and Decision Support of Clinical Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Roland; Lux, Thomas

    The German health care market is under a rapid rate of change, forcing especially hospitals to provide high-quality services at low costs. Appropriate measures for more effective and efficient service provision are process orientation and decision support by information technology of clinical pathway of a patient. The essential requirements are adequate modelling of clinical pathways as well as usage of adequate systems, which are capable of assisting the complete path of a patient within a hospital, and preferably also outside of it, in a digital way. To fulfil these specifications the authors present a suitable concept, which meets the challenges of well-structured clinical pathways as well as rather poorly structured diagnostic and therapeutic decisions, by interplay of process-oriented and knowledge-based hospital information systems.

  11. [Clinical practice guideline on closed tibial plateau fractures in adulthood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocegueda-Sosa, Miguel Ángel; Valenzuela-Flores, Adriana Abigail; Aldaco-García, Víctor Daniel; Flores-Aguilar, Sergio; Manilla-Lezama, Nicolás; Pérez-Hernández, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Closed tibiae plateau fractures are common injuries in the emergency room. The optimal treatment is not well defined or established. For this reason, there are several surgical management options: open reduction and internal fixation, closed reduction and percutaneous synthesis, external fixation, and even conservative treatment for this kind of fracture. The mechanism of production of this fracture is through large varus or valgus deformation to which is added a factor of axial load. The trauma may be direct or indirect. The degree of displacement, fragmentation and involvement of soft tissues like ligaments, menisci, vascular and nerve structures are determined by the magnitude of the force exerted. Any intra-articular fracture treatment can lead to an erroneous instability, deformity and limitation of motion with subsequent arthritic changes, leading to joint incongruity, limiting activity and significantly altering the quality of life. Open reduction and internal fixation with anatomic restitution is the method used in this type of fracture. However, the results of numerous publications can be questioned due to the inclusion in the same study of fractures treated with very different methods.

  12. 78 FR 11660 - Clinical Center; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... evaluation of individual intramural programs and projects conducted by the CLINICAL CENTER, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence of individual investigators, the...:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate the Department of Laboratory Medicine. Place: National...

  13. A distributed clinical decision support system architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaker H. El-Sappagh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an open and distributed clinical decision support system architecture. This technical architecture takes advantage of Electronic Health Record (EHR, data mining techniques, clinical databases, domain expert knowledge bases, available technologies and standards to provide decision-making support for healthcare professionals. The architecture will work extremely well in distributed EHR environments in which each hospital has its own local EHR, and it satisfies the compatibility, interoperability and scalability objectives of an EHR. The system will also have a set of distributed knowledge bases. Each knowledge base will be specialized in a specific domain (i.e., heart disease, and the model achieves cooperation, integration and interoperability between these knowledge bases. Moreover, the model ensures that all knowledge bases are up-to-date by connecting data mining engines to each local knowledge base. These data mining engines continuously mine EHR databases to extract the most recent knowledge, to standardize it and to add it to the knowledge bases. This framework is expected to improve the quality of healthcare, reducing medical errors and guaranteeing the safety of patients by helping clinicians to make correct, accurate, knowledgeable and timely decisions.

  14. Support across two generations: children's closeness to grandparents following parental divorce and remarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussier, Gretchen; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Dunn, Judy; Davies, Lisa

    2002-09-01

    There has been relatively little research on the role of grandparents as a source of support for children during and following their parents' marital transitions. In this study, we examined children's contact with and closeness to grandparents in different family types (i.e., two biological parents, single mother, stepparent). Participants included 155 children from the Avon Brothers and Sisters Study. Parent and child interviews and questionnaires regarding the children's relationships with maternal and paternal biological and stepgrandparents were examined. There were family type differences in rates of contact with grandparents as well as children's closeness to grandparents. Furthermore, children's and parents' view about these relationships with grandparents were modestly correlated, suggesting that children often held different views about their closeness to their grandparents than did their parents. Greater closeness to grandparents was associated with fewer adjustment problems.

  15. Financial and Emotional Support in Close Personal Ties among Central Asian Migrant Women in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornienko, Olga; Agadjanian, Victor; Menjívar, Cecilia; Zotova, Natalia

    2018-05-01

    This study advances research on the role of personal networks as sources of financial and emotional support in immigrants' close personal ties beyond the immediate family. Because resource scarcity experienced by members of immigrant communities is likely to disrupt normatively expected reciprocal support, we explored multi-level predictors of exchange processes with personal network members that involve (1) only receiving support, (2) only providing support, and (3) reciprocal support exchanges. We focus on an understudied case of Central Asian migrant women in the Russian Federation using a sample of 607 women from three ethnic groups-Kyrgyz, Tajik, Uzbek-who were surveyed in two large Russian cities-Nizhny Novgorod and Kazan. The survey collected information on respondents' demographic, socioeconomic, and migration-related characteristics, as well as characteristics of up to five individuals with whom they had a close relationship. Multi-level multinomial regression analyses were used to account for the nested nature of the data. Our results revealed that closer social relationships (siblings and friends) and greater levels of resources (income and regularized legal status) at both ego and alter levels were positively related to providing, receiving, and reciprocally exchanging financial and emotional support. Egos were more likely to provide financial assistance to transnational alters, whereas they were more likely to engage in mutual exchanges of emotional support with their network members from other countries. Personal network size and density showed no relationship with support exchanges. These findings provide a nuanced picture of close personal ties as conduits for financial and emotional support in migrant communities in a major, yet understudied, migrant-receiving context.

  16. Anxiety, depression and PTSD-related symptoms in spouses and close relatives of burn survivors: When the supporter needs to be supported.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Suzie; Gourlay, Catherine; Desjardins, Alexandra; Bodson-Clermont, Paule; Boucher, Marie-Ève

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of anxiety, depression and PTSD-related symptoms reported by spouses and close relatives of adult burn survivors. Potential associations between these symptoms and variables such as the severity of the burn were also explored. Participants were spouses (n=31) and close relatives (n=25) of hospitalized patients with acute burns. Anxiety and depression symptoms were assessed by the Hospital Distress Anxiety and Depression Scale and PTSD-related symptoms by the Modified PTSD Symptom Scale at both admission to and discharge from the burn unit. At admission, 77% of spouses and 56% of close relatives of burn patients reported anxiety, depression or PTSD-related symptoms in the clinical range. While spouses had higher scores than close relatives on symptom measures, significant differences were only established for anxiety symptoms (p<.02). A significant effect was found for gender, with women reporting more anxiety (p=.01) and depression (p=.02) symptoms than men. Results also showed a main effect for time, with anxiety (p<.0001), depression (p<.0001) and PTSD-related (p<.0001) symptoms being higher at admission than at discharge. Variables associated with the index patient, such as total body surface area burned, length of stay, number of ventilated days, facial burns, or level of care at admission, were not associated with outcome measures. Spouses and close relatives of burn survivors showed high levels of psychological distress in the first few days following admission, and more than a quarter still reported symptoms in the clinical range at discharge. Our analysis points to the need to offer psychological support and guidance to family members so that they can in turn provide effective support to the burn survivor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. An online infertility clinical decision support system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Diniz de Souza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore some possibilities of computer applications in medicine, and to discuss an online infertility clinical decision support system.Methods: Retrospective data were obtained from 52 couples, and then entered into the online tool. Both its results and the initial diagnoses obtained by the treating physicians were compared with the final diagnoses established by laparoscopy and other diagnostic tests (semen analysis, hormone analysis, endometrial biopsy, ultrasound and hysteroscopy. The initial hypothesis of the research was that the online tool's output was statistically associated with the final diagnoses. In order to verify that hypothesis, a chi-square (χ2 test with Yates' correction for continuity (P<0.05 was performed to verify if the online tool's and the doctor's diagnoses were statistically associated with the final diagnoses.Results: Four etiological factors were present in more than 50% of the couples (ovarian, tubal-peritoneal, uterine, and endometriosis. The statistical results confirmed the research hypothesis for eight out of the nine etiological factors (ovarian, tubal-peritoneal, uterine, cervical, male, vaginal, psychosomatic, and endometriosis; P<0.05. Since there were no cases related to the immune factor in the sample, further clinical data are necessary in order to assess the online tool's performance for that factor.Conclusions: The online tool tends to present more false-positives than false-negatives, whereas the expert physician tends to present more false-negatives than false-positives. Therefore, the online tool and the doctor seem to complement each other. Finally, the obtained results suggest that the infertility online tool discussed herein might be a useful research and instructional tool.

  18. An online infertility clinical decision support system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Diniz de Souza

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore some possibilities of computer applications in medicine, and to discuss an online infertility clinical decision support system. Methods: Retrospective data were obtained from 52 couples, and then entered into the online tool. Both its results and the initial diagnoses obtained by the treating physicians were compared with the final diagnoses established by laparoscopy and other diagnostic tests (semen analysis, hormone analysis, endometrial biopsy, ultrasound and hysteroscopy. The initial hypothesis of the research was that the online tool’s output was statistically associated with the final diagnoses. In order to verify that hypothesis, a chi-square (氈2 test with Yates’ correction for continuity (P<0.05 was performed to verify if the online tool’s and the doctor’s diagnoses were statistically associated with the final diagnoses. Results: Four etiological factors were present in more than 50% of the couples (ovarian, tubal-peritoneal, uterine, and endometriosis. The statistical results confirmed the research hypothesis for eight out of the nine etiological factors (ovarian, tubal-peritoneal, uterine, cervical, male, vaginal, psychosomatic, and endometriosis; P<0.05. Since there were no cases related to the immune factor in the sample, further clinical data are necessary in order to assess the online tool’s performance for that factor. Conclusions: The online tool tends to present more false-positives than false negatives, whereas the expert physician tends to present more false-negatives than false-positives. Therefore, the online tool and the doctor seem to complement each other. Finally, the obtained results suggest that the infertility online tool discussed herein might be a useful research and instructional tool.

  19. Ebb and Flow: Maintaining the Close Air Support Relationship through History

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-10

    3-09.3, Close Air Support (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 2014), xi. 20 Scott Fischer , LtCol, USAF, “Army and Air Force Subcultures...also happens that airmen and ground forces can 30 Jeff Schogol, "Welsh: The Air Force cares about...Advanced Military Studies, 2004), 59. 60 Fischer , “Army Air Force Subcultures,” 15. 61 Bolton, “Army Fixed-Wing Attack,” 5-6. 21 external

  20. Evaluation of engineering foods for closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karel, M.

    1982-01-01

    A nutritionally adequate and acceptable diet was evaluated and developed. A design for a multipurpose food plant is discussed. The types and amounts of foods needed to be regenerated in a partially closed ecological life support system (PCELSS) were proposed. All steps of food processes to be utilized in the multipurpose food plant of PCELSS were also considered. Equipment specifications, simplification of the proposed processes, and food waste treatment were analyzed.

  1. Proof-of-Concept Part Task Trainer for Close Air Support Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Application of Firepower JavaScript Object Notation xvi JTAC Joint Terminal Attack Controller KILSWITCH Kinetic Integrated Low-cost SoftWare...SUMMARY This chapter discussed the basics of the close air support mission, the importance of standardized procedures and quality training for the pilots...Bowman et al. 1999). In that article , the authors discuss the importance of direct experience and how it relates to education. They comment that

  2. The meaning and validation of social support networks for close family of persons with advanced cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjolander Catarina

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To strengthen the mental well-being of close family of persons newly diagnosed as having cancer, it is necessary to acquire a greater understanding of their experiences of social support networks, so as to better assess what resources are available to them from such networks and what professional measures are required. The main aim of the present study was to explore the meaning of these networks for close family of adult persons in the early stage of treatment for advanced lung or gastrointestinal cancer. An additional aim was to validate the study’s empirical findings by means of the Finfgeld-Connett conceptual model for social support. The intention was to investigate whether these findings were in accordance with previous research in nursing. Methods Seventeen family members with a relative who 8–14 weeks earlier had been diagnosed as having lung or gastrointestinal cancer were interviewed. The data were subjected to qualitative latent content analysis and validated by means of identifying antecedents and critical attributes. Results The meaning or main attribute of the social support network was expressed by the theme Confirmation through togetherness, based on six subthemes covering emotional and, to a lesser extent, instrumental support. Confirmation through togetherness derived principally from information, understanding, encouragement, involvement and spiritual community. Three subthemes were identified as the antecedents to social support: Need of support, Desire for a deeper relationship with relatives, Network to turn to. Social support involves reciprocal exchange of verbal and non-verbal information provided mainly by lay persons. Conclusions The study provides knowledge of the antecedents and attributes of social support networks, particularly from the perspective of close family of adult persons with advanced lung or gastrointestinal cancer. There is a need for measurement instruments that could

  3. The meaning and validation of social support networks for close family of persons with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjolander, Catarina; Ahlstrom, Gerd

    2012-09-17

    To strengthen the mental well-being of close family of persons newly diagnosed as having cancer, it is necessary to acquire a greater understanding of their experiences of social support networks, so as to better assess what resources are available to them from such networks and what professional measures are required. The main aim of the present study was to explore the meaning of these networks for close family of adult persons in the early stage of treatment for advanced lung or gastrointestinal cancer. An additional aim was to validate the study's empirical findings by means of the Finfgeld-Connett conceptual model for social support. The intention was to investigate whether these findings were in accordance with previous research in nursing. Seventeen family members with a relative who 8-14 weeks earlier had been diagnosed as having lung or gastrointestinal cancer were interviewed. The data were subjected to qualitative latent content analysis and validated by means of identifying antecedents and critical attributes. The meaning or main attribute of the social support network was expressed by the theme Confirmation through togetherness, based on six subthemes covering emotional and, to a lesser extent, instrumental support. Confirmation through togetherness derived principally from information, understanding, encouragement, involvement and spiritual community. Three subthemes were identified as the antecedents to social support: Need of support, Desire for a deeper relationship with relatives, Network to turn to. Social support involves reciprocal exchange of verbal and non-verbal information provided mainly by lay persons. The study provides knowledge of the antecedents and attributes of social support networks, particularly from the perspective of close family of adult persons with advanced lung or gastrointestinal cancer. There is a need for measurement instruments that could encourage nurses and other health-care professionals to focus on family members

  4. [Development of integrated support software for clinical nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siquier Homar, Pedro; Pinteño Blanco, Manel; Calleja Hernández, Miguel Ángel; Fernández Cortés, Francisco; Martínez Sotelo, Jesús

    2015-09-01

    to develop an integrated computer software application for specialized nutritional support, integrated in the electronic clinical record, which detects automatically and early those undernourished patients or at risk of developing undernourishment, determining points of opportunity for improvement and evaluation of the results. the quality standards published by the Nutrition Work Group of the Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacy (SEFH) and the recommendations by the Pharmacy Group of the Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SENPE) have been taken into account. According to these quality standards, the nutritional support has to include the following healthcare stages or sub-processes: nutritional screening, nutritional assessment, plan for nutritional care, prescription, preparation and administration. this software allows to conduct, in an automated way, a specific nutritional assessment for those patients with nutritional risk, implementing, if necessary, a nutritional treatment plan, conducting follow-up and traceability of outcomes derived from the implementation of improvement actions, and quantifying to what extent our practice is close to the established standard. this software allows to standardize the specialized nutritional support from a multidisciplinary point of view, introducing the concept of quality control per processes, and including patient as the main customer. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of integrated support software for clinical nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Siquier Homar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to develop an integrated computer software application for specialized nutritional support, integrated in the electronic clinical record, which detects automatically and early those undernourished patients or at risk of developing undernourishment, determining points of opportunity for improvement and evaluation of the results. Methods: the quality standards published by the Nutrition Work Group of the Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacy (SEFH and the recommendations by the Pharmacy Group of the Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SENPE have been taken into account. According to these quality standards, the nutritional support has to include the following healthcare stages or sub-processes: nutritional screening, nutritional assessment, plan for nutritional care, prescription, preparation and administration. Results: this software allows to conduct, in an automated way, a specific nutritional assessment for those patients with nutritional risk, implementing, if necessary, a nutritional treatment plan, conducting follow-up and traceability of outcomes derived from the implementation of improvement actions, and quantifying to what extent our practice is close to the established standard. Conclusions: this software allows to standardize the specialized nutritional support from a multidisciplinary point of view, introducing the concept of quality control per processes, and including patient as the main customer

  6. Supported Catalysts Useful in Ring-Closing Metathesis, Cross Metathesis, and Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakkrit Suriboot

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ruthenium and molybdenum catalysts are widely used in synthesis of both small molecules and macromolecules. While major developments have led to new increasingly active catalysts that have high functional group compatibility and stereoselectivity, catalyst/product separation, catalyst recycling, and/or catalyst residue/product separation remain an issue in some applications of these catalysts. This review highlights some of the history of efforts to address these problems, first discussing the problem in the context of reactions like ring-closing metathesis and cross metathesis catalysis used in the synthesis of low molecular weight compounds. It then discusses in more detail progress in dealing with these issues in ring opening metathesis polymerization chemistry. Such approaches depend on a biphasic solid/liquid or liquid separation and can use either always biphasic or sometimes biphasic systems and approaches to this problem using insoluble inorganic supports, insoluble crosslinked polymeric organic supports, soluble polymeric supports, ionic liquids and fluorous phases are discussed.

  7. Clinical Decision Support: Statistical Hopes and Challenges

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, Jan; Zvárová, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2016), s. 30-34 ISSN 1805-8698 Grant - others:Nadační fond na opdporu vědy(CZ) Neuron Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : decision support * data mining * multivariate statistics * psychiatry * information based medicine Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  8. Critical experiments supporting close proximity water storage of power reactor fuel. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, M.N.; Hoovler, G.S.; Eng, R.L.; Welfare, F.G.

    1979-07-01

    Close-packed storage of LWR fuel assemblies is needed in order to expand the capacity of existing underwater storage pools. This increased capacity is required to accommodate the large volume of spent fuel produced by prolonged onsite storage. To provide benchmark criticality data in support of this effort, 20 critical assemblies were constructed that simulated a variety of close-packed LWR fuel storage configurations. Criticality calculations using the Monte Carlo KENO-IV code were performed to provide an analytical basis for comparison with the experimental data. Each critical configuration is documented in sufficient detail to permit the use of these data in validating calculational methods according to ANSI Standard N16.9-1975

  9. Conducting Closed Habitation Experiments: Experience from the Lunar Mars Life Support Test Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Edeen, Marybeth A.; Henninger, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    The Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project (LMLSTP) was conducted from 1995 through 1997 at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) to demonstrate increasingly longer duration operation of integrated, closed-loop life support systems that employed biological and physicochemical techniques for water recycling, waste processing, air revitalization, thermal control, and food production. An analog environment for long-duration human space travel, the conditions of isolation and confinement also enabled studies of human factors, medical sciences (both physiology and psychology) and crew training. Four tests were conducted, Phases I, II, IIa and III, with durations of 15, 30, 60 and 91 days, respectively. The first phase focused on biological air regeneration, using wheat to generate enough oxygen for one experimental subject. The systems demonstrated in the later phases were increasingly complex and interdependent, and provided life support for four crew members. The tests were conducted using two human-rated, atmospherically-closed test chambers, the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC) and the Integrated Life Support Systems Test Facility (ILSSTF). Systems included test articles (the life support hardware under evaluation), human accommodations (living quarters, kitchen, exercise equipment, etc.) and facility systems (emergency matrix system, power, cooling, etc.). The test team was managed by a lead engineer and a test director, and included test article engineers responsible for specific systems, subsystems or test articles, test conductors, facility engineers, chamber operators and engineering technicians, medical and safety officers, and science experimenters. A crew selection committee, comprised of psychologists, engineers and managers involved in the test, evaluated male and female volunteers who applied to be test subjects. Selection was based on the skills mix anticipated for each particular test, and utilized

  10. Clinical Decision Support Tools: The Evolution of a Revolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mould, D. R.; D'Haens, G.; Upton, R. N.

    2016-01-01

    Dashboard systems for clinical decision support integrate data from multiple sources. These systems, the newest in a long line of dose calculators and other decision support tools, utilize Bayesian approaches to fully individualize dosing using information gathered through therapeutic drug

  11. Environmental control and life support - Partially closed system will save big money

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, W. W.

    1983-01-01

    Although the NASA space station has not yet been completely defined, realistic estimates may be made of the environmental control and life support system requirements entailed by a crew of eight, a resupply interval of 90 days, an initial launch which includes expendables for the first resupply interval, 7.86 lb/day of water per person, etc. An appraisal of these requirements is presented which strongly suggests the utility of a partially closed life support system. Such a scheme would give the crew high quality water to drink, and recycle nonpotable water from hand washing, bathing, clothes and dish washing, and urinal flushing. The excess recovery process water is electrolyzed to provide metabolic and leakage oxygen. The crew would drink electrolysis water and atmospheric humidity control moisture-derived water.

  12. The Physical/Chemical Closed-Loop Life Support Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilardo, Vincent J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The various elements of the Physical/Chemical Closed-Loop Life Support Research Project (P/C CLLS) are described including both those currently funded and those planned for implementation at ARC and other participating NASA field centers. The plan addresses the entire range of regenerative life support for Space Exploration Initiative mission needs, and focuses initially on achieving technology readiness for the Initial Lunar Outpost by 1995-97. Project elements include water reclamation, air revitalization, solid waste management, thermal and systems control, and systems integration. Current analysis estimates that each occupant of a space habitat will require a total of 32 kg/day of supplies to live and operate comfortably, while an ideal P/C CLLS system capable of 100 percent reclamation of air and water, but excluding recycling of solid wastes or foods, will reduce this requirement to 3.4 kg/day.

  13. Clinical decision support in community pharmacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heringa, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412650207

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of preventable patient harm caused by drug use has been shown over and over again. Clinical risk management is a concept to prevent patient harm by risk-reducing strategies. It is a systematic approach including risk detection, assessment, management and evaluation. One of the

  14. Supporting Placement Supervision in Clinical Exercise Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealey, Rebecca M.; Raymond, Jacqueline; Groeller, Herb; Rooney, Kieron; Crabb, Meagan; Watt, Kerrianne

    2015-01-01

    The continued engagement of the professional workforce as supervisors is critical for the sustainability and growth of work-integrated learning activities in university degrees. This study investigated factors that influence the willingness and ability of clinicians to continue to supervise clinical exercise physiology work-integrated learning…

  15. Using Pyrolysis and its Bioproducts to Help Close the Loop in Sustainable Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, LaShelle E.

    2012-01-01

    The next step in human exploration of space is beyond low Earth orbit and possibly to sites such as the Moon and Mars. Resupply of critical life support components for missions such as these are difficult or impossible. Life support processes for closing the loop of water, oxygen and carbon have to be identified .. Currently, there are many technologies proposed for terrestrial missions for waste, water, air processing and the creation of consumables. There are a variety of different approaches, but few address all of these issues simultaneously. One candidate is pyrolysis; a method where waste streams can be heated in the absence of oxygen to undergo a thermochemical conversion producing a series of bioproducts. Bioproducts like biochar made from non-edible biomass and human solid waste can possibly provide valuable benefits such as waste reduction, regolith fertilization for increased food production, and become a consumable for water processing and air revitalization systems. Syngas containing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and cbon dioxide, can be converted to methane and dimethyl ether to create propellants. Bio-oils can be utilized as a heating fuel or fed to bioreactors that utilize oil-eating microbes. Issues such as carbon sequestration and subsequent carbon balance of the closed system and identifying ideal process methods to achieve the highest quality products, whilst being energy friendly, will also be addressed.

  16. Enhanced clinical-scale manufacturing of TCR transduced T-cells using closed culture system modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jianjian; Gkitsas, Nikolaos; Fellowes, Vicki S; Ren, Jiaqiang; Feldman, Steven A; Hinrichs, Christian S; Stroncek, David F; Highfill, Steven L

    2018-01-24

    Genetic engineering of T-cells to express specific T cell receptors (TCR) has emerged as a novel strategy to treat various malignancies. More widespread utilization of these types of therapies has been somewhat constrained by the lack of closed culture processes capable of expanding sufficient numbers of T-cells for clinical application. Here, we evaluate a process for robust clinical grade manufacturing of TCR gene engineered T-cells. TCRs that target human papillomavirus E6 and E7 were independently tested. A 21 day process was divided into a transduction phase (7 days) and a rapid expansion phase (14 days). This process was evaluated using two healthy donor samples and four samples obtained from patients with epithelial cancers. The process resulted in ~ 2000-fold increase in viable nucleated cells and high transduction efficiencies (64-92%). At the end of culture, functional assays demonstrated that these cells were potent and specific in their ability to kill tumor cells bearing target and secrete large quantities of interferon and tumor necrosis factor. Both phases of culture were contained within closed or semi-closed modules, which include automated density gradient separation and cell culture bags for the first phase and closed GREX culture devices and wash/concentrate systems for the second phase. Large-scale manufacturing using modular systems and semi-automated devices resulted in highly functional clinical-grade TCR transduced T-cells. This process is now in use in actively accruing clinical trials and the NIH Clinical Center and can be utilized at other cell therapy manufacturing sites that wish to scale-up and optimize their processing using closed systems.

  17. The value of participatory development to support antimicrobial stewardship with a clinical decision support system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerlage-de Jong, Nienke; Wentzel, Jobke; Hendrix, Ron; van Gemert-Pijnen, Lisette

    2017-01-01

    Background: Current clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) for antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) are guideline- or expert-driven. They are focused on (clinical) content, not on supporting real-time workflow. Thus, CDSSs fail to optimally support prudent antimicrobial prescribing in daily

  18. The value of participatory development to support antimicrobial stewardship with a clinical decision support system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerlage-de Jong, Nienke; Wentzel, M.J.; Hendrix, Ron; van Gemert-Pijnen, Julia E.W.C.

    Background Current clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) for antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) are guideline- or expert-driven. They are focused on (clinical) content, not on supporting real-time workflow. Thus, CDSSs fail to optimally support prudent antimicrobial prescribing in daily

  19. The {open_quotes}leak-before-break{close_quotes} applicability in decision support system {open_quotes}strength{close_quotes}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torop, V.M.; Orynyak, I.V. [Institute for Problems of Strength, Kiev (Ukraine); Kutovoy, O.L. [Institute of Structure Integrity, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-04-01

    A software decision support system, STRENGTH, for application of leak before break analysis, is described. The background methodology and sample application are outlined. The program allows multioptional computation of loading parameters for different types of defects, and variable properties for metals and welded joints. Structural strength is assessed, and service life predictions are made. The program is used to analyze specific defects identified by nondestructive testing.

  20. Supporting Student Nurses Learning in and through Clinical Practice: The Role of the Clinical Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Margaret; Roberts, Debbie

    2003-01-01

    A clinical guide is an experienced nurse who supports nursing students throughout the program, particularly in clinical placements. More than a mentor, a guide is fully involved in promoting deep learning in clinical settings. (SK)

  1. TUW @ TREC Clinical Decision Support Track

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    and the ShARe/CLEF eHealth Evaluation Lab [8,3] running in 2013 and 2014. Here we briefly describe the goals of the first TREC Clinical Decision...Wendy W. Chapman, David Mart́ınez, Guido Zuccon, and João R. M. Palotti. Overview of the share/clef ehealth evalu- ation lab 2014. In Information Access...Zuccon. Overview of the share/clef ehealth evaluation lab 2013. In Information Access Evaluation. Multilinguality, Multimodality, and Visualization

  2. Clinical Research Informatics: Supporting the Research Study Lifecycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S B

    2017-08-01

    Objectives: The primary goal of this review is to summarize significant developments in the field of Clinical Research Informatics (CRI) over the years 2015-2016. The secondary goal is to contribute to a deeper understanding of CRI as a field, through the development of a strategy for searching and classifying CRI publications. Methods: A search strategy was developed to query the PubMed database, using medical subject headings to both select and exclude articles, and filtering publications by date and other characteristics. A manual review classified publications using stages in the "research study lifecycle", with key stages that include study definition, participant enrollment, data management, data analysis, and results dissemination. Results: The search strategy generated 510 publications. The manual classification identified 125 publications as relevant to CRI, which were classified into seven different stages of the research lifecycle, and one additional class that pertained to multiple stages, referring to general infrastructure or standards. Important cross-cutting themes included new applications of electronic media (Internet, social media, mobile devices), standardization of data and procedures, and increased automation through the use of data mining and big data methods. Conclusions: The review revealed increased interest and support for CRI in large-scale projects across institutions, regionally, nationally, and internationally. A search strategy based on medical subject headings can find many relevant papers, but a large number of non-relevant papers need to be detected using text words which pertain to closely related fields such as computational statistics and clinical informatics. The research lifecycle was useful as a classification scheme by highlighting the relevance to the users of clinical research informatics solutions. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.

  3. Coupling sensing to crop models for closed-loop plant production in advanced life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazzoni, James; Ling, Peter P.

    1999-01-01

    We present a conceptual framework for coupling sensing to crop models for closed-loop analysis of plant production for NASA's program in advanced life support. Crop status may be monitored through non-destructive observations, while models may be independently applied to crop production planning and decision support. To achieve coupling, environmental variables and observations are linked to mode inputs and outputs, and monitoring results compared with model predictions of plant growth and development. The information thus provided may be useful in diagnosing problems with the plant growth system, or as a feedback to the model for evaluation of plant scheduling and potential yield. In this paper, we demonstrate this coupling using machine vision sensing of canopy height and top projected canopy area, and the CROPGRO crop growth model. Model simulations and scenarios are used for illustration. We also compare model predictions of the machine vision variables with data from soybean experiments conducted at New Jersey Agriculture Experiment Station Horticulture Greenhouse Facility, Rutgers University. Model simulations produce reasonable agreement with the available data, supporting our illustration.

  4. [Support Team for Investigator-Initiated Clinical Research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hisako

    2017-07-01

    Investigator-initiated clinical research is that in which investigators plan and carry out their own clinical research in academia. For large-scale clinical research, a team should be organized and implemented. This team should include investigators and supporting staff, who will promote smooth research performance by fulfilling their respective roles. The supporting staff should include project managers, administrative personnel, billing personnel, data managers, and clinical research coordinators. In this article, I will present the current status of clinical research support and introduce the research organization of the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) study, an investigator-initiated international clinical research study, with particular emphasis on the role of the project management staff and clinical research coordinators.

  5. Bioregenerative Life Support Experiment for 90-days in a Closed Integrative Experimental Facility LUNAR PALACE 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong

    A 90-day bioregenerative life support experiment with three-member crew was carried out in the closed integrative experimental facility, LUNAR PALACE 1 regenerating basic living necessities and disposing wastes to provide life support for crew. It was composed of higher plant module, animal module, and waste treatment module. The higher plant module included wheat, chufa, pea, carrot and green leafy vegetables, with aim to satisfy requirement of 60% plant food and 100% O2 and water for crew. The yellow mealworm was selected as animal module to provide partial animal protein for crew, and reared on plant inedible biomass. The higher plant and yellow mealworm were both cultivated and harvested in the conveyor-type manner. The partial plant inedible biomass and human feces were mixed and co- fermented in the waste treatment module for preparation of soil-like substrate by bioconversion, maintaining gas balance and increasing closure degree. Meanwhile, in the waste treatment module, the water and partial nitrogen from human urine were recovered by physical-chemical means. Circulation of O2 and water as well as food supply from crops cultivated in the LUNAR PALACE 1 were investigated and calculated, and simultaneously gas exchange, mass flow among different components and system closure degree were also analyzed, respectively. Furthermore, the system robustness with respect to internal variation was tested and evaluated by sensitivity analysis of the aggregative index consisting of key performance indicators like crop yield, gaseous equilibrium concentration, microbial community composition, biogenic elements dynamics, etc., and comprehensively evaluating the operating state, to number change of crew from 2 to 4 during the 90-day closed experiment period.

  6. Clinical Ethics Support for Healthcare Personnel: An Integrative Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoal, Dara; Skovdahl, Kirsti; Gifford, Mervyn; Kihlgren, Annica

    2017-12-01

    This study describes which clinical ethics approaches are available to support healthcare personnel in clinical practice in terms of their construction, functions and goals. Healthcare personnel frequently face ethically difficult situations in the course of their work and these issues cover a wide range of areas from prenatal care to end-of-life care. Although various forms of clinical ethics support have been developed, to our knowledge there is a lack of review studies describing which ethics support approaches are available, how they are constructed and their goals in supporting healthcare personnel in clinical practice. This study engages in an integrative literature review. We searched for peer-reviewed academic articles written in English between 2000 and 2016 using specific Mesh terms and manual keywords in CINAHL, MEDLINE and Psych INFO databases. In total, 54 articles worldwide described clinical ethics support approaches that include clinical ethics consultation, clinical ethics committees, moral case deliberation, ethics rounds, ethics discussion groups, and ethics reflection groups. Clinical ethics consultation and clinical ethics committees have various roles and functions in different countries. They can provide healthcare personnel with advice and recommendations regarding the best course of action. Moral case deliberation, ethics rounds, ethics discussion groups and ethics reflection groups support the idea that group reflection increases insight into ethical issues. Clinical ethics support in the form of a "bottom-up" perspective might give healthcare personnel opportunities to think and reflect more than a "top-down" perspective. A "bottom-up" approach leaves the healthcare personnel with the moral responsibility for their choice of action in clinical practice, while a "top-down" approach risks removing such moral responsibility.

  7. Processing information about support exchanges in close relationships: The role of a knowledge structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulent eTuran

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available People develop knowledge of interpersonal interaction patterns (e.g., prototypes and schemas, which shape how they process incoming information. One such knowledge structure based on attachment theory was examined: the secure base script (the prototypic sequence of events when an attachment figure comforts a close relationship partner in distress. In two studies (N = 53 and N = 119, participants were shown animated film clips in which geometric figures depicted the secure base script and asked to describe the animations. Both studies found that many people readily recognize the secure-base script from these minimal cues quite well, suggesting that this script is not only available in the context of specific relationships (i.e., a relationship-specific knowledge: The generalized (abstract structure of the script is also readily accessible, which would make it possible to apply it to any relationship (including new relationships. Regression analyses suggested that participants who recognized the script were more likely to (a include more animation elements when describing the animations, (b see a common theme in different animations, (c create better organized stories, and (d later recall more details of the animations. These findings suggest that access to this knowledge structure helps a person organize and remember relevant incoming information. Furthermore, in both Study 1 and Study 2, individual differences in the ready recognition of the script were associated with individual differences in having access to another related knowledge: indicators suggesting that a potential relationship partner can be trusted to be supportive and responsive at times of stress. Results of Study 2 also suggest that recognizing the script is associated with those items of an attachment measure that concern giving and receiving support. Thus, these knowledge structures may shape how people process support-relevant information in their everyday lives, potentially

  8. Closing the gap between knowledge and clinical application: challenges for genomic translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Wylie; Korngiebel, Diane M

    2015-01-01

    Despite early predictions and rapid progress in research, the introduction of personal genomics into clinical practice has been slow. Several factors contribute to this translational gap between knowledge and clinical application. The evidence available to support genetic test use is often limited, and implementation of new testing programs can be challenging. In addition, the heterogeneity of genomic risk information points to the need for strategies to select and deliver the information most appropriate for particular clinical needs. Accomplishing these tasks also requires recognition that some expectations for personal genomics are unrealistic, notably expectations concerning the clinical utility of genomic risk assessment for common complex diseases. Efforts are needed to improve the body of evidence addressing clinical outcomes for genomics, apply implementation science to personal genomics, and develop realistic goals for genomic risk assessment. In addition, translational research should emphasize the broader benefits of genomic knowledge, including applications of genomic research that provide clinical benefit outside the context of personal genomic risk.

  9. Virtual Habitat -a dynamic simulation of closed life support systems -human model status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus Czupalla, M. Sc.; Zhukov, Anton; Hwang, Su-Au; Schnaitmann, Jonas

    In order to optimize Life Support Systems on a system level, stability questions must be in-vestigated. To do so the exploration group of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) is developing the "Virtual Habitat" (V-HAB) dynamic LSS simulation software. V-HAB shall provide the possibility to conduct dynamic simulations of entire mission scenarios for any given LSS configuration. The Virtual Habitat simulation tool consists of four main modules: • Closed Environment Module (CEM) -monitoring of compounds in a closed environment • Crew Module (CM) -dynamic human simulation • P/C Systems Module (PCSM) -dynamic P/C subsystems • Plant Module (PM) -dynamic plant simulation The core module of the simulation is the dynamic and environment sensitive human module. Introduced in its basic version in 2008, the human module has been significantly updated since, increasing its capabilities and maturity significantly. In this paper three newly added human model subsystems (thermal regulation, digestion and schedule controller) are introduced touching also on the human stress subsystem which is cur-rently under development. Upon the introduction of these new subsystems, the integration of these into the overall V-HAB human model is discussed, highlighting the impact on the most important I/F. The overall human model capabilities shall further be summarized and presented based on meaningful test cases. In addition to the presentation of the results, the correlation strategy for the Virtual Habitat human model shall be introduced assessing the models current confidence level and giving an outlook on the future correlation strategy. Last but not least, the remaining V-HAB mod-ules shall be introduced shortly showing how the human model is integrated into the overall simulation.

  10. A short version of the revised 'experience of close relationships questionnaire': investigating non-clinical and clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongpakaran, Tinakon; Wongpakaran, Nahathai

    2012-01-01

    This study seeks to investigate the psychometric properties of the short version of the revised 'Experience of Close Relationships' questionnaire, comparing non-clinical and clinical samples. In total 702 subjects participated in this study, of whom 531 were non-clinical participants and 171 were psychiatric patients. They completed the short version of the revised 'Experience of Close Relationships' questionnaire (ECR-R-18), the Perceived Stress Scale-10(PSS-10), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and the UCLA Loneliness scale. A retest of the ECR-R-18 was then performed at four-week intervals. Then, confirmatory factor analyses were performed to test the validity of the new scale. The ECR-R-18 showed a fair to good internal consistency (α 0.77 to 0.87) for both samples, and the test-retest reliability was found to be satisfactory (ICC = 0.75). The anxiety sub-scale demonstrated concurrent validity with PSS-10 and RSES, while the avoidance sub-scale showed concurrent validity with the UCLA Loneliness Scale. Confirmatory factor analysis using method factors yielded two factors with an acceptable model fit for both groups. An invariance test revealed that the ECR-R-18 when used on the clinical group differed from when used with the non-clinical group. The ECR-R-18 questionnaire revealed an overall better level of fit than the original 36 item questionnaire, indicating its suitability for use with a broader group of samples, including clinical samples. The reliability of the ECR-R- 18 might be increased if a modified scoring system is used and if our suggestions with regard to future studies are followed up.

  11. Towards implementation of optimum nutrition and better clinical nutrition support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, C. F.; Prins, F.; van Kempen, A.; Tepaske, R.; Sauerwein, H. P.

    2001-01-01

    Clinical Nutrition Support--defined as nutrition for hospitalized patients suffering from metabolic stress--plays a limited role in the therapeutic routine of the physician. This is not surprising as most research in the field of clinical nutrition is disappointing with regard to the objective

  12. The impact of an electronic clinical decision support for pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    State-of-the-art electronic radiology workflow can provide clinical decision support (CDS) for specialised imaging requests, but there has been limited work on the clinical impact of CDS in PE, particularly in resource-constrained environments. Objective. To determine the impact of an electronic CDS for PE on the efficiency ...

  13. Gut microbes in correlation with mood: case study in a closed experimental human life support system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Su, Q; Xie, B; Duan, L; Zhao, W; Hu, D; Wu, R; Liu, H

    2016-08-01

    Gut microbial community, which may influence our mood, can be shaped by modulating the gut ecosystem through dietary strategies. Understanding the gut-brain correlationship in healthy people is important for maintenance of mental health and prevention of mental illnesses. A case study on the correlation between gut microbial alternation and mood swing of healthy adults was conducted in a closed human life support system during a 105-day experiment. Gut microbial community structures were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing every 2 weeks. A profile of mood states questionnaire was used to record the mood swings. Correlation between gut microbes and mood were identified with partial least squares discrimination analysis. Microbial community structures in the three healthy adults were strongly correlated with mood states. Bacterial genera Roseburia, Phascolarctobacterium, Lachnospira, and Prevotella had potential positive correlation with positive mood, while genera Faecalibacterium, Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, and Anaerostipes were correlated with negative mood. Among which, Faecalibacterium spp. had the highest abundance, and showed a significant negative correlation with mood. Our results indicated that the composition of microbial community could play a role in emotional change in mentally physically healthy adults. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Genomic comparison of closely related Giant Viruses supports an accordion-like model of evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eFilée

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Genome gigantism occurs so far in Phycodnaviridae and Mimiviridae (order Megavirales. Origin and evolution of these Giant Viruses (GVs remain open questions. Interestingly, availability of a collection of closely related GV genomes enabling genomic comparisons offer the opportunity to better understand the different evolutionary forces acting on these genomes. Whole genome alignment for 5 groups of viruses belonging to the Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae families show that there is no trend of genome expansion or general tendency of genome contraction. Instead, GV genomes accumulated genomic mutations over the time with gene gains compensating the different losses. In addition, each lineage displays specific patterns of genome evolution. Mimiviridae (megaviruses and mimiviruses and Chlorella Phycodnaviruses evolved mainly by duplications and losses of genes belonging to large paralogous families (including movements of diverse mobiles genetic elements, whereas Micromonas and Ostreococcus Phycodnaviruses derive most of their genetic novelties thought lateral gene transfers. Taken together, these data support an accordion-like model of evolution in which GV genomes have undergone successive steps of gene gain and gene loss, accrediting the hypothesis that genome gigantism appears early, before the diversification of the different GV lineages.

  15. Genomic comparison of closely related Giant Viruses supports an accordion-like model of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filée, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Genome gigantism occurs so far in Phycodnaviridae and Mimiviridae (order Megavirales). Origin and evolution of these Giant Viruses (GVs) remain open questions. Interestingly, availability of a collection of closely related GV genomes enabling genomic comparisons offer the opportunity to better understand the different evolutionary forces acting on these genomes. Whole genome alignment for five groups of viruses belonging to the Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae families show that there is no trend of genome expansion or general tendency of genome contraction. Instead, GV genomes accumulated genomic mutations over the time with gene gains compensating the different losses. In addition, each lineage displays specific patterns of genome evolution. Mimiviridae (megaviruses and mimiviruses) and Chlorella Phycodnaviruses evolved mainly by duplications and losses of genes belonging to large paralogous families (including movements of diverse mobiles genetic elements), whereas Micromonas and Ostreococcus Phycodnaviruses derive most of their genetic novelties thought lateral gene transfers. Taken together, these data support an accordion-like model of evolution in which GV genomes have undergone successive steps of gene gain and gene loss, accrediting the hypothesis that genome gigantism appears early, before the diversification of the different GV lineages.

  16. Goals of clinical ethics support: perceptions of dutch healthcare institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dauwerse, L.; Abma, T.A.; Molewijk, A.C.; Widdershoven, G.

    2013-01-01

    In previous literature, ethicists mention several goals of Clinical Ethics Support (CES). It is unknown what key persons in healthcare institutions see as main- - and sub-goals of CES. This article presents the goals of CES as perceived by board members and members of ethics support staff. This is

  17. Grand Challenges in Clinical Decision Support v10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittig, Dean F.; Wright, Adam; Osheroff, Jerome A.; Middleton, Blackford; Teich, Jonathan M.; Ash, Joan S.; Campbell, Emily; Bates, David W.

    2008-01-01

    There is a pressing need for high-quality, effective means of designing, developing, presenting, implementing, evaluating, and maintaining all types of clinical decision support capabilities for clinicians, patients and consumers. Using an iterative, consensus-building process we identified a rank-ordered list of the top 10 grand challenges in clinical decision support. This list was created to educate and inspire researchers, developers, funders, and policy-makers. The list of challenges in order of importance that they be solved if patients and organizations are to begin realizing the fullest benefits possible of these systems consists of: Improve the human-computer interface; Disseminate best practices in CDS design, development, and implementation; Summarize patient-level information; Prioritize and filter recommendations to the user; Create an architecture for sharing executable CDS modules and services; Combine recommendations for patients with co-morbidities; Prioritize CDS content development and implementation; Create internet-accessible clinical decision support repositories; Use freetext information to drive clinical decision support; Mine large clinical databases to create new CDS. Identification of solutions to these challenges is critical if clinical decision support is to achieve its potential and improve the quality, safety and efficiency of healthcare. PMID:18029232

  18. [Overdenture supported by natural teeth: analysis of clinical advantages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, R; Melilli, D; Pizzo, G

    2003-05-01

    Hybrid prosthesis supported by natural teeth (overdenture) is widely used in clinical practice and should be executed whenever the clinical conditions suggest it. Through a critical review of the literature, the anatomical, functional, psychological and clinical advantages are emphasized. Among the first ones, the prophylaxis of residual anatomical components, due to the limitation of bone resorption, and the preservation of sensorial proprioception are relevant. Important advantages are also represented by a better crown-root ratio of residual teeth supporting overdenture, with the consequent improvement of the longitudinal prognosis of such teeth. The greater retention and stability of overdenture in comparison with complete denture greatly improve the masticatory efficacy. The psychological advantages resulting from the dental anchorage, which allows the patient to be more confident in social life, are also relevant. Finally, when the dental support is lost, converting overdenture into complete denture is simple and quick, and makes easier the longitudinal clinical maintenance of the denture.

  19. Physiological Disorders in Closed Environment-Grown Crops for Space Life Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Raymond; Morrow, Robert

    Crop production for life support systems in space will require controlled environments where temperature, humidity, CO2, and light might differ from natural environments where plants evolved. Physiological disorders, i.e., abnormal plant growth and development, can occur under these controlled environments. Among the most common of these disorders are Ca deficiency injuries such as leaf tipburn (e.g., lettuce), blossom-end-rot in fruits (e.g., tomato and pepper), and internal tissue necrosis in fruits or tubers (e.g., cucumber and potato). Increased Ca nutrition to the plants typically has little effect on these disorders, but slowing overall growth or providing better air circulation to increase transpiration can be effective. A second common disorder is oedema or intumescence, which appears as callus-like growth or galls on leaves (e.g., sweetpotato, potato, pepper, and tomato). This disorder can be reduced by increasing the near UV radiation ( 300-400 nm) to the plants. Leaf injury and necrosis can occur under long photoperiods (e.g., tomato, potato, and pepper) and at super-elevated (i.e., ¿ than 4000 mol mol-1) CO2 concentrations (e.g., soybean, potato, and radish), and these can be managed by reducing the photoperiod and CO2 concentration, respectively. Lack of blue light in the spectrum (e.g., under red LEDs or LPS lamps) can result in leggy growth and/or leaves lacking in chlorophyll (e.g., wheat, bean, and radish). Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), most commonly ethylene, can accumulate in tightly closed systems and result in a variety of negative responses. Most of these disorders can be mitigated by altering the environmental set-points or by using more resistant cultivars.

  20. Longitudinal data analysis in support of functional stability concepts for leachate management at closed municipal landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, Robert D.; Morris, Jeremy W.F.; Prucha, Christopher P.; Caldwell, Michael D.; Staley, Bryan F.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Longitudinal data analysis using a mixed-effects regression model. • Dataset consisted of a total of 1402 samples from 101 closed municipal landfills. • Target analytes and classes generally showed predictable degradation trends. • Validates historical studies focused on macro organic indicators such as BOD. • BOD can serve as “gateway” indicator for planning leachate management. - Abstract: Landfill functional stability provides a target that supports no environmental threat at the relevant point of exposure in the absence of active control systems. With respect to leachate management, this study investigates “gateway” indicators for functional stability in terms of the predictability of leachate characteristics, and thus potential threat to water quality posed by leachate emissions. Historical studies conducted on changes in municipal solid waste (MSW) leachate concentrations over time (longitudinal analysis) have concentrated on indicator compounds, primarily chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). However, validation of these studies using an expanded database and larger constituent sets has not been performed. This study evaluated leachate data using a mixed-effects regression model to determine the extent to which leachate constituent degradation can be predicted based on waste age or operational practices. The final dataset analyzed consisted of a total of 1402 samples from 101 MSW landfills. Results from the study indicated that all leachate constituents exhibit a decreasing trend with time in the post-closure period, with 16 of the 25 target analytes and aggregate classes exhibiting a statistically significant trend consistent with well-studied indicators such as BOD. Decreasing trends in BOD concentration after landfill closure can thus be considered representative of trends for many leachate constituents of concern

  1. Longitudinal data analysis in support of functional stability concepts for leachate management at closed municipal landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, Robert D., E-mail: rdg@uchicago.edu [Center for Health Statistics, University of Chicago, 5841 S. Maryland Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Morris, Jeremy W.F., E-mail: jmorris@geosyntec.com [Geosyntec Consultants, 10220 Old Columbia Road, Suite A, Columbia, MD 21046 (United States); Prucha, Christopher P., E-mail: cprucha@wm.com [Groundwater Protection Program, Waste Management, 1550 Balmer Road, Box 200, Model City, NY 14107 (United States); Caldwell, Michael D., E-mail: mcaldwell@wm.com [Groundwater Protection Program, Waste Management, 3623 Wilson Road, Humble, TX 77396 (United States); Staley, Bryan F., E-mail: BStaley@erefdn.org [Environmental Research and Education Foundation, 3301 Benson Drive, Suite 301, Raleigh, NC 27609 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Longitudinal data analysis using a mixed-effects regression model. • Dataset consisted of a total of 1402 samples from 101 closed municipal landfills. • Target analytes and classes generally showed predictable degradation trends. • Validates historical studies focused on macro organic indicators such as BOD. • BOD can serve as “gateway” indicator for planning leachate management. - Abstract: Landfill functional stability provides a target that supports no environmental threat at the relevant point of exposure in the absence of active control systems. With respect to leachate management, this study investigates “gateway” indicators for functional stability in terms of the predictability of leachate characteristics, and thus potential threat to water quality posed by leachate emissions. Historical studies conducted on changes in municipal solid waste (MSW) leachate concentrations over time (longitudinal analysis) have concentrated on indicator compounds, primarily chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). However, validation of these studies using an expanded database and larger constituent sets has not been performed. This study evaluated leachate data using a mixed-effects regression model to determine the extent to which leachate constituent degradation can be predicted based on waste age or operational practices. The final dataset analyzed consisted of a total of 1402 samples from 101 MSW landfills. Results from the study indicated that all leachate constituents exhibit a decreasing trend with time in the post-closure period, with 16 of the 25 target analytes and aggregate classes exhibiting a statistically significant trend consistent with well-studied indicators such as BOD. Decreasing trends in BOD concentration after landfill closure can thus be considered representative of trends for many leachate constituents of concern.

  2. Micropollutants in closed life-support systems: the case of triclosan, a biocide excreted via urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroleo, Felice; Pycke, Benny; Boon, Nico; de Wever, Heleen; Hendrickx, Larissa; Mastroleo, Felice; Wattiez, Ruddy; Mergeay, Max; Verstraete, Willy

    OBJECTIVES: The impact of triclosan on the growth and physiology of the bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum was studied in the frame of the regenerative life-support system, Micro- Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA). A wide range of compounds, such as steroid hormones, pharmaceuticals and personal care products, might enter the life support system via the excrements that are to be treated and recycled. Triclosan was chosen as the first compound to be tested because MELiSSA is a closed system, which is consequently particularly sensitive to compounds inhibiting the microbial metabolism. Because triclosan is increasingly used as an antimicrobial biocide in hygienic formulations (such as toothpaste, mouthwash, deodorants, etc.) and due to its chemical stability, it is considered an emerging pollutant in terrestrial ecosystems. METHODS: In a first phase, the triclosan concentration expected in the life-support system was estimated, the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was determined via plating, and the effect on growth kinetics was assessed by comparing growth parameters in the Gompertz model. In a second phase, the secondary effects of triclosan on cell physiology and gene expression were studied through flow-cytometry and microarray analyses, respectively. RESULTS: Based on the pharmacokinetic data from literature, the predicted concentration range is estimated to be 6-25µg/L triclosan in the Rhodospirillum rubrum compartment of the MELiSSA. The minimal inhibitory concentration of triclosan was determined to be 71 µg/L after 7 days of exposure on Sistrom medium. Upon exposure to 50-200µg/L triclosan, triclosan-resistant mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum arose spontaneously at high frequency (3.1 ∗ 10 - 4). Analysis of the growth kinetics of the wild-type revealed that triclosan causes an important elongation of the lag-phase and a decrease in growth rate. At concentrations higher than 75mg/L(LD = 500mg/L), triclosan is bactericidal to wild

  3. Nurses' clinical reasoning practices that support safe medication administration: An integrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Emily; Domm, Elizabeth

    2018-02-01

    To review the current literature about nurses' clinical reasoning practices that support safe medication administration. The literature about medication administration frequently focuses on avoiding medication errors. Nurses' clinical reasoning used during medication administration to maintain medication safety receives less attention in the literature. As healthcare professionals, nurses work closely with patients, assessing and intervening to promote mediation safety prior to, during and after medication administration. They also provide discharge teaching about using medication safely. Nurses' clinical reasoning and practices that support medication safety are often invisible when the focus is medication errors avoidance. An integrative literature review was guided by Whittemore and Knafl's (Journal of Advanced Nursing, 5, 2005 and 546) five-stage review of the 11 articles that met review criteria. This review is modelled after Gaffney et al.'s (Journal of Clinical Nursing, 25, 2016 and 906) integrative review on medical error recovery. Health databases were accessed and systematically searched for research reporting nurses' clinical reasoning practices that supported safe medication administration. The level and quality of evidence of the included research articles were assessed using The Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice Rating Scale©. Nurses have a central role in safe medication administration, including but not limited to risk awareness about the potential for medication errors. Nurses assess patients and their medication and use knowledge and clinical reasoning to administer medication safely. Results indicated nurses' use of clinical reasoning to maintain safe medication administration was inadequately articulated in 10 of 11 studies reviewed. Nurses are primarily responsible for safe medication administration. Nurses draw from their foundational knowledge of patient conditions and organisational processes and use clinical reasoning that

  4. Clinical governance in practice: closing the loop with integrated audit systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, L; Jones, S

    2006-04-01

    -making processes and care delivery as a result of the audit. Brief clinical examples are given. In conclusion, the impact of the audit on unit strategy and organizational efficiency are discussed to highlight the importance of closing the audit loop and completing the cycle of clinical governance. The audit system has positive implications for replication in other services.

  5. A realistic closed-form radiobiological model of clinical tumor-control data incorporating intertumor heterogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Stephen A.; Hendry, Jolyon H.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of intertumor heterogeneity in clinical tumor control datasets and the relationship to in vitro measurements of tumor biopsy samples. Specifically, to develop a modified linear-quadratic (LQ) model incorporating such heterogeneity that it is practical to fit to clinical tumor-control datasets. Methods and Materials: We developed a modified version of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model for tumor control, incorporating a (lagged) time factor to allow for tumor cell repopulation. We explicitly took into account the interpatient heterogeneity in clonogen number, radiosensitivity, and repopulation rate. Using this model, we could generate realistic TCP curves using parameter estimates consistent with those reported from in vitro studies, subject to the inclusion of a radiosensitivity (or dose)-modifying factor. We then demonstrated that the model was dominated by the heterogeneity in α (tumor radiosensitivity) and derived an approximate simplified model incorporating this heterogeneity. This simplified model is expressible in a compact closed form, which it is practical to fit to clinical datasets. Using two previously analysed datasets, we fit the model using direct maximum-likelihood techniques and obtained parameter estimates that were, again, consistent with the experimental data on the radiosensitivity of primary human tumor cells. This heterogeneity model includes the same number of adjustable parameters as the standard LQ model. Results: The modified model provides parameter estimates that can easily be reconciled with the in vitro measurements. The simplified (approximate) form of the heterogeneity model is a compact, closed-form probit function that can readily be fitted to clinical series by conventional maximum-likelihood methodology. This heterogeneity model provides a slightly better fit to the datasets than the conventional LQ model, with the same numbers of fitted parameters. The parameter estimates of the clinically

  6. Design of a Clinical Information Management System to Support DNA Analysis Laboratory Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubay, Christopher J.; Zimmerman, David; Popovich, Bradley

    1995-01-01

    The LabDirector system has been developed at the Oregon Health Sciences University to support the operation of our clinical DNA analysis laboratory. Through an iterative design process which has spanned two years, we have produced a system that is both highly tailored to a clinical genetics production laboratory and flexible in its implementation, to support the rapid growth and change of protocols and methodologies in use in the field. The administrative aspects of the system are integrated with an enterprise schedule management system. The laboratory side of the system is driven by a protocol modeling and execution system. The close integration between these two aspects of the clinical laboratory facilitates smooth operations, and allows management to accurately measure costs and performance. The entire application has been designed and documented to provide utility to a wide range of clinical laboratory environments.

  7. A proposed clinical research support career pathway for noninvestigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheree; Gullick, Janice; Ballard, Jacqueline; Perry, Lin

    2018-03-08

    To discuss the international experience of clinical research support for noninvestigator roles and to propose a new pathway for Australia, to promote a sustainable research support workforce capable of delivering high-quality clinical research. Noninvestigator research support roles are currently characterized by an ad hoc approach to training, with limited role delineation and perceived professional isolation with implications for study completion rates and participant safety. A focused approach to developing and implementing research support pathways has improved patient recruitment, study completion, job satisfaction, and research governance. The Queensland and New South Wales state-based Nurses' Awards, the Australian Qualifications Framework, and a University Professional (Research) Staff Award. Research nurses in the clinical environment improve study coordination, adherence to study protocol, patient safety, and clinical care. A career pathway that guides education and outlines position descriptions and skill sets would enhance development of the research support workforce. This pathway could contribute to changing the patient outcomes through coordination and study completion of high-quality research. A wide consultative approach is required to determine a cost-effective and feasible approach to implementation and evaluation of the proposed pathway. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Improving clinical decision support using data mining techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn-Thornton, Kath E.; Thorpe, Simon I.

    1999-02-01

    Physicians, in their ever-demanding jobs, are looking to decision support systems for aid in clinical diagnosis. However, clinical decision support systems need to be of sufficiently high accuracy that they help, rather than hinder, the physician in his/her diagnosis. Decision support systems with accuracies, of patient state determination, of greater than 80 percent, are generally perceived to be sufficiently accurate to fulfill the role of helping the physician. We have previously shown that data mining techniques have the potential to provide the underpinning technology for clinical decision support systems. In this paper, an extension of the work in reverence 2, we describe how changes in data mining methodologies, for the analysis of 12-lead ECG data, improve the accuracy by which data mining algorithms determine which patients are suffering from heart disease. We show that the accuracy of patient state prediction, for all the algorithms, which we investigated, can be increased by up to 6 percent, using the combination of appropriate test training ratios and 5-fold cross-validation. The use of cross-validation greater than 5-fold, appears to reduce the improvement in algorithm classification accuracy gained by the use of this validation method. The accuracy of 84 percent in patient state predictions, obtained using the algorithm OCI, suggests that this algorithm will be capable of providing the required accuracy for clinical decision support systems.

  9. Personalised mobile services supporting the implementation of clinical guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Valerie M.; Gay, Valerie; Leijdekkers, Peter; Rienks, Rienk; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Grasso, F; Paris, C

    2009-01-01

    Telemonitoring is emerging as a compelling application of Body Area Networks (BANs). We describe two health BAN systems developed respectively by a European team and an Australian team and discuss some issues encountered relating to formalization of clinical knowledge to support real-time analysis

  10. A Computerized Clinical Support System and Psychological Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1978-01-01

    Advocating "holistic" medicine, this article details the benefits to be derived from using a computerized clinical support system in a psychological laboratory focusing on internal healing where the client/patient becomes a committed partner utilizing biofeedback equipment, gaming, and simulation to achieve self-understanding and…

  11. Using Clinical Decision Support Software in Health Insurance Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, R.; Kumlander, Deniss

    This paper proposes the idea to use Clinical Decision Support software in Health Insurance Company as a tool to reduce the expenses related to Medication Errors. As a prove that this class of software will help insurance companies reducing the expenses, the research was conducted in eight hospitals in United Arab Emirates to analyze the amount of preventable common Medication Errors in drug prescription.

  12. Clinical study of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint with closed lock, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Yoshiyuki; Murakami, Ken-ichiro; Fujimura, Kazuma; Yokoyama, Tadaaki; Nose, Masahiro; Miyaki, Katsuaki; Segami, Natsuki; Iizuka, Tadahiko

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-three closed lock cases of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) were studied on the correlation between disk configuration at MR imaging and nine clinical parameters composed of opening degree, age, clicking and locking duration, visual analogue scale of pain (VAS), pain score, jaw dysfunction score, life activity limited score, and TMJ X-ray photo findings. Disk configuration and degree of anterior disk displacement were assessed on MR imaging in closed mouth position: the antero-posterior length of disk and the distance from condyle to anterior and posterior portion of disk were measured, respectively. Duration of clicking and locking were not correlated with MR index except that there was a strong correlation between clicking duration and the distance from condyle to anterior portion of the disk at MR imaging. Opening degree was related to the disk deformity and the access of posterior portion of the disk to condyle. Disk configuration and degree of anterior disk displacement were not correlated with TMJ pain, but jaw dysfunction was related to the disk deformity and the distance from posterior portion of the disk to condyle. TMJ X-ray photo findings were not correlated with clicking duration (below 3 years), locking duration (below 30 weeks), opening degree and disk configuration at MR imaging. In evaluation of factors related to opening degree in 53 patients with closed lock by means of multiple regression analysis, age, locking and clicking duration, TMJ pain, life activity limited score were more strongly correlated to opening degree than the others. (author)

  13. Evaluating online diagnostic decision support tools for the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Marie; White, David; Potter, Bronwyn; Traill, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Clinical decision support tools available at the point of care are an effective adjunct to support clinicians to make clinical decisions and improve patient outcomes. We developed a methodology and applied it to evaluate commercially available online clinical diagnostic decision support (DDS) tools for use at the point of care. We identified 11 commercially available DDS tools and assessed these against an evaluation instrument that included 6 categories; general information, content, quality control, search, clinical results and other features. We developed diagnostically challenging clinical case scenarios based on real patient experience that were commonly missed by junior medical staff. The evaluation was divided into 2 phases; an initial evaluation of all identified and accessible DDS tools conducted by the Clinical Information Access Portal (CIAP) team and a second phase that further assessed the top 3 tools identified in the initial evaluation phase. An evaluation panel consisting of senior and junior medical clinicians from NSW Health conducted the second phase. Of the eleven tools that were assessed against the evaluation instrument only 4 tools completely met the DDS definition that was adopted for this evaluation and were able to produce a differential diagnosis. From the initial phase of the evaluation 4 DDS tools scored 70% or more (maximum score 96%) for the content category, 8 tools scored 65% or more (maximum 100%) for the quality control category, 5 tools scored 65% or more (maximum 94%) for the search category, and 4 tools score 70% or more (maximum 81%) for the clinical results category. The second phase of the evaluation was focused on assessing diagnostic accuracy for the top 3 tools identified in the initial phase. Best Practice ranked highest overall against the 6 clinical case scenarios used. Overall the differentiating factor between the top 3 DDS tools was determined by diagnostic accuracy ranking, ease of use and the confidence and

  14. [Knowledge management system for laboratory work and clinical decision support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Masanori; Sato, Mayumi; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2011-05-01

    This paper discusses a knowledge management system for clinical laboratories. In the clinical laboratory of Toranomon Hospital, we receive about 20 questions relevant to laboratory tests per day from medical doctors or co-medical staff. These questions mostly involve the essence to appropriately accomplish laboratory tests. We have to answer them carefully and suitably because an incorrect answer may cause a medical accident. Up to now, no method has been in place to achieve a rapid response and standardized answers. For this reason, the laboratory staff have responded to various questions based on their individual knowledge. We began to develop a knowledge management system to promote the knowledge of staff working for the laboratory. This system is a type of knowledge base for assisting the work, such as inquiry management, laboratory consultation, process management, and clinical support. It consists of several functions: guiding laboratory test information, managing inquiries from medical staff, reporting results of patient consultation, distributing laboratory staffs notes, and recording guidelines for laboratory medicine. The laboratory test information guide has 2,000 records of medical test information registered in the database with flexible retrieval. The inquiry management tool provides a methos to record all questions, answer easily, and retrieve cases. It helps staff to respond appropriately in a short period of time. The consulting report system treats patients' claims regarding medical tests. The laboratory staffs notes enter a file management system so they can be accessed to aid in clinical support. Knowledge sharing using this function can achieve the transition from individual to organizational learning. Storing guidelines for laboratory medicine will support EBM. Finally, it is expected that this system will support intellectual activity concerning laboratory work and contribute to the practice of knowledge management for clinical work support.

  15. Real-Time Clinical Decision Support Decreases Inappropriate Plasma Transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neil; Baker, Steven A; Spain, David; Shieh, Lisa; Shepard, John; Hadhazy, Eric; Maggio, Paul; Goodnough, Lawrence T

    2017-08-01

    To curtail inappropriate plasma transfusions, we instituted clinical decision support as an alert upon order entry if the patient's recent international normalized ratio (INR) was 1.7 or less. The alert was suppressed for massive transfusion and within operative or apheresis settings. The plasma order was automatically removed upon alert acceptance while clinical exception reasons allowed for continued transfusion. Alert impact was studied comparing a 7-month control period with a 4-month intervention period. Monthly plasma utilization decreased 17.4%, from a mean ± SD of 3.40 ± 0.48 to 2.82 ± 0.6 plasma units per hundred patient days (95% confidence interval [CI] of difference, -0.1 to 1.3). Plasma transfused below an INR of 1.7 or less decreased from 47.6% to 41.6% (P = .0002; odds ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.69-0.89). The alert recommendation was accepted 33% of the time while clinical exceptions were chosen in the remaining cases (active bleeding, 31%; other clinical indication, 33%; and apheresis, 2%). Alert acceptance rate varied significantly among different provider specialties. Clinical decision support can help curtail inappropriate plasma use but needs to be part of a comprehensive strategy including audit and feedback for comprehensive, long-term changes. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. A SOA-Based Platform to Support Clinical Data Sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gazzarata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The eSource Data Interchange Group, part of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium, proposed five scenarios to guide stakeholders in the development of solutions for the capture of eSource data. The fifth scenario was subdivided into four tiers to adapt the functionality of electronic health records to support clinical research. In order to develop a system belonging to the “Interoperable” Tier, the authors decided to adopt the service-oriented architecture paradigm to support technical interoperability, Health Level Seven Version 3 messages combined with LOINC (Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes vocabulary to ensure semantic interoperability, and Healthcare Services Specification Project standards to provide process interoperability. The developed architecture enhances the integration between patient-care practice and medical research, allowing clinical data sharing between two hospital information systems and four clinical data management systems/clinical registries. The core is formed by a set of standardized cloud services connected through standardized interfaces, involving client applications. The system was approved by a medical staff, since it reduces the workload for the management of clinical trials. Although this architecture can realize the “Interoperable” Tier, the current solution actually covers the “Connected” Tier, due to local hospital policy restrictions.

  17. Differences between opening versus closing high tibial osteotomy on clinical outcomes and gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deie, Masataka; Hoso, Takayuki; Shimada, Noboru; Iwaki, Daisuke; Nakamae, Atsuo; Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2014-12-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) is mainly performed via two procedures: closing wedge HTO (CW) and opening wedge HTO (OW). In this study, differences between these procedures were assessed by serial clinical evaluation and gait analysis before and after surgery. Twenty-one patients underwent HTO for medial knee OA in 2011 and 2012, with 12 patients undergoing CW and nine undergoing OW. The severity of OA was classified according to the Kellgren-Lawrence classification. The Japanese Orthopedic Association score for assessment of knee OA (JOA score), the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), and the femoral tibial angle (FTA) on X-ray were evaluated. For gait analysis, gait speed, varus moment, varus angle and lateral thrust were calculated. The JOA score and NRS were improved significantly one year postoperatively in both groups. The FTA was maintained in both groups at one year. Varus angle and varus moment were significantly improved in both groups at each postoperative follow-up, when compared preoperatively. Lateral thrust was significantly improved at three months postoperatively in both groups. However, the significant improvement in lateral thrust had disappeared in the CW group six months postoperatively, whereas it was maintained for at least one year in the OW group. This study found that clinical outcomes were well maintained after HTO. OW reduced knee varus moment and lateral thrust, whereas CW had little effect on reducing lateral thrust. Level IV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Using systems thinking to support clinical system transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Allan; Berland, Alex; Herbert, Carol; Bitz, Jennifer; van Dijk, Marlies W; Krause, Christina; Cochrane, Douglas; Noel, Kevin; Marsden, Julian; McKeown, Shari; Millar, John

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - The British Columbia Ministry of Health's Clinical Care Management initiative was used as a case study to better understand large-scale change (LSC) within BC's health system. Using a complex system framework, the purpose of this paper is to examine mechanisms that enable and constrain the implementation of clinical guidelines across various clinical settings. Design/methodology/approach - Researchers applied a general model of complex adaptive systems plus two specific conceptual frameworks (realist evaluation and system dynamics mapping) to define and study enablers and constraints. Focus group sessions and interviews with clinicians, executives, managers and board members were validated through an online survey. Findings - The functional themes for managing large-scale clinical change included: creating a context to prepare clinicians for health system transformation initiatives; promoting shared clinical leadership; strengthening knowledge management, strategic communications and opportunities for networking; and clearing pathways through the complexity of a multilevel, dynamic system. Research limitations/implications - The action research methodology was designed to guide continuing improvement of implementation. A sample of initiatives was selected; it was not intended to compare and contrast facilitators and barriers across all initiatives and regions. Similarly, evaluating the results or process of guideline implementation was outside the scope; the methods were designed to enable conversations at multiple levels - policy, management and practice - about how to improve implementation. The study is best seen as a case study of LSC, offering a possible model for replication by others and a tool to shape further dialogue. Practical implications - Recommended action-oriented strategies included engaging local champions; supporting local adaptation for implementation of clinical guidelines; strengthening local teams to guide implementation; reducing

  19. Genomic comparison of closely related Giant Viruses supports an accordion-like model of evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Filée, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Genome gigantism occurs so far in Phycodnaviridae and Mimiviridae (order Megavirales). Origin and evolution of these Giant Viruses (GVs) remain open questions. Interestingly, availability of a collection of closely related GV genomes enabling genomic comparisons offer the opportunity to better understand the different evolutionary forces acting on these genomes. Whole genome alignment for five groups of viruses belonging to the Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae families show that there is no tr...

  20. Evaluation of RxNorm for Medication Clinical Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, Robert R; Wix, Kelly; Zhu, Qian; Siska, Mark; Chute, Christopher G

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the potential use of RxNorm to provide standardized representations of generic drug name and route of administration to facilitate management of drug lists for clinical decision support (CDS) rules. We found a clear representation of generic drug name but not route of administration. We identified several issues related to data quality, including erroneous or missing defined relationships, and the use of different concept hierarchies to represent the same drug. More importantly, we found extensive semantic precoordination of orthogonal concepts related to route and dose form, which would complicate the use of RxNorm for drug-based CDS. This study demonstrated that while RxNorm is a valuable resource for the standardization of medications used in clinical practice, additional work is required to enhance the terminology so that it can support expanded use cases, such as managing drug lists for CDS.

  1. BAMBOO: Accelerating Closed Itemset Mining by Deeply Pushing the Length-Decreasing Support Constraint

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Jianyong; Karypis, George

    2003-01-01

    Previous study has shown that mining frequent patterns with length-decreasing support constraint is very helpful in removing some uninteresting patterns based on the observation that short patterns...

  2. A Clinical Decision Support System for Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ana S.; Alves, Pedro; Jarman, Ian H.; Etchells, Terence A.; Fonseca, José M.; Lisboa, Paulo J. G.

    This paper proposes a Web clinical decision support system for clinical oncologists and for breast cancer patients making prognostic assessments, using the particular characteristics of the individual patient. This system comprises three different prognostic modelling methodologies: the clinically widely used Nottingham prognostic index (NPI); the Cox regression modelling and a partial logistic artificial neural network with automatic relevance determination (PLANN-ARD). All three models yield a different prognostic index that can be analysed together in order to obtain a more accurate prognostic assessment of the patient. Missing data is incorporated in the mentioned models, a common issue in medical data that was overcome using multiple imputation techniques. Risk group assignments are also provided through a methodology based on regression trees, where Boolean rules can be obtained expressed with patient characteristics.

  3. Closed Versus Open Supracondylar Fractures of the Humerus in Children: A Comparison of Clinical and Radiographic Presentation and Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewine, Eliza; Kim, Jaehon M; Miller, Patricia E; Waters, Peter M; Mahan, Susan T; Snyder, Brian; Hedequist, Daniel; Bae, Donald S

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the presentation and postoperative results of children treated for open and closed, completely displaced type III supracondylar humerus fractures (SCFs). Thirty patients with open and 66 patients with closed, completely displaced type III SCFs were evaluated. Open fractures underwent irrigation and debridement, and all patients were treated by open or closed reduction and pin fixation. Medical records were reviewed to obtain demographic information as well as preoperative and postoperative clinical data regarding mechanism of injury, neurovascular status, associated injuries, postoperative range of motion, infections, and pain. Radiographs were evaluated to quantify displacement, Baumann's angle, humeral capitellar angle, position of the anterior humeral line, and adequacy of reduction. Outcomes were assessed using Flynn criteria. Mean clinical follow-up for the open and closed fracture groups was 8.9 and 5.7 months, respectively. Both groups were similar with respect to age, sex distribution, weight and body mass index, laterality of involvement, and mechanism of injury. At presentation, 35% of closed SCFs and 23% of open SCFs presented with abnormal neurovascular status. There was a higher prevalence of diminished/absent pulses or distal limb ischemia in patients with open injuries (27%) compared with closed fractures (18%). Conversely, severely displaced closed fractures were more commonly associated with nerve injury/palsy at presentation (35%) than those with open fractures (23%). Spontaneous nerve recovery was seen in 87% within 3 to 6 months. Postoperative loss of reduction and malunion were more common in the closed fracture group. However, 84% of patients achieved good-to-excellent results by Flynn criteria, with no appreciable difference based upon open versus closed fractures. With timely wound and fracture treatment, the clinical and radiographic results of children treated for open SCFs is similar to

  4. Educational tool for modeling and simulation of a closed regenerative life support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Tatsuya; Fanchiang, Christine; Aoki, Hirofumi; Newman, Dava J.

    For long term missions on the moon and Mars, regenerative life support systems emerge as a promising key technology for sustaining successful explorations with reduced re-supply logistics and cost. The purpose of this study was to create a simple model of a regenerative life support system which allows preliminary investigation of system responses. A simplified regenerative life support system was made with MATLAB Simulink ™. Mass flows in the system were simplified to carbon, water, oxygen and carbon dioxide. The subsystems included crew members, animals, a plant module, and a waste processor, which exchanged mass into and out of mass reservoirs. Preliminary numerical simulations were carried out to observe system responses. The simplified life support system model allowed preliminary investigation of the system response to perturbations such as increased or decreased number of crew members. The model is simple and flexible enough to add new components, and also possible to numerically predict non-linear subsystem functions and responses. Future work includes practical issues such as energy efficiency, air leakage, nutrition, and plant growth modeling. The model functions as an effective teaching tool about how a regenerative advanced life support system works.

  5. The experience of being a middle-aged close relative of a person who has suffered a stroke--six months after discharge from a rehabilitation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckström, Britt; Sundin, Karin

    2010-03-01

    Being a close relative brings with it a large number of consequences, with the life situation changing over time. The aim of this study was to illuminate the experiences of being a middle-aged close relative of a person who has suffered a stroke 6 months after being discharged from a medical rehabilitation clinic. Narrative interviews were conducted with nine middle-aged close relatives and analysed using a content analysis with a latent approach. The analysis revealed that being close to someone who had suffered a stroke 6 months after discharge meant; a struggling for control and a renewal of family life in the shadow of suffering and hope. The middle-aged close relatives began to perceive the changed reality. They were struggling to take on something new, become reconciled and find a balance in their family life. Their ability to work, relief from caring concerns and having support and togetherness with others seemed to be essential for the close relatives in their efforts to manage their life situation and maintain their well-being. Having reached the 'halfway point' in their lives and still with half of their life in front of them created worries. They felt dejected about their changed relationships and roles, experience a sense of loss of shared child responsibilities, a negative impact on their marital relationships and sexual satisfaction. They felt trapped in a caring role and they worried about how to endure in the future. The middle-aged close relatives' experiences were of being alone and neglected, in an arduous and complex life situation filled with loss and grief. The findings highlights that health professionals need to see and listen to the close relatives' experiences of transition in order to provide appropriate support adjusted to their varying needs during a time of renewal.

  6. Evaluating the effects of cognitive support on psychiatric clinical comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalai, Venkata V; Khalid, Sana; Gottipati, Dinesh; Kannampallil, Thomas; John, Vineeth; Blatter, Brett; Patel, Vimla L; Cohen, Trevor

    2014-10-01

    Clinicians' attention is a precious resource, which in the current healthcare practice is consumed by the cognitive demands arising from complex patient conditions, information overload, time pressure, and the need to aggregate and synthesize information from disparate sources. The ability to organize information in ways that facilitate the generation of effective diagnostic solutions is a distinguishing characteristic of expert physicians, suggesting that automated systems that organize clinical information in a similar manner may augment physicians' decision-making capabilities. In this paper, we describe the design and evaluation of a theoretically driven cognitive support system (CSS) that assists psychiatrists in their interpretation of clinical cases. The system highlights, and provides the means to navigate to, text that is organized in accordance with a set of diagnostically and therapeutically meaningful higher-level concepts. To evaluate the interface, 16 psychiatry residents interpreted two clinical case scenarios, with and without the CSS. Think-aloud protocols captured during their interpretation of the cases were transcribed and analyzed qualitatively. In addition, the frequency and relative position of content related to key higher-level concepts in a verbal summary of the case were evaluated. In addition the transcripts from both groups were compared to an expert derived reference standard using latent semantic analysis (LSA). Qualitative analysis showed that users of the system better attended to specific clinically important aspects of both cases when these were highlighted by the system, and revealed ways in which the system mediates hypotheses generation and evaluation. Analysis of the summary data showed differences in emphasis with and without the system. The LSA analysis suggested users of the system were more "expert-like" in their emphasis, and that cognitive support was more effective in the more complex case. Cognitive support impacts

  7. Social Embeddedness and Late-Life Parenthood : Community Activity, Close Ties, and Support Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenger, G. Clare; Dykstra, Pearl A.; Melkas, Tuula; Knipscheer, Kees C.P.M.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the ways in which patterns of marriage and fertility shape older people’s involvement in community groups and their support networks. The data are from Australia, Finland, Germany, Israel, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Findings show

  8. Social embeddedness and late-life parenthood: community activity, close ties and support networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenger, G.; Dykstra, P.A.; Melkas, T.; Knipscheer, K.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the ways in which patterns of marriage and fertility shape older people’s involvement in community groups and their support networks. The data are from Australia, Finland, Germany, Israel, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Findings show

  9. Social embeddedness and late-life parenthood: Community activity, close ties, and support networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenger, G.C.; Dykstra, P.A.; Melkas, T.; Knipscheer, C.P.M.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the ways in which patterns of marriage and fertility shape older people's involvement in community groups and their support networks. The data are from Australia, Finland, Germany, Israel, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Findings show

  10. Social Embeddedness and Late-Life Parenthood: Community Activity, Close Ties, and Support Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, G. Clare; Dykstra, Pearl A.; Melkas, Tuula; Knipscheer, Kees C. P. M.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the ways in which patterns of marriage and fertility shape older people's involvement in community groups and their support networks. The data are from Australia, Finland, Germany, Israel, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Findings show that childless older adults, regardless of…

  11. Moving close to parents and adult children in the Netherlands: the influence of support needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the extent to which support needs lead to moves of adult children (aged 30 and above) to within one kilometer of their parents and vice versa is examined. Using Netherlands population data from 2004 and 2005, it is found that the divorce of the adult child increases the likelihood of

  12. Supporting clinical leadership through action: The nurse consultant role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Elizabeth; Grey, Rachael; Neal, Deborah; Reeve, Julie; Smith, Caroline; Valentine, Janine

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an action learning set to enhance clinical leadership and extend their scope and confidence more strategically. As the most senior clinical role in most healthcare systems, the consultant nurse role is a solitary one. They are required to develop personal resilience, commitment and a belief in their ability to lead, with new consultants needing a strong support network to succeed. Following a 2-year action learning set, four nurse consultants, one therapy consultant, and a university educationalist engaged in a cooperative inquiry approach using four cycles of discussion, reflection, analysis and action over an 18-month period from March 2015-July 2016, to learn how to change and enhance their working practices. Data were analysed thematically. Four themes emerged where the action learning set (i) offered structure and support, (ii) enabled a wider influence and (iii) empowered them to lead. The cooperative inquiry helped them realise how much they had gained from their collective learning and they felt empowered to lead. Their motivation to "make a difference" remains palpable. The outcomes of the cooperative inquiry included an enhanced understanding of the importance of openness and trust and a willingness to share and learn from each other in a respectful and confidential environment with a receptiveness to change. Self-leadership has clearly been accepted and embraced, and their collaboration has improved communication across the organisation, enhanced their strategic leadership capability and given confidence to disseminate externally. The action learning set offered structure to support these clinical leaders to keep them focused across the breadth of their role. Additionally, peer review with external facilitation has enabled these clinical leaders to gain a wider influence and empowered them to lead. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A Computerized Navigation Support for Maneuvering Clustered Ship Groups in Close Proximity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Kawaguchi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to investigate navigation behaviors and effects of interferences of multiple ocean-going vessels that share the same sailing course like a transport convoy. Detecting and evading other clusters in close proximity is one of the most important tasks in navigation as contacting these will potentially cause serious risks to the ship. Focus of this paper is to investigate computational capabilities added to the so-called ship cluster behavior model of our previous work. Enhancement is made to predict a risky situation and to guide for multiple ship clusters, enabling them to move safely and avoid contact with each other. Such improvement is critical, especially when the traffic becomes congested with a number of clustered ship groups moving to distinctive directions. Foundations for and preliminary experimental results of this study are discussed.

  14. IBM’s Health Analytics and Clinical Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J.; Knoop, S.; Shabo, A.; Carmeli, B.; Sow, D.; Syed-Mahmood, T.; Rapp, W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives This survey explores the role of big data and health analytics developed by IBM in supporting the transformation of healthcare by augmenting evidence-based decision-making. Methods Some problems in healthcare and strategies for change are described. It is argued that change requires better decisions, which, in turn, require better use of the many kinds of healthcare information. Analytic resources that address each of the information challenges are described. Examples of the role of each of the resources are given. Results There are powerful analytic tools that utilize the various kinds of big data in healthcare to help clinicians make more personalized, evidenced-based decisions. Such resources can extract relevant information and provide insights that clinicians can use to make evidence-supported decisions. There are early suggestions that these resources have clinical value. As with all analytic tools, they are limited by the amount and quality of data. Conclusion Big data is an inevitable part of the future of healthcare. There is a compelling need to manage and use big data to make better decisions to support the transformation of healthcare to the personalized, evidence-supported model of the future. Cognitive computing resources are necessary to manage the challenges in employing big data in healthcare. Such tools have been and are being developed. The analytic resources, themselves, do not drive, but support healthcare transformation. PMID:25123736

  15. Closing the antidepressant efficacy gap between clinical trials and real patient populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Alan G

    2006-01-01

    Overall, patient outcomes in the primary care of depression are seldom as good as those achieved in clinical trials - the "efficacy gap". Many factors contribute to this, including poor patient compliance, poor family and social support and negative media reporting of antidepressants. Indeed, negative media reporting has had far more impact on physicians' prescribing of antidepressants than have regulatory agencies, partly as a result of changing public attitudes. Negative media reports linking SSRIs to increased child suicide rates have also resulted in a decline in the prescribing of SSRIs to this age group, but with no concomitant increase in the prescribing of fluoxetine, the only antidepressant recommended for the treatment of children. There are also inadequacies in the guidelines available to primary care givers that might contribute to the efficacy gap. Guidelines can be too specific for clinical practice - especially where depression coexists with anxiety disorders - and too passive, resulting in delayed or inadequate intervention. Evidence suggests that many physicians prefer to be more proactive. In the recent AHEAD survey, physicians identified faster resolution of symptoms as the property most desirable for improving antidepressant therapy. There is recent evidence that structured long-term therapy and easily-implemented measurement-based care procedures can improve remission rates and help bridge the efficacy gap. If these can be allied with greater public/media understanding of depression and its treatment, along with improved guidelines, then significant progress can be anticipated in the management of mood disorders.

  16. Proposed minimum requirements for the operational characteristics and testing of closed circuit life support system control electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, J C

    1998-01-01

    The popularization and transformation of scuba diving into a broadly practiced sport has served to ignite the interest of technically oriented divers into ever more demanding areas. This, along with the gradual release of military data, equipment, and techniques of closed circuit underwater breathing apparatus, has resulted in a virtual explosion of semiclosed and closed circuit systems for divers. Although many of these systems have been carefully thought out by capable designers, the impulse to rush to market with equipment that has not been fully developed and carefully tested is irresistible to marketers. In addition, the presence of systems developed by well-intentioned and otherwise competent designers who are, nonetheless, inexperienced in the field of life support can result in the sale of failure-prone equipment to divers who lack the knowledge and skills to identify deficiencies before disaster occurs. For this reason, a set of industry standards establishing minimum requirements and testing is needed to guide the designers of this equipment, and to protect the user community from incomplete or inadequate design. Many different technologies go into the development of closed circuit scuba. One key area is the design of electronics to monitor and maintain the critical gas mixtures of the closed circuit loop. Much of the system reliability and inherent danger is resident in the design of the circuitry and the software (if any) that runs it. This article will present a set of proposed minimum requirements, with the goal of establishing a dialog for the creation of guidelines for the classification, rating, design, and testing of embedded electronics for life support systems used in closed circuit applications. These guidelines will serve as the foundation for the later creation of a set of industry specifications.

  17. SEMG activity of jaw-closing muscles during biting with different unilateral occlusal supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M-Q; He, J-J; Zhang, J-H; Wang, K; Svensson, P; Widmalm, S E

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that experimental and reversible changes of occlusion affect the levels of surface electromyographic (SEMG) activity in the anterior temporalis and masseter areas during unilateral maximal voluntary biting (MVB) in centric and eccentric position. Changes were achieved by letting 21 healthy subjects bite with and without a cotton roll between the teeth. The placement alternated between sides and between premolar and molar areas. The SEMG activity level was lower when biting in eccentric position without than with a cotton roll between teeth (P 0.05). In the anterior temporalis area, the balancing side SEMG activity was lower in eccentric than in centric but only in molar-supported biting (P = 0.026). These results support that the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles have different roles in keeping the mandible in balance during unilateral supported MVB. Changes in occlusal stability achieved by biting with versus without a cotton roll were found to affect the SEMG activity levels.

  18. Nurses' Clinical Decision Making on Adopting a Wound Clinical Decision Support System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, Peck Chui Betty; Hoi, Shu Yin; Holroyd, Eleanor; Wang, Wenru

    2015-07-01

    Healthcare information technology systems are considered the ideal tool to inculcate evidence-based nursing practices. The wound clinical decision support system was built locally to support nurses to manage pressure ulcer wounds in their daily practice. However, its adoption rate is not optimal. The study's objective was to discover the concepts that informed the RNs' decisions to adopt the wound clinical decision support system as an evidence-based technology in their nursing practice. This was an exploratory, descriptive, and qualitative design using face-to-face interviews, individual interviews, and active participatory observation. A purposive, theoretical sample of 14 RNs was recruited from one of the largest public tertiary hospitals in Singapore after obtaining ethics approval. After consenting, the nurses were interviewed and observed separately. Recruitment stopped when data saturation was reached. All transcribed interview data underwent a concurrent thematic analysis, whereas observational data were content analyzed independently and subsequently triangulated with the interview data. Eight emerging themes were identified, namely, use of the wound clinical decision support system, beliefs in the wound clinical decision support system, influences of the workplace culture, extent of the benefits, professional control over nursing practices, use of knowledge, gut feelings, and emotions (fear, doubt, and frustration). These themes represented the nurses' mental outlook as they made decisions on adopting the wound clinical decision support system in light of the complexities of their roles and workloads. This research has provided insight on the nurses' thoughts regarding their decision to interact with the computer environment in a Singapore context. It captured the nurses' complex thoughts when deciding whether to adopt or reject information technology as they practice in a clinical setting.

  19. Research and Technology Activities Supporting Closed-Brayton-Cycle Power Conversion System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    The elements of Brayton technology development emphasize power conversion system risk mitigation. Risk mitigation is achieved by demonstrating system integration feasibility, subsystem/component life capability (particularly in the context of material creep) and overall spacecraft mass reduction. Closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) power conversion technology is viewed as relatively mature. At the 2-kWe power level, a CBC conversion system Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of six (6) was achieved during the Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration (SD-GTD) in 1998. A TRL 5 was demonstrated for 10 kWe-class CBC components during the development of the Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU) from 1968 to 1976. Components currently in terrestrial (open cycle) Brayton machines represent TRL 4 for similar uses in 100 kWe-class CBC space systems. Because of the baseline component and subsystem technology maturity, much of the Brayton technology task is focused on issues related to systems integration. A brief description of ongoing technology activities is given.

  20. Impact of a Clinical Decision Support System on Pharmacy Clinical Interventions, Documentation Efforts, and Costs

    OpenAIRE

    Calloway, Stacy; Akilo, Hameed A.; Bierman, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    Health care organizations are turning to electronic clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) to increase quality of patient care and promote a safer environment. A CDSS is a promising approach to the aggregation and use of patient data to identify patients who would most benefit from interventions by pharmacy clinicians. However, there are limited published reports describing the impact of CDSS on clinical pharmacy measures. In February 2011, Good Shepherd Medical Center, a 425-bed acute car...

  1. Quality and clinical supply considerations of Paediatric Investigation Plans for IV preparations-A case study with the FP7 CloSed project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, Sara M; Orlu Gul, Mine; Winslade, Jackie; Baarslag, Manuel A; Neubert, Antje; Tuleu, Catherine

    2016-09-25

    A Paediatric Investigation Plan (PIP) is a development plan that aims to ensure that sufficient data are obtained through studies in paediatrics to support the generation of marketing authorisation of medicines for children. This paper highlights some practical considerations and challenges with respect to PIP submissions and paediatric clinical trials during the pharmaceutical development phase, using the FP7-funded Clonidine for Sedation of Paediatric Patients in the Intensive Care Unit (CloSed) project as a case study. Examples discussed include challenges and considerations regarding formulation development, blinding and randomisation, product labelling and shipment and clinical trial requirements versus requirements for marketing authorisation. A significant quantity of information is required for PIP submissions and it is hoped that future applicants may benefit from an insight into some critical considerations and challenges faced in the CloSed project. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical Decision Support Knowledge Management: Strategies for Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Mohamed; Alswailem, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems have been shown to increase quality of care, patient safety, improve adherence to guidelines for prevention and treatment, and avoid medication errors. Such systems depend mainly on two types of content; the clinical information related to patients and the medical knowledge related to the specialty that informs the system rules and alerts. At King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Saudi Arabia, the Health Information Technology Affairs worked on identifying best strategies and recommendations for successful CDSS knowledge management. A review of literature was conducted to identify main areas of challenges and factors of success. A qualitative survey was used over six months' duration to collect opinions, experiences and suggestions from both IT and healthcare professionals. Recommendations were categorized into ten main topics that should be addressed during the development and implementation of CDSS knowledge management tools in the hospital.

  3. Closed-cell stent for coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms: clinical and angiographic results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakhloo, A K; Linfante, I; Silva, C F; Samaniego, E A; Dabus, G; Etezadi, V; Spilberg, G; Gounis, M J

    2012-10-01

    Recanalization is observed in 20-40% of endovascularly treated intracranial aneurysms. To further reduce the recanalization and expand endovascular treatment, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of closed-cell SACE. Between 2007 and 2010, 147 consecutive patients (110 women; mean age, 54 years) presenting at 2 centers with 161 wide-neck ruptured and unruptured aneurysms were treated by using SACE. Inclusion criteria were wide-neck aneurysms (>4 mm or a dome/neck ratio ≤ 2). Clinical outcomes were assessed by the mRS score at baseline, discharge, and follow-up. Aneurysm occlusion was assessed on angiograms by using the RS immediately after SACE and at follow-up. Eighteen aneurysms (11%) were treated following rupture. Procedure-related mortality and permanent neurologic deficits occurred in 2 (1.4%) and 5 patients (3.4%), respectively. In total, 7 patients (4.8%) died, including 2 with reruptures. Of the 140 surviving patients, 113 (80.7%) patients with 120 aneurysms were available for follow-up neurologic examination at a mean of 11.8 months. An increase in mRS score from admission to follow-up by 1, 2, or 3 points was seen in 7 (6.9%), 1 (1%), and 2 (2%) patients, respectively. Follow-up angiography was performed in 120 aneurysms at a mean of 11.9 months. Recanalization occurred in 12 aneurysms (10%), requiring retreatment in 7 (5.8%). Moderate in-stent stenosis was seen in 1 (0.8%), which remained asymptomatic. This series adds to the evidence demonstrating the safety and effectiveness of SACE in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. However, SACE of ruptured aneurysms and premature termination of antiplatelet treatment are associated with increased morbidity and mortality.

  4. Clinical decision support must be useful, functional is not enough

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortteisto, Tiina; Komulainen, Jorma; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2012-01-01

    the use of computer-based clinical decision support (eCDS) in primary care and how different professional groups experience it. Our aim was to describe specific reasons for using or not using eCDS among primary care professionals. METHODS: The setting was a Finnish primary health care organization with 48......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Health information technology, particularly electronic decision support systems, can reduce the existing gap between evidence-based knowledge and health care practice but professionals have to accept and use this information. Evidence is scant on which features influence...... professionals receiving patient-specific guidance at the point of care. Multiple data (focus groups, questionnaire and spontaneous feedback) were analyzed using deductive content analysis and descriptive statistics. RESULTS: The content of the guidance is a significant feature of the primary care professional...

  5. Hybrid Patient Record – Supporting Hybrid Interaction in Clinical Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Schmidt, Mathias; Frost, Mads

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread dissemination of the electronic health record, the paper medical record remains an important central artefact in modern clinical work. A number of new technological solutions have been proposed to mitigate some of the configuration, mobility and awareness problems that emerge...... when using this dual record setup. In this paper, we present one such technology, the HyPR device, in which a paper record is augmented with an electronic sensing platform that is designed to reduce the configuration overhead, provide awareness cues and support mobility across the patient ward. Our...

  6. Resilient Systemics to Telehealth Support for Clinical Psychiatry and Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Rodolfo A; De Giacomo, Piero; L'Abate, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Reliably expanding our clinical practice and lowering our overhead with telepsychiatry, telepsychology, distance counseling and online therapy, requires resilient and antifragile system and tools. When utilized appropriately these technologies may provide greater access to needed services to include more reliable treatment, consultation, supervision, and training. The wise and proper use of technology is fundamental to create and boost outstanding social results. We present, as an example, the main steps to achieve application resilience and antifragility at system level, for diagnostic and therapeutic telepractice and telehealth support, devoted to psychiatry and psychology application. This article presents a number of innovations that can take psychotherapy treatment, supervision, training, and research forward, towards increased effectiveness application.

  7. Tools in a clinical information system supporting clinical trials at a Swiss University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Michael; Bucklar, Guido; Blaser, Jürg

    2014-12-01

    Issues concerning inadequate source data of clinical trials rank second in the most common findings by regulatory authorities. The increasing use of electronic clinical information systems by healthcare providers offers an opportunity to facilitate and improve the conduct of clinical trials and the source documentation. We report on a number of tools implemented into the clinical information system of a university hospital to support clinical research. In 2011/2012, a set of tools was developed in the clinical information system of the University Hospital Zurich to support clinical research, including (1) a trial registry for documenting metadata on the clinical trials conducted at the hospital, (2) a patient-trial-assignment-tool to tag patients in the electronic medical charts as participants of specific trials, (3) medical record templates for the documentation of study visits and trial-related procedures, (4) online queries on trials and trial participants, (5) access to the electronic medical records for clinical monitors, (6) an alerting tool to notify of hospital admissions of trial participants, (7) queries to identify potentially eligible patients in the planning phase as trial feasibility checks and during the trial as recruitment support, and (8) order sets to facilitate the complete and accurate performance of study visit procedures. The number of approximately 100 new registrations per year in the voluntary trial registry in the clinical information system now matches the numbers of the existing mandatory trial registry of the hospital. Likewise, the yearly numbers of patients tagged as trial participants as well as the use of the standardized trial record templates increased to 2408 documented trial enrolments and 190 reports generated/month in the year 2013. Accounts for 32 clinical monitors have been established in the first 2 years monitoring a total of 49 trials in 16 clinical departments. A total of 15 months after adding the optional feature of

  8. Precursor life science experiments and closed life support systems on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, A.; Paille, C.; Rebeyre, P.; Lamaze, B.; Lobo, M.; Lasseur, C.

    Nowadays the Moon is not only a scientific exploration target but also potentially also a launch pad for deeper space exploration. Establishing an extended human presence on the Moon could reduce the cost of further space exploration, and gather the technical and scientific experience that would make possible the next steps of space exploration, namely manned-missions to Mars. To enable the establishment of such a Moon base, a reliable and regenerative life support system (LSS) is required: without any recycling of metabolic consumables (oxygen, water and food), a 6-person crew during the course of one year would require a supply of 12t from Earth (not including water for hygiene purposes), with a prohibitive associated cost! The recycling of consumables is therefore mandatory for a combination of economic, logistical and also safety reasons. Currently the main regenerative technologies used, namely water recycling in the ISS, are physical-chemical but they do not solve the issue of food production. In the European Space Agency, for the last 15 years, studies are being performed on several life support topics, namely in air revitalisation, food, water and waste management, contaminants, monitoring and control. Ground demonstration, namely the MELiSSA Pilot Plant and Concordia Station, and simulation studies demonstrated the studies feasibility and the recycling levels are promising. To be able to build LSS in a Moon base, the temperature amplitude, the dust and its 14-day night, which limits solar power supply, should be regarded. To reduce these technical difficulties, a landing site should be carefully chosen. Considering the requirements of a mission to the Moon and within the Aurora programme phase I, a preliminary configuration for a regenerative LSS can be proposed as an experiment for a precursor mission to the Moon. An overview of the necessary LSS to a Moon base will be presented, identifying Moon?s specific requirements and showing preliminary

  9. Plant growth and mineral recycle trade-offs in different scenarios for a CELSS. [Closed Ecological Life Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballou, E. V.; Wydeven, T.; Spitze, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    Data for hydroponic plant growth in a manned system test is combined with nutritional recommendations to suport trade-off calculations for closed and partially closed life support system scenarios. Published data are used as guidelines for the masses of mineral nutrients needed for higher plant production. The results of calculations based on various scenarios are presented for various combinations of plant growth chamber utilization and fraction of mineral recycle. Estimates are made of the masses of material needed to meet human nutritional requirements in the various scenarios. It appears that food production from a plant growth chamber with mineral recycle is favorable to reduction of the total launch weight in missions exceeding 3 years.

  10. The possibility of aromorphosis in further development of closed human life support systems using genetically modified organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitelson, Josef

    Creation of closed systems that would be able to support human life outside the biosphere for extended periods of time (CES) was started after humans went into outer space. The last fifty years have seen the construction of experimental variants of the CES in Russia, USA, and Japan. The "MELISSA" project of the European Space Agency is being prepared to be launched. Much success has been achieved in closing material loops in the CES. An obstacle to constructing a fully closed ecosystem is significant imbalance in material exchange between the producing components and the decomposing ones in the CES. The spectrum of metabolites released by humans does not fully correspond to the requirements of the main producer of the CES -plants. However, this imbalance can be corrected by rather simple physicochemical processes that can be used in the CES without unclosing the system. The major disagreement that prevents further improvement of human life support systems (LSS) is that the spectrum of products of photosynthesis in the CES does not correspond to human food requirements qual-itatively, quantitatively, or in terms of diversity. In the normal, physiologically sound, human diet, this discrepancy is resolved by adding animal products. However, there are technical, technological, and hygienic obstacles to including animals in the closed human life support systems, and if higher animals are considered, there are also ethical arguments. If between the photoautotrophic link, plants, and the heterotrophic link, the human, there were one more heterotrophic link, farm animals, the energy requirements of the system would be increased by nearly an order of magnitude, decreasing its efficiency and making it heavier and bulkier. Is there another way to close loops in human life support systems? In biology, such "findings" of evolution, which open up new perspectives and offer ample opportunities for possible adapta-tions, are termed aromorphoses (Schmalhausen, 1948). In further

  11. Guideline Formalization and Knowledge Representation for Clinical Decision Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago OLIVEIRA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} The prevalence of situations of medical error and defensive medicine in healthcare institutions is a great concern of the medical community. Clinical Practice Guidelines are regarded by most researchers as a way to mitigate theseoccurrences; however, there is a need to make them interactive, easier to update and to deploy. This paper provides a model for Computer-Interpretable Guidelines based on the generic tasks of the clinical process, devised to be included in the framework of a Clinical Decision Support System. Aiming to represent medical recommendations in a simple and intuitive way. Hence, this work proposes a knowledge representation formalism that uses an Extension to Logic Programming to handle incomplete information. This model is used to represent different cases of missing, conflicting and inexact information with the aid of a method to quantify its quality. The integration of the guideline model with the knowledge representation formalism yields a clinical decision model that relies on the development of multiple information scenarios and the exploration of different clinical hypotheses.

  12. Guideline Formalization and Knowledge Representation for Clinical Decision Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo NOVAIS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;} The prevalence of situations of medical error and defensive medicine in healthcare institutions is a great concern of the medical community. Clinical Practice Guidelines are regarded by most researchers as a way to mitigate these occurrences; however, there is a need to make them interactive, easier to update and to deploy. This paper provides a model for Computer-Interpretable Guidelines based on the generic tasks of the clinical process, devised to be included in the framework of a Clinical Decision Support System. Aiming to represent medical recommendations in a simple and intuitive way. Hence, this work proposes a knowledge representation formalism that uses an Extension to Logic Programming to handle incomplete information. This model is used to represent different cases of missing, conflicting and inexact information with the aid of a method to quantify its quality. The integration of the guideline model with the knowledge representation formalism yields a clinical decision model that relies on the development of multiple information scenarios and the exploration of different clinical hypotheses.

  13. Incineration for resource recovery in a closed ecological life support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhye, R. S.; Wignarajah, K.; Wydeven, T.

    1993-01-01

    A functional schematic, including mass and energy balance, of a solid waste processing system for a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) was developed using Aspen Plus, a commercial computer simulation program. The primary processor in this system is an incinerator for oxidizing organic wastes. The major products derived from the incinerator are carbon dioxide and water, which can be recycled to a crop growth chamber (CGC) for food production. The majority of soluble inorganics are extracted or leached from the inedible biomass before they reach the incinerator, so that they can be returned directly to the CGC and reused as nutrients. The heat derived from combustion of organic compounds in the incinerator was used for phase-change water purification. The waste streams treated by the incinerator system conceptualized in this work are inedible biomass from a CGC, human urine (including urinal flush water) and feces, humidity condensate, shower water, and trash. It is estimated that the theoretical minimum surface area required for the radiator to reject the unusable heat output from this system would be 0.72 sq m/person at 298 K.

  14. Equity and Blindness: Closing Evidence Gaps to Support Universal Eye Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramke, Jacqueline; Zwi, Anthony B; Palagyi, Anna; Blignault, Ilse; Gilbert, Clare E

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization Program for the Prevention of Blindness adopted the principles of universal health coverage (UHC) in its latest plan, Universal Eye Health: A Global Action Plan, 2014-2019. This plan builds on the achievements of Vision 2020, which aimed to reduce the global prevalence of avoidable blindness, and its unequal distribution, by the year 2020. We reviewed the literature on health equity and the generation and use of evidence to promote equity, particularly in eye health. We describe the nature and extent of the equity-focused evidence to support and inform eye health programs on the path to universal eye health, and propose ways to improve the collection and reporting of this evidence. Blindness prevalence decreased in all regions of the world between 1990 and 2010, albeit not at the same rate or to the same extent. In 2010, the prevalence of blindness in West Africa (6.0%) remained 15 times higher than in high-income regions (0.4%); within all regions, women had a higher prevalence of blindness than men. Beyond inter-regional and sex differences, there is little comparable data on the distribution of blindness across social groups within regions and countries, or on whether this distribution has changed over time. Similarly, interventions known to address inequity in blindness are few, and equity-relevant goals, targets and indicators for eye health programs are scarce. Equity aims of eye health programs can benefit from the global momentum towards achieving UHC, and the progress being made on collecting, communicating and using equity-focused evidence.

  15. Goals of clinical ethics support: perceptions of Dutch healthcare institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauwerse, L; Abma, T A; Molewijk, B; Widdershoven, G

    2013-12-01

    In previous literature, ethicists mention several goals of Clinical Ethics Support (CES). It is unknown what key persons in healthcare institutions see as main--and sub-goals of CES. This article presents the goals of CES as perceived by board members and members of ethics support staff. This is part of a Dutch national research using a mixed methods design with questionnaires, focus groups and interviews. Quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed and combined in an iterative process. Four main clusters of goals were found: 1) encouraging an ethical climate, 2) fostering an accountable and transparent organization, 3) developing professionalism and a final goal, overarching the previous three, 4) good care. Most important sub-goals of CES were: attention for ethical issues, raising awareness of ethical issues, fostering ethical reflection and supporting employees. The article ends with a discussion on the desirability to further operationalize the general goal of good care, the context-boundedness of our findings and the need to relate goals of CES to the features of organizational cultures to further improve the integration of CES in healthcare institutions.

  16. Redesigning ambulatory care business processes supporting clinical care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, C; Sinkewich, M; Short, J; Callas, E

    1997-04-01

    The first step in redesigning the health care delivery process for ambulatory care begins with the patient and the business processes that support the patient. Patient-related business processes include patient access, service documentation, billing, follow-up, collection, and payment. Access is the portal to the clinical delivery and care management process. Service documentation, charge capture, and payment and collection are supporting processes to care delivery. Realigned provider networks now demand realigned patient business services to provide their members/customers/patients with improved service delivery at less cost. Purchaser mandates for cost containment, health maintenance, and enhanced quality of care have created an environment where every aspect of the delivery system, especially ambulatory care, is being judged. Business processes supporting the outpatient are therefore being reexamined for better efficiency and customer satisfaction. Many health care systems have made major investments in their ambulatory care environment, but have pursued traditional supporting business practices--such as multiple access points, lack of integrated patient appointment scheduling and registration, and multiple patient bills. These are areas that are appropriate for redesign efforts--all with the customer's needs and convenience in mind. Similarly, setting unrealistic expectations, underestimating the effort required, and ignoring the human elements of a patient-focused business service redesign effort can sabotage the very sound reasons for executing such an endeavor. Pitfalls can be avoided if a structured methodology, coupled with a change management process, are employed. Deloitte & Touche Consulting Group has been involved in several major efforts, all with ambulatory care settings to assist with the redesign of their business practices to consider the patient as the driver, instead of the institution providing the care.

  17. Acceptance of clinical decision support surveillance technology in the clinical pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Dan; Ankem, Kalyani; English, Kathleen

    2017-03-01

    There are clinical and economic benefits to incorporating clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) in patient care interventions in the clinical pharmacy setting. However, user dissatisfaction and resistance to HIT can prevent optimal use of such systems, particularly when users employ system workarounds and overrides. The present study applied a modified version of the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) to evaluate the disposition and satisfaction with CDSS among clinical pharmacists who perform surveillance to identify potential medication therapy interventions on patients in the hospital setting. A survey of clinical pharmacists (N = 48) was conducted. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used to analyze the influence of the UTAUT-related variables on behavioral intention and satisfaction with CDSS among clinical pharmacists. While behavioral intention did not predict actual use of HIT, facilitating conditions had a direct effect on pharmacists' use of CDSS. Likewise, satisfaction with CDSS was found to have a direct effect on use, with more satisfied users being less inclined to employ workarounds or overrides of the system. Based on the findings, organizational structures that facilitate CDSS use and user satisfaction affect the extent to which pharmacy and health care management maximize use in the clinical pharmacy setting.

  18. Duplicate laboratory test reduction using a clinical decision support tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procop, Gary W; Yerian, Lisa M; Wyllie, Robert; Harrison, A Marc; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice

    2014-05-01

    Duplicate laboratory tests that are unwarranted increase unnecessary phlebotomy, which contributes to iatrogenic anemia, decreased patient satisfaction, and increased health care costs. We employed a clinical decision support tool (CDST) to block unnecessary duplicate test orders during the computerized physician order entry (CPOE) process. We assessed laboratory cost savings after 2 years and searched for untoward patient events associated with this intervention. This CDST blocked 11,790 unnecessary duplicate test orders in these 2 years, which resulted in a cost savings of $183,586. There were no untoward effects reported associated with this intervention. The movement to CPOE affords real-time interaction between the laboratory and the physician through CDSTs that signal duplicate orders. These interactions save health care dollars and should also increase patient satisfaction and well-being.

  19. A Proposed Clinical Decision Support Architecture Capable of Supporting Whole Genome Sequence Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon M. Welch

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Whole genome sequence (WGS information may soon be widely available to help clinicians personalize the care and treatment of patients. However, considerable barriers exist, which may hinder the effective utilization of WGS information in a routine clinical care setting. Clinical decision support (CDS offers a potential solution to overcome such barriers and to facilitate the effective use of WGS information in the clinic. However, genomic information is complex and will require significant considerations when developing CDS capabilities. As such, this manuscript lays out a conceptual framework for a CDS architecture designed to deliver WGS-guided CDS within the clinical workflow. To handle the complexity and breadth of WGS information, the proposed CDS framework leverages service-oriented capabilities and orchestrates the interaction of several independently-managed components. These independently-managed components include the genome variant knowledge base, the genome database, the CDS knowledge base, a CDS controller and the electronic health record (EHR. A key design feature is that genome data can be stored separately from the EHR. This paper describes in detail: (1 each component of the architecture; (2 the interaction of the components; and (3 how the architecture attempts to overcome the challenges associated with WGS information. We believe that service-oriented CDS capabilities will be essential to using WGS information for personalized medicine.

  20. A proposed clinical decision support architecture capable of supporting whole genome sequence information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Brandon M; Loya, Salvador Rodriguez; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-04-04

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information may soon be widely available to help clinicians personalize the care and treatment of patients. However, considerable barriers exist, which may hinder the effective utilization of WGS information in a routine clinical care setting. Clinical decision support (CDS) offers a potential solution to overcome such barriers and to facilitate the effective use of WGS information in the clinic. However, genomic information is complex and will require significant considerations when developing CDS capabilities. As such, this manuscript lays out a conceptual framework for a CDS architecture designed to deliver WGS-guided CDS within the clinical workflow. To handle the complexity and breadth of WGS information, the proposed CDS framework leverages service-oriented capabilities and orchestrates the interaction of several independently-managed components. These independently-managed components include the genome variant knowledge base, the genome database, the CDS knowledge base, a CDS controller and the electronic health record (EHR). A key design feature is that genome data can be stored separately from the EHR. This paper describes in detail: (1) each component of the architecture; (2) the interaction of the components; and (3) how the architecture attempts to overcome the challenges associated with WGS information. We believe that service-oriented CDS capabilities will be essential to using WGS information for personalized medicine.

  1. SPARED RECOGNITION CAPACITY IN ELDERLY AND CLOSED-HEAD-INJURY SUBJECTS WITH CLINICAL MEMORY DEFICITS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spikman, J.M.; Berg, I.J.; Deelman, B.G.

    This study describes the performance of three groups of subjects on a pictorial forced-recognition task, the Hundred Pictures Test. The aim was to determine whether subjects with memory deficits (elderly and closed-head-injured subjects) would perform as well as healthy young subjects, both on

  2. Chemistry, manufacturing and control (CMC) and clinical trial technical support for influenza vaccine manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, Rahnuma; Holt, Renee; Hjorth, Richard; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco

    2016-10-26

    With the support of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) of the US Department of Health and Human Services, PATH has contributed to the World Health Organization's (WHO's) Global Action Plan for Influenza Vaccines (GAP) by providing technical and clinical assistance to several developing country vaccine manufacturers (DCVMs). GAP builds regionally based independent and sustainable influenza vaccine production capacity to mitigate the overall global shortage of influenza vaccines. The program also ensures adequate influenza vaccine manufacturing capacity in the event of an influenza pandemic. Since 2009, PATH has worked closely with two DCVMs in Vietnam: the Institute of Vaccines and Medical Biologicals (IVAC) and VABIOTECH. Beginning in 2013, PATH also began working with Torlak Institute in Serbia; Instituto Butantan in Brazil; Serum Institute of India Private Ltd. in India; and Changchun BCHT Biotechnology Co. (BCHT) in China. The DCVMs supported under the GAP program all had existing influenza vaccine manufacturing capability and required technical support from PATH to improve vaccine yield, process efficiency, and product formulation. PATH has provided customized technical support for the manufacturing process to each DCVM based on their respective requirements. Additionally, PATH, working with BARDA and WHO, supported several DCVMs in the clinical development of influenza vaccine candidates progressing toward national licensure or WHO prequalification. As a result of the activities outlined in this review, several companies were able to make excellent progress in developing state-of-the-art manufacturing processes and completing early phase clinical trials. Licensure trials are currently ongoing or planned for several DCVMs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of closed-cell and hybrid-cell stent designs in carotid artery stenting: clinical and procedural outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersan TatlI

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Carotid artery stenting (CAS is a promising alternative to surgery in high-risk patients. However, the impact of stent cell design on outcomes in CAS is a matter of continued debate. Aim : To compare the periprocedural and clinical outcomes of different stent designs for CAS with distal protection devices. Material and methods : All CAS procedures with both closed- and hybrid-cell stents performed at our institution between February 2010 and December 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. Adverse events were defined as death, major stroke, minor stroke, transient ischemic attack and myocardial infarction. Periprocedural and 30-day adverse events and internal carotid artery (ICA vasospasm rates were compared between the closed-cell and hybrid-cell stent groups. Results : The study included 234 patients comprising 146 patients with a closed-cell stent (Xact stent, Abbott Vascular (mean age: 68.5 ±8.6; 67.1% male and 88 patients with a hybrid-cell stent (Cristallo Ideale, Medtronic (mean age: 67.2 ±12.8; 68.2% male. There was no significant difference between the groups with respect to periprocedural or 30-day adverse event rates. While there was no difference in terms of tortuosity index between the groups, there was a higher procedural ICA vasospasm rate in the closed-cell stent group (35 patients, 23% compared with the hybrid-cell stent group (10 patients, 11% (p = 0.017. Conclusions : The results of this study showed no significant difference in the clinical adverse event rates after CAS between the closed-cell stent group and the hybrid-cell stent group. However, procedural ICA vasospasm was more common in the closed-cell stent group.

  4. Effect of closed drainage system on edema and ecchymosis following rhinoplasty: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Asadi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to minimize edema and ecchymosis following rhinoplasty through a closed drainage system to address concealed hemorrhage.Methods: This study was designed as a prospective، double blinded, randomized contr-olled study. Fifty one patients who underwent septorhinoplasty were included in this study and divided in two groups. In group A, a closed drainage system was applied in the most dependent posterior septal area following septal harvesting. Concealed bloody secretions were drained out of mouth in a vacutaner tube during three concecutive post operative days. In control group, group B, exactly the same classic rhinoplasty opera-tion by the same surgeon was done as for study group except omitting the closed drainage system. Degree of supra-tip and eyelid edema was evaluated on post operative days through photographic and software image analysis. Edema and ecchymosis rating of eyelids and ecchymosis of paranasal and cheek area done based on photographic analysis by independent plastic surgeons using a defined grading system.Results: Eyelid ecchymosis was reduced significantly on post operative day 14 in the study group (P=0.03. Ecchymosis of paranasal and check was reduced considerably likewise on days 7 and 14 in group A using Mann-Whitney test (P=0.03. There was no significant deference regarding supra tip edema on post operative days. The same hold true for the eyelids edema.Conclusion: Significant decrement observed in eyelids ecchymosis on day 14 and para-nasal and cheek ecchymosis on postoperative days 7 and 14 in study group. There were no positive effects regarding supra tip and eyelid edema reduction using closed drainage system to evacuate concealed haemorrhage in posterior septum space. There could be different etio-pathologies for two common morbidities following rhinoplasty that should be addressed separately.

  5. Quality assurance plan for the Close Support Laboratory for the remedial investigation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    The primary purpose of the Close Support Laboratory (CSL) is to provide rapid radiological screening of investigation-derived samples before they are shipped to off-site laboratories for more detailed analyses. Analyses for volatile organic compounds and miscellaneous water quality parameters are also performed at the CSL. CSL data are also used to select samples for off-site laboratory analysis, for rapid qualitative and quantitative determinations, and for other processes when off-site analysis is not needed and/or is impractical. This plan specifies methods of implementing analytical and radiological protocols and procedures for the documentation, handling, control, and analysis of samples and describes the levels of authority and responsibility for laboratory operation. Specific quality control methods used by the CSL for individual analyses are described in project procedures

  6. Evaluating clinical ethics support in mental healthcare: a systematic literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hem, M.H.; Pedersen, R.; Norvoll, R.; Molewijk, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review on evaluation of clinical ethics support services in mental healthcare is presented and discussed. The focus was on (a) forms of clinical ethics support services, (b) evaluation of clinical ethics support services, (c) contexts and participants and (d) results. Five

  7. Closed hollow bulb obturator--one-step fabrication: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzayan, Muaiyed M; Ariffin, Yusnidar T; Yunus, Norsiah

    2013-10-01

    A method is described for the fabrication of a closed hollow bulb obturator prosthesis using a hard thermoforming splint material and heat-cured acrylic resin. The technique allowed the thickness of the thermoformed bulb to be optimized for weight reduction, while the autopolymerized seal area was covered in heat-cured acrylic resin, thus eliminating potential leakage and discoloration. This technique permits the obturator prosthesis to be processed to completion from the wax trial denture without additional laboratory investing, flasking, and processing. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. A Review: Using Pyrolysis and its Bioproducts to Help Close the Loop in Sustainable Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, LaShelle E.

    2013-01-01

    The next step in human exploration of space is beyond low Earth orbit and possibly to sites such as the Moon and Mars. Resupply of critical life support components for missions such as these are difficult or impossible. Life support processes for closing the loop of water, oxygen and carbon have to be identified. Currently, there are many technologies proposed for terrestrial missions for waste, water, air processing. and the creation of consumables. There are a variety of different approaches, but few address all of these issues simultaneously. One candidate is pyrolysis; a method where waste streams can be heated in the absence of oxygen to undergo a thermochemical conversion producing a series of bioproducts. Bioproducts like biochar made from non-edible biomass and human solid waste can possibly provide valuable benefits such as waste reduction, regolith fertilization for increased food production, and become a consumable for water processing and air revitalization systems. Syngas containing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, can be converted to methane and dimethyl ether to create propellants. Bio-oils can be utilized as a heating fuel or fed to bioreactors that utilize oil-eating microbes.

  9. Fuzzy logic in clinical practice decision support systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warren, Jim; Beliakov, Gleb; van der Zwaag, B.J.

    Computerized clinical guidelines can provide significant benefits to health outcomes and costs, however, their effective implementation presents significant problems. Vagueness and ambiguity inherent in natural (textual) clinical guidelines is not readily amenable to formulating automated alerts or

  10. Closing the Gap between Research Evidence and Clinical Practice: Jordanian Nurses' Perceived Barriers to Research Utilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khalaileh, Murad; Al Qadire, Mohammad; Musa, Ahmad S.; Al-Khawaldeh, Omar A.; Al Qudah, Hani; Alhabahbeh, Atalla

    2016-01-01

    Background: The nursing profession is a combination of theory and practical skill, and nurses are required to generate and develop knowledge through implementing research into clinical practice. Considerable number of barriers could hind implementing research findings into practice. Barriers to research utilisation are not identified in the…

  11. Analysis of Closed Claims in the Clinical Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Otaki

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The characteristics of malpractice claims associated with RA management, including the high frequency of medication-related allegations, breakdowns in the assessment process, and high claim numbers among patients older than 60 years, suggest the importance of caution exercised by physicians when administering immunosuppressants for the clinical treatment of RA.

  12. Corpus callosum lesions after closed head injury in children: MRI, clinical features and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelsohn, D.B.; Bruce, D.

    1992-01-01

    Thirty-four children who sustained moderate to severe closed head injury underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Eight (24%) had MRI evidence of corpus callosum injury, most commonly within the posterior body and splenium. In contradistinction to reports in adults, there was no definite relationship between callosal injury and lower initial Glasgow Coma Scale scores, nor was there a significantly higher incidence of primary brain-stem lesions, diffuse axonal shear injury or intraventricular hemorrhage. In none of these 8 children did the initial admission computed tomography show evidence of callosal injury. Callosal injuries on MRI are not necessarily a poor prognostic finding, the majority of the 8 children showing good functional recovery. (orig.)

  13. Integrating usability testing and think-aloud protocol analysis with "near-live" clinical simulations in evaluating clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Alice C; Kannry, Joseph L; Kushniruk, Andre; Chrimes, Dillon; McGinn, Thomas G; Edonyabo, Daniel; Mann, Devin M

    2012-11-01

    Usability evaluations can improve the usability and workflow integration of clinical decision support (CDS). Traditional usability testing using scripted scenarios with think-aloud protocol analysis provide a useful but incomplete assessment of how new CDS tools interact with users and clinical workflow. "Near-live" clinical simulations are a newer usability evaluation tool that more closely mimics clinical workflow and that allows for a complementary evaluation of CDS usability as well as impact on workflow. This study employed two phases of testing a new CDS tool that embedded clinical prediction rules (an evidence-based medicine tool) into primary care workflow within a commercial electronic health record. Phase I applied usability testing involving "think-aloud" protocol analysis of 8 primary care providers encountering several scripted clinical scenarios. Phase II used "near-live" clinical simulations of 8 providers interacting with video clips of standardized trained patient actors enacting the clinical scenario. In both phases, all sessions were audiotaped and had screen-capture software activated for onscreen recordings. Transcripts were coded using qualitative analysis methods. In Phase I, the impact of the CDS on navigation and workflow were associated with the largest volume of negative comments (accounting for over 90% of user raised issues) while the overall usability and the content of the CDS were associated with the most positive comments. However, usability had a positive-to-negative comment ratio of only 0.93 reflecting mixed perceptions about the usability of the CDS. In Phase II, the duration of encounters with simulated patients was approximately 12 min with 71% of the clinical prediction rules being activated after half of the visit had already elapsed. Upon activation, providers accepted the CDS tool pathway 82% of times offered and completed all of its elements in 53% of all simulation cases. Only 12.2% of encounter time was spent using the

  14. 2014 Rural Clinical School Training and Support Program Snapshot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, Kumara; Greenhill, Jennene; Walker, Judi; Bailey, Jannine; Croft, Amanda; Doyle, Zelda; McCrossin, Timothy; Stevens, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    The Rural Clinical Training and Support (RCTS) program is an Australian Government initiative to address the shortage of medical practitioners within rural and remote Australia. There is a large amount of published information about the RCTS program and rural medical student cohorts who have undertaken short- and long-term rotations. However, very little is known about the academic and professional staff involved in the program, a knowledge gap that may impact workforce and succession planning. To address this, the Federation of Rural Australian Medical Educators (FRAME) initiated the pilot 2014 RCTS Snapshot survey to obtain data on the current RCTS workforce. All professional, academic and clinical academic staff (fixed-term and continuing, regardless of fraction) employed through the RCTS program were invited to complete a short, web-based survey. The survey was conducted from March to June 2014. The quantitative variables in the survey included demographics (age and gender), rural background and exposure, employment history in rural/regional areas and at rural clinical schools (RCS), experience and expertise, reasons for working at RCS, and future employment intentions. The last three questions also were of a qualitative open-ended format to allow respondents to provide additional details regarding their reasons for working at RCSs and their future intentions. The estimated total RCTS workforce was 970. A total of 413 responses were received and 316 (40.9%) complete responses analysed. The majority of respondents were female (71%), the 40-60-year age group was predominant (28%), and professional staff constituted the majority (62%). The below 40-year age group had more professionals than academics (21% vs 12%) and more than 62% of academics were aged above 50 years. Notably, there were no academics aged less than 30 years. The percentage of professional staff with a rural background was higher (62%) than that of academics with a rural background (42%). However

  15. Effect of temperature on the orthodontic clinical applications of niti closed-coil springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinar-Escalona, Eduardo; Llamas-Carreras, José M.; Barrera-Mora, José M.; Abalos-Lasbrucci, Camilo

    2013-01-01

    NiTi spring coils were used to obtain large deformation under a constant force. The device consists on a NiTi coil spring, superelastic at body temperature, in order to have a stress plateau during the austenitic retransformation during the unloading. The temperature variations induced changes in the spring force. Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the temperature variations in the spring forces and corrosion behaviour simulating the ingestion hot/cold drinks and food. Study Design: The springs were subjected to a tensile force using universal testing machine MTS-Adamel (100 N load cell). All tests were performed in artificial saliva maintained at different temperatures. The corrosion tests were performed according to the ISO-standard 10993-15:2000. Results: The increase in temperature of 18oC induced an increase in the spring force of 30%. However, when the temperature returns to 37oC the distraction force recovers near the initial level. After cooling down the spring to 15oC, the force decreased by 46%. This investigation show as the temperature increase, the corrosion potential shifts towards negative values and the corrosion density is rising. Conclusions: The changes of the temperatures do not modify the superelastic behaviour of the NiTi closed-coil springs. The corrosion potential of NiTi in artificial saliva is decreasing by the rise of the temperatures. Key words:Superelasticity, NiTi, springs, orthodontic, coils, recovery, temperature. PMID:23722142

  16. Prospective randomized crossover study of a new closed-loop control system versus pressure support during weaning from mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavieras, Noémie; Wysocki, Marc; Coisel, Yannael; Galia, Fabrice; Conseil, Matthieu; Chanques, Gerald; Jung, Boris; Arnal, Jean-Michel; Matecki, Stefan; Molinari, Nicolas; Jaber, Samir

    2013-09-01

    Intellivent is a new full closed-loop controlled ventilation that automatically adjusts both ventilation and oxygenation parameters. The authors compared gas exchange and breathing pattern variability of Intellivent and pressure support ventilation (PSV). In a prospective, randomized, single-blind design crossover study, 14 patients were ventilated during the weaning phase, with Intellivent or PSV, for two periods of 24 h in a randomized order. Arterial blood gases were obtained after 1, 8, 16, and 24 h with each mode. Ventilatory parameters were recorded continuously in a breath-by-breath basis during the two study periods. The primary endpoint was oxygenation, estimated by the calculation of the difference between the PaO2/FIO2 ratio obtained after 24 h of ventilation and the PaO2/FIO2 ratio obtained at baseline in each mode. The variability in the ventilatory parameters was also evaluated by the coefficient of variation (SD to mean ratio). There were no adverse events or safety issues requiring premature interruption of both modes. The PaO2/FIO2 (mean ± SD) ratio improved significantly from 245 ± 75 at baseline to 294 ± 123 (P = 0.03) after 24 h of Intellivent. The coefficient of variation of inspiratory pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure (median [interquartile range]) were significantly higher with Intellivent, 16 [11-21] and 15 [7-23]%, compared with 6 [5-7] and 7 [5-10]% in PSV. Inspiratory pressure, positive end-expiratory pressure, and FIO2 changes were adjusted significantly more often with Intellivent compared with PSV. Compared with PSV, Intellivent during a 24-h period improved the PaO2/FIO2 ratio in parallel with more variability in the ventilatory support and more changes in ventilation settings.

  17. Understanding complex clinical reasoning in infectious diseases for improving clinical decision support design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Roosan; Weir, Charlene R; Jones, Makoto; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Samore, Matthew H

    2015-11-30

    Clinical experts' cognitive mechanisms for managing complexity have implications for the design of future innovative healthcare systems. The purpose of the study is to examine the constituents of decision complexity and explore the cognitive strategies clinicians use to control and adapt to their information environment. We used Cognitive Task Analysis (CTA) methods to interview 10 Infectious Disease (ID) experts at the University of Utah and Salt Lake City Veterans Administration Medical Center. Participants were asked to recall a complex, critical and vivid antibiotic-prescribing incident using the Critical Decision Method (CDM), a type of Cognitive Task Analysis (CTA). Using the four iterations of the Critical Decision Method, questions were posed to fully explore the incident, focusing in depth on the clinical components underlying the complexity. Probes were included to assess cognitive and decision strategies used by participants. The following three themes emerged as the constituents of decision complexity experienced by the Infectious Diseases experts: 1) the overall clinical picture does not match the pattern, 2) a lack of comprehension of the situation and 3) dealing with social and emotional pressures such as fear and anxiety. All these factors contribute to decision complexity. These factors almost always occurred together, creating unexpected events and uncertainty in clinical reasoning. Five themes emerged in the analyses of how experts deal with the complexity. Expert clinicians frequently used 1) watchful waiting instead of over- prescribing antibiotics, engaged in 2) theory of mind to project and simulate other practitioners' perspectives, reduced very complex cases into simple 3) heuristics, employed 4) anticipatory thinking to plan and re-plan events and consulted with peers to share knowledge, solicit opinions and 5) seek help on patient cases. The cognitive strategies to deal with decision complexity found in this study have important

  18. Optimal Target Range of Closed-Loop Inspired Oxygen Support in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Cross-Over Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Maria Elisabeth Nicoletta; van Zanten, Henriette A; Bachman, Tom E; Te Pas, Arjan B; van Kaam, Anton H; Onland, Wes

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the effect of different pulse oximetry (SpO 2 ) target range settings during automated fraction of inspired oxygen control (A-FiO 2 ) on time spent within a clinically set SpO 2 alarm range in oxygen-dependent infants on noninvasive respiratory support. Forty-one preterm infants (gestational age [median] 26 weeks, age [median] 21 days) on FiO 2  >0.21 receiving noninvasive respiratory support were subjected to A-FiO 2 using 3 SpO 2 target ranges (86%-94%, 88%-92%, or 89%-91%) in random order for 24 hours each. Before switching to the next target range, SpO 2 was manually controlled for 24 hours (washout period). The primary outcome was the time spent within the clinically set alarm limits of 86%-94%. The percent time within the 86%-94% SpO 2 alarm range was similar for all 3 A-FiO 2 target ranges (74%). Time spent in hyperoxemia was not significantly different between target ranges. However, the time spent in severe hypoxemia (SpO 2  target ranges of A-FiO 2 (88%-92%; 1.9%, 89%-91%; 1.7%) compared with the wide target range (86%-94%; 3.4%, P target range. Narrowing the target range of A-FiO 2 to the desired median ±2% is effective in reducing the time spent in hypoxemia, without increasing the risk of hyperoxemia. www.trialregister.nl: NTR4368. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Can Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Clinical Trials Close the Risk Management Gap Between Diabetes and Prediabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perreault, Leigh; Færch, Kristine; Gregg, Edward W

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We reviewed published literature to determine the relationship between A1c and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and summarize the need and implications for CVD risk reduction with interventions, focusing in the prediabetic A1c range (... a continuous relationship between A1c and CVD-even below the current levels of A1c-defined prediabetes and after adjustment for known risk factors for CVD. Clinical trials have demonstrated a reduction in CV morbidity and/or mortality when interventions are invoked in the prediabetic A1c range. Guidelines...... advocating CV risk factor management in prediabetes have not been widely adopted, subsequently leading to comparable coronary heart disease risk between people with prediabetes (HR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.7-2.1 vs normoglycemia) and diabetes itself (HR=2.0, 95% CI 1.8-2.2 vs no diabetes). This review highlights...

  20. Parametric vs. Nonparametric Regression Modelling within Clinical Decision Support

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, Jan; Zvárová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2017), s. 21-27 ISSN 1805-8698 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-01251S Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : decision support systems * decision rules * statistical analysis * nonparametric regression Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science OBOR OECD: Statistics and probability

  1. Analysis of Nursing Clinical Decision Support Requests and Strategic Plan in a Large Academic Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Kimberly; Bavuso, Karen; Bouyer-Ferullo, Sharon; Goldsmith, Denise; Fairbanks, Amanda; Gesner, Emily; Lagor, Charles; Collins, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    To understand requests for nursing Clinical Decision Support (CDS) interventions at a large integrated health system undergoing vendor-based EHR implementation. In addition, to establish a process to guide both short-term implementation and long-term strategic goals to meet nursing CDS needs. We conducted an environmental scan to understand current state of nursing CDS over three months. The environmental scan consisted of a literature review and an analysis of CDS requests received from across our health system. We identified existing high priority CDS and paper-based tools used in nursing practice at our health system that guide decision-making. A total of 46 nursing CDS requests were received. Fifty-six percent (n=26) were specific to a clinical specialty; 22 percent (n=10) were focused on facilitating clinical consults in the inpatient setting. "Risk Assessments/Risk Reduction/Promotion of Healthy Habits" (n=23) was the most requested High Priority Category received for nursing CDS. A continuum of types of nursing CDS needs emerged using the Data-Information-Knowledge-Wisdom Conceptual Framework: 1) facilitating data capture, 2) meeting information needs, 3) guiding knowledge-based decision making, and 4) exposing analytics for wisdom-based clinical interpretation by the nurse. Identifying and prioritizing paper-based tools that can be modified into electronic CDS is a challenge. CDS strategy is an evolving process that relies on close collaboration and engagement with clinical sites for short-term implementation and should be incorporated into a long-term strategic plan that can be optimized and achieved overtime. The Data-Information-Knowledge-Wisdom Conceptual Framework in conjunction with the High Priority Categories established may be a useful tool to guide a strategic approach for meeting short-term nursing CDS needs and aligning with the organizational strategic plan.

  2. Assessing Scientific Practices Using Machine-Learning Methods: How Closely Do They Match Clinical Interview Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggrow, Elizabeth P.; Ha, Minsu; Nehm, Ross H.; Pearl, Dennis; Boone, William J.

    2014-02-01

    The landscape of science education is being transformed by the new Framework for Science Education (National Research Council, A framework for K-12 science education: practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas. The National Academies Press, Washington, DC, 2012), which emphasizes the centrality of scientific practices—such as explanation, argumentation, and communication—in science teaching, learning, and assessment. A major challenge facing the field of science education is developing assessment tools that are capable of validly and efficiently evaluating these practices. Our study examined the efficacy of a free, open-source machine-learning tool for evaluating the quality of students' written explanations of the causes of evolutionary change relative to three other approaches: (1) human-scored written explanations, (2) a multiple-choice test, and (3) clinical oral interviews. A large sample of undergraduates (n = 104) exposed to varying amounts of evolution content completed all three assessments: a clinical oral interview, a written open-response assessment, and a multiple-choice test. Rasch analysis was used to compute linear person measures and linear item measures on a single logit scale. We found that the multiple-choice test displayed poor person and item fit (mean square outfit >1.3), while both oral interview measures and computer-generated written response measures exhibited acceptable fit (average mean square outfit for interview: person 0.97, item 0.97; computer: person 1.03, item 1.06). Multiple-choice test measures were more weakly associated with interview measures (r = 0.35) than the computer-scored explanation measures (r = 0.63). Overall, Rasch analysis indicated that computer-scored written explanation measures (1) have the strongest correspondence to oral interview measures; (2) are capable of capturing students' normative scientific and naive ideas as accurately as human-scored explanations, and (3) more validly detect understanding

  3. The impact of an electronic clinical decision support for pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    emergency unit were positive for PE. ... technology. ... 1 Division of Radiodiagnosis, Department of Medical Imaging and Clinical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and ... Stellenbosch University and Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa.

  4. Social support, posttraumatic cognitions, and PTSD: The influence of family, friends, and a close other in an interpersonal and non-interpersonal trauma group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Matthew J; Eddinger, Jasmine; Henschel, Aisling V; Dodson, Thomas S; Tran, Han N; Beck, J Gayle

    2015-10-01

    Research has suggested that social support can shape posttraumatic cognitions and PTSD. However, research has yet to compare the influence of separate domains of support on posttraumatic cognitions. Multiple-group path analysis was used to examine a model in a sample of 170 victims of intimate partner violence and 208 motor vehicle accident victims in which support from friends, family, and a close other were each predicted to influence posttraumatic cognitions, which were in turn predicted to influence PTSD. Analyses revealed that support from family and friends were each negatively correlated with posttraumatic cognitions, which in turn were positively associated with PTSD. Social support from a close other was not associated with posttraumatic cognitions. No significant differences in the model were found between trauma groups. Findings identify which relationships are likely to influence posttraumatic cognitions and are discussed with regard to interpersonal processes in the development and maintenance of PTSD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Swedish MS registry – clinical support tool and scientific resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillert, J; Stawiarz, L

    2015-01-01

    The Swedish MS registry (SMSreg) is designed to assure quality health care for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). It has been active since 2001 and web-based since 2004. It runs on government funding only and is used in all Swedish neurology departments. The SMSreg currently includes data on 14,500 of Sweden's estimated 17,500 prevalent patients with MS. One important function of SMSreg, to which participation is voluntary, is to serve as a tool for decision support and to provide an easy overview of the patient information needed at clinical visits. This is its core feature and explains why the majority of Swedish MS specialists contribute data. Another success factor for SMSreg is that entered data can be readily accessed, either through a query function into Excel format or through a set of predesigned tables and diagrams in which parameters can be selected. Recent development includes a portal allowing patients to view a summary of their registered data and to report a set of patient-reported outcomes. SMSreg data have been used in close to 100 published scientific reports. Current projects include an incidence cohort (EIMS), post-marketing cohorts of patients on novel disease-modifying drugs (IMSE), and a prevalence cohort (GEMS). As these studies combine physical sampling and questionnaire data with clinical documentation and possible linkage to other public registries, together they provide an excellent platform for integrated MS research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Supporting Clinical Practice Candidates in Learning Community Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJarnette, Nancy K.; Sudeck, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to monitor pre-service teacher candidates' progression and implementation of the learning community philosophy along with classroom management strategies. The study took place during their final semester of clinical practice. Data were collected from self-reports, surveys, university supervisor…

  7. Clinical pharmacist interventions to support adherence to thrombopreventive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Ulla

    The three papers in the thesis were based on two randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on in-hospital clinical pharmacist interventions for improvement of adherence to thrombopreventive therapy in two different populations: outpatients with hypertension and patients with acute stroke/transient isch......The three papers in the thesis were based on two randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on in-hospital clinical pharmacist interventions for improvement of adherence to thrombopreventive therapy in two different populations: outpatients with hypertension and patients with acute stroke...... individualised interventions and team-based care, e.g. integrating a clinical pharmacist with particular focus on patients’ drug-related problems. One approach with growing evidence of improving medication adherence is motivational interviewing (MI). So far, no clinical pharmacist intervention using MI has...... targeted patients with hypertension or stroke in a hospital care setting. Thus, the aim of this thesis was to develop and evaluate in-hospital pharmacist interventions including MI to improve adherence to primary and secondary thrombopreventive therapy. The first study was a RCT, which investigated...

  8. SANDS: an architecture for clinical decision support in a National Health Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F

    2007-10-11

    A new architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support) is introduced and its performance evaluated. The architecture provides a method for performing clinical decision support across a network, as in a health information exchange. Using the prototype we demonstrated that, first, a number of useful types of decision support can be carried out using our architecture; and, second, that the architecture exhibits desirable reliability and performance characteristics.

  9. Digital communication to support clinical supervision: considering the human factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Marlow, Annette; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    During the last three years the School of Nursing and Midwifery at the University of Tasmania has used a needs assessment survey to explore the needs of organizations and nursing professionals that facilitate and clinically supervise Bachelor of Nursing students in the workplace. Findings from the survey indicated that staff at healthcare organizations wanted a communication strategy that was easily accessible by clinicians who supervised students during work integrated learning placements. In particular they wanted to receive timely information related to the role and function of supervisors in practice. The development of the digital strategy to strengthen the development of a community of practice between the University, organizations, facilities and clinical supervisors was identified as the key method of improving communication. Blogging and micro blogging were selected as methods of choice for the implementation of the digital strategy because they were easy to set up, use and enable equity of access to geographically dispersed practitioners in urban and rural areas. Change champions were identified to disseminate information about the strategy within their workplaces. Although clinicians indicated electronic communication as their preferred method, there were a number of human factors at a systems and individual level identified to be challenges when communicating with clinical supervisors who were based off-campus. Information communication technology policies and embedded culture towards social presence were impediments to using this approach in some organizations. Additionally, it was found that it is necessary for this group of clinicians to be educated about using digital methods to undertake their role as clinical supervisors in their varied clinical practice environments.

  10. U.S. Ebola Treatment Center Clinical Laboratory Support

    OpenAIRE

    Jelden, Katelyn C.; Iwen, Peter C.; Herstein, Jocelyn J.; Biddinger, Paul D.; Kraft, Colleen S.; Saiman, Lisa; Smith, Philip W.; Hewlett, Angela L.; Gibbs, Shawn G.; Lowe, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Fifty-five hospitals in the United States have been designated Ebola treatment centers (ETCs) by their state and local health authorities. Designated ETCs must have appropriate plans to manage a patient with confirmed Ebola virus disease (EVD) for the full duration of illness and must have these plans assessed through a CDC site visit conducted by an interdisciplinary team of subject matter experts. This study determined the clinical laboratory capabilities of these ETCs. ETCs were electronic...

  11. Evaluating clinical ethics support in mental healthcare: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hem, Marit Helene; Pedersen, Reidar; Norvoll, Reidun; Molewijk, Bert

    2015-06-01

    A systematic literature review on evaluation of clinical ethics support services in mental healthcare is presented and discussed. The focus was on (a) forms of clinical ethics support services, (b) evaluation of clinical ethics support services, (c) contexts and participants and (d) results. Five studies were included. The ethics support activities described were moral case deliberations and ethics rounds. Different qualitative and quantitative research methods were utilized. The results show that (a) participants felt that they gained an increased insight into moral issues through systematic reflection; (b) there was improved cooperation among multidisciplinary team members; (c) it was uncertain whether clinical ethics support services led to better patient care; (d) the issue of patient and client participation is complex; and (e) the implementation process is challenging. Clinical ethics support services have mainly been studied through the experiences of the participating facilitators and healthcare professionals. Hence, there is limited knowledge of whether and how various types of clinical ethics support services influence the quality of care and how patients and relatives may evaluate clinical ethics support services. Based on the six excluded 'grey zone articles', in which there was an implicit focus on ethics reflection, other ways of working with ethical reflection in practice are discussed. Implementing and evaluating clinical ethics support services as approaches to clinical ethics support that are more integrated into the development of good practice are in focus. In order to meet some of the shortcomings of the field of clinical ethics support services, a research project that aims to strengthen ethics support in the mental health services, including patients' and caregivers' views on ethical challenges, is presented. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Creating and sharing clinical decision support content with Web 2.0: Issues and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Bates, David W; Middleton, Blackford; Hongsermeier, Tonya; Kashyap, Vipul; Thomas, Sean M; Sittig, Dean F

    2009-04-01

    Clinical decision support is a powerful tool for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. However, developing a comprehensive package of decision support interventions is costly and difficult. If used well, Web 2.0 methods may make it easier and less costly to develop decision support. Web 2.0 is characterized by online communities, open sharing, interactivity and collaboration. Although most previous attempts at sharing clinical decision support content have worked outside of the Web 2.0 framework, several initiatives are beginning to use Web 2.0 to share and collaborate on decision support content. We present case studies of three efforts: the Clinfowiki, a world-accessible wiki for developing decision support content; Partners Healthcare eRooms, web-based tools for developing decision support within a single organization; and Epic Systems Corporation's Community Library, a repository for sharing decision support content for customers of a single clinical system vendor. We evaluate the potential of Web 2.0 technologies to enable collaborative development and sharing of clinical decision support systems through the lens of three case studies; analyzing technical, legal and organizational issues for developers, consumers and organizers of clinical decision support content in Web 2.0. We believe the case for Web 2.0 as a tool for collaborating on clinical decision support content appears strong, particularly for collaborative content development within an organization.

  13. Rationale and clinical data supporting nutritional intervention in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelborghs, S; Gilles, C; Ivanoiu, A; Vandewoude, M

    2014-01-01

    Adequate nutrition plays an important role in the maintenance of cognitive function, particularly during aging. Malnutrition is amongst the risk factors for developing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological studies have associated deficiencies in some nutrients with a higher risk of cognitive dysfunction and/or AD. Cognitive decline in AD is correlated with synaptic loss and many of the components required to maintain optimal synaptic function are derived from dietary sources. As synapses are part of the neuronal membrane and are continuously being remodelled, the availability of sufficient levels of nutritional precursors (mainly uridine monophosphate, choline and omega-3 fatty acids) to make the phospholipids required to build neuronal membranes may have beneficial effects on synaptic degeneration in AD. In addition, B-vitamins, phospholipids and other micronutrients act as cofactors to enhance the supply of precursors required to make neuronal membranes and synapses. Despite this, no randomized controlled trial has hitherto provided evidence that any single nutrient has a beneficial effect on cognition or lowers the risk for AD. However, a multi-target approach using combinations of (micro)nutrients might have beneficial effects on cognitive function in neurodegenerative brain disorders like AD leading to synaptic degeneration. Here we review the clinical evidence for supplementation, based on a multi-target approach with a focus on key nutrients with a proposed role in synaptic dysfunction. Based on preclinical evidence, a nutrient mixture, Souvenaid(®) (Nutricia N.V., Zoetermeer, The Netherlands) was developed. Clinical trials with Souvenaid(®) have shown improved memory performance in patients with mild AD. Further clinical trials to evaluate the effects of nutritional intervention in MCI and early dementia due to AD are on-going.

  14. Improved Adherence Rates and Clinical Outcomes of an Integrated, Closed-Loop, Pharmacist-Led Oral Chemotherapy Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muluneh, Benyam; Schneider, Molly; Faso, Aimee; Amerine, Lindsey; Daniels, Rowell; Crisp, Brett; Valgus, John; Savage, Scott

    2018-06-01

    To address the growing use of oral anticancer therapy, an integrated, closed-loop, pharmacist-led oral chemotherapy management program was created within an academic medical center. An integrated, closed-loop, pharmacy-led oral chemotherapy management program was established. From September 2014 until June 2015, demographic information, rates of adherence, patient understanding of treatment, pharmacist interventions, patient and provider satisfaction, and molecular response rates in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) were collected. After full implementation, 107 patients were enrolled in our oral chemotherapy management program from September 2014 until June 2015. All patients were educated before starting oral chemotherapy, and using pre- and postassessment tests, comprehension of oral chemotherapy treatment increased from 43% to 95%. Patient-reported adherence was 86% and 94.7% for the GI/breast and malignant hematology patient populations, respectively, and these were validated with medication possession ratio, revealing adherence rates of 85% and 93.9% for the GI/breast and malignant hematology patient populations, respectively. A total of 350 encounters with a clinical pharmacist and 318 adverse effects were reported, which led to 235 interventions. This program led to a higher major molecular response rate (83%) in our CML population compared with published clinical trials (average major molecular response rates, 40% and 60% with 1- and 2-year follow-up, respectively). An innovative model was developed and resulted in improved patient knowledge regarding oral chemotherapy, improved adherence rates that exceeded nationally established thresholds, and superior major molecular response outcomes for patients with CML compared with published literature. As a result, this model has produced the gold standard in managing patients receiving oral chemotherapy.

  15. Clinical Decision Support to Implement CYP2D6 Drug-Gene Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, Pedro J; Parkulo, Mark; Blair, David; Elliott, Michelle; Schultz, Cloann; Sutton, Joseph; Rao, Padma; Bruflat, Jamie; Bleimeyer, Robert; Crooks, John; Gabrielson, Donald; Nicholson, Wayne; Rohrer Vitek, Carolyn; Wix, Kelly; Bielinski, Suzette J; Pathak, Jyotishman; Kullo, Iftikhar

    2015-01-01

    The level of CYP2D6 metabolic activity can be predicted by pharmacogenomic testing, and concomitant use of clinical decision support has the potential to prevent adverse effects from those drugs metabolized by this enzyme. Our initial findings after implementation of clinical decision support alerts integrated in the electronic health records suggest high feasibility, but also identify important challenges.

  16. Application of Quality Assurance Strategies in Diagnostics and Clinical Support Services in Iranian Hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aghaei Hashjin, Asgar; Kringos, Dionne; Ravaghi, Hamid; Manoochehri, Jila; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Klazinga, Niek S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Iran has a widespread diagnostics and clinical support services (DCSS) network that plays a crucial role in providing diagnostic and clinical support services to both inpatient and outpatient care. However, very little is known on the application of quality assurance (QA) policies in

  17. Slender Spring Systems, for a close-to-body dynamic arm support for people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunning, A.G.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation is to develop a wearable, passive, dynamic arm support that provides users with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) with support to perform activities of daily living. The arm support needs to be inconspicuous and not stigmatizing, to encourage the users to participate in

  18. Exploring Nurse Manager Support of Evidence-Based Practice: Clinical Nurse Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramanica, Laura; Spiva, LeeAnna

    2018-05-01

    The study identifies what constitutes nurse manager (NM) support and other resources that enable clinical nurses (CNs) to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP). Clinical nurses report that NM support enables them to use EBP but what constitutes NM support is still unclear. Nurse managers, CNs, and EBP mentors received specialized education and use a team approach for EBP. Data were collected preintervention, mid-intervention, and postintervention from observations, interviews, journaling, and surveys. Results demonstrate how NMs can perform their role responsibilities and still engage CNs to develop a spirit of inquiry, seek answers to their clinical questions using EBP, and advance their clinical performance to improve patient outcomes. Four NM supportive behaviors emerged: cultivating a shared EBP vision, ensuring use of EBP, communicating the value of EBP, and providing resources for EBP. Through education and support, NMs describe supportive behaviors necessary for the successful conduction of EBP by CNs.

  19. Providing support to nursing students in the clinical environment: a nursing standard requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carina; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

    2016-10-01

    This discussion paper poses the question 'What enables or deters Registered Nurses to take up their professional responsibility to support undergraduate nursing students through the provision of clinical education?'. Embedded within many nursing standards are expectations that Registered Nurses provide support and professional development to undergraduate nursing students undertaking clinical placements. Expectations within nursing standards that Registered Nurses provide support and professional development to nursing students are important because nursing students depend on Registered Nurses to help them to become competent practitioners. Contributing factors that enable and deter Registered Nurses from fulfilling this expectation to support nursing students in their clinical learning include; workloads, preparedness for the teaching role, confidence in teaching and awareness of the competency requirement to support students. Factors exist which can enable or deter Registered Nurses from carrying out the licence requirement to provide clinical education and support to nursing students.

  20. Non clinical research at CENTIS supporting biotechnological and pharmaceutical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Gonzalez, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Drugs production is a highly demanding industry because the rigor of legislations and guidelines. Standards are applied to manufacturing facilities and also to research and development stage. Our national biotechnological industry is developing and producing important medications for diseases like cancer, some of them in the national and international market. Isotopes Centre is an institution supporting such development by means of a work platform to carry out researches in the field of pharmacokinetic and biodistribution in experimental models. Accumulated experience allows us to contribute to research and development of different kind of molecules as pharmaceuticals, specially the biotechnological ones. We are evolving in direction to new technologies and methodologies more suitable to current standards. Radiolabeling is still a convenient choice considering present and new imaging technologies to investigate distribution and kinetic in living subjects. With the techniques we have and the ones to incorporate in a near future, new and more demanding investigations will be affordable. (author)

  1. A work-based learning approach for clinical support workers on mental health inpatient wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Philip; Gilding, Moorene; Seewooruttun, Khooseal; Walsh, Hannah

    2016-09-14

    Background With a rise in the number of unqualified staff providing health and social care, and reports raising concerns about the quality of care provided, there is a need to address the learning needs of clinical support workers. This article describes a qualitative evaluation of a service improvement project that involved a work-based learning approach for clinical support workers on mental health inpatient wards. Aim To investigate and identify insights in relation to the content and process of learning using a work-based learning approach for clinical support workers. Method This was a qualitative evaluation of a service improvement project involving 25 clinical support workers at the seven mental health inpatient units in South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Three clinical skills tutors were appointed to develop, implement and evaluate the work-based learning approach. Four sources of data were used to evaluate this approach, including reflective journals, qualitative responses to questionnaires, three focus groups involving the clinical support workers and a group interview involving the clinical skills tutors. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings The work-based learning approach was highly valued by the clinical support workers and enhanced learning in practice. Face-to-face learning in practice helped the clinical support workers to develop practice skills and reflective learning skills. Insights relating to the role of clinical support workers were also identified, including the benefits of face-to-face supervision in practice, particularly in relation to the interpersonal aspects of care. Conclusion A work-based learning approach has the potential to enhance care delivery by meeting the learning needs of clinical support workers and enabling them to apply learning to practice. Care providers should consider how the work-based learning approach can be used on a systematic, organisation-wide basis in the context of budgetary

  2. Pregnancy outcomes in Ghana : Relavance of clinical decision making support tools for frontline providers of care

    OpenAIRE

    Amoakoh-Coleman, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ghana’s slow progress towards attaining millennium development goal 5 has been associated with gaps in quality of care, particularly quality of clinical decision making for clients. This thesis reviews the relevance and effect of clinical decision making support tools on pregnancy outcomes. Relevance of three clinical decision making support tools available to frontline providers of care in the Greater Accra region is discussed. These are routine maternal health service delivery data populati...

  3. User-centered design to improve clinical decision support in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Julian; Chuang, Emmeline; Goldzweig, Caroline; Cain, Cindy L; Sugar, Catherine; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2017-08-01

    A growing literature has demonstrated the ability of user-centered design to make clinical decision support systems more effective and easier to use. However, studies of user-centered design have rarely examined more than a handful of sites at a time, and have frequently neglected the implementation climate and organizational resources that influence clinical decision support. The inclusion of such factors was identified by a systematic review as "the most important improvement that can be made in health IT evaluations." (1) Identify the prevalence of four user-centered design practices at United States Veterans Affairs (VA) primary care clinics and assess the perceived utility of clinical decision support at those clinics; (2) Evaluate the association between those user-centered design practices and the perceived utility of clinical decision support. We analyzed clinic-level survey data collected in 2006-2007 from 170 VA primary care clinics. We examined four user-centered design practices: 1) pilot testing, 2) provider satisfaction assessment, 3) formal usability assessment, and 4) analysis of impact on performance improvement. We used a regression model to evaluate the association between user-centered design practices and the perceived utility of clinical decision support, while accounting for other important factors at those clinics, including implementation climate, available resources, and structural characteristics. We also examined associations separately at community-based clinics and at hospital-based clinics. User-centered design practices for clinical decision support varied across clinics: 74% conducted pilot testing, 62% conducted provider satisfaction assessment, 36% conducted a formal usability assessment, and 79% conducted an analysis of impact on performance improvement. Overall perceived utility of clinical decision support was high, with a mean rating of 4.17 (±.67) out of 5 on a composite measure. "Analysis of impact on performance

  4. SANDS: a service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support in a National Health Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. The SANDS architecture for decision support has several significant advantages over other architectures for clinical decision support. The most salient of these are:

  5. Support for Offering Sexual Health Services through School-Based Health Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michele Johnson; Barr, Elissa; Wilson, Kristina; Griner, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies document support for sexuality education in the schools. However, there is a dearth of research assessing support for sexual health services offered through school-based health clinics (SBHCs). The purpose of this study was to assess voter support for offering 3 sexual health services (STI/HIV testing, STI/HIV…

  6. Critical experiments supporting close proximity water storage of power reactor fuel. Technical progress report, July 1, 1978-September 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, M.N.; Hoovler, G.S.; Eng, R.L.; Welfare, F.G.

    1978-11-01

    Experimental measurements are being taken on critical configurations of clusters of fuel rods mocking up LWR-type fuel elements in close proximity water storage. The results will serve to benchmark the computer codes used in designing nuclear power reactor fuel storage racks. KENO calculations of Cores I to VI are within two standard deviations of the measured k/sub eff/ values.

  7. Outcomes of moral case deliberation - the development of an evaluation instrument for clinical ethics support (the Euro-MCD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svantesson, M.; Karlsson, J.; Boitte, P.; Schildman, J.; Dauwerse, L.; Widdershoven, G.; Pedersen, R.; Huisman, M.; Molewijk, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Clinical ethics support, in particular Moral Case Deliberation, aims to support health care providers to manage ethically difficult situations. However, there is a lack of evaluation instruments regarding outcomes of clinical ethics support in general and regarding Moral Case

  8. Close or renew? Factors affecting local community support for rebuilding nuclear power plants in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frantál, Bohumil; Malý, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Rebuilding and upgrading of existing nuclear power plants represent a great energy policy challenge today. In this paper, factors that affect local community support for the rebuilding of an existing nuclear power plant are explored using a regression analysis model. It is based on a survey involving nearly 600 residents of twelve municipalities located in the vicinity of the Dukovany power plant in the Czech Republic. Nearly two thirds of local population support the rebuilding of the plant. The support for rebuilding is not directly affected by distance of residence from the power plant or perceptions of its local economic impacts, but is more influenced by general perceptions of pros of nuclear power. Work in the power plant, perception of nuclear power as a clean energy contributing to climate change mitigation and negative attitude to the renewable energy development are strongest predictors of the support. In terms of energy policy implications, it seems that the education of the public and awareness of nuclear power plants as a clean, safe and landscape compatible system of energy production are more important for increasing acceptance of rebuilding projects than spatial distribution of economic benefits to local communities. - Highlights: • Predictors of support for nuclear power plant (NPP) rebuilding are explored. • Support is not affected by distance or perception of local economic impacts. • Support is affected by general perceptions of pros of NPPs. • Support is determined by perception of NPPs as a clean energy. • Support is correlated with a negative attitude to renewable energy promotion.

  9. Efficient elutriation of monocytes within a closed system (Elutra) for clinical-scale generation of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas G; Strasser, Erwin; Smith, Richard; Carste, Curt; Schuler-Thurner, Beatrice; Kaempgen, Eckhart; Schuler, Gerold

    2005-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are promising tools for the immunotherapy of cancer. The induction of tumor-specific T cells and clinical regressions have already been observed in early phase I/II vaccination trials. As DC vaccination is now facing trials with larger patient collectives it becomes increasingly important to obtain large numbers of cells suitable for therapeutic applications under labor- and cost-effective conditions. We describe here a procedure that uses a novel cell separator (Elutra, Gambro BCT) to enrich monocytes from an entire apheresis product within one hour. Cells are separated on the basis of size and to a lesser extent density, by elutriation in a 40-ml conical chamber. The total monocyte recovery following elutriation (n = 6) was 98.53% (+/-8.07%), the recovery in the monocyte-rich fraction 75.45% (+/-11.31%), and the mean purity 82.95% (+/-6.01%). These monocytes can be cultured either in conventional culture dishes or in closed cell culture bags and differentiated, by using GM-CSF+IL-4 followed by a maturation cocktail composed of IL-1beta+IL-6+TNF-alpha+PGE2, into fully mature DC. The Elutra separator allows for fast and easy enrichment of monocytes within a closed system. Subsequently, elutriated monocytes can be successfully cultured into phenotypically and functionally mature DC for immunotherapeutic approaches. The method neither requires a density gradient step to enrich PBMC from leucapheresis products nor does it apply (xenogeneic) antibodies to target monocytes. Isolation of monocytes with Elutra may greatly facilitate future DC-based vaccination approaches.

  10. Clinical librarian support for rapid review of clinical utility of cancer molecular biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yimin; Fowler, Clara S; Fulton, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The clinical librarian used a restricted literature searching and quality-filtering approach to provide relevant clinical evidence for the use of cancer molecular biomarkers by institutional policy makers and clinicians in the rapid review process. The librarian-provided evidence was compared with the cited references in the institutional molecular biomarker algorithm. The overall incorporation rate of the librarian-provided references into the algorithm was above 80%. This study suggests the usefulness of clinical librarian expertise for clinical practice. The searching and filtering methods for high-level evidence can be adopted by information professionals who are involved in the rapid literature review.

  11. Micro-costing the provision of emotional support and information in UK eye clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Gillespie-Gallery, Hanna; Subramanian, Ahalya; Conway, Miriam L

    2013-01-01

    Background Sight loss has wide ranging implications for an individual in terms of education, employment, mobility and mental health. Therefore there is a need for information and support to be provided in eye clinics at the point of diagnosis of sight threatening conditions, but these aspects of care are often missing from clinics. To meet these needs, some clinics employ an Eye Clinic Liaison Officer (ECLO) but the position has yet to be widely implemented. The aims of this study were: (1) T...

  12. Implementation of workflow engine technology to deliver basic clinical decision support functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Vojtech; Rasmussen, Luke V; Oberg, Ryan; Starren, Justin B

    2011-04-10

    Workflow engine technology represents a new class of software with the ability to graphically model step-based knowledge. We present application of this novel technology to the domain of clinical decision support. Successful implementation of decision support within an electronic health record (EHR) remains an unsolved research challenge. Previous research efforts were mostly based on healthcare-specific representation standards and execution engines and did not reach wide adoption. We focus on two challenges in decision support systems: the ability to test decision logic on retrospective data prior prospective deployment and the challenge of user-friendly representation of clinical logic. We present our implementation of a workflow engine technology that addresses the two above-described challenges in delivering clinical decision support. Our system is based on a cross-industry standard of XML (extensible markup language) process definition language (XPDL). The core components of the system are a workflow editor for modeling clinical scenarios and a workflow engine for execution of those scenarios. We demonstrate, with an open-source and publicly available workflow suite, that clinical decision support logic can be executed on retrospective data. The same flowchart-based representation can also function in a prospective mode where the system can be integrated with an EHR system and respond to real-time clinical events. We limit the scope of our implementation to decision support content generation (which can be EHR system vendor independent). We do not focus on supporting complex decision support content delivery mechanisms due to lack of standardization of EHR systems in this area. We present results of our evaluation of the flowchart-based graphical notation as well as architectural evaluation of our implementation using an established evaluation framework for clinical decision support architecture. We describe an implementation of a free workflow technology

  13. Implementation of workflow engine technology to deliver basic clinical decision support functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Workflow engine technology represents a new class of software with the ability to graphically model step-based knowledge. We present application of this novel technology to the domain of clinical decision support. Successful implementation of decision support within an electronic health record (EHR) remains an unsolved research challenge. Previous research efforts were mostly based on healthcare-specific representation standards and execution engines and did not reach wide adoption. We focus on two challenges in decision support systems: the ability to test decision logic on retrospective data prior prospective deployment and the challenge of user-friendly representation of clinical logic. Results We present our implementation of a workflow engine technology that addresses the two above-described challenges in delivering clinical decision support. Our system is based on a cross-industry standard of XML (extensible markup language) process definition language (XPDL). The core components of the system are a workflow editor for modeling clinical scenarios and a workflow engine for execution of those scenarios. We demonstrate, with an open-source and publicly available workflow suite, that clinical decision support logic can be executed on retrospective data. The same flowchart-based representation can also function in a prospective mode where the system can be integrated with an EHR system and respond to real-time clinical events. We limit the scope of our implementation to decision support content generation (which can be EHR system vendor independent). We do not focus on supporting complex decision support content delivery mechanisms due to lack of standardization of EHR systems in this area. We present results of our evaluation of the flowchart-based graphical notation as well as architectural evaluation of our implementation using an established evaluation framework for clinical decision support architecture. Conclusions We describe an implementation of

  14. Preserving professional credibility: grounded theory study of medical trainees' requests for clinical support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Tara J T; Regehr, Glenn; Baker, G Ross; Lingard, Lorelei

    2009-02-09

    To develop a conceptual framework of the influences on medical trainees' decisions regarding requests for clinical support from a supervisor. Phase 1: members of teaching teams in internal and emergency medicine were observed during regular clinical activities (216 hours) and subsequently completed brief interviews. Phase 2: 36 in depth interviews were conducted using videotaped vignettes to probe tacit influences on decisions to request support. Data collection and analysis used grounded theory methods. Three teaching hospitals in an urban setting in Canada. 124 members of teaching teams on general internal medicine wards and in the emergency department, comprising 31 attending physicians, 57 junior and senior residents, 28 medical students, and eight nurses. Purposeful sampling to saturation was conducted. Trainees' decisions about whether or not to seek clinical support were influenced by three issues: the clinical question (clinical importance, scope of practice), supervisor factors (availability, approachability), and trainee factors (skill, desire for independence, evaluation). Trainees perceived that requesting frequent/inappropriate support threatened their credibility and used rhetorical strategies to preserve credibility. These strategies included building a case for the importance of requests, saving requests for opportune moments, making a plan before requesting support, and targeting requests to specific team members. Trainees consider not only clinical implications but also professional credibility when requesting support from clinical supervisors. Exposing the complexity of this process provides the opportunity to make changes to training programmes to promote timely supervision and provides a framework for further exploration of the impact of clinical training on quality of care of patients.

  15. Supporting End of Life Decision Making: Case Studies of Relational Closeness in Supported Decision Making for People with Severe or Profound Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joanne; Wilson, Erin; Hagiliassis, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Background: The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) promotes the use of supported decision making in lieu of substitute decision making. To date, there has been a lack of focus on supported decision making for people with severe or profound intellectual disability, including for end of life decisions.…

  16. Comparing the Effectiveness of a Clinical Registry and a Clinical Data Warehouse for Supporting Clinical Trial Recruitment: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chunhua; Bigger, J Thomas; Busacca, Linda; Wilcox, Adam; Getaneh, Asqual

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a case study comparing the relative efficiency of using a Diabetes Registry or a Clinical Data Warehouse to recruit participants for a diabetes clinical trial, TECOS. The Clinical Data Warehouse generated higher positive predictive accuracy (31% vs. 6.6%) and higher participant recruitment than the Registry (30 vs. 14 participants) in a shorter time period (59 vs. 74 working days). We identify important factors that increase clinical trial recruitment efficiency and lower cost. PMID:21347102

  17. Characterizing Biological Closed-Loop Life Support Systems for Thermal Control and Revitalization of Spacecraft Cabin Environments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Environmental Control and Support Systems (ECLSS) are required for all manned spaceflight missions to provide the most fundamental physiological needs. One of these...

  18. Combining Clinical Treatment and Peer Support: A Unique Approach to Overcoming Stigma and Delivering Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heber, Alexandra; Grenier, Stephane; Richardson, Donald; Darte, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    .... These include post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and substance abuse. The Canadian Forces and Veterans Affairs Canada have established mental health clinics, called Operational Trauma and Stress Support Centres (OTSSC's...

  19. Clinical decision support for whole genome sequence information leveraging a service-oriented architecture: a prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Brandon M; Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information could soon be routinely available to clinicians to support the personalized care of their patients. At such time, clinical decision support (CDS) integrated into the clinical workflow will likely be necessary to support genome-guided clinical care. Nevertheless, developing CDS capabilities for WGS information presents many unique challenges that need to be overcome for such approaches to be effective. In this manuscript, we describe the development of a prototype CDS system that is capable of providing genome-guided CDS at the point of care and within the clinical workflow. To demonstrate the functionality of this prototype, we implemented a clinical scenario of a hypothetical patient at high risk for Lynch Syndrome based on his genomic information. We demonstrate that this system can effectively use service-oriented architecture principles and standards-based components to deliver point of care CDS for WGS information in real-time.

  20. Simulation of low temperature combustion mechanism of different combustion-supporting agents in close-coupled DOC and DPF system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Penghao; Li, Zhijun; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Wen; He, Li; Wu, Yue

    2018-07-01

    In the coupled Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) and Diesel Particular Filter (DPF) system, soot cannot be completely removed by only using the passive regeneration. And DPF active regeneration is necessary. The research method in this paper is to spray different kinds of combustion-supporting agents to the DOC in the front of the DPF. Therefore, the low temperature combustion mechanism of different kinds of combustion-supporting agents in DOC was studied, in order to grasp the law of combustion in DOC, and the influence of follow-up emission on DPF removal of soot. During the study, CH 4 H 2 mixture and diesel (n-heptane + toluene) were used as combustion-supporting agents respectively. The simplified mechanisms of two kinds of gas mixtures used as the combustion-supporting agents in DPF have been constructed and testified in the paper. In this paper, the combustion and emission conditions of the two combustion-supporting agents were analyzed so as to meet the practical requirements of different working conditions. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of changing occlusal support on jaw-closing muscle electromyographic activity in healthy men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-Qing; He, Jian-Jun; Wang, Kelun; Svensson, Peter

    2009-01-01

    To test whether changes in occlusal support differentially modulate masseter and anterior temporalis muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity during controlled maximal voluntary clenching. Forty-seven healthy subjects (32 M and 15 F, 22.9+/-1.3 years) were recruited. Cotton-rolls were used to modify the occlusal contact relations and were positioned on the right, left, or both sides, and either in the molar or premolar regions, i.e. six different occlusal combinations. Surface EMG activity was recorded bilaterally from the masseter and anterior temporalis area and normalized with respect to maximal voluntary clenching in the intercuspal position. Analysis of variance and the paired t-test were used to test the data. Normalized EMG activity was influenced by changes in cotton-roll modified occlusal support, and there were differences between muscles (pocclusal support was moved from the molar to the premolar region. When occlusal support was moved from bilateral to unilateral contacts, EMG activity in the balancing-side anterior temporalis muscle and in bilateral masseter muscles decreased. Unilateral clenching on the molars, but not on the premolars, was associated with lower EMG activity in the balancing-side masseter and always associated with lower EMG activity in the balancing-side anterior temporalis compared to the working side (pocclusal support, which may have implications for stability of the mandible during intense clenching.

  2. Design of a Clinical Information Management System to Support DNA Analysis Laboratory Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Dubay, Christopher J.; Zimmerman, David; Popovich, Bradley

    1995-01-01

    The LabDirector system has been developed at the Oregon Health Sciences University to support the operation of our clinical DNA analysis laboratory. Through an iterative design process which has spanned two years, we have produced a system that is both highly tailored to a clinical genetics production laboratory and flexible in its implementation, to support the rapid growth and change of protocols and methodologies in use in the field. The administrative aspects of the system are integrated ...

  3. The Evolution of Integrated Close Air Support: World War 2, Korea and the Future of Air-Ground Combined Arms Synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    employ our assault aircraft temporarily in close support of the armoured force that will be used to break in on the ground, against such objectives as...Masters thesis, 1971, 61. Young Major Ronald Fogleman USAF, a veteran of F-100 “ Misty ” FAC missions in Vietnam, returned stateside and wrote this...World War One Sourcebook. London: Arms and Armour Press, 1992. Holley, I.B. Jr. Ideas and Weapons. Washington, DC: Air Force History and

  4. Designing an automated clinical decision support system to match clinical practice guidelines for opioid therapy for chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Michael E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid prescribing for chronic pain is common and controversial, but recommended clinical practices are followed inconsistently in many clinical settings. Strategies for increasing adherence to clinical practice guideline recommendations are needed to increase effectiveness and reduce negative consequences of opioid prescribing in chronic pain patients. Methods Here we describe the process and outcomes of a project to operationalize the 2003 VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guideline for Opioid Therapy for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain into a computerized decision support system (DSS to encourage good opioid prescribing practices during primary care visits. We based the DSS on the existing ATHENA-DSS. We used an iterative process of design, testing, and revision of the DSS by a diverse team including guideline authors, medical informatics experts, clinical content experts, and end-users to convert the written clinical practice guideline into a computable algorithm to generate patient-specific recommendations for care based upon existing information in the electronic medical record (EMR, and a set of clinical tools. Results The iterative revision process identified numerous and varied problems with the initially designed system despite diverse expert participation in the design process. The process of operationalizing the guideline identified areas in which the guideline was vague, left decisions to clinical judgment, or required clarification of detail to insure safe clinical implementation. The revisions led to workable solutions to problems, defined the limits of the DSS and its utility in clinical practice, improved integration into clinical workflow, and improved the clarity and accuracy of system recommendations and tools. Conclusions Use of this iterative process led to development of a multifunctional DSS that met the approval of the clinical practice guideline authors, content experts, and clinicians involved in testing. The

  5. Apportionment and Tactical Airpower in Airland Battle -- An Evaluation of CAS (Close Air Support), BAI (Battlefield Air Interdiction) and AI (Air Interdiction) from an Operational Perspective,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-08

    Support, p. 13-10. - -38. Barbara de Florio arnd Bernard Korhaner , The Value of Close Air Support (U) (Secret) (Washington, D.C.: Office of the...International, Number 69, 1985, p. 35. 61. Gabriel, p. 204. 62. Gabriel, p. 212. 63. De Florio and Korhaner , p. 9. 46 * .%’ 4 8 04 §’W’A§.5. _16 A, 0. N *j 64...and Moran, pp. 21-24. 70. De Florio and Korhaner , p. A-47. 71. M. J. Armitage and R. A. Mason, Air Power In the Nuclear Age, 1945- * 82: Theory and

  6. Pregnancy outcomes in Ghana : Relavance of clinical decision making support tools for frontline providers of care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amoakoh-Coleman, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ghana’s slow progress towards attaining millennium development goal 5 has been associated with gaps in quality of care, particularly quality of clinical decision making for clients. This thesis reviews the relevance and effect of clinical decision making support tools on pregnancy

  7. Computer Decision Support to Improve Autism Screening and Care in Community Pediatric Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nerissa S.; Sturm, Lynne A.; Carroll, Aaron E.; Downs, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    An autism module was added to an existing computer decision support system (CDSS) to facilitate adherence to recommended guidelines for screening for autism spectrum disorders in primary care pediatric clinics. User satisfaction was assessed by survey and informal feedback at monthly meetings between clinical staff and the software team. To assess…

  8. On absence of bound states for weakly attractive delta'-interactions supported on non-closed curves in R-2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jex, M.; Lotoreichik, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 2 (2016), s. 022101 ISSN 0022-2488 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-06818S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : dimensional Schrodinger-operators * hypersurfaces * spectra Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.077, year: 2016

  9. Personalized Clinical Diagnosis in Data Bases for Treatment Support in Phthisiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugovkina, T K; Skornyakov, S N; Golubev, D N; Egorov, E A; Medvinsky, I D

    2016-01-01

    The decision-making is a key event in the clinical practice. The program products with clinical decision support models in electronic data-base as well as with fixed decision moments of the real clinical practice and treatment results are very actual instruments for improving phthisiological practice and may be useful in the severe cases caused by the resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The methodology for gathering and structuring of useful information (critical clinical signals for decisions) is described. Additional coding of clinical diagnosis characteristics was implemented for numeric reflection of the personal situations. The created methodology for systematization and coding Clinical Events allowed to improve the clinical decision models for better clinical results.

  10. A service oriented approach for guidelines-based clinical decision support using BPMN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Aziz, Ayesha; Chatwin, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based medical practice requires that clinical guidelines need to be documented in such a way that they represent a clinical workflow in its most accessible form. In order to optimize clinical processes to improve clinical outcomes, we propose a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) based approach for implementing clinical guidelines that can be accessed from an Electronic Health Record (EHR) application with a Web Services enabled communication mechanism with the Enterprise Service Bus. We have used Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) for modelling and presenting the clinical pathway in the form of a workflow. The aim of this study is to produce spontaneous alerts in the healthcare workflow in the diagnosis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The use of BPMN as a tool to automate clinical guidelines has not been previously employed for providing Clinical Decision Support (CDS).

  11. Close Contact Casting vs Surgery for Initial Treatment of Unstable Ankle Fractures in Older Adults: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Keith; Keene, David J; Mistry, Dipesh; Nam, Julian; Tutton, Elizabeth; Handley, Robert; Morgan, Lesley; Roberts, Emma; Briggs, Andrew; Lall, Ranjit; Chesser, Timothy J S; Pallister, Ian; Lamb, Sarah E

    2016-10-11

    Ankle fractures cause substantial morbidity in older persons. Surgical fixation is the contemporary intervention but is associated with infection and other healing complications. To determine whether initial fracture treatment with close contact casting, a molded below-knee cast with minimal padding, offers outcome equivalent to that with immediate surgery, with fewer complications and less health resource use. This was a pragmatic, equivalence, randomized clinical trial with blinded outcome assessors. A pilot study commenced in May 2004, followed by multicenter recruitment from July 2010 to November 2013; follow-up was completed May 2014. Recruitment was from 24 UK major trauma centers and general hospitals. Participants were 620 adults older than 60 years with acute, overtly unstable ankle fracture. Exclusions were serious limb or concomitant disease or substantial cognitive impairment. Participants were randomly assigned to surgery (n = 309) or casting (n = 311). Casts were applied in the operating room under general or spinal anesthesia by a trained surgeon. The primary 6-month, per-protocol outcome was the Olerud-Molander Ankle Score at 6 months (OMAS; range, 0-100; higher scores indicate better outcomes and fewer symptoms), equivalence prespecified as ±6 points. Secondary outcomes were quality of life, pain, ankle motion, mobility, complications, health resource use, and patient satisfaction. Among 620 adults (mean age, 71 years; 460 [74%] women) who were randomized, 593 (96%) completed the study. Nearly all participants (579/620; 93%) received allocated treatment; 52 of 275 (19%) who initially received casting later converted to surgery, which was allowable in the casting treatment pathway to manage early loss of fracture reduction. At 6 months, casting resulted in ankle function equivalent to that with surgery (OMAS score, 66.0 [95% CI, 63.6-68.5] for surgery vs 64.5 [95% CI, 61.8-67.2] for casting; mean difference, -0.6 [95% CI, -3.9 to 2.6]; P

  12. Information management to enable personalized medicine: stakeholder roles in building clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Gregory J; Boyle, Scott N; Brinner, Kristin M; Osheroff, Jerome A

    2009-10-08

    Advances in technology and the scientific understanding of disease processes are presenting new opportunities to improve health through individualized approaches to patient management referred to as personalized medicine. Future health care strategies that deploy genomic technologies and molecular therapies will bring opportunities to prevent, predict, and pre-empt disease processes but will be dependent on knowledge management capabilities for health care providers that are not currently available. A key cornerstone to the potential application of this knowledge will be effective use of electronic health records. In particular, appropriate clinical use of genomic test results and molecularly-targeted therapies present important challenges in patient management that can be effectively addressed using electronic clinical decision support technologies. Approaches to shaping future health information needs for personalized medicine were undertaken by a work group of the American Health Information Community. A needs assessment for clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to support personalized medical practices was conducted to guide health future development activities. Further, a suggested action plan was developed for government, researchers and research institutions, developers of electronic information tools (including clinical guidelines, and quality measures), and standards development organizations to meet the needs for personalized approaches to medical practice. In this article, we focus these activities on stakeholder organizations as an operational framework to help identify and coordinate needs and opportunities for clinical decision support tools to enable personalized medicine. This perspective addresses conceptual approaches that can be undertaken to develop and apply clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to achieve personalized medical care. In addition, to represent meaningful benefits to personalized

  13. Information management to enable personalized medicine: stakeholder roles in building clinical decision support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinner Kristin M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in technology and the scientific understanding of disease processes are presenting new opportunities to improve health through individualized approaches to patient management referred to as personalized medicine. Future health care strategies that deploy genomic technologies and molecular therapies will bring opportunities to prevent, predict, and pre-empt disease processes but will be dependent on knowledge management capabilities for health care providers that are not currently available. A key cornerstone to the potential application of this knowledge will be effective use of electronic health records. In particular, appropriate clinical use of genomic test results and molecularly-targeted therapies present important challenges in patient management that can be effectively addressed using electronic clinical decision support technologies. Discussion Approaches to shaping future health information needs for personalized medicine were undertaken by a work group of the American Health Information Community. A needs assessment for clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to support personalized medical practices was conducted to guide health future development activities. Further, a suggested action plan was developed for government, researchers and research institutions, developers of electronic information tools (including clinical guidelines, and quality measures, and standards development organizations to meet the needs for personalized approaches to medical practice. In this article, we focus these activities on stakeholder organizations as an operational framework to help identify and coordinate needs and opportunities for clinical decision support tools to enable personalized medicine. Summary This perspective addresses conceptual approaches that can be undertaken to develop and apply clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to achieve personalized medical care. In

  14. Supporting open access to clinical trial data for researchers: The Duke Clinical Research Institute-Bristol-Myers Squibb Supporting Open Access to Researchers Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencina, Michael J; Louzao, Darcy M; McCourt, Brian J; Adams, Monique R; Tayyabkhan, Rehbar H; Ronco, Peter; Peterson, Eric D

    2016-02-01

    There are growing calls for sponsors to increase transparency by providing access to clinical trial data. In response, Bristol-Myers Squibb and the Duke Clinical Research Institute have collaborated on a new initiative, Supporting Open Access to Researchers. The aim is to facilitate open sharing of Bristol-Myers Squibb trial data with interested researchers. Key features of the Supporting Open Access to Researchers data sharing model include an independent review committee that ensures expert consideration of each proposal, stringent data deidentification/anonymization and protection of patient privacy, requirement of prespecified statistical analysis plans, and independent review of manuscripts before submission for publication. We believe that these approaches will promote open science by allowing investigators to verify trial results as well as to pursue interesting secondary uses of trial data without compromising scientific integrity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Close or renew? Factors affecting local community support for rebuilding nuclear power plants in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frantál, Bohumil; Malý, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 140, č. 140 (2017), s. 134-143 ISSN 0301-4215 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-04483S Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : nuclear power plants * rebuilding * community acceptance Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Cultural and economic geography Impact factor: 4.140, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421517300599

  16. Development of a Primary Care-Based Clinic to Support Adults With a History of Childhood Cancer: The Tactic Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholser, Linda S; Moss, Kerry M; Kilbourn, Kristin; Risendal, Betsy; Jones, Alison F; Greffe, Brian S; Garrington, Timothy; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; Yamashita, Traci E; Kutner, Jean S

    2015-01-01

    Describe the development and evolution of a primary-care-based, multidisciplinary clinic to support the ongoing care of adult survivors of childhood cancer. A consultative clinic for adult survivors of childhood cancer has been developed that is located in an adult, academic internal medicine setting and is based on a long-term follow-up clinic model available at Children's Hospital Colorado. The clinic opened in July 2008. One hundred thirty-five patients have been seen as of April 2014. Referrals and clinic capacity have gradually increased over time, and a template has been developed in the electronic medical record to help facilitate completion of individualized care plan letters. A primary care-based, multidisciplinary consultative clinic for adults with a history of childhood cancer survivor is feasible and actively engages adult primary care resources to provide risk-based care for long-term pediatric cancer survivors. This model of care planning can help support adult survivors of pediatric cancer and their primary care providers in non-academic, community settings as well. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The relationship of individual characteristics, perceived worksite support and perceived creativity to clinical nurses' innovative outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Liou, Shwu-Ru; Hsiao, Ya-Chu; Cheng, Ching-Yu

    2013-09-01

    To understand the relationship of individual characteristics, perceived worksite support and perceived personal creativity to clinical nurses' innovative outcome (receiving the Nursing Innovation Award). Since the idea of applying creativity and innovation to clinical nursing practice and management was first advocated in the Nursing Administration Quarterly in 1982, the topic of nursing innovation has gained worldwide attention. To increase the prevalence of nursing innovation, it is important to identify and understand the related factors that influence nurses' innovative outcome. This study used a cross-sectional descriptive survey design. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by 32 award winners and 506 nonawarded clinical nurses in Taiwan. The level of creativity perceived by all participants was moderate-to-high. Individual characteristics (r = 0·61) and worksite support (r = 0·27) were both correlated with perceived creativity. Individual characteristics and worksite support showed some correlation as well (r = 0·21). Individual characteristics and worksite support could predict perceived creativity after controlling for demographic variables, but only individual characteristics had an effect on innovative outcome. Perceived creativity did not have mediation effects either between individual characteristics and innovative outcome or between worksite support and innovative outcome. Clinical nurses' individual characteristics had a direct relationship to innovative outcome, whereas neither worksite support nor creativity was correlated with innovative outcome. Although worksite support did not show effects on innovative outcome, it was related to both perceived creativity and individual characteristics. As suggested by other scholars, there might be other related factors between creativity and innovative outcome. Although worksite support did not have effect on clinical nurses' innovative outcome, it was related to individual characteristics

  18. A Discussion of Oxygen Recovery Definitions and Key Performance Parameters for Closed-Loop Atmosphere Revitalization Life Support Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Perry, Jay L.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 55 years, NASA has evolved life support for crewed space exploration vehicles from simple resupply during Project Mercury to the complex and highly integrated system of systems aboard the International Space Station. As NASA targets exploration destinations farther from low Earth orbit and mission durations of 500 to 1000 days, life support systems must evolve to meet new requirements. In addition to having more robust, reliable, and maintainable hardware, limiting resupply becomes critical for managing mission logistics and cost. Supplying a crew with the basics of food, water, and oxygen become more challenging as the destination ventures further from Earth. Aboard ISS the Atmosphere Revitalization Subsystem (ARS) supplies the crew's oxygen demand by electrolyzing water. This approach makes water a primary logistics commodity that must be managed carefully. Chemical reduction of metabolic carbon dioxide (CO2) provides a method of recycling oxygen thereby reducing the net ARS water demand and therefore minimizing logistics needs. Multiple methods have been proposed to achieve this recovery and have been reported in the literature. However, depending on the architecture and the technology approach, "oxygen recovery" can be defined in various ways. This discontinuity makes it difficult to compare technologies directly. In an effort to clarify community discussions of Oxygen Recovery, we propose specific definitions and describe the methodology used to arrive at those definitions. Additionally, we discuss key performance parameters for Oxygen Recovery technology development including challenges with comparisons to state-of-the-art.

  19. Fluoroscopically guided closed reduction and internal fixation of fractures of the lateral portion of the humeral condyle: prospective clinical study of the technique and results in ten dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J L; Tomlinson, J L; Reed, A L

    1999-01-01

    To report a technique for fluoroscopically guided closed reduction with internal fixation of fractures of the lateral portion of the humeral condyle (FLHC) and determine the long-term results in 10 clinical cases. Prospective clinical case study. Ten dogs with 11 fractures. Fractures of the lateral portion of the humeral condyle were stabilized with transcondylar screws and Kirschner wires. Closed reduction and implant placement were achieved using intraoperative fluoroscopic guidance. After fracture repair, postoperative radiographs were evaluated for articular alignment and implant placement. Dogs were evaluated after surgery by means of lameness scores, elbow range of motion (ROM), radiographic assessment, and owner evaluation of function. Postoperative reduction was considered anatomic in 6 fractures with all other fractures having ROM values between affected and unaffected elbows. All of the dogs in this study regained 90-100% of full function, based on owner assessment. Fluoroscopic guidance for closed reduction and internal fixation of FLHC in dogs is an effective technique.

  20. Evaluating the Application and Applicability of Treatment Guidelines in Daily Clinical Practice. Closing the loop with the Euro Heart Survey programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Lenzen (Mattie)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe main research questions in this thesis correspond to those of the Netherlands Heart Foundation (NHF)-Health Care programme and were closely related to the aims of the Euro Heart Survey (EHS) programme, namely to evaluate to which extend every day clinical practice corresponds with

  1. Competing infant feeding information in mothers' networks: advice that supports v. undermines clinical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Sato; Lynn, Freda B; Williams, Natalie A; Schafer, Ellen J

    2016-05-01

    To identify the social contextual factors, specifically the presence of information that supports v. undermines clinical recommendations, associated with infant feeding behaviours among mothers in low-income areas. Cross-sectional survey evaluating social support networks and social relationships involved in providing care to the infant along with feeding beliefs and practices. Out-patient paediatric and government-funded (Women, Infants, and Children) clinics in an urban, low-income area of the south-eastern USA. Eighty-one low-income mothers of infants between 0 and 12 months old. Most mothers reported receiving both supportive and undermining advice. The presence of breast-feeding advice that supports clinical recommendations was associated with two infant feeding practices that are considered beneficial to infant health: ever breast-feeding (OR=6·7; 95% CI 1·2, 38·1) and not adding cereal in the infant's bottle (OR=15·9; 95% CI 1·1, 227·4). Advice that undermines clinical recommendations to breast-feed and advice about solid foods were not associated with these behaviours. Efforts to facilitate optimal infant feeding practices may focus on increasing information supportive of clinical recommendations while concentrating less on reducing the presence of undermining information within mothers' networks. Cultural norms around breast-feeding may be stronger than the cultural norms around the introduction of solid foods in mothers' social environments; thus, additional efforts to increase information regarding introduction of solid foods earlier in mothers' infant care career may be beneficial.

  2. A clinical study of space closure with nickel-titanium closed coil springs and an elastic module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, R H; Rudge, S J; Mair, L H

    1998-07-01

    A previous study has shown that a 150-gram nickel-titanium closed coil spring (Sentalloy, GAC International Inc.) closed spaces more quickly and more consistently than an elastic module (Alastik, Unitec/3M). This study used the same friction sensitive sliding mechanics of pitting the six anterior teeth against the second bicuspid and first molars, to examine the rate of space closure of 100-gram and 200-gram nickel-titanium closed coil springs. The results for the three springs and elastic module were compared. The nickel-titanium closed coil springs produced a more consistent space closure than the elastic module. The 150- and 200-gram springs produced a faster rate of space closure than the elastic module or the 100-gram spring. No significant difference was noted between the rates of closure for the 150- and the 200-gram springs.

  3. Usability of clinical decision support system as a facilitator for learning the assistive technology adaptation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danial-Saad, Alexandra; Kuflik, Tsvi; Weiss, Patrice L Tamar; Schreuer, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usability of Ontology Supported Computerized Assistive Technology Recommender (OSCAR), a Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) for the assistive technology adaptation process, its impact on learning the matching process, and to determine the relationship between its usability and learnability. Two groups of expert and novice clinicians (total, n = 26) took part in this study. Each group filled out system usability scale (SUS) to evaluate OSCAR's usability. The novice group completed a learning questionnaire to assess OSCAR's effect on their ability to learn the matching process. Both groups rated OSCAR's usability as "very good", (M [SUS] = 80.7, SD = 11.6, median = 83.7) by the novices, and (M [SUS] = 81.2, SD = 6.8, median = 81.2) by the experts. The Mann-Whitney results indicated that no significant differences were found between the expert and novice groups in terms of OSCAR's usability. A significant positive correlation existed between the usability of OSCAR and the ability to learn the adaptation process (rs = 0.46, p = 0.04). Usability is an important factor in the acceptance of a system. The successful application of user-centered design principles during the development of OSCAR may serve as a case study that models the significant elements to be considered, theoretically and practically in developing other systems. Implications for Rehabilitation Creating a CDSS with a focus on its usability is an important factor for its acceptance by its users. Successful usability outcomes can impact the learning process of the subject matter in general, and the AT prescription process in particular. The successful application of User-Centered Design principles during the development of OSCAR may serve as a case study that models the significant elements to be considered, theoretically and practically. The study emphasizes the importance of close collaboration between the developers and

  4. A task-based support architecture for developing point-of-care clinical decision support systems for the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, S; Michalowski, W; O'Sullivan, D; Farion, K; Sayyad-Shirabad, J; Kuziemsky, C; Kukawka, B

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a task-based support architecture for developing clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) that assist physicians in making decisions at the point-of-care in the emergency department (ED). The backbone of the proposed architecture was established by a task-based emergency workflow model for a patient-physician encounter. The architecture was designed according to an agent-oriented paradigm. Specifically, we used the O-MaSE (Organization-based Multi-agent System Engineering) method that allows for iterative translation of functional requirements into architectural components (e.g., agents). The agent-oriented paradigm was extended with ontology-driven design to implement ontological models representing knowledge required by specific agents to operate. The task-based architecture allows for the creation of a CDSS that is aligned with the task-based emergency workflow model. It facilitates decoupling of executable components (agents) from embedded domain knowledge (ontological models), thus supporting their interoperability, sharing, and reuse. The generic architecture was implemented as a pilot system, MET3-AE--a CDSS to help with the management of pediatric asthma exacerbation in the ED. The system was evaluated in a hospital ED. The architecture allows for the creation of a CDSS that integrates support for all tasks from the task-based emergency workflow model, and interacts with hospital information systems. Proposed architecture also allows for reusing and sharing system components and knowledge across disease-specific CDSSs.

  5. [A computerised clinical decision-support system for the management of depression in Primary Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonès, Enric; Comín, Eva; Cavero, Myriam; Pérez, Víctor; Molina, Cristina; Palao, Diego

    Despite its clinical relevance and its importance as a public health problem, there are major gaps in the management of depression. Evidence-based clinical guidelines are useful to improve processes and clinical outcomes. In order to make their implementation easier these guidelines have been transformed into computerised clinical decision support systems. In this article, a description is presented on the basics and characteristics of a new computerised clinical guideline for the management of major depression, developed in the public health system in Catalonia. This tool helps the clinician to establish reliable and accurate diagnoses of depression, to choose the best treatment a priori according to the disease and the patient characteristics. It also emphasises the importance of systematic monitoring to assess the clinical course, and to adjust therapeutic interventions to the patient's needs at all times. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Electronic health record tools' support of nurses' clinical judgment and team communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossman, Susan P; Bonney, Leigh Ann; Kim, Myoung Jin

    2013-11-01

    Nurses need to quickly process information to form clinical judgments, communicate with the healthcare team, and guide optimal patient care. Electronic health records not only offer potential for enhanced care but also introduce unintended consequences through changes in workflow, clinical judgment, and communication. We investigated nurses' use of improvised (self-made) and electronic health record-generated cognitive artifacts on clinical judgment and team communication. Tanner's Clinical Judgment Model provided a framework and basis for questions in an online survey and focus group interviews. Findings indicated that (1) nurses rated self-made work lists and medication administration records highest for both clinical judgment and communication, (2) tools aided different dimensions of clinical judgment, and (3) interdisciplinary tools enhance team communication. Implications are that electronic health record tool redesign could better support nursing work.

  7. Pilot study of a point-of-use decision support tool for cancer clinical trials eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitfeld, P P; Weisburd, M; Overhage, J M; Sledge, G; Tierney, W M

    1999-01-01

    Many adults with cancer are not enrolled in clinical trials because caregivers do not have the time to match the patient's clinical findings with varying eligibility criteria associated with multiple trials for which the patient might be eligible. The authors developed a point-of-use portable decision support tool (DS-TRIEL) to automate this matching process. The support tool consists of a hand-held computer with a programmable relational database. A two-level hierarchic decision framework was used for the identification of eligible subjects for two open breast cancer clinical trials. The hand-held computer also provides protocol consent forms and schemas to further help the busy oncologist. This decision support tool and the decision framework on which it is based could be used for multiple trials and different cancer sites.

  8. Closing the Gap: Communicating to Change Gardening Practices in Support of Native Biodiversity in Urban Private Gardens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda M. van Heezik

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Private gardens collectively comprise the largest green space in most cities and the greatest potential for increasing the extent of wildlife-friendly and native-dominated habitat, improving the quality of ecosystem services, and providing opportunities for urban dwellers to reconnect with nature. Because attitudes and values driving landscape preferences in gardens are complex and often not conducive to biodiversity, and a gap exists between the possession of knowledge or values and the expression of pro-environmental behavior, facilitating change in gardening behavior is challenging. We attempted to improve knowledge and influence values, attitudes, and gardening behavior of 55 householders in favor of native biodiversity and environmentally friendly practices, through a two-way communication process, or interactive dialog, during a process of biodiversity documentation of their gardens. Informative feedback on their garden with a normative component was also provided. Despite being well educated and knowledgeable about common species at the start of the study, an increase in knowledge and shift in attitude was detected in 64% of householders: 40% reported a greater understanding of wildlife, and 26% made changes in their gardens, 13% to support native biodiversity. The normative component of our feedback information was of particular interest to 20% of householders. Because neighborhood norms influence gardening practices, changes adopted by a proportion of householders should be perpetuated across neighborhoods. The process of biodiversity assessment, dialog, and feedback was effective in improving knowledge of wildlife and native species, and stimulated a shift in attitude that resulted in native-friendly gardening practices. These changes were detected primarily through open self-report questions, rather than quantitative measures.

  9. Line-depth-ratio temperatures for the close binary ν Octantis: new evidence supporting the conjectured circumstellar retrograde planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm, D. J.

    2015-06-01

    We explore the possibly that either star-spots or pulsations are the cause of a periodic radial velocity (RV) signal (P ˜ 400 d) from the K-giant binary ν Octantis (P ˜ 1050 d, e ˜ 0.25), alternatively conjectured to have a retrograde planet. Our study is based on temperatures derived from 22 line-depth ratios (LDRs) for ν Oct and 20 calibration stars. Empirical evidence and stability modelling provide unexpected support for the planet since other standard explanations (star-spots, pulsations and additional stellar masses) each have credibility problems. However, the proposed system presents formidable challenges to planet formation and stability theories: it has by far the smallest stellar separation of any claimed planet-harbouring binary (a_{_bin} ˜ 2.6 au) and an equally unbelievable separation ratio (a_{_pl}/a_{_bin} ˜ 0.5), hence the necessity that the circumstellar orbit be retrograde. The LDR analysis of 215 ν Oct spectra acquired between 2001 and 2007, from which the RV perturbation was first revealed, have no significant periodicity at any frequency. The LDRs recover the original 21 stellar temperatures with an average accuracy of 45 ± 25 K. The 215 ν Oct temperatures have a standard deviation of only 4.2 K. Assuming the host primary is not pulsating, the temperatures converted to magnitude differences strikingly mimic the very stable photometric Hipparcos observations 15 years previously, implying the long-term stability of the star and demonstrating a novel use of LDRs as a photometric gauge. Our results provide substantial new evidence that conventional star-spots and pulsations are unlikely causes of the RV perturbation. The controversial system deserves continued attention, including with higher resolving-power spectra for bisector and LDR analyses.

  10. Knowledge bases, clinical decision support systems, and rapid learning in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peter Paul

    2015-03-01

    One of the most important benefits of health information technology is to assist the cognitive process of the human mind in the face of vast amounts of health data, limited time for decision making, and the complexity of the patient with cancer. Clinical decision support tools are frequently cited as a technologic solution to this problem, but to date useful clinical decision support systems (CDSS) have been limited in utility and implementation. This article describes three unique sources of health data that underlie fundamentally different types of knowledge bases which feed into CDSS. CDSS themselves comprise a variety of models which are discussed. The relationship of knowledge bases and CDSS to rapid learning health systems design is critical as CDSS are essential drivers of rapid learning in clinical care. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  11. Promoting Good Clinical Laboratory Practices and Laboratory Accreditation to Support Clinical Trials in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shott, Joseph P.; Saye, Renion; Diakité, Moussa L.; Sanogo, Sintry; Dembele, Moussa B.; Keita, Sekouba; Nagel, Mary C.; Ellis, Ruth D.; Aebig, Joan A.; Diallo, Dapa A.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory capacity in the developing world frequently lacks quality management systems (QMS) such as good clinical laboratory practices, proper safety precautions, and adequate facilities; impacting the ability to conduct biomedical research where it is needed most. As the regulatory climate changes globally, higher quality laboratory support is needed to protect study volunteers and to accurately assess biological parameters. The University of Bamako and its partners have undertaken a comprehensive QMS plan to improve quality and productivity using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute standards and guidelines. The clinical laboratory passed the College of American Pathologists inspection in April 2010, and received full accreditation in June 2010. Our efforts to implement high-quality standards have been valuable for evaluating safety and immunogenicity of malaria vaccine candidates in Mali. Other disease-specific research groups in resource-limited settings may benefit by incorporating similar training initiatives, QMS methods, and continual improvement practices to ensure best practices. PMID:22492138

  12. A pilot study of distributed knowledge management and clinical decision support in the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Brian E; Simonaitis, Linas; Goldberg, Howard S; Paterno, Marilyn D; Schaeffer, Molly; Hongsermeier, Tonya; Wright, Adam; Middleton, Blackford

    2013-09-01

    Implement and perform pilot testing of web-based clinical decision support services using a novel framework for creating and managing clinical knowledge in a distributed fashion using the cloud. The pilot sought to (1) develop and test connectivity to an external clinical decision support (CDS) service, (2) assess the exchange of data to and knowledge from the external CDS service, and (3) capture lessons to guide expansion to more practice sites and users. The Clinical Decision Support Consortium created a repository of shared CDS knowledge for managing hypertension, diabetes, and coronary artery disease in a community cloud hosted by Partners HealthCare. A limited data set for primary care patients at a separate health system was securely transmitted to a CDS rules engine hosted in the cloud. Preventive care reminders triggered by the limited data set were returned for display to clinician end users for review and display. During a pilot study, we (1) monitored connectivity and system performance, (2) studied the exchange of data and decision support reminders between the two health systems, and (3) captured lessons. During the six month pilot study, there were 1339 patient encounters in which information was successfully exchanged. Preventive care reminders were displayed during 57% of patient visits, most often reminding physicians to monitor blood pressure for hypertensive patients (29%) and order eye exams for patients with diabetes (28%). Lessons learned were grouped into five themes: performance, governance, semantic interoperability, ongoing adjustments, and usability. Remote, asynchronous cloud-based decision support performed reasonably well, although issues concerning governance, semantic interoperability, and usability remain key challenges for successful adoption and use of cloud-based CDS that will require collaboration between biomedical informatics and computer science disciplines. Decision support in the cloud is feasible and may be a reasonable

  13. Big Data as a Driver for Clinical Decision Support Systems: A Learning Health Systems Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Dagliati

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Big data technologies are nowadays providing health care with powerful instruments to gather and analyze large volumes of heterogeneous data collected for different purposes, including clinical care, administration, and research. This makes possible to design IT infrastructures that favor the implementation of the so-called “Learning Healthcare System Cycle,” where healthcare practice and research are part of a unique and synergic process. In this paper we highlight how “Big Data enabled” integrated data collections may support clinical decision-making together with biomedical research. Two effective implementations are reported, concerning decision support in Diabetes and in Inherited Arrhythmogenic Diseases.

  14. Micro-costing the provision of emotional support and information in UK eye clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie-Gallery, Hanna; Subramanian, Ahalya; Conway, Miriam L

    2013-11-19

    Sight loss has wide ranging implications for an individual in terms of education, employment, mobility and mental health. Therefore there is a need for information and support to be provided in eye clinics at the point of diagnosis of sight threatening conditions, but these aspects of care are often missing from clinics. To meet these needs, some clinics employ an Eye Clinic Liaison Officer (ECLO) but the position has yet to be widely implemented. The aims of this study were:(1) To evaluate the forms of advice and emotional support in eye clinics provided by ECLOs.(2) To determine the cost of the ECLO service per patient. Micro-costing was carried out using interviews, a survey and administrative data. The survey was completed by 18 of the 49 accredited ECLOs in the UK (37%) and provided information on the activities performed by ECLOs, numbers of patients seen per day, training costs incurred and the salary of the ECLOs. ECLOs provided information about the services in eye clinics and the community, referral to social services, emotional support to patients and also other advice. The cost of an ECLO per patient per contact was £17.94 based on an average annual ECLO salary of £23,349.60 per year, reviewing on average 9.1 patients per day, in a 42 week year. This study provides the first costing of support services in hospital eye clinics, providing a range of estimates to suit the circumstances of different clinics. The information can be used by local decision makers to estimate the cost of implementing an ECLO service.

  15. Human factor observations of the Biosphere 2, 1991-1993, closed life support human experiment and its application to a long-term manned mission to Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alling, Abigail; Nelson, Mark; Silverstone, Sally; Van Thillo, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Human factors are a key component to the success of long-term space missions such as those necessitated by the human exploration of Mars and the development of bioregenerative and eventually self-sufficient life support systems for permanent space outposts. Observations by participants living inside the 1991-1993 Biosphere 2 closed system experiment provide the following insights. (1) Crew members should be involved in the design and construction of their life support systems to gain maximum knowledge about the systems. (2) Individuals living in closed life support systems should expect a process of physiological and psychological adaptation to their new environment. (3) Far from simply being a workplace, the participants in such extended missions will discover the importance of creating a cohesive and satisfying life style. (4) The crew will be dependent on the use of varied crops to create satisfying cuisine, a social life with sufficient outlets of expression such as art and music, and to have down-time from purely task-driven work. (5) The success of the Biosphere 2 first 2-year mission suggests that crews with high cultural diversity, high commitment to task, and work democracy principles for individual responsibility may increase the probability of both mission success and personal satisfaction. (6) Remaining challenges are many, including the need for far more comprehensive real-time modeling and information systems (a "cybersphere") operating to provide real-time data necessary for decision-making in a complex life support system. (7) And, the aim will be to create a noosphere, or sphere of intelligence, where the people and their living systems are in sustainable balance.

  16. The NIAID Division of AIDS enterprise information system: integrated decision support for global clinical research programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nitin; Varghese, Suresh; Virkar, Hemant

    2011-01-01

    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Division of AIDS (DAIDS) Enterprise Information System (DAIDS-ES) is a web-based system that supports NIAID in the scientific, strategic, and tactical management of its global clinical research programs for HIV/AIDS vaccines, prevention, and therapeutics. Different from most commercial clinical trials information systems, which are typically protocol-driven, the DAIDS-ES was built to exchange information with those types of systems and integrate it in ways that help scientific program directors lead the research effort and keep pace with the complex and ever-changing global HIV/AIDS pandemic. Whereas commercially available clinical trials support systems are not usually disease-focused, DAIDS-ES was specifically designed to capture and incorporate unique scientific, demographic, and logistical aspects of HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, and vaccine research in order to provide a rich source of information to guide informed decision-making. Sharing data across its internal components and with external systems, using defined vocabularies, open standards and flexible interfaces, the DAIDS-ES enables NIAID, its global collaborators and stakeholders, access to timely, quality information about NIAID-supported clinical trials which is utilized to: (1) analyze the research portfolio, assess capacity, identify opportunities, and avoid redundancies; (2) help support study safety, quality, ethics, and regulatory compliance; (3) conduct evidence-based policy analysis and business process re-engineering for improved efficiency. This report summarizes how the DAIDS-ES was conceptualized, how it differs from typical clinical trial support systems, the rationale for key design choices, and examples of how it is being used to advance the efficiency and effectiveness of NIAID's HIV/AIDS clinical research programs. PMID:21816958

  17. Formative Evaluation of Clinician Experience with Integrating Family History-Based Clinical Decision Support into Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Doerr

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Family health history is a leading predictor of disease risk. Nonetheless, it is underutilized to guide care and, therefore, is ripe for health information technology intervention. To fill the family health history practice gap, Cleveland Clinic has developed a family health history collection and clinical decision support tool, MyFamily. This report describes the impact and process of implementing MyFamily into primary care, cancer survivorship and cancer genetics clinics. Ten providers participated in semi-structured interviews that were analyzed to identify opportunities for process improvement. Participants universally noted positive effects on patient care, including increases in quality, personalization of care and patient engagement. The impact on clinical workflow varied by practice setting, with differences observed in the ease of integration and the use of specific report elements. Tension between the length of the report and desired detail was appreciated. Barriers and facilitators to the process of implementation were noted, dominated by the theme of increased integration with the electronic medical record. These results fed real-time improvement cycles to reinforce clinician use. This model will be applied in future institutional efforts to integrate clinical genomic applications into practice and may be useful for other institutions considering the implementation of tools for personalizing medical management.

  18. Integrating complex business processes for knowledge-driven clinical decision support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaleswaran, Rishikesan; McGregor, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents in detail the component of the Complex Business Process for Stream Processing framework that is responsible for integrating complex business processes to enable knowledge-driven Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) recommendations. CDSSs aid the clinician in supporting the care of patients by providing accurate data analysis and evidence-based recommendations. However, the incorporation of a dynamic knowledge-management system that supports the definition and enactment of complex business processes and real-time data streams has not been researched. In this paper we discuss the process web service as an innovative method of providing contextual information to a real-time data stream processing CDSS.

  19. Animal protein production modules in biological life support systems: Novel combined aquaculture techniques based on the closed equilibrated biological aquatic system (C.E.B.A.S.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blüm, V.; Andriske, M.; Kreuzberg, K.; Schreibman, M. P.

    Based on the experiences made with the Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System (C.E.B.A.S.) which was primarily deveoloped for long-term and multi-generation experiments with aquatic animals and plants in a space station highly effective fresh water recycling modules were elaborated utilizing a combination of ammonia oxidizing bacteria filters and higher plants. These exhibit a high effectivity to eliminate phosphate and anorganic nitrogen compounds and arc. in addidition. able to contribute to the oxygen supply of the aquatic animals. The C.E.B.A.S. filter system is able to keep a closed artificial aquatic ecosystem containing teleost fishes and water snails biologically stable for several month and to eliminate waste products deriving from degraded dead fishes without a decrease of the oxygen concentration down to less than 3.5 mg/l at 25 °C. More advanced C.E.B.A.S. filter systems, the BIOCURE filters, were also developed for utilization in semiintensive and intensive aquaculture systems for fishes. In fact such combined animal-plant aquaculture systems represent highly effective productions sites for human food if proper plant and fish species are selected The present papers elucidates ways to novel aquaculture systems in which herbivorous fishes are raised by feeding them with plant biomass produced in the BIOCURE filters and presents the scheme of a modification which utilizes a plant species suitable also for human nutrition. Special attention is paid to the benefits of closed aquaculture system modules which may be integrated into bioregenerative life support systems of a higher complexity for, e. g.. lunar or planetary bases including some psychologiccal aspects of the introduction of animal protein production into plant-based life support systems. Moreover, the basic reproductive biological problems of aquatic animal breeding under reduced gravity are explained leading to a disposition of essential research programs in this context.

  20. Development of traditional Chinese medicine clinical data warehouse for medical knowledge discovery and decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuezhong; Chen, Shibo; Liu, Baoyan; Zhang, Runsun; Wang, Yinghui; Li, Ping; Guo, Yufeng; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Zhuye; Yan, Xiufeng

    2010-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a scientific discipline, which develops the related theories from the long-term clinical practices. The large-scale clinical data are the core empirical knowledge source for TCM research. This paper introduces a clinical data warehouse (CDW) system, which incorporates the structured electronic medical record (SEMR) data for medical knowledge discovery and TCM clinical decision support (CDS). We have developed the clinical reference information model (RIM) and physical data model to manage the various information entities and their relationships in TCM clinical data. An extraction-transformation-loading (ETL) tool is implemented to integrate and normalize the clinical data from different operational data sources. The CDW includes online analytical processing (OLAP) and complex network analysis (CNA) components to explore the various clinical relationships. Furthermore, the data mining and CNA methods are used to discover the valuable clinical knowledge from the data. The CDW has integrated 20,000 TCM inpatient data and 20,000 outpatient data, which contains manifestations (e.g. symptoms, physical examinations and laboratory test results), diagnoses and prescriptions as the main information components. We propose a practical solution to accomplish the large-scale clinical data integration and preprocessing tasks. Meanwhile, we have developed over 400 OLAP reports to enable the multidimensional analysis of clinical data and the case-based CDS. We have successfully conducted several interesting data mining applications. Particularly, we use various classification methods, namely support vector machine, decision tree and Bayesian network, to discover the knowledge of syndrome differentiation. Furthermore, we have applied association rule and CNA to extract the useful acupuncture point and herb combination patterns from the clinical prescriptions. A CDW system consisting of TCM clinical RIM, ETL, OLAP and data mining as the core

  1. Implicit and explicit clinical ethics support in The Netherlands: a mixed methods overview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dauwerse, L.; Weidema, F.C.; Abma, T.; Molewijk, A.C.; Widdershoven, G.

    2014-01-01

    Internationally, the prevalence of clinical ethics support (CES) in health care has increased over the years. Previous research on CES focused primarily on ethics committees and ethics consultation, mostly within the context of hospital care. The purpose of this article is to investigate the

  2. Towards meaningful medication-related clinical decision support: recommendations for an initial implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phansalkar, S; Wright, A; Kuperman, G J; Vaida, A J; Bobb, A M; Jenders, R A; Payne, T H; Halamka, J; Bloomrosen, M; Bates, D W

    2011-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) can improve safety, quality, and cost-effectiveness of patient care, especially when implemented in computerized provider order entry (CPOE) applications. Medication-related decision support logic forms a large component of the CDS logic in any CPOE system. However, organizations wishing to implement CDS must either purchase the computable clinical content or develop it themselves. Content provided by vendors does not always meet local expectations. Most organizations lack the resources to customize the clinical content and the expertise to implement it effectively. In this paper, we describe the recommendations of a national expert panel on two basic medication-related CDS areas, specifically, drug-drug interaction (DDI) checking and duplicate therapy checking. The goals of this study were to define a starter set of medication-related alerts that healthcare organizations can implement in their clinical information systems. We also draw on the experiences of diverse institutions to highlight the realities of implementing medication decision support. These findings represent the experiences of institutions with a long history in the domain of medication decision support, and the hope is that this guidance may improve the feasibility and efficiency CDS adoption across healthcare settings.

  3. Doing the right things and doing things right : inpatient drug surveillance assisted by clinical decision support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmons, Pieter J.; Suijkerbuijk, Bas O.; Nannan Panday, Prashant V.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.

    Increased budget constraints and a continuous focus on improved quality require an efficient inpatient drug surveillance process. We describe a hospital-wide drug surveillance strategy consisting of a multidisciplinary evaluation of drug surveillance activities and using clinical decision support to

  4. Bayesian networks for clinical decision support: A rational approach to dynamic decision-making under uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerven, M.A.J. van

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation deals with decision support in the context of clinical oncology. (Dynamic) Bayesian networks are used as a framework for (dynamic) decision-making under uncertainty and applied to a variety of diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment problems in medicine. It is shown that the proposed

  5. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  6. Theory and practice of clinical ethics support services: narrative and hermeneutical perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porz, R.; Landeweer, E.G.M.; Widdershoven, G.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce narrative and hermeneutical perspectives to clinical ethics support services (CESS). We propose a threefold consideration of 'theory' and show how it is interwoven with 'practice' as we go along. First, we look at theory in its foundational role: in our case 'narrative

  7. Designing and Implementing a Mentoring Program to Support Clinically-Based Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, John E.; Gut, Dianne; Beam, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    This article describes one teacher preparation program's approach to designing and implementing a mentoring program to support clinically-based teacher education. The design for the program is based on an interview study that compared the mentoring experiences of 18 teachers across three different contexts: student teaching, early field…

  8. Interoperability of clinical decision-support systems and electronic health records using archetypes: a case study in clinical trial eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Mar; Maldonado, Jose A; Martínez-Salvador, Begoña; Boscá, Diego; Robles, Montserrat

    2013-08-01

    Clinical decision-support systems (CDSSs) comprise systems as diverse as sophisticated platforms to store and manage clinical data, tools to alert clinicians of problematic situations, or decision-making tools to assist clinicians. Irrespective of the kind of decision-support task CDSSs should be smoothly integrated within the clinical information system, interacting with other components, in particular with the electronic health record (EHR). However, despite decades of developments, most CDSSs lack interoperability features. We deal with the interoperability problem of CDSSs and EHRs by exploiting the dual-model methodology. This methodology distinguishes a reference model and archetypes. A reference model is represented by a stable and small object-oriented model that describes the generic properties of health record information. For their part, archetypes are reusable and domain-specific definitions of clinical concepts in the form of structured and constrained combinations of the entities of the reference model. We rely on archetypes to make the CDSS compatible with EHRs from different institutions. Concretely, we use archetypes for modelling the clinical concepts that the CDSS requires, in conjunction with a series of knowledge-intensive mappings relating the archetypes to the data sources (EHR and/or other archetypes) they depend on. We introduce a comprehensive approach, including a set of tools as well as methodological guidelines, to deal with the interoperability of CDSSs and EHRs based on archetypes. Archetypes are used to build a conceptual layer of the kind of a virtual health record (VHR) over the EHR whose contents need to be integrated and used in the CDSS, associating them with structural and terminology-based semantics. Subsequently, the archetypes are mapped to the EHR by means of an expressive mapping language and specific-purpose tools. We also describe a case study where the tools and methodology have been employed in a CDSS to support

  9. Developing an Interactive Data Visualization Tool to Assess the Impact of Decision Support on Clinical Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Timothy C; Krishnaraj, Arun; Monaghan, Dayna; Gaskin, Cree M

    2018-05-18

    Due to mandates from recent legislation, clinical decision support (CDS) software is being adopted by radiology practices across the country. This software provides imaging study decision support for referring providers at the point of order entry. CDS systems produce a large volume of data, providing opportunities for research and quality improvement. In order to better visualize and analyze trends in this data, an interactive data visualization dashboard was created using a commercially available data visualization platform. Following the integration of a commercially available clinical decision support product into the electronic health record, a dashboard was created using a commercially available data visualization platform (Tableau, Seattle, WA). Data generated by the CDS were exported from the data warehouse, where they were stored, into the platform. This allowed for real-time visualization of the data generated by the decision support software. The creation of the dashboard allowed the output from the CDS platform to be more easily analyzed and facilitated hypothesis generation. Integrating data visualization tools into clinical decision support tools allows for easier data analysis and can streamline research and quality improvement efforts.

  10. Attachment-based family therapy for depressed and suicidal adolescents: theory, clinical model and empirical support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, E Stephanie Krauthamer; Diamond, Guy; Levy, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Attachment-Based Family Therapy (ABFT) is a manualized family-based intervention designed for working with depressed adolescents, including those at risk for suicide, and their families. It is an empirically informed and supported treatment. ABFT has its theoretical underpinnings in attachment theory and clinical roots in structural family therapy and emotion focused therapies. ABFT relies on a transactional model that aims to transform the quality of adolescent-parent attachment, as a means of providing the adolescent with a more secure relationship that can support them during challenging times generally, and the crises related to suicidal thinking and behavior, specifically. This article reviews: (1) the theoretical foundations of ABFT (attachment theory, models of emotional development); (2) the ABFT clinical model, including training and supervision factors; and (3) empirical support.

  11. Mobile clinical decision support systems and applications: a literature and commercial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Sainz-de-Abajo, Beatriz; Robles, Montserrat; García-Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The latest advances in eHealth and mHealth have propitiated the rapidly creation and expansion of mobile applications for health care. One of these types of applications are the clinical decision support systems, which nowadays are being implemented in mobile apps to facilitate the access to health care professionals in their daily clinical decisions. The aim of this paper is twofold. Firstly, to make a review of the current systems available in the literature and in commercial stores. Secondly, to analyze a sample of applications in order to obtain some conclusions and recommendations. Two reviews have been done: a literature review on Scopus, IEEE Xplore, Web of Knowledge and PubMed and a commercial review on Google play and the App Store. Five applications from each review have been selected to develop an in-depth analysis and to obtain more information about the mobile clinical decision support systems. Ninety-two relevant papers and 192 commercial apps were found. Forty-four papers were focused only on mobile clinical decision support systems. One hundred seventy-one apps were available on Google play and 21 on the App Store. The apps are designed for general medicine and 37 different specialties, with some features common in all of them despite of the different medical fields objective. The number of mobile clinical decision support applications and their inclusion in clinical practices has risen in the last years. However, developers must be careful with their interface or the easiness of use, which can impoverish the experience of the users.

  12. Sources of variation in primary care clinical workflow: implications for the design of cognitive support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militello, Laura G; Arbuckle, Nicole B; Saleem, Jason J; Patterson, Emily; Flanagan, Mindy; Haggstrom, David; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2014-03-01

    This article identifies sources of variation in clinical workflow and implications for the design and implementation of electronic clinical decision support. Sources of variation in workflow were identified via rapid ethnographic observation, focus groups, and interviews across a total of eight medical centers in both the Veterans Health Administration and academic medical centers nationally regarded as leaders in developing and using clinical decision support. Data were reviewed for types of variability within the social and technical subsystems and the external environment as described in the sociotechnical systems theory. Two researchers independently identified examples of variation and their sources, and then met with each other to discuss them until consensus was reached. Sources of variation were categorized as environmental (clinic staffing and clinic pace), social (perception of health information technology and real-time use with patients), or technical (computer access and information access). Examples of sources of variation within each of the categories are described and discussed in terms of impact on clinical workflow. As technologies are implemented, barriers to use become visible over time as users struggle to adapt workflow and work practices to accommodate new technologies. Each source of variability identified has implications for the effective design and implementation of useful health information technology. Accommodating moderate variability in workflow is anticipated to avoid brittle and inflexible workflow designs, while also avoiding unnecessary complexity for implementers and users.

  13. Sensor-based supporting mobile system Parkinson disease clinical tests utilising biomedical and RFID technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chmielewski Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses method and tool for assisting clinical tests of pharmaceutical drugs utilising sensors and mobile technologies. Emerging sensor and mobile technologies deliver new opportunities to gather and process medical data. Presented analytical approach implements such observations and delivers new, convenient means for remote patient monitoring. Clinical tests are highly specialised process requiring methodology and tools to support such research. Currently available methods rely mostly on analogue approach (booklets, requiring the clinical test participant to fill in health state daily. Such approach often can be biased by unpunctual, not precise reporting. The mobile device can support this process by automatic scheduling and recording an actual time of reports and most of all it can record the inertial and biometric sensor data during the survey process. Presented analytical method (tremors recognition and mobile tool offers consistent approach to clinical test assistance transforming and Android smartphone into remote reporting and notification tool. The tool offers additionally features for sensor based diagnostics support for PD tremor recognition as well as specific clonic and tonic symptoms (dedicated for further system extensions towards epilepsy. Capabilities of the system delivers also RFID mechanisms for efficient on-site clinical test authorisation and configuration. This feature simplifies application installation and automatic set-up considering the participant, clinical test configuration, schedule, smartphone and sensor data. Such a composition delivers convenient and reliable tool which can assist patients and medical staff during the process objectifying the clinical tests results and helping to ensure good quality of the data, quickly available and easily accessible.

  14. Depression, social support, and clinical outcomes following lung transplantation: a single-center cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrick J; Snyder, Laurie D; Palmer, Scott M; Hoffman, Benson M; Stonerock, Gregory L; Ingle, Krista K; Saulino, Caroline K; Blumenthal, James A

    2018-05-01

    Depressive symptoms are common among lung transplant candidates and have been associated with poorer clinical outcomes in some studies. Previous studies have been plagued by methodologic problems, including small sample sizes, few clinical events, and uncontrolled confounders, particularly perioperative complications. In addition, few studies have examined social support as a potential protective factor. We therefore examined the association between pretransplant depressive symptoms, social support, and mortality in a large sample of lung transplant recipients. As a secondary aim, we also examined the associations between psychosocial factors, perioperative outcomes [indexed by hospital length of stay (LOS)], and mortality. We hypothesized that depression would be associated with longer LOS and that the association between depression, social support, and mortality would be moderated by LOS. Participants included lung transplant recipients, transplanted at Duke University Medical Center from January 2009 to December 2014. Depressive symptoms were evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and social support using the Perceived Social Support Scale (PSSS). Medical risk factors included forced vital capacity (FVC), partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO 2 ), donor age, acute rejection, and transplant type. Functional status was assessed using six-minute walk distance (6MWD). We also controlled for demographic factors, including age, gender, and native disease. Transplant hospitalization LOS was examined as a marker of perioperative clinical outcomes. Participants included 273 lung recipients (174 restrictive, 67 obstructive, 26 cystic fibrosis, and six "other"). Pretransplant depressive symptoms were common, with 56 participants (21%) exhibiting clinically elevated levels (BDI-II ≥ 14). Greater depressive symptoms were associated with longer LOS [adjusted b = 0.20 (2 days per 7-point higher BDI-II score), P social support (P social support were

  15. A First Step towards a Clinical Decision Support System for Post-traumatic Stress Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sisi; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R; Wang, Xuya; Fenyö, David; Shalev, Arieh Y

    2016-01-01

    PTSD is distressful and debilitating, following a non-remitting course in about 10% to 20% of trauma survivors. Numerous risk indicators of PTSD have been identified, but individual level prediction remains elusive. As an effort to bridge the gap between scientific discovery and practical application, we designed and implemented a clinical decision support pipeline to provide clinically relevant recommendation for trauma survivors. To meet the specific challenge of early prediction, this work uses data obtained within ten days of a traumatic event. The pipeline creates personalized predictive model for each individual, and computes quality metrics for each predictive model. Clinical recommendations are made based on both the prediction of the model and its quality, thus avoiding making potentially detrimental recommendations based on insufficient information or suboptimal model. The current pipeline outperforms the acute stress disorder, a commonly used clinical risk factor for PTSD development, both in terms of sensitivity and specificity.

  16. Developing genomic knowledge bases and databases to support clinical management: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Vojtech; Sincan, Murat; Cimino, James J

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine, the ability to tailor diagnostic and treatment decisions for individual patients, is seen as the evolution of modern medicine. We characterize here the informatics resources available today or envisioned in the near future that can support clinical interpretation of genomic test results. We assume a clinical sequencing scenario (germline whole-exome sequencing) in which a clinical specialist, such as an endocrinologist, needs to tailor patient management decisions within his or her specialty (targeted findings) but relies on a genetic counselor to interpret off-target incidental findings. We characterize the genomic input data and list various types of knowledge bases that provide genomic knowledge for generating clinical decision support. We highlight the need for patient-level databases with detailed lifelong phenotype content in addition to genotype data and provide a list of recommendations for personalized medicine knowledge bases and databases. We conclude that no single knowledge base can currently support all aspects of personalized recommendations and that consolidation of several current resources into larger, more dynamic and collaborative knowledge bases may offer a future path forward.

  17. Clinical Decision Support: a 25 Year Retrospective and a 25 Year Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, B; Sittig, D F; Wright, A

    2016-08-02

    The objective of this review is to summarize the state of the art of clinical decision support (CDS) circa 1990, review progress in the 25 year interval from that time, and provide a vision of what CDS might look like 25 years hence, or circa 2040. Informal review of the medical literature with iterative review and discussion among the authors to arrive at six axes (data, knowledge, inference, architecture and technology, implementation and integration, and users) to frame the review and discussion of selected barriers and facilitators to the effective use of CDS. In each of the six axes, significant progress has been made. Key advances in structuring and encoding standardized data with an increased availability of data, development of knowledge bases for CDS, and improvement of capabilities to share knowledge artifacts, explosion of methods analyzing and inferring from clinical data, evolution of information technologies and architectures to facilitate the broad application of CDS, improvement of methods to implement CDS and integrate CDS into the clinical workflow, and increasing sophistication of the end-user, all have played a role in improving the effective use of CDS in healthcare delivery. CDS has evolved dramatically over the past 25 years and will likely evolve just as dramatically or more so over the next 25 years. Increasingly, the clinical encounter between a clinician and a patient will be supported by a wide variety of cognitive aides to support diagnosis, treatment, care-coordination, surveillance and prevention, and health maintenance or wellness.

  18. PCA safety data review after clinical decision support and smart pump technology implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prewitt, Judy; Schneider, Susan; Horvath, Monica; Hammond, Julia; Jackson, Jason; Ginsberg, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Medication errors account for 20% of medical errors in the United States with the largest risk at prescribing and administration. Analgesics or opioids are frequently used medications that can be associated with patient harm when prescribed or administered improperly. In an effort to decrease medication errors, Duke University Hospital implemented clinical decision support via computer provider order entry (CPOE) and "smart pump" technology, 2/2008, with the goal to decrease patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) adverse events. This project evaluated PCA safety events, reviewing voluntary report system and adverse drug events via surveillance (ADE-S), on intermediate and step-down units preimplementation and postimplementation of clinical decision support via CPOE and PCA smart pumps for the prescribing and administration of opioids therapy in the adult patient requiring analgesia for acute pain. Voluntary report system and ADE-S PCA events decreased based upon 1000 PCA days; ADE-S PCA events per 1000 PCA days decreased 22%, from 5.3 (pre) to 4.2 (post) (P = 0.09). Voluntary report system events decreased 72%, from 2.4/1000 PCA days (pre) to 0.66/1000 PCA days (post) and was statistically significant (P PCA events between time periods in both the ADE-S and voluntary report system data, thus supporting the recommendation of clinical decision support via CPOE and PCA smart pump technology.

  19. Theory and practice of clinical ethics support services: narrative and hermeneutical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porz, Rouven; Landeweer, Elleke; Widdershoven, Guy

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we introduce narrative and hermeneutical perspectives to clinical ethics support services (CESS). We propose a threefold consideration of 'theory' and show how it is interwoven with 'practice' as we go along. First, we look at theory in its foundational role: in our case 'narrative ethics' and 'philosophical hermeneutics' provide a theoretical base for clinical ethics by focusing on human identities entangled in stories and on moral understanding as a dialogical process. Second, we consider the role of theoretical notions in helping practitioners to understand their situation in clinical ethics practice, by using notions like 'story', 'responsibility', or 'vulnerability' to make explicit and explain their practical experience. Such theoretical notions help us to interpret clinical situations from an ethical perspective and to foster moral awareness of practitioners. And, thirdly, we examine how new theoretical concepts are developed by interpreting practice, using practice to form and improve our ethical theory. In this paper, we discuss this threefold use of theory in clinical ethics support services by reflecting on our own theoretical assumptions, methodological steps and practical experiences as ethicists, and by providing examples from our daily work. In doing so, we illustrate that theory and practice are interwoven, as theoretical understanding is dependent upon practical experience, and vice-versa. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. C.E.B.A.S., a closed equilibrated biological aquatic system as a possible precursor for a long-term life support system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blüm, V.

    C.E.B.A.S.-AQUARACK is a long-term multi-generation experimental device for aquatic organisms which is disposed for utlizitation in a space station. It results from the basic idea of a space aquarium for maintaining aquatic animals for longer periods integrated in a AQUARACK which consists of a modular animal holding tank, a semi-biological/physical water recycling system and an electronical control unit. The basic idea to replace a part of the water recycling system by a continuous culture of unicellular algae primarily leads to a second system for experiments with algae, a botanical AQUARACK consisting of an algal reactor, a water recycling and the electronical control unit. The combination of the zoological part, and the botanical part with a common control system in the AQUARACK, however, results in a ``Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System'' (C.E.B.A.S.) representing an closed artificial ecosystem. Although this is disposed primarily as an experimental device for basic zoological, botanical and interdisciplinary research it opens the theoretical possibility to adapt it for combined production of animal and plant biomass on ground or in space. The paper explains the basic conception of the hardware construction of the zoological part of the system, the corresponding scientific frame program including the choice of the experimental animals and gives some selected examples of the hardware-related resrearch. It furtheron discusses the practical and economical relevance of the system in the development of a controlled aquatical life support system in general.

  1. Using Best Practices to Extract, Organize, and Reuse Embedded Decision Support Content Knowledge Rules from Mature Clinical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesAutels, Spencer J; Fox, Zachary E; Giuse, Dario A; Williams, Annette M; Kou, Qing-Hua; Weitkamp, Asli; Neal R, Patel; Bettinsoli Giuse, Nunzia

    2016-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) knowledge, embedded over time in mature medical systems, presents an interesting and complex opportunity for information organization, maintenance, and reuse. To have a holistic view of all decision support requires an in-depth understanding of each clinical system as well as expert knowledge of the latest evidence. This approach to clinical decision support presents an opportunity to unify and externalize the knowledge within rules-based decision support. Driven by an institutional need to prioritize decision support content for migration to new clinical systems, the Center for Knowledge Management and Health Information Technology teams applied their unique expertise to extract content from individual systems, organize it through a single extensible schema, and present it for discovery and reuse through a newly created Clinical Support Knowledge Acquisition and Archival Tool (CS-KAAT). CS-KAAT can build and maintain the underlying knowledge infrastructure needed by clinical systems.

  2. Using Best Practices to Extract, Organize, and Reuse Embedded Decision Support Content Knowledge Rules from Mature Clinical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesAutels, Spencer J.; Fox, Zachary E.; Giuse, Dario A.; Williams, Annette M.; Kou, Qing-hua; Weitkamp, Asli; Neal R, Patel; Bettinsoli Giuse, Nunzia

    2016-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) knowledge, embedded over time in mature medical systems, presents an interesting and complex opportunity for information organization, maintenance, and reuse. To have a holistic view of all decision support requires an in-depth understanding of each clinical system as well as expert knowledge of the latest evidence. This approach to clinical decision support presents an opportunity to unify and externalize the knowledge within rules-based decision support. Driven by an institutional need to prioritize decision support content for migration to new clinical systems, the Center for Knowledge Management and Health Information Technology teams applied their unique expertise to extract content from individual systems, organize it through a single extensible schema, and present it for discovery and reuse through a newly created Clinical Support Knowledge Acquisition and Archival Tool (CS-KAAT). CS-KAAT can build and maintain the underlying knowledge infrastructure needed by clinical systems. PMID:28269846

  3. An Approach for Hydrogen Recycling in a Closed-loop Life Support Architecture to Increase Oxygen Recovery Beyond State-of-the-Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee; Greenwood, Zachary; Alvarez, Giraldo

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art atmosphere revitalization life support technology on the International Space Station is theoretically capable of recovering 50% of the oxygen from metabolic carbon dioxide via the Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA). When coupled with a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA), oxygen recovery increases dramatically, thus drastically reducing the logistical challenges associated with oxygen resupply. The PPA decomposes methane to predominantly form hydrogen and acetylene. Because of the unstable nature of acetylene, a down-stream separation system is required to remove acetylene from the hydrogen stream before it is recycled to the CRA. A new closed-loop architecture that includes a PPA and downstream Hydrogen Purification Assembly (HyPA) is proposed and discussed. Additionally, initial results of separation material testing are reported.

  4. A programmable rules engine to provide clinical decision support using HTML forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusinkveld, J; Geissbuhler, A; Sheshelidze, D; Miller, R

    1999-01-01

    The authors have developed a simple method for specifying rules to be applied to information on HTML forms. This approach allows clinical experts, who lack the programming expertise needed to write CGI scripts, to construct and maintain domain-specific knowledge and ordering capabilities within WizOrder, the order-entry and decision support system used at Vanderbilt Hospital. The clinical knowledge base maintainers use HTML editors to create forms and spreadsheet programs for rule entry. A test environment has been developed which uses Netscape to display forms; the production environment displays forms using an embedded browser.

  5. Establishment of a research pharmacy to support Ebola clinical research in Liberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Jerome F; Kirchoff, Matthew Carl; Tyee, Rev Tijli; Montello, Michael J; Rhie, Julie K

    This article describes the establishment of a research pharmacy to support the Partnership for Research on Ebola Vaccines in Liberia (PREVAIL) vaccine study for Ebola virus disease. This article describes the establishment of the pharmacy element to support the overall research program during an Ebola outbreak in Monrovia, Liberia, in 2014 and 2015. The need for the rapid establishment of infrastructure to support the Liberia-United States joint clinical research partnership in response to the emerging Ebola virus disease provided the opportunity for collaboration among Liberian and U.S. pharmacists. Resource austere and research naïve. Research pharmacy prepared and randomized 1500 vaccinations in support of PREVAIL. Experiences of the Liberian and U.S. pharmacists involved in the program are described. The partnership was successful in the conduct of the study. More importantly, the capacity for Liberian pharmacists to support clinical research was established. In addition, the U.S. team learned several important lessons that will help prepare them for responding to research needs in future infectious disease outbreaks. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Expanding the PACS archive to support clinical review, research, and education missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeyman-Buck, Janice C.; Frost, Meryll M.; Drane, Walter E.

    1999-07-01

    Designing an image archive and retrieval system that supports multiple users with many different requirements and patterns of use without compromising the performance and functionality required by diagnostic radiology is an intellectual and technical challenge. A diagnostic archive, optimized for performance when retrieving diagnostic images for radiologists needed to be expanded to support a growing clinical review network, the University of Florida Brain Institute's demands for neuro-imaging, Biomedical Engineering's imaging sciences, and an electronic teaching file. Each of the groups presented a different set of problems for the designers of the system. In addition, the radiologists did not want to see nay loss of performance as new users were added.

  7. Medical technology companies broaden role to support the financial success of clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Soren

    2003-01-01

    Market challenges continue to mount for hospitals and clinics, causing an unparalleled focus on profitability and return on investment for services. To support these challenges, technology suppliers that were once content to deliver and install equipment have become partners with the institutions they serve. Savvy technology companies are offering an extensive array of services that assist facilities in the planning, cost justification, implementation and ongoing support of their technology. The result is a marriage of progress and profit, resulting in solutions that enhance both the quality of care and the bottom line.

  8. Medical Device Integrated Vital Signs Monitoring Application with Real-Time Clinical Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moqeem, Aasia; Baig, Mirza; Gholamhosseini, Hamid; Mirza, Farhaan; Lindén, Maria

    2018-01-01

    This research involves the design and development of a novel Android smartphone application for real-time vital signs monitoring and decision support. The proposed application integrates market available, wireless and Bluetooth connected medical devices for collecting vital signs. The medical device data collected by the app includes heart rate, oxygen saturation and electrocardiograph (ECG). The collated data is streamed/displayed on the smartphone in real-time. This application was designed by adopting six screens approach (6S) mobile development framework and focused on user-centered approach and considered clinicians-as-a-user. The clinical engagement, consultations, feedback and usability of the application in the everyday practices were considered critical from the initial phase of the design and development. Furthermore, the proposed application is capable to deliver rich clinical decision support in real-time using the integrated medical device data.

  9. Personal and clinical recovery with the individual placement and support intervention in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Iben Gammelgaard; Stenager, Elsebeth; Eplov, Lene

    on outcomes often referred to as recovery measures i.e. symptoms and self-esteem is ambiguous. One branch of the recovery literature distinguishes between two kinds of recovery. The one, personal recovery is defined by: what helps the individual move beyond the role of being a patient with a mental illness......Introduction: Individual Placement and Support (IPS) is an evidence-based recovery-oriented intervention where employment specialists (ES) support persons with severe mental illness in achieving competitive employment. IPS is labelled a recovery-oriented intervention; although, the influence of IPS....... The other, clinical recovery is defined as symptom reduction and increased level of functioning. Aim: To investigate how an IPS-intervention influences the personal and clinical recovery in persons with severe mental illness. Method: A qualitative phenomenological study including interview of 12...

  10. Real-Time Clinical Decision Support System with Data Stream Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to describe a new design of data stream mining system that can analyze medical data stream and make real-time prediction. The motivation of the research is due to a growing concern of combining software technology and medical functions for the development of software application that can be used in medical field of chronic disease prognosis and diagnosis, children healthcare, diabetes diagnosis, and so forth. Most of the existing software technologies are case-based data mining systems. They only can analyze finite and structured data set and can only work well in their early years and can hardly meet today's medical requirement. In this paper, we describe a clinical-support-system based data stream mining technology; the design has taken into account all the shortcomings of the existing clinical support systems.

  11. Enhancing Worker Health Through Clinical Decision Support (CDS): An Introduction to a Compilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filios, Margaret S; Storey, Eileen; Baron, Sherry; Luensman, Genevieve B; Shiffman, Richard N

    2017-11-01

    This article outlines an approach to developing clinical decision support (CDS) for conditions related to work and health. When incorporated in electronic health records, such CDS will assist primary care providers (PCPs) care for working patients. Three groups of Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) identified relevant clinical practice guidelines, best practices, and reviewed published literature concerning work-related asthma, return-to-work, and management of diabetes at work. SMEs developed one recommendation per topic that could be supported by electronic CDS. Reviews with PCPs, staff, and health information system implementers in five primary care settings confirmed that the approach was important and operationally sound. This compendium is intended to stimulate a dialogue between occupational health specialists and PCPs that will enhance the use of work information about patients in the primary care setting.

  12. Clinical study of emergency treatment and selective closed reduction for the treatment of supracondylar humerus fracture in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of emergency treatment, selective closed reduction combined with percutaneous Kirschner wire fixation on the treatment of Gartland type-II and type-III supracondylar humerus fracture. Methods: Children who sustained the Gartland type-II and type-III supracondylar fractures of humerus treated with selective closed reduction combined with percutaneous Kirschner wire fixation in our hospital from May 2012 to August 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. They were divided into group A (emergency operation group and group B (selective operation group according to different operation timing. Perioperative situation, blood biochemical parameters, swelling degree and elbow joint function of affected limb were compared between two groups. Results: Operation time for patients of group A was significantly shorter than that of group B [(17.19 ± 2.85 vs. (21.43 ± 3.91 min], and frequency of fluoroscopy during operation of group A was obviously less than that of group B [(6.03 ± 0.95 vs. (7.61 ± 0.92 times]. Swelling index of affected limb in group A at 3 days, 5 days and 7 days after injury was all significantly lower than that in group B [(1.20 ± 0.17 vs. (1.38 ± 0.14, (1.13 ± 0.13 vs. (1.30 ± 0.18, (1.02 ± 0.15 vs. (1.22 ± 0.15]. Hospital for special surgery score at 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 and 4 weeks after removing Kirschner wire had no significant difference between group A and B (88.75 ± 10.18 vs. (89.14 ± 10.52, (94.22 ± 10.85 vs. (93.85 ± 11.08, (95.52 ± 11.27 vs. (95.92 ± 12.19, (95.43 ± 10.96 vs. (96.02 ± 11.38. Contents of serum alanine transaminase, aspertate aminotransferase, total protein, albumin and C-reactive protein in perioperative period had no obvious difference between patients in group A and B. Conclusions: Emergency closed reduction combined with percutaneous Kirschner wire fixation for Gartland type-II and type-III supracondylar humerus fracture in children has less trauma, low swelling degree

  13. Development of a clinical decision support system for diabetes care: A pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livvi Li Wei Sim

    Full Text Available Management of complex chronic diseases such as diabetes requires the assimilation and interpretation of multiple laboratory test results. Traditional electronic health records tend to display laboratory results in a piecemeal and segregated fashion. This makes the assembly and interpretation of results related to diabetes care challenging. We developed a diabetes-specific clinical decision support system (Diabetes Dashboard interface for displaying glycemic, lipid and renal function results, in an integrated form with decision support capabilities, based on local clinical practice guidelines. The clinical decision support system included a dashboard feature that graphically summarized all relevant laboratory results and displayed them in a color-coded system that allowed quick interpretation of the metabolic control of the patients. An alert module informs the user of tests that are due for repeat testing. An interactive graph module was also developed for better visual appreciation of the trends of the laboratory results of the patient. In a pilot study involving case scenarios administered via an electronic questionnaire, the Diabetes Dashboard, compared to the existing laboratory reporting interface, significantly improved the identification of abnormal laboratory results, of the long-term trend of the laboratory tests and of tests due for repeat testing. However, the Diabetes Dashboard did not significantly improve the identification of patients requiring treatment adjustment or the amount of time spent on each case scenario. In conclusion, we have developed and shown that the use of the Diabetes Dashboard, which incorporates several decision support features, can improve the management of diabetes. It is anticipated that this dashboard will be most helpful when deployed in an outpatient setting, where physicians can quickly make clinical decisions based on summarized information and be alerted to pertinent areas of care that require

  14. Advanced Clinical Decision Support for Transport of the Critically Ill Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    in the sections to follow. Accomplishments according to proposed tasks: Our "team" has included all CHRCO based physician and nurse investigators...ahead of print). Winsor, G., et al., Inadequate hemodynamic management in patients undergoing interfacility transfer for suspected aortic dissection...Fields, and C.d. Forca-Tarefa, Clinical practice parameters for hemodynamic support of pediatric and neonatal patients in septic shock. J Pediatr, 2002

  15. GELLO: an object-oriented query and expression language for clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordo, Margarita; Ogunyemi, Omolola; Boxwala, Aziz A; Greenes, Robert A

    2003-01-01

    GELLO is a purpose-specific, object-oriented (OO) query and expression language. GELLO is the result of a concerted effort of the Decision Systems Group (DSG) working with the HL7 Clinical Decision Support Technical Committee (CDSTC) to provide the HL7 community with a common format for data encoding and manipulation. GELLO will soon be submitted for ballot to the HL7 CDSTC for consideration as a standard.

  16. EHRs Connect Research and Practice: Where Predictive Modeling, Artificial Intelligence, and Clinical Decision Support Intersect

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Casey; Doub, Tom; Selove, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Electronic health records (EHRs) are only a first step in capturing and utilizing health-related data - the challenge is turning that data into useful information. Furthermore, EHRs are increasingly likely to include data relating to patient outcomes, functionality such as clinical decision support, and genetic information as well, and, as such, can be seen as repositories of increasingly valuable information about patients' health conditions and responses to treatment over time. ...

  17. Development of a tool to support holistic generic assessment of clinical procedure skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Robert K; Strand, Janice; Gray, Tracey; Schuwirth, Lambert; Alun-Jones, Tom; Miller, Helen

    2008-06-01

    The challenges of maintaining comprehensive banks of valid checklists make context-specific checklists for assessment of clinical procedural skills problematic. This paper reports the development of a tool which supports generic holistic assessment of clinical procedural skills. We carried out a literature review, focus groups and non-participant observation of assessments with interview of participants, participant evaluation of a pilot objective structured clinical examination (OSCE), a national modified Delphi study with prior definitions of consensus and an OSCE. Participants were volunteers from a large acute teaching trust, a teaching primary care trust and a national sample of National Health Service staff. Results In total, 86 students, trainees and staff took part in the focus groups, observation of assessments and pilot OSCE, 252 in the Delphi study and 46 candidates and 50 assessors in the final OSCE. We developed a prototype tool with 5 broad categories amongst which were distributed 38 component competencies. There was > 70% agreement (our prior definition of consensus) at the first round of the Delphi study for inclusion of all categories and themes and no consensus for inclusion of additional categories or themes. Generalisability was 0.76. An OSCE based on the instrument has a predicted reliability of 0.79 with 12 stations and 1 assessor per station or 10 stations and 2 assessors per station. This clinical procedural skills assessment tool enables reliable assessment and has content and face validity for the assessment of clinical procedural skills. We have designated it the Leicester Clinical Procedure Assessment Tool (LCAT).

  18. Multi-professional audit supports clinical governance in projecting and implementing a new stroke care area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Masina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with acute stroke have better outcomes in terms of survival or regaining independence if they receive organized inpatient care in a specific setting (Stroke Unit, SU where a coordinated multidisciplinary team can ensure the best level of care. The clinical governance of an SU requires a systematic monitoring of diagnostic, clinical and therapeutic processes through a structured audit. The entire project and set up of a new SU in Bentivoglio, Italy, were based on a model that focused on multidisciplinary teamwork and clinical governance. An audit based on the Benjamin audit cycle followed every step of the set up of the new SU. Markers from national and international guidelines and from the Italian Regional Audit, together with a specific database were used. The audit showed a high level of care and a significant improvement in the majority of clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic parameters. Only a few markers (i.e. waiting times for ultrasound tomography and prescription of oral anticoagulation therapy required specific projects in order to improve the results. Our experience confirmed that a structured audit can support clinical governance of an SU by monitoring clinical processes and quality of care. Such an audit involves the whole professional team and shows the effects of any single actions. It also helps integration and co-operation among staff. Furthermore, a structured audit is a useful instrument for professional accountability for both qualitative and quantitative aspects of care.

  19. Implant-supported titanium prostheses following augmentation procedures: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knabe, C; Hoffmeister, B

    2003-03-01

    This report describes a novel technique for fabricating retrievable implant-supported titanium (Ti) prostheses in patients requiring a comprehensive treatment plan involving the combined efforts of maxillofacial surgery and implant prosthodontics. Following bone graft reconstructive surgery and implant placement prosthetic treatment was initiated by inserting ITI-Octa abutments. An impression was made, and a framework was fabricated by fusing Ti-cast frameworks to prefabricated titanium copings by laser-welding. This was followed by veneering or fabrication of a removable denture with Ti metal re-enforcement. Favourable clinical results have been achieved using these screw-retained Ti implant-supported restorations for patients treated with reconstructive bone graft-surgery, with clinical observation periods ranging from three to four years. The present observations suggest that these screw-retained implant-supported Ti prostheses may be a meaningful contribution to implant prosthodontics, facilitating retrievable restorations of optimum biocompatibility, good marginal precision and with a good esthetic result. However, controlled clinical studies are needed to establish the long-term serviceability of these Ti restorations.

  20. A study of diverse clinical decision support rule authoring environments and requirements for integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Li

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient rule authoring tools are critical to allow clinical Knowledge Engineers (KEs, Software Engineers (SEs, and Subject Matter Experts (SMEs to convert medical knowledge into machine executable clinical decision support rules. The goal of this analysis was to identify the critical success factors and challenges of a fully functioning Rule Authoring Environment (RAE in order to define requirements for a scalable, comprehensive tool to manage enterprise level rules. Methods The authors evaluated RAEs in active use across Partners Healthcare, including enterprise wide, ambulatory only, and system specific tools, with a focus on rule editors for reminder and medication rules. We conducted meetings with users of these RAEs to discuss their general experience and perceived advantages and limitations of these tools. Results While the overall rule authoring process is similar across the 10 separate RAEs, the system capabilities and architecture vary widely. Most current RAEs limit the ability of the clinical decision support (CDS interventions to be standardized, sharable, interoperable, and extensible. No existing system meets all requirements defined by knowledge management users. Conclusions A successful, scalable, integrated rule authoring environment will need to support a number of key requirements and functions in the areas of knowledge representation, metadata, terminology, authoring collaboration, user interface, integration with electronic health record (EHR systems, testing, and reporting.

  1. The potential of predictive analytics to provide clinical decision support in depression treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C

    2018-01-01

    To review progress developing clinical decision support tools for personalized treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). Over the years, a variety of individual indicators ranging from biomarkers to clinical observations and self-report scales have been used to predict various aspects of differential MDD treatment response. Most of this work focused on predicting remission either with antidepressant medications versus psychotherapy, some antidepressant medications versus others, some psychotherapies versus others, and combination therapies versus monotherapies. However, to date, none of the individual predictors in these studies has been strong enough to guide optimal treatment selection for most patients. Interest consequently turned to decision support tools made up of multiple predictors, but the development of such tools has been hampered by small study sample sizes. Design recommendations are made here for future studies to address this problem. Recommendations include using large prospective observational studies followed by pragmatic trials rather than smaller, expensive controlled treatment trials for preliminary development of decision support tools; basing these tools on comprehensive batteries of inexpensive self-report and clinical predictors (e.g., self-administered performance-based neurocognitive tests) versus expensive biomarkers; and reserving biomarker assessments for targeted studies of patients not well classified by inexpensive predictor batteries.

  2. Privacy-preserving clinical decision support system using Gaussian kernel-based classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahulamathavan, Yogachandran; Veluru, Suresh; Phan, Raphael C-W; Chambers, Jonathon A; Rajarajan, Muttukrishnan

    2014-01-01

    A clinical decision support system forms a critical capability to link health observations with health knowledge to influence choices by clinicians for improved healthcare. Recent trends toward remote outsourcing can be exploited to provide efficient and accurate clinical decision support in healthcare. In this scenario, clinicians can use the health knowledge located in remote servers via the Internet to diagnose their patients. However, the fact that these servers are third party and therefore potentially not fully trusted raises possible privacy concerns. In this paper, we propose a novel privacy-preserving protocol for a clinical decision support system where the patients' data always remain in an encrypted form during the diagnosis process. Hence, the server involved in the diagnosis process is not able to learn any extra knowledge about the patient's data and results. Our experimental results on popular medical datasets from UCI-database demonstrate that the accuracy of the proposed protocol is up to 97.21% and the privacy of patient data is not compromised.

  3. Clinical decision support systems for improving diagnostic accuracy and achieving precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, Christian; Nalley, Kip; Mannion, Ciaran; Bhattacharyya, Pritish; Blake, Patrick; Pecora, Andrew; Goy, Andre; Suh, K Stephen

    2015-01-01

    , and logistical concerns. Ensuring data security and protection of patient rights while simultaneously facilitating standardization is paramount to maintaining public support. The capabilities of supercomputing need to be applied strategically. A standardized, methodological implementation must be applied to developed artificial intelligence systems with the ability to integrate data and information into clinically relevant knowledge. Ultimately, the integration of bioinformatics and clinical data in a clinical decision support system promises precision medicine and cost effective and personalized patient care.

  4. Designing a Clinical Data Warehouse Architecture to Support Quality Improvement Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelico, John D; Wilcox, Adam B; Vawdrey, David K; Kuperman, Gilad J

    2016-01-01

    Clinical data warehouses, initially directed towards clinical research or financial analyses, are evolving to support quality improvement efforts, and must now address the quality improvement life cycle. In addition, data that are needed for quality improvement often do not reside in a single database, requiring easier methods to query data across multiple disparate sources. We created a virtual data warehouse at NewYork Presbyterian Hospital that allowed us to bring together data from several source systems throughout the organization. We also created a framework to match the maturity of a data request in the quality improvement life cycle to proper tools needed for each request. As projects progress in the Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control stages of quality improvement, there is a proper matching of resources the data needs at each step. We describe the analysis and design creating a robust model for applying clinical data warehousing to quality improvement.

  5. Perioprosthetic and Implant-Supported Rehabilitation of Complex Cases: Clinical Management and Timing Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Luca; Piccinelli, Stefano; Raia, Roberto; Marinotti, Fabio; Manicone, Paolo Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of complex perioprosthetic cases is one of the clinical challenges of everyday practice. Only a complete and thorough diagnostic setup may allow the clinician to formulate a realistic prognosis to select the abutments to support prosthetic rehabilitation. Clinical, radiographic, or laboratory parameters used separately are useless to correctly assign a reliable prognosis to single teeth except in the case of a clearly hopeless tooth. Therefore, it is crucial to gather the greatest quantity of data to determine the role that every single element can play in the prosthetic rehabilitation of the case. The following report deals with the management of a multidisciplinary periodontally compromised case in which a treatment strategy and chronology were designed to reach clinical predictability while reducing the duration of the therapy.

  6. Perioprosthetic and Implant-Supported Rehabilitation of Complex Cases: Clinical Management and Timing Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Landi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of complex perioprosthetic cases is one of the clinical challenges of everyday practice. Only a complete and thorough diagnostic setup may allow the clinician to formulate a realistic prognosis to select the abutments to support prosthetic rehabilitation. Clinical, radiographic, or laboratory parameters used separately are useless to correctly assign a reliable prognosis to single teeth except in the case of a clearly hopeless tooth. Therefore, it is crucial to gather the greatest quantity of data to determine the role that every single element can play in the prosthetic rehabilitation of the case. The following report deals with the management of a multidisciplinary periodontally compromised case in which a treatment strategy and chronology were designed to reach clinical predictability while reducing the duration of the therapy.

  7. Personalised Care Plan Management Utilizing Guideline-Driven Clinical Decision Support Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laleci Erturkmen, Gokce Banu; Yuksel, Mustafa; Sarigul, Bunyamin; Lilja, Mikael; Chen, Rong; Arvanitis, Theodoros N

    2018-01-01

    Older age is associated with an increased accumulation of multiple chronic conditions. The clinical management of patients suffering from multiple chronic conditions is very complex, disconnected and time-consuming with the traditional care settings. Integrated care is a means to address the growing demand for improved patient experience and health outcomes of multimorbid and long-term care patients. Care planning is a prevalent approach of integrated care, where the aim is to deliver more personalized and targeted care creating shared care plans by clearly articulating the role of each provider and patient in the care process. In this paper, we present a method and corresponding implementation of a semi-automatic care plan management tool, integrated with clinical decision support services which can seamlessly access and assess the electronic health records (EHRs) of the patient in comparison with evidence based clinical guidelines to suggest personalized recommendations for goals and interventions to be added to the individualized care plans.

  8. Long-term Mechanical Circulatory Support System reliability recommendation by the National Clinical Trial Initiative subcommittee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James

    2009-01-01

    The Long-Term Mechanical Circulatory Support (MCS) System Reliability Recommendation was published in the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs (ASAIO) Journal and the Annals of Thoracic Surgery in 1998. At that time, it was stated that the document would be periodically reviewed to assess its timeliness and appropriateness within 5 years. Given the wealth of clinical experience in MCS systems, a new recommendation has been drafted by consensus of a group of representatives from the medical community, academia, industry, and government. The new recommendation describes a reliability test methodology and provides detailed reliability recommendations. In addition, the new recommendation provides additional information and clinical data in appendices that are intended to assist the reliability test engineer in the development of a reliability test that is expected to give improved predictions of clinical reliability compared with past test methods. The appendices are available for download at the ASAIO journal web site at www.asaiojournal.com.

  9. Reconstruction of epidermis by grafting of keratinocytes cultured on polymer support--clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvoránková, Barbora; Holíková, Zuzana; Vacík, Jirí; Königová, Radana; Kapounková, Zuzana; Michálek, Jirí; Prádn, Martin; Smetana, Karel

    2003-03-01

    Extensive wound coverage still represents a challenge for contemporary medicine. We demonstrate the results of a clinical trial of the grafting of cultured keratinocytes directly on a polymer cultivation support in the treatment of skin defects in seriously burned patients and in patients with trophic ulcers. Wound closure was evaluated clinically. The morphology and phenotypic pattern of the reconstructed epidermis, including the basal lamina, as well as the presence of Langerhans cells, were evaluated immunocytochemically using a panel of monoclonal antibodies. All layers of the reconstructed epidermis were normally differentiated (cytokeratin immunocytochemistry). The basal lamina contained collagen type IV and laminin. The reconstructed epidermis was extensively colonized by Langerhans cells. The results of the described technology are encouraging, especially in patients after a burn injury. The described procedure is suitable for the treatment of skin defects in clinical practice.

  10. The relationship between body esteem, exercise motivations, depression, and social support among female free clinic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Akiko; Christensen, Nancy; Al-Obaydi, Sarah; Solis, Silvia Patricia; Ashby, Jeanie; Greenwood, Jessica L J; Reel, Justine J

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a significant public health problem in women's health. This study examined relationship between body esteem, exercise motivations, depression, and social support among female free clinic patients. Low-income women who are at risk for obesity and other health concerns would benefit from health education efforts. We compared 299 female and 164 male free clinic patients 18 years or older using assessments for body esteem, motivation to exercise, depression, and social support. Although female participants reported lower levels of body esteem and higher levels of depression compared with male participants (p exercise for weight-related reasons than male participants (p exercise motivations compared with non-U.S.-born female participants (p exercise motivation among female free clinic patients (p health educators to engage a myriad of physical activity motives to increase the likelihood that clients will experience enjoyment and sustained adoption of exercise into their lifestyle. Future practice and research should warrant the implementation of body image and physical activity programs and the potential impact of using exercise to reducing depression among female patients at free clinics. Copyright © 2014 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Methodological Reflections on the Contribution of Qualitative Research to the Evaluation of Clinical Ethics Support Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wäscher, Sebastian; Salloch, Sabine; Ritter, Peter; Vollmann, Jochen; Schildmann, Jan

    2017-05-01

    This article describes a process of developing, implementing and evaluating a clinical ethics support service intervention with the goal of building up a context-sensitive structure of minimal clinical-ethics in an oncology department without prior clinical ethics structure. Scholars from different disciplines have called for an improvement in the evaluation of clinical ethics support services (CESS) for different reasons over several decades. However, while a lot has been said about the concepts and methodological challenges of evaluating CESS up to the present time, relatively few empirical studies have been carried out. The aim of this article is twofold. On the one hand, it describes a process of development, modifying and evaluating a CESS intervention as part of the ETHICO research project, using the approach of qualitative-formative evaluation. On the other hand, it provides a methodological analysis which specifies the contribution of qualitative empirical methods to the (formative) evaluation of CESS. We conclude with a consideration of the strengths and limitations of qualitative evaluation research with regards to the evaluation and development of context sensitive CESS. We further discuss our own approach in contrast to rather traditional consult or committee models. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Clinical decision support systems in child and adolescent psychiatry: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koposov, Roman; Fossum, Sturla; Frodl, Thomas; Nytrø, Øystein; Leventhal, Bennett; Sourander, Andre; Quaglini, Silvana; Molteni, Massimo; de la Iglesia Vayá, María; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Barbarini, Nicola; Milham, Michael Peter; Castellanos, Francisco Xavier; Skokauskas, Norbert

    2017-11-01

    Psychiatric disorders are amongst the most prevalent and impairing conditions in childhood and adolescence. Unfortunately, it is well known that general practitioners (GPs) and other frontline health providers (i.e., child protection workers, public health nurses, and pediatricians) are not adequately trained to address these ubiquitous problems (Braddick et al. Child and Adolescent mental health in Europe: infrastructures, policy and programmes, European Communities, 2009; Levav et al. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 13:395-401, 2004). Advances in technology may offer a solution to this problem with clinical decision support systems (CDSS) that are designed to help professionals make sound clinical decisions in real time. This paper offers a systematic review of currently available CDSS for child and adolescent mental health disorders prepared according to the PRISMA-Protocols (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocols). Applying strict eligibility criteria, the identified studies (n = 5048) were screened. Ten studies, describing eight original clinical decision support systems for child and adolescent psychiatric disorders, fulfilled inclusion criteria. Based on this systematic review, there appears to be a need for a new, readily available CDSS for child neuropsychiatric disorder which promotes evidence-based, best practices, while enabling consideration of national variation in practices by leveraging data-reuse to generate predictions regarding treatment outcome, addressing a broader cluster of clinical disorders, and targeting frontline practice environments.

  13. Possibilities of ICT-supported services in the clinical management of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam; Jansen-Kosterink, Stephanie; Tabak, Monique; Feletti, Luca Carlo; Zia, Gianluca; N'dja, Aurèle; Hermens, Hermie

    2017-02-01

    Services making use of information and communication technology (ICT) are of potential interest to face the challenges of our aging society. Aim of this article is to describe the possible field of application for ICT-supported services in the management of older adults, in particular those with functional impairment. The current status of ICT-supported services is described and examples of how these services can be implemented in everyday practice are given. Upcoming technical solutions and future directions are also addressed. An ICT-supported service is not only the technological tool, but its combination with clinical purposes for which it is used and the way it is implemented in everyday care. Patient's satisfaction with ICT-supported services is moderate to good. Actual use of patients is higher than those of professionals but very variable. Frequency of use is positively related to clinical outcome. ICT offers a variety of opportunities for the treatment and prevention of frailty and functional decline. Future challenges are related to the intelligence of the systems and making the technologies even more unobtrusive and intuitive.

  14. Evaluation of features to support safety and quality in general practice clinical software

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Electronic prescribing is now the norm in many countries. We wished to find out if clinical software systems used by general practitioners in Australia include features (functional capabilities and other characteristics) that facilitate improved patient safety and care, with a focus on quality use of medicines. Methods Seven clinical software systems used in general practice were evaluated. Fifty software features that were previously rated as likely to have a high impact on safety and/or quality of care in general practice were tested and are reported here. Results The range of results for the implementation of 50 features across the 7 clinical software systems was as follows: 17-31 features (34-62%) were fully implemented, 9-13 (18-26%) partially implemented, and 9-20 (18-40%) not implemented. Key findings included: Access to evidence based drug and therapeutic information was limited. Decision support for prescribing was available but varied markedly between systems. During prescribing there was potential for medicine mis-selection in some systems, and linking a medicine with its indication was optional. The definition of 'current medicines' versus 'past medicines' was not always clear. There were limited resources for patients, and some medicines lists for patients were suboptimal. Results were provided to the software vendors, who were keen to improve their systems. Conclusions The clinical systems tested lack some of the features expected to support patient safety and quality of care. Standards and certification for clinical software would ensure that safety features are present and that there is a minimum level of clinical functionality that clinicians could expect to find in any system.

  15. Use of a Relational Database to Support Clinical Research: Application in a Diabetes Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomatch, Diane; Truax, Terry; Savage, Peter

    1981-01-01

    A database has been established to support conduct of clinical research and monitor delivery of medical care for 1200 diabetic patients as part of the Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Center (MDRTC). Use of an intelligent microcomputer to enter and retrieve the data and use of a relational database management system (DBMS) to store and manage data have provided a flexible, efficient method of achieving both support of small projects and monitoring overall activity of the Diabetes Center Unit (DCU). Simplicity of access to data, efficiency in providing data for unanticipated requests, ease of manipulations of relations, security and “logical data independence” were important factors in choosing a relational DBMS. The ability to interface with an interactive statistical program and a graphics program is a major advantage of this system. Out database currently provides support for the operation and analysis of several ongoing research projects.

  16. Clinical decision support improves quality of telephone triage documentation--an analysis of triage documentation before and after computerized clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Frederick; Richards, Debra D; Bremseth, Kimberly A; Lee, Mary R; Cox, Debra L; Varkey, Prathibha; Stroebel, Robert J

    2014-03-20

    Clinical decision support (CDS) has been shown to be effective in improving medical safety and quality but there is little information on how telephone triage benefits from CDS. The aim of our study was to compare triage documentation quality associated with the use of a clinical decision support tool, ExpertRN©. We examined 50 triage documents before and after a CDS tool was used in nursing triage. To control for the effects of CDS training we had an additional control group of triage documents created by nurses who were trained in the CDS tool, but who did not use it in selected notes. The CDS intervention cohort of triage notes was compared to both the pre-CDS notes and the CDS trained (but not using CDS) cohort. Cohorts were compared using the documentation standards of the American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing (AAACN). We also compared triage note content (documentation of associated positive and negative features relating to the symptoms, self-care instructions, and warning signs to watch for), and documentation defects pertinent to triage safety. Three of five AAACN documentation standards were significantly improved with CDS. There was a mean of 36.7 symptom features documented in triage notes for the CDS group but only 10.7 symptom features in the pre-CDS cohort (p < 0.0001) and 10.2 for the cohort that was CDS-trained but not using CDS (p < 0.0001). The difference between the mean of 10.2 symptom features documented in the pre-CDS and the mean of 10.7 symptom features documented in the CDS-trained but not using was not statistically significant (p = 0.68). CDS significantly improves triage note documentation quality. CDS-aided triage notes had significantly more information about symptoms, warning signs and self-care. The changes in triage documentation appeared to be the result of the CDS alone and not due to any CDS training that came with the CDS intervention. Although this study shows that CDS can improve documentation, further study is needed

  17. Feasibility of streamlining an interactive Bayesian-based diagnostic support tool designed for clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Hao; Botzolakis, Emmanuel; Mohan, Suyash; Bryan, R. N.; Cook, Tessa

    2016-03-01

    In radiology, diagnostic errors occur either through the failure of detection or incorrect interpretation. Errors are estimated to occur in 30-35% of all exams and contribute to 40-54% of medical malpractice litigations. In this work, we focus on reducing incorrect interpretation of known imaging features. Existing literature categorizes cognitive bias leading a radiologist to an incorrect diagnosis despite having correctly recognized the abnormal imaging features: anchoring bias, framing effect, availability bias, and premature closure. Computational methods make a unique contribution, as they do not exhibit the same cognitive biases as a human. Bayesian networks formalize the diagnostic process. They modify pre-test diagnostic probabilities using clinical and imaging features, arriving at a post-test probability for each possible diagnosis. To translate Bayesian networks to clinical practice, we implemented an entirely web-based open-source software tool. In this tool, the radiologist first selects a network of choice (e.g. basal ganglia). Then, large, clearly labeled buttons displaying salient imaging features are displayed on the screen serving both as a checklist and for input. As the radiologist inputs the value of an extracted imaging feature, the conditional probabilities of each possible diagnosis are updated. The software presents its level of diagnostic discrimination using a Pareto distribution chart, updated with each additional imaging feature. Active collaboration with the clinical radiologist is a feasible approach to software design and leads to design decisions closely coupling the complex mathematics of conditional probability in Bayesian networks with practice.

  18. Healing of periodontal flaps when closed with silk sutures and N-butyl cyanoacrylate: A clinical and histological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Sudhindra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The closure of the periodontal flaps post-surgery is a necessity for attainment of a primary union between the flap margins and the establishment of a healthy dentogingival junction. N-butyl cyanoacrylate is a tissue adhesive, which can be used for the closure of the incised wounds to overcome the problems associated with conventional suture materials like silk. Objective: The present study was carried out to assess the healing of the periodontal flaps when closed with the conventional silk sutures and N-butyl cyanoacrylate. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on 24 patients who needed flap surgical procedure for pocket therapy. Results: It was found that healing with the cyanoacrylate is associated with less amount of inflammation during the first week when compared with silk. However, over a period of 21 days to 6 weeks, the sites treated with both the materials showed similar healing patterns. Conclusion: It can be concluded that cyanoacrylate aids in early initial healing.

  19. Automated Modular Magnetic Resonance Imaging Clinical Decision Support System (MIROR): An Application in Pediatric Cancer Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarinabad, Niloufar; Meeus, Emma M; Manias, Karen; Foster, Katharine; Peet, Andrew

    2018-05-02

    Advances in magnetic resonance imaging and the introduction of clinical decision support systems has underlined the need for an analysis tool to extract and analyze relevant information from magnetic resonance imaging data to aid decision making, prevent errors, and enhance health care. The aim of this study was to design and develop a modular medical image region of interest analysis tool and repository (MIROR) for automatic processing, classification, evaluation, and representation of advanced magnetic resonance imaging data. The clinical decision support system was developed and evaluated for diffusion-weighted imaging of body tumors in children (cohort of 48 children, with 37 malignant and 11 benign tumors). Mevislab software and Python have been used for the development of MIROR. Regions of interests were drawn around benign and malignant body tumors on different diffusion parametric maps, and extracted information was used to discriminate the malignant tumors from benign tumors. Using MIROR, the various histogram parameters derived for each tumor case when compared with the information in the repository provided additional information for tumor characterization and facilitated the discrimination between benign and malignant tumors. Clinical decision support system cross-validation showed high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating between these tumor groups using histogram parameters. MIROR, as a diagnostic tool and repository, allowed the interpretation and analysis of magnetic resonance imaging images to be more accessible and comprehensive for clinicians. It aims to increase clinicians' skillset by introducing newer techniques and up-to-date findings to their repertoire and make information from previous cases available to aid decision making. The modular-based format of the tool allows integration of analyses that are not readily available clinically and streamlines the future developments. ©Niloufar Zarinabad, Emma M Meeus, Karen Manias

  20. Physicians' perception of alternative displays of clinical research evidence for clinical decision support - A study with case vignettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slager, Stacey L; Weir, Charlene R; Kim, Heejun; Mostafa, Javed; Del Fiol, Guilherme

    2017-07-01

    To design alternate information displays that present summaries of clinical trial results to clinicians to support decision-making; and to compare the displays according to efficacy and acceptability. A 6-between (information display presentation order) by 3-within (display type) factorial design. Two alternate displays were designed based on Information Foraging theory: a narrative summary that reduces the content to a few sentences; and a table format that structures the display according to the PICO (Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome) framework. The designs were compared with the summary display format available in PubMed. Physicians were asked to review five clinical studies retrieved for a case vignette; and were presented with the three display formats. Participants were asked to rate their experience with each of the information displays according to a Likert scale questionnaire. Twenty physicians completed the study. Overall, participants rated the table display more highly than either the text summary or PubMed's summary format (5.9vs. 5.4vs. 3.9 on a scale between 1 [strongly disagree] and 7 [strongly agree]). Usefulness ratings of seven pieces of information, i.e. patient population, patient age range, sample size, study arm, primary outcome, results of primary outcome, and conclusion, were high (average across all items=4.71 on a 1 to 5 scale, with 1=not at all useful and 5=very useful). Study arm, primary outcome, and conclusion scored the highest (4.9, 4.85, and 4.85 respectively). Participants suggested additional details such as rate of adverse effects. The table format reduced physicians' perceived cognitive effort when quickly reviewing clinical trial information and was more favorably received by physicians than the narrative summary or PubMed's summary format display. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Does the use of a university lecturer as a visiting tutor support learning and assessment during physiotherapy students' clinical placements? A survey of higher education institution providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, M; Levis, A

    2016-12-01

    To establish the rationale for using a lecturer as a visiting tutor, and to identify the activities undertaken during clinical placements to support student learning and assessment in practice. A secure electronic survey was used to incorporate qualitative and quantitative data collection procedures. Thirty-three higher education institution (HEI) providers of physiotherapy education in the UK, registered with the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. UK HEI physiotherapy placement coordinators. A questionnaire was used to examine HEI perceptions. A pilot focus group consultation informed the questionnaire content. Surveys were analysed based on the proportion of responses to closed questions on an adapted Likert scale, with further thematic analysis of open questions. All 25 respondents (25/33, 76%) indicated their provision of support for students and clinical educators throughout their clinical placements. 'Face-to-face' engagement during the placement visit was viewed as essential to guide the clinical educator to provide a consistent approach to learning and assessment strategies; ensuring cohesion between theoretical and clinical components of the curriculum was viewed as a core objective by visiting academic tutors. However, the emergent themes highlighted key differences between HEIs' perspectives of what this support for clinical placement learning should entail. The majority of HEIs endorse the use of a lecturer as a visiting tutor to inform and maintain the standard of learning and assessment within the clinical placement. However, the value of this interaction requires confirmation via other stakeholders, and exploration of other forms of non-face-to-face support processes warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A data-rich recruitment core to support translational clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Rhonda G; Corregano, Lauren M; Rainer, Tyler-Lauren; Melendez, Caroline; Coller, Barry S

    2015-04-01

    Underenrollment of clinical studies wastes resources and delays assessment of research discoveries. We describe the organization and impact of a centralized recruitment core delivering comprehensive recruitment support to investigators. The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science supports a centralized recruitment core, call center, Research Volunteer Repository, data infrastructure, and staff who provide expert recruitment services to investigators. During protocol development, consultations aim to optimize enrollment feasibility, develop recruitment strategy, budget, and advertising. Services during study conduct include advertising placement, repository queries, call management, prescreening, referral, and visit scheduling. Utilization and recruitment outcomes are tracked using dedicated software. For protocols receiving recruitment services during 2009-2013: median time from initiation of recruitment to the first enrolled participant was 10 days; of 4,047 first-time callers to the call center, 92% (n = 3,722) enrolled in the Research Volunteer Repository, with 99% retention; 23% of Repository enrollees subsequently enrolled in ≥1 research studies, with 89% retention. Of volunteers referred by repository queries, 49% (280/537) enrolled into the study, with 92% retained. Provision of robust recruitment infrastructure including expertise, a volunteer repository, data capture and real-time analysis accelerates protocol accrual. Application of recruitment science improves the quality of clinical investigation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A Data‐Rich Recruitment Core to Support Translational Clinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corregano, Lauren M.; Rainer, Tyler‐Lauren; Melendez, Caroline; Coller, Barry S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Underenrollment of clinical studies wastes resources and delays assessment of research discoveries. We describe the organization and impact of a centralized recruitment core delivering comprehensive recruitment support to investigators. Methods The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science supports a centralized recruitment core, call center, Research Volunteer Repository, data infrastructure, and staff who provide expert recruitment services to investigators. During protocol development, consultations aim to optimize enrollment feasibility, develop recruitment strategy, budget, and advertising. Services during study conduct include advertising placement, repository queries, call management, prescreening, referral, and visit scheduling. Utilization and recruitment outcomes are tracked using dedicated software. Results For protocols receiving recruitment services during 2009–2013: median time from initiation of recruitment to the first enrolled participant was 10 days; of 4,047 first‐time callers to the call center, 92% (n = 3,722) enrolled in the Research Volunteer Repository, with 99% retention; 23% of Repository enrollees subsequently enrolled in ≥1 research studies, with 89% retention. Of volunteers referred by repository queries, 49% (280/537) enrolled into the study, with 92% retained. Conclusions Provision of robust recruitment infrastructure including expertise, a volunteer repository, data capture and real‐time analysis accelerates protocol accrual. Application of recruitment science improves the quality of clinical investigation. PMID:25381717

  4. Supporting Clinical Cognition: A Human-Centered Approach to a Novel ICU Information Visualization Dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiola, Anthony; Srinivas, Preethi; Duke, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Advances in intensive care unit bedside displays/interfaces and electronic medical record (EMR) technology have not adequately addressed the topic of visual clarity of patient data/information to further reduce cognitive load during clinical decision-making. We responded to these challenges with a human-centered approach to designing and testing a decision-support tool: MIVA 2.0 (Medical Information Visualization Assistant, v.2). Envisioned as an EMR visualization dashboard to support rapid analysis of real-time clinical data-trends, our primary goal originated from a clinical requirement to reduce cognitive overload. In the study, a convenience sample of 12 participants were recruited, in which quantitative and qualitative measures were used to compare MIVA 2.0 with ICU paper medical-charts, using time-on-task, post-test questionnaires, and interviews. Findings demonstrated a significant difference in speed and accuracy with the use of MIVA 2.0. Qualitative outcomes concurred, with participants acknowledging the potential impact of MIVA 2.0 for reducing cognitive load and enabling more accurate and quicker decision-making.

  5. The Research of Clinical Decision Support System Based on Three-Layer Knowledge Base Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yicheng Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In many clinical decision support systems, a two-layer knowledge base model (disease-symptom of rule reasoning is used. This model often does not express knowledge very well since it simply infers disease from the presence of certain symptoms. In this study, we propose a three-layer knowledge base model (disease-symptom-property to utilize more useful information in inference. The system iteratively calculates the probability of patients who may suffer from diseases based on a multisymptom naive Bayes algorithm, in which the specificity of these disease symptoms is weighted by the estimation of the degree of contribution to diagnose the disease. It significantly reduces the dependencies between attributes to apply the naive Bayes algorithm more properly. Then, the online learning process for parameter optimization of the inference engine was completed. At last, our decision support system utilizing the three-layer model was formally evaluated by two experienced doctors. By comparisons between prediction results and clinical results, our system can provide effective clinical recommendations to doctors. Moreover, we found that the three-layer model can improve the accuracy of predictions compared with the two-layer model. In light of some of the limitations of this study, we also identify and discuss several areas that need continued improvement.

  6. Using Elearning techniques to support problem based learning within a clinical simulation laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, Charles; Hoy, Derek; Topp, Helena; Trinder, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    This paper details the results of the first phase of a project that used eLearning to support students' learning within a simulated environment. The locus was a purpose built Clinical Simulation Laboratory (CSL) where the School's newly adopted philosophy of Problem Based Learning (PBL) was challenged through lecturers reverting to traditional teaching methods. The solution, a student-centred, problem-based approach to the acquisition of clinical skills was developed using learning objects embedded within web pages that substituted for lecturers providing instruction and demonstration. This allowed lecturers to retain their facilitator role, and encouraged students to explore, analyse and make decisions within the safety of a clinical simulation. Learning was enhanced through network communications and reflection on video performances of self and others. Evaluations were positive, students demonstrating increased satisfaction with PBL, improved performance in exams, and increased self-efficacy in the performance of nursing activities. These results indicate that an elearning approach can support PBL in delivering a student centred learning experience.

  7. Tenonplasty for closing defects during sclerocorneal surgery-A brief review of its anatomy and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Fabian N; Suffo, Shady; Daas, Loay; Seitz, Berthold; Fiorentzis, Miltiadis; Viestenz, Arne

    2018-01-01

    To provide insight into the clinical anatomy of Tenon's capsule and to describe a technique to manage sclerocorneal defects using autologous Tenon's tissue. A thin layer of Tenon's capsule harvested from the patient's own eye is used to seal the defect and act as a scaffold. The Tenon's flap is spread over the defect and held in place by Vicryl sutures. A bandage contact lens is then placed on the eye. Tenon's capsule is composed of thick fibrous tissue with smooth muscle fibers and a thin posterior capsule of orbital fat. It is rich in fibroblasts, which can accelerate wound healing and eventually lead to robust scarring without risk of immunogenicity and without cost. Tenonplasty uses easily-available autologous Tenon's tissue in patients with sclerocorneal defects to preserve globe morphology. The technique is a feasible alternative not limited by the availability of graft tissue. Clin. Anat. 31:72-76, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A clinical report on the use of closed tray, hex-lock-friction-fit implant impression copings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raviv, Eli; Hana, Jan; Raviv, Roy; Harel-Raviv, Mili

    2012-04-17

    Abstract AbstractThe precision of an impression determines the subsequent accuracy and fit of thefinal restoration. Therefore, the ultimate search is for the most accurate impressionmaterial and technique that is also the most efficient and least time consuming. One ofthe major debates in implant dentistry has been between the pick up versus the transferimpression technique. The pick up technique is widely accepted as the more accurate.However, the conventional transfer technique is simpler and less time consuming. TheHex-Lock-Friction-Fit impression coping (AB Dental Devices®) combines theadvantages of both the transfer impression technique and the pick up impressiontechnique. In this article we will review the relevant literature, discuss the advantages ofthis unique implant impression technique and present some related clinical cases.

  9. A clinical report on the use of closed-tray, hex-lock-friction-fit implant impression copings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raviv, Eli; Hanna, Jan; Raviv, Roy; Harel-Raviv, Mili

    2014-08-01

    The precision of an impression determines the subsequent accuracy and fit of the final restoration. Therefore, the ultimate search is for the most accurate impression material and the most efficient and least time consuming technique. One of the major debates in implant dentistry has focused on the advantages of the pick-up versus the transfer impression technique. The pick-up technique is widely accepted as the more accurate. However, the conventional transfer technique is simpler and less time consuming. The Hex-Lock-Friction-Fit impression coping (AB Dental Devices) combines the advantages of the transfer impression technique and the pick-up impression technique. In this article we will review the relevant literature, discuss the advantages of this unique implant impression technique, and present some related clinical cases.

  10. Clinical decision support systems in hospital care using ubiquitous devices: Current issues and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Mirza Mansoor; GholamHosseini, Hamid; Moqeem, Aasia A; Mirza, Farhaan; Lindén, Maria

    2017-11-01

    Supporting clinicians in decision making using advanced technologies has been an active research area in biomedical engineering during the past years. Among a wide range of ubiquitous systems, smartphone applications have been increasingly developed in healthcare settings to help clinicians as well as patients. Today, many smartphone applications, from basic data analysis to advanced patient monitoring, are available to clinicians and patients. Such applications are now increasingly integrating into healthcare for clinical decision support, and therefore, concerns around accuracy, stability, and dependency of these applications are rising. In addition, lack of attention to the clinicians' acceptability, as well as the low impact on the medical professionals' decision making, are posing more serious issues on the acceptability of smartphone applications. This article reviews smartphone-based decision support applications, focusing on hospital care settings and their overall impact of these applications on the wider clinical workflow. Additionally, key challenges and barriers of the current ubiquitous device-based healthcare applications are identified. Finally, this article addresses current challenges, future directions, and the adoption of mobile healthcare applications.

  11. A Laboratory Test Expert System for Clinical Diagnosis Support in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Fernandez-Millan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Decision Support Systems have the potential to reduce lack of communication and errors in diagnostic steps in primary health care. Literature reports have showed great advances in clinical decision support systems in the recent years, which have proven its usefulness in improving the quality of care. However, most of these systems are focused on specific areas of diseases. In this way, we propose a rule-based expert system, which supports clinicians in primary health care, providing a list of possible diseases regarding patient’s laboratory tests results in order to assist previous diagnosis. Our system also allows storing and retrieving patient’s data and the history of patient’s analyses, establishing a basis for coordination between the various health care levels. A validation step and speed performance tests were made to check the quality of the system. We conclude that our system could improve clinician accuracy and speed, resulting in more efficiency and better quality of service. Finally, we propose some recommendations for further research.

  12. Novel aquatic modules for bioregenerative life-support systems based on the closed equilibrated biological aquatic system (c.e.b.a.s.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluem, Volker; Paris, Frank

    2002-06-01

    The closed equilibrated biological aquatic system (C.E.B.A.S) is a man-made aquatic ecosystem which consists of four subcomponents: an aquatic animal habitat, an aquatic plant bioreactor, an ammonia oxidizing bacteria filter and a data acquisition/control unit. It is a precursor for different types of fish and aquatic plant production sites which are disposed for the integration into bioregenerative life-support systems. The results of two successful spaceflights of a miniaturized C.E.B.A.S version (the C.E.B.A.S. MINI MODULE) allow the optimization of aquatic food production systems which are already developed in the ground laboratory and open new aspects for their utilization as aquatic modules in space bioregenerative life support systems. The total disposition offers different stages of complexity of such aquatic modules starting with simple but efficient aquatic plant cultivators which can be implemented into water recycling systems and ending up in combined plant/fish aquaculture in connection with reproduction modules and hydroponics applications for higher land plants. In principle, aquaculture of fishes and/or other aquatic animals edible for humans offers optimal animal protein production under lowered gravity conditions without the tremendous waste management problems connected with tetrapod breeding and maintenance. The paper presents details of conducted experimental work and of future dispositions which demonstrate clearly that aquaculture is an additional possibility to combine efficient and simple food production in space with water recycling utilizing safe and performable biotechnologies. Moreover, it explains how these systems may contribute to more variable diets to fulfill the needs of multicultural crews.

  13. Mechanical behavior and clinical application of nickel-titanium closed-coil springs under different stress levels and mechanical loading cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichelhaus, Andrea; Brauchli, Lorenz; Ball, Judith; Mertmann, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    The main advantage of superelastic nickel-titanium (NiTi) products is their unique characteristic of force plateaus, which allow for clinically precise control of the force. The aims of this study were to define the mechanical characteristics of several currently available closed-coil retraction springs and to compare these products. A universal test frame was used to acquire force-deflection diagrams of 24 NiTi closed-coil springs at body temperature. Data analysis was performed with the superelastic algorithm. Also, the influence of temperature cycles and mechanical microcycles simulating ingestion of different foods and mastication, respectively, were considered. Mechanical testing showed significant differences between the various spring types (ANOVA, mechanical properties of the springs: strong superelasticity without bias stress, weak superelasticity without bias stress, strong superelasticity with bias stress, and weak superelasticity with bias stress. In sliding mechanics, the strongly superelastic closed-coil springs with preactivation are recommended. In addition, we found that the oral environment seems to have only a minor influence on their mechanical properties. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Automatic Decision Support for Clinical Diagnostic Literature Using Link Analysis in a Weighted Keyword Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuqing; Sun, Ying; Soergel, Dagobert

    2017-12-23

    We present a novel approach to recommending articles from the medical literature that support clinical diagnostic decision-making, giving detailed descriptions of the associated ideas and principles. The specific goal is to retrieve biomedical articles that help answer questions of a specified type about a particular case. Based on the filtered keywords, MeSH(Medical Subject Headings) lexicon and the automatically extracted acronyms, the relationship between keywords and articles was built. The paper gives a detailed description of the process of by which keywords were measured and relevant articles identified based on link analysis in a weighted keywords network. Some important challenges identified in this study include the extraction of diagnosis-related keywords and a collection of valid sentences based on the keyword co-occurrence analysis and existing descriptions of symptoms. All data were taken from medical articles provided in the TREC (Text Retrieval Conference) clinical decision support track 2015. Ten standard topics and one demonstration topic were tested. In each case, a maximum of five articles with the highest relevance were returned. The total user satisfaction of 3.98 was 33% higher than average. The results also suggested that the smaller the number of results, the higher the average satisfaction. However, a few shortcomings were also revealed since medical literature recommendation for clinical diagnostic decision support is so complex a topic that it cannot be fully addressed through the semantic information carried solely by keywords in existing descriptions of symptoms. Nevertheless, the fact that these articles are actually relevant will no doubt inspire future research.

  15. Evaluating a Clinical Decision Support Interface for End-of-Life Nurse Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febretti, Alessandro; Stifter, Janet; Keenan, Gail M; Lopez, Karen D; Johnson, Andrew; Wilkie, Diana J

    2014-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) are tools that assist healthcare personnel in the decision-making process for patient care. Although CDSSs have been successfully deployed in the clinical setting to assist physicians, few CDSS have been targeted at professional nurses, the largest group of health providers. We present our experience in designing and testing a CDSS interface embedded within a nurse care planning and documentation tool. We developed four prototypes based on different CDSS feature designs, and tested them in simulated end-of-life patient handoff sessions with a group of 40 nurse clinicians. We show how our prototypes directed nurses towards an optimal care decision that was rarely performed in unassisted practice. We also discuss the effect of CDSS layout and interface navigation in a nurse's acceptance of suggested actions. These findings provide insights into effective nursing CDSS design that are generalizable to care scenarios different than end-of-life.

  16. Multidisciplinary Modelling of Symptoms and Signs with Archetypes and SNOMED-CT for Clinical Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Maldonado, J Alberto; Karlsen, Randi; Bellika, Johan G

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) help to improve health care and reduce costs. However, the lack of knowledge management and modelling hampers their maintenance and reuse. Current EHR standards and terminologies can allow the semantic representation of the data and knowledge of CDSS systems boosting their interoperability, reuse and maintenance. This paper presents the modelling process of respiratory conditions' symptoms and signs by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and information architects with the help of openEHR, SNOMED and clinical information modelling tools for a CDSS. The information model of the CDSS was defined by means of an archetype and the knowledge model was implemented by means of an SNOMED-CT based ontology.

  17. Genetic Stratification in Myeloid Diseases: From Risk Assessment to Clinical Decision Support Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yishai Ofran

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic aberrations have become a dominant factor in the stratification of myeloid malignancies. Cytogenetic and a few mutation studies are the backbone of risk assessment models of myeloid malignancies which are a major consideration in clinical decisions, especially patient assignment for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Progress in our understanding of the genetic basis of the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies and the growing capabilities of mass sequencing may add new roles for the clinical usage of genetic data. A few recently identified mutations recognized to be associated with specific diseases or clinical scenarios may soon become part of the diagnostic criteria of such conditions. Mutational studies may also advance our capabilities for a more efficient patient selection process, assigning the most effective therapy at the best timing for each patient. The clinical utility of genetic data is anticipated to advance further with the adoption of deep sequencing and next-generation sequencing techniques. We herein suggest some future potential applications of sequential genetic data to identify pending deteriorations at time points which are the best for aggressive interventions such as allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Genetics is moving from being mostly a prognostic factor to becoming a multitasking decision support tool for hematologists. Physicians must pay attention to advances in molecular hematology as it will soon be accessible and influential for most of our patients.

  18. eLearning techniques supporting problem based learning in clinical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, Charles; Hoy, Derek; Topp, Helena; Trinder, Kathryn

    2005-08-01

    This paper details the results of the first phase of a project using eLearning to support students' learning within a simulated environment. The locus was a purpose built clinical simulation laboratory (CSL) where the School's philosophy of problem based learning (PBL) was challenged through lecturers using traditional teaching methods. a student-centred, problem based approach to the acquisition of clinical skills that used high quality learning objects embedded within web pages, substituting for lecturers providing instruction and demonstration. This encouraged student nurses to explore, analyse and make decisions within the safety of a clinical simulation. Learning was facilitated through network communications and reflection on video performances of self and others. Evaluations were positive, students demonstrating increased satisfaction with PBL, improved performance in exams, and increased self-efficacy in the performance of nursing activities. These results indicate that eLearning techniques can help students acquire clinical skills in the safety of a simulated environment within the context of a problem based learning curriculum.

  19. Supporting cancer patients and their carers: the contribution of art therapy and clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gudrun; Browning, Mary

    2009-11-01

    The value of various types of psychosocial support for people with cancer is now becoming well established. Typically the term 'psychosocial' includes: counselling and psychotherapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, education and information, and social support. The research literature sometimes fails to clarify the exact nature of the different approaches and their relative efficacy. Inevitably, even within a specific type of therapeutic approach, there is variation owing to the professional background and skills of different practitioners. This article describes the relative contributions made by an art psychotherapist and a clinical psychologist working together in a cancer and palliative care service in Wales. The referrals come from the same sources and tend to be for similar types of problem. The assessment and formulation processes are also broadly similar. Interventions, however, are markedly different. These are described in some detail through case study examples.

  20. The Development of a Clinical Decision Support System for the Management of Pediatric Food Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Alana K; Dyer, Ashley A; Warren, Christopher M; Walkner, Madeline; Smith, Bridget M; Gupta, Ruchi S

    2017-06-01

    Pediatricians are often first-line providers for children with food allergy. Food allergy management guidelines have been developed but are cumbersome and confusing, and significant variation exists in pediatricians' management practices. We therefore consolidated the guidelines into 5 key steps for pediatricians caring for patients with food allergy and used rapid-cycle improvement methods to create a clinical decision support system to facilitate the management of food allergy in the primary care setting. This report details the development of the Food Allergy Support Tool (FAST), its pilot testing in 4 primary care pediatric practices, and our ongoing efforts to improve its utility and ease of use. Key themes identified during these processes include the importance of both initial and ongoing provider education as well as the limitations of a tool that must be actively initiated by providers.

  1. Mobile Clinical Decision Support System for Acid-base Balance Diagnosis and Treatment Recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandzuka, Mensur; Begic, Edin; Boskovic, Dusanka; Begic, Zijo; Masic, Izet

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents mobile application implementing a decision support system for acid-base disorder diagnosis and treatment recommendation. The application was developed using the official integrated development environment for the Android platform (to maximize availability and minimize investments in specialized hardware) called Android Studio. The application identifies disorder, based on the blood gas analysis, evaluates whether the disorder has been compensated, and based on additional input related to electrolyte imbalance, provides recommendations for treatment. The application is a tool in the hands of the user, which provides assistance during acid-base disorders treatment. The application will assist the physician in clinical practice and is focused on the treatment in intensive care.

  2. Clinical Decision Support Tools for Selecting Interventions for Patients with Disabling Musculoskeletal Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gross, Douglas P; Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Shaw, William S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to identify and inventory clinical decision support (CDS) tools for helping front-line staff select interventions for patients with musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders. Methods We used Arksey and O'Malley's scoping review framework which progresses through five stages: (1) identifying...... the research question; (2) identifying relevant studies; (3) selecting studies for analysis; (4) charting the data; and (5) collating, summarizing and reporting results. We considered computer-based, and other available tools, such as algorithms, care pathways, rules and models. Since this research crosses...

  3. [The analytical reliability of clinical laboratory information and role of the standards in its support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men'shikov, V V

    2012-12-01

    The article deals with the factors impacting the reliability of clinical laboratory information. The differences of qualities of laboratory analysis tools produced by various manufacturers are discussed. These characteristics are the causes of discrepancy of the results of laboratory analyses of the same analite. The role of the reference system in supporting the comparability of laboratory analysis results is demonstrated. The project of national standard is presented to regulate the requirements to standards and calibrators for analysis of qualitative and non-metrical characteristics of components of biomaterials.

  4. Factors Influencing Support for National Health Insurance among Patients Attending Specialist Clinics in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almualm, Yasmin; Alkaff, Sharifa Ezat; Aljunid, Syed; Alsagoff, Syed Sagoff

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the level of support towards the proposed National Health Insurance scheme among Malaysian patients attending specialist clinics at the National University of Malaysia Medical centre and its influencing factors. The cross sectional study was carried out from July-October 2012. 260 patients were selected using multistage sampling method. 71.2% of respondents supported the proposed National Health insurance scheme. 61.4% of respondents are willing to pay up to RM240 per year to join the National Health Insurance and 76.6% of respondents are of the view that enrolment in NHI should be made compulsory. Knowledge had a positive influence on respondent's support towards National Health Insurance. National Health Insurance when implemented in Malaysia can be used to raise funds for health care financing, increase access to health services and achieve the desired health status. More efforts should be taken to promote the scheme and educate the public in order to achieve higher support towards the proposed National Health Insurance. The cost to enroll in NHI as well as services to be included under the scheme should be duly considered. PMID:23985101

  5. Moving the Self-Esteem of People with Epilepsy by Supportive Group: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritaya Sawangchareon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People with epilepsy (PWE face physical and mental illness, and social stigma, which affect their self-esteem and quality of life. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a support group on the self-esteem of PWE. Methods: A Quasi-experimental study was performed on 120 PWE in the Epilepsy Clinic at Srinagarind Hospital. The experimental group (N=60 attended the support group before receiving regular health care services. The control group (N=60 received only regular healthcare services. Data was collected by using the Rosenberg self-esteem scale scoring before and after the experiment. The score was analyzed by using a paired t-test and an independent t-test. Results: The study showed that before the experiment, the self–esteem score of the control group was significantly higher than the experimental group. After the experiment, the scores of the control group and the experimental group showed a significant statistical difference. The score in the control group was significantly lower than the experimental group, while the score in the experimental group was significantly higher than before the experiment. Conclusion: The support group improves the self-esteem of PWE. Medical personnel should set up a support group for PWE to enhance their self-esteem.

  6. Clinical, Etiological and Therapeutic Features of Jaw-opening and Jaw-closing Oromandibular Dystonias: A Decade of Experience at a Single Treatment Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Gonzalez-Alegre

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dystonia is a heterogeneous hyperkinetic disorder. The anatomical location of the dystonia helps clinicians guide their evaluation and treatment plan. When dystonia involves masticatory, lingual, and pharyngeal muscles, it is referred to as oromandibular dystonia (OMD.Methods: We identified patients diagnosed with OMD in a Movement Disorders Clinic and Laryngeal Movement Disorders Clinic from a single institution. Demographic, etiological, clinical, and therapeutic information was retrospectively reviewed for patients with jaw‐opening (O‐OMD and jaw‐closing (C‐OMD OMD.Results: Twenty‐seven patients were included. Their average age of onset was in the sixth decade of life and there was a female predominance. Etiological factors linked in this study to OMD included a family history of dystonia or essential tremor, occupation, cerebellar disease, a dental disorder, and tardive syndrome. Clinically, patients with C‐OMD presented with more prominent feeding difficulties, but seemed to respond better to therapy than those with O‐OMD. In addition to the known benefits of botulinum toxin therapy, patients who described sensory tricks obtained benefit from the use of customized dental prosthesis.Discussion: This works provides useful information on potential etiological factors for OMD and its response to therapy, and highlights the potential benefit of dental prosthesis for the treatment of OMD.

  7. Support and Assessment for Fall Emergency Referrals (SAFER 1: cluster randomised trial of computerised clinical decision support for paramedics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Anne Snooks

    Full Text Available To evaluate effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of Computerised Clinical Decision Support (CCDS for paramedics attending older people who fall.Cluster trial randomised by paramedic; modelling.13 ambulance stations in two UK emergency ambulance services.42 of 409 eligible paramedics, who attended 779 older patients for a reported fall.Intervention paramedics received CCDS on Tablet computers to guide patient care. Control paramedics provided care as usual. One service had already installed electronic data capture.Effectiveness: patients referred to falls service, patient reported quality of life and satisfaction, processes of care.Further emergency contacts or death within one month.Costs and quality of life. We used findings from published Community Falls Prevention Trial to model cost-effectiveness.17 intervention paramedics used CCDS for 54 (12.4% of 436 participants. They referred 42 (9.6% to falls services, compared with 17 (5.0% of 343 participants seen by 19 control paramedics [Odds ratio (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.12 to 3.72]. No adverse events were related to the intervention. Non-significant differences between groups included: subsequent emergency contacts (34.6% versus 29.1%; OR 1.27, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.72; quality of life (mean SF12 differences: MCS -0.74, 95% CI -2.83 to +1.28; PCS -0.13, 95% CI -1.65 to +1.39 and non-conveyance (42.0% versus 36.7%; OR 1.13, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.52. However ambulance job cycle time was 8.9 minutes longer for intervention patients (95% CI 2.3 to 15.3. Average net cost of implementing CCDS was £208 per patient with existing electronic data capture, and £308 without. Modelling estimated cost per quality-adjusted life-year at £15,000 with existing electronic data capture; and £22,200 without.Intervention paramedics referred twice as many participants to falls services with no difference in safety. CCDS is potentially cost-effective, especially with existing electronic data capture.ISRCTN Register ISRCTN

  8. Broad support for regulating the clinical implementation of future reproductive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, S; Vliegenthart, R; Repping, S; Dancet, E A F

    2018-01-01

    Do gynaecologists, infertile patients and the general public, consider that regulation of the clinical implementation of stem cell-based fertility treatments is required? There is broad support from gynaecologists, patients and the general public for regulating the clinical implementation of future stem cell-based fertility treatments. There is debate on the need to regulate the clinical implementation of novel techniques. Regulation may hinder their swift adoption and delay benefits for patients, but may prevent the implementation of ineffective or harmful techniques. Stem cell-based fertility treatments, which involve creating oocytes or spermatozoa by manipulating stem cells, are likely to be implemented in clinical practice in the near future and will probably impact future generations as well as the current one. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among gynaecologists working in fertility clinics (n = 179), patients with severe infertility (n = 348) and a representative sample of the general public (n = 1250). The questionnaire was disseminated in the Netherlands in the winter of 2015-2016. The newly developed questionnaire was reviewed by experts and tested among the general public. The questionnaire assessed whether participants wanted each of nine potential negative consequences of the clinical implementation of stem cell-based fertility treatments to be regulated. In addition, the importance of all negative and positive potential consequences, the appropriate regulatory body and its need to consult with advisors from various backgrounds was questioned. In total, 958 respondents completed the questionnaire (response rate: 54%). A large majority of each participant group (>85%) wanted regulation, for at least one potential negative consequence of the clinical implementation of stem cell-based fertility treatments. The majority of all participant groups wanted regulation for serious health risks for intended parents, serious health risks for children and

  9. Automatic identification of high impact articles in PubMed to support clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Jiantao; Morid, Mohammad Amin; Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha; Luo, Gang; Del Fiol, Guilherme

    2017-09-01

    The practice of evidence-based medicine involves integrating the latest best available evidence into patient care decisions. Yet, critical barriers exist for clinicians' retrieval of evidence that is relevant for a particular patient from primary sources such as randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses. To help address those barriers, we investigated machine learning algorithms that find clinical studies with high clinical impact from PubMed®. Our machine learning algorithms use a variety of features including bibliometric features (e.g., citation count), social media attention, journal impact factors, and citation metadata. The algorithms were developed and evaluated with a gold standard composed of 502 high impact clinical studies that are referenced in 11 clinical evidence-based guidelines on the treatment of various diseases. We tested the following hypotheses: (1) our high impact classifier outperforms a state-of-the-art classifier based on citation metadata and citation terms, and PubMed's® relevance sort algorithm; and (2) the performance of our high impact classifier does not decrease significantly after removing proprietary features such as citation count. The mean top 20 precision of our high impact classifier was 34% versus 11% for the state-of-the-art classifier and 4% for PubMed's® relevance sort (p=0.009); and the performance of our high impact classifier did not decrease significantly after removing proprietary features (mean top 20 precision=34% vs. 36%; p=0.085). The high impact classifier, using features such as bibliometrics, social media attention and MEDLINE® metadata, outperformed previous approaches and is a promising alternative to identifying high impact studies for clinical decision support. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evidence - competence - discourse: the theoretical framework of the multi-centre clinical ethics support project METAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter-Theil, Stella; Mertz, Marcel; Schürmann, Jan; Stingelin Giles, Nicola; Meyer-Zehnder, Barbara

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we assume that 'theory' is important for Clinical Ethics Support Services (CESS). We will argue that the underlying implicit theory should be reflected. Moreover, we suggest that the theoretical components on which any clinical ethics support (CES) relies should be explicitly articulated in order to enhance the quality of CES. A theoretical framework appropriate for CES will be necessarily complex and should include ethical (both descriptive and normative), metaethical and organizational components. The various forms of CES that exist in North-America and in Europe show their underlying theory more or less explicitly, with most of them referring to some kind of theoretical components including 'how-to' questions (methodology), organizational issues (implementation), problem analysis (phenomenology or typology of problems), and related ethical issues such as end-of-life decisions (major ethical topics). In order to illustrate and explain the theoretical framework that we are suggesting for our own CES project METAP, we will outline this project which has been established in a multi-centre context in several healthcare institutions. We conceptualize three 'pillars' as the major components of our theoretical framework: (1) evidence, (2) competence, and (3) discourse. As a whole, the framework is aimed at developing a foundation of our CES project METAP. We conclude that this specific integration of theoretical components is a promising model for the fruitful further development of CES. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Comparison of electronic health record system functionalities to support the patient recruitment process in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiweis, Björn; Trinczek, Benjamin; Köpcke, Felix; Leusch, Thomas; Majeed, Raphael W; Wenk, Joachim; Bergh, Björn; Ohmann, Christian; Röhrig, Rainer; Dugas, Martin; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-11-01

    Reusing data from electronic health records for clinical and translational research and especially for patient recruitment has been tackled in a broader manner since about a decade. Most projects found in the literature however focus on standalone systems and proprietary implementations at one particular institution often for only one singular trial and no generic evaluation of EHR systems for their applicability to support the patient recruitment process does yet exist. Thus we sought to assess whether the current generation of EHR systems in Germany provides modules/tools, which can readily be applied for IT-supported patient recruitment scenarios. We first analysed the EHR portfolio implemented at German University Hospitals and then selected 5 sites with five different EHR implementations covering all major commercial systems applied in German University Hospitals. Further, major functionalities required for patient recruitment support have been defined and the five sample EHRs and their standard tools have been compared to the major functionalities. In our analysis of the site's hospital information system environments (with four commercial EHR systems and one self-developed system) we found that - even though no dedicated module for patient recruitment has been provided - most EHR products comprise generic tools such as workflow engines, querying capabilities, report generators and direct SQL-based database access which can be applied as query modules, screening lists and notification components for patient recruitment support. A major limitation of all current EHR products however is that they provide no dedicated data structures and functionalities for implementing and maintaining a local trial registry. At the five sites with standard EHR tools the typical functionalities of the patient recruitment process could be mostly implemented. However, no EHR component is yet directly dedicated to support research requirements such as patient recruitment. We

  12. Does integrating nonurgent, clinically significant radiology alerts within the electronic health record impact closed-loop communication and follow-up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Stacy D; Dalal, Anuj K; Sahni, V Anik; Lacson, Ronilda; Khorasani, Ramin

    2016-03-01

    To assess whether integrating critical result management software--Alert Notification of Critical Results (ANCR)--with an electronic health record (EHR)-based results management application impacts closed-loop communication and follow-up of nonurgent, clinically significant radiology results by primary care providers (PCPs). This institutional review board-approved study was conducted at a large academic medical center. Postintervention, PCPs could acknowledge nonurgent, clinically significant ANCR-generated alerts ("alerts") within ANCR or the EHR. Primary outcome was the proportion of alerts acknowledged via EHR over a 24-month postintervention. Chart abstractions for a random sample of alerts 12 months preintervention and 24 months postintervention were reviewed, and the follow-up rate of actionable alerts (eg, performing follow-up imaging, administering antibiotics) was estimated. Pre- and postintervention rates were compared using the Fisher exact test. Postintervention follow-up rate was compared for EHR-acknowledged alerts vs ANCR. Five thousand nine hundred and thirty-one alerts were acknowledged by 171 PCPs, with 100% acknowledgement (consistent with expected ANCR functionality). PCPs acknowledged 16% (688 of 4428) of postintervention alerts in the EHR, with the remaining in ANCR. Follow-up was documented for 85 of 90 (94%; 95% CI, 88%-98%) preintervention and 79 of 84 (94%; 95% CI, 87%-97%) postintervention alerts (P > .99). Postintervention, 11 of 14 (79%; 95% CI, 52%-92%) alerts were acknowledged via EHR and 68 of 70 (97%; 95% CI, 90%-99%) in ANCR had follow-up (P = .03). Integrating ANCR and EHR provides an additional workflow for acknowledging nonurgent, clinically significant results without significant change in rates of closed-loop communication or follow-up of alerts. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Social support in the post-abortion recovery room: evidence from patients, support persons and nurses in a Vancouver clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Mariana B; Lam, Melanie; Gemeinhardt, Carla; Houlihan, Edwina; Fitzsimmons, Brian P; Hodgson, Zoë G

    2011-03-01

    The benefits of social support in post-surgical recovery are well documented; social support decreases preoperative stress and postoperative recovery time. However, a paucity of studies have examined the effect of social support in the context of pregnancy termination. This study is the first to examine the effect of postoperative accompaniment from the patient, support person and nurses' perspective. This study was carried out in two phases. In Phase I, no accompaniment was allowed in the post-anesthesia recovery room (PAR); in Phase II, accompaniment was permitted. All participants completed pre- and postoperative questionnaires. The perception of accompaniment was overwhelmingly positive in patients and support people. Patients in Phase II demonstrated a high (over 95%) acceptance of accompaniment in the recovery room. It was found that 96.8% reported they would choose to be accompanied in the recovery room again if they had to have another abortion. Support persons felt very strongly that their presence was helpful to the patient. The decrease in pre- to postoperative anxiety levels was significantly greater in those women who were accompanied. However, overall, nurses demonstrated a negative attitude towards accompaniment in the recovery room. In summary, the presence of a support person in the PAR was perceived in a positive manner by patients and support people. However, the reasoning behind the negative opinion of nurses requires further study before PAR accompaniment can be considered a possibility in the context of pregnancy termination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of Quality Assurance Strategies in Diagnostics and Clinical Support Services in Iranian Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei Hashjin, Asgar; Kringos, Dionne; Ravaghi, Hamid; Manoochehri, Jila; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Klazinga, Niek S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Iran has a widespread diagnostics and clinical support services (DCSS) network that plays a crucial role in providing diagnostic and clinical support services to both inpatient and outpatient care. However, very little is known on the application of quality assurance (QA) policies in DCSS units. This study explores the extent of application of eleven QA strategies in DCSS units within Iranian hospitals and its association with hospital characteristics. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 2009/2010. Data were collected from 554 DCSS units among 84 hospitals. Results: The average reported application rate for the QA strategies ranged from 57%-94% in the DCSS units. Most frequently reported were checking drugs expiration dates (94%), pharmacopoeia availability (92%), equipment calibration (87%) and identifying responsibilities (86%). Least reported was external auditing of the DCSS (57%). The clinical chemistry and microbiology laboratories (84%), pharmacies, blood bank services (83%) reported highest average application rates across all questioned QA strategies. Lowest application rates were reported in human tissue banks (50%). There was no significant difference between the reported application rates in DCSS in the general/specialized, teaching/research, nonteaching/research hospitals with the exception of pharmacies and radiology departments. They reported availability of a written QA plan significantly more often in research hospitals. Nearly all QA strategies were reported to be applied significantly more often in the DCSS of Social Security Organization (SSO) and private-for-profit hospitals than in governmental hospitals. Conclusion: There is still room for strengthening the managerial cycle of QA systems and accountability in the DCSS in Iranian hospitals. Getting feedback, change and learning through application of specific QA strategies (eg, external/internal audits) can be improved. Both the effectiveness of QA

  15. Carbapenem Breakpoints for Acinetobacter baumannii Group: Supporting Clinical Outcome Data from Patients with Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Tzu; Chiang, Mei-Chun; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Wang, Yung-Chih; Lee, I-Hsin; Chen, Te-Li; Yang, Ya-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The carbapenem breakpoints set by different organizations for Acinetobacter are discordant, but supporting clinical data are lacking. This study aimed to provide the first clinical outcome data to support the carbapenem breakpoints for Acinetobacter baumannii (Ab) group in patients with bacteremia. This study included 117 adults who received carbapenems for treatment of Ab group bacteremia in Taipei Veterans General Hospital over an 8-year period. We analyzed 30-day mortality rates among patient groups acquiring isolates with different carbapenem minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). The carbapenem MIC breakpoint derived from classification and regression tree (CART) analysis to delineate the risk of 30-day mortality was between MICs of ≤ 4 mg/L and ≥ 8 mg/L. Mortality rate was higher in patients acquiring isolates with carbapenem MIC ≥ 8 mg/L than ≤ 4 mg/L, by bivariate (54.9% [28/51] vs 25.8% [17/66]; P = 0.003) and survival analysis (P = 0.001 by log-rank test). Multivariate analysis using logistic regression and Cox regression models including severity of illness indices demonstrated that treating patients with Ab group bacteremia caused by isolates with a carbapenem MIC ≥ 8 mg/L with carbapenem was an independent predictor of 30-day mortality (odds ratio, 5.125; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.946-13.498; P = 0.001, and hazard ratio, 2.630; 95% CI, 1.431-4.834; P = 0.002, respectively). The clinical outcome data confirmed that isolates with MIC ≤ 4 mg/L were susceptible to carbapenem, and those with MIC ≥ 8 mg/L were resistant in patients with Ab group bacteremia.

  16. Interface, information, interaction: a narrative review of design and functional requirements for clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kristen; Mosby, Danielle; Capan, Muge; Kowalski, Rebecca; Ratwani, Raj; Noaiseh, Yaman; Kraft, Rachel; Schwartz, Sanford; Weintraub, William S; Arnold, Ryan

    2018-05-01

    Provider acceptance and associated patient outcomes are widely discussed in the evaluation of clinical decision support systems (CDSSs), but critical design criteria for tools have generally been overlooked. The objective of this work is to inform electronic health record alert optimization and clinical practice workflow by identifying, compiling, and reporting design recommendations for CDSS to support the efficient, effective, and timely delivery of high-quality care. A narrative review was conducted from 2000 to 2016 in PubMed and The Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics Society to identify papers that discussed/recommended design features of CDSSs that are associated with the success of these systems. Fourteen papers were included as meeting the criteria and were found to have a total of 42 unique recommendations; 11 were classified as interface features, 10 as information features, and 21 as interaction features. Features are defined and described, providing actionable guidance that can be applied to CDSS development and policy. To our knowledge, no reviews have been completed that discuss/recommend design features of CDSS at this scale, and thus we found that this was important for the body of literature. The recommendations identified in this narrative review will help to optimize design, organization, management, presentation, and utilization of information through presentation, content, and function. The designation of 3 categories (interface, information, and interaction) should be further evaluated to determine the critical importance of the categories. Future work will determine how to prioritize them with limited resources for designers and developers in order to maximize the clinical utility of CDSS. This review will expand the field of knowledge and provide a novel organization structure to identify key recommendations for CDSS.

  17. Current evidence does not support the use of Kinesio Taping in clinical practice: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia do Carmo Silva Parreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Questions: Is Kinesio Taping more effective than a sham taping/placebo, no treatment or other interventions in people with musculoskeletal conditions? Is the addition of Kinesio Taping to other interventions more effective than other interventions alone in people with musculoskeletal conditions? Design: Systematic review of randomised trials. Participants: People with musculoskeletal conditions. Intervention: Kinesio Taping was compared with sham taping/placebo, no treatment, exercises, manual therapy and conventional physiotherapy. Outcome measures: Pain intensity, disability, quality of life, return to work, and global impression of recovery. Results: Twelve randomised trials involving 495 participants were included in the review. The effectiveness of the Kinesio Taping was tested in participants with: shoulder pain in two trials; knee pain in three trials; chronic low back pain in two trials; neck pain in three trials; plantar fasciitis in one trial; and multiple musculoskeletal conditions in one trial. The methodological quality of eligible trials was moderate, with a mean of 6.1 points on the 10-point PEDro Scale score. Overall, Kinesio Taping was no better than sham taping/placebo and active comparison groups. In all comparisons where Kinesio Taping was better than an active or a sham control group, the effect sizes were small and probably not clinically significant or the trials were of low quality. Conclusion: This review provides the most updated evidence on the effectiveness of the Kinesio Taping for musculoskeletal conditions. The current evidence does not support the use of this intervention in these clinical populations. PROSPERO registration: CRD42012003436. [Parreira PdCS, Costa LdCM, Hespanhol Junior LC, Lopes AD, Costa LOP (2014 Current evidence does not support the use of Kinesio Taping in clinical practice: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 60: 31–39

  18. Change in quality management in diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J; Baan, Caroline A; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Rutten, Guy E

    2015-02-01

    To assess the change in level of diabetes quality management in primary care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support. This before-and-after study with a 1-year follow-up surveyed quality managers on six domains of quality management. Questionnaires measured organization of care, multidisciplinary teamwork, patient centeredness, performance results, quality improvement policy, and management strategies (score range 0-100%). Based on the scores, responders received feedback and a benchmark and were granted access to a toolbox of quality improvement instruments. If requested, additional support in improving quality management was available, consisting of an elucidating phone call or a visit from an experienced consultant. After 1 year, the level of quality management was measured again. Of the initially 60 participating care groups, 51 completed the study. The total quality management score improved from 59.8% (95% CI 57.0-62.6%) to 65.1% (62.8-67.5%; P quality management score (P = 0.001). Of the 44 participating outpatient clinics, 28 completed the study. Their total score changed from 65.7% (CI 60.3-71.1%) to 67.3% (CI 62.9-71.7%; P = 0.30). Only the results in the domain multidisciplinary teamwork improved (P = 0.001). Measuring quality management and providing feedback and a benchmark improves the level of quality management in care groups but not in outpatient clinics. The questionnaires might also be a useful asset for other diabetes care groups, such as Accountable Care Organizations. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  19. Application of Quality Assurance Strategies in Diagnostics and Clinical Support Services in Iranian Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei Hashjin, Asgar; Kringos, Dionne; Ravaghi, Hamid; Manoochehri, Jila; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Klazinga, Niek S

    2015-05-20

    Iran has a widespread diagnostics and clinical support services (DCSS) network that plays a crucial role in providing diagnostic and clinical support services to both inpatient and outpatient care. However, very little is known on the application of quality assurance (QA) policies in DCSS units. This study explores the extent of application of eleven QA strategies in DCSS units within Iranian hospitals and its association with hospital characteristics. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 2009/2010. Data were collected from 554 DCSS units among 84 hospitals. The average reported application rate for the QA strategies ranged from 57%-94% in the DCSS units. Most frequently reported were checking drugs expiration dates (94%), pharmacopoeia availability (92%), equipment calibration (87%) and identifying responsibilities (86%). Least reported was external auditing of the DCSS (57%). The clinical chemistry and microbiology laboratories (84%), pharmacies, blood bank services (83%) reported highest average application rates across all questioned QA strategies. Lowest application rates were reported in human tissue banks (50%). There was no significant difference between the reported application rates in DCSS in the general/specialized, teaching/research, nonteaching/research hospitals with the exception of pharmacies and radiology departments. They reported availability of a written QA plan significantly more often in research hospitals. Nearly all QA strategies were reported to be applied significantly more often in the DCSS of Social Security Organization (SSO) and private-for-profit hospitals than in governmental hospitals. There is still room for strengthening the managerial cycle of QA systems and accountability in the DCSS in Iranian hospitals. Getting feedback, change and learning through application of specific QA strategies (eg, external/internal audits) can be improved. Both the effectiveness of QA strategies in practice, and the application of

  20. Application of Quality Assurance Strategies in Diagnostics and Clinical Support Services in Iranian Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgar Aghaei Hashjin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Iran has a widespread diagnostics and clinical support services (DCSS network that plays a crucial role in providing diagnostic and clinical support services to both inpatient and outpatient care. However, very little is known on the application of quality assurance (QA policies in DCSS units. This study explores the extent of application of eleven QA strategies in DCSS units within Iranian hospitals and its association with hospital characteristics. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 2009/2010. Data were collected from 554 DCSS units among 84 hospitals. Results The average reported application rate for the QA strategies ranged from 57%-94% in the DCSS units. Most frequently reported were checking drugs expiration dates (94%, pharmacopoeia availability (92%, equipment calibration (87% and identifying responsibilities (86%. Least reported was external auditing of the DCSS (57%. The clinical chemistry and microbiology laboratories (84%, pharmacies, blood bank services (83% reported highest average application rates across all questioned QA strategies. Lowest application rates were reported in human tissue banks (50%. There was no significant difference between the reported application rates in DCSS in the general/specialized, teaching/research, nonteaching/research hospitals with the exception of pharmacies and radiology departments. They reported availability of a written QA plan significantly more often in research hospitals. Nearly all QA strategies were reported to be applied significantly more often in the DCSS of Social Security Organization (SSO and private-for-profit hospitals than in governmental hospitals. Conclusion There is still room for strengthening the managerial cycle of QA systems and accountability in the DCSS in Iranian hospitals. Getting feedback, change and learning through application of specific QA strategies (eg, external/internal audits can be improved. Both the effectiveness of QA

  1. Measuring Clinical Decision Support Influence on Evidence-Based Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Susan; Dietrich, Mary S; Wells, Nancy

    2016-07-01

    To measure the effect of clinical decision support (CDS) on oncology nurse evidence-based practice (EBP).
. Longitudinal cluster-randomized design.
. Four distinctly separate oncology clinics associated with an academic medical center.
. The study sample was comprised of randomly selected data elements from the nursing documentation software. The data elements were patient-reported symptoms and the associated nurse interventions. The total sample observations were 600, derived from a baseline, posteducation, and postintervention sample of 200 each (100 in the intervention group and 100 in the control group for each sample).
. The cluster design was used to support randomization of the study intervention at the clinic level rather than the individual participant level to reduce possible diffusion of the study intervention. An elongated data collection cycle (11 weeks) controlled for temporary increases in nurse EBP related to the education or CDS intervention.
. The dependent variable was the nurse evidence-based documentation rate, calculated from the nurse-documented interventions. The independent variable was the CDS added to the nursing documentation software.
. The average EBP rate at baseline for the control and intervention groups was 27%. After education, the average EBP rate increased to 37%, and then decreased to 26% in the postintervention sample. Mixed-model linear statistical analysis revealed no significant interaction of group by sample. The CDS intervention did not result in an increase in nurse EBP.
. EBP education increased nurse EBP documentation rates significantly but only temporarily. Nurses may have used evidence in practice but may not have documented their interventions.
. More research is needed to understand the complex relationship between CDS, nursing practice, and nursing EBP intervention documentation. CDS may have a different effect on nurse EBP, physician EBP, and other medical professional EBP.

  2. "Think aloud" and "Near live" usability testing of two complex clinical decision support tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Safiya; Mishuris, Rebecca; O'Connell, Alexander; Feldstein, David; Hess, Rachel; Smith, Paul; McCullagh, Lauren; McGinn, Thomas; Mann, Devin

    2017-10-01

    Low provider adoption continues to be a significant barrier to realizing the potential of clinical decision support. "Think Aloud" and "Near Live" usability testing were conducted on two clinical decision support tools. Each was composed of an alert, a clinical prediction rule which estimated risk of either group A Streptococcus pharyngitis or pneumonia and an automatic order set based on risk. The objective of this study was to further understanding of the facilitators of usability and to evaluate the types of additional information gained from proceeding to "Near Live" testing after completing "Think Aloud". This was a qualitative observational study conducted at a large academic health care system with 12 primary care providers. During "Think Aloud" testing, participants were provided with written clinical scenarios and asked to verbalize their thought process while interacting with the tool. During "Near Live" testing participants interacted with a mock patient. Morae usability software was used to record full screen capture and audio during every session. Participant comments were placed into coding categories and analyzed for generalizable themes. Themes were compared across usability methods. "Think Aloud" and "Near Live" usability testing generated similar themes under the coding categories visibility, workflow, content, understand-ability and navigation. However, they generated significantly different themes under the coding categories usability, practical usefulness and medical usefulness. During both types of testing participants found the tool easier to use when important text was distinct in its appearance, alerts were passive and appropriately timed, content was up to date, language was clear and simple, and each component of the tool included obvious indicators of next steps. Participant comments reflected higher expectations for usability and usefulness during "Near Live" testing. For example, visit aids, such as automatically generated order sets

  3. Maintaining clinical tissue archives and supporting human research: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Caterina; Oelkers, Michael M; Edwards, William D; Aubry, Marie Christine; Muncil, Maureen M; Mohamud, Koshin H; Sandleback, Sara G; Nowak, John M; Bridgeman, Andrew; Brown, Marie E; Cheville, John C

    2011-03-01

    The increasing number of requests for use of clinically archived tissue in translational research poses unique challenges. Conflicts may arise between pathologists who are responsible for overseeing and preserving the tissues and investigators who need these materials for research purposes. To evaluate the status of our institution's Tissue Registry Archive and to develop updated written policies and procedures to support a new modern and robust tracking system with features of a library loan system. An observational study was performed. We found the existing process for managing loans of tissue (slides and paraffin blocks) to be insufficient for the complexity and volume of this task. After extensive customization, a new tracking system was implemented in January 2008. Analysis of the first year of the system's use (2008) showed that of the 206,330 slides and 51,416 blocks loaned out in 2008, 92% and 94%, respectively, were returned by the due date. These rates were markedly improved from those before the new system: 61% and 47%, respectively, in 2005. Material permanently "lost" in 2008 represented only 0.02% of slides and 0.05% of blocks, none of which was the only diagnostic material for the case. With expanding needs for archived tissues for clinical care and growing demands for translational research, it is essential that pathology departments at institutions with large tissue-based research endeavors have a tracking and management system in place to meet clinical, educational, and research needs, as well as legal requirements.

  4. Implementation of a Mobile Clinical Decision Support Application to Augment Local Antimicrobial Stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Brian M; Ford, Diana C; Ince, Dilek; Ernst, Erika J; Livorsi, Daniel J; Heintz, Brett H; Masse, Vincent; Brownlee, Michael J; Ford, Bradley A

    2018-01-01

    Medical applications for mobile devices allow clinicians to leverage microbiological data and standardized guidelines to treat patients with infectious diseases. We report the implementation of a mobile clinical decision support (CDS) application to augment local antimicrobial stewardship. We detail the implementation of our mobile CDS application over 20 months. Application utilization data were collected and evaluated using descriptive statistics to quantify the impact of our implementation. Project initiation focused on engaging key stakeholders, developing a business case, and selecting a mobile platform. The preimplementation phase included content development, creation of a pathway for content approval within the hospital committee structure, engaging clinical leaders, and formatting the first version of the guide. Implementation involved a media campaign, staff education, and integration within the electronic medical record and hospital mobile devices. The postimplementation phase required ongoing quality improvement, revision of outdated content, and repeated staff education. The evaluation phase included a guide utilization analysis, reporting to hospital leadership, and sustainability and innovation planning. The mobile application was downloaded 3056 times and accessed 9259 times during the study period. The companion web viewer was accessed 8214 times. Successful implementation of a customizable mobile CDS tool enabled our team to expand beyond microbiological data to clinical diagnosis, treatment, and antimicrobial stewardship, broadening our influence on antimicrobial prescribing and incorporating utilization data to inspire new quality and safety initiatives. Further studies are needed to assess the impact on antimicrobial utilization, infection control measures, and patient care outcomes.

  5. Development and impact of computerised decision support systems for clinical management of depression: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triñanes, Yolanda; Atienza, Gerardo; Louro-González, Arturo; de-las-Heras-Liñero, Elena; Alvarez-Ariza, María; Palao, Diego J

    2015-01-01

    One of the proposals for improving clinical practice is to introduce computerised decision support systems (CDSS) and integrate these with electronic medical records. Accordingly, this study sought to systematically review evidence on the effectiveness of CDSS in the management of depression. A search was performed in Medline, EMBASE and PsycInfo, in order to do this. The quality of quantitative studies was assessed using the SIGN method, and qualitative studies using the CASPe checklist. Seven studies were identified (3 randomised clinical trials, 3 non-randomised trials, and one qualitative study). The CDSS assessed incorporated content drawn from guidelines and other evidence-based products. In general, the CDSS had a positive impact on different aspects, such as the screening and diagnosis, treatment, improvement in depressive symptoms and quality of life, and referral of patients. The use of CDSS could thus serve to optimise care of depression in various scenarios by providing recommendations based on the best evidence available and facilitating decision-making in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Electronic clinical decision support systems attitudes and barriers to use in the oncology setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, I M

    2012-03-02

    BACKGROUND: There is little evidence regarding attitudes to clinical decision support systems (CDSS) in oncology. AIMS: We examined the current usage, awareness, and concerns of Irish medical oncologists and oncology pharmacists in this area. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to 27 medical oncologists and 34 oncology pharmacists, identified through professional interest groups. Respondents ranked concerns regarding their use of a CDSS on a scale from 1 to 4, with 4 being most important. RESULTS: Overall, 67% (41\\/61) responded, 48% (13\\/27) of oncologists and 82% (28\\/34) of pharmacists surveyed. Concerns included "difficulty defining complex clinical situations with a set of rules" (mean ± SD) (3.2 ± 0.9), "ensuring evidence base is up to date and relevant" (3.2 ± 0.9) and "lack of clinically relevant suggestions" (2.9 ± 0.9). Ninety-three percent reported using a CDSS but 54% were unaware of this. CONCLUSION: While there are benefits to using a CDSS, concerns must be addressed through user education. This may be a starting point for a user-centred design approach to the development of future local systems through a consultative process.

  7. Design of a Clinical Decision Support System for Fracture Prediction Using Imbalanced Dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Fu Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 1 billion people suffer from chronic respiratory diseases worldwide, accounting for more than 4 million deaths annually. Inhaled corticosteroid is a popular medication for treating chronic respiratory diseases. Its side effects include decreased bone mineral density and osteoporosis. The aims of this study are to investigate the association of inhaled corticosteroids and fracture and to design a clinical support system for fracture prediction. The data of patients aged 20 years and older, who had visited healthcare centers and been prescribed with inhaled corticosteroids within 2002–2010, were retrieved from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD. After excluding patients diagnosed with hip fracture or vertebrate fractures before using inhaled corticosteroid, a total of 11645 patients receiving inhaled corticosteroid therapy were included for this study. Among them, 1134 (9.7% were diagnosed with hip fracture or vertebrate fracture. The statistical results showed that demographic information, chronic respiratory diseases and comorbidities, and corticosteroid-related variables (cumulative dose, mean exposed daily dose, follow-up duration, and exposed duration were significantly different between fracture and nonfracture patients. The clinical decision support systems (CDSSs were designed with integrated genetic algorithm (GA and support vector machine (SVM by training and validating the models with balanced training sets obtained by random and cluster-based undersampling methods and testing with the imbalanced NHIRD dataset. Two different objective functions were adopted for obtaining optimal models with best predictive performance. The predictive performance of the CDSSs exhibits a sensitivity of 69.84–77.00% and an AUC of 0.7495–0.7590. It was concluded that long-term use of inhaled corticosteroids may induce osteoporosis and exhibit higher incidence of hip or vertebrate fractures. The accumulated dose of ICS and

  8. Integrative review of clinical decision support for registered nurses in acute care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn Lopez, Karen; Gephart, Sheila M; Raszewski, Rebecca; Sousa, Vanessa; Shehorn, Lauren E; Abraham, Joanna

    2017-03-01

    To report on the state of the science of clinical decision support (CDS) for hospital bedside nurses. We performed an integrative review of qualitative and quantitative peer-reviewed original research studies using a structured search of PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Applied Health Literature (CINAHL), Scopus, Web of Science, and IEEE Xplore (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Xplore Digital Library). We included articles that reported on CDS targeting bedside nurses and excluded in stages based on rules for titles, abstracts, and full articles. We extracted research design and methods, CDS purpose, electronic health record integration, usability, and process and patient outcomes. Our search yielded 3157 articles. After removing duplicates and applying exclusion rules, 28 articles met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies were single-site, descriptive or qualitative (43%) or quasi-experimental (36%). There was only 1 randomized controlled trial. The purpose of most CDS was to support diagnostic decision-making (36%), guideline adherence (32%), medication management (29%), and situational awareness (25%). All the studies that included process outcomes (7) and usability outcomes (4) and also had analytic procedures to detect changes in outcomes demonstrated statistically significant improvements. Three of 4 studies that included patient outcomes and also had analytic procedures to detect change showed statistically significant improvements. No negative effects of CDS were found on process, usability, or patient outcomes. Clinical support systems targeting bedside nurses have positive effects on outcomes and hold promise for improving care quality; however, this research is lagging behind studies of CDS targeting medical decision-making in both volume and level of evidence. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  9. Clinical support role for a pharmacy technician within a primary care resource center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fera, Toni; Kanel, Keith T; Bolinger, Meghan L; Fink, Amber E; Iheasirim, Serah

    2018-02-01

    The creation of a clinical support role for a pharmacy technician within a primary care resource center is described. In the Primary Care Resource Center (PCRC) Project, hospital-based care transition coordination hubs staffed by nurses and pharmacist teams were created in 6 independent community hospitals. At the largest site, patient volume for targeted diseases challenged the ability of the PCRC pharmacist to provide expected elements of care to targeted patients. Creation of a new pharmacy technician clinical support role was implemented as a cost-effective option to increase the pharmacist's efficiency. The pharmacist's work processes were reviewed and technical functions identified that could be assigned to a specially trained pharmacy technician under the direction of the PCRC pharmacist. Daily tasks performed by the pharmacy technician included maintenance of the patient roster and pending discharges, retrieval and documentation of pertinent laboratory and diagnostic test information from the patient's medical record, assembly of patient medication education materials, and identification of discrepancies between disparate systems' medication records. In the 6 months after establishing the PCRC pharmacy technician role, the pharmacist's completion of comprehensive medication reviews (CMRs) for target patients increased by 40.5% ( p = 0.0223), driven largely by a 42.4% ( p technician to augment pharmacist care in a PCRC team extended the reach of the pharmacist and allowed more time for the pharmacist to engage patients. Technician support enabled the pharmacist to complete more CMRs and reduced the time required for chart reviews. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnet-retained implant-supported overdentures: review and 1-year clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruti, Paola; Bryant, S Ross; Lee, Jun-Ho; MacEntee, Michael I

    2010-01-01

    Open-field aluminum-nickle-cobalt magnets have been used in prosthodontics for many years, but success has been limited because these magnets are susceptible to corrosion by the saliva and because their retentive force is weak relative to the initial retention offered by mechanical attachments. More recently, magnets have been made from alloys of the rare earth elements samarium and neodymium, which provide stronger magnetic force per unit size. In addition, a new generation of laser-welded containers has improved protection from salivary corrosion. The current resurgence of interest in this type of attachment appears justified because, unlike mechanical attachments, magnets have potential for unlimited durability and might therefore be superior to mechanical ball or bar attachments for the retention of removable prostheses on implants. To date, no long-term prospective trials have been conducted to confirm the clinical durability of this new generation of magnets for retaining dentures on either teeth or implants. The aim of this study was to document initial clinical experiences and levels of satisfaction among edentulous patients treated with mandibular implant-supported overdentures retained using a new generation of rare-earth magnetic attachments. At the outset, all but one of the 17 patients had had several years of experience with implant-supported overdentures. During the first year, the mean overall satisfaction among these 17 patients increased from less than 70 to over 90 out of 100 (standardized visual analogue scale). No unusual difficulties were encountered in rendering the treatment or maintaining the attachments. This report offers preliminary evidence of the excellent potential of these magnets for retaining mandibular implant-supported overdentures.

  11. Survival of various implant-supported prosthesis designs following 36 months of clinical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, A M; Orenstein, I H; Morris, H F; Ochi, S

    2000-12-01

    The use of endosseous dental implants to replace natural teeth lost to trauma, dental caries, or periodontal disease has become a predictable form of prosthetic treatment since gaining popularity in the early 1980s. While numerous clinical studies have focused on the survival of implants, few address the survival of different prosthesis designs. Beginning in 1991, 882 prostheses supported by more than 2,900 implants (687 patients) were placed by the Department of Veterans Affairs Dental Implant Clinical Research Group (DICRG). These prostheses were divided into five research strata based on arch location. The recommended design for each stratum was: bar-supported overdenture (maxillary completely edentulous); screw-retained hybrid denture (mandibular completely edentulous); screw-retained fixed partial denture (mandibular and maxillary posterior partially edentulous); and cemented single crown (maxillary anterior single tooth). Alternative overdenture designs were utilized in the edentulous arches when the recommended prosthesis could not be fabricated. Prosthesis success rates for the research strata were calculated for an observation time of up to 36 months following prosthesis placement. Success rates for the maxillary edentulous stratum ranged from 94.6% for the bar-retained overdenture supported by five to six fixtures to 81.8% for the cap-retained overdenture. The mandibular edentulous strata produced success rates of 98.1% for the fixed hybrid prosthesis to 91.7% for the cap-retained prosthesis. Success rates for maxillary and mandibular posterior fixed partial dentures were 94.3% and 92.6%, respectively, while the maxillary anterior single-tooth prosthesis yielded a success rate of 98.1% for the 36-month observation period. The recommended prosthesis designs investigated in this study proved to be reliable, with encouraging success rates for an observation period of 36 months following placement.

  12. Pipe closing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klahn, F.C.; Nolan, J.H.; Wills, C.

    1979-01-01

    The closing device closes the upper end of a support tube for monitoring samples. It meshes with the upper connecting piece of the monitorung sample capsule, and loads the capsule within the bore of the support tube, so that it is fixed but can be released. The closing device consists of an interlocking component with a chamber and several ratchets which hang down. The interlocking component surrounds the actuating component for positioning the ratchets. The interlocking and actuating components are movable axially relative to each other. (DG) [de

  13. Usability Testing of a Complex Clinical Decision Support Tool in the Emergency Department: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Anne; McCullagh, Lauren; Khan, Sundas; Schachter, Andy; Pardo, Salvatore; McGinn, Thomas

    2015-09-10

    As the electronic health record (EHR) becomes the preferred documentation tool across medical practices, health care organizations are pushing for clinical decision support systems (CDSS) to help bring clinical decision support (CDS) tools to the forefront of patient-physician interactions. A CDSS is integrated into the EHR and allows physicians to easily utilize CDS tools. However, often CDSS are integrated into the EHR without an initial phase of usability testing, resulting in poor adoption rates. Usability testing is important because it evaluates a CDSS by testing it on actual users. This paper outlines the usability phase of a study, which will test the impact of integration of the Wells CDSS for pulmonary embolism (PE) diagnosis into a large urban emergency department, where workflow is often chaotic and high stakes decisions are frequently made. We hypothesize that conducting usability testing prior to integration of the Wells score into an emergency room EHR will result in increased adoption rates by physicians. The objective of the study was to conduct usability testing for the integration of the Wells clinical prediction rule into a tertiary care center's emergency department EHR. We conducted usability testing of a CDS tool in the emergency department EHR. The CDS tool consisted of the Wells rule for PE in the form of a calculator and was triggered off computed tomography (CT) orders or patients' chief complaint. The study was conducted at a tertiary hospital in Queens, New York. There were seven residents that were recruited and participated in two phases of usability testing. The usability testing employed a "think aloud" method and "near-live" clinical simulation, where care providers interacted with standardized patients enacting a clinical scenario. Both phases were audiotaped, video-taped, and had screen-capture software activated for onscreen recordings. Phase I: Data from the "think-aloud" phase of the study showed an overall positive outlook on

  14. Social Support in a Virtual Community: Analysis of a Clinic-Affiliated Online Support Group for Persons Living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flickinger, Tabor E; DeBolt, Claire; Waldman, Ava Lena; Reynolds, George; Cohn, Wendy F; Beach, Mary Catherine; Ingersoll, Karen; Dillingham, Rebecca

    2017-11-01

    Social support can improve outcomes for people living with HIV (PLWH) and could be provided through online support groups. The Positive Links smartphone app is a multicomponent intervention that allows users to interact in a clinic-affiliated anonymous online support group. We investigated how social support was exchanged in a group of 55 participants over 8 months, using an adaptation of the Social Support Behavior Code. Participant interviews assessed their experiences and perceptions of the app. Of 840 posts analyzed, 115 (14 %) were coded as eliciting social support and 433 (52 %) as providing social support. Messages providing support were predominantly emotional (41 %), followed by network (27 %), esteem (24 %), informational (18 %), and instrumental (2 %) support. Participants perceived connection and support as key benefits of the app. Technical issues and interpersonal barriers limited some participants in fully using the app. Mobile technology offers a useful tool to reach populations with barriers to in-person support and may improve care for PLWH.

  15. Interprofessional communication supporting clinical handover in emergency departments: An observation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redley, Bernice; Botti, Mari; Wood, Beverley; Bucknall, Tracey

    2017-08-01

    Poor interprofessional communication poses a risk to patient safety at change-of-shift in emergency departments (EDs). The purpose of this study was to identify and describe patterns and processes of interprofessional communication impacting quality of ED change-of-shift handovers. Observation of 66 change-of-shift handovers at two acute hospital EDs in Victoria, Australia. Focus groups with 34 nurse participants complemented the observations. Qualitative data analysis involved content and thematic methods. Four structural components of ED handover processes emerged represented by (ABCD): (1) Antecedents; (2) Behaviours and interactions; (3) Content; and (4) Delegation of ongoing care. Infrequent and ad hoc interprofessional communication and discipline-specific handover content and processes emerged as specific risks to patient safety at change-of-shift handovers. Three themes related to risky and effective practices to support interprofessional communications across the four stages of ED handovers emerged: 1) standard processes and practices, 2) teamwork and interactions and 3) communication activities and practices. Unreliable interprofessional communication can impact the quality of change-of-shift handovers in EDs and poses risk to patient safety. Structured reflective analysis of existing practices can identify opportunities for standardisation, enhanced team practices and effective communication across four stages of the handover process to support clinicians to enhance local handover practices. Future research should test and refine models to support analysis of practice, and identify and test strategies to enhance ED interprofessional communication to support clinical handovers. Copyright © 2017 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Immediately loaded implants supporting fixed prostheses in the edentulous maxilla: a preliminary clinical and radiologic report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergkvist, Göran; Sahlholm, Sten; Karlsson, Ulf; Nilner, Krister; Lindh, Christina

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the survival rate of immediately loaded ITI sand-blasted, large-grit, acid-etched (SLA) solid-screw dental implants in the edentulous maxilla after 8 months of loading. Twenty-eight patients (mean age 63 years) with edentulous maxillae each received 6 implants and 1 implant-supported fixed provisional prosthesis within 24 hours after surgery. After a mean healing time of 15 weeks, the patient received a definitive, screw-retained, implant-supported fixed prosthesis. A total of 168 implants were placed. Clinical parameters were registered after 1 month of loading with the implant-supported fixed prostheses as well as 8 months after implant placement. Radiologic examinations and assessments were made at implant placement and after 8 months. The mean marginal bone level at implant placement was 1.6 mm (range 0 to 5.1; SD 1.1) apical of the reference point (the implant shoulder). The mean marginal bone level at the 8-month follow-up was 3.2 mm (range 0.4 to 5.9; SD 1.1) apical of the reference point. Three implants failed during the healing period. The improved results in the present study might be a result of the positive effect of splinting the implants immediately after placement. ITI SLA solid-screw implants immediately loaded (ie, loaded within 24 hours of placement) and supporting fixed prostheses had successful survival rates after 8 months. The present results constitute a solid baseline for future follow-up studies.

  17. Emotions and clinical ethics support. A moral inquiry into emotions in moral case deliberation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molewijk, Bert; Kleinlugtenbelt, Dick; Pugh, Scott M; Widdershoven, Guy

    2011-12-01

    Emotions play an important part in moral life. Within clinical ethics support (CES), one should take into account the crucial role of emotions in moral cases in clinical practice. In this paper, we present an Aristotelian approach to emotions. We argue that CES can help participants deal with emotions by fostering a joint process of investigation of the role of emotions in a case. This investigation goes beyond empathy with and moral judgment of the emotions of the case presenter. In a moral case deliberation, the participants are invited to place themselves in the position of the case presenter and to investigate their own emotions in the situation. It is about critically assessing the facts in the case that cause the emotion and the related (moral) thoughts that accompany the emotion. It is also about finding the right emotion in a given situation and finding the right balance in dealing with that emotion. These steps in the moral inquiry give rise to group learning. It is a process of becoming open towards the perspectives of others, leading to new insights into what is an appropriate emotion in the specific situation. We show how this approach works in moral case deliberation. A physician presents a situation in which he is faced with a pregnant woman who is about to deliver multiple extremely premature infants at the threshold of viability. The moral deliberation of the case and the emotions therein leads to the participants' conclusion that "compassion" is a more adequate emotion than "sadness". The emotion "sadness" is pointed towards the tragedy that is happening to the woman. The emotion "compassion" is pointed towards the woman; it combines consideration and professional responsibility. Through the shift towards compassion, participants experienced more creativity and freedom to deal with the sad situation and to support the woman. The paper ends with an analysis and reflection on the deliberation process. In the conclusion we argue for more attention to

  18. [Design and clinical application of the drilling guide in the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation with closed reduction and Kirschner fixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Song; Hao, Yong-qiang; Shi, Xiao-lin; Zhao, Huan-li; Gao, Kai-tuo; Sun, Jin-xu

    2011-03-01

    To investigate a drilling guide in the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation with closed reduction and Kirschner fixation and explore the therapeutic effect. From June 2008 to December 2009, 36 patients with acromioclavicular joint dislocation (Tossy III) were treated with closed reduction and Kirschner fixation using a self-designed drilling guide as well as percutaneous repair of acromioclavicular joint. Among the patients, 24 patients were male and 12 patients were female,ranging in age from 20 to 61 years, averaged 38.6 years. The duration from injury to operation ranged from 3.5 to 72 h,with a mean of 15.2 h. No clavicle fracture was found in all cases. The operative time, intra-operative bleeding and therapeutic effects were observed. There were no complications including neurovascular problems. The mean operating time were 20 min,mean blood loss were about 10 ml. According to the observation of postoperative X-ray examination, all Kirschners in acromioclavicular joint were in place. All Kirschners were removed in 6 postoperative weeks. All the patients were followed up ranging from 2 to 26 months (averaged 14.3 months). According to the Karlsson standard,22 patients got an excellent result, 13 good and 1 poor. This method has following advantages: easy operation and fixation; minimum injuries to articular surface; and which would be widely used in clinical practice.

  19. Closing Remarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed

    1996-01-01

    -related conditions were developed. * The only three drugs to date that have been specifically approved for the treatment of AIDS-AZT, DDI, and DDC-were developed under the guidance of the DCT, with Bruce Chabner as Scientific Director. * The first clinical trials conducted with each of these agents-AZT, DDI, and DDC-were performed in the Intramural Program of the DCT. * Concurrently, many of the exciting findings reported by the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project over the past 10 years (as well as other cooperative groups) were a direct result of the strong support shown by Bruce Chabner during his tenure as Director of the Division of Cancer Treatment. Further, the list above does not include his personal labortory and clinical accomplishments, some of which are: * Development of the principles of use of important antimetabolites, such as methotrexate. * Elucidation of biochemical pathways affected, and the mechanisms of action, of antifols and other antimetabolites. * The conduct of seminal studies in the clinical staging of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, using laparoscopy as a primary tool. * Important contributions to the development of multiagent regimens in the clinical treatment of lymphomas, and of Hodgkin's disease. * Developed and is editor of the textbook which is considered to be the primary reference source for anticancer chemotherapeutic agents [1]. With all of these accomplishments, his career is long from over. Having just become the Medical Director of the Cancer Center at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Bruce Chabner is uniquely poised to have an even more far-reaching impact on a discipline in which he has played such a strong seminal role. This author was never a postdoctoral fellow in Bruce Chabner's laboratory. However, more than any other single person, he has played a central role in my professional development. I know of many others for whom the same statement would be true. It is a pleasure for me to witness the launching of the second phase

  20. Towards Resilient Telehealth Support for Clinical Psychiatry and Psychology: A Strategic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Rodolfo A; De Giacomo, Piero; L'Abate, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Human beings have increasingly shown a willingness to adopt Internet, mHealth and telehealth applications as a part of managing their health. Recent technological advances in the use of the Internet and video technologies has greatly impacted the provision of psychotherapy and other clinical services as well as how the training of psychotherapists may be conducted. When utilized appropriately these technologies may provide greater access to needed services to include treatment, consultation, supervision, and training. The major issue in such a development is whether online interventions will be structured or unstructured. The proper use of technology is fundamental to create and boost outstanding results. We present a strategic review and, as an example, the main steps to develop and achieve application resilience and antifragility at system level, for diagnostic and therapeutic telepractice and telehealth support. This article presents a number of innovations that can take psychotherapy treatment, supervision, training, and research forward, towards increased effectiveness application.

  1. Change-Point Detection Method for Clinical Decision Support System Rule Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siqi; Wright, Adam; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2017-06-01

    A clinical decision support system (CDSS) and its components can malfunction due to various reasons. Monitoring the system and detecting its malfunctions can help one to avoid any potential mistakes and associated costs. In this paper, we investigate the problem of detecting changes in the CDSS operation, in particular its monitoring and alerting subsystem, by monitoring its rule firing counts. The detection should be performed online, that is whenever a new datum arrives, we want to have a score indicating how likely there is a change in the system. We develop a new method based on Seasonal-Trend decomposition and likelihood ratio statistics to detect the changes. Experiments on real and simulated data show that our method has a lower delay in detection compared with existing change-point detection methods.

  2. Service oriented architecture for clinical decision support: a systematic review and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loya, Salvador Rodriguez; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Chatwin, Chris; Huser, Vojtech

    2014-12-01

    The use of a service-oriented architecture (SOA) has been identified as a promising approach for improving health care by facilitating reliable clinical decision support (CDS). A review of the literature through October 2013 identified 44 articles on this topic. The review suggests that SOA related technologies such as Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) and Service Component Architecture (SCA) have not been generally adopted to impact health IT systems' performance for better care solutions. Additionally, technologies such as Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) and architectural approaches like Service Choreography have not been generally exploited among researchers and developers. Based on the experience of other industries and our observation of the evolution of SOA, we found that the greater use of these approaches have the potential to significantly impact SOA implementations for CDS.

  3. Development and implementation of a clinical needs assessment to support nursing and midwifery students with a disability in clinical practice: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, Frances; Halligan, Phil; O'Toole, Sinead

    2014-09-01

    Equality and disability legislation, coupled with increasing numbers of students with a disability, and inadequate supports in clinical practice, acted as catalysts to explore how best to support undergraduate nursing and midwifery students on clinical placements. Historically, higher education institutions provide reasonable accommodations for theoretical rather than clinical modules for practice placements. This paper describes the development and implementation of a Clinical Needs Assessment designed to identify the necessary supports or reasonable accommodations for nursing and midwifery students with a disability undertaking work placements in clinical practice. The existing literature, and consultation with an expert panel, revealed that needs assessments should be competency based and clearly identify the core skills or elements of practice that the student must attain to achieve proficiency and competence. The five Domains of Competence, advocated by An Bord Altranais, the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Ireland, formed the framework for the Clinical Needs Assessment. A panel of experts generated performance indicators to enable the identification of individualised reasonable accommodations for year 1 nursing and midwifery students in one Irish University. Development and implementation of the Clinical Needs Assessment promoted equality, inclusion and a level playing field for nursing and midwifery students with a disability in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reasons For Physicians Not Adopting Clinical Decision Support Systems: Critical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairat, Saif; Marc, David; Crosby, William; Al Sanousi, Ali

    2018-04-18

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) are an integral component of today's health information technologies. They assist with interpretation, diagnosis, and treatment. A CDSS can be embedded throughout the patient safety continuum providing reminders, recommendations, and alerts to health care providers. Although CDSSs have been shown to reduce medical errors and improve patient outcomes, they have fallen short of their full potential. User acceptance has been identified as one of the potential reasons for this shortfall. The purpose of this paper was to conduct a critical review and task analysis of CDSS research and to develop a new framework for CDSS design in order to achieve user acceptance. A critical review of CDSS papers was conducted with a focus on user acceptance. To gain a greater understanding of the problems associated with CDSS acceptance, we conducted a task analysis to identify and describe the goals, user input, system output, knowledge requirements, and constraints from two different perspectives: the machine (ie, the CDSS engine) and the user (ie, the physician). Favorability of CDSSs was based on user acceptance of clinical guidelines, reminders, alerts, and diagnostic suggestions. We propose two models: (1) the user acceptance and system adaptation design model, which includes optimizing CDSS design based on user needs/expectations, and (2) the input-process-output-engagemodel, which reveals to users the processes that govern CDSS outputs. This research demonstrates that the incorporation of the proposed models will improve user acceptance to support the beneficial effects of CDSSs adoption. Ultimately, if a user does not accept technology, this not only poses a threat to the use of the technology but can also pose a threat to the health and well-being of patients. ©Saif Khairat, David Marc, William Crosby, Ali Al Sanousi. Originally published in JMIR Medical Informatics (http://medinform.jmir.org), 18.04.2018.

  5. Positive results of clinical educational support in situations of psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavormina, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    Education is a complex process that involves the individual in the course of his entire life and leads to the maturation and the overall development of his personality. The educational process involves the complete growth of each and completes the infinite possibilities that every child has potential since birth. Education also is a necessity for the human being, as only adequate environmental stimulation causes the mental processes to begin. In fact, the higher intellectual functions, such as language, thought, memory, emerge only from social and educational experiences of the child. The educational surgery creates experiences and learning that allow the person to change by improving the efficiency of synaptic connections. Clinical pedagogy has developed in Italy in the last decades of the twentieth century with the aim of research and experimenting educational purposes suitable for different situations in order to provide each subject with appropriate development opportunities. Clinical pedagogical support is offered in the form of artistic or bodily activities and represents for the individual a positive environment that allows the development of different brain areas and the potential inherent in them. The various methods are suitable for any situation of existential discomfort, which are understood as moments of personal growth.

  6. Easily configured real-time CPOE Pick Off Tool supporting focused clinical research and quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Benjamin P; Silkin, Nikolay; Miller, Randolph A

    2014-01-01

    Real-time alerting systems typically warn providers about abnormal laboratory results or medication interactions. For more complex tasks, institutions create site-wide 'data warehouses' to support quality audits and longitudinal research. Sophisticated systems like i2b2 or Stanford's STRIDE utilize data warehouses to identify cohorts for research and quality monitoring. However, substantial resources are required to install and maintain such systems. For more modest goals, an organization desiring merely to identify patients with 'isolation' orders, or to determine patients' eligibility for clinical trials, may adopt a simpler, limited approach based on processing the output of one clinical system, and not a data warehouse. We describe a limited, order-entry-based, real-time 'pick off' tool, utilizing public domain software (PHP, MySQL). Through a web interface the tool assists users in constructing complex order-related queries and auto-generates corresponding database queries that can be executed at recurring intervals. We describe successful application of the tool for research and quality monitoring.

  7. Reducing duplicate testing: a comparison of two clinical decision support tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procop, Gary W; Keating, Catherine; Stagno, Paul; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Partin, Mary; Tuttle, Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Unnecessary duplicate laboratory testing is common and costly. Systems-based means to avert unnecessary testing should be investigated and employed. We compared the effectiveness and cost savings associated with two clinical decision support tools to stop duplicate testing. The Hard Stop required telephone contact with the laboratory and justification to have the duplicate test performed, whereas the Smart Alert allowed the provider to bypass the alert at the point of order entry without justification. The Hard Stop alert was significantly more effective than the Smart Alert (92.3% vs 42.6%, respectively; P < .0001). The cost savings realized per alert activation was $16.08/alert for the Hard Stop alert vs $3.52/alert for the Smart Alert. Structural and process changes that require laboratory contact and justification for duplicate testing are more effective than interventions that allow providers to bypass alerts without justification at point of computerized physician order entry. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  8. The genesis of 'the Neophytes': a writing support group for clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Teresa; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Harris, Margaret; Sinclair, Peter M

    2010-10-01

    This paper profiles the establishment and evaluation of the Neophyte Writers' Group, run by nurse academics in collaboration with clinical nurses. The growing demand for nurses to write, publish and present their work had inspired the introduction of a series of workshops designed to develop and improve writing and presentation skills, which eventuated in formation of the Neophytes. The group was founded on the basis of Bandura's theory of self-efficacy (1997), a concept which has been discussed extensively in social psychology literature to explain motivation and learning theory. People with high assurance in their capabilities regard difficult tasks as challenges to be mastered rather than as threats to be avoided (Bandura, 1994). The Neophytes' group employs a collaborative approach intended to increase and reinforce members' self-confidence; the underlying philosophy is to promote and enhance writers' motivation, capacity and self-efficacy in order to achieve future publication goals confidently and independently. Support which engenders these strengths through a program relevant to participants' needs is likely, as this group found, to increase publication productivity. Additional unexpected outcomes resulted, such as engagement by clinical nurses' in academic work, and an increase in research higher degree enrolments. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Improved Clinical Efficacy with Wound Support Network Between Hospital and Home Care Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergersen, Tone Kristin; Storheim, Elisabeth; Gundersen, Stina; Kleven, Linn; Johnson, Maria; Sandvik, Leiv; Kvaerner, Kari Jorunn; Ørjasæter, Nils-Otto

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of a wound support network model between the primary home care service and the hospital. The impact on wound healing rate, cost benefit, and transfer of knowledge was investigated. The intervention group was exposed to a wound support network (n = 32), and the control group continued standard organization of treatment (n = 21). Nonrandomized controlled study; observations were made before (baseline) and after the implementation of the intervention (12 weeks). Patients with chronic wounds (lasting >6 weeks and with wound area >1 cm) in Oslo, Norway. Closure of the observation wound; wound size; total number of wounds; presence of eczema, edema, and pain; number of dressings per week; time spent per dressing; and number of control appointments at the hospital. The economic impact is calculated for the hospital and for the community of Oslo, Norway. The number of control appointments (t = 3.80, P home care service and the hospital is cost-effective, improves clinical efficacy of the home care services' work, and reduces the need for consultations at the hospital.

  10. Review of the Empirical and Clinical Support for Group Therapy Specific to Sexual Abusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Jerry L; Deming, Adam

    2017-12-01

    This review compiles 48 empirical studies and 55 clinical/practice articles specific to group therapy with sex offenders. Historically, group therapy has always been the predominant modality in sex offender-specific treatment. In the first decades of the field, treatment applied a psychoanalytic methodology that, although not empirically supported, fully appreciated the primary therapeutic importance of the group modality. Conversely, since the early 1980s, treatment has applied a cognitive behavioral method, but the field has largely neglected the therapeutic value of interpersonal group dynamics. The past decade has seen a growing re-appreciation of general therapeutic processes and more holistic approaches in sex offender treatment, and there is an emerging body of empirical research which, although often indirectly concerned with group, has yielded three definitive conclusions. First, the therapeutic qualities of the group therapist-specifically warmth, empathy, encouragement, and guidance-can strongly affect outcomes. Second, the quality of group cohesion can profoundly affect the effectiveness of treatment. Third, confrontational approaches in group therapy are ineffective, if not counter-therapeutic, and overwhelmingly rated as not helpful by sex offenders themselves. Additional conclusions are less strongly supported, but include compelling evidence that sex offenders generally prefer group therapy over individual therapy, that group therapy appears equally effective to individual therapy, and that mixing or separating groups by offense type is not important to therapeutic climate. Other group techniques and approaches specific to sexual abuse treatment are also summarized.

  11. Eliminating Health Care Disparities With Mandatory Clinical Decision Support: The Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Brandyn D; Haider, Adil H; Streiff, Michael B; Lehmann, Christoph U; Kraus, Peggy S; Hobson, Deborah B; Kraenzlin, Franca S; Zeidan, Amer M; Pronovost, Peter J; Haut, Elliott R

    2015-01-01

    All hospitalized patients should be assessed for venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk factors and prescribed appropriate prophylaxis. To improve best-practice VTE prophylaxis prescription for all hospitalized patients, we implemented a mandatory computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) tool. The tool requires completion of checklists to evaluate VTE risk factors and contraindications to pharmacological prophylaxis, and then recommends the risk-appropriate VTE prophylaxis regimen. The objective of the study was to examine the effect of a quality improvement intervention on race-based and sex-based health care disparities across 2 distinct clinical services. This was a retrospective cohort study of a quality improvement intervention. The study included 1942 hospitalized medical patients and 1599 hospitalized adult trauma patients. In this study, the proportion of patients prescribed risk-appropriate, best-practice VTE prophylaxis was evaluated. Racial disparities existed in prescription of best-practice VTE prophylaxis in the preimplementation period between black and white patients on both the trauma (70.1% vs. 56.6%, P=0.025) and medicine (69.5% vs. 61.7%, P=0.015) services. After implementation of the CCDS tool, compliance improved for all patients, and disparities in best-practice prophylaxis prescription between black and white patients were eliminated on both services: trauma (84.5% vs. 85.5%, P=0.99) and medicine (91.8% vs. 88.0%, P=0.082). Similar findings were noted for sex disparities in the trauma cohort. Despite the fact that risk-appropriate prophylaxis should be prescribed equally to all hospitalized patients regardless of race and sex, practice varied widely before our quality improvement intervention. Our CCDS tool eliminated racial disparities in VTE prophylaxis prescription across 2 distinct clinical services. Health information technology approaches to care standardization are effective to eliminate health care disparities.

  12. Visualizing complex processes using a cognitive-mapping tool to support the learning of clinical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bian; Wang, Minhong; Grotzer, Tina A; Liu, Jun; Johnson, Janice M

    2016-08-22

    Practical experience with clinical cases has played an important role in supporting the learning of clinical reasoning. However, learning through practical experience involves complex processes difficult to be captured by students. This study aimed to examine the effects of a computer-based cognitive-mapping approach that helps students to externalize the reasoning process and the knowledge underlying the reasoning process when they work with clinical cases. A comparison between the cognitive-mapping approach and the verbal-text approach was made by analyzing their effects on learning outcomes. Fifty-two third-year or higher students from two medical schools participated in the study. Students in the experimental group used the computer-base cognitive-mapping approach, while the control group used the verbal-text approach, to make sense of their thinking and actions when they worked with four simulated cases over 4 weeks. For each case, students in both groups reported their reasoning process (involving data capture, hypotheses formulation, and reasoning with justifications) and the underlying knowledge (involving identified concepts and the relationships between the concepts) using the given approach. The learning products (cognitive maps or verbal text) revealed that students in the cognitive-mapping group outperformed those in the verbal-text group in the reasoning process, but not in making sense of the knowledge underlying the reasoning process. No significant differences were found in a knowledge posttest between the two groups. The computer-based cognitive-mapping approach has shown a promising advantage over the verbal-text approach in improving students' reasoning performance. Further studies are needed to examine the effects of the cognitive-mapping approach in improving the construction of subject-matter knowledge on the basis of practical experience.

  13. The potential value on medication safety of a clinical decision support system in intensive care patients with renal insufficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmons, P.J.; Grouls, R.J.E.; Roos, A.N.; Bindels, A.J.G.H.; Clercq, de P.A.; Wessels-Basten, S.J.W.; Ackerman, E.W.; Korsten, H.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are defined as electronic or non-electronic systems designed to aid in clinical decision making, using characteristics of individual patients to generate patient-specific assessments or recommendations that are then presented to clinicians for consideration

  14. Preparation, Clinical Support, and Confidence of Speech-Language Therapists Managing Clients with a Tracheostomy in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Elizabeth; Morgan, Tessa; McGowan, Sue; Spurgin, Ann-Louise; Solley, Maura

    2012-01-01

    Background: Literature regarding the education, training, clinical support and confidence of speech-language therapists (SLTs) working with patients with a tracheostomy is limited; however, it suggests that many clinicians have reduced clinical confidence when managing this complex population, many face role and team challenges practising in this…

  15. A mathematical model for interpretable clinical decision support with applications in gynecology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanya M C A Van Belle

    Full Text Available Over time, methods for the development of clinical decision support (CDS systems have evolved from interpretable and easy-to-use scoring systems to very complex and non-interpretable mathematical models. In order to accomplish effective decision support, CDS systems should provide information on how the model arrives at a certain decision. To address the issue of incompatibility between performance, interpretability and applicability of CDS systems, this paper proposes an innovative model structure, automatically leading to interpretable and easily applicable models. The resulting models can be used to guide clinicians when deciding upon the appropriate treatment, estimating patient-specific risks and to improve communication with patients.We propose the interval coded scoring (ICS system, which imposes that the effect of each variable on the estimated risk is constant within consecutive intervals. The number and position of the intervals are automatically obtained by solving an optimization problem, which additionally performs variable selection. The resulting model can be visualised by means of appealing scoring tables and color bars. ICS models can be used within software packages, in smartphone applications, or on paper, which is particularly useful for bedside medicine and home-monitoring. The ICS approach is illustrated on two gynecological problems: diagnosis of malignancy of ovarian tumors using a dataset containing 3,511 patients, and prediction of first trimester viability of pregnancies using a dataset of 1,435 women. Comparison of the performance of the ICS approach with a range of prediction models proposed in the literature illustrates the ability of ICS to combine optimal performance with the interpretability of simple scoring systems.The ICS approach can improve patient-clinician communication and will provide additional insights in the importance and influence of available variables. Future challenges include extensions of the

  16. Advancing clinical decision support using lessons from outside of healthcare: an interdisciplinary systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Helen W

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Greater use of computerized decision support (DS systems could address continuing safety and quality problems in healthcare, but the healthcare field has struggled to implement DS technology. This study surveys DS experience across multiple non-healthcare disciplines for new insights that are generalizable to healthcare provider decisions. In particular, it sought design principles and lessons learned from the other disciplines that could inform efforts to accelerate the adoption of clinical decision support (CDS. Methods Our systematic review drew broadly from non-healthcare databases in the basic sciences, social sciences, humanities, engineering, business, and defense: PsychINFO, BusinessSource Premier, Social Sciences Abstracts, Web of Science, and Defense Technical Information Center. Because our interest was in DS that could apply to clinical decisions, we selected articles that (1 provided a review, overview, discussion of lessons learned, or an evaluation of design or implementation aspects of DS within a non-healthcare discipline and (2 involved an element of human judgment at the individual level, as opposed to decisions that can be fully automated or that are made at the organizational level. Results Clinical decisions share some similarities with decisions made by military commanders, business managers, and other leaders: they involve assessing new situations and choosing courses of action with major consequences, under time pressure, and with incomplete information. We identified seven high-level DS system design features from the non-healthcare literature that could be applied to CDS: providing broad, system-level perspectives; customizing interfaces to specific users and roles; making the DS reasoning transparent; presenting data effectively; generating multiple scenarios covering disparate outcomes (e.g., effective; effective with side effects; ineffective; allowing for contingent adaptations; and facilitating

  17. Advancing clinical decision support using lessons from outside of healthcare: an interdisciplinary systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Helen W; Davis, Paul K; Bell, Douglas S

    2012-08-17

    Greater use of computerized decision support (DS) systems could address continuing safety and quality problems in healthcare, but the healthcare field has struggled to implement DS technology. This study surveys DS experience across multiple non-healthcare disciplines for new insights that are generalizable to healthcare provider decisions. In particular, it sought design principles and lessons learned from the other disciplines that could inform efforts to accelerate the adoption of clinical decision support (CDS). Our systematic review drew broadly from non-healthcare databases in the basic sciences, social sciences, humanities, engineering, business, and defense: PsychINFO, BusinessSource Premier, Social Sciences Abstracts, Web of Science, and Defense Technical Information Center. Because our interest was in DS that could apply to clinical decisions, we selected articles that (1) provided a review, overview, discussion of lessons learned, or an evaluation of design or implementation aspects of DS within a non-healthcare discipline and (2) involved an element of human judgment at the individual level, as opposed to decisions that can be fully automated or that are made at the organizational level. Clinical decisions share some similarities with decisions made by military commanders, business managers, and other leaders: they involve assessing new situations and choosing courses of action with major consequences, under time pressure, and with incomplete information. We identified seven high-level DS system design features from the non-healthcare literature that could be applied to CDS: providing broad, system-level perspectives; customizing interfaces to specific users and roles; making the DS reasoning transparent; presenting data effectively; generating multiple scenarios covering disparate outcomes (e.g., effective; effective with side effects; ineffective); allowing for contingent adaptations; and facilitating collaboration. The article provides examples of

  18. [Influence of clinical nutritional support on the effects of mechanical ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiujuan; Zhang, Geng; Hu, Mahong; Ji, Chunlian; Meng, Jianbiao; Lai, Zhizhen; Dai, Muhua; Pang, Lisha; Zhang, Wei

    2018-03-01

    To study the influence of clinical nutritional support on the effects of mechanical ventilation (MV), and to find the factors affecting the outcome of patients undergoing MV. A case-control study was conducted. The clinical data of 235 patients undergoing MV admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) of Tongde Hospital of Zhejiang Province from January 2015 to June 2017 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups according to whether weaning successfully within 7 days. The clinical data of patients in the two groups were collected including gender, age, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score, underlying disease, nutritional indicators, nutritional support, and complications. The outcome of withdrawal within 7 days was served as a dependent variable, all observed indicators were served as independent variables, and Logistic regression analysis was carried out to screen the influencing factors of the weaning results within 7 days. 235 patients undergoing MV were enrolled, 128 patients were successfully withdrawn within 7 days, and 107 were unsuccessfully withdrawn. Compared with the successful weaning group, the patients of weaning failure group were older, and had higher APACHE II score and lower albumin (Alb) and hemoglobin (Hb), more patients with internal medical underlying diseases and receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) and mixed nutrition, and the incidences of secondary infection, vomiting, abdominal distension, abnormal bowel sound, gastric retention, and diarrhea were higher. However, there was no statistical significance in gender between the two groups. The variables of statistical significance in univariate analysis were enrolled in the multifactor analysis model showing that age [odds ratio (OR) = 1.269, 95% confidence interval (95%CI) = 1.119-1.439, P nutrition (EN; OR = 0.191, 95%CI = 0.098-0.372, P nutrition (OR = 0.375, 95%CI = 0.150-0.938, P = 0.037) were protective factors of successful weaning

  19. Development of clinical practice guidelines for supportive care in childhood cancer-prioritization of topics using a Delphi approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, E. A. H.; Mulder, R. L.; Kremer, L. C. M.; Michiels, E. M. C.; Abbink, F. C. H.; Ball, L. M.; Segers, H.; Mavinkurve-Groothuis, A. M. C.; Smit, F. J.; Vonk, I. J. M.; vd Wetering, M. D.; Tissing, W. J. E.

    Currently, very few guidelines for supportive care for children with cancer exist. In the Netherlands, nationwide guidelines are over 10 years old and mostly based on expert opinion. Consequently, there is growing support and need for clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), which ought to be developed

  20. Development of clinical practice guidelines for supportive care in childhood cancer--prioritization of topics using a Delphi approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, E. A. H.; Mulder, R. L.; Kremer, L. C. M.; Michiels, E. M. C.; Abbink, F. C. H.; Ball, L. M.; Segers, H.; Mavinkurve-Groothuis, A. M. C.; Smit, F. J.; Vonk, I. J. M.; Vd Wetering, M. D.; Tissing, W. J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, very few guidelines for supportive care for children with cancer exist. In the Netherlands, nationwide guidelines are over 10 years old and mostly based on expert opinion. Consequently, there is growing support and need for clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), which ought to be developed

  1. Building a bridge for nursing education and clinical care in Taiwan--using action research and Confucian tradition to close the gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wan-Ping; Chao, Co-Shi Chantal; Lai, Wei-Shu; Chen, Ching-Huey; Shih, Ya Lan; Chiu, Ge-Lin

    2013-03-01

    Nursing workplaces in Taiwan are unable to retain talent. An examination of this problem has revealed that the causes of this phenomenon are that nursing education fails to cultivate the skills that meet workplace requirements and that there are gap between nursing education and clinical practice. This paper is an action research that aims is to design educational programs that can close the gap between nursing education and clinical practice in Taiwan. In this action research project, 4 action cycles were used to design educational programs including concept mapping and focused discussion strategies. Participants were invited to join the research in three teaching hospitals and one university. Two groups of participants, student nurses (SN) and nursing staff personnel (NS), were sampled and invited to participate in the research. Participant observation, focus groups, and qualitative interviews were used to collect data. Qualitative data were not only profiled by content analysis, but they were also compared continuously between the two groups as well as between the 4 cycles. The qualitative data collected for the 135 participants were analysed. The themes of an effective nursing program were summarized. Many fundamental values of traditional Chinese education have gradually faded due to the Westernization of education. In this study, we discovered that Western educational models may play a critical role in improving traditionally taught nursing education programs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The relationship between clinical indicators, coping styles, perceived support and diabetes-related distress among adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Bjørg; Oftedal, Bjørg; Bru, Edvin

    2012-02-01

    This article is a report of a cross-sectional study examining the degree to which clinical indicators, coping styles and perceived support from healthcare professionals and family are related to diabetes-related distress. Many people with type 2 diabetes experience high levels of distress stemming from concerns and worries associated with their disease. Diabetes-related distress has predominantly been studied in relation to diabetes management and metabolic control, and to some extent in relation to coping styles and perceived social support. To date, little is known about the relative contribution of clinical indicators, coping styles and perceptions of social support to perceived distress among people with type 2 diabetes. A sample comprising 425 Norwegian adults, aged 30-70, with type 2 diabetes, completed questionnaires assessing coping styles, perceived social support from health professionals and family and diabetes-related distress assessed by the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale. Demographical and clinical data were collected by self-report. Data were collected in October 2008.   Results from the regression analyses showed a greater variance in emotional distress accounted for by coping styles (21·3%) and perceived support (19·7%) than by clinical indicators (5·8%). FINDINGS may indicate that healthcare providers should pay more attention to non-clinical factors such as coping styles and social support, when addressing diabetes-related distress. They should also be aware that interventions based on psychosocial approaches may primarily influence distress, and not necessarily metabolic control. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Free and open source enabling technologies for patient-centric, guideline-based clinical decision support: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, T Y; Kaiser, K; Miksch, S

    2007-01-01

    Guideline-based clinical decision support is an emerging paradigm to help reduce error, lower cost, and improve quality in evidence-based medicine. The free and open source (FOS) approach is a promising alternative for delivering cost-effective information technology (IT) solutions in health care. In this paper, we survey the current FOS enabling technologies for patient-centric, guideline-based care, and discuss the current trends and future directions of their role in clinical decision support. We searched PubMed, major biomedical informatics websites, and the web in general for papers and links related to FOS health care IT systems. We also relied on our background and knowledge for specific subtopics. We focused on the functionalities of guideline modeling tools, and briefly examined the supporting technologies for terminology, data exchange and electronic health record (EHR) standards. To effectively support patient-centric, guideline-based care, the computerized guidelines and protocols need to be integrated with existing clinical information systems or EHRs. Technologies that enable such integration should be accessible, interoperable, and scalable. A plethora of FOS tools and techniques for supporting different knowledge management and quality assurance tasks involved are available. Many challenges, however, remain in their implementation. There are active and growing trends of deploying FOS enabling technologies for integrating clinical guidelines, protocols, and pathways into the main care processes. The continuing development and maturation of such technologies are likely to make increasingly significant contributions to patient-centric, guideline-based clinical decision support.

  4. An Innovative Program to Support Internationally Educated Health Professionals and Their Instructors: Role of the Clinical Practice Facilitator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Sylvia; Lee, Annemarie L; Switzer-McIntyre, Sharon; Evans, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Internationally educated health professionals immigrating to other countries may experience difficulty in clinical practice, due to linguistic and cultural factors. An important element of bridging is the opportunity for internationally educated health professionals to practice in a clinical environment. To support these health professionals and their clinical instructors, a Clinical Practice Facilitator (CPF) role was created. This study aimed to examine the CPF from internationally educated health professionals and clinical instructors' perspective. A quantitative survey was conducted with two cohorts (2013 and 2015) of internationally educated physical therapists and clinical instructors who were asked about the nature of interaction with CPFs, mentor, and education roles and the benefits and challenges of the role. Thirty-five internationally educated physical therapists and 37 clinical instructors participated and were satisfied with the interaction with CPFs via face-to-face or e-mail communication. There was strong agreement (>80%) that the CPF educator role was to facilitate learner's reflection on clinical practice while the mentor role (>70%) was to answer questions, provide feedback, and investigate clinical concerns and conflicts. There was insufficient time for access to CPFs and resolution of learners' learning needs. There were differences (P = 0.04) in perspective on the benefit of the CPF in assisting with cultural differences. An innovative CPF role provided support encouragement, clinical, and professional advice. There were discordant views regarding the benefits of the CPF role in addressing cultural issues, which requires further examination.

  5. Design and implementation of a decision support system for breast cancer treatment based on clinical practice guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skevofilakas, M.T.; Nikita, K.S.; Templaleksis, P.H.; Birbas, K.N.; Kaklamanos, I.G.; Bonatsos, G.N.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence based medicine is the clinical practice that uses medical data and proof in order to make efficient clinical decisions. Information technology (IT) can play a crucial role in exploiting the huge size of raw medical data involved. In an attempt to improve clinical efficacy, health care society nowadays also utilizes a new assistant, clinical guidelines. Our research concerns the medical domain of the breast cancer disease. Our research's focus is twofold; our primary goal is to ensure consistency in clinical practice by importing clinical guidelines in an IT driven decision support system (DSS). Furthermore, we seek to improve visualization of disease specific, clinical data, providing for it's faster and more efficient use. (orig.)

  6. Text Message Support for Weight Loss in Patients With Prediabetes: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Henry H; Fischer, Ilana P; Pereira, Rocio I; Furniss, Anna L; Rozwadowski, Jeanne M; Moore, Susan L; Durfee, Michael J; Raghunath, Silvia G; Tsai, Adam G; Havranek, Edward P

    2016-08-01

    Although the benefits of in-person Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) classes for diabetes prevention have been demonstrated in trials, effectiveness in clinical practice is limited by low participation rates. This study explores whether text message support enhances weight loss in patients offered DPP classes. English- and Spanish-speaking patients with prediabetes (n = 163) were randomized to the control group, which only received an invitation to DPP classes as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or to the text message-augmented intervention group, which also received text messages adapted from the DPP curriculum for 12 months. Mean weight decreased 0.6 pounds (95% CI -2.7 to 1.6) in the control group and 2.6 pounds (95% CI -5.5 to 0.2) in the intervention group (P value 0.05). Three percent weight loss was achieved by 21.5% of participants in the control group (95% CI 12.5-30.6), compared with 38.5% in the intervention group (95% CI 27.7-49.3) (absolute difference 17.0%; P value 0.02). Mean glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) increased by 0.19% or 2.1 mmol/mol (95% CI -0.1 to 0.5%) and decreased by 0.09% or 1.0 mmol/mol (95% CI -0.2 to 0.0%) in the control group and intervention participants, respectively (absolute difference 0.28%; P value 0.07). Stratification by language demonstrated a significant treatment effect in Spanish speakers but not in English speakers. Text message support can lead to clinically significant weight loss in patients with prediabetes. Further study assessing effect by primary language and in an operational setting is warranted. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  7. Structure, organisation and clinical outcomes in cancer patients of hospital support teams in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuca-Rodriguez, Albert; Gómez-Batiste, Xavier; Espinosa-Rojas, Jose; Martínez-Muñoz, Marisa; Codorniu, Nuria; Porta-Sales, Josep

    2012-12-01

    To describe the structure, characteristics of patients and basic clinical outcomes in cancer patients receiving care from palliative care hospital support teams (HSTs) in Spain. A multi-centre observational two phase study. Phase I: A descriptive survey of all HSTs in Spain. Phase II: A quasi-experimental prospective cohort study to describe the clinical outcomes, symptom severity and survival. 60 HSTs in Spain met the inclusion criteria. All HSTs were multidisciplinary with wide experience (mean 6.8 years). HSTs coverage was 21.5% of all cancer deaths in Spain. A total number of 364 advanced cancer patients were included in the cohort study; 76% were classified as moderate or high complexity. Overall, 64% were male subjects and the most frequent primary cancer site was lung (26%). Half of the patients had no detailed information about cancer staging and only 19% knew their short-term prognosis. The mean length of intervention was 6.5 days (mean three visits per patient). Outcomes were: 34% deaths during the admission process; 38% were discharged home; and 28% were transferred to another medium-term-stay specialist unit. The main symptoms were pain (68%), dyspnoea (43%), vomiting (24%), anorexia (72%), asthenia (78%), insomnia (50%), anxiety (45%) and depression (35%). After the HSTs intervention, the symptom severity was significantly reduced (p<0.001) for all symptoms, except for weakness and anorexia. The mean survival from inclusion was 111 days. Palliative intervention of HSTs is characterised by being adjusted to patient needs and short duration. Their care was focused on the preterminal phase of cancer patients of moderate-high complexity.

  8. An ontology-driven, case-based clinical decision support model for removable partial denture design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingxiao; Wu, Ji; Li, Shusen; Lyu, Peijun; Wang, Yong; Li, Miao

    2016-06-01

    We present the initial work toward developing a clinical decision support model for specific design of removable partial dentures (RPDs) in dentistry. We developed an ontological paradigm to represent knowledge of a patient’s oral conditions and denture component parts. During the case-based reasoning process, a cosine similarity algorithm was applied to calculate similarity values between input patients and standard ontology cases. A group of designs from the most similar cases were output as the final results. To evaluate this model, the output designs of RPDs for 104 randomly selected patients were compared with those selected by professionals. An area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (AUC-ROC) was created by plotting true-positive rates against the false-positive rate at various threshold settings. The precision at position 5 of the retrieved cases was 0.67 and at the top of the curve it was 0.96, both of which are very high. The mean average of precision (MAP) was 0.61 and the normalized discounted cumulative gain (NDCG) was 0.74 both of which confirmed the efficient performance of our model. All the metrics demonstrated the efficiency of our model. This methodology merits further research development to match clinical applications for designing RPDs. This paper is organized as follows. After the introduction and description of the basis for the paper, the evaluation and results are presented in Section 2. Section 3 provides a discussion of the methodology and results. Section 4 describes the details of the ontology, similarity algorithm, and application.

  9. A fuzzy logic decision support system for assessing clinical nutritional risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad Hadianfard

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Studies have indicated a global high prevalence of hospital malnutrition on admission and during hospitalization. Clinical Nutritional Risk Screen (CNRS is a way to identify malnutrition and manage nutritional interventions. Several traditional and non-computer based tools have been suggested for screening nutritional risk levels. The present study was an attempt to employ a computer based fuzzy model decision support system as a nutrition-screening tool for inpatients. Method: This is an applied modeling study. The system architecture was designed based on the fuzzy logic model including input data, inference engine, and output. A clinical nutritionist entered nineteen input variables using a windows-based graphical user interface. The inference engine was involved with knowledge obtained from literature and the construction of ‘IF-THEN’ rules. The output of the system was stratification of patients into four risk levels from ‘No’ to ‘High’ where a number was also allocated to them as a nutritional risk grade. All patients (121 people admitted during implementing the system participated in testing the model. The classification tests were used to measure the CNRS fuzzy model performance. IBM SPSS version 21 was utilized as a tool for data analysis with α = 0.05 as a significance level. Results: Results showed that sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and precision of the fuzzy model performance were 91.67% (±4.92, 76% (±7.6, 88.43% (±5.7, and 93.62% (±4.32, respectively. Instant performance on admission and very low probability of mistake in predicting malnutrition risk level may justify using the model in hospitals. Conclusion: To conclude, the fuzzy model-screening tool is based on multiple nutritional risk factors, having the capability of classifying inpatients into several nutritional risk levels and identifying the level of required nutritional intervention.

  10. Honey for Wound Healing, Ulcers, and Burns; Data Supporting Its Use in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noori Al-Waili

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread existence of unhealed wounds, ulcers, and burns has a great impact on public health and economy. Many interventions, including new medications and technologies, are being used to help achieve significant wound healing and to eliminate infections. Therefore, to find an intervention that has both therapeutic effect on the healing process and the ability to kill microbes is of great value. Honey is a natural product that has been recently introduced in modern medical practice. Honey's antibacterial properties and its effects on wound healing have been thoroughly investigated. Laboratory studies and clinical trials have shown that honey is an effective broad-spectrum antibacterial agent. This paper reviews data that support the effectiveness of natural honey in wound healing and its ability to sterilize infected wounds. Studies on the therapeutic effects of honey collected in different geographical areas on skin wounds, skin and gastric ulcers, and burns are reviewed and mechanisms of action are discussed. (Ulcers and burns are included as an example of challenging wounds. The data show that the wound healing properties of honey include stimulation of tissue growth, enhanced epithelialization, and minimized scar formation. These effects are ascribed to honey's acidity, hydrogen peroxide content, osmotic effect, nutritional and antioxidant contents, stimulation of immunity, and to unidentified compounds. Prostaglandins and nitric oxide play a major role in inflammation, microbial killing, and the healing process. Honey was found to lower prostaglandin levels and elevate nitric oxide end products. These properties might help to explain some biological and therapeutic properties of honey, particularly as an antibacterial agent or wound healer. The data presented here demonstrate that honeys from different geographical areas have considerable therapeutic effects on chronic wounds, ulcers, and burns. The results encourage the use of honey

  11. Evaluation of a clinical decision support algorithm for patient-specific childhood immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Vivienne J; Grannis, Shaun J; Tu, Wanzhu; Rosenman, Marc B; Downs, Stephen M

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a clinical decision support system (CDSS) implementing standard childhood immunization guidelines, using real-world patient data from the Regenstrief Medical Record System (RMRS). Study subjects were age 6-years or younger in 2008 and had visited the pediatric clinic on the campus of Wishard Memorial Hospital. Immunization records were retrieved from the RMRS for 135 randomly selected pediatric patients. We compared vaccine recommendations from the CDSS for both eligible and recommended timelines, based on the child's date of birth and vaccine history, to recommendations from registered nurses who routinely selected vaccines for administration in a busy inner city hospital, using the same date of birth and vaccine history. Aggregated and stratified agreement and Kappa statistics were reported. The reasons for disagreement between suggestions from the CDSS and nurses were also identified. For the 135 children, a total of 1215 vaccination suggestions were generated by nurses and were compared to the recommendations of the CDSS. The overall agreement rates were 81.3% and 90.6% for the eligible and recommended timelines, respectively. The overall Kappa values were 0.63 for the eligible timeline and 0.80 for the recommended timeline. Common reasons for disagreement between the CDSS and nurses were: (1) missed vaccination opportunities by nurses, (2) nurses sometimes suggested a vaccination before the minimal age and minimal waiting interval, (3) nurses usually did not validate patient immunization history, and (4) nurses sometimes gave an extra vaccine dose. Our childhood immunization CDSS can assist providers in delivering accurate childhood vaccinations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Combined closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy with arthroscopy for varus knee and medial compartment osteoarthritis: clinical results at a minimum follow-up for five years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Song; Li, Zhi-Yao

    2013-09-01

    To study the results of closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy and arthroscopy for the treatment of medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee. From October 2005 to June 2007, 25 patients met with our inclusion criteria. All the patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis were treated with arthroscopy and closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy. There were 11 males and 14 females,with a mean age of 53 years old. The pre-operative HSS knee score was 67.6 +/- 2.8, FTA was (185.54 +/- 1.11) degrees, and aLPTA was (96.54 +/- 0.52) degrees in average. The patients were followed up and evaluated according to HSS knee score. The efficacy of the osteotomy was evaluated by FTA and aLPTA. All surgeries were successful without serious complication. All the patients were followed up, and the duration ranged from 5 to 7 years. The HSS was 85.5 +/- 3.7 at the 1st year and 80.3 +/- 5.4 at the latest follow-up. There was significant difference between every two scores of before operation and the two after operation (t = -33.135, P = 0.000; t = -13.215, P = 0.000). The FTA was (173.65 +/- 0.92) degrees at the 1st year and (174.34 +/- 0.53) degrees at the latest follow-up. There was significant difference between every two angles of before operation and after operation (t = 28.739, P = 0.000; t = 2.331, P = 0.048). The aLPTA was (87.32 +/- 0.33) degrees at the 1st year and (87.67 +/- 2.82) degrees at the latest follow-up. There was significant difference between every two angles of before operation and after operation (t = 37.264, P = 0.000; t = 2.469, P = 0.039). Indication is important and good surgical technique is critical for good clinical outcome. A detailed plan before operation is essential for the operation. Arthroscopy is helpful for treating the intra-articular pathology. The osteoarthritis is still in progress but in a slow mode. The combined method of arthroscopy and closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy is a reliable way for medial compartment osteoarthritis of the

  13. Evaluation of prescriber responses to pharmacogenomics clinical decision support for thiopurine S-methyltransferase testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubanyionwu, Samuel; Formea, Christine M; Anderson, Benjamin; Wix, Kelly; Dierkhising, Ross; Caraballo, Pedro J

    2018-02-15

    Results of a study of prescribers' responses to a pharmacogenomics-based clinical decision support (CDS) alert designed to prompt thiopurine S -methyltransferase (TPMT) status testing are reported. A single-center, retrospective, chart review-based study was conducted to evaluate prescriber compliance with a pretest CDS alert that warned of potential thiopurine drug toxicity resulting from deficient TPMT activity due to TPMT gene polymorphism. The CDS alert was triggered when prescribers ordered thiopurine drugs for patients whose records did not indicate TPMT status or when historical thiopurine use was documented in the electronic health record. The alert pop-up also provided a link to online educational resources to guide thiopurine dosing calculations. During the 9-month study period, 500 CDS alerts were generated: in 101 cases (20%), TPMT phenotyping or TPMT genotyping was ordered; in 399 cases (80%), testing was not ordered. Multivariable regression analysis indicated that documentation of historical thiopurine use was the only independent predictor of test ordering. Among the 99 patients tested subsequent to CDS alerts, 70 (71%) had normal TPMT activity, 29 (29%) had intermediate activity, and none had deficient activity. The online resources provided thiopurine dosing recommendations applicable to 24 patients, but only 3 were prescribed guideline-supported doses after CDS alerts. The pretest CDS rule resulted in a large proportion of neglected alerts due to poor alerting accuracy and consequent alert fatigue. Prescriber usage of online thiopurine dosing resources was low. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transforming User Needs into Functional Requirements for an Antibiotic Clinical Decision Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Many informatics studies use content analysis to generate functional requirements for system development. Explication of this translational process from qualitative data to functional requirements can strengthen the understanding and scientific rigor when applying content analysis in informatics studies. Objective To describe a user-centered approach transforming emergent themes derived from focus group data into functional requirements for informatics solutions and to illustrate these methods to the development of an antibiotic clinical decision support system (CDS). Methods The approach consisted of five steps: 1) identify unmet therapeutic planning information needs via Focus Group Study-I, 2) develop a coding framework of therapeutic planning themes to refine the domain scope to antibiotic therapeutic planning, 3) identify functional requirements of an antibiotic CDS system via Focus Group Study-II, 4) discover informatics solutions and functional requirements from coded data, and 5) determine the types of information needed to support the antibiotic CDS system and link with the identified informatics solutions and functional requirements. Results The coding framework for Focus Group Study-I revealed unmet therapeutic planning needs. Twelve subthemes emerged and were clustered into four themes; analysis indicated a need for an antibiotic CDS intervention. Focus Group Study-II included five types of information needs. Comments from the Barrier/Challenge to information access and Function/Feature themes produced three informatics solutions and 13 functional requirements of an antibiotic CDS system. Comments from the Patient, Institution, and Domain themes generated required data elements for each informatics solution. Conclusion This study presents one example explicating content analysis of focus group data and the analysis process to functional requirements from narrative data. Illustration of this 5-step method was used to develop an

  15. Managing ethical issues in patient care and the need for clinical ethics support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Evan; Fleming, Jennifer; Jordens, Christopher; Stewart, Cameron L; Letts, Julie; Kerridge, Ian H

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the range, frequency and management of ethical issues encountered by clinicians working in hospitals in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of a convenience sample of 104 medical, nursing and allied health professionals in two NSW hospitals. Some respondents did not provide data for some questions, therefore the denominator is less than 105 for some items. Sixty-two (62/104; 60%) respondents reported occasionally to often having ethical concerns. Forty-six (46/105; 44%) reported often to occasionally having legal concerns. The three most common responses to concerns were: talking to colleagues (96/105; 91%); raising the issue in a group forum (68/105; 65%); and consulting a relevant guideline (64/105; 61%). Most respondents were highly (65/99; 66%) or moderately (33/99; 33%) satisfied with the ethical environment of the hospital. Twenty-two (22/98; 22%) were highly satisfied with the ethical environment of their department and 74 (74/98; 76%) were moderately satisfied. Most (72/105; 69%) respondents indicated that additional support in dealing with ethical issues would be helpful. Clinicians reported frequently experiencing ethical and legal uncertainty and concern. They usually managed this by talking with colleagues. Although this approach was considered adequate, and the ethics of their hospital was reported to be satisfactory, most respondents indicated that additional assistance with ethical and legal concerns would be helpful. Clinical ethics support should be a priority of public hospitals in NSW and elsewhere in Australia.

  16. Decision support systems in clinical practice: The case of venous thromboembolism prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, G I; Kleymenova, E B; Payushik, S A; Otdelenov, V A; Sychev, D A; Yashina, L P

    2015-01-01

    Today medicine is facing a "knowledge crisis" in that explosively expanding medical knowledge encounters limited abilities to disseminate new practices [1]. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are intended to promote high standards of care in specific areas of medicine by summarizing best clinical practice based on careful reviews of current research. However, doctors are often short of time to study these documents and check their updates, have little motivation for strict adherence to them. A systematic review of 11 studies reporting on 29 recommendations has found that median adherence to all recommendations was 34%, suggesting that potential benefits for patients from health research may be lost [2].Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) can serve as a knowledge translation tool, mediator between clinical guidelines and physicians by providing the right information to the right person at the right time. To evaluate the effectiveness of implementation of international and national CPGs for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention with the help of CDSS in a general hospital. A multifunctional CDSS based on national and international guidelines on the VTE prevention was developed and implemented in the Medical Center of the Bank of Russia (MC). The system has the following functionalities: 1) it supports the decision on the VTE prevention based on individual risk assessment of thrombosis (scales of Caprini, Rogers and Khorana, Padua Prediction Score, additional risk factors) and bleeding (IMPROVE scale for non-surgical patients, major bleeding scale for surgical patients and major orthopedic surgeries, hemorrhagic complications risk in cancer patients); 2) generates the summary containing the grade of recommendations and the level of evidence, personalized recommendations on regimen and duration of preventive antithrombotic therapy, dose correction according to creatinine clearance; 3) provides an audit form for and statistical analysis of VTE cases; 3

  17. Clinical supervision and nursing students' professional competence: support-seeking behaviour and the attachment styles of students and mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moked, Zahava; Drach-Zahavy, Anat

    2016-02-01

    To examine whether the interdependent attachment style of students is positively related to their support-seeking behaviour during supervision and whether their over-dependent and counter-dependent attachment styles are negatively related to it. Second, to determine whether the mentors' attachment styles moderate the relationship between the students' support-seeking behaviours and their professional competence, such that this relationship is stronger when supervisors are characterized by higher independent attachment style. The mentor-student encounter during nursing clinical supervision is expected to create a supportive environment aimed at promoting support-seeking behaviours and subsequent positive supervision outcomes. Bowlby's attachment theory suggests that the three attachment styles - independent, counter-dependent and over-dependent - may have implications for clinical supervision. A correlative-prospective study. One hundred and seventy-eight students and 66 clinical mentors completed questionnaires at the beginning and end of a clinical supervision session during 2012-2013. Results demonstrated that high compared with low independent nursing students tended to seek less support. Second, students who seek less support evaluated their professional competence as higher than students who seek more support. Third, mentor's counter-dependent attachment style moderated the relationship between students' support-seeking behaviour and their professional competencies. The results allude to the detrimental meaning of support-seeking in the eyes of nursing students. Results can guide administrators in promoting supervision processes that are compatible with the students' independent learning style, while also preventing the negative implications of autonomic learning. Furthermore, as mentors' counter-dependent attachment style can hinder students' support-seeking, attachment styles should be considered in the selection of mentors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Occupational therapy influence on a carer peer support model in a clinical mental health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Cate; Sanders, Bronwyn; Allchin, Becca; Lentin, Primrose; Lang, Shannon

    2015-10-01

    Current policy frameworks call for the participation of consumers and carers in all levels of mental health service delivery in Australia. Such inclusion leads to better outcomes for all, however, it is recognised that carers have needs and occupations beyond their carer role. The aim of this article is to describe an innovative carer peer support program developed by a group of occupational therapists. The article describes the rationale, phases of development and the role that occupational therapists played in developing and sustaining the model. This is followed by an exploration of the occupational therapy attitudes, knowledge and skills that contributed to the conceptualisation and implementation of the model. Five occupational therapists engaged in a review process involving documentation, literature review, evaluation, reflection and discussion. Four of the occupational therapists had either coordinated or managed the service described. The fifth author facilitated the process. Review of the model indicates it equips carers to perform their caring occupation and helps carers recognise the need for occupations beyond caring, for their health and wellbeing. Employing carers as paid workers values their 'real life' experience in their caring occupation. Findings also illustrate that the attitudes, knowledge, skills and competency standards of occupational therapists are well suited in enabling this emerging area of service delivery. Although this model has been developed in a clinical mental health setting, the key principles could be applied with carers or consumers across a variety of settings in which occupational therapists are employed. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  19. Managing Ethical Difficulties in Healthcare: Communicating in Inter-professional Clinical Ethics Support Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönlund, Catarina Fischer; Dahlqvist, Vera; Zingmark, Karin; Sandlund, Mikael; Söderberg, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Several studies show that healthcare professionals need to communicate inter-professionally in order to manage ethical difficulties. A model of clinical ethics support (CES) inspired by Habermas' theory of discourse ethics has been developed by our research group. In this version of CES sessions healthcare professionals meet inter-professionally to communicate and reflect on ethical difficulties in a cooperative manner with the aim of reaching communicative agreement or reflective consensus. In order to understand the course of action during CES, the aim of this study was to describe the communication of value conflicts during a series of inter-professional CES sessions. Ten audio- and video-recorded CES sessions were conducted over eight months and were analyzed by using the video analysis tool Transana and qualitative content analysis. The results showed that during the CES sessions the professionals as a group moved through the following five phases: a value conflict expressed as feelings of frustration, sharing disempowerment and helplessness, the revelation of the value conflict, enhancing realistic expectations, seeing opportunities to change the situation instead of obstacles. In the course of CES, the professionals moved from an individual interpretation of the situation to a common, new understanding and then to a change in approach. An open and permissive communication climate meant that the professionals dared to expose themselves, share their feelings, face their own emotions, and eventually arrive at a mutual shared reality. The value conflict was not only revealed but also resolved.

  20. Supporting bachelor of nursing students within the clinical environment: perspectives of preceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Marc; Moxham, Lorna; Sander, Teresa; Walker, Sandra; Dwyer, Trudy

    2014-08-01

    Student learning in the clinical environment is a cornerstone of pedagogy for students undertaking a Bachelor of Nursing in Australia. This paper presents the results of a survey that was conducted with registered nurses who preceptor students for universities in Australia. Findings reveal that some preceptors do not hold the qualification they are preceptoring students to obtain, that university involvement in preparation of preceptors is scant and that resource provision and communication from universities to preceptors is considered problematic. Registered nurses choose to act as preceptors for reasons that are both altruistic and professional. They are often employed in senior positions and as such find it difficult to manage time and resolve role conflict. This paper concludes that the registered nurses who preceptor students generally have a positive experience but require greater involvement by universities in their preparation, particularly when they are responsible for the direct assessment of students. The paper posits this may be best achieved by universities creating effective lines of communication and ongoing support. This will sustain collaborative and meaningful engagement with registered nurses who preceptor undergraduate students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Total integrated performance excellence system (TIPES): A true north direction for a clinical trial support center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sather, Mike R; Parsons, Sherry; Boardman, Kathy D; Warren, Stuart R; Davis-Karim, Anne; Griffin, Kevin; Betterton, Jane A; Jones, Mark S; Johnson, Stanley H; Vertrees, Julia E; Hickey, Jan H; Salazar, Thelma P; Huang, Grant D

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the quality journey taken by a Federal organization over more than 20 years. These efforts have resulted in the implementation of a Total Integrated Performance Excellence System (TIPES) that combines key principles and practices of established quality systems. The Center has progressively integrated quality system frameworks including the Malcom Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA) Framework and Criteria for Performance Excellence, ISO 9001, and the Organizational Project Management Maturity Model (OPM3), as well as supplemental quality systems of ISO 15378 (packaging for medicinal products) and ISO 21500 (guide to project management) to systematically improve all areas of operations. These frameworks were selected for applicability to Center processes and systems, consistency and reinforcement of complimentary approaches, and international acceptance. External validations include the MBNQA, the highest quality award in the US, continued registration and conformance to ISO standards and guidelines, and multiple VA and state awards. With a focus on a holistic approach to quality involving processes, systems and personnel, this paper presents activities and lessons that were critical to building TIPES and establishing the quality environment for conducting clinical research in support of Veterans and national health care.

  2. Total integrated performance excellence system (TIPES: A true north direction for a clinical trial support center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike R. Sather

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the quality journey taken by a Federal organization over more than 20 years. These efforts have resulted in the implementation of a Total Integrated Performance Excellence System (TIPES that combines key principles and practices of established quality systems. The Center has progressively integrated quality system frameworks including the Malcom Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA Framework and Criteria for Performance Excellence, ISO 9001, and the Organizational Project Management Maturity Model (OPM3, as well as supplemental quality systems of ISO 15378 (packaging for medicinal products and ISO 21500 (guide to project management to systematically improve all areas of operations. These frameworks were selected for applicability to Center processes and systems, consistency and reinforcement of complimentary approaches, and international acceptance. External validations include the MBNQA, the highest quality award in the US, continued registration and conformance to ISO standards and guidelines, and multiple VA and state awards. With a focus on a holistic approach to quality involving processes, systems and personnel, this paper presents activities and lessons that were critical to building TIPES and establishing the quality environment for conducting clinical research in support of Veterans and national health care.

  3. Clinical decision support system for early detection of prostate cancer from benign hyperplasia of prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderzadeh, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    There has been a growing research interest in the use of intelligent methods in medical informatics studies. Intelligent computer programs were implemented to aid physicians and other medical professionals in making difficult medical decisions. Prostate Neoplasia problems including benign hyperplasia and cancer of prostate are very common and cause significant delay in recovery and often require costly investigations before coming to its diagnosis. The conventional approach to build medical diagnostic system requires the formulation of rules by which the input data can be analyzed. But the formulation of such rules is very difficult with large sets of input data. Realizing the difficulty, a number of quantitative mathematical and statistical models including pattern classification technique such as Artificial neural networks (ANN), rolled based system, discriminate analysis and regression analysis has been applied as an alternative to conventional clinical and medical diagnostic. Among the mathematical and statistical modeling techniques used in medical decision support, Artificial neural networks attract many attentions in recent studies and in the last decade, the use of neural networks has become widely accepted in medical applications. This is manifested by an increasing number of medical devices currently available on the market with embedded AI algorithms, together with an accelerating pace of publication in medical journals, with over 500 academic publications year featuring Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs).

  4. Using statistical anomaly detection models to find clinical decision support malfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Soumi; McEvoy, Dustin S; Aaron, Skye; Hickman, Thu-Trang; Wright, Adam

    2018-05-11

    Malfunctions in Clinical Decision Support (CDS) systems occur due to a multitude of reasons, and often go unnoticed, leading to potentially poor outcomes. Our goal was to identify malfunctions within CDS systems. We evaluated 6 anomaly detection models: (1) Poisson Changepoint Model, (2) Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) Model, (3) Hierarchical Divisive Changepoint (HDC) Model, (4) Bayesian Changepoint Model, (5) Seasonal Hybrid Extreme Studentized Deviate (SHESD) Model, and (6) E-Divisive with Median (EDM) Model and characterized their ability to find known anomalies. We analyzed 4 CDS alerts with known malfunctions from the Longitudinal Medical Record (LMR) and Epic® (Epic Systems Corporation, Madison, WI, USA) at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA. The 4 rules recommend lead testing in children, aspirin therapy in patients with coronary artery disease, pneumococcal vaccination in immunocompromised adults and thyroid testing in patients taking amiodarone. Poisson changepoint, ARIMA, HDC, Bayesian changepoint and the SHESD model were able to detect anomalies in an alert for lead screening in children and in an alert for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in immunocompromised adults. EDM was able to detect anomalies in an alert for monitoring thyroid function in patients on amiodarone. Malfunctions/anomalies occur frequently in CDS alert systems. It is important to be able to detect such anomalies promptly. Anomaly detection models are useful tools to aid such detections.

  5. Evaluation of real-time clinical decision support systems for platelet and cryoprecipitate orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Ryan A; Triulzi, Darrell J; Waters, Jonathan H; Reddy, Vivek; Yazer, Mark H

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate cryoprecipitate and platelet ordering practices after the implementation of real-time clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) in a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system. Uniform platelet and cryoprecipitate transfusion thresholds were implemented at 11 hospitals in a regional health care system with a common CPOE system. Over 6 months, a variety of information was collected on the ordering physicians and the number of alerts generated by the CDSSs when these products were ordered outside of the institutional guidelines. There were 1,889 orders for platelets and 152 orders for cryoprecipitate placed in 6 months. Of these, 1,102 (58.3%) platelet and 74 (48.7%) cryoprecipitate orders triggered an alert. The proportion of orders canceled after an alert was generated ranged from 13.5% to 17.9% for platelets and 0% to 50.0% for cryoprecipitate orders. CDSS alerts reduce, but do not eliminate, platelet and cryoprecipitate transfusions that do not meet institutional guidelines.

  6. [Human body meridian spatial decision support system for clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    The spatial position and distribution of human body meridian are expressed limitedly in the decision support system (DSS) of acupuncture and moxibustion at present, which leads to the failure to give the effective quantitative analysis on the spatial range and the difficulty for the decision-maker to provide a realistic spatial decision environment. Focusing on the limit spatial expression in DSS of acupuncture and moxibustion, it was proposed that on the basis of the geographic information system, in association of DSS technology, the design idea was developed on the human body meridian spatial DSS. With the 4-layer service-oriented architecture adopted, the data center integrated development platform was taken as the system development environment. The hierarchical organization was done for the spatial data of human body meridian via the directory tree. The structured query language (SQL) server was used to achieve the unified management of spatial data and attribute data. The technologies of architecture, configuration and plug-in development model were integrated to achieve the data inquiry, buffer analysis and program evaluation of the human body meridian spatial DSS. The research results show that the human body meridian spatial DSS could reflect realistically the spatial characteristics of the spatial position and distribution of human body meridian and met the constantly changeable demand of users. It has the powerful spatial analysis function and assists with the scientific decision in clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion. It is the new attempt to the informatization research of human body meridian.

  7. The Use of Clinical Decision Support in Reducing Diagnosis of and Treatment of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Sara C; Feldman, Leonard; Smith, Janessa; Pahwa, Amit; Cosgrove, Sara E; Chida, Natasha

    2018-06-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) embedded within the electronic health record (EHR) is a potential antibiotic stewardship strategy for hospitalized patients. Reduction in urine testing and treating asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is an important strategy to promote antibiotic stewardship. We created an intervention focused on reducing urine testing for asymptomatic patients at a large tertiary care center. The objective of this study was to design an intervention to reduce unnecessary urinalysis and urine culture (UC) orders as well as the treatment of ASB. We performed a quasiexperimental study among adult inpatients at a single academic institution. We implemented a bundled intervention, including information broadcast in newsletters, hospitalwide screensavers, and passive CDS messages in the EHR. We investigated the impact of this strategy on urinalysis, UC orders, and on the treatment of ASB by using an interrupted time series analysis. Our intervention led to reduced UC order as well as reduced antibiotic orders in response to urinalysis orders and UC results. This easily implementable bundle may play an important role as an antibiotic stewardship strategy. © 2018 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  8. Impact of INTERMACS Profile on Clinical Outcomes for Patients Supported With the Total Artificial Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Keyur B; Thanavaro, Kristin L; Tang, Daniel G; Quader, Mohammed A; Mankad, Anit K; Tchoukina, Inna; Thacker, Leroy R; Smallfield, Melissa C; Katlaps, Gundars; Hess, Michael L; Cooke, Richard H; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar

    2016-11-01

    Insufficient data delineate outcomes for Interagency Registry for Mechanically Assisted Circulatory Support (INTERMACS) profile 1 patients with the total artificial heart (TAH). We studied 66 consecutive patients implanted with the TAH at our institution from 2006 through 2012 and compared outcome by INTERMACS profile. INTERMACS profiles were adjudicated retrospectively by a reviewer blinded to clinical outcomes. Survival after TAH implantation at 6 and 12 months was 76% and 71%, respectively. INTERMACS profile 1 patients had decreased 6-month survival on the device compared with those in profiles 2-4 (74% vs 95%, log rank: P = .015). For the 50 patients surviving to heart transplantation, the 1-year posttransplant survival was 82%. There was no difference in 1-year survival when comparing patients in the INTERMACS 1 profile with less severe profiles (79% vs 84%; log rank test P = .7; hazard ratio [confidence interval] 1.3 [0.3-4.8]). Patients implanted with the TAH as INTERMACS profile 1 had reduced survival to transplantation compared with less sick profiles. INTERMACS profile at the time of TAH implantation did not affect 1-year survival after heart transplantation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Making space for empathy: supporting doctors in the emotional labour of clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerasidou, Angeliki; Horn, Ruth

    2016-01-27

    The academic and medical literature highlights the positive effects of empathy for patient care. Yet, very little attention has been given to the impact of the requirement for empathy on the physicians themselves and on their emotional wellbeing. The medical profession requires doctors to be both clinically competent and empathetic towards the patients. In practice, accommodating both requirements can be difficult for physicians. The image of the technically skilful, rational, and emotionally detached doctor dominates the profession, and inhibits physicians from engaging emotionally with their patients and their own feelings, which forms the basis for empathy. This inhibition has a negative impact not only on the patients but also on the physicians. The expression of emotions in medical practice is perceived as unprofessional and many doctors learn to supress and ignore their feelings. When facing stressful situations, these physicians are more likely to suffer from depression and burnout than those who engage with and reflect on their feelings. Physicians should be supported in their emotional work, which will help them develop empathy. Methods could include questionnaires that aid self-reflection, and discussion groups with peers and supervisors on emotional experiences. Yet, in order for these methods to work, the negative image associated with the expression of emotions should be questioned. Also, the work conditions of physicians should improve to allow them to make use of these tools. Empathy should not only be expected from doctors but should be actively promoted, assisted and cultivated in the medical profession.

  10. Development and Retrospective Clinical Assessment of a Patient-Specific Closed-Form Integro-Differential Equation Model of Plasma Dilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlas, Glen; Li, John K-J; Amin, Shawn; Hahn, Robert G

    2017-01-01

    A closed-form integro-differential equation (IDE) model of plasma dilution (PD) has been derived which represents both the intravenous (IV) infusion of crystalloid and the postinfusion period. Specifically, PD is mathematically represented using a combination of constant ratio, differential, and integral components. Furthermore, this model has successfully been applied to preexisting data, from a prior human study, in which crystalloid was infused for a period of 30 minutes at the beginning of thyroid surgery. Using Euler's formula and a Laplace transform solution to the IDE, patients could be divided into two distinct groups based on their response to PD during the infusion period. Explicitly, Group 1 patients had an infusion-based PD response which was modeled using an exponentially decaying hyperbolic sine function, whereas Group 2 patients had an infusion-based PD response which was modeled using an exponentially decaying trigonometric sine function. Both Group 1 and Group 2 patients had postinfusion PD responses which were modeled using the same combination of hyperbolic sine and hyperbolic cosine functions. Statistically significant differences, between Groups 1 and 2, were noted with respect to the area under their PD curves during both the infusion and postinfusion periods. Specifically, Group 2 patients exhibited a response to PD which was most likely consistent with a preoperative hypovolemia. Overall, this IDE model of PD appears to be highly "adaptable" and successfully fits clinically-obtained human data on a patient-specific basis, during both the infusion and postinfusion periods. In addition, patient-specific IDE modeling of PD may be a useful adjunct in perioperative fluid management and in assessing clinical volume kinetics, of crystalloid solutions, in real time.

  11. Poor social support as a risk factor for antenatal depressive symptoms among women attending public antennal clinics in Penang, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Abdul; Mohd, Rokiah

    2017-11-02

    Depression, a type of mental disorder which is portrayed by marked alterations in mood, is associated with distress and/or impaired functioning. Poor social support is an important risk factor for depression in pregnancy. An extensive literature search failed to show any published study conducted in Malaysia on antenatal depressive symptoms and the risk of poor social support on it. The aim of the study was to determine the risk of antenatal depressive symptoms due to poor social support. This cross sectional study was conducted among 3000 pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in Penang, Malaysia. Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) was used to screen for antenatal depressive symptoms and the Oslo-3 Social Support Scale (OSS-3) was used to measure social support. Odds ratio and adjusted odds ratio were used to quantify the risk of antenatal depressive symptoms due to poor social support. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 20%. Using OSS-3 scale to gauge social support, most of the participants had moderate support (61.3%) followed by poor support (22%) and strong support (16.7%). Social support was found to be significantly associated with depressive symptoms in this study (OR 2.2, aOR 2.1, AR 45%). Considering that an expecting mother's psychological factors are important in the wellbeing of the mother and child, antenatal depression must be quickly identified. Screening pregnant women for social support can help identify women with higher risk of depression.

  12. The Need for Clinical Decision Support Integrated with the Electronic Health Record for the Clinical Application of Whole Genome Sequencing Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon M. Welch

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Whole genome sequencing (WGS is rapidly approaching widespread clinical application. Technology advancements over the past decade, since the first human genome was decoded, have made it feasible to use WGS for clinical care. Future advancements will likely drive down the price to the point wherein WGS is routinely available for care. However, were this to happen today, most of the genetic information available to guide clinical care would go unused due to the complexity of genetics, limited physician proficiency in genetics, and lack of genetics professionals in the clinical workforce. Furthermore, these limitations are unlikely to change in the future. As such, the use of clinical decision support (CDS to guide genome-guided clinical decision-making is imperative. In this manuscript, we describe the barriers to widespread clinical application of WGS information, describe how CDS can be an important tool for overcoming these barriers, and provide clinical examples of how genome-enabled CDS can be used in the clinical setting.

  13. Implementation of a Clinical Decision Support Tool for Stool Cultures and Parasitological Studies in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, D; Richter, S S; Asamoto, K; Wyllie, R; Tuttle, R; Procop, G W

    2017-12-01

    There is substantial evidence that stool culture and parasitological examinations are of minimal to no value after 3 days of hospitalization. We implemented and studied the impact of a clinical decision support tool (CDST) to decrease the number of unnecessary stool cultures (STCUL), ova/parasite (O&P) examinations, and Giardia / Cryptosporidium enzyme immunoassay screens (GC-EIA) performed for patients hospitalized >3 days. We studied the frequency of stool studies ordered before or on day 3 and after day 3 of hospitalization (i.e., categorical orders/total number of orders) before and after this intervention and denoted the numbers and types of microorganisms detected within those time frames. This intervention, which corresponded to a custom-programmed hard-stop alert tool in the Epic hospital information system, allowed providers to override the intervention by calling the laboratory, if testing was deemed medically necessary. Comparative statistics were employed to determine significance, and cost savings were estimated based on our internal costs. Before the intervention, 129/670 (19.25%) O&P examinations, 47/204 (23.04%) GC-EIA, and 249/1,229 (20.26%) STCUL were ordered after 3 days of hospitalization. After the intervention, 46/521 (8.83%) O&P examinations, 27/157 (17.20%) GC-EIA, and 106/1,028 (10.31%) STCUL were ordered after 3 days of hospitalization. The proportions of reductions in the number of tests performed after 3 days and the associated P values were 54.1% for O&P examinations ( P < 0.0001), 22.58% for GC-EIA ( P = 0.2807), and 49.1% for STCUL ( P < 0.0001). This was estimated to have resulted in $8,108.84 of cost savings. The electronic CDST resulted in a substantial reduction in the number of evaluations of stool cultures and the number of parasitological examinations for patients hospitalized for more than 3 days and in a cost savings while retaining the ability of the clinician to obtain these tests if clinically indicated. Copyright © 2017

  14. Usability evaluation of a clinical decision support tool for osteoporosis disease management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newton David

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoporosis affects over 200 million people worldwide at a high cost to healthcare systems. Although guidelines are available, patients are not receiving appropriate diagnostic testing or treatment. Findings from a systematic review of osteoporosis interventions and a series of focus groups were used to develop a functional multifaceted tool that can support clinical decision-making in osteoporosis disease management at the point of care. The objective of our study was to assess how well the prototype met functional goals and usability needs. Methods We conducted a usability study for each component of the tool--the Best Practice Recommendation Prompt (BestPROMPT, the Risk Assessment Questionnaire (RAQ, and the Customised Osteoporosis Education (COPE sheet--using the framework described by Kushniruk and Patel. All studies consisted of one-on-one sessions with a moderator using a standardised worksheet. Sessions were audio- and video-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis consisted of a combination of qualitative and quantitative analyses. Results In study 1, physicians liked that the BestPROMPT can provide customised recommendations based on risk factors identified from the RAQ. Barriers included lack of time to use the tool, the need to alter clinic workflow to enable point-of-care use, and that the tool may disrupt the real reason for the visit. In study 2, patients completed the RAQ in a mean of 6 minutes, 35 seconds. Of the 42 critical incidents, 60% were navigational and most occurred when the first nine participants were using the stylus pen; no critical incidents were observed with the last six participants that used the touch screen. Patients thought that the RAQ questions were easy to read and understand, but they found it difficult to initiate the questionnaire. Suggestions for improvement included improving aspects of the interface and navigation. The results of study 3 showed that most patients were able

  15. Clinical research in implant dentistry: evaluation of implant-supported restorations, aesthetic and patient-reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Niklaus P; Zitzmann, Nicola U

    2012-02-01

    The articles discussed in working group 3 dealt with specific aspects of clinical research. In this context, the literature reporting on survival and complication rates of implant-supported or implant-tooth supported restorations in longitudinal studies of at least 5 years were discussed. The second aspect dealt with the evaluation of aesthetic outcomes in clinical studies and the related index systems available. Finally, the third aspect discussed dealt with patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). A detailed appraisal of the available methodology was presented. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Implant-supported mandibular removable partial dentures: Functional, clinical and radiographical parameters in relation to implant position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Charlotte; Speksnijder, Caroline M; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Kerdijk, Wouter; Meijer, Henny J A; Cune, Marco S

    2017-06-01

    Patients with a Kennedy class I situation often encounter problems with their removable partial denture (RPD). To assess the functional benefits of implant support to RPDs, the clinical performance of the implants and teeth and to determine the most favorable implant position: the premolar (PM) or molar (M) region. Thirty subjects received 2 PM and 2 M implants. A new RPD was made. Implant support was provided 3 months later. In a cross-over model, randomly, 2 implants (PM or M) supported the RPD during 3 months. Masticatory performance was assessed using the mixing ability index (MAI). Clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed. Non-parametric statistical analysis for related samples and post hoc comparisons were performed. Masticatory performance differed significantly between the stages of treatment (P < .001). MAI-scores improved with implant support although the implant position had no significant effect. No complications to the implants or RPD were observed and clinical and radiographical parameters for both implants and teeth were favorable. Higher scores for bleeding on probing were seen for molar implants. Implant support to a Kennedy class I RPD significantly improves masticatory function, regardless of implant position. No major clinical problems were observed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effect of intensive nutritional counseling and support on clinical outcomes of hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfino, Alessio; Chiappini, Maria Grazia; Laviano, Alessandro; Ammann, Thomas; Bollea, Maria Rosa; Alegiani, Filippo; Rossi Fanelli, Filippo; Muscaritoli, Maurizio

    2012-10-01

    Protein-energy wasting is frequently found in patients on hemodialysis (HD). Anorexia and hypophagia contribute to malnutrition and increased morbidity and mortality, but the clinical impact of correcting hypophagia remains uncertain. We evaluated whether the correction of hypophagia influences morbidity and mortality in anorexic patients on HD. Thirty-four patients on HD were enrolled in a 2-y follow-up program including regular nutritional assessments. Patients not meeting the nutritional requirements during the follow-up received nutritional counseling, consisting of advice, individually tailored diets, and, for a failed dietary intervention, artificial nutrition. Biochemical, anthropometric, and body composition parameters, morbidity, and mortality were recorded in all patients at 12 and 24 mo. At baseline, 14 patients (41%) were anorexic, and 20 patients (59%) were non-anorexic. Anorexic patients were hypophagic and presented with a decreased fat-free mass. After 12 and 24 mo, cholesterol, albumin, lymphocyte count, and body mass index did not differ between the groups, whereas fat-free mass (percentage) in supplemented anorexic patients significantly improved in no longer differing from non-anorexic patients (65.8 ± 4.4 versus 65.4 ± 8.9, respectively, P = NS; 65.8 ± 4.4 versus 66.7 ± 10.78, respectively, P = NS). Morbidity and mortality were not different between the two groups. In patients on HD, nutritional counseling and nutritional support positively affect the nutritional status in hypophagic patients and make the risk of morbidity and mortality in anorexic patients comparable to those of non-anorexic patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of clinical decision support system in improving maternal health care in Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Ayindenaba Dalaba

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the cost-effectiveness of a computer-assisted Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS in the identification of maternal complications in Ghana.A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed in a before- and after-intervention study. Analysis was conducted from the provider's perspective. The intervention area was the Kassena- Nankana district where computer-assisted CDSS was used by midwives in maternal care in six selected health centres. Six selected health centers in the Builsa district served as the non-intervention group, where the normal Ghana Health Service activities were being carried out.Computer-assisted CDSS increased the detection of pregnancy complications during antenatal care (ANC in the intervention health centres (before-intervention = 9 /1,000 ANC attendance; after-intervention = 12/1,000 ANC attendance; P-value = 0.010. In the intervention health centres, there was a decrease in the number of complications during labour by 1.1%, though the difference was not statistically significant (before-intervention =107/1,000 labour clients; after-intervention = 96/1,000 labour clients; P-value = 0.305. Also, at the intervention health centres, the average cost per pregnancy complication detected during ANC (cost -effectiveness ratio decreased from US$17,017.58 (before-intervention to US$15,207.5 (after-intervention. Incremental cost -effectiveness ratio (ICER was estimated at US$1,142. Considering only additional costs (cost of computer-assisted CDSS, cost per pregnancy complication detected was US$285.Computer -assisted CDSS has the potential to identify complications during pregnancy and marginal reduction in labour complications. Implementing computer-assisted CDSS is more costly but more effective in the detection of pregnancy complications compared to routine maternal care, hence making the decision to implement CDSS very complex. Policy makers should however be guided by whether the additional benefit is worth

  19. Application of support vector machines to breast cancer screening using mammogram and clinical history data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Walker H., Jr.; McKee, Dan; Velazquez, Roberto; Wong, Lut; Lo, Joseph Y.; Anderson, Francis R.

    2003-05-01

    The objectives of this paper are to discuss: (1) the development and testing of a new Evolutionary Programming (EP) method to optimally configure Support Vector Machine (SVM) parameters for facilitating the diagnosis of breast cancer; (2) evaluation of EP derived learning machines when the number of BI-RADS and clinical history discriminators are reduced from 16 to 7; (3) establishing system performance for several SVM kernels in addition to the EP/Adaptive Boosting (EP/AB) hybrid using the Digital Database for Screening Mammography, University of South Florida (DDSM USF) and Duke data sets; and (4) obtaining a preliminary evaluation of the measurement of SVM learning machine inter-institutional generalization capability using BI-RADS data. Measuring performance of the SVM designs and EP/AB hybrid against these objectives will provide quantative evidence that the software packages described can generalize to larger patient data sets from different institutions. Most iterative methods currently in use to optimize learning machine parameters are time consuming processes, which sometimes yield sub-optimal values resulting in performance degradation. SVMs are new machine intelligence paradigms, which use the Structural Risk Minimization (SRM) concept to develop learning machines. These learning machines can always be trained to provide global minima, given that the machine parameters are optimally computed. In addition, several system performance studies are described which include EP derived SVM performance as a function of: (a) population and generation size as well as a method for generating initial populations and (b) iteratively derived versus EP derived learning machine parameters. Finally, the authors describe a set of experiments providing preliminary evidence that both the EP/AB hybrid and SVM Computer Aided Diagnostic C++ software packages will work across a large population of patients, based on a data set of approximately 2,500 samples from five different

  20. A feasibility study for a clinical decision support system prompting HIV testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, D R; Hall, C; Rae, C; Rayment, Ml; Branch, M; Littlewood, J; Sullivan, A

    2017-07-01

    Levels of undiagnosed HIV infection and late presentation remain high globally despite attempts to increase testing. The objective of this study was to evaluate a risk-based prototype application to prompt HIV testing when patients undergo routine blood tests. Two computer physician order entry (CPOE) systems were modified using the application to prompt health care workers (HCWs) to add an HIV test when other tests selected suggested that the patient was at higher risk of HIV infection. The application was applied for a 3-month period in two areas, in a large London hospital and in general practices in Teesside/North Yorkshire. At the end of the evaluation period, HCWs were interviewed to assess the usability and acceptability of the prompt. Numbers of HIV tests ordered in the general practice areas were also compared before and after the prompt's introduction. The system was found to be both useable and generally acceptable to hospital doctors, general practitioners and nurse practitioners, with little evidence of prompt/alert fatigue. The issue of the prompt appearing late in the patient consultation did lead to some difficulties, particularly around discussion of the test and consent. In the general practices, around 1 in 10 prompts were accepted and there was a 6% increase in testing rates over the 3-month study period (P = 0.169). Using a CPOE-based clinical decision support application to prompt HIV testing appears both feasible and acceptable to HCWs. Refining the application to provide more accurate risk stratification is likely to make it more effective. © 2016 British HIV Association.

  1. Comparing minimally supervised home-based and closely supervised gym-based exercise programs in weight reduction and insulin resistance after bariatric surgery: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, Sara; Dadgostar, Haleh; Mazaherinezhad, Ali; Adib, Hanie; Solaymani-Dodaran, Masoud; Soheilipour, Fahimeh; Hakiminezhad, Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Effectiveness of various exercise protocols in weight reduction after bariatric surgery has not been sufficiently explored in the literature. Thus, in the present study, we aimed at comparing the effect of minimally supervised home-based and closely supervised gym-based exercise programs on weight reduction and insulin resistance after bariatric surgery. Methods: Females undergoing gastric bypass surgery were invited to participate in an exercise program and were randomly allocated into 2 groups using a random number generator in Excel. They were either offered a minimally supervised home-based (MSHB) or closely supervised gym-based (CSGB) exercise program. The CSGB protocol constitutes 2 weekly training sessions under ACSM guidelines. In the MSHB protocol, the participants received a notebook containing a list of recommended aerobic and resistance exercises, a log to record their activity, and a schedule of follow-up phone calls and clinic visits. Both groups received a pedometer. We measured their weight, BMI, lipid profile, FBS, and insulin level at baseline and at 20 weeks after the exercises, the results of which were compared using t test or Mann-Whitney U test at the end of the study. All the processes were observed by 1 senior resident in sport medicine. Results: A total of 80 patients were recruited who were all able to complete our study (MSHB= 38 and CSGB= 42). The baseline comparison revealed that the 2 groups were similar. The mean change (reduction) in BMI was slightly better in CSGB (8.61 95% CI 7.76-9.45) compared with the MSHB (5.18 95% CI 3.91-6.46); p< 0.01. However, the 2 groups did not have a statistically significant difference in the amount of change in the other factors including FBS and Homa.ir. Conclusion: As we expected a non-inferiority result, our results showed that both MSHB and CSGB exercise methods are somewhat equally effective in improving lipid profile and insulin resistance in the 2 groups, but a slightly better

  2. Partnerships for clinical learning: A collaborative initiative to support medical imaging technology students and their supervisors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, A.; Smythe, L.; Jones, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The involvement of practitioners in the teaching and supervision of medical imaging technology students is central to students' learning. This article presents an overview of a learning partnership initiative, reinforced by an online platform to support students' learning and their medical imaging technologist supervisors' (MITs) teaching within a clinical learning environment in a New Zealand context. Methodology: Data were generated through a series of fourteen collaborative action research focus group meetings with MITs and student MITs. Results: The findings revealed that a robust relationship between a student and their MIT partner gave students an ‘anchor’ for learning and a sense of belonging. The online platform supported the relationship and provided an effective means for communication between students and their MIT partners. The relationship was not one-directional as it also supported the enhancement of MITs' practice. Conclusions: The recommendations from the study suggest learning partnerships between MITs and student MITs will be valuable in supporting teaching and learning respectively. MITs need to be better supported in their teaching role to enable them to make a greater investment in students' learning. A redistribution of funding for clinical education needs to be considered to support the MITs' central role in teaching medical imaging students. - Highlights: • Learning partnerships within a clinical setting support students' learning. • An online platform can provide online support when face-to-face support is not possible. • Learning partnerships can enhance MITs' practice.

  3. SU-F-P-13: NRG Oncology Medical Physics Manpower Survey Quantifying Support Demands for Multi Institutional Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroe, J [St. Anthony’s Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); Case Western Reserve University (United States); Boparai, K [ACR, Reston, VA (United States); Xiao, Y [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Galvin, J [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Newtown, PA (United States); Sohn, J [Case Western University, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A survey was taken by NRG Oncology to assess Full Time Equivalent (FTE) contributions to multi institutional clinical trials by medical physicists.No current quantification of physicists’ efforts in FTE units associated with clinical trials is available. The complexity of multi-institutional trials increases with new technologies and techniques. Proper staffing may directly impact the quality of trial data and outcomes. The demands on physics time supporting clinical trials needs to be assessed. Methods: The NRG Oncology Medical Physicist Subcommittee created a sixteen question survey to obtain this FTE data. IROC Houston distributed the survey to their list of 1802 contact physicists. Results: After three weeks, 363 responded (20.1% response). 187 (51.5%) institutions reporting external beam participation were processed. There was a wide range in number of protocols active and supported at each institution. Of the 187 clinics, 134 (71.7%) participate in 0 to 10 trials, 28 (15%) in 11 to 20 trials, 10 (5.3%) in 21 to 30 trials, 9 (4.8%) had 40 to 75 trials. On average, physicist spent 2.7 hours (SD: 6.0) per week supervising or interacting with clinical trial staff. 1.25 hours (SD: 3.37), 1.83 hours (SD: 4.13), and 0.64 hours(SD: 1.13) per week were spent on patient simulation, reviewing treatment plans, and maintaining a DICOM server, respectively. For all protocol credentialing activities, physicist spent an average of 37.05 hours (SD: 96.94) yearly. To support dosimetrists, clinicians, and therapists, physicist spend on average 2.07 hours (SD: 3.52) per week just reading protocols. Physicist attended clinical trial meetings for on average 1.13 hours (SD: 1.85) per month. Conclusion: Responding physicists spend a nontrivial amount of time: 8.8 hours per week (0.22 FTE) supporting, on average, 9 active multi-institutional clinical trials.

  4. Multi-criteria clinical decision support: A primer on the use of multiple criteria decision making methods to promote evidence-based, patient-centered healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, James G

    2010-01-01

    Current models of healthcare quality recommend that patient management decisions be evidence-based and patient-centered. Evidence-based decisions require a thorough understanding of current information regarding the natural history of disease and the anticipated outcomes of different management options. Patient-centered decisions incorporate patient preferences, values, and unique personal circumstances into the decision making process and actively involve both patients along with health care providers as much as possible. Fundamentally, therefore, evidence-based, patient-centered decisions are multi-dimensional and typically involve multiple decision makers.Advances in the decision sciences have led to the development of a number of multiple criteria decision making methods. These multi-criteria methods are designed to help people make better choices when faced with complex decisions involving several dimensions. They are especially helpful when there is a need to combine "hard data" with subjective preferences, to make trade-offs between desired outcomes, and to involve multiple decision makers. Evidence-based, patient-centered clinical decision making has all of these characteristics. This close match suggests that clinical decision support systems based on multi-criteria decision making techniques have the potential to enable patients and providers to carry out the tasks required to implement evidence-based, patient-centered care effectively and efficiently in clinical settings.The goal of this paper is to give readers a general introduction to the range of multi-criteria methods available and show how they could be used to support clinical decision-making. Methods discussed include the balance sheet, the even swap method, ordinal ranking methods, direct weighting methods, multi-attribute decision analysis, and the analytic hierarchy process (AHP).

  5. New graduate nurses' experiences in a clinical specialty: a follow up study of newcomer perceptions of transitional support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Rafic; Everett, Bronwyn; Ramjan, Lucie M; Hu, Wendy; Salamonson, Yenna

    2017-01-01

    Given the increasing complexity of acute care settings, high patient acuity and demanding workloads, new graduate nurses continue to require greater levels of support to manage rising patient clinical care needs. Little is known about how change in new graduate nurses' satisfaction with clinical supervision and the practice environment impacts on their transitioning experience and expectations during first year of practice. This study aimed to examine change in new graduate nurses' perceptions over the 12-month Transitional Support Program, and identify how organizational factors and elements of clinical supervision influenced their experiences. Using a convergent mixed methods design, a prospective survey with open-ended questions was administered to new graduate nurses' working in a tertiary level teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia. Nurses were surveyed at baseline (8-10 weeks) and follow-up (10-12 months) between May 2012 and August 2013. Two standardised instruments: the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS-26) and the Practice Environment Scale Australia (PES-AUS) were used. In addition to socio-demographic data, single -item measures were used to rate new graduate nurses' confidence, clinical capability and support received. Participants were also able to provide open-ended comments explaining their responses. Free-text responses to the open-ended questions were initially reviewed for emergent themes, then coded as either positive or negative aspects of these preliminary themes. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the quantitative data and the qualitative data was analysed using conventional content analysis (CCA). The study was approved by the relevant Human Research Ethics Committees. Eighty seven new graduate nurses completed the follow-up surveys, representing a 76% response rate. The median age was 23 years (Range: 20 to 53). No change was seen in new graduate nurses' satisfaction with clinical supervision (mean MCSS

  6. HIV Case Management Support Service Is Associated with Improved CD4 Counts of Patients Receiving Care at the Antiretroviral Clinic of Pantang Hospital, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bismark Sarfo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Factors associated with individual patient-level management of HIV have received minimal attention in sub-Saharan Africa. This study determined the association between support services and cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4 counts among HIV patients attending ART clinic in Ghana. Methodology. This was a cross-sectional study involving adults with HIV recruited between 1 August 2014 and 31 January 2015. Data on support services were obtained through a closed-ended personal interview while the CD4 counts data were collected from their medical records. Data were entered into EpiData and analyzed using Stata software. Results. Of the 201 patients who participated in the study, 67% (129/191 received case management support service. Counseling about how to prevent the spread of HIV (crude odds ratio (cOR (95% confidence interval (CI (2.79 (1.17–6.68, mental health services (0.2 (0.04–1.00, and case management support service (2.80 (1.34–5.82 was associated with improved CD4 counts of 350 cells/mm3 or more. After adjusting for counseling about how to prevent the spread of HIV and mental health services, case management support service was significantly associated with CD4 counts of 350 cells/mm3 or more (aOR = 2.36 (CI = 1.01–5.49. Conclusion. Case management support service for HIV patients receiving ART improves their CD4 counts above 350 cells/mm3. Incorporating HIV case management services in ART regimen should be a priority in sub-Saharan Africa.

  7. Stress Management: Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Having close friends and family has far-reaching benefits for your health. Here's how to build and maintain these ... article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/social-support/art-20044445 . Mayo Clinic ...

  8. An Automated System for Generating Situation-Specific Decision Support in Clinical Order Entry from Local Empirical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klann, Jeffrey G.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support is one of the only aspects of health information technology that has demonstrated decreased costs and increased quality in healthcare delivery, yet it is extremely expensive and time-consuming to create, maintain, and localize. Consequently, a majority of health care systems do not utilize it, and even when it is…

  9. Implant-supported mandibular removable partial dentures : Functional, clinical and radiographical parameters in relation to implant position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Charlotte; Speksnijder, Caroline M.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Kerdijk, Wouter; Meijer, Henny J A; Cune, Marco S.

    Background: Patients with a Kennedy class I situation often encounter problems with their removable partial denture (RPD). Purpose: To assess the functional benefits of implant support to RPDs, the clinical performance of the implants and teeth and to determine the most favorable implant position:

  10. Implementation of clinical decision support in young children with acute gastroenteritis: a randomized controlled trial at the emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.F. Geurts (Dorien); E. De Vos-Kerkhof (Evelien); S. Polinder (Suzanne); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J. van der Lei (Johan); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte); R. Oostenbrink (Rianne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAcute gastroenteritis (AGE) is one of the most frequent reasons for young children to visit emergency departments (EDs). We aimed to evaluate (1) feasibility of a nurse-guided clinical decision support system for rehydration treatment in children with AGE and (2) the impact on

  11. Architectural design of a data warehouse to support operational and analytical queries across disparate clinical databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelico, John D; Wilcox, Adam; Wajngurt, David

    2007-10-11

    As the clinical data warehouse of the New York Presbyterian Hospital has evolved innovative methods of integrating new data sources and providing more effective and efficient data reporting and analysis need to be explored. We designed and implemented a new clinical data warehouse architecture to handle the integration of disparate clinical databases in the institution. By examining the way downstream systems are populated and streamlining the way data is stored we create a virtual clinical data warehouse that is adaptable to future needs of the organization.

  12. Using clinical governance levers to support change in a cancer care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, Isabelle; Denis, Jean-Louis; Sullivan, Terrence James

    2015-01-01

    Introducing change is a difficult issue facing all health care systems. The use of various clinical governance levers can facilitate change in health care systems. The purpose of this paper is to define clinical governance levers, and to illustrate their use in a large-scale transformation. The empirical analysis deals with the in-depth study of a specific case, which is the organizational model for Ontario's cancer sector. The authors used a qualitative research strategy and drew the data from three sources: semi-structured interviews, analysis of documents, and non-participative observations. From the results, the authors identified three phases and several steps in the reform of cancer services in this province. The authors conclude that a combination of clinical governance levers was used to transform the system. These levers operated at different levels of the system to meet the targeted objectives. To exercise clinical governance, managers need to acquire new competencies. Mobilizing clinical governance levers requires in-depth understanding of the role and scope of clinical governance levers. This study provides a better understanding of clinical governance levers. Clinical governance levers are used to implement an organizational environment that is conducive to developing clinical practice, as well as to act directly on practices to improve quality of care.

  13. Evaluation of user interface and workflow design of a bedside nursing clinical decision support system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Michael Juntao; Finley, George Mike; Long, Ju; Mills, Christy; Johnson, Ron Kim

    2013-01-31

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are important tools to improve health care outcomes and reduce preventable medical adverse events. However, the effectiveness and success of CDSS depend on their implementation context and usability in complex health care settings. As a result, usability design and validation, especially in real world clinical settings, are crucial aspects of successful CDSS implementations. Our objective was to develop a novel CDSS to help frontline nurses better manage critical symptom changes in hospitalized patients, hence reducing preventable failure to rescue cases. A robust user interface and implementation strategy that fit into existing workflows was key for the success of the CDSS. Guided by a formal usability evaluation framework, UFuRT (user, function, representation, and task analysis), we developed a high-level specification of the product that captures key usability requirements and is flexible to implement. We interviewed users of the proposed CDSS to identify requirements, listed functions, and operations the system must perform. We then designed visual and workflow representations of the product to perform the operations. The user interface and workflow design were evaluated via heuristic and end user performance evaluation. The heuristic evaluation was done after the first prototype, and its results were incorporated into the product before the end user evaluation was conducted. First, we recruited 4 evaluators with strong domain expertise to study the initial prototype. Heuristic violations were coded and rated for severity. Second, after development of the system, we assembled a panel of nurses, consisting of 3 licensed vocational nurses and 7 registered nurses, to evaluate the user interface and workflow via simulated use cases. We recorded whether each session was successfully completed and its completion time. Each nurse was asked to use the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Task Load Index to self

  14. Structured clinical documentation in the electronic medical record to improve quality and to support practice-based research in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Jaishree; Dobrin, Sofia; Choi, Janet; Rubin, Susan; Pham, Anna; Patel, Vimal; Frigerio, Roberta; Maurer, Darryck; Gupta, Payal; Link, Lourdes; Walters, Shaun; Wang, Chi; Ji, Yuan; Maraganore, Demetrius M

    2017-01-01

    Using the electronic medical record (EMR) to capture structured clinical data at the point of care would be a practical way to support quality improvement and practice-based research in epilepsy. We describe our stepwise process for building structured clinical documentation support tools in the EMR that define best practices in epilepsy, and we describe how we incorporated these toolkits into our clinical workflow. These tools write notes and capture hundreds of fields of data including several score tests: Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 items, Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Quality of Life in Epilepsy-10 items, Montreal Cognitive Assessment/Short Test of Mental Status, and Medical Research Council Prognostic Index. The tools summarize brain imaging, blood laboratory, and electroencephalography results, and document neuromodulation treatments. The tools provide Best Practices Advisories and other clinical decision support when appropriate. The tools prompt enrollment in a DNA biobanking study. We have thus far enrolled 231 patients for initial visits and are starting our first annual follow-up visits and provide a brief description of our cohort. We are sharing these EMR tools and captured data with other epilepsy clinics as part of a Neurology Practice Based Research Network, and are using the tools to conduct pragmatic trials using subgroup-based adaptive designs. © 2016 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. A health record integrated clinical decision support system to support prescriptions of pharmaceutical drugs in patients with reduced renal function: design, development and proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemeikka, Tero; Bastholm-Rahmner, Pia; Elinder, Carl-Gustaf; Vég, Anikó; Törnqvist, Elisabeth; Cornelius, Birgitta; Korkmaz, Seher

    2015-06-01

    To develop and verify proof of concept for a clinical decision support system (CDSS) to support prescriptions of pharmaceutical drugs in patients with reduced renal function, integrated in an electronic health record system (EHR) used in both hospitals and primary care. A pilot study in one geriatric clinic, one internal medicine admission ward and two outpatient healthcare centers was evaluated with a questionnaire focusing on the usefulness of the CDSS. The usage of the system was followed in a log. The CDSS is considered to increase the attention on patients with impaired renal function, provides a better understanding of dosing and is time saving. The calculated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the dosing recommendation classification were perceived useful while the recommendation texts and background had been used to a lesser extent. Few previous systems are used in primary care and cover this number of drugs. The global assessment of the CDSS scored high but some elements were used to a limited extent possibly due to accessibility or that texts were considered difficult to absorb. Choosing a formula for the calculation of eGFR in a CDSS may be problematic. A real-time CDSS to support kidney-related drug prescribing in both hospital and outpatient settings is valuable to the physicians. It has the potential to improve quality of drug prescribing by increasing the attention on patients with renal insufficiency and the knowledge of their drug dosing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Chemotherapy Order Entry by a Clinical Support Pharmacy Technician in an Outpatient Medical Day Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Heather; Broadfield, Larry; Harding, Claudia; Heukshorst, Shelley; Sweetapple, Jennifer; Rolle, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacy technicians are expanding their scope of practice, often in partnership with pharmacists. In oncology, such a shift in responsibilities may lead to workflow efficiencies, but may also cause concerns about patient risk and medication errors. The primary objective was to compare the time spent on order entry and order-entry checking before and after training of a clinical support pharmacy technician (CSPT) to perform chemotherapy order entry. The secondary objectives were to document workflow interruptions and to assess medication errors. This before-and-after observational study investigated chemotherapy order entry for ambulatory oncology patients. Order entry was performed by pharmacists before the process change (phase 1) and by 1 CSPT after the change (phase 2); order-entry checking was performed by a pharmacist during both phases. The tasks were timed by an independent observer using a personal digital assistant. A convenience sample of 125 orders was targeted for each phase. Data were exported to Microsoft Excel software, and timing differences for each task were tested with an unpaired t test. Totals of 143 and 128 individual orders were timed for order entry during phase 1 (pharmacist) and phase 2 (CSPT), respectively. The mean total time to perform order entry was greater during phase 1 (1:37 min versus 1:20 min; p = 0.044). Totals of 144 and 122 individual orders were timed for order-entry checking (by a pharmacist) in phases 1 and 2, respectively, and there was no difference in mean total time for order-entry checking (1:21 min versus 1:20 min; p = 0.69). There were 33 interruptions not related to order entry (totalling 39:38 min) during phase 1 and 25 interruptions (totalling 30:08 min) during phase 2. Three errors were observed during order entry in phase 1 and one error during order-entry checking in phase 2; the errors were rated as having no effect on patient care. Chemotherapy order entry by a trained CSPT appeared to be just as safe and

  17. People, organizational, and leadership factors impacting informatics support for clinical and translational research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payne Philip RO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, there have been numerous initiatives undertaken to describe critical information needs related to the collection, management, analysis, and dissemination of data in support of biomedical research (J Investig Med 54:327-333, 2006; (J Am Med Inform Assoc 16:316–327, 2009; (Physiol Genomics 39:131-140, 2009; (J Am Med Inform Assoc 18:354–357, 2011. A common theme spanning such reports has been the importance of understanding and optimizing people, organizational, and leadership factors in order to achieve the promise of efficient and timely research (J Am Med Inform Assoc 15:283–289, 2008. With the emergence of clinical and translational science (CTS as a national priority in the United States, and the corresponding growth in the scale and scope of CTS research programs, the acuity of such information needs continues to increase (JAMA 289:1278–1287, 2003; (N Engl J Med 353:1621–1623, 2005; (Sci Transl Med 3:90, 2011. At the same time, systematic evaluations of optimal people, organizational, and leadership factors that influence the provision of data, information, and knowledge management technologies and methods are notably lacking. Methods In response to the preceding gap in knowledge, we have conducted both: 1 a structured survey of domain experts at Academic Health Centers (AHCs; and 2 a subsequent thematic analysis of public-domain documentation provided by those same organizations. The results of these approaches were then used to identify critical factors that may influence access to informatics expertise and resources relevant to the CTS domain. Results A total of 31 domain experts, spanning the Biomedical Informatics (BMI, Computer Science (CS, Information Science (IS, and Information Technology (IT disciplines participated in a structured surveyprocess. At a high level, respondents identified notable differences in theaccess to BMI, CS, and IT expertise and services depending on the

  18. Publication, discovery and interoperability of Clinical Decision Support Systems: A Linked Data approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Pedrinaci, Carlos; Maldonado, J A; Panziera, Luca; Chen, Rong; Bellika, J Gustav

    2016-08-01

    The high costs involved in the development of Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) make it necessary to share their functionality across different systems and organizations. Service Oriented Architectures (SOA) have been proposed to allow reusing CDSS by encapsulating them in a Web service. However, strong barriers in sharing CDS functionality are still present as a consequence of lack of expressiveness of services' interfaces. Linked Services are the evolution of the Semantic Web Services paradigm to process Linked Data. They aim to provide semantic descriptions over SOA implementations to overcome the limitations derived from the syntactic nature of Web services technologies. To facilitate the publication, discovery and interoperability of CDS services by evolving them into Linked Services that expose their interfaces as Linked Data. We developed methods and models to enhance CDS SOA as Linked Services that define a rich semantic layer based on machine interpretable ontologies that powers their interoperability and reuse. These ontologies provided unambiguous descriptions of CDS services properties to expose them to the Web of Data. We developed models compliant with Linked Data principles to create a semantic representation of the components that compose CDS services. To evaluate our approach we implemented a set of CDS Linked Services using a Web service definition ontology. The definitions of Web services were linked to the models developed in order to attach unambiguous semantics to the service components. All models were bound to SNOMED-CT and public ontologies (e.g. Dublin Core) in order to count on a lingua franca to explore them. Discovery and analysis of CDS services based on machine interpretable models was performed reasoning over the ontologies built. Linked Services can be used effectively to expose CDS services to the Web of Data by building on current CDS standards. This allows building shared Linked Knowledge Bases to provide machine

  19. Exploring the perspectives of clinical professionals and support staff on implementing supported self-management for asthma in UK general practice: an IMP2ART qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Susan; Daines, Luke; Wiener-Ogilvie, Sharon; Steed, Liz; McKee, Lorna; Caress, Ann-Louise; Taylor, Stephanie J C; Pinnock, Hilary

    2017-07-18

    Despite an overwhelming evidence base, supported self-management of asthma is poorly implemented into routine practice. Strategies for implementation must address organisational routines, as well as provide resources for patients and training to improve professionals' skills. We aimed to explore the priority that primary care practices attach to asthma self-management, to describe their existing asthma management routines, and to generate innovative implementation strategies. We recruited 33 participants (23 general practitioners; seven nurses; three administrative staff) from 14 general practices. The 12 interviews and three focus groups were transcribed, coded and analysed thematically. Supported self-management was largely a nurse-led task within clinic-based annual reviews. Barriers included poor attendance at asthma clinics, lack of time, demarcation of roles, limited access to a range of tailored resources, and competing agendas in consultation, often due to multimorbidity. Suggestions for initiatives to improve the provision of supported self-management included emphasising the evidence for benefit (to influence prioritisation), improving teamwork (including team-based education), organisational strategies (including remote consulting) which need to fit within existing practice routines. Technology offers some potential solutions (e.g., improved templates, 'app'-based plans), but must be integrated with the practice information technology systems. Building on these insights, we will now develop a theoretically-based implementation strategy that will address patient, professional, and organisational buy-in, provide team-based education and offer a range of practical options and tools, which can be adapted and integrated within existing routines of individual practices.OVERCOMING THE ORGANISATIONAL BARRIERS TO IMPLEMENTING ASTHMA SELF-MANAGEMENT: Understanding the routines of primary care practices can suggest strategies to implement supported self

  20. Contribution of family social support to the metabolic control of people with diabetes mellitus: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Lilian Cristiane; Coelho, Anna Claudia Martins; Gomides, Danielle Dos Santos; Foss-Freitas, Maria Cristina; Foss, Milton César; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2017-08-01

    This randomized controlled clinical trial aimed to evaluate the contribution of family social support to the clinical/metabolic control of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that requires continuous care in order for individuals to reach glycemic control, the primordial goal of treatment. Family social support is essential to the development of care skills and their maintenance. However, there are few studies that investigate the contribution of family social support to diabetes control. The study was developed between June 2011 and May 2013, and included 164 people who were randomized using simple randomization. The intervention group differed from the control group in that it included a family caregiver, who was recognized by the patient as a source of social support. The educational interventions received by people with diabetes mellitus were used as the basis of the education provided through telephone calls to patients' family members and caregivers, and their purpose was to encourage dialogue between the patients and their relatives about the topics related to diabetes. Regarding the clinical impact, the results showed that there was a greater reduction in blood pressure and glycated hemoglobin in the intervention group than in the control group, showing a positive effect on the control of the disease. Families should be incorporated into the care of people with diabetes mellitus and especially in health care programs, in particular those that can promote different forms of social support to strengthen the bond between family members. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Classification of Clinical Research Study Eligibility Criteria to Support Multi-Stage Cohort Identification Using Clinical Data Repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, James J; Lancaster, William J; Wyatt, Mathew C

    2017-01-01

    One of the challenges to using electronic health record (EHR) repositories for research is the difficulty mapping study subject eligibility criteria to the query capabilities of the repository. We sought to characterize criteria as "easy" (searchable in a typical repository), "hard" (requiring manual review of the record data), and "impossible" (not typically available in EHR repositories). We obtained 292 criteria from 20 studies available from Clinical Trials.gov and rated them according to our three types, plus a fourth "mixed" type. We had good agreement among three independent reviewers and chose 274 criteria that were characterized by single types for further analysis. The resulting analysis showed typical features of criteria that do and don't map to repositories. We propose that these features be used to guide researchers in specifying eligibility criteria to improve development of enrollment workflow, including the definition of EHR repository queries for self-service or analyst-mediated retrievals.

  2. Self-management support interventions that are clinically linked and technology enabled: can they successfully prevent and treat diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Neal D; Woodley, Paula D Patnoe

    2011-05-01

    Patients with diabetes need a complex set of services and supports. The challenge of integrating these services into the diabetes regimen can be successfully overcome through self-management support interventions that are clinically linked and technology enabled: self-management support because patients need help mastering the knowledge, attitudes, skills, and behaviors so necessary for good outcomes; interventions because comprehensive theory-based, evidence-proven, long-term, longitudinal interventions work better than direct-to-consumer or nonplanned health promotion approaches; clinically linked because patients are more likely to adopt new behaviors when the approach is in the context of a trusted therapeutic relationship and within an effective medical care system; and technology enabled because capitalizing on the amazing power of information technology leads to the delivery of cost-effective, scalable, engaging solutions that prevent and manage diabetes. © 2011 Diabetes Technology Society.

  3. Effect of the clinical support nurse role on work-related stress for nurses on an inpatient pediatric oncology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ann; Kicis, Jennifer; Sangha, Gurjit

    2007-01-01

    High patient acuity, heavy workload, and patient deaths can all contribute to work-related stress for pediatric oncology nurses. A new leadership role, the clinical support nurse (CSN), was recently initiated on the oncology unit of a large Canadian pediatric hospital to support frontline staff and reduce some of the stresses related to clinical activity. The CSN assists nurses with complex patient care procedures, provides hands-on education at the bedside, and supports staff in managing challenging family situations. This study explores the effect of the CSN role on the nurses' work-related stress using the Stressor Scale for Pediatric Oncology Nurses. A total of 58 nurses participated in this study for a response rate of 86%. The results show that the intensity of work-related stress experienced by nurses in this study is significantly less (P < .001) on shifts staffed with a CSN compared with shifts without a CSN.

  4. Closing remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reig, J.

    2007-01-01

    Good afternoon. Before providing the closing remarks on behalf of the NEA, I would like to take this opportunity and make some personal reflections, if you allow me Mr. Chairman. I have had the opportunity to take part in the three workshops on public communication organised by the NEA. In the first one in Paris in 2000, representing my country, Spain, and in the two last ones in Ottawa in 2004 and Tokyo today, on behalf of the NEA. The topics for the three workshops follow a logical order, first the focus was on investing in trust in a time when public communication was becoming a big challenge for the regulators. Second, maintaining and measuring public confidence to assess how credible regulators are in front of the public; and finally here in Tokyo, transparency, which is a basic element to achieve trust and credibility. In my view, a regulatory decision has three main components, it has to be technically sound. legally correct and well communicated. The emphasis in the early years was in the technical matters, till legal issues became a key element to achieve the political acceptance from governments and local authorities. Finally the public communication aspects resulted into a major effort and challenge to achieve social acceptance. (author)

  5. An Application for Mobile Devices Focused on Clinical Decision Support: Diabetes Mellitus Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Lucas Felipe; Rigo, Sandro José; Cazella, Silvio César; Ben, Angela Jornada

    2016-01-01

    Clinical decision-making is performed by health professionals and it is currently connected to the need for manual query for these professionals for clinical guidelines, which are generally formed by large text files, which makes this process very slow and laborious. The development of

  6. Mild intellectual disability : an entity? Mapping clinical profiles and support needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soenen, S.M.T.A.

    2016-01-01

    The group of individuals with mild to borderline intellectual disability (MID) is heterogeneous with regard to their characteristics, the problems they encounter and the support they need. The diversity of the problems and the diffuse spectrum of support programs aggravate the process to identify

  7. Impact of preoperative nutritional support on clinical outcome in abdominal surgical patients at nutritional risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jie, Bin; Jiang, Zhu-Ming; Nolan, Marie T

    2012-01-01

    This multicenter, prospective cohort study evaluated the effect of preoperative nutritional support in abdominal surgical patients at nutritional risk as defined by the Nutritional Risk Screening Tool 2002 (NRS-2002).......This multicenter, prospective cohort study evaluated the effect of preoperative nutritional support in abdominal surgical patients at nutritional risk as defined by the Nutritional Risk Screening Tool 2002 (NRS-2002)....

  8. Patient factors that influence clinicians' decision making in self-management support : A clinical vignette study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos-Touwen, Irene D.; Trappenburg, Jaap C A; Van Der Wulp, Ineke; Schuurmans, Marieke J.; De Wit, Niek J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Self-management support is an integral part of current chronic care guidelines. The success of self-management interventions varies between individual patients, suggesting a need for tailored self-management support. Understanding the role of patient factors in the current

  9. A Framework to Support the Sharing and Reuse of Computable Phenotype Definitions Across Health Care Delivery and Clinical Research Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richesson, Rachel L; Smerek, Michelle M; Blake Cameron, C

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reproducibly identify clinically equivalent patient populations is critical to the vision of learning health care systems that implement and evaluate evidence-based treatments. The use of common or semantically equivalent phenotype definitions across research and health care use cases will support this aim. Currently, there is no single consolidated repository for computable phenotype definitions, making it difficult to find all definitions that already exist, and also hindering the sharing of definitions between user groups. Drawing from our experience in an academic medical center that supports a number of multisite research projects and quality improvement studies, we articulate a framework that will support the sharing of phenotype definitions across research and health care use cases, and highlight gaps and areas that need attention and collaborative solutions. An infrastructure for re-using computable phenotype definitions and sharing experience across health care delivery and clinical research applications includes: access to a collection of existing phenotype definitions, information to evaluate their appropriateness for particular applications, a knowledge base of implementation guidance, supporting tools that are user-friendly and intuitive, and a willingness to use them. We encourage prospective researchers and health administrators to re-use existing EHR-based condition definitions where appropriate and share their results with others to support a national culture of learning health care. There are a number of federally funded resources to support these activities, and research sponsors should encourage their use.

  10. A framework to support preceptors' evaluation and development of new nurses' clinical judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Ann; Lasater, Kathie; Stock, Mary

    2016-07-01

    In today's complex, fast-paced world of hospital nursing, new graduate nurses do not have well-developed clinical judgment skills. Nurse preceptors are charged with bridging the gap between new graduates' learning in school and their autonomous practice as RNs. In one large, urban medical center in the U.S., a clinical judgment model and rubric were used as a framework for a new evaluation and orientation process. Preceptors of new graduate nurses who had used the former and new processes described their experiences using the framework. The findings indicated that having a structured framework provided objective ways to evaluate and help develop new graduate nurses' clinical judgment. It is hypothesized that academic clinical supervisors may find such a framework useful to prepare students for transition to practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. OrderRex: clinical order decision support and outcome predictions by data-mining electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan H; Podchiyska, Tanya; Altman, Russ B

    2016-03-01

    To answer a "grand challenge" in clinical decision support, the authors produced a recommender system that automatically data-mines inpatient decision support from electronic medical records (EMR), analogous to Netflix or Amazon.com's product recommender. EMR data were extracted from 1 year of hospitalizations (>18K patients with >5.4M structured items including clinical orders, lab results, and diagnosis codes). Association statistics were counted for the ∼1.5K most common items to drive an order recommender. The authors assessed the recommender's ability to predict hospital admission orders and outcomes based on initial encounter data from separate validation patients. Compared to a reference benchmark of using the overall most common orders, the recommender using temporal relationships improves precision at 10 recommendations from 33% to 38% (P < 10(-10)) for hospital admission orders. Relative risk-based association methods improve inverse frequency weighted recall from 4% to 16% (P < 10(-16)). The framework yields a prediction receiver operating characteristic area under curve (c-statistic) of 0.84 for 30 day mortality, 0.84 for 1 week need for ICU life support, 0.80 for 1 week hospital discharge, and 0.68 for 30-day readmission. Recommender results quantitatively improve on reference benchmarks and qualitatively appear clinically reasonable. The method assumes that aggregate decision making converges appropriately, but ongoing evaluation is necessary to discern common behaviors from "correct" ones. Collaborative filtering recommender algorithms generate clinical decision support that is predictive of real practice patterns and clinical outcomes. Incorporating temporal relationships improves accuracy. Different evaluation metrics satisfy different goals (predicting likely events vs. "interesting" suggestions). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association 2015. This work is written by US Government

  12. Adapting Nielsen's Design Heuristics to Dual Processing for Clinical Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Teresa; Staes, Catherine; Slager, Stacey; Weir, Charlene

    2016-01-01

    The study objective was to improve the applicability of Nielson's standard design heuristics for evaluating electronic health record (EHR) alerts and linked ordering support by integrating them with Dual Process theory. Through initial heuristic evaluation and a user study of 7 physicians, usability problems were identified. Through independent mapping of specific usability criteria to support for each of the Dual Cognitive processes (S1 and S2) and deliberation, agreement was reached on mapping criteria. Finally, usability errors from the heuristic and user study were mapped to S1 and S2. Adding a dual process perspective to specific heuristic analysis increases the applicability and relevance of computerized health information design evaluations. This mapping enables designers to measure that their systems are tailored to support attention allocation. System 1 will be supported by improving pattern recognition and saliency, and system 2 through efficiency and control of information access.

  13. The experiences of supporting learning in pairs of nursing students in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Hanna; Ozolins, Lise-Lotte; Brunt, David; Hörberg, Ulrica

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe how supervisors experience supporting nursing students' learning in pairs on a Developing and Learning Care Unit in Sweden. The present study has been carried out with a Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach founded on phenomenology. A total of 25 lifeworld interviews were conducted with supervisors who had supervised pairs of students. The findings reveal how supervisors support students' learning in pairs through a reflective approach creating learning space in the encounter with patients, students and supervisors. Supervisors experience a movement that resembles balancing between providing support in learning together and individual learning. The findings also highlight the challenge in supporting both the pairs of students and being present in the reality of caring. In conclusion, the learning space has the potential of creating a relative level of independency in the interaction between pairs of students and their supervisor when the supervisor strives towards a reflective approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Adapting Nielsen’s Design Heuristics to Dual Processing for Clinical Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, Teresa; Staes, Catherine; Slager, Stacey; Weir, Charlene

    2016-01-01

    The study objective was to improve the applicability of Nielson’s standard design heuristics for evaluating electronic health record (EHR) alerts and linked ordering support by integrating them with Dual Process theory. Through initial heuristic evaluation and a user study of 7 physicians, usability problems were identified. Through independent mapping of specific usability criteria to support for each of the Dual Cognitive processes (S1 and S2) and deliberation, agreement was reached on mapping criteria. Finally, usability errors from the heuristic and user study were mapped to S1 and S2. Adding a dual process perspective to specific heuristic analysis increases the applicability and relevance of computerized health information design evaluations. This mapping enables designers to measure that their systems are tailored to support attention allocation. System 1 will be supported by improving pattern recognition and saliency, and system 2 through efficiency and control of information access. PMID:28269915

  15. Intensive Nutritional Counselling And Support And Clinical Outcomes In Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Molfino

    2012-06-01

    In conclusion, in HD patients, nutritional counselling and nutritional support positively affect nutritional status in hypophagic patients and make the risk of morbidity and mortality in anorexic patients comparable to non-anorexic.

  16. Telehealth for diabetes self-management education and support in an underserved, free clinic population: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threatt, Tiffaney B; Ward, Eileen D

    Primary study objectives were to (1) describe mean change in A1c from baseline of a free clinic population enrolled in telehealth diabetes self-management education and support (DSME/S) services and (2) to compare change in A1C and other clinical outcomes measures with free clinic patients enrolled in a traditional face-to-face DSME/S program. An exploratory study design and comparative evaluation of telehealth DSME/S services in a free clinic population was used. Baseline clinical measures were collected upon referral. Diabetes educators met with patients individually over 2-3 months. Clinical outcomes measures were collected within 6 months of program completion. Data from the telehealth group was assessed individually and compared to a free clinic traditional DSME/S program population. Twelve patients completed a telehealth free clinic DSME/S pilot program with a mean ± SD change in A1C from baseline of -1.03 ± 1.53% (P = 0.050). Mean ± SD change in A1C from baseline in the free clinic population participating in traditional face-to-face DSME/S services was -1.42 ± 1.80% (P = 0.001). No significant differences in secondary outcomes measures, including body mass index and blood pressure, were revealed among the study populations. Expanding access to care in populations faced with challenges of socioeconomics, limited education, and lower health literacy is a step toward reducing health disparities and positively affecting care. Mean A1C can be improved with telehealth DSME/S services in an underserved, free clinic population. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Associations of professional quality of life and social support with health in clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chia-Yun; Yang, Mei-Sang; Leung, Wan; Liu, Yea-Ying; Huang, Hui-Wen; Wang, Ruey-Hsia

    2018-03-01

    To explore the associations of the professional quality of life and social support with health in nurses. Physical and mental health may be associated with absence from work among nurses. Few studies have explored the associations of professional quality of life and social support on the physical and mental health of nurses. This was a cross-sectional study. In total, 294 nurses were recruited from a hospital in Southern Taiwan. A self-report questionnaire was used to collect data. Burnout, secondary traumatic stress and social support from relatives or friends were important factors of physical and mental health. Interactions between support from relatives or friends and secondary traumatic stress are important factors in physical health. Reducing burnout and secondary traumatic stress is important for physical and mental health of nurses. Increasing social support from relatives or friends may be useful to reduce the negative effects of secondary traumatic stress on the physical health of nurses. Nurse managers could design interventions to reduce and prevent nurses from being influenced by burnout and secondary traumatic stress. Educating nurses to build effective social networks with relatives or friends and to seek support when experiencing secondary traumatic stress may also be needed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Relationship between perceived social support and clinical variables in infertile couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdan Eren BODUR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study it was aimed to assess and evaluate the impact of the levels of perceived social support in infertile couples on stress related with infertility and marital adjustment. The study included 104 couples with primary or secondary infertility and 44 healthy couples with children for the control group. Control group was given the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS, Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS. Infertile group was given HADS, DAS, MSPSS and also Fertility Problem Inventory. Women in infertile couples reported greater psychological symptoms and more decreased marital adjustment than men in infertile couples; but the couples did not show any significant difference with those in control groups regarding these parameters. It was determined that, in general, while marital adjustment in infertile couples increases, depression and anxiety levels decrease. It was also observed that perceieved social support from the family has a positive effect on the marital adjustment. The perceived social support level in men in infertil couples is lower than women in the same group, and this outcome is also related with the increasing anxiety in men. These results showed that psychosocial problems in infertile couples should be evaluated with specific scales. Psychosocial support which will be given to infertile couples and motivating social support systems while providing this service would have positive effects especially on men. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 214-223

  19. Supporting rural remote physicians to conduct a study and write a paper: experience of Clinical Research Support Team (CRST)-Jichi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, S; Ohkuchi, A; Kamesaki, T; Ishikawa, S; Nakamura, Y; Matsumoto, M

    2014-01-01

    Jichi Medical University (JMU) is the only medical school in Japan that is devoted solely to producing rural and remote doctors. To support research activities of its graduates, mainly young graduates under obligatory rural service, JMU established a voluntary team, Clinical Research Support Team (CRST)-Jichi. CRST-Jichi consists of current and past JMU faculty members; all of them are specialists of certain medical fields and many are also graduates of JMU who have completed rural service. A client who asks the CRST for advice on study design or editing a paper emails the CRST to ask for support in conducting a study. Then, core members of the CRST assign the job to a registered specialist of the corresponding topic, who becomes a 'responsible supporter' and continues to support the client until a paper has been published. During the 3 years from July 2010, 12 English papers have been published in international peer-review journals, two Japanese papers in domestic journals, and 13 studies are in progress. Ninety-one percent of clients were satisfied with the service, and eighty-two percent considered their papers would not have been published if they had not used the service. Sense of commitment, existence of JMU-graduated specialists, and quick response were reported by clients as major strengths of CRST-Jichi. The experience of CRST-Jichi can potentially be transferred to not only other Japanese medical schools with rural doctor production programs, which are now rapidly increasing as part of a national policy, but also rural medical education systems in other countries.

  20. Evaluation of a Computerized Problem-Oriented Medical Record in a Hospital Department: Does it Support Daily Clinical Practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus

    2007-01-01

    led to more time spent documenting clinical work, fragmentation of patient situation into separate problems, and lack of overview.Conclusion: The problem-oriented method for structuring a computerized medical record may provide a description of how physicians think or ought to think, but does...... not adequately support complex clinical work. While the CPOMR can be used for patients with few, simple problems who are admitted for only a short time, the CPOMR is not useful for patients with a complex set of problems or for patients admitted for longer periods of time. This is in accordance with criticism...

  1. SU-E-T-23: A Developing Australian Network for Datamining and Modelling Routine Radiotherapy Clinical Data and Radiomics Information for Rapid Learning and Clinical Decision Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thwaites, D [University of Sydney, Camperdown, Sydney (Australia); Holloway, L [Ingham Institute, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Bailey, M; Carolan, M; Miller, A [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Barakat, S; Field, M [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Delaney, G; Vinod, S [Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Dekker, A [Maastro Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lustberg, T; Soest, J van; Walsh, S [MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Large amounts of routine radiotherapy (RT) data are available, which can potentially add clinical evidence to support better decisions. A developing collaborative Australian network, with a leading European partner, aims to validate, implement and extend European predictive models (PMs) for Australian practice and assess their impact on future patient decisions. Wider objectives include: developing multi-institutional rapid learning, using distributed learning approaches; and assessing and incorporating radiomics information into PMs. Methods: Two initial standalone pilots were conducted; one on NSCLC, the other on larynx, patient datasets in two different centres. Open-source rapid learning systems were installed, for data extraction and mining to collect relevant clinical parameters from the centres’ databases. The European DSSs were learned (“training cohort”) and validated against local data sets (“clinical cohort”). Further NSCLC studies are underway in three more centres to pilot a wider distributed learning network. Initial radiomics work is underway. Results: For the NSCLC pilot, 159/419 patient datasets were identified meeting the PM criteria, and hence eligible for inclusion in the curative clinical cohort (for the larynx pilot, 109/125). Some missing data were imputed using Bayesian methods. For both, the European PMs successfully predicted prognosis groups, but with some differences in practice reflected. For example, the PM-predicted good prognosis NSCLC group was differentiated from a combined medium/poor prognosis group (2YOS 69% vs. 27%, p<0.001). Stage was less discriminatory in identifying prognostic groups. In the good prognosis group two-year overall survival was 65% in curatively and 18% in palliatively treated patients. Conclusion: The technical infrastructure and basic European PMs support prognosis prediction for these Australian patient groups, showing promise for supporting future personalized treatment decisions

  2. SU-E-T-23: A Developing Australian Network for Datamining and Modelling Routine Radiotherapy Clinical Data and Radiomics Information for Rapid Learning and Clinical Decision Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thwaites, D; Holloway, L; Bailey, M; Carolan, M; Miller, A; Barakat, S; Field, M; Delaney, G; Vinod, S; Dekker, A; Lustberg, T; Soest, J van; Walsh, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Large amounts of routine radiotherapy (RT) data are available, which can potentially add clinical evidence to support better decisions. A developing collaborative Australian network, with a leading European partner, aims to validate, implement and extend European predictive models (PMs) for Australian practice and assess their impact on future patient decisions. Wider objectives include: developing multi-institutional rapid learning, using distributed learning approaches; and assessing and incorporating radiomics information into PMs. Methods: Two initial standalone pilots were conducted; one on NSCLC, the other on larynx, patient datasets in two different centres. Open-source rapid learning systems were installed, for data extraction and mining to collect relevant clinical parameters from the centres’ databases. The European DSSs were learned (“training cohort”) and validated against local data sets (“clinical cohort”). Further NSCLC studies are underway in three more centres to pilot a wider distributed learning network. Initial radiomics work is underway. Results: For the NSCLC pilot, 159/419 patient datasets were identified meeting the PM criteria, and hence eligible for inclusion in the curative clinical cohort (for the larynx pilot, 109/125). Some missing data were imputed using Bayesian methods. For both, the European PMs successfully predicted prognosis groups, but with some differences in practice reflected. For example, the PM-predicted good prognosis NSCLC group was differentiated from a combined medium/poor prognosis group (2YOS 69% vs. 27%, p<0.001). Stage was less discriminatory in identifying prognostic groups. In the good prognosis group two-year overall survival was 65% in curatively and 18% in palliatively treated patients. Conclusion: The technical infrastructure and basic European PMs support prognosis prediction for these Australian patient groups, showing promise for supporting future personalized treatment decisions

  3. REDLetr: Workflow and tools to support the migration of legacy clinical data capture systems to REDCap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, William D; Cobb, Jake; Levey, Allan I; Gutman, David A

    2016-09-01

    A memory clinic at an academic medical center has relied on several ad hoc data capture systems including Microsoft Access and Excel for cognitive assessments over the last several years. However these solutions are challenging to maintain and limit the potential of hypothesis-driven or longitudinal research. REDCap, a secure web application based on PHP and MySQL, is a practical solution for improving data capture and organization. Here, we present a workflow and toolset to facilitate legacy data migration and real-time clinical research data collection into REDCap as well as challenges encountered. Legacy data consisted of neuropsychological tests stored in over 4000 Excel workbooks. Functions for data extraction, norm scoring, converting to REDCap-compatible formats, accessing the REDCap API, and clinical report generation were developed and executed in Python. Over 400 unique data points for each workbook were migrated and integrated into our REDCap database. Moving forward, our REDCap-based system replaces the Excel-based data collection method as well as eases the integration into the standard clinical research workflow and Electronic Health Record. In the age of growing data, efficient organization and storage of clinical and research data is critical for advancing research and providing efficient patient care. We believe that the workflow and tools described in this work to promote legacy data integration as well as real time data collection into REDCap ultimately facilitate these goals. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Cultivation and grafting of human keratinocytes on a poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) support to the wound bed: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvoránková, B; Smetana, K; Königová, R; Singerová, H; Vacík, J; Jelínková, M; Kapounková, Z; Zahradník, M

    1998-01-01

    Cultured epithelial sheets on a textile support are used for the treatment of seriously burned patients. In this study we demonstrate a new procedure for the grafting of keratinocytes directly on a polymer cultivation support. This procedure is much easier in comparison with classical techniques, and encouraging results of clinical trials demonstrate the improved healing of the wound bed after the use of this procedure. There is no difference in the cytokeratine pattern (LP-34, cytokeratin-10) of the reconstructed epidermis and normal human skin.

  5. Encounter Decision Aid vs. Clinical Decision Support or Usual Care to Support Patient-Centered Treatment Decisions in Osteoporosis: The Osteoporosis Choice Randomized Trial II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie LeBlanc

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis Choice, an encounter decision aid, can engage patients and clinicians in shared decision making about osteoporosis treatment. Its effectiveness compared to the routine provision to clinicians of the patient's estimated risk of fracture using the FRAX calculator is unknown.Patient-level, randomized, three-arm trial enrolling women over 50 with osteopenia or osteoporosis eligible for treatment with bisphosphonates, where the use of Osteoporosis Choice was compared to FRAX only and to usual care to determine impact on patient knowledge, decisional conflict, involvement in the decision-making process, decision to start and adherence to bisphosphonates.We enrolled 79 women in the three arms. Because FRAX estimation alone and usual care produced similar results, we grouped them for analysis. Compared to these, use of Osteoporosis Choice increased patient knowledge (median score 6 vs. 4, p = .01, improved understanding of fracture risk and risk reduction with bisphosphonates (p = .01 and p<.0001, respectively, had no effect on decision conflict, and increased patient engagement in the decision making process (OPTION scores 57% vs. 43%, p = .001. Encounters with the decision aid were 0.8 minutes longer (range: 33 minutes shorter to 3.0 minutes longer. There were twice as many patients receiving and filling prescriptions in the decision aid arm (83% vs. 40%, p = .07; medication adherence at 6 months was no different across arms.Supporting both patients and clinicians during the clinical encounter with the Osteoporosis Choice decision aid efficiently improves treatment decision making when compared to usual care with or without clinical decision support with FRAX results.clinical trials.gov NCT00949611.

  6. Osteocondensant diseases. A new clinical-radiological Vision supported in genetics and osteoimmunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallejo, Jimi; Calvo, Enrique; Restrepo, Jose Felix

    2009-01-01

    The alterations in osseous remodeling lead to the increase or decrease of the osseous mass, generating damage to the osseous micro-architecture, which increases the risk of fracture. The pathologies with increase in osseous density lead to different genetically directed osteocondensing processes. The osteocondensing is currently explained by alteration in the function of the osteoclast, associated with a deficient function of the osseous resorption, an alteration in the osteoblast function, which generates an abnormal increase in the Osseous formation, or a homeostatic imbalance between the two processes; the clinical and radiological expression of these diseases can take place in early stages of the development, or in the adult life, depending on the recessive or dominant autosomic component, respectively. In this review, the classification based on the functional disorder of the bone cell is discussed, as well as the main clinical and radiological characteristics than permit a simple and applicable diagnostic approach in the clinical practice.

  7. Issues and Feasibility Demonstration of Positioning Closed Loop Control for the CLIC Supporting System Using a Test Mock-up with Five Degrees of Freedom

    CERN Document Server

    Sosin, M; Chritin, N; Griffet, S; Kemppinen, J; Mainaud Durand, H; Rude, V; Sterbini, G

    2012-01-01

    Since several years, CERN is studying the feasibility of building a high energy e+ e- linear collider: the CLIC (Compact LInear Collider). One of the challenges of such a collider is the pre-alignment precision and accuracy requirement on the transverse positions of the linac components, which is typically 14 μm over a window of 200 m. To ensure the possibility of positioning within such tight constraints, CERN Beams Department’s Survey team has worked intensively at developing the methods and technology needed to achieve that objective. This paper describes activities which were performed on a test bench (mock-up) with five degrees of freedom (DOF) for the qualification of control algorithms for the CLIC supporting system active-pre-alignment. Present understanding, lessons learned (“know how”), issues of sensors noise and mechanical components nonlinearities are presented.

  8. Results of the first stage (2002-2009) of investigation of higher plants onboard RS ISS, as an element of future closed Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychev, Vladimir; Levinskikh, Margarita; Podolsky, Igor; Bingham, Gail; Novikova, Nataliya; Sugimoto, Manabu

    A key task for biomedical human support in long-term manned space expeditions is the develop-ment of the Life Support System (LSS). It is expected that in the first continuous interplanetary expeditions LSS of only a few biological elements of the LSS, such as higher plants will be in-cluded. Therefore, investigations of growth and development of higher plants for consideration in the LSS are of high importance. In a period from October, 2002 to December 2009, 15 ex-periments on cultivation of different plants, including two genetically marked species of dwarf peas, a leaf vegetable strain of Mizuna, radish, barley and wheat were conducted in space greenhouse "LADA" onboard Russian Segment (RS) of International Space Station (ISS). The experiments resulted in the conclusion that the properties of growth and development of plants grown in space greenhouse "LADA" were unaffected by spaceflight conditions. In experiments conducted in a period from 2003 to 2005, it was shown for the first time that pea plants pre-serve reproductive functions, forming viable seeds during at least four continuous full cycles of ontogenesis ("seed to seed") under spaceflight conditions. No changes were found in the genetic apparatus of the pea plants in the four "space" generations. Since 2005, there have been routine collections of microbiological samples from the surfaces of the plants grown on-board in "LADA" greenhouse. Analysis has shown that the properties of contamination of the plants grown aboard by microorganism contain no abnormal patterns. Since 2008, the plants cultivated in "LADA" greenhouse have been frozen onboard RS ISS in the MELFI refrigerator and transferred to the Earth for further investigations. Investigations of Mizuna plants grown and frozen onboard of ISS, showed no differences between "ground control" and "space" plants in chemical and biochemical properties. There also no stress-response was found in kashinriki strain barley planted and frozen onboard ISS.

  9. Direct and Electronic Health Record Access to the Clinical Decision Support for Immunizations in the Minnesota Immunization Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamani, Sripriya; Bieringer, Aaron; Wallerius, Stephanie; Jensen, Daniel; Winden, Tamara; Muscoplat, Miriam Halstead

    2016-01-01

    Immunization information systems (IIS) are population-based and confidential computerized systems maintained by public health agencies containing individual data on immunizations from participating health care providers. IIS hold comprehensive vaccination histories given across providers and over time. An important aspect to IIS is the clinical decision support for immunizations (CDSi), consisting of vaccine forecasting algorithms to determine needed immunizations. The study objective was to analyze the CDSi presentation by IIS in Minnesota (Minnesota Immunization Information Connection [MIIC]) through direct access by IIS interface and by access through electronic health records (EHRs) to outline similarities and differences. The immunization data presented were similar across the three systems examined, but with varying ability to integrate data across MIIC and EHR, which impacts immunization data reconciliation. Study findings will lead to better understanding of immunization data display, clinical decision support, and user functionalities with the ultimate goal of promoting IIS CDSi to improve vaccination rates.

  10. Supporting chronic disease self-management: translating policies and principles into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Rosemary; Murphy, Barbara; Worcester, Marian; Daffey, Angela

    2012-01-01

    To support self-management, health professionals need to adopt a client-centred approach and learn to deliver evidence-based behaviour change interventions. This paper reports on the evaluation of 1- and 2-day training programs developed to improve health professionals' capacity to support chronic disease self-management (CDSM). The 321 participants attended one of eighteen supporting CDSM courses held in urban and rural settings. Participants included nurses, allied health professionals, Aboriginal health workers and general practitioners. Data were collected at three time points: before participation; immediately after the training; and, for a sub-sample of 37 participants, 2 months after the training. Results revealed a significant and sustained increase in CDSM self-efficacy following training regardless of participants' gender, age or qualifications. A thematic analysis of the responses concerning intended practice revealed four main areas of intended practice change, namely: use behavioural strategies; improve communication with clients; adopt a client-centred approach; and improve goal setting. The number of practice changes at 2 months reported by a sub-sample of participants ranged from 1 to 20 with a mean of 14 (s.d.=4). The three most common areas of practice change point to the adoption by health professionals of a collaborative approach with chronic disease patients. Lack of staff trained in CDSM was seen as a major barrier to practice change, with lack of support and finance also named as barriers to practice change. Participants identified that increased training, support and awareness of the principles of supporting CDSM would help to overcome barriers to practice change. These results indicate a readiness among health professionals to adopt a more collaborative approach given the skills and the tools to put this approach into practice.

  11. Resection of Gliomas with and without Neuropsychological Support during Awake Craniotomy—Effects on Surgery and Clinical Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Kelm; Nico Sollmann; Nico Sollmann; Sebastian Ille; Sebastian Ille; Bernhard Meyer; Florian Ringel; Florian Ringel; Sandro M. Krieg; Sandro M. Krieg

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundDuring awake craniotomy for tumor resection, a neuropsychologist (NP) is regarded as a highly valuable partner for neurosurgeons. However, some centers do not routinely involve an NP, and data to support the high influence of the NP on the perioperative course of patients are mostly lacking.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a difference in clinical outcomes between patients who underwent awake craniotomy with and without the attendance of an NP.Metho...

  12. Reduced Clostridium difficile Tests and Laboratory-Identified Events With a Computerized Clinical Decision Support Tool and Financial Incentive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Gregory R; German Mesner, Ian; Cox, Heather L; Mathers, Amy J; Lyman, Jason A; Sifri, Costi D; Enfield, Kyle B

    2018-06-01

    We hypothesized that a computerized clinical decision support tool for Clostridium difficile testing would reduce unnecessary inpatient tests, resulting in fewer laboratory-identified events. Census-adjusted interrupted time-series analyses demonstrated significant reductions of 41% fewer tests and 31% fewer hospital-onset C. difficile infection laboratory-identified events following this intervention.Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;39:737-740.

  13. Workflow barriers out of hours: optimising critical care outreach to support clinical decision making in medical and surgical care settings

    OpenAIRE

    Brady, Anne-Marie; Ennis, Shauna; Prendergast, Maebh; Quirke, Mary; Bhangu, Jas; Lynch, Aine; Byrne, Gobnait

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The out-of-hours period is associated with less favourable patient health outcomes as well as unpredictable workloads and reduced support structures for clinical activity. In particular, appropriate skill mix, staff numbers, resources, communication structures and access to diagnostic services can influence patient safety and risk. As part of continued efforts to improve patient care and hospital management, one major academic hospital is in Ireland has been engaged in work re-d...

  14. Leidos Biomed Supports Clinical Trials for Vaccine Against Mosquito-borne Chikungunya | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    An experimental vaccine for mosquito-borne chikungunya is being tested at sites in the Caribbean as part of a phase II clinical trial being managed by the Frederick National Lab. No vaccine or treatment currently exists for the viral disease, which c

  15. IT Infrastructure to Support the Secondary Use of Routinely Acquired Clinical Imaging Data for Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.Y.E. Leung (Esther); F. van der Lijn (Fedde); H.A. Vrooman (Henri); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam); W.J. Niessen (Wiro)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractWe propose an infrastructure for the automated anonymization, extraction and processing of image data stored in clinical data repositories to make routinely acquired imaging data available for research purposes. The automated system, which was tested in the context of analyzing routinely

  16. The Role of a Student Support System and the Clinical Consultant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noam, Gil G.; Bernstein-Yamashiro, Beth

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the fact that student-teacher relationships uncover many clinical issues, such as trauma. It looks at statistics of how prevalent mental health disorders and problems are and then shows that no teacher can handle all of the kinds of problems that will emerge in open relationships with the students. They need to do this work…

  17. A decision support system for medical mobile devices based on clinical guidelines for tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cazella, Silvio César; Feyh, Rafael; Ben, Angela Jornada

    2014-01-01

    The decision making process conducted by health professionals is strongly linked to the consultations of clinical guidelines, generally available in large text files, making the access to the information very laborious and time consuming. The health area is very fertile for the emergence of

  18. A Systematic Scoping Literature Review of Publications Supporting Treatment Guidelines for Pediatric Atopic Dermatitis in Contrast to Clinical Practice Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegfried, Elaine C; Jaworski, Jennifer C; Mina-Osorio, Paola

    2018-06-01

    Treatment guidelines endorse a variety of strategies for atopic dermatitis (AD) which may vary from published data and clinical practice patterns. The objective of this review was to quantify the volume of available medical literature supporting pediatric AD treatments and compare these patterns to those recommended by published guidelines and/or clinical practice patterns. Searches of Embase (2005-2016) and abstracts from selected meetings (2014-2016) related to AD treatment in patients younger than 17 years of age yielded references that were assessed by study design, primary treatment, age groups, and AD severity. Published literature partially supports clinical guidelines, with emollients and topical medications be