WorldWideScience

Sample records for supervision teamwork knowledge

  1. Making Teamwork Work: Team Knowledge for Team Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guchait, Priyanko; Lei, Puiwa; Tews, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the impact of two types of team knowledge on team effectiveness. The study assessed the impact of taskwork knowledge and teamwork knowledge on team satisfaction and performance. A longitudinal study was conducted with 27 service-management teams involving 178 students in a real-life restaurant setting. Teamwork knowledge was found to impact both team outcomes. Furthermore, team learning behavior was found to mediate the relationships between teamwork knowledge and team outcomes. Educators and managers should therefore ensure these types of knowledge are developed in teams along with learning behavior for maximum effectiveness.

  2. Becoming Team Players: Team Members' Mastery of Teamwork Knowledge as a Predictor of Team Task Proficiency and Observed Teamwork Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Robert R.; Jordan, Mark H.; Feild, Hubert S.; Giles, William F.; Armenakis, Achilles A.

    2006-01-01

    The authors explored the idea that teams consisting of members who, on average, demonstrate greater mastery of relevant teamwork knowledge will demonstrate greater task proficiency and observed teamwork effectiveness. In particular, the authors posited that team members' mastery of designated teamwork knowledge predicts better team task…

  3. Supervised Agricultural Experience: An Examination of Student Knowledge and Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lauren J.; Rayfield, John; Moore, Lori L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate student Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) knowledge and participation. This descriptive study was conducted in 120 randomly selected agricultural education programs throughout four purposively selected states representative of the National FFA regions. Students completed a questionnaire assessing…

  4. Supervision of professionals: Interdependency between embodied experiences and professional knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aud Marie Øien

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Social work counsellors, exposed to hardships of clients’ lives, might, over time, experience strain as bodily reactions of muscle tension and pain. Within the framework of improving professional practice, the aim was to explore meanings attached to moving and breathing by studying the influence of supervision, encompassing experiences and reflections on bodily exercises, and reflection on challenging professional experiences. Action research of interdisciplinary supervision for seven counsellors, based on observations, field notes, reflection notes, and a focus group interview, was carried out. Data were analysed across participants within sessions and over time to compare meaning variations. The counsellors’ change of experiences were identified as phases: What is in it for me, not knowing what to perceive, attention as basis for knowing how to move, experiencing and creating connections, and knowing oneself better. Adjusted to change of experiences, supervisors encouraged counsellors to give attention to, become aware of, and relieve and explore muscle tension and breathing restrictions to contexts of meaning. Supervision based on movement opened access to personal learning. Supervision as approaches of movements and reflections contributed to increased self-knowledge in professional social work practices. Based on ability to perceive and relieve muscle tension and flow of breathing, the approach might be a potential for professionals to handle challenging situations. The findings, related to the lived body, encompass appearances of new meanings and new uses to experiences of muscular tension and flow of breathing.

  5. A comparison of the teamwork attitudes and knowledge of Irish surgeons and U.S Naval aviators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Paul; Ryan, Stephen; Keogh, Ivan

    2012-10-01

    Poor teamwork skills are contributors to poor performance and mishaps in high risk work settings, including the operating theatre. A questionnaire was used to assess the attitudes towards, and knowledge of, Irish surgeons (n = 72) towards the human factors that contribute to mishaps and poor teamwork in high risk environments. The responses were compared to those obtained from U.S. Naval aviators (n = 552 for the attitude questions, and n = 172 for the knowledge test). U.S. Naval aviators were found to be significantly more knowledgeable, and held attitudes that were significantly more positive towards effective teamworking than the surgeons. Moreover, 78.9% of Senior House Officers and Registrars stated that junior personnel were frequently afraid to speak-up (compared with 31.3% of Consultants). Only 7.3% of surgeons stated that an adequate pre-operative brief team brief was frequently conducted, and only 15% stated that an adequate post-operative team brief was frequently conducted. It is suggested that the human factors training currently provided to surgeons in Ireland is a positive first step. However, there is a need to stress the importance of assertiveness in juniors, listening in seniors, and more reinforcement of good teamworking behaviours in the operating theatre.

  6. An Examination of Learning Formats on Interdisciplinary Teamwork Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Carole K.; Reed, Evelyn

    2011-01-01

    Although interdisciplinary teamwork is a recommended practice and important for coordinated interdisciplinary programming in special education, there is limited research on pedagogical practices to prepare professionals to work together effectively. This study examined the effectiveness of a graduate interdisciplinary teamwork course taught…

  7. Knowledge Work Supervision: Transforming School Systems into High Performing Learning Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Francis M.

    1997-01-01

    This article describes a new supervision model conceived to help a school system redesign its anatomy (structures), physiology (flow of information and webs of relationships), and psychology (beliefs and values). The new paradigm (Knowledge Work Supervision) was constructed by reviewing the practices of several interrelated areas: sociotechnical…

  8. Knowledge and opinions about banking supervision : Evidence from a survey of Dutch households

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Cruijsen, C.; Jansen, D.J.; de Haan, J.; Mosch, R.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    What does the general public know about banking supervision? What objectives does the public think bank supervisors should pursue? We investigate these issues using a survey among Dutch households. First, we find that the public's knowledge about banking supervision is far from perfect. We also find

  9. Adaptive research supervision : Exploring expert thesis supervisors' practical knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kleijn, Renske A M; Meijer, Paulien C.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Pilot, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested the importance of being responsive to students' needs in research supervision. Adapting support strategies to students' needs in light of the goals of a task is referred to as adaptivity. In the present study, the practice of adaptivity is explored by interviewing

  10. Adaptive research supervision : Exploring expert thesis supervisors' practical knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kleijn, Renske A M; Meijer, Paulien C.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Pilot, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested the importance of being responsive to students' needs in research supervision. Adapting support strategies to students' needs in light of the goals of a task is referred to as adaptivity. In the present study, the practice of adaptivity is explored by interviewing

  11. Adaptive Research Supervision: Exploring Expert Thesis Supervisors' Practical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleijn, Renske A. M.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Pilot, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested the importance of being responsive to students' needs in research supervision. Adapting support strategies to students' needs in light of the goals of a task is referred to as "adaptivity." In the present study, the practice of adaptivity is explored by interviewing expert thesis supervisors about…

  12. Examining Antecedents of Knowledge-Sharing Factors on Research Supervision: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Arash; Ahmad, Mohammad Nazir

    2016-01-01

    The use of an effective supervision mechanism is crucial between a student and supervisor. The essential knowledge shared and transferred between these two parties must be observed and understood very well in order to ensure that students are produced at good level of quality for future professional knowledge workers. The aim of this study was to…

  13. Teamwork during resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Peter; Halamek, Louis P

    2008-08-01

    Effective resuscitation requires the integration of several cognitive, technical, and behavioral skills. Because resuscitation is performed by teams of health care professionals, these individuals must be able to work together in a coordinated and efficient manner, making teamwork a critical skill for care of patients in distress. Despite the importance of teamwork in health care, little consensus exists as to what it is, how it can most effectively be learned, and how it should be assessed. This article reviews current knowledge on the measurement, training, and importance of teamwork in pediatric resuscitation.

  14. Collegiality and teamwork

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovbjerg, Kirsten Marie; Søgaard Sørensen, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    This article deals with teamwork as one of the social technologies that, also within the teaching sector, currently contributes to changing employee understanding of their work life, in this case that of teachers. Based on empirical studies done on vocational colleges, teamwork is contrasted...... of knowledge, the authors attempt to discover what factors are actually at play when a school introduces teamwork among teachers. The two co-operation logics appear to make use, for example, of two different types of democratic approaches that in turn influence the democratic domain in which students learn....

  15. Collegiality and teamwork

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovbjerg, Kirsten Marie; Søgaard Sørensen, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    This article deals with teamwork as one of the social technologies that, also within the teaching sector, currently contributes to changing employee understanding of their work life, in this case that of teachers. Based on empirical studies done on vocational colleges, teamwork is contrasted...... to what the authors call collegial co-operation, which comprises social and solidarity relations that in a variety of ways and to different degrees have always existed among colleagues. By examining the structure of teamwork and collegial co-operation, their social aspects and values as well as their view...... of knowledge, the authors attempt to discover what factors are actually at play when a school introduces teamwork among teachers. The two co-operation logics appear to make use, for example, of two different types of democratic approaches that in turn influence the democratic domain in which students learn....

  16. Reconsidering Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Dean

    2007-01-01

    Teamwork is often seen as an inseparable part of sport. Other than work done by sport psychologists, however, the topic has received scant attention. The broad aim of this article is to stimulate discussion on the topic. Specifically, I examine how we can think about and "do" teamwork in an alternative way to that presented in current…

  17. Need for Rehabilitation Teamwork Training in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    ELDAR, Reuben; Marincek, Crt; Kullmann, Lajos

    2008-01-01

    Teamwork is the cornerstone of rehabilitation medicine. Rehabilitation workers in European countries are well educated in their own disciplines and attain appropriate professional knowledge; however, they lack educational opportunities for acquiring skills and attitudes necessary for effective teamwork, mainly communication, cooperation, and leadership. Consequently, teamwork is compromised and rehabilitation effectiveness reduced. Therefore, training in these components of ...

  18. Role of care pathways in interprofessional teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaria, Minimol Kulakkottu

    2016-08-24

    Cohesive interprofessional teamwork is essential to successful healthcare services. Interprofessional teamwork is the means by which different healthcare professionals - with diverse knowledge, skills and talents - collaborate to achieve a common goal. Several interventions are available to improve teamwork in the healthcare setting. This article explores the role of care pathways in improving interprofessional teamwork. Care pathways enhance teamwork by promoting coordination, collaboration, communication and decision making to achieve optimal healthcare outcomes. They result in improved staff knowledge, communication, documentation and interprofessional relations. Care pathways also contribute to patient-centred care and increase patient satisfaction.

  19. Need for rehabilitation teamwork training in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldar, Reuben; Marincek, Crt; Kullmann, Lajos

    2008-06-01

    Teamwork is the cornerstone of rehabilitation medicine. Rehabilitation workers in European countries are well educated in their own disciplines and attain appropriate professional knowledge; however, they lack educational opportunities for acquiring skills and attitudes necessary for effective teamwork, mainly communication, cooperation, and leadership. Consequently, teamwork is compromised and rehabilitation effectiveness reduced. Therefore, training in these components of professional competence needs scaling up in order to increase their impact on rehabilitation care.

  20. [Interprofessional teamwork in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Conny H

    2010-01-01

    Providing health care requires the integrative co-operation of physicians, nurses and other professionals in the health care sector. The success of such interprofessional teamwork does not only rely on the team members' task knowledge, but also on their teamwork-related knowledge, their skills and attitudes. In this paper a theoretical framework for team effectiveness is developed and used to identify factors improving team success. Within this context interprofessional team composition is perceived as a characteristic of team diversity, which needs to be perceived as a chance for better patient care in order to be used effectively.

  1. Moving toward Teamwork through Professional Development Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Meghan M.; Theilheimer, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study of three Head Start Centers analyzed surveys, interviews, and focus group data to determine how education coordinators, teachers, and teacher assistants believed professional development activities could support teamwork at their centers. The researchers sorted data related to teamwork into four categories: knowledge and…

  2. Moving toward Teamwork through Professional Development Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Meghan M.; Theilheimer, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study of three Head Start Centers analyzed surveys, interviews, and focus group data to determine how education coordinators, teachers, and teacher assistants believed professional development activities could support teamwork at their centers. The researchers sorted data related to teamwork into four categories: knowledge and…

  3. Teamwork Competency Test (TWCT): a step forward on measuring teamwork competencies

    OpenAIRE

    Aguado García, David; Rico, Ramón; Sánchez-Manzanares, Miriam; Salas, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The Teamwork Knowledge, Skill, Ability Test (TWKSAT), designed to assess teamwork competencies, has been widely used in both applied and academic contexts. However, studies have brought to light a number of reliability problems in the test. In this article, we describe 3 studies that (a) examined the functioning of the TWKSAT (N 135); (b) investigated a new measure, the Teamwork Competency Test, including its metric properties (N 120); and (c) analyzed the convergent and predictive valid...

  4. A Multifaceted Approach to Teamwork Assessment in an Undergraduate Business Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemery, Edward R.; Stickney, Lisa T.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a multifaceted, multilevel approach to teamwork learning and assessment. It includes teamwork knowledge, peer and self-appraisal of teamwork behavior, and individual and team performance on objective tests for teaching and assessing teamwork in an undergraduate business program. At the beginning of this semester-long process, students…

  5. A Multifaceted Approach to Teamwork Assessment in an Undergraduate Business Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemery, Edward R.; Stickney, Lisa T.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a multifaceted, multilevel approach to teamwork learning and assessment. It includes teamwork knowledge, peer and self-appraisal of teamwork behavior, and individual and team performance on objective tests for teaching and assessing teamwork in an undergraduate business program. At the beginning of this semester-long process, students…

  6. Knowledge Translation and Interprofessional Collaboration: Where the Rubber of Evidence-Based Care Hits the Road of Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwarenstein, Merrick; Reeves, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge-translation interventions and interprofessional education and collaboration interventions all aim at improving health care processes and outcomes. Knowledge-translation interventions attempt to increase evidence-based practice by a single professional group and thus may fail to take into account barriers from difficulties in…

  7. SUPERVISED CURRICULUM INTERNSHIP IN GEOGRAPHY AND PEDAGOGICAL MEDIATION: between knowledge and practices for a dialogical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Kennedy Silva dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article is the result of an inquiry which has for its object the pedagogical mediation in Geography, with reference to the supervised curriculum internship in Geography, obligatory component for teacher training in degree courses. We start from an analysis of reflective professional trajectory teaching, in research supported type "state of the art" or "state of knowledge" for bibliographical supports our interventions (FERREIRA, 2002. We seek authors such as (CORTELLA, 2008; FAZENDA, 1991; FREIRE, 2003; LIBÂNEO, 2005; TARDIF, 2002; among others further deepening of the central categories for our analyzes. We intend to test this, open up new possibilities for understanding the role of teaching practice in teacher education in the light of the narrowing theory and practice. The reflection on the everyday, especially from the real questions of the teacher, is in the condition to proceed with training more articulate and coherent with reality. The lack of a more systematic partnership between schools and the University has led to the development of proposals and optimized with little impact on the educational community. Being a teacher today is a challenge that involves humanitarian issue and expertise needed to see and mingle with the world. RESUMO: O presente artigo resulta de uma investigação que tem por objeto a mediação pedagógica em Geografia, tendo como referência o estágio curricular supervisionado, componente obrigatório para formação de professores nos cursos de licenciatura. Partimos de uma análise reflexiva da trajetória profissional docente, respaldados em pesquisas do tipo “estado da arte” ou “estado do conhecimento” de caráter bibliográfico para dá suporte a nossas intervenções (FERREIRA, 2002. Buscamos em autores como (CORTELLA, 2008; FAZENDA, 1991; FREIRE, 2003; LIBÂNEO, 2005; TARDIF, 2002; entre outros um maior aprofundamento das categorias centrais para nossas análises. Pretendemos com este

  8. Discovering treatment pattern in Traditional Chinese Medicine clinical cases by exploiting supervised topic model and domain knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Liang; Zhang, Yin; Wei, Baogang; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yuejiao; Ren, Xiaolin; Bian, Yali

    2015-12-01

    In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), the prescription is the crystallization of clinical experience of doctors, which is the main way to cure diseases in China for thousands of years. Clinical cases, on the other hand, describe how doctors diagnose and prescribe. In this paper, we propose a framework which mines treatment patterns in TCM clinical cases by exploiting supervised topic model and TCM domain knowledge. The framework can reflect principle rules in TCM and improve function prediction of a new prescription. We evaluate our method on 3090 real world TCM clinical cases. The experiment validates the effectiveness of our method.

  9. Toward an Optimal Pedagogy for Teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, Mark A; Williams, Jason; Aagaard, Eva M

    2017-10-01

    Teamwork and collaboration are increasingly listed as core competencies for undergraduate health professions education. Despite the clear mandate for teamwork training, the optimal method for providing that training is much less certain. In this Perspective, the authors propose a three-level classification of pedagogical approaches to teamwork training based on the presence of two key learning factors: interdependent work and explicit training in teamwork. In this classification framework, level 1-minimal team learning-is where learners work in small groups but neither of the key learning factors is present. Level 2-implicit team learning-engages learners in interdependent learning activities but does not include an explicit focus on teamwork. Level 3-explicit team learning-creates environments where teams work interdependently toward common goals and are given explicit instruction and practice in teamwork. The authors provide examples that demonstrate each level. They then propose that the third level of team learning, explicit team learning, represents a best practice approach in teaching teamwork, highlighting their experience with an explicit team learning course at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. Finally, they discuss several challenges to implementing explicit team-learning-based curricula: the lack of a common teamwork model on which to anchor such a curriculum; the question of whether the knowledge, skills, and attitudes acquired during training would be transferable to the authentic clinical environment; and effectively evaluating the impact of explicit team learning.

  10. Knowledge translation and interprofessional collaboration: Where the rubber of evidence-based care hits the road of teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwarenstein, Merrick; Reeves, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge-translation interventions and interprofessional education and collaboration interventions all aim at improving health care processes and outcomes. Knowledge-translation interventions attempt to increase evidence-based practice by a single professional group and thus may fail to take into account barriers from difficulties in interprofessional relations. Interprofessional education and collaboration interventions aim to improve interprofessional relations, which may in turn facilitate the work of knowledge translation and thus evidence-based practice. We summarize systematic review work on the effects of interventions for interprofessional education and collaboration. The current evidence base contains mainly descriptive studies of these interventions. Knowledge is limited regarding the impact on care and outcomes and the extent to which the interventions increase the practice of evidence-based care. Rigorous multimethod research studies are needed to develop and strengthen the current evidence base in this field. We describe a Health Canada-funded randomized trial in which quantitative and qualitative data will be gathered in 20 general internal medicine units located at 5 Toronto, Ontario, teaching hospitals. The project examines the impact of interprofessional education and collaboration interventions on interprofessional relationships, health care processes (including evidence-based practice), and patient outcomes. Routes are suggested by which interprofessional education and collaboration interventions might affect knowledge translation and evidence-based practice.

  11. School Knowledge, Cross-Curricularity and Teamwork Teaching in the Greek Primary School: Mathematics Education as Discursive Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakaki, Maria; Dossa, Katerina; Moraiti, Tzeni

    2012-01-01

    Through analysis of exercises offered in mathematics textbooks, this article investigates the discursive practice of cross-curricularity and group work teaching that was advocated in the 2007 reform of mathematics education in Greek primary schools. The conclusion of the research is that the organisation of school knowledge is vertical, and strong…

  12. Virtual teamwork - Panoptic or Interactive Work design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of virtual teamwork represents a dynamic response to globalization, the growth of communication technologies and dismantling of industrial based organizational hierarchies. These developments pose new challenges as the completion of the distributed tasks must be integrated across...... the barriers of cultural differences, and with fewer face-to-face clues, Virtual teamwork involves demands regarding communication, trust and knowledge. The implications for future work design are immense, and still open for clarification and discussion....

  13. Virtual teamwork - Panoptic or Interactive Work design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of virtual teamwork represents a dynamic response to globalization, the growth of communication technologies and dismantling of industrial based organizational hierarchies. These developments pose new challenges as the completion of the distributed tasks must be integrated across...... the barriers of cultural differences, and with fewer face-to-face clues, Virtual teamwork involves demands regarding communication, trust and knowledge. The implications for future work design are immense, and still open for clarification and discussion....

  14. Teamwork of social pedagogues in elementary school

    OpenAIRE

    Ozmec, Maša

    2013-01-01

    Teamwork is becoming an important factor in efficient work of individual institutions. Individuals require certain skills and knowledge so they can work well in a team. It is needed to understand that a team has to go through specific phases of development in which individuals adopt different roles in order for the team to function successfully. Social pedagogues are actively involved in all three stages of teamwork. The main objective of this diploma thesis was to research different dime...

  15. Intercultural Doctoral Supervision: The Centrality of Place, Time and Other Forms of Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manathunga, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    In order to wrestle effectively with the problems facing our world in the 21st century, we need to draw together the vast array of knowledge systems that all human cultures have produced. This means creating space for Southern, Eastern and Indigenous knowledge in universities and developing more effective forms of intercultural communication. In a…

  16. Intercultural Doctoral Supervision: The Centrality of Place, Time and Other Forms of Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manathunga, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    In order to wrestle effectively with the problems facing our world in the 21st century, we need to draw together the vast array of knowledge systems that all human cultures have produced. This means creating space for Southern, Eastern and Indigenous knowledge in universities and developing more effective forms of intercultural communication. In a…

  17. Whither Supervision?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Waite

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper inquires if the school supervision is in decadence. Dr. Waite responds that the answer will depend on which perspective you look at it. Dr. Waite suggests taking in consideration three elements that are related: the field itself, the expert in the field (the professor, the theorist, the student and the administrator, and the context. When these three elements are revised, it emphasizes that there is not a consensus about the field of supervision, but there are coincidences related to its importance and that it is related to the improvement of the practice of the students in the school for their benefit. Dr. Waite suggests that the practice on this field is not always in harmony with what the theorists affirm. When referring to the supervisor or the skilled person, the author indicates that his or her perspective depends on his or her epistemological believes or in the way he or she conceives the learning; that is why supervision can be understood in different ways. About the context, Waite suggests that there have to be taken in consideration the social or external forces that influent the people and the society, because through them the education is affected. Dr. Waite concludes that the way to understand the supervision depends on the performer’s perspective. He responds to the initial question saying that the supervision authorities, the knowledge on this field, the performers, and its practice, are maybe spread but not extinct because the supervision will always be part of the great enterprise that we called education.

  18. Effective healthcare teams require effective team members: defining teamwork competencies

    OpenAIRE

    Leggat Sandra G

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Although effective teamwork has been consistently identified as a requirement for enhanced clinical outcomes in the provision of healthcare, there is limited knowledge of what makes health professionals effective team members, and even less information on how to develop skills for teamwork. This study identified critical teamwork competencies for health service managers. Methods Members of a state branch of the professional association of Australian health service managers...

  19. Material classification and automatic content enrichment of images using supervised learning and knowledge bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallepudi, Sri Abhishikth; Calix, Ricardo A.; Knapp, Gerald M.

    2011-02-01

    In recent years there has been a rapid increase in the size of video and image databases. Effective searching and retrieving of images from these databases is a significant current research area. In particular, there is a growing interest in query capabilities based on semantic image features such as objects, locations, and materials, known as content-based image retrieval. This study investigated mechanisms for identifying materials present in an image. These capabilities provide additional information impacting conditional probabilities about images (e.g. objects made of steel are more likely to be buildings). These capabilities are useful in Building Information Modeling (BIM) and in automatic enrichment of images. I2T methodologies are a way to enrich an image by generating text descriptions based on image analysis. In this work, a learning model is trained to detect certain materials in images. To train the model, an image dataset was constructed containing single material images of bricks, cloth, grass, sand, stones, and wood. For generalization purposes, an additional set of 50 images containing multiple materials (some not used in training) was constructed. Two different supervised learning classification models were investigated: a single multi-class SVM classifier, and multiple binary SVM classifiers (one per material). Image features included Gabor filter parameters for texture, and color histogram data for RGB components. All classification accuracy scores using the SVM-based method were above 85%. The second model helped in gathering more information from the images since it assigned multiple classes to the images. A framework for the I2T methodology is presented.

  20. Teaching teamwork: an evaluation of an interprofessional training ward placement for health care students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morphet J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Julia Morphet,1 Kerry Hood,2 Robyn Cant,2 Julie Baulch,3 Alana Gilbee,3 Kate Sandry4 1School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia; 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia; 3Southern Clinical School, Monash University, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia; 4Dandenong Emergency Department, Monash Health, David St, Dandenong, Victoria, Australia Abstract: The establishment of interprofessional teamwork training in the preprofessional health care curriculum is a major challenge for teaching faculties. Interprofessional clinical placements offer an opportunity for teamwork education, as students in various professions can work and learn together. In this sequential, mixed-method study, focus group and survey techniques were used to evaluate students' educational experiences after 2-week ward-based interprofessional clinical placements. Forty-five senior nursing, medicine, and other health care students cared for patients in hospital wards under professional supervision, with nursing-medicine student "teams" leading care. Thirty-six students attended nine exit focus groups. Five central themes that emerged about training were student autonomy and workload, understanding of other professional roles, communication and shared knowledge, interprofessional teamwork/collaboration, and the "inner circle", or being part of the unit team. The learning environment was described as positive. In a postplacement satisfaction survey (n=38, students likewise rated the educational experience highly. In practicing teamwork and collaboration, students were able to rehearse their future professional role. We suggest that interprofessional clinical placements be regarded as an essential learning experience for senior preprofessional students. More work is needed to fully understand the effect of this interactive program on students' clinical learning and preparation for practice

  1. Collaborative Teamwork in Crossdisciplinarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, Renée-Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Polytechnique Montréal has integrated an approach of teamwork in its twelve engineering programs, in the bachelor's degree program since 2005. Students must take a compulsory 45 hours course on teamwork and are then accompanied with team coaching throughout the four years program, in all the engineering integration projects. These integration…

  2. Differences in Perceptions of the Importance of Subject Matter Knowledge and How These Shaped Supervision and Assessment of Student Teachers on Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudavanhu, Young

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish lecturers and student teachers' perceptions of the importance of subject matter knowledge and how these views affected supervision and assessment of pre-service and in-service science teachers at University of Mashonaland (pseudonym) in Zimbabwe. The study was largely qualitative and used group…

  3. Context-Sensitive Sharedness Criteria for Teamwork (Extended Abstract)

    OpenAIRE

    M. Harbers; Jonker, C.M.; Van Riemsdijk, M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Teamwork between humans and intelligent systems gains importance with the maturing of agent and robot technology. In the social sciences, sharedness of mental models is used to explain and understand teamwork. To use this concept for developing teams that include agents, we propose contextsensitive sharedness criteria. These criteria specify how much, what, and among whom knowledge in a team should be shared.

  4. Context-Sensitive Sharedness Criteria for Teamwork (Extended Abstract)

    OpenAIRE

    Harbers, M; Jonker, C.M.; van Riemsdijk, M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Teamwork between humans and intelligent systems gains importance with the maturing of agent and robot technology. In the social sciences, sharedness of mental models is used to explain and understand teamwork. To use this concept for developing teams that include agents, we propose contextsensitive sharedness criteria. These criteria specify how much, what, and among whom knowledge in a team should be shared.

  5. Leadership Styles Promote Teamwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khater Aldoshan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper will evaluate the importance of learning leadership styles and the explanation of when and how each one is used in the workforce. In this paper many experts have been cited that are well-known in the field of leadership. Also this paper will concentrate on the importance of teamwork in the workforce and there are many examples of how teamwork is effective for creating the best possible outcomes for creativity and productivity. In the television industry creativity is an essential component of the job description and inspirational leadership that promotes teamwork is essential.

  6. Covert leadership: notes on managing professionals. Knowledge workers respond to inspiration, not supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzberg, H

    1998-01-01

    The orchestra conductor is a popular metaphor for managers today--up there on the podium in complete control. But that image may be misleading, says Henry Mintzberg, who recently spent a day with Bramwell Tovey, conductor of the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, in order to explore the metaphor. He found that Tovey does not operate like an absolute ruler but practices instead what Mintzberg calls covert leadership. Covert leadership means managing with a sense of nuances, constraints, and limitations. When a manager like Tovey guides an organization, he leads without seeming to, without his people being fully aware of all that he is doing. That's because in this world of professionals, a leader is not completely powerless--but neither does he have absolute control over others. As knowledge work grows in importance, the way an orchestra conductor really operates may serve as a good model for managers in a wide range of businesses. For example, Mintzberg found that Tovey does a lot more hands-on work than one might expect. More like a first-line supervisor than a hands-off executive, he takes direct and personal charge of what is getting done. In dealing with his musicians, his focus is on inspiring them, not empowering them. Like other professionals, the musicians don't need to be empowered--they're already secure in what they know and can do--but they do need to be infused with energy for the tasks at hand. This is the role of the covert leader: to act quietly and unobtrusively in order to exact not obedience but inspired performance.

  7. Kollegial supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Dibbern; Petersson, Erling

    Publikationen belyser, hvordan kollegial supervision i en kan organiseres i en uddannelsesinstitution......Publikationen belyser, hvordan kollegial supervision i en kan organiseres i en uddannelsesinstitution...

  8. 'Virtual Learning-by-Doing' Teamwork KSA: Strategic Management Simulation as an Effective Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Pérez, Víctor; Martín-Cruz, Natalia; Pérez-Santana, Pilar; Hernangómez-Barahona, Juan; Martín-Sierra, Celia

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of strategic management simulations as a learning-by-doing tool, that is they can enhance their knowledge, skills and abilities for effective teamwork. We have carried out an analysis of the effect of business simulation on the teamwork KSA with a group of undergraduates of the Business School. The results show that the teamwork KSA can improve and that the initial knowledge of those teamwork KSA, at the individual level, is the only factor which conditions their learning. Initial knowledge of the teamwork KSA and the spread of this knowledge within the team, are not a determinant influence on the individual learning-by-doing. Neither are features such as intelligence, personality, attitude to teamwork and teamwork self-efficacy.

  9. Teamwork – a Solution for Romanian Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Stan ªtefania Anca

    2013-01-01

    Creating an environment that is built on teamwork and establishing an effective team is a real challenge for any company and it is the responsibility of the organization, the manager or the team leader and of each team member. Thus, Romanian managers are required to have in-depth knowledge of their team hence they can make use of their full potential. The purpose of this paper is to analyze teamwork in the Romanian companies. Based on the analysis of 90 completed questionnaires, we are presen...

  10. Effective healthcare teams require effective team members: defining teamwork competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leggat Sandra G

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although effective teamwork has been consistently identified as a requirement for enhanced clinical outcomes in the provision of healthcare, there is limited knowledge of what makes health professionals effective team members, and even less information on how to develop skills for teamwork. This study identified critical teamwork competencies for health service managers. Methods Members of a state branch of the professional association of Australian health service managers participated in a teamwork survey. Results The 37% response rate enabled identification of a management teamwork competency set comprising leadership, knowledge of organizational goals and strategies and organizational commitment, respect for others, commitment to working collaboratively and to achieving a quality outcome. Conclusion Although not part of the research question the data suggested that the competencies for effective teamwork are perceived to be different for management and clinical teams, and there are differences in the perceptions of effective teamwork competencies between male and female health service managers. This study adds to the growing evidence that the focus on individual skill development and individual accountability and achievement that results from existing models of health professional training, and which is continually reinforced by human resource management practices within healthcare systems, is not consistent with the competencies required for effective teamwork.

  11. Assessing teamwork competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrelles Nadal, Cristina; Paris Mañas, Georgina; Sabrià Bernadó, Betlem; Alsinet Mora, Carles

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, organizations of all types have undergone major changes, and teamwork is one of them. This way of working generates greater profits for an organization. This article aims to assess the teamwork competence of the employees of various Spanish companies in order to determine how effective the team members are in their professional actions. We contacted 55 teams from different organizations and obtained a non-probabilistic sample comprised of 55 participants (subjects tested) and 218 observers (evaluators: coordinators and co-workers). The instrument used for data collection was the Teamwork Rubric (Torrelles, 2011) and data analysis was based on 360º feedback. 80% of the teams analyzed obtained median scores for teamwork competence that were greater than 3, whereas 20% obtained scores between 2 and 3. The results showed that the workers in the companies studied had not fully acquired teamwork competence. It is necessary to find training solutions to improve their level of acquisition, particularly the dimensions of performance and regulation.

  12. Leadership Styles Promote Teamwork

    OpenAIRE

    Khater Aldoshan

    2015-01-01

    This paper will evaluate the importance of learning leadership styles and the explanation of when and how each one is used in the workforce. In this paper many experts have been cited that are well-known in the field of leadership. Also this paper will concentrate on the importance of teamwork in the workforce and there are many examples of how teamwork is effective for creating the best possible outcomes for creativity and productivity. In the television industry creativity is an essential c...

  13. From knowledge to recognition: Evaluation of the process of a supervision group through lexical and textual statistical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Di Falco

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The following article shows the process analysis of group supervision within a Therapeutic Community for adolescents with psychiatric problems. The main aim is to explore the influence of the group supervision on the quality of the patients care and, at the same time, the relationship between the therapists. The evaluation was made recording the group meetings and analyzing the transcriptions (representation of therapists’ speeches in written form through the use of statistical text analysis. Data analysis describes the frame of an institution – the TC – where it seems possible to “think” and “rethink” the clinical work and the relationship with patients bearing in mind – at the same time – institutional aspects; patients’ family role; social context; emotional and relational aspects of the therapists.Keywords: Process, Supervision, Therapeutic community

  14. Teamwork methods for accountable care: relational coordination and TeamSTEPPS®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittell, Jody Hoffer; Beswick, Joanne; Goldmann, Don; Wallack, Stanley S

    2015-01-01

    To deliver greater value in the accountable care context, the Institute of Medicine argues for a culture of teamwork at multiple levels--across professional and organizational siloes and with patients and their families and communities. The logic of performance improvement is that data are needed to target interventions and to assess their impact. We argue that efforts to build teamwork will benefit from teamwork measures that provide diagnostic information regarding the current state and teamwork interventions that can respond to the opportunities identified in the current state. We identify teamwork measures and teamwork interventions that are validated and that can work across multiple levels of teamwork. We propose specific ways to combine them for optimal effectiveness. We review measures of teamwork documented by Valentine, Nembhard, and Edmondson and select those that they identified as satisfying the four criteria for psychometric validation and as being unbounded and therefore able to measure teamwork across multiple levels. We then consider teamwork interventions that are widely used in the U.S. health care context, are well validated based on their association with outcomes, and are capable of working at multiple levels of teamwork. We select the top candidate in each category and propose ways to combine them for optimal effectiveness. We find relational coordination is a validated multilevel teamwork measure and TeamSTEPPS® is a validated multilevel teamwork intervention and propose specific ways for the relational coordination measure to enhance the TeamSTEPPS intervention. Health care systems and change agents seeking to respond to the challenges of accountable care can use TeamSTEPPS as a validated multilevel teamwork intervention methodology, enhanced by relational coordination as a validated multilevel teamwork measure with diagnostic capacity to pinpoint opportunities for improving teamwork along specific dimensions (e.g., shared knowledge

  15. Measuring teamwork in health care settings: a review of survey instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Melissa A; Nembhard, Ingrid M; Edmondson, Amy C

    2015-04-01

    Teamwork in health care settings is widely recognized as an important factor in providing high-quality patient care. However, the behaviors that comprise effective teamwork, the organizational factors that support teamwork, and the relationship between teamwork and patient outcomes remain empirical questions in need of rigorous study. To identify and review survey instruments used to assess dimensions of teamwork so as to facilitate high-quality research on this topic. We conducted a systematic review of articles published before September 2012 to identify survey instruments used to measure teamwork and to assess their conceptual content, psychometric validity, and relationships to outcomes of interest. We searched the ISI Web of Knowledge database, and identified relevant articles using the search terms team, teamwork, or collaboration in combination with survey, scale, measure, or questionnaire. We found 39 surveys that measured teamwork. Surveys assessed different dimensions of teamwork. The most commonly assessed dimensions were communication, coordination, and respect. Of the 39 surveys, 10 met all of the criteria for psychometric validity, and 14 showed significant relationships to nonself-report outcomes. Evidence of psychometric validity is lacking for many teamwork survey instruments. However, several psychometrically valid instruments are available. Researchers aiming to advance research on teamwork in health care should consider using or adapting one of these instruments before creating a new one. Because instruments vary considerably in the behavioral processes and emergent states of teamwork that they capture, researchers must carefully evaluate the conceptual consistency between instrument, research question, and context.

  16. Teamwork in the Real World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foyle, David C.; Shafto, Michael G.; Hart, Sandra G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is well known for its roles in the space program and in aeronautics. Because teamwork is essential for most NASA missions, NASA has experience in both research on teamwork and implementation of team projects. The purpose of this chapter is not to summarize research results on teamwork. This chapter will summarize our insight into teamwork as it applies to the large institutions and organizations with which we have been associated: University academic systems, Navy research laboratories, and NASA. These organizations represent a variety of systems in which teamwork is commonplace.

  17. Kollegialitet og teamwork

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovbjerg, Kirsten Marie; Søgaard Sørensen, Marianne

    2007-01-01

     Kapitlet beskæftiger sig med teamwork som en af de sociale teknologier, der i dag, også indenfor undervisningssektoren, er med til at forandre medarbejderes, og altså her læreres, forståelse af deres arbejdsliv. Ud fra empiriske studier på erhvervsskoleområdet kontrasteres team-samarbejde med det...... forsøger forfatterne at finde ud af, hvad der egentligt er på spil, når en skole indfører teamwork blandt lærerne. Blandt andet ser det ud til, at de to forskellige samarbejdslogikker benytter sig af to forskellige demokratiforståelser, der således får indflydelse på det demokratiske rum, eleverne dannes i....

  18. Kollegialitet og teamwork

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovbjerg, Kirsten Marie; Søgaard Sørensen, Marianne

    2007-01-01

     Kapitlet beskæftiger sig med teamwork som en af de sociale teknologier, der i dag, også indenfor undervisningssektoren, er med til at forandre medarbejderes, og altså her læreres, forståelse af deres arbejdsliv. Ud fra empiriske studier på erhvervsskoleområdet kontrasteres team-samarbejde med det...... forsøger forfatterne at finde ud af, hvad der egentligt er på spil, når en skole indfører teamwork blandt lærerne. Blandt andet ser det ud til, at de to forskellige samarbejdslogikker benytter sig af to forskellige demokratiforståelser, der således får indflydelse på det demokratiske rum, eleverne dannes i....

  19. Guide to good practices for teamwork training and diagnostic skills development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    This guide provides assistance in the development, implementation, and improvement of training on teamwork and diagnostics. DOE and contractor representatives identified the need for teamwork and diagnostics training guidance. This need was based on the increasing emphasis of properly applying knowledge and skills to complete assigned tasks. Teamwork and diagnostic skills have become a focal point because of the impact they have on effective facility operation and safety.

  20. [Education for medical teamwork in Shinshu University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamiya, Osamu

    2006-03-01

    Both students of health sciences (medical technology, nursing science, physical therapy, and occupational therapy) and medical students learn medical teamwork in the primary stage by joint practice in Shinshu University. The aim of this class is for students that will become medical staff to increase their necessary communication skills for medical teamwork in addition to understanding the mutual medical professional fields in a medical institution. The 242 students of the medical department (147 students of health sciences and 95 students of medicine) take 15 classes during their first term as freshers. One teacher takes charge of a group consisting of 14 students for tutorials by mutually cooperation between teachers of medicine and health sciences. Positive relationships are expected to develop in the group, raising sociality and ethics so that both students of health science and medicine experience interdisciplinary discussion in small groups as an ideal method for continuing health care in times of poor knowledge of medicine and health care.

  1. Agent-Supported Mission Operations Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of software agents to support of mission operations teamwork. The goals of the work was to make automation by agents easy to use, supervise and direct, manage information and communication to decrease distraction, interruptions, workload and errors, reduce mission impact of off-nominal situations and increase morale and decrease turnover. The accomplishments or the project are: 1. Collaborative agents - mixed initiative and creation of instructions for mediating agent 2. Methods for prototyping, evaluating and evolving socio-technical systems 3. Technology infusion: teamwork tools in mISSIons 4. Demonstrations in simulation testbed An example of the use of agent is given, the use of an agent to monitor a N2 tank leak. An incomplete instruction to the agent is handled with mediating assistants, or Intelligent Briefing and Response Assistant (IBRA). The IBRA Engine also watches data stream for triggers and executes Act-Whenever actions. There is also a Briefing and Response Instruction (BRI) which is easy for a discipline specialist to create through a BRI editor.

  2. Teamwork in obstetric critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Segel, Sally

    2008-10-01

    Whether seeing a patient in the ambulatory clinic environment, performing a delivery or managing a critically ill patient, obstetric care is a team activity. Failures in teamwork and communication are among the leading causes of adverse obstetric events, accounting for over 70% of sentinel events according to the Joint Commission. Effective, efficient and safe care requires good teamwork. Although nurses, doctors and healthcare staff who work in critical care environments are extremely well trained and competent medically, they have not traditionally been trained in how to work well as part of a team. Given the complexity and acuity of critical care medicine, which often relies on more than one medical team, teamwork skills are essential. This chapter discusses the history and importance of teamwork in high-reliability fields, reviews key concepts and skills in teamwork, and discusses approaches to training and working in teams.

  3. Interdisciplinary teamwork in hospitals: a review and practical recommendations for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Kevin J; Sehgal, Niraj L; Terrell, Grace; Williams, Mark V

    2012-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of teamwork in hospitals, senior leadership from the American College of Physician Executives (ACPE), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE), and the Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) established the High Performance Teams and the Hospital of the Future project. This collaborative learning effort aims to redesign care delivery to provide optimal value to hospitalized patients. With input from members of this initiative, we prepared this report which reviews the literature related to teamwork in hospitals. Teamwork is critically important to provide safe and effective hospital care. Hospitals with high teamwork ratings experience higher patient satisfaction, higher nurse retention, and lower hospital costs. Elements of effective teamwork have been defined and provide a framework for assessment and improvement efforts in hospitals. Measurement of teamwork is essential to understand baseline performance, and to demonstrate the utility of resources invested to enhance it and the subsequent impact on patient care. Interventions designed to improve teamwork in hospitals include localization of physicians, daily goals of care forms and checklists, teamwork training, and interdisciplinary rounds. Though additional research is needed to evaluate the impact on patient outcomes, these interventions consistently result in improved teamwork knowledge, ratings of teamwork climate, and better understanding of patients' plans of care. The optimal approach is implementation of a combination of interventions, with adaptations to fit unique clinical settings and local culture.

  4. Clinical supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorapah, D

    1997-05-01

    The introduction of clinical supervision to a wider sphere of nursing is being considered from a professional and organizational point of view. Positive views are being expressed about adopting this concept, although there are indications to suggest that there are also strong reservations. This paper examines the potential for its success amidst the scepticism that exists. One important question raised is whether clinical supervision will replace or run alongside other support systems.

  5. Reflective writing as a tool for assessing teamwork in bioscience: insights into student performance and understanding of teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Lynne

    2012-07-01

    To ensure a modern bioscience curriculum that responds to the current needs of stakeholders, there is a need to embed a range of generic capabilities that enables graduates to succeed in and contribute to a rapidly changing world, as well as building strong bioscience skills and knowledge. The curriculum must also prepare students for a rapidly evolving competitive work place and align with the needs of industry. This creates a challenge, how do we develop generic capabilities without losing discipline content. This report analyses teamwork projects embedded in an undergraduate Biotechnology degree designed to promote teamwork skills along with a deeper understanding of the underpinning biochemistry. Student reflective writing was used to capture students' understanding and experience of teamwork as well as provide insight into their metacognition. The analysis demonstrates that 73% of Year 3 and 93% of Year 4 students were capable of learning about teamwork through reflective writing. While the importance of frequent high quality communication was a common theme, evidence suggests that many students were unsophisticated in their use of communication software. The analysis also highlighted the depth of metacognition that underpins successful team function and the significant weaknesses in self-insight some students possess. These findings challenge assumptions regarding student capacity for leadership and the ability of some students to contribute to successful team outcomes. It is essential for the design of teamwork experiences to fully understand the competencies that underlie teamwork, the metacognitive processes required, and ensure that assessments are fair and measure individual academic performance.

  6. The Thin Line. Teamwork--Misnomer or Innovation in Work Organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargmann, Holger

    1999-01-01

    A longitudinal study of factors influencing success or failure of workplace innovations such as teamwork was carried out in two German firms. Success factors included having a team mentor; integrating training, supervision, and implementation of the innovation; and training trainers. (SK)

  7. The Thin Line. Teamwork--Misnomer or Innovation in Work Organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargmann, Holger

    1999-01-01

    A longitudinal study of factors influencing success or failure of workplace innovations such as teamwork was carried out in two German firms. Success factors included having a team mentor; integrating training, supervision, and implementation of the innovation; and training trainers. (SK)

  8. Supervisors and Teamwork. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 24. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) courses, discusses supervisors and teamwork. It is designed to teach about differences between supervision in different kinds of workplaces; getting along and ahead with mainstream supervisors; and…

  9. A Cross-Country Study on Research Students' Perceptions of the Role of Supervision and Cultural Knowledge in Thesis Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Suzanne Claire; Koo, Yew Lie; Saeidi, Mahnaz

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary findings from a research study in Australia, Malaysia and Iran on students' perceptions of the roles of supervisor and student in the production of their thesis and the contribution of their cultural knowledge to thesis development. The 360 respondents who answered an online survey were studying for their Master's…

  10. A Cross-Country Study on Research Students' Perceptions of the Role of Supervision and Cultural Knowledge in Thesis Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Suzanne Claire; Koo, Yew Lie; Saeidi, Mahnaz

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary findings from a research study in Australia, Malaysia and Iran on students' perceptions of the roles of supervisor and student in the production of their thesis and the contribution of their cultural knowledge to thesis development. The 360 respondents who answered an online survey were studying for their Master's…

  11. Monitoring teamwork: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, J S

    2017-01-01

    A narrative review was carried out to identify articles on monitoring of teamwork, with particular relevance to anaesthetists. The papers reviewed showed that team monitoring takes place both implicitly and explicitly in the anaesthetic environment. No single optimal model of teamwork monitoring for all situations was identified. Most of the studies identified were of a pre-intervention, post-intervention design, without randomisation or control group. Information shared during a formal briefing is more likely to be recalled, and provides a basis for a shared team mental model. A number of studies appeared to show that targeted teamwork training has a positive impact on both teamwork and patient safety. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  12. Teamwork in obstetric critical care

    OpenAIRE

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Segel, Sally

    2008-01-01

    Whether seeing a patient in the ambulatory clinic environment, performing a delivery or managing a critically ill patient, obstetric care is a team activity. Failures in teamwork and communication are among the leading causes of adverse obstetric events, accounting for over 70% of sentinel events according to the Joint Commission. Effective, efficient and safe care requires good teamwork. Although nurses, doctors and healthcare staff who work in critical care environments are extremely well t...

  13. Enhancing teamwork among allied health students: evaluation of an interprofessional workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Sylvia; Mickan, Sharon; Marinac, Julie; Woodyatt, Gail

    2005-01-01

    This report outlines the teamwork learning outcomes of an interprofessional workshop conducted with a cohort of 81 graduate-entry students of occupational therapy, physiotherapy, speech pathology, and audiology. This four-hour workshop was based around a case scenario of a child with developmental coordination disorder. This report describes and evaluates the development of knowledge and skills of teamwork that were facilitated through this workshop. Students completed questionnaires before and after the workshop about their knowledge of teamwork, requisites for working together, the utility of the workshop, and learning outcomes. The evaluation indicated that the workshop was successful from the students' perspectives in confirming the importance of teamwork and the processes of communication and collaborative goal setting. Students refined their own professional roles and developed an appreciation of the contribution of other professions and parents. This recognition of the comparative value of different professional contributions in providing holistic patient care is one of the starting points for education about interprofessional teamwork.

  14. Learning from Cross-Functional Teamwork. IES Report 356.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettley, P.; Hirsh, W.

    A study was conducted to determine what knowledge and learning is developed through teamwork in business. Ten cross-functional teams selected from six major United Kingdom employers were surveyed, with structured interviews completed with 72 team members and team leaders and a short questionnaire completed by 50 of the interviewees. The study…

  15. Developing a high-performance team training framework for internal medicine residents: the ABC'S of teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbo, Alexander R; Tess, Anjala V; Roy, Christopher; Weingart, Saul N

    2011-06-01

    Effective teamwork and communication can prevent error and mitigate harm. High-performance team training was developed in the aviation industry for flight crews and is being incorporated in health care settings, such as emergency departments, operating rooms, and labor and delivery suites. We translated and adapted high-performance teamwork and communication principles from other industries and other disciplines to an inpatient internal medicine environment. We selected key principles from aviation and anesthesia crew training programs in 2004 and organized them into the ABC'S of teamwork. These included appropriate Assertiveness, effective Briefings, Callback and verification, Situational awareness, and Shared mental models. Based on this content, we developed a training session for internal medicine residents and faculty, and evaluated learners' patient safety attitudes and knowledge before and after training with a written survey. More than 50 residents participated in the module. The percentage of correct answers on a question related to key teamwork principles increased from 35% before training to 67% after training (P = 0.03). Before training, 65% of the residents reported that they "would feel comfortable telling a senior clinician his/her plan was unsafe"; this increased to 94% after training (P = 0.005). After the training session, residents were able to provide examples from their clinical practice that emphasized all of the ABC'S of teamwork. Teamwork principles can be adapted from other disciplines and applied to internal medicine. After a single session, residents displayed greater knowledge of teamwork principles and reported changed attitudes toward key teamwork behaviors.

  16. [Prehospital teamwork life support service for traffic accident victims].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Waleska Antunes da Porciúncula; Lima, Maria Alice Dias da Silva

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize prehospital teamwork service for traffic accident victims, identifying the actors' activities, the teamwork and the relations with actors from other areas. This is a qualitative study, in which data collection took place by observing the events that occurred at a public service in the city of Porto Alegre, in addition to interviews with each professional involved in the service. The results showed that prehospital care is founded on teamwork and that the understanding among professionals should go beyond the historical hierarchic relation existing in health organizations. There is a need to value the broad field of knowledge, which is associated with the core of care activities that meet most trauma victim needs.

  17. Teamwork training with nursing and medical students: does the method matter? Results of an interinstitutional, interdisciplinary collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobgood, Cherri; Sherwood, Gwen; Frush, Karen; Hollar, David; Maynard, Laura; Foster, Beverly; Sawning, Susan; Woodyard, Donald; Durham, Carol; Wright, Melanie; Taekman, Jeffrey

    2010-12-01

    The authors conducted a randomised controlled trial of four pedagogical methods commonly used to deliver teamwork training and measured the effects of each method on the acquisition of student teamwork knowledge, skills, and attitudes. The authors recruited 203 senior nursing students and 235 fourth-year medical students (total N = 438) from two major universities for a 1-day interdisciplinary teamwork training course. All participants received a didactic lecture and then were randomly assigned to one of four educational methods didactic (control), audience response didactic, role play and human patient simulation. Student performance was assessed for teamwork attitudes, knowledge and skills using: (a) a 36-item teamwork attitudes instrument (CHIRP), (b) a 12-item teamwork knowledge test, (c) a 10-item standardised patient (SP) evaluation of student teamwork skills performance and (d) a 20-item modification of items from the Mayo High Performance Teamwork Scale (MHPTS). All four cohorts demonstrated an improvement in attitudes (F(1,370) = 48.7, p = 0.001) and knowledge (F(1,353) = 87.3, p = 0.001) pre- to post-test. No educational modality appeared superior for attitude (F(3,370) = 0.325, p = 0.808) or knowledge (F(3,353) = 0.382, p = 0.766) acquisition. No modality demonstrated a significant change in teamwork skills (F(3,18) = 2.12, p = 0.134). Each of the four modalities demonstrated significantly improved teamwork knowledge and attitudes, but no modality was demonstrated to be superior. Institutions should feel free to utilise educational modalities, which are best supported by their resources to deliver interdisciplinary teamwork training.

  18. Teamwork in the operating room arena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraagen, J.M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Why teamwork in high-risk medical environments Capturing team processes in the wild Two models of teamwork Case study in paediatric cardiac surgery: Social Network Analysis Conclusions and recommendations

  19. Teamwork in the operating room arena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraagen, J.M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Why teamwork in high-risk medical environments Capturing team processes in the wild Two models of teamwork Case study in paediatric cardiac surgery: Social Network Analysis Conclusions and recommendations

  20. Cyber situation awareness and teamwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy J. Cooke

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyber analysis is a complex task that requires the coordination of a large sociotechnical system of human analysts working together with technology. Adequate situation awareness of such a complex system requires more than aggregate situation awareness of individuals. Teamwork in the form of communication and information coordination is at the heart of team-level situation awareness. In this position paper, we report observations from previously conducted cognitive task analyses that suggest that teamwork is lacking in many cyber analysis organizations. Communication is ineffective, team roles are inconsistent across organizations, reward structures and selection may thwart collaboration, and the environment is conducive to individual work. Suggestions for improving teamwork in the cyber domain are offered.

  1. Do transactive memory and participative teamwork improve nurses' quality of work life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunault, Paul; Fouquereau, Evelyne; Colombat, Philippe; Gillet, Nicolas; El-Hage, Wissam; Camus, Vincent; Gaillard, Philippe

    2014-03-01

    Improvement in nurses' quality of work life (QWL) has become a major issue in health care organizations. We hypothesized that the level of transactive memory (defined as the way groups collectively encode, store, and retrieve knowledge) and participative teamwork (an organizational model of care based on vocational training, a specific service's care project, and regular interdisciplinary staffing) positively affect nurses' QWL. This cross-sectional study enrolled 84 ward-based psychiatric nurses. We assessed transactive memory, participative teamwork, perceived organizational justice, perceived organizational support, and QWL using psychometrically reliable and valid scales. Participative teamwork and transactive memory were positively associated with nurses' QWL. Perceived organizational support and organizational justice fully mediated the relationship between participative teamwork and QWL, but not between transactive memory and QWL. Improved transactive memory could directly improve nurses' QWL. Improved participative teamwork could improve nurses' QWL through better perceived organizational support and perceived organizational justice.

  2. Landscaping: teamwork and integration into inter-individual coordination as a learning situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayen, Patrick; Olry, Paul

    2012-01-01

    One of the dimensions of work that is not well known in training is teamwork and the work of the team leader. The team leader is the personne who provides local supervision. Teachers and trainers, as well as business employers aknowledge the place and importance of teamwork and the role of the team leader. However, most consider themselves, insufficiently prepared to offer training in line with these elements. This paper thus aims to present the results of an analysis of group work in the field of landscaping conducted from the perspective of team work and team leader learning and training.

  3. Practicality of intraoperative teamwork assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phitayakorn, Roy; Minehart, Rebecca; Pian-Smith, May C M; Hemingway, Maureen W; Milosh-Zinkus, Tanya; Oriol-Morway, Danika; Petrusa, Emil

    2014-07-01

    High-quality teamwork among operating room (OR) professionals is a key to efficient and safe practice. Quantification of teamwork facilitates feedback, assessment, and improvement. Several valid and reliable instruments are available for assessing separate OR disciplines and teams. We sought to determine the most feasible approach for routine documentation of teamwork in in-situ OR simulations. We compared rater agreement, hypothetical training costs, and feasibility ratings from five clinicians and two nonclinicians with instruments for assessment of separate OR groups and teams. Five teams of anesthesia or surgery residents and OR nurses (RN) or surgical technicians were videotaped in simulations of an epigastric hernia repair where the patient develops malignant hyperthermia. Two anesthesiologists, one OR clinical RN specialist, one educational psychologist, one simulation specialist, and one general surgeon discussed and then independently completed Anesthesiologists' Non-Technical Skills, Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons, Scrub Practitioners' List of Intraoperative Non-Technical Skills, and Observational Teamwork Assessment for Surgery forms to rate nontechnical performance of anesthesiologists, surgeons, nurses, technicians, and the whole team. Intraclass correlations of agreement ranged from 0.17-0.85. Clinicians' agreements were not different from nonclinicians'. Published rater training was 4 h for Anesthesiologists' Non-Technical Skills and Scrub Practitioners' List of Intraoperative Non-Technical Skills, 2.5 h for Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons, and 15.5 h for Observational Teamwork Assessment for Surgery. Estimated costs to train one rater to use all instruments ranged from $442 for a simulation specialist to $6006 for a general surgeon. Additional training is needed to achieve higher levels of agreement; however, costs may be prohibitive. The most cost-effective model for real-time OR teamwork assessment may be to use a simulation technician

  4. Teaching teamwork in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Susan; Magrane, Diane; Friedman, Erica

    2009-08-01

    Teamwork has become a major focus in healthcare. In part, this is the result of the Institute of Medicine report entitled To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System, which details the high rate of preventable medical errors, many of which are the result of dysfunctional or nonexistent teamwork. It has been proposed that a healthcare system that supports effective teamwork can improve the quality of patient care and reduce workload issues that cause burnout among healthcare professionals. Few clear guidelines exist to help guide the implementation of all these recommendations in healthcare settings. In general, training programs designed to improve team skills are a new concept for medicine, particularly for physicians who are trained largely to be self-sufficient and individually responsible for their actions. Outside of healthcare, research has shown that teams working together in high-risk and high-intensity work environments make fewer mistakes than individuals. This evidence originates from commercial aviation, the military, firefighting, and rapid-response police activities. Commercial aviation, an industry in which mistakes can result in unacceptable loss, has been at the forefront of risk reduction through teamwork training. The importance of teamwork has been recognized by some in the healthcare industry who have begun to develop their own specialty-driven programs. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current literature on teaching about teamwork in undergraduate medical education. We describe the science of teams, analyze the work in team training that has been done in other fields, and assess what work has been done in other fields about the importance of team training (ie, aviation, nonmedical education, and business). Additionally, it is vital to assess what work has already been done in medicine to advance the skills required for effective teamwork. Much of this work has been done in fields in which medical professionals deal with crisis

  5. Bad Attitudes: Why Design Students Dislike Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Richard; Abbasi, Neda

    2016-01-01

    Positive experiences of teamwork in design contexts significantly improve students' satisfaction with teaching and their attitudes towards future teamwork. Thus, an understanding of the factors leading to negative and positive team experiences can inform strategies to support effective teamwork. This paper examines design students' perceptions and…

  6. The Impact of Environmental Design on Teamwork and Communication in Healthcare Facilities: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaveis, Arsalan; Hamilton, D Kirk; Pati, Debajyoti

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review is to investigate the current knowledge about the impact of healthcare facility design on teamwork and communication by exploring the relevant literature. Teamwork and communication are behavioral factors that are impacted by physical design. However, the effects of environmental factors on teamwork and communication have not been investigated extensively in healthcare design literature. There are no published systematic reviews on the current topic. Searches were conducted in PubMed and Google Scholar databases in addition to targeted design journals including Health Environmental Research & Design, Environment and Behavior, Environmental Psychology, and Applied Ergonomics. Inclusion criteria were (a) full-text English language articles related to teamwork and communication and (b) involving any healthcare built environment and space design published in peer-reviewed journals between 1984 and 2017. Studies were extracted using defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. In the first phase, 26 of the 195 articles most relevant to teamwork and 19 studies of the 147 were identified and reviewed to understand the impact of communication in healthcare facilities. The literature regarding the impact of built environment on teamwork and communication were reviewed and explored in detail. Eighteen studies were selected and succinctly summarized as the final product of this review. Environmental design, which involves nurses, support staff, and physicians, is one of the critical factors that promotes the efficiency of teamwork and collaborative communication. Layout design, visibility, and accessibility levels are the most cited aspects of design which can affect the level of communication and teamwork in healthcare facilities.

  7. Enhance Teamwork Outcomes through Guanxi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Susan

    2011-01-01

    According to a recent article in the "Chronicle of Higher Education" (April 2011), team assignments are increasingly prevalent in business schools. Not only are they ubiquitous, they are critically important, as our university's strategic plan states, "collaboration and teamwork are the keys to creating successful leaders."…

  8. [Evaluating a blended-learning program on developing teamwork competence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, David; Arranz, Virginia; Valera-Rubio, Ana; Marín-Torres, Susana

    2011-08-01

    The knowledge, skills and abilities that are required to work optimally in teams are critical for many types of work. Organizations can provide access to these skills by means of training programs. Diverse studies show how traditional in-site training methodologies can improve teamwork knowledge, skills and abilities. Nevertheless, in-site methods can be complemented with on-line strategies that result in blended-learning programs. The aim of this work is to analyze, following Kirkpatrick's assessment levels, the effectiveness of a blended-learning program of teamwork training in an organizational context. Carried out with 102 professionals, the results show participants' satisfaction with the program, high level of learning (of both declarative and procedural knowledge), and a moderate level of transfer of learning to the job.

  9. The Teamwork Assessment Scale: A Novel Instrument to Assess Quality of Undergraduate Medical Students' Teamwork Using the Example of Simulation-based Ward-Rounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiesewetter, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Simulation-based teamwork trainings are considered a powerful training method to advance teamwork, which becomes more relevant in medical education. The measurement of teamwork is of high importance and several instruments have been developed for various medical domains to meet this need. To our knowledge, no theoretically-based and easy-to-use measurement instrument has been published nor developed specifically for simulation-based teamwork trainings of medical students. Internist ward-rounds function as an important example of teamwork in medicine.Purposes: The purpose of this study was to provide a validated, theoretically-based instrument that is easy-to-use. Furthermore, this study aimed to identify if and when rater scores relate to performance.Methods: Based on a theoretical framework for teamwork behaviour, items regarding four teamwork components ( were developed. In study one, three ward-round scenarios, simulated by 69 students, were videotaped and rated independently by four trained raters. The instrument was tested for the embedded psychometric properties and factorial structure. In study two, the instrument was tested for construct validity with an external criterion with a second set of 100 students and four raters. Results: In study one, the factorial structure matched the theoretical components but was unable to separate Information Exchange and Team Cooperation. The preliminary version showed adequate psychometric properties (Cronbach’s α=.75. In study two, the instrument showed physician rater scores were more reliable in measurement than those of student raters. Furthermore, a close correlation between the scale and clinical performance as an external criteria was shown (r=.64 and the sufficient psychometric properties were replicated (Cronbach’s α=.78.Conclusions: The validation allows for use of the simulated teamwork assessment scale in undergraduate medical ward-round trainings to reliably measure

  10. The Teamwork Assessment Scale: A Novel Instrument to Assess Quality of Undergraduate Medical Students' Teamwork Using the Example of Simulation-based Ward-Rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesewetter, Jan; Fischer, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Simulation-based teamwork trainings are considered a powerful training method to advance teamwork, which becomes more relevant in medical education. The measurement of teamwork is of high importance and several instruments have been developed for various medical domains to meet this need. To our knowledge, no theoretically-based and easy-to-use measurement instrument has been published nor developed specifically for simulation-based teamwork trainings of medical students. Internist ward-rounds function as an important example of teamwork in medicine. The purpose of this study was to provide a validated, theoretically-based instrument that is easy-to-use. Furthermore, this study aimed to identify if and when rater scores relate to performance. Based on a theoretical framework for teamwork behaviour, items regarding four teamwork components (Team Coordination, Team Cooperation, Information Exchange, Team Adjustment Behaviours) were developed. In study one, three ward-round scenarios, simulated by 69 students, were videotaped and rated independently by four trained raters. The instrument was tested for the embedded psychometric properties and factorial structure. In study two, the instrument was tested for construct validity with an external criterion with a second set of 100 students and four raters. In study one, the factorial structure matched the theoretical components but was unable to separate Information Exchange and Team Cooperation. The preliminary version showed adequate psychometric properties (Cronbach's α=.75). In study two, the instrument showed physician rater scores were more reliable in measurement than those of student raters. Furthermore, a close correlation between the scale and clinical performance as an external criteria was shown (r=.64) and the sufficient psychometric properties were replicated (Cronbach's α=.78). The validation allows for use of the simulated teamwork assessment scale in undergraduate medical ward-round trainings to reliably

  11. Supervisor's HEXACO personality traits and subordinate perceptions of abusive supervision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breevaart, Kimberley; Vries, de Reinout E.

    2017-01-01

    Abusive supervision is detrimental to both subordinates and organizations. Knowledge about individual differences in personality related to abusive supervision may improve personnel selection and potentially reduce the harmful effects of this type of leadership. Using the HEXACO personality framewor

  12. A dataset of human decision-making in teamwork management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Han; Shen, Zhiqi; Miao, Chunyan; Leung, Cyril; Chen, Yiqiang; Fauvel, Simon; Lin, Jun; Cui, Lizhen; Pan, Zhengxiang; Yang, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Today, most endeavours require teamwork by people with diverse skills and characteristics. In managing teamwork, decisions are often made under uncertainty and resource constraints. The strategies and the effectiveness of the strategies different people adopt to manage teamwork under different situations have not yet been fully explored, partially due to a lack of detailed large-scale data. In this paper, we describe a multi-faceted large-scale dataset to bridge this gap. It is derived from a game simulating complex project management processes. It presents the participants with different conditions in terms of team members' capabilities and task characteristics for them to exhibit their decision-making strategies. The dataset contains detailed data reflecting the decision situations, decision strategies, decision outcomes, and the emotional responses of 1,144 participants from diverse backgrounds. To our knowledge, this is the first dataset simultaneously covering these four facets of decision-making. With repeated measurements, the dataset may help establish baseline variability of decision-making in teamwork management, leading to more realistic decision theoretic models and more effective decision support approaches.

  13. Teamwork and organizational innovation: the moderating role of the HRM context

    OpenAIRE

    Fay, D; Shipton, H.; West, MA; Patterson, M.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating on the role of teams in shaping a variety of business outcomes, but our knowledge on the effect of teamwork on organizational innovation is still evolving. This study examines whether the extent to which two staff groups are organized in teams (production staff and management/administrative staff) affects organizational innovation and whether human resource management (HRM) systems, which can be of facilitating or con- straining nature, enhance the teamwork/innovation...

  14. Teaching and learning teamwork: competency requirements for healthcare managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Sandra G

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses an essential element of postgraduate health service management education - development of individual competencies to enhance teamwork among health service managers. A survey of qualified health service managers in the state of Victoria, Australia revealed a set of individual competencies that the managers felt made a positive contribution to the success of workplace teams. The identified competencies included skills in leadership and communication; clinical knowledge and knowledge of organizational goals and strategies; motives such as commitment to the organization, to quality, to working collaboratively and to a consumer focus; and respect for others as a trait. Building on acknowledged teaching and learning theories, a teamwork teaching and learning model was successfully introduced into the postgraduate health services management curriculum at La Trobe University in Melbourne.

  15. [The importance of teamwork in emergency medicine training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, B; Carron, P-N

    2007-08-15

    The study of dynamics in relation to performing in small groups has increased pedagogic knowledge about teamwork. The successful management of patients with life-threatening pathologies depends highly from a succession of teams with a specific mission as: the call centre 144, Paramedics, the ED, the Operating Theatre and the Intensive care. To enable each team to operate successfully, it is essential to coordinate their qualifications and synergism. This can be efficiently attained by simulating real situations and by following protocols dedicated to teamwork. Emergency Medicine, which is on the brink of acquiring its proper curriculum, must adopt this concept to integrate knowledge and know-how, and the art of being and doing. At this stage, the Emergency Physician will have the competence which will enable him to be a real "team leader".

  16. Teamwork in skull base surgery: An avenue for improvement in patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Nancy; Carrau, Ricardo L; Kelly, Daniel F; Prevedello, Daniel M; Kassam, Amin B

    2013-01-01

    During the past several decades, numerous centers have acquired significant expertise in the treatment of skull base pathologies. Favorable outcomes are not only due to meticulous surgical planning and execution, but they are also related to the collaborative efforts of multiple disciplines. We review the impact of teamwork on patient care, elaborate on the key processes for successful teamwork, and discuss its challenges. Pubmed and Medline databases were searched for publications from 1970 to 2012 using the following keywords: "teamwork", "multidisciplinary", "interdisciplinary", "surgery", "skull base", "neurosurgery", "tumor", and "outcome". Current literature testifies to the complexity of establishing and maintaining teamwork. To date, few reports on the impact of teamwork in the management of skull base pathologies have been published. This lack of literature is somewhat surprising given that most patients with skull base pathology receive care from multiple specialists. Common factors for success include a cohesive and well-integrated team structure with well-defined procedural organization. Although a multidisciplinary work force has clear advantages for improving today's quality of care and propelling research efforts for tomorrow's cure, teamwork is not intuitive and requires training, guidance, and executive support. Teamwork is recommended to improve quality over the full cycle of care and consequently patient outcomes. Increased recognition of the value of an integrated team approach for skull base pathologies will hopefully encourage centers, physicians, allied health caregivers, and scientists devoted to treating these patients and advancing the field of knowledge to invest the time, effort, and resources to optimize and organize their collective expertise.

  17. The Impact of Technology-Enhanced Student Teacher Supervision on Student Teacher Knowledge, Performance, and Self-Efficacy during the Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopcha, Theodore J.; Alger, Christianna

    2011-01-01

    The eSupervision instructional program is a series of five online modules housed in a content management system that support triad members (student teachers, cooperating teachers, university supervisors) during the field experience. The program was designed on a cognitive apprenticeship framework and uses a variety of technology to support both…

  18. Lifting strength in two-person teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tzu-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of lifting range, hand-to-toe distance, and lifting direction on single-person lifting strengths and two-person teamwork lifting strengths. Six healthy males and seven healthy females participated in this study. Two-person teamwork lifting strengths were examined in both strength-matched and strength-unmatched groups. Our results showed that lifting strength significantly decreased with increasing lifting range or hand-to-toe distance. However, lifting strengths were not affected by lifting direction. Teamwork lifting strength did not conform to the law of additivity for both strength-matched and strength-unmatched groups. In general, teamwork lifting strength was dictated by the weaker of the two members, implying that weaker members might be exposed to a higher potential danger in teamwork exertions. To avoid such overexertion in teamwork, members with significantly different strength ability should not be assigned to the same team.

  19. Perceptions of teamwork among code team members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahramus, Tara; Frewin, Sarah; Penoyer, Daleen Aragon; Sole, Mary Lou

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) teams, known as code teams, provide coordinated and evidenced-based interventions by various disciplines during a CPA. Teamwork behaviors are essential during CPA resuscitation and may have an impact on patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of teamwork during CPA events among code team members and to determine if differences in perception existed between disciplines within the code team. A prospective, descriptive, comparative design using the Code Teamwork Perception Tool online survey was used to assess the perception of teamwork during CPA events by medical residents, critical care nurses, and respiratory therapists. Sixty-six code team members completed the Code Teamwork Perception Tool. Mean teamwork scores were 2.63 on a 5-point scale (0-4). No significant differences were found in mean scores among disciplines. Significant differences among scores were found on 7 items related to code leadership, roles and responsibilities between disciplines, and in those who had participated on a code team for less than 2 years and certified in Advanced Cardiac Life Support for less than 4 years. Teamwork perception among members of the code team was average. Teamwork training for resuscitation with all disciplines on the code team may promote more effective teamwork during actual CPA events. Clinical nurse specialists can aid in resuscitation efforts by actively participating on committees, identifying opportunities for improvement, being content experts, leading the development of team training programs, and conducting research in areas lacking evidence.

  20. Improving teamwork abilities across cultural differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene

    2009-01-01

    The Belbin method has been applied at the education in Arctic Technology in Greenland as a way of improving the student’s teamwork abilities. The feedback from the students is that Belbin is a meaningful and relevant tool and they are very engaged during the teamwork exercises. They get...... a theoretical approach to teamwork and a language in which they can talk about their own and each others strengths and weaknesses. There are indications that it has positive effect on their subsequent teamwork....

  1. Nursing control over practice and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Jessica; Ceravolo, Diane J; Foltz-Ramos, Kelly; Wu, Yow-Wu

    2013-05-31

    Nurses' control over practice is essential to nursing care quality and fosters teamwork at the point of care delivery. This article describes a study to measure the impact of nurses' control over their practice from the perspective of teamwork. The purpose of this study was to measure the relationship of control over practice to the five following dimensions of teamwork: team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, mutual support, and communication. The study method was a secondary analysis of 456 surveys from registered nurses working in a five-hospital system. Study results demonstrated that the global measure of teamwork correlated with control over practice and nursing experience, but not with teamwork training. All five individual dimensions of teamwork were perceived as better for those who had a high level of control over practice compared to those who did not. In the discussion section, we consider situation monitoring since this dimension demonstrated an interaction effect between teamwork training and control over practice. Nursing control over practice demonstrates a positive relationship with teamwork and should be considered in future education, policy, and research efforts. Further study is needed to understand control over practice as a potential moderator or mediator of other predecessors of effective teamwork.

  2. The development of a rubric for peer assessment of individual teamwork skills in undergraduate midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Carolyn; Fahy, Kathleen; Parratt, Jenny

    2014-09-01

    Poor teamwork is cited as one of the major root causes of adverse events in healthcare. Bullying, resulting in illness for staff, is an expression of poor teamwork skills. Despite this knowledge, poor teamwork persists in healthcare and teamwork skills are rarely the focus of teaching and assessment in undergraduate health courses. To develop and implement an assessment tool for use in facilitating midwifery students' learning of teamwork skills. This paper describes how the TeamUP rubric tool was developed. A review of the literature found no research reports on how to teach and assess health students' teamwork skills in standing teams. The literature, however, gives guidance about how university educators should evaluate individual students using peer assessment. The developmental processes of the rubric were grounded in the theoretical literature and feminist collaborative conversations. The rubric incorporates five domains of teamwork skills: Fostering a Team Climate; Project Planning; Facilitating Teams; Managing Conflict and Quality Individual Contribution. The process and outcomes of student and academic content validation are described. The TeamUP rubric is useful for articulating, teaching and assessing teamwork skills for health professional students. The TeamUP rubric is a robust, theoretically grounded model that defines and details effective teamwork skills and related behaviours. If these skills are mastered, we predict that graduates will be more effective in teams. Our assumption is that graduates, empowered by having these skills, are more likely to manage conflict effectively and less likely to engage in bullying behaviours. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Train-the-trainer intervention to increase nursing teamwork and decrease missed nursing care in acute care patient units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Xie, Boqin; Ronis, David L

    2013-01-01

    Teamwork is essential for patient safety and results in less missed nursing care. The aim of this study was to test the impact of a train-the-trainer intervention on the level of satisfaction with nursing teamwork and the amount of missed nursing care. This study used a quasiexperimental design with repeated measures taken at pretest, posttest, and 2 months after completion of the intervention. The sample for this study was the nursing staff on three medical-surgical units in three separate acute care hospitals (one unit in each hospital). Three nurses from each unit underwent a training program and then taught the skills and knowledge they acquired to the staff members on their units in three-hour-long sessions. The training involved staff role-playing scenarios based on teamwork problems that occur regularly on inpatient units in acute care hospitals followed by debriefing, which focused on teamwork behaviors (e.g., leadership, team orientation, backup, performance monitoring) and missed nursing care. Four measures were used to test the efficacy of this intervention: The Nursing Teamwork Survey, the MISSCARE Survey, and questions about the knowledge of and satisfaction with teamwork. Return rates for the surveys ranged from 73% to 84%. Follow-up tests individually comparing pretest, posttest, and delayed posttest were conducted within the mixed model and used the Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Teamwork increased (F = 6.91, df = 259.01, p = .001) and missed care decreased (F = 3.59, df = 251.29, p = .03) over time. Nursing staff also reported a higher level of satisfaction with teamwork and an increase of teamwork knowledge after the intervention. The intervention tested in this study shows promise of being an effective and efficient approach to increase nursing teamwork and decrease missed nursing care.

  4. Applying Adapted Big Five Teamwork Theory to Agile Software Development

    OpenAIRE

    Strode, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Teamwork is a central tenet of agile software development and various teamwork theories partially explain teamwork in that context. Big Five teamwork theory is one of the most influential teamwork theories, but prior research shows that the team leadership concept in this theory it is not applicable to agile software development. This paper applies an adapted form of Big Five teamwork theory to cases of agile software development. Three independent cases were drawn from a single organisation....

  5. Two Hours of Teamwork Training Improves Teamwork in Simulated Cardiopulmonary Arrest Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahramus, Tara L; Penoyer, Daleen A; Waterval, Eugene M E; Sole, Mary L; Bowe, Eileen M

    2016-01-01

    Teamwork during cardiopulmonary arrest events is important for resuscitation. Teamwork improvement programs are usually lengthy. This study assessed the effectiveness of a 2-hour teamwork training program. A prospective, pretest/posttest, quasi-experimental design assessed the teamwork training program targeted to resident physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists. Participants took part in a simulated cardiac arrest. After the simulation, participants and trained observers assessed perceptions of teamwork using the Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM) tool (ratings of 0 [low] to 4 [high]). A debriefing and 45 minutes of teamwork education followed. Participants then took part in a second simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Afterward, participants and observers assessed teamwork. Seventy-three team members participated-resident physicians (25%), registered nurses (32%), and respiratory therapists (41%). The physicians had significantly less experience on code teams (P teamwork scores were 2.57 to 2.72. Participants' mean (SD) scores on the TEAM tool for the first and second simulations were 3.2 (0.5) and 3.7 (0.4), respectively (P teamwork educational intervention resulted in improved perceptions of teamwork behaviors. Participants reported interactions with other disciplines, teamwork behavior education, and debriefing sessions were beneficial for enhancing the program.

  6. AD HOC TEAMWORK BEHAVIORS FOR INFLUENCING A FLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Genter

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ad hoc teamwork refers to the challenge of designing agents that can influence the behavior of a team, without prior coordination with its teammates. This paper considers influencing a flock of simple robotic agents to adopt a desired behavior within the context of ad hoc teamwork. Specifically, we examine how the ad hoc agents should behave in order to orient a flock towards a target heading as quickly as possible when given knowledge of, but no direct control over, the behavior of the flock. We introduce three algorithms which the ad hoc agents can use to influence the flock, and we examine the relative importance of coordinating the ad hoc agents versus planning farther ahead when given fixed computational resources. We present detailed experimental results for each of these algorithms, concluding that in this setting, inter-agent coordination and deeper lookahead planning are no more beneficial than short-term lookahead planning.

  7. Emotionality and teamwork in palliative nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian

    in spring 2007. Three interesting observations were done: 1) Teamwork in the hospice collides with the emotional character of the work 2) In spite of a very loose team organisation the team members find pivotal support in the teams 3) Materials such as the rota has far-reaching implications for the way...... teamwork is done....

  8. Teamwork Skills Assessment for Cooperative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Paris S.; Strom, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Teamwork skills are required at work, but teacher efforts in many countries to track achievement within this context have been hindered by lack of assessment tools and input from students. The Teamwork Skills Inventory relies on peer and self-evaluation to establish accountability, identify competencies, and detect learning needs. Twenty-five…

  9. Teamwork, Soft Skills, and Research Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, Anaïs; Tozer, Wade C; Westoby, Mark

    2017-02-01

    We provide a list of soft skills that are important for collaboration and teamwork, based on our own experience and from an opinion survey of team leaders. Each skill can be learned to some extent. We also outline workable short courses for graduate schools to strengthen teamwork and collaboration skills among research students. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Teamwork Skills Assessment for Cooperative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Paris S.; Strom, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Teamwork skills are required at work, but teacher efforts in many countries to track achievement within this context have been hindered by lack of assessment tools and input from students. The Teamwork Skills Inventory relies on peer and self-evaluation to establish accountability, identify competencies, and detect learning needs. Twenty-five…

  11. Incorporating Virtual Teamwork Training into MIS Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Sager, James; Corbitt, Gail; Gardiner, Stanley C.

    2008-01-01

    Due to increasing industry demand for personnel who work effectively in virtual/distributed teams, MIS students should undergo training to improve their awareness of and competence in virtual teamwork. This paper proposes a model for virtual teamwork training and describes the implementation of the model in a class where students were located in…

  12. Teamwork: Effectively Teaching an Employability Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebe, Linda; Roepen, Dean; Santarelli, Bruno; Marchioro, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a case study on improvements to professional teaching practice within an undergraduate university business programme to more effectively teach an employability skill and enhance the student experience of teamwork. Design/methodology/approach: A three-phase approach to teaching teamwork was…

  13. Breaking down silos and building teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, T

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain how successful companies break down old functional silos and build teamwork. It describes techniques that foster teamwork across functional departments within a company as well as methods that can be used to cut across company lines and break down barriers between organizations.

  14. Effect of diversified and teamwork health education mode on disease-related knowledge of patients with coronary artery disease%多元化、团队式健康教育模式对冠心病患者疾病认知的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁艳娇; 林梅; 和霞

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨多元化、多学科团队合作式健康教育模式对冠心病患者疾病相关知识的影响.方法 选取2011年10月至2012年11月在天津医科大学总医院心内科住院的147例确诊为冠心病的患者,随机分为对照组70例和干预组77例,对照组接受常规健康宣教;干预组给予多元化、多学科团队合作式健康教育,应用自行设计的调查问卷评价干预效果.结果 干预组出院时知识水平较对照组显著提高,干预组知识水平升高幅度高于对照组,且干预组在饮食、预防、临床表现、治疗、运动各维度的知识得分均高于对照组,差异有统计学意义.结论 多元化、多学科团队合作式健康教育模式能明显提高冠心病患者的知识水平,督促患者主动采取有益于健康的行为,使其身心处于最佳状态.%Objective To explore the effect of diversified and teamwork health education mode on disease-related knowledge of coronary artery disease patients.Methods 147 cases of patients with coronary artery disease hospitalized in the general hospital of Tianjin medical university were divided into the treatment group which was given diversified health education of teamwork mode and the control group which was given traditional health education.The self-designed questionnaire was used to evaluate the effect of teamwork health education mode.Results Level of knowledge in the treatment group was significantly improved when compared with the control group,the increase amplitude of knowledge level in the treatment group was higher than the control group,and the scores of the treatment group were higher than the control group in the dimensions of diet,prevention,clinical manifestation,treatment,activity,the differences were statistically significant.Conclusions With diversified,multidisciplinary,and teamwork health education mode the patients' level of knowledge was significantly improved,the correct and positive awareness about

  15. Challenges for Better thesis supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadirian, Laleh; Sayarifard, Azadeh; Majdzadeh, Reza; Rajabi, Fatemeh; Yunesian, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Conduction of thesis by the students is one of their major academic activities. Thesis quality and acquired experiences are highly dependent on the supervision. Our study is aimed at identifing the challenges in thesis supervision from both students and faculty members point of view. This study was conducted using individual in-depth interviews and Focus Group Discussions (FGD). The participants were 43 students and faculty members selected by purposive sampling. It was carried out in Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Data analysis was done concurrently with data gathering using content analysis method. Our data analysis resulted in 162 codes, 17 subcategories and 4 major categories, "supervisory knowledge and skills", "atmosphere", "bylaws and regulations relating to supervision" and "monitoring and evaluation". This study showed that more attention and planning in needed for modifying related rules and regulations, qualitative and quantitative improvement in mentorship training, research atmosphere improvement and effective monitoring and evaluation in supervisory area.

  16. Os saberes docentes na formação inicial do professor de física: elaborando sentidos para o estágio supervisionado Teacher knowledge in initial teacher education: elaborating meanings for supervised teaching practice activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Pereira Baccon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho apresentamos os resultados de uma investigação a respeito da construção dos saberes docentes, durante a realização do estágio supervisionado da licenciatura de Física. Para o levantamento das informações desta pesquisa, foram entrevistados dois grupos de estagiários e analisados seus relatórios de regência. Durante as entrevistas, semiestruturadas, o estagiário era convidado a falar sobre a sua experiência com o estágio supervisionado. Buscamos perceber as representações que cada estagiário elaborou durante o estágio, em relação aos alunos, ao professor, à escola, aos outros estagiários de seu grupo e ao próprio estágio. Com base nessas representações, procuramos verificar quais saberes os estagiários conseguiram construir durante esse período e caracterizar a singularidade de sua ação docente.In this work we present the results of research about the construction of the teacher´s knowledge, during the period of supervised teaching practice for students in a teacher education program in Physics. For the data collection, two groups of students had been interviewed; we also analyzed their reports of teaching practice. During the interviews, the students were invited to speak about their experiences on the supervised period of training. We were looking for the representations that each trainee elaborated during the period of training, related to the pupils, the teachers, the school and the other students of their groups. From these representations it was possible to verify the knowledge constructed by the trainees during the supervised teaching practice and to characterize the singularity of their practice teaching.

  17. Factors Influencing Students’ Perceptions of Online Teamwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Falls

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of online teaching in higher education demands a change in the types of pedagogies used in those courses. An example of one of these important pedagogies includes online teamwork. Teamwork in this context is one in which the majority of the individual’s grade is dependent on the positive or negative group experiences. This study utilized the theoretical framework of social motivation and cohesion to identify the factors shaping students’ perceptions of teamwork in online college courses. In these courses, the pedagogical approach known as the Five Pillars of effective collaborative work was applied. An Online Teamwork Learning Survey was developed based on these principles and completed by 62 undergraduate students enrolled in semester-long online courses required in their early childhood education program of study. Using a comparison between pre–postsurveys and regression analysis, the results showed that although the students’ perceptions of teamwork did not significantly change, the factors influencing their responses during the posttest doubled in number. The results showed that through carefully designed virtual teamwork activities, students learned that essential team characteristics such as promotive interaction, individual accountability, and positive interdependence are an integral part of effective collaboration and strong predictors of teamwork perception.

  18. Teamwork culture and patient satisfaction in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meterko, Mark; Mohr, David C; Young, Gary J

    2004-05-01

    A growing line of research indicates a positive relationship between a healthcare organization's culture and various performance measures. In these studies, a key cultural characteristic is the emphasis placed on teamwork. None of the studies, however, have examined teamwork culture relative to patient satisfaction, which is now 1 of the most widely used performance measures for healthcare organizations. This study investigated the relationship between teamwork culture of hospitals and patient reports of their satisfaction with the care they received. The study setting was the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), Department of Veterans Affairs. The study sample consisted of 125 VHA hospitals for which independent and valid sources of data for culture and patient satisfaction were obtained. Each hospital's culture was assessed relative to 4 dimensions: teamwork, entrepreneurial, bureaucratic, and rational. Patient satisfaction data were available for both inpatient and outpatient settings. Results from multivariate regression analyses indicated a significant and positive relation between teamwork culture and patient satisfaction for inpatient care, and a significant and negative relation between bureaucratic culture and patient satisfaction for inpatient care. Additional analyses revealed an almost 1 standard deviation difference in patient satisfaction scores between hospitals in the top third and bottom third of the distribution for the teamwork culture measure. Study results suggest that hospitals and possibly other healthcare organizations should strive to develop a culture emphasizing teamwork and deemphasizing those aspects of bureaucracy that are not essential to assuring efficiency and quality care.

  19. Leveraging teamwork by Google+ in a lifelong learning perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Leone

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The current affordances of ubiquitous global connections, of a large number of open resources, and of social and professional networks may boost innovation in open-minded organisations through their personnel’s empowerment. Lifelong and ubiquitous learning, cloud computing and smart working frameworks are the pillars of the change that is replacing the traditional work model and transforming the way crowds of people communicate, collaborate, teamwork, produce value and growth for the entities of which they are part. All this directly involves the smart city concept. The “cloudworker” virtually works, learns and socially participates effectively from anywhere anytime, and comfortably interacts in a knowledge society built on networked ecologies. Cloud teamwork applications, such as Google+ can be, enable teams to be more productive and organisations to devote more time to their core mission. Social networking and collaboration technologies draw renewed attention on the evidence that organisations are social entities above all; as such, they can turn into whole systems of leadership and learning, that is high-performance work systems. This paper aims to evaluate the effectiveness of Google+ as a leveraging teamwork tool in learning organisations. Results show that technology is not only a means of social exchange, but it turns into the joint design of learning and organisational strategies, and into the growth of learning communities.

  20. Supervision as Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alison; Green, Bill

    2009-01-01

    This article takes up the question of the language within which discussion of research degree supervision is couched and framed, and the consequences of such framings for supervision as a field of pedagogical practice. It examines the proliferation and intensity of metaphor, allegory and allusion in the language of candidature and supervision,…

  1. A Supervision of Solidarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Vikki

    2010-01-01

    This article illustrates an approach to therapeutic supervision informed by a philosophy of solidarity and social justice activism. Called a "Supervision of Solidarity", this approach addresses the particular challenges in the supervision of therapists who work alongside clients who are subjected to social injustice and extreme marginalization. It…

  2. A systematic review of teamwork in the intensive care unit: what do we know about teamwork, team tasks, and improvement strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Aaron S; Pronovost, Peter J; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro Alejandro; Wyskiel, Rhonda; Marsteller, Jill A; Thompson, David A; Rosen, Michael A

    2014-12-01

    Teamwork is essential for ensuring the quality and safety of health care delivery in the intensive care unit (ICU). This article addresses what we know about teamwork, team tasks, and team improvement strategies in the ICU to identify the strengths and limitations of the existing knowledge base to guide future research. A keyword search of the PubMed database was conducted in February 2013. Keyword combinations focused on 3 areas: (1) teamwork, (2) the ICU, and (3) training/quality improvement interventions. All studies that investigated teamwork, team tasks, or team interventions within the ICU (ie, intradepartment) were selected for inclusion. Teamwork has been investigated across an array of research contexts and task types. The terminology used to describe team factors varied considerably across studies. The most common team tasks involved strategy and goal formulation. Team training and structured protocols were the most widely implemented quality improvement strategies. Team research is burgeoning in the ICU, yet low-hanging fruit remains that can further advance the science of teams in the ICU if addressed. Constructs must be defined, and theoretical frameworks should be referenced. The functional characteristics of tasks should also be reported to help determine the extent to which study results might generalize to other contexts of work. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Relationship between Teamwork and Organizational Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musab Işık

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. In the implementation section the data from the survey of 250 workers is employed in call centers in Erzurum by using relevant statistical methods. Consequently, it is found that there is a positive and significant relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. Thus, the hypothesis of the study is supported as it was expected. Besides, it is found that there are positive and significant relationships between communication, openness to innovation, participation-trust in teamwork and organizational trust, trust in management, trust in co-workers, and trust in workplace.

  4. Effective Teamwork Practical Lessons from Organizational Research

    CERN Document Server

    West, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Updated to reflect the latest research evidence, the third edition of Effective Teamwork provides business managers with the necessary guidance and tools to build and maintain effective teamwork strategies. A new edition of a bestselling book on teamwork from an acknowledged leader in the fieldOffers a unique integration of rigorous research with practical guidance to develop effective leadership teamsFeatures new chapters on virtual teams and top management teams, plus contemporary themes of ethics and valuesUtilizes research based on positive psychology techniques

  5. Good supervision and PBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    This field study was conducted at the Faculty of Social Sciences at Aalborg University with the intention to investigate how students reflect on their experiences with supervision in a PBL environment. The overall aim of this study was to inform about the continued work in strengthening supervision...... at this faculty. This particular study invited Master level students to discuss: • How a typical supervision process proceeds • How they experienced and what they expected of PBL in the supervision process • What makes a good supervision process...

  6. Management Commitment to Safety, Teamwork, and Hospital Worker Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    McGonagle, Alyssa K.; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Hamblin, Lydia; Luborsky, Mark; Upfal, Mark; Arnetz, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Although many studies link teamwork in health care settings to patient safety, evidence linking teamwork to hospital worker safety is lacking. This study addresses this gap by providing evidence linking teamwork perceptions in hospital workers to worker injuries, and further, finds a linkage between manager commitment to safety and teamwork. Organizational records of worker injuries and survey responses regarding management commitment to safety and teamwork from 446 hospital workers within 42...

  7. Management Commitment to Safety, Teamwork, and Hospital Worker Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    McGonagle, Alyssa K.; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Hamblin, Lydia; Luborsky, Mark; Upfal, Mark; Arnetz, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Although many studies link teamwork in health care settings to patient safety, evidence linking teamwork to hospital worker safety is lacking. This study addresses this gap by providing evidence linking teamwork perceptions in hospital workers to worker injuries, and further, finds a linkage between manager commitment to safety and teamwork. Organizational records of worker injuries and survey responses regarding management commitment to safety and teamwork from 446 hospital workers within 42...

  8. Profil Teamwork Skill sebagai Gambaran Kemampuan Kompetitif Mahasiswa

    OpenAIRE

    Ichda Chayati; Sutriyati Purwanti; Mutiara Nugraheni

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the study were: 1) to identify the profile of the Hospitality Engineering Education students’ teamwork skills, 2) to identify the profile of the Hospitality Engineering Students’ teamwork skills, 3) to describe the general overview of the students’ teamwork skills, 4) to identify the group of Bachelor program with the highest and the lowest teamwork skills, 5) to identify the group of the Associate program with the highest and the lowest teamwork skills. This study was a des...

  9. Operating room teamwork among physicians and nurses: teamwork in the eye of the beholder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makary, Martin A; Sexton, J Bryan; Freischlag, Julie A; Holzmueller, Christine G; Millman, E Anne; Rowen, Lisa; Pronovost, Peter J

    2006-05-01

    Teamwork is an important component of patient safety. In fact, communication errors are the most common cause of sentinel events and wrong-site operations in the US. Although efforts to improve patient safety through improving teamwork are growing, there is no validated tool to scientifically measure teamwork in the surgical setting. Operating room personnel in 60 hospitals were surveyed using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire. Surgeons, anesthesiologists, certified registered nurse anesthetists, and operating room nurses rated their own peers and each other using a 5-point Likert scale (1 = very low, 5 = very high). Overall response rate was 77.1% (2,135 of 2,769). Ratings of teamwork differed substantially by operating room caregiver type, with the greatest differences in ratings shown by physicians: surgeons (F[4, 2058] = 41.73, p teamwork exist in the operating room, with physicians rating the teamwork of others as good, but at the same time, nurses perceive teamwork as mediocre. Given the importance of communication and collaboration in patient safety, health care organizations should measure teamwork using a scientifically valid method. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire can be used to measure teamwork, identify disconnects between or within disciplines, and evaluate interventions aimed at improving patient safety.

  10. Teamwork Produces Results That Attract National Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrle, Michele

    1980-01-01

    Recounts the way a high school newspaper staff used teamwork in investigating child labor law violations, writing news stories about the situation, and participating in airings of the issue for local and national television programs. (GT)

  11. The Relationship between Teamwork and Organizational Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Musab Işık; Kürşad Timuroğlu; Yussuf Aliyev

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. In the implementation section the data from the survey of 250 workers is employed in call centers in Erzurum by using relevant statistical methods. Consequently, it is found that there is a positive and significant relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. Thus, the hypothesis of the study is supported as it was expected. Besides, it is found that there are positive and significan...

  12. Human behavior representation of military teamwork

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Michael W.

    2006-01-01

    This work presents a conceptual structure for the behaviors of artificial intelligence agents, with emphasis on creating teamwork through individual behaviors. The goal is to set up a framework which enables teams of simulation agents to behave more realistically. Better team behavior can lend a higher fidelity of human behavior representation in a simulation, as well as provide opportunities to experiment with the factors that create teamwork. The framework divides agent behaviors into three...

  13. Training for teamwork through in situ simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Asta; Poehlman, Jon; Bollenbacher, John; Riggan, Scott; Davis, Stan; Miller, Kristi; Ivester, Thomas; Kahwati, Leila

    2015-01-01

    In situ simulations allow healthcare teams to practice teamwork and communication as well as clinical management skills in a team's usual work setting with typically available resources and equipment. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate how to plan and conduct in situ simulation training sessions, with particular emphasis on how such training can be used to improve communication and teamwork. The video features an in situ simulation conducted at a labour and delivery unit in response to postpartum hemorrhage. PMID:26294962

  14. Factors Influencing Students’ Perceptions of Online Teamwork

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Falls; Victor Bahhouth; Chiuchu Melody Chuang; Jocelyne Bahhouth

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of online teaching in higher education demands a change in the types of pedagogies used in those courses. An example of one of these important pedagogies includes online teamwork. Teamwork in this context is one in which the majority of the individual’s grade is dependent on the positive or negative group experiences. This study utilized the theoretical framework of social motivation and cohesion to ident...

  15. The Relationship between Teamwork and Organizational Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Musab Işık; Kürşad Timuroğlu; Yussuf Aliyev

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. In the implementation section the data from the survey of 250 workers is employed in call centers in Erzurum by using relevant statistical methods. Consequently, it is found that there is a positive and significant relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. Thus, the hypothesis of the study is supported as it was expected. Besides, it is found that there are positive and significan...

  16. Supervision of tunnelling constructions and software used for their evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravanas, Aristotelis; Hilar, Matous

    2017-09-01

    Supervision is a common instrument for controlling constructions of tunnels. In order to suit relevant project’s purposes a supervision procedure is modified by local conditions, habits, codes and ways of allocating of a particular tunnelling project. The duties of tunnel supervision are specified in an agreement with the client and they can include a wide range of activities. On large scale tunnelling projects the supervision tasks are performed by a high number of people of different professions. Teamwork, smooth communication and coordination are required in order to successfully fulfil supervision tasks. The efficiency and quality of tunnel supervision work are enhanced when specialized software applications are used. Such applications should allow on-line data management and the prompt evaluation, reporting and sharing of relevant construction information and other aspects. The client is provided with an as-built database that contains all the relevant information related to a construction process, which is a valuable tool for the claim management as well as for the evaluation of structure defects that can occur in the future. As a result, the level of risks related to tunnel constructions is decreased.

  17. Post-graduate supervision practices in South African universities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post-graduate supervision practices in South African universities in the era of ... in subject knowledge or genre knowledge in relation to postgraduate thesis ... and research and explores the complex nature of supervisory relationships which is ...

  18. Transformational Teamwork: Exploring the Impact of Nursing Teamwork on Nurse-Sensitive Quality Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, Debbie J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between nursing teamwork and NDNQI outcomes including pressure ulcers, falls, and catheter-associated urinary tract infections. Correlational analysis resulted in statistically significant relationships. Improving teamwork in medical-surgical acute care units can transform care and impact the occurrence of preventable adverse outcomes.

  19. Assessing Teamwork in Undergraduate Education: A Measurement Tool to Evaluate Individual Teamwork Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Emily; Simper, Natalie; Leger, Andrew; Stephenson, Jenn

    2017-01-01

    Effective teamwork skills are essential for success in an increasingly team-based workplace. However, research suggests that there is often confusion concerning how teamwork is measured and assessed, making it difficult to develop these skills in undergraduate curricula. The goal of the present study was to develop a sustainable tool for assessing…

  20. Teamwork Satisfaction: Exploring the Multilevel Interaction of Teamwork Interest and Group Extraversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Kimberly A.; Kottke, Janet L.

    2013-01-01

    Multilevel modeling is used to examine the impact of teamwork interest and group extraversion on group satisfaction. Participants included 206 undergraduates in 65 groups who were surveyed at the beginning and end of a requisite term-length group project for an upper-division university course. We hypothesized that teamwork interest and both…

  1. Teamwork Satisfaction: Exploring the Multilevel Interaction of Teamwork Interest and Group Extraversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Kimberly A.; Kottke, Janet L.

    2013-01-01

    Multilevel modeling is used to examine the impact of teamwork interest and group extraversion on group satisfaction. Participants included 206 undergraduates in 65 groups who were surveyed at the beginning and end of a requisite term-length group project for an upper-division university course. We hypothesized that teamwork interest and both…

  2. Assessing Teamwork in Undergraduate Education: A Measurement Tool to Evaluate Individual Teamwork Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Emily; Simper, Natalie; Leger, Andrew; Stephenson, Jenn

    2017-01-01

    Effective teamwork skills are essential for success in an increasingly team-based workplace. However, research suggests that there is often confusion concerning how teamwork is measured and assessed, making it difficult to develop these skills in undergraduate curricula. The goal of the present study was to develop a sustainable tool for assessing…

  3. Learning in Introductory E-Commerce: A Project-Based Teamwork Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, Eric W. T.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an e-commerce teamwork-based project designed and implemented at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) for undergraduate business and management students. The teaching objectives of this e-commerce project are to develop the students' knowledge and skills, such as in the use of e-commerce site building tools,…

  4. Learning in Introductory E-Commerce: A Project-Based Teamwork Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, Eric W. T.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an e-commerce teamwork-based project designed and implemented at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) for undergraduate business and management students. The teaching objectives of this e-commerce project are to develop the students' knowledge and skills, such as in the use of e-commerce site building tools,…

  5. Facilitating Better Teamwork: Analyzing the Challenges and Strategies of Classroom-Based Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, Terri A.

    2008-01-01

    To help students develop teamwork skills, teachers should be aware of the strategies students already employ to assert authority and manage conflict. Researchers studying engineering students have identified two such approaches: transfer-of-knowledge sequences, in which students emulate teacher and pupil roles; and collaborative sequences, in…

  6. Does trust promote more teamwork? Modeling online game players' teamwork using team experience as a moderator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun-Chia; Chang, Jen-Wei

    2013-11-01

    The need for teamwork has grown significantly in today's organizations. Especially for online game communities, teamwork is an important means of online game players' engagement. This study aims to investigate the impacts of trust on players' teamwork with affective commitment and normative commitment as mediators. Furthermore, this research includes team experience as a moderator to compare the difference between different player groups. A model was proposed and tested on 296 online game players' data using structural equation modeling. Findings revealed that team experience moderated the relationship between trust and teamwork. The results indicated that trust promotes more teamwork only for players with high experience through affective commitment than those who with low experience. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  7. Striving for wholeness and transdisciplinary teamwork at a pacific basin's pain and palliative care department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashita-Tan, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    Collaborations in palliative care have helped to create a framework and identify preferred practices so the field of palliative care can grow. Teamwork designed in a transdisciplinary style is desired and provides whole-person, sensitive, and comprehensive care. In applying the basic key concepts and evidenced-based knowledge of palliative care, this article details one palliative care department's effort to create change, enhance the delivery of care, and build their palliative care practice. Creating collaborations and building partnerships were fundamental outcomes to improve the palliative care practice, increase transdisciplinary teamwork activities, and enhance the delivery of care in this organization.

  8. A web-based teamwork skills training program for emergency medical teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entin, Eleen B; Sidman, Jason; Mizrahi, Gilbert; Stewart, Barry; Lai, Fuji; Neal, Lisa; Mackenzie, Colin; Xiao, Yan

    2007-01-01

    T-TRANE is a scenario-based teamwork skills training program for emergency medical teams that uses web-enabled collaborative technologies. The program assumes students are skilled in clinical techniques but have minimal formal knowledge of teamwork. By providing training that focuses on teamwork skills in emergency medical settings, the program is designed to rapidly increase team proficiency. The program is comprised of information about and examples of teamwork skills, and scenario-based training exercises that provide practice in strategies to promote teamwork such as conducting pre-planning and debriefing sessions. T-TRANE is comprised of four modules, with both live (synchronous) interactive sessions and self-paced (asynchronous) sessions that students can complete at their convenience within scheduled intervals. The program includes an Instructor's Guide that provides the designated instructor the necessary support to conduct the training. The approach used in this program can be adapted to any domain in which distributed teams will benefit from pre-deployment training.

  9. Effective teamwork in healthcare: research and reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Dave; Dault, Mylène; Priest, Alicia

    2007-01-01

    Issues affecting health workplaces range from serious concerns that could affect the immediate physical safety of workers to those that would improve productivity and efficiency, or make an organization a preferred employer. Employers and workers might consider effective teamwork an asset, but for patients it is a prerequisite. This paper reviews the evidence for effective teamwork, primarily that gathered by a research team funded by the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF). We also review the expert opinion provided by a group of 25 researchers and decision makers convened by CHSRF in late 2005 at a forum for discussion about issues related to effective teamwork. Included in the retreat were representatives from professional organizations and occupations as well as areas such as legal liability. Taken together, the research and expert opinion provide a comprehensive overview of the benefits of effective teamwork and the conditions needed for its implementation. In addition, we review policy and management perspectives on the most significant challenges to the implementation of effective teamwork in the Canadian context, and potential opportunities to overcome these obstacles.

  10. Teamwork improvement in emergency trauma departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademian, Zahra; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Tabei, Seyed Ziaadin; Bolandparvaz, Shahram; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Abbasi, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Interprofessional teamwork is considered as the key to improve the quality of patient management in critical settings such as trauma emergency departments, but it is not fully conceptualized in these areas to guide practice. The aim of this article is to explore interprofessional teamwork and its improvement strategies in trauma emergency departments. Materials and Methods: Participants of this qualitative study consisted of 11 nurses and 6 supervisors recruited from the emergency departments of a newly established trauma center using purposive sampling. Data were generated using two focus group and six in-depth individual interviews, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: Interprofessional teamwork attributes and improvement strategies were emerged in three main themes related to team, context, and goal. These were categorized as the effective presence of team members, role definition in team framework, managerial and physical context, effective patient management, and overcoming competing goals Conclusions: Interprofessional teamwork in trauma emergency departments is explained as interdependence of team, context, and goal; so, it may be improved by strengthening these themes. The findings also provide a basis to evaluate, teach, and do research on teamwork. PMID:24403932

  11. On psychoanalytic supervision as signature pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, C Edward

    2014-04-01

    What is signature pedagogy in psychoanalytic education? This paper examines that question, considering why psychoanalytic supervision best deserves that designation. In focusing on supervision as signature pedagogy, I accentuate its role in building psychoanalytic habits of mind, habits of hand, and habits of heart, and transforming theory and self-knowledge into practical product. Other facets of supervision as signature pedagogy addressed in this paper include its features of engagement, uncertainty, formation, and pervasiveness, as well as levels of surface, deep, and implicit structure. Epistemological, ontological, and axiological in nature, psychoanalytic supervision engages trainees in learning to do, think, and value what psychoanalytic practitioners in the field do, think, and value: It is, most fundamentally, professional preparation for competent, "good work." In this paper, effort is made to shine a light on and celebrate the pivotal role of supervision in "making" or developing budding psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic psychotherapists. Now over a century old, psychoanalytic supervision remains unparalleled in (1) connecting and integrating conceptualization and practice, (2) transforming psychoanalytic theory and self-knowledge into an informed analyzing instrument, and (3) teaching, transmitting, and perpetuating the traditions, practice, and culture of psychoanalytic treatment.

  12. Projected estimators for robust semi-supervised classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krijthe, Jesse H.; Loog, Marco

    2017-01-01

    For semi-supervised techniques to be applied safely in practice we at least want methods to outperform their supervised counterparts. We study this question for classification using the well-known quadratic surrogate loss function. Unlike other approaches to semi-supervised learning, the procedure...... proposed in this work does not rely on assumptions that are not intrinsic to the classifier at hand. Using a projection of the supervised estimate onto a set of constraints imposed by the unlabeled data, we find we can safely improve over the supervised solution in terms of this quadratic loss. More...... specifically, we prove that, measured on the labeled and unlabeled training data, this semi-supervised procedure never gives a lower quadratic loss than the supervised alternative. To our knowledge this is the first approach that offers such strong, albeit conservative, guarantees for improvement over...

  13. Networks of Professional Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan, Jean; Ryba, Ken

    2013-01-01

    An ecological analysis of the supervisory activity of 31 New Zealand school psychologists examined simultaneously the theories of school psychology, supervision practices, and the contextual qualities that mediated participants' supervisory actions. The findings indicated that the school psychologists worked to achieve the supervision goals of…

  14. Forskellighed i supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Birgitte; Beck, Emma

    2009-01-01

    Indtryk og tendenser fra den anden danske konference om supervision, som blev holdt på Københavns Universitet i oktober 2008......Indtryk og tendenser fra den anden danske konference om supervision, som blev holdt på Københavns Universitet i oktober 2008...

  15. Experiments in Virtual Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rob

    This paper examines the use of First Class conferencing software to create a virtual culture among research students and as a vehicle for supervision and advising. Topics discussed include: computer-mediated communication and research; entry to cyberculture, i.e., research students' induction into the research community; supervision and the…

  16. Improving Nurse-Physician Teamwork: A Multidisciplinary Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeton, Abigail; Bisbey, Cindy; O'Neill, Carrie; Allen, Danielle; O'Hara, Sara; Weinhold, Megan; Miller, Jenna; Bursiek, April; Grubbs, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Nurses surveyed on an inpatient gynecology surgical unit suggested communication and teamwork between nurses and physicians could be improved. To enhance teamwork, a multidisciplinary collaboration committee of nurses and physicians was created.

  17. Management Commitment to Safety, Teamwork, and Hospital Worker Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonagle, Alyssa K; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Hamblin, Lydia; Luborsky, Mark; Upfal, Mark; Arnetz, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Although many studies link teamwork in health care settings to patient safety, evidence linking teamwork to hospital worker safety is lacking. This study addresses this gap by providing evidence linking teamwork perceptions in hospital workers to worker injuries, and further, finds a linkage between manager commitment to safety and teamwork. Organizational records of worker injuries and survey responses regarding management commitment to safety and teamwork from 446 hospital workers within 42 work units in a multi-site hospital system were examined. Results underscored the particular importance of teamwork on worker injuries as well as the importance of management commitment to safety as relating to teamwork. To improve worker safety, organizational leaders and unit managers should work to maintain environments wherein teamwork can thrive.

  18. The Relationship between Teamwork and Organizational Trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musab Isik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. In the implementation section the data from the survey of 250 workers is employed in call centers in Erzurum by using relevant statistical  methods. Consequently, it is found that there is a positive and significant relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. Thus, the hypothesis of the study is supported as it was expected. Besides, it is found that there are positive and significant relationships between communication, openness to innovation, participation-trust in teamwork and organizational trust, trust in management, trust in co-workers, and trust in workplace.

  19. Contractor and Government: Teamwork and Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Gerald D.

    1984-01-01

    The assigned topic, "Contractor and Government: Teamwork and Commitment," is a subject about vitally interested. The successes of the U.S. space program were built on such teamwork and commitment. It seems only a short time ago that man's role in space was an unknown quantity. In rapid succession, however, the flights of Shepard, Glenn, and Armstrong demonstrated man's capability to live and travel in space. Consequently, we no longer live with the same awe of space. The success of these joint industry-NASA efforts in achieving our Nation's space goals testifies to the validity of our team's past commitment, management expertise, communications techniques, and teamwork over a period of 25 years. Today, however, We are at the beginning of a new era in space.

  20. The Relationship between Teamwork and Organizational Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Musab Isik

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. In the implementation section the data from the survey of 250 workers is employed in call centers in Erzurum by using relevant statistical  methods. Consequently, it is found that there is a positive and significant relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. Thus, the hypothesis of the study is supported as it was expected. Besides, it is found that there are positive and significa...

  1. Effective communication and teamwork promotes patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluyas, Heather

    2015-08-05

    Teamwork requires co-operation, co-ordination and communication between members of a team to achieve desired outcomes. In industries with a high degree of risk, such as health care, effective teamwork has been shown to achieve team goals successfully and efficiently, with fewer errors. This article introduces behaviours that support communication, co-operation and co-ordination in teams. The central role of communication in enabling co-operation and co-ordination is explored. A human factors perspective is used to examine tools to improve communication and identify barriers to effective team communication in health care.

  2. The Relationship between Teamwork and Organizational Trust

    OpenAIRE

    Musab Isik

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. In the implementation section the data from the survey of 250 workers is employed in call centers in Erzurum by using relevant statistical  methods. Consequently, it is found that there is a positive and significant relationship between teamwork and organizational trust. Thus, the hypothesis of the study is supported as it was expected. Besides, it is found that there are positive and significa...

  3. SELF-DIRECTED LEARNING, TEAMWORK, HOLISTIC VIEW AND ORAL HEALTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisnert, Leif

    2014-01-01

    The dental program at the Malmö Dental School, the so called Malmö-model, is guided by four linked principles: self-directed learning, teamwork, a holistic view of patient care, and oral health (Fig.1). Self-assessment ability is a critical competence for healthcare professionals, necessary for the successful adaptation to the modern life-long learning environment. Educational research seems to point out two critical factors for the development of such skills, continuous practice of self-assessment and constructive feedback. The first study presented in this thesis assessed students' self-assessment ability by means of the Interactive Examination in a cohort of senior dental students, who had gone through an identical assessment procedure during their second year of studies. The results indicated that self-assessment ability was not directly relevant to subject knowledge. Upon graduation, there were a number of students (10%) with significant self-assessment difficulties. Early detection of students with weak self-assessment abilities appears possible to achieve. The aim of the second study, concerning teamwork and holistic view, was to investigate if highlighting teamwork between dental and dental hygienist students could improve the students' holistic view on patients, as well as their knowledge of, and insight into, each other's future professions. This project showed that by initiating teamwork between dental and dental hygienist students, it was possible to increase students' knowledge on dental hygienists competence, develop students' perceived holistic view on patients, and prepare students for teamwork. The third study explored findings clinicians used when diagnosing chronic periodontitis. A questionnaire was distributed to students, dental teachers and clinical supervisors in the Public Dental Services. Within all categories of clinicians, the majority of the clinicians used deepened pocket, bone loss on x-rays, and bleeding as findings. There were

  4. Teamwork to Enhance Adapted Teaching and Formative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsrud, Halvor; Engh, Roar

    2012-01-01

    This article has as its main focus the contextual factors connected with teachers' teamwork. Firstly, it deals with the question of how to create reflections among teachers on the topic of teamwork. Their written answers function as empirical data for researchers and also as contributions to the further professional development of teamwork.…

  5. Teaching Teamwork through Coteaching in the Business Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliegl, Julie A.; Weaver, Kari D.

    2014-01-01

    Business educators recognize the importance of developing teamwork as an employability skill. However, current methods used to teach teamwork have been met with mixed results from both students and educators. This article integrates research on the importance of teamwork, team development processes, and coteaching through examining a case study…

  6. Teamwork to Enhance Adapted Teaching and Formative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsrud, Halvor; Engh, Roar

    2012-01-01

    This article has as its main focus the contextual factors connected with teachers' teamwork. Firstly, it deals with the question of how to create reflections among teachers on the topic of teamwork. Their written answers function as empirical data for researchers and also as contributions to the further professional development of teamwork.…

  7. Teamwork in Modern Organizations: Implications for Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Moshe; Maymon, Tsipora; Harel, Gedaliahu

    1999-01-01

    Examines characteristics of teamwork in modern organizations and workplaces in order to extrapolate the means for transferring teamwork skills to technology education. Discusses teamwork in education, team development, communication skills, interpersonal skills, team decision making, role assignment and leadership, and evaluation of team…

  8. Teamwork in Secular and Faith-Based Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Arnold R.

    2007-01-01

    The word "teamwork" has become a favorite of corporate leaders; however, many employees view "teamwork" as a word devoid of meaning. Part of the problem is that "teamwork" has an entirely different meaning to people at various levels in an organization, and this prevents individuals and different departments within a company from moving forward…

  9. Teamwork in Modern Organizations: Implications for Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Moshe; Maymon, Tsipora; Harel, Gedaliahu

    1999-01-01

    Examines characteristics of teamwork in modern organizations and workplaces in order to extrapolate the means for transferring teamwork skills to technology education. Discusses teamwork in education, team development, communication skills, interpersonal skills, team decision making, role assignment and leadership, and evaluation of team…

  10. Contract Teamwork: A Way Out of the Ivory Tower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Sally J.

    How can teamwork be implemented effectively in university-level advertising classrooms? This paper reviews literature on the nature, structure, and function of teams and processes for managing teamwork. Based on this literature, an innovative approach to contract teamwork is introduced for use in an entry-level graduate course on integrated…

  11. Teaching Teamwork through Coteaching in the Business Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliegl, Julie A.; Weaver, Kari D.

    2014-01-01

    Business educators recognize the importance of developing teamwork as an employability skill. However, current methods used to teach teamwork have been met with mixed results from both students and educators. This article integrates research on the importance of teamwork, team development processes, and coteaching through examining a case study…

  12. Supervision som undervisningsform i voksenspecialundervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, René

    2000-01-01

    Supervision som undervisningsform i voksenspecialundervisningen. Procesarbejde i undervisning af voksne.......Supervision som undervisningsform i voksenspecialundervisningen. Procesarbejde i undervisning af voksne....

  13. Say "Yes and" to Students Learning Teamwork! Using Improv in the College Classroom to Build Teamwork Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watland, Kathleen Hanold; Santori, David

    2014-01-01

    Teamwork and the ability to work collaboratively on a team are important skills in almost every industry or profession. The use of student teams in college courses is increasing and most academic programs require teamwork as part of the students' academic learning experience. While teamwork and other experiential collaborative learning…

  14. Introducing the nurse practitioner into the surgical ward: an ethnographic study of interprofessional teamwork practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvarnström, Susanne; Jangland, Eva; Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine

    2017-08-22

    The first nurse practitioners in surgical care were introduced into Swedish surgical wards in 2014. Internationally, organisations that have adopted nurse practitioners into care teams are reported to have maintained or improved the quality of care. However, close qualitative descriptions of teamwork practice may add to existing knowledge of interprofessional collaboration when introducing nurse practitioners into new clinical areas. The aim was to report on an empirical study describing how interprofessional teamwork practice was enacted by nurse practitioners when introduced into surgical ward teams. The study had a qualitative, ethnographic research design, drawing on a sociomaterial conceptual framework. The study was based on 170 hours of ward-based participant observations of interprofessional teamwork practice that included nurse practitioners. Data were gathered from 2014 to 2015 across four surgical sites in Sweden, including 60 interprofessional rounds. The data were analysed with an iterative reflexive procedure involving inductive and theory-led approaches. The study was approved by a Swedish regional ethics committee (Ref. No.: 2014/229-31). The interprofessional teamwork practice enacted by the nurse practitioners that emerged from the analysis comprised a combination of the following characteristic role components: clinical leader, bridging team colleague and ever-present tutor. These role components were enacted at all the sites and were prominent during interprofessional teamwork practice. The participant nurse practitioners utilised the interprofessional teamwork practice arrangements to enact a role that may be described in terms of a quality guarantee, thereby contributing to the overall quality and care flow offered by the entire surgical ward team. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. Teamwork in skull base surgery: An avenue for improvement in patient care

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Nancy; Carrau, Ricardo L.; Kelly, Daniel F.; Prevedello, Daniel M.; Kassam, Amin B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: During the past several decades, numerous centers have acquired significant expertise in the treatment of skull base pathologies. Favorable outcomes are not only due to meticulous surgical planning and execution, but they are also related to the collaborative efforts of multiple disciplines. We review the impact of teamwork on patient care, elaborate on the key processes for successful teamwork, and discuss its challenges. Methods: Pubmed and Medline databases were searched for publications from 1970 to 2012 using the following keywords: “teamwork”, “multidisciplinary”, “interdisciplinary”, “surgery”, “skull base”, “neurosurgery”, “tumor”, and “outcome”. Results: Current literature testifies to the complexity of establishing and maintaining teamwork. To date, few reports on the impact of teamwork in the management of skull base pathologies have been published. This lack of literature is somewhat surprising given that most patients with skull base pathology receive care from multiple specialists. Common factors for success include a cohesive and well-integrated team structure with well-defined procedural organization. Although a multidisciplinary work force has clear advantages for improving today's quality of care and propelling research efforts for tomorrow's cure, teamwork is not intuitive and requires training, guidance, and executive support. Conclusions: Teamwork is recommended to improve quality over the full cycle of care and consequently patient outcomes. Increased recognition of the value of an integrated team approach for skull base pathologies will hopefully encourage centers, physicians, allied health caregivers, and scientists devoted to treating these patients and advancing the field of knowledge to invest the time, effort, and resources to optimize and organize their collective expertise. PMID:23607058

  16. Developing and Assessing College Student Teamwork Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard L.; Jones, Steven K.

    2011-01-01

    Some form of team-oriented work is employed in most, if not all, organizations today. It would seem, then, that an important role for higher education should involve developing critical teamwork skills among students so as to prepare them for success in life. This very point was highlighted in a 2009 poll conducted on behalf of the Association of…

  17. The Trouble with Teamwork: A Discursive Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Dean M.; Rossi, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Background: Teamwork sits comfortably within the vocabularies of most physical education teachers. It is used to both describe and prescribe student behaviour in a variety of physical and sport-related activities. Yet while supporters of sport and PE have readily employed the term, remarkably few pedagogues have taken the time to consider what…

  18. [Burnout and teamwork in primary care teams].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilà Falgueras, Maite; Cruzate Muñoz, Carlota; Orfila Pernas, Francesc; Creixell Sureda, Joan; González López, María Pilar; Davins Miralles, Josep

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of burnout and the perception of teamwork in Primary Care teams from Barcelona. Multicenter cross-sectional. Primary Health Care Teams from Barcelona. Institut Català de la Salut. All permanent employees or temporary professionals of all categories from 51 teams (N=2398). A total of 879 responses (36.7%) were obtained. The Maslach Burnout Inventory questionnaire, with 3 dimensions, was sent by emotional exhaustion (AE), depersonalization (DP), and personal accomplishment (RP). Burnout is considered present when two or more dimensions scored high marks. Perception of teamwork and evaluation of leaders was evaluated using an ad hoc questionnaire. The prevalence of burnout was17.2% (two or more dimensions affected), and 46.2% had at least one of the three dimensions with a high level. A high level of AE was found in 38.2%, of DP in 23.8%, and 7.7% had low RP. Almost half (49.2%) believe that teamwork is encouraged in their workplace. Social workers overall, have a higher average of dimensions affected at a high level, followed by administrative personnel, dentists, doctors and nurses (pteamwork had more emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and higher level of burnout in general (pTeamwork and appreciating their leaders protect from burnout. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. The Trouble with Teamwork: A Discursive Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Dean M.; Rossi, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Background: Teamwork sits comfortably within the vocabularies of most physical education teachers. It is used to both describe and prescribe student behaviour in a variety of physical and sport-related activities. Yet while supporters of sport and PE have readily employed the term, remarkably few pedagogues have taken the time to consider what…

  20. Developing and Assessing College Student Teamwork Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard L.; Jones, Steven K.

    2011-01-01

    Some form of team-oriented work is employed in most, if not all, organizations today. It would seem, then, that an important role for higher education should involve developing critical teamwork skills among students so as to prepare them for success in life. This very point was highlighted in a 2009 poll conducted on behalf of the Association of…

  1. Healthy workplaces and teamwork for healthcare workers need public engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Sue; Macdonald-Rencz, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    This response challenges the healthcare system to take full responsibility for the work environments created for health human resources. While the need for healthy work environments and teamwork in healthcare are inarguable, the fact is they are not a reality in today's health system. The authors suggest strategies to address this issue and identify the person or groups that should take responsibility, including governments, organizations, individuals and the public. Strategies include ensuring that policies do not contradict one another and holding each level responsible for the outcomes of a healthy work environment - retention and recruitment of health human resources, better patient/client outcomes and healthcare costs. The need for strong and appropriate leadership for health human resources with "content knowledge" is discussed, along with recommendations for measuring the performance and success of healthy work environments and teamwork. The authors conclude that collaboration at the micro, meso and macro levels is required to facilitate the true change that is needed to improve the work environments of health human resources.

  2. Context in Quality of Care: Improving Teamwork and Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Daniel S; Sexton, John Bryan; Adair, Kathryn C; Kaplan, Heather C; Profit, Jochen

    2017-09-01

    Quality improvement in health care is an ongoing challenge. Consideration of the context of the health care system is of paramount importance. Staff resilience and teamwork climate are key aspects of context that drive quality. Teamwork climate is dynamic, with well-established tools available to improve teamwork for specific tasks or global applications. Similarly, burnout and resilience can be modified with interventions such as cultivating gratitude, positivity, and awe. A growing body of literature has shown that teamwork and burnout relate to quality of care, with improved teamwork and decreased burnout expected to produce improved patient quality and safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Interdisciplinary teamwork in the OR: Identification and measurement of teamwork in the operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passauer-Baierl, Stefanie; Baschnegger, Heiko; Bruns, Christiane; Weigl, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Effective teamwork is one of the essentials in conducting successful and safe surgical procedures in the operating theatre (OT). The present paper aims to provide a selective review of various approaches describing effective interdisciplinary teamwork in the OT. Furthermore, it covers observational methods to assess OT teamwork with particular focus on Germany. Our definition of successful surgical teamwork is based on an already established classification system considering five criteria for effective and safe OT teams: coordination, communication, cooperation, leadership, and team monitoring. Well-defined and reliable measures are necessary to examine the quality of OT teamwork. Those methods should entail the special characteristics of the OT team. They should include all phases of the surgical procedure and incorporate all the professions involved (surgeons, surgical nurses, and anaesthetic staff). We conclude that research into methods for the assessment of OTs in Germany needs to be undertaken as a prerequisite to investigating the relationship between OT teamwork and its effects on patient safety and surgical quality. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  4. Clinical Supervision in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard

    Data fra den danske undersøgelse af psykoterapeuters faglige udvikling indsamlet ved hjælp af DPCCQ. Oplægget fokuserer på supervision (modtaget, givet, uddannelse i) blandt danske psykoterapeutiske arbejdende psykologer....

  5. Supervision af psykoterapi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SUPERVISION AF PSYKOTERAPI indtager en central position i uddannelsen og udviklingen af psykoterapeuter. Trods flere lighedspunkter med psykoterapi, undervisning og konsultation er psykoterapisupervision et selvstændigt virksomhedsområde. Supervisor må foruden at være en trænet psykoterapeut kende...... supervisionens rammer og indplacering i forhold til organisation og samfund. En række kapitler drejer sig om supervisors opgaver, roller og kontrolfunktion, supervision set fra supervisandens perspektiv samt betragtninger over relationer og processer i supervision. Der drøftes fordele og ulemper ved de...... forskellige måder, hvorpå en sag kan fremlægges. Bogens første del afsluttes med refleksioner over de etiske aspekter ved psykoterapisupervision. Bogens anden del handler om de særlige forhold, der gør sig gældende ved supervision af en række specialiserede behandlingsformer eller af psykoterapi med bestemte...

  6. Psykoterapi og supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard

    2014-01-01

    Kapitlet beskriver supervisionen funktioner i forhold til psykoterapi. Supervision af psykoterapi henviser i almindelighed til, at en psykoterapeut konsulterer en ofte mere erfaren kollega (supervisor) med henblik på drøftelse af et konkret igangværende psykoterapeutisk behandlingsforløb. Formålet...... er at fremme denne fagpersons (psykoterapeutens) faglige udvikling samt sikre kvaliteten af behandlingen.kan defineres som i. Der redegøres for, hvorfor supervision er vigtig del af psykoterapeutens profession samt vises, hvorledes supervision foruden den faglige udvikling også er vigtigt redskab i...... psykoterapiens kvalitetssikring. Efter at have drøftet nogle etiske forhold ved supervision, fremlægges endelig nogle få forskningsresultater vedr. psykoterapisupervision af danske psykologer....

  7. Supervision and group dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Jensen, Lars Peter

    2004-01-01

    as well as at Aalborg University. The first visible result has been participating supervisors telling us that the course has inspired them to try supervising group dynamics in the future. This paper will explore some aspects of supervising group dynamics as well as, how to develop the Aalborg model...... An important aspect of the problem based and project organized study at Aalborg University is the supervision of the project groups. At the basic education (first year) it is stated in the curriculum that part of the supervisors' job is to deal with group dynamics. This is due to the experience...... that many students are having difficulties with practical issues such as collaboration, communication, and project management. Most supervisors either ignore this demand, because they do not find it important or they find it frustrating, because they do not know, how to supervise group dynamics...

  8. Two Approaches to Clinical Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eugene M.

    Criteria are established for a definition of "clinical supervision" and the effectiveness of such supervisory programs in a student teaching context are considered. Two differing genres of clinical supervision are constructed: "supervision by pattern analysis" is contrasted with "supervision by performance objectives." An outline of procedural…

  9. Counselor Supervision: A Consumer's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Geoffrey G.; Littrell, John M.

    This guide attempts to solve problems caused when a certain designated "brand" of supervision is forced on the counselor trainee with neither choice nor checklist of important criteria. As a tentative start on a guide to supervision the paper offers the following: a definition of supervision; a summary of the various types of supervision; a…

  10. 基于结构方程模型的护士长辱虐管理对护士隐性知识共享的影响研究%Impact of Abusive Supervision of Head Nurses on Tacit Knowledge Sharing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艳; 刘雪松; 赫小宏; 李鹏; 李佳; 周晶; 关敏; 孙涛; 张良

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of abusive supervision of head nurses on tacit knowledge sharing. Methods From April to June in 2013, with a cross-sectional survey among 284 nurses, the Abusive Supervision scale and Knowledge Sharing Scale were used to collect data and develop a structural equation model to test the relationship between abusive supervision and tacit knowledge sharing. Results The mean score of abusive supervision was 2.350±1.497, and that of tacit knowledge sharing 5.466±1.188. There was a significant correlation between psychological capital and tacit knowledge sharing (β=-0.20, P<0.01). Conclusion Head nurses employ abuse supervision in nursing practice, and abusive supervision has a negative impact on tacit knowledge sharing behaviors of nurses.%目的:探讨护士长辱虐管理对下属护士隐性知识共享的影响。方法2013年4-6月,对哈尔滨市5所三级甲等医院284名护士采用辱虐管理问卷和隐性知识共享量表进行数据收集,采用SPSS 17.0和AMOS 17.0进行统计分析。结果本组护士辱虐管理得分为(2.350±1.497)分,隐性知识共享得分为(5.466±1.188)分,护士长辱虐管理与下属的隐性知识共享具有负相关(β=-0.20,P<0.01)。结论护理实践中存在某些护士长辱虐管理现象,并且辱虐管理对下属护士间的隐性知识共享行为具有消极影响。

  11. Study on of supervision enterprises core competence faced capacity of project knowledge management and its evaluation method%面向监理企业核心竞争力的项目知识管理能力及评价方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王浩; 程诗昊; 蔡东; 周剑岚

    2013-01-01

    本文主要分析了项目知识管理能力与监理企业核心竞争力的关系以及面向监理企业核心竞争力的项目知识管理能力要素,探讨了项目知识管理能力的评价方法.研究内容对监理企业的知识管理和竞争力的提升具有一定参考价值.%The relationship between the capacity of project knowledge management and the core competence of supervision enterprises as well as the main factors of the supervision enterprises core competence faced capacity of project knowledge management are mainly analyzed herein, and then the method for evaluating the capacity of project knowledge management is also discussed. The study has a certain value of reference for enhancing the knowledge management and competence of the supervision enterprises concerned.

  12. Care pathways lead to better teamwork: results of a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneckere, Svin; Euwema, Martin; Van Herck, Pieter; Lodewijckx, Cathy; Panella, Massimiliano; Sermeus, Walter; Vanhaecht, Kris

    2012-07-01

    Care pathways are often said to promote interprofessional teamwork. As no systematic review on pathway effectiveness has ever focused on how care pathways promote teamwork, the objective of this review was to study this relationship. We performed an extensive search of electronic databases and identified 26 relevant studies. In our analysis of these studies we identified 20 team indicators and found that care pathways positively affected 17 of these indicators. Most frequently positive effects were found on staff knowledge, interprofessional documentation, team communication and team relations. However, the level of evidence was rather low. We found Level II evidence for improved interprofessional documentation. We also found Level II evidence for increased workload; improved actual versus planned team size; and improved continuity of care. The studies most frequently mentioned the need for a multidisciplinary approach and educational training sessions in order for pathways to be successful. The systematic review revealed that care pathways have the potential to support interprofessional teams in enhancing teamwork. Necessary conditions are a context that supports teamwork and including appropriate active pathway components that can mediate an effect on team processes. To achieve this, each care pathway requires a clearly defined team approach customized to the individual teams' needs.

  13. Teamwork Training Needs Analysis for Long-Duration Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Jentsch, Kimberly A.; Sierra, Mary Jane

    2016-01-01

    The success of future long-duration exploration missions (LDEMs) will be determined largely by the extent to which mission-critical personnel possess and effectively exercise essential teamwork competencies throughout the entire mission lifecycle (e.g., Galarza & Holland, 1999; Hysong, Galarza, & Holland, 2007; Noe, Dachner, Saxton, & Keeton, 2011). To ensure that such personnel develop and exercise these necessary teamwork competencies prior to and over the full course of future LDEMs, it is essential that a teamwork training curriculum be developed and put into place at NASA that is both 1) comprehensive, in that it targets all teamwork competencies critical for mission success and 2) structured around empirically-based best practices for enhancing teamwork training effectiveness. In response to this demand, the current teamwork-oriented training needs analysis (TNA) was initiated to 1) identify the teamwork training needs (i.e., essential teamwork-related competencies) of future LDEM crews, 2) identify critical gaps within NASA’s current and future teamwork training curriculum (i.e., gaps in the competencies targeted and in the training practices utilized) that threaten to impact the success of future LDEMs, and to 3) identify a broad set of practical nonprescriptive recommendations for enhancing the effectiveness of NASA’s teamwork training curriculum in order to increase the probability of future LDEM success.

  14. Organizing for teamwork in healthcare: an alternative to team training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydenfält, Christofer; Odenrick, Per; Larsson, Per Anders

    2017-05-15

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore how organizational design could support teamwork and to identify organizational design principles that promote successful teamwork. Design/methodology/approach Since traditional team training sessions take resources away from production, the alternative approach pursued here explores the promotion of teamwork by means of organizational design. A wide and pragmatic definition of teamwork is applied: a team is considered to be a group of people that are set to work together on a task, and teamwork is then what they do in relation to their task. The input - process - output model of teamwork provides structure to the investigation. Findings Six teamwork enablers from the healthcare team literature - cohesion, collaboration, communication, conflict resolution, coordination, and leadership - are discussed, and the organizational design measures required to implement them are identified. Three organizational principles are argued to facilitate the teamwork enablers: team stability, occasions for communication, and a participative and adaptive approach to leadership. Research limitations/implications The findings could be used as a foundation for intervention studies to improve team performance or as a framework for evaluation of existing organizations. Practical implications By implementing these organizational principles, it is possible to achieve many of the organizational traits associated with good teamwork. Thus, thoughtful organization for teamwork can be used as an alternative or complement to the traditional team training approach. Originality/value With regards to the vast literature on team training, this paper offers an alternative perspective on how to improve team performance in healthcare.

  15. Training for teamwork: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudano, Laura E; Patterson, Jo Ellen; Lister, Zephon D

    2015-09-01

    As the field of collaborative care, or integrated behavioral health, continues to develop, lessons are learned from attempts to establish such programs (Sieber et al., 2012; Unützer, 2014). Part of the success of collaborative care programs is the function of an interdisciplinary team. In this article, faculty from University of San Diego (USD) and University of California, San Diego (UCSD) share changes needed to curriculum and career development to support leadership and teamwork skills essential to program development, implementation, and sustainability for integrated behavioral health. This article uses Unützer's (2014) 4 factors of creating a successful collaborative care program (i.e., shared vision, leadership, staffing, and financial sustainability) to discuss implications for effective collaboration between 2 universities and the training of primary care providers in teamwork and leadership skills for overcoming barriers and pitfalls to expand collaborative care beyond their initial training.

  16. Knowledges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berling, Trine Villumsen

    2012-01-01

    and reflectivism. Bourdieu, on the contrary, lets the challenge to the theory/reality distinction spill over into a challenge to the theory/practice distinction by thrusting the scientist in the foreground as not just a factor (discourse/genre) but as an actor. In this way, studies of IR need to include a focus......Scientific knowledge in international relations has generally focused on an epistemological distinction between rationalism and reflectivism over the last 25 years. This chapter argues that this distinction has created a double distinction between theory/reality and theory/practice, which works...... as a ghost distinction structuring IR research. While reflectivist studies have emphasised the impossibility of detached, objective knowledge production through a dissolution of the theory/reality distinction, the theory/practice distinction has been left largely untouched by both rationalism...

  17. The Impact on Workplace Performance Teamwork

    OpenAIRE

    Mirela-Mihaela Dogaru; Irina Donciu

    2014-01-01

    t In terms of psychological and Physiological capability on job Requirements and There is two Types of Requirements, Capabilities and Requirements One of Increasing, and lowering Other Capabilities and Requirements. When the control decreases teamwork, Conflicts arise Between members; feel a lack of Employees When recognition, understanding and support from leaders who have Psychiatric Disorders Appear Particularly large Influence on the individual. Many activities at work and poor relationsh...

  18. Teamwork in Distributed Agile Software Development

    OpenAIRE

    Gurram, Chaitanya; Bandi, Srinivas Goud

    2013-01-01

    Context: Distributed software development has become a most desired way of software development. Application of agile development methodologies in distributed environments has taken a new trend in developing software due to its benefits of improved communication and collaboration. Teamwork is an important concept that agile methodologies facilitate and is one of the potential determinants of team performance which was not focused in distributed agile software development. Objectives: This res...

  19. Development and Evaluation of the Teamwork Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Tetsuro; Matsuishi, Masakatu; Matsumoto, Shigeo; Takemata, Kazuya; Yamakawa, Taketo

    At the subject that aims to develop the student's teamwork competencies which is one of the most important ability as an engineer, the appraisal method was investigated. Almost all the team activities were evaluated, and correlations with that result and the peer evaluation, the self-evaluation and the team peer evaluation were examined. It was found that the correlation between the quality of the team activities and the team peer evaluation which is evaluated by other team members is highest.

  20. Teamwork on the field and at work

    OpenAIRE

    Paul F. Levy

    2005-01-01

    One way that people learn teamwork, informal mentoring, and other workplace skills is through participating in sports. Yet, many women of my generation did not get a chance to develop these talents since they had fewer opportunities to participate in organized athletics when they were young. I came to understand the importance of sports from my own experience: My passion—all the rest is a hobby—is coaching girls’ soccer, something I have done for the last 15 years.

  1. Analysis of teamwork in officiating in basketball

    OpenAIRE

    Smid, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to characterise the role, activity and participation of the referees in games with a focus to basketball games. The author generally discusses these issues analysing changes in referees teamwork during the last three years, He presents referees´ individual positions on the basketball court (lead, centre, trail), places of their competences, duties and responsibilities. The method of study was direct observation of 45 basketball games during seasons 2012-2014 in mens b...

  2. Teamwork on the field and at work

    OpenAIRE

    Paul F. Levy

    2005-01-01

    One way that people learn teamwork, informal mentoring, and other workplace skills is through participating in sports. Yet, many women of my generation did not get a chance to develop these talents since they had fewer opportunities to participate in organized athletics when they were young. I came to understand the importance of sports from my own experience: My passion—all the rest is a hobby—is coaching girls’ soccer, something I have done for the last 15 years.

  3. The Impact on Workplace Performance Teamwork

    OpenAIRE

    Mirela-Mihaela Dogaru; Irina Donciu

    2014-01-01

    t In terms of psychological and Physiological capability on job Requirements and There is two Types of Requirements, Capabilities and Requirements One of Increasing, and lowering Other Capabilities and Requirements. When the control decreases teamwork, Conflicts arise Between members; feel a lack of Employees When recognition, understanding and support from leaders who have Psychiatric Disorders Appear Particularly large Influence on the individual. Many activities at work and poor relationsh...

  4. Principles and guidelines for diversity in teamwork

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, M.; Crespin, G.; Garcia, L.R.; Jansma, R.; Lovato, L.; Randall, G.; Sanchez, A.

    1994-08-01

    As part of Sandia`s Corporate Diversity Program, a Diversity Action Team was assembled to study the impact of diversity on teamwork. We reviewed the available literature on successful teaming, both with homogeneous (more alike than different) and heterogeneous teams. Although many principles and guidelines for successful homogeneous teams also apply to diverse teams, we believe that a document concentrating on diverse teams will be useful both for Sandians and for the outside world.

  5. Teamwork in Distributed Agile Software Development

    OpenAIRE

    Gurram, Chaitanya; Bandi, Srinivas Goud

    2013-01-01

    Context: Distributed software development has become a most desired way of software development. Application of agile development methodologies in distributed environments has taken a new trend in developing software due to its benefits of improved communication and collaboration. Teamwork is an important concept that agile methodologies facilitate and is one of the potential determinants of team performance which was not focused in distributed agile software development. Objectives: This res...

  6. Resistance to group clinical supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Delgado, Cynthia; Traynor, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This present study is a report of an interview study exploring personal views on participating in group clinical supervision among mental health nursing staff members who do not participate in supervision. There is a paucity of empirical research on resistance to supervision, which has traditiona......This present study is a report of an interview study exploring personal views on participating in group clinical supervision among mental health nursing staff members who do not participate in supervision. There is a paucity of empirical research on resistance to supervision, which has...... traditionally been theorized as a supervisee's maladaptive coping with anxiety in the supervision process. The aim of the present study was to examine resistance to group clinical supervision by interviewing nurses who did not participate in supervision. In 2015, we conducted semistructured interviews with 24...

  7. Best Practices in Clinical Supervision: another step in delineating effective supervision practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, L Dianne

    2014-01-01

    Across the helping professions, we have arrived at a point where it is possible to create statements of best practices in supervision that are based on available empirical research; credentialing, ethical, and legal guidelines; and consensus opinion. Best practices are different from, but certainly complementary to, statements of supervision competencies. In this paper, I highlight the differences between competencies and best practices, and then describe the development and content of one comprehensive statement, the Best Practices in Clinical Supervision created for the field of counseling and counselor education. I then illustrate the applicability of the Best Practices across disciplines and countries through a comparison and contrast with several other existing documents. I conclude with a brief look at the development of supervisor expertise, which requires not only declarative knowledge (competencies) and procedural knowledge (statements of best practices), but also reflective knowledge. The latter is composed of insights built over years of supervision education, experience, and self-reflection regarding necessary adaptions and improvisations that inform an individualized approach to supervision practice.

  8. TEAMWORK IN THE FAMILY HEALTHCARE STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Pinheiro Garcia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: The healthcare evaluation aims to improve the capacity to provide adequate assistance and better healthcare to the population. Through an evaluation process, one can rethink the practices that are being offered and subsidize managers for adequacy of services. The aim of this study is to evaluate teamwork, from the perspective of professionals who work in the family health strategy. Method: a descriptive cross-sectional study was performed. The population comprised healthcare professionals working with the family health strategy in the municipalities of the state of Espirito Santo with more than 50,000 inhabitants. Data collection was performed through a semi-structured questionnaire between July 2012 and August 2013. Results: there was a positive evaluation of the professionals regarding teamwork, with most considering the professional relationship always or most of the time good and respectful; the relationships were rarely considered to be confrontational; the organization of the activities was performed jointly, with rare occurrence of difficulties regarding domestic work and the community; the work was always or most of the time based on pre-established routines, as well as the capacity to review routines and procedures and the encouragement for community participation. Conclusion: One can observe the challenge and responsibility of healthcare professionals in acknowledging teamwork and its relevance to changes in the practices of care and management of the Brazilian Unified Health System. KEYWORDS: Health Evaluation; Primary Health care; Family Health; Working Environment.

  9. Intuitive expertise in ICT graduate supervision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Jameson

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Intuitive expertise in the application of advanced interdisciplinary facilitation is the subject of this personal reflection on the graduate supervisory style of Professor David Squires in computers in education. This single-case reflective study examines the characteristics of effective supervision observed during masters and doctoral supervision at King's College in the years 1990-9. Interdisciplinarity in ICT graduate studies particularly requires a fluency of supervisory expertise in enabling supervisees to combine multiple complex perspectives from a number of fields of knowledge. Intuitive combinatory aspects of supervision are highlighted in this reflection on the role carried out by an academic expert in facilitating student success. This is examined from a perspective incorporating affective as well as intellectual elements, informed by characteristics identified in professional sports and performing arts coaching/mentoring. Key characteristics comprising a model of intuitive expertise in ICT graduate supervision were outlined. The resultant portrait aims to complement existing literature on graduate supervision, with reference to the field of ICTI computers in education relating to student hypermedia composition.

  10. Teaching interprofessional teamwork in medical and nursing education in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aase, Ingunn; Aase, Karina; Dieckmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The notions of interprofessional education and interprofessional teamwork have attained widespread acceptance, partly because lack of teamwork has been tentatively linked to adverse incidents in healthcare. By analyzing data from 32 educational institutions, this study identifies the status...... of interprofessional teamwork in all nursing and medical education in Norway. The study programs issued by the 32 educational institutions were subject to content analysis, distilling the ambitions and goals for teaching interprofessional teamwork. Study program coordinators were approached and asked to what degree...... interprofessional teamwork was actually introduced in lecturing and clinical training. Results indicate that the medical and nursing schools clearly aspire to teach interprofessional teamwork and that this has largely been achieved when it comes to theoretical teaching. Although three of the four medical programs...

  11. The psychometric testing of the Nursing Teamwork Survey in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragadóttir, Helga; Kalisch, Beatrice J; Smáradóttir, Sigríður Bríet; Jónsdóttir, Heiður Hrund

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the Nursing Teamwork Survey-Icelandic (NTS-Icelandic), which was translated from US English to Icelandic. The Nursing Teamwork Survey, with 33 items, measures overall teamwork and five factors of teamwork: trust, team orientation, backup, shared mental models, and team leadership. The psychometric testing of the NTS-Icelandic was carried out on data from a pilot study and a national study. The sample for a pilot study included 123 nursing staff from five units, and the sample for a national study included 925 nursing staff from 27 inpatient units. The overall test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient in the pilot study was 0.693 (lower bound = 0.498, upper bound = 0.821) (p teamwork. The NTS-Icelandic tested valid and reliable in this study. Study findings support further use of the Nursing Teamwork Survey internationally.

  12. Teaching and Assessing Teamwork Skills in Engineering and Computer Science

    OpenAIRE

    Robert W. Lingard

    2010-01-01

    To be successful in today's workplace, engineering and computer science students must possess high levels of teamwork skills. Unfortunately, most engineering programs provide little or no specific instruction in this area. This paper outlines an assessment-driven approach toward teaching teamwork skills. Working with the Industrial Advisory Board for the College, a set of performance criteria for teamwork was developed. This set of criteria was used to build an assessment instrument to measur...

  13. Three fundamental pillars of decision-centered teamwork

    OpenAIRE

    Soriano Marcolino, Leandro

    2016-01-01

    This thesis introduces a novel paradigm in artificial intelligence: decision-centered teamwork. Decision-centered teamwork is the analysis of agent teams that iteratively take joint decisions into solving complex problems. Although teams of agents have been used to take decisions in many important domains, such as: machine learning, crowdsourcing, forecasting systems, and even board games; a study of a general framework for decisioncentered teamwork has never been presented in the literature ...

  14. Self-selection into teamwork: A theoretical and experimental analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Stribeck, Agnes; Pull, Kerstin

    2010-01-01

    We analyze self-selection decisions regarding teamwork both theoretically and empirically. While we focus on individual talent, we also investigate the effects of team tasks, individual teamwork skills, and expectations concerning the talent and teamwork skills of potential teammates as further determinants in the self-selection process. Putting our hypotheses derived from a basic self-selection model in dialogue with original data from a real-task laboratory experiment, we are able to show t...

  15. Barriers to Robust and Effective Human-Agent Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Barriers to Robust and Effective Human-Agent Teamwork Fei Gao, M. L. Cummings Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139, USA...done by an individual. Although teamwork may im- pose extra workload related to coordination and communi- cation, teams have the potential of offering...greater adapta- bility, productivity, and creativity than any one individual can offer (Gladstein, 1984). However, the benefits of teamwork do not

  16. Fostering Critical Thinking and Teamwork Skills via a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) Approach to Public Speaking Fundamentals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellnow, Deanna D.; Ahlfeldt, Stephanie L.

    2005-01-01

    The professoriate must produce graduates who demonstrate better critical thinking and teamwork skills. More specifically, college graduates appear to know a good deal, but are "unable to apply this knowledge in any useful or practical way." The challenge is to "train students to find new ways of dealing with issues and solving problems."…

  17. Collective academic supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Thomsen, Rie; Wichmann-Hansen, Gitte

    2013-01-01

    are interconnected. Collective Academic Supervision provides possibilities for systematic interaction between individual master students in their writing process. In this process they learn core academic competencies, such as the ability to assess theoretical and practical problems in their practice and present them...

  18. Reflecting reflection in supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    Reflection has moved from the margins to the mainstream in supervision. Notions of reflection have become well established since the late 1980s. These notions have provided useful framing devices to help conceptualize some important processes in guidance and counseling. However, some applications...

  19. Clinical Supervision in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard

    2011-01-01

    on giving and receiving clinical supervision as reported by therapists in Denmark. Method: Currently, the Danish sample consists of 350 clinical psychologist doing psychotherapy who completed DPCCQ. Data are currently being prepared for statistical analysis. Results: This paper will focus primarily...

  20. Kontraktetablering i supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Karen Vibeke; Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard

    2007-01-01

    Kapitlet behandler kontraktetablering i supervision, et element, der ofte er blevet negligeret eller endog helt forbigået ved indledningen af supervisionsforløb. Sikre aftaler om emner som tid, sted, procedurer for fremlæggelse, fortrolighed, ansvarsfordeling og evaluering skaber imidlertid tryghed...

  1. Etiske betragtninger ved supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Agerskov, Kirsten

    2007-01-01

    Kapitlet præsenterer nogle etiske betragtninger ved supervision. Mens der længe har eksisteret etiske retningslinjer for psykoterapeutisk arbejde, har der overraskende nok manglet tilsvarende vejledninger på supervisionsområdet. Det betyder imidlertid ikke, at de ikke er relevante. I kapitlet gøres...

  2. Importance of good teamwork in urgent care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Curtis

    2014-11-01

    High quality, safe care for patients depends on effective teamwork, and where multi-professional teams work together there is higher patient satisfaction, increased staff innovation, less stress and more communication ( West 2013 ). Conversely, lapses in teamwork and poor communication can result in adverse events ranging from retained foreign objects to perinatal events and medication errors ( Peter and Pronovost 2013 ), and even the death of patients ( Resuscitation Council UK 2011 ). Teamwork requires a set of skills and behaviours that, once learned by clinicians, can save lives ( Peter and Pronovost 2013 ). This article refers to a case study to explore the topic of teamwork in a tertiary care emergency setting.

  3. Teamwork in Multi-Agent Systems A Formal Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Dunin-Keplicz, Barbara Maria

    2010-01-01

    What makes teamwork tick?. Cooperation matters, in daily life and in complex applications. After all, many tasks need more than a single agent to be effectively performed. Therefore, teamwork rules!. Teams are social groups of agents dedicated to the fulfilment of particular persistent tasks. In modern multiagent environments, heterogeneous teams often consist of autonomous software agents, various types of robots and human beings. Teamwork in Multi-agent Systems: A Formal Approach explains teamwork rules in terms of agents' attitudes and their complex interplay. It provides the first comprehe

  4. Five Steps to Providing Effective Feedback in the Clinical Setting: A New Approach to Promote Teamwork and Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motley, Cindy L; Dolansky, Mary A

    2015-07-01

    Feedback is a major component of clinical education. Feedback reinforces or modifies behavior and helps learners to validate knowledge and feel motivated to learn. Traditionally, feedback is used by clinical educators who observe learners' behavior and provide expert direction. Teamwork and collaboration is one of the six Quality and Safety Education for Nurses core competencies developed for prelicensure and graduate nurses. These skills are important in the current complex health care environment. On the basis of the literature and prior experience, a new approach for clinical educators is using feedback to teach teamwork and collaboration skills. Five steps educators can take to provide effective feedback in the clinical setting are to (a) create a culture of feedback, (b) use structured communication tools, (c) encourage dialogue, (d) acknowledge the human factor, and (e) embrace a leadership role. This new approach enhances feedback and teaches teamwork and collaboration. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. What makes maternity teams effective and safe? Lessons from a series of research on teamwork, leadership and team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siassakos, Dimitrios; Fox, Robert; Bristowe, Katherine; Angouri, Jo; Hambly, Helen; Robson, Lauren; Draycott, Timothy J

    2013-11-01

    We describe lessons for safety from a synthesis of seven studies of teamwork, leadership and team training across a healthcare region. Two studies identified successes and challenges in a unit with embedded team training: a staff survey demonstrated a positive culture but a perceived need for greater senior presence; training improved actual emergency care, but wide variation in team performance remained. Analysis of multicenter simulation records showed that variation in patient safety and team efficiency correlated with their teamwork but not individual knowledge, skills or attitudes. Safe teams tended to declare the emergency earlier, hand over in a more structured way, and use closed-loop communication. Focused and directed communication was also associated with better patient-actor perception of care. Focus groups corroborated these findings, proposed that the capability and experience of the leader is more important than seniority, and identified teamwork and leadership issues that require further research.

  6. Team Members' Perceptions of Online Teamwork Learning Experiences and Building Teamwork Trust: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hung Wei; Yeh, Hsin-Te

    2013-01-01

    Teamwork factors can facilitate team members, committing themselves to the purposes of maximizing their own and others' contributions and successes. It is important for online instructors to comprehend students' expectations on learning collaboratively. The aims of this study were to investigate online collaborative learning experiences and to…

  7. Team Members' Perceptions of Online Teamwork Learning Experiences and Building Teamwork Trust: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hung Wei; Yeh, Hsin-Te

    2013-01-01

    Teamwork factors can facilitate team members, committing themselves to the purposes of maximizing their own and others' contributions and successes. It is important for online instructors to comprehend students' expectations on learning collaboratively. The aims of this study were to investigate online collaborative learning experiences and to…

  8. Teamwork as a Self-Disciplining Device

    OpenAIRE

    Fahn, Matthias; Hakenes, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    We show that team formation can serve as an implicit commitment device to overcome problems of self-control. In a situation where individuals have present-biased preferences, any effort that is costly today but rewarded at some later point in time is too low from the perspective of an individual's long-run self. If agents interact repeatedly and can monitor each other, a relational contract involving teamwork can help to improve an agent's performance. The mutual promise to work harder is cre...

  9. Social networks in supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    and practice have focused on conceptual frameworks and practical techniques of promoting reflection through conversation in general and questioning in particular. However, in recent years, supervision research has started to focus on the social and technological aspects of supervision. This calls...... is constituted by the relationality of the actors, not by the actors themselves. In other words, no one acts in a vacuum but rather always under the influence of a wide range of surrounding and interconnected factors. Actors are actors because they are in a networked relationship. Thus, focusing on social...... and space. That involves mobilised an denrolled actos, both animate and inanimate (e.g. books, computers, etc. Actor-network theory defines a symmetry between animate and inanimate, i.e. subjects and objects, because ”human powers increasingly derive from the complex interconnections if human with material...

  10. Developing Teamwork and Reading Skills in the ESP Classroom. Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buzarna-Tihenea (Gălbează Alina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the ideal ESP (English for Special Purposes classroom, students should work together inorder to perform their tasks. However, they should also compete and work independently. Thepurpose of this paper is to analyze the importance of teamwork/cooperative learning inencouraging cooperation, competition and independent work and in developing teamwork andreading skills in the ESP classroom. Cooperative learning involves students actively, as itorganizes them into groups, giving them defined roles and a common group task. Cooperativeteaching techniques involve the students in class and help them to increase their knowledge. Thefirst section of this paper is an introduction to Cooperative learning, while the second one presentsits basic elements and activities. The last section focuses on a case study that highlights the positiveeffects of cooperative learning methods on English reading skills.

  11. Bias Modeling for Distantly Supervised Relation Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Xiang; Yaoyun Zhang; Xiaolong Wang; Yang Qin; Wenying Han

    2015-01-01

    Distant supervision (DS) automatically annotates free text with relation mentions from existing knowledge bases (KBs), providing a way to alleviate the problem of insufficient training data for relation extraction in natural language processing (NLP). However, the heuristic annotation process does not guarantee the correctness of the generated labels, promoting a hot research issue on how to efficiently make use of the noisy training data. In this paper, we model two types of biases to reduce...

  12. Exploring University Teacher Perceptions about Out-of-Class Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Esparza Barajas, Elizabeth; Medrano Vela, Cecilia Araceli; Zepeda Huerta, Jesús Helbert Karim

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the first stage of a larger joint research project undertaken by five universities in Mexico to explore university teachers' thinking about out-of-class teamwork. Data from interviews were analyzed using open and axial coding. Although results suggest a positive perception towards teamwork, the study unveiled important…

  13. Teamwork in First Year Law Units: Can It Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Tracey L.; Stickley, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    There is an abundance of literature on the importance of teamwork in undergraduate degrees; how to teach it, how to assess it and how to manage it. However, there is also much recorded about students' dislike of teamwork, especially where an early experience is unsatisfactory and builds resistance against such assessment. Accordingly, despite the…

  14. Context-Sensitive Sharedness Criteria for Teamwork (Extended Abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harbers, M.; Jonker, C.M.; Van Riemsdijk, M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Teamwork between humans and intelligent systems gains importance with the maturing of agent and robot technology. In the social sciences, sharedness of mental models is used to explain and understand teamwork. To use this concept for developing teams that include agents, we propose contextsensitive

  15. Measuring Perceptions of Engagement in Teamwork in Youth Development Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Melissa; Jones, Kimberly Y.

    2014-01-01

    The literature regarding teamwork has supported the idea that the key to improving team performance is to understand team processes. Early work within the realm of teamwork focused on quantifiable measures of team performance, like number of products developed. The measure of a successful team hinged on whether or not the team accomplished the end…

  16. Teaching Teamwork to Public Relations Students: Does It Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Schena, Lori

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The first purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which students in university capstone public relations classes who receive teamwork training demonstrate effective team behaviors, produce quality work, experience satisfaction in the teamwork process, and engender client satisfaction. The second purpose was to determine the…

  17. FY2015 Analysis of the Teamwork USA Program. Memorandum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Research and Evaluation (DRE) has completed an analysis of the performance of students who participated in the Teamwork USA Program, administered in FY2014 at three District schools. Teamwork USA hopes to improve student achievement at select Title I elementary schools via its Instrumental Music Program grant. This memorandum to…

  18. Using Critical Praxis to Understand and Teach Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibold, David R.; Kang, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The authors pursue three aims in this article. The first is to underscore critical praxis as an especially valuable approach to understanding and enabling teamwork. The second is to offer four dimensions of teamwork--vision, roles, processes, and relationships--as salient areas to interrogate using critical praxis. The third aim is to consider the…

  19. Total Quality Management (TQM): Training Module on "Empowerment/Teamwork."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, David

    This module for a 1-semester Total Quality Management (TQM) course for high school or community college students covers the topics of empowerment and teamwork. It includes the following components: (1) a narrative summary of the topics; (2) a discussion of employee empowerment; (3) a discussion of teamwork and self-directed teams; (4) a discussion…

  20. Teaching Teamwork to Public Relations Students: Does It Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Schena, Lori

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The first purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which students in university capstone public relations classes who receive teamwork training demonstrate effective team behaviors, produce quality work, experience satisfaction in the teamwork process, and engender client satisfaction. The second purpose was to determine the…

  1. Teamwork in Israeli Arab-Bedouin School-Based Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizel, Omar

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the western world a leading example of the educational reforms that have been implemented in the late twentieth and twenty-first century is School-Based Management (SBM), a system designed to improve educational outcome through staff teamwork and self-governance. This research set out to examine the efficacy of teamwork in ten…

  2. Context-Sensitive Sharedness Criteria for Teamwork (Extended Abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harbers, M.; Jonker, C.M.; Van Riemsdijk, M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Teamwork between humans and intelligent systems gains importance with the maturing of agent and robot technology. In the social sciences, sharedness of mental models is used to explain and understand teamwork. To use this concept for developing teams that include agents, we propose contextsensitive

  3. Teamwork in Israeli Arab-Bedouin School-Based Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizel, Omar

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the western world a leading example of the educational reforms that have been implemented in the late twentieth and twenty-first century is School-Based Management (SBM), a system designed to improve educational outcome through staff teamwork and self-governance. This research set out to examine the efficacy of teamwork in ten…

  4. Measuring Perceptions of Engagement in Teamwork in Youth Development Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Melissa; Jones, Kimberly Y.

    2014-01-01

    The literature regarding teamwork has supported the idea that the key to improving team performance is to understand team processes. Early work within the realm of teamwork focused on quantifiable measures of team performance, like number of products developed. The measure of a successful team hinged on whether or not the team accomplished the end…

  5. Using Critical Praxis to Understand and Teach Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibold, David R.; Kang, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The authors pursue three aims in this article. The first is to underscore critical praxis as an especially valuable approach to understanding and enabling teamwork. The second is to offer four dimensions of teamwork--vision, roles, processes, and relationships--as salient areas to interrogate using critical praxis. The third aim is to consider the…

  6. Human-Robot Teamwork in USAR Environments: The TRADR Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greeff, J. de; Hindriks, K.; Neerincx, M.A.; Kruijff-Korbayova, I.

    2015-01-01

    The TRADR project aims at developing methods and models for human-robot teamwork, enabling robots to operate in search and rescue environments alongside humans as teammates, rather than as tools. Through a user-centered cognitive engineering method, human-robot teamwork is analyzed, modeled, impleme

  7. Ethics in education supervision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma ÖZMEN

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Supervision in education plays a crucial role in attaining educational goals. In addition to determining the present situation, it has a theoretical and practical function regarding the actions to be taken in general and the achievement of teacher development in particular to meet the educational goals in the most effective way. For the education supervisors to act ethically in their tasks while achieving this vital mission shall facilitate them to build up trust, to enhance the level of collaboration and sharing, thus it shall contribute to organizational effectiveness. Ethics is an essential component of educational supervision. Yet, it demonstrates rather vague quality due to the conditions, persons, and situations. Therefore, it is a difficult process to develop the ethical standards in institutions. This study aims to clarify the concept of ethics, to bring up its importance, and to make recommendations for more effective supervisions from the aspect of ethics, based on the literature review, some research results, and sample cases reported by teachers and supervisors.

  8. Computer Sciences Applied to Management at Open University of Catalonia: Development of Competences of Teamworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisa, Carlos Cabañero; López, Enric Serradell

    Teamwork is considered one of the most important professional skills in today's business environment. More specifically, the collaborative work between professionals and information technology managers from various functional areas is a strategic key in competitive business. Several university-level programs are focusing on developing these skills. This article presents the case of the course Computer Science Applied to Management (hereafter CSAM) that has been designed with the objective to develop the ability to work cooperatively in interdisciplinary teams. For their design and development have been addressed to the key elements of efficiency that appear in the literature, most notably the establishment of shared objectives and a feedback system, the management of the harmony of the team, their level of autonomy, independence, diversity and level of supervision. The final result is a subject in which, through a working virtual platform, interdisciplinary teams solve a problem raised by a case study.

  9. Leadership, management and teamwork learning through an extra-curricular project for medical students: descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Maria Lucia da Silva Germano; Coelho, Izabel Cristina Meister; Paraizo, Mariana Martins; Paciornik, Ester Fogel

    2014-01-01

    Professionalism in medicine requires preparation for the globalized world. Our objective was to describe a project that introduces medical students to the community, hospital and laboratory activities, thereby allowing them to gain experience in people management, leadership and teamwork. Descriptive study of the process applied at a philanthropic medical school in Curitiba, Paraná. Inclusion of management and leadership practices as part of the medical degree program. The study groups consisted of fifteen students. After six months, any of the participants could be elected as a subcoordinator, with responsibility for managing tasks and representing the team in hospital departments and the community. The activities required increasing levels of responsibility. In medical schools, students' involvement in practical activities is often limited to observation. They are not required to take responsibilities or to interact with other students and stakeholders. However, they will become accountable, which thus has an adverse effect on all involved. The learning space described here aims to fill this gap by bringing students closer to the daily lives and experiences of healthcare professionals. Being a physician requires not only management and leadership, but also transferrable competencies, communication and critical thinking. These attributes can be acquired through experience of teamwork, under qualified supervision from teaching staff. Students are thus expected to develop skills to deal with and resolve conflicts, learn to share leadership, prepare others to help and replace them, adopt an approach based on mutual responsibility and discuss their performance.

  10. Teamwork: building healthier workplaces and providing safer patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    A changing healthcare landscape requires nurses to care for more patients with higher acuity during their shift than ever before. These more austere working conditions are leading to increased burnout. In addition, patient safety is not of the quality or level that is required. To build healthier workplaces where safe care is provided, formal teamwork training is recommended. Formal teamwork training programs, such as that provided by the MedTeams group, TeamSTEPPS (Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety), or participatory action research programs such as the Healthy Workplace Intervention, have decreased errors in the workplace, increased nurse satisfaction and retention rates, and decreased staff turnover. This article includes necessary determinants of teamwork, brief overviews of team-building programs, and examples of research programs that demonstrate how teamwork brings about healthier workplaces that are safer for patients. Teamwork programs can bring about these positive results when implemented and supported by the hospital system.

  11. Teamwork Reasoning and Multi-Satellite Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsella, Stacy C.; Plaunt, Christian (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA is rapidly moving towards the use of spatially distributed multiple satellites operating in near Earth orbit and Deep Space. Effective operation of such multi-satellite constellations raises many key research issues. In particular, the satellites will be required to cooperate with each other as a team that must achieve common objectives with a high degree of autonomy from ground based operations. The multi-agent research community has made considerable progress in investigating the challenges of realizing such teamwork. In this report, we discuss some of the teamwork issues that will be faced by multi-satellite operations. The basis of the discussion is a particular proposed mission, the Magnetospheric MultiScale mission to explore Earth's magnetosphere. We describe this mission and then consider how multi-agent technologies might be applied in the design and operation of these missions. We consider the potential benefits of these technologies as well as the research challenges that will be raised in applying them to NASA multi-satellite missions. We conclude with some recommendations for future work.

  12. Profil Teamwork Skill sebagai Gambaran Kemampuan Kompetitif Mahasiswa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichda Chayati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the study were: 1 to identify the profile of the Hospitality Engineering Education students’ teamwork skills, 2 to identify the profile of the Hospitality Engineering Students’ teamwork skills, 3 to describe the general overview of the students’ teamwork skills, 4 to identify the group of Bachelor program with the highest and the lowest teamwork skills, 5 to identify the group of the Associate program with the highest and the lowest teamwork skills. This study was a descriptive study. The results showed: 1 the Hospitality Engineering Education students who were at the stages of forming, storming, norming, and performing teamwork skills were 1.02%; 0.52%; 53.39%; and 45.07% respectively, 2 The Hospitality Engineering students who were at the stage of forming, storming, norming, and performing teamwork skills were 2.3%; 2.43%; 54.85%; and 40.42% respectively, 3 All of students in Bachelor and Associate programs generally have good team work skills, 4 in the Bachelor level, the groups with the highest teamwork skills were the regular Bachelor program of 2011 and the non-regular Bachelor program of 2010, while the groups with the lowest teamwork skills were the regular Bachelor program of 2009 and the non-regular Bachelor program of 2009, 5 at the Associate level, the group with the highest teamwork skills was the regular Associate program of 2011, while the group with the lowest team work skills was the regular Associate program  of 2010.

  13. The Practice of Supervision for Professional Learning: The Example of Future Forensic Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köpsén, Susanne; Nyström, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Supervision intended to support learning is of great interest in professional knowledge development. No single definition governs the implementation and enactment of supervision because of different conditions, intentions, and pedagogical approaches. Uncertainty exists at a time when knowledge and methods are undergoing constant development. This…

  14. The Practice of Supervision for Professional Learning: The Example of Future Forensic Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köpsén, Susanne; Nyström, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Supervision intended to support learning is of great interest in professional knowledge development. No single definition governs the implementation and enactment of supervision because of different conditions, intentions, and pedagogical approaches. Uncertainty exists at a time when knowledge and methods are undergoing constant development. This…

  15. Knowledge Management at CNAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callosada, C. de la

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge management at CNAT (Almaraz & Trillo NPPs) representsa significant part of our safety-oriented management system. The purpose is to generate for the stations useful knowledge, which should be then preserved and made easily accessible for everyone in the organization. The aim is to promote knowledge usage for ensuring safe plant operation and facilitating the required generational change-over. In fact, knowledge management is considered one of the main policies at CNAT, with everyone in the organization being expected to collaborate in it. Similarly, some general behavioral expectations at CNAT are directly or indirectly related to knowledge management (i.e. qualification, teamwork, learning and continuous improvement). (Author)

  16. How do organisational characteristics influence teamwork and service delivery in lung cancer diagnostic assessment programmes? A mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honein-AbouHaidar, Gladys N; Stuart-McEwan, Terri; Waddell, Tom; Salvarrey, Alexandra; Smylie, Jennifer; Dobrow, Mark J; Brouwers, Melissa C; Gagliardi, Anna R

    2017-02-23

    Diagnostic assessment programmes (DAPs) can reduce wait times for cancer diagnosis, but optimal DAP design is unknown. This study explored how organisational characteristics influenced multidisciplinary teamwork and diagnostic service delivery in lung cancer DAPs. A mixed-methods approach integrated data from descriptive qualitative interviews and medical record abstraction at 4 lung cancer DAPs. Findings were analysed with the Integrated Team Effectiveness Model. 4 DAPs at 2 teaching and 2 community hospitals in Canada. 22 staff were interviewed about organisational characteristics, target service benchmarks, and teamwork processes, determinants and outcomes; 314 medical records were reviewed for actual service benchmarks. Formal, informal and asynchronous team processes enabled service delivery and yielded many perceived benefits at the patient, staff and service levels. However, several DAP characteristics challenged teamwork and service delivery: referral volume/workload, time since launch, days per week of operation, rural-remote population, number and type of full-time/part-time human resources, staff colocation, information systems. As a result, all sites failed to meet target benchmarks (from referral to consultation median 4.0 visits, median wait time 35.0 days). Recommendations included improved information systems, more staff in all specialties, staff colocation and expanded roles for patient navigators. Findings were captured in a conceptual framework of lung cancer DAP teamwork determinants and outcomes. This study identified several DAP characteristics that could be improved to facilitate teamwork and enhance service delivery, thereby contributing to knowledge of organisational determinants of teamwork and associated outcomes. Findings can be used to update existing DAP guidelines, and by managers to plan or evaluate lung cancer DAPs. Ongoing research is needed to identify ideal roles for navigators, and staffing models tailored to case volumes

  17. How do organisational characteristics influence teamwork and service delivery in lung cancer diagnostic assessment programmes? A mixed-methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honein-AbouHaidar, Gladys N; Stuart-McEwan, Terri; Waddell, Tom; Salvarrey, Alexandra; Smylie, Jennifer; Dobrow, Mark J; Brouwers, Melissa C; Gagliardi, Anna R

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Diagnostic assessment programmes (DAPs) can reduce wait times for cancer diagnosis, but optimal DAP design is unknown. This study explored how organisational characteristics influenced multidisciplinary teamwork and diagnostic service delivery in lung cancer DAPs. Design A mixed-methods approach integrated data from descriptive qualitative interviews and medical record abstraction at 4 lung cancer DAPs. Findings were analysed with the Integrated Team Effectiveness Model. Setting 4 DAPs at 2 teaching and 2 community hospitals in Canada. Participants 22 staff were interviewed about organisational characteristics, target service benchmarks, and teamwork processes, determinants and outcomes; 314 medical records were reviewed for actual service benchmarks. Results Formal, informal and asynchronous team processes enabled service delivery and yielded many perceived benefits at the patient, staff and service levels. However, several DAP characteristics challenged teamwork and service delivery: referral volume/workload, time since launch, days per week of operation, rural–remote population, number and type of full-time/part-time human resources, staff colocation, information systems. As a result, all sites failed to meet target benchmarks (from referral to consultation median 4.0 visits, median wait time 35.0 days). Recommendations included improved information systems, more staff in all specialties, staff colocation and expanded roles for patient navigators. Findings were captured in a conceptual framework of lung cancer DAP teamwork determinants and outcomes. Conclusions This study identified several DAP characteristics that could be improved to facilitate teamwork and enhance service delivery, thereby contributing to knowledge of organisational determinants of teamwork and associated outcomes. Findings can be used to update existing DAP guidelines, and by managers to plan or evaluate lung cancer DAPs. Ongoing research is needed to identify ideal roles for

  18. Supervising Writing: Helping Postgraduate Students Develop as Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Anne; Murray, Rowena

    2015-01-01

    Research and enquiry skills are increasingly required of students at all levels of the higher education curriculum, and this requires a sophisticated pedagogical response. The question is: how can we integrate current knowledge about academic writing with current knowledge about supervision? This article integrates different approaches to writing…

  19. Supervising Writing: Helping Postgraduate Students Develop as Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Anne; Murray, Rowena

    2015-01-01

    Research and enquiry skills are increasingly required of students at all levels of the higher education curriculum, and this requires a sophisticated pedagogical response. The question is: how can we integrate current knowledge about academic writing with current knowledge about supervision? This article integrates different approaches to writing…

  20. Researching online supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedegaard Ernst Bengtsen, Søren; Mathiasen, Helle

    2014-01-01

    , or a poor substitution of such. This one-sidedness on the conceptual level makes it challenging to empirically study the deeper implications digital tools have for the supervisory dialogue. Drawing on phenomenology and systems theory we argue that we need new concepts in qualitative methodology that allow...... us to research the digital tools on their own premises as autonomous things in themselves, possessing an ontological creativity of their own. In order for qualitative research to match the ontological nature of digital tools we conclude the article by formulating three criteria of a ‘torn......’ methodology that makes room for new approaches to researching online supervision at the university....

  1. Researching online supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren S. E.; Mathiasen, Helle

    2014-01-01

    us to research the digital tools on their own premises as autonomous things in themselves, possessing an ontological creativity of their own. In order for qualitative research to match the ontological nature of digital tools we conclude the article by formulating three criteria of a ‘torn......’ methodology that makes room for new approaches to researching online supervision at the university......., or a poor substitution of such. This one-sidedness on the conceptual level makes it challenging to empirically study the deeper implications digital tools have for the supervisory dialogue. Drawing on phenomenology and systems theory we argue that we need new concepts in qualitative methodology that allow...

  2. Online supervision at the university

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Jensen, Gry Sandholm

    2015-01-01

    The article presents and condenses the background, findings and results of a one yearlong research project on online supervision and feedback at the university. The article builds on presentations and discussions in different research environments and conferences on higher education research...... supervision proves unhelpful when trying to understand how online supervision and feedback is a pedagogical phenomenon in its own right, and irreducible to the face-to-face context. Secondly we show that not enough attention has been given to the way different digital tools and platforms influence...... the supervisory dialogue in the specific supervision context. We conclude by terming this challenge in online supervision a form of ‘torn pedagogy’; that online tools and platforms destabilise and ‘tear’ traditional understandings of supervision pedagogy ‘apart’. Also, we conclude that on the backdrop of a torn...

  3. Teamwork and clinical error reporting among nurses in Korean hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jee-In; Ahn, Jeonghoon

    2015-03-01

    To examine levels of teamwork and its relationships with clinical error reporting among Korean hospital nurses. The study employed a cross-sectional survey design. We distributed a questionnaire to 674 nurses in two teaching hospitals in Korea. The questionnaire included items on teamwork and the reporting of clinical errors. We measured teamwork using the Teamwork Perceptions Questionnaire, which has five subscales including team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, mutual support, and communication. Using logistic regression analysis, we determined the relationships between teamwork and error reporting. The response rate was 85.5%. The mean score of teamwork was 3.5 out of 5. At the subscale level, mutual support was rated highest, while leadership was rated lowest. Of the participating nurses, 522 responded that they had experienced at least one clinical error in the last 6 months. Among those, only 53.0% responded that they always or usually reported clinical errors to their managers and/or the patient safety department. Teamwork was significantly associated with better error reporting. Specifically, nurses with a higher team communication score were more likely to report clinical errors to their managers and the patient safety department (odds ratio = 1.82, 95% confidence intervals [1.05, 3.14]). Teamwork was rated as moderate and was positively associated with nurses' error reporting performance. Hospital executives and nurse managers should make substantial efforts to enhance teamwork, which will contribute to encouraging the reporting of errors and improving patient safety. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Teamwork the key to good patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    In a year when, with the inception of the new Clinical Commissioning Groups, the way that healthcare is procured and delivered will see radical changes, this month's HefmA 2013 National Conference & Exhibition will have as its theme, 'Many Players, One Goal: The Patient'. As HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie reports, among the wide-ranging estates and facilities topics set for discussion will be 'Getting the patient environment right'; 'Dementia Building for the Future'; 'Waterborne Infections; Lessons Learned'; 'Incorporating lean thinking into design', and the key challenges faced by the estates and facilities sector. The keynote address, touching on a wide range of issues common to all large organisations, will be given by one of the best known 'women in football', and will also reflect particularly on the importance of teamwork.

  5. Teamwork in AAC: examining clinical perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batorowicz, Beata; Shepherd, Tracy A

    2011-03-01

    This study examines Prescription Review (PR), a model of teamwork practiced in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) centres in Ontario, Canada. PR is a process in which teams make decisions about AAC system recommendations. For this study, 92 out of 141 professionals working on AAC teams completed questionnaires measuring the benefits of PR. Findings suggest that PR is beneficial in the areas of learning, providing quality services, team support, and decision making. Participants reported satisfaction with the quality of treatment plan, the PR results, and process. Perceptions of PR were related to size of the teams, participants' years of experience, and the range of experience on teams. This study supports PR and highlights the importance of healthy working relationships.

  6. Anaesthetists' attitudes to teamwork and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flin, R; Fletcher, G; McGeorge, P; Sutherland, A; Patey, R

    2003-03-01

    A questionnaire survey was conducted with 222 anaesthetists from 11 Scottish hospitals to measure their attitudes towards human and organisational factors that can have an impact on effective team performance and consequently on patient safety. A customised version of the Operating Room Management Attitude Questionnaire (ORMAQ) was used. This measures attitudes to leadership, communication, teamwork, stress and fatigue, work values, human error and organisational climate. The respondents generally demonstrated positive attitudes towards the interpersonal aspects of their work, such as team behaviours and they recognised the importance of communication skills, such as assertiveness. However, the results suggest that some anaesthetists do not fully appreciate the debilitating effects of stress and fatigue on performance. Their responses were comparable with (and slightly more favourable than) those reported in previous ORMAQ surveys of anaesthetists and surgeons in other countries.

  7. Neural correlates of corporate camaraderie and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Catherine

    2007-11-01

    Corporate citizenship creates an ethical and professional accountability among the employee, the organization, and the outside market. Teamwork is an essential part of this corporate accountability because it increases communication and confidence within the organization and promotes camaraderie and goal completion. Cognitive neuroscience research has been able to localize socialization to various areas of the limbic system, which includes, among other structures, the hypothalamus and amygdala, and is associated with the prefrontal cortex. These neurocortical areas can be monitored while set tasks are performed experimentally or observed naturally. Within the framework of cognitive neuroscience, one can evaluate the neural architecture involved in various states of organizational behavior. One can then use this framework as an overlay in the corporate environment to track project completion and profitability.

  8. Supervised Transfer Sparse Coding

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shedivat, Maruan

    2014-07-27

    A combination of the sparse coding and transfer learn- ing techniques was shown to be accurate and robust in classification tasks where training and testing objects have a shared feature space but are sampled from differ- ent underlying distributions, i.e., belong to different do- mains. The key assumption in such case is that in spite of the domain disparity, samples from different domains share some common hidden factors. Previous methods often assumed that all the objects in the target domain are unlabeled, and thus the training set solely comprised objects from the source domain. However, in real world applications, the target domain often has some labeled objects, or one can always manually label a small num- ber of them. In this paper, we explore such possibil- ity and show how a small number of labeled data in the target domain can significantly leverage classifica- tion accuracy of the state-of-the-art transfer sparse cod- ing methods. We further propose a unified framework named supervised transfer sparse coding (STSC) which simultaneously optimizes sparse representation, domain transfer and classification. Experimental results on three applications demonstrate that a little manual labeling and then learning the model in a supervised fashion can significantly improve classification accuracy.

  9. Advanced Music Therapy Supervision Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    supervision training excerpts live in the workshop will be offered. The workshop will include demonstrating a variety of supervision methods and techniques used in A) post graduate music therapy training programs b) a variety of work contexts such as psychiatry and somatic music psychotherapy. The workshop......The presentation will illustrate training models in supervision for experienced music therapists where transference/counter transference issues are in focus. Musical, verbal and body related tools will be illustrated from supervision practice by the presenters. A possibility to experience small...

  10. Advanced Music Therapy Supervision Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    supervision training excerpts live in the workshop will be offered. The workshop will include demonstrating a variety of supervision methods and techniques used in A) post graduate music therapy training programs b) a variety of work contexts such as psychiatry and somatic music psychotherapy. The workshop......The presentation will illustrate training models in supervision for experienced music therapists where transference/counter transference issues are in focus. Musical, verbal and body related tools will be illustrated from supervision practice by the presenters. A possibility to experience small...

  11. Improving teamwork between students from two professional programmes in dental education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisnert, L; Karlsson, M; Franklin, I; Lindh, L; Wretlind, K

    2012-01-01

    In Sweden, the National Board of Health and Welfare forecasts a decrease in dentists with 26% and an increase in dental hygienists with 47% until the year of 2023. This, together with changes in both epidemiology, especially of dental caries, and political priorities, calls for an effective and well-developed cooperation between dentists and dental hygienists in future dentistry. Hence, the aim of this project was to investigate whether highlighting teamwork during the undergraduate studies of dental students and dental hygiene students could improve the students’ holistic view on patients as well as their knowledge of and insight into each other’s future professions. Thirty-four dental students and 24 dental hygiene students participated in the study. At the beginning of their final year in undergraduate education, a questionnaire testing the level of knowledge of the dental hygienists’ clinical competences was completed by both groups of students. In addition, activities intending to improve teamwork quality included the following: (i) a seminar with a dentist representing the Public Dental Health Services in Sweden, (ii) dental students as supervisors for dental hygiene students, (iii) planning and treatment for shared patients and (iv) students’ presentations of the treatments and their outcomes at a final seminar. The project was ended by the students answering the above-mentioned questionnaire for the second time, followed by an evaluation of the different activities included in the study. The knowledge of dental hygienists’ competences showed higher scores in almost all questions. Both groups of students considered the following aspects important: seminars with external participants, dental students acting as supervisors and planning and treating shared patients. By initiating and encouraging teamwork between dental students and dental hygiene students, it is possible to increase knowledge on dental hygienists’ competence and also to develop and

  12. Study of supervising control over the foodstuff offered to the students, and nutritional-hygienic knowledge of the parents and educators at the primary schools located in the district of population research station of khorramabad city in the school year 2007-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    nahid Jahanbani

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Proper nutrition is among the most important needs to provide physical and mental health and in other words,it is the essential principle of the society good health.Offering healthy eating to children, the suitable preservation and distribution of foodstuff, and the control of the different sites of the maintenance and allotment of the nutritive substances at the schools are considered to be of foremost importance.So the present study is intended to specify the extent of the control and supervision of the allotment and distribution of the foodstuff to the students and the amount of the nutritional and hygienic knowledge of the parents and educators at the primary schools in 2007. Material and Methods: This descriptive cross sectional study conducted on 5695 male and female students studying at 39 primary schools of Khorramabad (district one. In order to scrutinize the status of the supervision of supply and distribution of the nutritive substances to the students and the measurement of the amount of the nutritional and hygienic knowledge of the parents and educators, a census was carried out. It suffices to say that the parents’ samples were selected apropos the arrangement of the classificatory sampling,cluster sampling, the two-stage sampling, and finally systematic sampling.The data gathering tool was a two self-made questionnaire completed by the interviewees themselves. Subsequently, the data were described with respect to the frequency distribution tables, the x2 independence tests and SPSS,V.15 saftware. Results: It was considered that 29.7% of the primary schools possessed buffets. Besides, 40.5% of them had hygiene educators. The amount of the attentiveness of the parents and educators to the control and supervision of the nutritive substances at the buffets was 61.5%, which is considered as a relatively good estimate. In this way, it is posited that, there exists a significant relationship between the existences of buffets at the

  13. Teamwork and leadership in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Sabina; Johansson, Anna C; Tschan, Franziska; Semmer, Norbert K; Rock, Laura; Howell, Michael D; Marsch, Stephan

    2011-06-14

    Despite substantial efforts to make cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) algorithms known to healthcare workers, the outcome of CPR has remained poor during the past decades. Resuscitation teams often deviate from algorithms of CPR. Emerging evidence suggests that in addition to technical skills of individual rescuers, human factors such as teamwork and leadership affect adherence to algorithms and hence the outcome of CPR. This review describes the state of the science linking team interactions to the performance of CPR. Because logistical barriers make controlled measurement of team interaction in the earliest moments of real-life resuscitations challenging, our review focuses mainly on high-fidelity human simulator studies. This technique allows in-depth investigation of complex human interactions using precise and reproducible methods. It also removes variability in the clinical parameters of resuscitation, thus letting researchers study human factors and team interactions without confounding by clinical variability from resuscitation to resuscitation. Research has shown that a prolonged process of team building and poor leadership behavior are associated with significant shortcomings in CPR. Teamwork and leadership training have been shown to improve subsequent team performance during resuscitation and have recently been included in guidelines for advanced life support courses. We propose that further studies on the effects of team interactions on performance of complex medical emergency interventions such as resuscitation are needed. Future efforts to better understand the influence of team factors (e.g., team member status, team hierarchy, handling of human errors), individual factors (e.g., sex differences, perceived stress), and external factors (e.g., equipment, algorithms, institutional characteristics) on team performance in resuscitation situations are critical to improve CPR performance and medical outcomes of patients.

  14. Measuring teamwork in primary care: Triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Judith Belle; Ryan, Bridget L; Thorpe, Cathy; Markle, Emma K R; Hutchison, Brian; Glazier, Richard H

    2015-09-01

    This article describes the triangulation of qualitative dimensions, reflecting high functioning teams, with the results of standardized teamwork measures. The study used a mixed methods design using qualitative and quantitative approaches to assess teamwork in 19 Family Health Teams in Ontario, Canada. This article describes dimensions from the qualitative phase using grounded theory to explore the issues and challenges to teamwork. Two quantitative measures were used in the study, the Team Climate Inventory (TCI) and the Providing Effective Resources and Knowledge (PERK) scale. For the triangulation analysis, the mean scores of these measures were compared with the qualitatively derived ratings for the dimensions. The final sample for the qualitative component was 107 participants. The qualitative analysis identified 9 dimensions related to high team functioning such as common philosophy, scope of practice, conflict resolution, change management, leadership, and team evolution. From these dimensions, teams were categorized numerically as high, moderate, or low functioning. Three hundred seventeen team members completed the survey measures. Mean site scores for the TCI and PERK were 3.87 and 3.88, respectively (of 5). The TCI was associated will all dimensions except for team location, space allocation, and executive director leadership. The PERK was associated with all dimensions except team location. Data triangulation provided qualitative and quantitative evidence of what constitutes teamwork. Leadership was pivotal in forging a common philosophy and encouraging team collaboration. Teams used conflict resolution strategies and adapted to the changes they encountered. These dimensions advanced the team's evolution toward a high functioning team. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Teamwork of clinical teachers in postgraduate medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slootweg, Irene Arida

    2016-08-01

    Teamwork among clinical teachers is essential for continuous improvement of postgraduate medical training. This thesis deconstructs teamwork in four studies, mostly based on qualitative research approaches and one study utilizes mixed methods. We found that clinical teachers do train residents, but individually rather than as a team. The programme directors as leaders focus more on teaching activities than on the collective ambition and mutual engagement of clinical teachers. During the teaching meetings, mistakes and conflicts are mainly discussed in a general sense and are often neither directed at the individual, nor result-oriented. A valid evaluation instrument is constructed to improve teamwork.

  16. Bias Modeling for Distantly Supervised Relation Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Distant supervision (DS automatically annotates free text with relation mentions from existing knowledge bases (KBs, providing a way to alleviate the problem of insufficient training data for relation extraction in natural language processing (NLP. However, the heuristic annotation process does not guarantee the correctness of the generated labels, promoting a hot research issue on how to efficiently make use of the noisy training data. In this paper, we model two types of biases to reduce noise: (1 bias-dist to model the relative distance between points (instances and classes (relation centers; (2 bias-reward to model the possibility of each heuristically generated label being incorrect. Based on the biases, we propose three noise tolerant models: MIML-dist, MIML-dist-classify, and MIML-reward, building on top of a state-of-the-art distantly supervised learning algorithm. Experimental evaluations compared with three landmark methods on the KBP dataset validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  17. Public Supervision over Private Relationships : Towards European Supervision Private Law?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cherednychenko, O.O.

    2014-01-01

    The rise of public supervision over private relationships in many areas of private law has led to the development of what, in the author’s view, could be called ‘European supervision private law’. This emerging body of law forms part of European regulatory private law and is made up of contract-rela

  18. Supervising PETE Candidates Using the Situational Supervision Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Linda S.; Johnson, Lynn V.

    2012-01-01

    Physical education teacher candidates (PETCs) often, as part of their curricular requirements, engage in early field experiences that prepare them for student teaching. Matching the PETC's developmental level with the mentor's supervision style enhances this experience. The situational supervision model, based on the situational leadership model,…

  19. Exploring Clinical Supervision as Instrument for Effective Teacher Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibara, E. C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines clinical supervision approaches that have the potential to promote and implement effective teacher supervision in Nigeria. The various approaches have been analysed based on the conceptual framework of instructional supervisory behavior. The findings suggest that a clear distinction can be made between the prescriptive and…

  20. Supervision Learning as Conceptual Threshold Crossing: When Supervision Gets "Medieval"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This article presumes that supervision is a category of teaching, and that we all "learn" how to teach better. So it enquires into what novice supervisors need to learn. An anonymised digital questionnaire sought data from supervisors [n226] on their experiences of supervision to find out what was difficult, and supervisor interviews…

  1. Supervision Learning as Conceptual Threshold Crossing: When Supervision Gets "Medieval"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This article presumes that supervision is a category of teaching, and that we all "learn" how to teach better. So it enquires into what novice supervisors need to learn. An anonymised digital questionnaire sought data from supervisors [n226] on their experiences of supervision to find out what was difficult, and supervisor interviews…

  2. Supervision of Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs: A Synthesis of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, James E.; Williams, David L.

    1997-01-01

    A review of literature from 1964 to 1993 found that supervised agricultural experience (SAE) teachers, students, parents, and employers value the teachers' supervisory role. Implementation practices vary widely and there are no cumulative data to guide policies and standards for SAE supervision. (SK)

  3. Learning collaborative teamwork: an argument for incorporating the humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Pippa; Brajtman, Susan; Weaver, Lynda; Grassau, Pamela Anne; Varpio, Lara

    2014-11-01

    A holistic, collaborative interprofessional team approach, which includes patients and families as significant decision-making members, has been proposed to address the increasing burden being placed on the health-care system. This project hypothesized that learning activities related to the humanities during clinical placements could enhance interprofessional teamwork. Through an interprofessional team of faculty, clinical staff, students, and patient representatives, we developed and piloted the self-learning module, "interprofessional education for collaborative person-centred practice through the humanities". The module was designed to provide learners from different professions and educational levels with a clinical placement/residency experience that would enable them, through a lens of the humanities, to better understand interprofessional collaborative person-centred care without structured interprofessional placement activities. Learners reported the self-paced and self-directed module to be a satisfactory learning experience in all four areas of care at our institution, and certain attitudes and knowledge were significantly and positively affected. The module's evaluation resulted in a revised edition providing improved structure and instruction for students with no experience in self-directed learning. The module was recently adapted into an interactive bilingual (French and English) online e-learning module to facilitate its integration into the pre-licensure curriculum at colleges and universities.

  4. Integrating teamwork, clinician occupational well-being and patient safety - development of a conceptual framework based on a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, Annalena; Manser, Tanja

    2016-07-19

    There is growing evidence that teamwork in hospitals is related to both patient outcomes and clinician occupational well-being. Furthermore, clinician well-being is associated with patient safety. Despite considerable research activity, few studies include all three concepts, and their interrelations have not yet been investigated systematically. To advance our understanding of these potentially complex interrelations we propose an integrative framework taking into account current evidence and research gaps identified in a systematic review. We conducted a literature search in six major databases (Medline, PsycArticles, PsycInfo, Psyndex, ScienceDirect, and Web of Knowledge). Inclusion criteria were: peer reviewed papers published between January 2000 and June 2015 investigating a statistical relationship between at least two of the three concepts; teamwork, patient safety, and clinician occupational well-being in hospital settings, including practicing nurses and physicians. We assessed methodological quality using a standardized rating system and qualitatively appraised and extracted relevant data, such as instruments, analyses and outcomes. The 98 studies included in this review were highly diverse regarding quality, methodology and outcomes. We found support for the existence of independent associations between teamwork, clinician occupational well-being and patient safety. However, we identified several conceptual and methodological limitations. The main barrier to advancing our understanding of the causal relationships between teamwork, clinician well-being and patient safety is the lack of an integrative, theory-based, and methodologically thorough approach investigating the three concepts simultaneously and longitudinally. Based on psychological theory and our findings, we developed an integrative framework that addresses these limitations and proposes mechanisms by which these concepts might be linked. Knowledge about the mechanisms underlying the

  5. Inductive Supervised Quantum Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monràs, Alex; Sentís, Gael; Wittek, Peter

    2017-05-01

    In supervised learning, an inductive learning algorithm extracts general rules from observed training instances, then the rules are applied to test instances. We show that this splitting of training and application arises naturally, in the classical setting, from a simple independence requirement with a physical interpretation of being nonsignaling. Thus, two seemingly different definitions of inductive learning happen to coincide. This follows from the properties of classical information that break down in the quantum setup. We prove a quantum de Finetti theorem for quantum channels, which shows that in the quantum case, the equivalence holds in the asymptotic setting, that is, for large numbers of test instances. This reveals a natural analogy between classical learning protocols and their quantum counterparts, justifying a similar treatment, and allowing us to inquire about standard elements in computational learning theory, such as structural risk minimization and sample complexity.

  6. Indicators of Effective Teamwork. Ideas for Training Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Margie

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on recognizing key indicators for developing teamwork and collaboration among child care staff. Addresses communicating clearly, interacting respectfully, demonstrating trust, negotiating different perspectives, building on each other's strengths, and promoting reliability and responsibility. Identifies strategies to cultivate growth in…

  7. Health science center faculty attitudes towards interprofessional education and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Jodie C; Gosselin, Kevin; Bentley, Regina

    2017-10-12

    The attitudes of faculty towards interprofessional education (IPE) and teamwork impact the education of health professions education (HPE) students. This paper reports on a study evaluating attitudes from health professions educators towards IPE and teamwork at one academic health science center (HSC) where modest IPE initiatives have commenced. Drawing from the results of a previous investigation, this study was conducted to examine current attitudes of the faculty responsible for the training of future healthcare professionals. Survey data were collected to evaluate attitudes from HSC faculty, dentistry, nursing, medicine, pharmacy and public health. In general, positive HSC faculty attitudes towards interprofessional learning, education, and teamwork were significantly predicted by those affiliated with the component of nursing. Faculty development aimed at changing attitudes and increasing understanding of IPE and teamwork are critical. Results of this study serve as an underpinning to leverage strengths and evaluate weakness in initiating IPE.

  8. Teamwork and Collaboration for Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, E Patchen

    2016-04-01

    The surgeon has been regarded as the "captain of the ship" in the operating room (OR) for many years, but cannot accomplish successful operative intervention without the rest of the team. Review of the pertinent English-language literature. Many reports demonstrate very different impressions of teamwork and communication in the OR held by different members of the surgical team. Objective measures of teamwork and communication demonstrate a reduction in complications including surgical site infections with improved teamwork and communication, with fewer distractions such as noise, and with effective use of checklists. Efforts to improve teamwork and communication and promote the effective use of checklists promote patient safety and improved outcomes for patients with reduction in surgical site infections.

  9. Situational Awareness Support to Enhance Teamwork in Collaborative Working Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulyk, Olga Anatoliyivna; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; van der Vet, P.E.; Nijholt, Antinus; van der Veer, Gerrit C.; Whitworth, B.; de Moor, A.

    This chapter addresses awareness support to enhance teamwork in co-located collaborative environments. In particular, we focus on the concept of situational awareness which is essential for successful team collaboration. Mutual situational awareness leads to informal social interactions, development

  10. Teaching and Assessing Teamwork Skills in Engineering and Computer Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Lingard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available To be successful in today's workplace, engineering and computer science students must possess high levels of teamwork skills. Unfortunately, most engineering programs provide little or no specific instruction in this area. This paper outlines an assessment-driven approach toward teaching teamwork skills. Working with the Industrial Advisory Board for the College, a set of performance criteria for teamwork was developed. This set of criteria was used to build an assessment instrument to measure the extent to which students are able to achieve the necessary skills. This set of criteria provides a clear basis for the development of an approach toward teaching teamwork skills. Furthermore, the results from the assessment can be used to adjust the teaching techniques to address the particular skills where students show some weaknesses. Although this effort is in the early stages, the approach seems promising and will be improved over time.

  11. Teamwork as a nursing competence at Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Helena Henriques Camelo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim in this study was to identify how Intensive Care Unit nurses perceive professional competences in thecare team. Methodology. Qualitative multiple case study with an exploratory focus. The sample consisted of 24 nurses from Intensive Care Units (ICU at two large hospitals. To collect the information, direct observation and - structured, non-structuredand participant - interviews were used. Results. Ninety-six percent of the participants were women, 79% were less than 40 years old, and 63% possessed less than five years of professional experience in ICU. Data analysis revealed three study categories: teamwork as a nursing management tool, improving teamwork, and interpersonal communication for teamwork. Conclusion. At the ICU where the nurses work, a teamwork strategy is observed, which demands cooperation and participation by other disciplines.

  12. Situational Awareness Support to Enhance Teamwork in Collaborative Working Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulyk, O.; Dijk, van E.M.A.G.; Vet, van der P.E.; Nijholt, A.; Veer, van der G.C.; Whitworth, B.; de Moor, A.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter addresses awareness support to enhance teamwork in co-located collaborative environments. In particular, we focus on the concept of situational awareness which is essential for successful team collaboration. Mutual situational awareness leads to informal social interactions, development

  13. AN ANALYSIS OF TEAMWORK IN THE INSURANCE COMPANIES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luka Stanić; Ivana Miklošević; Jerko Glavaš

    2017-01-01

    ...: a combination of science, the real sector and local government. The basis of this research is teamwork in insurance companies operating in eastern Croatia whose indicators reflect on other insurance companies in Croatia and beyond...

  14. Defining the technical skills of teamwork in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, A N; Undre, S; Vincent, C A

    2006-08-01

    Developments in surgical technology and procedure have accelerated and altered the work carried out in the operating theatre/room, but team modelling and training have not co-evolved. Evidence suggests that team structure and role allocation are sometimes unclear and contentious, and coordination and communication are not fully effective. To improve teamwork, clinicians need models that specify team resources, structure, process and tasks. They also need measures to assess performance and methods to train teamwork strategically. An effective training strategy might be to incorporate teamwork with other technical skills training in simulation. However, the measures employed for enhancing teamwork in training and practice will need to vary in their object of analysis, level of technical specificity, and system scope.

  15. Supervision in Special Language Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez-Tighe, Viola

    Too little emphasis is placed on instructional supervision in special language programs for limited-English-proficient students. Such supervision can provide a mechanism to promote the growth of instructional staff, improve the instructional program, and lead to curriculum development. Many supervisors are undertrained and unable to provide…

  16. Unfinished Business: Subjectivity and Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Bill

    2005-01-01

    Within the now burgeoning literature on doctoral research education, postgraduate research supervision continues to be a problematical issue, practically and theoretically. This paper seeks to explore and understand supervision as a distinctive kind of pedagogic practice. Informed by a larger research project, it draws on poststructuralism,…

  17. Supervision af psykoterapi via Skype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Grünbaum, Liselotte

    2011-01-01

    clinical experience of Skype™ in supervision, mainly of psychoanalytic child psychotherapy, is presented and reflected upon. Finally, the reluctance of the Danish Board for Psychologists’s to recognize audiovisual distance supervision as part of the required training demands is discussed. It is concluded...

  18. Supervisees' Perception of Clinical Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Supervisors must become aware of the possible conflicts that could arise during clinical supervision. It is important that supervisors communicate their roles and expectations effectively with their supervisees. This paper supports the notion that supervision is a mutual agreement between the supervisee and the supervisor and the roles of…

  19. Assessment of Counselors' Supervision Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Ali; Sürücü, Abdullah; Yavuz, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate elementary and high school counselors' supervision processes and efficiency of their supervision. The interview method was used as it was thought to be better for realizing the aim of the study. The study group was composed of ten counselors who were chosen through purposeful sampling method. Data were…

  20. Tværfaglig supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tværfaglig supervision dækker over supervision af forskellige faggrupper. Det er en kompleks disciplin der stiller store krav tl supervisor. Bogens første del præsenterer fire faglige supervisionsmodeller: En almen, en psykodynamisk, en kognitiv adfærdsterapeutisk og en narrativ. Anden del...

  1. Tværfaglig supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tværfaglig supervision dækker over supervision af forskellige faggrupper. Det er en kompleks disciplin der stiller store krav tl supervisor. Bogens første del præsenterer fire faglige supervisionsmodeller: En almen, en psykodynamisk, en kognitiv adfærdsterapeutisk og en narrativ. Anden del henven...

  2. Supervision Duty of School Principals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kürşat YILMAZ

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Supervision by school administrators is becoming more and more important. The change in the roles ofschool administrators has a great effect on that increase. At present, school administrators are consideredmore than as technical directors, but as instructional leaders. This increased the importance of schooladministrators’ expected supervision acts. In this respect, the aim of this study is to make a conceptualanalysis about school administrators’ supervision duties. For this reason, a literature review related withsupervision and contemporary supervision approaches was done, and the official documents concerningsupervision were examined. As a result, it can be said that school administrators’ supervision duties havebecome very important. And these duties must certainly be carried out by school administrators.

  3. Group supervision for general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galina Nielsen, Helena; Sofie Davidsen, Annette; Dalsted, Rikke;

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Group supervision is a sparsely researched method for professional development in general practice. The aim of this study was to explore general practitioners' (GPs') experiences of the benefits of group supervision for improving the treatment of mental disorders. METHODS: One long...... considered important prerequisites for disclosing and discussing professional problems. CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicate that participation in a supervision group can be beneficial for maintaining and developing GPs' skills in dealing with patients with mental health problems. Group supervision......-established supervision group was studied closely for six months by observing the group sessions, and by interviewing GPs and their supervisors, individually and collectively. The interviews were recorded digitally and transcribed verbatim. The data were analysed using systematic text condensation. RESULTS: The GPs found...

  4. Teamwork competence and academic motivation in computer science engineering studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Martínez, Jorge Enrique; García Martín, Javier; Sierra Alonso, Almudena

    2014-01-01

    The present work is focused on studying two issues: the “teamwork” generic competence and the “academic motivation”. Currently the professional profile of engineers has a strong component of teamwork. On the other hand, motivational profile of students determines their tendencies when they come to work in team, as well as their performance at work. In this context we suggest four hypotheses: (H1) students improve their teamwork capacity by specific training and carrying out a set of ...

  5. Teamwork Assessment Tools in Modern Surgical Practice: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    George Whittaker; Hamid Abboudi; Muhammed Shamim Khan; Prokar Dasgupta; Kamran Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Deficiencies in teamwork skills have been shown to contribute to the occurrence of adverse events during surgery. Consequently, several teamwork assessment tools have been developed to evaluate trainee nontechnical performance. This paper aims to provide an overview of these instruments and review the validity of each tool. Furthermore, the present paper aims to review the deficiencies surrounding training and propose several recommendations to address these issues. Methods. A s...

  6. Infusing Technical Communication and Teamwork within the ECE Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    KEDROWICZ, By April; WATANABE, Sundy

    2006-01-01

    This paper highlights a unique approach to infusing formal training and practice in oral and written communication and teamwork development in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at the University of Utah. Faculty and graduate (Ph.D.) students from the College of Humanities have teamed up with faculty from engineering to develop communication and teamwork instruction that is integrated into the existing engineering curriculum. These skills are used as a vehicle ...

  7. Personality, Relationship Conflict, and Teamwork-Related Mental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vîrgă, Delia; CurŞeu, Petru Lucian; Maricuţoiu, Laurenţiu; Sava, Florin A.; Macsinga, Irina; Măgurean, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    This study seeks to explore whether neuroticism, agreeableness, and conscientiousness moderate the influence of relationship conflict experienced in groups on changes in group members' evaluative cognitions related to teamwork quality (teamwork-related mental models). Data from 216 students, nested in 48 groups were analyzed using a multilevel modeling approach. Our results show that the experience of relationship conflict leads to a negative shift from the pre-task to the post-task teamwork-related mental models. Moreover, the results indicate that conscientiousness buffered the negative association between relationship conflict and the change in teamwork-related mental models. Our results did not support the hypothesized moderating effect of agreeableness and show that the detrimental effect of relationship conflict on the shift in teamwork-related mental models is accentuated for group members scoring low rather than high on neuroticism. These findings open new research venues for exploring the association between personality, coping styles and change in teamwork-related mental models. PMID:25372143

  8. Personality, relationship conflict, and teamwork-related mental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vîrgă, Delia; Curşeu, Petru Lucian; CurŞeu, Petru Lucian; Maricuţoiu, Laurenţiu; Sava, Florin A; Macsinga, Irina; Măgurean, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    This study seeks to explore whether neuroticism, agreeableness, and conscientiousness moderate the influence of relationship conflict experienced in groups on changes in group members' evaluative cognitions related to teamwork quality (teamwork-related mental models). Data from 216 students, nested in 48 groups were analyzed using a multilevel modeling approach. Our results show that the experience of relationship conflict leads to a negative shift from the pre-task to the post-task teamwork-related mental models. Moreover, the results indicate that conscientiousness buffered the negative association between relationship conflict and the change in teamwork-related mental models. Our results did not support the hypothesized moderating effect of agreeableness and show that the detrimental effect of relationship conflict on the shift in teamwork-related mental models is accentuated for group members scoring low rather than high on neuroticism. These findings open new research venues for exploring the association between personality, coping styles and change in teamwork-related mental models.

  9. Assessment of teamwork during structured interdisciplinary rounds on medical units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Kevin J; Boudreau, Yvonne N; Creden, Amanda J; Slade, Maureen E; Williams, Mark V

    2012-01-01

    Interdisciplinary rounds (IDR) provide a means to assemble hospital team members and improve collaboration. Little is known about teamwork during IDR. To evaluate and characterize teamwork during IDR. Cross-sectional observational study. Six medical units which had implemented structured interdisciplinary rounds (SIDR). We adapted the Observational Teamwork Assessment for Surgery (OTAS) tool, a behaviorally anchored rating scale shown to be reliable and valid in surgical settings. OTAS provides scores ranging from 0 to 6 (0 = problematic behavior; 6 = exemplary behavior) across 5 domains (communication, coordination, cooperation/backup behavior, leadership, and monitoring/situational awareness) and for prespecified subteams. Two researchers conducted direct observations using the adapted OTAS tool. We conducted 7-8 independent observations for each unit (total = 44) and 20 joint observations. Inter-rater reliability was excellent at the unit level (Spearman's rho = 0.75), and good across domains (rho = 0.53-0.68) and subteams (rho = 0.53-0.76) with the exception of the physician subteam, for which it was poor (rho = 0.35). Though teamwork scores were generally high, we found differences across units, with a median (interquartile range [IQR]) 4.5 (3.9-4.9) for the lowest and 5.4 (5.3-5.5) for the highest performing unit (P teamwork during SIDR across units, domains, and most subteams. Variation in performance suggests a need to improve consistency of teamwork and emphasizes the importance of leadership. Copyright © 2012 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  10. Overlap between empathy, teamwork and integrative approach to patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Bianco, Joseph A; Mann, Douglas; Massello, David; Calabrese, Leonard H

    2014-10-14

    Abstract Background: Empathy, teamwork and an integrative approach to patient care share common denominators such as interpersonal skills and understanding patients' concerns. Thus, a significant overlap among measures of empathy, teamwork and integrative approach to patient care is expected. Aim: This study examined the magnitude of overlap (shared variance) among three measures of empathy, teamwork and an integrative approach to patient care. Methods: Three-hundred seventy-three medical students completed the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE), the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration (JSAPNC) and Integrative Patient Care (IPC). Results: Significant overlaps were found among the three measures (p < 0.01), ranging from 13% (r = 0.36), between JSAPNC and IPC, to 18% (r = 0.42), between JSE and JSAPNC, and 30% (r = 0.55) between JSE and IPC for the total sample. Pattern of findings was similar for men and women. In a multiple regression model, a significant multiple correlation (R = 0.60, p < 0.01) was obtained in correlating scores on the JSE with the JSAPNC, and IPC scores, controlling for gender effect (men = 0 and women = 1). Conclusions: The significant links between empathy, teamwork and IPC support the common denominator assumption. The findings that IPC shares common variance with empathy and teamwork have implications for medical education curriculum, suggesting that implementation of integrative patient care can improve empathic engagement in patient care and orientation toward teamwork.

  11. Modeling and simulating human teamwork behaviors using intelligent agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaocong; Yen, John

    2004-12-01

    Among researchers in multi-agent systems there has been growing interest in using intelligent agents to model and simulate human teamwork behaviors. Teamwork modeling is important for training humans in gaining collaborative skills, for supporting humans in making critical decisions by proactively gathering, fusing, and sharing information, and for building coherent teams with both humans and agents working effectively on intelligence-intensive problems. Teamwork modeling is also challenging because the research has spanned diverse disciplines from business management to cognitive science, human discourse, and distributed artificial intelligence. This article presents an extensive, but not exhaustive, list of work in the field, where the taxonomy is organized along two main dimensions: team social structure and social behaviors. Along the dimension of social structure, we consider agent-only teams and mixed human-agent teams. Along the dimension of social behaviors, we consider collaborative behaviors, communicative behaviors, helping behaviors, and the underpinning of effective teamwork-shared mental models. The contribution of this article is that it presents an organizational framework for analyzing a variety of teamwork simulation systems and for further studying simulated teamwork behaviors.

  12. Developing and managing embedded systems and products methods, techniques, tools, processes, and teamwork

    CERN Document Server

    Fowler, Kim

    2014-01-01

    This Expert Guide gives you the knowledge, methods and techniques to develop and manage embedded systems successfully.  It shows that teamwork, development procedures, and program management require unique and wide ranging skills to develop a system, skills that most people can attain with persistence and effort. With this book you will: Understand the various business aspects of a project from budgets and schedules through contracts and market studiesUnderstand the place and timing for simulations, bench tests, and prototypes, and understand the differences between various formal metho

  13. Interdisciplinary teamwork and collaboration: an essential element of a positive practice environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, Patricia Reid; Gross, Anne H; Milliman-Richard, Yolanda J; Lacey, Kara

    2010-01-01

    Interdisciplinary collaboration is critical to excellence in patient care delivery. There is a growing consensus that the basic education for all clinical professionals should include the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to effectively participate in interdisciplinary teams, and that health care organizations should continue this education in the practice setting. The authors examine the large and growing evidence base regarding interdisciplinary collaboration and teamwork and explore the relationship between interdisciplinary collaboration and patient, workforce, and organizational outcomes. Antecedents and attributes of the construct are presented, as well as structures, models, and programs that are being implemented by health care organizations and academic settings to facilitate and advance interdisciplinary collaboration in clinical practice.

  14. Introducing the individual Teamwork Observation and Feedback Tool (iTOFT): Development and description of a new interprofessional teamwork measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thistlethwaite, Jill; Dallest, Kathy; Moran, Monica; Dunston, Roger; Roberts, Chris; Eley, Diann; Bogossian, Fiona; Forman, Dawn; Bainbridge, Lesley; Drynan, Donna; Fyfe, Sue

    2016-07-01

    The individual Teamwork Observation and Feedback Tool (iTOFT) was devised by a consortium of seven universities in recognition of the need for a means of observing and giving feedback to individual learners undertaking an interprofessional teamwork task. It was developed through a literature review of the existing teamwork assessment tools, a discussion of accreditation standards for the health professions, Delphi consultation and field-testing with an emphasis on its feasibility and acceptability for formative assessment. There are two versions: the Basic tool is for use with students who have little clinical teamwork experience and lists 11 observable behaviours under two headings: 'shared decision making' and 'working in a team'. The Advanced version is for senior students and junior health professionals and has 10 observable behaviours under four headings: 'shared decision making', 'working in a team', 'leadership', and 'patient safety'. Both versions include a comprehensive scale and item descriptors. Further testing is required to focus on its validity and educational impact.

  15. A simulation-based curriculum to introduce key teamwork principles to entering medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arna; Slagle, Jason M; Mercaldo, Nathaniel D; Booker, Ray; Miller, Anne; France, Daniel J; Rawn, Lisa; Weinger, Matthew B

    2016-11-16

    Failures of teamwork and interpersonal communication have been cited as a major patient safety issue. Although healthcare is increasingly being provided in interdisciplinary teams, medical school curricula have traditionally not explicitly included the specific knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors required to function effectively as part of such teams. As part of a new "Foundations" core course for beginning medical students that provided a two-week introduction to the most important themes in modern healthcare, a multidisciplinary team, in collaboration with the Center for Experiential Learning and Assessment, was asked to create an experiential introduction to teamwork and interpersonal communication. We designed and implemented a novel, all-day course to teach second-week medical students basic teamwork and interpersonal principles and skills using immersive simulation methods. Students' anonymous comprehensive course evaluations were collected at the end of the day. Through four years of iterative refinement based on students' course evaluations, faculty reflection, and debriefing, the course changed and matured. Four hundred twenty evaluations were collected. Course evaluations were positive with almost all questions having means and medians greater than 5 out of 7 across all 4 years. Sequential year comparisons were of greatest interest for examining the effects of year-to-year curricular improvements. Differences were not detected among any of the course evaluation questions between 2007 and 2008 except that more students in 2008 felt that the course further developed their "Decision Making Abilities" (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.07-2.67). With extensive changes to the syllabus and debriefer selection/assignment, concomitant improvements were observed in these aspects between 2008 and 2009 (OR = 2.11, 95% CI: 1.28-3.50). Substantive improvements in specific exercises also yielded significant improvements in the evaluations of those exercises. This

  16. Interaction Dynamics in AEC Global Teamwork

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renate Fruchter; Shubashri Swaminathan; Naohiro Matsumura; Yukio Ohsawa

    2008-01-01

    Architecture,engineering,and construction (AEC) global project teamwork is communication in-tensive and relies heavily on synchronous and asynchronous information and collaboration technologies (ICT).We explore in this paper how an asynchronous ICT,called ThinkTank,reshaped the work practice of design-construction global teams.and how the interaction with this ICT reshaped the purpose and benefits of its use.ThinkTank is a web-based asynchronous collaboration and discussion forum.We introduce the influence diffusion model (IDM) that formalizes the process of identifying the influence of people,messages,and terms mathematically.Discovering who the influence leaders in project teams are can be beneficial and critical from a corporate management perspective.since they can guide or motivate the team towards suc-cessful actions and outcomes.We present the ThinkTank-IDM integrated system and its validation with a testbed of 53 AEC global team project archived in ThinkTank over 8 years.

  17. Developing a Peer Mentorship Program to Increase Competence in Clinical Supervision in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxwell, Aleksandra A; Kennard, Beth D; Rodgers, Cynthia; Wolfe, Kristin L; Cassedy, Hannah F; Thomas, Anna

    2017-05-03

    Supervision has recently been recognized as a core competency for clinical psychologists. This recognition of supervision as a distinct competency has evolved in the context of an overall focus on competency-based education and training in health service psychology, and has recently gained momentum. Few clinical psychology doctoral programs offer formal training experiences in providing supervision. A pilot peer mentorship program (PMP) where graduate students were trained in the knowledge and practice of supervision was developed. The focus of the PMP was to develop basic supervision skills in advanced clinical psychology graduate students, as well as to train junior doctoral students in fundamental clinical and practical skills. Advanced doctoral students were matched to junior doctoral students to gain experience in and increase knowledge base in best practices of supervision skills. The 9-month program consisted of monthly mentorship meetings and three training sessions. The results suggested that mentors reported a 30% or more shift from the category of not competent to needs improvement or competent, in the following supervision competencies: theories of supervision, improved skill in supervision modalities, acquired knowledge in supervision, and supervision experience. Furthermore, 50% of the mentors reported that they were not competent in supervision experience at baseline and only 10% reported that they were not competent at the end of the program. Satisfaction data suggested that satisfaction with the program was high, with 75% of participants indicating increased knowledge base in supervision, and 90% indicating that it was a positive addition to their training program. This program was feasible and acceptable and appears to have had a positive impact on the graduate students who participated. Students reported both high satisfaction with the program as well as an increase in knowledge base and experience in supervision skills.

  18. Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Alexander B; Shea, Sandra; Czeisler, Charles A; Landrigan, Christopher P; Leape, Lucian

    2011-01-01

    educational value. The caseload can be so great that inadequate reflective time is left for learning based on clinical experiences. In addition, supervision is often vaguely defined and discontinuous. Medical malpractice data indicate that resident physicians are frequently named in lawsuits, most often for lack of supervision. The recommendations are: The ACGME should adjust resident physicians workload requirements to optimize educational value. Resident physicians as well as faculty should be involved in work redesign that eliminates nonessential and noneducational activity from resident physician dutiesMechanisms should be developed for identifying in real time when a resident physician's workload is excessive, and processes developed to activate additional providersTeamwork should be actively encouraged in delivery of patient care. Historically, much of medical training has focused on individual knowledge, skills, and responsibility. As health care delivery has become more complex, it will be essential to train resident and attending physicians in effective teamwork that emphasizes collective responsibility for patient care and recognizes the signs, both individual and systemic, of a schedule and working conditions that are too demanding to be safeHospitals should embrace the opportunities that resident physician training redesign offers. Hospitals should recognize and act on the potential benefits of work redesign, eg, increased efficiency, reduced costs, improved quality of care, and resident physician and attending job satisfactionAttending physicians should supervise all hospital admissions. Resident physicians should directly discuss all admissions with attending physicians. Attending physicians should be both cognizant of and have input into the care patients are to receive upon admission to the hospitalInhouse supervision should be required for all critical care services, including emergency rooms, intensive care units, and trauma services. Resident physicians

  19. Factors influencing teamwork and collaboration within a tertiary medical center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Shu Feng; Wan, Thomas TH; Chen, Yu-Chih

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To understand how work climate and related factors influence teamwork and collaboration in a large medical center. METHODS: A survey of 3462 employees was conducted to generate responses to Sexton’s Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) to assess perceptions of work environment via a series of five-point, Likert-scaled questions. Path analysis was performed, using teamwork (TW) and collaboration (CO) as endogenous variables. The exogenous variables are effective communication (EC), safety culture (SC), job satisfaction (JS), work pressure (PR), and work climate (WC). The measurement instruments for the variables or summated subscales are presented. Reliability of each sub-scale are calculated. Alpha Cronbach coefficients are relatively strong: TW (0.81), CO (0.76), EC (0.70), SC (0.83), JS (0.91), WP (0.85), and WC (0.78). Confirmatory factor analysis was performed for each of these constructs. RESULTS: Path analysis enables to identify statistically significant predictors of two endogenous variables, teamwork and intra-organizational collaboration. Significant amounts of variance in perceived teamwork (R2 = 0.59) and in collaboration (R2 = 0.75) are accounted for by the predictor variables. In the initial model, safety culture is the most important predictor of perceived teamwork, with a β weight of 0.51, and work climate is the most significant predictor of collaboration, with a β weight of 0.84. After eliminating statistically insignificant causal paths and allowing correlated predictors1, the revised model shows that work climate is the only predictor positively influencing both teamwork (β = 0.26) and collaboration (β = 0.88). A relatively weak positive (β = 0.14) but statistically significant relationship exists between teamwork and collaboration when the effects of other predictors are simultaneously controlled. CONCLUSION: Hospital executives who are interested in improving collaboration should assess the work climate to ensure that employees are

  20. Impact of teamwork on missed care in four Australian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Rose; Rahman, Asheq; Courtney, Mary; Chalmers, Cheyne

    2017-01-01

    Investigate effects of teamwork on missed nursing care across a healthcare network in Australia. Missed care is universally used as an indicator of quality nursing care, however, little is known about mitigating effects of teamwork on these events. A descriptive exploratory study. Missed Care and Team Work surveys were completed by 334 nurses. Using Stata software, nursing staff demographic information and components of missed care and teamwork were compared across the healthcare network. Statistical tests were performed to identify predicting factors for missed care. The most commonly reported components of missed care were as follows: ambulation three times per day (43·3%), turning patient every two hours (29%) and mouth care (27·7%). The commonest reasons mentioned for missed care were as follows: inadequate labour resources (range 69·8-52·7%), followed by material resources (range 59·3-33·3%) and communication (range 39·3-27·2%). There were significant differences in missed care scores across units. Using the mean scores in regression correlation matrix, the negative relationship of missed care and teamwork was supported (r = -0·34, p teamwork alone accounted for about 9% of missed nursing care. Similar to previous international research findings, our results showed nursing teamwork significantly impacted on missed nursing care. Teamwork may be a mitigating factor to address missed care and future research is needed. These results may provide administrators, educators and clinicians with information to develop practices and policies to improve patient care internationally. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Factors influencing teamwork and collaboration within a tertiary medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Shu Feng; Wan, Thomas Th; Chen, Yu-Chih

    2012-04-26

    To understand how work climate and related factors influence teamwork and collaboration in a large medical center. A survey of 3462 employees was conducted to generate responses to Sexton's Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) to assess perceptions of work environment via a series of five-point, Likert-scaled questions. Path analysis was performed, using teamwork (TW) and collaboration (CO) as endogenous variables. The exogenous variables are effective communication (EC), safety culture (SC), job satisfaction (JS), work pressure (PR), and work climate (WC). The measurement instruments for the variables or summated subscales are presented. Reliability of each sub-scale are calculated. Alpha Cronbach coefficients are relatively strong: TW (0.81), CO (0.76), EC (0.70), SC (0.83), JS (0.91), WP (0.85), and WC (0.78). Confirmatory factor analysis was performed for each of these constructs. Path analysis enables to identify statistically significant predictors of two endogenous variables, teamwork and intra-organizational collaboration. Significant amounts of variance in perceived teamwork (R(2) = 0.59) and in collaboration (R(2) = 0.75) are accounted for by the predictor variables. In the initial model, safety culture is the most important predictor of perceived teamwork, with a β weight of 0.51, and work climate is the most significant predictor of collaboration, with a β weight of 0.84. After eliminating statistically insignificant causal paths and allowing correlated predictors1, the revised model shows that work climate is the only predictor positively influencing both teamwork (β = 0.26) and collaboration (β = 0.88). A relatively weak positive (β = 0.14) but statistically significant relationship exists between teamwork and collaboration when the effects of other predictors are simultaneously controlled. Hospital executives who are interested in improving collaboration should assess the work climate to ensure that employees are operating in a setting conducive

  2. Jefferson Teamwork Observation Guide (JTOG): An Instrument to Observe Teamwork Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Kevin J; Giordano, Carolyn; Speakman, Elizabeth; Smith, Kellie; Horowitz, June A

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is becoming an integral part of the education of health professions students. However, teaching students to become successful members of interprofessional teams is complex, and it is important for students to learn the combinations of skills necessary for teams to function effectively. There are many instruments available to measure many features related to IPE. However, these instruments are often too cumbersome to use in an observational situation since they tend to be lengthy and contain many abstract characteristics that are difficult to identify. The Jefferson Teamwork Observation Guide (JTOG) is a short tool that was created for students early in their educational program to observe teams in action with a set of guidelines to help them focus their observation on behaviors indicative of good teamwork. The JTOG was developed over a 2-year period based on student and clinician feedback and the input of experts in IPE. While initially developed as a purely educational tool for prelicensure students, it is becoming clear that it is an easy-to-use instrument that assesses the behavior of clinicians in practice.

  3. Supporting and Supervising Teachers Working With Adults Learning English. CAELA Network Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    This brief provides an overview of the knowledge and skills that administrators need in order to support and supervise teachers of adult English language learners. It begins with a review of resources and literature related to teacher supervision in general and to adult ESL education. It continues with information on the background and…

  4. Leadership, management and teamwork learning through an extra-curricular project for medical students: descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lucia da Silva Germano Jorge

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Professionalism in medicine requires preparation for the globalized world. Our objective was to describe a project that introduces medical students to the community, hospital and laboratory activities, thereby allowing them to gain experience in people management, leadership and teamwork.DESIGN AND SETTING: Descriptive study of the process applied at a philanthropic medical school in Curitiba, Paraná.METHOD: Inclusion of management and leadership practices as part of the medical degree program.RESULTS: The study groups consisted of fifteen students. After six months, any of the participants could be elected as a subcoordinator, with responsibility for managing tasks and representing the team in hospital departments and the community. The activities required increasing levels of responsibility. In medical schools, students' involvement in practical activities is often limited to observation. They are not required to take responsibilities or to interact with other students and stakeholders. However, they will become accountable, which thus has an adverse effect on all involved. The learning space described here aims to fill this gap by bringing students closer to the daily lives and experiences of healthcare professionals.CONCLUSION: Being a physician requires not only management and leadership, but also transferrable competencies, communication and critical thinking. These attributes can be acquired through experience of teamwork, under qualified supervision from teaching staff. Students are thus expected to develop skills to deal with and resolve conflicts, learn to share leadership, prepare others to help and replace them, adopt an approach based on mutual responsibility and discuss their performance.

  5. Trade Supervision Adjustment in 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    China revised its supervision policies on import and export trades again, with 13 notices approved by related government ministries and administrations as well as 15 catalogues of import and export licenses being involved.

  6. Learning Dynamics in Doctoral Supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie

    This doctoral research explores doctoral supervision within life science research in a Danish university. From one angle it investigates doctoral students’ experiences with strengthening the relationship with their supervisors through a structured meeting with the supervisor, prepared as part...... investigates learning opportunities in supervision with multiple supervisors. This was investigated through observations and recording of supervision, and subsequent analysis of transcripts. The analyses used different perspectives on learning; learning as participation, positioning theory and variation theory....... The research illuminates how learning opportunities are created in the interaction through the scientific discussions. It also shows how multiple supervisors can contribute to supervision by providing new perspectives and opinions that have a potential for creating new understandings. The combination...

  7. Teamwork: relevance and interdependence of interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, M; Besoaín-Saldaña, A; Aguirre, M; Leiva, J

    2017-04-27

    Determine the perception of university students regarding interprofessional and interdependent work between team members in their inclusion in primary care. Analytical cross-sectional study. The sampling had a probabilistic, stratified random type with 95% confidence and 5% margin of error. Seven-hundred and four students of Public Universities in Santiago (Chile) answered self-administered questionnaire. Ninety-seven point eight of students say that interprofessional work is important; 27.1% of them declare that their university did not seem to show that their study plans were important. The professionals listed as most important in teams are physicians and nurses. Spaces for development and institutional support are key elements to promote interprofessional work. If this competence can involve each academic unit in their different formative spaces there will be a significant contribution to said promotion. Teamwork is a pending task. Determinar la percepción de estudiantes universitarios respecto al trabajo interprofesional e interdependencia entre los miembros del equipo en su inserción en la atención primaria. Estudio de tipo analítico y transversal. El muestreo fue de tipo aleatorio, probabilístico estratificado con un 95% de confianza y un 5% de margen de error. Se utilizó un cuestionario auto-administrado en 704 estudiantes de Universidades del Estado en Santiago de Chile. Un 97,8% de los estudiantes opinan que el trabajo interprofesional es importante; un 27,1% de ellos declara que su universidad no le ha entregado importancia en sus planes de estudios. Los profesionales mencionados como más importantes en el equipo son los médicos y enfermeras. Espacios de desarrollo y respaldo institucional son elementos claves para promover el trabajo interprofesional. Que esta competencia logre involucrar a cada unidad académica en sus diferentes espacios formativos será un aporte significativo en aquello. Trabajo en equipo es una tarea pendiente.

  8. Genetic classification of populations using supervised learning.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bridges, Michael

    2011-01-01

    There are many instances in genetics in which we wish to determine whether two candidate populations are distinguishable on the basis of their genetic structure. Examples include populations which are geographically separated, case-control studies and quality control (when participants in a study have been genotyped at different laboratories). This latter application is of particular importance in the era of large scale genome wide association studies, when collections of individuals genotyped at different locations are being merged to provide increased power. The traditional method for detecting structure within a population is some form of exploratory technique such as principal components analysis. Such methods, which do not utilise our prior knowledge of the membership of the candidate populations. are termed unsupervised. Supervised methods, on the other hand are able to utilise this prior knowledge when it is available.In this paper we demonstrate that in such cases modern supervised approaches are a more appropriate tool for detecting genetic differences between populations. We apply two such methods, (neural networks and support vector machines) to the classification of three populations (two from Scotland and one from Bulgaria). The sensitivity exhibited by both these methods is considerably higher than that attained by principal components analysis and in fact comfortably exceeds a recently conjectured theoretical limit on the sensitivity of unsupervised methods. In particular, our methods can distinguish between the two Scottish populations, where principal components analysis cannot. We suggest, on the basis of our results that a supervised learning approach should be the method of choice when classifying individuals into pre-defined populations, particularly in quality control for large scale genome wide association studies.

  9. Benefits of Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs: A Synthesis of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David L.; Dyer, James E.

    1997-01-01

    A review of literature from 1964 to 1993 identified the benefits of supervised agricultural experience (SAE) programs, including agriculture knowledge and positive work attitudes. Classroom, SAE, and Future Farmers of America complemented each other. The research base is state specific and fragmented and lacks cohesiveness. (SK)

  10. Teamwork Assessment Tools in Modern Surgical Practice: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, George; Abboudi, Hamid; Khan, Muhammed Shamim; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Deficiencies in teamwork skills have been shown to contribute to the occurrence of adverse events during surgery. Consequently, several teamwork assessment tools have been developed to evaluate trainee nontechnical performance. This paper aims to provide an overview of these instruments and review the validity of each tool. Furthermore, the present paper aims to review the deficiencies surrounding training and propose several recommendations to address these issues. Methods. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify teamwork assessment tools using MEDLINE (1946 to August 2015), EMBASE (1974 to August 2015), and PsycINFO (1806 to August 2015) databases. Results. Eight assessment tools which encompass aspects of teamwork were identified. The Nontechnical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) assessment was found to possess the highest level of validity from a variety of sources; reliability and acceptability have also been established for this tool. Conclusions. Deficits in current surgical training pathways have prompted several recommendations to meet the evolving requirements of surgeons. Recommendations from the current paper include integration of teamwork training and assessment into medical school curricula, standardised formal training of assessors to ensure accurate evaluation of nontechnical skill acquisition, and integration of concurrent technical and nontechnical skills training throughout training. PMID:26425732

  11. Improvement of teamwork in health care through interprofessional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Dragana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Collaboration, within and between healthcare teams, facilitates effective healthcare. Internationally, the development of interprofessional education, as a means to facilitate more effective teamwork in health care, has been recognized for over forty years. Objective. The aim of this paper is to evaluate students' attitudes toward the influence of interprofessional education on improvement of collaboration and teamwork. Methods. The research was conducted by interviewing students at the Medical Faculty in Novi Sad in the form of cross-sectional study. The study sample included students from two undergraduate programmes: School of Nursing (n=52 and Integrated Studies of Medicine (n=53. Students admitted to the research had to be exposed to clinical experience. The instrument used in this study was the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS. Results. As many as 93.3% of students indicated that basics of teamwork skills should be obtained prior to graduation, whereas 96.2% considered that interprofessional education would enable them to improve mutual trust and respect. The majority of interviewees indicated that patients would ultimately benefit if healthcare students worked together to solve patient problems. Multivariate procedures MANOVA p<0.05 and discriminative analysis p<0.05 of students' attitudes toward teamwork and collaboration showed significant differences between the students of medicine and nursing. Conclusion. The students of the Integrated Studies of Medicine and School of Nursing had a positive attitude toward the influence of interprofessional education on the improvement of collaboration and teamwork.

  12. Teamwork Assessment Tools in Modern Surgical Practice: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, George; Abboudi, Hamid; Khan, Muhammed Shamim; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Deficiencies in teamwork skills have been shown to contribute to the occurrence of adverse events during surgery. Consequently, several teamwork assessment tools have been developed to evaluate trainee nontechnical performance. This paper aims to provide an overview of these instruments and review the validity of each tool. Furthermore, the present paper aims to review the deficiencies surrounding training and propose several recommendations to address these issues. Methods. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify teamwork assessment tools using MEDLINE (1946 to August 2015), EMBASE (1974 to August 2015), and PsycINFO (1806 to August 2015) databases. Results. Eight assessment tools which encompass aspects of teamwork were identified. The Nontechnical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) assessment was found to possess the highest level of validity from a variety of sources; reliability and acceptability have also been established for this tool. Conclusions. Deficits in current surgical training pathways have prompted several recommendations to meet the evolving requirements of surgeons. Recommendations from the current paper include integration of teamwork training and assessment into medical school curricula, standardised formal training of assessors to ensure accurate evaluation of nontechnical skill acquisition, and integration of concurrent technical and nontechnical skills training throughout training.

  13. Teamwork Assessment Tools in Modern Surgical Practice: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Whittaker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Deficiencies in teamwork skills have been shown to contribute to the occurrence of adverse events during surgery. Consequently, several teamwork assessment tools have been developed to evaluate trainee nontechnical performance. This paper aims to provide an overview of these instruments and review the validity of each tool. Furthermore, the present paper aims to review the deficiencies surrounding training and propose several recommendations to address these issues. Methods. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify teamwork assessment tools using MEDLINE (1946 to August 2015, EMBASE (1974 to August 2015, and PsycINFO (1806 to August 2015 databases. Results. Eight assessment tools which encompass aspects of teamwork were identified. The Nontechnical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS assessment was found to possess the highest level of validity from a variety of sources; reliability and acceptability have also been established for this tool. Conclusions. Deficits in current surgical training pathways have prompted several recommendations to meet the evolving requirements of surgeons. Recommendations from the current paper include integration of teamwork training and assessment into medical school curricula, standardised formal training of assessors to ensure accurate evaluation of nontechnical skill acquisition, and integration of concurrent technical and nontechnical skills training throughout training.

  14. The role of teamworking in error reduction during vascular procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soane, Emma; Bicknell, Colin; Mason, Sarah; Godard, Kathleen; Cheshire, Nick

    2014-07-01

    To examine the associations between teamworking processes and error rates during vascular surgical procedures and then make informed recommendations for future studies and practices in this area. This is a single-center observational pilot study. Twelve procedures were observed over a 3-week period by a trained observer. Errors were categorized using a standardized error capture tool. Leadership and teamworking processes were categorized based on the Malakis et al. (2010) framework. Data are expressed as frequencies, means, standard deviations and percentages. Errors rates (per hour) were likely to be reduced when there were effective prebriefing measures to ensure that members were aware of their roles and responsibilities (4.50 vs. 5.39 errors/hr), communications were kept to a practical and effective minimum (4.64 vs. 5.56 errors/hr), when the progress of surgery was communicated throughout (3.14 vs. 8.33 errors/hr), and when team roles changed during the procedure (3.17 vs. 5.97 errors/hr). Reduction of error rates is a critical goal for surgical teams. The present study of teamworking processes in this environment shows that there is a variation that should be further examined. More effective teamworking could prevent or mitigate a range of errors. The development of vascular surgical team members should incorporate principles of teamworking and appropriate communication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The role of teamwork in the professional education of physicians: current status and assessment recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David P; Salas, Eduardo; King, Heidi; Battles, James; Barach, Paul

    2005-04-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has recommended that organizations establish interdisciplinary team training programs that incorporate proven methods for team management. Teamwork can be assessed during physician medical education, board certification, licensure, and continuing practice. Team members must possess specific knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs), such as the ability to exchange information, which enable individual team members to coordinate. KSAs might be elicited and assessed across a physician's career, starting in medical school and continuing through licensure and board certification. Professional bodies should be responsible for the development of specific team knowledge and skill competencies and for promoting specific team attitude competencies. Tools are available to assess medical student, resident, and physician competence in these critical team KSAs. For teamwork skills to be assessed and have credibility, team performance measures must be grounded in team theory, account for individual and team-level performance, capture team process and outcomes, adhere to standards for reliability and validity, and address real or perceived barriers to measurement.

  16. 20 CFR 656.21 - Supervised recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Supervised recruitment. 656.21 Section 656.21... Supervised recruitment. (a) Supervised recruitment. Where the Certifying Officer determines it appropriate, post-filing supervised recruitment may be required of the employer for the pending application or...

  17. Educational Supervision Appropriate for Psychiatry Trainee's Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rele, Kiran; Tarrant, C. Jane

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors studied the regularity and content of supervision sessions in one of the U.K. postgraduate psychiatric training schemes (Mid-Trent). Methods: A questionnaire sent to psychiatry trainees assessed the timing and duration of supervision, content and protection of supervision time, and overall quality of supervision. The authors…

  18. 32 CFR 727.11 - Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supervision. 727.11 Section 727.11 National... Supervision. The Judge Advocate General will exercise supervision over all legal assistance activities in the Department of the Navy. Subject to the supervision of the Judge Advocate General, officers in charge of...

  19. Multivoiced Supervision of Master's Students: A Case Study of Alternative Supervision Practices in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysthe, Olga; Samara, Akylina; Westrheim, Kariane

    2006-01-01

    This article describes and analyzes an alternative supervision model at the Master of Education Programme at the University of Bergen aimed at improving research supervision. A three-pronged approach was introduced, combining supervision groups, student colloquia and individual supervision. The supervision groups consisted of two supervisors and…

  20. Peer and Self-Assessment of Teamwork Collaboration Competencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Peder

    2015-01-01

    The ability to collaborate in teams is a central learning objective in a course for students enrolled in the elective 6th semester Civil Engineering Program. Therefore, methods for project management and team collaboration were facilitated through a designated course. The teamwork collaboration...... an Agreement of Collaboration (AC) for the project, including listing of values, norms and rules defining their mutual understanding of good teamwork behavior. The AC was discussed with the supervisors and finally signed by each member of the team. At the completion of the project period each team member...... to themselves than the average grade they received from their team mates. There was only a little difference in team mates’ grading of a given fellow team mate. Students expressed that the work with the AC was useful for the teamwork process, and that the peer assessment process had a positive effect...

  1. Project-based learning in Geotechnics: cooperative versus collaborative teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Lopes, Margarida; Macedo, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Since 2007/2008 project-based learning models have been used to deliver two fundamental courses on Geotechnics in University of Aveiro, Portugal. These models have evolved and have encompassed either cooperative or collaborative teamwork. Using data collected in five editions of each course (Soil Mechanics I and Soil Mechanics II), the different characteristics of the models using cooperative or collaborative teamwork are pointed out and analysed, namely in terms of the students' perceptions. The data collected include informal feedback from students, monitoring of their marks and academic performance, and answers to two sets of questionnaires: developed for these courses, and institutional. The data indicate students have good opinion of the project-based learning model, though collaborative teamwork is the best rated. The overall efficacy of the models was analysed (sum of their effectiveness, efficiency and attractiveness). The collaborative model was found more adequate.

  2. Peer and Self-Assessment of Teamwork Collaboration Competencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Peder

    2015-01-01

    The ability to collaborate in teams is a central learning objective in a course for students enrolled in the elective 6th semester Civil Engineering Program. Therefore, methods for project management and team collaboration were facilitated through a designated course. The teamwork collaboration...... an Agreement of Collaboration (AC) for the project, including listing of values, norms and rules defining their mutual understanding of good teamwork behavior. The AC was discussed with the supervisors and finally signed by each member of the team. At the completion of the project period each team member...... to themselves than the average grade they received from their team mates. There was only a little difference in team mates’ grading of a given fellow team mate. Students expressed that the work with the AC was useful for the teamwork process, and that the peer assessment process had a positive effect...

  3. MULTIDISCIPLINARY TEACHING – MSc COURSE ON TEAMWORK AND OPARATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlshøj, Jan; Dederichs, Anne

    2011-01-01

    of Denmark. The goal of the course is to provide training in teamwork at the final stage of the engineering education. The course has been carried out twice. It was held by a multidisciplinary team of professors in periods 2008/09, 2009/10 and 20010/2011. Teams of students were subject of a questionnaire...... investigation on collaboration and team work. The study has the following findings. The latest year there has been a special focus on team work and all members tested their role according to Belbin’s theory on teamwork. The work has the following findings: Collaboration was generally good. However the extra...... focus on teamwork did not lead to a improvement of the team work in contrary. The team-structure was generally flat and decisions were mostly made in consensus. It is worthwhile to offer a multidisciplinary course and give engineering students experience in collaboration methods....

  4. Health care interprofessional education: encouraging technology, teamwork, and team performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    It is critical to prepare nurses for future practice to work in teams by engaging students in interprofessional education (IPE) that fosters positive attitudes toward teamwork. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of computer-supported IPE on students’ attitudes and perceptions toward health care teamwork and team performance. A hybrid approach to IPE was used to provide students with an educational experience that combined the benefits of traditional face-to-face communication methodology with a computer-mediated platform that focused on reflection and team building. A statistically significant difference was found in students’ perceptions of team performance after engaging in computer-supported IPE. No statistically significant difference in students’ pretest–posttest composite attitude toward teamwork scores was noted; however, there was a positive trend toward improved scores.

  5. Teamwork as an essential component of high-reliability organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David P; Day, Rachel; Salas, Eduardo

    2006-08-01

    Organizations are increasingly becoming dynamic and unstable. This evolution has given rise to greater reliance on teams and increased complexity in terms of team composition, skills required, and degree of risk involved. High-reliability organizations (HROs) are those that exist in such hazardous environments where the consequences of errors are high, but the occurrence of error is extremely low. In this article, we argue that teamwork is an essential component of achieving high reliability particularly in health care organizations. We describe the fundamental characteristics of teams, review strategies in team training, demonstrate the criticality of teamwork in HROs and finally, identify specific challenges the health care community must address to improve teamwork and enhance reliability.

  6. Head Tracking Based Avatar Control for Virtual Environment Teamwork Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Marks

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Virtual environments (VE are gaining in popularity and are increasingly used for teamwork training purposes, e.g., for medical teams. One shortcoming of modern VEs is that nonverbal communication channels, essential for teamwork, are not supported well. We address this issue by using an inexpensive webcam to track the user's head. This tracking information is used to control the head movement of the user's avatar, thereby conveying head gestures and adding a nonverbal communication channel. We conducted a user study investigating the influence of head tracking based avatar control on the perceived realism of the VE and on the performance of a surgical teamwork training scenario. Our results show that head tracking positively influences the perceived realism of the VE and the communication, but has no major influence on the training outcome.

  7. Thriving Organizational Sustainability through Innovation: Incivility Climate and Teamwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewan Yang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the association between team incivility climate and team members’ perceived support for innovation. To extend findings on the negative effects of incivility (which are low intensity deviant behaviors, such as rudeness in studies focusing on the individual level, the effects of organizational incivility are examined at the work team level. Drawing on the spiral model of incivility and the literature on teams, this study suggests that team incivility climate has a negative impact on perceived support for innovation through team members’ teamwork behaviors. Using data collected from 411 subordinates on 62 work teams, the hypothesized mediation model is tested. The results show a negative effect of team incivility climate on teamwork and a positive effect of teamwork on perceived support for innovation, supporting the hypothesized negative indirect effect. Research and practical implications for organizational sustainability are discussed.

  8. Teamwork: an essential for leading and launching innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Patricia D; Marshall, David R

    2014-01-01

    Teamwork and innovation require a merging of special skills sets to produce the best outcomes. Collaboration and innovation have become core competencies for effectiveness in every industry. The capacity to collaborate and innovate has never been more important, especially in health care, with the regulatory and quality mandates to evaluate every aspect of service to ensure that we add value for patients and families. The examination of teamwork and innovation, which are inextricably linked, are described and discussed. The art of building teams, steps for leading change, and an approach to innovation in health care are described. The University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, Texas, shares one approach and experience called Innovation Forerunners-nurses from all levels and areas-to embed the tools and concepts of teamwork and innovation across patient care areas.

  9. Clinical supervision in a community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Carol; Marcroft, Emma

    Clinical supervision is a formal process of professional support, reflection and learning that contributes to individual development. First Community Health and Care is committed to providing clinical supervision to nurses and allied healthcare professionals to support the provision and maintenance of high-quality care. In 2012, we developed new guidelines for nurses and AHPs on supervision, incorporating a clinical supervision framework. This offers a range of options to staff so supervision accommodates variations in work settings and individual learning needs and styles.

  10. Clinical supervision: the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falender, Carol A; Shafranske, Edward P

    2014-11-01

    Since the recognition of clinical supervision as a distinct professional competence and a core competence, attention has turned to ensuring supervisor competence and effective supervision practice. In this article, we highlight recent developments and the state of the art in supervision, with particular emphasis on the competency-based approach. We present effective clinical supervision strategies, providing an integrated snapshot of the current status. We close with consideration of current training practices in supervision and challenges.

  11. Assessing Interprofessional Teamwork in Inpatient Medical Oncology Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, A Charlotta; Callaghan, Mary; Cooper, Abby L; Brandman, James; O'Leary, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Teamwork is important to providing safe and effective care for hospitalized patients with cancer; however, few studies have evaluated teamwork in this setting. We surveyed all nurses, residents, hospitalists, and oncology physicians in oncology units at a large urban teaching hospital from September to November 2012. Respondents rated teamwork using a validated instrument (Safety Attitudes Questionnaire; scale, 0 to 100) and rated the quality of collaboration they had experienced with other professionals using a 5-point ordinal response scale (1, very low quality; 5, very high quality). Respondents also rated potential barriers to collaboration using a 4-point ordinal response scale (1, not at all a barrier; 4, major barrier). We compared ratings by professionals using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Overall, 129 (67%) of 193 eligible participants completed the survey. Teamwork scores differed across professional types, with nurses providing the lowest ratings (69.7) and residents providing the highest (81.9; ANOVA P = .01). Ratings of collaboration with nurses were high across all types of professionals. Ratings of collaboration with physicians varied significantly by professional type (P ≤ .02), with nurses giving lower ratings of collaboration with all physician types. Similarly, perceived barriers to collaboration differed by professional type, with nurses perceiving the biggest barrier to be negative attitudes regarding the importance of communication. Oncologists did not perceive any of the listed options as major barriers to collaboration. In inpatient oncology units, discrepancies exist between nurses' and physicians' ratings of teamwork and collaboration. Oncologists seem to be unaware that teamwork is suboptimal in this setting. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Interventions to improve teamwork and communications among healthcare staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, P; Rathbone, J; Catchpole, K

    2011-04-01

    Concern over the frequency of unintended harm to patients has focused attention on the importance of teamwork and communication in avoiding errors. This has led to experiments with teamwork training programmes for clinical staff, mostly based on aviation models. These are widely assumed to be effective in improving patient safety, but the extent to which this assumption is justified by evidence remains unclear. A systematic literature review on the effects of teamwork training for clinical staff was performed. Information was sought on outcomes including staff attitudes, teamwork skills, technical performance, efficiency and clinical outcomes. Of 1036 relevant abstracts identified, 14 articles were analysed in detail: four randomized trials and ten non-randomized studies. Overall study quality was poor, with particular problems over blinding, subjective measures and Hawthorne effects. Few studies reported on every outcome category. Most reported improved staff attitudes, and six of eight reported significantly better teamwork after training. Five of eight studies reported improved technical performance, improved efficiency or reduced errors. Three studies reported evidence of clinical benefit, but this was modest or of borderline significance in each case. Studies with a stronger intervention were more likely to report benefits than those providing less training. None of the randomized trials found evidence of technical or clinical benefit. The evidence for technical or clinical benefit from teamwork training in medicine is weak. There is some evidence of benefit from studies with more intensive training programmes, but better quality research and cost-benefit analysis are needed. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Facilitating Teamwork in Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rebecca H; Macpherson, Catherine Fiona; Smith, Ashley W; Block, Rebecca G; Keyton, Joann

    2016-11-01

    A case of a young adult patient in the days immediately after a cancer diagnosis illustrates the critical importance of three interrelated core coordinating mechanisms-closed-loop communication, shared mental models, and mutual trust-of teamwork in an adolescent and young adult multidisciplinary oncology team. The case illustrates both the opportunities to increase team member coordination and the problems that can occur when coordination breaks down. A model for teamwork is presented, which highlights the relationships among these coordinating mechanisms and demonstrates how balance among them works to optimize team function and patient care. Implications for clinical practice and research suggested by the case are presented.

  14. Quantum Teamwork for Unconditional Multiparty Communication with Gaussian States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Adesso, Gerardo; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2009-08-01

    We demonstrate the capability of continuous variable Gaussian states to communicate multipartite quantum information. A quantum teamwork protocol is presented according to which an arbitrary possibly entangled multimode state can be faithfully teleported between two teams each comprising many cooperative users. We prove that N-mode Gaussian weighted graph states exist for arbitrary N that enable unconditional quantum teamwork implementations for any arrangement of the teams. These perfect continuous variable maximally multipartite entangled resources are typical among pure Gaussian states and are unaffected by the entanglement frustration occurring in multiqubit states.

  15. Simulation: learning from mistakes while building communication and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehster, Christina R; Hall, Carla D

    2010-01-01

    Medical errors are one of the leading causes of death annually in the United States. Many of these errors are related to poor communication and/or lack of teamwork. Using simulation as a teaching modality provides a dual role in helping to reduce these errors. Thorough integration of clinical practice with teamwork and communication in a safe environment increases the likelihood of reducing the error rates in medicine. By allowing practitioners to make potential errors in a safe environment, such as simulation, these valuable lessons improve retention and will rarely be repeated.

  16. Break through to success with training and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M K

    1999-08-01

    This is a case study on the effect of training and teamwork in two different divisions within the same company. One division consisted of a nonunion manufacturing plant; the second was a unionized distribution operation. In both operations, serious problems existed--poor customer service levels, inadequate inventory turns, and insufficient profitability. These are the kinds of problems that, left untreated, can cause the death of any manufacturing or distribution operation. However, by implementing training and teamwork at both operations, impressive benefits were achieved, including customer service levels exceeding 90 percent, dramatic improvements in the inventory turnover rate, and profitability that exceeded corporate goals.

  17. Exploring University Teacher Perceptions About Out-of-Class Teamwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ruiz-Esparza Barajas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on the first stage of a larger joint research project undertaken by five universities in Mexico to explore university teachers’ thinking about out-of-class teamwork. Data from interviews were analyzed using open and axial coding. Although results suggest a positive perception towards teamwork, the study unveiled important negative opinions. These opinions suggest the lack of success in promoting deep learning and in developing students’ socio-cognitive abilities. Findings were used to develop a survey to be applied to more teachers to gain a broader perspective and to corroborate results.

  18. Teamwork, pleasure and bargaining in animal social behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughgarden, J

    2012-07-01

    Intimate behaviour between animals is hypothesized to enable teamwork. The pleasure experienced in grooming, preening, dancing, mating and singing in synchrony is hypothesized to motivate participants to coordinate actions directed towards a shared goal that enhances each individual's fitness. This cooperative behaviour evolves as a mutual direct benefit, not as altruism. Teamwork leads to an equilibrium set of returns to the participants that may be modelled as a Nash bargaining solution instead of as the more familiar Nash equilibrium. The dynamics leading to that equilibrium may be modelled based on joint action instead of the more familiar individualistic action. Confusions by Binmore (J. Evol. Biol. 2010; 23: 1351) about this hypothesis are corrected.

  19. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Menchine

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons’ Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders.  Methods: We searched the PubMed database using the keywords “leadership” and then either “trauma” or “resuscitation” as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1 how leadership affects patient care; 2 which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3 methods to train physicians to become better leaders. Results: We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs

  20. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-09-01

    Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons' Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders. We searched the PubMed database using the keywords "leadership" and then either "trauma" or "resuscitation" as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1) how leadership affects patient care; 2) which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3) methods to train physicians to become better leaders. We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS) is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs included didactic teaching followed by simulations. Although programs

  1. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons’ Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders. Methods We searched the PubMed database using the keywords “leadership” and then either “trauma” or “resuscitation” as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1) how leadership affects patient care; 2) which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3) methods to train physicians to become better leaders. Results We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS) is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs included didactic teaching

  2. A Four-State Survey of Secondary Administrators' Perceptions of Foreign Language Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammadou, JoAnn; Schrier, Leslie L.

    1988-01-01

    Investigates secondary school administrators' attitudes toward foreign-language teacher supervision. Findings indicate limited knowledge of foreign languages among the supervisors and widely varying opinions regarding the consequences of this limited understanding. (Author/CB)

  3. Reconsidering Teamwork: Popular and Local Meanings for a Common Ideal Associated with Positive Youth Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01

    Although developing "teamwork" is commonly discussed as a goal for youth work, the meaning of teamwork is rarely articulated. Drawing from field research with programs for children and youth in a Chicago public housing community and with a community of Angolan refugee camps, this article demonstrates that teamwork has multiple potential meanings.…

  4. Teamwork in nursing: restricted to nursing professionals or an interprofessional collaboration?

    OpenAIRE

    Geisa Colebrusco de Souza; Marina Peduzzi; Jaqueline Alcântara Marcelino da Silva; Brígida Gimenez Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To understand the nursing professionals' conceptions of teamwork and their elements. METHOD A qualitative study conducted in an oncological hospital using a semi-structured interview with 21 nursing professionals. RESULTS Two conceptions emerged from the accounts: teamwork restricted to nursing professionals and teamwork with interprofessional collaboration with particular importance for interactive dimensions: communication, trust and professional bonds, mutual respect ...

  5. Development and Validation of Performance Assessment Tools for Interprofessional Communication and Teamwork (PACT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chia-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medical errors caused by breakdowns in teamwork and interprofessional communication contribute to many deaths in the United States each year. Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS®) is an evidence-based teamwork system developed to improve communication and teamwork skills among health care…

  6. Reconsidering Teamwork: Popular and Local Meanings for a Common Ideal Associated with Positive Youth Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01

    Although developing "teamwork" is commonly discussed as a goal for youth work, the meaning of teamwork is rarely articulated. Drawing from field research with programs for children and youth in a Chicago public housing community and with a community of Angolan refugee camps, this article demonstrates that teamwork has multiple potential…

  7. Processes and Outcomes in Student Teamwork. An Empirical Study in a Marketing Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Rafael; Lucia-Palacios, Laura; Martin, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of student teamwork is increasing in most university degrees. However, there is still a gap in the literature regarding the connection between teamwork processes and their outcomes. In this paper, the authors analyze these processes and how they relate to teamwork outcomes from the students' perspective. Data was gathered from 129…

  8. Development and Validation of Performance Assessment Tools for Interprofessional Communication and Teamwork (PACT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chia-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medical errors caused by breakdowns in teamwork and interprofessional communication contribute to many deaths in the United States each year. Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS®) is an evidence-based teamwork system developed to improve communication and teamwork skills among health care…

  9. Reconsidering Teamwork: Popular and Local Meanings for a Common Ideal Associated with Positive Youth Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01

    Although developing "teamwork" is commonly discussed as a goal for youth work, the meaning of teamwork is rarely articulated. Drawing from field research with programs for children and youth in a Chicago public housing community and with a community of Angolan refugee camps, this article demonstrates that teamwork has multiple potential…

  10. Achieving quality improvement in the nursing home: influence of nursing leadership on communication and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsmeier, Amy; Scott-Cawiezell, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Leadership, communication, and teamwork are essential elements of organizational capacity and are linked to organizational performance. How those organizations actually achieve improved performance, however, is not clearly understood. In this comparative case study, nursing leadership who facilitated open communication and teamwork achieved improvement while nursing leadership who impeded open communication and teamwork did not.

  11. The Knowledge Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuge, Hai

    2004-01-01

    The Knowledge Grid is an intelligent and sustainable interconnection environment that enables people and machines to effectively capture, publish, share and manage knowledge resources. It also provides appropriate on-demand services to support scientific research, technological innovation, cooperative teamwork, problem solving, and decision making. It incorporates epistemology and ontology to reflect human cognitive characteristics; exploits social, ecological and economic principles; and adopts techniques and standards developed during work toward the future web. This book presents its methodology, theory, models and applications systematically for the first time.

  12. Teaching the Attributes of Venture Teamwork in Tertiary Entrepreneurship Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotey, Bernice

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper seeks to demonstrate the characteristics of group work that are required to teach the attributes of real world venture teamwork in tertiary entrepreneurship programmes. Design/methodology/approach: One-tailed Spearman correlation analysis is used to assess the associations between students' grades in four group assessment tasks…

  13. Technology, Teamwork, and Teaching Meet in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poindexter, Sandra; Basu, S. Choton

    Laptops for students, increased teamwork and group interaction, and teaching as a facilitator of active learning have successfully converged in the classrooms of Northern Michigan University. This paper offers practical guidelines for integration strategies, theory, and outcomes assessments, based on a study undertaken for the 1999-2000 academic…

  14. Integrating Couple Teamwork Conversations into Child Welfare Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Dana; Antle, Becky; Johnson, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    This article summarizes the importance of and challenges to addressing couple teamwork issues in the child welfare population. Although there is substantial evidence to support the importance of healthy adult relationships for child well-being and the prevention of child maltreatment, there are a number of barriers to addressing these couple…

  15. Project-Based Learning in Geotechnics: Cooperative versus Collaborative Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Lopes, Margarida; Macedo, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Since 2007/2008 project-based learning models have been used to deliver two fundamental courses on Geotechnics in University of Aveiro, Portugal. These models have evolved and have encompassed either cooperative or collaborative teamwork. Using data collected in five editions of each course (Soil Mechanics I and Soil Mechanics II), the different…

  16. Can collaboration within multidisciplinary teamwork be explained using Belbin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dederichs, Anne; Karlshøj, Jan

    2013-01-01

    of teachers for 13 multidisciplinary teams of students. Belbin’s theory on teamwork was introduced and the teams were formed according to the theory, in order to optimize the collaboration. Students were given a standard- and course specific questionnaire including the possibility for making individual notes...

  17. Special Education Teachers' Attitudes and Perceptions of Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, D. Michael; Gallagher, Peggy A.

    2010-01-01

    One hundred and eighty-four special education teachers serving school-based intervention teams completed the "Attitudes About Teamwork Survey", the "Team Characteristics Survey", and the "Team Process Perception Survey". Respondents' regard for the team process in planning and implementing supports for children with disabilities was generally…

  18. A Tool for Preventing Teamwork Failure: the TFP Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Palle; Rebollar, Rubeén; Lidón, Iván

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the process used to devise the Teamwork Failure Prevention Questionnaire (TFP Questionnaire), a tool that allows teams with problems in functioning to be detected early. The TFP Questionnaire was formulated in a project management course at the University of Zaragoza (Spain...

  19. Autism and Multidisciplinary Teamwork through the SCERTS Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molteni, Paola; Guldberg, Karen; Logan, Nick

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates multidisciplinary teamwork in an English special school located in the West Midlands region of the UK. The research was carried out by Paola Molteni, a PhD student at Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan, Karen Guldberg of the Autism Centre for Education and Research Director at the University of Birmingham School…

  20. A case study on collaboration within multidisciplinary teamwork

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dederichs, Anne; Karlshøj, Jan; Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2010-01-01

    and teamwork at the final stage of the engineering education. The course was held by a multidisciplinary team of teachers for 9 multidisciplinary teams of students. The team of teachers and the student teams had similar working conditions. These teams were subject of investigation on collaboration...

  1. Assessing the Language of Chat for Teamwork Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibani, Antonette; Koh, Elizabeth; Lai, Vivian; Shim, Kyong Jin

    2017-01-01

    In technology-enhanced language learning, many pedagogical activities involve students in online discussion such as synchronous chat, in order to help them practice their language skills. Besides developing the language competency of students, it is also crucial to nurture their teamwork competencies for today's global and complex environment.…

  2. Teamwork and communication: an effective approach to patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujumdar, Sandhya; Santos, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Teamwork and communication failures are leading causes of patient safety incidents in health care. Though health care providers must work in teams, they are not well-trained in teamwork and communication skills. Health care faces the problems of differences in communication styles, communication failures and poor teamwork. There is enough evidence in the literature to show that communication failure is detrimental to patient safety. It is estimated that 80% of serious medical errors worldwide take place because of miscommunication between medical providers. NUH recognizes that effective communication and teamwork are essential in the delivery of high quality safe patient care, especially in a complex organization. NUH is a good example, where there is a rich mix of nationalities and races, in staff and in patients, and there is a rapidly expanding care environment. NUH had to overcome these challenges by adopting a multi-pronged approach. The trials and tribulations of NUH in this journey were worthwhile as the patient safety climate survey scores improved over the years.

  3. Teamwork: Education for Entrants to the Environment Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Barry; Thomas, Ian

    2006-01-01

    Numerous reports over recent years emphasise the importance of teamwork training in undergraduate programs in environment education at tertiary level. This paper describes a project undertaken by a team of final year undergraduate environment students from four faculties at RMIT University in Australia working on a multi-disciplinary environment…

  4. Teaching Teams about Teamwork: Preparation, Practice, and Performance Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Lisa Gueldenzoph

    2009-01-01

    Focusing on preparation, practice, and performance review to teach teams about teamwork provides a well-supported and effective methodology that both enhances students' collaborative skills and contributes to an effective team project experience. Preparation includes aspects of coaching to introduce and explain effective group processes. After…

  5. A picture tells 1000 words: learning teamwork in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Martina; Bennett, Deirdre; O'Flynn, Siun; Foley, Tony

    2013-04-01

    Teamwork and patient centredness are frequently articulated concepts in medical education, but are not always explicit in the curriculum. In Ireland, recent government policy emphasises the importance of a primary care team approach to health care. We report on an appraisal of a newly introduced community-based student attachment, which focused on teamwork. To review students' experience of teamwork following a community clinical placement by examining student assignments: essays, poetry, music and art. Year-2 graduate-entry students (n = 45) spent 2 weeks with a primary care team. Attachments comprised placements with members of the primary care team, emphasising team dynamics, at the end of which students submitted a representative piece of work, which captured their learning. Essays (n = 22) were analysed using a thematic content analysis. Artwork consisted of painting, collage, photography, poetry and original music (n = 23). These were analysed using Gardner's entry points. Three core themes emerged in both written and visual work: patient centredness; communication; and an improved appreciation of the skills of other health care professionals. Students identified optimal team communication occurring when patient outcomes were prioritised. Metaphors relating to puzzles, hands and inter-connectedness feature strongly. The poems and artwork had a high impact when they were presented to tutors. Primary care team placements focus student attention on teamwork and patient centredness. Student artwork shows potential as a tool to evaluate student learning in medical education. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2013.

  6. Can collaboration within multidisciplinary teamwork be explained using Belbin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dederichs, Anne; Karlshøj, Jan

    2013-01-01

    of teachers for 13 multidisciplinary teams of students. Belbin’s theory on teamwork was introduced and the teams were formed according to the theory, in order to optimize the collaboration. Students were given a standard- and course specific questionnaire including the possibility for making individual notes...

  7. A Tool for Preventing Teamwork Failure: the TFP Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Palle; Rebollar, Rubeén; Lidón, Iván

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the process used to devise the Teamwork Failure Prevention Questionnaire (TFP Questionnaire), a tool that allows teams with problems in functioning to be detected early. The TFP Questionnaire was formulated in a project management course at the University of Zaragoza (Spain...

  8. Special Education Teachers' Attitudes and Perceptions of Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, D. Michael; Gallagher, Peggy A.

    2010-01-01

    One hundred and eighty-four special education teachers serving school-based intervention teams completed the "Attitudes About Teamwork Survey", the "Team Characteristics Survey", and the "Team Process Perception Survey". Respondents' regard for the team process in planning and implementing supports for children with disabilities was generally…

  9. Project-Based Learning in Geotechnics: Cooperative versus Collaborative Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Lopes, Margarida; Macedo, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Since 2007/2008 project-based learning models have been used to deliver two fundamental courses on Geotechnics in University of Aveiro, Portugal. These models have evolved and have encompassed either cooperative or collaborative teamwork. Using data collected in five editions of each course (Soil Mechanics I and Soil Mechanics II), the different…

  10. Autism and Multidisciplinary Teamwork through the SCERTS Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molteni, Paola; Guldberg, Karen; Logan, Nick

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates multidisciplinary teamwork in an English special school located in the West Midlands region of the UK. The research was carried out by Paola Molteni, a PhD student at Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan, Karen Guldberg of the Autism Centre for Education and Research Director at the University of Birmingham School…

  11. 470 Teamwork Effectiveness in the Financial Management Sector ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-27

    Aug 27, 2015 ... Principles, theoretical concepts ... High Performance Workplace Organization: UK response (2007), the ... rather than its effects upon employees and the subsequent ... Consequently, this study will focus on effective teamwork within and ... Teams can be classified in diverse ways, as identified by various ...

  12. The Teamwork Sourcebook. EPIC Workplace Learning Project, 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershwin, Mary Crabbe, Ed.; Cyr, Anne Reis; Smith, Elizabeth Amidon; Travis, Lisa; Wiseman, Tim

    Designed as a reference for teaching teamwork skills in the workplace, this manual presents teaching strategies and activities for beginning, intermediate, and advanced learners. Following an overview of the manual's purpose, definitions are provided of the three skill levels integrated into the activities, indicating that beginning activities…

  13. Validation of a teamwork perceptions measure to increase patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keebler, Joseph R; Dietz, Aaron S; Lazzara, Elizabeth H; Benishek, Lauren E; Almeida, Sandra A; Toor, Phyllis A; King, Heidi B; Salas, Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    TeamSTEPPS (Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety) is a team-training intervention which shows promise in aiding the mitigation of medical errors. This article examines the construct validity of the TeamSTEPPS Teamwork Perceptions Questionnaire (T-TPQ), a self-report survey that examines multiple dimensions of perceptions of teamwork within healthcare settings. Using survey-based methods, 1700 multidisciplinary healthcare professionals and support staff were measured on their perceptions of teamwork. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between the five TeamSTEPPS dimensions: Leadership, Mutual Support, Situation Monitoring, Communication, and Team Structure. The analysis indicated that the T-TPQ measure is more reliable than previously thought (Cronbach's α=0.978). Further, our final tested model showed a good fit with the data (x(2) (df) 3601.27 (546), pteamwork. This has beneficial implications for patient safety and future research that studies medical teamwork. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Integrating Couple Teamwork Conversations into Child Welfare Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Dana; Antle, Becky; Johnson, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    This article summarizes the importance of and challenges to addressing couple teamwork issues in the child welfare population. Although there is substantial evidence to support the importance of healthy adult relationships for child well-being and the prevention of child maltreatment, there are a number of barriers to addressing these couple…

  15. Using Student Technical Conferences to Build Multidisciplinary Teamwork Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, David L.

    2007-01-01

    An open-ended student conference project involving sophomore, junior, and senior chemical engineering students is described. The project is designed to address outcomes in each of the courses in which those students are enrolled, as well as broader "soft skills" including multidisciplinary teamwork, communications, lifelong learning, and…

  16. General and special education teachers' relations within teamwork ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    education teachers within teamwork and to define socio-demographic factors .... The team approach of general and special education teachers proved to be useful ..... encourage cohesion are trust, openness, willingness for cooperation and .... enduring mental illness engaged in a physical activity programme integrated ...

  17. Teaching Teamwork: Electronics Instruction in a Collaborative Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Paul; von Davier, Alina; Chamberlain, John; Koon, Al; Andrews, Jessica; McIntyre, Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    The Teaching Teamwork Project is using an online simulated electronic circuit, running on multiple computers, to assess students' abilities to work together as a team. We pose problems that must be tackled collaboratively, and log students' actions as they attempt to solve them. Team members are isolated from one another and can communicate only…

  18. Difficulties in collaboration: a critical incident study of interprofessional healthcare teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvarnström, Susanne

    2008-03-01

    The challenge for members of interprofessional teams is to manage the team processes that occur in all teamwork while simultaneously managing their individual professional identities. The aim of this study was to identify and describe difficulties perceived by health professionals in interprofessional teamwork. Utterances on verbal actions and resolutions were also explored to enable a discussion of the implications for interprofessional learning. Individual interviews using a Critical Incident Technique were performed with 18 Swedish professionals working in healthcare teams, and examined with qualitative content analysis. The main findings show difficulties related to the team dynamic that arose when team members acted towards one another as representatives of their professions, difficulties that occurred when the members' various knowledge contributions interacted in the team, and difficulties related to the influence of the surrounding organization. The perceived consequences of the difficulties, beyond individual consequences, were restrictions on the use of collaborative resources to arrive at a holistic view of the patient's problem, and barriers to providing patient care and service in the desired manner. This paper also discusses how experiences of managing difficulties entailed various forms of interprofessional learning situations.

  19. Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Practice Characteristics: Barriers and Opportunities for Interprofessional Teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Norful, Allison A; Martsolf, Grant R

    Developing team-based care models and expanding nurse practitioner (NP) workforce in primary care are recommended by policy makers to meet demand. Little is known how to promote interprofessional teamwork. Using a mixed-methods design, we analyzed qualitative interview and quantitative survey data from primary care NPs to explore practice characteristics important for teamwork. The Interprofessional Teamwork for Health and Social Care Framework guided the study. We identified NP-physician and NP-administration relationships; organizational support and governance; time and space for teamwork; and regulations and economic impact as important. Practice and policy change addressing these factors is needed for effective interprofessional teamwork.

  20. Measuring teamwork and conflict among Emergency Medical Technician personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P. Daniel; Weaver, Matthew D.; Weaver, Sallie J.; Rosen, Michael A.; Todorova, Gergana; Weingart, Laurie R.; Krackhardt, David; Lave, Judith R.; Arnold, Robert M.; Yealy, Donald M.; Salas, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Objective We sought to develop a reliable and valid tool for measuring teamwork among Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) partnerships. Methods We adapted existing scales and developed new items to measure components of teamwork. After recruiting a convenience sample of 39 agencies, we tested a 122-item draft survey tool. We performed a series of Exploratory Factor Analyses (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to test reliability and construct validity, describing variation in domain and global scores using descriptive statistics. Results We received 687 completed surveys. The EFA analyses identified a 9-factor solution. We labeled these factors [1] Team Orientation, [2] Team Structure & Leadership, [3] Partner Communication, Team Support, & Monitoring, [4] Partner Trust and Shared Mental Models, [5] Partner Adaptability & Back-Up Behavior, [6] Process Conflict, [7] Strong Task Conflict, [8] Mild Task Conflict, and [9] Interpersonal Conflict. We tested a short form (30-item SF) and long form (45-item LF) version. The CFA analyses determined that both the SF and LF versions possess positive psychometric properties of reliability and construct validity. The EMT-TEAMWORK-SF has positive internal consistency properties with a mean Cronbach’s alpha coefficient ≥0.70 across all 9-factors (mean=0.84; min=0.78, max=0.94). The mean Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the EMT-TEAMWORK-LF version was 0.87 (min=0.79, max=0.94). There was wide variation in weighted scores across all 9 factors and the global score for the SF and LF versions. Mean scores were lowest for the Team Orientation factor (48.1, SD 21.5 SF; 49.3 SD 19.8 LF) and highest (more positive) for the Interpersonal Conflict factor (87.7 SD 18.1 for both SF and LF). Conclusions We developed a reliable and valid survey to evaluate teamwork between EMT partners. PMID:22128909

  1. Ethics in Rehabilitation Counselor Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Terry L.; Strohmer, Douglas C.; Belcas, Eva M.; Burton, Kathryn A.

    2002-01-01

    Article is an exploration of some of the ethical issues facing rehabilitation counselors who provide clinical supervision. Ethical issues related to competence, evaluation and due process, dual relationships, confidentiality, and informed consent are discussed. (Contains 28references, 2 tables, and 1 appendix.) (Author)

  2. Implementing an interprofessional first-year teamwork project: some key reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Susan Maree

    2013-09-01

    Implementing an interprofessional teamwork project for first-year students presents pedagogical and practical challenges. While transferable skills and attributes are important, engagement of students with limited professional experience in teamwork depends on relevance to current learning needs. This report outlines principles learned from planning and implementing a teamwork project for an interprofessional health administration and service development course. Practising interprofessional teamwork as leaders and teachers, aligning with previous, current and future teamwork content and processes and responding to student feedback and achievement have been the key factors in shaping the project over three semesters. Face-to-face and online interprofessional teamwork learning has necessitated developing resources that support self-direction, using familiar technology and providing enabling physical environments. Implications for first-year interprofessional teamwork are that structured well-resourced processes, responsiveness and alignment of learning all improve student outcomes.

  3. There is no "i" in teamwork in the patient-centered medical home: defining teamwork competencies for academic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leasure, Emily L; Jones, Ronald R; Meade, Lauren B; Sanger, Marla I; Thomas, Kris G; Tilden, Virginia P; Bowen, Judith L; Warm, Eric J

    2013-05-01

    Evidence suggests that teamwork is essential for safe, reliable practice. Creating health care teams able to function effectively in patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs), practices that organize care around the patient and demonstrate achievement of defined quality care standards, remains challenging. Preparing trainees for practice in interprofessional teams is particularly challenging in academic health centers where health professions curricula are largely siloed. Here, the authors review a well-delineated set of teamwork competencies that are important for high-functioning teams and suggest how these competencies might be useful for interprofessional team training and achievement of PCMH standards. The five competencies are (1) team leadership, the ability to coordinate team members' activities, ensure appropriate task distribution, evaluate effectiveness, and inspire high-level performance, (2) mutual performance monitoring, the ability to develop a shared understanding among team members regarding intentions, roles, and responsibilities so as to accurately monitor one another's performance for collective success, (3) backup behavior, the ability to anticipate the needs of other team members and shift responsibilities during times of variable workload, (4) adaptability, the capability of team members to adjust their strategy for completing tasks on the basis of feedback from the work environment, and (5) team orientation, the tendency to prioritize team goals over individual goals, encourage alternative perspectives, and show respect and regard for each team member. Relating each competency to a vignette from an academic primary care clinic, the authors describe potential strategies for improving teamwork learning and applying the teamwork competences to academic PCMH practices.

  4. Defining competencies in psychology supervision: a consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falender, Carol A; Cornish, Jennifer A Erickson; Goodyear, Rodney; Hatcher, Robert; Kaslow, Nadine J; Leventhal, Gerald; Shafranske, Edward; Sigmon, Sandra T; Stoltenberg, Cal; Grus, Catherine

    2004-07-01

    Supervision is a domain of professional practice conducted by many psychologists but for which formal training and standards have been largely neglected. In this article, supervision is proposed as a core competency area in psychology for which a number of elements reflecting specific knowledge, skills, and values must be addressed to ensure adequate training and professional development of the trainee. Supra-ordinate factors of supervision viewed as permeating all aspects of professional development are proposed. These include the perspective that professional development is a lifelong, cumulative process requiring attention to diversity in all its forms, as well as legal and ethical issues, personal and professional factors, and self- and peer-assessment. A competencies framework is presented with particular elements representing knowledge (e.g., about psychotherapy, research, etc.), skills (including supervising modalities, relationship skills, etc.), values (e.g., responsibility for the clients and supervisee rests with supervisor, etc.), and meta-knowledge. Social contextual factors and issues of education and training, assessment, and future directions also are addressed, with specific elements listed. Suggestions for future work in this area are addressed, including the need to refine further and operationalize competences, develop clear expectations for accreditation and licensure regarding supervision competencies, and expand the description of developmental levels of supervisors from minimal to optimal competence. This is one of a series of articles published together in this issue of the Journal of Clinical Psychology. Several other articles that resulted from the Competencies Conference: Future Directions in Education and Credentialing in Professional Psychology will appear in Professional Psychology: Research and Practice and The Counseling Psychologist.

  5. Learning Teamwork Skills in University Programming Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho-Thomas, Pilar; Fuentes-Fernandez, Ruben; Fernandez-Manjon, Baltasar

    2009-01-01

    University courses about computer programming usually seek to provide students not only with technical knowledge, but also with the skills required to work in real-life software projects. Nowadays, the development of software applications requires the coordinated efforts of the members of one or more teams. Therefore, it is important for software…

  6. Interprofessional Teamwork Education: Moving Toward the Patient-Centered Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Kamran; Najarkolai, Atena Rahmati; Keshmiri, Fatemeh

    2016-10-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.3 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Interprofessional Teamwork Education: Moving Toward the Patient-Centered Approach," found on pages 449-460, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until September 30, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Explain the recommended framework in teaching and implementing interprofessional competencies. Identify

  7. The interplay between teamwork, clinicians' emotional exhaustion, and clinician-rated patient safety: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, Annalena; Meier, Laurenz L; Manser, Tanja

    2016-04-19

    Effectively managing patient safety and clinicians' emotional exhaustion are important goals of healthcare organizations. Previous cross-sectional studies showed that teamwork is associated with both. However, causal relationships between all three constructs have not yet been investigated. Moreover, the role of different dimensions of teamwork in relation to emotional exhaustion and patient safety is unclear. The current study focused on the long-term development of teamwork, emotional exhaustion, and patient safety in interprofessional intensive care teams by exploring causal relationships between these constructs. A secondary objective was to disentangle the effects of interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral teamwork. We employed a longitudinal study design. Participants were 2100 nurses and physicians working in 55 intensive care units. They answered an online questionnaire on interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral aspects of teamwork, emotional exhaustion, and patient safety at three time points with a 3-month lag. Data were analyzed with cross-lagged structural equation modeling. We controlled for professional role. Analyses showed that emotional exhaustion had a lagged effect on interpersonal teamwork. Furthermore, interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral teamwork mutually influenced each other. Finally, cognitive-behavioral teamwork predicted clinician-rated patient safety. The current study shows that the interrelations between teamwork, clinician burnout, and clinician-rated patient safety unfold over time. Interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral teamwork play specific roles in a process leading from clinician emotional exhaustion to decreased clinician-rated patient safety. Emotionally exhausted clinicians are less able to engage in positive interpersonal teamwork, which might set in motion a vicious cycle: negative interpersonal team interactions negatively affect cognitive-behavioral teamwork and vice versa. Ultimately, ineffective cognitive

  8. Research and Practice on Teamwork Capability Development for Software Engineering Students%软件工程人才团队协作能力培养的研究与实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈健; 吴健; 张莉; 袁柳; 裘国永

    2011-01-01

    Teamwork capability is among the most essential abilities of engineering professionals. Software engineering requires even higher teamwork capability due to the nature of group oriented and knowledge intensive work processes. We first discuss the need, importance and feasibility of the teamwork capability development for software engineering professionals. We then analyze appropriate approaches for systematically developing an understanding and basic capability of teamwork knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) at the undergraduate level. The main conclusions are: teamwork capability is necessary and possible to be developed from the undergraduate level; systematically teaching teamwork KSAs throughout the undergraduate curriculum could effectively develop a level of teamwork capability of software engineering students.%团队协作能力是工程人才需具备的重要能力之一.软件工程对于人才的团队协作能力提出了更高和更迫切的要求.本文首先论述软件工程人才团队协作能力的必要性、重要性和培养可行性,然后分析在本科阶段系统进行相关知识、技能和能力(KSAs)培养的模式和方法.基于已有实践,对如何在本科阶段系统培养相关能力进行了探讨.主要结论:团队协作能力需要也可能在本科阶段开始培养;将其系统地贯穿于本科阶段可有效地提升人才的团队协作能力.

  9. 20 CFR 655.30 - Supervised recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Supervised recruitment. 655.30 Section 655.30... Workers) § 655.30 Supervised recruitment. (a) Supervised recruitment. Where an employer is found to have... failed to adequately conduct recruitment activities or failed in any obligation of this part, the CO may...

  10. 40 CFR 35.935-8 - Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supervision. 35.935-8 Section 35.935-8... ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.935-8 Supervision. In the case of... supervision and inspection of the project to ensure that the construction conforms with the approved plans...

  11. Supervision Experiences of New Professional School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultsma, Shawn A.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the supervision experiences of 11 new professional school counselors. They reported that their supervision experiences were most often administrative in nature; reports of clinical and developmental supervision were limited to participants whose supervisors were licensed as professional counselors. In addition,…

  12. 10 CFR 35.27 - Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supervision. 35.27 Section 35.27 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL General Administrative Requirements § 35.27 Supervision. (a) A... under the supervision of an authorized user, as allowed by § 35.11(b)(1), shall— (1) In addition to...

  13. 28 CFR 2.91 - Supervision responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supervision responsibility. 2.91 Section 2.91 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF....91 Supervision responsibility. (a) Pursuant to D.C. Code 24-133(c), the District of Columbia...

  14. 75 FR 59799 - Office of Thrift Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Purchase of Branch Office(s) and/or Transfer of Assets/Liabilities AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comment. SUMMARY: The... Supervision within the Department of the Treasury will submit the proposed information collection...

  15. 7 CFR 70.12 - Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supervision. 70.12 Section 70.12 Agriculture... PRODUCTS AND RABBIT PRODUCTS Grading of Poultry Products and Rabbit Products General § 70.12 Supervision. All grading service shall be subject to supervision at all times by the responsible State...

  16. 7 CFR 550.33 - Administrative supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative supervision. 550.33 Section 550.33... Agreements Program Management § 550.33 Administrative supervision. REE employees are prohibited from engaging... management issues. The cooperator is solely responsible for the administrative supervision of its employees....

  17. 27 CFR 46.79 - Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Supervision. 46.79 Section... § 46.79 Supervision. Before payment is made under this subpart in respect of the tax, or tax and duty... under the supervision of an appropriate TTB officer who will be assigned for that purpose by...

  18. 24 CFR 200.105 - Mortgagor supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mortgagor supervision. 200.105... supervision. (a) As long as the Commissioner is the insurer or holder of the mortgage, the Commissioner shall... Regulatory Agreement or other instrument granting the Commissioner supervision of the mortgagor....

  19. The Learning Alliance: Ethics in Doctoral Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halse, Christine; Bansel, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the ethics of relationships in doctoral supervision. We give an overview of four paradigms of doctoral supervision that have endured over the past 25 years and elucidate some of their strengths and limitations, contextualise them historically and consider their implications for doctoral supervision in the contemporary…

  20. 48 CFR 836.572 - Government supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Government supervision. 836.572 Section 836.572 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SPECIAL... supervision. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.236-78, Government supervision,...

  1. 7 CFR 56.6 - Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supervision. 56.6 Section 56.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections... Grading of Shell Eggs General § 56.6 Supervision. All grading service shall be subject to supervision...

  2. 32 CFR 631.3 - Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Supervision. 631.3 Section 631.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL....3 Supervision. The following will develop and have staff supervision over AFDCB and...

  3. 9 CFR 354.13 - Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supervision. 354.13 Section 354.13... CERTIFICATION VOLUNTARY INSPECTION OF RABBITS AND EDIBLE PRODUCTS THEREOF Basis of Service § 354.13 Supervision. All inspection service shall be subject to supervision at all times by the station supervisor,...

  4. Skærpet bevidsthed om supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This article presents a historical survey of the initiatives which have taken place in european music therapy towards developing a deeper consciousness about supervision. Supervision as a disciplin in music therapy training, as a maintenance of music therapy profession and as a postgraduate...... training for examined music therapists. Definitions are presented and methods developed by working groups in european music therapy supervision are presented....

  5. Multicultural Supervision: What Difference Does Difference Make?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Katie; Aros-O'Malley, Megan; Murrieta, Imelda

    2014-01-01

    Multicultural sensitivity and competency represent critical components to contemporary practice and supervision in school psychology. Internship and supervision experiences are a capstone experience for many new school psychologists; however, few receive formal training and supervision in multicultural competencies. As an increased number of…

  6. A National Survey of School Counselor Supervision Practices: Administrative, Clinical, Peer, and Technology Mediated Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera-Diltz, Dilani M.; Mason, Kimberly L.

    2012-01-01

    Supervision is vital for personal and professional development of counselors. Practicing school counselors (n = 1557) across the nation were surveyed to explore current supervision practices. Results indicated that 41.1% of school counselors provide supervision. Although 89% receive some type of supervision, only 10.3% of school counselors receive…

  7. The teamwork skills of social pedagogues

    OpenAIRE

    Kajič, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary pedagogical approaches are based on team work. Team work is when a group is focused on a particular goal and members of the group work together with the purpose of fulfilling the goal. In the pedagogical field this means that at least two pedagogical workers are focused on the same students at the same time. For team work to be successful certain competences are needed. In the widest definition competences can be defined as knowledge, skills and strategies. For a competence t...

  8. Improving nurse–physician teamwork through interprofessional bedside rounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkin, Stanislav; Chon, Tony Y; Christopherson, Marie L; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Worden, Lindsey M; Ratelle, John T

    2016-01-01

    Background Teamwork between physicians and nurses has a positive association with patient satisfaction and outcomes, but perceptions of physician–nurse teamwork are often suboptimal. Objective To improve nurse–physician teamwork in a general medicine inpatient teaching unit by increasing face-to-face communication through interprofessional bedside rounds. Intervention From July 2013 through October 2013, physicians (attendings and residents) and nurses from four general medicine teams in a single nursing unit participated in bedside rounding, which involved the inclusion of nurses in morning rounds with the medicine teams at the patients’ bedside. Based on stakeholder analysis and feedback, a checklist for key patient care issues was created and utilized during bedside rounds. Assessment To assess the effect of bedside rounding on nurse–physician teamwork, a survey of selected items from the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) was administered to participants before and after the implementation of bedside rounds. The number of pages to the general medicine teams was also measured as a marker of physician–nurse communication. Results Participation rate in bedside rounds across the four medicine teams was 58%. SAQ response rates for attendings, residents, and nurses were 36/36 (100%), 73/73 (100%), and 32/73 (44%) prior to implementation of bedside rounding and 36 attendings (100%), 72 residents (100%), and 14 (19%) nurses after the implementation of bedside rounding, respectively. Prior to bedside rounding, nurses provided lower teamwork ratings (percent agree) than residents and attendings on all SAQ items; but after the intervention, the difference remained significant only on SAQ item 2 (“In this clinical area, it is not difficult to speak up if I perceive a problem with patient care”, 64% for nurses vs 79% for residents vs 94% for attendings, P=0.02). Also, resident responses improved on SAQ item 1 (“Nurse input is well received in this area

  9. Supervision in rehabilitation psychology: Application of Beatrice Wright's value-laden beliefs and principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, M Jan; Nash, Laurie; Stucky, Kirk Jeffrey; Nierenberg, Barry

    2016-02-01

    Clinical supervision is of critical importance for training subsequent generations of psychologists. Specialty training in rehabilitation psychology requires exposure to specific knowledge, skills, and attitudes related to disability and specialized supervision and mentorship. In the literature to date, minimal guidance exists regarding supervision training and methods specifically for rehabilitation psychologists. This article aims to provoke discussion regarding supervision practice and dissemination of the values fundamental to our specialty. The foundational wisdom of Dr. Beatrice Wright (1983) is applied for the purposes of this endeavor. Examples of clinical supervision scenarios are presented as teaching vignettes to demonstrate ways in which supervisors and mentors can incorporate this content, promote discussion, and apply it to real-world practice.

  10. Supervision Experiences of Professional Counselors Providing Crisis Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupre, Madeleine; Echterling, Lennis G.; Meixner, Cara; Anderson, Robin; Kielty, Michele

    2014-01-01

    In this phenomenological study, the authors explored supervision experiences of 13 licensed professional counselors in situations requiring crisis counseling. Five themes concerning crisis and supervision were identified from individual interviews. Findings support intensive, immediate crisis supervision and postlicensure clinical supervision.

  11. APPLICATION OF GIT-BRANCHING FOR THE ORGANIZATION OF TEAMWORK ON IT PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerii G. Grytsenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article the basics of version control systems using are investigated and searched the tools for their implementation. For this purpose, it was made the analysis and justified the choice of programming environment Git. The features of Git version control system using in the implementation of IT projects are identified, as well as described the procedure and the basic steps to create a working version of the project. The technology of interoperability team software project using Git version control system for collaboration is investigated, identified and proposed. By the example of the implementation of the author’s project of knowledge testing information-analytical system it was shown the practical side of organizing teamwork with the use of Git version control system.

  12. Public sector physiotherapists believe that staff supervision should be broad ranging, individualised, structured, and based on needs and goals: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabel A Redpath

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Question: What do physiotherapists consider to be the structure and content of an effective clinical supervision program for public sector staff? Design: Qualitative study using emergent-systematic focus group design. Participants: 46 physiotherapists and six physiotherapy assistants from a large, regional, Australian health service participated in one of seven focus groups. Results: Data were represented by three major categories: the content of supervision; the structure of supervision; and participants’ roles and attributes. The content of supervision should encompass all issues affecting workplace experience and performance; supervision should be individualised and needs based. For the structure of supervision, a variety of methods and formats should be available, including: scheduled and unscheduled supervision (unscheduled supervision addresses needs as they arise but its usefulness can be restricted by supervisor availability; the environment should be organised to facilitate supervision; supervision should be integrated into existing practices; and supervision should be adequately prioritised and resourced to enable sustainability. In relation to participants’ roles and attributes, respondents recommended: clearly defined supervisor and supervisee roles, responsibilities, skills and attributes are required to facilitate a constructive relationship on which successful supervision depends; the supervisee should take primary responsibility for leading and organising their supervision; the supervisor provides support and accountability and assists with goal setting and attainment; and successful supervision requires considerable knowledge and skills from the supervisee and supervisor (supervision education and training might be necessary. Conclusion: The physiotherapists’ perspectives that were identified in this study are important to consider when assessing current clinical supervision models, as well as when designing and

  13. Multiprofessional teamwork in work-related medical rehabilitation for patients with chronic musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Betje; Neuderth, Silke; Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Bethge, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Systematic reviews indicate the effectiveness of multimodal rehabilitation. In Germany this has been shown, in particular, for work-related medical rehabilitation. A recently published guideline on work-related medical rehabilitation supports the dissemination of these programmes. The feasibility of this guideline was examined in a multicentre study. This paper presents findings on the relevance of multiprofessional teamwork for the implementation of successful work-related medical rehabilitation. Focus groups were conducted with 7 inpatient orthopaedic rehabilitation teams and examined using qualitative content analysis. Multiprofessional teamwork emerged inductively as a meaningful theme. All teams described multiprofessional teamwork as a work-related medical rehabilitation success factor, referring to its relevance for holistic treatment of multifactorially impaired patients. Although similar indicators of successful multiprofessional teamwork were named, the teams realized multiprofessional teamwork differently. We found 3 team types, corresponding to multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary team models. These types and models constitute a continuum of collaborative practice, which seems to be affected by context-related factors. The significance of multiprofessional teamwork for successful multimodal rehabilitation was underlined. Indicators of ideal multiprofessional teamwork and contextual facilitators were specified. The contingency approach to teamwork, as well as the assumption of multiprofessional teamwork as a continuum of collaborative practice, is supported. Stronger consideration of multiprofessional teamwork in the work-related medical rehabilitation guideline is indicated.

  14. A Typology of Interprofessional Teamwork in Acute Geriatric Care: A Study in 55 units in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piers, Ruth D; Versluys, Karen J J; Devoghel, Johan; Lambrecht, Sophie; Vyt, André; Van Den Noortgate, Nele J

    2017-09-01

    To explore the quality of interprofessional teamwork in acute geriatric care and to build a model of team types. Cross-sectional multicenter study. Acute geriatric units in Belgium. Team members of different professional backgrounds. Perceptions of interprofessional teamwork among team members of 55 acute geriatric units in Belgium were measured using a survey covering collaborative practice and experience, managerial coaching and open team culture, shared reflection and decision-making, patient files facilitating teamwork, members' belief in the power of teamwork, and members' comfort in reporting incidents. Cluster analysis was used to determine types of interprofessional teamwork. Professions and clusters were compared using analysis of variance. The overall response rate was 60%. Of the 890 respondents, 71% were nursing professionals, 20% other allied health professionals, 5% physicians, and 4% logistic and administrative staff. More than 70% of respondents scored highly on interprofessional teamwork competencies, consultation, experiences, meetings, management, and results. Fewer than 55% scored highly on items about shared reflection and decision-making, reporting incidents from a colleague, and patient files facilitating interprofessional teamwork. Nurses in this study rated shared reflection and decision-making lower than physicians on the same acute geriatric units (P teamwork in acute geriatric units is satisfactory, but shared reflection and decision-making needs improvement. Four types of interprofessional teamwork are identified and can be used to benchmark the teamwork of individual teams. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. [Software version and medical device software supervision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Liang; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The importance of software version in the medical device software supervision does not cause enough attention at present. First of all, the effect of software version in the medical device software supervision is discussed, and then the necessity of software version in the medical device software supervision is analyzed based on the discussion of the misunderstanding of software version. Finally the concrete suggestions on software version naming rules, software version supervision for the software in medical devices, and software version supervision scheme are proposed.

  16. Clinical supervision training across contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Joanna; Bearman, Margaret; Edouard, Vicki; Kent, Fiona; Nestel, Debra; Molloy, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Clinicians require specific skills to teach or supervise students in the workplace; however, there are barriers to accessing faculty member development, such as time, cost and suitability. The Clinical Supervision Support Across Contexts (ClinSSAC) programme was designed to provide accessible interprofessional educator training to clinical supervisors across a wide range of clinical settings. In Australia there are increasing numbers of health care students, creating pressure on existing placements. Students are now increasingly learning in community settings, where clinicians have traditionally had less access to faculty member development. An interprofessional team collaborated in the development and implementation of ClinSSAC. A total of 978 clinicians participated in a face-to-face, interactive, introductory module to clinical supervision; 672 people accessed the equivalent online core module, with 23 per cent completing all activities. Additional profession-and discipline-specific modules were also developed. Formal project evaluation found that most participants rated the workshops as helpful or very helpful for their roles as clinical supervisors. Interdisciplinary learning from the workshops was reported to enable cross-discipline supervision. Large participant numbers and favourable ratings indicate a continuing need for basic training in education. Key factors to workshop success included expert facilitators, the interprofessional context and interactive model. The online modules were an important adjunct, and provided context-specific resources, but the low online completion rate suggests protected face-to-face time for faculty member development is still required. Programmes such as ClinSSAC have the capacity to promote interprofessional education and practice. There are barriers to accessing faculty member development, such as time, cost and suitability. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Learning Dynamics in Doctoral Supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie

    This doctoral research explores doctoral supervision within life science research in a Danish university. From one angle it investigates doctoral students’ experiences with strengthening the relationship with their supervisors through a structured meeting with the supervisor, prepared as part...... of an introduction course for new doctoral students. This study showed how the course provides an effective way build supervisee agency and strengthening supervisory relationships through clarification and alignment of expectations and sharing goals about doctoral studies. From the other angle the research...

  18. Team and teamwork in modern european HR management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usheva Mariana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the major issues occurring in every contemporary organization is the issue of the efficiency of work and obtaining maximum results from work done. Most often when the issue of increasing the efficiency of work is laid the question of teams and teamwork in various projectя of the company comes to the foreground and frequently no proper differentiation is made between a “group of people” and a “team” and this brings to a large number of misunderstandings of managers and employees with regard to the designation and benefits of team organization of work. There are clear traceable differences between the perception of the concept of “team” and the implementation of teamwork by European and Bulgarian companies and it is good to make the differentiation between them with a view to the HR management.

  19. Toward a definition of teamwork in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Rosemarie; Kozlowski, Steve W J; Shapiro, Marc J; Salas, Eduardo

    2008-11-01

    The patient safety literature from the past decade emphasizes the importance of teamwork skills and human factors in preventing medical errors. Simulation has been used within aviation, the military, and now health care domains to effectively teach and assess teamwork skills. However, attempts to expand and generalize research and training principles have been limited due to a lack of a well-defined, well-researched taxonomy. As part of the 2008 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference on "The Science of Simulation in Healthcare," a subset of the group expertise and group assessment breakout sections identified evidence-based recommendations for an emergency medicine (EM) team taxonomy and performance model. This material was disseminated within the morning session and was discussed both during breakout sessions and via online messaging. Below we present a well-defined, well-described taxonomy that will help guide design, implementation, and assessment of simulation-based team training programs.

  20. Semi-supervised consensus clustering for gene expression data analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yunli; Pan, Youlian

    2014-01-01

    Background Simple clustering methods such as hierarchical clustering and k-means are widely used for gene expression data analysis; but they are unable to deal with noise and high dimensionality associated with the microarray gene expression data. Consensus clustering appears to improve the robustness and quality of clustering results. Incorporating prior knowledge in clustering process (semi-supervised clustering) has been shown to improve the consistency between the data partitioning and do...

  1. Semi-supervised sparse coding

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-07-06

    Sparse coding approximates the data sample as a sparse linear combination of some basic codewords and uses the sparse codes as new presentations. In this paper, we investigate learning discriminative sparse codes by sparse coding in a semi-supervised manner, where only a few training samples are labeled. By using the manifold structure spanned by the data set of both labeled and unlabeled samples and the constraints provided by the labels of the labeled samples, we learn the variable class labels for all the samples. Furthermore, to improve the discriminative ability of the learned sparse codes, we assume that the class labels could be predicted from the sparse codes directly using a linear classifier. By solving the codebook, sparse codes, class labels and classifier parameters simultaneously in a unified objective function, we develop a semi-supervised sparse coding algorithm. Experiments on two real-world pattern recognition problems demonstrate the advantage of the proposed methods over supervised sparse coding methods on partially labeled data sets.

  2. The Effectiveness of Teamwork Training on Teamwork Behaviors and Team Performance: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Controlled Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Desmond; Ruissen, Geralyn R; Eys, Mark A; Zumbo, Bruno D; Beauchamp, Mark R

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of teamwork interventions that were carried out with the purpose of improving teamwork and team performance, using controlled experimental designs. A literature search returned 16,849 unique articles. The meta-analysis was ultimately conducted on 51 articles, comprising 72 (k) unique interventions, 194 effect sizes, and 8439 participants, using a random effects model. Positive and significant medium-sized effects were found for teamwork interventions on both teamwork and team performance. Moderator analyses were also conducted, which generally revealed positive and significant effects with respect to several sample, intervention, and measurement characteristics. Implications for effective teamwork interventions as well as considerations for future research are discussed.

  3. The Effectiveness of Teamwork Training on Teamwork Behaviors and Team Performance: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Controlled Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Desmond; Ruissen, Geralyn R.; Eys, Mark A.; Zumbo, Bruno D.; Beauchamp, Mark R.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of teamwork interventions that were carried out with the purpose of improving teamwork and team performance, using controlled experimental designs. A literature search returned 16,849 unique articles. The meta-analysis was ultimately conducted on 51 articles, comprising 72 (k) unique interventions, 194 effect sizes, and 8439 participants, using a random effects model. Positive and significant medium-sized effects were found for teamwork interventions on both teamwork and team performance. Moderator analyses were also conducted, which generally revealed positive and significant effects with respect to several sample, intervention, and measurement characteristics. Implications for effective teamwork interventions as well as considerations for future research are discussed. PMID:28085922

  4. Achieving Strong Teamwork Practices in Hospital Labor and Delivery Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    express, suggest, and consequences DoD U.S. Department of Defense HSOPS Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture ICU intensive-care unit I’M SAFE...approaches for measuring teamwork Patient and staff satisfaction AHRQ surveys on patient - safety culture Patient and staff satisfaction Team behavior...Appendix B). The questions in the matrix related to the following major topic areas: • hospital environment for quality and safety • patient - safety culture in

  5. Electronic health records and support for primary care teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Kevin; Gourevitch, Rebecca; Cross, Dori A.; Scholle, Sarah Hudson

    2015-01-01

    Objective Consensus that enhanced teamwork is necessary for efficient and effective primary care delivery is growing. We sought to identify how electronic health records (EHRs) facilitate and pose challenges to primary care teams as well as how practices are overcoming these challenges. Methods Practices in this qualitative study were selected from those recognized as patient-centered medical homes via the National Committee for Quality Assurance 2011 tool, which included a section on practice teamwork. We interviewed 63 respondents, ranging from physicians to front-desk staff, from 27 primary care practices ranging in size, type, geography, and population size. Results EHRs were found to facilitate communication and task delegation in primary care teams through instant messaging, task management software, and the ability to create evidence-based templates for symptom-specific data collection from patients by medical assistants and nurses (which can offload work from physicians). Areas where respondents felt that electronic medical record EHR functionalities were weakest and posed challenges to teamwork included the lack of integrated care manager software and care plans in EHRs, poor practice registry functionality and interoperability, and inadequate ease of tracking patient data in the EHR over time. Discussion Practices developed solutions for some of the challenges they faced when attempting to use EHRs to support teamwork but wanted more permanent vendor and policy solutions for other challenges. Conclusions EHR vendors in the United States need to work alongside practicing primary care teams to create more clinically useful EHRs that support dynamic care plans, integrated care management software, more functional and interoperable practice registries, and greater ease of data tracking over time. PMID:25627278

  6. Interaction in motion:embodied conduct in emergency teamwork

    OpenAIRE

    Buscher, Monika

    2007-01-01

    Emergency situations demand fast, effective multi-agency collaboration. Communication is crucial, but often difficult under immense time pressure, in extremely complex and often very dangerous settings. This paper explores the role of embodied conduct and movement in making sense of the changing situation and in coordinating emergency teamwork. It presents ethnographic observations with emergency service professionals during training exercises for major incidents and ethnomethodological analy...

  7. Electronic health records and support for primary care teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ann S; Draper, Kevin; Gourevitch, Rebecca; Cross, Dori A; Scholle, Sarah Hudson

    2015-03-01

    Consensus that enhanced teamwork is necessary for efficient and effective primary care delivery is growing. We sought to identify how electronic health records (EHRs) facilitate and pose challenges to primary care teams as well as how practices are overcoming these challenges. Practices in this qualitative study were selected from those recognized as patient-centered medical homes via the National Committee for Quality Assurance 2011 tool, which included a section on practice teamwork. We interviewed 63 respondents, ranging from physicians to front-desk staff, from 27 primary care practices ranging in size, type, geography, and population size. EHRs were found to facilitate communication and task delegation in primary care teams through instant messaging, task management software, and the ability to create evidence-based templates for symptom-specific data collection from patients by medical assistants and nurses (which can offload work from physicians). Areas where respondents felt that electronic medical record EHR functionalities were weakest and posed challenges to teamwork included the lack of integrated care manager software and care plans in EHRs, poor practice registry functionality and interoperability, and inadequate ease of tracking patient data in the EHR over time. Practices developed solutions for some of the challenges they faced when attempting to use EHRs to support teamwork but wanted more permanent vendor and policy solutions for other challenges. EHR vendors in the United States need to work alongside practicing primary care teams to create more clinically useful EHRs that support dynamic care plans, integrated care management software, more functional and interoperable practice registries, and greater ease of data tracking over time. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  8. Teamwork as an Essential Component of High-Reliability Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, David P; Day, Rachel; Salas, Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    Organizations are increasingly becoming dynamic and unstable. This evolution has given rise to greater reliance on teams and increased complexity in terms of team composition, skills required, and degree of risk involved. High-reliability organizations (HROs) are those that exist in such hazardous environments where the consequences of errors are high, but the occurrence of error is extremely low. In this article, we argue that teamwork is an essential component of achieving high reliability ...

  9. Interaction in motion:embodied conduct in emergency teamwork

    OpenAIRE

    Buscher, Monika

    2007-01-01

    Emergency situations demand fast, effective multi-agency collaboration. Communication is crucial, but often difficult under immense time pressure, in extremely complex and often very dangerous settings. This paper explores the role of embodied conduct and movement in making sense of the changing situation and in coordinating emergency teamwork. It presents ethnographic observations with emergency service professionals during training exercises for major incidents and ethnomethodological analy...

  10. Leveraging teamwork by Google+ in a lifelong learning perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Sabrina Leone; Giovanni Biancofiore

    2015-01-01

    The current affordances of ubiquitous global connections, of a large number of open resources, and of social and professional networks may boost innovation in open-minded organisations through their personnel’s empowerment. Lifelong and ubiquitous learning, cloud computing and smart working frameworks are the pillars of the change that is replacing the traditional work model and transforming the way crowds of people communicate, collaborate, teamwork, produce value and growth for the entities...

  11. Defining the technical skills of teamwork in surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Healey, A N; Undre, S; Vincent, C. A.

    2006-01-01

    Developments in surgical technology and procedure have accelerated and altered the work carried out in the operating theatre/room, but team modelling and training have not co‐evolved. Evidence suggests that team structure and role allocation are sometimes unclear and contentious, and coordination and communication are not fully effective. To improve teamwork, clinicians need models that specify team resources, structure, process and tasks. They also need measures to assess performance and met...

  12. [Cognitive and social skills are necessary for safe teamwork].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukk Härenstam, Karin; Gaffney, Drew

    2015-04-28

    Most safety-critical enterprises have programs for teaching and training non-technical skills to their employees. These skills must complement pure technical skills. Programs for teaching and introducing these skills (communication, leadership, teamwork, decision-making, handling of conflicts and feed-back) are developing also in health-care. It is important that non-technical skills in combination with technical skills are seen as the foundation when developing new and safer ways to do the daily work with patients.

  13. Clinical group supervision in yoga therapy: model effects, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Bo; Volpe Horii, Cassandra; Earls, Bethany; Mashek, Stephanie; Akhtar, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    Clinical supervision is an integral component of therapist training and professional development because of its capacity for fostering knowledge, self-awareness, and clinical acumen. Individual supervision is part of many yoga therapy training programs and is referenced in the IAYT Standards as "mentoring." Group supervision is not typically used in the training of yoga therapists. We propose that group supervision effectively supports the growth and development of yoga therapists-in-training. We present a model of group supervision for yoga therapist trainees developed by the New England School of Integrative Yoga Therapeutics™ (The NESIYT Model) that includes the background, structure, format, and development of our inaugural 18-month supervision group. Pre-and post-supervision surveys and analyzed case notes, which captured key didactic and process themes, are discussed. Clinical issues, such as boundaries, performance anxiety, sense of self efficacy, the therapeutic alliance, transference and counter transference, pacing of yoga therapy sessions, evaluation of client progress, and adjunct therapist interaction are reviewed. The timing and sequence of didactic and process themes and benefits for yoga therapist trainees' professional development, are discussed. The NESIYT group supervision model is offered as an effective blueprint for yoga therapy training programs.

  14. ANALYSIS OF A MODEL OF TEAMWORK BY HILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Petkovski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The contemporary management of the intellectual capital of an organization, as a major determinant for efficient and effective operation of the organization has access to the teamwork. Teamwork means quality leadership which is necessary for a successful team management. In the theory and the practice are given a number of models for teamwork and team leadership, however, in this case the subject of this paperwork will be the analyzing of the model of team leadership according to Hill. According to this model there are two functions of team leading established: leading functions in the team and leading functions out of the team. In the first part, which refers to the functions of leadership in the team, are set two major categories: team leader’s tasks and the built relationships and atmosphere in the team. In terms of the functions of the leader out of the team, the model focuses on two categories, namely: the functions of leadership out of the team, but within the organization and leading functions of the team outside the organization.

  15. Identifying Requirements for Effective Human-Automation Teamwork

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey C. Joe; John O' Hara; Heather D. Medema; Johanna H. Oxstrand

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that poorly designed human-automation collaboration, such as poorly designed communication protocols, often leads to problems for the human operators, such as: lack of vigilance, complacency, and loss of skills. These problems often lead to suboptimal system performance. To address this situation, a considerable amount of research has been conducted to improve human-automation collaboration and to make automation function better as a “team player.” Much of this research is based on an understanding of what it means to be a good team player from the perspective of a human team. However, the research is often based on a simplified view of human teams and teamwork. In this study, we sought to better understand the capabilities and limitations of automation from the standpoint of human teams. We first examined human teams to identify the principles for effective teamwork. We next reviewed the research on integrating automation agents and human agents into mixed agent teams to identify the limitations of automation agents to conform to teamwork principles. This research resulted in insights that can lead to more effective human-automation collaboration by enabling a more realistic set of requirements to be developed based on the strengths and limitations of all agents.

  16. An evaluation of teamwork within a specialist palliative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Kevin; Devlin, Breige

    2002-11-01

    This small-scale 10-month study evaluated teamworking within a specialist palliative care team. The study aims were to: collect, analyse and summarize information on how team members perceive teamworking; compare team members' perceptions after a teambuilding workshop; and to evaluate the longer term effect of this training on the team. A group of practitioners from a local Marie Curie Cancer Care Centre was selected and included members from all available disciplines. A piloted questionnaire was used to obtain qualitative and quantitative input. The team as a whole scored themselves above average on almost all counts. Following the teambuilding workshop significant improvement was seen in areas such as role appreciation and communication but not all improvements were long lasting. A perception of understaffing was noted as being one of the largest negative influences on teamwork whereas the setting and maintaining of agreed team objectives and having sufficient education opportunity were positive influences. Although teambuilding sessions appear to have the potential to produce the desired benefits, they should not be initiated at a time when staff already feel anxiety over their workload.

  17. Teamwork in a coronary care unit: facilitating and hindering aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethania Ferreira Goulart

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify, within a multidisciplinary team, the facilitating and hindering aspects for teamwork in a coronary care unit. METHOD A descriptive study, with qualitative and quantitative data, was carried out in the coronary care unit of a public hospital. The study population consisted of professionals working in the unit for at least one year. Those who were on leave or who were not located were excluded. The critical incident technique was used for data collection, by means of semi-structured interviews. For data analysis, content analysis and the critical incident technique were applied. RESULTS Participants were 45 professionals: 29 nursing professionals; 11 physicians; 4 physical therapists; and 1 psychologist. A total of 49 situations (77.6% with negative references; 385 behaviors (54.2% with positive references; and 182 consequences emerged (71.9% with negative references. Positive references facilitate teamwork, whereas negative references hinder it. A collaborative/communicative interprofessional relationship was evidenced as a facilitator; whereas poor collaboration among agents/inadequate management was a hindering aspect. CONCLUSION Despite the prevalence of negative situations and consequences, the emphasis on positive behaviors reveals the efforts the agents make in order to overcome obstacles and carry out teamwork.

  18. Nursing supervision for care comprehensiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Lucieli Dias Pedreschi; Mininel, Vivian Aline; Silva, Jaqueline Alcântara Marcelino da; Alves, Larissa Roberta; Silva, Maria Ferreira da; Camelo, Silvia Helena Henriques

    2017-01-01

    To reflect on nursing supervision as a management tool for care comprehensiveness by nurses, considering its potential and limits in the current scenario. A reflective study based on discourse about nursing supervision, presenting theoretical and practical concepts and approaches. Limits on the exercise of supervision are related to the organization of healthcare services based on the functional and clinical model of care, in addition to possible gaps in the nurse training process and work overload. Regarding the potential, researchers emphasize that supervision is a tool for coordinating care and management actions, which may favor care comprehensiveness, and stimulate positive attitudes toward cooperation and contribution within teams, co-responsibility, and educational development at work. Nursing supervision may help enhance care comprehensiveness by implying continuous reflection on including the dynamics of the healthcare work process and user needs in care networks. refletir a supervisão de enfermagem como instrumento gerencial do enfermeiro para integralidade do cuidado, considerando suas potencialidades e limitações no cenário atual. estudo reflexivo baseado na formulação discursiva sobre a supervisão de enfermagem, apresentando conceitos e enfoques teóricos e/ou práticos. limitações no exercício da supervisão estão relacionadas à organização dos serviços de saúde embasada no modelo funcional e clínico de atenção, assim como possíveis lacunas no processo de formação do enfermeiro e sobrecarga de trabalho. Quanto às potencialidades, destaca-se a supervisão como instrumento de articulação de ações assistenciais e gerenciais, que pode favorecer integralidade da atenção, estimular atitudes de cooperação e colaboração em equipe, além da corresponsabilização e promoção da educação no trabalho. supervisão de enfermagem pode contribuir para fortalecimento da integralidade do cuidado, pressupondo reflexão cont

  19. Semi-Supervised Learning Techniques in AO Applications: A Novel Approach To Drift Counteraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito, S.; Fattoruso, G.; Pardo, M.; Tortorella, F.; Di Francia, G.

    2011-11-01

    In this work we proposed and tested the use of SSL techniques in the AO domain. The SSL characteristics have been exploited to reduce the need for costly supervised samples and the effects of time dependant drift of state-of-the-art statistical learning approaches. For this purpose, an on-field recorded one year long atmospheric pollution dataset has been used. The semi-supervised approach benefitted from the use of updated unlabeled samples, adapting its knowledge to the slowly changing drift effects. We expect that semi-supervised learning can provide significant advantages to the performance of sensor fusion subsystems in artificial olfaction exhibiting an interesting drift counteraction effect.

  20. eMed Teamwork: a self-moderating system to gather peer feedback for developing and assessing teamwork skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Chris; Toohey, Susan; Velan, Gary

    2008-02-01

    Students in the six-year undergraduate medicine program at UNSW must submit a portfolio which demonstrates inter alia their development in teamwork skills. Much of the feedback they need to develop these skills, as well as the evidence they require to document their achievements, can only come from their peers. The eMed Teamwork system, developed for this purpose, is a computer-based system which gathers feedback from peers in project groups. The feedback submitted to the system is available to the recipient for formative purposes, and becomes part of both the author's and the recipient's portfolios for later summative assessment. This dual use ensures that the feedback is thoughtful and constructive and the system operates without significant moderation by teachers.

  1. The supervision of research for dissertations and theses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lessing

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available South African higher institutions of learning are engaged in rapid transformation processes. Some of the consequences are that an increasing proportion of the postgraduate student body is from previously disadvantaged backgrounds and that the body of academic staff has also been transformed. In general, students have limited experience of independent research work as well as using library and other research facilities. However, quality research needs to be maintained. It is of great importance that academics should have the knowledge and skills to supervise research. However, preliminary research indicates that very little is done to equip academic staff in the skills of supervising research. A literature study is done to determine the nature of postgraduate supervision as well as the role of the supervisor and the student. From this investigation an interview schedule, consisting of open-ended questions, was composed to use in focus group interviews with academics from various local and international universities. The interviews revealed that seasoned supervisors experience the guidance of postgraduate students as quite satisfactory although a number of pitfalls were raised by supervisors with less experience in the field. None of the interviewees indicated that they have been formally trained to act as a supervisor. It was also indicated that students need much support and training in scientific formulation and writing. It seems that a definite need exists for newer academic staff to be schooled in research supervision.

  2. Effect of interprofessional clinical education programme length on students' attitudes towards teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renschler, Lauren; Rhodes, Darson; Cox, Carol

    2016-05-01

    This article reports on a study involving a range of health professions students who participated in similar one-semester (short) or two-semester (long) interprofessional clinical education programmes that focused on clinical assessment of senior citizens living independently in the community. Students' attitudes towards teamwork skills and perceptions of their own teamwork skills both before and after the programmes were assessed using two validated scales. Osteopathic medical student participants reported no significant changes in attitudes towards interprofessional healthcare teamwork skills or their perceptions of their own interprofessional teamwork skills after either the one- or two-semester programmes. For athletic training, speech-language pathology, exercise sciences, public health, and nursing students, though, attitudes towards teamwork skills significantly improved (p teamwork attitude change, but with a significant difference between medical as compared to nursing, allied health, and public health students.

  3. Extended teamwork: team performance in highly automated nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skjerve, Ann Britt; Strand, Stine; Skraaning, Gyrd Jr.

    2004-07-01

    Nuclear power plant (NPP) operation is in essence a teamwork task. The central control-room (CCR) operators are required to co-operate to achieve the operational goals, and they further depend on the assistance of the field operators and, at least in modern plants, on the assistance of the high-level automatic system. Future NPPs (e.g., advanced reactors) are foreseen to contain substantially higher automation levels, reduced staffing, and redefined roles of the remaining staff, as compared to the present situation. This paper suggests that in future plants, in which the autonomy and authority of the automatic system and of the field operators are increased, the transactions between the CCR operators and automatic system/field operators might most efficiently be conceptualized within the framework of co-operation, and thus teamwork. This framework has typically been restricted to conceptualizations of the transactions between the CCR operators, but in future settings, co-ordination, communication and mutual support between the CCR operators and the field operators/automatic system may be of increased importance for sustaining plant safety, as compared to the present situation. The paper further argues that human-system interfaces in future NPPs should be designed to support the activities of the extended team consisting of the CCR operators, the field operators, and the automatic system. The paper outlines an exploratory study aimed at generating ideas on how extended teamwork quality may be promoted. The study is currently foreseen to comprise two exemplary design solutions: a state-of-the art screen-based control-room (baseline condition) and a possible future control-room in which the activities of the field operators and the automatic system are explicitly represented on the human-system interface, where the authority and autonomy of these are increased, and the staffing level reduced, as compared to the baseline condition. The study will explore extended

  4. Teams and teamwork at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    The recent reorganization and shift to managing total quality at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has placed an increasing emphasis on teams and teamwork in accomplishing day-to-day work activities and long-term projects. The purpose of this research was to review the nature of teams and teamwork at LaRC. Models of team performance and teamwork guided the gathering of information. Current and former team members served as participants; their collective experience reflected membership in over 200 teams at LaRC. The participants responded to a survey of open-ended questions which assessed various aspects of teams and teamwork. The participants also met in a workshop to clarify and elaborate on their responses. The work accomplished by the teams ranged from high-level managerial decision making (e.g., developing plans for LaRC reorganization) to creating scientific proposals (e.g., describing spaceflight projects to be designed, sold, and built). Teams typically had nine members who remained together for six months. Member turnover was around 20 percent; this turnover was attributed to heavy loads of other work assignments and little formal recognition and reward for team membership. Team members usually shared a common and valued goal, but there was not a clear standard (except delivery of a document) for knowing when the goal was achieved. However, members viewed their teams as successful. A major factor in team success was the setting of explicit a priori rules for communication. Task interdependencies between members were not complex (e.g., sharing of meeting notes and ideas about issues), except between members of scientific teams (i.e., reliance on the expertise of others). Thus, coordination of activities usually involved scheduling and attendance of team meetings. The team leader was designated by the team's sponsor. This leader usually shared power and responsibilities with other members, such that team members established their own operating

  5. Quality management and perceptions of teamwork and safety climate in European hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensen, S; Hammer, A.; Bartels, P; Sunol, R.; Groene, O.; Thompson, CA; Arah, OA; Kutaj-Wasikowska, H; Michel, P.; Wagner, C

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the associations of quality management systems with teamwork and safety climate, and to describe and compare differences in perceptions of teamwork climate and safety climate among clinical leaders and frontline clinicians.We used a multi-method, cross-sectional approach to collect survey data of quality management systems and perceived teamwork and safety climate. Our data analyses included descriptive and multilevel regression methods.Data on implementation o...

  6. Students’ Perception on the Effectiveness of Teamwork Based Activities in Enhancing the Learning Process

    OpenAIRE

    Anitha Sundrum; Muthukumaran Kanasan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, many organizations have begun to embrace the teamwork-based work culture in most aspects of their operations. Hence, employers are increasingly stressing on the need for fresh graduates to demonstrate the willingness and ability to work in a teamwork-based environment, before recruiting them. This in turn has placed tremendous pressure on academics to incorporate elements of teamwork-based activities in the teaching as well as assessment processes, in orde...

  7. Students’ Perception on the Effectiveness of Teamwork Based Activities in Enhancing the Learning Process

    OpenAIRE

    Anitha Sundrum; Muthukumaran Kanasan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, many organizations have begun to embrace the teamwork-based work culture in most aspects of their operations. Hence, employers are increasingly stressing on the need for fresh graduates to demonstrate the willingness and ability to work in a teamwork-based environment, before recruiting them. This in turn has placed tremendous pressure on academics to incorporate elements of teamwork-based activities in the teaching as well as assessment processes, in orde...

  8. The interplay between teamwork, clinicians’ emotional exhaustion, and clinician-rated patient safety: a longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Welp, Annalena; Laurenz L. Meier; Manser, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Background Effectively managing patient safety and clinicians’ emotional exhaustion are important goals of healthcare organizations. Previous cross-sectional studies showed that teamwork is associated with both. However, causal relationships between all three constructs have not yet been investigated. Moreover, the role of different dimensions of teamwork in relation to emotional exhaustion and patient safety is unclear. The current study focused on the long-term development of teamwork, emot...

  9. Administrative clinical supervision as evaluated by the first-line managers in one health care organization district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirola-Karvinen, Pirjo; Hyrkäs, Kristiina

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this article is to increase knowledge and understanding of administrative clinical supervision. Administrative clinical supervision is a learning process for leaders that is based on experiences. Only a few studies have focused on administrative clinical supervision. The materials for this study were evaluations collected in 2002-2005 using a clinical supervision evaluation scale (MCSS). The respondents (n = 126) in the study were nursing leaders representing different specialties. The data were analysed statistically. The findings showed that the supervision succeeded very well. The contents of the sessions differed depending on the nurse leader's position. Significant differences were found in the evaluations between specialties and within years of work experience. Clinical supervision was utilized best in the psychiatric and mental health sector. The supervisees' who had long work experience scored the importance and value of clinical supervision as high. Clinical supervision is beneficial for nursing leaders. The experiences were positive and the nursing leaders appreciated the importance and value of clinical supervision. It is important to plan and coordinate a longitudinal evaluation so that clinical supervision for nursing leaders is systematically implemented and continuously developed.

  10. Relationship Between Operating Room Teamwork, Contextual Factors, and Safety Checklist Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara J; Molina, George; Li, Zhonghe; Jiang, Wei; Nurudeen, Suliat; Kite, Julia G; Edmondson, Lizabeth; Foster, Richard; Haynes, Alex B; Berry, William R

    2016-10-01

    Studies show that using surgical safety checklists (SSCs) reduces complications. Many believe SSCs accomplish this by enhancing teamwork, but evidence is limited. Our study sought to relate teamwork to checklist performance, understand how they relate, and determine conditions that affect this relationship. Using 2 validated tools for observing and coaching operating room teams, we evaluated the association between checklist performance with surgeon buy-in and 4 domains of surgical teamwork: clinical leadership, communication, coordination, and respect. Hospital staff in 10 South Carolina hospitals observed 207 procedures between April 2011 and January 2013. We calculated levels of checklist performance, buy-in, and measures of teamwork, and evaluated their relationship, controlling for patient and case characteristics. Few teams completed most or all SSC items. Teams more often completed items considered procedural "checks" than conversation "prompts." Surgeon buy-in, clinical leadership, communication, a summary measure of teamwork overall, and observers' teamwork ratings positively related to overall checklist completion (multivariable model estimates from 0.04, p teamwork and surgeon buy-in related positively to completing more conversation prompts; none related significantly to procedural checks (estimates from 0.10, p teamwork characterized by shared clinical leadership, open communication, active coordination, and mutual respect were critical in prompting case-related conversations, but not in completing procedural checks. Findings highlight the importance of surgeon engagement and high-quality, consistent teamwork for promoting checklist use and ensuring a safe surgical environment. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Intercultural PhD Supervision: Exploring the Hidden Curriculum in a Social Science Faculty Doctoral Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidman, Joanna; Manathunga, Catherine; Cornforth, Sue

    2017-01-01

    International knowledge markets rely heavily on a ready supply of highly mobile doctoral students, many of whom are from the global South, to bring in revenue. The supervision of these PhD students, however, can reproduce neo-colonial knowledge relations, often in subtle ways. In settler nations, international PhD students may find that they are…

  12. Sundhedsfaglig supervision som klinisk metode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    2011-01-01

    Kapitlet gennemgår og diskuterer sundhedsfaglig supervision (SFS) som metode. Formålet med kapitlet er at give læseren indsigt i og et kritisk blik på metodens muligheder og begrænsninger. Indledningsvis uddyber kapitlet den historiske baggrund for SFS og hvordan metoden udfolder sig i praksis me...... metodens fremtidige perspektiver - set i lyset af de mange nye metoder, der 'kæmper' om de samme målgrupper i vejledningslandskabet så som f.eks. coaching, debriefing og mentoring....

  13. Self-Supervised Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail

    2003-01-01

    Some progress has been made in a continuing effort to develop mathematical models of the behaviors of multi-agent systems known in biology, economics, and sociology (e.g., systems ranging from single or a few biomolecules to many interacting higher organisms). Living systems can be characterized by nonlinear evolution of probability distributions over different possible choices of the next steps in their motions. One of the main challenges in mathematical modeling of living systems is to distinguish between random walks of purely physical origin (for instance, Brownian motions) and those of biological origin. Following a line of reasoning from prior research, it has been assumed, in the present development, that a biological random walk can be represented by a nonlinear mathematical model that represents coupled mental and motor dynamics incorporating the psychological concept of reflection or self-image. The nonlinear dynamics impart the lifelike ability to behave in ways and to exhibit patterns that depart from thermodynamic equilibrium. Reflection or self-image has traditionally been recognized as a basic element of intelligence. The nonlinear mathematical models of the present development are denoted self-supervised dynamical systems. They include (1) equations of classical dynamics, including random components caused by uncertainties in initial conditions and by Langevin forces, coupled with (2) the corresponding Liouville or Fokker-Planck equations that describe the evolutions of probability densities that represent the uncertainties. The coupling is effected by fictitious information-based forces, denoted supervising forces, composed of probability densities and functionals thereof. The equations of classical mechanics represent motor dynamics that is, dynamics in the traditional sense, signifying Newton s equations of motion. The evolution of the probability densities represents mental dynamics or self-image. Then the interaction between the physical and

  14. Supervised Object Class Colour Normalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riabchenko, Ekatarina; Lankinen, Jukka; Buch, Anders Glent;

    2013-01-01

    Colour is an important cue in many applications of computer vision and image processing, but robust usage often requires estimation of the unknown illuminant colour. Usually, to obtain images invariant to the illumination conditions under which they were taken, color normalisation is used....... In this work, we develop a such colour normalisation technique, where true colours are not important per se but where examples of same classes have photometrically consistent appearance. This is achieved by supervised estimation of a class specic canonical colour space where the examples have minimal variation...

  15. Status Quo Of Drug Supervision in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Drugs are a special kind of commodity used to prevent,treat and diagnose diseases.Effective supervision of drugs has a great bearing on ensuring the safe use of pharmaceuticals by consumers and on safeguarding the right to lire and health of the general public.The Chinese government has always attached great importance to supervision over drug safety,and has always been commltted to the goal of strengthening such supervision and guaranteeing public drug safety.

  16. On Training Targets for Supervised Speech Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuxuan; Narayanan, Arun; Wang, DeLiang

    2014-01-01

    Formulation of speech separation as a supervised learning problem has shown considerable promise. In its simplest form, a supervised learning algorithm, typically a deep neural network, is trained to learn a mapping from noisy features to a time-frequency representation of the target of interest. Traditionally, the ideal binary mask (IBM) is used as the target because of its simplicity and large speech intelligibility gains. The supervised learning framework, however, is not restricted to the...

  17. [Teamwork in the operating theatre: the German Observational Teamwork Assessment for Surgery (OTAS-D) and its first application in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passauer-Baierl, S; Chiapponi, C; Bruns, C J; Weigl, M

    2014-12-01

    The quality of surgical teamwork contributes to performance of the operating theatre team, service quality and patient safety in surgery. Observational tools are a feasible and reliable way to capture and evaluate teamwork in the operating theatre (OT). We introduce the German version of the Observational Teamwork Assessment for Surgery (OTAS-D) and present the first observational results from German OTs. Quality of surgical teamwork was assessed with observational teamwork assessment for surgery (OTAS-D). It evaluates five dimensions of OT teamwork: communication, coordination, cooperation/backup behaviour, leadership, and team monitoring/situation awareness. Each dimension is evaluated for each profession (surgical, nursing, and anaesthesia team) as well for each phase of the procedure (pre-, intra-, and post-operative). We observed n = 63 procedures, mainly in abdominal/general and orthopaedic surgery. Additionally, all OT team members scored their individual evaluation of the intra-operative teamwork (standardised 1-item questions). The OTAS-D evaluations showed meaningful results and differences for the OT professions as well as across the different phases of the procedures. Overall, a medium to good level of the OT teamwork was observed. There were no differences in regard to type of surgery (minimally invasive vs. open) or surgical specialties. With an increased coordination of the surgical team we observed a significantly increased cooperation of the nursing team (r = 0.36, p = 0.004). Concerning the OT staffs self-reports, the surgical and nursing teams reported higher scores for quality of surgical teamwork during the procedure than their anaesthesia team members. No significant relationships between observed quality of OT teamwork and self-reports were found. The German version of OTAS-D is a psychometrically robust method to capture the quality of teamwork in operating theatres. It enables the analyses of teamwork between the surgical

  18. Supervised Discrete Hashing With Relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Jie; Liu, Tongliang; Sun, Zhenan; Tao, Dacheng; Tan, Tieniu

    2016-12-29

    Data-dependent hashing has recently attracted attention due to being able to support efficient retrieval and storage of high-dimensional data, such as documents, images, and videos. In this paper, we propose a novel learning-based hashing method called ''supervised discrete hashing with relaxation'' (SDHR) based on ''supervised discrete hashing'' (SDH). SDH uses ordinary least squares regression and traditional zero-one matrix encoding of class label information as the regression target (code words), thus fixing the regression target. In SDHR, the regression target is instead optimized. The optimized regression target matrix satisfies a large margin constraint for correct classification of each example. Compared with SDH, which uses the traditional zero-one matrix, SDHR utilizes the learned regression target matrix and, therefore, more accurately measures the classification error of the regression model and is more flexible. As expected, SDHR generally outperforms SDH. Experimental results on two large-scale image data sets (CIFAR-10 and MNIST) and a large-scale and challenging face data set (FRGC) demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of SDHR.

  19. Semi-supervised clustering methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Cluster analysis methods seek to partition a data set into homogeneous subgroups. It is useful in a wide variety of applications, including document processing and modern genetics. Conventional clustering methods are unsupervised, meaning that there is no outcome variable nor is anything known about the relationship between the observations in the data set. In many situations, however, information about the clusters is available in addition to the values of the features. For example, the cluster labels of some observations may be known, or certain observations may be known to belong to the same cluster. In other cases, one may wish to identify clusters that are associated with a particular outcome variable. This review describes several clustering algorithms (known as “semi-supervised clustering” methods) that can be applied in these situations. The majority of these methods are modifications of the popular k-means clustering method, and several of them will be described in detail. A brief description of some other semi-supervised clustering algorithms is also provided. PMID:24729830

  20. Clinical supervision by consultants in teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hore, Craig T; Lancashire, William; Fassett, Robert G

    2009-08-17

    Clinical supervision is a vital part of postgraduate medical education. Without it, trainees may not learn effectively from their experiences; this may lead to acceptance by registrars and junior doctors of lower standards of care. Currently, supervision is provided by consultants to registrars and junior doctors, and by registrars to junior doctors. Evidence suggests that the clinical supervision provided to postgraduate doctors is inadequate. Registrars and juniors doctors have the right to expect supervision in the workplace. Impediments to the provision of clinical supervision include competing demands of hospital service provision on trainees and supervisors, lack of clarity of job descriptions, private versus public commitments of supervisors and lack of interest. Supervisors should be trained in the process of supervision and provided with the time and resources to conduct it. Those being supervised should be provided with clear expectations of the process. We need to create and develop systems, environments and cultures that support high standards of conduct and effective clinical supervision. These systems must ensure the right to supervision, feedback, support, decent working conditions and respect for both trainees and their supervisors.

  1. A randomized trial comparing didactics, demonstration, and simulation for teaching teamwork to medical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semler, Matthew W; Keriwala, Raj D; Clune, Jennifer K; Rice, Todd W; Pugh, Meredith E; Wheeler, Arthur P; Miller, Alison N; Banerjee, Arna; Terhune, Kyla; Bastarache, Julie A

    2015-04-01

    Effective teamwork is fundamental to the management of medical emergencies, and yet the best method to teach teamwork skills to trainees remains unknown. In a cohort of incoming internal medicine interns, we tested the hypothesis that expert demonstration of teamwork principles and participation in high-fidelity simulation would each result in objectively assessed teamwork behavior superior to traditional didactics. This was a randomized, controlled, parallel-group trial comparing three teamwork teaching modalities for incoming internal medicine interns. Participants in a single-day orientation at the Vanderbilt University Center for Experiential Learning and Assessment were randomized 1:1:1 to didactic, demonstration-based, or simulation-based instruction and then evaluated in their management of a simulated crisis by five independent, blinded observers using the Teamwork Behavioral Rater score. Clinical performance was assessed using the American Heart Association Advanced Cardiac Life Support algorithm and a novel "Recognize, Respond, Reassess" score. Participants randomized to didactics (n = 18), demonstration (n = 17), and simulation (n = 17) were similar at baseline. The primary outcome of average overall Teamwork Behavioral Rater score for those who received demonstration-based training was similar to simulation participation (4.40 ± 1.15 vs. 4.10 ± 0.95, P = 0.917) and significantly higher than didactic instruction (4.40 ± 1.15 vs. 3.10 ± 0.51, P = 0.045). Clinical performance scores were similar between the three groups and correlated only weakly with teamwork behavior (coefficient of determination [Rs(2)] = 0.267, P teamwork training by expert demonstration resulted in similar teamwork behavior to participation in high-fidelity simulation and was more effective than traditional didactics. Clinical performance was largely independent of teamwork behavior and did not differ between training modalities.

  2. A problem shared...? Teamwork, autonomy and error in assisted conception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Anne

    2009-12-01

    This paper explores the benefits and drawbacks of new team-based approaches to error management in medicine through a case study of teamwork, double witnessing and incident reporting in assisted conception clinics in the UK. This is based upon the analysis of a series of semi-structured interviews with people working in assisted conception clinics and two periods of ethnography in clinics, conducted between 2004 and 2007, as part of an ESRC-funded study on the ethics of assisted conception and embryo research. In common with other studies of practitioners' management of error, I identify a series of tensions around individual and collective autonomy in identifying and preventing error, for the assisted conception team as a whole, and for particular groups within it, notably consultants and embryologists. I found that team-based approaches could create the conditions for error to occur when it undermined independent thinking, responsibility or concentration. There was also a danger that teamwork could come to be associated with particular 'technical' practices or occupational groups, diminishing its relevance and value in clinical settings. I, therefore, conclude that team-based approaches and professional autonomy have their 'dark' as well as their 'light' sides (Vaughan, D. (1999). The dark side of organisations: mistake, misconduct, and disaster. Annual Review of Sociology, 25, 271-305). Errors cannot be prevented in their entirety, but they can be well managed when teamwork and autonomy are complementary. Drawing on Reason (Reason, J. (2004). Beyond the organisational accident: the need for "error wisdom" on the frontline. Quality Safety in Health Care, 12, ii28-ii33), I argue that informed vigilance and intelligent wariness in a necessary compliment to systems-based approaches to error management in assisted conception in particular, and medicine in general.

  3. The importance of teamwork for outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, A D

    1995-01-01

    A variety of treatment models can be constructed to provide intravenous antibiotic therapy outside the hospital. The type and details of each model must be adapted to local needs and resources, but those that coordinate the resources of all the primary members of the team necessary to care for patients, offer the greatest potential for a safe and efficient programme. We believe that the teamwork of the physician, nurse, and pharmacist in our clinic-based, physician-directed model can provide a safe and effective service, which is appreciated by the patients we care for.

  4. Design Support System for Open Distance Learning Student Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putranto, A.; Pradipto, Y. D.

    2017-01-01

    Open distance learning students in doing team assignment, they seldom face to some problems such as student fell unfair in numbers of workload contribution, instructors also do not know which students do more work than others. So there are some questions ie: how to connect between instructor, team members, and working documents. Methods will be used are first, analyzing current condition and last by designing systems to connect between instructor, team members, and document. The expected result is support systems for open distance learning student teamwork.

  5. Teamwork in high-risk environments analogous to space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Barbara G.

    1990-01-01

    Mountaineering expeditions combine a number of factors which make them potentially good analogs to the planetary exploration facet of long-duration space missions. A study of mountain climbing teams was conducted in order to evaluate the usefulness of the environment as a space analog and to specifically identify the factors and issues surrounding teamwork and 'successful' team performance in two mountaineering environments. This paper focuses on social/organizational factors, including team size and structure, leadership styles and authority structure which were found in the sample of 22 climb teams (122 individuals). The second major issue discussed is the construction of a valid performance measure in this high-risk environment.

  6. Teamwork fosters successful, pleasing environment for patient accounts employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, C M

    1994-07-01

    If a patient accounts manager can cultivate teamwork successfully--if he or she can "tear down the walls" and "open up the lines of communication"--a positive and productive working environment can be created. Too often, though, invisible barriers exist within a patient accounts department: One area is in conflict with another area, representatives from each area blaming the other for high receivables and low cash flow. If this situation exists, the atmosphere it creates ultimately is reflected in every employee's performance. Further, if a patient accounts manager is engulfed by this atmosphere, his or her support staff certainly will be affected adversely.

  7. Self-Confidence and Teamwork : An Experimental Test

    OpenAIRE

    Rullière, Jean-Louis; Santos Pinto, Luis; Vialle, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Working paper GATE 2011-26; We use a laboratory experiment to study how perceptions of skill influence teamwork. Our design is based on Gervais and Goldstein (2007) theory of teams. Team output is increasing in skill and in effort, skill and effort are complements, and workers' effort choices are complements. An overconfident agent thinks that his skill is higher than it actually is. We find that the presence of overconfi-dent workers in teams is beneficial for firms since it raises effort pr...

  8. Diversity Competent Group Work Supervision: An Application of the Supervision of Group Work Model (SGW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okech, Jane E. Atieno; Rubel, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    This article emphasizes the need for concrete descriptions of supervision to promote diversity-competent group work and presents an application of the supervision of group work model (SGW) to this end. The SGW, a supervision model adapted from the discrimination model, is uniquely suited for promoting diversity competence in group work, since it…

  9. Diversity Competent Group Work Supervision: An Application of the Supervision of Group Work Model (SGW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okech, Jane E. Atieno; Rubel, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    This article emphasizes the need for concrete descriptions of supervision to promote diversity-competent group work and presents an application of the supervision of group work model (SGW) to this end. The SGW, a supervision model adapted from the discrimination model, is uniquely suited for promoting diversity competence in group work, since it…

  10. Implementability of Instructional Supervision as a Contemporary Educational Supervision Model in Turkish Education System

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In this study, implementability of instructional supervision as one of contemporary educational supervision models in Turkish Education System was evaluated. Instructional supervision which aims to develop instructional processes and increase the quality of student learning based on observation of classroom activities requires collaboration among supervisors and teachers. In this literature review, significant problems have been detected due to structural organization, structural and control-...

  11. Empirical study of supervised gene screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Shuangge

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray studies provide a way of linking variations of phenotypes with their genetic causations. Constructing predictive models using high dimensional microarray measurements usually consists of three steps: (1 unsupervised gene screening; (2 supervised gene screening; and (3 statistical model building. Supervised gene screening based on marginal gene ranking is commonly used to reduce the number of genes in the model building. Various simple statistics, such as t-statistic or signal to noise ratio, have been used to rank genes in the supervised screening. Despite of its extensive usage, statistical study of supervised gene screening remains scarce. Our study is partly motivated by the differences in gene discovery results caused by using different supervised gene screening methods. Results We investigate concordance and reproducibility of supervised gene screening based on eight commonly used marginal statistics. Concordance is assessed by the relative fractions of overlaps between top ranked genes screened using different marginal statistics. We propose a Bootstrap Reproducibility Index, which measures reproducibility of individual genes under the supervised screening. Empirical studies are based on four public microarray data. We consider the cases where the top 20%, 40% and 60% genes are screened. Conclusion From a gene discovery point of view, the effect of supervised gene screening based on different marginal statistics cannot be ignored. Empirical studies show that (1 genes passed different supervised screenings may be considerably different; (2 concordance may vary, depending on the underlying data structure and percentage of selected genes; (3 evaluated with the Bootstrap Reproducibility Index, genes passed supervised screenings are only moderately reproducible; and (4 concordance cannot be improved by supervised screening based on reproducibility.

  12. 19 CFR 146.4 - Operator responsibility and supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Operator responsibility and supervision. 146.4... and supervision. (a) Supervision. The operator shall supervise all admissions, transfers, removals... conditions of storage in the zone as required by law and regulations. Supervision by the operator shall...

  13. General and Special Education Teachers' Relations within Teamwork in Inclusive Education: Socio-Demographic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radic-Sestic, Marina; Radovanovic, Vesna; Milanovic-Dobrota, Biljana; Slavkovic, Sanela; Langovic-Milicvic, Ana

    2013-01-01

    The general objective of this study was to establish the relation between general and special education teachers within teamwork and to define socio-demographic factors that affect teamwork. The sample encompassed 223 general and special education teacher of both genders, age 25 to 60, who are employed in regular elementary schools in Serbia. The…

  14. Introduction of Team Self-Regulation for Teamwork Promotion. A Case Study in Energy Engineering Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, María Jesús; Sáiz-Manzanares, María Consuelo; Alaoui, Fatima E. M.; Aguilar, Fernando; Meneses, Jesús; Montero, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The learning and development of teamwork skill is only possible if its achievement is a self-building process of the student. In turn, the teachers must become guides in the process of a learning which is not limited only to the topic of their own course, but which must be imbedded with a good dose of this skill. Promotion of teamwork is not…

  15. Validation of a measurement tool for self-assessment of teamwork in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, J; Shulruf, B; Torrie, J; Frengley, R; Boyd, M; Paul, A; Yee, B; Dzendrowskyj, P

    2013-09-01

    Teamwork is an important contributor to patient safety and a validated teamwork measurement tool could help healthcare teams identify areas for improvement and measure progress. We explored the psychometric properties of a teamwork measurement tool when used for self-assessment. We hypothesized that the tool had a valid factor structure and that scores from participants and external assessors would correlate. Forty intensive care teams (one doctor, three nurses) participated in four simulated emergencies, and each independently rated their team's performance at the end of each case using the teamwork measurement tool, without prior training in the use of the tool. We used exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and compared factor structure between participants and external assessors (using previously reported data). Scores from participants and external assessors were compared using Pearson's correlation coefficient. EFA demonstrated items loaded onto three distinct factors which were supported by the CFA. We found significant correlations between external and participant scores for overall teamwork scores and the three factors. Participants agreed with external assessors on the ranking of overall team performance but scored themselves significantly higher than external assessors. The teamwork measurement tool has a valid structure when used for self-assessment. Participant and external assessor scores correlated significantly, suggesting that participants could discriminate between different levels of performance, although leniency in self-assessed scores indicated the need for calibration. This tool could help structure reflection on teamwork and potentially facilitate self-directed, workplace-based improvement in teamwork.

  16. The difficulties of interprofessional teamwork in diabetes care: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Miyako; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a multifactorial disease and its nature means that interprofessional teamwork is essential for its treatment. However, in general, interprofessional teamwork has certain problems that impede its function. To clarify these problems in relation to diabetes care, a questionnaire survey was conducted. The participants who were involved in diabetes-related educational seminars, and medical personnel who were engaged in diabetes care from the National Center for Global Health and Medicine, were asked to complete the questionnaire about perceptions of, and satisfaction with, interprofessional teamwork across multiple health care providers, who were actually involved in diabetes care. From 456 people who were asked to take the questionnaire, 275 people answered. The percentages of the respondents according to profession who considered multidisciplinary teamwork sufficient were as follows: physicians, 20.5%; nurses, 12.7%; registered dietitians, 29.6%; pharmacists, 21.9%; physiotherapists, 18.2%; and clinical laboratory technicians 15.4%. Insufficient interprofessional communication and inconsistency in motivation levels among staff were frequently cited as causes of insufficient teamwork. All professions considered interprofessional meetings or conferences necessary and essential for teamwork. The survey revealed that interprofessional teamwork in diabetes care is currently insufficient. Continuous efforts to change each profession's perceptions about interprofessional teamwork and efforts to improve the quality of interprofessional meetings are necessary.

  17. Factors related to teamwork performance and stress of operating room nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, Yukio; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-07-25

    To evaluate operating room nurses' perception of teamwork performance and their level of mental stress and to identify related factors. Little is known about the factors affecting teamwork and the mental stress of surgical nurses, although the performance of the surgical team is essential for patient safety. The questionnaire survey for operation room nurses consisted of simple questions about teamwork performance and mental stress. Multivariate analyses were used to identify factors causing a sense of teamwork performance or mental stress. A large number of surgical nurses had a sense of teamwork performance, but 30-40% of operation room nurses were mentally stressed during surgery. Neither the patient nor the operation factors were related to the sense of teamwork performance in both types of nurses. Among scrub nurses, endoscopic and abdominal surgery, body mass index, blood loss and the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class were related to their mental stress. Conversely, circulating nurses were stressed about teamwork performance. The factors related to teamwork performance and mental stress during surgery differed between scrub and circulating nurses. Increased support for operation room nurses is necessary. The increased support leads to safer surgical procedures and better patient outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Interprofessional teamwork in stroke care: Is it visible or important to patients and carers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Gillian; Sims, Sarah; Greenwood, Nan; Jones, Fiona; Ross, Fiona; Harris, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional teamwork is seen in healthcare policy and practice as a key strategy for providing safe, efficient and holistic healthcare and is an accepted part of evidence-based stroke care. The impact of interprofessional teamwork on patient and carer experience(s) of care is unknown, although some research suggests a relationship might exist. This study aimed to explore patient and carer perceptions of good and poor teamwork and its impact on experiences of care. Critical incident interviews were conducted with 50 patients and 33 carers in acute, inpatient rehabilitation and community phases of care within two UK stroke care pathways. An analytical framework, derived from a realist synthesis of 13 'mechanisms' (processes) of interprofessional teamwork, was used to identify positive and negative 'indicators' of teamwork. Participants identified several mechanisms of teamwork, but it was not a subject most talked about readily. This suggests that interprofessional teamwork is not a concept that is particularly important to stroke patients and carers; they do not readily perceive any impacts of teamwork on their experiences. These findings are a salient reminder that what might be expected by healthcare professionals to be important influences on experience may not be perceived to be so by patients and carers.

  19. Teaching Teamwork in Australian University Business Disciplines: Evidence from a Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebe, Linda; Girardi, Antonia; Whitsed, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Australian employers continue to indicate that the development of teamwork skills in graduates is as important as mastering technical skills required for a particular career. In Australia, the reporting on the teaching of teamwork skills has emanated across a range of disciplines including health and engineering, with less of a focus on business…

  20. A Three-Stage Process of Improvisation for Teamwork: Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hains-Wesson, Rachael; Pollard, Vikki; Campbell, Angela

    2017-01-01

    This study examines street performing arts students' responses to using improvisation for teamwork during a first year, non-placement, work-integrated learning (WIL) experience. The aim of the study was to investigate: (1) students' perceptions of improvisation and (2) ways in which to design teamwork assessments that utilise improvisation. Data…