WorldWideScience

Sample records for supervising student teachers

  1. Perceptions of Supervision Practices by Agricultural Education Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thobega, Moreetsi; Miller, Greg

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe student teachers' perceptions and preferences of the type of supervision they experienced while interacting with their university supervisors and cooperating teachers. Results revealed that student teachers perceived both their cooperating teachers and university supervisors to engage in contextual and…

  2. Using Clinical Supervision Techniques with Student Art Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Frank D.

    1992-01-01

    Contends that the student teaching experience and the cooperating teacher are the most significant aspects of the teacher education process. Describes the features and the implementation of clinical supervision in art education. Concludes that cooperating teachers also benefit as a result of their experiences with student teachers. (CFR)

  3. Supervising the Student Teacher in the Public School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2009-01-01

    The student teacher being supervised in the public school soon becomes a full time, licensed teacher. Student teaching is perceived to be the cap stone or final course in undergraduate preparation before entering the profession of being a teacher. It carries much responsibility for the cooperating teacher and the university supervisor in assisting…

  4. Non-Authoritative Approach to Supervision of Student Teachers: Cooperating Teachers' Conceptual Metaphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taehyung; Danforth, Scot

    2012-01-01

    Cooperating teachers' beliefs of effective supervision of student teachers may play an important role in mentoring practices. By systematically analysing metaphors unconsciously expressed in the discourse of cooperating teachers concerning supervision of student teachers, these beliefs could be made explicit. This study explored: (1) what…

  5. Student Teaching Program: Feedback from Supervising Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Fanchon F.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Provides an example of a comprehensive form for obtaining specific evaluative data related to teacher education programs. Reports on the findings of preliminary investigations that used the form. (FL)

  6. An Interactive Communication Network's Potential as a Communication and Student Teacher Supervision Tool in Agricultural Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Greg; Miller, Wade; Kessell, John

    2002-01-01

    Eight student teachers received two onsite supervisory visits and one via the Iowa Communications Network (ICN); 11 received three onsite visits. ICN-facilitated supervision was thought to be equally effective and was viewed favorably. Prior experience with ICN influenced perceptions. ICN-facilitated supervision offered substantial cost savings.…

  7. Teachers' and Students' Perception of Instructional Supervision on Capacity Building in Electrical Installation Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, Ogwa Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This research was conducted to ascertain teachers' and students perception of instructional supervision in relation to capacity building in electrical installation trade in technical colleges. Three research questions and a null hypothesis were employed to guide the study. Descriptive survey was adopted. A 23-item questionnaire was used to elicit…

  8. Supervision of Student Teachers in Foreign Languages: A Practical Guide for Cooperating Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Anthony

    This manual was written for cooperating teachers who plan to participate in the training of student teachers in foreign languages. It begins with a short questionnaire to be filled out by the cooperating teacher, designed to help the teacher decide how he or she actually feels about working with a student teacher. In the next section of the guide,…

  9. Safety in High School Supervised Agricultural Experiences: Teachers' Training and Students' Injury Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, M L; Lawver, R G; Sorensen, T J

    2016-01-01

    This research study sought to gather evidence of school-based agriculture teachers' hazard perceptions, safety practices, training experiences, and awareness of student injuries related to supervised agricultural experience (SAE) programs. Teachers agreed that students should follow safety guidelines developed by the National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Safety and Health during SAE work. Approximately 66% (f = 153) of teachers reported having general training in first aid, CPR, and AED. Twenty participants (8.6%) indicated having no safety certifications or training. Abrasions, lacerations, bites/stings, and burns accounted for a majority of the student SAE-related injuries that were reported. There were 82 participants (35.5%) who stated that no injuries had been reported or they were not aware of any injuries that occurred. The majority of teachers (66%) had received some form offirst aid or first response training, but fewer teachers had received safety training for ATVs (f = 25, 10.8%), tractors (f = 48, 20.7%), and livestock (f = 39, 16.8%). Results indicated a disparity between required safe work habits and the types of hazardous tasks students should be allowed to complete alone while participating in SAE activities. It appears most responding teachers in this study agreed to allow students to operate equipment and machinery alone. Recommendations for teachers include attending professional development training specific to SAE safety and keeping records of any risk assessments conducted during SAE supervision. Further development of best practices for SAE supervision and safety are needed to assist agricultural education professionals in protecting and shaping our future leaders in agriculture.

  10. The Impact of Technology-Enhanced Student Teacher Supervision on Student Teacher Knowledge, Performance, and Self-Efficacy during the Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopcha, Theodore J.; Alger, Christianna

    2011-01-01

    The eSupervision instructional program is a series of five online modules housed in a content management system that support triad members (student teachers, cooperating teachers, university supervisors) during the field experience. The program was designed on a cognitive apprenticeship framework and uses a variety of technology to support both…

  11. Facilitating the Learning Process in Design-Based Learning Practices: An Investigation of Teachers' Actions in Supervising Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Puente, S. M.; van Eijck, M.; Jochems, W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In research on design-based learning (DBL), inadequate attention is paid to the role the teacher plays in supervising students in gathering and applying knowledge to design artifacts, systems, and innovative solutions in higher education. Purpose: In this study, we examine whether teacher actions we previously identified in the DBL…

  12. "We Teach Plastic Lessons to Please Them": The Influence of Supervision on the Practice of English Language Student Teachers in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochieng' Ong'ondo, Charles; Borg, Simon

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses the process of supervision by teacher educators and its influence on English language student teachers during a practicum in Kenya. The student teachers were enrolled in a four-year Bachelor of Education course for teaching English at secondary school level. Drawing on the perspectives of teacher educators, co-operating…

  13. The Supervision Dance: Learning to Lead and Follow a Student Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trout, Muffet

    2008-01-01

    This article chronicles the journey of a student teaching supervisor as she worked with one of her student teachers. Early in their relationship, the supervisor's assessment of the student teacher's dispositions for teaching triggered concern. In this self-study, the supervisor was guided by Nel Noddings' (2003) phenomenological description of…

  14. Looking across Contexts in Foreign Language Student Teacher Supervision: A Self-Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Jason

    2012-01-01

    In the following self-study, I consider how my involvement in a teacher preparation program that features looking across multiple contexts of second language teaching influenced my supervisory practice with a particular student teacher during her secondary foreign language student teaching placement. I conduct this inquiry by identifying and…

  15. Supervising Emergency Credentialed Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Beverly; Hale, Walt

    2000-01-01

    Teachers assigned to teach on an emergency credential are severely challenged by inadequate understanding of classroom management techniques and instructional methods. Also, California's Beginning Teacher Support and Assessment Program is not available to these teachers. This article outlines criteria for principals to include in an inservice…

  16. Differences in Perceptions of the Importance of Subject Matter Knowledge and How These Shaped Supervision and Assessment of Student Teachers on Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudavanhu, Young

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish lecturers and student teachers' perceptions of the importance of subject matter knowledge and how these views affected supervision and assessment of pre-service and in-service science teachers at University of Mashonaland (pseudonym) in Zimbabwe. The study was largely qualitative and used group…

  17. Exploring Clinical Supervision as Instrument for Effective Teacher Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibara, E. C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines clinical supervision approaches that have the potential to promote and implement effective teacher supervision in Nigeria. The various approaches have been analysed based on the conceptual framework of instructional supervisory behavior. The findings suggest that a clear distinction can be made between the prescriptive and…

  18. Supervision in Physical Education Teacher Education Programs: Making the Case for Paired Placements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidorn, Brent; Jenkins, Deborah Bainer

    2015-01-01

    Many student teaching experiences in physical education teacher education programs face challenges related to supervision and realistic preparation for the workplace. This article suggests paired placements as a model for effective supervision and increased collaboration during the student teaching internship.

  19. Supervision in Physical Education Teacher Education Programs: Making the Case for Paired Placements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidorn, Brent; Jenkins, Deborah Bainer

    2015-01-01

    Many student teaching experiences in physical education teacher education programs face challenges related to supervision and realistic preparation for the workplace. This article suggests paired placements as a model for effective supervision and increased collaboration during the student teaching internship.

  20. Bridging the Gap between University Supervisors and Hispanic Students' Interpretation of English Language Development Teaching Practices during Intern Teacher Fieldwork Supervision in Inner-City Middle Schools of Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Lasisi

    2006-01-01

    Efforts at improving fieldwork supervision during internship have largely focused on the role of university supervisors and intern teachers. Thus students' perceptions of the instructional practices are not systematically collected, analyzed and discussed in such a way that insights from students' perceptions can inform fieldwork supervision. This…

  1. Exploring My Style of Teacher Supervision

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This is a report on a pilot study regarding language teacher supervision styles. The author holds a certificate in language program administration, and the pilot involved teachers of the Japanese language one of whom was also involved in the certificate program. The teachers teach at an American language institute and they agreed to be observed by the author, following procedures detailed in clinical supervision. After the lesson observation, a one-on-one conference was held with the author a...

  2. Teacher Supervision Practices and Principals' Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    April, Daniel; Bouchamma, Yamina

    2015-01-01

    A questionnaire was used to determine the individual and collective teacher supervision practices of school principals and vice-principals in Québec (n = 39) who participated in a research-action study on pedagogical supervision. These practices were then analyzed in terms of the principals' sociodemographic and socioprofessional characteristics…

  3. Reflective Teacher Supervision Through Videos of Classroom Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Mari Kaneko-Marques

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to briefly present roles of different teacher supervisors according to distinct models, highlighting the importance of collaborative dialogues supported by video recordings. This paper will present results from a qualitative study of an English as a foreign language teacher education course in Brazil. The results indicated that collaborative supervision was an efficient tool to address adversities within educational contexts and that student teachers who ob...

  4. Special Education Teachers' Supervision of Paraeducators: A Quantitative Study of Team Sharedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitz, Beth L.

    2012-01-01

    Paraeducators, also known as paraprofessionals or teaching assistants, provide special education services for students with disabilities under the supervision of special education teachers. Despite legal requirements that paraeducators work under the direct supervision of teachers, teacher education programs lack research-based evidence to design…

  5. Reflective Teacher Supervision Through Videos of Classroom Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Mari Kaneko-Marques

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to briefly present roles of different teacher supervisors according to distinct models, highlighting the importance of collaborative dialogues supported by video recordings. This paper will present results from a qualitative study of an English as a foreign language teacher education course in Brazil. The results indicated that collaborative supervision was an efficient tool to address adversities within educational contexts and that student teachers who observed their pedagogical actions through videos became more reflective and self-evaluative, as they provided a deeper analysis regarding their practice. With collaborative supervision, teacher candidates can be encouraged to recognize and understand the complexities of language learning and teaching both locally and globally.

  6. Theory of Multiple Intelligences at Teacher Supervision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İzzet Döş

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine views of teachers and supervisors related to the multiple intelligences in students’ learning that they took into consideration in the evaluation of teachers during lesson supervision. The study was conducted with 5 supervisors who work at Kahramanmaraş provincial directorate of national education and 10 teachers who work at primary schools in the centre of Kahramanmaraş in 2011-2012 year. Data was gathered with the help of interview form consisting of five open-ended questions. In the analysis of the data content analysis which is one of the qualitative research methods. According to the results of the analysis, it has been found that usage of multiple intelligences theory in the evaluation students’ learning during supervision enabled them to evaluate students’ learning in a more detailed way. It also made it possible for the supervisors to examine supervision evaluations at different levels. It was also mentioned that supervisions made according to multiple intelligence theory has some limitations.

  7. University Supervision within Physical Education Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven C.; Grenier, Michelle; Channell, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Physical education teacher education (PETE) students are given opportunities in "early field experiences" (EFEs) to observe and assist experienced teachers in schools. Typically, students are then required to do some autonomous teaching, to give them practical experience in the real world of local schools. Ultimately students will move on to…

  8. Evaluating students' perception of their clinical placements - testing the clinical learning environment and supervision and nurse teacher scale (CLES + T scale) in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergjan, Manuela; Hertel, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Clinical nursing education in Germany has not received attention in nursing science and practice for a long time, as it often seems to be a more or less "formalized appendix" of nursing education. Several development projects of clinical education taking place are mainly focused on the qualification of clinical preceptors. However, the clinical context and its influence on learning processes have still not been sufficiently investigated. The aim of this study was the testing of a German version of the clinical learning environment and supervision and nurse teacher scale (CLES + T scale). The sample of the pilot study consists of first-, second- and third-year student nurses (n=240) of a university nursing school from January to March 2011. Psychometric testing of the instrument is carried out by selected methods of classical testing theories using SPPS 19. The results show transferability of all subcategories of the CLES + T scale in the non-academic nursing education system of a university hospital in Germany, without the teacher scale. The strongest factor is "supervisory relationship". The German version of the CLES + T scale may help to evaluate and compare traditional and new models in clinical nursing education.

  9. Multivoiced Supervision of Master's Students: A Case Study of Alternative Supervision Practices in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysthe, Olga; Samara, Akylina; Westrheim, Kariane

    2006-01-01

    This article describes and analyzes an alternative supervision model at the Master of Education Programme at the University of Bergen aimed at improving research supervision. A three-pronged approach was introduced, combining supervision groups, student colloquia and individual supervision. The supervision groups consisted of two supervisors and…

  10. Entry-Level Technical Skills That Teachers Expected Students to Learn through Supervised Agricultural Experiences (SAEs): A Modified Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Jon W.; Edwards, M. Craig

    2012-01-01

    Supervised experiences are designed to provide opportunities for the hands-on learning of skills and practices that lead to successful personal growth and future employment in an agricultural career (Talbert, Vaughn, Croom, & Lee, 2007). In the Annual Report for Agricultural Education (2005-2006), it was stated that 91% of the respondents…

  11. Entry-Level Technical Skills That Teachers Expected Students to Learn through Supervised Agricultural Experiences (SAEs): A Modified Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Jon W.; Edwards, M. Craig

    2012-01-01

    Supervised experiences are designed to provide opportunities for the hands-on learning of skills and practices that lead to successful personal growth and future employment in an agricultural career (Talbert, Vaughn, Croom, & Lee, 2007). In the Annual Report for Agricultural Education (2005-2006), it was stated that 91% of the respondents (i.e.,…

  12. Baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of learning and supervision in the clinical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadou, Maria; Papastavrou, Evridiki; Efstathiou, Georgios; Theodorou, Mamas

    2015-06-01

    This study is an exploration of nursing students' experiences within the clinical learning environment (CLE) and supervision provided in hospital settings. A total of 357 second-year nurse students from all universities in Cyprus participated in the study. Data were collected using the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher instrument. The dimension "supervisory relationship (mentor)", as well as the frequency of individualized supervision meetings, were found to be important variables in the students' clinical learning. However, no statistically-significant connection was established between successful mentor relationship and team supervision. The majority of students valued their mentor's supervision more highly than a nurse teacher's supervision toward the fulfillment of learning outcomes. The dimensions "premises of nursing care" and "premises of learning" were highly correlated, indicating that a key component of a quality clinical learning environment is the quality of care delivered. The results suggest the need to modify educational strategies that foster desirable learning for students in response to workplace demands.

  13. Making Supervision Relationships Accountable: Graduate Student Logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeatman, Anna

    1995-01-01

    Graduate student journals of research projects and their supervision are suggested as a means of structuring the supervisory process, making it more accountable, and facilitating students' successful completion of their academic and research tasks. However, the method also requires skill in successful thesis production on the supervisor's part.…

  14. Identifying the Types of Student and Teacher Behaviours Associated with Teacher Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geving, Allison M.

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify the student behaviours associated with teacher stress and determine the types of teacher behaviours that may elicit these stressful student behaviours. Student teachers (n = 186) and their supervising teachers (n = 77) completed a stressful student behaviour questionnaire, a teacher behaviour…

  15. Health science students' experiences of group supervision of the bachelor's thesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utriainen, Kati; Ahonen, Sanna-Mari; Kangasniemi, Mari; Liikanen, Eeva

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed to describe health science university students' experiences of group supervision of the bachelor's thesis. Sixty-one students responded to questions on an open data collection form, and the data were analyzed by using qualitative inductive content analysis. According to the students, group supervision is supportive in terms of joint learning as well as commitment-enhancing and participative learning, but it also can be useless from the viewpoint of an individual student's own thesis. Teachers' role as experts and active directors of the group, students' commitment to learn together, and workable practical organization of the group were promoting factors, whereas students' timetable problems, mismatch between received and needed supervision, and difficulties in supervising other students were restraining factors. The results can be used for developing group supervision in higher health education.

  16. Techniques & Processes of Teacher Education & Supervision for TESOL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Chen; Chen Shi

    2011-01-01

    This essay gives the brief rationales on techniques and processes of teacher education and supervision by designing an in-service teacher education course and analyzing one of sessions.And also,the essay discusses the feasibilities of these teacher educat

  17. Testing Group Supervision in Fieldwork Training for Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeira, Anat; Schiff, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    This study monitors group supervision for students' field training in a Bachelor's Degree in Social Work (BSW) program and compares it with the experience of the students receiving the traditional individual supervision. The experimental group supervision model is implemented in two consecutive years. Students' experiences are compared at three…

  18. Testing Group Supervision in Fieldwork Training for Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeira, Anat; Schiff, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    This study monitors group supervision for students' field training in a Bachelor's Degree in Social Work (BSW) program and compares it with the experience of the students receiving the traditional individual supervision. The experimental group supervision model is implemented in two consecutive years. Students' experiences are compared at three…

  19. Predicting Teacher Job Satisfaction Based on Principals' Instructional Supervision Behaviours: A Study of Turkish Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgan, Abdurrahman; Parylo, Oksana; Sungu, Hilmi

    2015-01-01

    This quantitative research examined instructional supervision behaviours of school principals as a predictor of teacher job satisfaction through the analysis of Turkish teachers' perceptions of principals' instructional supervision behaviours. There was a statistically significant difference found between the teachers' job satisfaction level and…

  20. Predicting Teacher Job Satisfaction Based on Principals' Instructional Supervision Behaviours: A Study of Turkish Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgan, Abdurrahman; Parylo, Oksana; Sungu, Hilmi

    2015-01-01

    This quantitative research examined instructional supervision behaviours of school principals as a predictor of teacher job satisfaction through the analysis of Turkish teachers' perceptions of principals' instructional supervision behaviours. There was a statistically significant difference found between the teachers' job satisfaction level and…

  1. The role of team work experience, reflection and team supervision in the professional development of 1st and 2nd cycle students of teacher education

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    From the content, organisational and human resources’ point of view, school life is very complex and based on the interdependency of competences of different persons: school administration, teachers, special education teachers, psychologists, social workers etc. In current educational practice the quality and interdisciplinary oriented teaching as well as working with students cannot be assured without a team approach. The teamwork of pedagogical workers involves team planning, team implement...

  2. Aspiring Principals' Perspectives about Teacher Supervision and Evaluation: Insights for Educational Leadership Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Range, Bret G.; McKim, Courtney; Mette, Ian M.; Hvidston, David J.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to understand the views of aspiring principals about teacher supervision and evaluation issues, including their perceived definitions of each, as well as concerns about performing either duty in their first administrative role. Thirty-­two educational administration graduate students enrolled in an instructional…

  3. An Examination of University Supervision in a Physical Education Teacher Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven; Grenier, Michelle A.; Channell, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to analyze university supervision from the perspective of student teachers (STs), and to examine postlesson conference discourse between STs and university supervisors (USs) to determine if STs perspectives on supervisory models aligned with what actually occurred. Determining STs expectations and desires…

  4. Postgraduate students experience in research supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Hazura; Judi, Hairulliza Mohamad; Mohammad, Rofizah

    2017-04-01

    The success and quality of postgraduate education depends largely on the effective and efficient supervision of postgraduate students. The role of the supervisor becomes more challenging with supervisory expectations rising high quality graduates. The main objective of this study was to examine the experiences of postgraduate students towards supervisory services for the duration of their studies. It also examines whether supervisory experience varies based on demographic variables such as level of study and nationality. This study uses a quantitative approach in the form of survey. Questionnaires were distributed to 96 postgraduate students of the Faculty of Information Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. Data collected were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Science (SPSS 23.0) to get the frequency, mean and standard deviation. T-test was used to find the difference between demographic variables and supervisory experience. The findings overall showed that postgraduate students gave positive response to the supervisory services. However, there were differences supervisory experiences based on the level of study and nationality. The results of this study hope the parties involved could provide a better support to improve the quality of supervision.

  5. Re/Learning Student Teaching Supervision: A Co/Autoethnographic Self-Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Brandon M.; Diacopoulos, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    This article documents the critical friendship of an experienced teacher educator and a doctoral student through our joint exploration of student teaching supervision. By adopting a co/autoethnographic approach, we learned from biographical and contemporaneous critical incidents that informed short- and long-term practices. In particular, we…

  6. Group supervision and Japanese students' successful completion of undergraduate theses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yamada, Kiyomi

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores, from a sociocultural perspective, the nature and functions of zemi or seminars in which Japanese undergraduate students received group supervision for research and thesis writing...

  7. Language Coordinators Resource Kit. Section Two: Teacher Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    The guide is one section of a resource kit designed to assist Peace Corps language instruction coordinators in countries around the world in understanding the principles underlying second language learning and teaching and in organizing instructional programs. This section focuses on selection and supervision of language teachers. An introductory…

  8. Nursing students and the supervision of medication administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid-Seari, Kerry; Happell, Brenda; Burke, Karena J; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J

    2013-01-01

    Up to one in five medication administrations in Australian hospitals involve an error. As registered nurses (RNs) are at the forefront of medication administration, they have been the focus of attempts to reduce errors. Given that nursing students have reported errors or experiences of near misses, their practices, as well as the supervision they receive from RNs, also deserves investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate student nurses' experiences of supervision while administering medications. Students (N= 45) completed a questionnaire on their supervision experiences while administering medications. The findings revealed that 88% of students agreed that they had been directly supervised during the entirety of administration procedures. Although 7% of students reported not receiving supervision throughout medication administration, higher percentages of students indicated that they received lower levels of supervision when wards were busy (66%), when they felt under pressure to comply with the wishes of RNs (40%), when students had been in clinical settings for extended periods of time (51%), and when the RNs trusted the student nurses (37%). Approximately one third (29%) of student nurses disagreed that RNs followed the six rights when administering medications. These findings suggest that student nurses are not always adequately supervised and are at times administering medications outside the parameters of the law. Healthcare organisations need to adapt their policies and practices to ensure that the legal requirements surrounding student nurse administration of medications are being met, as well as the educational and welfare needs of neophyte nurses.

  9. Joint Supervision Practices in Doctoral Education--A Student Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahenius, Katja; Ikävalko, Heini

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study of students' experiences of joint supervision practices and supervisors' professional work in doctoral education in one department of a Finnish university. A qualitative methodology was used to explore students' experiences of joint supervision practices and an inductive protocol was used to analyse the data gathered…

  10. Characteristics of the Research Supervision of Postgraduate Teachers' Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Frank; van den Berg, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Today, many institutions of higher education support students in conducting practice-oriented research. This research refers to a broad array of approaches geared toward practitioners' practice. The supervision of such research is of crucial importance, but little is known about its nature and characteristics. This study examined what research…

  11. Boundary issues in teacher-student relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaut, S M

    1993-01-01

    Increasing concern about therapist-patient sex has led to a consideration of boundaries in all trust-based relationships, which always include elements of power and dependency. Such relationships include those between teacher and student, especially those involving research or clinical supervision. Teacher-student relationships differ from those between therapist and patient because of the collegiality considered important for the student's development. Yet, both share the objective of fostering independence of the "client." Therefore, teachers need to find a balance of nurturance and separateness in their relationships with their students, so that the students can carry that modeling into their own careers.

  12. Teacher Supervision Practices and Characteristics of In-School Supervisors in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalule, Lawrence; Bouchamma, Yamina

    2014-01-01

    We examined teacher supervision practices (supervision models, phases, and professional development guidelines) of in-school supervisors (principals, vice principals, and study program directors) in Uganda, the supervisors' efficacy perceptions regarding teacher supervision, and supervisor characteristics associated with the choice of supervisory…

  13. The Impact of Teacher-Student Relationships on EFL Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Sánchez, Carlos Alberto; Gillings de González, Barbara Scholes; López Martínez, Cecilio de Jesús

    2013-01-01

    This research report aims at sharing the findings that emerged from a qualitative research study by a student-teacher, under the supervision of two practicing teacher-researchers. The study focused on the impact of teacher-student relationships in English as a foreign language learning according to the collective perceptions of a group of…

  14. Clinical learning environment, supervision and nurse teacher evaluation scale: psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Unn-Britt; Kaila, Päivi; Ahlner-Elmqvist, Marianne; Leksell, Janeth; Isoaho, Hannu; Saarikoski, Mikko

    2010-09-01

    This article is a report of the development and psychometric testing of the Swedish version of the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher evaluation scale. To achieve quality assurance, collaboration between the healthcare and nursing systems is a pre-requisite. Therefore, it is important to develop a tool that can measure the quality of clinical education. The Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher evaluation scale is a previously validated instrument, currently used in several universities across Europe. The instrument has been suggested for use as part of quality assessment and evaluation of nursing education. The scale was translated into Swedish from the English version. Data were collected between March 2008 and May 2009 among nursing students from three university colleges, with 324 students completing the questionnaire. Exploratory factor analysis was performed on the 34-item scale to determine construct validity and Cronbach's alpha was used to measure the internal consistency. The five sub-dimensions identified in the original scale were replicated in the exploratory factor analysis. The five factors had explanation percentages of 60.2%, which is deemed sufficient. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the total scale was 0.95, and varied between 0.96 and 0.75 within the five sub-dimensions. The Swedish version of Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher evaluation scale has satisfactory psychometric properties and could be a useful quality instrument in nursing education. However, further investigation is required to develop and evaluate the questionnaire.

  15. Teacher training: challenges and possibilities of teaching of reproduction and sexuality in supervised curricular stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Lustosa de Oliveira

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This work has its origins in a survey conducted during the supervised curricular stage of Biological Sciences course at Federal University of Goiás. The article describes critically and analytically every step of the curricular stage, especially the classes with the themes: reproduction and sexuality. The classes were taught to elementary students in State College St. Bernadete in Goiânia-GO. To facilitate the process of teaching and learning the trainees divided the themes into subtopics, and several teaching resources were developed for each subtopic. The research was descriptive and exploratory, using interviews with school students, teachers, supervisors and college students to collect data that allowed assessing the success of the teaching methodologies applied by the teachers in training. The field diaries of the trainees were also used to compose the analysis. Through the statements of the participants, it is considered that the methods achieved their goal in clarifying the issues. The resources used not only brought understanding, but encouraged the participation of the students. The article has been organized according to the steps of the curricular stage and it exposes all the impressions of the supervising teachers, school students and undergraduates during the internship, highlighting, comments, concerns, planning and execution process of the activities.

  16. Perception of nursing students face clinical supervision: literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Certo, Ana; Galvão, Ana Maria; Louçano, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Currently, without theoretical clinical training is not possible for the nursing student adequately meet their clinical practices.In this regard, clinical supervision plays a key role monitoring and development of the same. However,so that the student can be supervised, requires evidence of nurse supervisor competence in this context. In contemporary literature, this issue has been much debated, as the target of numerous different scientific studies. Aim of the study was, under...

  17. Supervision--The Most Variable of Variables: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Lynn; McKinnon, Margot

    2013-01-01

    The supervision literature often conceptualizes the supervisor as the primary person in doctoral students' progress. Yet, there is growing evidence that the supervisor is but one of many resources that students draw on. Our study takes up this idea in answering the question: What is students' experience of their supervisory relationships over…

  18. Improving Supervision of Cross-Cultural Postgraduate University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Kenneth David

    2010-01-01

    The internet has led to an increasing number of international students enrolling for postgraduate degrees. The literature confirms that there have been problems such as attrition, motivation, supervision and others. Professors struggle to appease international student learning styles, while simultaneously international students strain to…

  19. Student Teachers Speak Out!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Gina G.; Goebel, Vella

    2013-01-01

    The high teacher attrition and early-career exodus of beginning teachers suggest that traditional methods fall short of providing the support needed by beginning teachers. This qualitative study examined the challenges encountered by student teachers during their practicum experience. Findings suggest that the attrition rate may be at least…

  20. Student Teachers Speak Out!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Gina G.; Goebel, Vella

    2013-01-01

    The high teacher attrition and early-career exodus of beginning teachers suggest that traditional methods fall short of providing the support needed by beginning teachers. This qualitative study examined the challenges encountered by student teachers during their practicum experience. Findings suggest that the attrition rate may be at least…

  1. Supervised Agricultural Experience: An Examination of Student Knowledge and Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lauren J.; Rayfield, John; Moore, Lori L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate student Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) knowledge and participation. This descriptive study was conducted in 120 randomly selected agricultural education programs throughout four purposively selected states representative of the National FFA regions. Students completed a questionnaire assessing…

  2. Supporting and Supervising Teachers Working With Adults Learning English. CAELA Network Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    This brief provides an overview of the knowledge and skills that administrators need in order to support and supervise teachers of adult English language learners. It begins with a review of resources and literature related to teacher supervision in general and to adult ESL education. It continues with information on the background and…

  3. Teachers, Let Students Talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigford, Aretha Butler

    1988-01-01

    To improve oral communication skills of their students, teachers should provide opportunities for students to talk in class. Teachers are advised to: begin early, be sensitive to the individuality of students' speech patterns, and stress that there are different kinds of speech patterns for different situations. (JDD)

  4. Test-retest reliability of the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Margareta; Blomberg, Karin; Holmefur, Marie

    2015-07-01

    The Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) scale evaluates the student nurses' perception of the learning environment and supervision within the clinical placement. It has never been tested in a replication study. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the CLES + T scale. The CLES + T scale was administered twice to a group of 42 student nurses, with a one-week interval. Test-retest reliability was determined by calculations of Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs) and weighted Kappa coefficients. Standard Error of Measurements (SEM) and Smallest Detectable Difference (SDD) determined the precision of individual scores. Bland-Altman plots were created for analyses of systematic differences between the test occasions. The results of the study showed that the stability over time was good to excellent (ICC 0.88-0.96) in the sub-dimensions "Supervisory relationship", "Pedagogical atmosphere on the ward" and "Role of the nurse teacher". Measurements of "Premises of nursing on the ward" and "Leadership style of the manager" had lower but still acceptable stability (ICC 0.70-0.75). No systematic differences occurred between the test occasions. This study supports the usefulness of the CLES + T scale as a reliable measure of the student nurses' perception of the learning environment within the clinical placement at a hospital.

  5. The Impact of Teacher-Student Relationships on EFL Learning

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This research report aims at sharing the findings that emerged from a qualitative research study by a student-teacher, under the supervision of two practicing teacher-researchers. The study focused on the impact of teacher-student relationships in English as a foreign language learning according to the collective perceptions of a group of university students. The data generation process employed was comprised of semi-structured interviews, as well as the concurrent analysis of the data, based...

  6. WORKSHOP FOR SUPERVISING TEACHERS IN AGRICULTURAL OCCUPATIONS FROM ELEVEN WESTERN STATES HELD AT COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY AUGUST 1-5, 1966, SUMMARY REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JULSON, EARL E.

    A WORKSHOP FOR SUPERVISING-TEACHERS WAS ORGANIZED TO PLAN, EXPLORE, AND INNOVATE A MORE COMPLETE PROGRAM IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. THE WORKSHOP ALSO INCLUDED DISCUSSION OF ESSENTIAL PHASES OF THE OFF-FARM AGRICULTURAL OCCUPATIONS AS THEY APPLY TO THE PREPARATION OF STUDENT TEACHERS. THIS REPORT INCLUDED (1) A LIST OF PARTICIPANTS FROM 11 WESTERN…

  7. Implementing a system of structured clinical supervision with a group of DipHE(nursing) RMN students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, V; Turner, P

    1998-01-01

    Clinical supervision is to become an integral part of mental health nursing, and the United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery & Health Visiting has recommended that it be incorporated in pre-registration education. This paper describes teachers' experiences of delivering a programme of clinical supervision education within the mental health branch of a diploma in nursing course. It outlines the implementation and evaluation of the programme, including discussion of the process and difficulties encountered. The programme appears to have provided a positive first experience for the students and to have given them the enthusiasm to adopt clinical supervision as part of their future roles as qualified practitioners.

  8. Group Supervision and Japanese Students' Successful Completion of Undergraduate Theses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kiyomi

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores, from a sociocultural perspective, the nature and functions of "zemi" or seminars in which Japanese undergraduate students received group supervision for research and thesis writing. The study also investigates how the "zemi" contributed to completion of their theses. It was found that the "zemi"…

  9. Group Supervision and Japanese Students' Successful Completion of Undergraduate Theses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kiyomi

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores, from a sociocultural perspective, the nature and functions of "zemi" or seminars in which Japanese undergraduate students received group supervision for research and thesis writing. The study also investigates how the "zemi" contributed to completion of their theses. It was found that the "zemi" provided contexts for teaching…

  10. Technology-Mediated Supervision of Undergraduate Students' Dissertations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaldemark, Jimmy; Lindberg, J. Ola

    2013-01-01

    In Sweden, technology-mediated participation has increased in tertiary education, which has led to changing conditions for its delivery. However, one part has proven more resistant to change, technology-mediated or not: the supervision of students' undergraduate dissertation work. This article presents a study that analyses technological…

  11. Group Supervision and Japanese Students' Successful Completion of Undergraduate Theses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kiyomi

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores, from a sociocultural perspective, the nature and functions of "zemi" or seminars in which Japanese undergraduate students received group supervision for research and thesis writing. The study also investigates how the "zemi" contributed to completion of their theses. It was found that the "zemi"…

  12. Supervising Writing: Helping Postgraduate Students Develop as Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Anne; Murray, Rowena

    2015-01-01

    Research and enquiry skills are increasingly required of students at all levels of the higher education curriculum, and this requires a sophisticated pedagogical response. The question is: how can we integrate current knowledge about academic writing with current knowledge about supervision? This article integrates different approaches to writing…

  13. Supervising Writing: Helping Postgraduate Students Develop as Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Anne; Murray, Rowena

    2015-01-01

    Research and enquiry skills are increasingly required of students at all levels of the higher education curriculum, and this requires a sophisticated pedagogical response. The question is: how can we integrate current knowledge about academic writing with current knowledge about supervision? This article integrates different approaches to writing…

  14. Tablets as a digital tool in supervision of student teachers’ practical training

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In the project “Tablets in Practicum Supervision”, the tablet has been tested as a tool for observation and supervision in Norwegian teacher education. The study incorporates 14 practicum supervision groups and focuses on how the use of tablets can influence the quality of the supervision and the coherence between teaching, observation and supervision. Throughout the supervision process, the groups have used tablets to produce and share texts, pictures and video recordings. The use of tablets...

  15. Moral Teachers, Moral Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbourd, Rick

    2003-01-01

    Argues that schools will largely fail in their efforts to improve the moral and emotional growth of students if they do not attend to the moral and ethical development of teachers, especially urban teachers, who suffer from depression and disillusionment, the two primary causes of which are isolation and stress induced by problem students.…

  16. Educational clinical supervision: meeting the needs of specialist community practitioner students and professional practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canham, J

    1998-07-01

    In light of the possible demise of the community practice teacher, this paper proposes that a specific system of educationally led clinical supervision would benefit learning, teaching and assessing in the practice elements of specialist community practitioner education. Such a system would be additional to models of clinical supervision currently utilized in practice. An educative supervisory relationship would foster those skills and attributes essential for specialist community practice, enabling students to move toward mature responsible practice. It would provide experience of supportive frameworks that could be later utilized in professional practice. Clinical supervision specifically tailored for specialist community practitioner education would enable equity across branches and could be delivered in a variety of settings without a supervisor having to be 'on-site', thus benefiting comparatively isolated students in practice nursing and occupational health. To work successfully, educationally led clinical supervision necessitates a joint response by educational institutions and those practices where specialist community students undertake assessed placements. Without such a system in place to support specialist community practitioner courses, the standard of education and future practice cannot be assured.

  17. Clinical learning environment and supervision of international nursing students: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkonen, Kristina; Elo, Satu; Miettunen, Jouko; Saarikoski, Mikko; Kääriäinen, Maria

    2017-05-01

    Previously, it has been shown that the clinical learning environment causes challenges for international nursing students, but there is a lack of empirical evidence relating to the background factors explaining and influencing the outcomes. To describe international and national students' perceptions of their clinical learning environment and supervision, and explain the related background factors. An explorative cross-sectional design was used in a study conducted in eight universities of applied sciences in Finland during September 2015-May 2016. All nursing students studying English language degree programs were invited to answer a self-administered questionnaire based on both the clinical learning environment, supervision and nurse teacher scale and Cultural and Linguistic Diversity scale with additional background questions. Participants (n=329) included international (n=231) and Finnish (n=98) nursing students. Binary logistic regression was used to identify background factors relating to the clinical learning environment and supervision. International students at a beginner level in Finnish perceived the pedagogical atmosphere as worse than native speakers. In comparison to native speakers, these international students generally needed greater support from the nurse teacher at their university. Students at an intermediate level in Finnish reported two times fewer negative encounters in cultural diversity at their clinical placement than the beginners. To facilitate a successful learning experience, international nursing students require a sufficient level of competence in the native language when conducting clinical placements. Educational interventions in language education are required to test causal effects on students' success in the clinical learning environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Improving the professionalism of post-certification teacher through academic supervision in vocational schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyawati, Sophia Tri; Widyanto, I. Putu; Suemy

    2017-03-01

    This paper examines the principal's efforts in improving the professionalism of post-certification teachers through academic supervision in vocational school. The certification of educators is expected to improve the professionalism of teachers, there are significant changes between the before and after receiving the certificate of educators. One of the efforts made by the principal on increasing the professionalism of teachers is to carry out academic supervision completely and continuously. This paper examines about how principals at vocational schools carry out the programmed academic supervision, and continuing through mentoring, evaluation and coaching. Academic supervision is performed by individual supervision techniques which includes: classroom or practical visit, classroom or practical observation, individual meetings, inter-class or practical places visit, and self-assessment.

  19. MyAgRecord: An Online Career Portfolio Management Tool for High School Students Conducting Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emis, Larry; Dillingham, John

    Texas's online career portfolio management tool for high school students participating in supervised agricultural experience programs (SAEPs) was developed in 1998 by a committee of Texas high school teachers of agriscience and Texas Education Agency personnel. The career portfolio management tool reflects General Accepted Accounting Principles…

  20. Supervision Practices and Teachers' Satisfaction in Public Secondary Schools: Malaysia and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Mohd Izham Mohd; Wei, Yan; Ahmad, Jamil; Hamid, Aida Hanim A.; Mansor, Azlin Norhaini

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore supervision practices among school management teams and teachers' satisfaction in secondary schools in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and He Fei, China. The samples consist of 248 managers and 367 teachers in Kuala Lumpur, and 175 managers and 346 teachers in He Fei. The study indicates that the level of supervision…

  1. Supervision of Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs: A Synthesis of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, James E.; Williams, David L.

    1997-01-01

    A review of literature from 1964 to 1993 found that supervised agricultural experience (SAE) teachers, students, parents, and employers value the teachers' supervisory role. Implementation practices vary widely and there are no cumulative data to guide policies and standards for SAE supervision. (SK)

  2. Research supervision: Perceptions of postgraduate nursing students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (UKZN), Durban, SA the average drop-out rate at Master's level for thesis- based coursework ... What perceptions do PG nursing students have of research supervisors? • Which factors ... C Muraraneza,1 MN; F Mtshali,1 PhD; S Z Mthembu,2 PhD ..... which results in late completion of their degree, while some even abandon.

  3. The Preparation and Supervision of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagarik, Panninee

    1973-01-01

    Paper contributed as Thailand's Country Report to the Eighth Regional Seminar on "The Training and Supervision of Teachers of English as a Second or Foreign Language," July 3-7, 1973, Regional English Language Centre, Singapore. (HW)

  4. The Profound of Students' Supervision Practice in Higher Education to Enhance Student Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Affero; Abiddin, Norhasni Zainal; Hassan, Razali; Ro'is, Ihsan

    2014-01-01

    Supervision has become a highlight in higher education in recent years. While striving for the quality of education, the stress in research supervision has become dominant. Excellent research can contribute to the prominent of institutions' image. This paper accumulates the models from expert scholars in students' development regarding supervision…

  5. Is Direct Supervision in Clinical Education for Athletic Training Students Always Necessary to Enhance Student Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriber, Kent; Trowbridge, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To present an alternative model of supervision within clinical education experiences. Background: Several years ago direct supervision was defined more clearly in the accreditation standards for athletic training education programs (ATEPs). Currently, athletic training students may not gain any clinical experience without their clinical…

  6. Treating student contributions as displays of understanding in group supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The analyses this paper reports come from ongoing research into the interactive establishment of local social order in an educational setting (Day & Kjærbeck 2008, Day & Kjærbeck, in preparation). In focus for this paper are a particular sort of activity in the setting, 'group supervision', whereby...... students working in 'project groups' are to meet with their 'supervisor' to discuss the group's ongoing project, and a particular set of interactive phenomena, namely students' displays of comprehension directed toward the supervisor following his or evaluation of their work. This work is in line...

  7. The Use of E-supervision to Support Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Students during Student Teaching Practica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Charles H; Boarman, Katie; Carlin, Emily; Inselmann, Karissa

    2013-01-01

    In the present feasibility study, e-supervision was used to provide university liaison supervision to speech-language pathology (SLP) graduate students enrolled in student teaching practica. Utilizing a mixed methodology approach, interview and survey data were compared in order to identify similarities and differences between in-person and e-supervision, and guide future practice. Results showed e-supervised graduate students perceived that they received adequate supervision, feedback, support, and communication. Further, e-supervision provided additional benefits to supervisors, children on the caseload, and universities. Despite the benefits, disadvantages emerged. Implications for future practice and limitations of the study were identified.

  8. The Use of E-supervision to Support Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Students during Student Teaching Practica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles H. Carlin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present feasibility study, e-supervision was used to provide university liaison supervision to SLP graduate students enrolled in student teaching practica. Utilizing a mixed methodology approach, interview and survey data were compared in order to identify similarities and differences between face-to-face and e-supervision and guide future practice. Results showed e-supervised graduate students received adequate supervision, feedback, support, and communication. Further, e-supervision provided additional benefits to supervisors, children on the caseload, and universities. Despite the benefits, disadvantages emerged. Implications for future practice and limitations of the study were identified.

  9. [Students as teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, A.; Ringsted, C.

    2008-01-01

    and addressing their problems. Empirical studies support these theories and show that high levels of satisfaction are associated with near-peer teaching without compromising the learning outcome. In addition, student teachers achieve a substantial learning benefit from teaching. Much more research is needed......The concept of near-peer teaching is reviewed in this article. Theories of learning support the rationale for using students as teachers by explaining how near-peers as opposed to experts may have a superior understanding of the needs of the taught students and a better basis for identifying...

  10. Supervision in Language Teaching: A Supervisor's and Three Trainee Teachers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahyalar, Eda; Yazici, lkay Çelik

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the findings from a study which investigated supervision in language teaching from a supervisor's and her three trainee teachers' perspectives. The data in the study were from three sources: 1) audio recordings of the supervisor's feedback sessions with each trainee teacher, 2) audio recording of an interview between the…

  11. Place of Instructional Supervision in Enhancing Public Primary School Teachers' Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwambam, Aja Sunday; Eze, Prisca Ijeoma

    2017-01-01

    The study examined the place of instructional supervision in enhancing teachers' effectiveness in public primary schools in Ebonyi State. Four research questions were formulated to guide the study. Descriptive survey research design was adopted for the study. The population of the study consists of all the 462,186 teachers including the…

  12. Participation in clinical supervision (PACS): an evaluation of student nurse clinical supervision facilitated by mental health service users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maplethorpe, Fran; Dixon, Julie; Rush, Brenda

    2014-03-01

    This paper discusses an innovative learning approach in which people having experience of mental health services facilitated humanistic clinical supervision with groups of student nurses in the classroom. A four-day course of preparation for the role of supervisor is described and the results of subsequent clinical supervision sessions are analysed. Seven service users who had previous experience of teaching students in the classroom and fifty students on a Diploma/BSc in mental health nursing course participated in the project, which was evaluated through focus groups. The results indicated that the service user supervisors appreciated the skills they had gained on the course and felt that they were more appropriate than lecturers to facilitate clinical supervision sessions. Some students expressed initial uncertainty about the appropriateness of service users as supervisors but as changes to the pedagogical process of supervision were made and the supervisors gained more experience and confidence, students expressed greater satisfaction. The authors conclude that clinical supervision facilitated by service users who have preparation and continual support can add considerable value to the learning experience of student nurses.

  13. Online supervision at the university - A comparative study of supervision on student assignments face-to-face and online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Smedegaard Bengtsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Through an empirical study of supervision on student assignments at the university across face-to-face and online settings, we show firstly the limiting implications of traditional dichotomies between face-to-face and online supervision. Secondly we show that more attention must be given to the way different digital tools influence the supervisory dialogue. These findings illustrate a form of ‘torn pedagogy’; that online tools and platforms destabilize and tear traditional understandings of supervision pedagogy apart. Also we forge a new concept of “format supervision” that enables supervisors to understand and reflect their supervision practice as a deliberate choice between face-to-face and online formats.

  14. Clinical supervision for clinical psychology students in Uganda: an initial qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jennifer; Kasujja, Rosco; Oakes, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Burn out in clinical psychologists working in low income countries has been reported. Clinical supervisory structures do not yet exist in Uganda. A way to decrease levels of burn out and increase quality of care for people with mental illness is through clinical supervision. The aim of this study was to explore the initial experiences of supervision for clinical psychology students in Uganda to ascertain whether or not clinical supervision is culturally appropriate, and what aspects of supervision had been helpful and unhelpful. A qualitative design with thematic analysis was utilized. A focus group was held with 12 second year clinical psychology students to ask their experiences of receiving supervision. Data analysis created five themes. Firstly, the negative emotions that resulted from the training processed were discussed, and how supervision helped and did not help the students to manage these. Secondly, the students voiced that supervision helped them to learn through observational experiences, co-therapist roles and parallel processes within the supervisory relationship. Thirdly, supervision had taught the clinical psychology students their role as a clinical psychology student, how to act within the Ugandan mental health system and skills to conduct therapy. Fourthly, suggestions for the future of supervision were given, with the students requesting for it to start earlier in the training, for supervisors who can meet with the students on a regular basis to be selected and for the training the students receive at university to match the skills required on their placements, with a request for more practical techniques rather than theory. The final theme related to left over miscellaneous data, such as the students agreeing with each other. The students stated that supervision was helpful overall, implying that clinical supervision is culturally appropriate for clinical psychology students in Uganda. Suggestions for future supervision were given. In order to

  15. The collaborative model of fieldwork education: a blueprint for group supervision of students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Debra J; DeIuliis, Elizabeth D

    2015-04-01

    Historically, occupational therapists have used a traditional one-to-one approach to supervision on fieldwork. Due to the impact of managed care on health-care delivery systems, a dramatic increase in the number of students needing fieldwork placement, and the advantages of group learning, the collaborative supervision model has evolved as a strong alternative to an apprenticeship supervision approach. This article builds on the available research to address barriers to model use, applying theoretical foundations of collaborative supervision to practical considerations for academic fieldwork coordinators and fieldwork educators as they prepare for participation in group supervision of occupational therapy and occupational therapy assistant students on level II fieldwork.

  16. Assessment of work-integrated learning: comparison of the usage of a grading rubric by supervising radiographers and teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, Andrew J; Kilgour, Peter W; Gerzina, Tania; Christian, Beverly

    2014-02-01

    IntroductionProfessional work-integrated learning (WIL) that integrates the academic experience with off-campus professional experience placements is an integral part of many tertiary courses. Issues with the reliability and validity of assessment grades in these placements suggest that there is a need to strengthen the level of academic rigour of placements in these programmes. This study aims to compare the attitudes to the usage of assessment rubrics of radiographers supervising medical imaging students and teachers supervising pre-service teachers. MethodsWIL placement assessment practices in two programmes, pre-service teacher training (Avondale College of Higher Education, NSW) and medical diagnostic radiography (Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW), were compared with a view to comparing assessment strategies across these two different educational domains. Educators (course coordinators) responsible for teaching professional development placements of teacher trainees and diagnostic radiography students developed a standards-based grading rubric designed to guide assessment of students' work during WIL placement by assessors. After ∼12 months of implementation of the rubrics, assessors' reaction to the effectiveness and usefulness of the grading rubric was determined using a specially created survey form. Data were collected over the period from March to June 2011. Quantitative and qualitative data found that assessors in both programmes considered the grading rubric to be a vital tool in the assessment process, though teacher supervisors were more positive about the benefits of its use than the radiographer supervisors. ResultsBenefits of the grading rubric included accuracy and consistency of grading, ability to identify specific areas of desired development and facilitation of the provision of supervisor feedback. The use of assessment grading rubrics is of benefit to assessors in WIL placements from two very different teaching

  17. The Role of In-Service Teacher in Supervising Pre-Service Teachers during Teaching Practicum Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diah Latifah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the role of in-service teacher in supervising the pre-service teachers during the Teaching Practicum Program and in building the pre-service teachers’ character to be competent music teachers in the future. This study implements narrative inquiry as the method of research. Narrative inquiry method explains the variety of cases during the process of supervision by the in-service teacher. In addition, the research was held in Pasundan 8 Senior High School Bandung and was analyzed further by using qualitative methods with interactive analysis as it is formulated in the research question of this study. Results show that the supervision by an in-service teacher has been successfully enhanced the ability of pre-service teachers in teaching art and culture, particularly music lesson. The competence of pre-service teachers can be achieved by giving them examples, model, and music experience from in-service of the pre-service teachers.

  18. Supervising PETE Candidates Using the Situational Supervision Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Linda S.; Johnson, Lynn V.

    2012-01-01

    Physical education teacher candidates (PETCs) often, as part of their curricular requirements, engage in early field experiences that prepare them for student teaching. Matching the PETC's developmental level with the mentor's supervision style enhances this experience. The situational supervision model, based on the situational leadership model,…

  19. Assessment of work-integrated learning: comparison of the usage of a grading rubric by supervising radiographers and teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilgour, Andrew J, E-mail: akilgour@csu.edu.au [Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW (Australia); Kilgour, Peter W [Avondale College of Higher Education, Cooranbong, NSW (Australia); Gerzina, Tania [Dental Educational Research, Faculty of Dentistry, Jaw Function and Orofacial Pain Research Unit, Westmead Centre for Oral Health, C24- Westmead Hospital, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006 (Australia); Christian, Beverly [Avondale College of Higher Education, Cooranbong, NSW (Australia); Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW (Australia)

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Professional work-integrated learning (WIL) that integrates the academic experience with off-campus professional experience placements is an integral part of many tertiary courses. Issues with the reliability and validity of assessment grades in these placements suggest that there is a need to strengthen the level of academic rigour of placements in these programmes. This study aims to compare the attitudes to the usage of assessment rubrics of radiographers supervising medical imaging students and teachers supervising pre-service teachers. Methods: WIL placement assessment practices in two programmes, pre-service teacher training (Avondale College of Higher Education, NSW) and medical diagnostic radiography (Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW), were compared with a view to comparing assessment strategies across these two different educational domains. Educators (course coordinators) responsible for teaching professional development placements of teacher trainees and diagnostic radiography students developed a standards-based grading rubric designed to guide assessment of students’ work during WIL placement by assessors. After ∼12 months of implementation of the rubrics, assessors’ reaction to the effectiveness and usefulness of the grading rubric was determined using a specially created survey form. Data were collected over the period from March to June 2011. Quantitative and qualitative data found that assessors in both programmes considered the grading rubric to be a vital tool in the assessment process, though teacher supervisors were more positive about the benefits of its use than the radiographer supervisors. Results: Benefits of the grading rubric included accuracy and consistency of grading, ability to identify specific areas of desired development and facilitation of the provision of supervisor feedback. The use of assessment grading rubrics is of benefit to assessors in WIL placements from two very different

  20. The Issue of Education Supervision in Turkey in the Views of Teachers, Administrators, Supervisors and Lecturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memduhoglu, Hasan Basri

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the views of teachers, administrators, supervisors and lecturers that are experts in their fields as people having roles in education regarding the aim, structure, process, strong sides and main problems of the education supervision in Turkey. In this research, the scanning model research was employed through…

  1. The Trainee Teacher and His Practice Class. Fifty Pointers for the Student-Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Alun L. W.

    1969-01-01

    This handbook, based on the author's experience of supervising the English practice-classes of trainee teachers, was originally compiled for the specific use of students at the National University of Trujillo, Peru, and consists of a list of pointers embracing the most prevalent of trainees' shortcomings observed over a period of years at all…

  2. Pedagogical supervision in physical education- the perspective of student interns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Albuquerque

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study aims to locate the subjective thinking between students physical education trainees during teaching practice. Set in the format of the study and interpretation of a descriptive nature, can contribute to a better understanding and interpretation of the repertoire of experiential trainees Physical Education. The instrument used consisted of question relating to the quantitative and qualitative analysis and focused on five dimensions: Social and Emotional Aspects; Vocational Aspects; Learning and Professional Development; Supervision; Professional and Institutional Socialization. The sample consisted of 118 trainees, from two higher education institutions, one private and one public. The personal growth associated with the placement experience focuses on aspects related to professional competence. The professional skills of the stage are directly related to the organization and management of teaching and learning.

  3. The Impact of Supervised Mentorship on Music Education Master's Degree Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Joshua A.; Haston, Warren

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of supervised mentorship in an authentic-context learning setting on music education graduate students' graduate school experiences. Participants were six current and former graduate music education majors who acted as supervised mentors to undergraduate students teaching instrumental…

  4. Student Satisfaction with Graduate Supervision in Doctoral Programs Primarily Delivered in Distance Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erichsen, Elizabeth Anne; Bolliger, Doris U.; Halupa, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    There are no universal, precise, or explicit criteria for completing a doctoral degree successfully. Researchers and practitioners have pointed out how difficult and time consuming the supervision of graduate student research can be. When students in doctoral programs complete their degrees via distance delivery, supervision of graduate students…

  5. Desperately seeking consistency: Student nurses' experiences and expectations of academic supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratrix, Lesley; Barrett, David

    2017-01-01

    Academic supervision - the support available to students when writing assignments - is a fundamental element in the provision of support within nurse education. Not only can it underpin high levels of academic achievement, but it also has a role in enhancing the retention of students. Despite its importance, there is little investigation of undergraduate academic supervision within the nursing literature. To explore students' experiences and expectations of academic supervision as part of an undergraduate programme of nurse education. A qualitative approach to explore student perceptions. The research was undertaken at a Higher Education Institution in the United Kingdom. The institution offers undergraduate nurse education programmes to approximately 800 students. Eight pre-registration nursing students from a Bachelor of Science programme participated in a focus group interview. All were in the first semester of their final year. Data were collected using focus group interviewing, based around a semistructured question framework. The focus groups explored students' expectations and previous experiences of academic supervision. The focus group was recorded, responses were transcribed and thematic analysis was undertaken to identify key findings. Three themes were identified from the data: relationship with supervisor, variation between supervisors, and the link between supervision and marking. Overall, students identified frustration with variability in the provision of academic supervision. Effective academic supervision depends on a strong relationship between student and supervisor - something that can be difficult to achieve if supervision is only for a short period of time. Equally, students crave a consistent approach to supervision, in terms of both the amount and content of feedback. Students are able to identify and articulate a clear link between effective supervision and academic achievement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Implementability of Instructional Supervision as a Contemporary Educational Supervision Model in Turkish Education System

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In this study, implementability of instructional supervision as one of contemporary educational supervision models in Turkish Education System was evaluated. Instructional supervision which aims to develop instructional processes and increase the quality of student learning based on observation of classroom activities requires collaboration among supervisors and teachers. In this literature review, significant problems have been detected due to structural organization, structural and control-...

  7. Form Follows Function: A Model for Clinical Supervision of Genetic Counseling Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wherley, Colleen; Veach, Patricia McCarthy; Martyr, Meredith A; LeRoy, Bonnie S

    2015-10-01

    Supervision plays a vital role in genetic counselor training, yet models describing genetic counseling supervision processes and outcomes are lacking. This paper describes a proposed supervision model intended to provide a framework to promote comprehensive and consistent clinical supervision training for genetic counseling students. Based on the principle "form follows function," the model reflects and reinforces McCarthy Veach et al.'s empirically derived model of genetic counseling practice - the "Reciprocal Engagement Model" (REM). The REM consists of mutually interactive educational, relational, and psychosocial components. The Reciprocal Engagement Model of Supervision (REM-S) has similar components and corresponding tenets, goals, and outcomes. The 5 REM-S tenets are: Learning and applying genetic information are key; Relationship is integral to genetic counseling supervision; Student autonomy must be supported; Students are capable; and Student emotions matter. The REM-S outcomes are: Student understands and applies information to independently provide effective services, develop professionally, and engage in self-reflective practice. The 16 REM-S goals are informed by the REM of genetic counseling practice and supported by prior literature. A review of models in medicine and psychology confirms the REM-S contains supervision elements common in healthcare fields, while remaining unique to genetic counseling. The REM-S shows promise for enhancing genetic counselor supervision training and practice and for promoting research on clinical supervision. The REM-S is presented in detail along with specific examples and training and research suggestions.

  8. Development and psychometric testing of the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher evaluation scale (CLES+T): the Spanish version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizcaya-Moreno, M Flores; Pérez-Cañaveras, Rosa M; De Juan, Joaquín; Saarikoski, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    The Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher scale is a reliable and valid instrument to evaluate the quality of the clinical learning process in international nursing education contexts. This paper reports the development and psychometric testing of the Spanish version of the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher scale. Cross-sectional validation study of the scale. 10 public and private hospitals in the Alicante area, and the Faculty of Health Sciences (University of Alicante, Spain). 370 student nurses on clinical placement (January 2011-March 2012). The Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher scale was translated using the modified direct translation method. Statistical analyses were performed using PASW Statistics 18 and AMOS 18.0.0 software. A multivariate analysis was conducted in order to assess construct validity. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was used to evaluate instrument reliability. An exploratory factorial analysis identified the five dimensions from the original version, and explained 66.4% of the variance. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the factor structure of the Spanish version of the instrument. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the scale was .95, ranging from .80 to .97 for the subscales. This version of the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher scale instrument showed acceptable psychometric properties for use as an assessment scale in Spanish-speaking countries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Supervising Pre-service CFL teachers: A case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chun

    2015-01-01

    and tertiary education in China. Prior to being recruited by the Danish university, they had obtained a Master degree in Teaching Chinese as a Foreign/Second Language (TCFL/TESL) from Chinese universities. Upon being recruited, each teacher worked as a pre-service teacher teaching Chinese as a subject for one...... academic year. The study data is collected by using in-depth interview. Based on the data, the discussions of the data are devoted to three thematic headings: ‘Chinese’ teaching methods, ‘Danish’ learning style, and CFL teacher’s role. The researcher concludes that there is a gap between what...... they understood about the subject of 'Intercultural Competency' from Chinese universities and what they could actually apply it in the classroom within a Danish context. The study concludes by proposing an urge to strengthen the teaching of intercultural competency from a pedagogical aspect in their MA curriculum....

  10. Becoming-Teachers: Desiring Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercieca, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes a reading of the lives of teachers through a Deleuzian-Guattarian materialistic approach. By asking the question "what kind of life do teachers live?" this article reminds us that teachers sometimes welcome the imposed policies, procedures and programmes, the consequences of which remove them from students. This desire is…

  11. Systemic-Developmental Supervision: Clinical Supervisory Approach for Family Counseling Student Interns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Ryan G.; Lambie, Glenn W.

    2012-01-01

    Supervision models for marriage and family counseling student interns primarily focus on the use of traditional systemic techniques. In addition, a supervisee's level of development may not be considered when utilizing systemic tools. Furthermore, the supervisory relationship has been identified as a significant indicator of quality supervision,…

  12. Synergistic Supervision: A Confirmed Key to Retaining Entry-Level Student Affairs Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupp, Matthew R.; Arminio, Jan L.

    2012-01-01

    Entry-level student affairs staff are the profession's future and seasoned professionals must lay a strong supervisory foundation. Supervision has received little attention in the literature even though practitioners spend substantial time supervising. Although an important role, many seasoned professionals are ill prepared for this task. This…

  13. Nurse lecturers' perceptions of what baccalaureate nursing students could gain from clinical group supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Barbro; Athlin, Elsy

    2010-05-01

    The extensive amount of studies on clinical supervision during the nursing students' clinical programmes has shown that supervision most often is given on a one-to-one basis, and that many challenges are embedded in this kind of supervision. In some studies group supervision has been used, with mostly successful effects according to the nursing students. At a university in Sweden, a model of group supervision was included in the baccalaureate nursing programme, conducted by nurse lecturers. The purpose of this study was to describe the value of clinical group supervision to nursing students, as perceived by the nurse lecturers. Data consisted of field notes written by the nurse lecturers after 60 supervision sessions, and qualitative content analysis was performed. The findings showed how reflection in a group of equals was considered to give the nursing students opportunities to increase their understanding of themselves and others, prepare them for coming events, increase their personal and professional strengths, and inspire them for further development. On the basis of the findings and previous studies the value of using nurse lecturers as group supervisors was discussed. The impact of a contract to achieve a good learning environment in group supervision was also stressed.

  14. The Impact of Teacher-Student Relationships on EFL Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto García Sánchez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This research report aims at sharing the findings that emerged from a qualitative research study by a student-teacher, under the supervision of two practicing teacher-researchers. The study focused on the impact of teacher-student relationships in English as a foreign language learning according to the collective perceptions of a group of university students. The data generation process employed was comprised of semi-structured interviews, as well as the concurrent analysis of the data, based on aspects of grounded theory. The results of this inquiry revealed that university students’ sense of well-being, attitudes, and willingness to learn are improved when teachers demonstrate empathy, interest in student development, and respect.

  15. Instructional Supervision and Its Relationship with Professional Development: Perception of Private and Government Secondary School Teachers in Addis Ababa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaw, T. A.; Hofman, R. H.

    2012-01-01

    (Purpose) The purpose of this study is to examine the existing perceptions and preferences of teachers toward instructional supervision, more specifically on the actual and ideal use of selected instructional supervisory approaches (such as clinical supervision, peer coaching, cognitive coaching, mentoring, reflective coaching, teaching…

  16. Students' ratings of teacher practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, T.; Harris, G.; Liu, X.; Aguirre-Munoz, Z.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we explore a novel approach for assessing the impact of a professional development programme on classroom practice of in-service middle school mathematics teachers. The particular focus of this study is the assessment of the impact on teachers' employment of strategies used in the classroom to foster the mathematical habits of mind and mathematical self-efficacy of their students. We describe the creation and testing of a student survey designed to assess teacher classroom practice based primarily on students' ratings of teacher practices.

  17. PSYCHOANALYTICAL GUIDELINES TO THE SUPERVISION OF POST-GRADUATION STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emari Andrade

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We first dedicated ourselves to an extensive research, on the work of Jacques Lacan, of elements that could help us to throw light on the complex task of advising a career of researcher training. We then are willing, in this text, to formalize eight guidelines to psychoanalysis that could guide the supervision of post-graduation students. They are: 1 There are differences between the organism and the erogenous body; 2 There is a gap between the human being and his sexuality; 3 The instance that bonds language and the body is the Real; 4 Teaching and transmitting are two different things; 5 It is possible to transmit someone the love for knowledge by the management of the Real; 6 Advising makes more effect from what the advisor does than from what he says; 7 The evaluation of what is said must be done from the consequences of saying; e 8Writing can be an resource to help someone in the creation of his own self. Taking them as a support to analyse the manuscripts of the corpus, we realised that they are an important tool to show what happens in the process of the academic text writing, leading to the comprehension of the ways followed by each researcher regarding the instructions given by the theses advisor.

  18. Does doctors’ workload impact supervision and ward activities of final-year students? A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celebi Nora

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital doctors face constantly increasing workloads. Besides caring for patients, their duties also comprise the education of future colleagues. The aim of this study was to objectively investigate whether the workload arising from increased patient care interferes with student supervision and is associated with more non-medical activities of final-year medical students. Methods A total of 54 final-year students were asked to keep a diary of their daily activities over a three-week period at the beginning of their internship in Internal Medicine. Students categorized their activities – both medical and non-medical - according to whether they had: (1 only watched, (2 assisted the ward resident, (3 performed the activity themselves under supervision of the ward resident, or (4 performed the activity without supervision. The activities reported on a particular day were matched with a ward specific workload-index derived from the hospital information system, including the number of patients treated on the corresponding ward on that day, a correction factor according to the patient comorbidity complexity level (PCCL, and the number of admissions and discharges. Both students and ward residents were blinded to the study question. Results A total of 32 diaries (59 %, 442 recorded working days were handed back. Overall, the students reported 1.2 ± 1.3 supervised, 1.8 ±1.6 medical and 3.6 ± 1.7 non-medical activities per day. The more supervised activities were reported, the more the number of reported medical activities increased (p  Conclusions There was a significant association between ward doctors’ supervision of students and the number of medical activities performed by medical students. The workload had no significant effect on supervision or the number of medical or non-medical activities of final-year students.

  19. Conducting Supervised Experiential Learning/Field Experiences for Students' Development and Career Reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Jerome I.

    A major problem in the educational system of the United States is that a great number of students and graduates lack a career objective, and, therefore, many workers are unhappy. Offering a variety of supervised field experiences, paid or unpaid, in which students see workers in their occupations will help students identify career choices.…

  20. The Relationship between Athletic Training Student Critical Thinking Skills and Clinical Instructor Supervision: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabay, Michele R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to 1) assess the critical thinking skill level of the athletic training student at onset and end of the clinical education experience 2) to examine the influence of the students' critical thinking skills and the CIs' supervision responses to the changes in the students' critical thinking skills and 3) to compare the…

  1. High School Science Teachers Examine Practice as They Supervise Preservice Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Anita

    1997-01-01

    Explores the perspectives of two high school science teachers on teaching for conceptual change as they work with graduate level preservice teachers. Details the conceptual change model employed by the teachers. (DDR)

  2. Translation and validation of the clinical learning environment, supervision and nurse teacher scale (CLES + T) in Croatian language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrić, Robert; Piškorjanac, Silvija; Pekić, Vlasta; Vujanić, Jasenka; Ratković, Karolina Kramarić; Luketić, Suzana; Plužarić, Jadranka; Matijašić-Bodalec, Dubravka; Barać, Ivana; Žvanut, Boštjan

    2016-07-01

    Clinical practice is essential to nursing education as it provides experience with patients and work environments that prepare students for future work as nurses. The aim of this study was to translate the "Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher" questionnaire in Croatian language and test its validity and reliability in practice. The study was performed at the Faculty of medicine, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Croatia in April 2014. The translated questionnaire was submitted to 136 nursing students: 20 males and 116 females. Our results reflected a slightly different factor structure, consisting of four factors. All translated items of the original constructs "Supervisory relationship", "Role of nurse teacher" and "Leadership style of the ward manager" loaded on factor 1. Items of "Pedagogical atmosphere on the ward" are distributed on two factors (3 and 4). The items of "Premises of nursing on the ward" loaded on factor 2. Three items were identified as problematic and iteratively removed from the analysis. The translated version of the aforementioned questionnaire has properties suitable for the evaluation of clinical practice for nursing students within a Croatian context and reflects the specifics of the nursing clinical education in this country.

  3. Team Modes and Power: Supervision of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Margaret J.

    2017-01-01

    Currently, team supervision in doctoral studies is widely practised across Australian universities. The interpretation of 'team' is broad and there is evidence of experimentation with supervisory models. This paper elaborates upon a taxonomy of team modes and power forms based on a recent qualitative study across universities in a number of states…

  4. Team Modes and Power: Supervision of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Margaret J.

    2017-01-01

    Currently, team supervision in doctoral studies is widely practised across Australian universities. The interpretation of 'team' is broad and there is evidence of experimentation with supervisory models. This paper elaborates upon a taxonomy of team modes and power forms based on a recent qualitative study across universities in a number of states…

  5. Reflections on Doctoral Supervision: Drawing from the Experiences of Students with Additional Learning Needs in Two Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Bethan

    2015-01-01

    Supervision is an essential part of doctoral study, consisting of relationship and process aspects, underpinned by a range of values. To date there has been limited research specifically about disabled doctoral students' experiences of supervision. This paper draws on qualitative, narrative interviews about doctoral supervision with disabled…

  6. RESEARCH CONTRIBUTIONS IN THE SUPERVISED INTERNSHIP IN SHAPING THE GEOGRAPHY TEACHER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Praxedes de Almeida

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The supervised internship, mandatory curricular component in teacher training courses, must walk towards the practice of research on the formation of a critical, reflective educator and producer of knowledge. The design of an educator to work in contemporary times should contemplate the preparation to assist in building an inclusive school, toward the formation of a democratic and thinking citizen. Thus, the students of the course of Geography Degree, who attended the discipline Supervised Internship II, were included in a survey developed at school internship field seeking his students ' perceptions about gender, social prejudice and sexual orientation. It is not intended in this paper to discuss the themes addressed in this investigation, but the contributions arising from the practice of research carried out on stage. Trainees participated in all stages of research, since the drafting of questionnaires to the submission of the results to the school community. In this study of qualitative nature, the content analysis and categorization, using as a tool for data collection the questionnaire. Throughout the development of the work, the trainees were confronted with their own prejudices and taken to rethink their values and to reflect on its role as an educator. O estágio supervisionado, componente curricular obrigatório nos cursos de formação docente, deve caminhar no sentido da inserção da prática da pesquisa como forma de contribuir na formação de um educador crítico, reflexivo e produtor de conhecimento. A concepção de um educador para atuar na contemporaneidade deve contemplar a preparação para auxiliar na construção de uma escola inclusiva, voltada para a formação de um pensamento democrático e cidadão. Baseando-se nesses princípios, os licenciandos do curso de Geografia Licenciatura, que cursavam a disciplina Estágio Supervisionado II, foram inseridos em uma pesquisa desenvolvida na escola campo de estágio que

  7. Towards a Theoretical Framework for Understanding PGCE Student Teacher Learning in the Wild Coast Rural Schools' Partnership Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennefather, Jane

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on a theoretical model that I am developing in order to understand student teacher learning in a rural context and the enabling conditions that can support this learning. The question of whether a supervised teaching practice in a rural context can contribute to the development of student teacher professional learning and…

  8. An Examination of the Perceptions of Cooperating Teachers and Teacher Candidates Regarding the Initial Implementation of a Co-Teaching Model with Student Teaching at a Northern Louisiana University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Tina L.

    2013-01-01

    Since Louisiana now requires 50% of yearly evaluations of classroom teachers be based on student achievement, cooperating teachers who regularly supervise teacher candidates for a northern Louisiana university have become hesitant to accept teacher candidates into their classrooms. Other universities in Louisiana and across the United States have…

  9. Teacher Immediacy and its Impacts on Teacher-Student Relationship

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙亚兰

    2011-01-01

    Effective communication between teacher and students can help establish a closer relationship between the two sides and motivate the latter to engage in learning activities more efficiently. This paper aims to explore the impacts teacher immediacy has on teacher-student relationship and find some ways to improve teacher immediacy.

  10. Teacher Wellbeing: The Importance of Teacher-Student Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilt, Jantine L.; Koomen, Helma M. Y.; Thijs, Jochem T.

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have examined the importance of teacher-student relationships for the development of children. Much less is known, however, about how these relationships impact the professional and personal lives of teachers. This review considers the importance of teacher-student relationships for the wellbeing of teachers starting from the…

  11. Teachers' Perceptions of SAE Programs and Benefits for Students with Special Needs in Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwager, Tony A.; White, James D.

    An Oklahoma study sought to identify specific benefits that accrue to students with special needs in secondary Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) programs and to determine teachers' perceptions of SAE programs for students with special needs. Data were gathered in the fall of 1993 through a mailed survey of all 362 agricultural education…

  12. Black Students in Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Margaret Moyo

    1995-01-01

    Examines black student's experiences in initial teacher education, and reveals what still needs to be done before these students can receive the same positive treatment as their white colleagues. The author presents research revealing the various forms of racism, discrimination, and stereotyping that create these negative educational experiences…

  13. Teachers Promoting Student Mathematical Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Mary; Yankelewitz, Dina; Maher, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    During an informal, after-school, math program, a group of middle school students worked collaboratively on open-ended problems. The students co-constructed arguments, provided justifications for their solutions, and engaged in mathematical reasoning. This paper describes the specific teacher moves that promoted this phenomenon. The findings of…

  14. Peer Support in Negotiating Multiple Relationships within Supervision among Counselor Education Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Amanda J.; Pimpleton, Asher; Stinchfield, Tracy; Stevens, Heath; Othman, Nor Asma

    2013-01-01

    Counselor education doctoral students (CEDSs), like other doctoral students, need assistance and support to ensure their self-care. One area markedly affecting self-care is one's relationships with others. The purpose of this article is to examine the multiple relationships involved within CEDSs supervision, the potential areas to utilize peer…

  15. Students' Views on Thesis Supervision in International Master's Degree Programmes in Finnish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippou, Kalypso; Kallo, Johanna; Mikkilä-Erdmann, Mirjamaija

    2017-01-01

    This paper employs an intercultural perspective to examine students' views on master's thesis supervision and the roles and responsibilities of supervisors and students. The 302 respondents who answered the online questionnaire were enrolled in international master's degree programmes in four Finnish universities. The study revealed asymmetric…

  16. Relationship of Supervised Agricultural Experience Program Participation and Student Achievement in Agricultural Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Jimmy G.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Data from 537 high school students demonstrated the positive effect of participation in supervised agricultural experience (SAE) and Future Farmers of America (FFA) on agriscience achievement. FFA involvement and the scope of SAE were highly correlated. Student interest, socioeconomic status, and years of agriscience were related to achievement…

  17. Barriers to Conducting Supervised Agricultural Experiences as Perceived by Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Joey Blackburn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this descriptive study was to assess preservice agriculture teachers’ perceptions of the importance of Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE and their views on barriers to conducting SAE. A census of the sophomore-level agricultural education course at Oklahoma State University was conducted to measure perceptions at the beginning and end of the course. This study was framed upon Ajzen’s Theory of Planned Behavior. Results indicated that preservice teachers perceived SAE was an important component of agricultural education and important at the secondary school they attended. The greatest barrier to conducting SAE was their lack of familiarity with newer SAE categories. This was true at both the beginning and end of the course. It is recommended that preservice teachers receive instruction on and experiences in all types of SAE. This would increase the likelihood of preservice teachers perceiving they have control over this barrier regarding SAE implementation. This cohort of preservice teachers should be surveyed over time to determine change in their perceptions of barriers to SAE implementation as they progress in the agricultural education program and through their careers. Further, the views of in-service teachers should also be assessed to determine if perceived barriers differ with professional experience.

  18. Public high school teachers opinions on school administrators supervision duty in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhayat Celebi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Supervision that has been conducted by public high school administrators plays a major role in the effectiveness of a school.Lack of having well defined criteria is thought to be causing some major problems in the educational environment. Subjectivity,administrative policy constraints, lack of teacher motivation and lack of job satisfaction are only a few examples of those kindsof problems. The study, which is based on the scanning model and a descriptive research, was performed on 303 teachersworking in randomly chosen high schools in the Bakırköy district of İstanbul. The data collection instrument was developed bythe researcher. The confirmatory factor analysis test was used to determine whether the scale confirm to the factor structureor not. It was noticed that the factor structure could be explained with 5 factor sub-dimensions, and accordingly, the measuringscale, which had been originally prepared in 45 items, was modified and reduced to 32 items. As a result of factor analysis, thefactors were confirmed as follows; “the leadership, supervision techniques, effective supervision, efficacy of administration andteaching quality”. All these factors are explain about 48 % for total test variance. Cronbach alpha internal consistency factorwhich has been calculated according to the reliability analysis and it’s value was ,90. Factor loadings of sub- dimensions arebetween ,41 and ,81. In accordance with the results, training programs must be applied regularly to the administrators in orderto enable them to acquire more supervision attitude and to increase the efficiency and quality levels of the schools

  19. Teacher Quality and Student Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Darling-Hammond

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Using data from a 50-state survey of policies, state case study analyses, the 1993-94 Schools and Staffing Surveys (SASS, and the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP, this study examines the ways in which teacher qualifications and other school inputs are related to student achievement across states. The findings of both the qualitative and quantitative analyses suggest that policy investments in the quality of teachers may be related to improvements in student performance. Quantitative analyses indicate that measures of teacher preparation and certification are by far the strongest correlates of student achievement in reading and mathematics, both before and after controlling for student poverty and language status. State policy surveys and case study data are used to evaluate policies that influence the overall level of teacher qualifications within and across states. This analysis suggests that policies adopted by states regarding teacher education, licensing, hiring, and professional development may make an important difference in the qualifications and capacities that teachers bring to their work. The implications for state efforts to enhance quality and equity in public education are discussed.

  20. Student to Teacher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Spence

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Teacher preparation cast in Heidegger’s terms is “present-at-hand” (potentially useful until interrogation makes it ready-to-hand (actually useable. What authentic questions prompt teaching to become ready-to-hand for the beginning teacher? How might we show that the essential particularity for phronesis (knowledge as practical wisdom resides in teaching other Beings who are not just present or ready for us, but are creating the very world in which we encounter within the classroom? The study described below, undertaken in the 2008/2009 school year, juxtaposes passages from Being and Time (Heidegger, 1962 with observations in the classroom, knowledge of the local university teacher preparation program, and interviews with beginning teachers. So that no teacher might be able to self-identify, “Becky” and “Eloise” are both fictitious names. “Becky” comes from a university program outside the area now teaching in the district described in the study, whereas “Eloise” was educated in the local teacher preparation program.

  1. Social and Emotional Learning and Teacher-Student Relationships: Preschool Teachers' and Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulou, Maria S.

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate how teachers' perceptions of emotional intelligence, and social and emotional learning (SEL) relate to teacher-student relationships. Teachers' perceptions of teacher-student relationships and the degree of agreement with students' perceptions was also investigated. Preschool teachers from 92 public schools in…

  2. The Influence of Teacher Development on Secondary Content Area Supervision among Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Mary D.; Bates, Alisa; Gupta, Udita

    2016-01-01

    This study addresses the issues and challenges faced by university supervisors when providing content-specific and general pedagogical feedback to preservice teachers. Study data highlight the perspectives of six preservice teachers as they reflect on their supervisory experiences over the course of a licensure year. Survey, interview, and written…

  3. Studying Student Teachers' Acceptance of Role Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael D.; Davis, Concetta M.

    1980-01-01

    There is variance in the way in which student teachers accept responsibility for the teaching act. This study explains why some variables may affect student teachers' acceptance of role responsibilities. (CM)

  4. Physiotherapy students' perception of their teachers' clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physiotherapy students' perception of their teachers' clinical teaching attributes. ... The objective of the study was to report on Nigerian physiotherapy students' perceptions of the clinical teaching skills of their teachers. ... Article Metrics.

  5. Changes in Student Teachers' Intention to Teach during Student Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, T. Grady; Greiman, Bradley C.; Murphy, T. H.; Ricketts, John C.; Harlin, Julie F.; Briers, Gary E.

    2009-01-01

    Over the course of the student teaching experience, a student teacher's intention to teach can increase, decrease, or remain the same. The purpose of this study was to explore differences in student teachers that were representative of each category. Teaching intention of 103 student teachers at four universities in 2005-2006 exhibited little…

  6. Pasteur: Student and Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Nicholas

    1983-01-01

    Louis Pasteur's career as a scientist and as a teacher of science is traced. The discovery of his ability and interest, his choice of teaching as a profession, the controversy over teaching versus research, and his methods of teaching science are included. (MNS)

  7. Teacher and student learning through a Teacher Design Team (TDT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenders, Fer

    2015-01-01

    The change from teacher dominated to student controlled classrooms is not easy as teachers fear poorer learning. However, in context based education students need more autonomy. Mandatory context based curricula for the natural sciences were introduced in 2013 in the Netherlands. To support teachers

  8. Exploring student teachers' resistance to teacher education pedagogies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronkhorst, L.H.; Koster, B.; Meijer, P.C.; Woldman, N.; Vermunt, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Student teachers' resistance to teacher education is often understood as a lack of quality of the student teacher and/or the internship, and is expected to impede learning. In this study we suggest that resistance is interactive in nature, and can potentially have constructive outcomes. We engaged i

  9. Teacher wellbeing: the importance of teacher-student relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spilt, J.L.; Koomen, H.M.Y.; Thijs, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have examined the importance of teacher-student relationships for the development of children. Much less is known, however, about how these relationships impact the professional and personal lives of teachers. This review considers the importance of teacher-student relationships for the

  10. Teacher wellbeing: the importance of teacher-student relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spilt, J.L.; Koomen, H.M.Y.; Thijs, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have examined the importance of teacher-student relationships for the development of children. Much less is known, however, about how these relationships impact the professional and personal lives of teachers. This review considers the importance of teacher-student relationships for the

  11. Burnout among Teachers: Students' and Teachers' Perceptions Compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Will J. G.; Tomic, Welko; Brouwers, Andre

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore students' and teachers' perceptions of teacher burnout in relation to the occurrence of disruptive student classroom behaviour and the teachers' competence to cope with this kind of behaviour. First, the study shows that the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Coping with Disruptive Behaviour Scale and the Perceived…

  12. Exploring student teachers' resistance to teacher education pedagogies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronkhorst, L.H.; Koster, B.; Meijer, P.C.; Woldman, N.; Vermunt, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Student teachers' resistance to teacher education is often understood as a lack of quality of the student teacher and/or the internship, and is expected to impede learning. In this study we suggest that resistance is interactive in nature, and can potentially have constructive outcomes. We engaged

  13. Training English Language Student Teachers to Become Reflective Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Issa, Ali; Al-Bulushi, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Reflective teaching practice has become a central theme in professional growth at the pre-service teacher education level almost everywhere. English language teaching (ELT) teacher trainers, like any other teacher trainers, have a powerful role to play in fostering reflection in their student teachers through the approaches and strategies they…

  14. Beginning Student Teachers' Teacher Identities Based on Their Practical Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Katariina; Karlsson, Liisa; Pitkaniemi, Harri; Maaranen, Katriina

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we investigate first-year student teachers' teacher identities through their practical theories and ask what these practical theories reveal about their emerging teacher identities? This study approaches teacher identity from a dialogical viewpoint where identity is constructed through various positions. The empirical part of this…

  15. Placement Supervision of Pedagogue Students in Denmark: The Role of University Colleges and Early Childhood Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jytte Juul

    2015-01-01

    The article examines Danish pedagogue students' supervision during their placement periods in early childhood settings. Throughout the long history of Danish pedagogue education, discourses relating to the placement element have been located either within a "work" paradigm or a "scholastic" paradigm. These two understandings of…

  16. Supervising nursing students in a technology-driven medication administration process in a hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaard, Mette; Orbæk, Janne

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to identify, describe and synthesize the experiences of nurse supervisors and the factors that influence the supervision of pre-graduate nursing students in undertaking technology-driven medication administration in hospital settings...

  17. Supervisee Incompatibility and Its Influence on Triadic Supervision: An Examination of Doctoral Student Supervisors' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Serge F.; Lawson, Gerard; Rodriguez, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted to explore supervisors' experiences of supervisee incompatibility in triadic supervision. In-depth interviews were completed with 9 doctoral student supervisors in a counselor education program, and a whole-text analysis generated 3 categories. Supervisee incompatibility took a wide variety of forms and negatively…

  18. International Doctoral Students in Counselor Education: Coping Strategies in Supervision Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hongryun; Jang, Yoo Jin; Henfield, Malik S.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores 8 international doctoral students' perceptions of coping strategies used in supervision training in counselor education programs. Using human agency as a conceptual framework, the authors found 3 categories: (a) personal and professional self-directed strategies as personal agency, (b) support and care from mentors as proxy…

  19. Colleague Supervision--"Ignored and Undervalued"? The Views of Students and Supervisors in a New University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Colleague supervision is increasingly used in UK modern (post-92) universities to support the progress of academic staff to doctoral qualifications. Denicolo (2004) argues that it is a "role relationship that has been largely ignored or undervalued by administration" (p. 693) and colleague students and supervisors "felt more…

  20. An Assessment of Students' Perceptions toward Factors Influencing Supervised Agricultural Experience Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lauren J.; Rayfield, John; Moore, Lori L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate student perceptions toward factors influencing Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) participation. This descriptive study was conducted in 120 randomly selected agricultural education programs throughout four purposively selected states representative of the National FFA regions. Within each state…

  1. Elder Rehab: A Student-Supervised Exercise Program for Alzheimer's Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkin, Sharon M.

    1999-01-01

    Describes and evaluates an elder rehab program, which offers credit to students who serve as rehab partners and fitness supervisors to noninstitutionalized persons with dementia. In addition to aerobics and weight training workouts, participants engage in supervised volunteer work and memory- and language-stimulation activities with their student…

  2. Risk in Academic Writing: Postgraduate Students, their Teachers and the Making of Knowledge, L. Thesen and L. Cooper (Eds.) : book review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leibowitz, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    Risk in Academic Writing: Postgraduate Students, their Teachers and the Making of Knowledge is a very timely publication, given the current interest worldwide in postgraduate studies and postgraduate supervision...

  3. A Survey of Students' Views of Supervision at Unisa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, S.

    2011-01-01

    This study is framed by self-efficacy theory (SET). It aimed to determine successful research students' views of supervisory practices they had experienced. The research design was an embedded design. A questionnaire determined the views of 52 students in one college at Unisa on the support they received for successful experiences; the influence…

  4. Special Education Teachers' Experiences Supporting and Supervising Paraeducators: Implications for Special and General Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Sarah N.; Chapin, Shelley E.; Nolan, James F.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in paraeducator supports, in large part because students with low incidence disabilities are being included more frequently in general education settings. As a result, special education teachers have been given additional supervisory responsibilities related to directing the work of paraeducators in…

  5. Special Education Teachers' Experiences Supporting and Supervising Paraeducators: Implications for Special and General Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Sarah N.; Chapin, Shelley E.; Nolan, James F.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in paraeducator supports, in large part because students with low incidence disabilities are being included more frequently in general education settings. As a result, special education teachers have been given additional supervisory responsibilities related to directing the work of paraeducators in…

  6. Internal conflict: undergraduate nursing students' response to inadequate supervision during the administration of medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid-Searl, Kerry; Moxham, Lorna; Walker, Sandra; Happell, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Current legislation in Queensland requires that undergraduate nursing students are personally supervised when administering restricted medication in the clinical setting. Previous research suggests this is not always the case. Exploration of the experiences of undergraduate nursing students was undertaken using grounded theory as the methodological framework. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 28 students during their final year clinical placements. Data were analysed using a constant comparative approach. The focus of this paper is to examine the emergent theme of internal conflict, which is experienced by the participants as a consequence of the theory-practice gap. This conflict is reflected by the divergent requirements and expectations between the university and the registered nurses providing supervision in light of the role both play in student assessment. In addition, the participants voiced concerns about patient safety due to the potential for medication error. Internal conflict was identified by participants as the cause of considerable fear and anxiety about passing the course, getting a job and avoiding harm to patients. These findings raise serious concerns about the adequacy of the supervision for nursing students and highlighted the need for a more concerted approach to the theoretical and clinical education of students in relation to medication administration.

  7. Clinical supervision of nursing students: challenges and alternatives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    practice is to prepare nursing students develop and apply the necessary theoretical and empirical knowledge and skills in .... Practice, teaching methodology and inter-disciplinary ... The most common and probably the best model for Rwanda.

  8. Remote Video Supervision in Adapted Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Luke; Bishop, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Supervision for beginning adapted physical education (APE) teachers and inservice general physical education teachers who are learning to work with students with disabilities poses a number of challenges. The purpose of this article is to describe a project aimed at developing a remote video system that could be used by a university supervisor to…

  9. Os saberes docentes na formação inicial do professor de física: elaborando sentidos para o estágio supervisionado Teacher knowledge in initial teacher education: elaborating meanings for supervised teaching practice activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Pereira Baccon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho apresentamos os resultados de uma investigação a respeito da construção dos saberes docentes, durante a realização do estágio supervisionado da licenciatura de Física. Para o levantamento das informações desta pesquisa, foram entrevistados dois grupos de estagiários e analisados seus relatórios de regência. Durante as entrevistas, semiestruturadas, o estagiário era convidado a falar sobre a sua experiência com o estágio supervisionado. Buscamos perceber as representações que cada estagiário elaborou durante o estágio, em relação aos alunos, ao professor, à escola, aos outros estagiários de seu grupo e ao próprio estágio. Com base nessas representações, procuramos verificar quais saberes os estagiários conseguiram construir durante esse período e caracterizar a singularidade de sua ação docente.In this work we present the results of research about the construction of the teacher´s knowledge, during the period of supervised teaching practice for students in a teacher education program in Physics. For the data collection, two groups of students had been interviewed; we also analyzed their reports of teaching practice. During the interviews, the students were invited to speak about their experiences on the supervised period of training. We were looking for the representations that each trainee elaborated during the period of training, related to the pupils, the teachers, the school and the other students of their groups. From these representations it was possible to verify the knowledge constructed by the trainees during the supervised teaching practice and to characterize the singularity of their practice teaching.

  10. Impact of clinical supervision on field training of nursing students at Urmia University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMADREZA DEHGHANI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obtaining clinical competency in clinical education is one of the problems in nursing and use of the new methods of clinical training is very important. Clinical supervision is one of the methods used as a mechanism to promote knowledge and skill for promoting professional performance in nursing students. This study is carried out to determine the impact of clinical supervision on field training of nursing students at Urmia University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In the present experimental study, 32 nursing students were enrolled in the study based on census and randomly assigned into two groups of experimental and control by block randomization. Clinical supervision was used in the experimental group and the control group received routine clinical trainings in the field. The students’ clinical skills were assessed using a researcher-made checklist, the validity of which was confirmed through content validity method by 13 faculty members and its reliability was approved by test-retest method on 20 nursing students in the form of a pilot study and through Cronbach’s alpha (87%. Data were analyzed using SPSS, version 14. Results: There was a significant difference between the experimental and control groups in clinical skills such as recognition and administration of medication, team participation, patients and their relatives’ education, considering the safety, infection prevention and nursing process (p<0.005. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that in clinical supervision process, students have a better communication and cooperation with their instructor and with each other and their confidence and understanding and the amount of learning in practical skills was enhanced more than routine clinical training. The implementation of this clinical training method for students of nursing and other fields of medical sciences is recommendable.

  11. Legal Implications of Clinical Supervision of Medical Students and Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Marshall B.

    1983-01-01

    The legal liability of faculty members, school, and institution may arise from their supervisory function with regard to a student caring for a patient who claims injury because of that care. The legal implications raised by these functions are examined and potential liabilities are explained. (Author/MSE)

  12. Turning tables : By information students supervised by prof. Annette Klarenbeek

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klarenbeek, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Description of a research project in which information students did an online environment analysis. The research is aiming at discovering the frames which consists around ICT and Governments, in particular about the NSA. Our goal is to get an insight in the functions of these frames in conversations

  13. Providing Effective Feedback to EFL Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Holi Ibrahim Holi; Al-Adawi, Hamed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Feedback on school practicum is of utmost importance for student teachers to help them to develop their pedagogical and teaching skills. This paper attempts to collect data from both student teachers and their mentors in an ELT teacher training programme in Oman to answer the questions which are raised by this study: 1) What kind of feedback do…

  14. Teacher Perceptions of Student Bullying Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Sandra; Willoughby, William

    2003-01-01

    Explores 68 teachers' perceptions of student bullying behaviors within a revised framework of Richard Lazarus's stress and coping theory. About half of the teachers indicated they "always" tried to stop bullying. Only a small percentage of teachers said, however, they considered other teachers as "always" interested in trying to stop bullying.…

  15. Chinese Teachers' Perceptions of Students' Classroom Misbehaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Meixia; Li, Yeping; Li, Xiaobao; Kulm, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on Chinese teachers' perceptions of students' classroom misbehaviour. A questionnaire was designed to assess teachers' general concerns about classroom management, teachers' perceptions of the most frequent and troublesome types of misbehaviour, and teachers' perceived needs for help with improving classroom management. A total…

  16. Colleague supervision – “ignored and undervalued”? The views of students and supervisors in a new university

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Colleague supervision is increasingly used in UK modern (post-92) universities to support the progress of academic staff to doctoral qualifications. Denicolo (2004) argues that it is a ‘role relationship that has been\\ud largely ignored or undervalued by administration’ (p. 693) and colleague students and supervisors ‘felt more vulnerable’ than other students/supervisors (p. 706). This small-scale research amongst students and staff in a colleague supervision relationship at a single UK moder...

  17. Effects of Non-Guidance Activities, Supervision, and Student-to-Counselor Ratios on School Counselor Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    School counselors, like all mental health professionals are at high risk for burnout. High caseloads, job role ambiguity, and lack of supervision increase their propensity for burnout. Three areas were selected for study in this article due to their potential impact on burnout: supervision, student-to-counselor-ratios, and non-guidance related…

  18. Video Narratives to Assess Student Teachers' Competence as New Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admiraal, Wilfried; Berry, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    In teacher education programmes, written portfolios or text-based self-evaluations are generally used to document the development of student teachers' competence. However, such approaches do no justice to the complex nature of teaching as they tend to lead to evidence in which teacher competencies are disconnected and removed from the actual…

  19. Teachers' and Students' Perceptions of the Ideal Teacher

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telli, Sibel; den Brok, Perry; Cakiroglu, Jale

    The purpose of the Study was to describe the characteristics of an ideal Turkish teacher from an interpersonal point of view. A total number of 21 teachers and 276 students (Grades 9 to 11) answered the questions "What should be/should not be the characteristics of an ideal teacher?" A total of 17

  20. The "Ideal Teacher." Implications for Student Evaluation of Teacher Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo-Munoz, Carmen; Rebolloso-Pacheco, Enrique; Fernandez-Ramirez, Baltasar

    2000-01-01

    Examined characteristics defining the ideal teacher using the semantic differential (SD) scale, which can detect attributes of ideal teachers and find evaluative, emotional, or affective components linked to this concept. Spanish college students completed the SD Scale. Results found teacher profiles similar to those found using other assessments,…

  1. Teachers Know Best: Making Data Work for Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, 2015

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's broader efforts to improve educational opportunities for all students, the "Teachers Know Best" research project seeks to encourage innovation in K-12 education by helping product developers and those who procure resources for teachers better understand teachers' views. The original…

  2. Teachers' and Students' Perceptions of the Ideal Teacher

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telli, Sibel; den Brok, Perry; Cakiroglu, Jale

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the Study was to describe the characteristics of an ideal Turkish teacher from an interpersonal point of view. A total number of 21 teachers and 276 students (Grades 9 to 11) answered the questions "What should be/should not be the characteristics of an ideal teacher?" A total of 17 s

  3. Evaluation of a model of dissertation supervision for 3rd year B.Sc. undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholefield, Donna; Cox, Georgina

    2016-03-01

    All English universities now offer an all degree undergraduate nursing programme. Many currently use an individual supervision model to support final year dissertation students, but with increased numbers and limited resources new models of supervision are needed. This study evaluated a mixed (group and individual) model of dissertation supervision to determine its effectiveness for a large group of undergraduate nursing students. A sample of 3rd year students and their supervisors were selected from one large university. An evaluation survey was conducted using anonymous internet-based questionnaires and focus groups. The data was analysed using Survey Monkey, SPSS and thematic analysis. A 51% (n = 56/110) response rate (students) and 65% (n = 24/37) for supervisors was obtained. The majority of students and supervisors were satisfied with the new model. There was a mixed response to the group workshops and supervision groups. Three themes emerged from the qualitative data: engaging with the process, motivation to supervise and valuing the process. The supervision process is a struggle but both parties gained considerably from going through the process. In conclusion, a mixed model of supervision together with a range of other learning resources can be an effective approach in supporting students through the dissertation process.

  4. Supervising M.Sc. Students working in the 100 Gigabit Ethernet field using OPNET Modeler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Berger, Michael Stübert; Wessing, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with supervision methods for M.Sc. students who are using OPNET Modeler for their thesis work within the field of 100 Gigabit Ethernet. We detail how we use OPNET Modeler in our M.Sc. projects at the Technical University of Denmark. In particular, we discuss on how we teach...... students to learn OPNET independently and in a short timeframe, and we outline what students find challenging and rewarding by using OPNET Modeler. Furthermore, we show some cases on how OPNET was applied in specific projects within the field of 100 Gigabit Ethernet....

  5. Treating student contributions as displays of understanding in group supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    the analytic relevance of the talk's embeddedness within a particular sort of institutional activity. With regard to the last point, we will show how the supervisors' construction an evaluation and the work embarked upon by him or her following students' post-evaluation comprehension displays reflexively...... grounds the particular institutional setting. In spite of the particulars of these data, however, we nonetheless maintain that our analyses of them reveal generalities concerning how cognition can be viewed as distributed, situated, activity-bound and embodied....

  6. Issues in the supervision of postgraduate research students in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, J

    1993-06-01

    Some general points are made in this paper about the nature of postgraduate research degrees, and the process which results in a thesis is set out. These are followed by considering the degrees in a nursing context and also in relation to the social sciences. Next the aims of postgraduate research degree programmes are considered. Approaches to the matching of students are set out. Among those discussed are mentoring, collegiality, classification and framing, and the use of workshops. In the conclusion, some desired outcomes of the supervisory process are suggested.

  7. Rethinking attitudes to student clinical supervision and patient care: a change management success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Maree; Wade, Victoria; McAllister, Sue; Stupans, Ieva; Miller, Jennifer; Burgess, Teresa; LeCouteur, Amanda; Starr, Linda

    2014-08-30

    The aim of this project was to explore the process of change in a busy community dental clinic following a team development intervention designed to improve the management of student supervision during clinical placements. An action research model was used. Seven members of a community dental clinic team (three dentists, two dental therapists, one dental assistant and the clinic manager), together with the university clinical placement supervisor participated in the team development intervention. The intervention consisted of two profiling activities and associated workshops spread six months apart. These activities focused on individual work preferences and overall team performance with the aim of improving the functioning of the clinic as a learning environment for dental students. Evaluation data consisted of 20 participant interviews, fourteen hours of workplace observation and six sets of field notes. Following initial thematic analysis, project outcomes were re-analysed using activity theory and expansive learning as a theoretical framework. At project commencement students were not well integrated into the day-to-day clinic functioning. Staff expressed a general view that greater attention to student supervision would compromise patient care. Following the intervention greater clinical team cohesion and workflow changes delivered efficiencies in practice, enhanced relationships among team members, and more positive attitudes towards students. The physical layout of the clinic and clinical workloads were changed to achieve greater involvement of all team members in supporting student learning. Unexpectedly, these changes also improved clinic functioning and increased the number of student placements available. In navigating the sequential stages of the expansive learning cycle, the clinical team ultimately redefined the 'object' of their activity and crossed previously impervious boundaries between healthcare delivery and student supervision with benefits to

  8. Teacher-Student Interpersonal Relationships in Indonesian Lower Secondary Education: Teacher and Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulana, R.; Opdenakker, M. C. J. L.; den Brok, P.; Bosker, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated firstly the reliability and validity of an Indonesian version of the "Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction" (QTI). Second, perceptions of Indonesian secondary school teachers' interpersonal behaviour as perceived by students and teachers were studied with the QTI. Third, differences between students' and teachers'…

  9. PhD students' experiences of thesis supervision in Malaysia: managing relationships in the midst of institutional change

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krauss, Steven Eric; Ismail, Ismi Arif

    2010-01-01

    Despite the plethora of studies that have been conducted on PhD supervision, little qualitative investigation has been conducted with a diverse, non-Western sample of doctoral students in an attempt...

  10. Characteristics of Effective Teachers of Gifted Students: Teacher Background and Personality Styles of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Carol J.

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to explore characteristics of exceptional teachers of gifted students. Participants included 63 teachers and 1,247 highly able students. Teachers responded to 2 measures: a background questionnaire and the Myers Briggs Type Inventory (MBTI), a self-report personality inventory. Students also completed the MBTI. In response…

  11. A qualitative inquiry into the challenges and complexities of research supervision: viewpoints of postgraduate students and faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Alireza; Bazrafkan, Leila; Yamani, Nikoo

    2015-07-01

    The supervision of academic theses at the Universities of Medical Sciences is one of the most important issues with several challenges. The aim of the present study is to discover the nature of problems and challenges of thesis supervision in Iranian universities of medical sciences. The study was conducted with a qualitative method using conventional content analysis approach. Nineteen faculty members, using purposive sampling, and 11 postgraduate medical sciences students (Ph.D students and residents) were selected on the basis of theoretical sampling. The data were gathered through semi-structured interviews and field observations in Shiraz and Isfahan universities of medical sciences from September 2012 to December 2014. The qualitative content analysis was used with a conventional approach to analyze the data. While experiencing the nature of research supervision process, faculties and the students faced some complexities and challenges in the research supervision process. The obtained codes were categorized under 4 themes Based on the characteristics; included "contextual problem", "role ambiguity in thesis supervision", "poor reflection in supervision" and "ethical problems". The result of this study revealed that there is a need for more attention to planning and defining the supervisory, and research supervision. Also, improvement of the quality of supervisor and students relationship must be considered behind the research context improvement in research supervisory area.

  12. Introducing Dialogic Teaching to Science Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehesvuori, Sami; Viiri, Jouni; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena

    2011-12-01

    It is commonly believed that science teachers rely on language that allows only minor flexibility when it comes to taking into account contrasting views and pupil thoughts. Too frequently science teachers either pose questions that target predefined answers or simply lecture through lessons, a major concern from a sociocultural perspective. This study reports the experiences of science student teachers when introduced to the Communicative Approach to science education drawing on dialogic teacher-talk in addition to authoritative teacher-talk. This approach was introduced to the students in an interventional teaching program running parallel to the student teachers' field practice. The practical implications of this approach during initial teacher education are the central focus of this study. The data consisting of videos of lessons and interviews indicate that the student teacher awareness of teacher-talk and alternative communicative options did increase. Student teachers reported greater awareness of the different functions of teacher-talk as well as the challenges when trying to implement dialogic teaching.

  13. Exploring Concerns of Business Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Edward C., Jr.; Mountjoy, Kathy; Bailey, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    Background: The student teaching internship is the culminating experience and has been cited as the most significant, exciting, and difficult experience teacher candidates will encounter throughout their entire teacher preparation program. In order to prepare business teacher candidates for their internships, it is critical to understand the…

  14. Policies Target Teacher-Student Cyber Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Katie

    2009-01-01

    Teachers in Louisiana may soon think twice before sending a text message or e-mail to a student from a personal electronic device. A new state law requires all Louisiana districts to implement policies requiring documentation of every electronic interaction between teachers and students through a nonschool-issued device, such as a personal…

  15. Student Teacher Beliefs on Grammar Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graus, Johan; Coppen, Peter-Arno

    2016-01-01

    The role of grammar teaching in foreign language education is a controversial one both in second language acquisition (SLA) research and language pedagogy and, as a result, a potential source of confusion to student teachers. The objective of this study was to gain insight into the beliefs on grammar teaching of student teachers of English as a…

  16. Immigration and Students' Relationship with Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguero, Anthony A.; Bondy, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    Students' relationship with teachers is a building block toward student progress and success. Little is known, however, about the relationships the children of immigrants have with their teachers, which is particularly relevant today in the midst of the current social, political, and economic debate over the influence of immigration in U.S.…

  17. Cornerstones: Literacy Units Ready for Teachers, Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasko, Jennifer; Donahue, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    Every day, teachers face the time-consuming task of adapting materials from curricula that do not meet their students' needs or match their learning styles. This article discusses ready-made literacy units specifically designed for teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students. The units were part of the Cornerstones Project, an activity of the…

  18. Peer and Teacher Preference, Student-Teacher Relationships, Student Ethnicity, and Peer Victimization in Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feihong; Leary, Kevin A.; Taylor, Lorraine C.; Derosier, Melissa E.

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of peer preference and teacher preference for students, students' perceived relationship with their teacher and student ethnicity on peer victimization in late elementary school. Participants were students in the third through fifth grades in four public elementary schools in a southern state. Using hierarchical…

  19. Power dynamics in the student-teacher relationship in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia Cy; Tong, Chien Wai; Henderson, Saras

    2017-02-01

    Among many factors that influence clinical learning, the teacher-student relationship has been found to be crucial. The imbalance of power in that relationship tends to be regarded as negative, but how students actually perceive the power within the relationship is unknown. This study explored nurse students' perceptions of the power dynamics in the teacher-student relationship during their clinical placement. A descriptive qualitative study. A total of 51 students were recruited from a nursing school in Hong Kong. Seven focus group interviews consisted of three groups of Year 3 students (n=26) and four groups of final year students (n=25). A semi-structured interview guideline was designed. Content analysis was employed to analyse the research data. The three core themes that emerged from the qualitative data were: (1) meanings of power - avoiding doing harm to patients; (2) the desired power dynamics - master vs apprentice; and (3) enhancing the clinical learning experience. The dominant theme in the participants' discourse was that teachers should possess more power than students in order to prevent students from causing harm to patients. The consensus was that the teacher's power in supervising students' clinical practice is accepted and necessary for the benefit of patient safety. The cultural relevance of the power dynamics in the teacher-student relationship should be embraced in order to understand the student's perspective. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Student Teachers in Search of Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Marla; Chiodo, John J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined to whom 43 elementary and secondary teacher education students at a large Southwestern university turned for help regarding problems during their student-teaching internship. Participants were asked to complete a survey related to student teaching. In addition, 5 students were interviewed as a follow-up to the survey. Of the…

  1. Student Teachers' Approaches to Teaching Biological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.; Klein, Vanessa A.; Ghosh, Rajlakshmi; Eibel, Albert

    2015-06-01

    Evolution is fundamental to biology and scientific literacy, but teaching high school evolution is often difficult. Evolution teachers face several challenges including limited content knowledge, personal conflicts with evolution, expectations of resistance, concerns about students' conflicts with religion, and curricular constraints. Evolution teaching can be particularly challenging for student teachers who are just beginning to gain pedagogical knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge related to evolution teaching and who seek approval from university supervisors and cooperating teachers. Science teacher educators need to know how to best support student teachers as they broach the sometimes daunting task of teaching evolution within student teaching placements. This multiple case study report documents how three student teachers approached evolution instruction and what influenced their approaches. Data sources included student teacher interviews, field note observations for 4-5 days of evolution instruction, and evolution instructional artifacts. Data were analyzed using grounded theory approaches to develop individual cases and a cross-case analysis. Seven influences (state exams and standards, cooperating teacher, ideas about teaching and learning, concerns about evolution controversy, personal commitment to evolution, knowledge and preparation for teaching evolution, and own evolution learning experiences) were identified and compared across cases. Implications for science teacher preparation and future research are provided.

  2. Teachers' and Students' Negotiation Moves When Teachers Scaffold Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Gloriana; DeJarnette, Anna F.

    2015-01-01

    Group work has been a main activity recommended by mathematics education reform. We aim at describing the patterns of interaction between teachers and students during group work. We ask: How do teachers scaffold group work during a problem-based lesson? We use data from a problem-based lesson taught in six geometry class periods by two teachers…

  3. Perceptions of Teacher Characteristics and Student Judgments of Teacher Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Harvey R.

    1988-01-01

    Uses a seven point Likert scale to examine the relationship between perceived teacher attractiveness, expertness, and trustworthiness and student judgment of teacher effectiveness. Correlations suggest that a more accurate view of teaching may be as an instance of social influence process. Urges further research to identify those cues that infer…

  4. Teacher-Written Feedback: Student Perceptions, Teacher Self-Assessment, and Actual Teacher Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Julie L.; Baker, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    Most research in second language (L2) writing has focused on students' perceptions more than teachers' self-assessment of teacher-written feedback. This study's purpose was to investigate: (1) how much local and global written feedback teachers give, (2) how their self-assessments and students' perceptions of this feedback coordinate, and (3) how…

  5. Written Teacher Feedback: Student Perceptions, Teacher Perceptions, and Actual Teacher Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Li

    2016-01-01

    This study sets out to investigate a teacher's and her students' perceptions of written teacher feedback in a college English as a foreign language (EFL) writing class in China. Essays, questionnaires, and interviews were employed to identify the types of feedback given by the teacher, the perceptions and preferences of students and the…

  6. Collective pedagogical teacher culture, teacher-student ethno-racial mismatch, and teacher job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Elizabeth; Banerjee, Neena; Mickelson, Roslyn; Moller, Stephanie

    2014-05-01

    Teacher job satisfaction is critical to schools' successful functioning. Using a representative sample of kindergarten teachers from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, we investigate the association among professional learning community and teacher collaboration, teacher ethno-racial group, teacher-student ethno-racial mismatch, and teacher job satisfaction. We find that White teachers are significantly less satisfied than African-American and Latino teachers, especially when they teach in majority non-White classrooms. However, the existence of a professional community moderates the negative influence of teacher-student ethno-racial mismatch on White teachers' job satisfaction. In effect, strong professional communities serve as a cushion to bolster teacher job satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Teachers' Talk on Students' Writing: Negotiating Students' Texts in Interdisciplinary Teacher Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helstad, Kristin; Lund, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines how a team of teachers in a Norwegian upper secondary school responds to, negotiates, and evaluates students' writing in and across different disciplines. The purpose is to identify discourse strategies and professional development as the teachers discuss students' texts, and to explore how the teachers develop a shared…

  8. Self Evaluations of Educational Administration and Supervision Graduate Students in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferudun SEZGİN,

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the self evaluations of educational administration and supervision graduate students about their own qualifications in the context of National Qualifications Framework for Higher Education in Turkey (NQF-HETR in a descriptive way. In this respect, this study was designed as a qualitative research. Participants consisted of 15 master and 6 doctoral students who had completed the courses at educational administration and supervision graduate program. To collect the data, a semi-structured interview form developed by researchers was used. The results demonstrated that graduate students had problems especially with associating theory and practice, using research methods and techniques, designing interdisciplinary studies and studies capable of providing solutions for country problems, sharing knowledge in national and international platforms, and using foreign language. In addition, it was determined that participants had great expectations from course advisor faculty members in terms of overcoming the deficiencies expressed in the study. In the light of the results, some suggestions have been made in order to make graduate programs more capable of providing necessary knowledge, skills and competence expressed in NQF-HETR.

  9. Clinical Scholar Model: providing excellence in clinical supervision of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preheim, Gayle; Casey, Kathy; Krugman, Mary

    2006-01-01

    The Clinical Scholar Model (CSM) is a practice-education partnership focused on improving the outcomes of clinical nursing education by bridging the academic and service settings. An expert clinical nurse serves as a clinical scholar (CS) to coordinate, supervise, and evaluate the clinical education of nursing students in collaboration with school of nursing faculty. This article describes the model's evolution, how the model is differentiated from traditional clinical instruction roles and responsibilities, and the benefits to the collaborating clinical agency and school of nursing.

  10. How Students Perceive the Math Teacher?

    OpenAIRE

    Güneş, Gönül; Gökçek, Tuba

    2011-01-01

    The study is aimed to put forward how the students? express their perception of math teacher visually. The study is a qualitative research conducted with 30 randomly selected 8th grade students from three elementary schools. Data are gained from document analyses and open-ended questions. For the purpose of the study, sample students were asked to draw a picture about their perception of mathematics teachers and later their ideas about that matter were taken by five open ended questions. Pict...

  11. Students' perceptions of male teachers: effects of teachers' dress and students' characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, S; Roesel, K

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of a male teacher's clothing and selected students' characteristics on students' perceptions of teachers' characteristics. The sample consisted of 152 male and female high school students. Respondents selected one of four photographs of a male teacher model dressed in four different clothing styles for each of 20 teachers' characteristic statements. The mediating effects of students' gender, formality of clothing, and perceptions of the importance of clothing were also investigated. Significant differences among the four clothing styles were found for all 20 statements. Students' gender and rated importance of clothing had some influence on this relationship. The results supplement previous research on female teachers by suggesting that different types of clothing also influence students' perceptions of male teachers and that students' characteristics have some mediating effect.

  12. Student teachers' beliefs about mentoring and learning to teach during teaching practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanting, A; Verloop, N; Vermunt, J D

    2001-03-01

    Various interpretations of mentor roles, by teacher educators and mentors, have been described in the literature on mentoring, while those of student teachers have received less attention. Therefore, this study focuses on student teachers' expectations of mentors and their own contributions to their learning process while they are supervised by a mentor. The main aims of this study were: (1) bridging the research on mentoring and the research on higher education students' learning conceptions by investigating student teachers' beliefs about mentoring and learning to teach, and (2) comparing these beliefs to mentors' ones and recent views on mentoring and learning in order to make suggestions for improving learning to teach. Thirty student teachers, graduates in various academic disciplines, participated. They were attending a one-year teacher education programme at Leiden University in the Netherlands. Structured interviews with the student teachers were audio-taped. Firstly, categories of mentor roles and learning activities were derived from the data. These were linked, secondly, by their focus of attention and, thirdly, empirically by a homogeneity analysis (HOMALS). Six mentor roles, ten learning activities, and one regulation activity were combined in six foci: (1) affective aspects of learning to teach, (2) mentors' teaching styles, (3) assessment of student teachers' performance, (4) reflecting on students' lessons, (5) school context, and (6) self-regulation of learning. The HOMALS analysis yielded a process-product dimension. In this study, the student teachers' beliefs about mentoring were similar to those of mentors. Furthermore, a third of the student teachers expected themselves as thinking critically about their lessons, but nobody expected their mentors to explicate their practical knowledge underlying their teaching. Therefore, the articulation of this knowledge is indicated as an additional mentor role and will be elaborated.

  13. Clinical Supervision Strategies for School Counselors Working with Twice-Exceptional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, SaDohl K.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical supervision is a way for counselors in training to develop needed skills (Bernard & Goodyear, 1998). Best practices indicate that counselors trained in the application of supervision theory should provide clinical supervision. However, many school counselors receive administrative supervision by non-counseling professionals who may…

  14. Guiding dialogue in the transformation of teacher-student relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, S; Baldwin, D

    1996-01-01

    The National League for Nursing at its 1989 biennial convention resolved that nursing curricula be revised to reflect enriched caring practices through egalitarian teacher-student and teacher-to-teacher relationships that reflect cooperation and a sense of community. The distribution of power relationships between student and teacher, teacher and teacher, and teacher and administrator must be reconceptualized and realized before any significant change in nursing education's curriculum can occur. Revising curricula to incorporate such a change in teacher-student relationships begins with dialogue with teachers that is authentic. Authentic dialogue will cause examination and reexamination of assumptions and ideologies about teacher-student relationships.

  15. A Metaphor Analysis of Elementary Student Teachers' Conceptions of Teachers in Student- and Teacher-Centered Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duru, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: Student teachers' beliefs and conceptions affect not only what and how they learn in teacher education programs, but also their future professional development in their teaching careers. Examining and understanding student teachers' beliefs and conceptions is therefore crucial to improving their professional preparation and…

  16. PhD Students' Experiences of Thesis Supervision in Malaysia: Managing Relationships in the Midst of Institutional Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Steven Eric; Ismail, Ismi Arif

    2010-01-01

    Despite the plethora of studies that have been conducted on PhD supervision, little qualitative investigation has been conducted with a diverse, non-Western sample of doctoral students in an attempt to understand how the supervisory relationship is experienced. In response, eighteen students from diverse, non-Western backgrounds studying at one…

  17. Training Level, Acculturation, Role Ambiguity, and Multicultural Discussions in Training and Supervising International Counseling Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kok-Mun; Smith, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    This research partially replicated Nilsson and Anderson's "Professional Psychology: Research and Practice" (2004) study on training and supervising international students. It investigated the relationships among international counseling students' training level, acculturation, supervisory working alliance (SWA), counseling self-efficacy (COSE),…

  18. Effects of School Counselor Supervised Peer Tutoring in Inclusive Settings on Meeting IEP Outcomes of Students with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odluyurt, Serhat; Tekin-Iftar, Elif; Ersoy, Gulhan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of school counselor supervised peer tutoring intervention on meeting IEP outcomes of six inclusion students with developmental disabilities in a public elementary and secondary school. The effectiveness of this intervention was evaluated by using multiple probe design across students.…

  19. Training Level, Acculturation, Role Ambiguity, and Multicultural Discussions in Training and Supervising International Counseling Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kok-Mun; Smith, Shannon D.

    2012-01-01

    This research partially replicated Nilsson and Anderson's "Professional Psychology: Research and Practice" (2004) study on training and supervising international students. It investigated the relationships among international counseling students' training level, acculturation, supervisory working alliance (SWA), counseling self-efficacy (COSE),…

  20. Preservice elementary teachers' actual and designated identities as teachers of science and teachers of students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canipe, Martha Murray

    Preservice elementary teachers often have concerns about teaching science that may stem from a lack of confidence as teachers or their own negative experiences as learners of science. These concerns may lead preservice teachers to avoid teaching science or to teach it in a way that focuses on facts and vocabulary rather than engaging students in the doing of science. Research on teacher identity has suggested that being able to envision oneself as a teacher of science is an important part of becoming a teacher of science. Elementary teachers are generalists and as such rather than identifying themselves as teachers of particular content areas, they may identify more generally as teachers of students. This study examines three preservice teachers' identities as teachers of science and teachers of students and how these identities are enacted in their student teaching classrooms. Using a narrated identity framework, I explore stories told by preservice teachers, mentor teachers, student teaching supervisors, and science methods course instructors about who preservice teachers are as teachers of science and teachers of students. Identities are the stories that are told about who someone is or will become in relation to a particular context. Identities that are enacted are performances of the stories that are an identity. Stories were collected through interviews with each storyteller and in an unmoderated focus group with the three preservice teachers. In addition to sorting stories as being about teachers of science or students, the stories were categorized as being about preservice teachers in the present (actual identities) or in the future (designated identities). The preservice teachers were also observed teaching science lessons in their student teaching placements. These enactments of identities were analyzed in order to identify which aspects of the identity stories were reflected in the way preservice teachers taught their science lessons. I also analyzed the

  1. The Competencies of an English Teacher: Beginning Student Teachers' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn-Edwards, Sorrel

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey conducted with first year Education students at a Queensland university on the levels of competency in literacies expected for teachers in schools. Eight aspects were chosen to be examined to discover the skill levels students thought to be essential for effective teaching and to compare these with their…

  2. The narrative of nursing students in their Supervised Curricular Internship portfolios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádia Frazão Rossi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The critical-reflective training of nurses is a challenge. The reflective portfolio is an instrument used for developing this capacity. The aim of this qualitative study was to identify the types of narratives present in such portfolios and analyze the reflections of students enrolled in the Supervised Curricular Internship. Eleven portfolios were analyzed, and the narratives found were descriptive, reflective and descriptive, reflective and dialogic, and critical with subsequent thematic analysis. We identified four types of narratives. Reflections were focused around three thematic categories: an analysis of the internship’s field of work; assimilation and analysis of the nursing professional’s work; and what was learned throughout the Supervised Curricular Internship. The relevant aspects of the internship experience were apprehended and systematized through the portfolios, although more in-depth critical reflection is needed. The analysis of narrative types presented by students can contribute to guiding the process of nursing training evaluation towards critical reflection. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i3.25691.

  3. The Development of Student Teachers' Professional Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamote, Carl; Engels, Nadine

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on student teachers' perceptions of their professional identity. The respondents are students enrolled in a three-year course in secondary education teaching at bachelor level. Questionnaires were filled out by first-year, second-year and third-year students from two colleges. The questionnaire included four scales: commitment…

  4. On the Effect of Teacher Talk on Teacher-Student Rapport in College English Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程佳

    2013-01-01

    This paper aimed to investigate the effect of teacher talk on teacher-student rapport in college English classroom. Be-sides, it attempted to analyze how to build teacher-student rapport in English classroom based on the theories of teacher Talk, hoping that it can assist teachers to upgrade their awareness in teacher talk and increase language learning and teaching efficiency.

  5. Role of Teacher Educational Institutions in Developing Personality of Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Srinivasan; Xavier S. J., S. Amaladoss

    2014-01-01

    Teacher Education is an integral part of any educational system. It should provide a platform in developing the holistic personality of a student teacher. This paper reports on personality of student teachers and the role of Teacher Educational institutions in developing it. The sample consists of 1,080 student teachers of Madurai revenue…

  6. PRACTICUM EXPERIENCE IN TEACHER EDUCATION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    practicum which provides students with supervised experiences and help the student teachers to ... problems such as poverty, wasteful ... function that education has to the society and to the country .... in concept and in detail for the practicum ...

  7. A Social Reconstruction Model of Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, E. Elliott

    This paper presents a social reconstructionist model of supervision. The model connects schools and society, and considers the vital role teachers, students, staff, and others play in developing, designing, and implementing reforms in school and society. The model is based on the philosophy of social reconstructionism, which views schools as…

  8. A qualitative inquiry into the challenges and complexities of research supervision: viewpoints of postgraduate students and faculty members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALIREZA YOUSEFI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The supervision of academic theses at the Universities of Medical Sciences is one of the most important issues with several challenges. The aim of the present study is to discover the nature of problems and challenges of thesis supervision in Iranian universities of medical sciences. Methods: The study was conducted with a qualitative method using conventional content analysis approach. Nineteen faculty members, using purposive sampling, and 11 postgraduate medical sciences students (Ph.D students and residents were selected on the basis of theoretical sampling. The data were gathered through semi-structured interviews and field observations in Shiraz and Isfahan universities of medical sciences from September 2012 to December 2014. The qualitative content analysis was used with a conventional approach to analyze the data. Results: While experiencing the nature of research supervision process, faculties and the students faced some complexities and challenges in the research supervision process. The obtained codes were categorized under 4 themes based on the characteristics; included “Conceptual problem”, “Role ambiguity in thesis supervision”, “Poor reflection in supervision” and “Ethical problems”. Conclusion: The result of this study revealed that there is a need for more attention to planning and defining the supervisory, and research supervision. Also, improvement of the quality of supervisor and students relationship must be considered behind the research context improvement in research supervisory area.

  9. SOAP in Practice: Learning Outcomes of a Cross-Institutional Innovation Project Conducted by Teachers, Student Teachers, and Teacher Educators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seezink, Audrey; Poell, Rob; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Seezink, A., Poell, R. F., & Kirschner, P. A. (2010). SOAP in practice: learning outcomes of a cross-institutional innovation project conducted by teachers, student teachers, and teacher educators. European Journal of Teacher Education, 33(3), 229-243.

  10. Experiences of Diverse Students in Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This study described the teacher education experiences of a diverse group of early childhood majors. Periodic interviews with Black, White, Asian, male, female, heterosexual, and gay students highlighted their feelings about their teacher preparation experiences, diversity in education, field experiences in urban/suburban schools, and special…

  11. EFL Teachers' Factors and Students' Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lei

    2007-01-01

    Individual learners' affective factors are very important for foreign language learning. In China foreign language learning mainly happens in the classroom. Foreign language teachers are the organizers and carriers of language classes, and thus they inevitably influence the students' affection. This study explores how EFL teachers influence…

  12. Teacher-Student Interaction and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Joan Kelly; Walsh, Meghan

    2002-01-01

    Reviews literature on recent developments in teacher-student interaction and language learning. Based on a sociocultural perspective of language and learning, draws from three types of classrooms: first language, second language, and foreign language. Attention is given to studies that investigate the specific means used in teacher-student…

  13. How Teacher Turnover Harms Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronfeldt, Matthew; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and policymakers often assume that teacher turnover harms student achievement, though recent studies suggest this may not be the case. Using a unique identification strategy that employs school-by-grade level turnover and two classes of fixed-effects models, this study estimates the effects of teacher turnover on over 850,000 New York…

  14. Conceptual Change among Arab Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rass, Ruwaida Abu

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a qualitative research study designed to examine the effectiveness of an attempt to make a conceptual change among pre-service teachers to their role as trainees and the role of their pedagogical advisor. The participants are six Arab-Muslim female student teachers who are highly influenced by their first learning…

  15. Experiences of Diverse Students in Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This study described the teacher education experiences of a diverse group of early childhood majors. Periodic interviews with Black, White, Asian, male, female, heterosexual, and gay students highlighted their feelings about their teacher preparation experiences, diversity in education, field experiences in urban/suburban schools, and special…

  16. Dolanan Dance Learning on Supervising Pre-Service Teachers during Teaching Practicum Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilam Cahyaningrum

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Taman Kanak- kanak Mekarsari (Mekarsari Kindergarten is a school that choses dolanan anak dance lesson which is taught using demonstration methods. This study aims to find, understand, and describe the process and learning outcomes of dolanan anak dance in Mekarsari Kindergarten, Kandeman District of Batang. This study uses qualitative research methods with a phenomenological approach to research sites in Mekarsari Kindergarten, Kandeman District of Batang. Data collection techniques used were observation, interview techniques, and technical documentation. Data analysis were using data reduction, data presentation, drawing conclusions, and verification. The validity test were using triangulation of data sources, techniques, and time. Dolanan anak dance learning in Mekarsari Kindergarten consists of several components, namely teaching and learning activities, goals, teachers, students, materials, methods, media, tools and learning resources, and evaluation. Dolanan dance learning was using demonstration method implemented through three stages: pre-development activities, core activities, and closing activities. The learning outcomes of dolanan anak dance learning in Mekarsari kindergarten were categorized into three aspects, namely cognitive, affective, and psychomotor. Cognitive aspects can be seen from the students’ ability to remember, memorize and understand the dance. Affective aspects include familiar levels, namely learning to know friends and dance movements, respond the movements amomg friends, and appreciate the teacher’s explanation given to each student. Psychomotor aspects can be seen from the students’ ability to imitate the dance movements, use the concept of doing the movements and precision of movements, weave movement and exercise appropriately.

  17. PREVIEW BENEFITS BOTH TEACHERS AND STUDENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    This paper offers college teachers practical advice on how to encourage their students to develop effective study skills through previewing their reading texts before class. The advantages and disadvantages of such an approach are also discussed.

  18. Facilitating Creativity in Science Students' through Teacher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Facilitating Creativity in Science Students' through Teacher Professional Development. ... and the creativity checklist (CCh) was the instrument used to collect data. ... The research questions were answered using mean while the hypotheses ...

  19. Student Teachers' Key Learning Experiences--Mapping the Steps for Becoming a Professional Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahonen, Elsi; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Pietarinen, Janne; Soini, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    Teacher education provides the central forum for student teacher learning. Student teachers are advised to learn about teaching and undergo professional transformation during this instruction. However, research on student teacher learning often focuses on a certain time period and on how students "should" learn instead of analysing what…

  20. Teacher Role Breadth and its Relationship to Student-Reported Teacher Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillippo, Kate L.; Stone, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This study capitalizes on a unique, nested data set comprised of students ("n" = 531) and teachers ("n" = 45) in three high schools that explicitly incorporated student support roles into teachers' job descriptions. Drawing from research on student-teacher relationships, teacher effects on student outcomes, and role…

  1. Student-Teacher Mentoring Targeted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    With state and national policymakers eyeing ways to improve teacher preparation, a handful of education programs are becoming more intentional about how such "cooperating" teachers--as they're known in the lingo of teacher preparation--are selected and trained. That interest could grow as programs wrestle with the finer points of how to…

  2. Whither Supervision?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Waite

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper inquires if the school supervision is in decadence. Dr. Waite responds that the answer will depend on which perspective you look at it. Dr. Waite suggests taking in consideration three elements that are related: the field itself, the expert in the field (the professor, the theorist, the student and the administrator, and the context. When these three elements are revised, it emphasizes that there is not a consensus about the field of supervision, but there are coincidences related to its importance and that it is related to the improvement of the practice of the students in the school for their benefit. Dr. Waite suggests that the practice on this field is not always in harmony with what the theorists affirm. When referring to the supervisor or the skilled person, the author indicates that his or her perspective depends on his or her epistemological believes or in the way he or she conceives the learning; that is why supervision can be understood in different ways. About the context, Waite suggests that there have to be taken in consideration the social or external forces that influent the people and the society, because through them the education is affected. Dr. Waite concludes that the way to understand the supervision depends on the performer’s perspective. He responds to the initial question saying that the supervision authorities, the knowledge on this field, the performers, and its practice, are maybe spread but not extinct because the supervision will always be part of the great enterprise that we called education.

  3. Mentoring and supervising clinical pharmacist students at patients' bedside: which benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzaud-Laborde, Charlotte; Damery, Léa; Cestac, Philippe; Sallerin, Brigitte; Calvet, Pauline

    2016-02-01

     Hospital clinical pharmacists are involved in teaching students during professional internship. Organization between the unit care and the pharmacy place is complicated. This study evaluated the effectiveness of two pharmaceutical teams: an experienced pharmacist in the pharmacy place, reachable by phone (team 1) or an experienced pharmacist in the ward, near patients and students (team 2). Pharmaceutical interventions were collected during two successive time periods, each of 6 months in a 15-bed unit (neurology). During the first time period, prescriptions were analyzed by the student (resident) in the ward and experienced pharmacist in the pharmacy place. During the second time period, prescriptions were analyzed by both experienced pharmacist and the resident in the ward. We compared the number, the type, the approval of pharmaceutical interventions and the medication reconciliation activities. Proportions were compared by a chisquared test (or Fisher exact test) as well as the quantitative value was calculated by a Student test. 'Mentoring and supervising' students in the ward increased significantly the number of pharmaceutical interventions (PI; 104 interventions for 1408 analyzed prescriptions (7.4%) by the students in the ward and 317 interventions for 1391 (22.8%) by both the experienced pharmacist and the students in the ward (P = 0.002). Furthermore, specific interventions from medication reconciliation were significantly increased by the presence of experienced pharmacist in the ward (0.96% vs. 8.83% P = 0.018). Effectiveness of clinical pharmacists can be improved by the presence of experienced pharmacist at patients' bedside, near students. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Good supervision and PBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    This field study was conducted at the Faculty of Social Sciences at Aalborg University with the intention to investigate how students reflect on their experiences with supervision in a PBL environment. The overall aim of this study was to inform about the continued work in strengthening supervision...... at this faculty. This particular study invited Master level students to discuss: • How a typical supervision process proceeds • How they experienced and what they expected of PBL in the supervision process • What makes a good supervision process...

  5. Exploring Turkish Social Studies Student Teachers' Development of Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbas, Banu Çulha

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore professional identity development among social studies student teachers in a four-year teacher education program in Turkey. Fifty-five student teachers participated in the study. Data were collected about their metaphorical images about teachers and social studies teachers and a series of in-depth interviews…

  6. When Supervision Is Conflated with Evaluation: Teacher Candidates' Perceptions of Their Novice Supervisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Rebecca West; Badiali, Bernard J.

    2015-01-01

    Preparing teachers in clinically rich contexts requires teacher educators who are skilled and knowledgeable about university coursework as well as the complexities of classrooms. Retired teachers or principals have often assumed the role of field supervisor, bringing to their work extensive practitioner knowledge but often lacking theoretical…

  7. Classroom Climate among Teacher Education Mathematics Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polemer M. Cuarto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Classroom climate has gained prominence as recent studies revealed its potentials as an effective mediator in the various motivational factors as well as an antecedent of academic performance outcome of the students. This descriptive-correlational study determined the level of classroom climate dimensions among teacher education students specializing in Mathematics at Mindoro State College of Agriculture and Technology. Employing a self-structured questionnaire adapted to the WIHIC (What Is Happening In this Class questionnaire, the surveyed data were treated statistically using Pearson’s r. Result showed that there was high level of classroom climate among the respondents in their Mathematics classes in both teacher-directed and student-directed dimensions specifically in terms of equity, teacher support, cohesiveness, involvement, responsibility and task orientation. Also, it revealed that equity and teacher support were both positively related to the students-directed classroom climate dimensions. With these results, teachers are seen to be very significant determinants of the climate in the classroom. Relevant to this, the study recommended that faculty should develop effective measures to enhance classroom climate dimensions such as equity and teacher support to address the needs of diverse studentsdespite large size classes. Moreover, faculty should provide greater opportunitiesfor the students to achieve higher level of responsibility, involvement, cohesiveness, and task orientation as these could motivate them to develop positive learning attitude, perform to the best of their ability, as well as maximize their full potential in school.

  8. Exploration of Norwegian Student Teachers' Relational Concerns during Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Jan Arvid; Moen, Torill; Karlsdottir, Ragnheidur

    2012-01-01

    This study builds on and contributes to research on student teachers' relational concerns in teacher education, as four Grade 3 Norwegian student teachers were followed during their internship for two periods of two weeks each. The article presents and discusses data from interviews and student teachers' logs, while the aim of the study is to…

  9. Personality Factors and Expectation Effects in Teacher-Student Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Robert S.

    Although the effect of teacher expectations on student performance has been well documented, little research has focused on the effect of teacher personality styles on student-teacher interactions. To investigate the effect of teachers' locus of control and their expectations of their own effectiveness on student success, 77 female college…

  10. How Teachers Teach to Students with Different Learning Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haar, Jean; Hall, Gretchen; Schoepp, Paul; Smith, David H.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on findings from a case study in which eight excellent K-12 public school teachers were interviewed and observed. Discusses how teachers talk about their students' different learning styles; how teachers respond to their students' different learning styles; and why teachers respond to their students' different learning styles. Notes four…

  11. Teacher-Student Relationships: The Meaning of Teachers' Experience Working with Underachieving Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreshkina, Maria; Greenberg, Katherine H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is based on phenomenological interviews with teachers who worked with underachieving students in South Africa, Russia, and the United States. It focuses on the analysis of meanings that teachers constructed while describing their relationship with underachieving students and how metaphors worked to construct such meanings. The…

  12. Examining Teacher Job Satisfaction and Principals' Instructional Supervision Behaviours: A Comparative Study of Turkish Private and Public School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungu, Hilmi; Ilgan, Abdurrahman; Parylo, Oksana; Erdem, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    In spite of a strong body of research examining teacher job satisfaction and teachers' assessment of their principals' behaviours, most studies focus on the educational systems in the first world countries. This quantitative study focuses on a lesser-examined educational context by comparing school teachers' job satisfaction levels and principals'…

  13. Examining Teacher Job Satisfaction and Principals' Instructional Supervision Behaviours: A Comparative Study of Turkish Private and Public School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungu, Hilmi; Ilgan, Abdurrahman; Parylo, Oksana; Erdem, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    In spite of a strong body of research examining teacher job satisfaction and teachers' assessment of their principals' behaviours, most studies focus on the educational systems in the first world countries. This quantitative study focuses on a lesser-examined educational context by comparing school teachers' job satisfaction levels and principals'…

  14. Learning and the Teacher-Student Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protheroe, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    A critical element in effective teaching is establishing positive connections with students, particularly those at risk of failure. This article presents the findings and suggestions of researchers who have examined the practices and impact of caring teachers, and how their students perceive them.

  15. Students' Consent to a Teacher's Pedagogical Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjunen, Elina

    2011-01-01

    In this paper student comments are examined to identify a typology of demands for granting their consent to a teacher's pedagogical authority. The data for this study (136 written responses and 66 interviews) have been collected from students in a Finnish comprehensive school and examined by means of a theory-bounded content analysis. The results…

  16. Teacher Behavior Unwanted According to Student's Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Isa; Akan, Durdagi; Yalçin, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted in the aim of revealing the misbehaviors of the teachers according to the perceptions of the students. In the study, semi-structured interview was done with 8th grade 45 students, 20 males and 25 females, from three secondary school determined through purposive sampling. The interviews were analyzed with content analysis,…

  17. Changes in Teacher-Student Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlbach, Hunter; Brinkworth, Maureen E.; Harris, Anna D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although teacher-student relationships lie at the heart of students' schooling experience, fundamental questions regarding these relationships remain unanswered. Aims: This study investigates three related questions about these relationships: To what extent do they change from the beginning to the end of a school year? Are any emergent…

  18. Theory in Teacher Education: Students' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Leonie G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the views of Post Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) students' of the theoretical component in one of the modules in their teacher education programme. In this module students are exposed to the following theoretical frameworks: Empiricism, Critical Rationalism, Feminism, Critical Theory, African Philosophy and…

  19. Engaging students: The role of teacher beliefs and interpersonal teacher behavior in fostering student engagement in vocational education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uden, van Jolien M.; Ritzen, Henk; Pieters, Jules M.

    2014-01-01

    Student engagement is an important precursor for learning. In this study we used teacher (N = 200) and student (N = 2288) questionnaires to investigate whether perceived interpersonal teacher behavior and teacher beliefs concerning motives for being a teacher, attitudes toward teacher knowledge doma

  20. Teachers and students: Reflections on social control and future performance

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    To instruct consists of arranging controls between teacher, student, and subject matter. Initial controls must emanate from the teacher since those of the subject matter are minimal, crude, or missing. Teachers mand students to behave in certain ways with respect to a given subject matter. Eventually, however, the teacher must transfer the teacher mediated and managed control of the student to natural controls functioning directly through student interaction with the subject matter. Difficult...

  1. 美国边缘教师督导困境及改进方案%The Particularity Study on Marginal Teacher Supervision and Improvement Research in USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高佳

    2014-01-01

    Marginal teacher is a special group among American teachers,who directly related to the bottom quality on basic education. The supervision to the marginal teacher makes managers under the dilemma which is including improving their teaching and the last dismissal ,managers must use different supervision program from excellent teachers. We should provide the reference for our country ’s education supervision reform through the particular supervision analysis of the marginal teacher and improved schemes.%边缘教师是美国教师队伍中的特殊群体,直接关系到美国基础教育质量底线。对边缘教师督导使管理者陷入督导的两难境地:帮助边缘教师改进教学的同时还要兼顾其被解聘的可能。管理者必须运用区别于优秀教师的督导方案,对边缘教师督导特殊性和改进方案进行系统剖析。

  2. Medical students' and teachers' perceptions of sexual misconduct in the student-teacher relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Hanke; Snoek, Jos W; Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; van der Molen, Thys; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2013-11-01

    Teachers are important role models for the development of professional behaviour of young trainee doctors. Unfortunately, sometimes they show unprofessional behaviour. To address misconduct in teaching, it is important to determine where the thresholds lie when it comes to inappropriate behaviours in student-teacher encounters. We explored to what extent students and teachers perceive certain behaviours as misconduct or as sexual harassment. We designed-with a reference group-five written vignettes describing inappropriate behaviours in the student-teacher relationship. Clinical students (n = 1,195) and faculty of eight different hospitals (n = 1,497) were invited to rate to what extent they perceived each vignette as misconduct or sexual harassment. Data were analyzed using t tests and Pearson's correlations. In total 643 students (54 %) and 551 teachers (37 %) responded. All vignettes were consistently considered more as misconduct than as actual sexual harassment. At an individual level, respondents differed largely as to whether they perceived an incident as misconduct or sexual harassment. Comparison between groups showed that teachers' and students' perceptions on three vignettes differed significantly, although the direction differed. Male students were more lenient towards certain behaviours than female students. To conclude, perceptions of misconduct and sexual harassment are not univocal. We recommend making students and teachers aware that the boundaries of others may not be the same as their own.

  3. Teacher Preparation and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald J.; Grossman, Pamela L.; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2009-01-01

    There are fierce debates over the best way to prepare teachers. Some argue that easing entry into teaching is necessary to attract strong candidates, whereas others argue that investing in high quality teacher preparation is the most promising approach. Most agree, however, that we lack a strong research basis for understanding how to prepare…

  4. A Study on Changes of Supervision Model in Universities and Fostering Creative PhD Students in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Lingling; Zhou, Chunfang; Zhang, Song

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the changes of supervision model in higher education in relation to fostering creative Ph.D. students in China. The changes are being made from the traditional Apprentice Master Model (AMM) to the modern Collaborative Cohort Model (CCM). According to the results of the ...

  5. Beginning and experienced secondary school teachers' self- and student schema in positive and problematic teacher-student relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, Luce; van Tartwijk, Jan; Pennings, Heleen; van der Want, Anna; Verloop, Nico; den Brok, Perry; Wubbels, Theo

    2016-01-01

    The quality of teacher-student relationships is important for teachers' well-being in schools. In this interview study we investigated which cognitions comprise secondary school teachers' self- and student schema in positive and problematic teacher-student relationships. Frequency analyses of these

  6. Motives for Becoming a Teacher and Their Relations to Academic Engagement and Dropout among Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungert, Tomas; Alm, Fredrik; Thornberg, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Difficulties in attracting student teachers have resulted in research focusing on student teachers' motives for studying to join the profession. Because previous findings are mixed, the first aim of this study was to explore motives for students to become teachers. A second aim was to explore the relationship between teachers' motives and their…

  7. Teachers' Expectations of Teacher-Student Interaction: Complementary and Distinctive Expectancy Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, R. J.; van Tartwijk, J.; Verloop, N.; Veldman, I.; Wubbels, T.

    2012-01-01

    In this study it is investigated what student responses teachers expect in particular teacher behaviour vignettes, and whether experience and gender produce differences in expectations. Teacher behaviour vignettes were presented to teachers (N = 46), who described the student responses they anticipated. Anticipated student responses were then…

  8. Who Wants to Become a Teacher? Typology of Student-Teachers' Commitment to Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Ikupa; Berry, Amanda; Saab, Nadira; Admiraal, Wilfried

    2017-01-01

    Understanding student-teachers' decisions to enter and stay in the teaching profession after graduation could help teacher educators to find appropriate procedures to enhance commitment to teaching. This study classified student-teachers based on their levels of commitment to teaching, and described these types based on student-teachers'…

  9. Do Teacher Characteristics Matter? New Results on the Effects of Teacher Preparation on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla-Acevedo, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Research fairly consistently demonstrates that teachers are an important measurable factor in student learning, yet few teacher characteristics are shown to be consistently related to student achievement. Using a state administrative dataset that matches individual students to their teachers over time, I find that math teachers' undergraduate…

  10. Elementary student teachers' science content representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembal-Saul, Carla; Krajcik, Joseph; Blumenfeld, Phyllis

    2002-08-01

    This purpose of this study was to examine the ways in which three prospective teachers who had early opportunities to teach science would approach representing science content within the context of their student teaching experiences. The study is framed in the literature on pedagogical content knowledge and learning to teach. A situated perspective on cognition is applied to better understand the influence of context and the role of the cooperating teacher. The three participants were enrolled in an experimental teacher preparation program designed to enhance the teaching of science at the elementary level. Qualitative case study design guided the collection, organization, and analysis of data. Multiple forms of data associated with student teachers' content representations were collected, including audiotaped planning and reflection interviews, written lesson plans and reflections, and videotaped teaching experiences. Broad analysis categories were developed and refined around the subconstructs of content representation (i.e., knowledge of instructional strategies that promote learning and knowledge of students and their requirements for meaningful science learning). Findings suggest that when prospective teachers are provided with opportunities to apply and reflect substantively on their developing considerations for supporting children's science learning, they are able to maintain a subject matter emphasis. However, in the absence of such opportunities, student teachers abandon their subject matter emphasis, even when they have had extensive background and experiences addressing subject-specific considerations for teaching and learning.

  11. Teacher education students' number sense: initial explorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Eugene

    1997-09-01

    Use of number sense can assist learners in their understanding of, and calculating in, mathematics. This paper reports on these aspects which were investigated with six primary pre-service teacher education students at the commencement of a semester unit in mathematics education. Various mathematical examples were completed by each student in individual sessions which suggested that the students had at least a limited development of number sense.

  12. Relationships with Special Needs Students: Exploring Primary Teachers' Descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Chevon; Corcoran, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Positive teacher-student relationships play an established role in the developmental outcomes of students. Ongoing research suggests that positive teacher-student relationships may be particularly beneficial for students with special educational needs [Baker, J. A. 2006. "Contributions of Teacher-Child Relationships to Positive School…

  13. The effects of school systems, teacher internal characteristics, and students on vocational teacher stress

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Elaine

    1996-01-01

    Job stress is a multidimensional phenomenon. The researcher sought to examine variables that cause vocational teachers to experience stress in their teaching occupations and to evaluate the effects of these related stressors. This research evaluated the relationships between school systems and vocational teacher stress, teacher internal characteristics and vocational teacher stress, and students and vocational teacher stress. It also analyzed vocational teacher stre...

  14. Enhancing patient safety: the importance of direct supervision for avoiding medication errors and near misses by undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid-Searl, Kerry; Moxham, Lorna; Happell, Brenda

    2010-06-01

    Medication errors have been the focus of considerable research attention in nursing; however, the extent to which nursing students might contribute to errors has not been researched. Using a grounded theory approach, in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with undergraduate nursing students based in a university in Queensland to explore their experiences of administering medication in the clinical setting. Almost a third of the participants reported making an actual medication error or a near miss. Where medication errors occurred, participants described not receiving direct and appropriate supervision by a registered nurse. Medication errors by nursing students have the potential to impact significantly on patient safety, quality of health care, and on nursing students' perceptions of their professional competence. Ensuring direct supervision is provided at all times must become an urgent priority for undergraduate nursing education.

  15. Education, consultation, guidance, students, advisor, teacher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Seyedmajidi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Student counseling and supervision play an important role to overcome learning problems and to achieve educational goals. The present study is intended to investigate viewpoints of students regarding educational guidance and advice studying at Babol University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional survey, viewpoints of 480 students were collected by a questionnaire. The validity and reliability of the questionnaire had been approved before. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17 software. Chi- square and ANOVA tests were administered. Results: 61.2% of all participants were female and 38.8% were males with mean age of 21.3±4.0. 37.2% of these students lacked sufficient knowledge and information on how to request from their advisors for help and guidance. Half of students (50.3% reported attendance of advisors and holding routine consultation is inappropriate. Advisors made more educational files for females compare to males (P=0.001. No difference observed regarding educational disciplines of the advisors regarding students were dissatisfied with help and guidance received from paramedics and dentistry students in most fields (87.3% and 81.5% respectively. Conclusion: It seems that either student has no sufficient information about tasks of advisors and/or advisors may not do their tasks properly. It is recommended the students to be acquainted with advisors’ tasks upon their entrance into the university. Training classes for new academics would be helpful.

  16. Two Approaches to Clinical Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eugene M.

    Criteria are established for a definition of "clinical supervision" and the effectiveness of such supervisory programs in a student teaching context are considered. Two differing genres of clinical supervision are constructed: "supervision by pattern analysis" is contrasted with "supervision by performance objectives." An outline of procedural…

  17. Effects of Student Teaching on the Classroom Management Beliefs and Skills of Music Student Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Manny

    1982-01-01

    Does the music student teaching experience affect student teachers' classroom management beliefs and skills, and as a result of student teaching, do the classroom management beliefs and skills of music student teachers and their cooperating teachers become more congruent? Research indicates that student teaching does not affect student teacher…

  18. American Teacher Supervision and Its Enlightenment to China%美国教师督导及其对我国的启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵惠

    2011-01-01

    American teacher supervision with particular emphasis on teacher's guidance, fundamental purpose is to help teachers to improve the teaching quality o And our country is the lack of teachers' service function of supervision. This paper introduces the development course of the American teacher supervision, supervisor, the direction of the role the concept, purpose, the main body as well as the strategy, to hope our teacher supervision revelation.%美国教师督导特别强调其对教师的指导,帮助教师提高教学质量是其根本目的。由此美国的教师督导强调其对教师的服务功能,这是我们国家所欠缺的。笔者对美国教师督导的发展历程,教师督导者角色,教师督导的概念、目的、主体以及督导策略做了介绍,以期对我国教师督导有所启示。

  19. Status and Importance/Support for Supervised Occupational Experience Programs (SOEP) as Perceived by New York Vocational Agriculture Teachers and Their Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkey, Arthur L.; Sutphin, H. Dean

    A study examined the status of agricultural supervised occupational experience programs (SOEP) in the state of New York and also the attitudes of agricultural teachers and their building administrators toward SOEP. Two separate survey instruments were used to gather data for the study--one survey was mailed to 333 secondary vocational agriculture…

  20. Students Perceptions on the quality of clinical supervision among the 12 affiliated hospital of Medical Faculty of UNISSULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Apriliana Rahmawatie

    2011-12-01

    Design and Methods: This study involved 181 students of clinical internship of the year 2003, 2004 and 2005 of medical faculty of Islamic Sultan Agung University having the clinical rotation at the stage of surgery, obsgyn, pediatrics, internal medicine, ENT, neurology, dermatology and venerology, psychiatry, across the affiliated hospitals. The subject were divided into groups based on the hospital they were placed. Clinical Teaching Effectiveness Instrument (CTEI adapted in bahasa Indonesia was used. The Descriptive and Kruskal-Wallis test were applied for the data analysis. Results: Means of the effectiveness of clinical supervision for 12 affiliated hospitals ranged from 3.25 to 4.02. Kruskal-Wallis test resulted in the value of Chi-S=13.32 and p=0.27. Conclusion: Over all the clinical supervision for the 12 affiliated hospitals is perceived good and shows no significant difference. However the practice of clinical supervision varies among the hospitals (Sains Medika, 3(2:135-149.

  1. Experiments in Virtual Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rob

    This paper examines the use of First Class conferencing software to create a virtual culture among research students and as a vehicle for supervision and advising. Topics discussed include: computer-mediated communication and research; entry to cyberculture, i.e., research students' induction into the research community; supervision and the…

  2. The Use of a Student Group Log to Facilitate Student and Teacher Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenders, Fer

    2016-01-01

    In 21st century education students should have ample opportunities to collaborate on authentic problems. Many teachers however find it difficult to make the transfer from teacher to student-centered education. Giving students autonomy can be disquieting to teachers, as they fear to lose control of student learning. Teachers in a teacher…

  3. Student Teachers' Discipline Strategies: Relations with Self-Images, Anticipated Student Responses and Control Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Romi; van Tartwijk, Jan; Wubbels, Theo; Veldman, Ietje; Verloop, Nico

    2013-01-01

    Teacher discipline strategies are well documented when it comes to its effects on students and the working climate in the classroom. Although it is commonly acknowledged that for student teachers classroom management is a major concern, student teachers' use of discipline strategies is largely unknown. In this paper, we examine student teachers'…

  4. Student Teachers' Experiences of Relation Building in Teaching Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Maj; Laursen, Per Fibæk

    The study explores how 22 student teachers in a Danish college of education experience and interpret their own becoming a teacher and the implied attitudes to pupils. The student teachers attending mainstream teacher education and a course in mindful awareness and relational competencies have...... – to a larger extend than the mainstream educated student teachers - learned a reflexive attitude to their state of being in teaching practice and to their relational interaction with children in class....

  5. CREATIVITY OF PRESCHOOL AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS AND THEIR STUDENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sali, Güneş; Akyol, Aysel Köksal

    2015-12-01

    Although creativity provides a considerable number of advantages, many teachers have direct and indirect prejudices against creative students since they may display distracting and disruptive behaviors toward teachers and classmates. To determine how teachers' creativity affects their students' creative development, 90 preschool and elementary school teachers and 90 pupils were assessed for creative thinking. The children's sex was not correlated with creativity scores. There were small, significant relationships between various measures of preschool teachers' and students' creativity.

  6. NITARP: Changing Perceptions of Science Among Secondary Students and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohrs, Russell; Kilts, Kelly; Urbanowski, Vincent; Rutherford, Thomas; Gorjian, Varoujan

    2017-01-01

    The NASA/IPAC Teacher Archival Research Program (NITARP) provides secondary teachers and their students with an authentic, high-level research experience. NITARP participants work alongside one another as colleagues, allowing both teachers and students to experience the challenges of actual research. Teachers and students learn that science doesn’t always follow the prescriptive methodology taught in most high schools. Current NITARP students and teachers were interviewed on how their perceptions of the methods by which science is really conducted changed over the course of the program. Following participation in the NITARP program, both teacher and student perceptions of how science operates were found to have changed in many ways.

  7. Conceptualizing the Roles of Mentor Teachers during Student Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Brandon M.; Cuenca, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The field-based mentoring of student teachers is often an idiosyncratic and nuanced practice in which mentors' conceptualizations of their interactions with student teachers are generated through personal experiences with teacher education. If teacher educators and programs are to strengthen the tie between campus and field-based teacher…

  8. Developing a cognitive theory from student teachers' post-lesson ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by secondary school mathematics student teachers with their peers. Five pairs .... student teachers were open to sharing their points of view, receive suggestions and more importantly .... A case study approach was used for this investigation.

  9. Student teachers' questioning behaviour which elicit conceptual explanation from students

    OpenAIRE

    Hähkiöniemi, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Getting students to explain their thinking is one of the big challenges in teachers’ work. Previous studies have analysed teacher questioning by focusing on amounts of different types of questions. In this study, I use questioning diagrams to see how questioning develops during the lessons. The data includes video recordings of student teachers’ mathematics lessons in secondary and upper secondary school. The data is analysed by constructing questioning diagram for each student...

  10. What medical students value from their teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Maria Theresa; Tani, Massimiliano

    2007-08-01

    As Australian medical educators become more accustomed to the increasing pressures imposed upon them, there is a risk that the traditional educational relationship between a student and his or her teacher is replaced by a pure transactional relationship between a customer and his or her supplier. A large sample of medical students surveyed revealed that medical students seem to value directed rather than independent learning. New approaches to teaching, such as being innovative or entertaining, as well as facilitating participation, do not appear to be very important to medical students. Medical students do not seem to have strong preferences when it comes to assessment, contradicting some of the fundamental suggestions of the recent educational literature, in which assessment is often viewed as a key element in the formation and the direction of learning. The fact that medical students seem to reject many of the paradigms of the psychology-based educational literature, at least based on the large sample surveyed at the University of New South Wales, suggests that caution should be used in the development of training programs for teachers in medical faculties, and that learning and teaching should ensure that students' expectations and teachers' training do not mismatch.

  11. Effect of Supervised Students' Involvement on Diagnostic Accuracy in Hospitalized Medical Patients — A Prospective Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, Dorothea Adelheid; Wagner, Robert; Holderried, Friederike; Fenik, Yelena; Riessen, Reimer; Weyrich, Peter; Celebi, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Background During internships most medical students engage in history taking and physical examination during evaluation of hospitalized patients. However, the students' ability for pattern recognition is not as developed as in medical experts and complete history taking is often not repeated by an expert, so important clues may be missed. On the other hand, students' history taking is usually more extensive than experts' history taking and medical students discuss their findings with a Supervisor. Thus the effect of student involvement on diagnostic accuracy is unclear. We therefore compared the diagnostic accuracy for patients in the medical emergency department with and without student involvement in the evaluation process. Methodology/Principal Findings Patients in the medical emergency department were assigned to evaluation by either a supervised medical student or an emergency department physician. We only included patients who were admitted to our hospital and subsequently cared for by another medical team on the ward. We compared the working diagnosis from the emergency department with the discharge diagnosis. A total of 310 patients included in the study were cared for by 41 medical students and 21 emergency department physicians. The working diagnosis was changed in 22% of the patients evaluated by physicians evaluation and in 10% of the patients evaluated by supervised medical students (p = .006). There was no difference in the expenditures for diagnostic procedures, length of stay in the emergency department or patient comorbidity complexity level. Conclusion/Significance Involvement of closely supervised medical students in the evaluation process of hospitalized medical patients leads to an improved diagnostic accuracy compared to evaluation by an emergency department physician alone. PMID:22984578

  12. Effect of supervised students' involvement on diagnostic accuracy in hospitalized medical patients--a prospective controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothea Adelheid Herter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During internships most medical students engage in history taking and physical examination during evaluation of hospitalized patients. However, the students' ability for pattern recognition is not as developed as in medical experts and complete history taking is often not repeated by an expert, so important clues may be missed. On the other hand, students' history taking is usually more extensive than experts' history taking and medical students discuss their findings with a Supervisor. Thus the effect of student involvement on diagnostic accuracy is unclear. We therefore compared the diagnostic accuracy for patients in the medical emergency department with and without student involvement in the evaluation process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Patients in the medical emergency department were assigned to evaluation by either a supervised medical student or an emergency department physician. We only included patients who were admitted to our hospital and subsequently cared for by another medical team on the ward. We compared the working diagnosis from the emergency department with the discharge diagnosis. A total of 310 patients included in the study were cared for by 41 medical students and 21 emergency department physicians. The working diagnosis was changed in 22% of the patients evaluated by physicians evaluation and in 10% of the patients evaluated by supervised medical students (p = .006. There was no difference in the expenditures for diagnostic procedures, length of stay in the emergency department or patient comorbidity complexity level. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Involvement of closely supervised medical students in the evaluation process of hospitalized medical patients leads to an improved diagnostic accuracy compared to evaluation by an emergency department physician alone.

  13. The Relationship between Teacher Burnout and Student Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bo; McCaughtry, Nate; Martin, Jeffrey; Garn, Alex; Kulik, Noel; Fahlman, Mariane

    2015-01-01

    Background: Teacher burnout is regarded as a serious problem in school settings. To date, studies on teachers' stress and burnout have largely centred on teachers' own characteristics, socialization, and behaviours, but few have explored the connection between teachers' burnout and students' motivation via their own perceptions of teachers'…

  14. Student Teachers' Participation in Learning Activities and Effective Teaching Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Siebrich; Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.; Helms-Lorenz, Michelle; van de Grift, Wim J. C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Teacher learning is essential to the teaching profession, because it has been strongly linked to improved teaching practices and teacher quality. The source for teacher learning is initial teacher education, a crucial phase in the learning-to-teach continuum. To gain insight into this influential period for student teachers' long-term professional…

  15. The Patterns and Possible Costs of Teacher Absenteeism: Are Teacher Absences an Indicator of Student Achievement?

    OpenAIRE

    Womack, Janet Leigh

    2014-01-01

    Since the inception of No Child Left Behind, particularly in the past few years, teacher accountability is at the forefront of educational debate. Taking in to account the many facets of teacher accountability, student performance is nearly half of teacher evaluation systems. Considering the value of a quality teacher, one would logically presume that the teacher was present in the classroom to ensure student achievement. However, teacher absenteeism is an overlooked issue in toda...

  16. Student Teacher and Cooperating Teacher Tensions in a High School Mathematics Teacher Internship: The Case of Luis and Sheri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Kathryn; Samkoff, Aron; Weber, Keith

    2013-01-01

    We investigate interpersonal difficulties that student teachers and cooperating teachers may experience during the teaching internship by exploring the tension between one high school mathematics student teacher and his cooperating teacher. We identified seven causes of this tension, which included different ideas about what mathematics should be…

  17. Teacher Emotions in the Classroom: Associations with Students' Engagement, Classroom Discipline and the Interpersonal Teacher-Student Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenauer, Gerda; Hascher, Tina; Volet, Simone E.

    2015-01-01

    The present study explores teacher emotions, in particular how they are predicted by students' behaviour and the interpersonal aspect of the teacher-student relationship (TSR). One hundred thirty-two secondary teachers participated in a quantitative study relying on self-report questionnaire data. Based on the model of teacher emotions by Frenzel…

  18. Student Teachers' Management Practices in Elementary Classrooms: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildenbrand, Susan M.; Arndt, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study of four student teachers completing certification in elementary and special education investigated the classroom management practices of the student teachers. This is an important area of study because management practices are essential for an effective classroom, and student teachers often lack confidence and skill in the…

  19. Sources of Foreign Language Student Teacher Anxiety: A Qualitative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merc, Ali

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to find out the sources of foreign language student teacher anxiety experienced by Turkish EFL student teachers throughout the teaching practicum using qualitative data collection tools. 150 student teachers completing their teaching practicum as part of their graduation requirement at Anadolu University Faculty of Education…

  20. STEM High Schools Teachers' Belief Regarding STEM Student Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofel-Grehl, Colby; Callahan, Carolyn M.

    2017-01-01

    Teachers' beliefs about students influence many of the decisions they make in the classroom. While much work has been done exploring teachers' beliefs as they relate to the nomination of students for gifted programs, little work has yet explored the ways in which teachers' beliefs about student giftedness possibly affect instructional decisions.…

  1. Teacher Misbehavior and Its Effects on Student Interest and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeckelman-Post, Melissa Ann; Tacconelli, Angelica; Guzmán, Jaime; Rios, Maritza; Calero, Beverly; Latif, Farah

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to investigate whether there was any relationship between teacher misbehaviors and student interest and engagement. Consistent with Emotional Response Theory and models for how teacher behavior impacts student interest and engagement, teacher misbehaviors were strongly correlated with student interest and weakly correlated with…

  2. Teacher and Student Intrinsic Motivation in Project-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Shui-fong; Cheng, Rebecca Wing-yi; Ma, William Y. K.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between teacher and student intrinsic motivation in project-based learning. The participants were 126 Hong Kong secondary school teachers and their 631 students who completed evaluation questionnaires after a semester-long project-based learning program. Both teachers and students were asked to indicate…

  3. Relationships between Personality Type and Teaching Efficacy of Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, T. Grady; Mowen, Diana L.; Edgar, Don W.; Harlin, Julie F.; Briers, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if relationships exist between teaching efficacy and personality type of student teachers. The population of interest was all agricultural science student teachers at Texas A&M University. The sampling frame included all student teachers during the spring and fall semesters of 2005 (n= 72). Teaching…

  4. Student Teachers' Management Practices in Elementary Classrooms: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildenbrand, Susan M.; Arndt, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study of four student teachers completing certification in elementary and special education investigated the classroom management practices of the student teachers. This is an important area of study because management practices are essential for an effective classroom, and student teachers often lack confidence and skill in the…

  5. Exploring Student-Teacher Interactions in Longitudinal Achievement Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, J. R.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.

    2009-01-01

    This article develops a model for longitudinal student achievement data designed to estimate heterogeneity in teacher effects across students of different achievement levels. The model specifies interactions between teacher effects and students' predicted scores on a test, estimating both average effects of individual teachers and interaction…

  6. Assessing Student Achievement in Physical Education for Teacher Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Kevin; Doolittle, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    While many teachers continue to ignore the practice of assessing student achievement in physical education, recent federal pressures to include student assessment data in teacher evaluation systems has shown that assessment of student outcomes is here to stay. Though there is a strong tradition of assessing teacher practice in physical education,…

  7. STEM High Schools Teachers' Belief Regarding STEM Student Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofel-Grehl, Colby; Callahan, Carolyn M.

    2017-01-01

    Teachers' beliefs about students influence many of the decisions they make in the classroom. While much work has been done exploring teachers' beliefs as they relate to the nomination of students for gifted programs, little work has yet explored the ways in which teachers' beliefs about student giftedness possibly affect instructional decisions.…

  8. Understanding Teacher-Student Relationships, Student-Student Relationships, and Conduct Problems in China and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, George G.; Yang, Chunyan; Glutting, Joseph; Huang, Xishan; He, Xianyou; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Dandan

    2014-01-01

    Several previous studies have found that Chinese students perceive teacher-student relationships and student-student relationships more favorably than American students. In this study we examined if the same holds true with respect to teachers' perceptions. Also examined were both students' and teachers' perceptions of conduct problems. The sample…

  9. Goal-Orientation and Teacher Motivation among Teacher Applicants and Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, Lars-Erik

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between goal-orientation, intrinsic/extrinsic motivation for the teaching profession, previous achievement and entrance scores was investigated among teacher applicants (Study 1; N=230), and student teachers (Study 2; N=114). Utilizing path-analyses the following relationships were found in both studies, between: (a) mastery goals…

  10. Changes in student teachers' motives and the meaning of teacher education programme quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canrinus, Esther; Fokkens-Bruinsma, Marjon

    2014-01-01

    This study provides insights into possible changes in 83 student teachers' motives for becoming teachers, their professional commitment and their self-efficacy after a year of teacher education. Furthermore, it addresses the extent to which these changes relate to student teachers' perceptions of th

  11. The Correlation between Teacher Self-Efficacy among Seminaries and Institutes Seminary Teachers and Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangum, James Irvin, III

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the correlation between teacher self-efficacy and student outcomes. Teacher self-efficacy was measured in 99 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Seminaries and Institutes seminary teachers using Tschannen-Moran and Hoy's Teachers Sense of Efficacy Scale (2001). Student outcomes included academic grades, conduct…

  12. Changes in Student Teachers' Motives and the Meaning of Teacher Education Programme Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canrinus, E. T.; Fokkens-Bruinsma, M.

    2014-01-01

    This study provides insights into possible changes in 83 student teachers' motives for becoming teachers, their professional commitment and their self-efficacy after a year of teacher education. Furthermore, it addresses the extent to which these changes relate to student teachers' perceptions of their learning environment--specifically, their…

  13. Stress Levels of Agricultural Science Cooperating Teachers and Student Teachers: A Repeated Measures Comparative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, Billy R.; Rayfield, John; Harlin, Julie; Adams, Andy

    2013-01-01

    This study compared job stress levels of Texas agricultural science cooperating teachers and Texas agricultural science student teachers across a semester. The research objectives included describing secondary agricultural science cooperating teachers and student teachers perceptions of stressors, by time of semester (beginning, middle, and end),…

  14. Examining Student Teachers' Beliefs about Oral Corrective Feedback: Insights from a Teacher Education Program in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Kemal Sinan; Aydin, Hale Ülkü

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' beliefs about language learning and teaching are largely shaped during pre-service teacher education. Although many empirical studies have analyzed various dimensions of how student teachers' beliefs and practices are formed, the literature is scarce with the research on student teacher's beliefs about oral corrective feedback. For the…

  15. Teachers' expectations of teacher-student interaction : Complementary and distinctive expectancy patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, R. J.; van Tartwijk, J.; Verloop, N.; Veldman, I.; Wubbels, T.

    2012-01-01

    In this study it is investigated what student responses teachers expect in particular teacher behaviour vignettes, and whether experience and gender produce differences in expectations. Teacher behaviour vignettes were presented to teachers (N = 46), who described the student responses they anticipa

  16. Changes in Student Teachers' Motives and the Meaning of Teacher Education Programme Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canrinus, E. T.; Fokkens-Bruinsma, M.

    2014-01-01

    This study provides insights into possible changes in 83 student teachers' motives for becoming teachers, their professional commitment and their self-efficacy after a year of teacher education. Furthermore, it addresses the extent to which these changes relate to student teachers' perceptions of their learning environment--specifically, their…

  17. Student Self-Assessment and Student Ratings of Teacher Rapport in Secondary Student Course Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, John Wilford

    2010-01-01

    This study involved administering two rating forms (student self-rating on commitment and student rating of teacher rapport) to approximately 1,400 secondary students taught by 12 different teachers at two different high school Latter-day Saint (LDS) released time seminaries along the Wasatch Front in Utah. Seminaries and Institutes of Religion…

  18. Which Teacher-Student Interaction Triggers Students Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Herlina Karjo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The pattern of interaction between the teacher and the students will determine the students uptake (i.e. the students incorporating correction into an utterance of their own. This paper examines the type of teacher-student interaction which will likely trigger the students uptake. The data was taken from the recordings of 10 non-native English lessons at university level and different types of subjects (literature, grammar, discourse, semantics, and classroom management. 500 minutes of lessons were transcribed and 50 focus on form episodes were chosen to be analyzed. The study revealed that the dominant type of interaction was reactive focus on form which was followed by metalinguistic feedback.

  19. The Effects of Reciprocal Imitation on Teacher-Student Relationships and Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiangyuan

    2012-01-01

    Neuroscientific and developmental psychological research in imitation has yielded important insights into building teacher-student relationships and enhancing students' learning. This study investigated the effects of reciprocal imitation on teacher-student relationships and students' learning outcomes in one-on-one teacher-student interactions.…

  20. Student Participation in Elementary Mathematics Classrooms: The Missing Link between Teacher Practices and Student Achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Marsha; Webb, Noreen M.; Franke, Megan L.; Turrou, Angela C.; Wong, Jacqueline; Shin, Nami; Fernandez, Cecilia H.

    2015-01-01

    Engaging students as active participants in mathematics classroom discussions has great potential to promote student learning. Less well understood is how teachers can promote beneficial student participation, and how teacher-student interaction relates to student achievement. This study examined how the kinds of teacher practices that may…

  1. Student experiences in learning person-centred care of patients with Alzheimer's disease as perceived by nursing students and supervising nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaalvik, Mari W; Normann, Hans Ketil; Henriksen, Nils

    2010-09-01

    The aims and objectives of this paper are to illuminate and discuss the experiences and perceptions of nursing students and supervising nurses regarding the students' learning of person- centred care of patients with Alzheimer's disease in a teaching nursing home. This information is then used to develop recommendations as to how student learning could be improved. The clinical experiences of nursing students are an important part of learning person-centred care. Caring for patients with Alzheimer's disease may cause frustration, sadness, fear and empathy. Person-centred care can be learned in clinical practice. A qualitative study. The study was performed in 2006 using field work with field notes and qualitative interviews with seven-fifth-semester nursing students and six supervising nurses. This study determined the variation in the perceptions of nursing students and supervising nurses with regards to the students' expertise in caring for patients with Alzheimer's disease. The nursing students experienced limited learning regarding person-centred approaches in caring for patients with Alzheimer's disease. However, the supervising nurses perceived the teaching nursing home as a site representing multiple learning opportunities in this area. Nursing students perceived limited learning outcomes because they did not observe or experience systematic person-centred approaches in caring for patients with Alzheimer's disease. It is important that measures of quality improvements in the care of patients with Alzheimer's disease are communicated and demonstrated for nursing students working in clinical practices in a teaching nursing home. Introduction of person-centred approaches is vital regarding learning outcomes for nursing students caring for patients with Alzheimer's disease. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Student Teachers' Approaches to Teaching Biological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.; Klein, Vanessa A.; Ghosh, Rajlakshmi; Eibel, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Evolution is fundamental to biology and scientific literacy, but teaching high school evolution is often difficult. Evolution teachers face several challenges including limited content knowledge, personal conflicts with evolution, expectations of resistance, concerns about students' conflicts with religion, and curricular constraints. Evolution…

  3. Biology Student Teachers' Conceptual Frameworks regarding Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmenli, Musa

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, biodiversity has received a great deal of attention worldwide, especially in environmental education. The reasons for this attention are the increase of human activities on biodiversity and environmental problems. The purpose of this study is to investigate biology student teachers' conceptual frameworks regarding biodiversity.…

  4. Business Studies Teachers and Student Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Chiew Wye; Siraj, Saedah

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a report on the findings of a study conducted on the direct users of the Business Studies curriculum in Malaysia to uncover the perceived gap between what was experienced with what was wanted. Interviews were used to examine the needs of the Form Six (equivalent to "A" level) Business Studies teachers and students. Findings…

  5. Student teachers' self-regulated learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endedijk, M.D.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is on student teachers’ self-regulated learning in a dual learning programme, in which learning in practice and at university are combined. These programmes, especially one-year post-graduate teacher education programmes only form a very time-limited intervention in the prof

  6. The Case Law on Student Teachers' Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanxha, Zorka; Zirkel, Perry A.

    2008-01-01

    The article provides a concise and up-to-date synthesis of the published case law where a student teacher was the plaintiff, or suing party, and the defendant was an institution of higher education and/or the cooperating local school district. There were 28 of these court decisions, and the outcomes favored the defendant institutions in 23 of them…

  7. Student Teachers' Knowledge about Chemical Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Vahide; Bernholt, Sascha; Parchmann, Ilka

    2017-01-01

    Chemical representations serve as a communication tool not only in exchanges between scientists but also in chemistry lessons. The goals of the present study were to measure the extent of student teachers' knowledge about chemical representations, focusing on chemical formulae and structures in particular, and to explore which factors related to…

  8. Student Teachers' Conceptions of Teaching Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate prospective biology teachers' conceptions of teaching biology and identify how these conceptions revealed their strategies for helping their future students' learning of biology. The study utilized drawings, narratives and interviews to investigate the nature of the prospective biology…

  9. Student teacher anxieties related to practice teaching

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    variables. The findings indicated that the dimension of neurotic personality is significantly correlated with professional preparation as well ... preparation, class control, and school staff factors. Notably ... To what extent is anxiety among student teachers evoked by ... Respondents were asked to circle the number which best.

  10. Handbook for Teachers of Vietnamese Refugee Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tam Thi Dang

    This teacher's handbook delineates core features of Vietnamese culture, identifies conflicts Vietnamese children may face as students in American schools and provides suggestions for accurate school records, grade placement and assessment and instruction in English. Part I outlines religous beliefs and practices, indicates basic values (filial…

  11. Student Teachers' Approaches to Teaching Biological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.; Klein, Vanessa A.; Ghosh, Rajlakshmi; Eibel, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Evolution is fundamental to biology and scientific literacy, but teaching high school evolution is often difficult. Evolution teachers face several challenges including limited content knowledge, personal conflicts with evolution, expectations of resistance, concerns about students' conflicts with religion, and curricular constraints. Evolution…

  12. Student Teachers' Conceptions of Teaching Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate prospective biology teachers' conceptions of teaching biology and identify how these conceptions revealed their strategies for helping their future students' learning of biology. The study utilized drawings, narratives and interviews to investigate the nature of the prospective biology…

  13. Biology Student Teachers' Conceptual Frameworks regarding Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmenli, Musa

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, biodiversity has received a great deal of attention worldwide, especially in environmental education. The reasons for this attention are the increase of human activities on biodiversity and environmental problems. The purpose of this study is to investigate biology student teachers' conceptual frameworks regarding biodiversity.…

  14. Teacher in Residence: Bringing Science to Students

    CERN Multimedia

    Daisy Yuhas

    CERN welcomes its first Teacher in Residence, Terrence Baine of the University of Oslo. Baine, who originally hails from Canada, will be concurrently completing his PhD in Physics Education during his time at CERN. Like CERN’s High School Teacher Programme (HST), of which Baine is an alumnus, the Teacher in Residence position is designed to help educators spread the science of CERN in a form that is accessible to students and can encourage them to pursue physics throughout their education.   Terrence Baine, first 'teacher in residence' at CERN Baine explains, “It’s very important to have a teacher present who can be that middle person between the young peoplecoming here, whom we are trying to enlighten, and the physicists who work at CERN. The Teacher in Residence can act as an on-site educational consultant.” As Teacher in Residence, Baine’s primary project will be to develop teaching modules, or a series of lesson plans, that can help high schoo...

  15. I Think I Can Engage My Students. Teachers' Perceptions of Student Engagement and Their Beliefs about Being a Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Uden, Jolien M.; Ritzen, Henk; Pieters, Jules M.

    2013-01-01

    Student engagement is an important condition for positive outcomes at school. This study examined whether teachers' motives for being a teacher, their ratings of the relative importance of different teacher competences, their self-efficacy for teaching, and ratings of their own interpersonal teacher behavior could predict teacher perceptions of…

  16. Collaborative cultures in education: sense of community of teachers and student teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, W.; Brouwer, P.; Dobber, M.; Lockhorst, D.; Vandyck, I.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher communities create excellent conditions for teacher learning implying a sustainable form of teacher collaboration and collaborative learning. Sense of community of both teachers in secondary schools and student teachers was related to the perception of a collaborative group culture. Various

  17. Influences of Teacher Delivery, Student Engagement, and Observation Focus on Preservice Teachers' Perceptions of Teaching Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoles, Jessica; MacLeod, Rebecca B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how teacher delivery, student engagement, and observation focus influenced preservice teachers' ratings of teaching effectiveness. Participants (N = 84 preservice teachers) viewed short teaching excerpts of orchestral and choral rehearsals wherein the teacher displayed either high or low teacher delivery,…

  18. Teacher Job Satisfaction and Student Achievement: The Roles of Teacher Professional Community and Teacher Collaboration in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Neena; Stearns, Elizabeth; Moller, Stephanie; Mickelson, Roslyn Arlin

    2017-01-01

    Studies have not conclusively established whether teacher job satisfaction improves student achievement or whether the advantages to students from having satisfied teachers vary with the broader school culture. In this article, we investigate two research questions: (1) Is there a relationship between teacher job satisfaction and students' math…

  19. Teacher Job Satisfaction and Student Achievement: The Roles of Teacher Professional Community and Teacher Collaboration in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Neena; Stearns, Elizabeth; Moller, Stephanie; Mickelson, Roslyn Arlin

    2017-01-01

    Studies have not conclusively established whether teacher job satisfaction improves student achievement or whether the advantages to students from having satisfied teachers vary with the broader school culture. In this article, we investigate two research questions: (1) Is there a relationship between teacher job satisfaction and students' math…

  20. Kollegial supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Dibbern; Petersson, Erling

    Publikationen belyser, hvordan kollegial supervision i en kan organiseres i en uddannelsesinstitution......Publikationen belyser, hvordan kollegial supervision i en kan organiseres i en uddannelsesinstitution...

  1. Training graduate students to be teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. de-Macedo

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Pedagogic education of graduate students, when and where it exists, is restricted to theoretical courses or to the participation of the students as teachers' assistants. This model is essentially reproductive and offers few opportunities for any significant curriculum innovation. To open an opportunity for novelty we have introduced a new approach in "Biochemistry Teaching", a course included in the Biochemistry Graduate Program of the Biochemistry Department (Universidade Estadual de Campinas and Universidade de São Paulo. The content of the course consists of a choosing the theme, b selecting and organizing the topics, c preparing written material, d establishing the methodological strategies, e planning the evaluation tools and, finally, f as teachers, conducting the course as an optional summer course for undergraduate students. During the first semester the graduate students establish general and specific educational objectives, select and organize contents, decide on the instructional strategies and plan evaluation tools. The contents are explored using a wide range of strategies, which include computer-aided instruction, laboratory classes, small group teaching, a few lectures and round table discussions. The graduate students also organize printed class notes to be used by the undergraduate students. Finally, as a group, they teach the summer course. In the three versions already developed, the themes chosen were Biochemistry of Exercise (UNICAMP, Biochemistry of Nutrition (UNICAMP and Molecular Biology of Plants (USP. In all cases the number of registrations greatly exceeded the number of places and a selection had to be made. The evaluation of the experience by both graduate and undergraduate students was very positive. Graduate students considered this experience to be unique and recommended it to their schoolmates; the undergraduate students benefited from a more flexible curriculum (more options and gave very high scores to both

  2. Teachers' Attitudes and Students' Opposition. School Misconduct as a Reaction to Teachers' Diminished Effort and Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demanet, Jannick; Van Houtte, Mieke

    2012-01-01

    Recent decades have seen many studies dealing with the effects of teacher expectations. While most have focused on students' cognitive outcomes, we relate teacher expectations to student deviancy. We expect low expectations to be associated with students' feelings of futility and less teacher support, which, according to respectively strain theory…

  3. Student Teachers' Views of Practicums (Teacher Training Placements) in Turkish and English Contexts: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busher, Hugh; Gündüz, Müge; Cakmak, Melek; Lawson, Tony

    2015-01-01

    How student teachers experience their transformation into serving teachers in the liminal social spaces of the school-based practicum (teaching practice) is of key importance to them, their future students and their educators. The practicum is a challenging experience for student teachers, even with help from university and school-based mentors,…

  4. Dynamics of the Relationship between Student Teachers and Master Teachers within the Co-Teaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothe, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Student teaching is a critical step in the process of becoming a teacher. Since its development over the past few decades, student teaching has become a requirement to attain a teaching credential in all fifty of the United States. Unfortunately, the relationship between student teachers and master teachers is frequently wrought with tension. This…

  5. LIFE-LONG LEARNING AND TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: CAN STUDENTS TEACH THEIR TEACHERS?

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The paper is centered upon the student as a source of learning for the language teacher and the biunivocal, teacher-student, student-teacher knowledge and experience transfer, in the context of life-long learning and the development of motivational strategies related to military foreign language education.

  6. An investigation of the relationship between teachers' expectations and teachers' perceptions of student attributes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, Anneke C.; de Boer, Hester; van der Werf, Margaretha P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about factors other than students' abilities and background variables that shape teachers' achievement expectations. This study was aimed at investigating the role of teachers' perceptions of students attributes (working habits, popularity, self-confidence, student-teacher relationsh

  7. An investigation of the relationship between teachers' expectations and teachers' perceptions of student attributes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, Anneke C.; de Boer, Hester; van der Werf, Margaretha P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about factors other than students' abilities and background variables that shape teachers' achievement expectations. This study was aimed at investigating the role of teachers' perceptions of students attributes (working habits, popularity, self-confidence, student-teacher relationsh

  8. LIFE-LONG LEARNING AND TEACHER DEVELOPMENT: CAN STUDENTS TEACH THEIR TEACHERS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza KRAFT

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is centered upon the student as a source of learning for the language teacher and the biunivocal, teacher-student, student-teacher knowledge and experience transfer, in the context of life-long learning and the development of motivational strategies related to military foreign language education.

  9. Effect of Student Vulnerability on Perceptions of Teacher-Student Sexual Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromuth, Mary Ellen; Mackey, Amber L.; Wilson, Amy

    2010-01-01

    This study explored whether the vulnerability of an adolescent student affected perceptions of teacher sexual misconduct. Respondents (150 male and 150 female undergraduates) read scenarios depicting teacher sexual misconduct varied by respondent gender, gender dyad (male teacher-female student and female teacher-male student), and three levels of…

  10. Supervision and Situation: A Methodology of Self-Report for Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grumet, Madeleine R.

    This paper describes "currere", a method of critical reflection upon educational experience devised by William Pinar and Madeleine Grumet. In teacher education, this autobiographical method is employed to reveal how the classroom situation is determined by the kinds of questions asked of it. The methodology is related to dominant themes in…

  11. Improving Teachers' Practices through Supervision and Observations by School Principals: An Action Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Latasha M.

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the impact of a new observation tool for principals to utilize and the effects it has on improving teachers' instruction and influencing best practices. The action research project explored the impact and influence that a well-developed observation tool could possess to help address areas of need; essentially, focusing on how…

  12. Supervision of Teachers Based on Adjusted Arithmetic Learning in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Gota

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on 20 children's learning in arithmetic after teaching was adjusted to their conceptual development. The report covers periods from three months up to three terms in an ongoing intervention study of teachers and children in schools for the intellectually disabled and of remedial teaching in regular schools. The researcher…

  13. Teacher Perceptions about Observation Conferences: What Do Teachers Think about Their Formative Supervision in One US School District?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Range, Bret G.; Young, Suzie; Hvidston, David

    2013-01-01

    This study measured teachers' perceptions about the important elements of the pre- and post-observation conferences within one school district in a US state. Overall, respondents valued the post-observation conference more than the pre-observation conference and identified trusting relationships, constructive feedback, reflection and areas of…

  14. Expectations of Achievement: Student, Teacher and Parent Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubie-Davies, Christine M.; Peterson, Elizabeth; Irving, Earl; Widdowson, Deborah; Dixon, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    Teachers' expectations of students have been extensively studied for forty years. However, students' self-expectations and the expectations of parents are less well understood. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of student, teacher and parent expectations in relation to student achievement from the perspective of each group. Focus…

  15. Disconnections between Teacher Expectations and Student Confidence in Bioethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanegan, Nikki L.; Price, Laura; Peterson, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    This study examines how student practice of scientific argumentation using socioscientific bioethics issues affects both teacher expectations of students' general performance and student confidence in their own work. When teachers use bioethical issues in the classroom students can gain not only biology content knowledge but also important…

  16. Expectations of Achievement: Student, Teacher and Parent Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubie-Davies, Christine M.; Peterson, Elizabeth; Irving, Earl; Widdowson, Deborah; Dixon, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    Teachers' expectations of students have been extensively studied for forty years. However, students' self-expectations and the expectations of parents are less well understood. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of student, teacher and parent expectations in relation to student achievement from the perspective of each group. Focus…

  17. Tension between Students and Teachers in Urban High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Many schools are characterized by a pervasive tension between students and teachers: Teachers want students to learn and so they set high expectations for students. Students become anxious about those expectations and often become resistant to learning, perhaps out of fear that they can't meet those expectations. School leaders can make a…

  18. Maximizing ESY Services: Teaching Pre-Service Teachers to Assess Communication Skills and Implement Picture Exchange with Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Doris Adams; Flores, Margaret M.; Kearley, Regina F.

    2014-01-01

    The authors supervised and trained pre-service teachers while conducting extended school year (ESY) services for pre-kindergarten and elementary students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental disabilities (DD). Each classroom was responsible for conducting communication assessments and developing interventions focused on…

  19. Maximizing ESY Services: Teaching Pre-Service Teachers to Assess Communication Skills and Implement Picture Exchange with Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Doris Adams; Flores, Margaret M.; Kearley, Regina F.

    2014-01-01

    The authors supervised and trained pre-service teachers while conducting extended school year (ESY) services for pre-kindergarten and elementary students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental disabilities (DD). Each classroom was responsible for conducting communication assessments and developing interventions focused on…

  20. Student Learning, Student Achievement: How Do Teachers Measure up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) welcomes the efforts of federal, state, and local policymakers to find new ways to ensure an accomplished teacher for every student in America. The National Board has advanced this mission since its inception in 1987. Today, that mission is carried out by the tens of thousands of…

  1. Teachers' Sense of Efficacy: Examining the Relationship of Teacher Efficacy and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrefaei, Nouf

    The purpose of this study was to investigate which teachers' characteristics have an impact on teachers' sense of efficacy. In addition, the relationship between mathematics and science fifth grade teachers' sense of efficacy and student achievement was examined. Two characteristics related to teachers were examined: teachers' years of teaching experience and teachers' highest degree. Participants included 62 mathematics and science teachers from three school districts in Northwest Arkansas. When comparing fifth grade mathematics and science teachers' efficacy beliefs based on their highest degree, a significant difference in teachers' efficacy beliefs was found based on their degrees. Teachers with a Bachelor degree have higher total efficacy than teachers who hold Master's degrees. Moreover, an investigation to determine if there is a difference in mathematics and science teachers' efficacy beliefs in the three subscale of teachers' efficacy (for classroom management, for student engagement, and for instructional strategies) revealed a significant difference in teachers' efficacy for two of the three constructs. However, when examining teachers' sense of efficacy based on their teaching experience, no differences in teachers' efficacy were found. A correlation was conducted and the results indicated that there was no significant relationship between fifth grade teachers' sense of efficacy and students' achievement in the benchmark test in mathematics and science. The recommendations from this study should be used to inform other scholars and administrators of the importance of teachers' sense of efficacy in order to improve students' achievement gains.

  2. Teacher Education and Black Male Students in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Richard Milner

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Teacher education programs in the United States (U.S. struggle to prepare teachers to meet the complex needs of elementary and secondary students in public schools - especially those of color, those living in poverty, and those whose first language is not English. In this article, we argue for focused attention on preparing educators to teach African American male students as these students face particular institutional challenges in successfully navigating the U.S. public school system. Drawing from the significant body of research on teacher education and teacher learning for equity and social justice, four Black teacher educators discuss challenges they have faced in classes designed to prepare teachers to teach Black male students. Through an analysis of commonalities in their experiences, they propose means for teacher educators to foster greater understandings of the heterogeneity found among Black male students so that teachers can craft more responsive and responsible educational experiences for Black males.

  3. Assessing student teachers' reflective writing through quantitative content analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poldner, Eric; Van der Schaaf, Marieke; Simons, P. Robert Jan; Van Tartwijk, Jan; Wijngaards, Guus

    2014-01-01

    Students' reflective essay writing can be stimulated by the formative assessments provided to them by their teachers. Such assessments contain information about the quality of students' reflective writings and offer suggestions for improvement. Despite the importance of formatively assessing student

  4. Assessing student teachers' reflective writing through quantitative content analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poldner, Eric; Van der Schaaf, Marieke; Simons, P. Robert Jan; Van Tartwijk, Jan; Wijngaards, Guus

    2014-01-01

    Students' reflective essay writing can be stimulated by the formative assessments provided to them by their teachers. Such assessments contain information about the quality of students' reflective writings and offer suggestions for improvement. Despite the importance of formatively assessing student

  5. A Model of Student Engagement and Academic Achievement: The Role of Teacher-Student Relationships and Teacher Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Aja

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine patterns of academic achievement among minority students and investigate teacher-student relationships, teachers' classroom and future educational expectations for students, and students' levels of classroom engagement in order to better understand their patterns of academic achievement. Participants (n =…

  6. Assessing Student Teaching Experiences: Teacher Candidates' Perceptions of Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohi; Tice, Kathleen; Collins, Denise; Brown, Amber; Smith, Cleta; Fox, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of student teaching experiences by measuring teacher candidates' perceptions of their preparedness. The participants were 130 teacher candidates who had completed their student teaching as part of a program preparing them to teach children in pre-K through grade 4. Teacher candidates…

  7. Bangladeshi Teachers' Perceptions about Student Behaviour in Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malak, Saiful; Deppeler, Joanne M.; Sharma, Umesh

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of Bangladeshi teachers' perceptions of student behaviour. Semi-structured, one-on-one interviews were conducted with 22 teachers from six primary schools in one district in Bangladesh. Thematic analysis technique was used to analyse the data. The findings indicated that teachers conceptualized students' inappropriate…

  8. Grade One Peer and Teacher Feedback on Student Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Shelley Stagg; Portier, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a grade one teacher's support for her students' writing development through formal peer and teacher feedback. The teacher modelled and provided examples of effective feedback and good writing in whole-class and small-group lessons and in her own one-on-one verbal feedback on student writing. She allocated time for the…

  9. Family Background of Beginning Education Students: Implications for Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Roger A.; Coll, Kenneth M.; Osguthorpe, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Teacher education has not historically focused on the social and emotional development of teachers even though there is evidence that such variables influence student success (Jennings & Greenberg, 2009). We believe such a focus is important and we explored variables in teacher education students' families of origin that underpin social and…

  10. How Does Using Technology Affect Student Attitudes about Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, David W.

    1997-01-01

    Describes how a version of the Tuckman Teacher Feedback Form (TTFF) was used to measure teachers'"personality" factors as perceived by students. The instrument included 28 sets of bipolar adjectives to use in describing the teacher. Findings revealed that the application of technology to instruction improved students' perceptions of…

  11. Student Teachers' Expectations of Teaching as a Profession in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamri bin Khairani, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Teacher education is an essential professional development for student teachers. The knowledge of both subject matter and how to teach provides some guidance on how teachers make sense of their learning. Teaching expectation is an important topic that has been discussed by educational researchers in order to explain not only why students choose…

  12. Assessing Students' Perceptions of Inappropriate and Appropriate Teacher Humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frymier, Ann Bainbridge; Wanzer, Melissa Bekelja; Wojtaszczyk, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    This study replicated and extended a preliminary typology of appropriate and inappropriate teacher humor and advanced three explanations for differences in interpretations of teacher humor. Students were more likely to view teacher humor as inappropriate when it was perceived as offensive and when it demeaned students as a group or individually.…

  13. Prior Student Achievement, Collaborative School Processes, and Collective Teacher Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, John A.; Hogaboam-Gray, Anne; Gray, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Collective teacher efficacy refers to teacher perceptions that they constitute an effective instructional team, capable of bringing about learning in students. Previous research demonstrates that a school staff with a strong sense of collective efficacy is likely to generate high student achievement. This study of 2,170 teachers in 141 elementary…

  14. Error Management Behavior in Classrooms: Teachers' Responses to Student Mistakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulis, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Only a few studies have focused on how teachers deal with mistakes in actual classroom settings. Teachers' error management behavior was analyzed based on data obtained from direct (Study 1) and videotaped systematic observation (Study 2), and students' self-reports. In Study 3 associations between students' and teachers' attitudes towards…

  15. Building Strong Teacher-Student Relationships in Pluralistic Music Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgel, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    A positive teacher-student relationship is a critical component of an engaging climate in pluralistic music classrooms. This article defines and gives examples of five strategies for building positive, cross-cultural teacher-student relationships. Teachers who take responsibility for developing these relationships begin by becoming culturally…

  16. Teacher wellbeing: the importance of teacher‐student relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spilt, J.L.; Koomen, H.M.Y.; Thijs, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have examined the importance of teacher-student relationships for the development of children. Much less is known, however, about how these relationships impact the professional and personal lives of teachers. This review considers the importance of teacher-student relationships for the

  17. Exploring student teachers’ resistance to teacher education pedagogies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronkhorst, L.H.; Koster, B.; Meijer, P.C.; Woldman, N.; Vermunt, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Student teachers' resistance to teacher education is often understood as a lack of quality of the student teacher and/or the internship, and is expected to impede learning. In this study we suggest that resistance is interactive in nature, and can potentially have constructive outcomes. We engaged i

  18. Teacher wellbeing: the importance of teacher‐student relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spilt, J.L.; Koomen, H.M.Y.; Thijs, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have examined the importance of teacher-student relationships for the development of children. Much less is known, however, about how these relationships impact the professional and personal lives of teachers. This review considers the importance of teacher-student relationships for the

  19. Creating an "Ecological Fit" through Supportive Teacher-Student Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Rosa M.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study was based on the challenges of today's urban schools and highlights the work of teachers in these schools who have achieved increased successes in student achievement. Demographic changes in today's urban schools have fueled an increased gap in the backgrounds of the students and their teachers. Many teachers also lack an…

  20. Bangladeshi Teachers' Perceptions about Student Behaviour in Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malak, Saiful; Deppeler, Joanne M.; Sharma, Umesh

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of Bangladeshi teachers' perceptions of student behaviour. Semi-structured, one-on-one interviews were conducted with 22 teachers from six primary schools in one district in Bangladesh. Thematic analysis technique was used to analyse the data. The findings indicated that teachers conceptualized students' inappropriate…

  1. Student Teachers' Views about Assessment and Evaluation Methods in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to find out assessment and evaluation approaches in a Mathematics Teacher Training Department based on the views and experiences of student teachers. The study used a descriptive survey method, with the research sample consisting of 150 third- and fourth-year Primary Mathematics student teachers. Data were collected using a…

  2. How Can We Better Train Our Student Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Ann; Croker, Denise L.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between student teachers and their cooperating teachers as student teachers balance notions of teaching based on their preparation in the university with the reality they encounter in the classroom. Offers a short article by a university supervisor called "Seduction and Resistance in the Classroom," with a response by a…

  3. Building Strong Teacher-Student Relationships in Pluralistic Music Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgel, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    A positive teacher-student relationship is a critical component of an engaging climate in pluralistic music classrooms. This article defines and gives examples of five strategies for building positive, cross-cultural teacher-student relationships. Teachers who take responsibility for developing these relationships begin by becoming culturally…

  4. Failing Intercultural Education? "Thoughtfulness" in Intercultural Education for Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas, Maija

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a rethinking of intercultural education in teacher education, arguing that discussion of the intercultural education of student teachers tends to have the following two gaps: "one," such discussion tends to overlook student teacher education as a context for teaching intercultural education, and "two," it…

  5. Exploring student teachers’ resistance to teacher education pedagogies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronkhorst, L.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315029110; Koster, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/121712761; Meijer, P.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/176063765; Woldman, N.; Vermunt, J.D.

    Student teachers' resistance to teacher education is often understood as a lack of quality of the student teacher and/or the internship, and is expected to impede learning. In this study we suggest that resistance is interactive in nature, and can potentially have constructive outcomes. We engaged

  6. Multilingualism in an EFL Practicum: Increasing Student Teachers' Pedagogical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero, María Matilde

    2015-01-01

    Research in second language teacher education has demonstrated that novice teachers have difficulty in using their pedagogical knowledge, which partly results from a heavy focus on theory offered in teacher training programs (e.g., Bartels, 2005, 2009; Tarone & Allwright, 2005). In order to better equip student teachers with the knowledge…

  7. Effective Teachers for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: Active Ingredients Leading to Positive Teacher and Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Maureen A.; Sutherland, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    Teachers of students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) have varied skills and abilities. Within the field there are some teachers, who teach students with E/BD by actively engaging them in learning tasks and who have few behavior problems in comparison to other teachers, who struggle with classroom management. Many researchers have found…

  8. I think I can engage my students. Teachers' perceptions of student engagement and their beliefs about being a teacher

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uden, van J.M.; Ritzen, H.; Pieters, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Student engagement is an important condition for positive outcomes at school. This study examined whether teachers' motives for being a teacher, their ratings of the relative importance of different teacher competences, their self-efficacy for teaching, and ratings of their own interpersonal teacher

  9. How to improve the students' grades for an English teacher

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶长青

    2015-01-01

    The teacher plays a very important role on the stage of education. Although behaving well is important for a student, the grade of him is more. Then how to improve the students' grades for an English teacher? This passage tells you about it from three aspects:1. Lead-in in a novel way and motivate the students' learning interests;2. Set up the new relationship between the teachers and the students;3. Build the cooperative relationship between students and students,which are helpful to improve the students' grades.

  10. Factors affecting college students' perceptions of sexual relationships between high school students and teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromuth, M E; Holt, A; Parker, A L

    2001-01-01

    This study explored the effects of respondent gender, gender combination (male teacher/female student versus female teacher/male student), and teacher age (24 versus 39-years-old) on the perception of a sexual relationship between a teacher and a 16-year-old student. Participants were 80 male and 80 female undergraduates. A MANOVA yielded significant main effects for respondent gender and gender combination. Subsequent ANOVAs indicated that men generally viewed the experience more positively and that the male teacher/female student combination was viewed more negatively than the female teacher/male student pairing.

  11. LIBRARY USE IN AFGHAN TEACHER TRAINING COLLEGES : Reading Culture among Teacher Students

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Reading culture and library use in Afghan education area can be a very important issue to be studied particularly, in teacher training colleges because these institutions play a very important role in spreading and developing reading culture and library use among students. Moreover, students of TTCs as teacher students and future teachers get reading habit in order to convey it to their school students and can be very affective to establishment of this culture among them. This study is aimed ...

  12. The Relationship between Teacher Self-Efficacy and Violence toward Students as Mediated by Teacher's Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury-Kassabri, Mona

    2012-01-01

    This study examines physical and verbal maltreatment of students by their teachers. This study, the first of its kind, examines teachers' use of violence based on their own reports and assesses the contribution of teachers' characteristics in explaining their reports of violence toward their students. The research is based on a large sample of…

  13. Characteristics of Successful Teachers of Students with Emotional Behavioral Disabilities: Teacher and Expert Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delport, John

    2012-01-01

    This study used a mixed methods design to examine the characteristics--including competencies (i.e., knowledge and skills), and personal attributes--of successful teachers of students with E/BD. The characteristics were examined through the perceptions of teachers of students with E/BD (teachers who are expert in E/BD, n = 14, MEd Graduates…

  14. Teacher Attitudes toward Dyslexia: Effects on Teacher Expectations and the Academic Achievement of Students with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornstra, Lisette; Denessen, Eddie; Bakker, Joep; van den Bergh, Linda; Voeten, Marinus

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined teacher attitudes toward dyslexia and the effects of these attitudes on teacher expectations and the academic achievement of students with dyslexia compared to students without learning disabilities. The attitudes of 30 regular education teachers toward dyslexia were determined using both an implicit measure and an…

  15. The Characteristics of a Good Mathematics Teacher in Terms of Students, Mathematics Teachers, and School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesildere-Imre, Sibel

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative research aims to examine the opinions of school administrators, teachers, and middle school students about what makes a good mathematics teacher. Interviews were conducted with thirty-five participants: ten school administrators, ten mathematics teachers, and fifteen middle school students. A semi-structured interview form…

  16. Ethnic incongruence and the student-teacher relationship: the perspective of ethnic majority teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, J.; Westhof, S.; Koomen, H.M.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Among 36 ethnic-Dutch school teachers in the Netherlands, the present study examined the role of ethnic incongruence in perceived student-teacher relationship quality. Teachers rated their relationships with 59 Turkish-Dutch, 62 Moroccan-Dutch, and 109 ethnic-Dutch students attending grades 4 throug

  17. Teacher attitudes toward dyslexia: Effects on teacher expectations and the academic achievement of students with dyslexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornstra, T.; Denessen, E.J.P.G.; Bakker, J.T.A.; Bergh, L. van den; Voeten, M.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined teacher attitudes toward dyslexia and the effects of these attitudes on teacher expectations and the academic achievement of students with dyslexia compared to students without learning disabilities. The attitudes of 30 regular education teachers toward dyslexia were deter

  18. Teachers' Relationship Closeness with Students as a Resource for Teacher Wellbeing: A Response Surface Analytical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milatz, Anne; Lüftenegger, Marko; Schober, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' relationship quality with students has been argued to be an important source of teacher wellbeing. Thus, the current study aimed to investigate to what extent teachers' relationship closeness toward students, combined with attachment security is a resource protecting against teacher burnout. Eighty-three elementary school teachers reported on their most and least attached student's relationship closeness, their attachment security and levels of burnout, as measured by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment. Response surface analysis (RSA), enabling researchers to investigate the effect of congruence/incongruence of two predictors on an outcome, revealed that teachers' depersonalization and emotional exhaustion were lowest when they developed homogenous close relationships toward the students within their classroom and when teachers in general made congruent relationship experiences. No RSA model could be specified for personal accomplishment, even though a correlational analysis revealed that increasing closeness with students fostered teachers' personal accomplishment. Teachers' secure attachment experiences were not directly related to burnout, but enhanced their capability to establish close relationships toward their students. Findings suggest that teachers' relationships toward students are a resource for the teacher's wellbeing, which highlights once again the importance of student-teacher relationships in education.

  19. Good Teacher-Student Relationships: Perspectives of Teachers in Urban High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Julia

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the behaviors that teachers in eight large urban high schools in a Northeastern state considered important for good teacher-student relationships. A factor analysis of teacher (N = 103) survey responses revealed three factors related to student behaviors: (a) demonstrating engagement and interest in schoolwork; (b) being…

  20. Teacher Attitudes toward Dyslexia: Effects on Teacher Expectations and the Academic Achievement of Students with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornstra, Lisette; Denessen, Eddie; Bakker, Joep; van den Bergh, Linda; Voeten, Marinus

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined teacher attitudes toward dyslexia and the effects of these attitudes on teacher expectations and the academic achievement of students with dyslexia compared to students without learning disabilities. The attitudes of 30 regular education teachers toward dyslexia were determined using both an implicit measure and an…

  1. Supporting Emerging Teacher Identities: Can We Identify Teacher Potential among Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofstrom, Erika; Poom-Valickis, Katrin; Hannula, Markku S.; Mathews, Samuel R.

    2010-01-01

    The research focuses on Estonian university students' emerging teacher identity and their interest in becoming teachers. Five hundred and sixty-five first, third and fifth year students participated in the survey. The results suggest that pedagogical reasons for entering teacher education and clear motives for studying are significant indicators…

  2. From Students' and Teachers' Perspectives: Metaphor Analysis of Beliefs about EFL Teachers' Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Wan; Low, Graham David; Li, Miao

    2011-01-01

    The paper reports on a study about how a group of Chinese university teachers and two groups of their English major students used personal "teacher" metaphors via a metaphor prompt "An English teacher is...because..." to represent their beliefs relating to EFL teachers' roles. Data sources also included follow-up individual interviews. The primary…

  3. Effects of Teacher Consultation on Evidence-Based Classroom Management Strategies: Teacher and Student Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Kristin M.

    2013-01-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) conducted the online 2005-2006 Teacher Needs Survey wherein 52% of first year teachers, 28% of teachers with two to five years of experience, and 26% of teachers with 6 to 10 years experience ranked classroom management as their greatest need. Difficulty managing student behaviors leads to higher stress…

  4. Effects of Teacher Consultation on Evidence-Based Classroom Management Strategies: Teacher and Student Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Kristin M.

    2013-01-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) conducted the online 2005-2006 Teacher Needs Survey wherein 52% of first year teachers, 28% of teachers with two to five years of experience, and 26% of teachers with 6 to 10 years experience ranked classroom management as their greatest need. Difficulty managing student behaviors leads to higher stress…

  5. Internationally Educated Teachers and Student Teachers in Iceland: Two Qualitative Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragnarsdottir, Hanna

    2010-01-01

    This article draws upon two qualitative studies with internationally educated teachers and teacher assistants in preschools in Iceland as well as ethnic minority student teachers at the Iceland University of Education. The common research question in both studies is whether the experiences of these teachers reveal barriers to integration within…

  6. Importance of Communication between Teachers and Students in English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jia-lin

    2011-01-01

    @@ A great deal of time in teaching is devoted both to interaction between the teacher and the learners, and to interactionamong the learners themselves and to interaction between multimedia instruments and teacher - student.

  7. Effects of Teacher Scaffolding on Students' Oral Reading Fluency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the effects of an English teacher's scaffolding on students' passage reading fluency in Dona Berber Primary School, Ethiopia. ... to examine changes in their reading strategies and fluency as a result of teacher scaffolding.

  8. Teacher-student interpersonal relationships in Indonesia : profiles and importance to student motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maulana, Ridwan; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; den Brok, Perry; Bosker, Roel

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the distribution of interpersonal profiles based on students' and teachers' perceptions and to examine the associations between students' perceptions of teacher interpersonal behaviour and learning motivation in Indonesia. Participants were 1900 secondary schoo

  9. Teacher-student interpersonal relationships in Indonesia : profiles and importance to student motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maulana, Ridwan; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; den Brok, Perry; Bosker, Roel

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the distribution of interpersonal profiles based on students' and teachers' perceptions and to examine the associations between students' perceptions of teacher interpersonal behaviour and learning motivation in Indonesia. Participants were 1900 secondary schoo

  10. Changes in the images of teaching, teachers, and children expressed by student teachers before and after student teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Tomotaka; Horimoto, Akihiro; Mori, Toshiaki

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how education majors' images of teaching, teachers, and children change before and after student teaching, with special attention to the grade level (Grades 1-2, 3-4, 5-6) taught by the student teachers at primary school in Japan. A total of 126 student teachers from an education faculty (49 men, 77 women) participated in this study using metaphor-questionnaires before and after student teaching. For images of teaching, responses to the factors Dull Event and Live Event changed, suggesting that students started to develop more positive, active, and clear images of teaching. For images of teachers, responses on the factor Performer changed, suggesting that students started to develop more active images of teachers. For images of children, responses on the factors Critic and Pure-minded Person changed, suggesting that student teachers started to develop more realistic images of children. However, grade level taught had no significant effect.

  11. ATTITUDE OF STUDENT TEACHERS TOWARDS TEACHING PROFESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama BHARGAVA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Teaching being a dynamic activity requires a favourable attitude and certain specific competencies from its practitioners. Teachers’ proficiency depends on the attitude she possesses for the profession. The positive attitude helps teacher to develop a conductive learner friendly environment in the classroom. This also casts a fruitful effect on learning of the students. Attitude being a social construct is influenced by many factors like gender social strata ,age, stream of education and previous experience of the job .what bearing the gender and stream of education has on the attitude of student teachers towards teaching profession to throw light on this a study was conducted using a readymade tool. Study of different categories like Non-tribal male and female science stream, nontribal male and female social science stream, Tribal male and female science stream, Tribal male and female social science stream was undertaken. In a sample of hundred students ninety six students responded. The mean scores were considered and ‘ t’ value was calculated to find the difference in the attitude of different categories towards teaching profession.

  12. Focusing on Form: Student Engagement with Teacher Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Fiona

    2003-01-01

    Explores the relationship between teacher feedback and student revision in two academic writing classes. Adopts a case study approach and looks at all the feedback given to six students over a complete course. Examines the extent to which teachers focused on formal language concerns when they gave feedback and the use that students made of this…

  13. Teachers Use of a Differentiated Curriculum for Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta-Garcia, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Teachers have the responsibility to educate a diverse group of students in heterogeneous classes. One way in which teachers meet this challenge is to differentiate the curriculum to meet the needs, interests, and abilities of each student. One particular group of students in need of a differentiated curriculum to maximize learning potential is the…

  14. Students' Attitudes toward Teachers' Ethnicity, Bilinguality, and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galguera, Tomas

    1998-01-01

    A study of 186 mostly Latino and African-American students, aged 9 to 17, in six inner-city California schools assessed student attitudes toward the ethnicity, bilinguality, and gender of 12 hypothetical teachers. Students rated African-American bilingual, and female teachers highest. Evidence was found of same-ethnicity preferences. Contains 70…

  15. Teacher-Student Negotiation in an Action Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsafos, Vassilis

    2009-01-01

    Students in Greece are required to study classical texts, a task often challenging both for them and for their teachers. In this article, a teacher action researcher describes how he explored ways to enhance student engagement in the required reading. By negotiating the task of indexing, a process where students go through the text collecting…

  16. Race of Student and Nonverbal Behavior of Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Robert S.

    White and black subjects, playing the role of teacher, were led to praise verbally a white or black student. It was hypothesized that the race of the student would affect the nonverbal behavior of the teacher. White and black judges, blind to the race of the students and to the hypothesis of the study, rated how pleased the facial expressions of…

  17. Science Student Teachers and Educational Technology: Experience, Intentions, and Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efe, Rifat

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to examine science student teachers' experience with educational technology, their intentions for their own use, their intentions for their students' use, and their beliefs in the value of educational technology in science instruction. Four hundred-forty-eight science student teachers of different disciplines…

  18. Weblog-Based Electronic Portfolios for Student Teachers in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Hsueh-Hua

    2010-01-01

    This paper explored how the use of weblogs within the portfolio framework affected portfolio production and development for student teachers, and how the weblog-based electronic portfolio (WBEP) shaped student teachers' reflective practice during the student teaching practicum. The individuals participating in this study consisted of 31 elementary…

  19. Classroom Emotional Climate, Teacher Affiliation, and Student Conduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackett, Marc A.; Reyes, Maria Regina; Rivers, Susan E.; Elbertson, Nicole A.; Salovey, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Using a multi-method, multi-level approach, this study examined the link between classroom emotional climate and student conduct, including as a mediator the role of teacher affiliation, i.e., students' perceptions of their relationships with their teachers. Data were collected from 90 fifth- and sixth-grade classrooms (n = 2,000 students) and…

  20. Assessing Student Teachers' Reflective Writing through Quantitative Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poldner, Eric; Van der Schaaf, Marieke; Simons, P. Robert-Jan; Van Tartwijk, Jan; Wijngaards, Guus

    2014-01-01

    Students' reflective essay writing can be stimulated by the formative assessments provided to them by their teachers. Such assessments contain information about the quality of students' reflective writings and offer suggestions for improvement. Despite the importance of formatively assessing students' reflective writings in teacher education…

  1. Assessing Student Teachers' Reflective Writing through Quantitative Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poldner, Eric; Van der Schaaf, Marieke; Simons, P. Robert-Jan; Van Tartwijk, Jan; Wijngaards, Guus

    2014-01-01

    Students' reflective essay writing can be stimulated by the formative assessments provided to them by their teachers. Such assessments contain information about the quality of students' reflective writings and offer suggestions for improvement. Despite the importance of formatively assessing students' reflective writings in teacher education…

  2. Interns as teachers of medical students: a pilot programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunne, B

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, rising numbers of medical students and an increasingly demanding clinical workload has put pressures on the educational systems for medical students in the hospital. Bedside teaching remains central to education, but tutorial delivery by registrars, tutors and consultants has proven to be increasingly difficult with the greater numbers of students now in the undergraduate system. AIMS: We have performed a pilot study to determine the feasibility of developing a Junior Tutor Programme, to assist in the delivery of tutorials to undergraduate medical students. METHODS: This was designed and delivered by interns under the supervision of the academic staff in the Departments of Medicine and Surgery in Connolly Hospital. The programme was evaluated by a questionnaire filled in by the students anonymously. RESULTS: A supervised programme of tutorials delivered by interns is a potentially useful way to ensure delivery of clinical teaching to undergraduate medical students.

  3. How to Enable Asian Teachers to Empower Students to Adopt Student-Centred Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thanh Thi Hong; Renshaw, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Asian teachers' reluctance to empower students has been claimed to be an significant barrier preventing their students from practising student-centred learning. To promote student-centredness in Asian classrooms, this study aimed to develop strategies that could enable Asian teachers to delegate part of their authority to students. Twelve college…

  4. Exploring Prospective Secondary Mathematics Teachers' Interpretation of Student Thinking through Analysing Students' Work in Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didis, Makbule Gozde; Erbas, Ayhan Kursat; Cetinkaya, Bulent; Cakiroglu, Erdinc; Alacaci, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    Researchers point out the importance of teachers' knowledge of student thinking and the role of examining student work in various contexts to develop a knowledge base regarding students' ways of thinking. This study investigated prospective secondary mathematics teachers' interpretations of students' thinking as manifested in students' work that…

  5. Sources of Foreign Language Student Teacher Anxiety: A Qualitative Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Merç

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to find out the sources of foreign language student teacher anxiety experienced by Turkish EFL student teachers throughout the teaching practicum using qualitative data collection tools. 150 student teachers completing their teaching practicum as part of their graduation requirement at Anadolu University Faculty of Education English Language Teaching Program participated in the study. The research tools were diaries kept by student teachers and semi-structured interviews conducted with 30 of the participant student teachers. Constant Comparison Method was used to analyze the qualitative data. The analysis of the data revealed six main categories as the sources of foreign language student teacher anxiety: students and class profiles, classroom management, teaching procedures, being observed, mentors, and miscellaneous. Each source of foreign language student teacher anxiety is described and exemplified with extracts from student teachers’ diaries or interview records. The findings are discussed along the recent literature on foreign language student teacher anxiety. Suggestions for foreign language teacher education programs are also provided.

  6. The use of a student group log to facilitate student and teacher learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenders, Fer

    2016-01-01

    In 21st century education students should have ample opportunities to collaborate on authentic problems. Many teachers however find it difficult to make the transfer from teacher to student-centered education. Giving students autonomy can be disquieting to teachers, as they fear to lose control of s

  7. Preparing Vietnamese student teachers for teaching with a student-centered approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.T.; Dekker, R.; Goedhart, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The Vietnamese curriculum reform which trends toward a student-centered approach requires Vietnamese teacher educators to prepare student teachers for teaching using this approach. In this article, we present a case study of three Vietnamese student teachers working in groups in a methods course to

  8. The Importance of Teacher-Student Interpersonal Relationships for Turkish Students' Attitudes towards Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telli, Sibel; den Brok, Perry; Cakiroglu, Jale

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine associations between Turkish high school students' perceptions of their science teachers' interpersonal behaviour and their attitudes towards science. Students' perceptions of the teacher-student interpersonal relationship were mapped with the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI), which uses two…

  9. Dispositions and Practices That Promote Teacher-Student Relationships with African-American Male Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeldell, Karyn Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    This research study was focused on teacher dispositions and practices that create positive teacher-student relationships with African-American elementary male students. Robert Pianta's work on relationships between teachers and students, over the past decade, provided a conceptual framework for this specific study. A review of the literature…

  10. Supervision Provided to Indigenous Australian Doctoral Students: A Black and White Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudgett, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The number of Indigenous Australians completing doctoral qualifications is disparately below their non-Indigenous contemporaries. Whilst there has been a steady increase in Indigenous completions in recent years, significant work remains to redress the imbalance. Supervision has been identified as a primary influencer of the likely success of…

  11. Supervision Provided to Indigenous Australian Doctoral Students: A Black and White Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudgett, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The number of Indigenous Australians completing doctoral qualifications is disparately below their non-Indigenous contemporaries. Whilst there has been a steady increase in Indigenous completions in recent years, significant work remains to redress the imbalance. Supervision has been identified as a primary influencer of the likely success of…

  12. The Influence of Gender on Junior Secondary School Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DrNneka

    supervision, organizational climate (open and close), student factors (poor ability of ... that teachers' approaches of teaching mathematics are complex whereby .... (e.g., teaching materials, classroom management, teacher knowledge, attitudes.

  13. Exploring prospective secondary mathematics teachers' interpretation of student thinking through analysing students' work in modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didis, Makbule Gozde; Erbas, Ayhan Kursat; Cetinkaya, Bulent; Cakiroglu, Erdinc; Alacaci, Cengiz

    2016-09-01

    Researchers point out the importance of teachers' knowledge of student thinking and the role of examining student work in various contexts to develop a knowledge base regarding students' ways of thinking. This study investigated prospective secondary mathematics teachers' interpretations of students' thinking as manifested in students' work that embodied solutions of mathematical modelling tasks. The data were collected from 25 prospective mathematics teachers enrolled in an undergraduate course through four 2-week-long cycles. Analysis of data revealed that the prospective teachers interpreted students' thinking in four ways: describing, questioning, explaining, and comparing. Moreover, whereas some of the prospective teachers showed a tendency to increase their attention to the meaning of students' ways of thinking more while they engaged in students' work in depth over time and experience, some of them continued to focus on only judging the accuracy of students' thinking. The implications of the findings for understanding and developing prospective teachers' ways of interpreting students' thinking are discussed.

  14. Teacher Behaviors Associated with Student Change in Attitude Toward a Teacher Education Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, Mary M.

    The relationship between student perception of teacher behaviors and change in students' attitude toward a course in preservice teacher education was studied. The course selected was School and Society, a required course in educational foundations. Subjects included 87 students enrolled in eight sections taught by six instructors. A common…

  15. Evaluating clinical teachers with the Maastricht clinical teaching questionnaire : How much 'teacher' is in student ratings?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerboom, Tobias B. B.; Mainhard, Tim; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.; Van Beukelen, Peter; Jaarsma, A. D. (Debbie) C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Students are a popular source of data to evaluate the performance of clinical teachers. Instruments to obtain student evaluations must have proven validity. One aspect of validity that often remains underexposed is the possibility of effects of between-student differences and teacher and

  16. Impact of Chemistry Teachers' Knowledge and Practices on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantlebury, Kathryn

    2008-10-01

    Professional development programs promoting inquiry-based teaching are challenged with providing teachers content knowledge and using pedagogical approaches that model standards based instruction. Inquiry practices are also important for undergraduate students. This paper focuses on the evaluation of an extensive professional development program for chemistry teachers that included chemistry content tests for students and the teachers and the impact of undergraduate research experiences on college students' attitudes towards chemistry. Baseline results for the students showed that there were no gender differences on the achievement test but white students scored significantly higher than non-white students. However, parent/adult involvement with chemistry homework and projects, was a significant negative predictor of 11th grade students' test chemistry achievement score. This paper will focus on students' achievement and attitude results for teachers who are mid-way through the program providing evidence that on-going, sustained professional development in content and pedagogy is critical for improving students' science achievement.

  17. Factors influencing students' perceptions of their teachers' interpersonal behaviour: A multilevel analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fisher, D.; den Brok, P.; Rickards, T.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates which student, teacher and class characteristics are associated with students' perceptions of their science teachers' interpersonal behaviour. Using the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI), two important dimensions of teacher interpersonal behaviour were investigated:

  18. Teachers' Perception of Job Environment on Professional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teachers' Perception of Job Environment on Professional Effectiveness. ... use of instructional aids, classroom management, evaluation of students, learning motivation, supervision of co-curricular activities, professional and personal qualities.

  19. Students' Perceptions of Their Science Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Lilia; Abdullah, Sharifah Intan Sharina Syed; Meerah, T. Subahan Mohd

    2014-04-01

    Pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) is a type of teacher knowledge to be developed by a teacher. PCK is said to contribute to effective teaching. Most studies investigated the development of PCK and its influence on students' learning from the teachers' perspectives. Only a limited number of studies have investigated the components of science teachers' PCK that helped students' learning from the perspective of students. Thus, it is the aim of this study to investigate the level of science teachers' PCK from students' perspective, in particular whether or not students of different achieving ability had different views of teachers' PCK in assisting their learning and understanding. Based on the PCK research literature, six components of PCK have been identified, which were as follows: (1) subject matter knowledge, (2) knowledge of teaching strategies, (3) knowledge of concept representation, (4) knowledge of teaching context, (5) knowledge of students, and (6) knowledge of assessment in learning science. A questionnaire consisting of 56 items on a five-point Likert-type scale were used for data collection from 316 Form Four students (16 years old). One-way analysis of variance revealed that the differences in science teachers' PCK identified by students of different achieving abilities were statistically significant. Overall, students of various academic achieving abilities considered all the components of PCK as important. The low-achieving students viewed all the components of PCK as being less important compared to the high and moderate achievers. In particular, low-achieving students do not view `knowledge of concept representation' as important for effective teaching. They valued the fact that teachers should be alert to their needs, such as being sensitive to students' reactions and preparing additional learning materials. This study has revealed that PCK of science teachers should be different for high and low-achieving students and knowledge of students

  20. Graduate Student and High School Teacher Partnerships Implementing Inquiry-Based Lessons in Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. A.; Preston, L.; Graham, K.

    2007-12-01

    Partnering science graduate students with high school teachers in their classroom is a mutually beneficial relationship. Graduate students who may become future university level faculty are exposed to teaching, classroom management, outreach scholarship, and managing time between teaching and research. Teachers benefit by having ready access to knowledgeable scientists, a link to university resources, and an additional adult in the classroom. Partnerships in Research Opportunities to Benefit Education (PROBE), a recent NSF funded GK-12 initiative, formed partnerships between science and math graduate students from the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and local high school science teachers. A primary goal of this program was to promote inquiry-based science lessons. The teacher-graduate student teams worked together approximately twenty hours per week on researching, preparing, and implementing new lessons and supervising student-led projects. Several new inquiry-based activities in Geology and Astronomy were developed as a result of collaboration between an Earth Science graduate student and high school teacher. For example, a "fishbowl" activity was very successful in sparking a classroom discussion about how minerals are used in industrial materials. The class then went on to research how to make their own paint using minerals. This activity provided a capstone project at the end of the unit about minerals, and made real world connections to the subject. A more involved geology lesson was developed focusing on the currently popular interest in forensics. Students were assigned with researching how geology can play an important part in solving a crime. When they understood the role of geologic concepts within the scope of the forensic world, they used techniques to solve their own "crime". Astronomy students were responsible for hosting and teaching middle school students about constellations, using a star- finder, and operating an interactive planetarium

  1. Learning Mathematics for Teaching in the Student Teaching Experience: Two Contrasting Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Blake E.; Williams, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Student teaching (guided teaching by a prospective teacher under the supervision of an experienced "cooperating" teacher) provides an important opportunity for prospective teachers to increase their understanding of mathematics in and for teaching. The interactions between a student teacher and cooperating teacher provide an obvious mechanism for…

  2. Quality Science Teacher Professional Development and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubner, J.

    2007-12-01

    Studies show that socio-economic background and parental education accounts for 50-60 percent of a child's achievement in school. School, and other influences, account for the remaining 40-50 percent. In contrast to most other professions, schools require no real apprenticeship training of science teachers. Overall, only 38 percent of United States teachers have had any on-the-job training in their first teaching position, and in some cases this consisted of a few meetings over the course of a year between the beginning teacher and the assigned mentor or master teacher. Since individual teachers determine the bulk of a student's school experiences, interventions focused on teachers have the greatest likelihood of affecting students. To address this deficiency, partnerships between scientists and K-12 teachers are increasingly recognized as an excellent method for improving teacher preparedness and the quality of science education. Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Science Teachers' (founded in 1990) basic premise is simple: teachers cannot effectively teach science if they have no firsthand experience doing science, hence the Program's motto, "Practice what you teach." Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Science Teachers provides strong evidence that a teacher research program is a very effective form of professional development for secondary school science teachers and has a direct correlation to increased student achievement in science. The author will present the methodology of the program's evaluation citing statistically significant data. The author will also show the economic benefits of teacher participation in this form of professional development.

  3. Entry-Level Technical Skills that Agricultural Industry Experts Expected Students to Learn through Their Supervised Agricultural Experiences: A Modified Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Jon W.; Edwards, M. Craig

    2011-01-01

    The National Research Council's (NRC) Report (1988), Understanding Agriculture: New Directions for Education, called on secondary agricultural education to shift its scope and purpose, including students' supervised agricultural experiences (SAEs). The NRC asserted that this shift should create opportunities for students to acquire supervised…

  4. Student teachers' use of instructional choice in physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ping; Gao, Zan; McBride, Ron E

    2011-09-01

    Guided by self-determination theory and research on teacher beliefs, we examined student teachers' (STs) use of instructional choices in teaching physical education classes. Participants included 131 STs (52 men and 79 women) from a major university in the United States. STs completed questionnaires assessing three types of instructional choices (cognitive, organizational, and procedural) they provided and their rationale for providing their students with choices. The STs reported they gave students cognitive, organizational, and procedural choices. They firmly believed instructional choice promotes students' motivation, autonomy, and engagement in physical education. They also believed teachers should consider factors such as student characteristics and the beneficial effects when implementing choice in their classes.

  5. 77 FR 22359 - Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program; Comment Request AGENCY: National...: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program. Evaluation for the National...: Initial clearance. Abstract: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) is a...

  6. Student teaching from the perspectives of cooperating teachers and pupils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Zülküf Altan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate student-teachers’ transition from internship to permanent positions, they are advised to meticulously learn from real experiences of practicum process as it might form their future teaching practices. To help promote the effectiveness of this process, investigating student-teaching from stakeholder perspectives could be enriching. Research on the cooperating teacher has mainly dealt with the perspective of student-teachers; however, this study focuses on student teaching process from the perspective of both cooperating teachers and the pupils in student-teacher’s classes of EFL in a Turkish teaching context. We administered open-ended questionnaires to 21 teachers and 114 pupils and carried out inductive qualitative content analysis to analyze the data. The study elaborates on the cooperating teachers’ and pupils’ perceptions of the student-teachers as well as the impact of their teaching. Results reveal that the arrival of student-teachers was highly welcomed by most of the students and some of the cooperating teachers even though some expectations from student-teachers were not met.

  7. Student Teachers and Classroom Management: The Development of Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Courtney Dionne

    2009-01-01

    This study of four preservice teachers was designed to answer the question of what preservice teachers describe as their views and experiences with classroom management during the student teaching experience. This is a question of importance to educators as successful learning in the classroom will not take place if a teacher is unable to utilize…

  8. Actual and Preferred Teacher Feedback on Student Blog Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Chun

    2014-01-01

    This research illustrates the provisions and receptivity of teacher feedback in a blogmediated writing project between two colleges. The blog serves as a peer collaboration platform, as well as a mediating tool for teachers to offer timely feedback or prompt student idea exchanges. This paper discusses how teacher feedback may alter in response to…

  9. Examining Elementary Teachers' Identities through Analysis of Student Science Notebooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand how teacher identity influences elementary teachers' science practices from multiple perspective---the teacher's self-reported identity, the researcher's perspective, and the students' perspectives. Two frameworks on identity were synthesized and used in this research. The first, developed by Gee…

  10. The effect of a brief teacher training on student achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijde, van der Pieter C.

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of previously determined correlations between teacher behavior and student achievement, a training program for mathematics teachers was developed. Previous research had established that this training did change the behavior of teachers. This article reports the effects of the training p

  11. "Who Leaves?" Teacher Attrition and Student Achievement. Working Paper 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald; Grossman, Pamela; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes attrition patterns among teachers in New York City public elementary and middle schools and explores whether teachers who transfer among schools, or leave teaching entirely, are more or less effective than those who remain. We find that the first-year teachers who are less effective in improving student math scores have higher…

  12. Challenging Teacher Beliefs about Student Engagement in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobis, Janette; Way, Jennifer; Anderson, Judy; Martin, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the beliefs about student engagement in mathematics of three Year 5 and 6 teachers, focusing on the shifts that occurred during a 10-week intervention. Data obtained from teacher surveys, interviews, video-recorded workshop observations and artefacts from teachers' classrooms reveal variations in their reactions to the…

  13. Students' Individual and Social Behaviors with Physical Education Teachers' Personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabisarjou, Azizollah; Sourki, Mehdi Sadeghian; Bonjar, Seyedeh Elaham Hashemi

    2016-01-01

    The main objective for this survey is to assess the relationship between physical education teachers' personality and students' individual with social behaviors. The statistical population of the study was all the teachers of physical education working at high schools in the academic year 2012-2013. The sample consisted of sixty teachers that were…

  14. To Be Anxious or Not: Student Teachers in the Practicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eksi, Gonca Yangin; Yakisik, Burçak Yilmaz

    2016-01-01

    High levels of teaching-related anxiety may cause high levels of stress, failure and disappointment in pre-service teachers. The factors that increase anxiety and those that reduce it for student teachers might also be culture-specific. This study was conducted on 52 pre-service language teachers at a state university in Turkey during their…

  15. Teacher Student Interaction in the Puerto Rican School System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Clara

    This paper is based on the premise that an evaluation of teacher performance should consist of an evaluation of the teacher's presentation of subject matter and of the teacher's interaction with the students. In order to develop a balanced evaluation methodology, four English as a Second Language (ESL) classes in two schools on the island of…

  16. While representing teaching, I myself become a teacher: a research with Music student teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Ribeiro Bellochio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper derives from a research that aimed to investigaterepresentations about student teaching in the academic-professional formation of the undergraduate course in Music offered by the Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (FUSM. Based on studies concerning teacher’s formation, supervised student teaching and musical education, this work aimed to understand and analyze the representations, beliefs, ideas and values of music students in relation to the student teaching model, as well as to understand the processes of genesis and transformation regarding the development of teaching as a whole. The fi ndings indicate that the representations of the supervised student teaching change along the formation and that the central aspect regarding teaching conveys the positive aspiration of being a “good music teacher” in different educational contexts.

  17. Student Teacher Attitudes regarding Their Experiences in Student Teaching: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Edward C.; And Others

    A survey was made of student teachers in the Secondary Education Program at Western Kentucky University to determine their attitudes regarding their student teaching experience. Responses to a 25 item questionnaire were obtained from 123 students. The findings showed that: (1) Most student teachers were highly positive in their rating of the…

  18. Relevance of Student Teaching Skills and Activities from the Perspective of the Student Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Scott W.; Retallick, Michael S.; Paulsen, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive survey study was to determine the extent to which student teachers deem traditional student teaching skills and activities relevant as part of the capstone student teaching experience. The study population consisted of all (N = 140) fall 2012 and spring 2013 agricultural education student teachers in the North…

  19. Relations between harsh discipline from teachers, perceived teacher support, and bullying victimization among high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzon-Librojo, Lorelie Ann; Garabiles, Melissa R; Alampay, Liane Peña

    2017-06-01

    This study examined how the experience of harsh discipline from teachers is related to students' experience of bullying victimization in a Philippine high school. Respondents were 401 first- to fourth-year high school students of an urban public school in the Philippines. Using structural equation modeling, a hypothesized model with direct associations between harsh discipline and bullying victimization, and an indirect path via students' perception of teacher support, was tested. The data adequately fit the model and showed that experiences of harsh teacher discipline predicted higher bullying victimization and students' negative perception of teacher support. There were no significant indirect effects. The findings suggest that school discipline strategies may have repercussions on students' behaviors and relationships, highlighting the teacher's role in modeling and setting norms for acceptable behaviors. Future studies can examine further how teachers' harsh or positive discipline behaviors relate to bullying. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Unraveling Bias from Student Evaluations of Their High School Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Geoff; Hazari, Zahra; Tai, Robert H.; Sadler, Philip M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the evaluation of high school biology, chemistry, and physics teachers by their students is examined according to the gender of the student and the gender of the teacher. Female teachers are rated significantly lower than male teachers by male students in all three disciplines, whereas female students underrate female teachers only…

  1. Analysing the Metaphorical Images of Turkish Preschool Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadayi, Abdulkadir

    2008-01-01

    The metaphorical basis of teacher reflection about teaching and learning has been a rich area of theory and research. This is a study of metaphor as a shared system of interpretation and classification, which teachers and student teachers and their supervising teachers can cooperatively explore. This study employs metaphor as a means of research…

  2. Leadership Effects on Student Learning Mediated by Teacher Emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingping Sun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available School leaders’ influence on student achievement is largely indirect. Using systematic review techniques, this paper assesses the impact that leaders have on their students when they focus their improvement efforts on those teacher emotions or dispositions known to have direct effects on teaching and learning in the classroom. Building on an earlier conceptions of how leadership influences student learning and based on a review of research over the last 25 years, this study identifies four distinct teacher emotions which have significant effects on student learning—collective teacher efficacy, teacher commitment, teacher trust in others, and Organizational Citizenship Behavior. This review also describes leadership practices likely to foster productive teacher emotions, most such practices reflecting a transformational approach to leadership.

  3. Hosting Student Teachers: A Teaching and Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The author has spent six years teaching dance and movement to grades pre-kindergarten through fourth at an independent school in New York City. For five of those years, the author has had the privilege of hosting student teachers from New York University's Dance Education Program. Although the author has reflected on what the student teachers may…

  4. On the Concept "Microscope": Biology Student Teachers' Cognitive Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Hakan; Ekici, Gulay; Aktas, Murat; Aksu, Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to determine biology student teachers' cognitive structures on the concept of microscope. Qualitative research methodology has been applied in the study. The data were collected from biology student teachers. Free word association test and drawing-writing test were used to collect data. The data collected were…

  5. Wiki Writers: Students and Teachers Making Connections across Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andes, Laurie; Claggett, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Expressions of delight and anticipation are a direct result of a schoolwide writing program designed by teachers to develop language skills in special education students. These second graders participated in a writing project that made use of wikis to facilitate collaboration among the students, parents, teachers, and university members of their…

  6. The Portfolio Effect: Enhancing Turkish ELT Student-Teachers' Autonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Rana

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the use of portfolios to develop ELT major student-teachers' autonomy. The research was carried out for 14 weeks with twenty-one 3rd grade student-teachers in the English Language Teaching Department of Cukurova University, Adana, Turkey. To evaluate the impact of portfolios on fostering the participants' autonomy, data…

  7. Using Technology to Enhance Feedback to Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Lenwood; Musti-Rao, Shobana

    2016-01-01

    The importance of effective and efficient feedback is paramount during the student teaching experience. This experience is a vital component of many teacher preparation programs. During these limited experiences, supervisors deliver performance feedback that is designed to improve the way student teachers implement evidence-based practices and/or…

  8. Technology Integration in Elementary Classrooms: Teaching Practices of Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how and why student teachers integrated technology to enhance instruction in elementary classrooms. The participants were 31 student teachers who completed an assignment of eight weeks. Multiple data sets including observation notes of 347 lessons were obtained from three key groups for data triangulation. Results reveal that…

  9. Emphatic Tendency Scale for Student Teachers: Validity and Reliability Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocak, Canan; Onen, Aysem Seda

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the validity and reliability of the Empathic Tendency Scale, which was developed in order to identify student teachers' empathic tendencies. The sampling of the study consisted of 730 student teachers studying at Hacettepe University Faculty of Education. To determine the factor pattern of Empathic…

  10. Teacher-Student Interactions under the Influence of Cultural Differences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莹

    2009-01-01

    The interactions between teachers and students are often influenced by the factor of cultural differences. The author mainly analyzes the American teacher-Chinese student interactions under the influence of cultural differences with the theory of Hofstede's four value dimensions. The author also puts forward some suggestions to promote cross-cultural communication in the classrooms.

  11. Student Responses to Teaching in Teacher Education, 1900-1950

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary teacher education, like other aspects of tertiary education, involves regimes for assessing quality of teaching. These regimes include student assessment of and feedback on teaching. These are widely considered problematic, and yet there are few signs that teacher educators reject the notion that student responses have something of…

  12. Peeling the Onion: Student Teacher's Conceptions of Literary Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Maj Asplund; Fulop, Marta; Marton, Ference

    2001-01-01

    Studied the theories student teachers held about literary understanding through interviews with 25 Hungarian and 8 Swedish student teachers. Categories of theories captured a substantial portion of the variation in how literary understanding can be seen. Three central aspects of human understanding, variation, discernment, and simultaneity, could…

  13. School Psychologists' Experiences with Teacher-to-Student Mistreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Sharon R. Brown

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, transcendental, phenomenological study was to describe school psychologists' experiences with teacher-to-student mistreatment in the Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12 educational setting. There are few United States studies presented in the literature on the topic of teacher-to-student mistreatment and its…

  14. Tuning in Zoning Out: Student Assessment in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Justine

    2012-01-01

    Assessment in higher education and teacher education in particular continues to be a prominent feature of the student experience. For teacher education students there is an immediate and future concern as they both experience assessment and go on to become assessors of learning within their profession. In the state of Queensland, Australia,…

  15. Rating Students' Problem Behaviour: The Role of Teachers' Individual Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinos, Constantinos M.; Kargiotidis, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the role of teachers' personal characteristics and mental health status on their frequency ratings of student problem behaviour. A sample of 121 primary school teachers were asked to rate the frequency of a student's behavioural problems, and to self-report their personality traits, psychopathology symptoms and burnout.…

  16. Environmental Awareness and Attitudes of Student Teachers: An Empirical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess the awareness and attitudes of student teachers in Turkey. The relationship between the student teachers' attitudes and their gender, academic major, grade level, geographical region and socioeconomic status (level of family income, their parents' education level and occupation, residence) was evaluated with…

  17. Breaking the Pedagogic Contract: Teachers' and Students' Voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Gaell M.

    When teachers try to dramatically change the "pedagogic contract" - the prevailing classroom norms - their efforts are frequently met by resistance from students. My central question is: what do students' and teachers' voices tell us about breaking the pedagogic contract through the use of creative/imaginative writing in science classrooms? This…

  18. Transforming Teacher Behaviour to Increase Student Participation in Classroom Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedova, Klara

    2017-01-01

    This article draws on data from an action research project carried out in a lower secondary school environment in the Czech Republic. The project involved the implementation of a teacher professional development programme aimed at transforming teacher-student communication and reinforcing opportunities for student participation in classroom…

  19. On the Concept "Microscope": Biology Student Teachers' Cognitive Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Hakan; Ekici, Gulay; Aktas, Murat; Aksu, Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to determine biology student teachers' cognitive structures on the concept of microscope. Qualitative research methodology has been applied in the study. The data were collected from biology student teachers. Free word association test and drawing-writing test were used to collect data. The data collected were…

  20. Teachers' Considerations of Students' Thinking during Mathematics Lesson Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, Julie M.

    2016-01-01

    Teachers' abilities to design mathematics lessons are related to their capability to mobilize resources to meeting intended learning goals based on their noticing. In this process, knowing how teachers consider Students' thinking is important for understanding how they are making decisions to promote student learning. While teaching, what teachers…

  1. Writing II for 2nd Year EFL Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mahmoud M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Writing is a very important skill that should be mastered properly by university students, especially pre-service language teachers (e.g. EFL student teachers). In order to present their ideas efficiently in the context of their academic study, they have to be trained well on how to write meaningful pieces (e.g. essays, academic reports,…

  2. Teacher Assertiveness in the Development of Students' Social Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena Martínez, M. D.; Justicia, F. Justicia; Fernández de Haro, E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Social competence in school students has been studied extensively in terms of their being socially competent or not. However, there has been little analysis of how teachers contribute to the development of these skills. This research assesses the influence of teachers' assertiveness on the social competence of their students and on…

  3. Students' and Teachers' Participation in Decision-Making and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-04-19

    Apr 19, 2011 ... making in secondary schools and the consequent impact on their attitude to ... Results showed that students and teachers, irrespective of sex, indicated ... social roles of both students and teachers, one of the most glaring being their ..... Besides, the school is a social system in which various interactions take.

  4. Students' Perceptions of Parents' and Teachers' Qualities of Interpersonal Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevets, Roma K.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Predominantly white midwestern high school students (n=561) rated a parent and a teacher on the Barret-Lennard Relationship Inventory (1962, 1978). Overall, girls perceived greater warmth from parents and teachers. Evidence of age differences and of greater warmth from parents with whom students lived was also found. (SLD)

  5. Managing Student Participation: Teacher Strategies in a Virtual EFL Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Airong

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to explore teacher strategies for managing student participation in a complex Multi-user Virtual Environment. Data include transcribed recordings from a task-based EFL course in Second Life. Conversational Analysis is adopted to analyze the teacher's verbal language output in the transcript, and a student questionnaire is used to…

  6. How Student Teachers Understand Distance Force Interactions in Different Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariotoglou, Petros; Spyrtou, Anna; Tselfes, Vassilis

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe empirical research on the recording of primary school and preschool student teacher conceptions of the concept of distant force interactions in different contexts related to the school curriculum for this subject. For this objective to be achieved, we undertook ten semi-structured interviews with student teachers. Based…

  7. A Worthwhile Mathematical Task for Students and Their Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Michelle T.; Zawojewski, Judith

    2006-01-01

    Worthwhile mathematical tasks not only prompt students to learn mathematics, they also prompt teachers to learn and improve their teaching in their own mathematics classrooms. When teachers use worthwhile tasks, they have to learn "what aspects of a task to highlight, how to organize and orchestrate the work of the students, what questions to ask…

  8. Primary Student Teachers' Ideas about Teaching a Physics Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahtee, Maija; Johnston, Jane

    2006-01-01

    This study examines Finnish and English primary student teachers' ideas when planning to teach a physics topic during their science education studies. Many primary student teachers lack sufficient subject knowledge, which prevents them from constructing the scientific pedagogical content knowledge that enables them to concentrate on pupils'…

  9. Teacher-student contact : Exploring a basic but complicated concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korthagen, Fred A J; Attema-Noordewier, Saskia; Zwart, Rosanne C.

    2014-01-01

    Contact is fundamental to teacher-student relationships, but empirical studies or theoretical frameworks on teacher-student contact are rare. This article describes a theoretical and empirical exploration aimed at building such a framework. In two studies using classroom observations and interviews

  10. Teachers' Use of a Verbally Governed Algorithm and Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Dolleen-Day; Greer, R. Douglas

    2005-01-01

    The effects of instructing teachers in the use of a verbally governed algorithm to solve students' learning problems were measured. The teachers were taught to analyze students' responses to instruction using a strategic protocol, which included a series of verbally governed questions. The study was designed to determine whether the instructional…

  11. Teachers' Conceptions of Student Creativity in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Isa; Haertel, Tobias; Wildt, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Creativity is one of the important skills of the twenty-first century and central to higher education (HE). When we look closer into research on creativity in HE, however, it is not clear how university teachers conceptualise student creativity. How do teachers grasp, observe and express student creativity? Different methods such as interviews and…

  12. The Intercultural Sensitivity of Student Teachers in Three Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Celeste Y. M.; Grossman, David L.

    2009-01-01

    This study represents an initial attempt to determine and compare the levels of the intercultural sensitivity of three samples of student teachers in Hong Kong, Shanghai and Singapore using the Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI). A total of 317 student teachers participated in the study. Across the three samples, the majority of…

  13. Teachers' Conceptions of Student Creativity in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Isa; Haertel, Tobias; Wildt, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Creativity is one of the important skills of the twenty-first century and central to higher education (HE). When we look closer into research on creativity in HE, however, it is not clear how university teachers conceptualise student creativity. How do teachers grasp, observe and express student creativity? Different methods such as interviews and…

  14. Student Science Teachers' Ideas about the Degradation of Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardak, Osman; Dikmenli, Musa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate student science teachers' opinions about the causes of degradation of ecosystems and the effects of such degradations on the environment. This research focuses on the following questions: What kind of descriptions do student science teachers ascribe to the reasons of degradation in ecosystems? What are…

  15. The Teacher I Wish to Be: Exploring the Influence of Life Histories on Student Teacher Idealised Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of life histories and apprenticeship of observation on the formation of student teachers' idealised identities. The life histories of 15 student teachers are decoded. Through eliciting from the student teachers the teacher they wish to be, the paper focuses on the interplay between the personal histories and ideal…

  16. Classroom Management Strategies of Student Teachers on Their Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Vlčková Kateřina; Lojdová Kateřina; Škarková Lucie

    2016-01-01

    Classroom management (CM) can be viewed as a system of strategies employed by a teacher to influence the physical and social space of the classroom to foster an environment where learning can occur (Christofferson, Sullivan, & Bradley, 2015). Classroom management skills are crucial for teachers to create classroom settings where students can learn as effective CM leads to student high achievement (Stronge, Ward, & Grant, 2011) and contributes to teacher remaining in the profession. Th...

  17. The Teacher-Student Relationship in Experiential Classes and the Student's Perception of Course Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Lane; Whatley, Arthur

    1980-01-01

    This study, which used as subjects 89 undergraduate students in a personnel management course, indicated that the emotional relationship between teacher and student is related to the student's perception of the effectiveness of experiential learning. (RAO)

  18. Teachers' Perspectives and Suggestions for Improving Teacher Education to Facilitate Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkenhoker, Dina L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this transcendental phenomenological study is to give teachers a voice to express their self-efficacy beliefs, their opinions about the content and the effectiveness of their teacher preparation programs to facilitate student learning, and to hear their suggestions for improving teacher education to enable future educators to…

  19. Developing Novice Teachers as Change Agents: Student Teacher Placements "against the Grain"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Sheila; Lacefield-Parachini, Nancy; Isken, JoAnn

    2003-01-01

    Efforts at reforming urban schools have often revolved around choosing the "right" formulaic programs or providing sufficient funds to repair schools. However, too little attention has been paid to staffing schools with competent teachers who desire to stay and effect reform. Finding ways to educate student teachers and novice teachers at these…

  20. National Board Certified Teachers' Perspectives on Using Growth Measures of Student Learning for Teacher Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, James H.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation examined the perspectives of twenty National Board Certified Teachers toward the use of growth measures of student learning for teacher evaluation. An analysis of responses from four focus groups that included elementary and secondary teachers, showed that there is much concern about the validity and efficiency of current…