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Sample records for supertough nanofibers inspired

  1. Mussel inspired protein-mediated surface functionalization of electrospun nanofibers for pH-responsive drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiang; Xie, Jingwei; Ma, Bing; Bartlett, David E.; Xu, An; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    pH-responsive drug delivery systems could mediate drug releasing rate by changing pH values at specific time as per the pathophysiological need of the disease. Herein, we demonstrated a mussel inspired protein polydopamine coating can tune the loading and releasing rate of charged molecules from electrospun poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers in solutions with different pH values. In vitro release profiles showed that the positive charged molecules released significantly faster in acidic than those in neutral and basic environments within the same incubation time. The results of fluorescein diacetate staining and 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays showed the viability of cancer cells after treatment with doxorubicin released media at different pH values qualitatively and quantitatively, indicating the media contained doxorubicin which was released in solutions at low pH values could kill significantly higher number of cells than that released in solutions at high pH values. Together, the pH-responsive drug delivery systems based on polydopamine-coated PCL nanofibers could have potential applications in oral delivery of anticancer drugs for treating gastric cancer and vaginal delivery of anti-viral drugs or anti-inflammatory drugs, which could raise their efficacy, deliver them to the specific target, and minimize their toxic side effects. PMID:24287161

  2. Supertough polylactide materials prepared through in situ reactive blending with PEG-based diacrylate monomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Huagao; Jiang, Feng; Wu, Qianghua; Ding, Yunsheng; Wang, Zhigang

    2014-08-27

    Supertough biocompatible and biodegradable polylactide materials were fabricated by applying a novel and facile method involving reactive blending of polylactide (PLA) and poly(ethylene glycol) diacylate (PEGDA) monomer with no addition of exogenous radical initiators. Torque analysis and FT-IR spectra confirm that cross-linking reaction of acylate groups occurs in the melt blending process according to the free radical polymerization mechanism. The results from differential scanning calorimetry, phase contrast optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicate that the in situ polymerization of PEGDA leads to a phase separated morphology with cross-linked PEGDA (CPEGDA) as the dispersed particle phase domains and PLA matrix as the continuous phase, which leads to increasing viscosity and elasticity with increasing CPEGDA content and a rheological percolation CPEGDA content of 15 wt %. Mechanical properties of the PLA materials are improved significantly, for example, exhibiting improvements by a factor of 20 in tensile toughness and a factor of 26 in notched Izod impact strength at the optimum CPEGDA content. The improvement of toughness in PLA/CPEGDA blends is ascribed to the jointly contributions of crazing and shear yielding during deformation. The toughening strategy in fabricating supertoughened PLA materials in this work is accomplished using biocompatible PEG-based polymer as the toughening modifier with no toxic radical initiators involved in the processing, which has a potential for biomedical applications.

  3. Fully biobased and supertough polylactide-based thermoplastic vulcanizates fabricated by peroxide-induced dynamic vulcanization and interfacial compatibilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guang-Chen; He, Yi-Song; Zeng, Jian-Bing; Li, Qiu-Tong; Wang, Yu-Zhong

    2014-11-10

    A fully biobased and supertough thermoplastic vulcanizate (TPV) consisting of polylactide (PLA) and a biobased vulcanized unsaturated aliphatic polyester elastomer (UPE) was fabricated via peroxide-induced dynamic vulcanization. Interfacial compatibilization between PLA and UPE took place during dynamic vulcanization, which was confirmed by gel measurement and NMR analysis. After vulcanization, the TPV exhibited a quasi cocontinuous morphology with vulcanized UPE compactly dispersed in PLA matrix, which was different from the pristine PLA/UPE blend, exhibiting typically phase-separated morphology with unvulcanized UPE droplets discretely dispersed in matrix. The TPV showed significantly improved tensile and impact toughness with values up to about 99.3 MJ/m(3) and 586.6 J/m, respectively, compared to those of 3.2 MJ/m(3) and 16.8 J/m for neat PLA, respectively. The toughening mechanisms under tensile and impact tests were investigated and deduced as massive shear yielding of the PLA matrix triggered by internal cavitation of VUPE. The fully biobased supertough PLA vulcanizate could serve as a promising alternative to traditional commodity plastics.

  4. Mussel-Inspired Modification of Nanofibers for REST siRNA Delivery: Understanding the Effects of Gene-Silencing and Substrate Topography on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Neuronal Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Wei Ching; Rujitanaroj, Pim-On; Lee, Dong-Keun; Kuang, Jinghao; Messersmith, Phillip B; Chan, Jerry Kok Yen; Chew, Sing Yian

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we promote neuronal differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) through scaffold-mediated sustained release of siRNA targeting RE-1 silencing transcription factor (REST). Poly (ϵ-caprolactone) nanofibers were surface modified with mussel inspired DOPA-melanin (DM) coating for adsorption of REST siRNA. DM modification increased siRNA-loading efficiency and reduced the initial burst release. Fiber alignment and DM modification enhanced REST knockdown efficiencies. Under non-specific differentiation condition, REST silencing and fiber topography enhanced MSC neuronal markers expressions and reduced glial cell commitment. Such scaffolds may find useful applications in enhancing MSCs neuronal differentiation under non-specific conditions such as an in vivo environment. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Writing Inspired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischhauser, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Students need inspiration to write. Assigning is not teaching. In order to inspire students to write fiction worth reading, teachers must take them through the process of writing. Physical objects inspire good writing with depth. In this article, the reader will be taken through the process of inspiring young writers through the use of boxes.…

  6. Inspired Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Carol Frederick

    2011-01-01

    In terms of teacher quality, Steele believes the best teachers have reached a stage she terms inspired, and that teachers move progressively through the stages of unaware, aware, and capable until the most reflective teachers finally reach the inspired level. Inspired teachers have a wide repertoire of teaching and class management techniques and…

  7. Electrospun Perovskite Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Zhu, Yanyan

    2017-02-01

    CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite nanofibers were synthesized by versatile electrospinning techniques. The synthetic CH3NH3PbI3 nanofibers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and photoluminescence. As counter electrodes, the synthesized nanofibers increased the performance of the dye-sensitized solar cells from 1.58 to 2.09%. This improvement was attributed to the enhanced smoothness and efficiency of the electron transport path. Thus, CH3NH3PbI3 perovskites nanofibers are potential alternative to platinum counter electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells.

  8. NANOFIBER PRODUCTION [REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KESKIN Reyhan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanofibers are very thin fibers having diameters lower than 100 nm and their lengths might be as long as possible within production limits. The large surface area of nanofibers gives opportunity to functionalize them. Nanofibers have several applications including both applications for industrial production in many sectors and for research studies. Nanofibers find applications in energy devices such as solar cells, fuel cells and nanogenarators; in filtration applications (such as water/oil filtration, fine particle filtration, aerosol filtration, air filtration, nanoparticle filtration and in several medical applications including antibacterial efficacy, wound healing, drug delivery and scaffolds for tissue engineering. There are several methods to produce nanofibers: Electrospinning, self assembly, phase separation, bacterial cellulose, templating, drawing, extraction, vapor-phase polymerization, kinetically controlled solution synthesis, conventional chemical polymerization for anyline. Electrospinning is the most widely used method to produce nanofibers.In electrospinning, a high electric field, which is in kilovolts, is applied to a polymer solution. The polymer solution is drawn from a syringe to a collector surface.Electrospinning requires usage of appropriate solvent, removal of evaporating solvent, an adequate power supply to overcome the viscosity and surface tension of the polymer solution; while, jet instability and jet control remain as challenges in electrospinning. Nanofiber production methods possess some disadvantages as: higher cost compared to conventional fiber production methods, health hazards such as inhale risk of nanofibers during production and keeping the environment safe from evaporating solvents used during nanofiber production. Up to date, many researches have been conducted on nanofibers and electrospinning; still, more controllable, more cost effective, more environmentally friendly and safer methods are of

  9. Accelerating Inspire

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2266999

    2017-01-01

    CERN has been involved in the dissemination of scientific results since its early days and has continuously updated the distribution channels. Currently, Inspire hosts catalogues of articles, authors, institutions, conferences, jobs, experiments, journals and more. Successful orientation among this amount of data requires comprehensive linking between the content. Inspire has lacked a system for linking experiments and articles together based on which accelerator they were conducted at. The purpose of this project has been to create such a system. Records for 156 accelerators were created and all 2913 experiments on Inspire were given corresponding MARC tags. Records of 18404 accelerator physics related bibliographic entries were also tagged with corresponding accelerator tags. Finally, as a part of the endeavour to broaden CERN's presence on Wikipedia, existing Wikipedia articles of accelerators were updated with short descriptions and links to Inspire. In total, 86 Wikipedia articles were updated. This repo...

  10. Antioxidant activity of polyaniline nanofibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Well-confined uniform polyaniline (PANT) nanofibers were synthesized by using photo-assisted chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of different dopant acids, and the radical scavenging ability of the produced PANI nanofibers was determined by the DPPH assay. It was found that the antioxidant activity of PANI nanofibers was higher than conventional PANI,and increased with decreasing of averaged diameter of the nanofibers. The enhanced antioxidant activity was concerned with increased surface area of PANI nanofibers.

  11. Collection of Electrospun Polymer Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataphinan, Woraphon; Reneker, Darrell H.

    2000-03-01

    The dry nanofibers produced in a typical electrospinning process are electrically charged. The nanofibers were directed by an electrical field, a tensile force along the axis of the fiber, and by the viscous drag force of moving air. The looping and spiraling path of the nanofibers, which resulted from bending and other kinds of instabilities that occurred as the fiber was formed, also complicated the collection process. Non-woven sheets of nanofibers were made by attracting the nanofibers to a conducting sheet or screen. The sheet or screen was flat and stationary, or wrapped around a rotating drum. Nanofibers were also collected in a liquid. The liquid removed charge or solvent. Nanofibers were collected on the surface of a non-wetting liquid, so that the patterns formed by the arriving nanofibers were observed directly. Streams of air, and air vortices were also used. These methods are being combined with robotic manipulators to collect nanofibers in many useful forms.

  12. Fabrication of electrospun nanofibers bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Junjun; Sun, Daoheng

    2007-12-01

    Aligned nanofibers, filament bundle composed of large number of nanofibers have potential applications such as bio-material, composite material etc. A series of electrospinning experiments have been conducted to investigate the electrospinning process,in which some parameters such as polymer solution concentration, bias voltage, distance between spinneret and collector, solution flow rate etc have been setup to do the experiment of nanofibers bundles construction. This work firstly reports electrospun nanofiber bundle through non-uniform electrical field, and nanofibers distributed in different density on electrodes from that between them. Thinner nanofibers bundle with a few numbers of nanofiber is collected for 3 seconds; therefore it's also possible that the addressable single nanofiber could be collected to bridge two electrodes.

  13. Porous block nanofiber composite filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginley, David S.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Weiss, Alan J.; Paddock, Arnold

    2016-08-09

    Porous block nano-fiber composite (110), a filtration system (10) and methods of using the same are disclosed. An exemplary porous block nano-fiber composite (110) includes a porous block (100) having one or more pores (200). The porous block nano-fiber composite (110) also includes a plurality of inorganic nano-fibers (211) formed within at least one of the pores (200).

  14. Inspirational Journey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Artists from across Europe and Asia ventured into the remote Chinese countryside to seek inspiration from the Miao Ethnic group "I’ve never been to Asia before and everything is strange and wonderful:supermarkets and shopping mails,even the air- port seemed exotic!"wrote Ula Sickle,a choreographer from Poland on her blog under the name"chopstick diaries."Ula was one of the 18 foreign and domestic artists participating in a cultural exchange project called the Pointe to Point: Asia-Europe Dance Forum.It aims to empower aspiring young artists from Asia and Europe to reflect upon their views of

  15. Lamination of microfibrous PLGA fabric by electrospinning a layer of collagen-hydroxyapatite composite nanofibers for bone tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Gi-Wan; Gupta, Kailash Chandra; Jung, Kyung-Hye; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2017-01-01

    Background To mimic the muscle inspired cells adhesion through proteins secretion, the lamination of collagen?hydroxyapatite nanorod (nHA) composite nanofibers has been carried out successfully on polydopamine (PDA)-coated microfibrous polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) fabrics. The lamination of collagen-hydroxyapatite composite nanofibers on polydopamine-coated microfibrous PLGA fabrics was carried through electrospinning the solution of collagen containing L-glutamic acid-grafted hydroxyapati...

  16. Optics of Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordo, Vladimir

    During the last decade, fabrication and investigation of submicron-sized optical fibers have been received growing attention. Such nanofibers or nanowires can be grown from both inorganic and organic semiconductor materials being arranged in mutually parallel nanoaggregates. Also, selected...... nanofibers can be placed on a substrate or immersed in a liquid that allows one to study them individually. It has been demonstated that such structures possess promising waveguiding and photoluminescence properties. Under pumping conditions, they operate as a nanolaser. This remarkable progress dictates...

  17. Smart electrospun nanofibers for controlled drug release: recent advances and new perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lin; Xie, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    In biological systems, chemical molecules or ions often release upon certain conditions, at a specific location, and over a desired period of time. Electrospun nanofibers that undergo alterations in the physicochemical characteristics corresponding to environmental changes have gained considerable interest for various applications. Inspired by biological systems, therapeutic molecules have been integrated with these smart electrospun nanofibers, presenting activation-modulated or feedback-regulated control of drug release. Compared to other materials like smart hydrogels, environment-responsive nanofiber-based drug delivery systems are relatively new but possess incomparable advantages due to their greater permeability, which allows shorter response time and more precise control over the release rate. In this article, we review the mechanisms of various environmental parameters functioning as stimuli to tailor the release rates of smart electrospun nanofibers. We also illustrate several typical examples in specific applications. We conclude this article with a discussion on perspectives and future possibilities in this field.

  18. Templates for integrated nanofiber growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Hansen, Roana Melina de

    Para-hexaphenylene (p6P) molecules have the ability to self-assemble into organic nanofibers. These nanofibers hold unique optoelectronic properties, which make them interesting candidates as elements in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Typically these nanofibers are grown on specific single......, high-volume integration. Besides such single-crystalline templates, the nanofibers can also be grown on non-crystalline gold surfaces, on which the orientation of the nanofibers can be manipulated by structuring the gold surface prior to p6P deposition. In this work, a novel method for in-situ growth...... of p6P nanofibers on nano-structured gold surfaces is presented. The substrates are prepared by conventional nanofabrication techniques such as e-beam lithography and metal deposition, which increase their potential as device platforms. Some of the results presented here demonstrate, that both...

  19. Ultrasonic dyeing of cellulose nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Muzamil; Ahmed, Farooq; Jatoi, Abdul Wahab; Mahar, Rasool Bux; Khatri, Zeeshan; Kim, Ick Soo

    2016-07-01

    Textile dyeing assisted by ultrasonic energy has attained a greater interest in recent years. We report ultrasonic dyeing of nanofibers for the very first time. We chose cellulose nanofibers and dyed with two reactive dyes, CI reactive black 5 and CI reactive red 195. The cellulose nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning of cellulose acetate (CA) followed by deacetylation. The FTIR results confirmed complete conversion of CA into cellulose nanofibers. Dyeing parameters optimized were dyeing temperature, dyeing time and dye concentrations for each class of the dye used. Results revealed that the ultrasonic dyeing produced higher color yield (K/S values) than the conventional dyeing. The color fastness test results depicted good dye fixation. SEM analysis evidenced that ultrasonic energy during dyeing do not affect surface morphology of nanofibers. The results conclude successful dyeing of cellulose nanofibers using ultrasonic energy with better color yield and color fastness results than conventional dyeing.

  20. Shear adhesion strength of aligned electrospun nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najem, Johnny F; Wong, Shing-Chung; Ji, Guang

    2014-09-01

    Inspiration from nature such as insects' foot hairs motivates scientists to fabricate nanoscale cylindrical solids that allow tens of millions of contact points per unit area with material substrates. In this paper, we present a simple yet robust method for fabricating directionally sensitive shear adhesive laminates. By using aligned electrospun nylon-6, we create dry adhesives, as a succession of our previous work on measuring adhesion energies between two single free-standing electrospun polymer fibers in cross-cylinder geometry, randomly oriented membranes and substrate, and peel forces between aligned fibers and substrate. The synthetic aligned cylindrical solids in this study are electrically insulating and show a maximal Mode II shear adhesion strength of 27 N/cm(2) on a glass slide. This measured value, for the purpose of comparison, is 270% of that reported from gecko feet. The Mode II shear adhesion strength, based on a commonly known "dead-weight" test, is 97-fold greater than the Mode I (normal) adhesion strength of the same. The data indicate a strong shear binding on and easy normal lifting off. Anisotropic adhesion (Mode II/Mode I) is pronounced. The size and surface boundary effects, crystallinity, and bending stiffness of fibers are used to understand these electrospun nanofibers, which vastly differ from otherwise known adhesive technologies. The anisotropic strength distribution is attributed to a decreasing fiber diameter and an optimized laminate thickness, which, in turn, influences the bending stiffness and solid-state "wettability" of points of contact between nanofibers and surface asperities.

  1. Processing and Structure of Carbon Nanofiber Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongfu Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A unique concept of making nanocomposites from carbon nanofiber paper was explored in this study. The essential element of this method was to design and manufacture carbon nanofiber paper with well-controlled and optimized network structure of carbon nanofibers. In this study, carbon nanofiber paper was prepared under various processing conditions, including different types of carbon nanofibers, solvents, dispersants, and acid treatment. The morphologies of carbon nanofibers within the nanofiber paper were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. In addition, the bulk densities of carbon nanofiber papers were measured. It was found that the densities and network structures of carbon nanofiber paper correlated to the dispersion quality of carbon nanofibers within the paper, which was significantly affected by papermaking process conditions.

  2. Mechanism of nanofiber crimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Rou-Xi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication of crimped fibers has been caught much attention recently due to remarkable improvement surface-to-volume ratio. The precise mechanism of the fiber crimp is, however, rare and preliminary. This paper finds that pulsation of fibers is the key factor for fiber crimp, and its configuration (wave formation corresponds to its nature frequency after solidification. Crimping performance can be improved by temperature control of the uncrimped fibers. In the paper, polylactide/ dimethylfomamide solution is fabricated into crimped nanofibers by the bubble electrospinning, an approximate period- amplitude relationship of the wave formation is obtained.

  3. Reinforcement of polymeric nanofibers by ferritin nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Sun I.; Kim, Seon Jeong; Kim, Sung-Kyoung; Lee, Haiwon

    2006-05-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofibers containing bimolecular ferritin nanoparticles exhibited the enhancement of elastic modulus as compared to pure PVA nanofibers due to chemical interactions between the ferritin and the PVA matrix. The elastic modulus of the nanofibers was measured using a three-point bending test employing an atomic force microscope (AFM). To improve the reliability of the AFM measurements, uniform nanofibers were oriented linearly on an AFM calibration grating by introducing parallel subelectrodes in an electrospinning system. The length to diameter ratio of the measured nanofibers was >16. The PVA nanofibers reinforced by ferritin are applicable as artificial muscles and actuators.

  4. Ultrahigh Transmission Optical Nanofibers

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, J E; Grover, J A; Solano, P; Kordell, P R; Wong-Campos, J D; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L

    2014-01-01

    We present a procedure for reproducibly fabricating ultrahigh transmission optical nanofibers (530 nm diameter and 84 mm stretch) with single-mode transmissions of 99.95 $ \\pm$ 0.02%, which represents a loss from tapering of 2.6 $\\,\\times \\,$ 10$^{-5}$ dB/mm when normalized to the entire stretch. When controllably launching the next family of higher-order modes on a fiber with 195 mm stretch, we achieve a transmission of 97.8 $\\pm$ 2.8%, which has a loss from tapering of 5.0 $\\,\\times \\,$ 10$^{-4}$ dB/mm when normalized to the entire stretch. Our pulling and transfer procedures allow us to fabricate optical nanofibers that transmit more than 400 mW in high vacuum conditions. These results, published as parameters in our previous work, present an improvement of two orders of magnitude less loss for the fundamental mode and an increase in transmission of more than 300% for higher-order modes, when following the protocols detailed in this paper. We extract from the transmission during the pull, the only reported...

  5. Mechanical properties of organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Hansen, Ole; Rubahn, H.R.

    2006-01-01

    Intrinsic elastic and inelastic mechanical Properties of individual, self-assembled, quasi-single-crystalline para-hexaphenylene nanofibers supported on substrates with different hydrophobicities are investigated as well as the interplay between the fibers and the underlying substrates. We find f...... on a silicon substrate with a low-adhesion coating, whereas such motion on a noncoated substrate is limited to very short (sub-micrometer) nanofiber pieces due to strong adhesive forces....

  6. Touch- and Brush-Spinning of Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarev, Alexander; Asheghali, Darya; Griffiths, Ian M; Trotsenko, Oleksandr; Gruzd, Alexey; Lin, Xin; Stone, Howard A; Minko, Sergiy

    2015-11-01

    Robust, simple, and scalable touch- and brush-spinning methods for the drawing of nanofibers, core-shell nanofibers, and their aligned 2D and 3D meshes using polymer solutions and melts are discussed.

  7. Characterization and Biocompatibility of Biopolyester Nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    Tang Hui Ying; Tetsuji Yamaoka; Tadahisa Iwata; Daisuke Ishii

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradable nanofibers are expected to be promising scaffold materials for biomedical engineering, however, biomedical applications require control of the degradation behavior and tissue response of nanofiber scaffolds in vivo. For this purpose, electrospun nanofibers of poly(hydroxyalkanoate)s (PHAs) and poly(lactide)s (PLAs) were subjected to degradation tests in vitro and in vivo. In this review, characterization and biocompatibility of nanofibers derived from PHAs and PLAs are described...

  8. Biodegradable nanofibers-reinforced microfibrous composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Albino; Pinho, Elisabete D; Correlo, Vítor M; Faria, Susana; Marques, Alexandra P; Reis, Rui L; Neves, Nuno M

    2010-12-01

    Native bone extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex hierarchical fibrous composite structure, resulting from the assembling of collagen fibrils at several length scales, ranging from the macro to the nanoscale. The combination of nanofibers within microfibers after conventional reinforcement methodologies seems to be a feasible solution to the rational design of highly functional synthetic ECM substitutes. The present work aims at the development of bone ECM inspired structures, conjugating electrospun chitosan (Cht) nanofibers within biodegradable polymeric microfibers [poly(butylene succinate)-PBS and PBS/Cht], assembled in a fiber mesh structure. The nanofibers-reinforced composite fiber mesh scaffolds were seeded with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) and cultured under osteogenic differentiation conditions. These nanofibers-reinforced composite scaffolds sustained ECM deposition and mineralization, mainly in the PBS/Cht-based fiber meshes, as depicted by the increased amount of calcium phosphates produced by the osteogenic differentiated hBMSCs. The osteogenic genotype of the cultured hBMSCs was confirmed by the expression of osteoblastic genes, namely Alkaline Phosphatase, Osteopontin, Bone Sialoprotein and Osteocalcin, and the transcription factors Runx2 and Osterix, all involved in different stages of the osteogenesis. These data represent the first report on the biological functionality of nanofibers-reinforced composite scaffolds, envisaging the applicability of the developed structures for bone tissue engineering.

  9. Bubbfil electrospinning of PA66/Cu nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Different PA66/Cu nanofibers were prepared under various electrospinning parameters through bubbfil electrospinning. The process parameters were determined. Cuprum particles with different size were added to PA66 solution to produce PA6/66-Cu composite nanofibers. The influence of cuprum nanoparticle size on the PA66 nanofibers was analyzed.

  10. Chitin nanofibers: preparations, modifications, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifuku, Shinsuke; Saimoto, Hiroyuki

    2012-05-01

    Chitin nanofibers are prepared from the exoskeletons of crabs and prawns by a simple mechanical treatment after the removal of proteins and minerals. The obtained nanofibers have fine nanofiber networks with a uniform width of approximately 10-20 nm and a high aspect ratio. The method used for chitin-nanofiber isolation is also successfully applied to the cell walls of mushrooms. They form a complex with glucans on the fiber surface. A grinder, a Star Burst atomization system, and a high speed blender are all used in the mechanical treatment to convert chitin to nanofibers. Mechanical treatment under acidic conditions is the key to facilitate fibrillation. At pH 3-4, the cationization of amino groups on the fiber surface assists nano-fibrillation by electrostatic repulsive force. By applying this finding, we also prepared chitin nanofibers from dry chitin powder. Chitin nanofibers are acetylated to modify their surfaces. The acetyl DS can be controlled from 1 to 3 by changing the reaction time. An acetyl group is introduced heterogeneously from the surface to the core. Nanofiber morphology is maintained even in the case of high acetyl DS. Optically transparent chitin nanofiber composites are prepared with 11 different types of acrylic resins. Due to the nano-sized structure, all of the composites are highly transparent. Chitin nanofibers significantly increase the Young's moduli and the tensile strengths and decrease the thermal expansion of all acrylic resins due to the reinforcement effect of chitin nanofibers. Chitin nanofibers show chiral separation ability. The chitin nanofiber membrane transports the d-isomer of glutamic acid, phenylalanine, and lysine from the corresponding racemic amino acid mixtures faster than the corresponding l-isomer. The chitin nanofibers improve clinical symptoms and suppress ulcerative colitis in a DSS-induced mouse model of acute ulcerative colitis. Moreover, chitin nanofibers suppress myeloperoxidase activation in the colon and

  11. Polydopamine-Templated Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Polycaprolactone Composite Nanofibers with Enhanced Cytocompatibility and Osteogenesis for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Song, Jinlin; Ji, Ping; Zhang, Xiaohong; Li, Xiaoman; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Mengke; Zhang, Siqi; Deng, Yi; Deng, Feng; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-02-10

    Nanohydroxyapatite (HA) synthesized by biomimetic strategy is a promising nanomaterial as bone substitute due to its physicochemical features similar to those of natural nanocrystal in bone tissue. Inspired by mussel adhesive chemistry, a novel nano-HA was synthesized in our work by employing polydopamine (pDA) as template under weak alkaline condition. Subsequently, the as-prepared pDA-templated HA (tHA) was introduced into polycaprolactone (PCL) matrix via coelectrospinning, and a bioactive tHA/PCL composite nanofiber scaffold was developed targeted at bone regeneration application. Our research showed that tHA reinforced PCL composite nanofibers exhibited favorable cytocompatibility at given concentration of tHA (0-10 w.t%). Compared to pure PCL and traditional nano-HA enriched PCL (HA/PCL) composite nanofibers, enhanced cell adhesion, spreading and proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were observed on tHA/PCL composite nanofibers on account of the contribution of pDA present in tHA. More importantly, tHA nanoparticles exposed on the surface of composite nanofibers could further promote osteogenesis of hMSCs in vitro even in the absence of osteogenesis soluble inducing factors when compared to traditional HA/PCL scaffolds, which was supported by in vivo test as well according to the histological analysis. Overall, our study demonstrated that the developed tHA/PCL composite nanofibers with enhanced cytocompatibility and osteogenic capacity hold great potential as scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

  12. Electrospinning of Nanofibers for Energy Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guiru; Sun, Liqun; Xie, Haiming; Liu, Jia

    2016-07-02

    With global concerns about the shortage of fossil fuels and environmental issues, the development of efficient and clean energy storage devices has been drastically accelerated. Nanofibers are used widely for energy storage devices due to their high surface areas and porosities. Electrospinning is a versatile and efficient fabrication method for nanofibers. In this review, we mainly focus on the application of electrospun nanofibers on energy storage, such as lithium batteries, fuel cells, dye-sensitized solar cells and supercapacitors. The structure and properties of nanofibers are also summarized systematically. The special morphology of nanofibers prepared by electrospinning is significant to the functional materials for energy storage.

  13. Aligned Layers of Silver Nano-Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii B. Golovin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new dichroic polarizers made by ordering silver nano-fibers to aligned layers. The aligned layers consist of nano-fibers and self-assembled molecular aggregates of lyotropic liquid crystals. Unidirectional alignment of the layers is achieved by means of mechanical shearing. Aligned layers of silver nano-fibers are partially transparent to a linearly polarized electromagnetic radiation. The unidirectional alignment and density of the silver nano-fibers determine degree of polarization of transmitted light. The aligned layers of silver nano-fibers might be used in optics, microwave applications, and organic electronics.

  14. Preparation of chitosan nanofiber tube by electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Kagata, Go; Kino, Rikako; Tanaka, Junzo

    2007-03-01

    Water-insoluble chitosan nanofiber sheets and tubes coated with chitosan-cast film were prepared by electrospinning. When as-spun chitosan nanofiber sheets and tubes were immersed in 28% ammonium aqueous solution, they became insoluble in water and showed nanofiber structures confirmed by SEM micrography. Mechanical properties of chitosan nanofiber sheets and tubes were improved by coating with chitosan-cast film, which gave them a compressive strength higher than that of crab-tendon chitosan, demonstrating that chitosan nanofiber tubes coated with chitosan-cast film are usable as nerve-regenerative guide tubes.

  15. Electrospinning of Nanofibers for Energy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiru Sun

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With global concerns about the shortage of fossil fuels and environmental issues, the development of efficient and clean energy storage devices has been drastically accelerated. Nanofibers are used widely for energy storage devices due to their high surface areas and porosities. Electrospinning is a versatile and efficient fabrication method for nanofibers. In this review, we mainly focus on the application of electrospun nanofibers on energy storage, such as lithium batteries, fuel cells, dye-sensitized solar cells and supercapacitors. The structure and properties of nanofibers are also summarized systematically. The special morphology of nanofibers prepared by electrospinning is significant to the functional materials for energy storage.

  16. Oriented nanofibers embedded in a polymer matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Enrique V. (Inventor); Rodriguez-Macias, Fernando J. (Inventor); Lozano, Karen (Inventor); Chibante, Luis Paulo Felipe (Inventor); Stewart, David Harris (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of forming a composite of embedded nanofibers in a polymer matrix is disclosed. The method includes incorporating nanofibers in a plastic matrix forming agglomerates, and uniformly distributing the nanofibers by exposing the agglomerates to hydrodynamic stresses. The hydrodynamic said stresses force the agglomerates to break apart. In combination or additionally elongational flow is used to achieve small diameters and alignment. A nanofiber reinforced polymer composite system is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of nanofibers that are embedded in polymer matrices in micron size fibers. A method for producing nanotube continuous fibers is disclosed. Nanofibers are fibrils with diameters of 100 nm, multiwall nanotubes, single wall nanotubes and their various functionalized and derivatized forms. The method includes mixing a nanofiber in a polymer; and inducing an orientation of the nanofibers that enables the nanofibers to be used to enhance mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Orientation is induced by high shear mixing and elongational flow, singly or in combination. The polymer may be removed from said nanofibers, leaving micron size fibers of aligned nanofibers.

  17. Electrospinning of Biocompatible Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Andrew J.; Queen, Hailey A.; McCullen, Seth D.; Krause, Wendy E.

    2006-03-01

    Artificial scaffolds for growing cells can have a wide range of applications including wound coverings, supports in tissue cultures, drug delivery, and organ and tissue transplantation. Tissue engineering is a promising field which may resolve current problems with transplantation, such as rejection by the immune system and scarcity of donors. One approach to tissue engineering utilizes a biodegradable scaffold onto which cells are seeded and cultured, and ideally develop into functional tissue. The scaffold acts as an artificial extracellular matrix (ECM). Because a typical ECM contains collagen fibers with diameters of 50-500 nm, electrostatic spinning (electrospinning) was used to mimic the size and structure of these fibers. Electrospinning is a novel way of spinning a nonwoven web of fibers on the order of 100 nm, much like the web of collagen in an ECM. We are investigating the ability of several biocompatible polymers (e.g., chitosan and polyvinyl alcohol) to form defect-free nanofiber webs and are studying the influence of the zero shear rate viscosity, molecular weight, entanglement concentration, relaxation time, and solvent on the resulting fiber size and morphology.

  18. Clay Bells: Edo Inspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The ceremonial copper and iron bells at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art were the author's inspiration for an interdisciplinary unit with a focus on the contributions various cultures make toward the richness of a community. The author of this article describes an Edo bell-inspired ceramic project incorporating slab-building…

  19. Tailoring Supramolecular Nanofibers for Air Filtration Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Daniel; Skrybeck, Dominik; Misslitz, Holger; Nardini, David; Kern, Alexander; Kreger, Klaus; Schmidt, Hans-Werner

    2016-06-15

    The demand of new materials and processes for nanofiber fabrication to enhance the performance of air filters is steadily increasing. Typical approaches to obtain nanofibers are based on top-down processes such as melt blowing, centrifugal spinning, and electrospinning of polymer materials. However, fabrication of polymer nanofibers is limited with respect to either a sufficiently high throughput or the smallest achievable fiber diameter. This study reports comprehensively on a fast and simple bottom-up process to prepare supramolecular nanofibers in situ inside viscose/polyester microfiber nonwovens. Here, selected small molecules of the materials class of 1,3,5-benzenetrisamides are employed. The microfiber-nanofiber composites exhibit a homogeneous nanofiber distribution and morphology throughout the entire nonwoven scaffold. Small changes in molecular structure and processing solvent have a strong influence on the final nanofiber diameter and diameter distribution and, consequently, on the filtration performance. Choosing proper processing conditions, microfiber-nanofiber composites with surprisingly high filtration efficiencies of particulate matter are obtained. In addition, the microfiber-nanofiber composite integrity at elevated temperatures was determined and revealed that the morphology of supramolecular nanofibers is maintained compared to that of the utilized polymer nonwoven.

  20. Bioinspired Design of Polycaprolactone Composite Nanofibers as Artificial Bone Extracellular Matrix for Bone Regeneration Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yancong; Xu, Xiao; Zhang, Siqi; Ji, Ping; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-10-07

    The design and development of functional biomimetic systems for programmed stem cell response is a field of topical interest. To mimic bone extracellular matrix, we present an innovative strategy for constructing drug-loaded composite nanofibrous scaffolds in this study, which could integrate multiple cues from calcium phosphate mineral, bioactive molecule, and highly ordered fiber topography for the control of stem cell fate. Briefly, inspired by mussel adhesion mechanism, a polydopamine (pDA)-templated nanohydroxyapatite (tHA) was synthesized and then surface-functionalized with bone morphogenetic protein-7-derived peptides via catechol chemistry. Afterward, the resulting peptide-loaded tHA (tHA/pep) particles were blended with polycaprolactone (PCL) solution to fabricate electrospun hybrid nanofibers with random and aligned orientation. Our research demonstrated that the bioactivity of grafted peptides was retained in composite nanofibers. Compared to controls, PCL-tHA/pep composite nanofibers showed improved cytocompatibility. Moreover, the incorporated tHA/pep particles in nanofibers could further facilitate osteogenic differentiation potential of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). More importantly, the aligned PCL-tHA/pep composite nanofibers showed more osteogenic activity than did randomly oriented counterparts, even under nonosteoinductive conditions, indicating excellent performance of biomimetic design in cell fate decision. After in vivo implantation, the PCL-tHA/pep composite nanofibers with highly ordered structure could significantly promote the regeneration of lamellar-like bones in a rat calvarial critical-sized defect. Accordingly, the presented strategy in our work could be applied for a wide range of potential applications in not only bone regeneration application but also pharmaceutical science.

  1. Multifunctional Nanofibers towards Active Biomedical Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaishri Sharma

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional (1-D nanostructures have attracted enormous research interest due to their unique physicochemical properties and wide application potential. These 1-D nanofibers are being increasingly applied to biomedical fields owing to their high surface area-to-volume ratio, high porosity, and the ease of tuning their structures, functionalities, and properties. Many biomedical nanofiber reviews have focused on tissue engineering and drug delivery applications but have very rarely discussed their use as wound dressings. However, nanofibers have enormous potential as wound dressings and other clinical applications that could have wide impacts on the treatment of wounds. Herein, the authors review the main fabrication methods of nanofibers as well as requirements, strategies, and recent applications of nanofibers, and provide perspectives of the challenges and opportunities that face multifunctional nanofibers for active therapeutic applications.

  2. Effect of airflow on nanofiber yarn spinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Jian-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a new air-jet spinning method for the preparation of continuous twisted nanofiber yarns. The nozzle-twisting device is designed to create the 3-D rotating airflow to twist nanofiber bundles. The airflow characteristics inside the twisting chamber are studied numerically. The airflow field distribution and its effect on nanofiber yarn spinning at different pressures are also discussed.

  3. Fabrication of bioinspired composite nanofiber membranes with robust superhydrophobicity for direct contact membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yuan; Wang, Rong; Fane, Anthony G

    2014-06-03

    The practical application of membrane distillation (MD) for water purification is hindered by the absence of desirable membranes that can fulfill the special requirements of the MD process. Compared to the membranes fabricated by other methods, nanofiber membranes produced by electrospinning are of great interest due to their high porosity, low tortuosity, large surface pore size, and high surface hydrophobicity. However, the stable performance of the nanofiber membranes in the MD process is still unsatisfactory. Inspired by the unique structure of the lotus leaf, this study aimed to develop a strategy to construct superhydrophobic composite nanofiber membranes with robust superhydrophobicity and high porosity suitable for use in MD. The newly developed membrane consists of a superhydrophobic silica-PVDF composite selective skin formed on a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) porous nanofiber scaffold via electrospinning. This fabrication method could be easily scaled up due to its simple preparation procedures. The effects of silica diameter and concentration on membrane contact angle, sliding angle, and MD performance were investigated thoroughly. For the first time, the direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) tests demonstrate that the newly developed membranes are able to present stable high performance over 50 h of testing time, and the superhydrophobic selective layer exhibits excellent durability in ultrasonic treatment and a continuous DCMD test. It is believed that this novel design strategy has great potential for MD membrane fabrication.

  4. Physicists get INSPIREd

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Particle physicists thrive on information. They first create information by performing experiments or elaborating theoretical conjectures and then they share it through publications and various web tools. The INSPIRE service, just released, will bring state of the art information retrieval to the fingertips of researchers.   Keeping track of the information shared within the particle physics community has long been the task of libraries at the larger labs, such as CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC, as well as the focus of indispensible services like arXiv and those of the Particle Data Group. In 2007, many providers of information in the field came together for a summit at SLAC to see how physics information resources could be enhanced, and the INSPIRE project emerged from that meeting. The vision behind INSPIRE was built by a survey launched by the four labs to evaluate the real needs of the community. INSPIRE responds to these directives from the community by combining the most successful aspe...

  5. Nanofiber filter media for air filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Bharath Kumar

    Nanofibers have higher capture efficiencies in comparison to microfibers in the submicron particle size range of 100-500 nm because of small fiber diameter and increased surface area of the fibers. Pressure drop across the filter increases tremendously with decrease in fiber diameter in the continuum flow regime. Nanofibers with fiber diameter less than 300 nm are in the slip flow regime as a consequence of which steep increase in pressure drop is considerably reduced due to slip effect. The outlet or inlet gases have broad range of particle size distribution varying from few micrometers to nanometers. The economic benefits include capture of a wide range of particle sizes in the gas streams using compact filters composed of nanofibers and microfibers. Electrospinning technique was used to successfully fabricate polymeric and ceramic nanofibers. The nanofibers were long, continuous, and flexible with diameters in the range of 200--300 nm. Nanofibers were added to the filter medium either by mixing microfibers and nanofibers or by directly electrospinning nanofibers as thin layer on the surface of the microfiber filter medium. Experimental results showed that either by mixing Nylon 6 nanofibers with B glass fibers or by electrospinning Nylon 6 nanofibers as a thin layer on the surface of the microfiber medium in the surface area ratio of 1 which is 0.06 g of nanofibers for 2 g of microfibers performed better than microfiber filter media in air filtration tests. This improved performance is consistent with numerical modeling. The particle loading on a microfibrous filter were studied for air filtration tests. The experimental and modeling results showed that both pressure drop and capture efficiency increased with loading time. Nanofiber filter media has potential applications in many filtration applications and one of them being hot gas filtration. Ceramic nanofibers made of alumina and titania nanofibers can withstand in the range of 1000°C. Ceramic nanofibers

  6. Nickel nanofibers synthesized by the electrospinning method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Anhui 230000 (China); Zhang, Xuebin, E-mail: zzhhxxbb@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Anhui 230000 (China); Zhu, Yajun; Li, Bin; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Jingcheng; Feng, Yi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Anhui 230000 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► The nickel nanofibers have been obtained by electrospinning method. ► The nickel nanofibers had rough surface which was consisted of mass nanoparticles. ► The average diameter of nickel nanofibers is about 135 nm and high degree of crystallization. ► The Hc, Ms, and Mr were estimated to be 185 Oe, 51.9 and 16.9 emu/g respectively. - Abstract: In this paper, nickel nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning polyvinyl alcohol/nickel nitrate precursor solution followed by high temperature calcination in air and deoxidation in hydrogen atmosphere. The thermal stability of the as-electrospun PVA/Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} composite nanofibers were characterized by TG–DSC. The morphologies and structures of the as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field-emission scanning electronmicroscope (FE-SEM) and field-emission transmission electron microscopy (FE-TEM). The hysteresis loops (M–H loops) were measured by Physical Property Measurement System (PPMS). The results indicate that: the PVA and the nickel nitrate were almost completely decomposed at 460 °C and the products were pure nickel nanofibers with face-centered cubic (fcc) structure. Furthermore, the as-prepared nickel nanofibers had a continuous structure with rough surface and high degree of crystallization. The average diameter of nickel nanofibers was about 135 nm. The nanofibers showed a stronger coercivity of 185 Oe than value of bulk nickel.

  7. Electrospun nanofiber scaffolds: engineering soft tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumbar, S G; Nukavarapu, S P; Laurencin, C T [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia, VA 22908 (United States); James, R [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, VA 22908 (United States)], E-mail: laurencin@virginia.edu

    2008-09-01

    Electrospinning has emerged to be a simple, elegant and scalable technique to fabricate polymeric nanofibers. Pure polymers as well as blends and composites of both natural and synthetics have been successfully electrospun into nanofiber matrices. Physiochemical properties of nanofiber matrices can be controlled by manipulating electrospinning parameters to meet the requirements of a specific application. Such efforts include the fabrication of fiber matrices containing nanofibers, microfibers, combination of nano-microfibers and also different fiber orientation/alignments. Polymeric nanofiber matrices have been extensively investigated for diversified uses such as filtration, barrier fabrics, wipes, personal care, biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Recently electrospun nanofiber matrices have gained a lot of attention, and are being explored as scaffolds in tissue engineering due to their properties that can modulate cellular behavior. Electrospun nanofiber matrices show morphological similarities to the natural extra-cellular matrix (ECM), characterized by ultrafine continuous fibers, high surface-to-volume ratio, high porosity and variable pore-size distribution. Efforts have been made to modify nanofiber surfaces with several bioactive molecules to provide cells with the necessary chemical cues and a more in vivo like environment. The current paper provides an overlook on such efforts in designing nanofiber matrices as scaffolds in the regeneration of various soft tissues including skin, blood vessel, tendon/ligament, cardiac patch, nerve and skeletal muscle.

  8. Biomimetic synthesis of interlaced mesh structures TiO{sub 2} nanofibers with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guanghui [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Applied Catalysis Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 China (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering(Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 China (China); Zhang, Tianyong, E-mail: tyzhang@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Applied Catalysis Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 China (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering(Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 China (China); Li, Bin, E-mail: libin@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Applied Catalysis Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 China (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering(Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 China (China); Zhang, Xia; Chen, Xingwei [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Applied Catalysis Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 China (China)

    2016-05-25

    A facile and economical method assisted by PPs (the spongy white peels of pomelo peel) was applied for preparing interlaced mesh structures TiO{sub 2} nanofibers by a liquid impregnation method followed by a calcination process in this study. And the as-prepared materials were comprehensively investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectra, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectra and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption. The resultant TiO{sub 2} materials exhibit unique morphology, in which the curly nanofibers with the diameter about 90 nm interweave each other for assembling hierarchical mesh structures and there are abundant grooves on the surface of the nanofibers. During the bio-inspired synthetic process, the PPs play important roles as template and induction for forming the hierarchical mesh structures of TiO{sub 2} nanofibers. Furthermore, some of the as-prepared TiO{sub 2} samples exhibit 99% degradation rate for methyl orange in 30 min under UV light irradiation, which can be ascribed to the larger surface area and the unique hierarchical mesh structures. In addition, the stability tests of 5 cycling runs of the photocatalysts indicate that the as-prepared TiO{sub 2} nanofibers can be applied as a practical photocatalyst for degrading organic dyes under UV light irradiation. Therefore, hopefully, the strategy for preparing the TiO{sub 2} nanofibers can be extended to design many more powerful photocatalysts for the environmental remediation in the near future. - Graphical abstract: The TiO{sub 2} nanofibers with interlaced mesh structures were prepared with PPs (the spongy white peels of pomelo peel) as the reactive substrate and directing template, and titanium tetrachloride (TiCl{sub 4}) as titanium resource. And the as-prepared TiO{sub 2} samples exhibit highly photocatalytic activity and good stability for degrading methyl orange under UV light irradiation. - Highlights: • A

  9. Effective immobilization of BMP-2 mediated by polydopamine coating on biodegradable nanofibers for enhanced in vivo bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyeong-jin; Perikamana, Sajeesh Kumar Madhurakkat; Lee, Ji-hye; Lee, Jinkyu; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Shin, Choongsoo S; Shin, Heungsoo

    2014-07-23

    Although bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) have been widely used for bone regeneration, the ideal delivery system with optimized dose and minimized side effects is still active area of research. In this study, we developed bone morphogenetic protein-2(BMP-2) immobilized poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) nanofibers inspired by polydopamine, which could be ultimately used as membranes for guided bone regeneration, and investigated their effect on guidance of in vitro cell behavior and in vivo bone formation. Surface chemical analysis of the nanofibers confirmed successful immobilization of BMP-2 mediated by polydopamine, and about 90% of BMP-2 was stably retained on the nanofiber surface for at least 28 days. The alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium mineralization of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) after 14 days of in vitro culture was significantly enhanced on nanofibers immobilized with BMP-2. More importantly, BMP-2 at a relatively small dose was highly active following implantation to the critical-sized defect in the cranium of mice; radiographic analysis demonstrated that 77.8 ± 11.7% of newly formed bone was filled within the defect for a BMP-2-immobilized groups at the concentration of 124 ± 9 ng/cm(2), as compared to 5.9 ± 1.0 and 34.1 ± 5.5% recovery, for a defect-only and a polydopamine-only group, respectively. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of samples from the BMP-2 immobilized group showed fibroblasts and osteoblasts with nanofiber strands in the middle of regenerated bone tissue, revealing the importance of interaction between implanted nanofibers and the neighboring extracellular environment. Taken together, our data support that the presentation of BMP-2 on the surface of nanofibers as immobilized by utilizing polydopamine chemistry may be an effective method to direct bone growth at relatively low local concentration.

  10. Magnetic nanofiber composite materials and devices using same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xing; Zhou, Ziyao

    2017-04-11

    A nonreciprocal device is described. It includes a housing, a waveguide layer and at least one layer of magnetic nanofiber composite. The magnetic nanofiber composite layer is made up of a polymer base layer, a dielectric matrix comprising magnetic nanofibers. The nanofibers have a high aspect ratio and wherein said dielectric matrix is embedded in the polymer base layer.

  11. Inspiration is "Mission Critical"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, D. W.; DeVore, E.; Lebofsky, L.

    2014-07-01

    In spring 2013, the President's budget proposal restructured the nation's approach to STEM education, eliminating ˜$50M of NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) funding with the intent of transferring it to the Dept. of Education, National Science Foundation, and Smithsonian Institution. As a result, Education and Public Outreach (EPO) would no longer be a NASA mission requirement and funds that had already been competed, awarded, and productively utilized were lost. Since 1994, partnerships of scientists, engineers, and education specialists were required to create innovative approaches to EPO, providing a direct source of inspiration for today's youth that may now be lost. Although seldom discussed or evaluated, "inspiration" is the beginning of lasting education. For decades, NASA's crewed and robotic missions have motivated students of all ages and have demonstrated a high degree of leverage in society. Through personal experiences we discuss (1) the importance of inspiration in education, (2) how NASA plays a vital role in STEM education, (3) examples of high-leverage educational materials showing why NASA should continue embedding EPO specialists within mission teams, and (4) how we can document the role of inspiration. We believe that personal histories are an important means of assessing the success of EPO. We hope this discussion will lead other people to document similar stories of educational success and perhaps to undertake longitudinal studies of the impact of inspiration.

  12. Method of manufacturing tin-doped indium oxide nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Soydan; Naskar, Amit K

    2017-06-06

    A method of making indium tin oxide nanofibers includes the step of mixing indium and tin precursor compounds with a binder polymer to form a nanofiber precursor composition. The nanofiber precursor composition is co-formed with a supporting polymer to form a composite nanofiber having a precursor composition nanofiber completely surrounded by the supporting polymer composition. The supporting polymer composition is removed from the composite nanofiber to expose the precursor composition nanofiber. The precursor composition nanofiber is then heated in the presence of oxygen such as O.sub.2 to form indium tin oxide and to remove the binder polymer to form an indium tin oxide nanofiber. A method of making metal oxide nanofibers is also disclosed.

  13. Alkylated graphene nanosheet composites with polyaniline nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinou, Ali; Yun, Young Soo; Cho, Se Youn; Jin, Hyoung-Joon

    2011-07-01

    We demonstrate a simple method to prepare alkylated graphene/polyaniline composites (a-GR/PANI) using solution mixing of exfoliated alkyl Iodododecane treated graphene oxide sheets with polyaniline nanofiber; polyaniline nanofibers (PANI) prepared by using rapid mixing polymerization significantly improve the processibility of polyaniline and its performance in many conventional applications. Also, polyaniline nanofibers exhibit excellent water dispersibility due to their uniform nanofiber morphology. Morphological study using SEM and TEM analysis showed that the fibrous PANI in the composites a-GR/PANI mainly adsorbed onto the surface or intercalated between the graphene sheets, due especially to the good interfacial interaction between the alkylated gaphene and the polyaniline nanofibers. The existence of polyaniline nanofibers on the surface of the garphene and the alkylated graphene sheets was confirmed by using FT-IR, FT-Raman and X-ray diffraction analysis. Due to the good interfacial interaction between the alkylated graphene and the polyanilines nanofibers, the composite (a-GR/PANI) exhibited excellent dispersion stability in DMF compared to the same composite (GR/PANI) without alkylation. The electrical conductivity of the (GR/PANI) composite was 9% higher than that of pure PANI and the same weight percent for the composite after alkylation was 13% higher than that of pure PANI nanofibers.

  14. Fabrication of unsmooth bamboo-like nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of post drawing on morphology of bubbfil-spun polyvinyl alcohol nanofibers was firstly investigated. Bamboo-like nanofibers were observed after drawing. The increase of surface area of the unsmooth fibers has many potential applications in various fields.

  15. Antibacterial properties of laser spinning glass nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echezarreta-López, M M; De Miguel, T; Quintero, F; Pou, J; Landin, M

    2014-12-30

    A laser-spinning technique has been used to produce amorphous, dense and flexible glass nanofibers of two different compositions with potential utility as reinforcement materials in composites, fillers in bone defects or scaffolds (3D structures) for tissue engineering. Morphological and microstructural analyses have been carried out using SEM-EDX, ATR-FTIR and TEM. Bioactivity studies allow the nanofibers with high proportion in SiO2 (S18/12) to be classified as a bioinert glass and the nanofibers with high proportion of calcium (ICIE16) as a bioactive glass. The cell viability tests (MTT) show high biocompatibility of the laser spinning glass nanofibers. Results from the antibacterial activity study carried out using dynamic conditions revealed that the bioactive glass nanofibers show a dose-dependent bactericidal effect on Sthaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) while the bioinert glass nanofibers show a bacteriostatic effect also dose-dependent. The antibacterial activity has been related to the release of alkaline ions, the increase of pH of the medium and also the formation of needle-like aggregates of calcium phosphate at the surface of the bioactive glass nanofibers which act as a physical mechanism against bacteria. The antibacterial properties give an additional value to the laser-spinning glass nanofibers for different biomedical applications, such as treating or preventing surgery-associated infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Novel Synthesis of Aluminium Oxide Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP012177 TITLE: Novel Synthesis of Aluminium Oxide Nanofibers DISTRIBUTION...ADP012174 thru ADP012259 UNCLASSIFIED Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 703 © 2002 Materials Research Society V1.8 Novel Synthesis of Aluminium Oxide Nanofibers

  17. Electrospun MOF nanofibers as hydrogen storage media

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ren, Jianwei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Zr-MOF and Cr-MOF were chosen as representatives of the developed MOFs in our laboratory and were incorporated into electrospun nanofibers. The obtained MOF nanofibers composites were evaluated as hydrogen storage media. The results...

  18. Growth of Y-shaped Carbon Nanofibers from Ethanol Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Jin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Y-shaped carbon nanofibers as a multi-branched carbon nanostructure have potential applications in electronic devices. In this article, we report that several types of Y-shaped carbon nanofibers are obtained from ethanol flames. These Y-shaped carbon nanofibers have different morphologies. According to our experimental results, the growth mechanism of Y-shaped carbon nanofibers has been discussed and a possible growth model of Y-shaped carbon nanofibers has been proposed.

  19. A novel method for fabrication of fascinated nanofiber yarns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hong-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Potential applications of nanofibers as a new-generation of material will be realized if suitable nanofiber yarns become available. Electrospinning has been widely accepted as a feasible technique for the fabrication of continuous nanofiber yarns. However its low output limited its industrial applications. This paper presents a new processing approach to fabrication of fascinated nanofiber yarns which possess excellent properties of nanofibers while enhancing its mechanical strength by the core yarn.

  20. Printed second harmonic active organic nanofiber arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    Organic nanofibers from semiconducting conjugated molecules are well suited to meet refined demands for advanced applications in future optoelectronics and nanophotonics. In contrast to their inorganic counterparts, the properties of organic nanowires can be tailored at the molecular level...... investigated nanofibers as grown via organic epitaxy. In the present work we show how chemically changing the functionalizing end groups leads to a huge increase of second order susceptibility, making the nanofibers technologically very interesting as efficient frequency doublers. For that the nanofibers have...... to be transferred either as individual entities or as ordered arrays onto specific target substrates. Here, we study the applicability of contact printing as a possible route to non-destructive nanofiber transfer....

  1. Characterization and Biocompatibility of Biopolyester Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Hui Ying

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable nanofibers are expected to be promising scaffold materials for biomedical engineering, however, biomedical applications require control of the degradation behavior and tissue response of nanofiber scaffolds in vivo. For this purpose, electrospun nanofibers of poly(hydroxyalkanoates (PHAs and poly(lactides (PLAs were subjected to degradation tests in vitro and in vivo. In this review, characterization and biocompatibility of nanofibers derived from PHAs and PLAs are described. In particular, the effects of the crystalline structure of poly[(R-3-hydroxybutyrate], stereocomplex structure of PLA, and monomer composition of PHA on the degradation behaviors are described in detail. These studies show the potential of biodegradable polyester nanofibers as scaffold material, for which suitable degradation rate and regulated interaction with surrounding tissues are required.

  2. Electrospun Nanofibers for Neural and Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Younan

    2009-03-01

    Electrospinning has been exploited for almost one century to process polymers and other materials into nanofibers with controllable compositions, diameters, porosities, and porous structures for a variety of applications. Owing to its small size, high porosity, and large surface area, a nonwoven mat of electrospun nanofibers can serve as an ideal scaffold to mimic the extra cellular matrix for cell attachment and nutrient transportation. The nanofiber itself can also be functionalized through encapsulation or attachment of bioactive species such as extracellular matrix proteins, enzymes, and growth factors. In addition, the nanofibers can be further assembled into a variety of arrays or architectures by manipulating their alignment, stacking, or folding. All these attributes make electrospinning a powerful tool for generating nanostructured materials for a range of biomedical applications that include controlled release, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. This talk will focus on the use of electrospun nanofibers as scaffolds for neural and bone tissue engineering.

  3. Bio-inspired nano tools for neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suradip; Carnicer-Lombarte, Alejandro; Fawcett, James W; Bora, Utpal

    2016-07-01

    Research and treatment in the nervous system is challenged by many physiological barriers posing a major hurdle for neurologists. The CNS is protected by a formidable blood brain barrier (BBB) which limits surgical, therapeutic and diagnostic interventions. The hostile environment created by reactive astrocytes in the CNS along with the limited regeneration capacity of the PNS makes functional recovery after tissue damage difficult and inefficient. Nanomaterials have the unique ability to interface with neural tissue in the nano-scale and are capable of influencing the function of a single neuron. The ability of nanoparticles to transcend the BBB through surface modifications has been exploited in various neuro-imaging techniques and for targeted drug delivery. The tunable topography of nanofibers provides accurate spatio-temporal guidance to regenerating axons. This review is an attempt to comprehend the progress in understanding the obstacles posed by the complex physiology of the nervous system and the innovations in design and fabrication of advanced nanomaterials drawing inspiration from natural phenomenon. We also discuss the development of nanomaterials for use in Neuro-diagnostics, Neuro-therapy and the fabrication of advanced nano-devices for use in opto-electronic and ultrasensitive electrophysiological applications. The energy efficient and parallel computing ability of the human brain has inspired the design of advanced nanotechnology based computational systems. However, extensive use of nanomaterials in neuroscience also raises serious toxicity issues as well as ethical concerns regarding nano implants in the brain. In conclusion we summarize these challenges and provide an insight into the huge potential of nanotechnology platforms in neuroscience.

  4. An eye for inspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    The discovery that the eye of a particular mantis shrimp has an achromatic quarter-waveplate that is superior to modern-day devices could be a source of inspiration to those designing optical components. Nature Photonics spoke to Nicholas Roberts, one of the researchers involved in the study.

  5. Inspire & innovate : Endbericht

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, T.; Lugtenaar, M.; Balendonck, J.; Ruckelshausen, A.; Wit, de R.

    2008-01-01

    Met het project Inspire & Innovate helpt de EU Nederlandse en Duitse bedrijven in met name de sectoren Food en Life Sciences op weg. Het project is bedoeld voor MKB-bedrijven in de Euregio Rijn-Waal en de EUREGIO die inhoudelijke en financiële ondersteuning zoeken om hun innovatieplannen door te

  6. Ndebele Inspired Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The house paintings of the South African Ndebele people are more than just an attempt to improve the aesthetics of a community; they are a source of identity and significance for Ndebele women. In this article, the author describes an art project wherein students use the tradition of Ndebele house painting as inspiration for creating their own…

  7. Inspire & innovate : Endbericht

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, T.; Lugtenaar, M.; Balendonck, J.; Ruckelshausen, A.; Wit, de R.

    2008-01-01

    Met het project Inspire & Innovate helpt de EU Nederlandse en Duitse bedrijven in met name de sectoren Food en Life Sciences op weg. Het project is bedoeld voor MKB-bedrijven in de Euregio Rijn-Waal en de EUREGIO die inhoudelijke en financiële ondersteuning zoeken om hun innovatieplannen door te

  8. Nature as Inspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, Kristina; Moore, Tamara; Strnat, Meg

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the final lesson within a seven-day STEM and literacy unit that is part of the Picture STEM curriculum (pictureSTEM. org) and uses engineering to integrate science and mathematics learning in a meaningful way (Tank and Moore 2013). For this engineering challenge, students used nature as a source of inspiration for designs to…

  9. An Ark of Inspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Steve

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art project suitable for middle and high school students in which they either combine identifiable parts from different animals to create one creature or take one animal and creatively distort it. Explains that this lesson enables students to be satisfied with their animal-inspired artwork. (CMK)

  10. Nature as Inspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, Kristina; Moore, Tamara; Strnat, Meg

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the final lesson within a seven-day STEM and literacy unit that is part of the Picture STEM curriculum (pictureSTEM. org) and uses engineering to integrate science and mathematics learning in a meaningful way (Tank and Moore 2013). For this engineering challenge, students used nature as a source of inspiration for designs to…

  11. Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    of mask respirators with bio -inspired adhesive integrated into their peripheral seals; and (2) assessment of the competitive position of the new bio -inspired adhesives in broader fields of application.

  12. Optical Properties of GaSb Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez-Bergquist Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Amorphous GaSb nanofibers were obtained by ion beam irradiation of bulk GaSb single-crystal wafers, resulting in fibers with diameters of ~20 nm. The Raman spectra and photoluminescence (PL of the ion irradiation-induced nanofibers before and after annealing were studied. Results show that the Raman intensity of the GaSb LO phonon mode decreased after ion beam irradiation as a result of the formation of the amorphous nanofibers. A new mode is observed at ~155 cm-1 both from the unannealed and annealed GaSb nanofiber samples related to the A1g mode of Sb–Sb bond vibration. Room temperature PL measurements of the annealed nanofibers present a wide feature band at ~1.4–1.6 eV. The room temperature PL properties of the irradiated samples presents a large blue shift compared to bulk GaSb. Annealed nanofibers and annealed nanofibers with Au nanodots present two different PL peaks (400 and 540 nm, both of which may originate from Ga or O vacancies in GaO. The enhanced PL and new band characteristics in nanostructured GaSb suggest that the nanostructured fibers may have unique applications in optoelectronic devices.

  13. Functional Self-Assembled Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, A.; Wendorff, J. H.

    Electrospinning constitutes a unique technique for the production of nanofibers with diameters down to the range of a few nanometers. In strong contrast to conventional fiber producing techniques, it relies on self-assembly processes driven by the Coulomb interactions between charged elements of the fluids to be spun to nanofibers. The transition from a macroscopic fluid object such as a droplet emerging from a die to solid nanofibers is controlled by a set of complex physical instability processes. They give rise to extremely high extensional deformations and strain rates during fiber formation causing among others a high orientational order in the nanofibers as well as enhanced mechanical properties. Electrospinning is predominantly applied to polymer based materials including natural and synthetic polymers, but, more recently, its use has been extended towards the production of metal, ceramic and glass nanofibers exploiting precursor routes. The nanofibers can be functionalized during electrospinning by introducing pores, fractal surfaces, by incorporating functional elements such as catalysts, quantum dots, drugs, enzymes or even bacteria. The production of individual fibers, random nonwovens, or orientationally highly ordered nonwovens is achieved by an appropriate selection of electrode configurations. Broad areas of application exist in Material and Life Sciences for such nanofibers, including not only optoelectronics, sensorics, catalysis, textiles, high efficiency filters, fiber reinforcement but also tissue engineering, drug delivery, and wound healing. The basic electrospinning process has more recently been extended towards compound co-electrospinning and precision deposition electrospinning to further broaden accessible fiber architectures and potential areas of application.

  14. Biofunctionalized Nanofibers Using Arthrospira (Spirulina Biomass and Biopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Greque de Morais

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospun nanofibers composed of polymers have been extensively researched because of their scientific and technical applications. Commercially available polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB and polyhydroxybutyrate-co-valerate (PHB-HV copolymers are good choices for such nanofibers. We used a highly integrated method, by adjusting the properties of the spinning solutions, where the cyanophyte Arthrospira (formally Spirulina was the single source for nanofiber biofunctionalization. We investigated nanofibers using PHB extracted from Spirulina and the bacteria Cupriavidus necator and compared the nanofibers to those made from commercially available PHB and PHB-HV. Our study assessed nanofiber formation and their selected thermal, mechanical, and optical properties. We found that nanofibers produced from Spirulina PHB and biofunctionalized with Spirulina biomass exhibited properties which were equal to or better than nanofibers made with commercially available PHB or PHB-HV. Our methodology is highly promising for nanofiber production and biofunctionalization and can be used in many industrial and life science applications.

  15. Biofunctionalized Nanofibers Using Arthrospira (Spirulina) Biomass and Biopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Michele Greque; Stillings, Christopher; Dersch, Roland; Rudisile, Markus; Pranke, Patrícia; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; Wendorff, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers composed of polymers have been extensively researched because of their scientific and technical applications. Commercially available polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and polyhydroxybutyrate-co-valerate (PHB-HV) copolymers are good choices for such nanofibers. We used a highly integrated method, by adjusting the properties of the spinning solutions, where the cyanophyte Arthrospira (formally Spirulina) was the single source for nanofiber biofunctionalization. We investigated nanofibers using PHB extracted from Spirulina and the bacteria Cupriavidus necator and compared the nanofibers to those made from commercially available PHB and PHB-HV. Our study assessed nanofiber formation and their selected thermal, mechanical, and optical properties. We found that nanofibers produced from Spirulina PHB and biofunctionalized with Spirulina biomass exhibited properties which were equal to or better than nanofibers made with commercially available PHB or PHB-HV. Our methodology is highly promising for nanofiber production and biofunctionalization and can be used in many industrial and life science applications. PMID:25667931

  16. Biofunctionalized nanofibers using Arthrospira (Spirulina) biomass and biopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Michele Greque; Stillings, Christopher; Dersch, Roland; Rudisile, Markus; Pranke, Patrícia; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; Wendorff, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers composed of polymers have been extensively researched because of their scientific and technical applications. Commercially available polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and polyhydroxybutyrate-co-valerate (PHB-HV) copolymers are good choices for such nanofibers. We used a highly integrated method, by adjusting the properties of the spinning solutions, where the cyanophyte Arthrospira (formally Spirulina) was the single source for nanofiber biofunctionalization. We investigated nanofibers using PHB extracted from Spirulina and the bacteria Cupriavidus necator and compared the nanofibers to those made from commercially available PHB and PHB-HV. Our study assessed nanofiber formation and their selected thermal, mechanical, and optical properties. We found that nanofibers produced from Spirulina PHB and biofunctionalized with Spirulina biomass exhibited properties which were equal to or better than nanofibers made with commercially available PHB or PHB-HV. Our methodology is highly promising for nanofiber production and biofunctionalization and can be used in many industrial and life science applications.

  17. Electrical Impedance Measurements of PZT Nanofiber Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Galos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical impedance measurements of PZT nanofiber sensors were performed using a variety of methods over a frequency spectrum ranging from DC to 1.8 GHz. The nanofibers formed by electrospinning with diameters ranging from 10 to 150 nm were collected and integrated into sensors using microfabrication techniques. Special matching circuits with ultrahigh input impedance were fabricated to produce low noise, measurable sensor outputs. Material properties including resistivity and dielectric constant are derived from the impedance measurements. The resulting material properties are also compared with those of individual nanofibers being tested using conductive AFM and Scanning Conductive Microscopy.

  18. Inspiral into Gargantua

    CERN Document Server

    Gralla, Samuel E; Warburton, Niels

    2016-01-01

    We model the inspiral of a compact object into a more massive black hole rotating very near the theoretical maximum. We find that once the body enters the near-horizon regime the gravitational radiation is characterized by a constant frequency, equal to (twice) the horizon frequency, with an exponentially damped profile. This contrasts with the usual "chirping" behavior and, if detected, would constitute a "smoking gun" for a near-extremal black hole in nature.

  19. Quantum-Inspired Maximizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail

    2008-01-01

    A report discusses an algorithm for a new kind of dynamics based on a quantum- classical hybrid-quantum-inspired maximizer. The model is represented by a modified Madelung equation in which the quantum potential is replaced by different, specially chosen 'computational' potential. As a result, the dynamics attains both quantum and classical properties: it preserves superposition and entanglement of random solutions, while allowing one to measure its state variables, using classical methods. Such optimal combination of characteristics is a perfect match for quantum-inspired computing. As an application, an algorithm for global maximum of an arbitrary integrable function is proposed. The idea of the proposed algorithm is very simple: based upon the Quantum-inspired Maximizer (QIM), introduce a positive function to be maximized as the probability density to which the solution is attracted. Then the larger value of this function will have the higher probability to appear. Special attention is paid to simulation of integer programming and NP-complete problems. It is demonstrated that the problem of global maximum of an integrable function can be found in polynomial time by using the proposed quantum- classical hybrid. The result is extended to a constrained maximum with applications to integer programming and TSP (Traveling Salesman Problem).

  20. Biologically inspired intelligent robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Breazeal, Cynthia

    2003-07-01

    Humans throughout history have always sought to mimic the appearance, mobility, functionality, intelligent operation, and thinking process of biological creatures. This field of biologically inspired technology, having the moniker biomimetics, has evolved from making static copies of human and animals in the form of statues to the emergence of robots that operate with realistic behavior. Imagine a person walking towards you where suddenly you notice something weird about him--he is not real but rather he is a robot. Your reaction would probably be "I can't believe it but this robot looks very real" just as you would react to an artificial flower that is a good imitation. You may even proceed and touch the robot to check if your assessment is correct but, as oppose to the flower case, the robot may be programmed to respond physical and verbally. This science fiction scenario could become a reality as the current trend continues in developing biologically inspired technologies. Technology evolution led to such fields as artificial muscles, artificial intelligence, and artificial vision as well as biomimetic capabilities in materials science, mechanics, electronics, computing science, information technology and many others. This paper will review the state of the art and challenges to biologically-inspired technologies and the role that EAP is expected to play as the technology evolves.

  1. Inspiring a generation

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    The motto of the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games is ‘Inspire a generation’ so it was particularly pleasing to see science, the LHC and Higgs bosons featuring so strongly in the opening ceremony of the Paralympics last week.   It’s a sign of just how far our field has come that such a high-profile event featured particle physics so strongly, and we can certainly add our support to that motto. If the legacy of London 2012 is a generation inspired by science as well as sport, then the games will have more than fulfilled their mission. Particle physics has truly inspiring stories to tell, going well beyond Higgs and the LHC, and the entire community has played its part in bringing the excitement of frontier research in particle physics to a wide audience. Nevertheless, we cannot rest on our laurels: maintaining the kind of enthusiasm for science we witnessed at the Paralympic opening ceremony will require constant vigilance, and creative thinking about ways to rea...

  2. Perceptually-Inspired Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Lin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Human sensory systems allow individuals to see, hear, touch, and interact with the surrounding physical environment. Understanding human perception and its limit enables us to better exploit the psychophysics of human perceptual systems to design more efficient, adaptive algorithms and develop perceptually-inspired computational models. In this talk, I will survey some of recent efforts on perceptually-inspired computing with applications to crowd simulation and multimodal interaction. In particular, I will present data-driven personality modeling based on the results of user studies, example-guided physics-based sound synthesis using auditory perception, as well as perceptually-inspired simplification for multimodal interaction. These perceptually guided principles can be used to accelerating multi-modal interaction and visual computing, thereby creating more natural human-computer interaction and providing more immersive experiences. I will also present their use in interactive applications for entertainment, such as video games, computer animation, and shared social experience. I will conclude by discussing possible future research directions.

  3. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of cellulose nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Lima R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Renata de Lima,1 Leandro Oliveira Feitosa,1 Cintia Rodrigues Maruyama,1 Mariana Abreu Barga,1 Patrícia Cristina Yamawaki,1 Isolda Jesus Vieira,1 Eliangela M Teixeira,2 Ana Carolina Corrêa,2 Luiz Henrique Caparelli Mattoso,2 Leonardo Fernandes Fraceto31Department of Biotechnology, University of Sorocaba, Sorocaba, 2Embrapa Instrumentation (CNPDIA, National Nanotechnology Laboratory for Agriculture (LNNA, São Carlos, 3Department of Environmental Engineering, State University of São Paulo (UNESP, Sorocaba, SP, BrazilBackground: Agricultural products and by products provide the primary materials for a variety of technological applications in diverse industrial sectors. Agro-industrial wastes, such as cotton and curaua fibers, are used to prepare nanofibers for use in thermoplastic films, where they are combined with polymeric matrices, and in biomedical applications such as tissue engineering, amongst other applications. The development of products containing nanofibers offers a promising alternative for the use of agricultural products, adding value to the chains of production. However, the emergence of new nanotechnological products demands that their risks to human health and the environment be evaluated. This has resulted in the creation of the new area of nanotoxicology, which addresses the toxicological aspects of these materials.Purpose and methods: Contributing to these developments, the present work involved a genotoxicological study of different nanofibers, employing chromosomal aberration and comet assays, as well as cytogenetic and molecular analyses, to obtain preliminary information concerning nanofiber safety. The methodology consisted of exposure of Allium cepa roots, and animal cell cultures (lymphocytes and fibroblasts, to different types of nanofibers. Negative controls, without nanofibers present in the medium, were used for comparison.Results: The nanofibers induced different responses according to the cell type used. In

  4. Optical properties of bio-inspired peptide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Rosenman, Gil

    2016-04-01

    Supramolecular self-assembled bio-inspired peptide nanostructures are favorable to be implemented in diverse nanophotonics applications due to their superior physical properties such as wideband optical transparency, high second-order nonlinear response, waveguiding properties and more. Here, we focus on the optical properties found in di-phenylalanine peptide nano-architectures, with special emphasize on their linear and nonlinear optical waveguiding effects. Using both simulation and experiments, we show their ability to passively guide light at both fundamental and second-harmonic frequencies. In addition, we show that at elevated temperatures, 140-180°C, these native supramolecular structures undergo irreversible thermally induced transformation via re-assembling into completely new thermodynamically stable phase having nanofiber morphology similar to those of amyloid fibrils. In this new phase, the peptide nanofibers lose their second-order nonlinear response, while exhibit profound modification of optoelectronic properties followed by the appearance of visible (blue and green) photoluminescence (PL). Our study propose a new generation of multifunctional optical waveguides with variety of characteristics, which self-assembled into 1D-elongated nanostructures and could be used as building blocks of many integrated photonic devices.

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Boehmite Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Boehmite nanofibers of high quality were synthesized through a wet-gel conversion process without the use of a surfactant. The long nanofibers of boehmite with clear-cut edges were obtained by steaming the wet-gel precipitate at 170∘C for 2 days. Analytical techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, infrared emission spectroscopy (IES, as well as Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the products.

  6. Fabrication of Conductive Polypyrrole Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqun Cong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning is employed to prepare conductive polypyrrole nanofibers with uniform morphology and good mechanical strength. Soluble PPy was synthesized with NaDEHS as dopant and then applied to electrospinning with or without PEO as carrier. The PEO contents had great influence on the morphology and conductivity of the electrospun material. The results of these experiments will allow us to have a better understanding of PPy electrospun nanofibers and will permit the design of effective electrodes in the BMIs fields.

  7. Lamination of microfibrous PLGA fabric by electrospinning a layer of collagen-hydroxyapatite composite nanofibers for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Gi-Wan; Gupta, Kailash Chandra; Jung, Kyung-Hye; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2017-01-01

    To mimic the muscle inspired cells adhesion through proteins secretion, the lamination of collagen-hydroxyapatite nanorod (nHA) composite nanofibers has been carried out successfully on polydopamine (PDA)-coated microfibrous polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) fabrics. The lamination of collagen-hydroxyapatite composite nanofibers on polydopamine-coated microfibrous PLGA fabrics was carried through electrospinning the solution of collagen containing L-glutamic acid-grafted hydroxyapatite nanorods (nHA-GA) at a flow rate of 1.5 mL/h and an applied voltage of 15 kV. In comparison to pristine PLGA, dopamine-coated PLGA and collagen-hydroxyapatite composite nanofiber lamination has produced more wettable surfaces and surface wettability is found to higher with dopamine-coated PLGA fabrics then pristine PLGA. The SEM micrographs have clearly indicated that the lamination of polydopamine-coated PLGA fabric with collagen-hydroxyapatite composite nanofibers has shown increased adhesion of MC3T3E1 cells in comparison to pristine PLGA fabrics. The results of these studies have clearly demonstrated that collagen-nHA composites fibers may be used to create bioactive 3D scaffolds using PLGA as an architectural support agent.

  8. Fabrication of Poly(4-vinylpyridine) Nanofiber and Fluorescent Poly(4-vinylpyridine)/Porphyrin Nanofiber by Electrospinning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yan; ZHAN Nai-qian; YU Miao; YANG Qing-biao; ZHANG Chao-qun; WANG Heng-guo; LI Yao-xian

    2008-01-01

    Poly(4-vinylpyridine)(P4-VP) nanofiber and fluoresent poly(4-vinylpyridine)/porphyrin(P4-VP/TPPA) nanofiber were respectively prepared by electrospinning.The effect of the concentration of P4-VP/dimethylformamide (DMF) electrospinning solutions on the morphology of P4-VP nanofiber was investigated and it was found that the average diameter of the nanofiber of P4-VP/DMF increased with the increase of the concentration of the spinning solution.After the addition of TPPA to the P4-VP/DMF spinning solution,the diameter of P4-VP/TPPA nanofiber became even due to the increase of the conductivity of the P4-VP/DMF-TPPA solution.The photoluminescent(PL) spectral analysis indicates that the emission peak position of P4-VP/TPPA nanofiber is almost the same as that of pure TPPA at about 650 nm without peak shift,and when it was stored for 20 days,the emission peak of P4-VP/TPPA nanofiber is also at 650 rim,indicating that the fuorescent property of P4-VP/TPPA nanofiber is stable.Fourier-transform infrared(FTIR) spectrum confirms the chemical composition of the resulting P4-VP/TPPA composite nanoflber.

  9. Hydrodynamic Helical Orientations of Nanofibers in a Vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Tsuda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, I report our recent studies on spectroscopic visualizations of macroscopic helical alignments of nanofibers in vortex flows. Our designed supramolecular nanofibers, formed through self-assemblies of dye molecules, helically align in torsional flows of a vortex generated by mechanical rotary stirring of the sample solutions. The nanofiber, formed through bundling of linear supramolecular polymers, aligns equally in right- and left-handed vortex flows. However, in contrast, a one-handedly twisted nanofiber, formed through helical bundling of the supramolecular polymers, shows unequal helical alignments in these torsional flows. When the helical handedness of the nanofiber matches that of the vortex flow, the nanofiber aligns more efficiently in the flowing fluid. Such phenomena are observed not only with the artificial helical supramolecular nanofibers but also with biological nanofibers such as double-stranded DNA.

  10. Bubbfil spinning for mass-production of nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Rou-Xi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bubbfil spinning is a generalized bubble electrospinning, including bubble spinning, blown-bubble spinning, and membrane spinning, for mass production of nanofiber. This paper shows small bubbles in liquid membrane are the best candidate for uniform nanofibers.

  11. #IWD2016 Academic Inspiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Ninna

    2016-01-01

    What academics or books have inspired you in your writing and research, or helped to make sense of the world around you? In this feature essay, Ninna Meier returns to her experience of reading Hannah Arendt as she sought to understand work and how it relates to value production in capitalist...... economies. Meier recounts how Arendt’s book On Revolution (1963) forged connective threads between the ‘smallest parts’ and the ‘largest wholes’ and showed how academic work is never fully relegated to the past, but can return in new iterations across time....

  12. A hybrid biomimetic scaffold composed of electrospun polycaprolactone nanofibers and self-assembled peptide amphiphile nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tambralli, Ajay; Blakeney, Bryan; Anderson, Joel; Kushwaha, Meenakshi; Andukuri, Adinarayana; Jun, Ho-Wook [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 801 Shelby Building, 1825 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Dean, Derrick [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham, BEC 254, 1150 10th Ave South, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)], E-mail: hwjun@uab.edu

    2009-06-01

    Nanofibrous electrospun poly ({epsilon}-caprolactone) (ePCL) scaffolds have inherent structural advantages, but lack of bioactivity has limited their usefulness in biomedical applications. Thus, here we report the development of a hybrid, nanostructured, extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking scaffold by a combination of ePCL nanofibers and self-assembled peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers. The PAs have ECM mimicking characteristics including a cell adhesive ligand (RGDS) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) mediated degradable sites. Transmission electron microscope imaging verified successful PA self-assembly into nanofibers (diameters of 8-10 nm) using a solvent evaporation method. This evaporation method was then used to successfully coat PAs onto ePCL nanofibers (diameters of 300-400 nm), to develop hybrid, bioactive scaffolds. Scanning electron microscope characterization showed that the PA coatings did not interfere with the porous ePCL nanofiber network. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were seeded onto the hybrid scaffolds to evaluate their bioactivity. Significantly greater attachment and spreading of hMSCs were observed on ePCL nanofibers coated with PA-RGDS as compared to ePCL nanofibers coated with PA-S (no cell adhesive ligand) and uncoated ePCL nanofibers. Overall, this novel strategy presents a new solution to overcome the current bioactivity challenges of electrospun scaffolds and combines the unique characteristics of ePCL nanofibers and self-assembled PA nanofibers to provide an ECM mimicking environment. This has great potential to be applied to many different electrospun scaffolds for various biomedical applications.

  13. Effect of Nanofibers on Spore Penetration and Lunar Dust Filtration

    OpenAIRE

    Phil Gibson, Ph.D.; Heidi Schreuder-Gibson, Ph.D.; Robert Stote; Margaret Roylance, Ph.D.; Cathy Capone; Masami Nakagawa, Ph.D.

    2008-01-01

    The results of two separate studies on biological spore penetration and simulated lunar dust filtration illustrate the use of nanofibers in some nonstandard filtration applications (nanofibers are generally defined as having diameters of less than a micron). In the first study, a variety of microporous liners containing microfibers and nanofibers were combined with cotton-based fabrics in order to filter aerosolized spores. The aerosol penetration resistance of the nanofiber-lined fabrics was...

  14. Preparation and characterization of crosslinked chitosan-based nanofibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Shan Zhou; Dong Zhi Yang; Jun Nie

    2007-01-01

    Crosslinked chitosan-based nanofibers were successfully prepared via electrospinning technique with heat mediated chemical crosslinking followed. The structure, morphology and mechanical property of nanofibers were characterized by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Instron machine, respectively. The results showed that, nanofibers exhibited a smooth surface and regular morphology, and tensile strength of nanofibers improved with increasing of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) content.

  15. Self-assembled nanofiber coatings for controlling cell responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barros, Raquel C.; Gelens, Edith; Bulten, Erna; Tuin, Annemarie; de Jong, Menno R; Kuijer, Roel; van Kooten, Theo G

    Nanofibers are thought to enhance cell adhesion, growth, and function. We demonstrate that the choice of building blocks in self-assembling nanofiber systems can be used to control cell behavior. The use of 2 D-coated, self-assembled nanofibers in controlling lens epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and

  16. When science inspires art

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Vernède

    2011-01-01

    On Tuesday 18 January 2011, artist Pipilotti Rist came to CERN to find out how science could provide her with a source of inspiration for her art and perhaps to get ideas for future work. Pipilotti, who is an eclectic artist always on the lookout for an original source of inspiration, is almost as passionate about physics as she is about art.   Ever Is Over All, 1997, audio video installation by Pipilotti Rist.  View of the installation at the National Museum for Foreign Art, Sofia, Bulgaria. © Pipilotti Rist. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo by Angel Tzvetanov. Swiss video-maker Pipilotti Rist (her real name is Elisabeth Charlotte Rist), who is well-known in the international art world for her highly colourful videos and creations, visited CERN for the first time on Tuesday 18 January 2011.  Her visit represented a trip down memory lane, since she originally studied physics before becoming interested in pursuing a career as an artist and going on to de...

  17. Geophysics in INSPIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sőrés, László

    2013-04-01

    INSPIRE is a European directive to harmonize spatial data in Europe. Its' aim is to establish a transparent, multidisciplinary network of environmental information by using international standards and OGC web services. Spatial data themes defined in the annex of the directive cover 34 domains that are closely bundled to environment and spatial information. According to the INSPIRE roadmap all data providers must setup discovery, viewing and download services and restructure data stores to provide spatial data as defined by the underlying specifications by 2014 December 1. More than 3000 institutions are going to be involved in the progress. During the data specification process geophysics as an inevitable source of geo information was introduced to Annex II Geology. Within the Geology theme Geophysics is divided into core and extended model. The core model contains specifications for legally binding data provisioning and is going to be part of the Implementation Rules of the INSPIRE directives. To minimize the work load of obligatory data transformations the scope of the core model is very limited and simple. It covers the most essential geophysical feature types that are relevant in economic and environmental context. To fully support the use cases identified by the stake holders the extended model was developed. It contains a wide range of spatial object types for geophysical measurements, processed and interpreted results, and wrapper classes to help data providers in using the Observation and Measurements (O&M) standard for geophysical data exchange. Instead of introducing the traditional concept of "geophysical methods" at a high structural level the data model classifies measurements and geophysical models based on their spatial characteristics. Measurements are classified as geophysical station (point), geophysical profile (curve) and geophysical swath (surface). Generic classes for processing results and interpretation models are curve model (1D), surface

  18. Fabrication of WS2 nanofibers from WO3 nanofibers prepared by an electrospinning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yajun; Zhang, Xuebin; Ji, Yi; Feng, Yi; Zhang, Jingcheng

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes a procedure of synthesizing long WS2 nanofibers. WO3 nanofibers were prepared as precursors by electrospinning of ammonium meta-tungstate (AMT), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and alcohol solution followed by calcination at 550 degrees C in air. WS2 nanofibers were obtained by sulfurization of the WO3 nanofibres at 800 degrees C in an argon atmosphere, with sulfur powder acting as sulfuration reducer. The nanofibres were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that the final products are pure WS2 nanofibres, which have high aspect ratio. The WS2 nanofibers with rough surface were formed of nanoparticles, while some nanoflakes appeared on the surface of WS2 nanofibres. The diameters of the WS2 nanofibers were between 200 and 300 nm, which is similar to WO3 nanofibers. In addition, the WS2 nanofibers were polycrystalline.

  19. Surface structure enhanced second harmonic generation in organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kostiucenko, Oksana;

    Second-harmonic generation upon femto-second laser irradiation of nonlinearly optically active nanofibers grown from nonsymmetrically functionalized para-quarterphenylene (CNHP4) molecules is investigated. Following growth on mica templates, the nanofibers have been transferred onto lithography-d......-defined regular arrays of gold square nanostructures. These nanostructure arrays induce local field enhancement, which significantly lowers the threshold for second harmonic generation in the nanofibers.......Second-harmonic generation upon femto-second laser irradiation of nonlinearly optically active nanofibers grown from nonsymmetrically functionalized para-quarterphenylene (CNHP4) molecules is investigated. Following growth on mica templates, the nanofibers have been transferred onto lithography...

  20. Novel continuous carbon and ceramic nanofibers and nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yongkui

    2004-12-01

    Manufacturing of carbon nanofibers from PAN precursor is described in Chapter 2 of the dissertation. The electrospun nanofibers were continuous, uniform in diameter, and the samples didn't contain impurities, unlike carbon nanotubes or vapor grown carbon fibers. Systematic studies on the electrospinning parameters showed that nanofiber diameter could be varied in a range of 80 to 1800 nm. XRD studies on the carbon nanofibers fired at different temperatures showed that higher temperature resulted in better nanostructure. Fracture-free random carbon nanofiber sheets were produced by stretch-stabilization and carbonization for the first time. Toughening effects of random as-spun PAN, stabilized PAN, and carbon nanofibers on Mode I and Mode II interlaminar fracture of advanced carbon-epoxy composites were examined by DCB and ENF tests respectively in Chapter 3. The results showed that the interlaminar fracture toughness increased the most with carbon nanofiber reinforcement. 200% improvement in Mode I fracture toughness and 60% in Mode II fracture toughness were achieved with a minimum increase of weight. SEM fractographic analysis showed nanofiber pullout and crack bridging as the main nanomechanisms of toughening. Chapter 4 describes manufacturing of aligned carbon nanofibers and nanocomposites by a modified electrospinning technique. Constant-load stretch-stabilization was applied on carbon nanofibers for the first time. Analysis showed that mechanical properties of nanofibers and nanocomposites improved with stretch-stabilization and alignment of carbon nanofibers. Nanofabrication of ceramic 3Al2O3-2SiO2, SiO2-TiO2 nanofibers by a novel combination of sol-gel and electrospinning techniques invented recently at UNL is described in Chapters 5. The 3Al2O3-2SiO2, SiO2-TiO 2 nanofibers were continuous, non circular in cross section and had crystalline structure after high temperature calcination. Effects of the process parameters on their geometry and structure were

  1. Advancement in organic nanofiber based transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Baunegaard With; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Tavares, Luciana

    The focus of this project is to study the light emission from nanofiber based organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs) with the overall aim of developing efficient, nanoscale light sources with different colors integrated on-chip. The research performed here regards the fabrication and characte......The focus of this project is to study the light emission from nanofiber based organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs) with the overall aim of developing efficient, nanoscale light sources with different colors integrated on-chip. The research performed here regards the fabrication...... and characterization of OLETs using the organic semiconductors para-hexaphenylene (p6P), 5,5´-Di-4-biphenyl-2,2´-bithiophene (PPTTPP) and 5,5'-bis(naphth-2-yl)-2,2'-bithiophene (NaT2). These molecules can self-assemble forming molecular crystalline nanofibers. Organic nanofibers can form the basis for light......-emitters for future nanophotonic applications, due to their many interesting optoelectronic properties, such as polarized photo- and electroluminescence, waveguiding and emission color tunability. A simple roll printing technique1 has allowed us to implement these nanofibers in different types of devices. Multicolor...

  2. A Biologically Inspired Classifier

    CERN Document Server

    Bagnoli, Franco

    2007-01-01

    We present a method for measuring the distance among records based on the correlations of data stored in the corresponding database entries. The original method (F. Bagnoli, A. Berrones and F. Franci. Physica A 332 (2004) 509-518) was formulated in the context of opinion formation. The opinions expressed over a set of topic originate a ``knowledge network'' among individuals, where two individuals are nearer the more similar their expressed opinions are. Assuming that individuals' opinions are stored in a database, the authors show that it is possible to anticipate an opinion using the correlations in the database. This corresponds to approximating the overlap between the tastes of two individuals with the correlations of their expressed opinions. In this paper we extend this model to nonlinear matching functions, inspired by biological problems such as microarray (probe-sample pairing). We investigate numerically the error between the correlation and the overlap matrix for eight sequences of reference with r...

  3. Theosophically Inspired Movements in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybdal, René

    2016-01-01

    The theosophical movement has had a significant influence on the esoteric milieu in Denmark during the 20th Century. In this paper the inspiration on other Groups in Denmark is explored.......The theosophical movement has had a significant influence on the esoteric milieu in Denmark during the 20th Century. In this paper the inspiration on other Groups in Denmark is explored....

  4. Graphene oxide decorated electrospun gelatin nanofibers: Fabrication, properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalaja, K; Sreehari, V S; Kumar, P R Anil; Nirmala, R James

    2016-07-01

    Gelatin nanofiber fabricated by electrospinning process is found to mimic the complex structural and functional properties of natural extracellular matrix for tissue regeneration. In order to improve the physico-chemical and biological properties of the nanofibers, graphene oxide is incorporated in the gelatin to form graphene oxide decorated gelatin nanofibers. The current research effort is focussed on the fabrication and evaluation of physico-chemical and biological properties of graphene oxide-gelatin composite nanofibers. The presence of graphene oxide in the nanofibers was established by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We report the effect of incorporation of graphene oxide on the mechanical, thermal and biological performance of the gelatin nanofibers. The tensile strength of gelatin nanofibers was increased from 8.29±0.53MPa to 21±2.03MPa after the incorporation of GO. In order to improve the water resistance of nanofibers, natural based cross-linking agent, namely, dextran aldehyde was employed. The cross-linked composite nanofibers showed further increase in the tensile strength up to 56.4±2.03MPa. Graphene oxide incorporated gelatin nanofibers are evaluated for bacterial activity against gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and gram negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria and cyto compatibility using mouse fibroblast cells (L-929 cells). The results indicate that the graphene oxide incorporated gelatin nanofibers do not prevent bacterial growth, nevertheless support the L-929 cell adhesion and proliferation.

  5. Fabrication of nanofiber mats from electrospinning of functionalized polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, Burcu; Kayaman-Apohan, Nilhan; Erdem-Kuruca, Serap

    2014-08-01

    Electrospinning technique enabled us to prepare nanofibers from synthetic and natural polymers. In this study, it was aimed to fabricate electrospun poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) based nanofibers by reactive electrospinning process. To improve endurance of fiber toward to many solvents, PVA was functionalized with photo-crosslinkable groups before spinning. Afterward PVA was crosslinked by UV radiation during electrospinning process. The nanofiber mats were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that homogenous, uniform and crosslinked PVA nanofibers in diameters of about 200 nm were obtained. Thermal stability of the nanofiber mat was investigated with thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Also the potential use of this nanofiber mats for tissue engineering was examined. Osteosarcoma (Saos) cells were cultured on the nanofiber mats.

  6. Transparent Conductive Nanofiber Paper for Foldable Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogi, Masaya; Karakawa, Makoto; Komoda, Natsuki; Yagyu, Hitomi; Nge, Thi Thi

    2015-11-26

    Optically transparent nanofiber paper containing silver nanowires showed high electrical conductivity and maintained the high transparency, and low weight of the original transparent nanofiber paper. We demonstrated some procedures of optically transparent and electrically conductive cellulose nanofiber paper for lightweight and portable electronic devices. The nanofiber paper enhanced high conductivity without any post treatments such as heating or mechanical pressing, when cellulose nanofiber dispersions were dropped on a silver nanowire thin layer. The transparent conductive nanofiber paper showed high electrical durability in repeated folding tests, due to dual advantages of the hydrophilic affinity between cellulose and silver nanowires, and the entanglement between cellulose nanofibers and silver nanowires. Their optical transparency and electrical conductivity were as high as those of ITO glass. Therefore, using this conductive transparent paper, organic solar cells were produced that achieved a power conversion of 3.2%, which was as high as that of ITO-based solar cells.

  7. Nano-Fiber Reinforced Enhancements in Composite Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    Nano-fibers are used to reinforce polymer matrices to enhance the matrix dependent properties that are subsequently used in conventional structural composites. A quasi isotropic configuration is used in arranging like nano-fibers through the thickness to ascertain equiaxial enhanced matrix behavior. The nano-fiber volume ratios are used to obtain the enhanced matrix strength properties for 0.01,0.03, and 0.05 nano-fiber volume rates. These enhanced nano-fiber matrices are used with conventional fiber volume ratios of 0.3 and 0.5 to obtain the composite properties. Results show that nano-fiber enhanced matrices of higher than 0.3 nano-fiber volume ratio are degrading the composite properties.

  8. Electrospinning nanofibers for controlled drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Indrani

    Electrospinning is the most widely studied technique for the synthesis of nanofibers. Electrospinning is considered as one of the technologies that can produce nanosized drugs incorporated in polymeric nanofibers. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that the release rates of drugs from these nanofiber formulations are enhanced compared to those from original drug substance. This technology has the potential for enhancing the oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs. The electrospun mats were made using Polycaprolactone/PCL, Poly(DL-lactide)/PDL 05 and Poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide)/PLGA. The drugs incorporated in the electrospun fibers were 5-Fluorouracil and Rapamycin. The evidence of the drugs being embedded in the polymers was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The release of 5-Fluorouracil and Rapamycin were followed by UV-VIS spectroscopy.

  9. High nonlinear optical anisotropy of urea nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, D.; de Matos Gomes, E.; Belsley, M.; Almeida, B.; Martins, A.; Neves, N.; Reis, R.

    2010-07-01

    Nanofibers consisting of the optically nonlinear organic molecule urea embedded in both poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) polymers were produced by the electrospinning technique. The second-harmonic generation produced by aligned fiber mats of these materials displays a strong dependence on the polarization of the incident light. In PVA-urea nanofibers the effectiveness in generating of the second-harmonic light is as high as that of a pure urea powder with an average grain size of 110 μm. The results suggest that single crystalline urea nanofibers were achieved with a long-range crystalline order extending into the range of 2-4 μm with PVA as the host polymer.

  10. Purification process for vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V.; Delziet, Lance; Matthews, Kristopher; Chen, Bin; Meyyappan, M.

    2003-01-01

    Individual, free-standing, vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes or nanofibers are ideal for sensor and electrode applications. Our plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition techniques for producing free-standing and vertically aligned carbon nanofibers use catalyst particles at the tip of the fiber. Here we present a simple purification process for the removal of iron catalyst particles at the tip of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers derived by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The first step involves thermal oxidation in air, at temperatures of 200-400 degrees C, resulting in the physical swelling of the iron particles from the formation of iron oxide. Subsequently, the complete removal of the iron oxide particles is achieved with diluted acid (12% HCl). The purification process appears to be very efficient at removing all of the iron catalyst particles. Electron microscopy images and Raman spectroscopy data indicate that the purification process does not damage the graphitic structure of the nanotubes.

  11. Graphene oxide decorated electrospun gelatin nanofibers: Fabrication, properties and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalaja, K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 547 (India); Sreehari, V.S. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Bhopal, Bhauri, Madhya Pradesh 462066 (India); Kumar, P.R. Anil [Tissue culture laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojappura, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 012 (India); Nirmala, R. James, E-mail: nirmala@iist.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 547 (India)

    2016-07-01

    Gelatin nanofiber fabricated by electrospinning process is found to mimic the complex structural and functional properties of natural extracellular matrix for tissue regeneration. In order to improve the physico-chemical and biological properties of the nanofibers, graphene oxide is incorporated in the gelatin to form graphene oxide decorated gelatin nanofibers. The current research effort is focussed on the fabrication and evaluation of physico-chemical and biological properties of graphene oxide-gelatin composite nanofibers. The presence of graphene oxide in the nanofibers was established by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We report the effect of incorporation of graphene oxide on the mechanical, thermal and biological performance of the gelatin nanofibers. The tensile strength of gelatin nanofibers was increased from 8.29 ± 0.53 MPa to 21 ± 2.03 MPa after the incorporation of GO. In order to improve the water resistance of nanofibers, natural based cross-linking agent, namely, dextran aldehyde was employed. The cross-linked composite nanofibers showed further increase in the tensile strength up to 56.4 ± 2.03 MPa. Graphene oxide incorporated gelatin nanofibers are evaluated for bacterial activity against gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and gram negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria and cyto compatibility using mouse fibroblast cells (L-929 cells). The results indicate that the graphene oxide incorporated gelatin nanofibers do not prevent bacterial growth, nevertheless support the L-929 cell adhesion and proliferation. - Highlights: • Graphene oxide nano reinforced gelatin nanofibers are fabricated by electrospinning. • Graphene oxide (0.5%) loading resulted in increased tensile strength. • GO/gelatin nanofibers are cross-linked with dextran aldehyde. • Composite nanofibers favoured adhesion of L-929 cells. • GO/gelatin mats do not prevent bacterial growth.

  12. Modified Silica Nanofibers with Antibacterial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Veverková

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on development of functionalized inorganic-organic nanofibrous material with antibacterial activity for wound dressing applications. The nanofibers combining poly(vinyl alcohol and silica were produced by electrospinning from the sol and thermally stabilized. The PVA/silica nanofibers surface was functionalized by silver and copper nanoparticles to ensure antibacterial activity. It was proven that quantity of adsorbed silver and copper nanoparticles depends on process time of adsorption. According to antibacterial tests results, this novel nanofibrous material shows a big potential for wound dressing applications due to its significant antibacterial efficiency.

  13. Biofunctionalizing nanofibers with carbohydrate blood group antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Katie; Kannan, Bhuvaneswari; Korchagina, Elena; Popova, Inna; Ryzhov, Ivan; Henry, Stephen; Bovin, Nicolai

    2016-11-01

    A rapid and simple method of biofunctionalising nylon, cellulose acetate, and polyvinyl butyral electrospun nanofibers with blood group glycans was achieved by preparing function-spacer-lipid constructs and simply contacting them to fibers with a piezo inkjet printer. A series of water dispersible amphipathic glycan-spacer constructs were synthesized representing a range ABO and related blood group antigens. After immediate contact of the amphipathic glycan-spacer constructs with nanofiber surfaces they self-assembled and were detectable by enzyme immunoassays with high sensitivity and specificity.

  14. Controlled Morphology of Porous Polyvinyl Butyral Nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    A simple and effective method for the fabrication of porous nanofibers based on the solvent evaporation methods in one-step electrospinning process from the commercial polyvinyl butyral (PVB) is presented. The obtained nanofibers are prevalently amorphous with diameters ranging from 150 to 4350 nm and specific surface area of approximately 2–20 m2/g. Pore size with irregular shape of the porous PVB fibers ranged approximately from 50 to 200 nm. The effects of polymer solution concentration,...

  15. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C.; Tan, C.D.; Hidalgo, R.; Baker, R.T.K.; Rodriguez, N.M. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1998-08-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNF) are a type of material that is produced by the decomposition of carbon containing gases over metal catalyst particles at temperatures around 600 C. These molecularly engineered structures consist of graphene sheets perfectly arranged in a parallel, perpendicular or at angle orientation with respect to the fiber axis. The most important feature of the material is that only edges are exposed. Such an arrangement imparts the material with unique properties for gas adsorption because the evenly separated layers constitute the most ordered set of nanopores that can accommodate an adsorbate in the most efficient manner. In addition, the non-rigid pore walls can also expand so as to accommodate hydrogen in a multilayer conformation. Of the many varieties of structures that can be produced the authors have discovered that when gram quantities of a selected number of GNF are exposed to hydrogen at pressures of {approximately} 2,000 psi, they are capable of adsorbing and storing up to 40 wt% of hydrogen. It is believed that a strong interaction is established between hydrogen and the delocalized p-electrons present in the graphite layers and therefore a new type of chemistry is occurring within these confined structures.

  16. Electrospinning of nanofibers from non-polymeric systems: polymer-free nanofibers from cyclodextrin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebioglu, Asli; Uyar, Tamer

    2012-01-21

    High molecular weight polymers and high polymer concentrations are desirable for the electrospinning of nanofibers since polymer chain entanglements and overlapping are important for uniform fiber formation. Hence, the electrospinning of nanofibers from non-polymeric systems such as cyclodextrins (CDs) is quite a challenge since CDs are cyclic oligosaccharides. Nevertheless, in this study, we have successfully achieved the electrospinning of nanofibers from chemically modified CDs without using a carrier polymer matrix. Polymer-free nanofibers were electrospun from three different CD derivatives, hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD), hydroxypropyl-γ-cyclodextrin (HPγCD) and methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) in three different solvent systems, water, dimethylformamide (DMF) and dimethylacetamide (DMAc). We observed that the electrospinning of these CDs is quite similar to polymeric systems in which the solvent type, the solution concentration and the solution conductivity are some of the key factors for obtaining uniform nanofibers. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements indicated that the presence of considerable CD aggregates and the very high solution viscosity were playing a key role for attaining nanofibers from CD derivatives without the use of any polymeric carrier. The electrospinning of CD solutions containing urea yielded no fibers but only beads or splashes since urea caused a notable destruction of the self-associated CD aggregates in their concentrated solutions. The structural, thermal and mechanical characteristics of the CD nanofibers were also investigated. Although the CD derivatives are amorphous small molecules, interestingly, we observed that these electrospun CD nanofibers/nanowebs have shown some mechanical integrity by which they can be easily handled and folded as a free standing material.

  17. Electrospinning of nanofibers from non-polymeric systems: polymer-free nanofibers from cyclodextrin derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebioglu, Asli; Uyar, Tamer

    2012-01-01

    High molecular weight polymers and high polymer concentrations are desirable for the electrospinning of nanofibers since polymer chain entanglements and overlapping are important for uniform fiber formation. Hence, the electrospinning of nanofibers from non-polymeric systems such as cyclodextrins (CDs) is quite a challenge since CDs are cyclic oligosaccharides. Nevertheless, in this study, we have successfully achieved the electrospinning of nanofibers from chemically modified CDs without using a carrier polymer matrix. Polymer-free nanofibers were electrospun from three different CD derivatives, hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD), hydroxypropyl-γ-cyclodextrin (HPγCD) and methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) in three different solvent systems, water, dimethylformamide (DMF) and dimethylacetamide (DMAc). We observed that the electrospinning of these CDs is quite similar to polymeric systems in which the solvent type, the solution concentration and the solution conductivity are some of the key factors for obtaining uniform nanofibers. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements indicated that the presence of considerable CD aggregates and the very high solution viscosity were playing a key role for attaining nanofibers from CD derivatives without the use of any polymeric carrier. The electrospinning of CD solutions containing urea yielded no fibers but only beads or splashes since urea caused a notable destruction of the self-associated CD aggregates in their concentrated solutions. The structural, thermal and mechanical characteristics of the CD nanofibers were also investigated. Although the CD derivatives are amorphous small molecules, interestingly, we observed that these electrospun CD nanofibers/nanowebs have shown some mechanical integrity by which they can be easily handled and folded as a free standing material.

  18. Holography inspired stringy hadrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenschein, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Holography inspired stringy hadrons (HISH) is a set of models that describe hadrons: mesons, baryons and glueballs as strings in flat four dimensional space-time. The models are based on a "map" from stringy hadrons of holographic confining backgrounds. In this note we review the "derivation" of the models. We start with a brief reminder of the passage from the AdS5 ×S5 string theory to certain flavored confining holographic models. We then describe the string configurations in holographic backgrounds that correspond to a Wilson line, a meson, a baryon and a glueball. The key ingredients of the four dimensional picture of hadrons are the "string endpoint mass" and the "baryonic string vertex". We determine the classical trajectories of the HISH. We review the current understanding of the quantization of the hadronic strings. We end with a summary of the comparison of the outcome of the HISH models with the PDG data about mesons and baryons. We extract the values of the tension, masses and intercepts from best fits, write down certain predictions for higher excited hadrons and present attempts to identify glueballs.

  19. [Medicine inspired by poverty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, H

    2000-05-13

    Since his arrival in Egypt in 1994 the author joined a number of archaeological expeditions as a surveyor and part-time physician. During this latter activity he came into contact with the beliefs and practices of the local workmen and those of the Ababda Bedouin in particular. Living a harsh life in the southern part of the Egyptian Eastern Desert, their medicine seems to be inspired by poverty. Widely used for all internal disorders are 'kaya bil-naar': oval scars made with red-hot metal instruments. Another, less common, form of scarification is 'mi'ah-hed'asher', three parallel lines carved deeply into the cheek of the patient. 'Muhawy' is the bite of a snake into the earlobe of the patient, to prevent snake-bites. Another prophylactic is the 'higab', a small leather pouch containing a magical object or text. Therapies for less serious disorders include the use of herbs, spices and foodstuffs, often prepared in special ways. Externally, car fuel and axle grease are widely used. With the development of the Red Sea coast for tourism, the life of the Ababda Bedouin will change fundamentally. The above practices are likely to be replaced by Western medicine, probably a change for the better for these people.

  20. Inspiration, anyone? (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Glynn

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available I have to admit that writing an editorial for this issue was a struggle. Trying to sit down and write when the sun was shining outside and most of my colleagues were on vacation was, to say the least, difficult. Add to that research projects and conferences…let’s just say that I found myself less than inspired. A pitiful plea for ideas to a colleague resulted in the reintroduction to a few recent evidence based papers and resources which inspired further searching and reading. Though I generally find myself surrounded (more like buried in research papers and EBLIP literature, somehow I had missed the great strides that have been made of late in the world of evidence based library and information practice. I realize now that I am inspired by the researchers, authors and innovators who are putting EBLIP on the proverbial map. My biggest beef with library literature in general has been the plethora of articles highlighting what we should be doing. Take a close look at the evidence based practitioners in the information professions: these are some of the people who are actively practicing what has been preached for the past few years. Take, for example, the about‐to‐be released Libraries using Evidence Toolkit by Northern Sydney Central Coast Health and The University of Newcastle, Australia (see their announcement in this issue. An impressive advisory group is responsible for maintaining the currency and relevancy of the site as well as promoting the site and acting as a steering committee for related projects. This group is certainly doing more than “talking the talk”: they took their experience at the 3rd International Evidence Based Librarianship Conference and did something with the information they obtained by implementing solutions that worked in their environment. The result? The creation of a collection of tools for all of us to use. This toolkit is just what EBLIP needs: a portal to resources aimed at supporting the information

  1. Inspired by CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Art students inspired by CERN will be returning to show their work 9 to 16 October in Building 500, outside the Auditorium. Seventeen art students from around Europe visited CERN last January for a week of introductions to particle physics and astrophysics, and discussions with CERN scientists about their projects. A CERN scientist "adopted"each artist so they could ask questions during and after the visit. Now the seeds planted during their visit have come to fruition in a show using many media and exploring varied concepts, such as how people experience the online world, the sheer scale of CERN's equipment, and the abstractness of the entities scientists are looking for. "The work is so varied, people are going to love some pieces and detest others," says Andrew Charalambous, the project coordinator from University College London who is also curating the exhibition. "It's contemporary modern art, and that's sometimes difficult to take in." For more information on this thought-provoking show, see: htt...

  2. Combining Bio-inspired Sensing with Bio-inspired Locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Hallam, John; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    In this paper we present a preliminary Braitenberg vehicle–like approach to combine bio-inspired audition with bio-inspired quadruped locomotion in simulation. Locomotion gaits of the salamander–like robot Salamandra robotica are modified by a lizard’s peripheral auditory system model that modula......In this paper we present a preliminary Braitenberg vehicle–like approach to combine bio-inspired audition with bio-inspired quadruped locomotion in simulation. Locomotion gaits of the salamander–like robot Salamandra robotica are modified by a lizard’s peripheral auditory system model...... that modulates the parameters of the locomotor central pattern generators. We present phonotactic performance results of the simulated lizard-salamander hybrid robot....

  3. Combining Bio-inspired Sensing with Bio-inspired Locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Hallam, John; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    In this paper we present a preliminary Braitenberg vehicle–like approach to combine bio-inspired audition with bio-inspired quadruped locomotion in simulation. Locomotion gaits of the salamander–like robot Salamandra robotica are modified by a lizard’s peripheral auditory system model that modula......In this paper we present a preliminary Braitenberg vehicle–like approach to combine bio-inspired audition with bio-inspired quadruped locomotion in simulation. Locomotion gaits of the salamander–like robot Salamandra robotica are modified by a lizard’s peripheral auditory system model...... that modulates the parameters of the locomotor central pattern generators. We present phonotactic performance results of the simulated lizard-salamander hybrid robot....

  4. UV-responsive polyvinyl alcohol nanofibers prepared by electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khatri, Zeeshan, E-mail: zeeshan.khatri@faculty.muet.edu.pk [Department of Textile Engineering, Mehran University of Engineering and Technology, Jamshoro 76062 (Pakistan); Nano Fusion Technology Research Lab, Division of Frontier Fibers, Institute for Fiber Engineering (IFES), Interdisciplinary Cluster for Cutting Edge Research (ICCER), Shinshu University, 3-15-1, Tokida, Ueda, Nagano 386-8567 (Japan); Ali, Shamshad [Department of Textile Engineering, Mehran University of Engineering and Technology, Jamshoro 76062 (Pakistan); Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Khatri, Imran [Department of Entomology, Sindh Agriculture University, Tandojam (Pakistan); Mayakrishnan, Gopiraman [Nano Fusion Technology Research Lab, Division of Frontier Fibers, Institute for Fiber Engineering (IFES), Interdisciplinary Cluster for Cutting Edge Research (ICCER), Shinshu University, 3-15-1, Tokida, Ueda, Nagano 386-8567 (Japan); Kim, Seong Hun [Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ick-Soo, E-mail: kim@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Nano Fusion Technology Research Lab, Division of Frontier Fibers, Institute for Fiber Engineering (IFES), Interdisciplinary Cluster for Cutting Edge Research (ICCER), Shinshu University, 3-15-1, Tokida, Ueda, Nagano 386-8567 (Japan)

    2015-07-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • UV responsive PVA nanofibers were prepared via electrospinning. • Quick response codes were recorded multiple times on UV responsive nanofibers. • The rate of photo-coloration was found faster than the rate of photo-reversibility. - Abstract: We report UV-responsive polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers for potential application for recording and erasing quick response (QR) codes. We incorporate 1′-3′-dihydro-8-methoxy-1′,3′,3′-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro [2H-1-benzopyran-2,2′-(2H)-indole] (indole) and,3-dihydro-1,3,3-trimethylspiro [2H-indole-2,3′-[3H] phenanthr [9,10-b] (1,4) oxazine] (oxazine) into PVA polymer matrix via electrospinning technique. The resultant nanofibers were measured for recording–erasing, photo-coloration and thermal reversibility. The rate of photo-coloration of PVA–indole nanofibers was five times higher than the PVA–oxazine nanofibers, whereas the thermal reversibility found to be more than twice as fast as PVA–oxazine nanofibers. Results showed that the resultant nanofibers have very good capability of recording QR codes multiple times. The FTIR spectroscopy and SEM were employed to characterize the electrospun nanofibers. The UV-responsive PVA nanofibers have great potentials as a light-driven nanomaterials incorporated within sensors, sensitive displays and in optical devices such as erasable and rewritable optical storage.

  5. Electrospinning of nickel oxide nanofibers: Process parameters and morphology control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Abdullah, E-mail: akhalil@masdar.ac.ae; Hashaikeh, Raed, E-mail: rhashaikeh@masdar.ac.ae

    2014-09-15

    In the present work, nickel oxide nanofibers with varying morphology (diameter and roughness) were fabricated via electrospinning technique using a precursor composed of nickel acetate and polyvinyl alcohol. It was found that the diameter and surface roughness of individual nickel oxide nanofibers are strongly dependent upon nickel acetate concentration in the precursor. With increasing nickel acetate concentration, the diameter of nanofibers increased and the roughness decreased. An optimum concentration of nickel acetate in the precursor resulted in the formation of smooth and continuous nickel oxide nanofibers whose diameter can be further controlled via electrospinning voltage. Beyond an optimum concentration of nickel acetate, the resulting nanofibers were found to be ‘flattened’ and ‘wavy’ with occasional cracking across their length. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that the obtained nanofibers are polycrystalline in nature. These nickel oxide nanofibers with varying morphology have potential applications in various engineering domains. - Highlights: • Nickel oxide nanofibers were synthesized via electrospinning. • Fiber diameter and roughness depend on nickel acetate concentration used. • With increasing nickel acetate concentration the roughness of nanofibers decreased. • XRD and TEM revealed a polycrystalline structure of the nanofibers.

  6. Bio-inspired vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posch, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nature still outperforms the most powerful computers in routine functions involving perception, sensing and actuation like vision, audition, and motion control, and is, most strikingly, orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than its artificial competitors. The reasons for the superior performance of biological systems are subject to diverse investigations, but it is clear that the form of hardware and the style of computation in nervous systems are fundamentally different from what is used in artificial synchronous information processing systems. Very generally speaking, biological neural systems rely on a large number of relatively simple, slow and unreliable processing elements and obtain performance and robustness from a massively parallel principle of operation and a high level of redundancy where the failure of single elements usually does not induce any observable system performance degradation. In the late 1980`s, Carver Mead demonstrated that silicon VLSI technology can be employed in implementing ``neuromorphic'' circuits that mimic neural functions and fabricating building blocks that work like their biological role models. Neuromorphic systems, as the biological systems they model, are adaptive, fault-tolerant and scalable, and process information using energy-efficient, asynchronous, event-driven methods. In this paper, some basics of neuromorphic electronic engineering and its impact on recent developments in optical sensing and artificial vision are presented. It is demonstrated that bio-inspired vision systems have the potential to outperform conventional, frame-based vision acquisition and processing systems in many application fields and to establish new benchmarks in terms of redundancy suppression/data compression, dynamic range, temporal resolution and power efficiency to realize advanced functionality like 3D vision, object tracking, motor control, visual feedback loops, etc. in real-time. It is argued that future artificial vision systems

  7. Hierarchical structure of nanofibers by bubbfil spinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A polymer bubble is easy to be broken under a small external force, various different fragments are formed, which can be produced to different morphologies of products including nanofibers and plate-like strip. Polyvinyl-alcohol/honey solution is used in the experiment to show hierarchical structure by the bubbfil spinning.

  8. Carbon nanofiber growth on thin rhodium layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chinthaginjala, J.K.; Unnikrishnan, S.; Smithers, M.A.; Kip, G.A.M.; Lefferts, L.

    2012-01-01

    A thinlayer of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) was synthesized on a thin polycrystalline rhodium (Rh) metal layer by decomposing ethylene in the presence of hydrogen. Interaction of Rh crystals with carbon results in fragmentation and formation of Rh-nanoparticles, facilitating CNF growth. CNFs are immobil

  9. Functionalized Nanofiber Meshes Enhance Immunosorbent Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersey, Joseph S; Meller, Amit; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional substrates with high surface-to-volume ratios and subsequently large protein binding capacities are of interest for advanced immunosorbent assays utilizing integrated microfluidics and nanosensing elements. A library of bioactive and antifouling electrospun nanofiber substrates, which are composed of high-molecular-weight poly(oxanorbornene) derivatives, is described. Specifically, a set of copolymers are synthesized from three 7-oxanorbornene monomers to create a set of water insoluble copolymers with both biotin (bioactive) and triethylene glycol (TEG) (antifouling) functionality. Porous three-dimensional nanofiber meshes are electrospun from these copolymers with the ability to specifically bind streptavidin while minimizing the nonspecific binding of other proteins. Fluorescently labeled streptavidin is used to quantify the streptavidin binding capacity of each mesh type through confocal microscopy. A simplified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is presented to assess the protein binding capabilities and detection limits of these nanofiber meshes under both static conditions (26 h) and flow conditions (1 h) for a model target protein (i.e., mouse IgG) using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) colorimetric assay. Bioactive and antifouling nanofiber meshes outperform traditional streptavidin-coated polystyrene plates under flow, validating their use in future advanced immunosorbent assays and their compatibility with microfluidic-based biosensors.

  10. Controlled Morphology of Porous Polyvinyl Butyral Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Lubasova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and effective method for the fabrication of porous nanofibers based on the solvent evaporation methods in one-step electrospinning process from the commercial polyvinyl butyral (PVB is presented. The obtained nanofibers are prevalently amorphous with diameters ranging from 150 to 4350 nm and specific surface area of approximately 2–20 m2/g. Pore size with irregular shape of the porous PVB fibers ranged approximately from 50 to 200 nm. The effects of polymer solution concentration, composition of the solvents mixture, and applied voltage on fiber diameter and morphology were investigated. The theoretical approach for the choice of poor and good solvents for PVB was explained by the application Hansen solubility parameter (HSP and two-dimensional graph. Three basic conditions for the production of porous PVB nanofibers were defined: (i application of good/poor solvent mixture for spinning solution, (ii differences of the evaporation rate between good/poor solvent, and (iii correct ratios of good/poor solvent (v/v. The diameter of prepared porous PVB fibers decreased as the polymer concentration was lowered and with higher applied voltage. These nanofiber sheets with porous PVB fibers could be a good candidate for high-efficiency filter materials in comparison to smooth fibers without pores.

  11. Carbon nanofibers: catalytic synthesis and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, K.P. de; Geus, John W.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers (diameter range, 3-100 nm; length range, 1.1-1000 µm) have been known for a long time as a nuisance that often merges during catalythic conversion of carbon-containing gases. The recent outburst of interest in these graphitic materials originates from their potential for unique app

  12. Fluorescent Self-Assembled Polyphenylene Dendrimer Nanofibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Daojun; Feyter, Steven De; Cotlet, Mircea; Wiesler, Uwe-Martin; Weil, Tanja; Herrmann, Andreas; Müllen, Klaus; Schryver, Frans C. De

    2003-01-01

    A second-generation polyphenylene dendrimer 1 self-assembles into nanofibers on various substrates such as HOPG, silicon, glass, and mica from different solvents. The investigation with noncontact atomic force microscopy (NCAFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the morphology of the

  13. Bubbfil spinning for fabrication of PVA nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Chun-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bubbfil spinning is used to fabricate PVA nanofibers. Multiple polymer bubbles are formed on the spinneret, and an external force is added to burst the bubbles immediately. The ejected jets are accelerated to a high velocity, and fiber diameter is tenable by adjusting the spinning parameters.

  14. Nature-inspired optimization algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xin-She

    2014-01-01

    Nature-Inspired Optimization Algorithms provides a systematic introduction to all major nature-inspired algorithms for optimization. The book's unified approach, balancing algorithm introduction, theoretical background and practical implementation, complements extensive literature with well-chosen case studies to illustrate how these algorithms work. Topics include particle swarm optimization, ant and bee algorithms, simulated annealing, cuckoo search, firefly algorithm, bat algorithm, flower algorithm, harmony search, algorithm analysis, constraint handling, hybrid methods, parameter tuning

  15. Implementing INSPIRE for the Czech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Poláček

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the topic of the implementation of INSPIRE directive within the Information System of the Czech Cadastre of Real Estates. The procedure of implementation of the INSPIRE directive for cadastral related themes, which started in 2008, is followed. Currently running view and download services as well as experience with its operational run are described. Finally an overview of the implementation problems and scheduled follow-up activities are outlined.

  16. Crystallization of Poly(3-hexylthiophene Nanofiber in a Narrow Groove

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kushi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Whisker-type poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl (P3HT nanofibers were aligned by restricting their growth direction using an approximately 100–1000 nm wide narrow groove fabricated by thermal nanoimprinting. In grooves made of an amorphous fluoropolymer (CYTOP™ with widths of less than 1500 nm, the nanofibers oriented uniaxially perpendicular to the groove and their length was limited to the width of the groove. This result indicates that the nucleation of nanofibers tends to be selectively promoted near the interface of CYTOP™ with fluoro-groups, and nanofiber growth perpendicular to the wall is promoted because P3HT molecules are supplied more frequently from the center of the groove. Furthermore, the orientation induced anisotropic conductivity, and the conductivity parallel to the oriented nanofibers was more than an order of magnitude higher than that perpendicular to the oriented nanofibers.

  17. Preparation of photocrosslinkable polystyrene methylene cinnamate nanofibers via electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chuan; Nirmala, R; Navamathavan, R; Li, Xiang-Dan; Kim, Hak-Yong

    2011-10-01

    Nanoscaled photocrosslinkable polystyrene methylene cinnamate (PSMC) nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning. The PSMC was prepared by the modification of polystyrene as a starting material via a two-step reaction process, chloromethylation and esterification. The chemical structure of PSMC was confirmed by 1H NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The photosensitivity of the PSMC was investigated using ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopic methods. Electrospun PSMC nanofiber mat showed excellent solubility in many organic solvents. UV irradiation of the electrospun mats led to photodimerization to resist dissolving in organic solvents. The morphology of the nanofiber was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the result indicated that the average diameter of nanofibers is 350 nm and the crosslinked nanofibers were not collapsed after dipping into organic solvent showing good solvent-stability. This photocrosslinked nanofibers has the potential application in filtration, catalyst carrier and protective coating.

  18. Mechanical characterization of cellulose single nanofiber by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Lindong; Kim, Jeong Woong; Lee, Jiyun; Kim, Jaehwan

    2017-04-01

    Cellulose fibers are strong natural fibers and they are renewable, biodegradable and the most abundant biopolymer in the world. So to develop new cellulose fibers based products, the mechanical properties of cellulose nanofibers would be a key. The atomic microscope is used to measure the mechanical properties of cellulose nanofibers based on 3-points bending of cellulose nanofiber. The cellulose nanofibers were generated for an aqueous counter collision system. The cellulose microfibers were nanosized under 200 MPa high pressure. The cellulose nanofiber suspension was diluted with DI water and sprayed on the silicon groove substrate. By performing a nanoscale 3-points bending test using the atomic force microscopy, a known force was applied on the center of the fiber. The elastic modulus of the single nanofiber is obtained by calculating the fiber deflection and several parameters. The elastic modulus values were obtained from different resources of cellulose such as hardwood, softwood and cotton.

  19. Transparent Conductive Films of Copper Nanofiber Network Fabricated by Electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungyeoul Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cu nanofiber networks can be a good alternative of the Ag nanowire of high electrical conductivity while having the advantage of low price. An electrospinning method was developed to fabricate copper nanofiber network for use as a transparent conductive film on glass substrate. The effects of liquid diluents for electrospinning processability were examined in relation to the subsequent Cu nanofiber formation processes. Electrospinning solutions of copper acetate/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA and copper nitrate trihydrate/polyvinyl butyral (PVB were investigated. The polymer mixing solutions influenced the subsequent annealing temperatures for removal of the polymers and reduction of the formed CuO nanofibers to Cu metal nanofibers. The morphology and structures of the formed nanofiber networks were examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and so forth. The mixture with PVB provided lower annealing temperatures suitable for application to flexible substrates.

  20. NiO Nanofibers as a Candidate for a Nanophotocathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Macdonald

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available p-type NiO nanofibers have been synthesized from a simple electrospinning and sintering procedure. For the first time, p-type nanofibers have been electrospun onto a conductive fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO surface. The properties of the NiO nanofibers have been directly compared to that of bulk NiO nanopowder. We have observed a p-type photocurrent for a NiO photocathode fabricated on an FTO substrate.

  1. Doubly curved nanofiber-reinforced optically transparent composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Md. Iftekhar; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    Doubly curved nanofiber-reinforced optically transparent composites with low thermal expansion of 15 ppm/k are prepared by hot pressing vacuum-filtered Pickering emulsions of hydrophobic acrylic resin monomer, hydrophilic chitin nanofibers and water. The coalescence of acrylic monomer droplets in the emulsion is prevented by the chitin nanofibers network. This transparent composite has 3D shape moldability, making it attractive for optical precision parts.

  2. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of polyaniline nanofibers by interfacial polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, James; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Kim, Dul-Sun; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Ki-Won; Kim, Jae-Kwang; Jacobsson, Per

    2012-04-01

    Polyaniline nanofibers were prepared by interfacial polymerization with different organic solvents such as chloroform and carbon tetrachloride. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to study the morphological properties of polyaniline nanofibers. Chemical characterization was carried out using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy and surface area was measured using BET isotherm. Polyaniline nanofibers doped with lithium hexafluorophosphate were prepared and their electrochemical properties were evaluated.

  3. Physicists Get INSPIREd: INSPIRE Project and Grid Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klem, Jukka; Iwaszkiewicz, Jan

    2011-12-01

    INSPIRE is the new high-energy physics scientific information system developed by CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC. INSPIRE combines the curated and trusted contents of SPIRES database with Invenio digital library technology. INSPIRE contains the entire HEP literature with about one million records and in addition to becoming the reference HEP scientific information platform, it aims to provide new kinds of data mining services and metrics to assess the impact of articles and authors. Grid and cloud computing provide new opportunities to offer better services in areas that require large CPU and storage resources including document Optical Character Recognition (OCR) processing, full-text indexing of articles and improved metrics. D4Science-II is a European project that develops and operates an e-Infrastructure supporting Virtual Research Environments (VREs). It develops an enabling technology (gCube) which implements a mechanism for facilitating the interoperation of its e-Infrastructure with other autonomously running data e-Infrastructures. As a result, this creates the core of an e-Infrastructure ecosystem. INSPIRE is one of the e-Infrastructures participating in D4Science-II project. In the context of the D4Science-II project, the INSPIRE e-Infrastructure makes available some of its resources and services to other members of the resulting ecosystem. Moreover, it benefits from the ecosystem via a dedicated Virtual Organization giving access to an array of resources ranging from computing and storage resources of grid infrastructures to data and services.

  4. Inspiring to inspire: Developing teaching in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Williams

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Following a three-year staff development initiative within one faculty in a UK university, the authors reflected on inspiring teaching and the role that staff development can play in enhancing individual practice. Teaching is a core component of Higher Education and is complex and multi-faceted both theoretically and in practice. Through individual reflections to a set of pre-determined questions, a group of Higher Education teachers (n = 5 with a responsibility for the development of learning, teaching and assessment, share their thoughts, feelings and beliefs on inspiring teaching. The interpretive analysis of the data shows from a staff perspective that the notion of inspiring teaching has three main components which are all interrelated, those being; the actual teaching and learning experience; the design of the curriculum and the teacher/student relationship. Staff development initiatives were found to help people explore and develop their own teaching philosophy, to develop new practices and to share and learn from others. However, individual’s mindset, beliefs and attitudes were found to be a challenge. Teachers can frame their development around the different aspects of inspiring teaching and with support from senior leadership as well as a positive culture, teaching communities can work together towards inspiring teaching.

  5. Functionalized electrospun nanofibers as bioseparators in microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlock-Colangelo, Lauren; Cho, Daehwan; Pitner, Christine L; Frey, Margaret W; Baeumner, Antje J

    2012-05-01

    Functionalized electrospun nanofibers were integrated into microfluidic channels to serve as on-chip bioseparators. Specifically, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofiber mats were shown to successfully serve as bioseparators for negatively charged nanoparticles. Nanofibers were electrospun onto gold microelectrodes, which were incorporated into poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic devices using UV-assisted thermal bonding. PVA nanofibers functionalized with poly(hexadimethrine bromide) (polybrene) were positively charged and successfully filtered negatively charged liposomes out of a buffer solution, while negatively charged nanofibers functionalized with Poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic anhydride) (POLY(MVE/MA)) were shown to repel the liposomes. The effect of fiber mat thickness was studied using confocal fluorescence microscopy, determining a quite broad optimal range of thicknesses for specific liposome retention, which simplifies fiber mat production with respect to retention reliability. Finally, it was demonstrated that liposomes bound to positively charged nanofibers could be selectively released using a 4-(2-Hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES)-sucrose-saline (HSS) solution of pH 9, which dramatically changes the nanofiber zeta potential and renders the positively charged nanofibers negatively charged. This is the first demonstration of functional electrospun nanofibers used to enable sample preparation procedures of isolation and concentration in lab-on-a-chip devices. This has far reaching impact on the ability to integrate functional surfaces and materials into microfluidic devices and to significantly expand their ability toward simple lab-on-a-chip devices.

  6. Electrospun PVDF nanofiber web as polymer electrolyte or separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung-Seen Choi [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea). College of Natural Sciences, Department of Applied Chemistry; Young Soo Lee; Chang Whan Joo; Seung Goo Lee [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea). Department of Textile Engineering; Jong Kyoo Park; Kyoo-Seung Han [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea). Department of Fine Chemicals Engineering and Chemistry

    2004-11-30

    Electrospinning is an useful technique to produce nanofiber webs. Since electrospun nanofiber webs have a nanoporous structure, they have a potential application for a polymer electrolyte or a separator. Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) is used as one of polymer electrolyte binders. We studied application of electrospun PVDF nanofiber webs as an electrolyte binder or a separator for a battery. Diameters of the electrospun PVDF nanofibers were 100-800 nm. The electrospun PVDF nanofiber web was thermally treated at 150-160 {sup o}C to improve the physical property and dimensional stability. The tensile strength and elongation at break as well as the tensile modulus were notably improved by the thermal treatment. Level of crystallinity of the electrospun PVDF nanofiber was increased by the thermal treatment. The ion conductivity of the polymer electrolyte formed from the electrospun PVDF nanofiber web and 1 M LiN(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2} electrolyte solution was 1.6-2.0 x 10{sup -3} S/cm. The electrospun PVDF nanofiber mat was treated with ethylene plasma to use as a separator. The ethylene plasma-treated mat showed a role of shutter by melting the polyethylene (PE) layer grafted on the PVDF nanofibers. (author)

  7. Carbon nanofibers as hydrogen adsorbing materials for power sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilov, M.O.; Kolbasov, G.Ya. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences, Prospekt Palladina 32/34, Kyiv 142 (Ukraine); Melezhyk, A.V. [TM Spetsmash Ltd., vul. Viskoznaya 5, build. 23, 02660 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2008-01-21

    Porous carbon nanofibers are synthesized by CVD method from acetylene with use of iron-containing catalysts. Activation of the nanofibers in melted potassium hydroxide results in increasing surface area from initial 300-400 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} to 1700 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. As follows from XRD data, activated nanofibers do not contain regular packages of graphene layers, but retain high electric conductivity. Deposition of copper improves electrochemical hydrogen storing characteristics of carbon nanofibers. Carbon nanomaterials obtained can be used as hydrogen storing materials in batteries instead of hydride forming metals. (author)

  8. Polyurethane nanofibers containing copper nanoparticles as future materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheikh, Faheem A.; Kanjwal, Muzafar Ahmed; Saran, Saurabh

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to represent a novel approach to fabricate polyurethane nanofibers containing copper nanoparticles (NPs) by simple electrospinning process. A simple method, not depending on additional foreign chemicals, has been employed to utilize prepared copper NPs in polyurethane...... nanofibers. Typically, a colloidal gel consisting of copper NPs and polyurethane has been electrospun. SEM-EDX and TEM results confirmed well oriented nanofibers and good dispersion of pure copper NPs. Copper NPs have diameter in the range of 5–10nm. The thermal stability of the synthesized nanofibers...

  9. Damping Augmentation of Nanocomposites Using Carbon Nanofiber Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangbing Song

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM process was used to fabricate the nanocomposites through integrating carbon nanofiber paper into traditional glass fiber reinforced composites. The carbon nanofiber paper had a porous structure with highly entangled carbon nanofibers and short glass fibers. In this study, the carbon nanofiber paper was employed as an interlayer and surface layer of composite laminates to enhance the damping properties. Experiments conducted using the nanocomposite beam indicated up to 200–700% increase of the damping ratios at higher frequencies. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM characterization of the carbon nanofiber paper and the nanocomposites was also conducted to investigate the impregnation of carbon nanofiber paper by the resin during the VARTM process and the mechanics of damping augmentation. The study showed a complete penetration of the resin through the carbon nanofiber paper. The connectivities between carbon nanofibers and short glass fibers within the carbon nanofiber paper were responsible for the significant energy dissipation in the nanocomposites during the damping tests.

  10. Electrospun nickel oxide nanofibers: Microstructure and surface evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Abdullah; Hashaikeh, Raed

    2015-12-01

    Nickel oxide (NiO) nanofibers with controlled microstructure were synthesized through the electrospinning technique using a solution composed of nickel acetate and polyvinyl alcohol. The microstructure of NiO nanofibers was found to be highly dependent on nickel acetate concentration in the solution and the post-heat treatment. As the nickel acetate concentration increases, the crystallinity index of NiO nanofibers increases from nearly 50 percent to 90 percent and the average crystallite size in the nanofibers increases from about 20 nm to 30 nm. Further, it was found that annealing the nanofibers at 1000 °C for 2 h leads to nearly full crystallization of nanofibers with significant increase in the crystallite size to about 50 nm while maintaining the fibrous shape. For low nickel acetate concentration, and because of the small nanofibers size, the surface of the calcined nanofibers showed oxygen deficiency which promises a superior activity of these NiO nanofibers for catalytic and sensing applications.

  11. The synthesis of titanium carbide-reinforced carbon nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pinwen; Hong, Youliang; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian

    2009-06-24

    Tailoring hard materials into nanoscale building blocks can greatly extend the applications of hard materials and, at the same time, also represents a significant challenge in the field of nanoscale science. This work reports a novel process for the preparation of carbon-based one-dimensional hard nanomaterials. The titanium carbide-carbon composite nanofibers with an average diameter of 90 nm are prepared by an electrospinning technique and a high temperature pyrolysis process. A composite solution containing polyacrylonitrile and titanium sources is first electrospun into the composite nanofibers, which are subsequently pyrolyzed to produce the desired products. The x-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscopy results show that the main phase of the as-synthesized nanofibers is titanium carbide. The Raman analyses show that the composite nanofibers have low graphite clusters in comparison with the pure carbon nanofibers originating from the electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofibers. The mechanical property tests demonstrate that the titanium carbide-carbon nanofiber membranes have four times higher tensile strength than the carbon nanofiber membranes, and the Young's modulus of the titanium carbide-carbon nanofiber membranes increases in direct proportion to the titanium quantity.

  12. Effect of Carbon Nanofiber on Mechanical Behavior of Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Ghaffarpour Jahromi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Uses of fibers to improve material properties have a scientific background in recent years in civil engineering. Use of Nanofiber reinforcement of materials refers to incorporating materials with desired properties within some other materials lacking those properties. Use of fibers for improvement is not a new phenomenon as the technique of fiber-reinforced bitumen began as early as 1950, but using nanofiber is a new idea. In this research the mechanical properties of asphalt mixture that have been modified with carbon nanofiber were investigated using mechanical tests, which can improve the performance of flexible pavements. To evaluate the effect of nanofiber contents on bituminous mixtures, laboratory investigations were carried out on the samples with and without nanofibers. During the course of this study, various tests were undertaken applying the Marshall test, indirect tensile test, resistance to fatigue cracking by using repeated load indirect tensile test and creep test. Carbon nanofiber exhibited consistency in results and it was observed that the addition of nanofiber can change the properties of bituminous mixtures, increase its stability and decrease the flow value. Results indicate that nanofiber have the potential to resist structural distress in the pavement and thus improve fatigue by increasing resistance to cracks or permanent deformation, when growing traffic loads. On the whole, the results show that the addition of carbon nanofiber will improve some of the mechanical properties such as fatigue and deformation in the flexible pavement.

  13. Synthesis of Uniform Polyaniline Nanofibers through Interfacial Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrir Hashim

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to study the preparation of polyaniline nanofibers through simple interfacial polymerization. Ammonium persulfate, hydrochloric acid and chloroform were used as oxidant, dopant and organic solvent respectively. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM, X-ray diffraction and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR techniques were used to analyze the product. FESEM results show that polyaniline has nano-fiber morphology. XRD results show the crystalline properties of polyaniline nanofiber, and FTIR results confirmed the formation of polyaniline in different monomer/oxidant molar ratios. This study provides a better understanding on the synthesis of uniform polyaniline nanofibers through interfacial polymerization.

  14. Jet Shaping Nanofibers and the Collection of Nanofiber Mats in Electrospinning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinwei WANG; Jin CAO; Zuming HU; Wanlian PAN; Zhaofeng LIU

    2006-01-01

    Electrospinning is an effective way to produce nanofibers. Theconcentration or the corresponding viscosity of the spin solution is one of the most important variables to control the fiber morphology in electrospinning. Jet shaping nanofibers might be divided in two operating modes for different solution viscosity: split thinning and single thinning. From the analysis of jet single thinning, an equation to calculate the velocity of nanofibers depositing on the collector was educed and it was found that the velocity range was very different from the reported result. For the electrospun mats obtained from low solution concentration, the split is observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. On the other hand, the beads formation in the nanofiber mats can be explained well by jet splitting. The arrangement of nanofibers in the mats is related to the methods of collection, and the cylinder collector gets more ordered mats. This result is proved by so-called break strengths testing and SEM images of the mats obtained from different methods of collection.

  15. Electrospinning of nanofibers from non-polymeric systems: electrospun nanofibers from native cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebioglu, Asli; Uyar, Tamer

    2013-08-15

    Electrospinning of nanofibers from non-polymeric systems is rather challenging, yet in this study, we have successfully performed electrospinning of nanofibers from two of the native cyclodextrins (CDs); α-CD and β-CD. Electrospinning was carried out for highly concentrated solutions of α-CD (120% up to 160%, w/v) and β-CD (120% up to 150%, w/v) in basic aqueous system. At optimal concentration level, the electrospinning of CD solutions yielded bead-free uniform CD nanofibers without using carrier polymeric matrix. Similar to polymeric systems, the electrospinning of CD solutions resulted in different morphologies and average fiber diameters depending on the CD type and CD concentration. The dynamic light scattering (DLS) and rheology measurements were performed in order to examine the electrospinnability of CD solutions. The existence of CD aggregates via hydrogen bonding and very high solution viscosity and viscoelastic solid-like behavior of CD solutions were found to be the key factors for obtaining bead-free nanofibers from CDs. The addition of urea disrupted CD aggregates and lowered the viscosity significantly, and therefore, the urea-added CD solutions yielded beaded fibers and/or beads. Although the as-received CDs in powder form are crystalline, the structural analyses by XRD and HR-TEM indicated that electrospun CD nanofibers have amorphous characteristic without showing any particular orientation or crystalline aggregation of CD molecules.

  16. Formation of inorganic nanofibers by heat-treatment of poly(vinyl alcohol-zirconium compound hybrid nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakane K.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(vinyl alcohol-zirconium compound hybrid nanofibers (precursors were formed by electrospinning employing water as a solvent for the spinning solution. The precursors were converted into oxide (ZrO2, carbide (ZrC or nitride (ZrN nanofibers by heating them in air, Ar or N2 atmospheres. Monoclinic ZrO2 nanofibers with high-specific surface area were obtained by heat-treatment of the precursors in air. ZrC and ZrN nanofibers could be obtained below theoretical temperatures calculated from thermodynamics data.

  17. Inspiring Student Self-Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Brackett

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available While normally appreciative of the invitation to join colleagues in a discussion of pedagogy and what “works” in the classroom, I have in most instances reluctantly participated in discussion of student motivation. I dip my toe into this philosophical quagmire only if permitted license to substitute the phrase student inspiration in place of student motivation. I also find it helpful to turn the rhetorical tables, as it were, and consider self-motivation on the part of students. The concept of individuals who hold some sense of self that a classroom mentor may nurture through student inspiration is one in which I place a modicum of trust. To “inspire” is literally to “breathe in,” to actively pull sustenance from a proffered external source. Active student determination based on some sense of self may couple with instructor inspiration to promote academic success.

  18. Electrospun Nanofibers of Guar Galactomannan for Targeted Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hsiao Mei Annie

    2011-12-01

    Guar galactomannan is a biodegradable polysaccharide used widely in the food industry but also in the cosmetics, pharmaceutical, oil drilling, textile and paper industries. Guar consists of a mannose backbone and galactose side groups that are both susceptible to enzyme degradation, a unique property that can be explored for targeted drug delivery especially since those enzymes are naturally secreted by the microflora in human colon. The present study can be divided into three parts. In the first part, we discuss ways to modify guar to produce nanofibers by electrospinning, a process that involves the application of an electric field to a polymer solution or melt to facilitate production of fibers in the sub-micron range. Nanofibers are currently being explored as the next generation of drug carriers due to its many advantages, none more important than the fact that nanofibers are on a size scale that is a fraction of a hair's width and have large surface-to-volume ratio. The incorporation and controlled release of nano-sized drugs is one way in which nanofibers are being utilized in drug delivery. In the second part of the study, we explore various methods to crosslink guar nanofibers as a means to promote water-resistance in a potential drug carrier. The scope and utility of water-resistant guar nanofibers can only be fully appreciated when subsequent drug release studies are carried out. To that end, the third part of our study focuses on understanding the kinetics and diffusion mechanisms of a model drug, Rhodamine B, through moderately-swelling (crosslinked) hydrogel nanofibers in comparison to rapidly-swelling (non-crosslinked) nanofibers. Along the way, our investigations led us to a novel electrospinning set-up that has a unique collector designed to capture aligned nanofibers. These aligned nanofiber bundles can then be twisted to hold them together like yarn. From a practical standpoint, these yarns are advantageous because they come freely suspended and

  19. Antifouling Electrospun Nanofiber Mats Functionalized with Polymer Zwitterions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolewe, Kristopher W; Dobosz, Kerianne M; Rieger, Katrina A; Chang, Chia-Chih; Emrick, Todd; Schiffman, Jessica D

    2016-10-06

    In this study, we exploit the excellent fouling resistance of polymer zwitterions and present electrospun nanofiber mats surface functionalized with poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (polyMPC). This zwitterionic polymer coating maximizes the accessibility of the zwitterion to effectively limit biofouling on nanofiber membranes. Two facile, scalable methods yielded a coating on cellulose nanofibers: (i) a two-step sequential deposition featuring dopamine polymerization followed by the physioadsorption of polyMPC, and (ii) a one-step codeposition of polydopamine (PDA) with polyMPC. While the sequential and codeposited nanofiber mat assemblies have an equivalent average fiber diameter, hydrophilic contact angle, surface chemistry, and stability, the topography of nanofibers prepared by codeposition were smoother. Protein and microbial antifouling performance of the zwitterion modified nanofiber mats along with two controls, cellulose (unmodified) and PDA coated nanofiber mats were evaluated by dynamic protein fouling and prolonged bacterial exposure. Following 21 days of exposure to bovine serum albumin, the sequential nanofiber mats significantly resisted protein fouling, as indicated by their 95% flux recovery ratio in a water flux experiment, a 300% improvement over the cellulose nanofiber mats. When challenged with two model microbes Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus for 24 h, both zwitterion modifications demonstrated superior fouling resistance by statistically reducing microbial attachment over the two controls. This study demonstrates that, by decorating the surfaces of chemically and mechanically robust cellulose nanofiber mats with polyMPC, we can generate high performance, free-standing nanofiber mats that hold potential in applications where antifouling materials are imperative, such as tissue engineering scaffolds and water purification technologies.

  20. Electrospinning of Chitosan-Xanthan Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shekarforoush, Elhamalsadat; Mendes, Ana Carina Loureiro; Chronakis, Ioannis S.

    Electrospun chitosan-xanthan gum nanofibers were produced and the correlation between the rheological properties of chitosan-xanthan solutions and electrospinability were investigated at different xanthan gum concentrations. Uniform chitosan-xanthan nanofibers with diameters ranging from 382......+182 to 842+296 nm were developed based on the chitosan-xanthan gum content. Overall chitosan-xanthan gum solutions exhibited shear thinning behavior for all the concentrations tested, which tended to increase with the increase of concentration of xanthan. Furthermore the electrical conductivity...... of the chitosan-xanthan solutions was observed to increase with the increase of xanthan gum concentrations. We can conclude that the optimal electrospinning process is directed by the apparent viscosity properties and the electrical conductivity of the chitosan-xanthan solutions. We are currently investigating...

  1. Temperature responsive hydrogel nanofibers and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruokolainen, Janne

    2011-03-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) is one of the most extensively investigated synthetic temperature-responsive polymers. In this work temperature-responsive PNIPAM based triblock copolymer hydrogels, their self-assembly and phase behavior in bulk, are described. Additionally, recent results from responsive hydrogel nanofibers and hydrogel nanoparticles are shown. It is known that block copolymers form well-organized nano structures in bulk or thin films when annealed thermally or in solvent vapours. However, in the case of nanofibers or nanoparticles, the annealing leads in most cases to aggregation and particle sintering. This work utilizes aerosol-based gas phase method where the preparation and annealing of hydrogel nanoparticles with well-organized, hierarchical inner structures are performed without any particle coagulation or sintering. In the method, the block copolymers assemble within aerosol nanoparticles to form, for instance, lamellar onion-like or gyroid inner structures.

  2. Process Dependence of Cellulose Nanofiber Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Doug; Zhang, Xin; Mao, Yimin; Jang, Soo-Hwan; Hu, Liangbing; Briber, Robert; Wang, Howard

    Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) are the most abundant natural nanomaterial on earth with potential applications in renewable energy, polymer nanocomposites and flexible electronics. CNF can be produced through TEMPO oxidation which separates the hierarchical structure of cellulose fibers into smaller micro- and nanofibers by altering their surface chemistry, inducing a repulsive electrostatic charge on the fibers. This work will examine the structural evolution of CNF during production. Samples were prepared by removing and quenching aliquots during the TEMPO reaction. The fibers were washed, filtered and re-dispersed into D2O for small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. The SANS data was analyzed to track the changes in the CNF structure as a function of reaction time.

  3. Photopatterned conjugated polymer electrochromic nanofibers on paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A; Asemota, C; Invernale, M; Sotzing, G A [Department of Chemistry and the Polymer Program, 97, N. Eagleville Road, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT-06269-3136 (United States); Padilla, J; Otero, T F [Center for Electrochemistry and Intelligent Materials C/Carlos III s/n, Campus Alfonso XIII, Polytechnic University of Cartagena, 30203 (Spain)], E-mail: sotzing@ims.uconn.edu

    2008-08-15

    Electrochromic nanofibers of conducting polymer (terthiophene) have been deposited over a conventional paper sheet by means of the electrospinning technique, and subsequently photopatterned by means of UV radiation. The synthesis of a processable precursor copolymer with a norbornylene matrix and pendant units of terthiophene makes the electrospinning process available, and allows for chemical or electrochemical crosslinking of the precursor copolymer to obtain a conducting polymer. The inclusion of photocrosslinkable units (methacrylate) in the precursor copolymer also allows for photopatterning of the material. This was applied to obtain patterns on the paper which can be chemically oxidized or reduced resulting in electrochromic characters. SEM images of the conducting polymer nanofibers together with the cellulose fibers show how these materials can be attached to textile fibers, adding new functionalities that are reminiscent of the chameleonic abilities of some living creatures.

  4. General strategy for fabricating thoroughly mesoporous nanofibers

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Huilin

    2014-12-03

    Recently, preparation of mesoporous fibers has attracted extensive attentions because of their unique and broad applications in photocatalysis, optoelectronics, and biomaterials. However, it remains a great challenge to fabricate thoroughly mesoporous nanofibers with high purity and uniformity. Here, we report a general, simple and cost-effective strategy, namely, foaming-assisted electrospinning, for producing mesoporous nanofibers with high purity and enhanced specific surface areas. As a proof of concept, the as-fabricated mesoporous TiO2 fibers exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity and stability than both the conventional solid counterparts and the commercially available P25. The abundant vapors released from the introduced foaming agents are responsible for the creation of pores with uniform spatial distribution in the spun precursor fibers. The present work represents a critically important step in advancing the electrospinning technique for generating mesoporous fibers in a facile and universal manner.

  5. Optical Micro- and Nanofiber Pulling Rig

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, J M; Le, Vu H; Chormaic, S Nic

    2014-01-01

    We review the method of producing adiabatic optical micro- and nanofibers using a hydrogen/oxygen flame brushing technique. The flame is scanned along the fiber, which is being simultaneously stretched by two translation stages. The tapered fiber fabrication is reproducible and yields highly adiabatic tapers with either exponential or linear profiles. Details regarding the setup of the flame brushing rig and the various parameters used are presented. Information available from the literature is compiled and further details that are necessary to have a functioning pulling rig are included. This should enable the reader to fabricate various taper profiles, while achieving adiabatic transmission of ~ 99% for fundamental mode propagation. Using this rig, transmissions greater than 90% for higher order modes in an optical nanofiber have been obtained.

  6. Inspiring to Inspire: Developing Teaching in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Louise; Nixon, Sarah; Hennessy, Claire; Mahon, Elizabeth; Adams, Gill

    2016-01-01

    Following a three-year staff development initiative within one faculty in a UK university, the authors reflected on inspiring teaching and the role that staff development can play in enhancing individual practice. Teaching is a core component of Higher Education and is complex and multi-faceted both theoretically and in practice. Through…

  7. Controlled Angiogenesis in Peptide Nanofiber Composite Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Wickremasinghe, Navindee C.; Kumar, Vivek A.; Shi, Siyu; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Multidomain peptide (MDP) nanofibers create scaffolds that can present bioactive cues to promote biological responses. Orthogonal self-assembly of MDPs and growth-factor-loaded liposomes generate supramolecular composite hydrogels. These composites can act as delivery vehicles with time-controlled release. Here we examine the controlled release of placental growth factor-1 (PlGF-1) for its ability to induce angiogenic responses. PlGF-1 was loaded either in MDP matrices or within liposomes bou...

  8. Composites incorporated a conductive polymer nanofiber network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzo, Lilo Danielle; Newbloom, Gregory

    2017-04-11

    Methods of forming composites that incorporate networks of conductive polymer nanofibers are provided. Networks of less-than conductive polymers are first formed and then doped with a chemical dopant to provide networks of conductive polymers. The networks of conductive polymers are then incorporated into a matrix in order to improve the conductivity of the matrix. The formed composites are useful as conductive coatings for applications including electromagnetic energy management on exterior surfaces of vehicles.

  9. Carbon nanofibers encapsulated in macropores in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkov, V.; Red' kin, A. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High Purity Materials, RAS, Institutskaya str. 6, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation)

    2007-05-15

    This work reports on the development of fuel cells electrodes with a porous silicon structure and carbon nanofibers encapsulated in macropores in silicon. It is demonstrated that decomposition of carbon on a Ni catalyst deposited on the pore walls can be used to create a homogeneous carbon nanotube layer that dramatically increases the specific surface area while simultaneously reducing the resistivity of the macroporous silicon layer. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Multifunctional Composite Nanofibers for Smart Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    translated to the composite nanofibrous structures in the form of nonwovens and yarns? (3) Can these functional composite fibers be integrated into...nanoparticles were co- electrospun into nonwoven mat and over meter long yarn. The SEM and TEM image in Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...functional composite nanofiber structures (yarn and nonwoven ) characterized we explored the feasibility of integrating these functional composite fibers into

  11. Carbonized Electrospun Nanofiber Sheets for Thermophones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, Ali E; Perananthan, Sahila; Ferraris, John P

    2016-11-16

    Thermoacoustic performance of thin freestanding sheets of carbonized poly(acrylonitrile) and polybenzimidazole nanofibers are studied as promising candidates for thermophones. We analyze thermodynamic properties of sheets using transport parameters of single nanofibers and their aligned and randomly electrospun thin film assemblies. The electrical and thermal conductivities, thermal diffusivity, heat capacity, and infrared blackbody radiation are investigated to extract the heat exchange coefficient and enhance the energy conversion efficiency. Spectral and power dependencies of sound pressure in air are compared with carbon nanotube sheets and theoretical prediction. Despite lower thermoacoustic performance compared to that of CNT sheets, the mechanical strength and cost-effective production technology of thermophones make them very attractive for large-size sound projectors. The advantages of carbonized electrospun polymer nanofiber sheets are in the low frequency domain (<1000 Hz), where the large thermal diffusion length diminishes the thermal inertia of thick (∼200 nm) nonbundled fibers and the high intrinsic thermal conductivity of fibers enhances the heat exchange coefficient. Applications of thermoacoustic projectors for loudspeakers, high power SONAR arrays, and sound cancellation are discussed.

  12. Perspectives: Nanofibers and nanowires for disordered photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Pisignano

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available As building blocks of microscopically non-homogeneous materials, semiconductor nanowires and polymer nanofibers are emerging component materials for disordered photonics, with unique properties of light emission and scattering. Effects found in assemblies of nanowires and nanofibers include broadband reflection, significant localization of light, strong and collective multiple scattering, enhanced absorption of incident photons, synergistic effects with plasmonic particles, and random lasing. We highlight recent related discoveries, with a focus on material aspects. The control of spatial correlations in complex assemblies during deposition, the coupling of modes with efficient transmission channels provided by nanofiber waveguides, and the embedment of random architectures into individually coded nanowires will allow the potential of these photonic materials to be fully exploited, unconventional physics to be highlighted, and next-generation optical devices to be achieved. The prospects opened by this technology include enhanced random lasing and mode-locking, multi-directionally guided coupling to sensors and receivers, and low-cost encrypting miniatures for encoders and labels.

  13. Investigation of electrochemical actuation by polyaniline nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehraeen, Shayan; Alkan Gürsel, Selmiye; Papila, Melih; Çakmak Cebeci, Fevzi

    2017-09-01

    Polyaniline nanofibers have shown promising electrical and electrochemical properties which make them prominent candidates in the development of smart systems employing sensors and actuators. Their electrochemical actuation potential is demonstrated in this study. A trilayer composite actuator based on polyaniline nanofibers was designed and fabricated. Cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol was sandwiched between two polyaniline nanofibrous electrodes as ion-containing electrolyte gel. First, electrochemical behavior of a single electrode was studied, showing reversible redox peak pairs in 1 M HCl using a cyclic voltammetry technique. High aspect ratio polyaniline nanofibers create a porous network which facilitates ion diffusion and thus accelerates redox reactions. Bending displacement of the prepared trilayer actuator was then tested and reported under an AC potential stimulation as low as 0.5 V in a variety of frequencies from 50 to 1000 mHz, both inside 1 M HCl solution and in air. Decay of performance of the composite actuator in air is investigated and it is reported that tip displacement in a solution was stable and repeatable for 1000 s in all selected frequencies.

  14. Cooperative Switching in Nanofibers of Azobenzene Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christopher; Liebig, Tobias; Gensler, Manuel; Zykov, Anton; Pithan, Linus; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Hecht, Stefan; Bléger, David; Kowarik, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Next-generation molecular devices and machines demand the integration of molecular switches into hierarchical assemblies to amplify the response of the system from the molecular level to the meso- or macro-scale. Here, we demonstrate that multi-azobenzene oligomers can assemble to form robust supramolecular nanofibers in which they can be switched repeatedly between the E- and Z-configuration. While in isolated oligomers the azobenzene units undergo reversible photoisomerization independently, in the nanofibers they are coupled via intermolecular interactions and switch cooperatively as evidenced by unusual thermal and kinetic behavior. We find that the photoisomerization rate from the Z-isomer to the E-isomer depends on the fraction of Z-azobenzene in the nanofibers, and is increased by more than a factor of 4 in Z-rich fibers when compared to E-rich fibers. This demonstrates the great potential of coupling individual photochromic units for increasing their quantum efficiency in the solid state with potential relevance for actuation and sensing.

  15. Nanomembranes and Nanofibers from Biodegradable Conducting Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Puiggalí

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This review provides a current status report of the field concerning preparation of fibrous mats based on biodegradable (e.g., aliphatic polyesters such as polylactide or polycaprolactone and conducting polymers (e.g., polyaniline, polypirrole or polythiophenes. These materials have potential biomedical applications (e.g., tissue engineering or drug delivery systems and can be combined to get free-standing nanomembranes and nanofibers that retain the better properties of their corresponding individual components. Systems based on biodegradable and conducting polymers constitute nowadays one of the most promising solutions to develop advanced materials enable to cover aspects like local stimulation of desired tissue, time controlled drug release and stimulation of either the proliferation or differentiation of various cell types. The first sections of the review are focused on a general overview of conducting and biodegradable polymers most usually employed and the explanation of the most suitable techniques for preparing nanofibers and nanomembranes (i.e., electrospinning and spin coating. Following sections are organized according to the base conducting polymer (e.g., Sections 4–6 describe hybrid systems having aniline, pyrrole and thiophene units, respectively. Each one of these sections includes specific subsections dealing with applications in a nanofiber or nanomembrane form. Finally, miscellaneous systems and concluding remarks are given in the two last sections.

  16. Polyurethane nanofibers containing copper nanoparticles as future materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Faheem A.; Kanjwal, Muzafar A.; Saran, Saurabh; Chung, Wook-Jin; Kim, Hern

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to represent a novel approach to fabricate polyurethane nanofibers containing copper nanoparticles (NPs) by simple electrospinning process. A simple method, not depending on additional foreign chemicals, has been employed to utilize prepared copper NPs in polyurethane nanofibers. Typically, a colloidal gel consisting of copper NPs and polyurethane has been electrospun. SEM-EDX and TEM results confirmed well oriented nanofibers and good dispersion of pure copper NPs. Copper NPs have diameter in the range of 5-10 nm. The thermal stability of the synthesized nanofibers was examined for identifying the proper settlement of copper NPs among the nanofibers, according to the concentrations used in original solutions. Furthermore, XRD results well demonstrated crystalline feature of copper NPs. Model microorganisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtillus had been used to check the antimicrobial efficacy of these nanofiber mats. Subsequently, antimicrobial tests have indicated that the prepared nanofibers do posses good bactericidal effect. Accordingly, it is noted that the obtained nanofiber mats can be used as future filter membranes with good antimicrobial activities.

  17. Surface structure enhanced second harmonic generation in organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kostiucenko, Oksana;

    Second-harmonic generation upon femto-second laser irradiation of nonlinearly optically active nanofibers grown from nonsymmetrically functionalized para-quarterphenylene (CNHP4) molecules is investigated. Following growth on mica templates, the nanofibers have been transferred onto lithography-d...

  18. The photophysics of luminescence in multilayered organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Quochi, Francesco; Simbrunner, Clemens

    Multilayered crystalline nanofibers are exemplary model system for the study of exciton dynamics and lasing in organic materials due to their well-defined morphology, high luminescence efficiencies, and color tunability. The multi-layered nanofibers are composed of alternating layers of two...

  19. Blow spinning of food-grade-gelatin nanofibers (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanofibers have been examined for many diverse applications, including catalysis, filtration, controlled release of drugs and active agents, sensor, and tissue engineering and as texturized food ingredients. The primary advantage of nanofibers over larger diameter fibers is the larger surface area t...

  20. Direct fabrication of cerium oxide hollow nanofibers by electrospinning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Qizheng; DONG Xiangting; WANG Jinxian; LI Mei

    2008-01-01

    Electrospinning technique was used to fabricate PVP/Ce(NO3)3 composite mierofibers. Different morphological CeO2 nanofibers were obtained by calcination of the PVP/Ce(NO3)3 composite microfibers and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), and (FHR). SEM micrographs indicated that the surface of the composite fibers was smooth and became coarse with the increase of calcination temperatures. The diameters of CeO2 hollow nanofibers (300 nm at 600 ℃ and 600 nm at 800 ℃) were smaller than those of PVP/Ce(NO3)3 composite fibers (1-2 μm). CeO2 hollow nanofibers were obtained at 600 ℃ and CeO2 hollow and porous nanofibers formed by nanoparti-ties were obtained at 800 ℃. The length of the CeO2 hollow nanofibers was greater than 50 μm. XRD analysis revealed that the composite microfibers were amorphous in structure and CeO2 nanofibers were cubic in structure with space groupO5H-FM3m when calcination tem-peratures were 600-800 ℃. TG-DTA and FTIR revealed that the formation of CeO2 nanofibers was largely influenced by the calcination temperatures. Possible formation mechanism of CeO2 hollow nanofibers was proposed.

  1. Myocardial Cell Pattern on Piezoelectric Nanofiber Mats for Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Wang, X.; Zhao, H.; Du, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents in vitro contractile myocardial cell pattern on piezoelectric nanofiber mats with applications in energy harvesting. The cell-based energy harvester consists of myocardial cell sheet and a PDMS substrate with a PVDF nanofiber mat on. Experimentally, cultured on specifically distributed nanofiber mats, neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes are characterized with the related morphology and contraction. Previously, we have come up with the concept of energy harvesting from heart beating using piezoelectric material. A bio-hybrid energy harvester combined living cardiomyocytes, PDMS polymer substrate and piezoelectric PVDF film with the electrical output of peak current 87.5nA and peak voltage 92.3mV. However, the thickness of the cardiomyocyte cultured on a two-dimensional substrate is much less than that of the piezoelectric film. The Micro Contact Printing (μCP) method used in cell pattern on the PDMS thin film has tough requirement for the film surface. As such, in this paper we fabricated nanofiber-constructed PDMS thin film to realize cell pattern due to PVDF nanofibers with better piezoelectricity and microstructures of nanofiber mats guiding cell distribution. Living cardiomyocytes patterned on those distributed piezoelectric nanofibers with the result of the same distribution as the nanofiber pattern.

  2. Fabrication of NiO/zirconium oxide nanofibers by electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundarrajan, Subramanian, E-mail: sundarnus1@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, NUS, 117576 (Singapore); Venkatesan, Arunachalam; Agarwal, Satya R.; Shaik Anwar Ahamed, Nabeela Nasreen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, NUS, 117576 (Singapore); Ramakrishna, Seeram, E-mail: seeram@nus.edu.sg [Department of Mechanical Engineering, NUS, 117576 (Singapore); King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 117602 (Singapore)

    2014-12-01

    The electrospinning technique has been used to fabricate 1D inorganic–organic composite nanofibers from solutions containing poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and suitable aqueous precursors of nickel and zirconium ions. Upon calcination, nickel oxide/zirconia nanofibers retained the original morphological features of as-spun nanofibers. X-ray diffraction was used to identify the crystalline nature of the final product and analytical tools such as Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to elucidate the pathway of ceramic phase formation and the systematic evolution of morphological features in the as-spun and calcined fibers. These fibers will find potential applications in biomedical field. - Highlights: • PVA/NiO/zirconia composite nanofibers were synthesized via electrospinning. • Green processing of nanofibers using only water as solvent. • Calcination of composite nanofibers to yield ceramic nanofibers. • High aspect ratio nanofibers with diameters 106 ± 25 nm • The application of these fibers as dental composites and bone tissue engineering.

  3. UV-responsive polyvinyl alcohol nanofibers prepared by electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Zeeshan; Ali, Shamshad; Khatri, Imran; Mayakrishnan, Gopiraman; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, Ick-Soo

    2015-07-01

    We report UV-responsive polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers for potential application for recording and erasing quick response (QR) codes. We incorporate 1‧-3‧-dihydro-8-methoxy-1‧,3‧,3‧-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro [2H-1-benzopyran-2,2‧-(2H)-indole] (indole) and,3-dihydro-1,3,3-trimethylspiro [2H-indole-2,3‧-[3H] phenanthr [9,10-b] (1,4) oxazine] (oxazine) into PVA polymer matrix via electrospinning technique. The resultant nanofibers were measured for recording-erasing, photo-coloration and thermal reversibility. The rate of photo-coloration of PVA-indole nanofibers was five times higher than the PVA-oxazine nanofibers, whereas the thermal reversibility found to be more than twice as fast as PVA-oxazine nanofibers. Results showed that the resultant nanofibers have very good capability of recording QR codes multiple times. The FTIR spectroscopy and SEM were employed to characterize the electrospun nanofibers. The UV-responsive PVA nanofibers have great potentials as a light-driven nanomaterials incorporated within sensors, sensitive displays and in optical devices such as erasable and rewritable optical storage.

  4. Development of braided drug-loaded nanofiber sutures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Wen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Huang Zhengming [School of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Liu Xiangyang, E-mail: huangzm@tongji.edu.cn [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 (Singapore)

    2010-08-06

    The objectives of this work are twofold. Firstly, while most work on electrospinning is limited to the development of only functional materials, a structural application of electrospun nanofibers is explored. Secondly, a drug-loaded tissue suture is fabricated and its various properties are characterized. Braided drug-loaded nanofiber sutures are obtained by combining an electrospinning process with a braiding technique followed by a coating procedure. Two different electrospinning techniques, i.e. blend and coaxial electrospinning, to incorporate a model drug cefotaxime sodium (CFX-Na) into poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanofibers have been applied and compared with each other. Properties of the braided drug-loaded sutures are characterized through a variety of methods including SEM, TEM and tensile testing. The results show that the nanofibers had a preferable micromorphology. The drug was incorporated into the polymer nanofibers homogeneously, with no cross-linking. The nanofibers maintained their fibrous structures. An in vitro release study indicates that the drug-loaded nanofibers fabricated by blend electrospinning and coaxial electrospinning had a different drug release behavior. An inhibition zone experiment shows that both sutures obtained from the nanofibers of the different electrospinning techniques had favorable antibacterial properties. The drug-loaded sutures had preferable histological compatibility performance compared with commercial silk sutures in an in vivo comparative study.

  5. Inspiration: One Percent and Rising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2009-01-01

    Inventor Thomas Edison once famously declared, "Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration." If that's the case, then the students the author witnessed at the International Student Media Festival (ISMF) last November in Orlando, Florida, are geniuses and more. The students in the ISMF pre-conference workshop had much to…

  6. Novel locomotion via biological inspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Roger D.; Boxerbaum, Alexander; Palmer, Luther; Chiel, Hillel; Diller, Eric; Hunt, Alexander; Bachmann, Richard

    2011-05-01

    Animal behavioral, physiological and neurobiological studies are providing a wealth of inspirational data for robot design and control. Several very different biologically inspired mobile robots will be reviewed. A robot called DIGbot is being developed that moves independent of the direction of gravity using Distributed Inward Gripping (DIG) as a rapid and robust attachment mechanism observed in climbing animals. DIGbot is an 18 degree of freedom hexapod with onboard power and control systems. Passive compliance in its feet, which is inspired by the flexible tarsus of the cockroach, increases the robustness of the adhesion strategy and enables DIGbot to execute large steps and stationary turns while walking on mesh screens. A Whegs™ robot, inspired by insect locomotion principles, is being developed that can be rapidly reconfigured between tracks and wheel-legs and carry GeoSystems Zipper Mast. The mechanisms that cause it to passively change its gait on irregular terrain have been integrated into its hubs for a compact and modular design. The robot is designed to move smoothly on moderately rugged terrain using its tracks and run on irregular terrain and stairs using its wheel-legs. We are also developing soft bodied robots that use peristalsis, the same method of locomotion earthworms use. We present a technique of using a braided mesh exterior to produce fluid waves of motion along the body of the robot that increase the robot's speed relative to previous designs. The concept is highly scalable, for endoscopes to water, oil or gas line inspection.

  7. Inversion exercises inspired by mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2016-02-01

    An elementary calculus transform, inspired by the centroid and gyration radius, is introduced as a prelude to the study of more advanced transforms. Analysis of the transform, including its inversion, makes use of several key concepts from basic calculus and exercises in the application and inversion of the transform provide practice in the use of technology in calculus.

  8. Biologically Active Polycaprolactone/Titanium Hybrid Electrospun Nanofibers for Hard Tissue Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barakat, Nasser A. M.; Sheikh, Faheem A.; Al-Deyab, Salem S.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a novel strategy to improve the bioactivity of polycaprolactone nanofibers is proposed. Incorporation of pure titanium nanoparticles into polycaprolactone nanofibers strongly enhances the precipitation of bone-like apatite materials when the doped nanofibers are soaked in a simulat...... nanofiber mats and the successful incorporation of the titanium nanoparticles make the prepared polycaprolactone nanofiber mat a proper candidate for the hard-tissue engineering applications....

  9. Nanofiber of ultra-structured aluminum and zirconium oxide hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2006-02-01

    An internally ultrastructured Al- and Zr-oxide hybrid was developed into a nanofiber. As a precursor for the generation of nanofiber, a hybridized sol was prepared using the Pechini-type sol-gel process, whereby the Al- and Zr-metallic ions were to be efficiently distributed and stabilized within the polymeric network. The hybridized sol was subsequently electrospun and heat treated to a nanofiber with diameters of tens to hundreds of nanometers. The internal structure of the nanofiber was organized at the molecular level, with the Al- and Zr-oxide regions being interspaced at distances of less than ten nanometers. This ultrastructured Al- and Zr-oxide hybrid nanofiber is considered to be potentially applicable in numerous fields.

  10. Layered Perovskite Nanofibers via Electrospinning for Overall Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Nils C; Soldat, Julia; Marschall, Roland

    2015-05-06

    The (111)-layered perovskite materials Ba5 Ta4 O15 , Ba5 Ta2 Nb2 O15 and Ba5 Nb4 O15 are prepared with nanofiber morphology via electrospinning for the first time. The nanofibers are built up from small single crystals, with up to several micrometers length even after calcination. The formation mechanism is investigated in detail, revealing an intermediate formation of amorphous barium carbonate strengthening the nanofiber morphology for high temperature treatment. All nanofiber compounds are able to generate hydrogen without any co-catalyst in photocatalytic reformation of methanol. After photodeposition of Rh-Cr2 O3 co-catalysts, the nanofibers show better activity in overall water splitting compared to sol-gel-derived powders.

  11. Preparation of natural brucite nanofibers by the dispersion method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xu; Wen Ni; Wenping Li; Xingde Liu; Hailong Yang; Xiaoguang Yang

    2008-01-01

    The preparation of natural brucite nanofibers through dispersion by the wet process is described. The test results indicate that brucite fibers can be well dispersed by using sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (OT) as the dispersant at a dispersant/fiber mass ratio of 0.15:1, dispersing for 30 min at a water/solid mass ratio of 20:1. The prepared nanofibers were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). It is shown that the prepared single brucite nanofiber is around 30 run in diameter and the talus of the nonsingle brucite nanofibers is about 50-150 nm in diameter. Natural brucite mineral fibers were treated by the dispersion method to obtain nanomaterials. These fibers have significant advantages over artificial nanofibers both in yield and in cost.

  12. A Nanofiber-Based Optical Conveyor Belt for Cold Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Schneeweiss, Philipp; Mitsch, Rudolf; Reitz, Daniel; Vetsch, Eugen; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate optical transport of cold cesium atoms over millimeter-scale distances along an optical nanofiber. The atoms are trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice formed by a two-color evanescent field surrounding the nanofiber, far red- and blue-detuned with respect to the atomic transition. The blue-detuned field is a propagating nanofiber-guided mode while the red-detuned field is a standing-wave mode which leads to the periodic axial confinement of the atoms. Here, this standing wave is used for transporting the atoms along the nanofiber by mutually detuning the two counter-propagating fields which form the standing wave. The performance and limitations of the nanofiber-based transport are evaluated and possible applications are discussed.

  13. Study on the Electrospun CNTs/Polyacrylonitrile-Based Nanofiber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Qiao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available CNTs/PAN nanofibers were electrospun from PAN-based solution for the preparation of carbon nanofiber composites. The as-spun polyacrylonitrile-based nanofibers were hot-stretched by weighing metal in a temperature controlled oven. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to characterize the morphology of the nanofibers, which indicated that carbon nanotubes were dispersed well in the composites and were completely wrapped by PAN matrix. Because of the strong interfacial interaction between CNTs and PAN, the CNTs/PAN application performance will be enhanced correspondingly, such as the mechanical properties and the electrical conductivity. It was concluded that the hot-stretched CNTs/PAN nanofibers can be used as a potential precursor to produce high-performance carbon composites.

  14. Improved Electrical Conductivity of Carbon/Polyvinyl Alcohol Electrospun Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Shehata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofibers (CNFs gained much interest in the last few years due to their promising electrical, chemical, and mechanical characteristics. This paper investigates a new nanocomposite composed of carbon nanofibers hosted by PVA and both are integrated in one electrospun nanofibers web. This technique shows a simple and cheap way to offer a host for CNFs using traditional deposition techniques. The results show that electrical conductivity of the formed nanofibers has been improved up to 1.63 × 10−4 S/cm for CNFs of weight 2%. The peak temperature of mass loss through TGA measurements has been reduced by 2.3%. SEM images show the homogeneity of the formed PVA and carbon nanofibers in one web, with stretched CNFs after the electrospinning process. The formed nanocomposite can be used in wide variety of applications including nanoelectronics and gas adsorption.

  15. Superresolution measurement of nanofiber diameter by modes beating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, E. F.; Solano, P.; Hoffman, J. E.; Orozco, L. A.; Rolston, S. L.; Fatemi, F. K.

    2016-05-01

    Nanofibers are becoming an important tool in quantum information technologies for coupling photonics systems to atomic systems. Nondestructive techniques for characterizing these nanofibers prior to integration into an apparatus are desirable. In this work, we probe the light propagating in a fused silica optical nanofiber (750-nm-diameter) by coupling it evanescently to a 6- μm-diameter microfiber that is scanned along the nanofiber length. This technique is capable of observing all possible beat lengths among different propagating modes. The beat lengths are strongly dependent on the nanofiber diameter and refractive index of the fiber. The steep dependence has enabled measurements of the fiber diameter with sub-Angstrom sensitivity. The diameter extracted from the beat length measurements agrees with a measurement made using scanning electron microscopy. Work supported by NSF.

  16. Complex film of chitosan and carboxymethyl cellulose nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takuma; Nakaji-Hirabayashi, Tadashi; Masuyama, Kazuhira; Fujita, Satoshi; Kitano, Hiromi

    2016-03-01

    A polymer film composed of a mixture of chitosan (Ch) and carboxymethyl cellulose sodium salt (CMC) nanofibers was deposited on a glass surface. The thin film of the Ch-CMC mixture obtained was stable, and fibroblast adhesion to the film was lowest when the weight ratio of Ch to CMC was 4:6. The ζ-potential and contact angle of the mixture film indicated that a polyion complex of Ch and CMC was formed. The mechanical strength of the film composed of Ch-CMC nanofiber complexes was much higher than that of the film composed of Ch-water-soluble CMC complexes (non-nanofiber), likely because the entanglement of nanofibers was enhanced by electrostatic attractions. These results indicate that the charge-neutralized nanofiber film was highly effective in suppressing cell adhesion and therefore is a promising material for biomedical applications.

  17. Bioactive thermoresponsive polyblend nanofiber formulations for wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawar, Mahesh D. [Polymer Science and Engineering, National Chemical Laboratory, Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India); MAEER' s Maharashtra Institute of Pharmacy S. No. 124, MIT Campus Paud Road, Kothrud, Pune 411 038 (India); Rathna, G.V.N., E-mail: rv.gundloori@ncl.res.in [Polymer Science and Engineering, National Chemical Laboratory, Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India); Agrawal, Shubhang [Polymer Science and Engineering, National Chemical Laboratory, Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India); Kuchekar, Bhanudas S. [MAEER' s Maharashtra Institute of Pharmacy S. No. 124, MIT Campus Paud Road, Kothrud, Pune 411 038 (India)

    2015-03-01

    The rationale of this work is to develop new bioactive thermoresponsive polyblend nanofiber formulations for wound healing (topical). Various polymer compositions of thermoresponsive, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), egg albumen and poly(ε-caprolactone) blend solutions with and without a drug [gatifloxacin hydrochloride, Gati] were prepared. Non-woven nanofibers of various compositions were fabricated using an electrospinning technique. The morphology of the nanofibers was analyzed by an environmental scanning electron microscope. The morphology was influenced by the concentration of polymer, drug, and polymer blend composition. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis showed the shift in bands due to hydrogen ion interactions between polymers and drug. Thermogram of PNIPAM/PCL/EA with Gati recorded a shift in lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) of PNIPAM. Similarly T{sub g} and melting temperature (T{sub m}) of PCL were shifted. X-ray diffraction patterns recorded a decrease in the crystalline state of PCL nanofibers and transformed crystalline drug to an amorphous state. In vitro release study of nanofibers with Gati showed initial rapid release up to 10 h, followed by slow and controlled release for 696 h (29 days). Nanofiber mats with Gati exhibited antibacterial properties to Staphylococcus aureus, supported suitable controlled drug release with in vitro cell viability and in vivo wound healing. - Highlights: • Thermoresponsive and bioactive nanofiber blends of PNIPAM/EA/PCL were fabricated. • Nanofiber blends favored initial rapid release, followed by controlled release. • In vitro cell viability of pure polymers and nanofiber blends was least toxic. • In vivo studies of drug loaded nanofiber mats recorded faster tissue regeneration.

  18. Production of Nanofibers Containing the Bioactive Compound C-Phycocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Felipe da Silva; Gettens, Juliana Garcia; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; de Morais, Michele Greque; Moraes, Caroline Costa; Kalil, Susana Juliano

    2016-01-01

    C-phycocyanin (C-PC) is a water-soluble phycobiliprotein present in light-harvesting antenna system of cyanobacteria. The nanostructures have not been widely evaluated, precluding improvements in stability and application of the C-PC. Electrospun nanofibers have an extremely high specific surface area due to their small diameter, they can be produced from a wide variety of polymers, and they are successfully evaluated to increase the efficacy of antitumor drugs. The incorporation of C-PC into nanofibers would allow investigations of potential uses in alternative cancer treatments and tissue engineering scaffolds. In this paper, C-phycocyanin were incorporated into the polymer polyethylene oxide (PEO) in various concentrations for nanofiber production via an electrospinning process. Nanofibers structures were analyzed using digital optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermogravimetric analysis was performed on the pure starting compounds and the produced nanofibers. At a concentration of 2% (w/w) of PEO, nanofibers were not produced, and concentrations of 4% (w/w) of PEO failed to produce nanofibers of good quality. Solutions with 6% (w/w) PEO, 6% (w/w) PEO plus 1% (w/w) NaCI, and 8% (w/w) PEO promote the formation of bluish, homogeneous and bead-free nanofibers with average diameters varying between 542.1 and 759.9 nm, as evaluated by optical microscopy. SEM analysis showed that nanofibers produced from polymer solutions containing 6% (w/w) PEO, 1% (w/w) NaCl and 3% (w/w) C-PC have an average diameter of 295 nm. Thermogravimetric analysis detected an increase in thermal resistance with the incorporation of C-phycocyanin into nanofibers.

  19. Honeycomb-like nanofiber based triboelectric nanogenerator using self-assembled electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Shin; Kim, Hyounjin; Kim, Yeongjun; Kang, Byung Ju; Oh, Je Hoon

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a honeycomb-like nanofiber based triboelectric nanogenerator (HN-TENG) is presented. In order to fabricate the honeycomb-like nanofiber, we utilized self-assembly of electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) nanofibers. The honeycomb-like P(VDF-TrFE) nanofiber network was directly produced via electrospinning without any additional processing. The HN-TENG showed a maximum voltage, current, and power density of 160 V, 17 μA, and 1.6 W/m2, respectively. The power density was enhanced more than twofold as compared with a typical flat nanofiber network based TENG due to the large surface area and high surface roughness of the honeycomb structure. Finally, we verified that HN-TENG has the potential to be used for practical applications by driving 100 light emitting diodes and charging capacitors.

  20. Process optimization and empirical modeling for electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber precursor of carbon nanofibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, S.Y.; Ren, J.; Vancso, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Ultrafine fibers were spun from polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) solution as a precursor of carbon nanofibers using a homemade electrospinning set-up. Fibers with diameter ranging from 200 nm to 1200 nm were obtained. Morphology of fibers and distribution of fiber diameter were i

  1. A Tony Thomas-Inspired Guide to INSPIRE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connell, Heath B.; /Fermilab

    2010-04-01

    The SPIRES database was created in the late 1960s to catalogue the high energy physics preprints received by the SLAC Library. In the early 1990s it became the first database on the web and the first website outside of Europe. Although indispensible to the HEP community, its aging software infrastructure is becoming a serious liability. In a joint project involving CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC, a new database, INSPIRE, is being created to replace SPIRES using CERN's modern, open-source Invenio database software. INSPIRE will maintain the content and functionality of SPIRES plus many new features. I describe this evolution from the birth of SPIRES to the current day, noting that the career of Tony Thomas spans this timeline.

  2. Bio-Inspired Odor Source Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    1 Distribution A: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Bio -Inspired Odor Source Localization Bio -Inspired Odor Source Localization...2011 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Bio -Inspired Odor Source Localization 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Distribution Unlimited Bio -Inspired Odor Source Localization Why study odor tracking? • Engineer odor tracking systems – Gas leaks – Hazardous waste

  3. Decrypting $SO(10)$-inspired leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Di Bari, Pasquale; Fiorentin, Michele Re

    2014-01-01

    Encouraged by the recent results from neutrino oscillation experiments, we perform an analytical study of $SO(10)$-inspired models and leptogenesis with hierarchical right-handed (RH) neutrino spectrum. Under the approximation of negligible misalignment between the neutrino Yukawa basis and the charged lepton basis, we find an analytical expression for the final asymmetry directly in terms of the low energy neutrino parameters that fully reproduces previous numerical results. This expression also shows that is possible to identify an effective leptogenesis phase for these models. When we also impose the wash-out of a large pre-existing asymmetry $N^{\\rm p,i}_{B-L}$, the strong thermal (ST) condition, we derive analytically all those constraints on the low energy neutrino parameters that characterise the {\\rm ST}-$SO(10)$-inspired leptogenesis solution, confirming previous numerical results. In particular we show why, though neutrino masses have to be necessarily normally ordered, the solution implies an analy...

  4. Observing binary inspiral with LIGO

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, L S

    1994-01-01

    Gravitational radiation from a binary neutron star or black hole system leads to orbital decay and the eventual coalescence of the binary's components. During the last several minutes before the binary components coalesce, the radiation will enter the bandwidth of the United States Laser Inteferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) and the French/Italian VIRGO gravitational radiation detector. The combination of detector sensitivity, signal strength, and source density and distribution all point to binary inspiral as the most likely candidate for observation among all the anticipated sources of gravitational radiation for LIGO/VIRGO. Here I review briefly some of the questions that are posed to theorists by the impending observation of binary inspiral.

  5. Metamaterial-inspired silicon nanophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staude, Isabelle; Schilling, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    The prospect of creating metamaterials with optical properties greatly exceeding the parameter space accessible with natural materials has been inspiring intense research efforts in nanophotonics for more than a decade. Following an era of plasmonic metamaterials, low-loss dielectric nanostructures have recently moved into the focus of metamaterial-related research. This development was mainly triggered by the experimental observation of electric and magnetic multipolar Mie-type resonances in high-refractive-index dielectric nanoparticles. Silicon in particular has emerged as a popular material choice, due to not only its high refractive index and very low absorption losses in the telecom spectral range, but also its paramount technological relevance. This Review overviews recent progress on metamaterial-inspired silicon nanostructures, including Mie-resonant and off-resonant regimes.

  6. Social insects inspire human design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, C. Tate; Clark, Rebecca M.; Moore, Dani; Overson, Rick P.; Penick, Clint A.; Smith, Adrian A.

    2010-01-01

    The international conference ‘Social Biomimicry: Insect Societies and Human Design’, hosted by Arizona State University, USA, 18–20 February 2010, explored how the collective behaviour and nest architecture of social insects can inspire innovative and effective solutions to human design challenges. It brought together biologists, designers, engineers, computer scientists, architects and businesspeople, with the dual aims of enriching biology and advancing biomimetic design. PMID:20392721

  7. Polysulfone nanofibers prepared by electrospinning and gas/jet-electrospinning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Yongyi; Zhu Puxin; Ye Hai; Niu Anjian; Gao Xushan; Wu Dacheng

    2006-01-01

    Polysulfone nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning.The electrospinning equipment was designed in a new way,wherein the spinneret was combined with a gas jet device.The intrinsic viscosity of the used polysulfone was 0.197 dL/g in dimethyl acetamide,which was also the solvent in electrospinning.The gas used in this gas jet/electrostatic spinning was nitrogen.The relationship between the process parameters and the average diameter of polysulfone nanofibers was investigated.The main process parameters studied in this work were the voltage,the flow rate of the spinning fluid,the distance between the spinneret and the nanofiber collector and the temperature in the spinning chamber.The other important factors determining the nanometer diameter were the spinning fluid properties including its viscosity,surface tension and electrical conductivity.The average diameter and the diameter distribution of electrospinning nanofibers were measured experimentally by using scanning electron microscopy.The diameter of polysnlfone nanofibers prepared by the gas jet/electrostatic spinning was in the range 50-500 nm.It was found that the diameter of nanofibers mainly depended on high voltage,the gap between the spinneret and the collector and the concentration of polymer solutions.It is concluded that the gas-jet/electrospinning is a better method than the conventional electrospinning,in that it makes the nanofibers finer and more uniform and exhibits higher efficiency in the process of electrospinning.

  8. Development of Protective Clothing against Nanoparticle Based on Electrospun Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Faccini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the development of efficient protective clothing against nanoparticulate aerosols is presented. Nanofibrous mats of polyamide 6 (PA6 were deposited onto a nonwoven viscose substrate by electrospinning technique. The influence of electrospinning parameters, including solution concentration, viscosity, and conductivity, was studied for the production of nonwovens with controlled fiber diameter showing a size distribution ranging from 66 to 195 nm. By varying several process parameters, textiles with different thickness of the nanofiber layer and thus air permeability were obtained. A hot-press lamination process using a thermoplastic resin as glue was applied to improve the adhesion of the nanofiber layer onto the textile support. After 1500 cycles of repeated compression and torsion, the nanofiber layer was still firmly attached to the support, while mechanical damage is visible in some areas. The penetration of NaCl particles with diameter ranging from 15 to 300 nm through the electrospun textiles was found to be strongly dependent on nanofiber layer thickness. A really thin nanofiber coating provides up to 80% retention of 20 nm size particles and over 50% retention of 200 nm size nanoparticles. Increasing the thickness of the nanofiber mat, the filtration efficiency was increased to over 99% along the whole nanoparticle range. The results obtained highlight the potential of nanofibers in the development of efficient personal protective equipments against nanoparticles.

  9. Nanofiber Anisotropic Conductive Films (ACF) for Ultra-Fine-Pitch Chip-on-Glass (COG) Interconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Wan; Suk, Kyung-Lim; Paik, Kyung-Wook

    2015-11-01

    Nanofiber anisotropic conductive films (ACF) were invented, by adapting nanofiber technology to ACF materials, to overcome the limitations of ultra-fine-pitch interconnection packaging, i.e. shorts and open circuits as a result of the narrow space between bumps and electrodes. For nanofiber ACF, poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) polymers were used as nanofiber polymer materials. For PVDF and PBS nanofiber ACF, conductive particles of diameter 3.5 μm were incorporated into nanofibers by electrospinning. In ultra-fine-pitch chip-on-glass assembly, insulation was significantly improved by using nanofiber ACF, because nanofibers inside the ACF suppressed the mobility of conductive particles, preventing them from flowing out during the bonding process. Capture of conductive particles was increased from 31% (conventional ACF) to 65%, and stable electrical properties and reliability were achieved by use of nanofiber ACF.

  10. Chemistry on electrospun polymeric nanofibers: merely routine chemistry or a real challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Seema; Wendorff, Joachim H; Greiner, Andreas

    2010-08-03

    Nanofiber-based non-wovens can be prepared by electrospinning. The chemical modification of such nanofibers or chemistry using nanofibers opens a multitude of application areas and challenges. A wealth of chemistry has been elaborated in recent years on and with electrospun nanofibers. Known methods as well as new methods have been applied to modify the electrospun nanofibers and thereby generate new materials and new functionalities. This Review summarizes and sorts the chemistry that has been reported in conjunction with electrospun nanofibers. The major focus is on catalysis and nanofibers, enzymes and nanofibers, surface modification for biomedical and specialty applications, coatings of fibers, crosslinking, and bulk modifications. A critical focus is on the question: what could make chemistry on or with nanofibers different from bulk chemistry?

  11. New High-Energy Nanofiber Anode Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiangwu; Fedkiw, Peter; Khan, Saad; Huang, Alex; Fan, Jiang

    2013-11-15

    The overall goal of the proposed work was to use electrospinning technology to integrate dissimilar materials (lithium alloy and carbon) into novel composite nanofiber anodes, which simultaneously had high energy density, reduced cost, and improved abuse tolerance. The nanofiber structure allowed the anodes to withstand repeated cycles of expansion and contraction. These composite nanofibers were electrospun into nonwoven fabrics with thickness of 50 μm or more, and then directly used as anodes in a lithium-ion battery. This eliminated the presence of non-active materials (e.g., conducting carbon black and polymer binder) and resulted in high energy and power densities. The nonwoven anode structure also provided a large electrode-electrolyte interface and, hence, high rate capacity and good lowtemperature performance capability. Following are detailed objectives for three proposed project periods. • During the first six months: Obtain anodes capable of initial specific capacities of 650 mAh/g and achieve ~50 full charge/discharge cycles in small laboratory scale cells (50 to 100 mAh) at the 1C rate with less than 20 percent capacity fade; • In the middle of project period: Assemble, cycle, and evaluate 18650 cells using proposed anode materials, and demonstrate practical and useful cycle life (750 cycles of ~70% state of charge swing with less than 20% capacity fade) in 18650 cells with at least twice improvement in the specific capacity than that of conventional graphite electrodes; • At the end of project period: Deliver 18650 cells containing proposed anode materials, and achieve specific capacities greater than 1200 mAh/g and cycle life longer than 5000 cycles of ~70% state of charge swing with less than 20% capacity fade.

  12. Novel dental composites reinforced with zirconia-silica ceramic nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guangqing; Fan, Yuwei; Zhang, Jian-Feng; Hagan, Joseph L; Xu, Xiaoming

    2012-04-01

    To fabricate and characterize dental composites reinforced with various amounts of zirconia-silica (ZS) or zirconia-yttria-silica (ZYS) ceramic nanofibers. Control composites (70 wt% glass particle filler, no nanofibers) and experimental composites (2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 wt% ZS or ZYS nanofibers replacing glass particle filler) were prepared by blending 29 wt% dental resin monomers, 70 wt% filler, and 1.0 wt% initiator, and polymerized by either heat or dental curing light. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM), energy at break (EAB), and fracture toughness (FT) were tested after the specimens were stored in 37°C deionized water for 24h, 3 months, or 6 months. Degree of conversion (DC) of monomers in composites was measured using Fourier transformed near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy. Fractured surfaces were observed by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The data were analyzed using ANOVA with Tukey's Honestly Significant Differences test used for post hoc analysis. Reinforcement of dental composites with ZS or ZYS nanofibers (2.5% or 5.0%) can significantly increase the FS, FM and EAB of dental composites over the control. Further increase the content of ZS nanofiber (7.5%), however, decreases these properties (although they are still higher than those of the control). Addition of nanofibers did not decrease the long-term mechanical properties of these composites. All ZS reinforced composites (containing 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5% ZS nanofibers) exhibit significantly higher fracture toughness than the control. The DC of the composites decreases with ZS nanofiber content. Incorporation of ceramic nanofibers in dental composites can significantly improve their mechanical properties and fracture toughness and thus may extend their service life. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Permeability of Electrospun Superhydrophobic Nanofiber Mats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarfaraz U. Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the fabrication and characterization of electrospun nanofiber mats made up of poly(4-methyl-1-pentene polymer. The polymer was electrospun in different weight concentrations. The mats were characterized by their basis weight, fiber diameter distribution, contact angles, contact angle hysteresis, and air permeability. All of the electrospun nonwoven fiber mats had water contact angles greater than 150 degrees making them superhydrophobic. The permeabilities of the mats were empirically fitted to the mat basis weight by a linear relation. The experimentally measured air permeabilities were significantly larger than the permeabilities predicted by the Kuwabara model for fibrous media.

  14. Charge Injection and Transport in Organic Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Bøggild, Peter; Rubahn, H. G.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the carrier injection and transport in individual para-hexaphenylene nanofibers by electrical transport measurements at different temperatures. The injected current shows much weaker temperature dependence than what would be anticipated from a simplistic model that considers...... the injection barrier height equal to the difference between the metal electrode work function and the HOMO energy level of the organic semiconductor. Semiquantitative modeling suggests that the weak temperature dependence is due to injection into a distribution of states rather than into a single energy level...

  15. Highly stretchable electrospun conducting polymer nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubée de Gramont, Fanny; Zhang, Shiming; Tomasello, Gaia; Kumar, Prajwal; Sarkissian, Andranik; Cicoira, Fabio

    2017-08-01

    Biomedical electronics research targets both wearable and biocompatible electronic devices easily adaptable to specific functions. To achieve such goals, stretchable organic electronic materials are some of the most intriguing candidates. Herein, we develop highly stretchable poly-(3,4-ethylenedioxythiphene) (PEDOT) doped with tosylate (PEDOT:Tos) nanofibers. A two-step process involving electrospinning of a carrier polymer (with oxidant) and vapor phase polymerization was used to produce fibers on a polydimethylsiloxane substrate. The fibers can be stretched up to 140% of the initial length maintaining high conductivity.

  16. Performance evaluation of PAN nanofiber air filter fabricated by electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Cheol; Kim, Tae Eun; Lee, Jung Koo; Ahn, Ji Woong; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Hyung Man [Dept. of Electronic, Telecommunications, Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Inje University, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Nanomaterials possess unique mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. They are small, and have an ultrahigh surface area, making them suitable for air filter applications. Electrospinning has been recognized as an efficient technique for fabricating polymer nanofibers. In order to determine the optimum manufacturing conditions, the effects of several electrospinning process parameters on the diameter, orientation, and distribution of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber are analyzed. To improve interlaminar fracture toughness and suppress delamination in the form of laminated non-woven fibers by using a heat roller, the performances of filter efficiency and pressure drop achieved with PAN nanofiber air filter are evaluated experimentally.

  17. Enhanced thermal conductance of polymer composites through embeddingaligned carbon nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale K. Hensley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this work is to find a more efficient method of enhancing the thermal conductance of polymer thin films. This work compares polymer thin films embedded with randomly oriented carbon nanotubes to those with vertically aligned carbon nanofibers. Thin films embedded with carbon nanofibers demonstrated a similar thermal conductance between 40–60 μm and a higher thermal conductance between 25–40 μm than films embedded with carbon nanotubes with similar volume fractions even though carbon nanotubes have a higher thermal conductivity than carbon nanofibers.

  18. Preparation and Electrochemical Properties of Silver Doped Hollow Carbon Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Fu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Silver doped PAN-based hollow carbon nanofibers were prepared combining co-electrospinning with in situ reduction technique subsequently heat treatment to improve the electrochemical performances of carbon based supercapacitor electrodes. The morphology, structure and electrochemical performances of the resulted nanofiber were studied. The results show that the silver nanoparticles can be doped on the surface of hollow carbon nanofibers and the addition of silver favors the improvement of the electrochemical performances, exhibiting the enhanced reversibility of electrode reaction and the capacitance and the reduced charge transfer impedance.

  19. Electrostatic Self-Assembly of Polysaccharides into Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendes, Ana Carina Loureiro; Strohmenger, Timm; Goycoolea, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the anionic polysaccharide Xanthan gum (X) was mixed with positively charged Chitosan oligomers (ChO), and used as building blocks, to generate novel nanofibers by electrostatic self-assembly in aqueous conditions. Different concentrations, ionic strength and order of mixing of both...... components were tested and observed to affect the diameter, which ranged from 100 to 500 nm, and morphology of the self-assembled nanofibers. The release of diclofenac, as model drug, from self-assembled xanthan-chitosan nanofibers was demonstrated, suggesting that these nanostructures can be used...

  20. Hybrid electrospun chitosan-phospholipids nanofibers for transdermal drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendes, Ana Carina Loureiro; Gorzelanny, Christian; Halter, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (Ch) polysaccharide was mixed with phospholipids (P) to generate electrospun hybrid nanofibers intended to be used as platforms for transdermal drug delivery. Ch/P nanofibers exibithed average diameters ranging from 248 +/- 94 nm to 600 +/- 201 nm, depending on the amount of phospholipids...... used. Fourier Transformed Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) data suggested the occurrence of electrostatic interactions between amine groups of chitosan with the phospholipid counterparts. The nanofibers were shown to be stable for at least 7 days in Phosphate Buffer...

  1. Facile aqueous-phase synthesis of copper sulfide nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zengmin; Im, Sang Hyuk; Kim, Woo-Sik; Yu, Taekyung

    2017-07-01

    We report a facile aqueous-phase synthetic route to vine-like copper sulfide (CuS) nanofibers prepared by reacting elemental sulfur with Cu+-branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI) complex obtained by the reaction of Cu2+ with ascorbic acid in the presence of BPEI. By controlling the concentration of BPEI, we could easily control the morphology of CuS from nanofibers to hollow nanoparticles. We also found that concentration of BPEI and the presence of halide anion would play important roles in the formation of vine-like CuS nanofibers.

  2. Nanofiber-based all-optical switches

    CERN Document Server

    Kien, Fam Le

    2016-01-01

    We study all-optical switches operating on a single four-level atom with the $N$-type transition configuration in a two-mode nanofiber cavity with a significant length (on the order of $20$ mm) and a moderate finesse (on the order of 300) under the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) conditions. In our model, the gate and probe fields are the quantum nanofiber-cavity fields excited by weak classical light pulses, and the parameters of the $D_2$ line of atomic cesium are used. We examine two different switching schemes. The first scheme is based on the effect of the presence of a photon in the gate mode on the EIT of the probe mode. The second scheme is based on the use of EIT to store a photon of the gate mode in the population of an appropriate atomic level, which leads to the reduction of the transmission of the field in the probe mode. We investigate the dependencies of the switching contrast on various parameters, such as the cavity length, the mirror reflectivity, and the detunings and powers ...

  3. Drop impacts on electrospun nanofiber membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Rakesh P.; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Yarin, Alexander; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    2013-11-01

    This work reports a study of drop impacts of polar and non-polar liquids onto electrospun nanofiber membranes (of 8-10 mm thickness and pore sizes of 3-6 nm) with an increasing degree of hydrophobicity. The nanofibers used were electrospun from polyacrylonitrile (PAN), nylon 6/6, polycaprolactone (PCL) and Teflon. It was found that for any liquid/fiber pair there exists a threshold impact velocity (1.5 to 3 m/s) above which water penetrates membranes irrespective of their wettability. The low surface tension liquid left the rear side of sufficiently thin membranes as a millipede-like system of tiny jets protruding through a number of pores. For such a high surface tension liquid as water, jets immediately merged into a single bigger jet, which formed secondary drops due to capillary instability. An especially non-trivial result is that superhydrophobicity of the porous nano-textured Teflon skeleton with the interconnected pores is incapable of preventing water penetration due to drop impact, even at relatively low impact velocities close to 3.46 m/s. A theoretical estimate of the critical membrane thickness sufficient for complete viscous dissipation of the kinetic energy of penetrating liquid corroborates with the experimental data. The current work is supported by the Nonwovens Cooperative Research Center (NCRC).

  4. Tensile properties of bacterial cellulose nanofibers - polyester composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abral, H.; Mahardika, M.

    2016-07-01

    The paper shows tensile properties of bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers and polyester (PO) matrix composites. Tensile properties including tensile strength (TS), modulus elasticity (ME), and elongation (EL) were observed respectively. BC nanofibers exist in the form of a sheet that was then varied in matrix PO. The BC sheet was mounted by one, three, five and seven pieces respectively in the matrix PO. The tensile strength of the composites was conducted by using the tensile equipment. The results showed that the tensile strength of the composite with a single sheet of BC was lower than that of pure PO. The ST value achieved maximum level in the number of layers of BC three pieces, but then it decreased for the composites reinforced five and seven pieces of BC nanofiber, respectively. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) observation exhibits bad interface bonding between BC nanofibers and PO matrix.

  5. Oxygen-Generating Nanofiber Cell Scaffolds with Antimicrobial Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Junping; Zhu, Yizhou; Bawa, Harinder K.; Ng, Geoffrey; Wu, Yong; Libera, Matthew; van der Mei, H. C.; Busscher, H. J.; Yu, Xiaojun

    2011-01-01

    Many next-generation biomaterials will need ability to not only promote healthy tissue integration but to simultaneously resist bacterial colonization resulting biomaterials associated infection. For this purpose, antimicrobial nanofibers of (polycapro-lactone(PCL) were fabricated by incorporating c

  6. Method of synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Jaswinder K.; Datskos, Panos G.

    2015-09-15

    A method for synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves is provided. The method includes providing a solution of polyvinyl pyrrolidone, adding sodium citrate and ammonium hydroxide to form a first mixture, adding a silica-based compound to the solution to form a second mixture, and sonicating the second mixture to synthesize a plurality of silica nanofibers having an average cross-sectional diameter of less than 70 nm and having a length on the order of at least several hundred microns. The method can be performed without heating or electrospinning, and instead includes less energy intensive strategies that can be scaled up to an industrial scale. The resulting nanofibers can achieve a decreased mean diameter over conventional fibers. The decreased diameter generally increases the tensile strength of the silica nanofibers, as defects and contaminations decrease with the decreasing diameter.

  7. Multicolored Nanofiber Based Organic Light-Emitting Transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    With Jensen, Per Baunegaard; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Tavares, Luciana

    For optoelectronic applications, organic semiconductors have several advantages over their inorganic counterparts such as facile synthesis, tunability via synthetic chemistry, and low temperature processing. Self-assembled, molecular crystalline nanofibers are of particular interest as they could...... form ultra-small light-emitters in future nanophotonic applications. Such organic nanofibers exhibit many interesting optical properties including polarized photo- and electroluminescence, waveguiding, and emission color tunability. We here present a first step towards a multicolored, electrically...... driven device by combining nanofibers made from two different molecules, parahexaphenylene (p6P) and 5,5´-Di-4-biphenyl-2,2´-bithiophene (PPTTPP), which emits blue and green light, respectively. The organic nanofibers are implemented on a bottom gate/bottom contact field-effect transistor platform using...

  8. Preparation and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Nanofibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ning; WEI Qu-fu; LI Qi; XU Wen-zheng

    2006-01-01

    A new class of nanocomposites based on organic and inorganic species integrated at a nanoscale has obtained more attention these years. Organic-inorganic hybrids have both the advantages of organic materials, such as light weight, flexibility and good moldability, and inorganic materials, such as high strength, heat stability and chemical resistance. In this work, PVAc/TiO2 organicinorganic hybrid was prepared by sol-gel process. Electrospinning technique was used to fabricate PVAc/TiO2hybrid nanofibers. The structures and properties of the hybrid nanofibers were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscope (AFM),Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) and Fouriertransform infrared (FTIR) spectra. SEM and AFM were employed to study the topography of the hybrid nanofibers.The chemical structure of the hybrid nanofibers were examined by FTIR. The DSC scansrevealed the second order transition temperature of the hybrid materials were higher than PVAc.

  9. Multicolored Nanofiber Based Organic Light-Emitting Transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    With Jensen, Per Baunegaard; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Tavares, Luciana

    For optoelectronic applications, organic semiconductors have several advantages over their inorganic counterparts such as facile synthesis, tunability via synthetic chemistry, and low temperature processing. Self-assembled, molecular crystalline nanofibers are of particular interest as they could...... form ultra-small light-emitters in future nanophotonic applications. Such organic nanofibers exhibit many interesting optical properties including polarized photo- and electroluminescence, waveguiding, and emission color tunability. We here present a first step towards a multicolored, electrically...... driven device by combining nanofibers made from two different molecules, parahexaphenylene (p6P) and 5,5´-Di-4-biphenyl-2,2´-bithiophene (PPTTPP), which emits blue and green light, respectively. The organic nanofibers are implemented on a bottom gate/bottom contact field-effect transistor platform using...

  10. Method of synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Jaswinder K.; Datskos, Panos G.

    2017-08-08

    A method for synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves is provided. The method includes providing a solution of polyvinyl pyrrolidone, adding sodium citrate and ammonium hydroxide to form a first mixture, adding a silica-based compound to the solution to form a second mixture, and sonicating the second mixture to synthesize a plurality of silica nanofibers having an average cross-sectional diameter of less than 70 nm and having a length on the order of at least several hundred microns. The method can be performed without heating or electrospinning, and instead includes less energy intensive strategies that can be scaled up to an industrial scale. The resulting nanofibers can achieve a decreased mean diameter over conventional fibers. The decreased diameter generally increases the tensile strength of the silica nanofibers, as defects and contaminations decrease with the decreasing diameter.

  11. Method of synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jaswinder K.; Datskos, Panos G.

    2015-09-15

    A method for synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves is provided. The method includes providing a solution of polyvinyl pyrrolidone, adding sodium citrate and ammonium hydroxide to form a first mixture, adding a silica-based compound to the solution to form a second mixture, and sonicating the second mixture to synthesize a plurality of silica nanofibers having an average cross-sectional diameter of less than 70 nm and having a length on the order of at least several hundred microns. The method can be performed without heating or electrospinning, and instead includes less energy intensive strategies that can be scaled up to an industrial scale. The resulting nanofibers can achieve a decreased mean diameter over conventional fibers. The decreased diameter generally increases the tensile strength of the silica nanofibers, as defects and contaminations decrease with the decreasing diameter.

  12. Research on morphologies of polyvinyl alcohol/milk nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the surface morphologies of polyvinyl alcohol/milk nanofibers produced via electrospinning technique were investigated. The electrospinning process was performed at various processing parameters (flow rate, applied voltage and different polyvinyl acetate to milk ratios (100/0, 90/10, 80/20, 70/30, and 60/40. The scanning electron microscopy and Image J software were used to characterize the surface morphologies, especially the diameter distribution of electro spun nanofibers. The results of scanning electron microscopy show that the diameter of polyvinyl acetate/milk nanofibers increases with the increase of the spinning speed and spinning voltage but decreases with the increase of the weight percentage of milk in the spinning solution. The potential applications of this bicomponent nanofibers are numerous and diverse. The research results in present paper can contribute to better control of the electrospinning process and thus expanding the applicabilities, such as dressings for wound healing in sports.

  13. Silicon Whisker and Carbon Nanofiber Composite Anode Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) proposes to develop a silicon whisker and carbon nanofiber composite anode for lithium ion batteries on a Phase I program. This anode...

  14. Polyethylene/silver-nanofiber composites: A material for antibacterial films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Paula A; Larrea, Maialen; Tamayo, Laura; Rabagliati, Franco M; Azócar, M Ignacio; Páez, Maritza

    2016-12-01

    Silver nanofibers (Ag-Nfbs)~80nm in diameter were synthesized by hydrothermal treatment. The nanofibers (3 and 5wt%) were added in the initial feed together with the catalytic system. Polymerizations in an ethylene atmosphere were performed, yielding PE nanocomposites in situ with 3 and 5wt% content of Ag-Nfbs. The antibacterial effect of the silver-nanofiber composites was evaluated after incubation of Escherichia coli ATCC 25923 for 8h on their surface. Bacterial viability tests showed that the silver-nanofiber composites inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli ATCC 25923 by 88 and 56%. This behavior is attributed to increased silver ions release from the nanocomposite. TEM analysis showed that the antibacterial effect is associated with membrane disruption but not with changes in shape.

  15. Improved fire retardancy of thermoset composites modified with carbon nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongfu Zhao and Jan Gou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multifunctional thermoset composites were made from polyester resin, glass fiber mats and carbon nanofiber sheets (CNS. Their flaming behavior was investigated with cone calorimeter under well-controlled combustion conditions. The heat release rate was lowered by pre-planting carbon nanofiber sheets on the sample surface with the total fiber content of only 0.38 wt.%. Electron microscopy showed that carbon nanofiber sheet was partly burned and charred materials were formed on the combusting surface. Both the nanofibers and charred materials acted as an excellent insulator and/or mass transport barrier, improving the fire retardancy of the composite. This behavior agrees well with the general mechanism of fire retardancy in various nanoparticle-thermoplastic composites.

  16. Nanofiber-based optical trapping of cold neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Vetsch, Eugen; Mitsch, Rudolf; Reitz, Daniel; Schneeweiss, Philipp; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2012-01-01

    We present experimental techniques and results related to the optimization and characterization of our nanofiber-based atom trap [Vetsch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 203603 (2010)]. The atoms are confined in an optical lattice which is created using a two-color evanescent field surrounding the optical nanofiber. For this purpose, the polarization state of the trapping light fields has to be properly adjusted. We demonstrate that this can be accomplished by analyzing the light scattered by the nanofiber. Furthermore, we show that loading the nanofiber trap from a magneto-optical trap leads to sub-Doppler temperatures of the trapped atomic ensemble and yields a sub-Poissonian distribution of the number of trapped atoms per trapping site.

  17. A review of opportunities for electrospun nanofibers in analytical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigome, Samuel; Torto, Nelson

    2011-11-07

    Challenges associated with analyte and matrix complexities and the ever increasing pressure from all sectors of industry for alternative analytical devices, have necessitated the development and application of new materials in analytical chemistry. To date, nanomaterials have emerged as having excellent properties for analytical chemistry applications mainly due to their large surface area to volume ratio and the availability of a wide variety of chemical and morphological modification methods. Of the available nanofibrous material fabrication methods, electrospinning has emerged as the most versatile. It is the aim of this contribution to highlight some of the recent developments that harness the great potential shown by electrospun nanofibers for application in analytical chemistry. The review discusses the use of electrospun nanofibers as a platform for low resolution separation or as a chromatographic sorbent bed for high resolution separation. It concludes by discussing the applications of electrospun nanofibers in detection systems with a specific focus on the development of simple electrospun nanofiber based colorimetric probes.

  18. Mechanical properties of homogeneous nanofiber composites fabricated by electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kentaro; Hotta, Atsushi

    2013-03-01

    A new composite that possesses uniformly dispersed polymeric nanofibers in different polymeric matrix was introduced by using electrospinning. Recently, nanofibers have been actively investigated for fillers for polymeric nano-composites to enhance the mechanical properties of the composites or to get highly functionalize polymer materials. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers were selected as polymeric fillers and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was used for polymeric matrix. Internally well-dispersed composites were fabricated by this new method, whereas rather anisotropic composites were also made by the traditional sandwich method. The morphology of the composites was analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). It was found that, in the new internally well-dispersed composites, PVA nanofibers existed from the both surfaces of the polymer matrix, uniformly dispersed in the composite. Isotropic mechanical properties were observed for internally well-dispersed composites, whereas relatively anisotropic characteristics could be observed for the traditionally-made composites.

  19. Silicon Whisker and Carbon Nanofiber Composite Anode Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has successfully developed a silicon whisker and carbon nanofiber composite anode for lithium ion batteries on a Phase I program. PSI...

  20. Space as an inspiring context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancu, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Using space as context to inspire science education tapps into the excitement of generations of discovering the unknown resulting in unprecedented public participation. Educators are finding exciting and age appropiate materials for their class that explore science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Possible misconceptions are highlighted so that teachers may plan lessons to facilitate correct conceptual understanding. With a range of hands-on learning experiences, Web materials and online ,opportunities for students, educators are invited to take a closer look to actual science missions. This session leverages resources, materials and expertise to address a wide range of traditional and nontraditional audiences while providing consistent messages and information on various space agencies programs.

  1. Natural photonics for industrial inspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Andrew R

    2009-05-13

    There are two considerations for optical biomimetics: the diversity of submicrometre architectures found in the natural world, and the industrial manufacture of these. A review exists on the latter subject, where current engineering methods are considered along with those of the natural cells. Here, on the other hand, I will provide a modern review of the different categories of reflectors and antireflectors found in animals, including their optical characterization. The purpose of this is to inspire designers within the $2 billion annual optics industry.

  2. Neuroscience-Inspired Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassabis, Demis; Kumaran, Dharshan; Summerfield, Christopher; Botvinick, Matthew

    2017-07-19

    The fields of neuroscience and artificial intelligence (AI) have a long and intertwined history. In more recent times, however, communication and collaboration between the two fields has become less commonplace. In this article, we argue that better understanding biological brains could play a vital role in building intelligent machines. We survey historical interactions between the AI and neuroscience fields and emphasize current advances in AI that have been inspired by the study of neural computation in humans and other animals. We conclude by highlighting shared themes that may be key for advancing future research in both fields. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Dispersion of cellulose nanofibers in biopolymer based nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei

    The focus of this work was to understand the fundamental dispersion mechanism of cellulose based nanofibers in bionanocomposites. The cellulose nanofibers were extracted from soybean pod and hemp fibers by chemo-mechanical treatments. These are bundles of cellulose nanofibers with a diameter ranging between 50 to 100 nm and lengths of thousands of nanometers which results in very high aspect ratio. In combination with a suitable matrix polymer, cellulose nanofiber networks show considerable potential as an effective reinforcement for high quality specialty applications of bio-based nanocomposites. Cellulose fibrils have a high density of --OH groups on the surface, which have a tendency to form hydrogen bonds with adjacent fibrils, reducing interaction with the surrounding matrix. The use of nanofibers has been mostly restricted to water soluble polymers. This thesis is focused on synthesizing the nanocomposite using a solid phase matrix polypropylene (PP) or polyethylene (PE) by hot compression and poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) in an aqueous phase by film casting. The mechanical properties of nanofiber reinforced PVA film demonstrated a 4-5 fold increase in tensile strength, as compared to the untreated fiber-blend-PVA film. It is necessary to reduce the entanglement of the fibrils and improve their dispersion in the matrix by surface modification of fibers without deteriorating their reinforcing capability. Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) was used to explore how various surface treatments would change the dispersion component of surface energy and acid-base character of cellulose nanofibers and the effect of the incorporation of these modified nanofibers into a biopolymer matrix on the properties of their nano-composites. Poly (lactic acid) (PLA) and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) based nanocomposites using cellulose nanofibers were prepared by extrusion, injection molding and hot compression. The IGC results indicated that styrene maleic anhydride coated and ethylene

  4. Smart nanofibers with a photoresponsive surface for controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guo-Dong; Xu, Li-Qun; Yao, Fang; Li, Guo-Liang; Kang, En-Tang

    2009-11-01

    A novel photocontrolled "ON-OFF" release system for the alpha-cyclodextrin-5-fluorouracial (alpha-CD-5FU) prodrug, based on host-guest interaction on the photoresponsive and cross-linked nanofiber surface, was demonstrated. The nanofibers with a stimuli-responsive surface were electrospun from the block copolymer prepared via controlled radical polymerization, followed by surface modification via "Click Chemistry", and loading of the prodrug via host-guest interaction.

  5. High temperature resistant nanofiber by bubbfil-spinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat-resisting nanofibers have many potential applications in various industries, and the bubbfil spinning is the best candidate for mass-production of such materials. Polyether sulfone/zirconia solution with a bi-solvent system is used in the experiment. Experimental result reveals that polyether sulfone/zirconia nanofibers have higher resistance to high temperature than pure polyether sulfone fibers, and can be used as high-temperature-resistant filtration materials.

  6. Enhancement of radiative processes in nanofibers with embedded plasmonic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Jurga, Radoslaw; Pisignano, Dario; Ciracì, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Efficient manipulation and long distance transport of single-photons is a key component in nanoscale quantum optics. In this letter, we study the emission properties of an individual light emitter placed into a nanofiber and coupled to a metallic nanoparticle. We find that plasmonic field enhancement together with the nanofiber optical confinement uniquely and synergistically contribute to an overall increase of emission rates as well as quantum yields.

  7. Preparation of nanofibers consisting of MnO/Mn3O4 by using the electrospinning technique: the nanofibers have two band-gap energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Nasser A. M.; Woo, Kee-Do; Ansari, S. G.; Ko, Jung-Ahn; Kanjwal, Muzafar A.; Kim, Hak Yong

    2009-06-01

    In the present study, nanofibers consisting of manganese monoxide (MnO), which is hard to prepare because of the chemical activity of the manganese metal, and the popular Mn3O4 have been synthesized via the electrospinning technique. The nanofibers were obtained by electrospinning of an aqueous sol-gel consisting of manganese acetate tetra-hydrate and poly(vinyl alcohol). The obtained nanofiber mats were dried in vacuum at 80°C for 24 h and then calcined in argon atmosphere at 900°C for 5 h. According to X-ray diffraction results, the obtained nanofibers contain 65% MnO. Transmission electron microscope analysis reveals good crystallinity of the produced nanofibers. UV-visible spectroscopic analysis has indicated that the produced nanofibers have two band-gap energies, 2 and 3.7 eV, which enhances utilizing of the nanofibers in different applications.

  8. Optically Monitoring Mineralization and Demineralization on Photoluminescent Bioactive Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Li, Yangyang; Chen, Xiaoyi; Li, Binbin; Gao, Bo; Ren, Zhaohui; Han, Gaorong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-04-05

    Bone regeneration and scaffold degradation do not usually follow the same rate, representing a daunting challenge in bone repair. Toward this end, we propose to use an external field such as light (in particular, a tissue-penetrating near-infrared light) to precisely monitor the degradation of the mineralized scaffold (demineralization) and the formation of apatite mineral (mineralization). Herein, CaTiO3:Yb(3+),Er(3+)@bioactive glass (CaTiO3:Yb(3+),Er(3+)@BG) nanofibers with upconversion (UC) photoluminescence (PL) were synthesized. Such nanofibers are biocompatible and can emit green and red light under 980 nm excitation. The UC PL intensity is quenched during the bone-like apatite formation on the surface of the nanofibers in simulated body fluid; more mineral formation on the nanofibers induces more rapid optical quenching of the UC PL. Furthermore, the quenched UC PL can recover back to its original magnitude when the apatite on the nanofibers is degraded. Our work suggests that it is possible to optically monitor the apatite mineralization and demineralization on the surface of nanofibers used in bone repair.

  9. Antibacterial polylactic acid/chitosan nanofibers decorated with bioactive glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, Yi-fan; Akram, Muhammad; Alshemary, Ammarz [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Hussain, Rafaqat, E-mail: rafaqat@comsats.edu.pk [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • PLA/Chitosan nanofibers were coated with functional bioglass. • Polymer/ceramic composite fibers exhibited good in-vitro bioactivity. • Nanofibers coated with Ag doped bioglass exhibited good antibacterial activity. - Abstract: In this study, we have presented the structural and in vitro characterization of electrospun polylactic acid (PLA)/Chitosan nanofibers coated with cerium, copper or silver doped bioactive glasses (CeBG/CuBG/AgBG). Bead-free, smooth surfaced nanofibers were successfully prepared by using electrospinning technique. The nanocomposite fibers were obtained using a facile dip-coating method, their antibacterial activities against E. coliE. coli (ATCC 25922 strains) were measured by the disk diffusion method after 24 h of incubation at 37 °C. CeBG and CuBG decorated PLA/Chitosan nanofibers did not develop an inhibition zone against the bacteria. On the other hand, nanofibers coated with AgBG developed an inhibition zone against the bacteria. The as-prepared nanocomposite fibers were immersed in SBF for 1, 3 and 7 days in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) for evaluation of in vitro bioactivity. All samples induced the formation of crystallites with roughly ruffled morphology and the pores of fibers were covered with the extensive growth of crystallites. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) composition analysis showed that the crystallites possessed Ca/P ratio close to 1.67, confirming the good in-vitro bioactivity of the fibers.

  10. Single flexible nanofiber to simultaneously realize electricity-magnetism bifunctionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ming; Sheng, Shujuan; Ma, Qianli; Lv, Nan; Yu, Wensheng; Wang, Jinxian; Dong, Xiangting; Liu, Guixia, E-mail: wenshengyu2009@sina.com, E-mail: dongxiangting888@163.com [Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry and Nanotechnology at Universities of Jilin Province, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun (China)

    2016-03-15

    In order to develop new-typed multifunctional composite nanofibers, PANI/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/PVP flexible bifunctional composite nanofibers with simultaneous electrical conduction and magnetism have been successfully fabricated via a facile electrospinning technology. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) is used as a matrix to construct composite nanofibers containing different amounts of polyaniline (PANI) and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs). The bifunctional composite nanofibers simultaneously possess excellent electrical conductivity and magnetic properties. The electrical conductivity reaches up to the order of 10{sup -3} S·cm{sup -1}. The electrical conductivity and saturation magnetization of the composite nanofibers can be respectively tuned by adding various amounts of PANI and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. The obtained electricity-magnetism bifunctional composite nanofibers are expected to possess many potential applications in areas such as electromagnetic interference shielding, special coating, microwave absorption, molecular electronics and future nanomechanics. More importantly, the design concept and construct technique are of universal significance to fabricate other bifunctional one-dimensional nanostructures. (author)

  11. Cellulose nanofiber extraction from grass by a modified kitchen blender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagaito, Antonio Norio; Ikenaga, Koh; Takagi, Hitoshi

    2015-03-01

    Cellulose nanofibers have been used to reinforce polymers, delivering composites with strength that in some cases can be superior to that of engineering plastics. The extraction of nanofibers from plant fibers can be achieved through specialized equipment that demands high energy input, despite delivering extremely low yields. The high extraction cost confines the use of cellulose nanofibers to the laboratory and not for industrial applications. This study aims to extract nanofibers from grass by using a kitchen blender. Earlier studies have demonstrated that paper sheets made of blender-extracted nanofibers (after 5 min to 10 min of blending) have strengths on par with paper sheets made from commercially available cellulose nanofibers. By optimizing the design of the blender bottle, nanofibrillation can be achieved in shorter treatment times, reducing the energy consumption (in the present case, to half) and the overall extraction cost. The raw materials used can be extended to the residue straw of agricultural crops, as an alternative to the usual pulp fibers obtained from wood.

  12. Preparation and biomedical applications of chitin and chitosan nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Kazuo; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Osaki, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Minami, Saburo

    2014-10-01

    Chitin (β-(1-4)-poly-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine) is widely distributed in nature and is the second most abundant polysaccharide after cellulose. Chitin occurs in nature as ordered macrofibrils. It is the major structural component in the exoskeleton of crab and shrimp shells and the cell wall of fungi and yeast. As chitin is not readily dissolved in common solvents, it is often converted to its more deacetylated derivative, chitosan. Chitin, chitosan, and its derivatives are widely used in tissue engineering, wound healing, and as functional foods. Recently, easy methods for the preparation of chitin and chitosan nanofibers have been developed, and studies on biomedical applications of chitin and chitosan nanofibers are ongoing. Chitin and chitosan nanofibers are considered to have great potential for various biomedical applications, because they have several useful properties such as high specific surface area and high porosity. This review summarizes methods for the preparation of chitin and chitosan nanofibers. Further, biomedical applications of chitin and chitosan nanofibers in (i) tissue engineering, (ii) wound dressing, (iii) cosmetic and skin health, (iv) stem cell technology, (v) anti-cancer treatments and drug delivery, (vi) anti-inflammatory treatments, and (vii) obesity treatment are summarized. Many studies indicate that chitin and chitosan nanofibers are suitable materials for various biomedical applications.

  13. Effect of electrospun nanofibers on flexural properties of fiberglass composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Fatima T.

    In the present study, sintered electrospun TEOS nanofibers were interleaved in S2 fiberglass woven fabric layers, and composite panels were fabricated using the heated vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (H-VARTM) process. Cured panels were water jet cut to obtain the flexural test coupons. Flexural coupons were then tested using ASTM D7264 standard. The mechanical properties such as flexural strength, ultimate flexural failure strains, flexural modulus, and fiber volume fraction were measured. The S-2 fiberglass composite with the sintered TEOS electrospun nanofibers displayed lower flexural stiffness and strength as compared to the composites that were fabricated using S-2 fiberglass composite without the TEOS electrospun nanofibers. The present study also indicated that the composites fabricated with sintered TEOS electrospun nanofibers have larger failure strains as compared to the ones that were fabricated without the presence of electrospun nanofibers. The study indicates that the nanoengineered composites have better energy absorbing mechanism under flexural loading as compared to conventional fiberglass composites without presence of nanofibers.

  14. Effect of Nanofibers on Spore Penetration and Lunar Dust Filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Gibson, Ph.D.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of two separate studies on biological spore penetration and simulated lunar dust filtration illustrate the use of nanofibers in some nonstandard filtration applications (nanofibers are generally defined as having diameters of less than a micron. In the first study, a variety of microporous liners containing microfibers and nanofibers were combined with cotton-based fabrics in order to filter aerosolized spores. The aerosol penetration resistance of the nanofiber-lined fabrics was measured, and some analysis was conducted of where the particles are captured within the fabric layers. Testing was conducted with aerosolized living spores, in order to evaluate the efficacy of various fabric treatments on spore viability within the fabric layers after exposure. Reported are the results of studies on fabrics with and without a removable electrospun nanofiber liner, and the fate of the spores within the fabric layers. In the second study, non-instrumented filtration testing using simulated lunar dust determined the comparative filtration efficiency of various nonwoven filtration media. Nanofiber witness media, combined with scanning electron microscope images, showed that an electrospun nonwoven filter layer effectively filtered out all the large and fine particles of the simulated lunar dust.

  15. Synthesis of Keratin-based Nanofiber for Biomedical Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Zanshe S; Rijal, Nava P; Jarvis, David; Edwards, Angela; Bhattarai, Narayan

    2016-02-07

    Electrospinning, due to its versatility and potential for applications in various fields, is being frequently used to fabricate nanofibers. Production of these porous nanofibers is of great interest due to their unique physiochemical properties. Here we elaborate on the fabrication of keratin containing poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers (i.e., PCL/keratin composite fiber). Water soluble keratin was first extracted from human hair and mixed with PCL in different ratios. The blended solution of PCL/keratin was transformed into nanofibrous membranes using a laboratory designed electrospinning set up. Fiber morphology and mechanical properties of the obtained nanofiber were observed and measured using scanning electron microscopy and tensile tester. Furthermore, degradability and chemical properties of the nanofiber were studied by FTIR. SEM images showed uniform surface morphology for PCL/keratin fibers of different compositions. These PCL/keratin fibers also showed excellent mechanical properties such as Young's modulus and failure point. Fibroblast cells were able to attach and proliferate thus proving good cell viability. Based on the characteristics discussed above, we can strongly argue that the blended nanofibers of natural and synthetic polymers can represent an excellent development of composite materials that can be used for different biomedical applications.

  16. Tuned Morphological Electrospun Hydroxyapatite Nanofibers via pH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Song; Fengguang Ling; Haotian Li; Zhantuan Gao; Xuesi Chen

    2012-01-01

    The concept of biocompatible,osteoconductive and noninflammatory material mimicking the structure of natural bone has generated a considerable interest in recent decades.Hydroxyapatite (HA) is an important bionic material that is used for bone grafting in osseous defects and drug carriers.HA with various morphologies and surface properties have been widely investigated.In this paper,HA nanofibers are produced through a combination of electrospinning and sol-gel technique.The morphologies,composition and structure are investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM),Thermogravimetic Analysis (TGA),Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR),X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns,Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).The results show that HA nanofibers are even and well-crystallized,and pH is crucial for producing HA nanofibers.With the change ofpH from 4 to 9,nanofibers grow densely along (210) plane and become compact while surface area,pore volume and pore size decrease correspondingly.The synthesized HA nanofibers are nontoxic and safe.Zn can be also incorporated into HA nanofibers,which will endow them with more perfect function.

  17. Ammonia Sensing Behaviors of TiO2-PANI/PA6 Composite Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingqing; Dong, Xianjun; Pang, Zengyuan; Du, Yuanzhi; Xia, Xin; Wei, Qufu; Huang, Fenglin

    2012-01-01

    Titanium dioxide-polyaniline/polyamide 6 (TiO2-PANI/PA6) composite nanofibers were prepared by in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of PA6 nanofibers and a sputtering-deposition process with a high purity titanium sputtering target. TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers and PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers were fabricated for ammonia gas sensing. The ammonia sensing behaviors of the sensors were examined at room temperature. All the results indicated that the ammonia sensing property of TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers was superior to that of PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers. TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers had good selectivity to ammonia. It was also found that the content of TiO2 had a great influence on both the morphology and the sensing property of TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers. PMID:23235446

  18. Ammonia Sensing Behaviors of TiO2-PANI/PA6 Composite Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenglin Huang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide-polyaniline/polyamide 6 (TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers were prepared by in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of PA6 nanofibers and a sputtering-deposition process with a high purity titanium sputtering target. TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers and PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers were fabricated for ammonia gas sensing. The ammonia sensing behaviors of the sensors were examined at room temperature. All the results indicated that the ammonia sensing property of TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers was superior to that of PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers. TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers had good selectivity to ammonia. It was also found that the content of TiO2 had a great influence on both the morphology and the sensing property of TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers.

  19. Transparent Conductive Films Fabricated from Polythiophene Nanofibers Composited with Conventional Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borjigin Aronggaowa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Transparent, conductive films were prepared by compositing poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT nanofibers with poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA. The transparency, conductivity, atmospheric stability, and mechanical strength of the resulting nanofiber composite films when doped with AuCl3 were evaluated and compared with those of P3HT nanofiber mats. The conductivity of the nanofiber composite films was 4.1 S∙cm−1, which is about seven times less than that which was previously reported for a nanofiber mat with the same optical transmittance (~80% reported by Aronggaowa et al. The time dependence of the transmittance, however, showed that the doping state of the nanofiber composite films in air was more stable than that of the nanofiber mats. The fracture stress of the nanofiber composite film was determined to be 12.3 MPa at 3.8% strain.

  20. A super hydrophilic modification of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanofibers: By in situ hydrothermal approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Faheem A.; Zargar, Mohammad Afzal; Tamboli, Ashif H.; Kim, Hern

    2016-11-01

    Nanofibers fabricated from Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) possesses potential applications in the field of filtrations, because of their excellent resistance towards harsh chemicals. However, the hydrophobicity restricts its further application. In this work, we focus on optimal parameters for post-electrospun tethering of Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as superhydrophilic domain onto each individual PVDF nanofibers by exploiting the in situ hydrothermal approach. The results indicated an increase in nanofiber diameters due to coating of PVA and improved surface wettability of PVDF nanofibers. The tensile tests of nanofibers indicated that mechanical properties of PVDF nanofibers could be sharply tuned from rigid to ductile. Furthermore, the studies strongly suggest that in situ hydrothermal treatment of post-electrospun nanofibers can improve the water contact angle and these nanofibers can be used in varied applications (e.g., in water purification systems).

  1. Efficient Roll-on Transfer Technique for Well-Aligned Organic Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2011-01-01

    A transfer technique enabling efficient device integration of fragile organic nanostructures is presented. The technique is capable of transferring organic nanofibers to arbitrary substrates, the preservation of nanofiber morphology is demonstrated, and the optical properties are unaffected or ev...

  2. Guard Cell and Tropomyosin Inspired Chemical Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelyn K.S. Nagel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sensors are an integral part of many engineered products and systems. Biological inspiration has the potential to improve current sensor designs as well as inspire innovative ones. This paper presents the design of an innovative, biologically-inspired chemical sensor that performs “up-front” processing through mechanical means. Inspiration from the physiology (function of the guard cell coupled with the morphology (form and physiology of tropomyosin resulted in two concept variants for the chemical sensor. Applications of the sensor design include environmental monitoring of harmful gases, and a non-invasive approach to detect illnesses including diabetes, liver disease, and cancer on the breath.

  3. Tailoring Mechanically Robust Poly(m-phenylene isophthalamide) Nanofiber/nets for Ultrathin High-Efficiency Air Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shichao; Liu, Hui; Yin, Xia; Li, Zhaoling; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Effective promotion of air filtration applications proposed for fibers requires their real nanoscale diameter, optimized pore structure, and high service strength; however, creating such filter medium has proved to be a tremendous challenge. This study first establishes a strategy to design and fabricate novel poly(m-phenylene isophthalamide) nanofiber/nets (PMIA NF/N) air filter via electrospinning/netting. Our strategy results in generation of a bimodal structure including a scaffold of nanofibers and abundant two-dimensional ultrathin (~20 nm) nanonets to synchronously construct PMIA filters by combining solution optimization, humidity regulation, and additive inspiration. Benefiting from the structural features including the true nanoscale diameter, small pore size, high porosity, and nets bonding contributed by the widely distributed nanonets, our PMIA NF/N filter exhibits the integrated properties of superlight weight (0.365 g m‑2), ultrathin thickness (~0.5 μm), and high tensile strength (72.8 MPa) for effective air filtration, achieving the ultra-low penetration air filter level of 99.999% and low pressure drop of 92 Pa for 300–500 nm particles by sieving mechanism. The successful synthesis of PMIA NF/N would not only provide a promising medium for particle filtration, but also develop a versatile platform for exploring the application of nanonets in structural enhancement, separation and purification.

  4. Fabrication of Cellulose Nanofiber/AlOOH Aerogel for Flame Retardant and Thermal Insulation

    OpenAIRE

    Bitao Fan; Shujun Chen; Qiufang Yao; Qingfeng Sun; Chunde Jin

    2017-01-01

    Cellulose nanofiber/AlOOH aerogel for flame retardant and thermal insulation was successfully prepared through a hydrothermal method. Their flame retardant and thermal insulation properties were investigated. The morphology image of the cellulose nanofiber/AlOOH exhibited spherical AlOOH with an average diameter of 0.5 μm that was wrapped by cellulose nanofiber or adhered to them. Cellulose nanofiber/AlOOH composite aerogels exhibited excellent flame retardant and thermal insulation propertie...

  5. Controlled Angiogenesis in Peptide Nanofiber Composite Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickremasinghe, Navindee C; Kumar, Vivek A; Shi, Siyu; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D

    2015-09-14

    Multidomain peptide (MDP) nanofibers create scaffolds that can present bioactive cues to promote biological responses. Orthogonal self-assembly of MDPs and growth-factor-loaded liposomes generate supramolecular composite hydrogels. These composites can act as delivery vehicles with time-controlled release. Here we examine the controlled release of placental growth factor-1 (PlGF-1) for its ability to induce angiogenic responses. PlGF-1 was loaded either in MDP matrices or within liposomes bound inside MDP matrices. Scaffolds showed expected rapid infiltration of macrophages. When released through liposomes incorporated in MDP gels (MDP(Lipo)), PlGF-1 modulates HUVEC VEGF receptor activation in vitro and robust vessel formation in vivo. These loaded MDP(Lipo) hydrogels induce a high level of growth-factor-mediated neovascular maturity. MDP(Lipo) hydrogels offer a biocompatible and injectable platform to tailor drug delivery and treat ischemic tissue diseases.

  6. Carbon nanofiber supercapacitors with large areal capacitances

    KAUST Repository

    McDonough, James R.

    2009-01-01

    We develop supercapacitor (SC) devices with large per-area capacitances by utilizing three-dimensional (3D) porous substrates. Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) functioning as active SC electrodes are grown on 3D nickel foam. The 3D porous substrates facilitate a mass loading of active electrodes and per-area capacitance as large as 60 mg/ cm2 and 1.2 F/ cm2, respectively. We optimize SC performance by developing an annealing-free CNF growth process that minimizes undesirable nickel carbide formation. Superior per-area capacitances described here suggest that 3D porous substrates are useful in various energy storage devices in which per-area performance is critical. © 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Superhydrophobic behavior of fluorinated carbon nanofiber arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chien-Te; Fan, Wen-Syuan

    2006-06-01

    Superhydrophobic behavior of fluorinated carbon nanofiber (CNF) arrays, prepared by a template-assisted synthesis, has been investigated. A thermal chemical vapor method, using perfluorohexane as the precursor, was used to coat fluorocarbon on the surface of the CNFs, thus lowering their surface tension. The F-coated CNFs exhibited a good water-repellent behavior, i.e., the highest value of contact angle ˜166°. The superhydrophobicity of water droplets on the arrays can be well predicted by a modified Cassie-Baxter model, incorporating the pore size distributions determined from the density functional theory method. This satisfactory result would shed one light on how the variation of opened sizes would induce the superhydrophobicity of nanostructured surfaces.

  8. Microstructure transformation of carbon nanofibers during graphitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; TANG Yuan-hong; LIN Liang-wu; ZHANG En-lei

    2008-01-01

    The mierostructures of vapor-grown carbon nanofibers(CNFs) before and after graphitization process were analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy(HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry(XRD), near-edge-X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy(NEXAFS) and thermogravimetric analysis(TGA). The results indicate that although non-graphitized CNFs have the characteristics of higher disorder, a transformation is found in the inner layer of tube wall where graphite sheets become stiff, which demonstrates the characteristics of higher graphitization of graphitized CNFs. The defects in outer tube wall disappear because the amorphous carbon changes to perfect crystalline carbon after annealing treatment at about 2 800 ℃. TGA analysis in air indicates that graphitized CNFs have excellent oxidation resistance up to 857 ℃. And the graphitization mechanism including four stages was also proposed.

  9. A design methodology for biologically inspired dry fibrillar adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksak, Burak

    Realization of the unique aspects of gecko adhesion and incorporating these aspects into a comprehensive design methodology is essential to enable fabrication of application oriented gecko-inspired dry fibrillar adhesives. To address the need for such a design methodology, we propose a fibrillar adhesion model that evaluates the effect of fiber dimensions and material on adhesive performance of fiber arrays. A fibrillar adhesion model is developed to predict the adhesive characteristics of an array of fibrillar structures, and quantify the effect of fiber length, radius, spacing, and material. Photolithography techniques were utilized to fabricate elastomer microfiber arrays. Fibers that are fabricated from stiff SU-8 photoresist are used to fabricate a flexible negative mold that facilitates fabrication of fiber arrays from various elastomers with high yield. The tips of the cylindrical fibers are modified to mushroom-like tip shapes. Adhesive strengths in excess of 100 kPa is obtained with mushroom tipped elastomer microfibers. Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) are utilized as enhanced friction materials by partially embedding inside soft polyurethanes. Friction coefficients up to 1 were repeatedly obtained from the resulting VACNF composite structures. A novel fabrication method is used to attach Poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) molecular brush-like structures on the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). These brushes are grown on unstructured PDMS and PDMS fibers with mushroom tips. Pull-off force is enhanced by up to 7 times with PBA brush grafted micro-fiber arrays over unstructured PDMS substrate. Adhesion model, initially developed for curved smooth surfaces, is extended to self-affine fractal surfaces to better reflect the adhesion performance of fiber arrays on natural surfaces. Developed adhesion model for fiber arrays is used in an optimization scheme which estimates optimal design parameters to obtain maximum adhesive strength on a given

  10. Frame Stability of Tunnel‐Structured Cryptomelane Nanofibers: The Role of Tunnel Cations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Tao; Norby, Poul

    2013-01-01

    The role of tunnel K+ ions on the growth and stability of tunnel‐structured cryptomelane‐type MnO2 nanofibers (denoted as cryptomelane nanofibers hereafter) has been discussed by means of X‐ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Cryptomelane nanofibers with typical diameters of 20–80 nm and len...

  11. Fabrications of electrospun nanofibers containing inorganic fillers for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Keun; Hwang, Won-Pill; Seo, Min-Hye; Lee, Jin-Kook; Kim, Mi-Ra

    2014-08-01

    Poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) nanofibers containing inorganic fillers were fabricated by electrospinning. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) using these nanofibers showed improved short circuit currents without degraded fill factors or open circuit voltages. The long-term stabilities of cells using electrospun PVDF-HFP/titanium isopropoxide (TIP) nanofibers were significantly improved.

  12. Collide@CERN: sharing inspiration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Late last year, Julius von Bismarck was appointed to be CERN's first "artist in residence" after winning the Collide@CERN Digital Arts award. He’ll be spending two months at CERN starting this March but, to get a flavour of what’s in store, he visited the Organization last week for a crash course in its inspiring activities.   Julius von Bismarck, taking a closer look... When we arrive to interview German artist Julius von Bismarck, he’s being given a presentation about antiprotons’ ability to kill cancer cells. The whiteboard in the room contains graphs and equations that might easily send a non-scientist running, yet as Julius puts it, “if I weren’t interested, I’d be asleep”. Given his numerous questions, he must have been fascinated. “This ‘introduction’ week has been exhilarating,” says Julius. “I’ve been able to interact ...

  13. [Nikola Tesla: flashes of inspiration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarejo-Galende, Albero; Herrero-San Martín, Alejandro

    2013-01-16

    Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was one of the greatest inventors in history and a key player in the revolution that led to the large-scale use of electricity. He also made important contributions to such diverse fields as x-rays, remote control, radio, the theory of consciousness or electromagnetism. In his honour, the international unit of magnetic induction was named after him. Yet, his fame is scarce in comparison with that of other inventors of the time, such as Edison, with whom he had several heated arguments. He was a rather odd, reserved person who lived for his inventions, the ideas for which came to him in moments of inspiration. In his autobiography he relates these flashes with a number of neuropsychiatric manifestations, which can be seen to include migraine auras, synaesthesiae, obsessions and compulsions.

  14. Decrypting SO(10-inspired leptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Di Bari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Encouraged by the recent results from neutrino oscillation experiments, we perform an analytical study of SO(10-inspired models and leptogenesis with hierarchical right-handed (RH neutrino spectrum. Under the approximation of negligible misalignment between the neutrino Yukawa basis and the charged lepton basis, we find an analytical expression for the final asymmetry directly in terms of the low energy neutrino parameters that fully reproduces previous numerical results. This expression also shows that it is possible to identify an effective leptogenesis phase for these models. When we also impose the wash-out of a large pre-existing asymmetry NB−Lp,i, the strong thermal (ST condition, we derive analytically all those constraints on the low energy neutrino parameters that characterise the ST-SO(10-inspired leptogenesis solution, confirming previous numerical results. In particular we show why, though neutrino masses have to be necessarily normally ordered, the solution implies an analytical lower bound on the effective neutrino-less double beta decay neutrino mass, mee≳8 meV, for NB−Lp,i=10−3, testable with next generation experiments. This, in combination with an upper bound on the atmospheric mixing angle, necessarily in the first octant, forces the lightest neutrino mass within a narrow range m1≃(10–30 meV (corresponding to ∑imi≃(75–125 meV. We also show why the solution could correctly predict a non-vanishing reactor neutrino mixing angle and requires the Dirac phase to be in the fourth quadrant, implying sin⁡δ (and JCP negative as hinted by current global analyses. Many of the analytical results presented (expressions for the orthogonal matrix, RH neutrino mixing matrix, masses and phases can have applications beyond leptogenesis.

  15. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  16. Imaging, spectroscopy, mechanical, alignment and biocompatibility studies of electrospun medical grade polyurethane (Carbothane™ 3575A) nanofibers and composite nanofibers containing multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Faheem A; Macossay, Javier; Cantu, Travis; Zhang, Xujun; Shamshi Hassan, M; Esther Salinas, M; Farhangi, Chakavak S; Ahmad, Hassan; Kim, Hern; Bowlin, Gary L

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we discuss the electrospinning of medical grade polyurethane (Carbothane™ 3575A) nanofibers containing multi-walled-carbon-nanotubes (MWCNTs). A simple method that does not depend on additional foreign chemicals has been employed to disperse MWCNTs through high intensity sonication. Typically, a polymer solution consisting of polymer/MWCNTs has been electrospun to form nanofibers. Physiochemical aspects of prepared nanofibers were evaluated by SEM, TEM, FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, confirming nanofibers containing MWCNTs. The biocompatibility and cell attachment of the produced nanofiber mats were investigated while culturing them in the presence of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. The results from these tests indicated non-toxic behavior of the prepared nanofiber mats and had a significant attachment of cells towards nanofibers. The incorporation of MWCNTs into polymeric nanofibers led to an improvement in tensile stress from 11.40 ± 0.9 to 51.25 ± 5.5 MPa. Furthermore, complete alignment of the nanofibers resulted in an enhancement on tensile stress to 72.78 ± 5.5 MPa. Displaying these attributes of high mechanical properties and non-toxic nature of nanofibers are recommended for an ideal candidate for future tendon and ligament grafts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Business Inspiration: Small Business Leadership in Recovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, David; Price, Liz; Bosworth, Gary; Parkinson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Business Inspiration was a short, action-centred leadership and innovation development programme designed for owners and managers of smaller firms to address business survival and repositioning needs arising from the UK's economic downturn. The article examines the design and delivery of Business Inspiration and the impact of the programme on…

  18. 二氧化硅@聚合物同轴纳米纤维%Silica@Polymers Coaxial Nanofibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪友良; 商铁存; 靳玉伟; 杨帆; 王策

    2005-01-01

    The preparation and formation mechamsm ot silica/polyvinylpyrrolidone(PAN) coaxial nanofibers were presented in this paper. The PVP-PAN composite nanofibers were obtained via an electrospinning technique, while SiO2 nanoparticles were prepared according to a Stoeher method. The measurements of water contact angle(WCA), the compared results of silica coating PVPPAN composite nanofibers with PAN nanofibers indicate that much PVP resided on the composite nanofiber surface, which resuks in the occurrence of SiO2@polymer coaxial nanofibers due to the formation of hydrogen bonding between silica and composite nanofibers and subsequent adsorption of silica on the fiber surface.

  19. Highly eccentric inspirals into a black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburn, Thomas; Warburton, Niels; Evans, Charles R.

    2016-03-01

    We model the inspiral of a compact stellar-mass object into a massive nonrotating black hole including all dissipative and conservative first-order-in-the-mass-ratio effects on the orbital motion. The techniques we develop allow inspirals with initial eccentricities as high as e ˜0.8 and initial separations as large as p ˜50 to be evolved through many thousands of orbits up to the onset of the plunge into the black hole. The inspiral is computed using an osculating elements scheme driven by a hybridized self-force model, which combines Lorenz-gauge self-force results with highly accurate flux data from a Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli code. The high accuracy of our hybrid self-force model allows the orbital phase of the inspirals to be tracked to within ˜0.1 radians or better. The difference between self-force models and inspirals computed in the radiative approximation is quantified.

  20. Learning from nature: Nature-inspired algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albeanu, Grigore; Madsen, Henrik; Popentiu-Vladicescu, Florin

    2016-01-01

    During last decade, the nature has inspired researchers to develop new algorithms. The largest collection of nature-inspired algorithms is biology-inspired: swarm intelligence (particle swarm optimization, ant colony optimization, cuckoo search, bees' algorithm, bat algorithm, firefly algorithm etc...... on collective social behaviour of organisms, researchers have developed optimization strategies taking into account not only the individuals, but also groups and environment. However, learning from nature, new classes of approaches can be identified, tested and compared against already available algorithms....... This work reviews the most effective nature-inspired algorithms and describes learning strategies based on nature oriented thinking. Examples and the benefits obtained from applying nature-inspired strategies in test generation, learners group optimization, and artificial immune systems for learning...

  1. Nanofibers of Ca2Fe2O5: A novel material for aqueous supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundriyal, Sandeep Kumar; Bhagwan, Jai; Sharma, Yogesh

    2016-05-01

    Porous, aligned and high aspect ratio nanofibers of Ca2Fe2O5 (CFO) have been fabricated by varying various system and process parameter of electrospinning technique for the first time. CFO nanofibers are further characterized by XRD, FESEM and BET surface area. The diameter of as-spun nanofibers of CFO was found to be polymer concentration dependent. Heating profile is found to be responsible for alignment of CFO nanofibers. For the first time, novel CFO nanofibers were subjected to cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD) cycling to investigate its energy storage performance as electrode material for aqueous supercapacitor, and accordingly preliminary results are discussed.

  2. Wet-Laid Meets Electrospinning: Nonwovens for Filtration Applications from Short Electrospun Polymer Nanofiber Dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Markus; Greiner, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Dispersions of short electrospun fibers are utilized for the preparation of nanofiber nonwovens with different weight area on filter substrates. The aerosol filtration efficiencies of suspension-borne nanofiber nonwovens are compared to nanofiber nonwovens prepared directly by electrospinning with similar weight area. The filtration efficiencies are found to be similar for both types of nonwovens. With this, a large potential opens for processing, design, and application of new nanofiber nonwovens obtained by wet-laying of short electrospun nanofiber suspensions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Synthesis and electrical property of indium tin oxide nanofibers using electrospinning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-In; Lee, Kun-Jae; Kim, Ki Do; Kim, Hee Taik; Chang, Young-Wook; Kang, Shin-Choon; Choa, Yong-Ho

    2007-11-01

    In this study indium tin oxide (ITO) nanofibers were synthesized using an electrospinning method. The morphological properties of the ITO nanofibers were considered and their specific resistances were measured to determine their applicability as filler for a transparent conducting film. ITO/PVP composite nanofibers were successfully obtained by electrospinning using a precursor solution containing indium nitrate, tin chloride, and poly(vinlypyrrolidone). After the heat treatment of ITO/PVP composite nanofibers at 600 degrees C and 1000 degrees C, ITO nanofibers with an average diameter of about 168 nm and 165 nm were synthesized, respectively.

  4. Spherical and rodlike inorganic nanoparticle regulated the orientation of carbon nanotubes in polymer nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Linbin; Tu, Hu; Lu, Yuan; Wu, Yang; Tian, Jing; Shi, Xiaowen; Wang, Qun; Zhan, Yingfei; Huang, Zuqiang; Deng, Hongbing

    2016-04-01

    PVA nanofibers containing carboxylic-modified MWCNTs were fabricated via electrospinning of PVA/MWCNTs mixed solution. The alignment of MWCNTs in PVA nanofibers was studied using transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope. In addition, the orientation of MWCNTs in PVA nanofibers was further investigated in the presence of rod-like nanoparticle rectorite (REC) and of spherical nanoparticle titanium dioxide (TiO2). The images demonstrated the embedment of MWCNTs in the nanofibers and the alignment of MWCNTs along the fiber axis. Moreover, the addition of REC and TiO2 improved the alignment of MWCNTs in PVA nanofibers.

  5. Syringeless Electrospinning toward Versatile Fabrication of Nanofiber Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seongjun; Gil, Manjae; Lee, Kyung Jin

    2017-01-01

    Although electrospinning is considered a powerful and generic tool for the preparation of nanofiber webs, several issues still need to be overcome for real-world applications. Most of these issues stem from the use of a syringe-based system, where the key factor influencing successful electrospinning is the maintenance of several subtle balances such as those of between the mass and the electrical state. It is extremely difficult to maintain these balances throughout the spinning process until all the polymeric solution in the syringe has been consumed. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a syringeless electrospinning technique as an alternative and efficient means of preparing a nanofiber web. This new technique uses a helically probed rotating cylinder. This technique can not only cover conventional methods, but also provides several advantages over syringe-based and needless electrospinning in terms of productivity (6 times higher) and processibility. For example, we can produce nanofibers with highly crystalline polymers and nanofiber-webs comprising networks of several different polymers, which is sometimes difficult in conventional electrospinning. In addition, this method provides several benefits for colloidal electrospinning as well. This method should help expand the range of applications for electrospun nanofiber webs in the near future.

  6. Polypyrrole-Coated Electrospun PLGA Nanofibers for Neural Tissue Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Young; Bashur, Chris A.; Goldstein, Aaron S.; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2009-01-01

    Electrospinning is a promising approach to create nanofiber structures that are capable of supporting adhesion and guiding extension of neurons for nerve regeneration. Concurrently, electrical stimulation of neurons in the absence of topographical features also has been shown to guide axonal extension. Therefore, the goal of this study was to form electrically conductive nanofiber structures and to examine the combined effect of nanofiber structures and electrical stimulation. Conductive meshes were produced by growing polypyrrole (PPy) on random and aligned electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofibers, as confirmed by scanning electron micrographs and X-ray photon spectroscopy. PPy-PLGA electrospun meshes supported the growth and differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells and hippocampal neurons comparable to non-coated PLGA control meshes, suggesting that PPy-PLGA may be suitable as conductive nanofibers for neuronal tissue scaffolds. Electrical stimulation studies showed that PC12 cells, stimulated with a potential of 10 mV/cm on PPy-PLGA scaffolds, exhibited 40–50% longer neurites and 40–90% more neurite formation compared to unstimulated cells on the same scaffolds. In addition, stimulation of the cells on aligned PPy-PLGA fibers resulted in longer neurites and more neurite-bearing cells than stimulation on random PPy-PLGA fibers, suggesting a combined effect of electrical stimulation and topographical guidance and the potential use of these scaffolds for neural tissue applications. PMID:19501901

  7. Application of Nanofiber Technology to Nonwoven Thermal Insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip W. Gibson, Ph.D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanofiber technology (fiber diameter less than 1 micrometer is under development for future Army lightweight protective clothing systems. Nanofiber applications for ballistic and chemical/biological protection are being actively investigated, but the thermal properties of nanofibers and their potential protection against cold environments are relatively unknown. Previous studies have shown that radiative heat transfer in fibrous battings is minimized at fiber diameters between 5 and 10 micrometers. However, the radiative heat transfer mechanism of extremely small diameter fibers of less than 1 micrometer diameter is not well known. Previous studies were limited to glass fibers, which have a unique set of thermal radiation properties governed by the thermal emissivity properties of glass. We are investigating the thermal transfer properties of high loft nanofiber battings composed of carbon fiber and various polymeric fibers such as polyacrylonitrile, nylon, and polyurethane. Thermal insulation battings incorporating nanofibers could decrease the weight and bulk of current thermal protective clothing, and increase mobility for soldiers in the battlefield.

  8. Encapsulation of Lactobacillus plantarum 423 and its Bacteriocin in Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heunis, T D J; Botes, M; Dicks, L M T

    2010-03-01

    Plantaricin 423, produced by Lactobacillus plantarum 423, was encapsulated in nanofibers that were produced by the electrospinning of 18% (w/v) polyethylene oxide (200 000 Da). The average diameter of the nanofibers was 288 nm. Plantaricin 423 activity decreased from 51 200 AU/ml to 25 600 AU/ml and from 204 800 AU/ml to 51 200 AU/ml after electrospinning, as determined against Lactobacillus sakei DSM 20017 and Enterococcus faecium HKLHS, respectively. Cells of L. plantarum 423 encapsulated in nanofibers decreased from 2.3 × 10(10) cfu/ml before electrospinning to 4.7 × 10(8) cfu/ml thereafter. Cells entrapped in the nanofibers continued to produce plantaricin 423. This is the first report on the encapsulation of a bacteriocin and cells of L. plantarum in nanofibers. The method may be used to design a drug delivery system for bacteriocins and the encapsulation of probiotic lactic acid bacteria. The technology is currently being optimized.

  9. Solution Blow Spinning of Food-Grade Gelatin Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Avena-Bustillos, Roberto J; Bilbao-Sainz, Cristina; Woods, Rachelle; Chiou, Bor-Sen; Wood, Delilah; Williams, Tina; Yokoyama, Wallace; Glenn, Gregory M; McHugh, Tara H; Zhong, Fang

    2017-06-01

    The primary advantage of nanofibers over larger diameter fibers is the larger surface area to volume ratio. This study evaluated solution blow spinning (SBS) processing conditions for obtaining food-grade gelatin nanofibers from mammalian and fishery byproducts, such as pork skin gelatins (PGs) and high molecular weight fish skin gelatin (HMWFG). HMWFG had a highest intact collagen structure compared to PGs. PGs with different Bloom values, solution viscosities, and surface tensions were compared with HMWFG for their ability to produce nanofibers through SBS. Only HMWFG fibers were obtained irrespective of processing conditions, which looked like fluffy cotton candy. HMWFG nanofibers had round morphologies with a narrower diameter distribution and lower average fiber diameter (AFD) under medium gelatin concentrations, medium air pressures, and medium feed rates. The highest glass transition temperature (Tg ) values were obtained at medium concentrations, medium air pressure, and either high or low feed rate. The thinnest HMWFG nanofibers with an AFD of 80.1 nm and the highest Tg value of 59.0 °C could be formed by combining a concentration of 17.6% (w/v), an air pressure of 0.379 MPa, and a feed rate of 0.06 mL/min from the response surface analysis. HMWFG Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller surface area increased from 221 to 237 m(2) /g, indicating their potential applicability for active compound carrier. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  10. Phytotoxicity of soluble graphitic nanofibers to model plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorka, Danielle E; Jeger, Jonathan Litvak; Zhang, Hongbo; Ma, Yanwen; Colman, Benjamin P; Bernhardt, Emily S; Liu, Jie

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanomaterials are considered promising for applications in energy storage, catalysis, and electronics. This has motivated study of their potential environmental toxicity. Recently, a novel nanomaterial consisting of graphene oxide wrapped around a carbon nanotube (CNT) core was synthesized. The resulting soluble graphitic nanofibers were found to have superior catalytic properties, which could result in their use in fuel cells. Before this material undergoes widespread use, its environmental toxicity must be determined because of its aqueous solubility. The authors used the plant species Lolium multiflorum, Solanum lycopersicum, and Lactuca sativa to study the toxicity of the soluble graphitic nanofibers, as well as multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphene oxide, all synthesized in-house. Soluble graphitic nanofiber-exposed plant roots and shoots showed decreased growth, with roots showing more toxicity than shoots. Decreased pH of nanomaterial solutions corresponded to insignificantly decreased root growth, suggesting that another mechanism of toxicity must exist. Agglomeration and adsorption of soluble graphitic nanofibers onto the roots likely caused the remaining toxicity because a gray layer could be seen around the surface of the root. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes showed little toxicity over the concentration range tested, whereas graphene oxide showed a unique pattern of high toxicity at both the lowest and highest concentrations tested. Overall, soluble graphitic nanofibers showed moderate toxicity between that of the more toxic graphene oxide and the relatively nontoxic MWCNTs. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2941-2947. © 2016 SETAC.

  11. Syringeless Electrospinning toward Versatile Fabrication of Nanofiber Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seongjun; Gil, Manjae; Lee, Kyung Jin

    2017-01-01

    Although electrospinning is considered a powerful and generic tool for the preparation of nanofiber webs, several issues still need to be overcome for real-world applications. Most of these issues stem from the use of a syringe-based system, where the key factor influencing successful electrospinning is the maintenance of several subtle balances such as those of between the mass and the electrical state. It is extremely difficult to maintain these balances throughout the spinning process until all the polymeric solution in the syringe has been consumed. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a syringeless electrospinning technique as an alternative and efficient means of preparing a nanofiber web. This new technique uses a helically probed rotating cylinder. This technique can not only cover conventional methods, but also provides several advantages over syringe-based and needless electrospinning in terms of productivity (6 times higher) and processibility. For example, we can produce nanofibers with highly crystalline polymers and nanofiber-webs comprising networks of several different polymers, which is sometimes difficult in conventional electrospinning. In addition, this method provides several benefits for colloidal electrospinning as well. This method should help expand the range of applications for electrospun nanofiber webs in the near future. PMID:28120916

  12. Needleless Electrospinning Experimental Study and Nanofiber Application in Semiconductor Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianwei

    Electronics especially mobile electronics such as smart phones, tablet PCs, notebooks and digital cameras are undergoing rapid development nowadays and have thoroughly changed our lives. With the requirement of more transistors, higher power, smaller size, lighter weight and even bendability, thermal management of these devices became one of the key challenges. Compared to active heat management system, heat pipe, which is a passive fluidic system, is considered promising to solve this problem. However, traditional heat pipes have size, weight and capillary limitation. Thus new type of heat pipe with smaller size, lighter weight and higher capillary pressure is needed. Nanofiber has been proved with superior properties and has been applied in multiple areas. This study discussed the possibility of applying nanofiber in heat pipe as new wick structure. In this study, a needleless electrospinning device with high productivity rate was built onsite to systematically investigate the effect of processing parameters on fiber properties as well as to generate nanofiber mat to evaluate its capability in electronics cooling. Polyethylene oxide (PEO) and Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) nanofibers were generated. Tensiometer was used for wettability measurement. The results show that independent parameters including spinneret type, working distance, solution concentration and polymer type are strongly correlated with fiber morphology compared to other parameters. The results also show that the fabricated nanofiber mat has high capillary pressure.

  13. Antibacterial Properties of Novel Bacterial Cellulose Nanofiber Containing Silver Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨加志; 刘晓丽; 黄立勇; 孙东平

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we describe a novel facile method to prepare long one-dimensional hybrid nanofibers by using hydrated bacterial cellulose nanofibers (BCF) as a template. Silver (Ag) nanoparticles with an average di-ameter of 1.5 nm were well dispersed on BCF via a simple in situ chemical-reduction between AgNO3 and NaBH4 at a relatively low temperature. A growth mechanism is proposed that Ag nanoparticles are uniformly anchored onto BCF by coordination with BC-containing hydroxyl groups. The bare BCF and as-prepared Ag/BCF hybrid nanofibers were characterized by several techniques including transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogra-vimetric analyses, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectra. The antibacterial properties of Ag/BCF hybrid nanofibers against Escherichia coli (E. coli, Gram-negative) and Staphylococcu saureus (S. saureus, Gram-positive) bacteria were evaluated by using modified Kirby Bauer method and colony forming count method. The results show that Ag nanoparticles are well dispersed on BCF surface via in situ chemical-reduction. The Ag/BCF hybrid nanofiber presents strong antibacterial property and thus offers its candidature for use as functional antimicrobial agents.

  14. Enhancement of Ultrahigh Performance Concrete Material Properties with Carbon Nanofiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libya Ahmed Sbia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrahigh performance concrete (UHPC realized distinctly high mechanical, impermeability, and durability characteristics by reducing the size and content of capillary pore, refining the microstructure of cement hydrates, and effectively using fiber reinforcement. The dense and fine microstructure of UHPC favor its potential to effectively disperse and interact with nanomaterials, which could complement the reinforcing action of fibers in UHPC. An optimization experimental program was implemented in order to identify the optimum combination of steel fiber and relatively low-cost carbon nanofiber in UHPC. The optimum volume fractions of steel fiber and carbon nanofiber identified for balanced improvement of flexural strength, ductility, energy sorption capacity, impact, and abrasion resistance of UHPC were 1.1% and 0.04%, respectively. Desired complementary/synergistic actions of nanofibers and steel fibers in UHPC were detected, which were attributed to their reinforcing effects at different scales, and the potential benefits of nanofibers to interfacial bonding and pull-out behavior of fibers in UHPC. Modification techniques which enhanced the hydrophilicity and bonding potential of nanofibers to cement hydrates benefited their reinforcement efficiency in UHPC.

  15. Evaluation of proanthocyanidin-crosslinked electrospun gelatin nanofibers for drug delivering system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chiung-Hua [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 40601, Taiwan (China); Chi, Chin-Ying [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Materials Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 40601, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yueh-Sheng [School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kuo-Yu [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan (China); Chen, Pei-Lain [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 40601, Taiwan (China); Yao, Chun-Hsu, E-mail: chyao@mail.cmu.edu.tw [School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-01

    Electrospun nanofibers are excellent candidates for various biomedical applications. We successfully fabricated proanthocyanidin-crosslinked gelatin electrospun nanofibers. Proanthocyanidin, a low cytotoxic collagen crosslinking reagent, increased the gelatin crosslinking percentage in the nanofibers from 53% to 64%. The addition of proanthocyanidin kept the nanofibers from swelling, and, thus, made the fibers more stable in the aqueous state. The compatibility and the release behavior of the drug in the nanofibers were examined using magnesium ascorbyl phosphate as the model drug. Proanthocyanidin also promoted drug loading and kept the drug release rate constant. These properties make the proanthocyanidin-crosslinked gelatin nanofibers an excellent material for drug delivery. In the cell culture study, L929 fibroblast cells had a significantly higher proliferation rate when cultured with the gelatin/proanthocyanidin blended nanofibers. This characteristic showed that proanthocyanidin-crosslinked gelatin electrospun nanofibers could potentially be employed as a wound healing material by increasing cell spreading and proliferation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proanthocyanidin-crosslinked gelatin nanofibers (GEL/PA) is synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proanthocyanidin promoted drug loading and kept the drug release rate constant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The GEL/PA nanofibers accelerate fibroblast cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The GEL/PA nanofibers increase the drug loading efficiency.

  16. Surface functionalization of carbon nanofibers by sol-gel coating of zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao Dongfeng [Key Laboratory of Eco-textiles, Ministry of Education, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Changzhou Textile Garment Institute, Changzhou 213164 (China); Wei Qufu [Key Laboratory of Eco-textiles, Ministry of Education, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China)], E-mail: qfwei@jiangnan.edu.cn; Zhang Liwei; Cai Yibing; Jiang Shudong [Key Laboratory of Eco-textiles, Ministry of Education, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China)

    2008-08-15

    In this paper the functional carbon nanofibers were prepared by the carbonization of ZnO coated PAN nanofibers to expand the potential applications of carbon nanofibers. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers were obtained by electrospinning. The electrospun PAN nanofibers were then used as substrates for depositing the functional layer of zinc oxide (ZnO) on the PAN nanofiber surfaces by sol-gel technique. The effects of coating, pre-oxidation and carbonization on the surface morphology and structures of the nanofibers were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results of SEM showed a significant increase of the size of ZnO nanograins on the surface of nanofibers after the treatments of coating, pre-oxidation and carbonization. The observations by SEM also revealed that ZnO nanoclusters were firmly and clearly distributed on the surface of the carbon nanofibers. FTIR examination also confirmed the deposition of ZnO on the surface of carbon nanofibers. The XRD analysis indicated that the crystal structure of ZnO nanograins on the surface of carbon nanofibers.

  17. Cyclodextrin-grafted electrospun cellulose acetate nanofibers via “Click” reaction for removal of phenanthrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebioglu, Asli; Demirci, Serkan; Uyar, Tamer

    2014-06-01

    Beta-cyclodextrin (β-CD) functionalized cellulose acetate (CA) nanofibers have been successfully prepared by combining electrospinning and “click” reaction. Initially, β-CD and electrospun CA nanofibers were modified so as to be azide-β-CD and propargyl-terminated CA nanofibers, respectively. Then, “click” reaction was performed between modified CD molecules and CA nanofibers to obtain permanent grafting of CDs onto nanofibers surface. It was observed from the SEM image that, while CA nanofibers have smooth surface, there were some irregularities and roughness at nanofibers morphology after the modification. Yet, the fibrous structure was still protected. ATR-FTIR and XPS revealed that, CD molecules were successfully grafted onto surface of CA nanofibers. The adsorption capacity of β-CD-functionalized CA (CA-CD) nanofibers was also determined by removing phenanthrene (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH) from its aqueous solution. Our results indicate that CA-CD nanofibers have potential to be used as molecular filters for the purpose of water purification and waste water treatment by integrating the high surface area of nanofibers with inclusion complexation property of CD molecules.

  18. Bioactive Glass Nanoparticles-Loaded Poly(ɛ-caprolactone Nanofiber as Substrate for ARPE-19 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeu Henrique Lima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glass nanoparticles-loaded poly(ɛ-caprolactone nanofibers (BIOG PCL nanofibers were synthesized and evaluated as substrates for ocular cells (ARPE-19. BIOG PCL nanofibers were characterized using SEM, FTIR, and DSC, and the in vitro degradation profile was also investigated. The in vitro ocular biocompatibility of nanofibers was exploited in Müller glial cells (MIO-M1 cells and in chorioallantoic membrane (CAM; and the proliferative capacity, cytotoxicity, and functionality were evaluated. Finally, ARPE-19 cells were seeded onto BIOG PCL nanofibers and they were investigated as supports for in vitro cell adhesion and proliferation. SEM images revealed the incorporation of BIOG nanoparticles into PCL nanofibers. Nanoparticles did not induce modifications in the chemical structure and semicrystalline nature of PCL in the nanofiber, as shown by FTIR and DSC. MIO-M1 cells exposed to BIOG PCL nanofibers showed viability, and they were able to proliferate and to express GFAP, indicating cellular functionality. Moreover, nanofibers were well tolerated by CAM. These findings suggested the in vitro ocular biocompatibility and absence of toxicity of these nanofibers. Finally, the BIOG nanoparticles modulated the protein adsorption, and, subsequently, ARPE-19 cells adhered and proliferated onto the nanostructured supports, establishing cell-substrate interactions. In conclusion, the biodegradable and biocompatible BIOG PCL nanofibers supported the ARPE-19 cells.

  19. Biomedical Applications of Antibacterial Nanofiber Mats Made of Electrospinning with Wire Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jun Pan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Twisted stainless steel wires are used as wire electrodes for electrospinning the polyvinyl alcohol (PVA/zinc citrate nanofiber mats. The morphology and diameter of the nanofibers in PVA/zinc citrate nanofiber mats are evaluated. We measured the antibacterial efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus and Escherichia coli (E. coli of the nanofiber mats. We also examined the cell adhesion affinity of mammalian tissue culture cells on these nanofiber mats. Our results indicate that an increase in zinc citrate increases the viscosity and electrical conductivity of PVA solution. In addition, increasing zinc citrate results in a smaller diameter of nanofibers that reaches below 100 nm. According to the antibacterial test results, increasing zinc citrate enlarges the inhibition zone of S. aureus but only has a bacteriostatic effect against E. coli. Finally, cell adhesion test results indicate that all nanofiber mats have satisfactory cell attachment regardless of the content of zinc citrate.

  20. Highly Aligned Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoro propylene) Nanofibers via Electrospinning Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae-Hwan; Nirmala, R; Kim, Tae Woo; Navamathavan, R; Kim, Hak Yong; Park, Soo Jin

    2016-01-01

    We report on the simple way of obtaining aligned poly(vinylidiene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) nanofibers by electrospinning process. The collector drum rotation speed was adjusted to prepare well aligned PVDF-HFP nanofibers. The degree of alignment and the orientation of PVDF-HFP nanofibers can be significantly altered by varying the speed of collector drum rotation. The resultant PVDF-HFP nanofibers were systematically characterized. From the scanning electron microscopy data, it was found that the electrospun PVDF-HFP nanofibers were formed with well-aligned nature. The X-ray diffraction results revealed that the electrospun PVDF-HFP nanofibers with β-phase can be formed by the increased collector drum rotation speed. Overall, the collector rotation speed during the electrospinning process plays an important role in obtaining well-aligned and improved characteristics of PVDF-HFP nanofibers.

  1. Electrospun nanofibers of collagen-chitosan and P(LLA-CL) for tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MO Xiumei; CHEN Zonggang; Hans J.Weber

    2007-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers could be used to mimic the nanofibrous structure of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in native tissue.In tissue engineering,the ECM could be used as tissue engineering scaffold to solve tissue engineering prob-lems.In this paper,poly(L-lactid-co-ε-caprolactone) [P(LLA-CL)] nanofibers and collagen-chitosan complex nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning.Results of the experi-ments showed that the mechanical properties of the collagen- chitosan complex nanofibers varied with the collagen content in the complex.It was also found that the biodegradability of P(LLA-CL) nanofibers was faster than its membrane and that smooth muscle cells (SMC) grow faster on collagen nanofibers than on P(LLA-CL) nanofibers.

  2. Fabrication and optical properties of Y2O3: Eu3+ nanofibers prepared by electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guoping; Chi, Yingzhi; Xiao, Xiudi; Liu, Xiaofeng; Qian, Bin; Ma, Zhijun; Wu, E; Zeng, Heping; Chen, Danping; Qiu, Jianrong

    2009-12-07

    Y(2)O(3): Eu(3+) nanofibers with the average diameter of ~300 nm were in situ fabricated by electrospinning. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirmed that the Y(2)O(3): Eu(3+) nanofibers were composed of pure body-centered cubic (bcc) Y(2)O(3) phase. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results indicated that Y(2)O(3): Eu(3+) nanofibers were constituted of nonspherical crystalline grains, and these crystalline grains were orderly arranged along the axial direction of single nanofiber. These Y(2)O(3): Eu(3+) nanofibers showed a partially polarized photoluminescence (PL). The arrangement of crystalline grains and the mismatch of dielectric constant between Y(2)O(3): Eu(3+) nanofiber and its environment probably contributed together to the polarized PL from Y(2)O(3): Eu(3+) nanofiber.

  3. Antibacterial Properties of Titanate Nanofiber Thin Films Formed on a Titanium Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsunori Yada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A sodium titanate nanofiber thin film and a silver nanoparticle/silver titanate nanofiber thin film formed on the surface of a titanium plate exhibited strong antibacterial activities against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which is one of the major bacteria causing in-hospital infections. Exposure of the sodium titanate nanofiber thin film to ultraviolet rays generated a high antibacterial activity due to photocatalysis and the sodium titanate nanofiber thin film immediately after its synthesis possessed a high antibacterial activity even without exposure to ultraviolet rays. Elution of silver from the silver nanoparticle/silver titanate nanofiber thin film caused by the silver ion exchange reaction was considered to contribute substantially to the strong antibacterial activity. The titanate nanofiber thin films adhered firmly to titanium. Therefore, these titanate nanofiber thin film/titanium composites will be extremely useful as implant materials that have excellent antibacterial activities.

  4. Development of green nanocomposites reinforced by cellulose nanofibers extracted from paper sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hitoshi; Nakagaito, Antonio N.; Kusaka, Kazuya; Muneta, Yuya

    2015-03-01

    Cellulose nanofibers have been showing much greater potential to enhance the mechanical and physical properties of polymer-based composite materials. The purpose of this study is to extract the cellulose nanofibers from waste bio-resources; such as waste newspaper and paper sludge. The cellulosic raw materials were treated chemically and physically in order to extract individualized cellulose nanofiber. The combination of acid hydrolysis and following mechanical treatment resulted in the extraction of cellulose nanofibers having diameter of about 40 nm. In order to examine the reinforcing effect of the extracted cellulose nanofibers, fully biodegradable green nanocomposites were fabricated by composing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) resin with the extracted cellulose nanofibers, and then the tensile tests were conducted. The results showed that the enhancement in mechanical properties was successfully obtained in the cellulose nanofiber/PVA green nanocomposites.

  5. Cold plasma welding of polyaniline nanofibers with enhanced electrical and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dong; Yu, Yao; Liu, Lin; Lu, Xinpei; Wu, Yue

    2015-12-01

    Joining conducting polymer (CP) nanofibers into an interconnected porous network can result in good mechanical and electrical contacts between nanofibers that can be beneficial for the high performance of CP-based devices. Here, we demonstrate the cold welding of polyaniline (PAni) nanofiber loose ends with cold plasma. The room-temperature and atmospheric-pressure helium micro-plasma jet launches highly charged ion bullets at a PAni nanofiber target with high precision and the highly charged ion bullet selectively induces field emission at the sharp nanofiber loose ends. This technique joins nanofiber tips without altering the morphology of the film and protonation thus leading to significantly enhanced electrical and mechanical properties. In addition, this technique has high spatial resolution and is able to selectively weld and dope regions of nanofiber film with promising novel device applications.

  6. Electrospinning cellulose based nanofibers for sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nartker, Steven

    2009-12-01

    Bacterial pathogens have recently become a serious threat to the food and water supply. A biosensor based on an electrochemical immunoassay has been developed for detecting food borne pathogens, such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7. These sensors consist of several materials including, cellulose, cellulose nitrate, polyaniline and glass fibers. The current sensors have not been optimized in terms of microscale architecture and materials. The major problem associated with the current sensors is the limited concentration range of pathogens that provides a linear response on the concentration conductivity chart. Electrospinning is a process that can be used to create a patterned fiber mat design that will increase the linear range and lower the detection limit of these sensors by improving the microscale architecture. Using the electrospinning process to produce novel mats of cellulose nitrate will offer improved surface area, and the cellulose nitrate can be treated to further improve chemical interactions required for sensor activity. The macro and micro architecture of the sensor is critical to the performance of the sensors. Electrospinning technology can be used to create patterned architectures of nanofibers that will enhance sensor performance. To date electrospinning of cellulose nitrate has not been performed and optimization of the electrospinning process will provide novel materials suitable for applications such as filtration and sensing. The goal of this research is to identify and elucidate the primary materials and process factors necessary to produce cellulose nitrate nanofibers using the electrospinning process that will improve the performance of biosensors. Cellulose nitrate is readily dissolved in common organic solvents such as acetone, tetrahydrofuran (THF) and N,N dimethylformamide (DMF). These solvents can be mixed with other latent solvents such as ethanol and other alcohols to provide a solvent system with good electrospinning behavior

  7. Nature Inspired Hay Fever Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrei P.Sommer; Dan Zhu

    2008-01-01

    The survival oriented adaptation of evolved biosystems to variations in their environment is a selective optimization process. Recognizing the optimised end product and its functionality is the classical arena of bionic engineering. In a primordial world, however, the molecular organization and functions of prebiotic systems were solely defined by formative processes in their physical and chemical environment, for instance, the interplay between interracial water layers on surfaces and solar light. The formative potential of the interplay between light (laser light) and interfacial water layers on surfaces was recently exploited in the formation of supercubane carbon nanocrystals. In evolved biosystems the formative potential of interracial water layers can still be activated by light. Here we report a case of hay fever, which was successfully treated in the course of a facial reju-venation program starting in November 2007. Targeting primarily interfacial water layers on elastin fibres in the wrinkled areas, we presumably also activated mast cells in the nasal mucosa, reported to progressively decrease in the nasal mucosa of the rabbit, when frequently irradiated. Hay fever is induced by the release of mediators, especially histamine, a process associated with the degranulation of mast cells. Decrease in mast cells numbers implies a decrease in the release of histamine. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on the treatment of hay fever with visible light. This approach was inspired by bionic thinking, and could help ameliorating the condition of millions of people suffering from hay fever world wide.

  8. Fracture Mechanics: Inspirations from Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Taylor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In Nature there are many examples of materials performing structural functions. Nature requires materials which are stiff and strong to provide support against various forces, including self-weight, the dynamic forces involved in movement, and external loads such as wind or the actions of a predator. These materials and structures have evolved over millions of years; the science of Biomimetics seeks to understand Nature and, as a result, to find inspiration for the creation of better engineering solutions. There has been relatively little fundamental research work in this area from a fracture mechanics point of view. Natural materials are quite brittle and, as a result, they have evolved several interesting strategies for preventing failure by crack propagation. Fatigue is also a major problem for many animals and plants. In this paper, several examples will be given of recent work in the Bioengineering Research Centre at Trinity College Dublin, investigating fracture and fatigue in such diverse materials as bamboo, the legs and wings of insects, and living cells.

  9. Berengario's drill: origin and inspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorney, Michael A; Gandhi, Chirag D; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2014-04-01

    Craniotomies are among the oldest neurosurgical procedures, as evidenced by early human skulls discovered with holes in the calvaria. Though devices change, the principles to safely transgress the skull are identical. Modern neurosurgeons regularly use electric power drills in the operating theater; however, nonelectric trephining instruments remain trusted by professionals in certain emergent settings in the rare instance that an electric drill is unavailable. Until the late Middle Ages, innovation in craniotomy instrumentation remained stunted without much documented redesign. Jacopo Berengario da Carpi's (c. 1457-1530 CE) text Tractatus de Fractura Calvae sive Cranei depicts a drill previously unseen in a medical volume. Written in 1518 CE, the book was motivated by defeat over the course of Lorenzo II de'Medici's medical care. Berengario's interchangeable bit with a compound brace ("vertibulum"), known today as the Hudson brace, symbolizes a pivotal device in neurosurgery and medical tool design. This drill permitted surgeons to stock multiple bits, perform the craniotomy faster, and decrease equipment costs during a period of increased incidence of cranial fractures, and thus the need for craniotomies, which was attributable to the introduction of gunpowder. The inspiration stemmed from a school of thought growing within a population of physicians trained as mathematicians, engineers, and astrologers prior to entering the medical profession. Berengario may have been the first to record the use of such a unique drill, but whether he invented this instrument or merely adapted its use for the craniotomy remains clouded.

  10. Inspired at a book fair

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    During the Frankfurt book fair last October, the CERN stand drew quite the crowd. Director-General Rolf Heuer was there to promote CERN’s mission and the "LHC: the Large Hadron Collider" book. He met a lot of visitors and for one of them there was also a nice follow-up…   Marcus and his father visiting the LINAC facility. Fifteen year-old Marcus lives in Lauterecken near Frankfurt. The popular book fair last autumn was for him a nice opportunity to get in touch with the CERN environment. Inspired by the stand and what the CERN people were describing, he started to ask more and more questions… So many, that Rolf Heuer decided to invite him to come to CERN and find out some of the answers for himself. A few weeks later, while recovering from an exciting visit to the ATLAS underground cavern and other CERN installations with a cup of tea in Restaurant 1, Marcus shared his enthusiasm about the Organization: “When I was younger, my moth...

  11. Fabrication of NiO/zirconium oxide nanofibers by electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundarrajan, Subramanian; Venkatesan, Arunachalam; Agarwal, Satya R; Ahamed, Nabeela Nasreen Shaik Anwar; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-12-01

    The electrospinning technique has been used to fabricate 1D inorganic-organic composite nanofibers from solutions containing poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and suitable aqueous precursors of nickel and zirconium ions. Upon calcination, nickel oxide/zirconia nanofibers retained the original morphological features of as-spun nanofibers. X-ray diffraction was used to identify the crystalline nature of the final product and analytical tools such as Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to elucidate the pathway of ceramic phase formation and the systematic evolution of morphological features in the as-spun and calcined fibers. These fibers will find potential applications in biomedical field.

  12. Laser-induced charge separation in organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Behn, Dino; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    -assemble into crystalline nanofibers by vapor deposition onto muscovite mica substrates, and we have recently shown that such nanofibers can be transferred to different substrates by roll-printing and used as the active material in e.g. organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs......Organic semiconductors have unique properties that can be tailored via synthetic chemistry for specific applications, which combined with their low price and straight-forward processing over large areas make them interesting materials for future devices. Certain oligomers can self......), and organic phototransistors (OPTs). However, several device-related issues incl. charge-separation and local band structure remain poorly understood. In this work, we use electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) combined with optical microscopy to study the local surface charge of an individual organic nanofiber...

  13. Laser-induced charge separation in organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Behn, Dino; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    Organic semiconductors have unique properties that can be tailored via synthetic chemistry for specific applications, which combined with their low price and straight-forward processing over large areas make them interesting materials for future devices. Certain oligomers can self......-assemble into crystalline nanofibers by vapor deposition onto muscovite mica substrates, and we have recently shown that such nanofibers can be transferred to different substrates by roll-printing and used as the active material in e.g. organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs......), and organic phototransistors (OPTs). However, several device-related issues incl. charge-separation and local band structure remain poorly understood. In this work, we use electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) combined with optical microscopy to study the local surface charge of an individual organic nanofiber...

  14. Conductive Behaviors of Carbon Nanofibers Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI Qilin; WANG Jihui; WANG Fuling; HUANG Zhixiong; YANG Xiaolin; WEI Tao

    2008-01-01

    By means of ultrasonic dispersion,carbon nanofibers reinforced epoxy resin composite was prepared in the lab,the electrical conductivity of composite with different carbon nanofibers loadings were studied,also the voltage-current relationship,resistance-temperature properties and mechano-electric effect were investigated.Results show that the resistivity of composite decreases in geometric progression with the increasing of carbon nanofibers,and the threshold ranges between 0.1 wt%-0.2 wt%.The voltage-current relationship is in good conformity with the Ohm's law,both positive temperature coefficient and negative temperature coefficient can be found at elevated temperature.In the course of stretching,the electrical resistance of the composites increases with the stress steadily and changes sharply near the breaking point,which is of importance for the safety monitor and structure health diagnosis.

  15. Giant Thermal Rectification from Polyethylene Nanofiber Thermal Diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Teng

    2015-01-01

    The realization of phononic computing is held hostage by the lack of high performance thermal devices. Here we show through theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics simulations that unprecedented thermal rectification factors (as large as 1.20) can be achieved utilizing the phase dependent thermal conductivity of polyethylene nanofibers. More importantly, such high thermal rectifications only need very small temperature differences (< 20 oC) across the device, which is a significant advantage over other thermal diodes which need temperature biases on the order of the operating temperature. Taking this into consideration, we show that the dimensionless temperature-scaled rectification factors of the polymer nanofiber diodes range from 12 to 25 - much larger than other thermal diodes (< 8). The polymer nanofiber thermal diode consists of a crystalline portion whose thermal conductivity is highly phase-sensitive and a cross-linked portion which has a stable phase. Nanoscale size effect can be utilized t...

  16. Properties of Electrospun TiO2 Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Caratão

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium oxide filled polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP composite nanofibers have been prepared via a simple electrospinning technique. The combination of good TiO2 properties with its high surface area leads these nanofibers into having a vast applicability such as cosmetics, scaffolds for tissue engineering, catalytic devices, sensors, solar cells, and optoelectronic devices. The structural and chemical properties of the prepared samples have been studied. The presence of the TiO2 phase on the nanofibers was confirmed. An anatase to rutile transformation was observed at 600°C. Regarding the thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA, the TIP decomposition and the PVP evaporation at 225°C were verified.

  17. Uniaxially aligned ceramic nanofibers obtained by chemical mechanical processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tararam, R. [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Instituto de Química, Rua Prof. Francisco Degni n° 55, CEP 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Foschini, C.R. [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Faculdade de Engenharia de Bauru, Dept. de Eng. Mecanica, Av. Eng. Luiz Edmundo C. Coube 14-01, CEP 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil); Destro, F.B. [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Faculdade de Engenharia de Guaratinguetá, Guaratinguetá 12516-410, SP (Brazil); Simões, A.Z., E-mail: alezipo@yahoo.com [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Faculdade de Engenharia de Guaratinguetá, Guaratinguetá 12516-410, SP (Brazil); Longo, E.; Varela, J.A. [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Instituto de Química, Rua Prof. Francisco Degni n° 55, CEP 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-01

    For this study, we investigated a simple method to generate well aligned nanofibers over large areas using an organic polymer stretched over the substrate surface With this method, ZnO and CuO 3D parallel nanowire arrays were successfully prepared by calcinations of the polymer fibers. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that the copper oxide has a monoclinic structure while the zinc oxide has a hexagonal structure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed ceramic nanofibers with an average diameter of 120 nm which were composed of small nanoparticles which are 10 nm in diameter. The ability to obtain uniaxially aligned nanofibers reveals a range of interesting properties with potential applications for sensors, catalysts and energy technologies.

  18. Electrochemical characteristics of activated carbon nanofiber electrodes for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Min-Kang [Dept. of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin [Dept. of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: sjpark@inha.ac.kr

    2009-08-25

    In this work, poly(amide imide) solutions in dimethylformamide were electrospun into webs consisting of 350 nm ultrafine nanofibers. These nanofiber webs were used to produce activated carbon nanofibers (ACNFs), through stabilization and carbonisation-activation processes. Experimental results indicated that ACNFs activated at 800 deg. C afforded the highest specific surface area but low mesopore volume. The high specific surface area, mainly due to the micropores, introduced maximum specific capacitance at low current density (150 F g{sup -1} at 10 mA g{sup -1}). Elevating the volume fraction of mesopores gave maximum specific capacitance at high current density (100 F g{sup -1} at 1000 mA g{sup -1}), which could be explained on the basis of ion mobility in the pores. Thus, the capacitance of the supercapacitors was strongly dependent on the specific surface area and micro- or mesopore volume of the ACNFs.

  19. Phase diagram of hopping conduction mechanisms in polymer nanofiber network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jeng-Ting; Lu, Yu-Cheng; Jiang, Shiau-Bin; Zhong, Yuan-Liang, E-mail: ylzhong@cycu.edu.tw [Department of Physics and Center for Nanotechnology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Jui-Ming [Department of Chemistry and Center for Nanotechnology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-07

    Network formation by nanofiber crosslinking is usually in polymer materials as application in organic semiconductor devices. Electron hopping transport mechanisms depend on polymer morphology in network. Conducting polymers morphology in a random network structure is modeled by a quasi-one-dimensional system coupled of chains or fibers. We observe the varying hopping conduction mechanisms in the polyaniline nanofibers of the random network structure. The average diameter d of the nanofibers is varied from approximately 10 to 100 nm. The different dominant hopping mechanisms including Efros-Shklovskii variable-range hopping (VRH), Mott VRH, and nearest-neighbor hopping are dependent on temperature range and d in crossover changes. The result of this study is first presented in a phase diagram of hopping conduction mechanisms based on the theories of the random network model. The hopping conduction mechanism is unlike in normal semiconductor materials.

  20. Bio-inspired computation in telecommunications

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xin-She; Ting, TO

    2015-01-01

    Bio-inspired computation, especially those based on swarm intelligence, has become increasingly popular in the last decade. Bio-Inspired Computation in Telecommunications reviews the latest developments in bio-inspired computation from both theory and application as they relate to telecommunications and image processing, providing a complete resource that analyzes and discusses the latest and future trends in research directions. Written by recognized experts, this is a must-have guide for researchers, telecommunication engineers, computer scientists and PhD students.

  1. Bio-Inspired, Odor-Based Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Bio -Inspired, Odor-Based Navigation THESIS Maynard John Porter III, Captain, USAF AFIT/GE/ENG/06-48 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR...States Government. AFIT/GE/ENG/06-48 Bio -Inspired, Odor-Based Navigation THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Electrical and Computer...APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT/GE/ENG/06-48 Bio -Inspired, Odor-Based Navigation Maynard John Porter III, B.S.E.E. Captain

  2. La maturità di INSPIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Salvemini

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available INPIRE's maturityThe INSPIRE Conference 2010 took place from 23 to 25 June 2010 in Kraków, Poland. On 22 June pre-conference workshops have been organized. The theme of this year’s edition has been "INSPIRE as a Framework for Cooperation".The INSPIRE Conference has been organised through a series of plenary sessions addressing common policy issues, and parallel sessions focusing in particular on applications and implementations of SDIs, research issues and new and evolvingtechnologies and applications and poster presentations.

  3. Interfacial engineering of carbon nanofiber-graphene-carbon nanofiber heterojunctions in flexible lightweight electromagnetic shielding networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei-Li; Wang, Jia; Fan, Li-Zhen; Li, Yong; Wang, Chan-Yuan; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2014-07-09

    Lightweight carbon materials of effective electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding have attracted increasing interest because of rapid development of smart communication devices. To meet the requirement in portable electronic devices, flexible shielding materials with ultrathin characteristic have been pursued for this purpose. In this work, we demonstrated a facile strategy for scalable fabrication of flexible all-carbon networks, where the insulting polymeric frames and interfaces have been well eliminated. Microscopically, a novel carbon nanofiber-graphene nanosheet-carbon nanofiber (CNF-GN-CNF) heterojunction, which plays the dominant role as the interfacial modifier, has been observed in the as-fabricated networks. With the presence of CNF-GN-CNF heterojunctions, the all-carbon networks exhibit much increased electrical properties, resulting in the great enhancement of EMI shielding performance. The related mechanism for engineering the CNF interfaces based on the CNF-GN-CNF heterojunctions has been discussed. Implication of the results suggests that the lightweight all-carbon networks, whose thickness and density are much smaller than other graphene/polymer composites, present more promising potential as thin shielding materials in flexible portable electronics.

  4. Morphology and internal structure of polymeric and carbon nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhenxin

    Evaporation and the associated solidification are important factors that affect the diameter of electrospun nanofibers. The evaporation and solidification of a charged jet were controlled by varying the partial pressure of water vapor during electrospinning of poly(ethylene oxide) from aqueous solution. As the partial pressure of water vapor increases, the solidification process of the charged jet becomes slower, allowing elongation of the charged jet to continue longer and thereby to form thinner fibers. The morphology and internal structure of electrospun poly(vinylidene fluorides) nanofibers were investigated. Low voltage high resolution scanning electron microscopy was used to study the surface of electrospun nanofibers. Control of electrospinning process produced fibers with various morphological forms. Fibers that were beaded, branched, or split were obtained when different instabilities dominated in the electrospinning process. The high ratio of stretching during electrospinning aligns the polymer molecules along the fiber axis. A rapid evaporation of solvent during electrospinning gives fibers with small and imperfect crystallites. These can be perfected by thermal annealing. Fibers annealed at elevated temperature form plate-like lamellar crystals tightly linked by tie molecules. Electrospinning can provide ultrafine nanofibers with cross-sections that contain only a few polymer molecules. Ultrafine polymer nanofibers are extremely stable in transmission electron microscope. Electrospun nanofibers suspended on a holey carbon film showed features of individual polymer molecules. Carbon fibers with diameters ranging from 100 nm to several microns were produced from mesophase pitch by a low cost gas jet process. The structure of mesophase pitch-based carbon fibers was investigated as a function of heat treatment temperatures. Submicron-sized graphene oxide flakes were prepared by a combination of oxidative treatment and ultrasonic radiation. Because pitch is

  5. Advances in Poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline) Nanofibers Preparation by Electrospinning Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Pina, C; Busacca, C; Frontera, P; Antonucci, P L; Scarpino, L A; Sironi, A; Falletta, E

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanofibers are drawing a great deal of interest from academia and industry due to their multiple applications, especially in biomedical field. PANI nanofibers were successfully electrospun for the first time by MacDiarmid and co-workers at the beginning of the millennium and since then many efforts have been addressed to improve their quality. However, traditional PANI prepared from aniline monomer shows some drawbacks, such as presence of toxic (i.e., benzidine) and inorganic (salts and metals) co-products, that complicate polymer post-treatment, and low solubility in common organic solvents, making hard its processing by electrospinning technique. Some industrial sectors, such as medical and biomedical, need to employ materials free from toxic and polluting species. In this regard, the oxidative polymerization of N-(4-aminophenyl)aniline, aniline dimer, to produce poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline), P4ADA, a kind of PANI, represents an innovative alternative to the traditional synthesis because the obtained polymer results free from carcinogenic and/or polluting co-products, and, moreover, more soluble than traditional PANI. This latter feature can be exploited to obtain P4ADA nanofibers by electrospinning technique. In this paper we report the advances obtained in the P4ADA nanofibers electrospinnig. A comparison among polyethylene oxide (PEO), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS), as the second polymer to facilitate the electrospinning process, is shown. In order to increase the conductivity of P4ADA nanofibers, two strategies were adopted and compared: selective insulating binder removal from electrospun nanofibers by a rinsing tratment, afterwards optimizing the minimum amount of binder necessary for the electrospinning process. Moreover, the effect of PEO/P4ADA weight ratio on the fibers morphology and conductivity was highlighted.

  6. Stability of β-carotene in polyethylene oxide electrospun nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peinado, I., E-mail: irpeipar@upvnet.upv.es [Free University of Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Mason, M.; Romano, A. [Free University of Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Biasioli, F. [Department of Food Quality and Nutrition, Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach (FEM), via E. Mach 1, 38010 San Michele all ‘Adige, TN (Italy); Scampicchio, M., E-mail: matteo.scampicchio@unibz.it [Free University of Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy)

    2016-05-01

    Highlights: • β-carotene was incorporated into PEO-nanofibers by electrospinning. • Properties of the fibers were analyzed by SEM, color analysis, and DSC. • TGA coupled to PTR–ms resulted promising to online-monitoring thermal degradation. • Thermal stability of βc increased after encapsulation into the PEO-nanofibers. - Abstract: β-carotene (βc) was successfully incorporated into electrospun nanofibers of poly-(ethylene oxide) (PEO) with the aim of prolonging its shelf life and thermal stability. The physical and thermal properties of the βc-PEO-nanofibers were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), color analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The nanofibers of PEO and βc-PEO exhibited average fiber diameters of 320 ± 46 and 230 ± 21 nm, with colorimetric coordinates L* = 95.7 ± 2.4 and 89.4 ± 4.6 and b* = −0.5 ± 0.1 and 6.2 ± 3.0 respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis coupled with Proton Transfer–Mass Spectroscopy (TGA/PTR–ms) demonstrated that coated βc inside PEO nanofibers increased thermal stability when compared to standard βc in powder form. In addition, β-carotene in the membranes showed higher stability during storage when compared with β-carotene in solution with a decrease in concentration of 57 ± 4% and 70 ± 2% respectively, thus should extend the shelf life of this compound. Also, TGA coupled with PTR–MS resulted in a promising technique to online-monitoring thermal degradation.

  7. Efficient and reusable polyamide-56 nanofiber/nets membrane with bimodal structures for air filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bowen; Zhang, Shichao; Wang, Xueli; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2015-11-01

    Nanofibrous media that both possess high airborne particle interception efficiency and robust air permeability would have broad technological implications for areas ranging from individual protection and industrial security to environmental governance; however, creating such filtration media has proved extremely challenging. Here we report a strategy to construct the bio-based polyamide-56 nanofiber/nets (PA-56 NFN) membranes with bimodal structures for effective air filtration via one-step electrospinning/netting. The PA-56 membranes are composed of completely covered two-dimensional (2D) ultrathin (∼20 nm) nanonets which are optimized by facilely regulating the solution concentration, and the bonded scaffold fibers constructed cavity structures which are synchronously created by using the CH3COOH inspiration. With integrated properties of small aperture, high porosity, and bonded scaffold, the resulting PA-56 NFN membranes exhibit high filtration efficiency of 99.995%, low pressure drop of 111 Pa, combined with large dust holding capacity of 49 g/m(2) and dust-cleaning regeneration ability, for filtrating ultrafine airborne particles in the most safe manner involving sieving principle and surface filtration. The successful synthesis of PA-56 NFN medium would not only make it a promising candidate for air filtration, but also provide new insights into the design and development of nanonet-based bimodal structures for various applications.

  8. An optical nanofiber-based interface for single molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Skoff, Sarah M; Schauffert, Hardy; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2016-01-01

    Optical interfaces for quantum emitters are a prerequisite for implementing quantum networks. Here, we couple single molecules to the guided modes of an optical nanofiber. The molecules are embedded within a crystal that provides photostability and due to its inhomogeneous environment, a means to spectrally address single molecules. Single molecules are excited and detected solely via the nanofiber interface without the requirement of additional optical access. In this way, we realize a fully fiber-integrated system that is scalable and may become a versatile constituent for quantum hybrid systems.

  9. CONFORMATION AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF CARBON NANOFIBERS DEPOSITED ON FOAM Ni

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Bundles of pure carbon nanofibers were prepared by catalytic decomposition of acetylene on foam Ni. The morphological and structural characteristics of the carbon nanostructures, in the as-prepared state, were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HTEM). A special conformation of carbon nanofibers composed of segmented structures was found among the products by both SEM and TEM observations. Further HTEM ex amination indicated that the segments were stacked with well ordered graphite platelets arranged perpendicular to the axis of the filaments.

  10. Nanofibers Offer Alternative Ways to the Treatment of Skin Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. J. Heunis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury to the skin causes a breach in the protective layer surrounding the body. Many pathogens are resistant to antibiotics, rendering conventional treatment less effective. This led to the use of alternative antimicrobial compounds, such as silver ions, in skin treatment. In this review nanofibers, and the incorporation of natural antimicrobial compounds in these scaffolds, are discussed as an alternative way to control skin infections. Electrospinning as a technique to prepare nanofibers is discussed. The possibility of using these structures as drug delivery systems is investigated.

  11. Dispersive Optical Interface Based on Nanofiber-Trapped Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Dawkins, S T; Reitz, D; Vetsch, E; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2011-01-01

    We dispersively interface an ensemble of one thousand atoms trapped in the evanescent field surrounding a tapered optical nanofiber. This method relies on the azimuthally-asymmetric coupling of the ensemble with the evanescent field of an off-resonant probe beam, transmitted through the nanofiber. The resulting birefringence and dispersion are significant; we observe a phase shift per atom of $\\sim$\\,1\\,mrad at a detuning of six times the natural linewidth, corresponding to an effective resonant optical density per atom of 2.7\\,%. Moreover, we utilize this strong dispersion to non-destructively determine the number of atoms.

  12. Field-enhanced nonlinear optical properties of organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek; Brewer, Jonathan R.;

    Second harmonic generation in nonlinearly optically active organic nanofibers, generated via self-assembled surface growth from nonsymmetrically functionalized para-quarterphenylene (CNHP4) molecules, has been investigated. After the growth on mica templates, nanofibers have been transferred onto...... lithographically defined regular arrays of metal and dielectric nanostructures. Such hybrid systems were employed to correlate the second harmonic response to both morphology of the fibers i.e. local field enhancement due to local changes in the fiber’s morphology and field enhancement effects appearing...

  13. Field-enhanced nonlinear optical properties of organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek; Brewer, Jonathan R.;

    2014-01-01

    Second harmonic generation in nonlinearly optically active organic nanofibers, generated via self-assembled surface growth from nonsymmetrically functionalized para-quarterphenylene (CNHP4) molecules, has been investigated. After the growth on mica templates, nanofibers have been transferred onto...... lithographically defined regular arrays of metal and dielectric nanostructures. Such hybrid systems were employed to correlate the second harmonic response to both morphology of the fibers i.e. local field enhancement due to local changes in the fiber’s morphology and field enhancement effects appearing...

  14. CHARACTERIZATION AND ADSORPTION PROPERTIES OF POROUS CARBON NANOFIBER GRANULES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiuling Chen; Qinghai Chen; Yongdan Li

    2006-01-01

    The properties of the porous granules produced by agglomeration of catalytically grown carbon nanofibers were investigated in this work. The single pellet crushing strength of the granules is high, e.g., 1.6-2.5 MPa. They have adsorption at 298 K of benzene or phenol on the granules is much lower than that on activated carbon and depends not only on the specific surface area of the carbon material but also on the sewing structure of the granules and the morphology of the carbon nanofibers. Treatment in dilute nitric acid appreciably reduces such adsorption.

  15. Local field enhanced second-harmonic response of organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek

    Organic CNHP4 nanofibers showing a strong second-harmonic (SH) response have been successfully implemented as active components in a metal-organic hybrid system. Using nondestructive roll-on transfer technique nanofibers were transferred from the growing mica substrates onto electron......-beam lithography-defined regular arrays of gold, titanium and silicon oxide. As shown in a femtosecond laser scanning microscopy study the fiber-substrate interplay leads (only) on gold to a significantly enhanced SH signal. We suggest that this effect is driven by the local field enhancement i.e. the excitation...

  16. The effect of DNA on mechanical properties of nanofiber hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Shi Hyeong; Jung, Sung-il; Kim, Sun I.; Kim, Seon Jeong; Kim, Byung Joo; So, Insuk

    2008-10-01

    Uniform poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofiber gels incorporating double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) were fabricated without the aid of cross-linkers employing electrospinning. Creep and tensile tests of the DNA/PVA nanofiber gels were carried out in an aqueous medium to analyze interactions between the DNA and PVA. The DNA/PVA gels had a higher elastic modulus than the PVA gel. The viscosity with increasing external load was calculated by applying the Burger model to the creep curves. We conclude that DNA is relatively weakly bound with the PVA chains, although the elastic modulus of the DNA/PVA gels was higher than that of PVA gel.

  17. Engineered Polymer Composites Through Electrospun Nanofiber Coating of Fiber Tows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlman, Lee W.; Bakis, Charles; Williams, Tiffany S.; Johnston, James C.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Composite materials offer significant weight savings in many aerospace applications. The toughness of the interface of fibers crossing at different angles often determines failure of composite components. A method for toughening the interface in fabric and filament wound components using directly electrospun thermoplastic nanofiber on carbon fiber tow is presented. The method was first demonstrated with limited trials, and then was scaled up to a continuous lab scale process. Filament wound tubes were fabricated and tested using unmodified baseline towpreg material and nanofiber coated towpreg.

  18. Nb2O5 nanofiber memristor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishin, A. M.; Velichko, A. A.; Jalalian, A.

    2013-07-01

    Non-woven bead-free 100 μm long and 80-200 nm in diameter highly crystalline orthorhombic T-Nb2O5 nanofibers were sintered by sol-gel assisted electrospinning technique. Electrical and dielectric spectroscopy tests of individual fibers clamped onto Pt coated Si substrate were performed using a spreading resistance mode of atomic force microscope. Reproducible resistive switching with ON-OFF resistance ratio as high as 2 × 104 has a bipolar character, starts with a threshold voltage of 0.8-1.7 V, and follows by continuous growth of conductivity. Resistive memory effect is associated with a voltage-driven accumulation/depletion of oxygen vacancies at Nb2O5/Pt cathode interface. Poole-Frenkel emission from the electronic states trapped at reduced NbOx complexes determines a shape of Nb2O5/Pt diode I-V characteristics. Simple thermodynamic model explains a threshold character of switching, relates experimentally observed characteristics in low and high resistive states, and gives a reasonable estimate of the concentration of oxygen vacancies.

  19. Radiation Effects on Polypropylene Carbon Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, John; Mion, Thomas; Chipara, Alin C.; Ibrahim, Elamin I.; Lozano, Karen; Chipara, Magdalena; Tidrow, Steven C.; Chipara, Mircea

    2010-03-01

    Dispersion of carbon nanostructures within polymeric matrices affects most physical and chemical properties of the polymeric matrix (increased Young modulus, improved thermal stability, faster crystallization rates, higher equilibrium degree of crystallinity, modified glass, melting, and crystallization temperatures, enhanced thermal and electrical conductivity). Such changes have been reported and explained by thorough spectroscopic investigations. Nevertheless, little is known about the radiation stability of such nanocomposites. The research is focused on spectroscopic investigations of radiation-induced modifications in isotactic polypropylene (iPP)-vapor grown nanofiber (VGCNF)composites. VGCNF were dispersed within iPP by extrusion at 180^oC. Composites containing various amounts of VGCNFs ranging from 0 to 20 % wt. were prepared and subjected to gamma irradiation, at room temperature, at various integral doses (10 MGy, 20 MGy, and 30 MGy). Raman spectroscopy, ATR, and WAXS were used to assess the radiation-induced modifications in these nanocomposites. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the Welch Foundation (Department of Chemistry at UTPA) and by US Army Research Office (AMSRD-ARL-RO-SI: 54498-MS-ISP).

  20. Carbon Nanofiber Nanoelectrodes for Biosensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Jessica Erin

    2014-01-01

    A sensor platform based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been developed. Their inherent nanometer scale, high conductivity, wide potential window, good biocompatibility and well-defined surface chemistry make them ideal candidates as biosensor electrodes. Here, we report two studies using vertically aligned CNF nanoelectrodes for biomedical applications. CNF arrays are investigated as neural stimulation and neurotransmitter recording electrodes for application in deep brain stimulation (DBS). Polypyrrole coated CNF nanoelectrodes have shown great promise as stimulating electrodes due to their large surface area, low impedance, biocompatibility and capacity for highly localized stimulation. CNFs embedded in SiO2 have been used as sensing electrodes for neurotransmitter detection. Our approach combines a multiplexed CNF electrode chip, developed at NASA Ames Research Center, with the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensor (WINCS) system, developed at the Mayo Clinic. Preliminary results indicate that the CNF nanoelectrode arrays are easily integrated with WINCS for neurotransmitter detection in a multiplexed array format. In the future, combining CNF based stimulating and recording electrodes with WINCS may lay the foundation for an implantable smart therapeutic system that utilizes neurochemical feedback control while likely resulting in increased DBS application in various neuropsychiatric disorders. In total, our goal is to take advantage of the nanostructure of CNF arrays for biosensing studies requiring ultrahigh sensitivity, high-degree of miniaturization, and selective biofunctionalization.

  1. Nature-inspired computing for control systems

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The book presents recent advances in nature-inspired computing, giving a special emphasis to control systems applications. It reviews different techniques used for simulating physical, chemical, biological or social phenomena at the purpose of designing robust, predictive and adaptive control strategies. The book is a collection of several contributions, covering either more general approaches in control systems, or methodologies for control tuning and adaptive controllers, as well as exciting applications of nature-inspired techniques in robotics. On one side, the book is expected to motivate readers with a background in conventional control systems to try out these powerful techniques inspired by nature. On the other side, the book provides advanced readers with a deeper understanding of the field and a broad spectrum of different methods and techniques. All in all, the book is an outstanding, practice-oriented reference guide to nature-inspired computing addressing graduate students, researchers and practi...

  2. INSPIRE and SPIRES Log File Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Cole; /Wheaton Coll. /SLAC

    2012-08-31

    SPIRES, an aging high-energy physics publication data base, is in the process of being replaced by INSPIRE. In order to ease the transition from SPIRES to INSPIRE it is important to understand user behavior and the drivers for adoption. The goal of this project was to address some questions in regards to the presumed two-thirds of the users still using SPIRES. These questions are answered through analysis of the log files from both websites. A series of scripts were developed to collect and interpret the data contained in the log files. The common search patterns and usage comparisons are made between INSPIRE and SPIRES, and a method for detecting user frustration is presented. The analysis reveals a more even split than originally thought as well as the expected trend of user transition to INSPIRE.

  3. String-Inspired Gravity through Symmetries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    José Antonio Belinchón

    2016-01-01

    We study a string-inspired cosmological model from the symmetries point of view. We start by deducing the form that each physical quantity must take so that the field equations, in the string frame, admit self-similar solutions...

  4. Towards gecko-feet-inspired bandages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2009-01-01

    A novel bandage inspired by gecko feet might one day be used during emergencies and internal surgeries. The bandage uses a combination of nanofabricated structures, biodegradable materials and adhesive surface chemistry that allows adhesion onto even wet, moving tissue.

  5. Innovative Didactics in an International Internship - inspiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lembcke, Steen; Skibsted, Else Bengaard; Mølgaard, Niels

    An inspiration handbook for the international team from the teacher education programme in VIA. Aimed to assist internship supervisors and students during international internships in regards to innovation, social entrepreneurship and development of the international teacher. Introduces why and how...

  6. Bio-inspired dynamic robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Alan S.; Wax, Steven G.; Christodoulou, Leo

    2003-09-01

    The unique performance of biological systems across a wide spectrum of phylogenetic species has historically provided inspirations for roboticists in new designs and fabrication of new robotic platforms. Of particular interest to a number of important applications is to create dynamic robots able to adapt to a change in their world, unplanned events that are sometimes unexpected, and sometimes unstable, harsh conditions. It is likely that the exploring dynamics in biological systems will continue to provide rich solutions to attaining robots capable of more complex tasks for this purpose. This is because the long-term design process of evolution utilizes a natural selection process that responds to such changes. Recently, there have been significant advances across a number of interdisciplinary efforts that have generated new capabilities in biorobotics. Whole body dynamics that capture the force dynamics and functional stability of legged systems over rough terrain have been elucidated and applied in legged robotic systems. Exploying the force dynamics of flapping winged insect flight has provided key discoveries and enabled the fabrication of new micro air vehicles. New classes of materials are being developed that emulate the ability of natural muscle, capturing the compliant and soft subtle movement and performance of biological appendages. In addition, classes of new multifunctional materials are being developed to enable the design of biorobotics with the structural and functional efficiency of living organisms. Optical flow and other sensors based on the principles of invertebrate vision have been implemented on robotic platforms for autonomous robotic guidance and control. These fundamental advances have resulted in the emergence of a new generation of bioinspired dynamic robots which show significant performance improvements in early prototype testing and that could someday be useful in a number of significant applications such as search and rescue and

  7. Inspirational Catalogue of Master Thesis Proposals 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren

    2015-01-01

    This catalog presents different topics for master thesis projects. It is important to emphasize that the project descriptions only serves as an inspiration and that you always can discuss with the potential supervisors the specific contents of a project.......This catalog presents different topics for master thesis projects. It is important to emphasize that the project descriptions only serves as an inspiration and that you always can discuss with the potential supervisors the specific contents of a project....

  8. Inspirational Catalogue of Master Thesis Proposals 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren

    2015-01-01

    This catalog presents different topics for master thesis projects. It is important to emphasize that the project descriptions only serves as an inspiration and that you always can discuss with the potential supervisors the specific contents of a project.......This catalog presents different topics for master thesis projects. It is important to emphasize that the project descriptions only serves as an inspiration and that you always can discuss with the potential supervisors the specific contents of a project....

  9. Surface modification of polyvinyl alcohol/malonic acid nanofibers by gaseous dielectric barrier discharge plasma for glucose oxidase immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Esmail; Mazinani, Saeedeh; Ranaei-Siadat, Seyed-Omid; Ghomi, Hamid

    2016-11-01

    Polymeric nanofiber prepares a suitable situation for enzyme immobilization for variety of applications. In this research, we have fabricated polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/malonic acid nanofibers using electrospinning. After fabrication of nanofibers, the effect of air, nitrogen, CO2, and argon DBD (dielectric barrier discharge) plasmas on PVA/malonic acid nanofibers were analysed. Among them, air plasma had the most significant effect on glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilization. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrum analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results revealed that in case of air plasma modified nanofibers, the carboxyl groups on the surface are increased. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that, after GOx immobilization, the modified nanofibers with plasma has retained its nanofiber structure. Finally, we analysed reusability and storage stability of GOx immobilized on plasma modified and unmodified nanofibers. The results were more satisfactory for modified nanofibers with respect to unmodified ones.

  10. Aligned Nanofibers for Regenerating Arteries, Nerves, and Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClendon, Mark Trosper

    Cells are the fundamental unit of the human body, and therefore the ability to control cell behavior is the most important challenge in regenerative medicine. Peptides are the language of biology which is why synthetic peptide amphiphile (PA) molecules hold great potential as a biomaterial. The work presented in this dissertation explores a variety of liquid crystalline PA nanofibers as a means for directing cell growth. Shaping the alignment of these nanofiber networks requires a deep understanding of their rheological properties which presents a difficult challenge as they exist in complex solid and liquid environments. Using PA molecules that self-assemble into high aspect ratio nanofibers and liquid crystalline solutions, this work investigates the influence of shear flow on macroscopic and microscopic nanofiber alignment. To this end, a shear force applied to PA solutions was systematically varied while the alignment was probed using small angle x-ray scattering. Nanofibers were found to respond to shear flow by aligning parallel to the flow direction. By changing pH and PA chemical sequence it was observed that increasing the interfiber electrostatic repulsive interactions resulted in a greater dependence on shear rate. Nanofiber solutions having greater repulsion did not drastically increase in alignment when the applied strain was increased by two orders of magnitude (1 s -1 to 100 s-1), while solutions with nanofibers having less repulsion increased there alignment four fold with the same strain increase. say exactly what you mean by resulted in greater dependence: did it result in fibers aligning under lower shear rates or higher rates--give the results Anionic PA solutions typically used to encapsulate living cells at neutral pH were found to require minimal shear rates, Histological and behavioral observations confirmed that PA implants sustained regeneration rates comparable to autologous grafts and significantly better than empty biopolymer grafts

  11. INSPIRE from the JRC Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlado Cetl

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarises some recent developments in INSPIRE implementation from the JRC (Joint Research Centre point of view. The INSPIRE process started around 11 years ago and today, clear results and benefits can be seen. Spatial data are more accessible and shared more frequently between countries and at the European level. In addition to this, efficient, unified coordination and collaboration between different stakeholders and participants has been achieved, which is another great success. The JRC, as a scientific think-tank of the European Commission, has played a very important role in this process from the very beginning. This role is in line with its mission, which is to provide customer-driven scientific and technical support for the conception, development, implementation and monitoring of European Union (EU policies. The JRC acts as the overall technical coordinator of INSPIRE, but it also carries out the activities necessary to support the coherent implementation of INSPIRE, by helping member states in the implementation process. Experiences drawn from collaboration and negotiation in each country and at the European level will be of great importance in the revision of the INSPIRE Directive, which is envisaged for 2014. Keywords: spatial data infrastructure (SDI; INSPIRE; development; Joint Research Centre (JRC

  12. Lysozyme-immobilized electrospun PAMA/PVA and PSSA-MA/PVA ion-exchange nanofiber for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonglairoum, Prasopchai; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2014-08-27

    Abstract This research was aimed to develop the lysozyme immobilized ion-exchange nanofiber mats for wound healing. To promote the healing process, the PSSA-MA/PVA and PAMA ion-exchange nanofiber mats were fabricated to mimic the extracellular matrix structure using electrospinning process followed by thermally crosslinked. Lysozyme was immobilized on the ion-exchane nanofibers by an adsorption method. The ion-exchange nanofibers were investigated using SEM, FTIR and XRPD. Moreover, the lysozyme-immobilized ion-exchange nanofibers were further investigated for lysozyme content and activity, lysozyme release and wound healing activity. The fiber diameters of the mats were in the nanometer range. Lysozyme was gradually absorbed into the PSSA-MA/PVA nanofiber with higher extend than that is absorbed on the PAMA/PVA nanofiber and exhibited higher activity than lysozyme-immobilized PAMA/PVA nanofiber. The total contents of lysozyme on the PSSA-MA/PVA and PAMA/PVA nanofiber were 648 and 166 µg/g, respectively. FTIR and lysozyme activity results confirmed the presence of lysozyme on the nanofiber mats. The lysozyme was released from the PSSA-MA/PVA and PAMA/PVA nanofiber in the same manner. The lysozyme-immobilized PSSA-MA/PVA nanofiber mats and lysozyme-immobilized PAMA/PVA nanofiber mats exhibited significantly faster healing rate than gauze and similar to the commercial antibacterial gauze dressing. These results suggest that these nanofiber mats could provide the promising candidate for wound healing application.

  13. Preparation of Ag/HBP/PAN Nanofiber Web and Its Antimicrobial and Filtration Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Rong Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To widen the application of nanofibers web in the field of medical health materials, a new Ag/amino-terminated hyperbranched polymer (HBP/polyacrylonitrile (PAN nanofiber web with excellent antimicrobial activity and filtration property was produced with Ag/HBP dispersion solution and PAN nanofiber. Ag/HBP dispersion solution was prepared with HBP as reducer and stabilizer, and Ag/HBP/PAN nanofiber was prepared by modifying electrospun PAN nanofiber with Ag/HBP aqueous solution. The characterization results showed that spherical Ag nanoparticles were prepared and they had a narrow distribution in HBP aqueous solution. The results of Ag/HBP/PAN nanofiber characterized with SEM and EDS showed that the content of silver nanoparticles on the surface of PAN nanofiber was on the increase when the treating temperature rose. The bacterial reduction rates of HBP-treated PAN nanofiber against S. aureus and E. coli were about 89%, while those of the Ag/HBP/PAN nanofiber against S. aureus and E. coli were 99.9% and 99.96%, respectively, due to the cooperative effects from the amino groups in HBP and Ag nanoparticles. Moreover, the small pores and high porosity in Ag/HBP/PAN nanofiber web resulted in high filtration efficiency (99.9% for removing smaller particles (0.1 μm~0.7 μm, which was much higher than that of the gauze mask.

  14. Influence of polyvinyl alcohol amount on producing in situ photo-crosslinked thioamide functionalized nanofiber membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeytuncu Bihter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(vinyl alcohol/maleic anhydride/acryloyl thioamide monomer (PVA/MA/ATM photo-cured nanofiber membranes and pure PVA nanofiber membranes were produced by electrospinning technique. In situ UV radiation was applied during the electrospinning in order to provide polymerization during the jet flight and promote crosslinking of ATM and MA with PVA. The cross-linking was examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The morphology and thermal behavior of electrospun nanofiber were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, respectively. The surface area of nanofiber membranes was measured by Brunauer-Emmert-Teller (BET analysis. Furthermore, water durability test was examined. Water durability test demonstrated that in situ photo-cured PVA/MA/ATM nanofiber membrane had the least average mass loss. The surface areas of PVA/MA/ATM nanofiber membranes were 160-280 m2/g. The surface area and diameter of PVA/MA/ATM nanofibers decreased as the PVA content increased. The diameter of nanofibers was obtained less than 100 nm. The results showed that the water-insoluble nanofiber membranes with better chemical and thermal resistance were obtained. These nanofiber membranes may be a promising candidate for the usage of water treatment.

  15. Biodegradable poly (ɛ-caprolactone)/gelatin nanofibers: Effect of tubular halloysite on structure and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švachová, Veronika; Khunová, Viera; Vojtová, Lucy; PavliÅák, David

    2016-05-01

    The work explores preparation of new advanced nanofibers based on biodegradable polymers and biocompatible tubular halloysite (HNT). Electrospun nanofibers comprising 8 wt% gelatin (Gel) and 8 wt% poly (͛-caprolactone) (PCL) have been prepared by using eco-friendly solvent - acetic acid. The content of HNT in PCL/Gel nanofibers was 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 6.0 and 9.0 wt%. It was found that the addition of HNT significantly affected the polymer mixture spinnability and the fiber diameter. SEM observations revealed that the structure of nanofibers depends on nanofiber composition. Whilst in nanofibers with lower HNT content uniform morphology with HNTs located merely inside the individual nanofibers has been observed, in nanofibers with 6 and 9 wt% HNT individual particles as well as the agglomerates of HNT have been detected in both, the inner part as well as outside part of nanofiber. Important reinforcing effect has been achieved in whole HNT content. The highest improvement has been reached when the HNT content was 0.5 wt%. In this case, multiple enhancements of strength (2x), elongation (4x) and modulus (2x) have been confirmed. ATR-FTIR revealed that improvement of mechanical properties is also due to the increase of interface interaction in between PCL/Gel and HNT. The prepared PCL/Gel/HNT nanofibers can be used for tissue engineering and/or as drug carriers or signal molecules in whole spectrum of medical applications.

  16. Osteoinductive peptide-functionalized nanofibers with highly ordered structure as biomimetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaohong; Song, Jinlin; Xu, Xiao; Xu, Anxiu; Wang, Mengke; Xie, Bingwu; Huang, Enyi; Deng, Feng; Wei, Shicheng

    2015-01-01

    The construction of functional biomimetic scaffolds that recapitulate the topographical and biochemical features of bone tissue extracellular matrix is now of topical interest in bone tissue engineering. In this study, a novel surface-functionalized electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofiber scaffold with highly ordered structure was developed to simulate the critical features of native bone tissue via a single step of catechol chemistry. Specially, under slightly alkaline aqueous solution, polydopamine (pDA) was coated on the surface of aligned PCL nanofibers after electrospinning, followed by covalent immobilization of bone morphogenetic protein-7-derived peptides onto the pDA-coated nanofiber surface. Contact angle measurement, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of pDA and peptides on PCL nanofiber surface. Our results demonstrated that surface modification with osteoinductive peptides could improve cytocompatibility of nanofibers in terms of cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation. Most importantly, Alizarin Red S staining, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunostaining, and Western blot revealed that human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on aligned nanofibers with osteoinductive peptides exhibited enhanced osteogenic differentiation potential than cells on randomly oriented nanofibers. Furthermore, the aligned nanofibers with osteoinductive peptides could direct osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells even in the absence of osteoinducting factors, suggesting superior osteogenic efficacy of biomimetic design that combines the advantages of osteoinductive peptide signal and highly ordered nanofibers on cell fate decision. The presented peptide-decorated bone-mimic nanofiber scaffolds hold a promising potential in the context of bone tissue engineering.

  17. Incorporation of functionalized gold nanoparticles into nanofibers for enhanced attachment and differentiation of mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Dongju

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrospun nanofibers have been widely used as substrata for mammalian cell culture owing to their structural similarity to natural extracellular matrices. Structurally consistent electrospun nanofibers can be produced with synthetic polymers but require chemical modification to graft cell-adhesive molecules to make the nanofibers functional. Development of a facile method of grafting functional molecules on the nanofibers will contribute to the production of diverse cell type-specific nanofiber substrata. Results Small molecules, peptides, and functionalized gold nanoparticles were successfully incorporated with polymethylglutarimide (PMGI nanofibers through electrospinning. The PMGI nanofibers functionalized by the grafted AuNPs, which were labeled with cell-adhesive peptides, enhanced HeLa cell attachment and potentiated cardiomyocyte differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells. Conclusions PMGI nanofibers can be functionalized simply by co-electrospinning with the grafting materials. In addition, grafting functionalized AuNPs enable high-density localization of the cell-adhesive peptides on the nanofiber. The results of the present study suggest that more cell type-specific synthetic substrata can be fabricated with molecule-doped nanofibers, in which diverse functional molecules are grafted alone or in combination with other molecules at different concentrations.

  18. Environmental remediation and superhydrophilicity of ultrafine antibacterial tungsten oxide-based nanofibers under visible light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srisitthiratkul, Chutima; Yaipimai, Wittaya [Nano Functional Textile Laboratory, National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), 111 Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Rd., Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Intasanta, Varol, E-mail: varol@nanotec.or.th [Nano Functional Textile Laboratory, National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), 111 Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Rd., Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand)

    2012-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanosilver-decorated WO{sub 3} photocatalytic nanofibers are antibacterial and superhydrophilic under a visible light source. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deposition of nanosilver onto electrospun WO{sub 3} nanofibers' surface was done exploiting visible or UV light driven photoreduction of silver ion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanofibers showed antibacterial characteristics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanofibers degraded a model toxin effectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanofibers showed superhydrophilicity under a visible light source. - Abstract: Fabrication of nanosilver-decorated WO{sub 3} nanofibers was successfully performed. First, deposition of nanosilver onto electrospun WO{sub 3} nanofibers' surface was done via photoreduction of silver ion under visible or UV light. The resulting hybrid nanofibers not only revealed antibacterial characteristics but also maintained their photocatalytic performance towards methylene blue decomposition. Unexpectedly, the nanofibrous layers prepared from these nanofibers showed superhydrophilicity under a visible light source. The nanofibers might be advantageous in environmental and hygienic nanofiltration under natural light sources, where the self-cleaning characteristics could be valuable in maintenance processes.

  19. Chitin Nanofiber Transparent Paper for Flexible Green Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jungho; Lee, Daewon; Im, Hyeon-Gyun; Han, Yun Cheol; Jeong, Eun Gyo; Rolandi, Marco; Choi, Kyung Cheol; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2016-07-01

    A transparent paper made of chitin nanofibers (ChNF) is introduced and its utilization as a substrate for flexible organic light-emitting diodes is demonstrated. Given its promising macroscopic properties, biofriendly characteristics, and availability of the raw material, the utilization of the ChNF transparent paper as a structural platform for flexible green electronics is envisaged.

  20. Electrospun gelatin/polyurethane blended nanofibers for wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Eun; Heo, Dong Nyoung; Lee, Jung Bok; Kwon, Il Keun [Department of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Ryul; Park, Sang Hyuk [Conservative Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Seong Ho, E-mail: kwoni@khu.ac.k [College of Pharmacy, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    In this study, we prepared a blended nanofiber scaffold using synthetic and natural polymers, polyurethane (PU) and gelatin respectively, using the electrospinning method to prepare a material for wound dressing. In order to confirm the properties of this gelatin/PU blended nanofiber scaffold, we performed scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, contact angle, water uptake, mechanical property, recovery, and degradation tests, and cellular response. The results obtained indicate that the mean diameter of these nanofibers was uniformly electrospun and ranged from 0.4 to 2.1{mu}m. According to the results, when the amount of gelatin in the blended solution decreased, the contact angle increased and water uptake of the scaffold decreased concurrently. In the mechanical tests, the blended nanofibrous scaffolds were elastic, and elasticity increased as the total amount of PU increased. Moreover, as the total amount of gelatin increased, the cell proliferation increased with the same amount of culture time. Therefore, this gelatin/PU blended nanofiber scaffold has potential application for use as a wound dressing.

  1. Effect of bubble size on nanofiber diameter in bubble electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Zhong-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer bubbles are widely used for fabrication of nanofibers. Bubble size affects not only bubble's surface tension, but also fiber's morphology. A mathematical model is established to reveal the effect of bubble size on the spinning process, and the experiment verification shows the theoretical analysis is reliable.

  2. Micro-nanofibers with hierarchical structure by bubbfil-spinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Peng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bubbfil spinning is used to fabricate micro/nanofibers with hierarchical structure. The wall of a polymer film is attenuated unevenly by a blowing air. The burst of the bubble results in film fragments with different thickness, as a result, different sizes of fibers are obtained.

  3. Silver nanowire dopant enhancing piezoelectricity of electrospun PVDF nanofiber web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baozhang; Zheng, Jianming; Xu, Chunye

    2013-08-01

    A highly sensitive flexible piezoelectric material is developed by using a composite nanofibers web of polymer and metal. The nanofibers webs are made by electrospinning a mixed solution of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and silver nanowires (AgNWs) in the co-solvent of dimethyl formamide and acetone. SEM images show that the obtained webs are composed of AgNWs doped PVDF fibers with diameters ranging from 200nm to 500nm. Our FTIR and XRD results indicate that doping AgNWs into PVDF fiber can enhance the contents of beta phase of the PVDF. UV-Vis spectrum shows a slightly red shift at 324 nm and 341 nm after the AgNWs doping into PVDF, proving the presence of interaction between AgNWs and the PVDF polymer chain. The piezoelectric constant d33 of the nanofibers webs tested with a homemade system, reveals a good agreement with FTIR and XRD characteristic, and the highest one is up to 29.8 pC/N for the nanofibers webs containing 1.5% AgNWs, which is close to that of poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE), 77/23). This study may provide a way to develop high-performance flexible sensors.

  4. Electrical properties of single p-hexaphenylene nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Henrichsen, H.H.; Bøggild, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of individual para-hexaphenylene (p6P) nanofibers with typical widths of a few hundred nanometers and heights of a few ten nanometers are investigated. For that purpose we transfer the narofibers onto a lithographically patterned silicon oxide electrode support...

  5. The photophysics of luminescence in multilayered organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Quochi, Francesco; Simbrunner, Clemens

    Periodic deposition of para-hexaphenyl (p6P) and alfa-sexithiophene (6T) molecules on a muscovite mica substrate by hot wall epitaxy results in multilayered, crystalline nanofibers. By varying the relative thicknesses of the constituent materials, the fluorescence spectrum can be tuned within the...

  6. Facile Fabrication of Multifunctional Aramid Nanofiber Films by Spin Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Jing; Liu, Lehao; Zhao, Xing; Shang, Yudong; Zhao, Tingkai; Li, Tiehu

    2016-11-01

    Polymer matrices with excellent mechanical properties, thermal stability and other features are highly demanded for the effective utilization within nanocomposites. Here, we fabricate free-standing aramid nanofiber films via spin coating of an aramid nanofiber/dimethyl sulfoxide solution. Compared with traditional film fabrication methods, this process is time-saving and also able to easily tune the thickness of the films. The resultant films show greatly improved stretchability than that of Kevlar threads and relatively high mechanical strength. Typically, these films with a thickness of 5.5 µm show an ultimate strength of 182 MPa with an ultimate tensile strain of 10.5%. We also apply a finite element modeling to simulate the strain and strength distributions of the films under uniaxial tension, and the results of the simulation are in accordance with the experimental data. Furthermore, the aramid nanofiber films exhibit outstanding thermostability (decomposition at 550 °C under N2 atmosphere and 500 °C in air) and chemical inertness, which would endure acid and alkali. The simple method demonstrated here provides an important way to prepare high-performance aramid nanofiber films for designing new composite systems.

  7. Spontaneous Four-Wave Mixing in an Irregular Nanofiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukhin A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The features of biphotons states generated via spontaneous four-wave mixing in nanofibers with a variable cross-section are studied. The spectral amplitude of the biphoton field is calculated and the effects of interference and phase modulation of the biphoton field in such structures is discussed.

  8. Chemical filtration of Cr (VI) with electrospun chitosan nanofiber membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Li, Yanxiang; Yang, Chuanfang

    2016-04-20

    Chitosan nanofibers (average diameter of 75nm) were electrospun on polyester (PET) scrim to form composite nanofiber membranes with controlled pore size. The membranes were then stacked as a membrane bed for chemical filtration of Cr (VI) of 1-5mg/L. The performance of the bed with respect to loading capacity at breakthrough, bed saturation and utilization efficiency were carefully investigated. The results showed that while these three parameters were dependent on pH, flow rate, flow distribution and packed pattern of the membrane, the latter two were less affected by feed Cr (VI) concentration and bed length. The maximum bed loading capacity for 1mg/L Cr (VI) filtration at breakthrough was found to be 16.5mg-chromium/g-chitosan, higher than the static adsorption capacity of 11.0mg-chromium/g-chitosan using nanofiber mats, indicating the membranes' better potential for dynamic adsorption. The minimum bed length required to avoid breakthrough was determined to be three layers of stacked membranes with nanofiber deposition density of 1g/m(2) by applying bed depth service time (BDST) model.

  9. Dislocation Starvation and Exhaustion Hardening in Mo-alloy Nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisholm, Claire [University of California, Berkeley & LBNL; Bei, Hongbin [ORNL; Lowry, M. B. [University of California, Berkeley; Oh, Jason [Hysitron, Inc., MN; Asif, S.A. Syed [Hysitron, Inc., MN; Warren, O. [Hysitron, Inc., MN; Shan, Zhiwei [Xi' an Jiaotong University, China & Hysitron, Inc., MN; George, Easo P [ORNL; Minor, Andrew [University of California, Berkeley & LBNL

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of defects in Mo alloy nanofibers with initial dislocation densities ranging from 0 to 1.6 1014 m2 were studied using an in situ push-to-pull device in conjunction with a nanoindenter in a transmission electron microscope. Digital image correlation was used to determine stress and strain in local areas of deformation. When they had no initial dislocations the Mo alloy nanofibers suffered sudden catastrophic elongation following elastic deformation to ultrahigh stresses. At the other extreme fibers with a high dislocation density underwent sustained homogeneous deformation after yielding at much lower stresses. Between these two extremes nanofibers with intermediate dislocation densities demonstrated a clear exhaustion hardening behavior, where the progressive exhaustion of dislocations and dislocation sources increases the stress required to drive plasticity. This is consistent with the idea that mechanical size effects ( smaller is stronger ) are due to the fact that nanostructures usually have fewer defects that can operate at lower stresses. By monitoring the evolution of stress locally we find that exhaustion hardening causes the stress in the nanofibers to surpass the critical stress predicted for self-multiplication, supporting a plasticity mechanism that has been hypothesized to account for the rapid strain softening observed in nanoscale bcc materials at high stresses.

  10. Structure and properties of carbon nanofibers. application as electrocatalyst support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. del Rio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to gain an insight into the physical-chemical properties of carbon nanofibers and the relationship between those properties and the electrocatalytic behavior when used as catalyst support for their application in fuel cells.

  11. Stability of β-carotene in polyethylene oxide electrospun nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinado, I.; Mason, M.; Romano, A.; Biasioli, F.; Scampicchio, M.

    2016-05-01

    β-carotene (βc) was successfully incorporated into electrospun nanofibers of poly-(ethylene oxide) (PEO) with the aim of prolonging its shelf life and thermal stability. The physical and thermal properties of the βc-PEO-nanofibers were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), color analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The nanofibers of PEO and βc-PEO exhibited average fiber diameters of 320 ± 46 and 230 ± 21 nm, with colorimetric coordinates L* = 95.7 ± 2.4 and 89.4 ± 4.6 and b* = -0.5 ± 0.1 and 6.2 ± 3.0 respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis coupled with Proton Transfer-Mass Spectroscopy (TGA/PTR-ms) demonstrated that coated βc inside PEO nanofibers increased thermal stability when compared to standard βc in powder form. In addition, β-carotene in the membranes showed higher stability during storage when compared with β-carotene in solution with a decrease in concentration of 57 ± 4% and 70 ± 2% respectively, thus should extend the shelf life of this compound. Also, TGA coupled with PTR-MS resulted in a promising technique to online-monitoring thermal degradation.

  12. Electrospun propolis/polyurethane composite nanofibers for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong In [Department of Bio-nano System Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Pant, Hem Raj, E-mail: hempant@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bio-nano System Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Engineering Science and Humanities, Pulchowk Campus, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu (Nepal); Research Institute for Next Generation, Kalanki, Kathmandu (Nepal); Sim, Hyun-Jaung [Department of Bioactive Material Science, Research Center of Bioactive Material, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Chonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Min [Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Science, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Cheol Sang, E-mail: chskim@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bio-nano System Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    Tissue engineering requires functional polymeric membrane for adequate space for cell migration and attachment within the nanostructure. Therefore, biocompatible propolis loaded polyurethane (propolis/PU) nanofibers were successfully prepared using electrospinning of propolis/PU blend solution. Here, composite nanofibers were subjected to detailed analysis using electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and mechanical properties and water contact angle measurement. FE-SEM images revealed that the composite nanofibers became point-bonded with increasing amounts of propolis in the blend due to its adhesive properties. Incorporation of small amount of propolis through PU matrix could improve the hydrophilicity and mechanical strength of the fibrous membrane. In order to assay the cytocompatibility and cell behavior on the composite scaffolds, fibroblast cells were seeded on the matrix. Results suggest that the incorporation of propolis into PU fibers could increase its cell compatibility. Moreover, composite nanofibers have effective antibacterial activity. Therefore, as-synthesized nanocomposite fibrous mat has great potentiality in wound dressing and skin tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Sufficient amount of propolis is simply loaded through PU fibers. • Propolis increases the hydrophilicity and mechanical properties of PU fibers. • Composite mat shows excellent antibacterial activity. • Small amount of propolis can enhance the cell compatibility of PU fibers.

  13. Ultralight, scalable, and high-temperature–resilient ceramic nanofiber sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haolun; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Ning; Li, Yan; Feng, Xue; Huang, Ya; Zhao, Chunsong; Liu, Zhenglian; Fang, Minghao; Ou, Gang; Gao, Huajian; Li, Xiaoyan; Wu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Ultralight and resilient porous nanostructures have been fabricated in various material forms, including carbon, polymers, and metals. However, the development of ultralight and high-temperature resilient structures still remains extremely challenging. Ceramics exhibit good mechanical and chemical stability at high temperatures, but their brittleness and sensitivity to flaws significantly complicate the fabrication of resilient porous ceramic nanostructures. We report the manufacturing of large-scale, lightweight, high-temperature resilient, three-dimensional sponges based on a variety of oxide ceramic (for example, TiO2, ZrO2, yttria-stabilized ZrO2, and BaTiO3) nanofibers through an efficient solution blow-spinning process. The ceramic sponges consist of numerous tangled ceramic nanofibers, with densities varying from 8 to 40 mg/cm3. In situ uniaxial compression in a scanning electron microscope showed that the TiO2 nanofiber sponge exhibits high energy absorption (for example, dissipation of up to 29.6 mJ/cm3 in energy density at 50% strain) and recovers rapidly after compression in excess of 20% strain at both room temperature and 400°C. The sponge exhibits excellent resilience with residual strains of only ~1% at 800°C after 10 cycles of 10% compression strain and maintains good recoverability after compression at ~1300°C. We show that ceramic nanofiber sponges can serve multiple functions, such as elasticity-dependent electrical resistance, photocatalytic activity, and thermal insulation. PMID:28630915

  14. Synthesis of Carbon Nanofibers on Large Woven Cloth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotanjac, Z.; Lefferts, L.; Koissin, V.; Warnet, L.; Akkerman, R.

    2015-01-01

    This experimental study aims at the in situ growth of carbon nano-fibers (CNFs) on relatively large (25 × 30 cm2) single-layer carbon-fiber fabrics. It is shown that CNFs can be grown with the distribution potentially suitable for a future use in polymer-matrix composite materials. Details of tuning

  15. Recent prospective of nanofiber scaffolds fabrication approaches for skin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi-Aghkand, Fateme; Gholizadeh-Ghaleh Aziz, Shiva; Panahi, Yunes; Daraee, Hadis; Gorjikhah, Fateme; Gholizadeh-Ghaleh Aziz, Sara; Hsanzadeh, Arash; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-11-01

    The largest organ of human body is skin, which acting as a barrier with immunologic, sensorial and protective functions. It is always in exposure to the external environment, which can result many different types of damage and injury with loss of variable volumes of extracellular matrix (ECM). For the treatment of skin lesions and damages, several approaches are now accessible, such as the application of allografts, autografts, and tissue-engineered substitutes, wound dressings and nanofiber scaffolds approaches. Even though proven clinically effective, these methods are still characterized by main drawbacks such as patient inadequate vascularization, morbidity, the inability to reproduce skin appendages, low adherence to the wound bed and high manufacturing costs. Advanced approaches based on nanofiber scaffolds approaches offer a permanent, viable and effective substitute to explain the drawbacks of skin regeneration and repair by combining growth factors, cells, and biomaterials and advanced biomanufacturing methods. This review details recent advances of nanofiber scaffolds in skin regeneration and repair strategies, and describes a synthesis method of nanofiber scaffolds.

  16. Preparation of Electrically Conductive Polystyrene/Carbon Nanofiber Nanocomposite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luyi; O'Reilly, Jonathan Y.; Tien, Chi-Wei; Sue, Hung-Jue

    2008-01-01

    A simple and effective approach to prepare conductive polystyrene/carbon nanofiber (PS/CNF) nanocomposite films via a solution dispersion method is presented. Inexpensive CNF, which has a structure similar to multi-walled carbon nanotubes, is chosen as a nanofiller in this experiment to achieve conductivity in PS films. A good dispersion is…

  17. Polysaccharide-coated PCL nanofibers for wound dressing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croisier, Florence; Atanasova, Ganka; Poumay, Yves; Jérôme, Christine

    2014-12-01

    Polysaccharide-based nanofibers with a multilayered structure are prepared by combining electrospinning (ESP) and layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition techniques. Charged nanofibers are firstly prepared by electrospinning poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) with a block-copolymer bearing carboxylic acid functions. After deprotonation of the acid groups, the layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolyte polysaccharides, notably chitosan and hyaluronic acid, is used to coat the electrospun fibers. A multilayered structure is achieved by alternating the deposition of the positively charged chitosan with the deposition of a negatively charged polyelectrolyte. The construction of this multilayered structure is followed by Zeta potential measurements, and confirmed by observation of hollow nanofibers resulting from the dissolution of the PCL core in a selective solvent. These novel polysaccharide-coated PCL fiber mats remarkably combine the mechanical resistance typical of the core material (PCL)-particularly in the hydrated state-with the surface properties of chitosan. The control of the nanofiber structure offered by the electrospinning technology, makes the developed process very promising to precisely design biomaterials for tissue engineering. Preliminary cell culture tests corroborate the potential use of such system in wound healing applications.

  18. Highly crystalline MOF-based materials grown on electrospun nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechelany, M.; Drobek, M.; Vallicari, C.; Abou Chaaya, A.; Julbe, A.; Miele, P.

    2015-03-01

    Supported Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) with a high specific surface area are of great interest for applications in gas storage, separation, sensing, and catalysis. In the present work we report the synthesis of a novel composite architecture of MOF materials supported on a flexible mat of electrospun nanofibers. The system, based on three-dimensional interwoven nanofibers, was designed by using a low-cost and scalable multistep synthesis protocol involving a combination of electrospinning and low-temperature atomic layer deposition of oxide materials, and their subsequent solvothermal conversion under either conventional or microwave-assisted heating. This highly versatile approach allows the production of different types of supported MOF crystals with controlled sizes, morphology, orientation and high accessibility.Supported Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) with a high specific surface area are of great interest for applications in gas storage, separation, sensing, and catalysis. In the present work we report the synthesis of a novel composite architecture of MOF materials supported on a flexible mat of electrospun nanofibers. The system, based on three-dimensional interwoven nanofibers, was designed by using a low-cost and scalable multistep synthesis protocol involving a combination of electrospinning and low-temperature atomic layer deposition of oxide materials, and their subsequent solvothermal conversion under either conventional or microwave-assisted heating. This highly versatile approach allows the production of different types of supported MOF crystals with controlled sizes, morphology, orientation and high accessibility. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06640e

  19. Antibacterial polylactic acid/chitosan nanofibers decorated with bioactive glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yi-fan; Akram, Muhammad; Alshemary, Ammarz; Hussain, Rafaqat

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we have presented the structural and in vitro characterization of electrospun polylactic acid (PLA)/Chitosan nanofibers coated with cerium, copper or silver doped bioactive glasses (CeBG/CuBG/AgBG). Bead-free, smooth surfaced nanofibers were successfully prepared by using electrospinning technique. The nanocomposite fibers were obtained using a facile dip-coating method, their antibacterial activities against E. coliE. coli (ATCC 25922 strains) were measured by the disk diffusion method after 24 h of incubation at 37 °C. CeBG and CuBG decorated PLA/Chitosan nanofibers did not develop an inhibition zone against the bacteria. On the other hand, nanofibers coated with AgBG developed an inhibition zone against the bacteria. The as-prepared nanocomposite fibers were immersed in SBF for 1, 3 and 7 days in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) for evaluation of in vitro bioactivity. All samples induced the formation of crystallites with roughly ruffled morphology and the pores of fibers were covered with the extensive growth of crystallites. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) composition analysis showed that the crystallites possessed Ca/P ratio close to 1.67, confirming the good in-vitro bioactivity of the fibers.

  20. Electrospun Nanofiber Scaffolds with Gradations in Fiber Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandalavala, Karl; Jiang, Jiang; Shuler, Franklin D.; Xie, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this protocol is to report a simple method for generating nanofiber scaffolds with gradations in fiber organization and test their possible applications in controlling cell morphology/orientation. Nanofiber organization is controlled with a new fabrication apparatus that enables the gradual decrease of fiber organization in a scaffold. Changing the alignment of fibers is achieved through decreasing deposition time of random electrospun fibers on a uniaxially aligned fiber mat. By covering the collector with a moving barrier/mask, along the same axis as fiber deposition, the organizational structure is easily controlled. For tissue engineering purposes, adipose-derived stem cells can be seeded to these scaffolds. Stem cells undergo morphological changes as a result of their position on the varied organizational structure, and can potentially differentiate into different cell types depending on their locations. Additionally, the graded organization of fibers enhances the biomimicry of nanofiber scaffolds so they more closely resemble the natural orientations of collagen nanofibers at tendon-to-bone insertion site compared to traditional scaffolds. Through nanoencapsulation, the gradated fibers also afford the possibility to construct chemical gradients in fiber scaffolds, and thereby further strengthen their potential applications in fast screening of cell-materials interaction and interfacial tissue regeneration. This technique enables the production of continuous gradient scaffolds, but it also can potentially produce fibers in discrete steps by controlling the movement of the moving barrier/mask in a discrete fashion. PMID:25938562

  1. PREPARATION OF CARBON NANOFIBERS BY POLYMER BLEND TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The polymer blend technique is a novel method to produced carbon nanofibers. In this paper, we have prepared fine carbon fibers and porous carbon materials by this technique, and we will discuss the experiment results by means of SEM, TGA, Element Analysis, etc.

  2. Dynamic in vivo biocompatibility of angiogenic peptide amphiphile nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanaati, Shahram; Webber, Matthew J; Unger, Ronald E; Orth, Carina; Hulvat, James F; Kiehna, Sarah E; Barbeck, Mike; Rasic, Angela; Stupp, Samuel I; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2009-10-01

    Biomaterials that promote angiogenesis have great potential in regenerative medicine for rapid revascularization of damaged tissue, survival of transplanted cells, and healing of chronic wounds. Supramolecular nanofibers formed by self-assembly of a heparin-binding peptide amphiphile and heparan sulfate-like glycosaminoglycans were evaluated here using a dorsal skinfold chamber model to dynamically monitor the interaction between the nanofiber gel and the microcirculation, representing a novel application of this model. We paired this model with a conventional subcutaneous implantation model for static histological assessment of the interactions between the gel and host tissue. In the static analysis, the heparan sulfate-containing nanofiber gels were found to persist in the tissue for up to 30 days and revealed excellent biocompatibility. Strikingly, as the nanofiber gel biodegraded, we observed the formation of a de novo vascularized connective tissue. In the dynamic experiments using the dorsal skinfold chamber, the material again demonstrated good biocompatibility, with minimal dilation of the microcirculation and only a few adherent leukocytes, monitored through intravital fluorescence microscopy. The new application of the dorsal skinfold model corroborated our findings from the traditional static histology, demonstrating the potential use of this technique to dynamically evaluate the biocompatibility of materials. The observed biocompatibility and development of new vascularized tissue using both techniques demonstrates the potential of these angiogenesis-promoting materials for a host of regenerative strategies.

  3. Silver-functionalized carbon nanofiber composite electrodes for ibuprofen detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manea, F.; Motoc, S.; Pop, A.; Remes, A.; Schoonman, J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare and characterize two types of silver-functionalized carbon nanofiber (CNF) composite electrodes, i.e., silver-decorated CNF-epoxy and silver-modified natural zeolite-CNF-epoxy composite electrodes suitable for ibuprofen detection in aqueous solution. Ag carbon nan

  4. Needleless Electrospinning of Uniform Nanofibers Using Spiral Coil Spinnerets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl alcohol nanofibers were prepared by a needleless electrospinning technique using a rotating spiral wire coil as spinneret. The influences of coil dimension (e.g., coil length, coil diameter, spiral distance, and wire diameter and operating parameters (e.g., applied voltage and spinning distance on electrospinning process, nanofiber diameter, and fiber productivity were examined. It was found that the coil dimension had a considerable influence on the nanofiber production rate, but minor effect on the fiber diameter. The fiber production rate increased with the increased coil length or coil diameter, or the reduced spiral distance or wire diameter. Higher applied voltage or shorter collecting distance also improved the fiber production rate but had little influence on the fiber diameter. Compared with the conventional needle electrospinning, the coil electrospinning produced finer fibers with a narrower diameter distribution. A finite element method was used to analyze the electric field on the coil surface and in electrospinning zone. It was revealed that the high electric field intensity was concentrated on the coil surface, and the intensity was highly dependent on the coil dimension, which can be used to explain the electrospinning performances of coils. In addition, PAN nanofibers were prepared using the same needleless electrospinning technique to verify the improvement in productivity.

  5. Morphological Characterization of Nanofibers: Methods and Application in Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Širc

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical applications such as wound dressing for skin regeneration, stem cell transplantation, or drug delivery require special demands on the three-dimensional porous scaffolds. Besides the biocompatibility and mechanical properties, the morphology is the most important attribute of the scaffold. Specific surface area, volume, and size of the pores have considerable effect on cell adhesion, growth, and proliferation. In the case of incorporated biologically active substances, their release is also influenced by the internal structure of nanofibers. Although many scientific papers are focused on the preparation of nanofibers and evaluation of biological tests, the morphological characterization was described just briefly as service methods. The aim of this paper is to summarize the methods applicable for morphological characterization of nanofibers and supplement it by the results of our research. Needleless electrospinning technique was used to prepare nanofibers from polylactide, poly(ε-caprolactone, gelatin, and polyamide. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the fiber diameters and to reveal eventual artifacts in the nanofibrous structure. Nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements were employed to measure the specific surface areas. Mercury porosimetry was used to determine total porosities and compare pore size distributions of the prepared samples.

  6. Organic nanofiber-loaded surface plasmon-polariton waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, Ilya; Fiutowski, Jacek; Tavares, Luciana;

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of organic nanofibers, composed of self-assembled organic molecules, as a dielectric medium for dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides at near-infrared wavelengths. We successfully exploit a metallic grating coupler to excite the waveguiding mode and charact...

  7. Reducing bleaching effects in organic nanofibers by coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Rubahn, Horst-Günter;

    Para-hexaphenylene (p-6P) organic nanofibers emit polarized, blue light upon UV excitation with a peak wavelength of the emitted light of 425 nm [1] and a spatially anisotropic distribution of the emitted light [2]. These features could enable future (opto-)electronic applications [3], since, for...

  8. Preparation of Biopolymeric Nanofiber Containing Silica and Antibiotic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bagheri Pebdeni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The biocompatible and biodegradable polymer nanofiber with high potential for anti-bacterial coating are used for: multi-functional membranes, tissue engineering, wound dressings, drug delivery, artificial organs, vascular grafts and etc. Electrospinning nanofiber made of scaffolding due to characteristics such as high surface to volume ratio, high porosity and very fine pores are used for a wide range of applications. In this study, polymer composite nanofiber Silica/chitosan/poly (ethylene oxide /cefepime antibiotic synthesis and antibacterial properties will be discussed. The optimum conditions for preparation of electrospun nanofiber were: voltage; 21 kV, feed rate; 0.5 mL/h, nozzle-collector distance; 10 cm, and chitosan/poly(ethylene oxide weight ratio 90:10 and the volume ratio of chitosan/silica is 70:30.  The antibacterial activity of composite scaffolds were tested by agar plate method by two type bacteria including Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. With the addition of the silica to chitosan, the hybrid was more biodegradable and improves the mechanical properties of biopolymer.

  9. From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2010-10-01

    The conference 'From DNA-Inspired Physics to Physics-Inspired Biology' (1-5 June 2009, International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy) that myself and two former presidents of the American Biophysical Society—Wilma Olson (Rutgers University) and Adrian Parsegian (NIH), with the support of an ICTP team (Ralf Gebauer (Local Organizer) and Doreen Sauleek (Conference Secretary)), have organized was intended to establish stronger links between the biology and physics communities on the DNA front. The relationships between them were never easy. In 1997, Adrian published a paper in Physics Today ('Harness the Hubris') summarizing his thoughts about the main obstacles for a successful collaboration. The bottom line of that article was that physicists must seriously learn biology before exploring it and even having an interpreter, a friend or co-worker, who will be cooperating with you and translating the problems of biology into a physical language, may not be enough. He started his story with a joke about a physicist asking a biologist: 'I want to study the brain. Tell me something about it!' Biologist: 'First, the brain consists of two parts, and..' Physicist: 'Stop. You have told me too much.' Adrian listed a few direct avenues where physicists' contributions may be particularly welcome. This gentle and elegantly written paper caused, however, a stormy reaction from Bob Austin (Princeton), published together with Adrian's notes, accusing Adrian of forbidding physicists to attack big questions in biology straightaway. Twelve years have passed and many new developments have taken place in the biologist-physicist interaction. This was something I addressed in my opening conference speech, with my position lying somewhere inbetween Parsegian's and Austin's, which is briefly outlined here. I will first recall certain precepts or 'dogmas' that fly in the air like Valkyries, poisoning those relationships. Since the early seventies when I was a first year Ph

  10. Ordered Nucleation Sites for the Growth of Zinc Oxide Nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Ginley, D.S.; Shaheen, S.

    2006-01-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) offer a promising route to low cost photovoltaic (PV) technology that can be inexpensively manufactured on a large scale for use in power generation and commercial products. Solar power conversion efficiencies of laboratory scale OPV devices have recently reached ~5%; however, projected efficiencies of at least 10% will be required for commercialization. An analogous approach that has arisen recently that can potentially increase efficiencies employs metal oxide semiconductors as the electron acceptor, creating a hybrid organic-inorganic device. This approach offers the advantage that the conduction band of the oxide can be tuned in a systematic way through doping, thus potentially achieving higher photovoltages in the device. Additionally, nanostructures of these materials can be easily grown from precursor solutions, providing a technique to precisely control the nanoscale geometry. This work focuses on using ZnO, which is known to have high electron mobility (>100 cm2/Vs), as the electron acceptor. Nanofibers of ZnO can be grown from precursors such as zinc acetate or zinc nitrate to form arrays of nanofibers into which a conjugated polymer can be intercalated to form a composite PV device. The morphology of the nanofiber array is critical to the performance of the device, but current methods of nanofiber growth from a flat, polycrystalline nucleation layer allow for little morphological control. To overcome this limitation, we have created ordered arrays of ZnO nucleation sites with controllable size and spacing. Toluene solutions of diblock copolymer micelles with ZnCl2 incorporated into the micellar cores were spin-coated onto glass substrates and etched with an O2 plasma to yield hexagonally ordered arrays of ZnO nanoparticles that functioned as nucleation sites. Changing the concentration of ZnCl2 and the molecular weight and ratio of the diblock copolymer resulted in systematic variation in the size and spacing of the

  11. Surface-functionalized electrospun nanofibers for tissue engineering and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyuk Sang; Kim, Taek Gyoung; Park, Tae Gwan

    2009-10-05

    Electrospun nanofibers with a high surface area to volume ratio have received much attention because of their potential applications for biomedical devices, tissue engineering scaffolds, and drug delivery carriers. In order to develop electrospun nanofibers as useful nanobiomaterials, surfaces of electrospun nanofibers have been chemically functionalized for achieving sustained delivery through physical adsorption of diverse bioactive molecules. Surface modification of nanofibers includes plasma treatment, wet chemical method, surface graft polymerization, and co-electrospinning of surface active agents and polymers. A variety of bioactive molecules including anti-cancer drugs, enzymes, cytokines, and polysaccharides were entrapped within the interior or physically immobilized on the surface for controlled drug delivery. Surfaces of electrospun nanofibers were also chemically modified with immobilizing cell specific bioactive ligands to enhance cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation by mimicking morphology and biological functions of extracellular matrix. This review summarizes surface modification strategies of electrospun polymeric nanofibers for controlled drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  12. Highly Sensitive Local Surface Plasmon Resonance in Anisotropic Au Nanoparticles Deposited on Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanari Saigusa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the facile and high-throughput fabrication method of anisotropic Au nanoparticles with a highly sensitive local surface plasmon resonance (LPR using cylindrical nanofibers as substrates. The substrates consisting of nanofibers were prepared by the electrospinning of poly(vinylidene fluoride (PVDF. The Au nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of electrospun nanofibers by vacuum evaporation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a curved Au island structure on the surface of cylindrical nanofibers. Polarized UV-visible extinction spectroscopy showed anisotropy in their LPR arising from the high surface curvature of the nanofiber. The LPR of the Au nanoparticles on the thinnest nanofiber with a diameter of ~100 nm showed maximum refractive index (RI sensitivity over 500 nm/RI unit (RIU. The close correlation between the fiber diameter dependence of the RI sensitivity and polarization dependence of the LPR suggests that anisotropic Au nanoparticles improve RI sensitivity.

  13. Fabrication and Characterization of Electrospun Wool Keratin/Poly(vinyl alcohol Blend Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wool keratin/poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA blend nanofibers were fabricated using the electrospinning method in formic acid solutions with different weight ratios of keratin to PVA. The resultant blend nanofibers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA, and tensile test. SEM images showed that the diameter of the blend nanofibers was affected by the content of keratin in blend solution. FTIR and XRD analyses data demonstrated that there were good interactions between keratin and PVA in the blended nanofibers caused by possibly hydrogen bonds. The TGA study revealed that the thermal stability of the blend nanofibers was between those of keratin and PVA. Tensile test indicated that the addition of PVA was able to improve the mechanical properties of the electrospun nanofibers.

  14. Organic nanofibers integrated by transfer technique in field-effect transistor devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Thilsing-Hansen, Kasper;

    2011-01-01

    The electrical properties of self-assembled organic crystalline nanofibers are studied by integrating these on field-effect transistor platforms using both top and bottom contact configurations. In the staggered geometries, where the nanofibers are sandwiched between the gate and the source-drain...... light on the charge injection and transport properties for such organic nanostructures and thus constitute a significant step forward towards a nanofiber-based light-emitting device.......-drain electrodes, a better electrical conduction is observed compared to the coplanar geometry where the nanofibers are placed over the gate and the source-drain electrodes. Qualitatively different output characteristics were observed for top and bottom contact devices reflecting the significantly different...... contact resistances. Bottom contact devices are dominated by contact effects while the top contact device characteristics are determined by the nanofiber bulk properties. It is found that the contact resistance is lower for crystalline nanofibers when compared to amorphous thin films. These results shed...

  15. Fabrication and characterization of silver- and copper-coated Nylon 6 forcespun nanofibers by thermal evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihut, Dorina M., E-mail: dorinamm@yahoo.com; Lozano, Karen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas Pan American, 1201 W University Drive, Edinburg, Texas 78539 (United States); Foltz, Heinrich [Department of Electrical Engineering, The University of Texas Pan American, 1201 W University Drive, Edinburg, Texas 78539 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Silver and copper nanoparticles were deposited as thin films onto substrates consisting of Nylon 6 nanofibers manufactured using forcespinning{sup ®} equipment. Different rotational speeds were used to obtain continuous nanofibers of various diameters arranged as nonwoven mats. The Nylon 6 nanofibers were collected as successive layers on frames, and a high-vacuum thermal evaporation method was used to deposit the silver and copper thin films on the nanofibers. The structures were investigated using scanning electron microscopy–scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and electrical resistance measurements. The results indicate that evaporated silver and copper nanoparticles were successfully deposited on Nylon 6 nanofibers as thin films that adhered well to the polymer substrate while the native morphology of the nanofibers were preserved, and electrically conductive nanostructures were achieved.

  16. Electrical properties of in-situ grown and transferred organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Hansen, Roana Melina de; Madsen, Morten; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Para-hexaphenylene (p6P) molecules have the ability to self-assemble into organic nanofibers, which exhibit a range of interesting optical and optoelectronic properties such as intense, polarized luminescence, waveguiding and lasing. The nanofibers are typically grown on specific single...... of the nanofibers can be manipulated by structuring the gold surface prior to parahexaphenylene (p6P) deposition. In this work it is demonstrated, how such organic nanofiber growth can be controlled by modifying the design of the underlying gold structures prior to growth. Here, the investigated designs include...... pinning lines and gratings. We demonstrate how gold gratings fabricated on an insulating substrate can enable electrical contact to in-situ grown p6P nanofibers. Furthermore, the electrical characteristics of in-situ grown fibers are compared to that of transferred p6P nanofibers. The transferred...

  17. Superhydrophilicity of a nanofiber-covered aluminum surface fabricated via pyrophosphoric acid anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Daiki; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Natsui, Shungo; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2016-12-01

    A superhydrophilic aluminum surface covered by numerous alumina nanofibers was fabricated via pyrophosphoric acid anodizing. High-density anodic alumina nanofibers grow on the bottom of a honeycomb oxide via anodizing in concentrated pyrophosphoric acid. The water contact angle on the nanofiber-covered aluminum surface decreased with time after a 4 μL droplet was placed on the surface, and a superhydrophilic behavior with a contact angle measuring 2.2° was observed within 2 s; this contact angle is considerably lower than those observed for electropolished and porous alumina-covered aluminum surfaces. There was no dependence of the superhydrophilicity on the density of alumina nanofibers fabricated via different constant voltage anodizing conditions. The superhydrophilic property of the surface covered by anodic alumina nanofibers was maintained during an exposure test for 359 h. The quick-drying and snow-sliding behaviors of the superhydrophilic aluminum covered with anodic alumina nanofibers were demonstrated.

  18. Fabrication and durable antibacterial properties of electrospun chitosan nanofibers with silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanan; Liu, Yang; Liao, Nina; Cui, Fuhai; Park, Mira; Kim, Hak-Yong

    2015-08-01

    Non-precipitation chitosan/silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in 1% acetic acid aqueous solution was prepared from chitosan colloidal gel with various contents of silver nitrate via electron beam irradiation (EBI). Electrospun chitosan-based nanofibers decorated with AgNPs were successfully performed by blending poly(vinyl alcohol). The morphology of as-prepared nanofibers and the size of AgNPs in the nanofibers were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The presence of AgNPs in as-obtained nanofibers was also confirmed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, EDX spectrum and metal mapping. Silver ion release behavior indicated that these hybrid nanofibers continually release adequate silver to exhibit antibacterial activity over 16 days. These biocomposite nanofibers showed pronounced antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli).

  19. Electrospun nanofibers composed of poly({epsilon}-caprolactone) and polyethylenimine for tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jang Ho [Department of Biosystems and Biomaterials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Choung, Pill-Hoon [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Tooth Bioengineering National Research Lab, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Yong [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Ki Taek; Son, Hyun Mok [Department of Biosystems and Biomaterials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Choung, Yun-Hoon [Department of Otolaryngology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, 443-721 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chong-Su, E-mail: chocs@plaza.snu.ac.kr [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jong Hoon, E-mail: jchung@snu.ac.kr [Department of Biosystems and Biomaterials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-01

    Poly({epsilon}-caprolactone) (PCL) electrospun nanofibers have been reported as a scaffold for tissue engineering application. However, high hydrophobicity of PCL limits use of functional scaffold. In this study, PCL/polyethylenimine (PEI) blend electrospun nanofibers were prepared to overcome the limitation of PCL ones because the PEI as a cationic polymer can increase cell adhesion and can improve the electrospinnability of PCL. The structure, mechanical properties and biological activity of the PCL/PEI electrospun nanofibers were studied. The diameters of the PCL/PEI nanofibers ranged from 150.4 {+-} 33 to 220.4 {+-} 32 nm. The PCL/PEI nanofibers showed suitable mechanical properties with adequate porosity and increased hydrophilic behavior. The cell adhesion and cell proliferation of PCL nanofibers were increased by blending with PEI due to the hydrophilic properties of PEI.

  20. Highly eccentric inspirals into a black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Osburn, Thomas; Evans, Charles R

    2015-01-01

    We model the inspiral of a compact stellar-mass object into a massive non-rotating black hole including all dissipative and conservative first-order-in-the-mass-ratio effects on the orbital motion. The techniques we develop allow inspirals with initial eccentricities as high as $e\\sim0.8$ and initial separations as large as $\\sim 100M$ to be evolved through many thousands of orbits up to the onset of the plunge into the black hole. The inspiral is computed using an osculating elements scheme driven by a hybridized self-force model, which combines Lorenz-gauge self-force results with highly accurate flux data from a Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli code. The high accuracy of our hybrid self-force model allows the orbital phase of the inspirals to be tracked to within $\\sim0.1$ radians or better. The difference between self-force models and inspirals computed in the radiative approximation is quantified.

  1. Mechanical properties and cellular response of novel electrospun nanofibers for ligament tissue engineering: Effects of orientation and geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Hannah M; Kelly, Daniel J; Popat, Ketul C; Trujillo, Nathan A; Dunne, Nicholas J; McCarthy, Helen O; Haut Donahue, Tammy L

    2016-08-01

    Electrospun nanofibers are a promising material for ligamentous tissue engineering, however weak mechanical properties of fibers to date have limited their clinical usage. The goal of this work was to modify electrospun nanofibers to create a robust structure that mimics the complex hierarchy of native tendons and ligaments. The scaffolds that were fabricated in this study consisted of either random or aligned nanofibers in flat sheets or rolled nanofiber bundles that mimic the size scale of fascicle units in primarily tensile load bearing soft musculoskeletal tissues. Altering nanofiber orientation and geometry significantly affected mechanical properties; most notably aligned nanofiber sheets had the greatest modulus; 125% higher than that of random nanofiber sheets; and 45% higher than aligned nanofiber bundles. Modifying aligned nanofiber sheets to form aligned nanofiber bundles also resulted in approximately 107% higher yield stresses and 140% higher yield strains. The mechanical properties of aligned nanofiber bundles were in the range of the mechanical properties of the native ACL: modulus=158±32MPa, yield stress=57±23MPa and yield strain=0.38±0.08. Adipose derived stem cells cultured on all surfaces remained viable and proliferated extensively over a 7 day culture period and cells elongated on nanofiber bundles. The results of the study suggest that aligned nanofiber bundles may be useful for ligament and tendon tissue engineering based on their mechanical properties and ability to support cell adhesion, proliferation, and elongation.

  2. Surface modification of polyvinyl alcohol/malonic acid nanofibers by gaseous dielectric barrier discharge plasma for glucose oxidase immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshari, Esmail, E-mail: e.afshari@mail.sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, 1983963113 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mazinani, Saeedeh [Amirkabir Nanotechnology Research Institute (ANTRI), Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ranaei-Siadat, Seyed-Omid [Protein Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, 1983963113 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghomi, Hamid [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, 1983963113 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We fabricated polyvinyl alcohol/malonic acid nanofibers using electrospinning. • The surface nanofibers were modified by gaseous (air, nitrogen, CO{sub 2} and argon) dielectric barrier discharge. • Among them, air plasma had the most significant effect on glucose oxidase immobilization. • Chemical analysis showed that after modification of nanofibers by air plasma, the carboxyl group increased. • After air plasma treatment, reusability and storage stability of glucose oxidase immobilized on nanofibers improved. - Abstract: Polymeric nanofiber prepares a suitable situation for enzyme immobilization for variety of applications. In this research, we have fabricated polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/malonic acid nanofibers using electrospinning. After fabrication of nanofibers, the effect of air, nitrogen, CO{sub 2}, and argon DBD (dielectric barrier discharge) plasmas on PVA/malonic acid nanofibers were analysed. Among them, air plasma had the most significant effect on glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilization. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrum analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results revealed that in case of air plasma modified nanofibers, the carboxyl groups on the surface are increased. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that, after GOx immobilization, the modified nanofibers with plasma has retained its nanofiber structure. Finally, we analysed reusability and storage stability of GOx immobilized on plasma modified and unmodified nanofibers. The results were more satisfactory for modified nanofibers with respect to unmodified ones.

  3. Polymer-inorganic core-shell nanofibers by electrospinning and atomic layer deposition: flexible nylon-ZnO core-shell nanofiber mats and their photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayaci, Fatma; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Donmez, Inci; Biyikli, Necmi; Uyar, Tamer

    2012-11-01

    Polymer-inorganic core-shell nanofibers were produced by two-step approach; electrospinning and atomic layer deposition (ALD). First, nylon 6,6 (polymeric core) nanofibers were obtained by electrospinning, and then zinc oxide (ZnO) (inorganic shell) with precise thickness control was deposited onto electrospun nylon 6,6 nanofibers using ALD technique. The bead-free and uniform nylon 6,6 nanofibers having different average fiber diameters (∼80, ∼240 and ∼650 nm) were achieved by using two different solvent systems and polymer concentrations. ZnO layer about 90 nm, having uniform thickness around the fiber structure, was successfully deposited onto the nylon 6,6 nanofibers. Because of the low deposition temperature utilized (200 °C), ALD process did not deform the polymeric fiber structure, and highly conformal ZnO layer with precise thickness and composition over a large scale were accomplished regardless of the differences in fiber diameters. ZnO shell layer was found to have a polycrystalline nature with hexagonal wurtzite structure. The core-shell nylon 6,6-ZnO nanofiber mats were flexible because of the polymeric core component. Photocatalytic activity of the core-shell nylon 6,6-ZnO nanofiber mats were tested by following the photocatalytic decomposition of rhodamine-B dye. The nylon 6,6-ZnO nanofiber mat, having thinner fiber diameter, has shown better photocatalytic efficiency due to higher surface area of this sample. These nylon 6,6-ZnO nanofiber mats have also shown structural stability and kept their photocatalytic activity for the second cycle test. Our findings suggest that core-shell nylon 6,6-ZnO nanofiber mat can be a very good candidate as a filter material for water purification and organic waste treatment because of their photocatalytic properties along with structural flexibility and stability.

  4. Control of mechanical properties of chitin nanofiber film using glycerol without losing its characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifuku, Shinsuke; Ikuta, Akiko; Izawa, Hironori; Morimoto, Minoru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-30

    Surface-deacetylated chitin nanofiber films plasticized with glycerol were prepared to control mechanical properties. Nanofiber networks were able to retain excessive glycerol content up to 70% to obtain self-standing film. All films were flexible and highly transparent independent of glycerol content. Glycerol significantly decreased the Young's moduli and tensile strengths, and increased the fracture strain due to its plasticizing effect. At the same time, glycerol did not change the high transparency or the low thermal expansion of the nanofiber film.

  5. Electrospun nanofibers of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)/Eu3+ and its photoluminescence properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Shan Tang; Chang Lu Shao; Shou Zhu Li

    2007-01-01

    Nanofibers of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP)/Eu3+ with diameters of 300-900 nm were prepared by using sol-gel processing and electrospinning technique. The products were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and photoluminescence (PL). The results indicated that, Eu3+ was successfully embedded in the onedimensional hybrid nanofibers, and the PVP/Eu3+ hybrid nanofibers had favorable photoluminescence properties.

  6. The Fabrication and Characterization of Piezoelectric PZT/PVDF Electrospun Nanofiber Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Ji Sun Yun; Chun Kil Park; Young Hun Jeong; Jeong Ho Cho; Jong-Hoo Paik; Sun Hong Yoon; Kyung-Ran Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Piezoelectric nanofiber composites of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymer and PZT (Pb(Zr0.53Ti0.47)O3) ceramics were fabricated by electrospinning. The micro‐ structure of the PZT/PVDF electrospun nanofiber compo‐ sites was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The tensile properties (stress- strain curves) and electrical properties (P-E hysteresis loops) of the PZT/PVDF electrospun nanofiber composites w...

  7. Mathematical Models of Bead-Spring Jets during Electrospinning for Fabrication of Nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    Thananchai DASRI

    2012-01-01

    Electrospinning is a popular technique to produce structures in the form of nanofibers. These nanofibers can be used for many applications such as filtration composites, insulator and energy storage. The technique is based on the electrostatic force that acts on the polymeric solution. However, during the electrospinning process the liquid jet shows unstable behavior. This problem causes the random formation of nanofibers. This article focuses on the mathematical models to describe the dynami...

  8. Silica-based nanofibers for electrospun ultra-thin layer chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Toni E; Olesik, Susan V

    2014-10-17

    Nanofibrous silica-based stationary phases for electrospun ultra-thin layer chromatography (E-UTLC) are described. Nanofibers were produced by electrospinning a solution of silica nanoparticles dispersed in polyvinylpyrrolidone solutions to create composite silica/polymer nanofibers. Stationary phases were created from as-spun nanofibers, or the nanofibers were heated either to crosslink the polyvinylpyrrolidone or to calcine and selectively remove the polymer. As-spun, crosslinked, and calcined nanofibers with similar mat thicknesses (23-25 μm) were evaluated as stationary phases for E-UTLC separations of laser dyes and amino acids and compared to commercial silica TLC plates. As-spun nanofiber plates offered fast mobile phase velocities, but like other polymer-based nanofibers, separations were only compatible with techniques using nonsolvents of the polymer. Crosslinked nanofibers were not as limited in terms of chemical stability, but separations produced tailed spot shapes. No limitations in terms of mobile phases, analyte solvents, and visualization techniques were observed for calcined nanofibers. Highly efficient separations of amino acids were performed in 15 mm on calcined nanofiber plates, with observed plate heights as low as 8.6 μm, and plate numbers as large as 1400. Additional alignment of the nanofibers provided shorter analysis times but also larger spot widths. The extension of stationary phases to silica-based nanofibers vastly expands the range of mobile phases, analyte solvents, and visualization techniques which can be used for E-UTLC separations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Carbon-coated Li3 N nanofibers for advanced hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Guanglin; Li, Dan; Chen, Xiaowei; Tan, Yingbin; Tang, Ziwei; Guo, Zaiping; Liu, Huakun; Liu, Zongwen; Yu, Xuebin

    2013-11-20

    3D porous carbon-coated Li3 N nanofibers are successfully fabricated via the electrospinning technique. The as-prepared nanofibers exhibit a highly improved hydrogen-sorption performance in terms of both thermodynamics and kinetics. More interestingly, a stable regeneration can be achieved due to the unique structure of the nanofibers, over 10 cycles of H2 sorption at a temperature as low as 250 °C.

  10. Cavity QED on a nanofiber using a composite photonic crystal cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Yalla, Ramachandrarao; Nayak, Kali P; Hakuta, Kohzo

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate cavity QED conditions in the Purcell regime for single quantum emitters on the surface of an optical nanofiber. The cavity is formed by combining an optical nanofiber and a nanofabricated grating to create a composite photonic crystal cavity. Using this technique, significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate into the nanofiber guided modes is observed for single quantum dots. Our results pave the way for enhanced on-fiber light-matter interfaces with clear applications to quantum networks.

  11. Continuous nanofiber yarns twisted through three-dimensional high-speed swirling airflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Jian-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method is proposed to fabricate continuous twisted nanofiber yarns. Nanofibers are bunched by a double conjugate electrospinning, and then twisted through a three-dimensional high-speed swirling airflow. Its principle and process are analyzed theoretically, and the airflow field inside the nozzle chamber is studied numerically, and mechanical properties of nanofiber yarns at different spinning conditions are systematically discussed.

  12. Novel Continuous Carbon Nanofibers for the Next Generation Lightweight Structural Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Presentations Dzenis, Y., "Novel Continuous Carbon Nanofibers and Nanocomposites", 2006 AFOSR Polymer Matrix Composite Review, Long Beach, April 2006...Dzenis, Y., "Novel Continuous Carbon Nanofibers and Nanocomposites", 2005 AFOSR Polymer Matrix Composite Review, San Diego, August 2005 Dzenis, Y., "Next...34Electrospinning of Nanofibers for Composite Laminates", 2004 Polymer Matrix Composite Review, Long Beach, CA, May 2004 (Presented by Dr. X. Wu) Dzenis

  13. Cavity quantum electrodynamics on a nanofiber using a composite photonic crystal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalla, Ramachandrarao; Sadgrove, Mark; Nayak, Kali P; Hakuta, Kohzo

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate cavity QED conditions in the Purcell regime for single quantum emitters on the surface of an optical nanofiber. The cavity is formed by combining an optical nanofiber and a nanofabricated grating to create a composite photonic crystal cavity. By using this technique, significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate into the nanofiber guided modes is observed for single quantum dots. Our results pave the way for enhanced on-fiber light-matter interfaces with clear applications to quantum networks.

  14. Flexural properties of experimental nanofiber reinforced composite are affected by resin composition and nanofiber/resin ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidotti, Hugo A; Manso, Adriana P; Leung, Victor; do Valle, Accácio L; Ko, Frank; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the influence of different resin blends concentrations and nanofibers mass ratio on flexural properties of experimental Poliacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers reinforced composites. Poliacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers mats were produced by electrospinning and characterized by tensile testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experimental resin-fiber composite beams were manufactured by infiltrating PAN nanofiber mats with varied concentrations of BisGMA-TEGDMA resin blends (BisGMA/TEGDMA: 30/70, 50/50 and 70/30weight%). The mass ratio of fiber to resin varied from 0% to 8%. Beams were cured and stored in water at 37°C. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM) and work of fracture (WF) were evaluated by three-point bending test after 24h storage. The tensile properties of the PAN nanofibers indicated an anisotropic behavior being always higher when tested in a direction perpendicular to the rotation of the collector drum. Except for WF, the other flexural properties (FS and FM) were always higher as the ratio of BisGMA to TEGDMA increased in the neat resin beams. The addition of different ratios of PAN fibers did not affect FS and FM of the composite beams as compared to neat resin beams (p>0.05). However, the addition of fibers significantly increased the WF of the composite beams, and this was more evident for the blends with higher TEGDMA ratios (presin blends did not negatively affect the properties of the composite and resulted in an increase in toughness that is a desirable property for a candidate material for prosthodontics application. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Biologically Inspired Micro-Flight Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, David L.; Waszak, Martin R.

    2003-01-01

    Natural fliers demonstrate a diverse array of flight capabilities, many of which are poorly understood. NASA has established a research project to explore and exploit flight technologies inspired by biological systems. One part of this project focuses on dynamic modeling and control of micro aerial vehicles that incorporate flexible wing structures inspired by natural fliers such as insects, hummingbirds and bats. With a vast number of potential civil and military applications, micro aerial vehicles represent an emerging sector of the aerospace market. This paper describes an ongoing research activity in which mechanization and control concepts for biologically inspired micro aerial vehicles are being explored. Research activities focusing on a flexible fixed- wing micro aerial vehicle design and a flapping-based micro aerial vehicle concept are presented.

  16. String and string-inspired phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    López, J L

    1994-01-01

    In these lectures I review the progress made over the last few years in the subject of string and string-inspired phenomenology. I take a practical approach, thereby concentrating more on explicit examples rather than on formal developments. Topics covered include: introduction to string theory the free-fermionic formulation and its general features, generic conformal field theory properties, SU(5)\\times U(1) GUT and string model-building, supersymmetry breaking, the bottom-up approach to string-inspired models, radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, the determination of the allowed parameter space of supergravity models and the experimental constraints on this class of models, and prospects for direct and indirect tests of string-inspired models. (Lectures delivered at the XXII ITEP International Winter School of Physics, Moscow, Russia, February 22 -- March 2, 1994)

  17. Nature-inspired computation in engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This timely review book summarizes the state-of-the-art developments in nature-inspired optimization algorithms and their applications in engineering. Algorithms and topics include the overview and history of nature-inspired algorithms, discrete firefly algorithm, discrete cuckoo search, plant propagation algorithm, parameter-free bat algorithm, gravitational search, biogeography-based algorithm, differential evolution, particle swarm optimization and others. Applications include vehicle routing, swarming robots, discrete and combinatorial optimization, clustering of wireless sensor networks, cell formation, economic load dispatch, metamodeling, surrogated-assisted cooperative co-evolution, data fitting and reverse engineering as well as other case studies in engineering. This book will be an ideal reference for researchers, lecturers, graduates and engineers who are interested in nature-inspired computation, artificial intelligence and computational intelligence. It can also serve as a reference for relevant...

  18. Compact and Thermosensitive Nature-inspired Micropump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyejeong; Kim, Kiwoong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-10-01

    Liquid transportation without employing a bulky power source, often observed in nature, has been an essential prerequisite for smart applications of microfluidic devices. In this report, a leaf-inspired micropump (LIM) which is composed of thermo-responsive stomata-inspired membrane (SIM) and mesophyll-inspired agarose cryogel (MAC) is proposed. The LIM provides a durable flow rate of 30 μl/h · cm2 for more than 30 h at room temperature without external mechanical power source. By adapting a thermo-responsive polymer, the LIM can smartly adjust the delivery rate of a therapeutic liquid in response to temperature changes. In addition, as the LIM is compact, portable, and easily integrated into any liquid, it might be utilized as an essential component in advanced hand-held drug delivery devices.

  19. Bio-inspired variable structural color materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Xie, Zhuoying; Gu, Hongcheng; Zhu, Cun; Gu, Zhongze

    2012-04-21

    Natural structural color materials, especially those that can undergo reversible changes, are attracting increasing interest in a wide variety of research fields. Inspired by the natural creatures, many elaborately nanostructured photonic materials with variable structural colors were developed. These materials have found important applications in switches, display devices, sensors, and so on. In this critical review, we will provide up-to-date research concerning the natural and bio-inspired photonic materials with variable structural colors. After introducing the variable structural colors in natural creatures, we will focus on the studies of artificial variable structural color photonic materials, including their bio-inspired designs, fabrications and applications. The prospects for the future development of these fantastic variable structural color materials will also be presented. We believe this review will promote the communications among biology, bionics, chemistry, optical physics, and material science (196 references).

  20. Astrophysics of extreme mass ratio inspiral sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hopman, C

    2007-01-01

    Compact remnants on orbits with peri-apses close to the Schwarzschild radius of a massive black hole (MBH) lose orbital energy by emitting gravitational waves (GWs) and spiral in. Scattering with other stars allows successful inspiral of such extreme mass ratio inspiral sources (EMRIs) only within small distances, a < few \\times 0.01 pc from the MBH. The event rate of EMRIs is therefore dominated by the stellar dynamics and content in the inner few \\times 0.01 pc. I discuss the relevant dynamical aspects and resulting estimated event rates of EMRIs. Subjects considered include the loss-cone treatment of inspiral sources; mass segregation; resonant relaxation; and alternative routes to EMRI formation such as tidal binary disruptions, stellar formation in disks and tidal capture of massive main sequence stars. The EMRI event rate is estimated to be of order few \\times 10^2/Gyr per MBH, giving excellent prospects for observation by LISA.

  1. Biologically inspired technologies in NASA's morphing project

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Cox, David E.; Lazos, Barry S.; Waszak, Martin R.; Raney, David L.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Pao, S. Paul

    2003-07-01

    For centuries, biology has provided fertile ground for hypothesis, discovery, and inspiration. Time-tested methods used in nature are being used as a basis for several research studies conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center as a part of Morphing Project, which develops and assesses breakthrough vehicle technologies. These studies range from low drag airfoil design guided by marine and avian morphologies to soaring techniques inspired by birds and the study of small flexible wing vehicles. Biology often suggests unconventional yet effective approaches such as non-planar wings, dynamic soaring, exploiting aeroelastic effects, collaborative control, flapping, and fibrous active materials. These approaches and other novel technologies for future flight vehicles are being studied in NASA's Morphing Project. This paper will discuss recent findings in the aeronautics-based, biologically-inspired research in the project.

  2. Precisely Assembled Nanofiber Arrays as a Platform to Engineer Aligned Cell Sheets for Biofabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vince Beachley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid cell sheet engineering approach was developed using ultra-thin nanofiber arrays to host the formation of composite nanofiber/cell sheets. It was found that confluent aligned cell sheets could grow on uniaxially-aligned and crisscrossed nanofiber arrays with extremely low fiber densities. The porosity of the nanofiber sheets was sufficient to allow aligned linear myotube formation from differentiated myoblasts on both sides of the nanofiber sheets, in spite of single-side cell seeding. The nanofiber content of the composite cell sheets is minimized to reduce the hindrance to cell migration, cell-cell contacts, mass transport, as well as the foreign body response or inflammatory response associated with the biomaterial. Even at extremely low densities, the nanofiber component significantly enhanced the stability and mechanical properties of the composite cell sheets. In addition, the aligned nanofiber arrays imparted excellent handling properties to the composite cell sheets, which allowed easy processing into more complex, thick 3D structures of higher hierarchy. Aligned nanofiber array-based composite cell sheet engineering combines several advantages of material-free cell sheet engineering and polymer scaffold-based cell sheet engineering; and it represents a new direction in aligned cell sheet engineering for a multitude of tissue engineering applications.

  3. Morphology study of nanofibers produced by extraction from polymer blend fibers using image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehghan, Neda; Tavanaie, Mohammad Ali; Payvandy, Pedram [University of Yazd, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    The morphology of nanofibers extracted from the industrial-scale produced polypropylene/polybutylene terephthalate (PP/PBT) blend fibers was studied. To study the morphology and diameter measurements of the nanofibers, image processing method was used, and the results were compared with the results of a conventional visual method. Comparing these two methods indicated the good performance of image processing methods for the measuring of nanofiber diameter. Among the various applied image processing methods, the fuzzy c-means (FCM) method was determined as the best for image thresholding. Additionally, the distance transform method was determined as the best way for measuring nanofiber diameter. According to high regression coefficient (R=0.98) resulting between the draw ratio and nanofibers diameter, the high effectiveness of draw ratio to nanofiber diameter is concluded. The spherical (drop) shapes of the PBT dispersed phase particles were eventually deformed into very thin fibrils during the drawing process. The results of measuring the nanofiber diameters showed that the diameter means of nanofibers varied from 420 nm to 175 nm with the highest draw ratio. Good uniformity for diameter of nanofibers was observed, which had not been observed in previous works.

  4. Electrospinning preparation and electrical and biological properties of ferrocene/poly(vinylpyrrolidone composite nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hong Chai

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanofibers containing ferrocene (Fc have been prepared for the first time by electrospinning. In this paper, Fc was dispersed uniformly throughout the poly(vinypyrrolidone (PVP matrix for the purpose of combining the properties of PVP and Fc. The effects of solvents and Fc concentration on the morphologies and diameters of nanofibers were investigated. In the DMF/ethanol solvent, the morphologies of the obtained nanofibers significantly changed with the increase of Fc concentration. The results demonstrated that the morphologies of the nanofibers could be controlled through adjusting solvents and Fc concentration. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed that the diameters of the obtained composite fibers were about 30–200 nm at different Fc concentrations. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA results confirmed the presence of ferrocene within the PVP nanofibers. X-ray diffraction (XRD results showed that the crystalline structure of Fc in the fibers was amorphous after the electrospinning process. A biological evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of Fc/PVP nanofibers was carried out by using Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli as model organisms. The nanofibers fabricated by this method showed obvious antibacterial activity. Electrochemical properties were characterized based on cyclic voltammetry measurements. The CV results showed redox peaks corresponding to the Fc+/Fc couple, which suggested that Fc molecules encapsulated inside PVP nanofibers retian their electrochemical activity. The properties and facile preparation method make the Fc/PVP nanofibers promising for antibacterial and sensing applications.

  5. Multifunctional Electrospun Nanofibers Incorporated with an Anti-infection Drug and Immobilized with Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shufei

    Electrospinning has been used to fabricate ultrafine fibers with sizes ranging from nano to micrometers. Nanofibers electrospun from biocompatible and biodegradable polymers have been extensively investigated for their potential applications in wound healing and tissue regeneration. These nanofiber materials can be modified to incorporate bioactive molecules, such as antibacterial agents that provide infection control, or functional proteins which promote cell proliferation and tissue reconstruction. Despite the numerous studies on the development and design of nanofibers for biomedical applications, there has been little research on multifunctional nanofibers that are incorporated with both antibacterial drug(s) and bioactive proteins. The objective of the current study is, therefore, to develop nanofibers that are functionalized by several bioactive molecules. In this study, electrospinning was utilized to fabricate nanofibers from biodegradable polymers PLLA (Poly-L-lactide) and the copolymer PLLA-PEG (Polyethylene glycol)-NH2.A water soluble antibiotic drug, Tetracycline Hydrochloride (TCH), was incorporated into the electrospun nanofibers via emulsion electrospinning. The TCH-loaded nanofibers were surface modified to produce functional groups that can be further conjugated with a model protein, Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA).Drug releasing profiles of the medicated nanofibers were monitored and their antimicrobial properties were evaluated. Proteins (BSAs) immobilized on the fiber surface were verified by ATR-FTIR. The number of immobilized BSAs was determined using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The results of the study suggested that this multifunctional nanofibrous material could be a promising material for wound dressing or scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  6. Titanium Carbide Nanofibers-Reinforced Aluminum Compacts, a New Strategy to Enhance Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Abdelrazek Khalil

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available TiC nanofibers reinforced Al matrix composites were produced by High Frequency Induction Heat Sintering (HFIHS.The titanium carbide nanofibers with an average diameter of 90 nm are first prepared by electrospinning technique and high temperature calcination process. A composite solution containing polyacrylonitrile and titanium isopropoxide is first electrospun into the nanofibers, which are subsequently stabilized and then calcined to produce the desired TiC nanofibers. The X-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscopy results show that the main phase of the as-synthesized nanofibers is titanium carbide. The TiC nanofibers is then mixed with the aluminum powders and introduced into high frequency induction heat sintering (HFIHS to produce composites of TiC nanofibers reinforced aluminum matrix. The potential application of the TiC nanofibers reinforced aluminum matrix composites was systematically investigated. 99.5% relative density and around 85 HV (833 MPa Vickers hardness of the Al reinforced with 5 wt % TiC nanofiber has been obtained. Furthermore, the sample of Al contains 5 wt % TiC, has the highest value of compression and yield strength of about 415 and 350 MPa, respectively. The ductility of the Al/5 wt % TiC showed increasing with increasing the TiC contents.

  7. Production of Conductive PEDOT-Coated PVA-GO Composite Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, Nur Afifah; Rahman, Norizah Abdul; Lim, Hong Ngee; Sulaiman, Yusran

    2017-02-01

    Electrically conductive nanofiber is well known as an excellent nanostructured material for its outstanding performances. In this work, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)-coated polyvinyl alcohol-graphene oxide (PVA-GO)-conducting nanofibers were fabricated via a combined method using electrospinning and electropolymerization techniques. During electrospinning, the concentration of PVA-GO solution and the applied voltage were deliberately altered in order to determine the optimized electrospinning conditions. The optimized parameters obtained were 0.1 mg/mL of GO concentration with electrospinning voltage of 15 kV, which displayed smooth nanofibrous morphology and smaller diameter distribution. The electrospun PVA-GO nanofiber mats were further modified by coating with the conjugated polymer, PEDOT, using electropolymerization technique which is a facile approach for coating the nanofibers. SEM images of the obtained nanofibers indicated that cauliflower-like structures of PEDOT were successfully grown on the surface of the electrospun nanofibers during the potentiostatic mode of the electropolymerization process. The conductive nature of PEDOT coating strongly depends on the different electropolymerization parameters, resulting in good conductivity of PEDOT-coated nanofibers. The optimum electropolymerization of PEDOT was at a potential of 1.2 V in 5 min. The electrochemical measurements demonstrated that the fabricated PVA-GO/PEDOT composite nanofiber could enhance the current response and reduce the charge transfer resistance of the nanofiber.

  8. Electrospun ion gel nanofibers for flexible triboelectric nanogenerator: electrochemical effect on output power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Byeong Uk; Kim, Byoung-Joon; Ryu, Jungho; Lee, Joo Yul; Baik, Jeong Min; Hong, Kihyon

    2015-10-01

    A simple fabrication route for ion gel nanofibers in a triboelectric nanogenerator was demonstrated. Using an electrospinning technique, we could fabricate a large-area ion gel nanofiber mat. The triboelectric nanogenerator was demonstrated by employing an ion gel nanofiber and the device exhibited an output power of 0.37 mW and good stability under continuous operation.A simple fabrication route for ion gel nanofibers in a triboelectric nanogenerator was demonstrated. Using an electrospinning technique, we could fabricate a large-area ion gel nanofiber mat. The triboelectric nanogenerator was demonstrated by employing an ion gel nanofiber and the device exhibited an output power of 0.37 mW and good stability under continuous operation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: I. Experimental section. II. FTIR and XRD spectra of ion gel nanofiber. III. Output voltage of TENG with various polymer nanofibers. IV. Output voltage of TENG under different connection types. V. Output voltage of TENG with 20 wt% ion gel nanofibers. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02602d

  9. Novel electrospun gelatin/oxycellulose nanofibers as a suitable platform for lung disease modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Švachová, Veronika, E-mail: xcsvachova@fch.vutbr.cz [Institute of Materials Chemistry, Brno University of Technology (Czech Republic); Vojtová, Lucy [CEITEC – Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology (Czech Republic); SCITEG, a.s., Brno (Czech Republic); Pavliňák, David [Department of Physical Electronics, Masaryk University (Czech Republic); Vojtek, Libor [Institute of Experimental Biology, Masaryk University (Czech Republic); Sedláková, Veronika [Department of Histology and Embryology, Masaryk University (Czech Republic); International Clinical Research, St. Anne' s University Hospital, Brno (Czech Republic); Hyršl, Pavel [Institute of Experimental Biology, Masaryk University (Czech Republic); Alberti, Milan [Department of Physical Electronics, Masaryk University (Czech Republic); Jaroš, Josef; Hampl, Aleš [Department of Histology and Embryology, Masaryk University (Czech Republic); International Clinical Research, St. Anne' s University Hospital, Brno (Czech Republic); Jančář, Josef [Institute of Materials Chemistry, Brno University of Technology (Czech Republic); CEITEC – Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology (Czech Republic); SCITEG, a.s., Brno (Czech Republic)

    2016-10-01

    Novel hydrolytically stable gelatin nanofibers modified with sodium or calcium salt of oxycellulose were prepared by electrospinning method. The unique inhibitory effect of these nanofibers against Escherichia coli bacteria was examined by luminometric method. Biocompatibility of these gelatin/oxycellulose nanofibers with eukaryotic cells was tested using human lung adenocarcinoma cell line NCI-H441. Cells firmly adhered to nanofiber surface, as determined by scanning electron microscopy, and no signs of cell dying were detected by fluorescent live/dead assay. We propose that the newly developed gelatin/oxycellulose nanofibers could be used as promising scaffold for lung disease modeling and anti-cancer drug testing. - Highlights: • Novel hydrolytically stable gelatin nanofibers modified with oxycellulose were prepared by electrospinning. • ATR–FTIR spectroscopy and EDX confirmed the presence of oxycellulose in the nanofibers. • Nanofibers modified with calcium salt of oxycellulose exhibited significant antibacterial properties. • Nanofibers modified with sodium salt of oxycellulose revealed excellent biocompatibility with cell line NCI-H441.

  10. Electrical properties of in-situ grown and transferred organic nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Roana Melina de Oliveira; Madsen, Morten; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Pedersen, Rasmus Haugstrup; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Rubahn, Horst-Guenter

    2010-08-01

    Para-hexaphenylene (p6P) molecules have the ability to self-assemble into organic nanofibers, which exhibit a range of interesting optical and optoelectronic properties such as intense, polarized luminescence, waveguiding and lasing. The nanofibers are typically grown on specific single-crystalline templates, such as muscovite mica, on which mutually parallel nanofibers are self-assembled upon vapor deposition of the organic material under high vacuum conditions. Besides such single-crystalline templates, the nanofibers can also be grown on non-crystalline gold surfaces, on which the orientation of the nanofibers can be manipulated by structuring the gold surface prior to parahexaphenylene (p6P) deposition. In this work it is demonstrated, how such organic nanofiber growth can be controlled by modifying the design of the underlying gold structures prior to growth. Here, the investigated designs include pinning lines and gratings. We demonstrate how gold gratings fabricated on an insulating substrate can enable electrical contact to in-situ grown p6P nanofibers. Furthermore, the electrical characteristics of in-situ grown fibers are compared to that of transferred p6P nanofibers. The transferred nanofibers are initially grown on muscovite mica, and subsequently transferred onto a target substrate by drop casting, and electrodes are applied on top by a special shadow mask technique.

  11. Preparation and Photocatalysis of Mesoporous TiO2 Nanofibers via an Electrospinning Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; YUAN Qing; CHI Yue; SHAO Chang-lu; LI Nan; LI Xiao-tian

    2012-01-01

    Mesoporous TiO2 nanofibers have been synthesized by a new method that combines sol-gel chemistry and electrospinning technique.The obtained mesoporous TiO2 nanofibers were characterized with scanning electron microscopy(SEM),X-ray diffraction(XRD),transmission electron microscopy(TEM) and nitrogen adsorptiondesorption isotherms.The photocatalytic performance was evaluated by the photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B undcr UV light irradiation.The results show that mesoporous TiO2 nanofibers exhibit higher photocatalytic activity compared with nonporous TiO2 nanofibers.

  12. Aligned Electrospun Polyvinyl Pyrrolidone/Poly ɛ-Caprolactone Blend Nanofiber Mats for Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charernsriwilaiwat, Natthan; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2016-02-01

    Electrospun nanofibrous materials are widely used in medical applications such as tissue engineering scaffolds, wound dressing material and drug delivery carriers. For tissue engineering scaffolds, the structure of the nanofiber is similar to extracellular matrix (ECM) which promotes the cell growth and proliferation. In the present study, the aligned nanofiber mats of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) blended poly ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) was successfully generated using electrospinning technique. The morphology of PVP/PCL nanofiber mats were characterized by scanning electron microspore (SEM). The chemical and crystalline structure of PVP/PCL nanofiber mats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and powder X-ray diffactometer (PXRD). The water contact angle of mats was investigated. Cell culture studies using normal human fibroblasts (NHF) were performed to assess cell morphology, cell alignment and cell proliferation. The results indicated that the fiber were in nanometer range. The PVP/PCL was well dispersed in nanofiber mats and was in amorphous form. The water contact angle of PVP/PCL nanofiber mats was lower than PCL nanofiber mats. The PVP/PCL nanofiber mats exhibited good biocompatibility with NHF cells. In summary, the PVP/PCL nanofiber mats had potential to be used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  13. Influence of TiO2 nanofiber additives for high efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyung-Jun; Lee, Jae-Wook; Park, Ju-Young; Kim, Sun-Il

    2011-02-01

    TiO2 nanofibers were prepared from a mixture of titanium-tetra-isopropoxide and poly vinyl pyrrolidone by applying the electrospinning method. The samples were characterized by XRD, FE-SEM, TEM and BET analyses. The diameter of electrospun TiO2 nanofibers is in the range of 70 approximately 160 nm. To improve the short-circuit photocurrent, we added the TiO2 nanofibers in the TiO2 electrode of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). TiO2 nanofibers added in DSSCs can make up to 20% more conversion energy than the conventional DSSC with only TiO2 films only.

  14. Preparation of chitosan nanofibers from completely deacetylated chitosan powder by a downsizing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aklog, Yihun Fantahun; Dutta, Ajoy Kumar; Izawa, Hironori; Morimoto, Minoru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Ifuku, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan nanofibers were easily prepared from fully deacetylated chitosan dry powder using a high-pressure waterjet system. From SEM observation, after 10 cycles of treatment, most of the chitosan had been reduced to homogeneous nanofibers measuring tens of nanometers. On the other hand, further mechanical treatment did not show a significant change. Relative crystallinity of chitosan nanofibers gradually decreased as the number of passes increased since high-pressure waterjet treatment damaged the crystalline region of chitosan nanofibers. The transmittance of the chitosan nanofiber slurry increased steeply, as the number of passes increased, indicating that the chitosan fibers were disintegrated effectively. Viscosity of chitosan nanofiber slurry also showed that the chitosan disintegrated well into nanofibers up to 10 passes. Above 10 passes, disintegration efficiency was saturated. The molecular weights of the nanofibers steeply decreased due to the depolymerization of chitosan by mechanical disintegration. The Young's modulus and tensile strength of chitosan nanofiber sheets were improved as the number of treatments increased, but further treatments deteriorated the tensile strength.

  15. Electrospun Polycaprolactone/Polylactic Acid Nanofibers as an Artificial Nerve Conduit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Ali Khatri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Development of conduits made of biodegradable nanofibers is gaining substantial interest due to their suitability for nerve regeneration. Among all polymeric nanofibers PCL (Poly ?-Caprolactone is distinctively found for mechanical stability and PLLA (Poly (L-Lactic Acid for relatively faster biodegradability. The aim of this study is to investigate blending compatibility between PCL and PLLA and the ability to fabricate nanofibers conduits via electro spinning. The PCL-PLLA nano-fiber tubular made from different blend ratios of PCL-PLLA were electro spun. The electro spun nanofibers were continuously deposited over high speed rotating mandrel to fabricate nanofibers conduit having inner diameter of 2mm and the wall thickness of 55-65µm. The diameters of nano-fibers were between 715-860nm. FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy used to analyze chemical change in the blends of nerve conduits, which revealed that the PCL-PLLA blend nanofiber exhibit characteristic peaks of both PCL and PLLA and was composition dependent. The crystallinity of PCL-PLLA tubes were studied using WAXD (Wide Angle Xray Diffraction. The morphology of nanofibers were investigated under SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope. The mechanical properties of the conduits were also tested; the Young?s modulus obtained for small diameter was 10MPa, twice as high as larger diameter.

  16. Preparation and characterization of Ag nanoparticle-embedded polymer electrospun nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Guoping, E-mail: guoping_dong@163.com; Xiao Xiudi; Liu, Xiaofeng; Qian Bin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (China); Ma Zhijun; Ye Song [Zhejiang University, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials (China); Chen Danping [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (China); Qiu Jianrong, E-mail: jrqiu@zju.edu.c [Zhejiang University, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials (China)

    2010-05-15

    Poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and poly (vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) nanofibers embedding Ag nanoparticles (5-18 nm) have been prepared successfully by electrospinning at room temperature. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Fourier transform IR spectra (FTIR), and Raman scattering were used to characterize the structure and properties of Ag nanoparticle-embedded PVA and PVP nanofibers before and after heat treatment at different temperature. The antibacterial activity of Ag nanoparticle-embedded PVP nanofibers after heat treatment was also tested, which indicated that the biological activity of yeast cells was effectively inhibited by these Ag nanoparticle-embedded PVP nanofibers.

  17. Cells Attachment Property of PVA Hydrogel Nanofibers Incorporating Hyaluronic Acid for Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we report the fabrication and cell affinity studies of the poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/hyaluronic acid (HA) cross-linked nanofibers via electrospinning and post cross-linking. FT-IR and TGA analysis demonstrate that HA is not influenced by acid environment such as HCl vapor during cross-linking, and well incorporated into PVA nanofibers. Swelling behavior and cell adhesion of the PVA/HA hydrogel nanofibers are investigated and compared with pure PVA hydrogel nanofibers. It is expe...

  18. Preparation of poly (Vinyl Alcohol) nanofibers containing silver nanoparticles by gamma-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yun Hye [AMOTECH Co., Ltd., Kimpo (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jun Wha; An, Sung Jun; Youn, Min Ho; Lim, Youn Mook; Gwon, Hui Jeong; Nho, Young Chang [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    PVA nanofibers containing silver nanoparticles were prepared by two methods. The first method was electrospinning of irradiated solution. The prepared PVA/AgNO{sub 3} solution was irradiated by gamma-rays. And then the irradiated solution was electrospun. The second method was irradiation of electrospun nanofibers. Nanofibers prepared by electrospinning of unirradiated PVA/AgNO{sub 3} solution. The morphology of the nanofibers was observed with a SEM, TEM. When the irradiated PVA/AgNO{sub 3} solution were electrospun, the average size of the Ag nanoparticles was increased, but their number was decreased.

  19. (Au/PANA/PVAc) nanofibers as a novel composite matrix for albumin and streptavidin immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golshaei, Rana [University of Kashan, Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Guler, Zeliha [Istanbul Technical University, Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, Maslak, Istanbul 34469 (Turkey); Sarac, Sezai A., E-mail: sarac@itu.edu.tr [Istanbul Technical University, Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, Maslak, Istanbul 34469 (Turkey); Istanbul Technical University, Department of Chemistry and Polymer Science and Technology, Maslak, Istanbul 34469 (Turkey)

    2016-03-01

    A novel electrospun nanofiber mat (Au/PANA/PVAc) consists of (Gold/Poly Anthranilic acid) (Au/PANA) core/shell nanostructures as a support material for protein immobilization that was developed and characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In the core/shells, PANA served carboxyl groups (− COOH) for covalent protein immobilization and Au enhanced the electrochemical properties by acting as tiny conduction centers to facilitate electron transfer. Covalent immobilization of albumin and streptavidin as model proteins onto the (Au/PANA/PVAc) nanofibers was carried out by using 1-ethyl-3-(dimethyl-aminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC)/N-hydroxyl succinimide (NHS) activation. PVAc nanofibers were compared with Au/PANA/PVAc nanofibers before and after protein immobilization. The successful covalent binding of both albumin and streptavidin onto (Au/PANA/PVAc) nanofibers was confirmed by FTIR-ATR, Electron Microscopy/Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy SEM/EDX and Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The nanofibers became resistive due to protein immobilization and the higher charge transfer resistance was observed after higher amount of protein was immobilized. - Highlights: • Au/PANA/PVAc nanofibers with (COOH) groups as a suitable supports for covalent immobilization of proteins. • Increasing of the resistivity of the nanofibers after immobilization of the proteins. • Activation of Au/PANA/PVAc nanofibers by using EDC/NHS.

  20. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  1. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Morrissey, Michael J; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining ground in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension on this work to molecules will be introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for particular applications.

  2. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Síle Nic Chormaic

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications.

  3. Biologically inspired self-organizing networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naoki WAKAMIYA; Kenji LEIBNITZ; Masayuki MURATA

    2009-01-01

    Information networks are becoming more and more complex to accommodate a continuously increasing amount of traffic and networked devices, as well as having to cope with a growing diversity of operating environments and applications. Therefore, it is foreseeable that future information networks will frequently face unexpected problems, some of which could lead to the complete collapse of a network. To tackle this problem, recent attempts have been made to design novel network architectures which achieve a high level of scalability, adaptability, and robustness by taking inspiration from self-organizing biological systems. The objective of this paper is to discuss biologically inspired networking technologies.

  4. Basic fibroblast growth factor-loaded, mineralized biopolymer-nanofiber scaffold improves adhesion and proliferation of rat mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Jung-Ju; Kim, Hae-Won

    2014-02-01

    Nanofibrous matrices are attractive scaffolding platforms for tissue regeneration. Modification of the nanofiber surface, particularly with biological proteins, improves cellular interactions. Here, we loaded basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) onto mineralized nanofibers and investigated the effect on adhesion and proliferation of rat mesenchymal stem cells. bFGF loading was significantly higher on the mineralized nanofiber than on the non-mineralized one. Release of bFGF from the mineralized nanofibers was continuous over 2 weeks. Cells cultured on the bFGF-loaded nanofiber attached and proliferated in significantly higher numbers than those on the bFGF-free nanofiber. bFGF-receptor inhibition study confirmed the biological role played by the loaded bFGF. This study details the advantages of the mineralized nanofiber surface for the loading and delivery bFGF, and thus the bFGF-loaded nanofiber scaffold may be useful for tissue repair and regeneration.

  5. Electrospun nanofiber reinforcement of dental composites with electromagnetic alignment approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uyar, Tansel [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Başkent University Bağlıca Campus, 06530 Ankara (Turkey); Çökeliler, Dilek, E-mail: cokeliler@baskent.edu.tr [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Başkent University Bağlıca Campus, 06530 Ankara (Turkey); Doğan, Mustafa [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Başkent University, Ankara 06180 (Turkey); Koçum, Ismail Cengiz [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Başkent University Bağlıca Campus, 06530 Ankara (Turkey); Karatay, Okan [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Başkent University, Ankara 06180 (Turkey); Denkbaş, Emir Baki [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry Division, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-05-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is commonly used as a base acrylic denture material with benefits of rapid and easy handling, however, when it is used in prosthetic dentistry, fracturing or cracking problems can be seen due to the relatively low strength issues. Besides, acrylic resin is the still prominent material for denture fabrication due to its handy and low cost features. Numerous proposed fillers that are used to produce PMMA composites, however electrospun polyvinylalcohol (PVA) nanofiber fillers for production of PMMA composite resins are not studied as much as the others. The other focus of the practice is to compare both mechanical properties and efficiency of aligned fibers versus non-aligned PVA nanofibers in PMMA based dental composites. Field-controlled electrospinning system is manufactured and provided good alignment in lab scale as one of contributions. Some novel auxiliary electrodes in controlled structure are augmented to obtain different patterns of alignment with a certain range of fiber diameters. Scanning electron microscopy is used for physical characterization to determine the range of fiber diameters. Non-woven fiber has no unique pattern due to chaotic nature of electrospinning process, but aligned fibers have round pattern or crossed lines. These produced fibers are structured as layer-by-layer form with different features, and these features are used in producing PMMA dental composites with different volume ratios. The maximum flexural strength figure shows that fiber load by weight of 0.25% w/w and above improves in the maximum level. As a result, mechanical properties of PMMA dental composites are improved by using PVA nanofibers as a filler, however the improvement was higher when aligned PVA nanofibers are used. The maximum values were 5.1 MPa (flexural strength), 0.8 GPa (elastic modulus), and 170 kJ/m{sup 3} (toughness) in three-point bending test. In addition to the positive results of aligned and non-aligned nanofibers it was

  6. Nanofiber adsorbents for high productivity continuous downstream processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardick, Oliver; Dods, Stewart; Stevens, Bob; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2015-11-10

    An ever increasing focus is being placed on the manufacturing costs of biotherapeutics. The drive towards continuous processing offers one opportunity to address these costs through the advantages it offers. Continuous operation presents opportunities for real-time process monitoring and automated control with potential benefits including predictable product specification, reduced labour costs, and integration with other continuous processes. Specifically to chromatographic operations continuous processing presents an opportunity to use expensive media more efficiently while reducing their size and therefore cost. Here for the first time we show how a new adsorbent material (cellulosic nanofibers) having advantageous convective mass transfer properties can be combined with a high frequency simulated moving bed (SMB) design to provide superior productivity in a simple bioseparation. Electrospun polymeric nanofiber adsorbents offer an alternative ligand support surface for bioseparations. Their non-woven fiber structure with diameters in the sub-micron range creates a remarkably high surface area material that allows for rapid convective flow operations. A proof of concept study demonstrated the performance of an anion exchange nanofiber adsorbent based on criteria including flow and mass transfer properties, binding capacity, reproducibility and life-cycle performance. Binding capacities of the DEAE adsorbents were demonstrated to be 10mg/mL, this is indeed only a fraction of what is achievable from porous bead resins but in combination with a very high flowrate, the productivity of the nanofiber system is shown to be significant. Suitable packing into a flow distribution device has allowed for reproducible bind-elute operations at flowrates of 2,400 cm/h, many times greater than those used in typical beaded systems. These characteristics make them ideal candidates for operation in continuous chromatography systems. A SMB system was developed and optimised to

  7. High Sensitive Sensor Fabricated by Reduced Graphene Oxide/Polyvinyl Butyral Nanofibers for Detecting Cu (II) in Water

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO)/polyvinyl butyral (PVB) nanofibers were prepared by a simple electrospinning technique with PVB as matrix and GO as a functional nanomaterial. GO/PVB nanofibers on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) were reduced through electrochemical method to form reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/PVB nanofibers. The morphology and structure of GO/PVB nanofiber were studied by scanning election microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). RGO/PV...

  8. Method for producing and controlling the morphology of metal-oxide nanofiber and/or nanotube catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a process for the controlled production of metal-containing nanofibers and/or nanotubes, where the morphology of the nanofibers and/or nanotubes is followed in real time by TEM measurements.......Disclosed herein is a process for the controlled production of metal-containing nanofibers and/or nanotubes, where the morphology of the nanofibers and/or nanotubes is followed in real time by TEM measurements....

  9. Comparison of Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticle-nanofiber and nanofiber-nanoparticle on the application of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumaning Tyas, Linda; Suryana, Risa; Nurosyid, Fahru; Asma Ilahi, Novita

    2017-01-01

    Dye-sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) is a solar cell that has great potential in the future because of the cheaper cost of fabrication and environmentally friendly basic ingredients. This study aims to determine the effect of type of screen on the TiO2 layer as the active electrode DSSC. The active electrode TiO2 based DSSC fabricated by the method of double layer. Efficiency Dye-sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) can be obtained from the current-voltage curve I-V meter. Nanofiber on the nanoparticles can reach a highest efficiency of DSSC about 0,015%. The second variation of between nanofiber-nanoparticle layering, and nanoparticle-nanofiber, it appears that the nanofiber layer of nanoparticles above, no significant changes, namely in 10 minutes η = 0.014965; 15 minutes η = 0.011021 and 20 minutes η = 0.013332. This is demonstrated by the nature of the dominant nanofiber as a photon trap covered by the nature of the dominant nanoparticles absorb the dye, so that overtime does not affect the incoming electron. While the results of nanofiber layer on the nanoparticles changed significantly in the variation of 20 minutes, ie η = 0.00283. You can also see the most optimum time was 15 minutes, which is η = 0.01559. This may be due in this 15 minute nanofiber coating has a thickness that is optimum so that electrons can reach the electrode diffuse due to the interaction between photons and the dye more.

  10. A novel nano-nonwoven fabric with three-dimensionally dispersed nanofibers: entrapment of carbon nanofibers within nonwovens using the wet-lay process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwa, Amogh N.; Barron, Troy J.; Davis, Virginia A.; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    2012-05-01

    This study demonstrates, for the first time, the manufacturing of novel nano-nonwovens that are comprised of three-dimensionally distributed carbon nanofibers within the matrices of traditional wet-laid nonwovens. The preparation of these nano-nonwovens involves dispersing and flocking carbon nanofibers, and optimizing colloidal chemistry during wet-lay formation. The distribution of nanofibers within the nano-nonwoven was verified using polydispersed aerosol filtration testing, air permeability, low surface tension liquid capillary porometry, SEM and cyclic voltammetry. All these characterization techniques indicated that nanofiber flocks did not behave as large solid clumps, but retained the ‘nanoporous’ structure expected from nanofibers. These nano-nonwovens showed significant enhancements in aerosol filtration performance. The reduction-oxidation reactions of the functional groups on nanofibers and the linear variation of electric double-layer capacitance with nanofiber loading were measured using cyclic voltammetry. More than 65 m2 (700 ft2) of the composite were made during the demonstration of process scalability using a Fourdrinier-type continuous pilot papermaking machine. The scalability of the process with the control over pore size distribution makes these composites very promising for filtration and other nonwoven applications.

  11. Nanofiber based triple layer hydro-philic/-phobic membrane - a solution for pore wetting in membrane distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, J. A.; Rana, D.; Matsuura, T.; Ayyanar, N.; Shanmugasundaram, T. S.; Singh, G.

    2014-01-01

    The innovative design and synthesis of nanofiber based hydro-philic/phobic membranes with a thin hydro-phobic nanofiber layer on the top and a thin hydrophilic nanofiber layer on the bottom of the conventional casted micro-porous layer which opens up a solution for membrane pore wetting and improves the pure water flux in membrane distillation. PMID:25377488

  12. Multifunctional ZnO/Nylon 6 nanofiber mats by an electrospinning– electrospraying hybrid process for use in protective applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZnO/Nylon 6 nanofiber mats were prepared by an electrospinning–electrospraying hybrid process in which ZnO nanoparticles were dispersed on the surface of Nylon 6 nanofibers without becoming completely embedded. The prepared ZnO/Nylon 6 nanofiber mats were evaluated for their abilities to kill bacter...

  13. Influences of Silver-Doping on the Crystal Structure, Morphology and Photocatalytic Activity of TiO2 Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barakat, Nasser A. M.; Kanjwal, Muzafar Ahmed; Al-Deyab, Salem S.

    2011-01-01

    activity of titanium oxide nanofibers has been studied. Sil-ver-doped TiO2 nanofibers having different silver contents were prepared by calcination of electrospun nanofiber mats consisting of silver nitrate, titanium isopropoxide and poly(vinyl acetate) at 600°C. The results affirmed formation of silver...

  14. A Biologically Inspired CMOS Image Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkar, M.

    2011-01-01

    Biological systems are a source of inspiration in the development of small autonomous sensor nodes. The two major types of optical vision systems found in nature are the single aperture human eye and the compound eye of insects. The latter are among the most compact and smallest vision sensors. The

  15. Water Treatment Technologies Inspire Healthy Beverages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Mike Johnson, a former technician at Johnson Space Center, drew on his expertise as a wastewater engineer to create a line of kombucha-based probiotic drinks. Unpeeled Inc., based in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, employs 12 people and has sold more than 6 million units of its NASA-inspired beverage.

  16. Inspirational catalogue of Master Thesis proposals 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This catalog presents different topics for master thesis projects. It is important to emphasize that the project descriptions only serves as an inspiration and that you always can discuss with the potential supervisors the specific contents of a project. If you have an idea for a project which...

  17. Inspiration and the Texts of the Bible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Buchner

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to explore what the inspired text of the Old Testament was as it existed for the New Testament authors, particularly for the author of the book of Hebrews. A quick look at the facts makes. it clear that there was, at the time, more than one 'inspired' text, among these were the Septuagint and the Masoretic Text 'to name but two'. The latter eventually gained ascendancy which is why it forms the basis of our translated Old Testament today. Yet we have to ask: what do we make of that other text that was the inspired Bible to the early Church, especially to the writer of the book of Hebrews, who ignored the Masoretic text? This article will take a brief look at some suggestions for a doctrine of inspiration that keeps up with the facts of Scripture. Allied to this, the article is something of a bibliographical study of recent developments in textual research following the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls.

  18. Inspirational catalogue of Master Thesis proposals 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This catalog presents different topics for master thesis projects. It is important to emphasize that the project descriptions only serves as an inspiration and that you always can discuss with the potential supervisors the specific contents of a project. If you have an idea for a project which...

  19. Inspiration in the Act of Reading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeller, Kinga

    2016-01-01

    In German-language theology, Professor Ulrich H. J. Körtner’s theory of inspiration, as it relates to the Bible reader’s perspective, is well known. His attempt to gain fruitful insights from contemporary literary hermeneutics while linking them to theological concerns makes his approach a valued...

  20. Trauma-Inspired Prosocial Leadership Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jenifer Wolf; Allen, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Though trauma survivors sometimes emerge as leaders in prosocial causes related to their previous negative or traumatic experiences, little is known about this transition, and limited guidance is available for survivors who hope to make prosocial contributions. To understand what enables trauma-inspired prosocial leadership development, the…

  1. Inspired by Athletes, Myths, and Poets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Samantha

    2010-01-01

    Tales of love and hate, of athleticism, heroism, devotion to gods and goddesses that influenced myth and culture are a way of sharing ancient Greece's rich history. In this article, the author describes how her students created their own Greek-inspired clay vessels as artifacts of their study. (Contains 6 online resources.)

  2. Pop Art--Inspired Self-Portraits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Donna J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art lesson that was inspired by Andy Warhol's mass-produced portraits. Warhol began his career as a graphic artist and illustrator. His artwork was a response to the redundancy of the advertising images put in front of the American public. Celebrities and famous people in magazines and newspapers were seen…

  3. Pop Art--Inspired Self-Portraits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Donna J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art lesson that was inspired by Andy Warhol's mass-produced portraits. Warhol began his career as a graphic artist and illustrator. His artwork was a response to the redundancy of the advertising images put in front of the American public. Celebrities and famous people in magazines and newspapers were seen…

  4. Early Reading and Practice-Inspired Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale standardised, early reading assessments abound at the international and national levels, but research into urgent problems facing practitioners remains scarce. Practice-inspired research involves university-researchers in partnership with teacher-researchers undertaking high-quality research to provide relevant and useful knowledge.…

  5. What is Mathematics? Perspectives inspired by anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyrup, Jens

    The paper discusses the question “what is mathematics” from a point of view inspired by anthropology. In this perspective, the character of mathematical thinking and argument is strongly affected – almost essentially determined, indeed – by the dynamics of the specific social, mostly professional...

  6. Triple Antibiotic Polymer Nanofibers for Intracanal Drug Delivery: Effects on Dual Species Biofilm and Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankajakshan, Divya; Albuquerque, Maria T P; Evans, Joshua D; Kamocka, Malgorzata M; Gregory, Richard L; Bottino, Marco C

    2016-10-01

    Root canal disinfection and the establishment of an intracanal microenvironment conducive to the proliferation/differentiation of stem cells play a significant role in regenerative endodontics. This study was designed to (1) investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of triple antibiotic-containing nanofibers against a dual-species biofilm and (2) evaluate the ability of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to adhere to and proliferate on dentin upon nanofiber exposure. Seven-day-old dual-species biofilm established on dentin specimens was exposed for 3 days to the following: saline (control), antibiotic-free nanofibers (control), and triple antibiotic-containing nanofibers or a saturated triple antibiotic paste (TAP) solution (50 mg/mL in phosphate buffer solution). Bacterial viability was assessed using the LIVE/DEAD assay (Molecular Probes, Inc, Eugene, OR) and confocal laser scanning microscopy. For cytocompatibility studies, dentin specimens after nanofiber or TAP (1 g/mL in phosphate buffer solution) exposure were evaluated for cell adhesion and spreading by actin-phalloidin staining. DPSC proliferation was assessed on days 1, 3, and 7. Statistics were performed, and significance was set at the 5% level. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed significant bacterial death upon antibiotic-containing nanofiber exposure, differing significantly (P antibiotic-free fibers and the control (saline). DPSCs showed enhanced adhesion/spreading on dentin specimens treated with antibiotic-containing nanofibers when compared with its TAP counterparts. The DPSC proliferation rate was similar on days 1 and 3 in antibiotic-free nanofibers, triple antibiotic-containing nanofibers, and TAP-treated dentin. Proliferation was higher (9-fold) on dentin treated with antibiotic-containing nanofibers on day 7 compared with TAP. Triple antibiotic-containing polymer nanofibers led to significant bacterial death, whereas they did not affect DPSC attachment and proliferation on dentin

  7. Carbon nanofiber growth in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denysenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.; Cvelbar, U.; Mozetic, M.; Azarenkov, N. A.

    2008-10-01

    A theoretical model to describe the plasma-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) is proposed. Using the model, the plasma-related effects on the nanofiber growth parameters, such as the growth rate due to surface and bulk diffusion, the effective carbon flux to the catalyst surface, the characteristic residence time and diffusion length of carbon atoms on the catalyst surface, and the surface coverages, have been studied. The dependence of these parameters on the catalyst surface temperature and ion and etching gas fluxes to the catalyst surface is quantified. The optimum conditions under which a low-temperature plasma environment can benefit the CNF growth are formulated. These results are in good agreement with the available experimental data on CNF growth and can be used for optimizing synthesis of related nanoassemblies in low-temperature plasma-assisted nanofabrication.

  8. Fabrication of cellulose nanofiber transparent films for IT applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Lindong; Song, Sangho; Kim, Jeong Woong; Li, Yaguang; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-04-01

    One of the abundant renewable biomaterials in the world - cellulose is produced from plants forming micro-fibrils which in turn aggregate of form cellulose fibers. These fibers size can be disintegrated from micro-fibrils to nanofibers by physical and chemical methods. Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) can be a new building block of renewable smart materials. The CNF has excellent mechanical strength, dimensional stability, thermal stability and good optical properties on top of their renewable behavior. This paper reports CNF transparent films made by CNF extracted by the physical method: a high pressure physical, so called aqueous counter collision method. Natural behaviors, extraction and film formation of CNF are explained and their characteristics are illustrated, which is suit for IT applications.

  9. Polymorphism Behaviors of Electrospun Poly(vinylidene fluoride) Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhenxin; Reneker, Darrell

    2009-03-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and its copolymers have drawn great attention in recent years due to their attractive electrical properties such as ferro-, piezo- and pyro-electricity. Depending on its processing, PVDF can exhibit five different polymorphs. Among them, the beta phase has the highest piezo-, pyro- and ferroelectric activities. Electrospinning was used to produce thin polymer fibers. The polymorphic behavior of electrospun PVDF fibers was observed. Long cylindrical PVDF specimens with cross-sections in the range of 10 nm to 1 micron was obtained by varying the electrospinning conditions. Almost pure beta phase was obtained in electrospun PVDF nanofibers. The morphology and internal structure of single PVDF electrospun nanofibers were studied by transmission electron microscopy.

  10. Metal nanogrids, nanowires, and nanofibers for transparent electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Liangbing

    2011-10-01

    Metals possess the highest conductivity among all room-temperature materials; however, ultrathin metal films demonstrate decent optical transparency but poor sheet conductance due to electron scattering from the surface and grain boundaries. This article discusses engineered metal nanostructures in the form of nanogrids, nanowires, or continuous nanofibers as efficient transparent and conductive electrodes. Metal nanogrids are discussed, as they represent an excellent platform for understanding the fundamental science. Progress toward low-cost, nano-ink-based printed silver nanowire electrodes, including silver nanowire synthesis, film fabrication, wire-wire junction resistance, optoelectronic properties, and stability, are also discussed. Another important factor for low-cost application is to use earth-abundant materials. Copper-based nanowires and nanofibers are discussed in this context. Examples of device integrations of these materials are also given. Such metal nanostructure-based transparent electrodes are particularly attractive for solar cell applications. © 2011 Materials Research Society.

  11. Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene nanofibers prepared by CO2 laser supersonic drawing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Suzuki

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE nanofibers were prepared by carbon dioxide (CO2 laser irradiation of asspun ETFE fibers with four different melt flow rates (MFRs in a supersonic jet that was generated by blowing air into a vacuum chamber through the fiber injection orifice. The drawability and superstructure of fibers produced by CO2 laser supersonic drawing depend on the laser power, the chamber pressure, the fiber injection speed, and the MFR. Nanofibers obtained using a laser power of 20 W, a chamber pressure of 20 kPa, and an MFR of 308 g•10 min–1 had an average diameter of 0.303 µm and a degree of crystallinity of 54%.

  12. Microstructure and property of regenepercentaged silk fibroin/chitosan nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Lei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite silk fibroin/chitosan nanofiber membrane was fabricated by bubbfil electrospinning. The influence of chitosan content on composite membrane's microstructure, mechanical property, and the percentage of water-dissolved were studied experimentally. The result indicated that the crystallinity of electrospun membrane was enhanced by increasing chitosan concentration. It is noteworthy that the percentage of water-dissolved was the minimum when the weight ratio of silk fibroin/chitosan was 70:30. After the composite membrane treated by the methanol, the percentage of water-dissolved of the nanofiber membrane decreased significantly. The strength and elongation at break of composite membrane increased gradually with the increased content of chitosan. Additionally, the electrospun silk fibroin/chitosan membrane showed excellent antibacterial property.

  13. Chitosan nanofibers fabricated by combined ultrasonic atomization and freeze casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yihan; Wakisaka, Minato

    2015-05-20

    Aligned chitosan nanofibers exhibiting diameters smaller than 100 nm were easily prepared by combining ultrasonic atomization with freeze casting. A major advantage of this approach is the use of distilled water as main solvent. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that fiber diameter and morphology mainly depended on the atomizing tools, freezing temperature, and chitosan solution viscosity. Minimum diameter and uniform orientation were achieved using an electric flosser as an atomizing tool, liquid nitrogen as a coolant, 0.4 wt% aqueous chitosan solution (molecular weight = 22 kDa), and a small amount of lactic acid as solvent at 0 °C. The resulting chitosan nanofibers may find application in biomedical and food engineering. Moreover, this new technology may be applicable to other natural and synthetic water-soluble polymers.

  14. Laser-induced charge separation in organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Behn, Dino; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    Organic semiconductors have unique properties that can be tailored via synthetic chemistry for specific applications, which combined with their low price and straight-forward processing over large areas make them interesting materials for future devices. Certain oligomers can self-assemble into c......Organic semiconductors have unique properties that can be tailored via synthetic chemistry for specific applications, which combined with their low price and straight-forward processing over large areas make them interesting materials for future devices. Certain oligomers can self...... with the transport characteristics that show these nanofibers form p-type FET devices. Our current efforts are focused on nanofiber-based transistor devices using scanning photocurrent imaging (SPI) to study the local electronic band structure along the channel and at the contacts....

  15. Coherence properties of nanofiber-trapped cesium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, D; Sayrin, C; Mitsch, R; Schneeweiss, P; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2013-06-14

    We experimentally study the ground state coherence properties of cesium atoms in a nanofiber-based two-color dipole trap, localized ∼ 200 nm away from the fiber surface. Using microwave radiation to coherently drive the clock transition, we record Ramsey fringes as well as spin echo signals and infer a reversible dephasing time of T(2)(*) = 0.6 ms and an irreversible dephasing time of T(2)(') = 3.7 ms. By modeling the signals, we find that, for our experimental parameters, T(2)(*) and T(2)(') are limited by the finite initial temperature of the atomic ensemble and the heating rate, respectively. Our results represent a fundamental step towards establishing nanofiber-based traps for cold atoms as a building block in an optical fiber quantum network.

  16. Coherence properties of nanofiber-trapped cesium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Reitz, D; Mitsch, R; Schneeweiss, P; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally study the ground state coherence properties of cesium atoms in a nanofiber-based two-color dipole trap, localized 200 nm away from the fiber surface. Using microwave radiation to coherently drive the clock transition, we record Ramsey fringes as well as spin echo signals and infer a reversible dephasing time $T_2^\\ast=0.6$ ms and an irreversible dephasing time $T_2^\\prime=3.7$ ms. By theoretically modelling the signals, we find that, for our experimental parameters, $T_2^\\ast$ and $T_2^\\prime$ are limited by the finite initial temperature of the atomic ensemble and the heating rate, respectively. Our results represent a fundamental step towards establishing nanofiber-based traps for cold atoms as a building block in an optical fiber quantum network.

  17. Application of direct tracking method for measuring electrospun nanofiber diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ziabari

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, direct tracking method as an image analysis based technique for measuring electrospun nanofiber diameter has been presented and compared with distance transform method. Samples with known characteristics generated using a simulation scheme known as µ-randomness were employed to evaluate the accuracy of the method. Electrospun webs of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA were also used to verify the applicability of the method on real samples. Since direct tracking as well as distance transform require binary input images, micrographs of the electrospun webs obtained from Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM were first converted to black and white using local thresholding. Direct tracking resulted in more accurate estimations of fiber diameter for simulated images as well as electrospun webs suggesting the usefulness of the method for electrospun nanofiber diameter measurement.

  18. Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofiber based Biosensor Platform for Glucose Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Mamun, Khandaker A.; Tulip, Fahmida S.; MacArthur, Kimberly; McFarlane, Nicole; Islam, Syed K.; Hensley, Dale

    2014-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) have recently become an important tool for biosensor design. Carbon nanofibers (CNF) have excellent conductive and structural properties with many irregularities and defect sites in addition to exposed carboxyl groups throughout their surfaces. These properties allow a better immobilization matrix compared to carbon nanotubes and offer better resolution when compared with the FET-based biosensors. VACNFs can be deterministically grown on silicon substrates allowing optimization of the structures for various biosensor applications. Two VACNF electrode architectures have been employed in this study and a comparison of their performances has been made in terms of sensitivity, sensing limitations, dynamic range, and response time. The usage of VACNF platform as a glucose sensor has been verified in this study by selecting an optimum architecture based on the VACNF forest density. Read More: http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0129156414500062

  19. Tapered nanofiber trapping of high-refractive-index nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Swaim, Jon D; Bowen, Warwick P

    2013-01-01

    A nanofiber-based optical tweezer is demonstrated. Trapping is achieved by combining attractive near-field optical gradient forces with repulsive electrostatic forces. Silica-coated Fe$_2$O$_3$ nanospheres of 300 diameter are trapped as close as 50 nm away from the surface with 810 $\\mu$W of optical power, with a maximum trap stiffness of 2.7 pN $\\mu$m$^{-1}$. Electrostatic trapping forces up to 0.5 pN are achieved, a factor of 50 larger than those achievable for the same optical power in conventional optical tweezers. Efficient collection of the optical field directly into the nanofiber enables ultra-sensitive tracking of nanoparticle motion and extraction of its characteristic Brownian motion spectrum, with a minimum position sensitivity of 3.4 $\\AA / \\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$.

  20. Biological adhesive based on carboxymethyl chitin derivatives and chitin nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Kazuo; Nishihara, Masahiro; Shimizu, Haruki; Itoh, Yoshiki; Takashima, Osamu; Osaki, Tomohiro; Itoh, Norihiko; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Murahata, Yusuke; Tsuka, Takeshi; Izawa, Hironori; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Minami, Saburo; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Morimoto, Minoru

    2015-02-01

    Novel biological adhesives made from chitin derivatives were prepared and evaluated for their adhesive properties and biocompatibility. Chitin derivatives with acrylic groups, such as 2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropylated carboxymethyl chitin (HMA-CM-chitin), were synthesized and cured by the addition of an aqueous hydrogen peroxide solution as a radical initiator. The adhesive strength of HMA-CM-chitin increased when it was blended with chitin nanofibers (CNFs) or surface-deacetylated chitin nanofibers (S-DACNFs). HMA-CM-chitin/CNFs or HMA-CM-chitin/S-DACNFs have almost equal adhesive strength compared to that of a commercial cyanoacrylate adhesive. Moreover, quick adhesion and induction of inflammatory cells migration were observed in HMA-CM-chitin/CNF and HMA-CM-chitin/S-DACNF. These findings indicate that the composites prepared in this study are promising materials as new biological adhesives.

  1. Carbon nanofibers grown on metallic filters as novel catalytic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Tribolet, Pascal; Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNF) were synthesized on sintered metal fibers (SMF) filters of nickel and Ni-containing alloys (Inconel, stainless steel (SS)) by thermal chemical vapor deposition of ethane in the presence of hydrogen at not, vert, similar660 °C. The CNFs were formed directly over the SMF filters without deposition of metal particles. The catalytic active sites leading to the CNF formation were attained by oxidation–reduction of the SMF filter. The CNFs present platelet morphology as dete...

  2. Cellulose nanowhiskers and nanofibers from biomass for composite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao

    2011-12-01

    Biological nanocomposites such as plant cell wall exhibit high mechanical properties at a light weight. The secret of the rigidity and strength of the cell wall lies in its main structural component -- cellulose. Native cellulose exists as highly-ordered microfibrils, which are just a few nanometers wide and have been found to be stiffer than many synthetic fibers. In the quest for sustainable development around the world, using cellulose microfibrils from plant materials as renewable alternatives to conventional reinforcement materials such as glass fibers and carbon fibers is generating particular interest. In this research, by mechanical disintegration and by controlled chemical hydrolysis, both cellulose nanofibers and nanowhiskers were extracted from the cell wall of an agricultural waste, wheat straw. The reinforcement performances of the two nanofillers were then studied and compared using the water-soluble polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) as a matrix material. It was found that while both of these nanofillers could impart higher stiffness to the polymer, the nanofibers from biomass were more effective in composite reinforcement than the cellulose crystals thanks to their large aspect ratio and their ability to form interconnected network structures through hydrogen bonding. One of the biggest challenges in the development of cellulose nanocomposites is achieving good dispersion. Because of the high density of hydroxyl groups on the surface of cellulose, it remains a difficult task to disperse cellulose nanofibers in many commonly used polymer matrices. The present work addresses this issue by developing a water-based route taking advantage of polymer colloidal suspensions. Combining cellulose nanofibers with one of the most important biopolymers, poly(lactic acid) (PLA), we have prepared nanocomposites with excellent fiber dispersion and improved modulus and strength. The bio-based nanocomposites have a great potential to serve as light-weight structural materials

  3. Tuneable nanoparticle-nanofiber composite substrate for improved cellular adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Ariana M; Toth, Tyler D; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2016-09-01

    This work presents a novel technique using a reverse potential electrospinning mode for fabricating nanoparticle-embedded composites that can be tailored to represent various fiber diameters, surface morphologies, and functional groups necessary for improved cellular adhesion. Polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers were electrospun in both traditional positive (PP) and reverse potential (RP) electrical fields. The fibers were incorporated with 300nm polystyrene (PS) fluorescent particles, which contained carboxyl, amine groups, and surfactants. In the unconventional RP, the charged colloidal particles and surfactants were shown to have an exaggerated effect on Taylor cone morphology and fiber diameter caused by the changes in charge density and surface tension of the bulk solution. The RP mode was shown to lead to a decrease in fiber diameter from 1200±100nm (diameter±SE) for the nanofibers made with PCL alone to 440±80nm with the incorporation of colloidal particles, compared to the PP mode ranging from 530±90nm to 350±50nm, respectively. The nanoparticle-nanofiber composite substrates were cultured with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and evaluated for cellular viability and adhesion for up to 5 days. Adhesion to the nanofibrous substrates was improved by 180±10% with the addition of carboxylated particles and by 480±60% with the functionalization of an RGD ligand compared to the PCL nanofibers. The novel approach of electrospinning in the RP mode with the addition of colloids in order to alter charge density and surface tension could be utilized towards many applications, one being implantable biomaterials and tissue engineered scaffolds as demonstrated in this work.

  4. Characterization of Chitosan Nanofiber Sheets for Antifungal Application

    OpenAIRE

    Mayumi Egusa; Ryo Iwamoto; Hironori Izawa; Minoru Morimoto; Hiroyuki Saimoto; Hironori Kaminaka; Shinsuke Ifuku

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan produced by the deacetylation of chitin is a cationic polymer with antimicrobial properties. In this study, we demonstrate the improvement of chitosan properties by nanofibrillation. Nanofiber sheets were prepared from nanofibrillated chitosan under neutral conditions. The Young’s modulus and tensile strength of the chitosan NF sheets were higher than those of the chitosan sheets prepared from dissolving chitosan in acetic acid. The chitosan NF sheets showed strong mycelial growth in...

  5. Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    migration distance divided by vertical distance travelled. Figure 3. Gradient generation method (A–F) and characterization and concentrations of the...relative to one another (Table 1, aligned fiber density column ). The nanofiber size was maintained at 760 nm, within the intermediate diameter range of...expenditures Significant changes in use or care of human subjects, vertebrate animals, biohazards, and/or select agents Significant changes in use or

  6. Cellulose nanofibers use in coated paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Finley

    Cellulose Nanofibers (CNF) are materials that can be obtained by the mechanical breakdown of natural fibers. CNF have the potential to be produced at low cost in a paper mill and may provide novel properties to paper, paper coatings, paints, or other products. However, suspensions have a complex rheology even at low solid contents. To be able to coat, pump, or mix CNF at moderate solids, it is critical to understand the rheology of these suspensions and how they flow in process equipment; current papers only report the rheology up to 6% solids. Few publications are available that describe the coating of CNF onto paper or the use of CNF as an additive into a paper coating. The rheology of CNF suspensions and coatings that contain CNF were characterized with parallel-disk geometry in a controlled stress rheometer. The steady shear viscosity, the complex viscosity, the storage modulus, and the yield stress were determined for the range of solids or concentrations (2.5-10.5%). CNF were coated onto paper with a laboratory rod coater, a size press and a high speed cylindrical laboratory coater (CLC). For each case, the coat weights were measures and the properties of the papers were characterized. CNF water base suspension was found to be a shear thinning with a power law index of around 0.1. Oscillatory tests showed a linear viscoelastic region at low strains and significant storage and loss moduli even at low solids. The Cox Merz rule does not hold for CNF suspensions or coating formulations that contain CNF with complex viscosities that are about 100 times larger than the steady shear viscosities. Paper coating formulations that contain CNF were found to have viscosities and storage and loss moduli that are over ten times larger than coatings that contain starch at similar solids. CNF suspensions were coated on papers with low amount transferred on paper either at high solids or high nip loadings. The amount transferred appears to be controlled by an interaction of

  7. New applications for cellulose nanofibers: Rheological challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari-Nasrabad, Behzad

    Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) are an exciting new renewable material produced from wood fibers. Even at low solids content, CNF-water suspensions have a complex rheology that includes extreme shear-thinning as well as viscoelastic properties and a yield stress. In the rheology of CNF suspensions, the measurement method may influence the results due to wall-slippage, but it is unclear how the behavior near walls influences the measurement method and what process equipment can manipulate this material. Parallel-plate and vane geometries were utilized to compare yielding and flow of CNF suspensions obtained by steady-state shear and oscillatory rheological measurements. Four different methods were compared as techniques to obtain a yield stress. The results are compared to pressure driven flow in a tube. Cone and plate geometries were found to lead to sample ejection at low shear rates: floc-floc interactions can explain this ejection. The suspensions violated the Cox-Merz rule in a significant manner as a sign of containing weak gel structures and the formation of a water-rich layer near the solid boundaries. For suspensions lower than 3% solids, the yield stress measured with different procedures were within 20% of each other, but for high solids suspensions, differences among the methods could be as large as 100%; the water-rich layer formation likely is the cause of these results. Oscillatory methods are suggested as a technique to obtain yield stress values. The pressure driven flow results were consistent with the power-law line fitted to the parallel-plate geometry data from steady shear. The capability of the extrusion process was investigated for pumping CNF suspensions through different dies. The extrusion process resulted in acceptable pumping rates which was in good agreement with the mathematical model. However, attributable to the extreme shear-thinning behavior of CNF, the pressure counter-flow dominates the drag flow along the screw channel and does not

  8. Kittens! Inspired by Kittens! Undergraduate Theorists Inspired by YouTube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Diane Downer; Lewis, Mark; Peterson, Sarah; Griggs, Samantha; Grubb, Gina; Singer, Nicole; Fried, Simone; Krone, Elizabeth; Elko, Leigh; Narang, Jasmine

    2010-01-01

    A professor and students in an undergraduate honors research seminar were inspired to playfully link old and contemporary literacy theories to a 2.0 media artifact, the popular YouTube video Kittens! Inspired by Kittens! (KIbK) starring 6 year-old Maddie. In this article KIbK is theorized drawing on frames of school-based reading instruction,…

  9. Antibiotic-functionalized graphite nanofibers and applications of cyanoglycosides in graphite nanofiber functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotella, Madeline

    The synthesis of functionalized graphite nanofibers (GNFs) with antibiotics and cyclic boronate esters is described. By first oxidizing the GNFs, surface oxides are introduced to the fiber that serve as sites for the attachment of larger molecules such as aminoglycoside antibiotics and carbohydrates. On the one hand, the aminoglycoside antibiotic tobramycin can be attached to the surface of a GNF via the carboxyl groups. This tobramycin-labeled GNF was prepared, characterized for its antibiotic content by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and studied for its retention of antibacterial activity against the common bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. On the other hand, Boc-protected amine precursors which may serve as key intermediates in the preparation of a reversible GNF label were prepared starting from two similar carbohydrate substrates, tri-O-acetyl-D-galactal and tri-O-acetyl-D-glucal. A nitrile group was added to the C1 of the substrate via Ferrier addition with trimethylsilyl cyanide followed by reduction of the C2-C3 double bond and finally a deacylation to yield stereoisomeric diol nitriles. The diol nitriles in both series were converted to analogous protected Boc amines. Products were characterized by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography.

  10. Carbon Nanofibers (CNFs) Surface Modification to Fabricate Carbon Nanofibers_Nanopaper Integrated Polymer Composite Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianjun; Zhao, Ziwei; Deng, Chao; Liu, Fa; Li, Dejia; Fang, Liangchao; Zhang, Dan; Castro Jose M; Chen, Feng; Lee, L James

    2016-06-01

    Carbon Nanofibers (CNFs) have shown great potential to improve the physical and mechanical properties of conventional Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites (FRPCs) surface. Excellent dispersion CNFs into water or polymer matrix was very crucial to get good quality CNFs enhanced FRPCs. Because of the hydrophobic properties of CNFs, we apply the reversible switching principles to transfer the hydrophobic surface into hydrophilic surface by growing polyaniline nanograss on the surface of CNFs which was carried out in hydrochloric acid condition. Incorporating CNFs into FRPCs as a surface layer named CNFs Nanopaper to increase the erosion resistance and electrical conductivity in this research which was very important in the wind energy field. In order to get high quality dispersed CNFs suspension, a sonication unit was used to detangle and uniform disperse the functionalized CNFs. A filter with vacuum pressure used to filter the suspension of CNFs onto Carbon veil to make CNFs Nanopaper. Vacuum Aided Resin Transfer Modeling (VARTM) process was used to fabricate Nano-enhanced FRPCs samples. In order to characterize the mechanical properties, three point bending experiment was measured. The flexural strength capacity and deformation resistance and behavior were compared and analyzed. In this paper, we discussed the methods used and provided experimental parameter and experimental results.

  11. Giant Thermal Rectification from Polyethylene Nanofiber Thermal Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Luo, Tengfei

    2015-09-01

    The realization of phononic computing is held hostage by the lack of high-performance thermal devices. Here, it is shown through theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics simulations that unprecedented thermal rectification factors (as large as 1.20) can be achieved utilizing the phase-dependent thermal conductivity of polyethylene nanofibers. More importantly, such high thermal rectifications only need very small temperature differences (rectification factors of the polymer nanofiber diodes range from 12 to 25-much larger than those of other thermal diodes (<8). The polymer nanofiber thermal diode consists of a crystalline portion whose thermal conductivity is highly phase-sensitive and a cross-linked portion which has a stable phase. Nanoscale size effect can be utilized to tune the phase transition temperature of the crystalline portion, enabling thermal diodes capable of operating at different temperatures. This work will be instrumental to the design of high performance, inexpensive, and easily processible thermal devices, based on which thermal circuits can be built to ultimately enable phononic computing.

  12. Proliferation of Genetically Modified Human Cells on Electrospun Nanofiber Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandula Borjigin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene editing is a process by which single base mutations can be corrected, in the context of the chromosome, using single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (ssODNs. The survival and proliferation of the corrected cells bearing modified genes, however, are impeded by a phenomenon known as reduced proliferation phenotype (RPP; this is a barrier to practical implementation. To overcome the RPP problem, we utilized nanofiber scaffolds as templates on which modified cells were allowed to recover, grow, and expand after gene editing. Here, we present evidence that some HCT116-19, bearing an integrated, mutated enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP gene and corrected by gene editing, proliferate on polylysine or fibronectin-coated polycaprolactone (PCL nanofiber scaffolds. In contrast, no cells from the same reaction protocol plated on both regular dish surfaces and polylysine (or fibronectin-coated dish surfaces proliferate. Therefore, growing genetically modified (edited cells on electrospun nanofiber scaffolds promotes the reversal of the RPP and increases the potential of gene editing as an ex vivo gene therapy application.

  13. Conducting polymer nanofibers for high sensitivity detection of chemical analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Nagarajan, Subhalakshmi; Nagarajan, Ramaswamy; Kumar, Jayant

    2008-03-01

    Possessing large surface area materials is vital for high sensitivity detection of analyte. We report a novel, inexpensive and simple technique to make high surface area sensing interfaces using electrospinning. Conducting polymers (CP) nanotubes were made by electrospinning a solution of a catalyst (ferric tosylate) along with poly (lactic acid), which is an environment friendly biodegradable polymer. Further vapor deposition polymerization of the monomer ethylenedioxy thiophene (EDOT) on the nanofiber surface yielded poly (EDOT) covered fibers. X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS) study reveals the presence of PEDOT predominantly on the surface of nanofibers. Conducting nanotubes had been received by dissolving the polymer in the fiber core. By a similar technique we had covalently incorporated fluorescent dyes on the nanofiber surface. The materials obtained show promise as efficient sensing elements. UV-Vis characterization confirms the formation of PEDOT nanotubes and incorporation of chromophores on the fiber surface. The morphological characterization was carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  14. Improved fullerene nanofiber electrodes used in direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q [Nano Craft Technologies Co., Ltd., Tsukuba (Japan); Zhang, Y [Nationals Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Miyazawa, K; Kato, R; Hotta, K; Wakahara, T [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba (Japan)], E-mail: yi.zhang@aist.go.jp, E-mail: q.wang@aist.go.jp

    2009-04-01

    Platinum supported on fullerene nanofibers as possible electrodes for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) were studied. Fullerene nanofiber with 20 wt% Pt loading was mixed with 5 wt% Nafion solution. The mixture paste was coated on Nafion 117 membrane and sandwiched with silicon plates. To increase the surface reaction area of catalyst, nanoimprint was used to fabricate micro-patterns in the Nafion proton exchange membrane. Nanoimprint pattern consisted of dots of 500 nm-in-diameter, 140 nm-in-depth and 1 {mu}m-in-spacing. The nanoimprint of the treated proton exchange membrane (PEM) was carried out in a desktop thermal nanoimprint system (NI273, Nano Craft Tech. Corp., Japan) at the optimized conditions of 130 {sup 0}C and pressure of 3 MPa for 6 min. Then the Pt-coated PEM was sandwiched with micro-channelled silicon plates to form a micro-DMFC. With passively feeding of 1 M methanol solution and air at room temperature, the as-prepared cell had the open circuit voltage of 0.34 V and the maximum power density of 0.30 mW/cm{sup 2}. Compared with a fresh cell, the results shows that nanofibers used in nanoimprinted PEM have an improvement on the performance of micro fuel cells.

  15. Toward an understanding of the formation of conducting polymer nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Henry D; Wang, Yue; D'Arcy, Julio M; Kaner, Richard B

    2008-09-23

    Introducing small amounts of additives into polymerization reactions to produce conducting polymers can have a profound impact on the resulting polymer morphology. When an oligomer such as aniline dimer is added to the polymerization of aniline, the nanofibers produced are longer and less entangled than those typically observed. The addition of aniline dimer can even induce nanofiber formation under synthetic conditions that generally do not favor a nanofibrillar morphology. This finding can be extended to both the synthesis of polythiophene and polypyrrole nanofibers. The traditional oxidative polymerization of thiophene or pyrrole only produces agglomerated particles. However, when minute amounts of thiophene or pyrrole oligomers are added to the reaction, the resulting polymers possess a nanofibrillar morphology. These results reveal important insights into a semirigid rod nucleation phenomenon that has hitherto been little explored. When polyaniline nucleates homogeneously, surface energy requirements necessitate the formation of ordered nuclei which leads to the directional polymerization of aniline. This ultimately leads to the one-dimensional nanofibrillar morphology observed in the final product. The synthetic procedures developed here are simple, scalable, and do not require any templates or other additives that are not inherent to the polymer.

  16. Performance Enhancement of Dental Composites Using Electrospun Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Dodiuk-Kenig

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is to investigate the effect of electrospun nanofiber reinforcement on the properties of commercially available, hyperbranched polymer modified (Hybrane, 0.3 wt.% DSM dental formulations. The emergence of functionalized nanoscale reinforcements having large surface area (hundreds of square meters/gram has enabled the design of novel nanocomposites with new and complex structures leading to enhanced mechanical and physical properties. Electrospun nanofibers from a range of polymer chemistries (PVOH, PLLA, Nylon 6 have been investigated as a reinforcing phase at levels between 0.01 and 0.3 wt.%, with and without a silane coupling agent surface treatment. The experimental results indicate that 0.05 wt.% reinforcement with 250 nm diameter PVOH nanofibers leads to a 30% improvement in compressive strength, coupled with a shrinkage reduction of about 50%. Electrospun fiber reinforcement by other chemistries or at other diameters showed either no property improvement or led to property loss.

  17. Dispersions of Aramid Nanofibers: A New Nanoscale Building Block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ming; Cao, Keqin; Sui, Lang; Qi, Ying; Zhu, Jian; Waas, Anthony; Arruda, Ellen; Kieffer, John; Thouless, M. D.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2011-09-27

    Stable dispersions of nanofibers are virtually unknown for synthetic polymers. They can complement analogous dispersions of inorganic components, such as nanoparticles, nanowires, nanosheets, etc. as a fundamental component of a toolset for design of nanostructures and metamaterials via numerous solvent-based processing methods. As such, strong flexible polymeric nanofibers are very desirable for the effective utilization within composites of nanoscale inorganic components such as nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and others. Here stable dispersions of uniform high-aspect-ratio aramid nanofibers (ANFs) with diameters between 3 and 30 nm and up to 10 μm in length were successfully obtained. Unlike the traditional approaches based on polymerization of monomers, they are made by controlled dissolution of standard macroscale form of the aramid polymer, that is, well-known Kevlar threads, and revealed distinct morphological features similar to carbon nanotubes. ANFs are successfully processed into films using layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly as one of the potential methods of preparation of composites from ANFs. The resultant films are transparent and highly temperature resilient. They also display enhanced mechanical characteristics making ANF films highly desirable as protective coatings, ultrastrong membranes, as well as building blocks of other high performance materials in place of or in combination with carbon nanotubes.

  18. Electrospun Metal Nanofiber Webs as High-Performance Transparent Electrode

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Hui

    2010-10-13

    Transparent electrodes, indespensible in displays and solar cells, are currently dominated by indium tin oxide (ITO) films although the high price of indium, brittleness of films, and high vacuum deposition are limiting their applications. Recently, solution-processed networks of nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, and silver nanowires have attracted great attention as replacements. A low junction resistance between nanostructures is important for decreasing the sheet resistance. However, the junction resistances between CNTs and boundry resistances between graphene nanostructures are too high. The aspect ratios of silver nanowires are limited to ∼100, and silver is relatively expensive. Here, we show high-performance transparent electrodes with copper nanofiber networks by a low-cost and scalable electrospinning process. Copper nanofibers have ultrahigh aspect ratios of up to 100000 and fused crossing points with ultralow junction resistances, which result in high transmitance at low sheet resistance, e.g., 90% at 50 Ω/sq. The copper nanofiber networks also show great flexibility and stretchabilty. Organic solar cells using copper nanowire networks as transparent electrodes have a power efficiency of 3.0%, comparable to devices made with ITO electrodes. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  19. Electrospun PLLA nanofiber scaffolds for bladder smooth muscle reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshan, Mohammad Ali; Pourmand, Gholamreza; Ai, Jafar; Ghanbari, Hossein; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Naji, Mohammad; Faridi-Majidi, Reza

    2016-07-01

    Urinary bladder may encounter several pathologic conditions that could lead to loss of its function. Tissue engineering using electrospun PLLA scaffolds is a promising approach to reconstructing or replacing the problematic bladder. PLLA nanofibrous scaffolds were prepared utilizing single-nozzle electrospinning. The morphology and distribution of fiber diameters were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Human bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMCs) were isolated from biopsies and characterized by immunocytochemistry (ICC). Then, the cells were seeded on the PLLA nanofibers and Alamar Blue assay proved the biocompatibility of prepared scaffolds. Cell attachment on the nanofibers and also cell morphology over fibrous scaffolds were observed by SEM. The results indicated that electrospun PLLA scaffold provides proper conditions for hBSMCs to interact and attach efficiently to the fibers. Alamar Blue assay showed the compatibility of the obtained electrospun scaffolds with hBSMCs. Also, it was observed that the cells could achieve highly elongated morphology and their native aligned direction besides each other on the random electrospun scaffolds and in the absence of supporting aligned nanofibers. Electrospun PLLA scaffold efficiently supports the hBSMCs growth and alignment and also has proper cell compatibility. This scaffold would be promising in urinary bladder tissue engineering.

  20. Light-activated polymethylmethacrylate nanofibers with antibacterial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elashnikov, Roman [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, 16628 Prague (Czech Republic); Lyutakov, Oleksiy, E-mail: lyutakoo@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, 16628 Prague (Czech Republic); Ulbrich, Pavel [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Chemistry and Technology, 16628 Prague (Czech Republic); Svorcik, Vaclav [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, 16628 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-07-01

    The creation of an antibacterial material with triggerable properties enables us to avoid the overuse or misuse of antibacterial substances and, thus, prevent the emergence of resistant bacterial strains. As a potential light-activated antibacterial material, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) nanofibers doped with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) were prepared by electrospinning. TPP was chosen as an effectively reactive oxygen species (ROS) producer. Antibacterial tests on Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) showed the excellent light-triggerable antibacterial activity of the doped materials. Upon light irradiation at the wavelength corresponding to the TPP absorption peak (405 nm), antibacterial activity dramatically increased, mostly due to the release of AgNPs from the polymer matrix. Furthermore, under prolonged light irradiation, the AgNPs/TPP/PMMA nanofibers, displayed enhanced longevity and photothermal stability. Thus, our results suggest that the proposed material is a promising option for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteria. - Highlights: • The novelty of proposed work can be summared as follow: • Silver nanoparticles/meso-tetraphenylporphyrin embedded polymethylmethacrylate nanofibers were obtained for the first time. • Light triggering of PMMA fibers leads to sufficient release of AgNPs or their agglomeration, depending on the light source. • Release of AgNPs leads to appearance of pronounced antimicrobial activity, which can be switched on/off by the illumination.