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Sample records for supersonic turbulent reacting

  1. Chemically reacting supersonic flow calculation using an assumed PDF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshchi, M.

    1990-01-01

    This work is motivated by the need to develop accurate models for chemically reacting compressible turbulent flow fields that are present in a typical supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMJET) engine. In this paper the development of a new assumed probability density function (PDF) reaction model for supersonic turbulent diffusion flames and its implementation into an efficient Navier-Stokes solver are discussed. The application of this model to a supersonic hydrogen-air flame will be considered.

  2. Chemically Reacting Turbulent Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-14

    two stages of gen I tubes equipped with P-47 phosphor screens The detector chosen for the camera was a Reticon RL128S* line detectoI- .,hich consists...the Stud’, of Turbulent Mixing," William M. Pitts, Nuclear Engineering Seminar of the Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of

  3. Mixing in Supersonic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Liubin

    2010-01-01

    In many astrophysical environments, mixing of heavy elements occurs in the presence of a supersonic turbulent velocity field. Here we carry out the first systematic numerical study of such passive scalar mixing in isothermal supersonic turbulence. Our simulations show that the ratio of the scalar mixing timescale, $\\tau_{\\rm c}$, to the flow dynamical time, $\\tau_{\\rm dyn}$ (defined as the flow driving scale divided by the rms velocity), increases with the Mach number, $M$, for $M \\lsim3$, and becomes essentially constant for $M \\gsim3.$ This trend suggests that compressible modes are less efficient in enhancing mixing than solenoidal modes. However, since the majority of kinetic energy is contained in solenoidal modes at all Mach numbers, the overall change in $\\tau_{\\rm c}/\\tau_{\\rm dyn}$ is less than 20\\% over the range $1 \\lsim M \\lsim 6$. At all Mach numbers, if pollutants are injected at around the flow driving scale, $\\tau_{\\rm c}$ is close to $\\tau_{\\rm dyn}.$ This suggests that scalar mixing is drive...

  4. PDF approach for compressible turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, A. T.; Tsai, Y.-L. P.; Raju, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a probability density function (pdf) turbulence model for compressible reacting flows for use with a CFD flow solver. The probability density function of the species mass fraction and enthalpy are obtained by solving a pdf evolution equation using a Monte Carlo scheme. The pdf solution procedure is coupled with a compressible CFD flow solver which provides the velocity and pressure fields. A modeled pdf equation for compressible flows, capable of capturing shock waves and suitable to the present coupling scheme, is proposed and tested. Convergence of the combined finite-volume Monte Carlo solution procedure is discussed, and an averaging procedure is developed to provide smooth Monte-Carlo solutions to ensure convergence. Two supersonic diffusion flames are studied using the proposed pdf model and the results are compared with experimental data; marked improvements over CFD solutions without pdf are observed. Preliminary applications of pdf to 3D flows are also reported.

  5. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerstein, A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  6. Turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting gaseous admixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elperin, T.; Kleeorin, N.; Liberman, M.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2014-11-01

    We study turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting gaseous admixtures in a developed turbulence. In our previous study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 69 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.80.69] using a path-integral approach for a delta-correlated in a time random velocity field, we demonstrated a strong modification of turbulent transport in fluid flows with chemical reactions or phase transitions. In the present study we use the spectral τ approximation that is valid for large Reynolds and Peclet numbers and show that turbulent diffusion of the reacting species can be strongly depleted by a large factor that is the ratio of turbulent and chemical times (turbulent Damköhler number). We have demonstrated that the derived theoretical dependence of a turbulent diffusion coefficient versus the turbulent Damköhler number is in good agreement with that obtained previously in the numerical modeling of a reactive front propagating in a turbulent flow and described by the Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov-Fisher equation. We have found that turbulent cross-effects, e.g., turbulent mutual diffusion of gaseous admixtures and turbulent Dufour effect of the chemically reacting gaseous admixtures, are less sensitive to the values of stoichiometric coefficients. The mechanisms of the turbulent cross-effects differ from the molecular cross-effects known in irreversible thermodynamics. In a fully developed turbulence and at large Peclet numbers the turbulent cross-effects are much larger than the molecular ones. The obtained results are applicable also to heterogeneous phase transitions.

  7. Linear models for sound from supersonic reacting mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, P. Shivakanth; Samanta, Arnab

    2016-12-01

    We perform a linearized reduced-order modeling of the aeroacoustic sound sources in supersonic reacting mixing layers to explore their sensitivities to some of the flow parameters in radiating sound. Specifically, we investigate the role of outer modes as the effective flow compressibility is raised, when some of these are expected to dominate over the traditional Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) -type central mode. Although the outer modes are known to be of lesser importance in the near-field mixing, how these radiate to the far-field is uncertain, on which we focus. On keeping the flow compressibility fixed, the outer modes are realized via biasing the respective mean densities of the fast (oxidizer) or slow (fuel) side. Here the mean flows are laminar solutions of two-dimensional compressible boundary layers with an imposed composite (turbulent) spreading rate, which we show to significantly alter the growth of instability waves by saturating them earlier, similar to in nonlinear calculations, achieved here via solving the linear parabolized stability equations. As the flow parameters are varied, instability of the slow modes is shown to be more sensitive to heat release, potentially exceeding equivalent central modes, as these modes yield relatively compact sound sources with lesser spreading of the mixing layer, when compared to the corresponding fast modes. In contrast, the radiated sound seems to be relatively unaffected when the mixture equivalence ratio is varied, except for a lean mixture which is shown to yield a pronounced effect on the slow mode radiation by reducing its modal growth.

  8. Simulating Supersonic Turbulence in Galaxy Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Scannapieco, Evan

    2010-01-01

    We present three-dimensional, adaptive mesh simulations of dwarf galaxy out- flows driven by supersonic turbulence. Here we develop a subgrid model to track not only the thermal and bulk velocities of the gas, but also its turbulent velocities and length scales. This allows us to deposit energy from supernovae directly into supersonic turbulence, which acts on scales much larger than a particle mean free path, but much smaller than resolved large-scale flows. Unlike previous approaches, we are able to simulate a starbursting galaxy modeled after NGC 1569, with realistic radiative cooling throughout the simulation. Pockets of hot, diffuse gas around individual OB associations sweep up thick shells of material that persist for long times due to the cooling instability. The overlapping of high-pressure, rarefied regions leads to a collective central outflow that escapes the galaxy by eating away at the exterior gas through turbulent mixing, rather than gathering it into a thin, unstable shell. Supersonic, turbul...

  9. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  10. Turbulent Shear Layers in Supersonic Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Smits, Alexander J

    2006-01-01

    A good understanding of turbulent compressible flows is essential to the design and operation of high-speed vehicles. Such flows occur, for example, in the external flow over the surfaces of supersonic aircraft, and in the internal flow through the engines. Our ability to predict the aerodynamic lift, drag, propulsion and maneuverability of high-speed vehicles is crucially dependent on our knowledge of turbulent shear layers, and our understanding of their behavior in the presence of shock waves and regions of changing pressure. Turbulent Shear Layers in Supersonic Flow provides a comprehensive introduction to the field, and helps provide a basis for future work in this area. Wherever possible we use the available experimental work, and the results from numerical simulations to illustrate and develop a physical understanding of turbulent compressible flows.

  11. Control of star formation by supersonic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    MacLow, M M; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the formation of stars in galaxies is central to much of modern astrophysics. For several decades it has been thought that stellar birth is primarily controlled by the interplay between gravity and magnetostatic support, modulated by ambipolar diffusion. Recently, however, both observational and numerical work has begun to suggest that support by supersonic turbulence rather than magnetic fields controls star formation. In this review we outline a new theory of star formation relying on the control by turbulence. We demonstrate that although supersonic turbulence can provide global support, it nevertheless produces density enhancements that allow local collapse. Inefficient, isolated star formation is a hallmark of turbulent support, while efficient, clustered star formation occurs in its absence. The consequences of this theory are then explored for both local star formation and galactic scale star formation. (Abstract abbreviated)

  12. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  13. Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer: DNS and RANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jing-Lei; MA Hui-Yang

    2007-01-01

    We assess the performance of a few turbulence models for Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of supersonic boundary layers, compared to the direct numerical simulations (DNS) of supersonic flat-plate turbulent boundary layers, carried out by Gao et al. [Chin. Phys. Lett. 22 (2005) 1709] and Huang et al. [Sci.Chin. 48 (2005) 614], as well as some available experimental data. The assessment is made for two test cases, with incoming Mach numbers and Reynolds numbers M = 2.25, Re = 365, 000/in, and M = 4.5, Re - 1.7 × 107/m,respectively. It is found that in the first case the prediction of RANS models agrees well with the DNS and the experimental data, while for the second case the agreement of the DNS models with experiment is less satisfactory.The compressibility effect on the RANS models is discussed.

  14. The shock waves in decaying supersonic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, M D; Zuev, J M; Smith, Michael D.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Zuev, Julia M.

    2000-01-01

    We here analyse numerical simulations of supersonic, hypersonic andmagnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is free to decay. Our goals are tounderstand the dynamics of the decay and the characteristic properties of theshock waves produced. This will be useful for interpretation of observations ofboth motions in molecular clouds and sources of non-thermal radiation. We find that decaying hypersonic turbulence possesses an exponential tail offast shocks and an exponential decay in time, i.e. the number of shocks isproportional to t exp (-ktv) for shock velocity jump v and mean initialwavenumber k. In contrast to the velocity gradients, the velocity ProbabilityDistribution Function remains Gaussian with a more complex decay law. The energy is dissipated not by fast shocks but by a large number of low Machnumber shocks. The power loss peaks near a low-speed turn-over in anexponential distribution. An analytical extension of the mapping closuretechnique is able to predict the basic decay features. Our analytic descrip...

  15. Turbulence-chemistry interactions in reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, R.S.; Carter, C.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Interactions between turbulence and chemistry in nonpremixed flames are investigated through multiscalar measurements. Simultaneous point measurements of major species, NO, OH, temperature, and mixture fraction are obtained by combining spontaneous Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). NO and OH fluorescence signals are converted to quantitative concentrations by applying shot-to-shot corrections for local variations of the Boltzmann fraction and collisional quenching rate. These measurements of instantaneous thermochemical states in turbulent flames provide insights into the fundamental nature of turbulence-chemistry interactions. The measurements also constitute a unique data base for evaluation and refinement of turbulent combustion models. Experimental work during the past year has focused on three areas: (1) investigation of the effects of differential molecular diffusion in turbulent combustion: (2) experiments on the effects of Halon CF{sub 3}Br, a fire retardant, on the structure of turbulent flames of CH{sub 4} and CO/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}; and (3) experiments on NO formation in turbulent hydrogen jet flames.

  16. A PDF closure model for compressible turbulent chemically reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, W.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research project was the analysis of single point closures based on probability density function (pdf) and characteristic functions and the development of a prediction method for the joint velocity-scalar pdf in turbulent reacting flows. Turbulent flows of boundary layer type and stagnation point flows with and without chemical reactions were be calculated as principal applications. Pdf methods for compressible reacting flows were developed and tested in comparison with available experimental data. The research work carried in this project was concentrated on the closure of pdf equations for incompressible and compressible turbulent flows with and without chemical reactions.

  17. The Turbulent Dynamo in Highly Compressible Supersonic Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph; Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R G

    2014-01-01

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly-compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early Universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024^3 cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = nu/eta = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm >= 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm_crit = 129 (+43, -31), showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present a...

  18. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towery, C A Z; Poludnenko, A Y; Urzay, J; O'Brien, J; Ihme, M; Hamlington, P E

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  19. High speed turbulent reacting flows: DNS and LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givi, Peyman

    1990-01-01

    Work on understanding the mechanisms of mixing and reaction in high speed turbulent reacting flows was continued. Efforts, in particular, were concentrated on taking advantage of modern computational methods to simulate high speed turbulent flows. In doing so, two methodologies were used: large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). In the work related with LES the objective is to study the behavior of the probability density functions (pdfs) of scalar properties within the subgrid in reacting turbulent flows. The data base obtained by DNS for a detailed study of the pdf characteristics within the subgrid was used. Simulations are performed for flows under various initializations to include the effects of compressibility on mixing and chemical reactions. In the work related with DNS, a two-dimensional temporally developing high speed mixing layer under the influence of a second-order non-equilibrium chemical reaction of the type A + B yields products + heat was considered. Simulations were performed with different magnitudes of the convective Mach numbers and with different chemical kinetic parameters for the purpose of examining the isolated effects of the compressibility and the heat released by the chemical reactions on the structure of the layer. A full compressible code was developed and utilized, so that the coupling between mixing and chemical reactions is captured in a realistic manner.

  20. Direct simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Ralph W.; Mcmurtry, Patrick A.; Jou, Wen-Huei; Riley, James J.; Givi, Peyman

    1988-01-01

    The results of direct numerical simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers are presented. This is an extension of earlier work to a more detailed study of previous three dimensional simulations of cold reacting flows plus the development, validation, and use of codes to simulate chemically reacting shear layers with heat release. Additional analysis of earlier simulations showed good agreement with self similarity theory and laboratory data. Simulations with a two dimensional code including the effects of heat release showed that the rate of chemical product formation, the thickness of the mixing layer, and the amount of mass entrained into the layer all decrease with increasing rates of heat release. Subsequent three dimensional simulations showed similar behavior, in agreement with laboratory observations. Baroclinic torques and thermal expansion in the mixing layer were found to produce changes in the flame vortex structure that act to diffuse the pairing vortices, resulting in a net reduction in vorticity. Previously unexplained anomalies observed in the mean velocity profiles of reacting jets and mixing layers were shown to result from vorticity generation by baroclinic torques.

  1. Modeling of turbulent supersonic H2-air combustion with a multivariate beta PDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurle, R. A.; Hassan, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent calculations of turbulent supersonic reacting shear flows using an assumed multivariate beta PDF (probability density function) resulted in reduced production rates and a delay in the onset of combustion. This result is not consistent with available measurements. The present research explores two possible reasons for this behavior: use of PDF's that do not yield Favre averaged quantities, and the gradient diffusion assumption. A new multivariate beta PDF involving species densities is introduced which makes it possible to compute Favre averaged mass fractions. However, using this PDF did not improve comparisons with experiment. A countergradient diffusion model is then introduced. Preliminary calculations suggest this to be the cause of the discrepancy.

  2. A flamelet model for turbulent diffusion combustion in supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE; ChunHian

    2010-01-01

    In order to develop a turbulent diffusion combustion model for supersonic flow, the physical argument of the extension of the flamelet model to supersonic flow was presented, and the flow field of a hydrogen/air diffusion combustion generated by axisymmetric supersonic jets was numerically simulated by employing the flamelet model. Using the experimental data, value of the model coefficient of scalar dissipation in the flamelet model was revised specifically for supersonic flow. The computational results of the modified flamelet model were compared with the experimental results, and it was indicated that the precision of the modified flamelet model was satisfying. Based on the numerical results and flamelet theory, the influence mechanisms of turbulence fluctuation on the average state equation and chemical reaction rate were studied for the first time. It was found that the fluctuation correlation of species mass fractions and temperature has little effect on the averaged gas state equation; the temperature fluctuation decreases the product of H2O, but its effect is small; the fluctuation of species mass fractions increases the product of H2O in the region close to oxidizer while decreases the product of H2O in other regions; the fluctuation correlation of species mass fractions and temperature largely decreases the product of H2O.

  3. Dissipation and Heating in Supersonic Hydrodynamic and MHD Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaster, M Nicole

    2008-01-01

    We study energy dissipation and heating by supersonic MHD turbulence in molecular clouds using Athena, a new higher-order Godunov code. We analyze the dependence of the saturation amplitude, energy dissipation characteristics, power spectra, sonic scaling, and indicators of intermittency in the turbulence on factors such as the magnetic field strength, driving scale, energy injection rate, and numerical resolution. While convergence in the energies is reached at moderate resolutions, we find that the power spectra require much higher resolutions that are difficult to obtain. In a 1024^3 hydro run, we find a power law relationship between the velocity dispersion and the spatial scale on which it is measured, while for an MHD run at the same resolution we find no such power law. The time-variability and temperature intermittency in the turbulence both show a dependence on the driving scale, indicating that numerically driving turbulence by an arbitrary mechanism may not allow a realistic representation of these...

  4. THE TURBULENT DYNAMO IN HIGHLY COMPRESSIBLE SUPERSONIC PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federrath, Christoph [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Schober, Jennifer [Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R. G., E-mail: christoph.federrath@anu.edu.au [Institut für Astrophysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-12-20

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024{sup 3} cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = ν/η = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm ≥ 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm{sub crit}=129{sub −31}{sup +43}, showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present and early universe, we conclude that magnetic fields need to be taken into account during structure formation from the early to the present cosmic ages, because they suppress gas fragmentation and drive powerful jets and outflows, both greatly affecting the initial mass function of stars.

  5. Numerical Investigation of a Statistically Stationary Turbulent Reacting Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholt, Matthew R.; Pope, Stephen B.

    1997-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) has been very useful in the study of inert scalar mixing in turbulent flows, and has recently become feasible for studies of reacting scalars. We have formulated an accessible inhomogeneous nonpremixed turbulent reactive flow for investigating the effects of mixing on reaction and testing mixing models. The mixture fraction-progress variable approach is used with a model single-step reversible finite-rate thermochemistry, yielding non-trivial stationary solutions corresponding to stable reaction and allowing local extinction to occur. A mean gradient in the mixture fraction gives rise to stationarity without forcing, as well as a flame brush. A range of reaction zone thicknesses and Damkohler numbers are examined, yielding a broad spectrum of behavior, ranging from thick to thin flames, and from local extinction to near equilibrium. Based on this study results from full probability density function (PDF) simulations using the IEM and EMST mixing models are evaluated. Conditional moment closure (CMC) results are evaluated as well.

  6. Turbulence characteristics in a supersonic cascade wake flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew, P.L.; Ng, W.F. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States))

    1994-10-01

    The turbulent character of the supersonic wake of a linear cascade of fan airfoils has been studied using a two-component laser-doppler anemometer. The cascade was tested in the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University intermittent wind tunnel facility, where the Mach and Reynolds numbers were 2.36 and 4.8 [times] 10[sup 6], respectively. In addition to mean flow measurements, Reynolds normal and shear stresses were measured as functions of cascade incidence angle and streamwise locations spanning the near-wake and the far-wake. The extremities of profiles of both the mean and turbulent wake properties were found to be strongly influenced by upstream shock-boundary-layer interactions, the strength of which varied with cascade incidence. In contrast, the peak levels of turbulence properties within the shear layer were found to be largely independent of incidence, and could be characterized in terms of the streamwise position only. The velocity defect turbulence level was found to be 23%, and the generally accepted value of the turbulence structural coefficient of 0.30 was found to be valid for this flow. The degree of similarity of the mean flow wake profiles was established, and those profiles demonstrating the most similarity were found to approach a state of equilibrium between the mean and turbulent properties. In general, this wake flow may be described as a classical free shear flow, upon which the influence of upstream shock-boundary-layer interactions has been superimposed.

  7. Accuracy Of Hot-Wire Anemometry In Supersonic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Pamela; Mckenzie, Robert L.; Bershader, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity of hot-wire probe compared to laser-induced-florescence measurements. Report discusses factors affecting readings of hot-wire anemometer in turbulent supersonic boundary layer. Presents theoretical analysis of responses of hot-wire probe to changes in flow; also compares measurements by hot-wire probe with measurements of same flows by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Because LIF provides spatially and temporally resolved data on temperature, density, and pressure, provides independent means to determine responses of hot-wire anemometers to these quantities.

  8. Nonlinear closures for scale separation in supersonic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Grete, Philipp; Schmidt, Wolfram; Schleicher, Dominik R G; Federrath, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence in compressible plasma plays a key role in many areas of astrophysics and engineering. The extreme plasma parameters in these environments, e.g. high Reynolds numbers, supersonic and super-Alfvenic flows, however, make direct numerical simulations computationally intractable even for the simplest treatment -- magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). To overcome this problem one can use subgrid-scale (SGS) closures -- models for the influence of unresolved, subgrid-scales on the resolved ones. In this work we propose and validate a set of constant coefficient closures for the resolved, compressible, ideal MHD equations. The subgrid-scale energies are modeled by Smagorinsky-like equilibrium closures. The turbulent stresses and the electromotive force (EMF) are described by expressions that are nonlinear in terms of large scale velocity and magnetic field gradients. To verify the closures we conduct a priori tests over 137 simulation snapshots from two different codes with varying ratios of thermal to magnetic pre...

  9. Comparing Numerical Methods for Isothermal Magnetized Supersonic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kritsuk, Alexei G; Collins, David; Padoan, Paolo; Norman, Michael L; Abel, Tom; Banerjee, Robi; Federrath, Christoph; Flock, Mario; Lee, Dongwook; Li, Pak Shing; Mueller, Wolf-Christian; Teyssier, Romain; Ustyugov, Sergey D; Vogel, Christian; Xu, Hao

    2011-01-01

    We employ simulations of supersonic super-Alfv\\'enic turbulence decay as a benchmark test problem to assess and compare the performance of nine astrophysical MHD methods actively used to model star formation. The set of nine codes includes: ENZO, FLASH, KT-MHD, LL-MHD, PLUTO, PPML, RAMSES, STAGGER, and ZEUS. We present a comprehensive set of statistical measures designed to quantify the effects of numerical dissipation in these MHD solvers. We compare power spectra for basic fields to determine the effective spectral bandwidth of the methods and rank them based on their relative effective Reynolds numbers. We also compare numerical dissipation for solenoidal and dilatational velocity components to check for possible impacts of the numerics on small-scale density statistics. Finally, we discuss convergence of various characteristics for the turbulence decay test and impacts of various components of numerical schemes on the accuracy of solutions. We show that the best performing codes employ a consistently high...

  10. High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows: Intrinsic Flame Instability and its Effects on the Turbulent Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poludnenko, Alexei

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent reacting flows are pervasive both in our daily lives on Earth and in the Universe. They power modern society being at the heart of many energy generation and propulsion systems, such as gas turbines, internal combustion and jet engines. On astronomical scales, thermonuclear turbulent flames are the driver of some of the most powerful explosions in the Universe, knows as Type Ia supernovae. Despite this ubiquity in Nature, turbulent reacting flows still pose a number of fundamental questions often exhibiting surprising and unexpected behavior. In this talk, we will discuss several such phenomena observed in direct numerical simulations of high-speed, premixed, turbulent flames. We show that turbulent flames in certain regimes are intrinsically unstable even in the absence of the surrounding combustor walls or obstacles, which can support the thermoacoustic feedback. Such instability can fundamentally change the structure and dynamics of the turbulent cascade, resulting in a significant (and anisotropic) redistribution of kinetic energy from small to large scales. In particular, three effects are observed. 1) The turbulent burning velocity can develop pulsations with significant peak-to-peak amplitudes. 2) Unstable burning can result in pressure build-up and the formation of pressure waves or shocks when the flame speed approaches or exceeds the speed of a Chapman-Jouguet deflagration. 3) Coupling of pressure and density gradients across the flame can lead to the anisotropic generation of turbulence inside the flame volume and flame acceleration. We extend our earlier analysis, which relied on a simplified single-step reaction model, by demonstrating existence of these effects in realistic chemical flames (hydrogen and methane) and in thermonuclear flames in degenerate, relativistic plasmas found in stellar interiors. Finally, we discuss the implications of these results for subgrid-scale LES combustion models. This work was supported by the Air Force

  11. Super-Sonic Turbulence in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Padoan, P; Billawala, Y N; Juvela, M; Nordlund, A A; Padoan, Paolo; Bally, John; Billawala, Youssef; Juvela, Mika; Nordlund, AAke

    1999-01-01

    We compare the statistical properties of J=1-0 13CO spectra observed in the Perseus Molecular Cloud with synthetic J=1-0 13CO spectra, computed solving the non-LTE radiative transfer problem for a model cloud obtained as solutions of the three dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The model cloud is a randomly forced super-Alfvenic and highly super-sonic turbulent isothermal flow. The purpose of the present work is to test if idealized turbulent flows, without self-gravity, stellar radiation, stellar outflows, or any other effect of star formation, are inconsistent or not with statistical properties of star forming molecular clouds. We present several statistical results that demonstrate remarkable similarity between real data and the synthetic cloud. Statistical properties of molecular clouds like Perseus are appropriately described by random super-sonic and super-Alfvenic MHD flows. Although the description of gravity and stellar radiation are essential to understand the formation of single prot...

  12. Experiments on supersonic turbulent flow development in a square duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, F. B.; Ferguson, S. D.; Lo, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    The nature of supersonic, turbulent, adiabatic-wall flow in a square duct is investigated experimentally over a development length of x/D between 0 and 20 for a uniform flow, Mach 3.9 condition at the duct inlet. Initial discussion centers on the duct configuration itself, which was designed specifically to minimize wave effects and nozzle-induced distortion in the flow. Total pressure contours and local skin friction coefficient distributions are presented which show that the flow develops in a manner similar to that observed for the incompressible case. In particular, undulations exist in total pressure contours within the cross plane and in transverse skin friction coefficient distributions, which are indicative of the presence of a well-defined secondary flow superimposed upon the primary flow. The results are analyzed to show that local law-of-the-wall behavior extends well into the corner region, which implies that wall functions conventionally applied in two-equation type turbulence models, when suitably defined for compressible flow, may also be applied to supersonic streamwise corner flows.

  13. The IMF as a function of supersonic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelli Motta, C.; Clark, P. C.; Glover, S. C. O.; Klessen, R. S.; Pasquali, A.

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies seem to suggest that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in early-type galaxies might be different from a classical Kroupa or Chabrier IMF, i.e. contain a larger fraction of the total mass in low-mass stars. From a theoretical point of view, supersonic turbulence has been the subject of interest in many analytical theories proposing a strong correlation with the characteristic mass of the core mass function (CMF) in star-forming regions, and as a consequence with the stellar IMF. Performing two suites of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations with different mass resolutions, we aim at testing the effects of variations in the turbulent properties of a dense, star-forming molecular cloud on the shape of the system mass function in different density regimes. While analytical theories predict a shift of the peak of the CMF towards lower masses with increasing velocity dispersion of the cloud, we observe in the low-density regime the opposite trend, with high Mach numbers giving rise to a top-heavy mass distribution. For the high-density regime we do not find any trend correlating the Mach number with the characteristic mass of the resulting IMF, implying that the dynamics of protostellar accretion discs and fragmentation on small scales is not strongly affected by turbulence driven at the scale of the cloud. Furthermore, we suggest that a significant fraction of dense cores are disrupted by turbulence before stars can be formed in their interior through gravitational collapse. Although this particular study has limitations in its numerical resolution, we suggest that our results, along with those from other studies, cast doubt on the turbulent fragmentation models on the IMF that simply map the CMF to the IMF.

  14. Observation of supersonic turbulent wakes by laser Fourier densitometry (LFD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresillon, D.; Cabrit, B.; Bonnet, J. P.; Gemaux, G.

    Laser Fourier Densitometry (LFD) is an optical method appropriate for turbulent flow observations. It uses the collective scattering of coherent light, by optical index inhomogeneities. The principle of this method is described. It provides a signal proportional to the space Fourier transform amplitude of index distribution for a wavevector k defined by the optical arrangement. For a fluctuating flow, this amplitude is a function of time, and its frequency spectrum can be observed. The spectrum shape provides elementary parameters of the flow, such as: direction, modulus of mean velocity, and local temperature. It also provides means to distinguish different kinds of density fluctuations, such as convected inhomogeneities, or acoustic waves. The respective level of these different fluctuations types can be measured, as well as their power scale-law and absolute level. A compact optical bench has been set on a nozzle flow. The results of measurements performed in two supersonic wake configurations are presented, for Mach numbers of 1.6 and 4.2. These include density fluctuation spectra in supersonic flows, acoustic waves, variations with position, and comparison with hot wire anemometry.

  15. Comparing Numerical Methods for Isothermal Magnetized Supersonic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsuk, Alexei G.; Nordlund, Åke; Collins, David; Padoan, Paolo; Norman, Michael L.; Abel, Tom; Banerjee, Robi; Federrath, Christoph; Flock, Mario; Lee, Dongwook; Li, Pak Shing; Müller, Wolf-Christian; Teyssier, Romain; Ustyugov, Sergey D.; Vogel, Christian; Xu, Hao

    2011-08-01

    Many astrophysical applications involve magnetized turbulent flows with shock waves. Ab initio star formation simulations require a robust representation of supersonic turbulence in molecular clouds on a wide range of scales imposing stringent demands on the quality of numerical algorithms. We employ simulations of supersonic super-Alfvénic turbulence decay as a benchmark test problem to assess and compare the performance of nine popular astrophysical MHD methods actively used to model star formation. The set of nine codes includes: ENZO, FLASH, KT-MHD, LL-MHD, PLUTO, PPML, RAMSES, STAGGER, and ZEUS. These applications employ a variety of numerical approaches, including both split and unsplit, finite difference and finite volume, divergence preserving and divergence cleaning, a variety of Riemann solvers, and a range of spatial reconstruction and time integration techniques. We present a comprehensive set of statistical measures designed to quantify the effects of numerical dissipation in these MHD solvers. We compare power spectra for basic fields to determine the effective spectral bandwidth of the methods and rank them based on their relative effective Reynolds numbers. We also compare numerical dissipation for solenoidal and dilatational velocity components to check for possible impacts of the numerics on small-scale density statistics. Finally, we discuss the convergence of various characteristics for the turbulence decay test and the impact of various components of numerical schemes on the accuracy of solutions. The nine codes gave qualitatively the same results, implying that they are all performing reasonably well and are useful for scientific applications. We show that the best performing codes employ a consistently high order of accuracy for spatial reconstruction of the evolved fields, transverse gradient interpolation, conservation law update step, and Lorentz force computation. The best results are achieved with divergence-free evolution of the

  16. The IMF as a function of supersonic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Motta, Clio Bertelli; Glover, Simon C O; Klessen, Ralf S; Pasquali, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies seem to suggest that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in early-type galaxies might be different from a classical Kroupa or Chabrier IMF, i.e. contain a larger fraction of the total mass in low-mass stars. From a theoretical point of view, supersonic turbulence has been the subject of interest in many analytical theories proposing a strong correlation with the characteristic mass of the core mass function (CMF) in star forming regions, and as a consequence with the stellar IMF. Performing two suites of smoothed particles hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations with different mass resolutions, we aim at testing the effects of variations in the turbulent properties of a dense, star forming molecular cloud on the shape of the system mass function in different density regimes. While analytical theories predict a shift of the peak of the CMF towards lower masses with increasing velocity dispersion of the cloud, we observe in the low-density regime the opposite trend, with high Mach numbers giving rise...

  17. The fractal measurement of experimental images of supersonic turbulent mixing layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO YuXin; YI ShiHe; TIAN LiFeng; HE Lin; CHENG ZhongYu

    2008-01-01

    Flow Visualization of supersonic mixing layer has been studied based on the high spatiotemporal resolution Nano-based Planar Laser Scattering (NPLS) method in SML-1 wind tunnel. The corresponding images distinctly reproduced the flow structure of laminar, transitional and turbulent region, with which the fractal meas-urement can be implemented. Two methods of measuring fractal dimension wereintroduced and compared. The fractal dimension of the transitional region and the fully developing turbulence region of supersonic mixing layer were measured based on the box-counting method. In the transitional region, the fractal dimension will increase with turbulent intensity. In the fully developing turbulent region, the fractal dimension will not vary apparently for different flow structures, which em-bodies the self-similarity of supersonic turbulence.

  18. The fractal measurement of experimental images of supersonic turbulent mixing layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Flow visualization of supersonic mixing layer has been studied based on the high spatiotemporal resolution Nano-based Planar Laser Scattering(NPLS) method in SML-1 wind tunnel. The corresponding images distinctly reproduced the flow structure of laminar,transitional and turbulent region,with which the fractal measurement can be implemented. Two methods of measuring fractal dimension were introduced and compared. The fractal dimension of the transitional region and the fully developing turbulence region of supersonic mixing layer were measured based on the box-counting method. In the transitional region,the fractal dimension will increase with turbulent intensity. In the fully developing turbulent region,the fractal dimension will not vary apparently for different flow structures,which em-bodies the self-similarity of supersonic turbulence.

  19. Supersonic Turbulent Convection and the Origin of the Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, A. J. R.; Dyt, C. P.

    2000-10-01

    We report a new set of calculations which support the view that supersonic turbulent convection played a major role in the formation of the solar system. A flux-corrected transport scheme (Zalesak, J. Comp. Phys.} 31 335 1979) is used to numerically simulate thermal convection in a 2D ideal gas layer that is heated from below and is stratified gravitationally across many scale heights. The temperature T0 at the top boundary and the temperature gradient (∂ T/∂ z)1 at the lower boundary are kept constant during the computation. The initial atmosphere is superadiabatic with polytropic index m = 1, specific heats ratio γ = 1.4 and temperature contrast T1}/T{0 = 11. This layer mimics a section of the outer layer of the proto-solar cloud (Dyt & Prentice, MNRAS 296 56 1998). Because the Reynolds number of the real atmosphere is so large, motions whose scale is less than the computational grid size are represented with a Smagorinsky sub-grid scale turbulence approximation (Chan et al, Ap.J.} 263 935 1982). That is, a velocity-dependent turbulent viscosity ν t and thermal diffusivity κ t are chosen so that the high wavenumber kinetic energy spectrum follows Kolmogorov's -5/3 law. The flow soon evolves to a configuration consisting of a network of giant convective cells. At cell boundaries, the downflows are spatially concentrated and rapid. Turbulent pressures t range up to 3 times the local gas pressure pgas. The convection eliminates nearly all of the superadiabaticity in the lower 90% of the atmosphere. In the top 10%, ∂ T/∂ z increases sharply and a steep density inversion occurs, with ρ increasing by a factor of 3-4. This result gives new credibility to the modern Laplacian theory of solar system origin (Moon & Planets} 19 341 1978; ibid 73 237 1996; Phys. Lett. A} 213 253 1996). Even so, we need t ≈ 10 pgas if the proto-solar cloud is to shed discrete gas rings whose orbits match the mean planetary spacings and whose chemical condensates match the

  20. Development of Comprehensive Reduced Kinetic Models for Supersonic Reacting Shear Layer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambon, A. C.; Chelliah, H. K.; Drummond, J. P.

    2006-01-01

    Large-scale simulations of multi-dimensional unsteady turbulent reacting flows with detailed chemistry and transport can be computationally extremely intensive even on distributed computing architectures. With the development of suitable reduced chemical kinetic models, the number of scalar variables to be integrated can be decreased, leading to a significant reduction in the computational time required for the simulation with limited loss of accuracy in the results. A general MATLAB-based automated mechanism reduction procedure is presented to reduce any complex starting mechanism (detailed or skeletal) with minimal human intervention. Based on the application of the quasi steady-state (QSS) approximation for certain chemical species and on the elimination of the fast reaction rates in the mechanism, several comprehensive reduced models, capable of handling different fuels such as C2H4, CH4 and H2, have been developed and thoroughly tested for several combustion problems (ignition, propagation and extinction) and physical conditions (reactant compositions, temperatures, and pressures). A key feature of the present reduction procedure is the explicit solution of the concentrations of the QSS species, needed for the evaluation of the elementary reaction rates. In contrast, previous approaches relied on an implicit solution due to the strong coupling between QSS species, requiring computationally expensive inner iterations. A novel algorithm, based on the definition of a QSS species coupling matrix, is presented to (i) introduce appropriate truncations to the QSS algebraic relations and (ii) identify the optimal sequence for the explicit solution of the concentration of the QSS species. With the automatic generation of the relevant source code, the resulting reduced models can be readily implemented into numerical codes.

  1. Fundamental Structure of High-Speed Reacting Flows: Supersonic Combustion and Detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-30

    supersonic. Oblique Shock Interface Inert Reactants β θ P1 P2e P3eUCJ P1 UCJ P2i Detonation Figure 3. Idealized flow model of a detonation wave with an...Propagation With No Confinement But With Transvers Flow A consistent cross-flow was established by calibrating the height of the gases in time relative...to the controller commands, and then staggering the triggering of the gases such that each species – hydrogen, helium, and oxygen – independently

  2. Direct Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer with Spanwise Wall Oscillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidan Ni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Direct numerical simulations (DNS of Mach = 2.9 supersonic turbulent boundary layers with spanwise wall oscillation (SWO are conducted to investigate the turbulent heat transport mechanism and its relation with the turbulent momentum transport. The turbulent coherent structures are suppressed by SWO and the drag is reduced. Although the velocity and temperature statistics are disturbed by SWO differently, the turbulence transports of momentum and heat are simultaneously suppressed. The Reynolds analogy and the strong Reynolds analogy are also preserved in all the controlled flows, proving the consistent mechanisms of momentum transport and heat transport in the turbulent boundary layer with SWO. Despite the extra dissipation and heat induced by SWO, a net wall heat flux reduction can be achieved with the proper selected SWO parameters. The consistent mechanism of momentum and heat transports supports the application of turbulent drag reduction technologies to wall heat flux controls in high-speed vehicles.

  3. Three-dimensional vortex organization in a high-Reynolds-number supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, G.E.; Adrian, R.J.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.; Scarano, F.

    2010-01-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry was used to quantitatively visualize the three-dimensional coherent structures in a supersonic (Mach 2) turbulent boundary layer in the region between y/δ = 0.15 and 0.89. The Reynolds number based on momentum thickness Reθ = 34000. The instantaneous velocity f

  4. Study on Turbulent Behavior of Water Jet in Supersonic Steam Injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuichi, Akira; Abe, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Akiko; Kawamoto, Yujiro; Iwaki, Chikako; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Mori, Michitsugu; Ohmori, Shuichi

    One of the most interesting devices for light water reactor systems aimed at simplified system, improvement of safety and reliability is a supersonic steam injector. Supersonic steam injector is a passive jet pump without rotating machine and high efficient heat exchanger because of direct contact condensation between supersonic steam and a subcooled water jet. It is considered that flow behavior in the supersonic steam injector is related to complicated turbulent flow with large shear stress induced by velocity difference between steam and water and direct contact condensation. However, studies about turbulent flow under large shear stress with direct contact condensation are not enough. Especially, mechanisms of momentum and heat transfer are not clarified in detail. Objective of the present study is to investigate turbulent behaviors of a water jet and interface that play an important role in heat transfer and momentum transfer. Radial distribution of streamwise velocity and fluctuation of total pressure are measured by a pitot measurement. Visual measurement of the turbulent water jet is conducted by a high speed camera in order to identify location of unstable interface and its behavior. It is found that streamwise velocity increases as it approaches downstream of the mixing nozzle. Fluctuation of total pressure is large at water-steam mixture region. It is confirmed that waves propagated on the interface. And its velocity is obtained.

  5. Comparison of PDF and Moment Closure Methods in the Modeling of Turbulent Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Andrew T.; Hsu, Andrew T.

    1994-01-01

    In modeling turbulent reactive flows, Probability Density Function (PDF) methods have an advantage over the more traditional moment closure schemes in that the PDF formulation treats the chemical reaction source terms exactly, while moment closure methods are required to model the mean reaction rate. The common model used is the laminar chemistry approximation, where the effects of turbulence on the reaction are assumed negligible. For flows with low turbulence levels and fast chemistry, the difference between the two methods can be expected to be small. However for flows with finite rate chemistry and high turbulence levels, significant errors can be expected in the moment closure method. In this paper, the ability of the PDF method and the moment closure scheme to accurately model a turbulent reacting flow is tested. To accomplish this, both schemes were used to model a CO/H2/N2- air piloted diffusion flame near extinction. Identical thermochemistry, turbulence models, initial conditions and boundary conditions are employed to ensure a consistent comparison can be made. The results of the two methods are compared to experimental data as well as to each other. The comparison reveals that the PDF method provides good agreement with the experimental data, while the moment closure scheme incorrectly shows a broad, laminar-like flame structure.

  6. An Experimental Study of Turbulent Skin Friction Reduction in Supersonic Flow Using a Microblowing Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Danny P.

    1999-01-01

    A new turbulent skin friction reduction technology, called the microblowing technique has been tested in supersonic flow (Mach number of 1.9) on specially designed porous plates with microholes. The skin friction was measured directly by a force balance and the boundary layer development was measured by a total pressure rake at the tailing edge of a test plate. The free stream Reynolds number was 1.0(10 exp 6) per meter. The turbulent skin friction coefficient ratios (C(sub f)/C(sub f0)) of seven porous plates are given in this report. Test results showed that the microblowing technique could reduce the turbulent skin friction in supersonic flow (up to 90 percent below a solid flat plate value, which was even greater than in subsonic flow).

  7. The Density Variance--Mach Number Relation in Supersonic Turbulence: I. Isothermal, magnetised gas

    CERN Document Server

    Molina, F Z; Federrath, C; Klessen, R S

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that supersonic, magnetised turbulence plays a fundamental role for star formation in molecular clouds. It produces the initial dense gas seeds out of which new stars can form. However, the exact relation between gas compression, turbulent Mach number, and magnetic field strength is still poorly understood. Here, we introduce and test an analytical prediction for the relation between the density variance and the root-mean-square Mach number in supersonic, isothermal, magnetised turbulent flows. We approximate the density and velocity structure of the interstellar medium as a superposition of shock waves. We obtain the density contrast considering the momentum continuity equation for a single magnetised shock and extrapolate this result to the entire cloud. Depending on the field geometry, we then make three different assumptions based on observational and theoretical constraints: B independent of density, B proportional to the root square of the density and B proportional to the density....

  8. Ensemble Averaged Probability Density Function (APDF) for Compressible Turbulent Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a concept of the averaged probability density function (APDF) for studying compressible turbulent reacting flows. The APDF is defined as an ensemble average of the fine grained probability density function (FG-PDF) with a mass density weighting. It can be used to exactly deduce the mass density weighted, ensemble averaged turbulent mean variables. The transport equation for APDF can be derived in two ways. One is the traditional way that starts from the transport equation of FG-PDF, in which the compressible Navier- Stokes equations are embedded. The resulting transport equation of APDF is then in a traditional form that contains conditional means of all terms from the right hand side of the Navier-Stokes equations except for the chemical reaction term. These conditional means are new unknown quantities that need to be modeled. Another way of deriving the transport equation of APDF is to start directly from the ensemble averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The resulting transport equation of APDF derived from this approach appears in a closed form without any need for additional modeling. The methodology of ensemble averaging presented in this paper can be extended to other averaging procedures: for example, the Reynolds time averaging for statistically steady flow and the Reynolds spatial averaging for statistically homogeneous flow. It can also be extended to a time or spatial filtering procedure to construct the filtered density function (FDF) for the large eddy simulation (LES) of compressible turbulent reacting flows.

  9. Large Eddy Simulation of Spatially Developing Turbulent Reacting Shear Layers with the One-Dimensional Turbulence Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffie, Andreas Frank

    Large eddy simulation (LES) combined with the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model is used to simulate spatially developing turbulent reacting shear layers with high heat release and high Reynolds numbers. The LES-ODT results are compared to results from direct numerical simulations (DNS), for model development and validation purposes. The LES-ODT approach is based on LES solutions for momentum and pressure on a coarse grid and solutions for momentum and reactive scalars on a fine, one-dimensional, but three-dimensionally coupled ODT subgrid, which is embedded into the LES computational domain. Although one-dimensional, all three velocity components are transported along the ODT domain. The low-dimensional spatial and temporal resolution of the subgrid scales describe a new modeling paradigm, referred to as autonomous microstructure evolution (AME) models, which resolve the multiscale nature of turbulence down to the Kolmogorv scales. While this new concept aims to mimic the turbulent cascade and to reduce the number of input parameters, AME enables also regime-independent combustion modeling, capable to simulate multiphysics problems simultaneously. The LES as well as the one-dimensional transport equations are solved using an incompressible, low Mach number approximation, however the effects of heat release are accounted for through variable density computed by the ideal gas equation of state, based on temperature variations. The computations are carried out on a three-dimensional structured mesh, which is stretched in the transverse direction. While the LES momentum equation is integrated with a third-order Runge-Kutta time-integration, the time integration at the ODT level is accomplished with an explicit Forward-Euler method. Spatial finite-difference schemes of third (LES) and first (ODT) order are utilized and a fully consistent fractional-step method at the LES level is used. Turbulence closure at the LES level is achieved by utilizing the Smagorinsky

  10. Numerical Simulations of Driven Supersonic Relativistic MHD Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zrake, Jonathan; 10.1063/1.3621748

    2011-01-01

    Models for GRB outflows invoke turbulence in relativistically hot magnetized fluids. In order to investigate these conditions we have performed high-resolution three-dimensional numerical simulations of relativistic magneto-hydrodynamical (RMHD) turbulence. We find that magnetic energy is amplified to several percent of the total energy density by turbulent twisting and folding of magnetic field lines. Values of epsilon_B near 1% are thus naturally expected. We study the dependence of saturated magnetic field energy fraction as a function of Mach number and relativistic temperature. We then present power spectra of the turbulent kinetic and magnetic energies. We also present solenoidal (curl-like) and dilatational (divergence-like) power spectra of kinetic energy. We propose that relativistic effects introduce novel couplings between these spectral components. The case we explore in most detail is for equal amounts of thermal and rest mass energy, corresponding to conditions after collisions of shells with re...

  11. Improved method of analyzing hot-wire measurements in supersonic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Pamela

    1989-01-01

    The present analysis method for hot-wire data in supersonic turbulence takes sound field effects into account and yields greater accuracy in its treatment of flow variable fluctuations than existing methods despite requiring only a moderately accurate estimate of static pressure fluctuations. The method demonstrates the way in which neglecting pressure fluctuations will affect hot-wire data analysis, as well as indicating the probable direction the errors will take.

  12. An experimental and numerical study of confined non-reacting and reacting turbulent jets to facilitate homogeneous combustion in industrial furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Insu

    Confined non-reacting turbulent jets are ideal for recirculating the hot flue gas back into the furnace from an external exhaust duct. Such jets are also used inside the furnace to internally entrain and recirculate the hot flue gas to preheat and dilute the reactants. Both internal and external implementation of confined turbulent jets increase the furnace thermal efficiency. For external implementation, depending on the circumstances, the exhaust gas flow may be co- or counter-flow relative to the jet flow. Inside the furnaces, fuel and air jets are injected separately. To create a condition which can facilitate near homogeneous combustion, these jets have to first mix with the burned gas inside the furnace and simultaneously being heated and diluted prior to combustion. Clearly, the combustion pattern and emissions from reacting confined turbulent jets are affected by jet interactions, mixing and entrainment of hot flue gas. In this work, the flow and mixing characteristics of a non-reacting and reacting confined turbulent jet are investigated experimentally and numerically. This work consists of two parts: (i) A study of flow and mixing characteristics of non-reacting confined turbulent jets with co- or counter-flowing exhaust/flue gas. Here the axial and radial distributions of temperature, velocity and NO concentration (used as a tracer gas) were measured. FLUENT was used to numerically simulate the experimental results. This work provides the basic understanding of the flow and mixing characteristics of confined turbulent jets and develops some design considerations for recirculating flue gas back into the furnace as expressed by the recirculation zone and the stagnation locations. (ii) Numerical calculations of near homogeneous combustion are performed for the existing furnace. The exact geometry of the furnace in the lab is used and the real dimensional boundary conditions are considered. The parameters such as air nozzle diameter (dair), fuel nozzle

  13. Recovery of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer after an expansion corner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-bo; Hu, Zhiwei; Sandham, Neil D.

    2017-07-01

    Supersonic turbulent flows at Mach 2.7 over expansion corners with deflection angles of 0° (flat plate), 2°, and 4° have been studied using direct numerical simulation. Distributions of skin friction, pressure, velocity, and boundary layer growth show that the turbulent boundary layer experiences a recovery from a non-equilibrium to an equilibrium state downstream of the expansion corner. Analysis of velocity profiles indicates that the streamwise velocity undergoes a reduction in the near-wall region even though the velocity in the core part of the boundary layer is accelerated after the expansion corner. Growth of the boundary layer was evaluated and a higher shape factor was found in the expansion cases. Turbulence was found to be mostly suppressed downstream of the corner, and throughout the recovery region, even though turbulence is regenerated in the near-wall region. The expansion ramp increases the near-wall streak spacing compared to a flat plate, and turbulent kinetic energy profiles and budgets exhibit a characteristic two-layer structure. Near-wall turbulence recovers to a balance between the local production and dissipation equilibrium more quickly in the inner layer than in the outer layer. The two-layer structure is due to a history effect of turbulence decay in the outer part of the boundary layer downstream of the expansion corner, with limited momentum and energy exchange between the inner layer and the main stream.

  14. Mathematical modeling of turbulent reacting plumes - I. General theory and model formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgopoulos, P.G.; Seinfeld, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    A new, comprehensive model for a chemically reacting plume is presented that accounts for the effects of incomplete turbulent macro- and micromixing on chemical reactions between plume and atmospheric constituents. The model is modular in nature, allowing for the use of different levels of approximation of the phenomena involved. The core of the model consists of the evolution equations for reaction progress variables appropriate for evolving spatially varying systems. These equations estimate the interaction of mixing and chemical reaction and require input parameters characterizing internal plume behavior, such as relative dispersion and fine scale plume segregation. The model addresses deficiencies in previous reactive plume models. Part II is devoted to atmospheric application of the model. (authors).

  15. Computing supersonic non-premixed turbulent combustion by an SMLD flamelet progress variable model

    CERN Document Server

    Coclite, A; Gurtner, M; De Palma, P; Haidnd, O J; Pascazio, G

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the numerical simulation of the NASA Langley Research Center supersonic H2 -Air combustion chamber performed using two approaches to model the presumed probability density function (PDF) in the flamelet progress variable (FPV) framework. The first one is a standard FPV model, built presuming the functional shape of the PDFs of the mixture fraction, Z, and of the progress parameter, {\\Lambda}. In order to enhance the prediction capabilities of such a model in high-speed reacting flows, a second approach is proposed employing the statistically most likely distribution (SMLD) techcnique to presume the joint PDF of Z and {\\Lambda}, without any assumption about their behaviour. The standard and FPV-SMLD models have been developed using the low Mach number assumption. In both cases, the temperature is evaluated by solving the total-energy conservation equation, providing a more suitable approach for the simulation of supersonic combustion. By comparison with experimental data, the proposed SMLD...

  16. Dense core formation in supersonic turbulent converging flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Hao

    2011-01-01

    We use numerical hydrodynamic simulations to investigate prestellar core formation in the dynamic environment of giant molecular clouds, focusing on planar post-shock layers produced by colliding turbulent flows. A key goal is to test how core evolution and properties depend on the velocity dispersion in the parent cloud; our simulation suite consists of 180 models with inflow Mach numbers Ma=v/c_s=1.1-9. At all Mach numbers, our models show that turbulence and self-gravity collect gas within post-shock regions into filaments at the same time as overdense areas within these filaments condense into cores. This morphology, together with the subsonic velocities we find inside cores, is similar to observations. We extend previous results showing that core collapse develops in an ``outside-in'' manner, with density and velocity approaching the Larson-Penston asymptotic solution. The time for the first core to collapse varies as 1/sqrt(v), consistent with analytic estimates. Core building takes 10 times as long as ...

  17. Statistical analysis of the velocity and scalar fields in reacting turbulent wall-jets

    CERN Document Server

    Pouransari, Z; Johansson, A V

    2015-01-01

    The concept of local isotropy in a chemically reacting turbulent wall-jet flow is addressed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Different DNS databases with isothermal and exothermic reactions are examined. The chemical reaction and heat release effects on the turbulent velocity, passive scalar and reactive species fields are studied using their probability density functions (PDF) and higher order moments for velocities and scalar fields, as well as their gradients. With the aid of the anisotropy invariant maps for the Reynolds stress tensor the heat release effects on the anisotropy level at different wall-normal locations are evaluated and found to be most accentuated in the near-wall region. It is observed that the small-scale anisotropies are persistent both in the near-wall region and inside the jet flame. Two exothermic cases with different Damkohler number are examined and the comparison revealed that the Damkohler number effects are most dominant in the near-wall region, where the wall cooli...

  18. Investigation of Efficient Turbulence Model for Two-Dimensional Nozzle Designed for Supersonic Cruise Using STAR-CCM+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Mummidisetti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, investigation of various turbulence models has been carried out for predicting the efficient turbulence model for a two-dimensional nozzle designed for a supersonic cruise nozzle. Initially, a computational domain was created for a two-dimensional nozzle for a supersonic cruise, then, with an appropriate mesh size, various turbulence models has been used for simulations. The main objective of the present work is to determine the efficient turbulence model for nozzle designs. As till date, commercial software’s are implementing many advanced technique, the test of turbulence model is very much needed for today’s research. The results obtained from the computational approach were compared with experimental approach which was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.8 to 1.2 by NASA Langley Research Centre, Virginia. These supersonic cruise nozzles have a wide range of applications in designing Fighter jets and supersonic cruise aircraft's. The present work was conducted by using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics Software, STAR-CCM+. Initially, Nozzle at a free stream Mach number 0.9 was designed and all the initial and boundary conditions were calculated. From the results obtained in the present investigation, we can conclude that there was an excellent correlation between the experimental and computational data for K-Epsilon turbulence model.

  19. On the impact of adverse pressure gradient on the supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian-Cheng; Wang, Zhen-Guo; Zhao, Yu-Xin

    2016-11-01

    By employing the particle image velocimetry, the mean and turbulent characteristics of a Mach 2.95 turbulent boundary layer are experimentally investigated without the impact of curvature. The physical mechanism with which the streamwise adverse pressure gradient affects the supersonic boundary layer is revealed. The data are compared to that of the concave boundary layer with similar streamwise distributions of wall static pressure to clarify the separate impacts of the adverse pressure gradient and the concave curvature. The logarithmic law is observed to be well preserved for both of the cases. The dip below the logarithmic law is not observed in present investigation. Theoretical analysis indicates that it could be the result of compromise between the opposite impacts of the compression wave and the increased turbulent intensity. Compared to the zero pressure gradient boundary layer, the principal strain rate and the turbulent intensities are increased by the adverse pressure gradient. The shear layer formed due the hairpin packets could be sharpened by the compression wave, which leads to higher principal strain rate and the associated turbulent level. Due to the additional impact of the centrifugal instability brought by the concave wall, even higher turbulent intensities than that of the adverse pressure gradient case are introduced. The existence of velocity modes within the zero pressure gradient boundary layer suggests that the large scale motions are statistically well organized. The generation of new velocity modes due to the adverse pressure gradient indicates that the turbulent structure is changed by the adverse pressure gradient, through which more turbulence production that cannot be effectively predicted by the Reynolds-stress transport equations could be brought.

  20. A finite difference method for predicting supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows with tangential slot injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, E. W.; Lewis, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    An implicit finite difference method has been applied to tangential slot injection into supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows. In addition, the effects induced by the interaction between the boundary layer displacement thickness and the external pressure field are considered. In the present method, three different eddy viscosity models have been used to specify the turbulent momentum exchange. One model depends on the species concentration profile and the species conservation equation has been included in the system of governing partial differential equations. Results are compared with experimental data at stream Mach numbers of 2.4 and 6.0 and with results of another finite difference method. Good agreement was generally obtained for the reduction of wall skin friction with slot injection and with experimental Mach number and pitot pressure profiles. Calculations with the effects of pressure interaction included showed these effects to be smaller than effects of changing eddy viscosity models.

  1. On the Coupling Between a Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer and a Flexible Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frendi, Abdelkader

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical model and a computer code have been developed to fully couple the vibration of an aircraft fuselage panel to the surrounding flow field, turbulent boundary layer and acoustic fluid. The turbulent boundary layer model is derived using a triple decomposition of the flow variables and applying a conditional averaging to the resulting equations. Linearized panel and acoustic equations are used. Results from this model are in good agreement with existing experimental and numerical data. It is shown that in the supersonic regime, full coupling of the flexible panel leads to lower response and radiation from the panel. This is believed to be due to an increase in acoustic damping on the panel in this regime. Increasing the Mach number increases the acoustic damping, which is in agreement with earlier work.

  2. Supersonic turbulence, filamentary accretion,and the rapid assembly of massive stars and disks

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, R; Anderson, D W; Banerjee, Robi; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Anderson, Dave W.

    2006-01-01

    We present a detailed computational study of the assembly of protostellar disks and massive stars in molecular clouds with supersonic turbulence. We follow the evolution of large scale filamentary structures in a cluster-forming clump down to protostellar length scales by means of very highly resolved, 3D adaptive mesh refined (AMR) simulations, and show how accretion disks and massive stars form in such environments. We find that an initially elongated cloud core which has a slight spin from oblique shocks collapses first to a filament and later develops a turbulent disk close to the center of the filament. The continued large scale flow that shocks with the filament maintains the high density and pressure within it. Material within the cooling filament undergoes gravitational collapse and an outside-in assembly of a massive protostar. Our simulations show that very high mass accretion rates of up to 10^-2 Msol/yr and high, supersonic, infall velocities result from such filamentary accretion. Accretion at th...

  3. A numerical study of mixing in stationary, nonpremixed, turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholt, Matthew Ryan

    1998-10-01

    In this work a detailed numerical study is made of a statistically-stationary, non-premixed, turbulent reacting model flow known as Periodic Reaction Zones. The mixture fraction-progress variable approach is used, with a mean gradient in the mixture fraction and a model, single-step, reversible, finite-rate thermochemistry, yielding both stationary and local extinction behavior. The passive scalar is studied first, using a statistical forcing scheme to achieve stationarity of the velocity field. Multiple independent direct numerical simulations (DNS) are performed for a wide range of Reynolds numbers with a number of results including a bilinear model for scalar mixing jointly conditioned on the scalar and x2-component of velocity, Gaussian scalar probability density function tails which were anticipated to be exponential, and the quantification of the dissipation of scalar flux. A new deterministic forcing scheme for DNS is then developed which yields reduced fluctuations in many quantities and a more natural evolution of the velocity fields. This forcing method is used for the final portion of this work. DNS results for Periodic Reaction Zones are compared with the Conditional Moment Closure (CMC) model, the Quasi-Equilibrium Distributed Reaction (QEDR) model, and full probability density function (PDF) simulations using the Euclidean Minimum Spanning Tree (EMST) and the Interaction by Exchange with the Mean (IEM) mixing models. It is shown that CMC and QEDR results based on the local scalar dissipation match DNS wherever local extinction is not present. However, due to the large spatial variations of scalar dissipation, and hence local Damkohler number, local extinction is present even when the global Damkohler number is twenty-five times the critical value for extinction. Finally, in the PDF simulations the EMST mixing model closely reproduces CMC and DNS results when local extinction is not present, whereas the IEM model results in large error.

  4. Nonlinear dynamics and intermittency in a turbulent reacting wake with density ratio as bifurcation parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresha, Suhas; Sujith, R. I.; Emerson, Benjamin; Lieuwen, Tim

    2016-10-01

    The flame or flow behavior of a turbulent reacting wake is known to be fundamentally different at high and low values of flame density ratio (ρu/ρb ), as the flow transitions from globally stable to unstable. This paper analyzes the nonlinear dynamics present in a bluff-body stabilized flame, and identifies the transition characteristics in the wake as ρu/ρb is varied over a Reynolds number (based on the bluff-body lip velocity) range of 1000-3300. Recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) of the experimentally obtained time series of the flame edge fluctuations reveals that the time series is highly aperiodic at high values of ρu/ρb and transitions to increasingly correlated or nearly periodic behavior at low values. From the RQA of the transverse velocity time series, we observe that periodicity in the flame oscillations are related to periodicity in the flow. Therefore, we hypothesize that this transition from aperiodic to nearly periodic behavior in the flame edge time series is a manifestation of the transition in the flow from globally stable, convective instability to global instability as ρu/ρb decreases. The recurrence analysis further reveals that the transition in periodicity is not a sudden shift; rather it occurs through an intermittent regime present at low and intermediate ρu/ρb . During intermittency, the flow behavior switches between aperiodic oscillations, reminiscent of a globally stable, convective instability, and periodic oscillations, reminiscent of a global instability. Analysis of the distribution of the lengths of the periodic regions in the intermittent time series and the first return map indicate the presence of type-II intermittency.

  5. An experimental investigation of the supersonic turbulent boundary layer subjected to concave curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian-cheng; Wang, Zhen-guo; Zhao, Yu-xin

    2016-09-01

    By employing particle image velocimetry, the response of a Mach 2.95 turbulent boundary layer to the concave curvature is experimentally investigated. The radius of the concave wall is 350 mm, and the turning angle is 20∘. Logarithmic law is well preserved in the profile of streamwise velocity at all streamwise positions despite the impact of curvature. The varying trend of principal strain rate is found to be different at different heights within the boundary layer, which cannot be explained by the suggestion given by former researchers. Based on the three-layer model proposed in this paper, distribution of the principal strain rate is carefully analyzed. The streamwise increase of wall friction is suggested to be brought by the increase of velocity gradient in the thin subsonic layer. Increases of the static temperature and the related sound speed are responsible for that. Larger correlated turbulent motions could be introduced by the concave curvature. The probability density histograms of streamwise velocity reveal that the large scale hairpin packets are statistically well organized. The concave curvature is found to have the potential of reinforcing the organization, which explains the increase of turbulent level in the supersonic concave boundary layer.

  6. Hot-wire accuracy in supersonic turbulence from comparisons with laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Pamela; Bershader, Daniel; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    A hot-wire anemometer and a new, nonintrusive, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique are used to survey a turbulent boundary layer in a supersonic channel flow at Mach no. 2.06. The purpose is to test the accuracy of using the hot wire to measure the fluctuation amplitudes of static temperature and density in a compressible turbulent flow by comparing the results with independent and direct LIF measurements. Several methods of hot-wire calibration and analysis are applied. With each method, the hot-wire response can be related primarily to fluctuations of mass flux and total temperature, from which fluctuations of static temperature and density are calculated. However, these calculations are shown to be valid only if the fluctuations in static pressure are negligible. The acquisition and the analysis of the hot-wire data are often simplified further by neglecting the effects of fluctuations in total temperature. Comparisons of the fluctuation amplitudes of temperature and density obtained by hot-wire and LIF measurements demonstrate that such assumptions might not always be warranted, even in apparently simple flows.

  7. On a consistent high-order finite difference scheme with kinetic energy conservation for simulating turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trisjono, Philipp; Kang, Seongwon; Pitsch, Heinz

    2016-12-01

    The main objective of this study is to present an accurate and consistent numerical framework for turbulent reacting flows based on a high-order finite difference (HOFD) scheme. It was shown previously by Desjardins et al. (2008) [4] that a centered finite difference scheme discretely conserving the kinetic energy and an upwind-biased scheme for the scalar transport can be combined into a useful scheme for turbulent reacting flows. With a high-order spatial accuracy, however, an inconsistency among discretization schemes for different conservation laws is identified, which can disturb a scalar field spuriously under non-uniform density distribution. Various theoretical and numerical analyses are performed on the sources of the unphysical error. From this, the derivative of the mass-conserving velocity and the local Péclet number are identified as the primary factors affecting the error. As a solution, an HOFD stencil for the mass conservation is reformulated into a flux-based form that can be used consistently with an upwind-biased scheme for the scalar transport. The effectiveness of the proposed formulation is verified using two-dimensional laminar flows such as a scalar transport problem and a laminar premixed flame, where unphysical oscillations in the scalar fields are removed. The applicability of the proposed scheme is demonstrated in an LES of a turbulent stratified premixed flame.

  8. Mathematical modeling of turbulent reacting plumes - II. Application to the NO-NO/sub 2/-O/sub 3/ system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgopoulos, P.G.; Seinfeld, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Calculations performed with the Turbulent Reacting plume model (TPRM) developed in Part I are compared with the experimental data of Builtjes (1981, Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, Div. of Technology for Soc., Ref. No. 81-013563) for the reaction between NO in a point source plume and ambient O/sub 3/, taking place in a wind tunnel simulating a neutral atmospheric boundary layer. The comparison shows the TRPM capable of quantitatively predicting the retardation imposed on the evolution of nonlinear plume chemistry by incomplete mixing. (authors).

  9. Heat and mass transfer for turbulent flow of chemically reacting gas in eccentric annular channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besedina, T. V.; Tverkovkin, B. E.; Udot, A. V.; Yakushev, A. P.

    1987-08-01

    An algorithm is proposed for calculating the velocity, temperature, and concentration fields under conditions of cooling of a cylindrical heat-releasing rod, placed off-center in a circular casing pipe, by a longitudinal flow of chemically reacting gas [N2O4].

  10. LES, DNS, and RANS for the Analysis of High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, P. J.; Jaberi, F. A.; Givi, P.

    1996-01-01

    A filtered density function (FDF) method suitable for chemically reactive flows is developed in the context of large eddy simulation. The advantage of the FDF methodology is its inherent ability to resolve subgrid scales (SGS) scalar correlations that otherwise have to be modeled. Because of the lack of robust models to accurately predict these correlations in turbulent reactive flows, simulations involving turbulent combustion are often met with a degree of skepticism. The FDF methodology avoids the closure problem associated with these terms and treats the reaction in an exact manner. The scalar FDF approach is particularly attractive since it can be coupled with existing hydrodynamic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes.

  11. Mach number study of supersonic turbulence: The properties of the density field

    CERN Document Server

    Konstandin, Lukas; Girichidis, Philipp; Peters, Thomas; Shetty, Rahul; Klessen, Ralf S

    2015-01-01

    We model driven, compressible, isothermal, turbulence with Mach numbers ranging from the subsonic ($\\mathcal{M} \\approx 0.65$) to the highly supersonic regime ($\\mathcal{M}\\approx 16 $). The forcing scheme consists both solenoidal (transverse) and compressive (longitudinal) modes in equal parts. We find a relation $\\sigma_{s}^2 = \\mathrm{b}\\log{(1+\\mathrm{b}^2\\mathcal{M}^2)}$ between the Mach number and the standard deviation of the logarithmic density with $\\mathrm{b} = 0.457 \\pm 0.007$. The density spectra follow $\\mathcal{D}(k,\\,\\mathcal{M}) \\propto k^{\\zeta(\\mathcal{M})}$ with scaling exponents depending on the Mach number. We find $\\zeta(\\mathcal{M}) = \\alpha \\mathcal{M}^{\\beta}$ with a coefficient $\\alpha$ that varies slightly with resolution, whereas $\\beta$ changes systematically. We extrapolate to the limit of infinite resolution and find $\\alpha = -1.91 \\pm 0.01,\\, \\beta =-0.30\\pm 0.03$. The dependence of the scaling exponent on the Mach number implies a fractal dimension $D=2+0.96 \\mathcal{M}^{-0.3...

  12. 支板喷射超声速湍流燃烧的大涡模拟%Large Eddy Simulation of Supersonic Turbulent Combustion with a Strut Injector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪洪波; 孙明波; 范周琴; 王振国; 梁剑寒

    2012-01-01

    In order to develop a feasible method for large eddy simulation of supersonic turbulent combustion, an assumed sub-grid PDF (Probability density Function) model was combined with large eddy simulation to close the sub-grid turbulence- combustion interaction. Then the model was used to simulate the supersonic combustion flowfield behind a strut injector. Sim- ulations were carried out for both nonreacting and reacting flows, where the calculations agreed well with the experiments, in- dicating the feasibility of the present methods and models. In the nonreacting flow, large scale vortices dominate the near-field mixing by rolling and stretching, and influence the far-field mixing via breaking up to smaller vortices. In the reacting flow, the recirculation region becomes larger due to the heat release. The hot products generated in the shear layers enter into the re- circulation region by entrainment of large vortices and convection at the end of the recirculation region. In the recirculation re- gion, the hot products interact with the fuel jets, heating them and forcing part of the fuel into the shear layers to mix and react with the air in the free stream. The LES mesh is not fine enough to resolve the interaction of turbulence and combustion in the thin reacting shear layers and around the boundaries of large reacting vortices, where the PDF model gives higher sub-grid fluctuations.%为了发展可行的超声速湍流燃烧大涡模拟方法,将设定型PDF(Probability Density Function)模型与LES(Large Eddy Simulation)相结合以封闭亚格子湍流-燃烧相互作用,并将模型用于支板喷射超声速湍流燃烧流场的数值模拟。分别对冷流及燃烧流场进行了模拟,计算结果与实验测量符合较好,表明了所采用方法及模型的可行性。冷流条件下,大尺度湍流涡通过卷吸、拉伸运动主导支板尾迹区的近场混合,并通过破碎过程影响远场混合。燃烧条件下,回流区尺度扩

  13. An improved high-order scheme for DNS of low Mach number turbulent reacting flows based on stiff chemistry solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rixin; Yu, Jiangfei; Bai, Xue-Song

    2012-06-01

    We present an improved numerical scheme for numerical simulations of low Mach number turbulent reacting flows with detailed chemistry and transport. The method is based on a semi-implicit operator-splitting scheme with a stiff solver for integration of the chemical kinetic rates, developed by Knio et al. [O.M. Knio, H.N. Najm, P.S. Wyckoff, A semi-implicit numerical scheme for reacting flow II. Stiff, operator-split formulation, Journal of Computational Physics 154 (2) (1999) 428-467]. Using the material derivative form of continuity equation, we enhance the scheme to allow for large density ratio in the flow field. The scheme is developed for direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flow by employing high-order discretization for the spatial terms. The accuracy of the scheme in space and time is verified by examining the grid/time-step dependency on one-dimensional benchmark cases: a freely propagating premixed flame in an open environment and in an enclosure related to spark-ignition engines. The scheme is then examined in simulations of a two-dimensional laminar flame/vortex-pair interaction. Furthermore, we apply the scheme to direct numerical simulation of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) process in an enclosure studied previously in the literature. Satisfactory agreement is found in terms of the overall ignition behavior, local reaction zone structures and statistical quantities. Finally, the scheme is used to study the development of intrinsic flame instabilities in a lean H2/air premixed flame, where it is shown that the spatial and temporary accuracies of numerical schemes can have great impact on the prediction of the sensitive nonlinear evolution process of flame instability.

  14. Simulations of Turbulent Momentum and Scalar Transport in Non-Reacting Confined Swirling Coaxial Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical simulations of confined three-dimensional coaxial water jets. The objectives are to validate the newly proposed nonlinear turbulence models of momentum and scalar transport, and to evaluate the newly introduced scalar APDF and DWFDF equation along with its Eulerian implementation in the National Combustion Code (NCC). Simulations conducted include the steady RANS, the unsteady RANS (URANS), and the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS); both without and with invoking the APDF or DWFDF equation. When the APDF (ensemble averaged probability density function) or DWFDF (density weighted filtered density function) equation is invoked, the simulations are of a hybrid nature, i.e., the transport equations of energy and species are replaced by the APDF or DWFDF equation. Results of simulations are compared with the available experimental data. Some positive impacts of the nonlinear turbulence models and the Eulerian scalar APDF and DWFDF approach are observed.

  15. Combustion characteristics and turbulence modeling of swirling reacting flow in solid fuel ramjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Omer; Xiong, Chen; Changsheng, Zhou

    2017-10-01

    This paper reviews the historical studies have been done on the solid-fuel ramjet engine and difficulties associated with numerical modeling of swirling flow with combustible gases. A literature survey about works related to numerical and experimental investigations on solid-fuel ramjet as well as using swirling flow and different numerical approaches has been provided. An overview of turbulence modeling of swirling flow and the behavior of turbulence at streamline curvature and system rotation are presented. A new and simple curvature/correction factor is proposed in order to reduce the programming complexity of SST-CC turbulence model. Finally, numerical and experimental investigations on the impact of swirling flow on SFRJ have been carried out. For that regard, a multi-physics coupling code is developed to solve the problems of multi-physics coupling of fluid mechanics, solid pyrolysis, heat transfer, thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. The connected-pipe test facility is used to carry out the experiments. The results showed a positive impact of swirling flow on SFRJ along with, three correlations are proposed.

  16. The investigation of coherent structures in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer based on DNS database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Through temporal mode direct numerical simulation, flow field database of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with Mach number 4.5 and Reynolds number Reθ =1094 has been obtained. Commonly used detection meth- ods in experiments are applied to detecting coherent structures in the flow field, and it is found that coherent structures do exist in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer. The detected results show that a low-speed streak is de- tected by using the Mu-level method, the rising parts of this streak are detected by using the second quadrant method, and the crossing regions from a low-speed streak to the high-speed one are detected by using the VITA method respectively. Notwithstanding that different regions are detected by different methods, they are all accompanied by quasi-stream-wise vortex structures.

  17. The investigation of coherent structures in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer based on DNS database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG ZhangFeng; ZHOU Heng; LUO JiSheng

    2007-01-01

    Through temporal mode direct numerical simulation, flow field database of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with Mach number 4.5 and Reynolds number Reθ=1094 has been obtained. Commonly used detection methods in experiments are applied to detecting coherent structures in the flow field,and it is found that coherent structures do exist in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer. The detected results show that a low-speed streak is detected by using the Mu-level method, the rising parts of this streak are detected by using the second quadrant method, and the crossing regions from a low-speed streak to the high-speed one are detected by using the VITA method respectively.Notwithstanding that different regions are detected by different methods, they are all accompanied by quasi-stream-wise vortex structures.

  18. Computation of supersonic jet mixing noise for an axisymmetric CD nozzle using k-epsilon turbulence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavaran, A.; Krejsa, E. A.; Kim, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    The turbulent mixing noise of a supersonic jet is calculated for a round convergent-divergent nozzle at the design pressure ratio. Aerodynamic computations are performed using the PARC code with a k-epsilon turbulence model. Lighthill's acoustic analogy combined with Ribner's assumption is adopted. The acoustics solution is based upon the methodology followed by GE in the MGB code. The source correlation function is expressed as a linear combination of second-order tensors. Assuming separable second-order correlations and incorporating Batchelor's isotropic turbulence model, the source term was calculated from the kinetic energy of turbulence. A Gaussian distribution for the time-delay of correlation was introduced. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solution was used to obtain the source strength as well as the characteristic time-delay of correlation. The effect of sound/flow interaction was incorporated using the high frequency asymptotic solution to Lilley's equation for axisymmetric geometries. Acoustic results include sound pressure level directivity and spectra at different polar angles. The aerodynamic and acoustic results demonstrate favorable agreement with experimental data.

  19. SYMPOSIUM ON TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION - SPECIAL SYMPOSIUM TO BRING TOGETHER TOP RESEARCHERS IN THE FIELDS OF FLUID TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION TO PROMOTE ADVANCES IN TURBULENT, REACTING FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caughey, David

    2010-10-08

    A Symposium on Turbulence and Combustion was held at Cornell University on August 3-4, 2009. The overall goal of the Symposium was to promote future advances in the study of turbulence and combustion, through an unique forum intended to foster interactions between leading members of these two research communities. The Symposium program consisted of twelve invited lectures given by world-class experts in these fields, two poster sessions consisting of nearly 50 presentations, an open forum, and other informal activities designed to foster discussion. Topics covered in the lectures included turbulent dispersion, wall-bounded flows, mixing, finite-rate chemistry, and others, using experiment, modeling, and computations, and included perspectives from an international community of leading researchers from academia, national laboratories, and industry.

  20. Semi-implicit iterative methods for low Mach number turbulent reacting flows: Operator splitting versus approximate factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArt, Jonathan F.; Mueller, Michael E.

    2016-12-01

    Two formally second-order accurate, semi-implicit, iterative methods for the solution of scalar transport-reaction equations are developed for Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of low Mach number turbulent reacting flows. The first is a monolithic scheme based on a linearly implicit midpoint method utilizing an approximately factorized exact Jacobian of the transport and reaction operators. The second is an operator splitting scheme based on the Strang splitting approach. The accuracy properties of these schemes, as well as their stability, cost, and the effect of chemical mechanism size on relative performance, are assessed in two one-dimensional test configurations comprising an unsteady premixed flame and an unsteady nonpremixed ignition, which have substantially different Damköhler numbers and relative stiffness of transport to chemistry. All schemes demonstrate their formal order of accuracy in the fully-coupled convergence tests. Compared to a (non-)factorized scheme with a diagonal approximation to the chemical Jacobian, the monolithic, factorized scheme using the exact chemical Jacobian is shown to be both more stable and more economical. This is due to an improved convergence rate of the iterative procedure, and the difference between the two schemes in convergence rate grows as the time step increases. The stability properties of the Strang splitting scheme are demonstrated to outpace those of Lie splitting and monolithic schemes in simulations at high Damköhler number; however, in this regime, the monolithic scheme using the approximately factorized exact Jacobian is found to be the most economical at practical CFL numbers. The performance of the schemes is further evaluated in a simulation of a three-dimensional, spatially evolving, turbulent nonpremixed planar jet flame.

  1. Asymptotic structure of low frequency supersonic heated jet noise using LES data to re-construct a turbulence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Mohammed; Sescu, Adrian; Sassanis, Vasileios; Bres, Guillaume; Towne, Aaron; Lele, Sanjiva

    2016-11-01

    The Goldstein-Sescu-Afsar asymptotic theory postulated that the appropriate distinguished limit in which non-parallel mean flow effects introduces a leading order change in the 'propagator' (which is related adjoint linearized Euler Green's function) within Goldstein's acoustic analogy must be when the jet spread rate is the same order as Strouhal number. We analyze the low frequency structure of the acoustic spectrum using Large-eddy simulations of two axi-symmetric jets (heated & unheated) at constant supersonic jet Mach number to obtain the mean flow for the asymptotic theory. This approach provides excellent quantitative agreement for the peak jet noise when the coefficients of the turbulence model are tuned for good agreement with the far-field acoustic data. Our aim in this talk, however, is to show the predictive capability of the asymptotics when the turbulence model in the acoustic analogy is 'exactly' re-constructed by numerically matching the length scale coefficients of an algebraic-exponential model for the 1212-component of the Reynolds stress auto-covariance tensor (1 is streamwise & 2 is radial direction) with LES data at any spatial location and temporal frequency. In this way, all information is obtained from local unsteady flow. We thank Professor Parviz Moin for supporting this work as part of the Center for Turbulence Research Summer Program 2016.

  2. Micro Ramps in Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers: An experimental and numerical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The micro vortex generator (MVG) is used extensively in low speed aerodynamic problems and is now extended into the supersonic flow regime to solve undesired flow features that are associated with shock wave boundary layer interactions (SWBLI) such as flow separation and associated unsteadiness of t

  3. Modeling of turbulent supersonic H2-air combustion with an improved joint beta PDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurle, R. A.; Hassan, H. A.

    1991-01-01

    Attempts at modeling recent experiments of Cheng et al. indicated that discrepancies between theory and experiment can be a result of the form of assumed probability density function (PDF) and/or the turbulence model employed. Improvements in both the form of the assumed PDF and the turbulence model are presented. The results are again used to compare with measurements. Initial comparisons are encouraging.

  4. Turbulence models and Reynolds analogy for two-dimensional supersonic compression ramp flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi R.; Bidek, Maleina C.

    1994-01-01

    Results of the application of turbulence models and the Reynolds analogy to the Navier-Stokes computations of Mach 2.9 two-dimensional compression ramp flows are presented. The Baldwin-Lomax eddy viscosity model and the kappa-epsilon turbulence transport equations for the turbulent momentum flux modeling in the Navier-Stokes equations are studied. The Reynolds analogy for the turbulent heat flux modeling in the energy equation was also studied. The Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation were numerically solved for the flow properties. The Reynolds shear stress, the skin friction factor, and the surface heat transfer rate were calculated and compared with their measurements. It was concluded that with a hybrid kappa-epsilon turbulence model for turbulence modeling, the present computations predicted the skin friction factors of the 8 deg and 16 deg compression ramp flows and with the turbulent Prandtl number Pr(sub t) = 0.93 and the ratio of the turbulent thermal and momentum transport coefficients mu(sub q)/mu(sub t) = 2/Prt, the present computations also predicted the surface heat transfer rates beneath the boundary layer flow of the 16 compression ramp.

  5. Turbulence measurements in axisymmetric supersonic boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gootzait, E.; Childs, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    Mean flow and turbulence measurements are presented for adiabatic compressible turbulent boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients. The gradients were induced on the wall of an axially symmetric wind tunnel by contoured centerbodies mounted on the wind tunnel centerline. The boundary layer turbulence downstream of a boundary layer bleed section in a zero pressure gradient was also examined. The measurements were obtained using a constant temperature hot-wire anemometer. The adverse pressure gradients were found to significantly alter the turbulence properties of the boundary layer. With flow through the bleed holes there was a measureable decrease in the rms longitudinal velocity fluctuations near the wall and the turbulent shear stress in the boundary layer was reduced.

  6. Reacting to "Reacting"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Amanda

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the author's experiences as a student participating in a general education program called "Reacting to the Past," in which college students play elaborate games set at pivotal moments in the past, their roles informed by great texts. She found that the experience of reenacting pivotal historical moments produced an intensely…

  7. Evaluation of Industry Standard Turbulence Models on an Axisymmetric Supersonic Compression Corner

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBonis, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computations of a shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction (SWBLI) created by a Mach 2.85 flow over an axisymmetric 30-degree compression corner were carried out. The objectives were to evaluate four turbulence models commonly used in industry, for SWBLIs, and to evaluate the suitability of this test case for use in further turbulence model benchmarking. The Spalart-Allmaras model, Menter's Baseline and Shear Stress Transport models, and a low-Reynolds number k- model were evaluated. Results indicate that the models do not accurately predict the separation location; with the SST model predicting the separation onset too early and the other models predicting the onset too late. Overall the Spalart-Allmaras model did the best job in matching the experimental data. However there is significant room for improvement, most notably in the prediction of the turbulent shear stress. Density data showed that the simulations did not accurately predict the thermal boundary layer upstream of the SWBLI. The effect of turbulent Prandtl number and wall temperature were studied in an attempt to improve this prediction and understand their effects on the interaction. The data showed that both parameters can significantly affect the separation size and location, but did not improve the agreement with the experiment. This case proved challenging to compute and should provide a good test for future turbulence modeling work.

  8. Galaxy formation from annihilation-generated supersonic turbulence in the baryon-symmetric big-bang cosmology and the gamma ray background spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Following the big-bang baryon symmetric cosmology of Omnes, the redshift was calculated to be on the order of 500-600. It is show that, at these redshifts, annihilation pressure at the boundaries between regions of matter and antimatter drives large scale supersonic turbulence which can trigger galaxy formation. This picture is consistent with the gamma-ray background observations discussed previously. Gravitational binding of galaxies then occurs at a redshift of about 70, at which time vortical turbulent velocities of about 3 x 10 to the 7th power cm/s lead to angular momenta for galaxies comparable with measured values.

  9. Numerical Computation of the Chemically Reacting Flow around the National Aero-Space Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannehill, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    This final report summarizes the research accomplished. The research performed during the grant period can be divided into the following major areas: (1) Computation of chemically reacting Supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) flowfields. (2) Application of a two-equation turbulence model to supersonic combustion flowfields. (3) Computation of the integrated aerodynamic and propulsive flowfields of a generic hypersonic space plane. (4) Computation of hypersonic flows with finite-catalytic walls. (5) Development of an upwind Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code for thermo-chemical nonequilibrium flows.

  10. Assessment of the Partially Resolved Numerical Simulation (PRNS) Approach in the National Combustion Code (NCC) for Turbulent Nonreacting and Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an approach which aims at bridging the gap between the traditional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach and the traditional large eddy simulation (LES) approach. It has the characteristics of the very large eddy simulation (VLES) and we call this approach the partially-resolved numerical simulation (PRNS). Systematic simulations using the National Combustion Code (NCC) have been carried out for fully developed turbulent pipe flows at different Reynolds numbers to evaluate the PRNS approach. Also presented are the sample results of two demonstration cases: nonreacting flow in a single injector flame tube and reacting flow in a Lean Direct Injection (LDI) hydrogen combustor.

  11. Turbulent mixing layers in supersonic protostellar outflows, with application to DG Tauri

    CERN Document Server

    White, Marc C; Sutherland, Ralph S; Salmeron, Raquel; McGregor, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent entrainment processes may play an important role in the outflows from young stellar objects at all stages of their evolution. In particular, lateral entrainment of ambient material by high-velocity, well-collimated protostellar jets may be the cause of the multiple emission-line velocity components observed in the microjet-scale outflows driven by classical T Tauri stars. Intermediate-velocity outflow components may be emitted by a turbulent, shock- excited mixing layer along the boundaries of the jet. We present a formalism for describing such a mixing layer based on Reynolds decomposition of quantities measuring fundamental properties of the gas. In this model, the molecular wind from large disc radii provides a continual supply of material for entrainment. We calculate the total stress profile in the mixing layer, which allows us to estimate the dissipation of turbulent energy, and hence the luminosity of the layer. We utilize MAPPINGS IV shock models to determine the fraction of total emission t...

  12. Measurements of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer by focusing schlieren deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, S.; Settles, G. S.

    Some novel, non-intrusive, high-frequency, localized optical measurements of turbulence in compressible flows are described. The technique is based upon focusing schlieren optics coupled with high-speed quantitative measurement of light intensity fluctuations in the schlieren image. Measurements of density gradient fluctuations confined to a thin slice of the flowfield are thus obtained. The new instrument was used to investigate the structure of a two-dimensional, adiabatic, wind tunnel wall boundary layer at a Mach number of 3. The measurements were compared to data obtained using hot-wire anemometry and good agreement was found between the two. Distributions of broadband convection velocity of large-scale structures through the boundary later were also measured. In marked contrast to earlier results, it is shown here that the convection velocity is essentially identical to the local mean velocity. Further, results obtained using the VITA conditional sampling technique shed new light on the turbulent boundary layer structure. Overall, the data presented herein serve to validate the new measurement technique.

  13. Comparing Spray Characteristics from Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) National Combustion Code (NCC) Calculations Against Experimental Data for a Turbulent Reacting Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetti, Anthony C.; Moder, Jeffery P.

    2010-01-01

    Developing physics-based tools to aid in reducing harmful combustion emissions, like Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Unburnt Hydrocarbons (UHC s), and Sulfur Dioxides (SOx), is an important goal of aeronautics research at NASA. As part of that effort, NASA Glenn Research Center is performing a detailed assessment and validation of an in-house combustion CFD code known as the National Combustion Code (NCC) for turbulent reacting flows. To assess the current capabilities of NCC for simulating turbulent reacting flows with liquid jet fuel injection, a set of Single Swirler Lean Direct Injection (LDI) experiments performed at the University of Cincinnati was chosen as an initial validation data set. This Jet-A/air combustion experiment operates at a lean equivalence ratio of 0.75 at atmospheric pressure and has a 4 percent static pressure drop across the swirler. Detailed comparisons of NCC predictions for gas temperature and gaseous emissions (CO and NOx) against this experiment are considered in a previous work. The current paper is focused on detailed comparisons of the spray characteristics (radial profiles of drop size distribution and at several radial rakes) from NCC simulations against the experimental data. Comparisons against experimental data show that the use of the correlation for primary spray break-up implemented by Raju in the NCC produces most realistic results, but this result needs to be improved. Given the single or ten step chemical kinetics models, use of a spray size correlation gives similar, acceptable results

  14. LES Study on the Mechanism of Vortex Rings behind Supersonic MVG with Turbulent Inflow

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Yonghua; Lu, Ping; Liu, Chaoqun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the interaction between vortex rings behind MVG and the oblique shocks in the MVG controlled ramp flow at M=2.5 and Req=5760. Implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) method is used by solving the unfiltered form of the Navier-Stokes equations with the 5th order Bandwidth-optimized WENO scheme. The fully developed inflow is given by a series of turbulent profiles obtained from previous DNS simulation. It shows that the ring structure does not break down and keeps its topology after penetrating the strong shock wave and the oblique shocks is influenced a lot by the induced flow field from rings. The bump of the 3D shock wave surface is discovered and its mechanism is explained.

  15. 超声速化学反应流场迎风格式数值模拟及并行计算%PARALLELIZED UPWIND FLUX SPLITTING SCHEME FOR SUPERSONIC REACTING FLOWS ON UNSTRUCTURED HYBRID MESHES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王江峰; 伍贻兆

    2007-01-01

    A parallelized upwind flux splitting scheme for supersonic reacting flows on hybrid meshes is presented. The complexity of super/hyper-sonic combustion flows makes it necessary to establish solvers with higher resolution and efficiency for multi-component Euler/N-S equations. Hence, a spatial second-order van Leer type flux vector splitting scheme is established by introducing auxiliary points in interpolation, and a domain decomposition method used on unstructured hybrid meshes for obtaining high calculating efficiency. The numerical scheme with five-stage Runge-Kutta time step method is implemented to the simulation of combustion flows, including the supersonic hydrogen/air combustion and the normal injection of hydrogen into reacting flows. Satisfying results are obtained compared with limited references.%基于有限体积迎风格式对超声速燃烧流场进行了的数值模拟.由于超声速燃烧流场绕流的复杂性,要求对多组分Euler/N-S方程求解的数值模拟方法应具有较高的计算精度及效率.本文引用辅助点方法建立了具有空间二阶精度的van Leer迎风矢通量分裂格式,并应用于超声速燃烧流场绕流的数值模拟.化学反应为氢气/空气十反应模型,采用考虑了化学反应特征时间的当地时间步长显式Runge-Kutta时间推进格式.对钝头体模型爆轰现象、后向台阶氢气喷射及二维内外流超声速燃烧流场模型进行了区域分裂技术的并行计算.计算结果与参考文献作了对比,得到了满意的结果.

  16. Efficient partially implicit integration method for stiff chemistry in high-fidelity simulations of turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Ihme, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    High-fidelity turbulent reactive flow simulations are typically associated with small time step sizes (h combustion simulations due to the reduced number of internal iterations and excessive implicitness. In this study, an improved 4th-order Rosenbrock-Krylov (ROK4L) scheme is developed for the system of chemical reactions. This class of schemes replaces the Jacobian matrix by its low-rank Krylov approximation, thus introducing partial implicitness. The scheme is improved in both accuracy and efficiency by fulfilling additional order conditions and reducing the number of function evaluations. The ROK4L scheme is demonstrated to possess superior efficiency in comparison to CVODE due to the minimal degree of implicitness for small time-step sizes and the avoidance of other overhead associated with the start-up process of multi-step methods. Financial support from NASA Transformational Tools and Technologies Project with Award No. NNX15AV04A.

  17. 在超音速压缩角下的湍流模型数值比较%Comparison of Turbulent Models for Supersonic Compression Corner Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡李鹏; 苏莫明; 孙正中; 李小平

    2009-01-01

    在超音速飞机进气道的湍流数值仿真中,选择合适的湍流模型可以比较准确的捕捉激波位置和流场分布,对飞机发动机的设计和控制都是很重要的.但是对湍流模型的选择,文献中并无记载.针对上述情况选择了进气道的简化结构.分别运用标准的高雷诺数k-epsilon模型,重整化群RNG模型,Realizable k-epsilon模型及ASM模型等进行了数值仿真和比较.基于SIMPLE算法,采用相同的分析壁面函数处理法,并且对流项都采用MINMOD格式.从比较发现:RNG模型比标准的k-epsilon模型和Realizable k-epsilon模型精度高,比ASM模型精度稍低,但是比ASM模型省时间,最后作者认为RNG模型在算例中是最经济实用的湍流模型.%A decent turbulence model in the numerical simulation of supersonic inlet can precisely capture the shock wave and predict the flow field, which is very important to the design and control of aircraft engine. However, no reference deals with the selection of turbulence model under this condition, so a comparison of turbulent models is performed on the supersonic compression corner which is a similar and simple configuration of inlet channel. The four turbulent models are standard k -epsilon model, RNG model , Realizable model and ASM model. They depend on the same SIMPLE algorithm ,analytical wall function and MINMOD scheme of convection. The paper concludes that the RNG turbulent model is more precise than the standard k -epsilon model and the Realizable k -epsilon model, and needs less time than ASM model . In the end , the it is concluded that the RNG model is the most economic and practical one.

  18. Simultaneous measurements of temperature, density, and pressure in a supersonic turbulent flow using laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Gross, K. P.; Logan, P.

    1985-01-01

    A pulsed laser-induced fluorescence technique is described that provides simultaneous measurements of temperature, density, and pressure in low-temperature, turbulent flows. The measurements are made with spatial and temporal resolution comparable to that obtained with modern laser anemometer techniques used for turbulent boundary layer research. The capabilities of the method are briefly described and its demonstration in a simple two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer at Mach 2 is reported. The results are compared with conventional hot-wire anemometer data obtained in the same flow.

  19. Turbulence Characteristics of Swirling Reacting Flow in a Combustor with Staged Air Injection%分级进风燃烧室内旋流反应流的湍流特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健; 普勇; 周力行

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of the turbulent reacting flow in a swirl combustor with staged air injection. The air injected into the combustor is composed of the primary swirling jet and the secondary non-swirling jet. A three dimension-laser particle dynamic analyzer (PDA) was employed to measure the instantaneous gas velocity. The probability density functions (PDF) for the instantaneous gas axial and tangential velocities at each measuring location, as well as the radial profiles of the root mean square of fluctuating gas axial and tangential velocities and the second-order moment for the fluctuating gas axial and tangential velocities are obtained. The measured results delineate the turbulence properties of the swirling reacting flow under the conditions of staged combustion.

  20. A comparison between grid and particle methods on the small-scale dynamo in magnetised supersonic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Tricco, Terrence S; Federrath, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We perform a comparison between the smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD) code, Phantom, and the Eulerian grid-based code, Flash, on the small-scale turbulent dynamo in driven, Mach 10 turbulence. We show, for the first time, that the exponential growth and saturation of an initially weak magnetic field via the small-scale dynamo can be successfully reproduced with SPMHD. The two codes agree on the behaviour of the magnetic energy spectra, the saturation level of magnetic energy, and the distribution of magnetic field strengths during the growth and saturation phases. The main difference is that the dynamo growth rate, and its dependence on resolution, differs between the codes, caused by differences in the numerical dissipation and shock capturing schemes leading to differences in the effective Prandtl number in Phantom and Flash.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Combustion with Parallel Injection of Hydrogen Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S.R. Chandra Murty

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermochemical exploration of mixing and combustion of parallel hydrogen injection into supersonic vitiated air stream in a divergent duct is presented. Three-dimensional Navier Stokes equations along with twoequation turbulence models and Eddy dissipation concept (EDC-based combustion models are solved using commercial CFD software. Chemical reaction for H2-air system is modelled by two different simple chemical kinetic schemes namely; infinitely fast rate kinetics as well as the single-step finite rate kinetics. Grid convergence of the solution is demonstrated and a grid convergence index-based error estimate has been provided. Insight into the mixing and combustion of high-speed turbulent reacting flow is obtained through the analysis of various thermochemical variables. Very good comparisons are obtained for the exit profiles for various fluid dynamical and chemical variables for the mixing case. For reacting case, the comparison between the experimental and the numerical values are reasonable. Parametric studies were carried out to study the effect of different turbulence models and turbulent Schmidt numbers. It is seen that Wilcox k-w turbulence model performed better than the other two-equation turbulence models in its class. Strong dependence of flow behaviour on turbulent Schmidt number was observed. The results indicate that simple chemical kinetics is adequate to describe the H2-air reaction in the scramjet combustor.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(5, pp.465-475, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.57

  2. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  3. Investigation of nonlinear turbulence models for separated supersonic flows%超声速分离流非线性湍流模式的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓东; 马晖扬

    2002-01-01

    本文在低雷诺数k-ε两方程框架下,应用八个常见的非线性湍流模式,对两个激波/边界层相互作用诱导分离的超声速流动进行了研究.采用的非线性模式有:二阶模式(Wilcox & Rubesin (1980), Shih, Zhu & Lumley (1993), Shih, Zhu & Lumley (1995), Gatski & Speziale (1993))和三阶模式(Craft, Launder & Suga (1996), Lien & Leschziner (1996), Apsley & Leschziner (1998), Shih (1997)).两个超声速流动为:20°可压缩拐角绕流和轴对称尖顶拱-柱-裙组合体绕流.计算结果表明,对于激波边界层相互作用,在不做任何可压缩性修正的情况下,非线性模式并没有给出明显优于线性模式的结果.%Eight popular nonlinear turbulence models under low-Re k-ε framework have been tested and validated against experimental data of two supersonic flows with shock-wave/ boundary-layer interaction including separation. These models are: the nonlinear quadratic models ( Wilcox & Rubesin (1980), Shih, Zhu & Lumley (1993), Shih, Zhu & Lumley (1995), Gatski & Speziale (1993) ) and the nonlinear cubic models ( Craft, Launder & Suga (1996), Lien & Leschziner (1996), Apsley & Leschziner (1998), Shih (1997) ). The configurations consist of a 20°compression corner and an axisymmetric ogive-cylinder-flare. The computational results show that nonlinear models yield little improvement over linear models without any compressibility correction.

  4. Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z. Lin; R.E. Waltz

    2007-01-01

    @@ Turbulent transport driven by plasma pressure gradients [Tangl978] is one of the most important scientific challenges in burning plasma experiments since the balance between turbulent transport and the self-heating by the fusion products (a-particles) determines the performance of a fusion reactor like ITER.

  5. Turbulent heat flux measurement in a non-reacting round jet, using BAM:Eu2+ phosphor thermography and particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunchang; Böhm, Benjamin; Sadiki, Amsini; Dreizler, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Turbulent mixing is highly important in flows that involve heat and mass transfer. Information on turbulent heat flux is needed to validate the mixing models implemented in numerical simulations. The calculation of turbulent heat fluxes requires instantaneous information on temperature and velocity. Even using minimally intrusive laser optical methods, simultaneous measurement of temperature and velocity is still a challenge. In this study, thermographic phosphor particles are used for simultaneous thermometry and velocimetry: conventional particle image velocimetry is combined with temperature-dependent spectral shifts of BAM:Eu2+ phosphor particles upon UV excitation. The novelty of this approach is the analysis of systematic errors and verification using the well-known properties of a heated turbulent jet issuing into a low velocity, cold coflow. The analysis showed that systematic errors caused by laser fluence, multiple scattering, or preferential signal absorption can be reduced such that reliable measurement of scalar fluxes becomes feasible, which is a prerequisite for applying the method to more complex heat transfer problems.

  6. Numerical analysis for supersonic turbulent mixing layers of different species gases. lst report. ; Mixing characteristics of uniform flows. Choonsoku ishu gas ranryu kongoso no suchi kaiseki. 1. ; Ichiyoryu no kongo tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, S.; Ikegawa, M. (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-07-25

    Flow field in which two supersonic turbulent flows with different species gases mix, was analyzed with a two-equation turbulence model and the mixing characteristics of 2 supersonic parallel flows were investigated by making the inlet flow condition of high speed gas constant and by ststematically changing the inlet flow condition of low speed gas. When mixing is carried out so that high speed gas is taken in the low speed gas, high spreading rate of the mixing layer is obtained and this tendency is emphasized markedly as the ratio such as velocity, density and pressure between low and high speed gases become small. The spreading of low mass ratio layer of low speed gas and that of low mass ratio layer of high speed gas are assymmetric and the spreading of the former is suppressed at the coindition where the latter expands. The tendency of developing rate of mixing layer to the correlating parameter in this calculation agreed well with results of visualized experiment. 14 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Pdf prediction of supersonic hydrogen flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifler, P.; Kollmann, W.

    1993-01-01

    A hybrid method for the prediction of supersonic turbulent flows with combustion is developed consisting of a second order closure for the velocity field and a multi-scalar pdf method for the local thermodynamic state. It is shown that for non-premixed flames and chemical equilibrium mixture fraction, the logarithm of the (dimensionless) density, internal energy per unit mass and the divergence of the velocity have several advantages over other sets of scalars. The closure model is applied to a supersonic non-premixed flame burning hydrogen with air supplied by a supersonic coflow and the results are compared with a limited set of experimental data.

  8. Supersonic compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.; Breidenthal, Robert E.

    2016-04-12

    A supersonic compressor including a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a diffuser. The diffuser includes a plurality of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions, for deceleration of gas to subsonic conditions and then for expansion of subsonic gas, to change kinetic energy of the gas to static pressure. The aerodynamic ducts include vortex generating structures for controlling boundary layer, and structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when the aerodynamic ducts are designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are provided having an aspect ratio of in excess of two to one, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.

  9. Numerical simulation of the generation mechanism of axisymmetric supersonic jet screech tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. D.; Gao, J. H.

    2005-08-01

    In this paper an axisymmetric computational aeroacoustic procedure is developed to investigate the generation mechanism of axisymmetric supersonic jet screech tones. The axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations and the two equations standard k-ɛ turbulence model modified by Turpin and Troyes ["Validation of a two-equation turbulence model for axisymmetric reacting and non-reaction flows," AIAA Paper No. 2000-3463 (2000)] are solved in the generalized curvilinear coordinate system. A generalized wall function is applied in the nozzle exit wall region. The dispersion-relation-preserving scheme is applied for space discretization. The 2N storage low-dissipation and low-dispersion Runge-Kutta scheme is employed for time integration. Much attention is paid to far-field boundary conditions and turbulence model. The underexpanded axisymmetric supersonic jet screech tones are simulated over the Mach number from 1.05 to 1.2. Numerical results are presented and compared with the experimental data by other researchers. The simulated wavelengths of A0, A1, A2, and B modes and part of simulated amplitudes agree very well with the measurement data by Ponton and Seiner ["The effects of nozzle exit lip thickness on plume resonance," J. Sound Vib. 154, 531 (1992)]. In particular, the phenomena of modes jumping have been captured correctly although the numerical procedure has to be improved to predict the amplitudes of supersonic jet screech tones more accurately. Furthermore, the phenomena of shock motions are analyzed. The predicted splitting and combination of shock cells are similar with the experimental observations of Panda ["Shock oscillation in underexpanded screeching jets," J. Fluid. Mech. 363, 173 (1998)]. Finally, the receptivity process is numerically studied and analyzed. It is shown that the receptivity zone is associated with the initial thin shear layer, and the incoming and reflected sound waves.

  10. Experimental comparison of two hot-wire techniques for resolution of turbulent mass flux and local stagnation temperature in supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D. A.; Ng, W. F.; Walker, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of two constant-temperature normal hot-wire techniques in a supersonic flow is examined. The first technique uses a single-wire and rapid scanning of multiple overheat ratios. Time averages of the signals at all overheats are used to separate the mean and rms mass flux, stagnation temperature and their cross-correlation. The second technique uses a dual-wire probe with each wire operating at different overheat ratios, giving instantaneous mass flux and stagnation temperature. Preliminary results indicate that the separation distance (0.18 mm) between the two hot wires in the dual-wire probe does not introduce significant error. However, the rms mass flux inferred from the dual-wire technique is a factor of two higher than that from the single-wire technique.

  11. Multiphase reacting flows modelling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Marchisio, Daniele L

    2007-01-01

    The papers in this book describe the most widely applicable modeling approaches and are organized in six groups covering from fundamentals to relevant applications. In the first part, some fundamentals of multiphase turbulent reacting flows are covered. In particular the introduction focuses on basic notions of turbulence theory in single-phase and multi-phase systems as well as on the interaction between turbulence and chemistry. In the second part, models for the physical and chemical processes involved are discussed. Among other things, particular emphasis is given to turbulence modeling strategies for multiphase flows based on the kinetic theory for granular flows. Next, the different numerical methods based on Lagrangian and/or Eulerian schemes are presented. In particular the most popular numerical approaches of computational fluid dynamics codes are described (i.e., Direct Numerical Simulation, Large Eddy Simulation, and Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes approach). The book will cover particle-based meth...

  12. Two-Component Simultaneous LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimeter) Turbulence Measurements in an Axisymmetric Nozzle Afterbody Subsonic Flow Field with a Cold, Underexpanded Supersonic Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    Diffracted Laser Vclocimeter to Turbulence Measurement in a Subsonic Jet." AEDC- TR-76-36 (AD-A025355), May 1976. . Knott , P. and Mossey, P. "Parametric...0 . 5 I 1 8 3 ~ . ~ 306 2 3 I I O0 V = = 7 1 3 . 0 f i / s e c T t = 6 4 0 . 3 ° R SEQ ~D fiB VjF’V. V/V. IVI/V. M S / V . SJV. S ~ S

  13. Turbulent combustion flow through variable cross section channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogov, B.V.; Sokolova, I.A.

    1999-07-01

    The object of this study is to develop a new evolutionary numerical method for solving direct task of Laval nozzle, which provides non-iterative calculations of chemical reacting turbulent flows with detailed kinetic chemistry. The numerical scheme of fourth order along the normal coordinate and second order along the streamwise one is derived for calculation of difference-differential equations of the second order and the first order. Marching method provides the possibility of computing field flow in subsonic section of nozzle and near an expansion. Critical mass consumption is calculated with controlled accuracy. After critical cross section of nozzle a combined marching method with global iterations over axial pressure (only) makes it possible to overcome ill posedness of mixed supersonic flow and calculate the whole flow field near and after critical cross section. Numerical results are demonstrated on turbulent burning hydrogen-oxygen flow through Laval nozzle with curvature of wall K{sub w} = 0.5.

  14. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  15. Experimental design for research on shock-turbulence interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, S. W.

    1969-01-01

    Report investigates the production of acoustic waves in the interaction of a supersonic shock and a turbulence environment. The five stages of the investigation are apparatus design, development of instrumentation, preliminary experiment, turbulence generator selection, and main experiments.

  16. The experimental study of interaction between shock wave and turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO YuXin; YI ShiHe; HE Lin; CHENG ZhongYu; TIAN LiFeng

    2007-01-01

    The interaction between shock wave and turbulence has been studied in supersonic turbulent mix layer wind tunnel. The interaction between oblique shock wave and turbulent boundary layer and the influence of large vortex in mix layer on oblique shock wave have been observed by NPLS technique. From NPLS image, not only complex flow structure is observed but also time-dependent supersonic flow visualization is realized. The mechanism of interaction between shock wave and turbulence is discussed based on high quality NPLS image.

  17. Supersonic flow imaging via nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Due to influence of compressibility,shock wave,instabilities,and turbulence on supersonic flows, current flow visualization and imaging techniques encounter some problems in high spatiotemporal resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio(SNR)measurements.Therefore,nanoparticle based planar laser scattering method(NPLS)is developed here.The nanoparticles are used as tracer,and pulse planar laser is used as light source in NPLS;by recording images of particles in flow field with CCD, high spatiotemporal resolution supersonic flow imaging is realized.The flow-following ability of nanoparticles in supersonic flows is studied according to multiphase flow theory and calibrating experiment of oblique shock wave.The laser scattering characteristics of nanoparticles are analyzed with light scattering theory.The results of theoretical and experimental studies show that the dynamic behavior and light scattering characteristics of nanoparticles highly enhance the spatiotemporal resolution and SNR of NPLS,with which the flow field involving shock wave,expansion,Mach disk,boundary layer,sliding-line,and mixing layer can be imaged clearly at high spatiotemporal resolution.

  18. The Stellar IMF from turbulent fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padoan, P.; Nordlund, A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is unavoidable in super-sonically turbulent molecular clouds, and given the success of the present model to predict the observed shape of the Stellar IMF, they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is essential to the origin of the stellar IMF.

  19. Analysis of pressure perturbation sources on a generic space launcher after-body in supersonic flow using zonal turbulence modeling and dynamic mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statnikov, Vladimir; Sayadi, Taraneh; Meinke, Matthias; Schmid, Peter; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    A sparsity promoting dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) combined with a classical data-based statistical analysis is applied to the turbulent wake of a generic axisymmetric configuration of an Ariane 5-like launcher at Ma∞ = 6.0 computed via a zonal Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large-eddy simulation (RANS/LES) method. The objective of this work is to gain a better understanding of the wake flow dynamics of the generic launcher by clarification and visualization of initially unknown pressure perturbation sources on its after-body in coherent flow patterns. The investigated wake topology is characterized by a subsonic cavity region around the cylindrical nozzle extension which is formed due to the displacement effect of the afterexpanding jet plume emanating from the rocket nozzle (Mae = 2.52, pe/p∞ = 100) and the shear layer shedding from the main body. The cavity region contains two toroidal counter-rotating large-scale vortices which extensively interact with the turbulent shear layer, jet plume, and rocket walls, leading to the shear layer instability process to be amplified. The induced velocity fluctuations in the wake and the ultimately resulting pressure perturbations on the after-body feature three global characteristic frequency ranges, depending on the streamwise position inside the cavity. The most dominant peaks are detected at SrD r3 = 0.85 ± 0.075 near the nozzle exit, while the lower frequency peaks, in the range of SrD r2 = 0.55 ± 0.05 and SrD r1 = 0.25 ± 0.05, are found to be dominant closer to the rocket's base. A sparse promoting DMD algorithm is applied to the time-resolved velocity field to clarify the origin of the detected peaks. This analysis extracts three low-frequency spatial modes at SrD = 0.27, 0.56, and 0.85. From the three-dimensional shape of the DMD modes and the reconstructed modulation of the mean flow in time, it is deduced that the detected most dominant peaks of SrD r3 ≈ 0.85 are caused by the radial flapping motion of

  20. Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flows in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaeizadeh, Araz

    The two-phase compressible scalar filtered mass density function (FMDF) model is further developed and employed for large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent spray combustion in internal combustion (IC) engines. In this model, the filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved in a generalized curvilinear coordinate system with high-order, multi-block, compact differencing schemes for the turbulent velocity and pressure. However, turbulent mixing and combustion are computed with a new two-phase compressible scalar FMDF model. The spray and droplet dispersion/evaporation are modeled with a Lagrangian method. A new Lagrangian-Eulerian-Lagrangian computational method is employed for solving the flow, spray and scalar equation. The pressure effect in the energy equation, as needed in compressible flows, is included in the FMDF formulation. The performance of the new compressible LES/FMDF model is assessed by simulating the flow field and scalar mixing in a rapid compression machine (RCM), in a shock tube and in a supersonic co-axial jet. Consistency of temperatures predicted by the Eulerian finite-difference (FD) and Lagrangian Monte Carlo (MC) parts of the LES/FMDF model are established by including the pressure on the FMDF. It is shown that the LES/FMDF model is able to correctly capture the scalar mixing in both compressible subsonic and supersonic flows. Using the new two-phase LES/FMDF model, fluid dynamics, heat transfer, spray and combustion in the RCM with flat and crevice piston are studied. It is shown that the temperature distribution in the RCM with crevice piston is more uniform than the RCM with flat piston. The fuel spray characteristics and the spray parameters affecting the fuel mixing inside the RCM in reacting and non-reacting flows are also studied. The predicted liquid penetration and flame lift-off lengths for respectively non-reacting and reacting sprays are found to compare well with the available experimental data. Temperatures and

  1. The REACT Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Paul; Blystad, Astrid; Byskov, Jens;

    selected disease and programme interventions and services, within general care and on health systems management. Efforts to improve health sector performance have not yet been satisfactory, and adequate and sustainable improvements in health outcomes have not been shown. Priority setting in health systems...... decisions; and the provision of leadership and the enforcement of conditions. REACT - "REsponse to ACcountable priority setting for Trust in health systems" is an EU-funded five-year intervention study, which started in 2006 testing the application and effects of the AFR approach in one district each...... in Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia. Qualitative and quantitative methods are applied in an action research framework. The project baseline surveys have already been completed and indicate both a strong need and a high willingness for change in the study districts. REACT has developed active research...

  2. On supersonic combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁生学

    1999-01-01

    Some basic concepts and features of supersonic combustion are explained from the view point of macroscopic aerodynamics. Two kinds of interpretations of supersonic combustion are proposed. The difference between supersonic combustion and subsonic combustion is discussed, and the mechanism of supersonic combustion propagation and the limitation of heat addition in supersonic flow are pointed out. The results of the calculation of deflagration in supersonic flow show that the entropy increment and the total pressure loss of the combustion products may decrease with the increase of combustion velocity. It is also demonstrated that the oblique detonation wave angle may not be controlled by the wedge angle under weak underdriven solution conditions and be determined only by combustion velocity. Therefore, the weak underdriven solution may become self-sustaining oblique detonation waves with a constant wave angle.

  3. Pdf - Transport equations for chemically reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, W.

    1989-01-01

    The closure problem for the transport equations for pdf and the characteristic functions of turbulent, chemically reacting flows is addressed. The properties of the linear and closed equations for the characteristic functional for Eulerian and Lagrangian variables are established, and the closure problem for the finite-dimensional case is discussed for pdf and characteristic functions. It is shown that the closure for the scalar dissipation term in the pdf equation developed by Dopazo (1979) and Kollmann et al. (1982) results in a single integral, in contrast to the pdf, where double integration is required. Some recent results using pdf methods obtained for turbulent flows with combustion, including effects of chemical nonequilibrium, are discussed.

  4. Supersonic Injection of Aerated Liquid Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhari, Abhijit; Sallam, Khaled

    2016-11-01

    A computational study of the exit flow of an aerated two-dimensional jet from an under-expanded supersonic nozzle is presented. The liquid sheet is operating within the annular flow regime and the study is motivated by the application of supersonic nozzles in air-breathing propulsion systems, e.g. scramjet engines, ramjet engines and afterburners. The simulation was conducted using VOF model and SST k- ω turbulence model. The test conditions included: jet exit of 1 mm and mass flow rate of 1.8 kg/s. The results show that air reaches transonic condition at the injector exit due to the Fanno flow effects in the injector passage. The aerated liquid jet is alternately expanded by Prandtl-Meyer expansion fan and compressed by oblique shock waves due to the difference between the back (chamber) pressure and the flow pressure. The process then repeats itself and shock (Mach) diamonds are formed at downstream of injector exit similar to those typical of exhaust plumes of propulsion system. The present results, however, indicate that the flow field of supersonic aerated liquid jet is different from supersonic gas jets due to the effects of water evaporation from the liquid sheet. The contours of the Mach number, static pressure of both cases are compared to the theory of gas dynamics.

  5. Numerical and experimental investigations on supersonic ejectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartosiewicz, Y.; Aidoun, Z. [CETC-Varennes, Natural Resources Canada (Canada); Desevaux, P. [CREST-UMR 6000, Belfort (France); Mercadier, Y. [Sherbrooke Univ. (Canada). THERMAUS

    2005-02-01

    Supersonic ejectors are widely used in a range of applications such as aerospace, propulsion and refrigeration. The primary interest of this study is to set up a reliable hydrodynamics model of a supersonic ejector, which may be extended to refrigeration applications. The first part of this work evaluated the performance of six well-known turbulence models for the study of supersonic ejectors. The validation concentrated on the shock location, shock strength and the average pressure recovery prediction. Axial pressure measurements with a capillary probe performed previously [Int. J. Turbo Jet Engines 19 (2002) 71; Conference Proc., 10th Int. Symp. Flow Visualization, Kyoto, Japan, 2002], were compared with numerical simulations while laser tomography pictures were used to evaluate the non-mixing length. The capillary probe has been included in the numerical model and the non-mixing length has been numerically evaluated by including an additional transport equation for a passive scalar, which acted as an ideal colorant in the flow. At this point, the results show that the k-omega-sst model agrees best with experiments. In the second part, the tested model was used to reproduce the different operation modes of a supersonic ejector, ranging from on-design point to off-design. In this respect, CFD turned out to be an efficient diagnosis tool of ejector analysis (mixing, flow separation), for design, and performance optimization (optimum entrainment and recompression ratios). (Author)

  6. SIMULATION OF THE LASER DISCHARGE IN A SUPERSONIC GAS FLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tropina, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A heat model of the laser discharge in a supersonic turbulent gas flow has been developed. A numerical investigation of the error of the method of velocity measurements, which is based on the nitrogen molecules excitation, has been carried out. It is shown that fast gas heating by the discharge causes the velocity profiles deformation.

  7. Supersonic unstalled flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Goldstein, M. E.; Hartmann, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Recently two flutter analyses have been developed at NASA Lewis Research Center to predict the onset of supersonic unstalled flutter of a cascade of two-dimensional airfoils. The first of these analyzes the onset of supersonic flutter at low levels of aerodynamic loading (i.e., backpressure), while the second examines the occurrence of supersonic flutter at moderate levels of aerodynamic loading. Both of these analyses are based on the linearized unsteady inviscid equations of gas dynamics to model the flow field surrounding the cascade. The details of the development of the solution to each of these models have been published. The objective of the present paper is to utilize these analyses in a parametric study to show the effects of cascade geometry, inlet Mach number, and backpressure on the onset of single and multi degree of freedom unstalled supersonic flutter. Several of the results from this study are correlated against experimental qualitative observation to validate the models.

  8. Inflow Turbulence Generation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Research activities on inflow turbulence generation methods have been vigorous over the past quarter century, accompanying advances in eddy-resolving computations of spatially developing turbulent flows with direct numerical simulation, large-eddy simulation (LES), and hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes–LES. The weak recycling method, rooted in scaling arguments on the canonical incompressible boundary layer, has been applied to supersonic boundary layer, rough surface boundary layer, and microscale urban canopy LES coupled with mesoscale numerical weather forecasting. Synthetic methods, originating from analytical approximation to homogeneous isotropic turbulence, have branched out into several robust methods, including the synthetic random Fourier method, synthetic digital filtering method, synthetic coherent eddy method, and synthetic volume forcing method. This article reviews major progress in inflow turbulence generation methods with an emphasis on fundamental ideas, key milestones, representative applications, and critical issues. Directions for future research in the field are also highlighted.

  9. Supersonic flows over cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianwen FANG; Meng DING; Jin ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of supersonic cold flows over cavities were investigated experimentally and numer-ically, and the effects of cavities of different sizes on super-sonic flow field were analyzed. The results indicate that the ratio of length to depth L/D within the range of 5-9 has little relevance to integral structures of cavity flow. The bevel angle of the rear wall does not alter the overall structure of the cavity flow within the range of 30°-60°, but it can exert obvious effect on the evolvement of shear layer and vortexes in cavities.

  10. Simulation of underexpanded supersonic jet flows with chemical reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Debin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To achieve a detailed understanding of underexpanded supersonic jet structures influenced by afterburning and other flow conditions, the underexpanded turbulent supersonic jet with and without combustions are investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD method. A program based on a total variation diminishing (TVD methodology capable of predicting complex shocks is created to solve the axisymmetric expanded Navier–Stokes equations containing transport equations of species. The finite-rate ratio model is employed to handle species sources in chemical reactions. CFD solutions indicate that the structure of underexpanded jet is typically influenced by the pressure ratio and afterburning. The shock reflection distance and maximum value of Mach number in the first shock cell increase with pressure ratio. Chemical reactions for the rocket exhaust mostly exist in the mixing layer of supersonic jet flows. This tends to reduce the intensity of shocks existing in the jet, responding to the variation of thermal parameters.

  11. Simulation of underexpanded supersonic jet flows with chemical reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Debin; Yu Yong; Niu Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    To achieve a detailed understanding of underexpanded supersonic jet structures influenced by afterburning and other flow conditions, the underexpanded turbulent supersonic jet with and without combustions are investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. A program based on a total variation diminishing (TVD) methodology capable of predicting complex shocks is created to solve the axisymmetric expanded Navier-Stokes equations containing transport equations of species. The finite-rate ratio model is employed to handle species sources in chemical reactions. CFD solutions indicate that the structure of underexpanded jet is typically influenced by the pressure ratio and afterburning. The shock reflection distance and maximum value of Mach number in the first shock cell increase with pressure ratio. Chemical reactions for the rocket exhaust mostly exist in the mixing layer of supersonic jet flows. This tends to reduce the intensity of shocks existing in the jet, responding to the variation of thermal parameters.

  12. The PDF method for turbulent combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, S. B.

    1991-01-01

    Probability Density Function (PDF) methods provide a means of calculating the properties of turbulent reacting flows. They have been successfully applied to many turbulent flames, including some with finite rate kinetic effects. Here the methods are reviewed with an emphasis on computational issues and their application to turbulent combustion.

  13. Infinitesimal Conical Supersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemann, Adolf

    1947-01-01

    The calculation of infinitesimal conical supersonic flow has been applied first to the simplest examples that have also been calculated in another way. Except for the discovery of a miscalculation in an older report, there was found the expected conformity. The new method of calculation is limited more definitely to the conical case.

  14. DNS, LES and Stochastic Modeling of Turbulent Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    the analytical results derived by Fendell (1965) via the method of matched asymptotic expansions. A typical DNS scatter plot of the product mass...fields. In Buckmaster, J. D., Jackson, T. L., and Kumar, A., editors, Combustion in High-Speed Flows. in press. Fendell , F. E. (1965). Ignition and

  15. Simulation of Compressible Multi-Phase Turbulent Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    positivity and entropy preservation. The known instability of this solver to odd-even decoupling and carbuncle phenomenon is cured by employing the HLLE...Two-Shock Riemann Solver and the Roe Riemann solver with Harten-Hyman entropy corrections showed very strong sensitiveness to the instability. The...Paper 2005–0314, 2005. [23] B. Fryxell, K. Olson, P. Ricker, F. X. Timmes, M. Zingale, D. Q. Lamb , P. Mac- Neice, R. Rosner, J. W. Truran, and H. Tufo

  16. Star Formation in Turbulent Interstellar Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Klessen, R S

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the star formation process is central to much of modern astrophysics. For several decades it has been thought that stellar birth is primarily controlled by the interplay between gravity and magnetostatic support, modulated by ambipolar diffusion. Recently, however, both observational and numerical work has begun to suggest that supersonic interstellar turbulence rather than magnetic fields controls star formation. Supersonic turbulence can provide support against gravitational collapse on global scales, while at the same time it produces localized density enhancements that allow for collapse on small scales. The efficiency and timescale of stellar birth in Galactic molecular clouds strongly depend on the properties of the interstellar turbulent velocity field, with slow, inefficient, isolated star formation being a hallmark of turbulent support, and fast, efficient, clustered star formation occurring in its absence.

  17. Continuous supersonic plasma wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Nielsen, P.

    1968-01-01

    The B field configuration of a Q-device has been modified into a magnetic Laval nozzle. Continuous supersonic plasma flow is observed with M≈3......The B field configuration of a Q-device has been modified into a magnetic Laval nozzle. Continuous supersonic plasma flow is observed with M≈3...

  18. Continuous supersonic plasma wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Nielsen, P.

    1969-01-01

    The normal magnetic field configuration of a Q device has been modified to obtain a 'magnetic Laval nozzle'. Continuous supersonic plasma 'winds' are obtained with Mach numbers ~3. The magnetic nozzle appears well suited for the study of the interaction of supersonic plasma 'winds' with either...

  19. Multifluid magnetohydrodynamic turbulent decay

    CERN Document Server

    Downes, Turlough P

    2011-01-01

    It is generally believed that turbulence has a significant impact on the dynamics and evolution of molecular clouds and the star formation which occurs within them. Non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects are known to influence the nature of this turbulence. We present the results of a suite of 512-cubed resolution simulations of the decay of initially super-Alfvenic and supersonic fully multifluid MHD turbulence. We find that ambipolar diffusion increases the rate of decay of the turbulence while the Hall effect has virtually no impact. The decay of the kinetic energy can be fitted as a power-law in time and the exponent is found to be -1.34 for fully multifluid MHD turbulence. The power spectra of density, velocity and magnetic field are all steepened significantly by the inclusion of non-ideal terms. The dominant reason for this steepening is ambipolar diffusion with the Hall effect again playing a minimal role except at short length scales where it creates extra structure in the magnetic field. Interestingl...

  20. The Edge supersonic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Roxana; Bilbija, Dushan; Deutsch, Marc; Gallant, David; Rose, Don; Shreve, Gene; Smario, David; Suffredini, Brian

    1992-01-01

    As intercontinental business and tourism volumes continue their rapid expansion, the need to reduce travel times becomes increasingly acute. The Edge Supersonic Transport Aircraft is designed to meet this demand by the year 2015. With a maximum range of 5750 nm, a payload of 294 passengers and a cruising speed of M = 2.4, The Edge will cut current international flight durations in half, while maintaining competitive first class, business class, and economy class comfort levels. Moreover, this transport will render a minimal impact upon the environment, and will meet all Federal Aviation Administration Part 36, Stage III noise requirements. The cornerstone of The Edge's superior flight performance is its aerodynamically efficient, dual-configuration design incorporating variable-geometry wingtips. This arrangement combines the benefits of a high aspect ratio wing at takeoff and low cruising speeds with the high performance of an arrow-wing in supersonic cruise. And while the structural weight concerns relating to swinging wingtips are substantial, The Edge looks to ever-advancing material technologies to further increase its viability. Heeding well the lessons of the past, The Edge design holds economic feasibility as its primary focus. Therefore, in addition to its inherently superior aerodynamic performance, The Edge uses a lightweight, largely windowless configuration, relying on a synthetic vision system for outside viewing by both pilot and passengers. Additionally, a fly-by-light flight control system is incorporated to address aircraft supersonic cruise instability. The Edge will be produced at an estimated volume of 400 aircraft and will be offered to airlines in 2015 at $167 million per transport (1992 dollars).

  1. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  2. The three-dimensional flow organization past a micro-ramp in a supersonic boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Z.; Schrijer, F.F.J.; Scarano, F.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2012-01-01

    The three-dimensional instantaneous flow organization in the near wake of a micro-ramp interacting with a Mach 2.0 supersonic turbulent boundary layer is studied using tomographic particle image velocimetry. The mean flow reveals a wake with approximately circular cross section dominated by a pair o

  3. Numerical simulation of high speed chemically reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuricht, Scott Richard

    . The scramjet case demonstrates the usefulness of the method as a predictive tool for reacting flows. The rocket motor nozzle case demonstrates the capability of the method to handle mixed subsonic/transonic/supersonic flow environments. Five different chemical reaction mechanisms were studied illustrating the flexibility of the method.

  4. The effects of profiles on supersonic jet noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Bhat, T. R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of velocity profiles on supersonic jet noise are studied by using stability calculations made for a shock-free coannular jet, with both the inner and outer flows supersonic. The Mach wave emission process is modeled as the noise generated by the large scale turbulent structures or the instability waves in the mixing region. Both the vortex-sheet and the realistic finite thickness shear layer models are considered. The stability calculations were performed for both inverted and normal velocity profiles. Comparisons are made with the results for an equivalent single jet, based on equal thrust, mass flow rate and exit area to that of the coannular jet. The advantages and disadvantages of these velocity profiles as far as noise radiation is concerned are discussed. It is shown that the Rayleigh's model prediction of the merits and demerits of different velocity profiles are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Supersonic Jet Noise Reduction Using Microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Cuppoletti, Dan; Malla, Bhupatindra

    2013-11-01

    Fluidic injection for jet noise reduction involves injecting secondary jets into a primary jet to alter the noise characteristics of the primary jet. A major challenge has been determining what mechanisms are responsible for noise reduction due to varying injector designs, injection parameters, and primary jets. The current study provides conclusive results on the effect of injector angle and momentum ux ratio on the acoustics and shock structure of a supersonic Md = 1.56 jet. It is shown that the turbulent mixing noise scales primarily with the injector momentum flux ratio. Increasing the injector momentum flux ratio increases streamwise vorticity generation and reduces peak turbulence levels. It is found that the shock-related noise components are most affected by the interaction of the shocks from the injectors with the primary shock structure of the jet. Increasing momentum flux ratio causes shock noise reduction until a limit where shock noise increases again. It is shown that the shock noise components and mixing noise components are reduced through fundamentally different mechanisms and maximum overall noise reduction is achieved by balancing the reduction of both components.

  6. Coherent structures in a supersonic complex nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magstadt, Andrew; Berry, Matthew; Glauser, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The jet flow from a complex supersonic nozzle is studied through experimental measurements. The nozzle's geometry is motivated by future engine designs for high-performance civilian and military aircraft. This rectangular jet has a single plane of symmetry, an additional shear layer (referred to as a wall jet), and an aft deck representative of airframe integration. The core flow operates at a Mach number of Mj , c = 1 . 6 , and the wall jet is choked (Mj , w = 1 . 0). This high Reynolds number jet flow is comprised of intense turbulence levels, an intricate shock structure, shear and boundary layers, and powerful corner vortices. In the present study, stereo PIV measurements are simultaneously sampled with high-speed pressure measurements, which are embedded in the aft deck, and far-field acoustics in the anechoic chamber at Syracuse University. Time-resolved schlieren measurements have indicated the existence of strong flow events at high frequencies, at a Strouhal number of St = 3 . 4 . These appear to result from von Kàrmàn vortex shedding within the nozzle and pervade the entire flow and acoustic domain. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied on the current data to identify coherent structures in the jet and study the influence of this vortex street. AFOSR Turbulence and Transition Program (Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0435) with program managers Dr. I. Leyva and Dr. R. Ponnappan.

  7. Equilibrium chemical reaction of supersonic hydrogen-air jets (the ALMA computer program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghobashi, S.

    1977-01-01

    The ALMA (axi-symmetrical lateral momentum analyzer) program is concerned with the computation of two dimensional coaxial jets with large lateral pressure gradients. The jets may be free or confined, laminar or turbulent, reacting or non-reacting. Reaction chemistry is equilibrium.

  8. Supersonic induction plasma jet modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selezneva, S.E. E-mail: svetlana2@hermes.usherbS_Selezneva2@hermes.usherb; Boulos, M.I

    2001-06-01

    Numerical simulations have been applied to study the argon plasma flow downstream of the induction plasma torch. It is shown that by means of the convergent-divergent nozzle adjustment and chamber pressure reduction, a supersonic plasma jet can be obtained. We investigate the supersonic and a more traditional subsonic plasma jets impinging onto a normal substrate. Comparing to the subsonic jet, the supersonic one is narrower and much faster. Near-substrate velocity and temperature boundary layers are thinner, so the heat flux near the stagnation point is higher in the supersonic jet. The supersonic plasma jet is characterized by the electron overpopulation and the domination of the recombination over the dissociation, resulting into the heating of the electron gas. Because of these processes, the supersonic induction plasma permits to separate spatially different functions (dissociation and ionization, transport and deposition) and to optimize each of them. The considered configuration can be advantageous in some industrial applications, such as plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition of diamond and polymer-like films and in plasma spraying of nanoscaled powders.

  9. Study of density field measurement based on NPLS technique in supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Due to the influence of shock wave and turbulence, supersonic density field exhibits strongly inhomogeneous and unsteady characteristics. Applying traditional density field measurement techniques to supersonic flows yields three problems: low spatiotemporal resolution, limitation of measuring 3D density field, and low signal to noise ratio (SNR). A new method based on Nano-based Planar Laser Scattering (NPLS) technique is proposed in this paper to measure supersonic density field. This method measures planar transient density field in 3D supersonic flow by calibrating the relationship between density and concentration of tracer particles, which would display the density fluctuation due to the influence of shock waves and vortexes. The application of this new method to density field measurement of supersonic optical bow cap is introduced in this paper, and the results reveal shock wave, turbulent boundary layer in the flow with the spatial resolution of 93.2 μm/pixel. By analyzing the results at interval of 5 μs, temporal evolution of density field can be observed.

  10. Study of density field measurement based on NPLS technique in supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN LiFeng; YI ShiHe; ZHAO YuXin; HE Lin; CHENG ZhongYu

    2009-01-01

    Due to the influence of shock wave and turbulence,supersonic density field exhibits strongly inho-mogeneous and unsteady characteristics.Applying traditional density field measurement techniques to supersonic flows yields three problems: low spatiotemporal resolution,limitation of measuring 3D density field,and low signal to noise ratio (SNR).A new method based on Nano-based Planar Laser Scattering (NPLS) technique is proposed in this paper to measure supersonic density field.This method measures planar transient density field in 3D supersonic flow by calibrating the relationship between density and concentration of tracer particles,which would display the density fluctuation due to the influence of shock waves and vortexes.The application of this new method to density field measurement of supersonic optical bow cap is introduced in this paper,and the results reveal shock wave,turbulent boundary layer in the flow with the spatial resolution of 93.2 pm/pixel.By analyzing the results at interval of 5 μs,temporal evolution of density field can be observed.

  11. Methods for Prediction of High-Speed Reacting Flows in Aerospace Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, J. Philip

    2014-01-01

    Research to develop high-speed airbreathing aerospace propulsion systems was underway in the late 1950s. A major part of the effort involved the supersonic combustion ramjet, or scramjet, engine. Work had also begun to develop computational techniques for solving the equations governing the flow through a scramjet engine. However, scramjet technology and the computational methods to assist in its evolution would remain apart for another decade. The principal barrier was that the computational methods needed for engine evolution lacked the computer technology required for solving the discrete equations resulting from the numerical methods. Even today, computer resources remain a major pacing item in overcoming this barrier. Significant advances have been made over the past 35 years, however, in modeling the supersonic chemically reacting flow in a scramjet combustor. To see how scramjet development and the required computational tools finally merged, we briefly trace the evolution of the technology in both areas.

  12. Numerical simulation of reacting and non-reacting flow in a combustion chamber; Numerisk simulering av reagerande och icke-reagerande stroemning i en braennkammare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, A.; Revstedt, J.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this work has been to do a preliminary study of how well numerical calculations with different turbulence models can predict the flow and temperature fields of a strongly swirling and combusting flow in an experimental combustion chamber and to see which parameters in the mathematical model are the most important. The combustion chamber on which we have done the calculations is called Validation Rig II and was designed by Volvo Aero Corporation. The main part of the study has been carried out on a non-reacting flow but some work has also been done on reacting flow. In most cases it has not been meaningful to compare the calculations with the measurements because they differ quite a lot from each other. For the non-reacting case the following investigations have been made: * How the solution differs for different turbulence models, * The solutions sensitivity to inlet boundary conditions, * How different types of leakage disturb the flow, and * The difference in results between two different CFD-codes, the commercial code CFDS-Flow3D and a code developed at the department of fluid mechanics. For the reacting cases we have studied the influence of: * one or two reaction steps, * the effects of a change in reaction rate, * the influence of thermal radiation, and * the effects of changing the boundary conditions for temperature on the walls. The results from these calculations show that the inlet turbulence intensity has very little effect on the values of the turbulent quantities as well as the velocity profiles at the outlet. Changing the turbulence model or the outlet boundary conditions gives some change in velocity profiles at the outlet but only marginal effects on the swirl number. 21 refs, 54 figs, 19 tabs

  13. The improvement of turbulence modeling for the aerothermal computation of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The engineering computation of turbulent flows is mainly based on turbulence modeling,however,accurate aerothermal computation of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers is still a not well-solved problem. Aerothermal computation for turbulent boundary layers on a supersonic or hypersonic blunt cone with small bluntness is done firstly by using both direct numerical simulation and BL model,and seven different cases are investigated. Then the results obtained by the two methods are compared,and the reason causing the differences is found to be the incorrect assumption in the turbulence modeling that the ratio between eddy heat conductivity and eddy viscosity is constant throughout the whole boundary layer. Based on certain theoretical arguments,a method of modifying the expression of eddy heat conductivity in the region surrounding the peak location of the turbulent kinetic energy is proposed,which is verified to be effective,at least for the seven cases investigated.

  14. Tesseract supersonic business transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshotko, Eli; Garbinski, Gary; Fellenstein, James; Botting, Mary; Hooper, Joan; Ryan, Michael; Struk, Peter; Taggart, Ben; Taillon, Maggie; Warzynski, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This year, the senior level Aerospace Design class at Case Western Reserve University developed a conceptual design of a supersonic business transport. Due to the growing trade between Asia and the United States, a transpacific range was chosen for the aircraft. A Mach number of 2.2 was chosen, too, because it provides reasonable block times and allows the use of a large range of materials without a need for active cooling. A payload of 2,500 lbs. was assumed corresponding to a complement of nine passengers and crew, plus some light cargo. With these general requirements set, the class was broken down into three groups. The aerodynamics of the aircraft were the responsibility of the first group. The second developed the propulsion system. The efforts of both the aerodynamics and propulsion groups were monitored and reviewed for weight considerations and structural feasibility by the third group. Integration of the design required considerable interaction between the groups in the final stages. The fuselage length of the final conceptual design was 107.0 ft, while the diameter of the fuselage was 7.6 ft. The delta wing design consisted of an aspect ratio of 1.9 with a wing span of 47.75 ft and mid-chord length of 61.0 ft. A SNECMA MCV 99 variable-cycle engine design was chosen for this aircraft.

  15. Tesseract: Supersonic business transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshotko, Eli; Garbinski, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This year, the senior level Aerospace Design class at Case Western Reserve University developed a conceptual design of a supersonic business transport. Due to the growing trade between Asia and the United States, a transpacific range has been chosen for the aircraft. A Mach number of 2.2 was chosen too because it provides reasonable block times and allows the use of a large range of materials without a need for active cooling. A payload of 2500 lbs. has been assumed corresponding to a complement of nine (passengers and crew) plus some light cargo. With these general requirements set, the class was broken down into three groups. The aerodynamics of the aircraft were the responsibility of the first group. The second developed the propulsion system. The efforts of both the aerodynamics and propulsion groups were monitored and reviewed for weight considerations and structural feasibility by the third group. Integration of the design required considerable interaction between the groups in the final stages. The fuselage length of the final conceptual design was 107.0 ft. while the diameter of the fuselage was 7.6 ft. The delta wing design consisted of an aspect ratio of 1.9 with a wing span of 47.75 ft and midcord length of 61.0 ft. A SNEMCA MCV 99 variable-cycle engine design was chosen for this aircraft.

  16. Acoustic imaging for diagnostics of chemically reacting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramohalli, K.; Seshan, P.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of local diagnostics, in chemically reacting systems, with acoustic imaging is developed. The elements of acoustic imaging through ellipsoidal mirrors are theoretically discussed. In a general plan of the experimental program, the first system is chosen in these studies to be a simple open jet, non premixed turbulent flame. Methane is the fuel and enriched air is the oxidizer. This simple chemically reacting flow system is established at a Reynolds number (based on cold viscosity) of 50,000. A 1.5 m diameter high resolution acoustic mirror with an f-number of 0.75 is used to map the acoustic source zone along the axis of the flame. The results are presented as acoustic power spectra at various distances from the nozzle exit. It is seen that most of the reaction intensity is localized in a zone within 8 diameters from the exit. The bulk reactions (possibly around the periphery of the larger eddies) are evenly distributed along the length of the flame. Possibilities are seen for locally diagnosing single zones in a multiple cluster of reaction zones that occur frequently in practice. A brief outline is given of the future of this work which will be to apply this technique to chemically reacting flows not limited to combustion.

  17. The role of presumed probability density functions in the simulation of nonpremixed turbulent combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coclite, A.; Pascazio, G.; De Palma, P.; Cutrone, L.

    2016-07-01

    Flamelet-Progress-Variable (FPV) combustion models allow the evaluation of all thermochemical quantities in a reacting flow by computing only the mixture fraction Z and a progress variable C. When using such a method to predict turbulent combustion in conjunction with a turbulence model, a probability density function (PDF) is required to evaluate statistical averages (e. g., Favre averages) of chemical quantities. The choice of the PDF is a compromise between computational costs and accuracy level. The aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of the PDF choice and its modeling aspects to predict turbulent combustion. Three different models are considered: the standard one, based on the choice of a β-distribution for Z and a Dirac-distribution for C; a model employing a β-distribution for both Z and C; and the third model obtained using a β-distribution for Z and the statistically most likely distribution (SMLD) for C. The standard model, although widely used, does not take into account the interaction between turbulence and chemical kinetics as well as the dependence of the progress variable not only on its mean but also on its variance. The SMLD approach establishes a systematic framework to incorporate informations from an arbitrary number of moments, thus providing an improvement over conventionally employed presumed PDF closure models. The rational behind the choice of the three PDFs is described in some details and the prediction capability of the corresponding models is tested vs. well-known test cases, namely, the Sandia flames, and H2-air supersonic combustion.

  18. Supersonic Dislocation Bursts in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, E. N.; Zhao, S.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Dislocations are the primary agents of permanent deformation in crystalline solids. Since the theoretical prediction of supersonic dislocations over half a century ago, there is a dearth of experimental evidence supporting their existence. Here we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shocked silicon to reveal transient supersonic partial dislocation motion at approximately 15 km/s, faster than any previous in-silico observation. Homogeneous dislocation nucleation occurs near the shock front and supersonic dislocation motion lasts just fractions of picoseconds before the dislocations catch the shock front and decelerate back to the elastic wave speed. Applying a modified analytical equation for dislocation evolution we successfully predict a dislocation density of 1.5 × 1012 cm-2 within the shocked volume, in agreement with the present simulations and realistic in regards to prior and on-going recovery experiments in silicon.

  19. Fundamentals of Turbulent and Multi-Phase Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Kuo, Kenneth Kuan-yun

    2012-01-01

    Detailed coverage of advanced combustion topics from the author of Principles of Combustion, Second Edition Turbulence, turbulent combustion, and multiphase reacting flows have become major research topics in recent decades due to their application across diverse fields, including energy, environment, propulsion, transportation, industrial safety, and nanotechnology. Most of the knowledge accumulated from this research has never been published in book form-until now. Fundamentals of Turbulent and Multiphase Combustion presents up-to-date, integrated coverage of the fundamentals of turbulence

  20. Properties of Supersonic Evershed Downflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozuelo, S. Esteban; Bellot Rubio, L. R.; de la Cruz Rodríguez, J.

    2016-12-01

    We study supersonic Evershed downflows in a sunspot penumbra by means of high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric data acquired in the Fe i 617.3 nm line with the CRISP instrument at the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. Physical observables, such as Dopplergrams calculated from line bisectors and Stokes V zero-crossing wavelengths, and Stokes V maps in the far red-wing, are used to find regions where supersonic Evershed downflows may exist. We retrieve the line-of-sight velocity and the magnetic field vector in these regions using two-component inversions of the observed Stokes profiles with the help of the SIR code. We follow these regions during their lifetime to study their temporal behavior. Finally, we carry out a statistical analysis of the detected supersonic downflows to characterize their physical properties. Supersonic downflows are contained in compact patches moving outward, which are located in the mid- and outer penumbra. They are observed as bright, roundish structures at the outer end of penumbral filaments that resemble penumbral grains. The patches may undergo fragmentations and mergings during their lifetime; some of them are recurrent. Supersonic downflows are associated with strong and rather vertical magnetic fields with a reversed polarity compared to that of the sunspot. Our results suggest that downflows returning back to the solar surface with supersonic velocities are abruptly stopped in dense deep layers and produce a shock. Consequently, this shock enhances the temperature and is detected as a bright grain in the continuum filtergrams, which could explain the existence of outward-moving grains in the mid- and outer penumbra.

  1. A new compressibility modification k-ε turbulence model with shock unsteadiness effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN XingSi; YE TaoHong; ZHU MinMing; CHEN YiLiang

    2008-01-01

    A new compressibility modification k-ε model, including shock unsteadiness effect and the previous compressibility modification of pressure dilatation and dilatational dissipation rate, was developed with a simple formulation for numerical simulation in supersonic complex turbulent flows. The shock unsteadiness effect was modeled by inhibiting turbulent kinetic energy production in the governing equations of turbulent kinetic energy and the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate. Sarkar's correction models were employed accounting for the dilatational compressibility effects in the new model.Two types of flows, the free supersonic mixing layers and complex supersonic flow with transverse injection were simulated with different flow conditions. Comparisons with experimental data of the free supersonic mixing layers showed that the new compressibility modification k-ε model significantly inhibited the excessive growth of turbulent kinetic energy and improved predictions. On the supersonic mixing layer flows, prediction results with the new model were in close agreement with experimental data, accurately predicting the decreasing trend of the mixing layer spreading rate with the increase of the convective Mach number. Due to the complicated flow field with flow separation, shock unsteadiness modification inhibited excessive growth of the turbulent kinetic energy in shock regions and wider shock regions are predicted, thereby significantly improving results of the flow with a strong separation forecast. The flow separation was stronger, which was the primary modification effect of the new model. Predictions accord with experimental results even in strong separation flows.

  2. Molecular Tracers of Turbulent Shocks in Giant Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Pon, A; Kaufman, M J

    2012-01-01

    Giant molecular clouds contain supersonic turbulence and simulations of MHD turbulence show that these supersonic motions decay in roughly a crossing time, which is less than the estimated lifetimes of molecular clouds. Such a situation requires a significant release of energy. We run models of C-type shocks propagating into gas with densities around 10^3 cm^(-3) at velocities of a few km / s, appropriate for the ambient conditions inside of a molecular cloud, to determine which species and transitions dominate the cooling and radiative energy release associated with shock cooling of turbulent molecular clouds. We find that these shocks dissipate their energy primarily through CO rotational transitions and by compressing pre-existing magnetic fields. We present model spectra for these shocks and by combining these models with estimates for the rate of turbulent energy dissipation, we show that shock emission should dominate over emission from unshocked gas for mid to high rotational transitions (J >5) of CO. ...

  3. Numerical Simulation of the Supersonic Flows in the Second Throat Ejector —Diffuser Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HeuydongKim; ToshiakiSetoguchi; 等

    1999-01-01

    The supersonic ejector-diffuser system with a second throat was simulated using CFD.A fully implicity finite volume scheme was applied to solve the axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations and a standard k-ε turbulence model was used to close the governing equations,The flow field in the supersonic ejectordiffuser system was investigated by changing the ejector throat area ratio and the secondary mass flow ratio at a fixed operating pressure ratio of 10. A convergent-divergent nozzle with a design Mach number of 2.11 was selected to give the supersonic operation of the ejector -diffuser system.For the constant area mixing tube the secondary mass flow seemed not to singnificantly change the flow field in the ejector-diffuser systems.It was however,found that the flow in the ejector-diffuser systems having the second throat is strongly dependent on the secondary mass flow.

  4. The Origin of Molecular Cloud Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Padoan, Paolo; Haugboelle, Troels; Nordlund, Ake

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in molecular clouds (MCs), but its origin is still unclear because MCs are usually assumed to live longer than the turbulence dissipation time. It has been shown that interstellar medium (ISM) turbulence is likely driven by SN explosions, but it has never been demonstrated that SN explosions can establish and maintain a turbulent cascade inside MCs consistent with the observations. In this work, we carry out a simulation of SN-driven turbulence in a volume of (250 pc)^3, specifically designed to test if SN driving alone can be responsible for the observed turbulence inside MCs. We find that SN driving establishes velocity scaling consistent with the usual scaling laws of supersonic turbulence. This also means that previous idealized simulations of MC turbulence, driven with a random, large-scale volume force, were correctly adopted as appropriate models for MC turbulence, despite the artificial driving. We also find the same scaling laws extend to the interior of MCs, and their normal...

  5. Turbulent Velocity Structure in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ossenkopf, V; Ossenkopf, Volker; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2002-01-01

    We compare velocity structure observed in the Polaris Flare molecular cloud at scales ranging from 0.015 pc to 20 pc to the velocity structure of a suite of simulations of supersonic hydrodynamic and MHD turbulence computed with the ZEUS MHD code. We examine different methods of characterising the structure, including a scanning-beam size-linewidth relation, structure functions, velocity and velocity difference probability distribution functions (PDFs), and the Delta-variance wavelet transform, and use them to compare models and observations. The Delta-variance is most sensitive in detecting characteristic scales and varying scaling laws, but is limited in the observational application by its lack of intensity weighting. We compare the true velocity PDF in our models to simulated observations of velocity centroids and average line profiles in optically thin lines, and find that the line profiles reflect the true PDF better. The observed velocity structure is consistent with supersonic turbulence showing a com...

  6. Properties of Supersonic Evershed Downflows

    CERN Document Server

    Pozuelo, Sara Esteban; Rodriguez, Jaime de la Cruz

    2016-01-01

    We study supersonic Evershed downflows in a sunspot penumbra by means of high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric data acquired in the Fe I 617.3 nm line with the CRISP instrument at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. Physical observables, such as Dopplergrams calculated from line bisectors and Stokes V zero-crossing wavelengths, and Stokes V maps in the far red wing, are used to find regions where supersonic Evershed downflows may exist. We retrieve the LOS velocity and the magnetic field vector in these regions using two-component inversions of the observed Stokes profiles with the help of the SIR code. We follow these regions during their lifetime to study their temporal behavior. Finally, we carry out a statistical analysis of the detected supersonic downflows to characterize their physical properties. Supersonic downflows are contained in compact patches moving outward, which are located in the mid and outer penumbra. They are observed as bright, roundish structures at the outer end of penumbral filamen...

  7. Does turbulence determine the initial mass function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptai, David; Price, Daniel J.; Wurster, James; Bate, Matthew R.

    2017-02-01

    We test the hypothesis that the initial mass function (IMF) is determined by the density probability distribution function (PDF) produced by supersonic turbulence. We compare 14 simulations of star cluster formation in 50 M⊙ molecular cloud cores where the initial turbulence contains either purely solenoidal or purely compressive modes, in each case resolving fragmentation to the opacity limit to determine the resultant IMF. We find statistically indistinguishable IMFs between the two sets of calculations, despite a factor of 2 difference in the star formation rate and in the standard deviation of log (ρ). This suggests that the density PDF, while determining the star formation rate, is not the primary driver of the IMF.

  8. A numerical study of turbulent combustion characteristics in a combustion chamber of a scramjet engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE; ChunHian

    2010-01-01

    3D numerical simulation of flow fields in a combustion chamber of a scramjet engine using an SST turbulence model with an explicit compressibility correction was performed and the results were compared to the experimental results.The characteristics of the turbulent combustion flow fields were analyzed via the numerical results and presented.In order to identify the mechanisms of turbulent combustion in supersonic flows,the evolutions of governing dimensionless parameters in the flow fields were investigated based on the theory of combustion and the available numerical results.It was found that the supersonic combustion takes place in the region of fully developed turbulence and that the strongest effects of turbulence and combustion processes appear in the vicinity of the injector.The unsteady effects and the local flame extinction phenomenon induced by turbulent flows were found to be negligibly small,and the steady flamelet approximation will hold for practical applications.

  9. Isotropically Driven versus Outflow Driven Turbulence: Observational Consequences for Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, Jonathan J; Blackman, Eric G

    2010-01-01

    Feedback from protostellar outflows can influence the nature of turbulence in star forming regions even if they are not the primary source of velocity dispersion for all scales of molecular clouds. For the rate and power expected in star forming regions, we previously (Carroll et al. 2009) demonstrated that outflows could drive supersonic turbulence at levels consistent with the scaling relations from Matzner 2007 although with a steeper velocity power spectrum than expected for an isotropically driven supersonic turbulent cascade. Here we perform higher resolution simulations and combine simulations of outflow driven turbulence with those of isotropically forced turbulence. We find that the presence of outflows within an ambient isotropically driven turbulent environment produces a knee in the velocity power spectrum at the outflow scale and a steeper slope at sub-outflow scales than for a purely isotropically forced case. We also find that the presence of outflows flattens the density spectrum at large scal...

  10. Supersonic Plasma Flow Control Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    to liquid metals , for example, the conductivities of typical plasma and electrolyte flows are relatively low. Ref. 14 cites the conductivity of...heating is the dominant effect. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Supersonic, plasma , MHD , boundary-layer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...horns in operation on Mach 5 wind tunnel with a plasma discharge. 31 Figure 17 Front view of a 100 mA DC discharge generated with upstream pointing

  11. Supersonic Chordwise Bending Flutter in Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-31

    such a flutter boundary can be made by utilizing the trend lines predicted from a supersonic analysis based on supersonic cascade theory (Appendix I...bonding agent was injected via hypodermic needles after the blade tabs were properly inserted, The integrity and repeatability of the mounting of the indi...in conjunction with NASTRAN predictions and supersonic cascade aerodynamic computa- tions. Comparisons between theory and experiment are discussed. DD

  12. Turbulence and diffusion fossil turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    2000-01-01

    Fossil turbulence processes are central to turbulence, turbulent mixing, and turbulent diffusion in the ocean and atmosphere, in astrophysics and cosmology, and in most other natural flows. George Gamov suggested in 1954 that galaxies might be fossils of primordial turbulence produced by the Big Bang. John Woods showed that breaking internal waves on horizontal dye sheets in the interior of the stratified ocean form highly persistent remnants of these turbulent events, which he called fossil turbulence. The dark mixing paradox of the ocean refers to undetected mixing that must exist somewhere to explain why oceanic scalar fields like temperature and salinity are so well mixed, just as the dark matter paradox of galaxies refers to undetected matter that must exist to explain why rotating galaxies don't fly apart by centrifugal forces. Both paradoxes result from sampling techniques that fail to account for the extreme intermittency of random variables involved in self-similar, nonlinear, cascades over a wide ra...

  13. Quantitative visualization of the chemical reacting JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, K.; Arata, Y.; Sasaki, T.; Madarame, H. [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    The sodium-water reaction should be precisely evaluated for the safety analysis of the sodium-cooled nuclear power plant. To evaluate these chemical reacting jet, the characteristics of the reaction and the mole fraction distributions of the reacting material should be known. In this study, to evaluate the basic characteristics, two fluid jet and chemical reacting jet was measured by the PIV and DELIF. The new dye pair for the dual emission LIF technique was proposed to measure the pH distribution. The Quinine for pH sensitive dye with blue emission and Rhodamine 6G for non-sensitive dye with orange emission, were excited by the third harmonic of Nd:YAG laser (355nm). The high accurate measurement could be achieved for the range of pH 4.0 to 5.5. The ammonia jet into acetic acid was measured using the proposed dye. The effectiveness of the present method was demonstrated. (author)

  14. PDF approach for turbulent scalar field: Some recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng

    1993-01-01

    The probability density function (PDF) method has been proven a very useful approach in turbulence research. It has been particularly effective in simulating turbulent reacting flows and in studying some detailed statistical properties generated by a turbulent field There are, however, some important questions that have yet to be answered in PDF studies. Our efforts in the past year have been focused on two areas. First, a simple mixing model suitable for Monte Carlo simulations has been developed based on the mapping closure. Secondly, the mechanism of turbulent transport has been analyzed in order to understand the recently observed abnormal PDF's of turbulent temperature fields generated by linear heat sources.

  15. Calorimetry of non-reacting systems

    CERN Document Server

    McCullough, John P

    2013-01-01

    Experimental Thermodynamics, Volume 1: Calorimetry of Non-Reacting Systems covers the heat capacity determinations for chemical substances in the solid, liquid, solution, and vapor states, at temperatures ranging from near the absolute zero to the highest at which calorimetry is feasible.This book is divided into 14 chapters. The first four chapters provide background information and general principles applicable to all types of calorimetry of non-reacting systems. The remaining 10 chapters deal with specific types of calorimetry. Most of the types of calorimetry treated are developed over a c

  16. Experimental observations of a complex, supersonic nozzle concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magstadt, Andrew; Berry, Matthew; Glauser, Mark; Ruscher, Christopher; Gogineni, Sivaram; Kiel, Barry; Skytop Turbulence Labs, Syracuse University Team; Spectral Energies, LLC. Team; Air Force Research Laboratory Team

    2015-11-01

    A complex nozzle concept, which fuses multiple canonical flows together, has been experimentally investigated via pressure, schlieren and PIV in the anechoic chamber at Syracuse University. Motivated by future engine designs of high-performance aircraft, the rectangular, supersonic jet under investigation has a single plane of symmetry, an additional shear layer (referred to as a wall jet) and an aft deck representative of airframe integration. Operating near a Reynolds number of 3 ×106 , the nozzle architecture creates an intricate flow field comprised of high turbulence levels, shocks, shear & boundary layers, and powerful corner vortices. Current data suggest that the wall jet, which is an order of magnitude less energetic than the core, has significant control authority over the acoustic power through some non-linear process. As sound is a direct product of turbulence, experimental and analytical efforts further explore this interesting phenomenon associated with the turbulent flow. The authors acknowledge the funding source, a SBIR Phase II project with Spectral Energies, LLC. and AFRL turbine engine branch under the direction of Dr. Barry Kiel.

  17. Performance of Several High Order Numerical Methods for Supersonic Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjoegreen, Bjoern; Yee, H. C.; Don, Wai Sun; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The performance of two recently developed numerical methods by Yee et al. and Sjoegreen and Yee using postprocessing nonlinear filters is examined for a 2-D multiscale viscous supersonic react-live flow. These nonlinear filters can improve nonlinear instabilities and at the same time can capture shock/shear waves accurately. They do not, belong to the class of TVD, ENO or WENO schemes. Nevertheless, they combine stable behavior at discontinuities and detonation without smearing the smooth parts of the flow field. For the present study, we employ a fourth-order Runge-Kutta in time and a sixth-order non-dissipative spatial base scheme for the convection and viscous terms. We denote the resulting nonlinear filter schemes ACM466-RK4 and WAV66-RK4.

  18. Slow Growth Formulation for DNS of Chemically Reacting Temporal Boundary Layers with Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topalian, Victor; Oliver, Todd; Moser, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Extensions to a previously developed formulation for DNS of temporally evolving boundary layers are presented. The original formulation, which allows characterization of turbulence in a temporal boundary layer at a chosen stage of the development, uses a multiscale approach where the fast evolution of the turbulent fluctuations is simulated directly while the slow evolution of averaged quantities is modeled. Specifically, the source terms from slow evolution are modeled assuming self-similarity in the evolution of mean and RMS quantities. Here, the formulation is extended to enable DNS of chemically reacting boundary layers with forcing. These extensions are used to obtain DNS data for conditions similar to those observed in the boundary layer during athmospheric reentry of the NASA CEV. Data from this simulation will be used to inform turbulence model calibration and UQ. This work is supported by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security Administration] under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  19. Effect of Ablation on Heat Transfer & Performance of an Axisymmetric Supersonic Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, M. A.

    The theoretical prediction of heat transfer effects in compressible turbulent flows is fundamentally complex phenomenon. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is employed using Baldwin-Lomax turbulent model to simulate the effect of various nozzle geometry defects on the heat transfer state in supersonic nozzles. The study is done in terms of various heat transfer correlations and analogies by characteristic flow regimes numbers. Theses are calculated from modified Reynolds analogy for laminar flow over flat plate, the Dittus-Boelter correlation for fully developed turbulent flow, Sieder-Tate correlation for turbulent pipe flow with property variation and Bartz correlation for variable cross sections flow. In addition to these, modified Stanton correlation for high speed flows for pipe flow analogy is also used. The contribution of ablation on the formation of new nozzle contours at various regions is simulated using energy equation for charring ablators. The effect of heat transfer correlations on nozzle performance with various geometrical defects is also discussed. In addition to it, the supersonic flow behavior is also simulated in the nozzles in terms of pressure, temperature, Mach number and density distribution with ablated surfaces.

  20. CFD Analysis of Supersonic Coaxial Jets on Effect of Spreading Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kathiresan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prevailing high-speed air-breathing propulsion systems invariably banks on coaxial jets which plays a vigorous role in stabilization of flames and combustion emission. Coaxial jets have applications in supersonic ejectors, noise control techniques and enhancement of mixing. Coaxial jet nozzles regulate spreading rates by developing virtuous mean flow and shortening primary flow potential core length. In the present paper, two-dimensional coaxial jet profiles of different area ratios are designed and analyzed. The models were designed in ANSYS Design Modeler and the numerical simulation was done in ANSYS FLUENT 14.5 using the two dimensional density based energy equation and k- ε turbulence model with primary supersonic flow and secondary subsonic flow. The contours of turbulence intensity, acoustics power level and axial-velocity are investigated along the flow direction. This study shows that increasing the area ratio results in less turbulence which in turn increases the potential core length,acoustics power level, turbulent kinetic energy and generates more noise.

  1. Plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Hu, G. [Globalstar LP, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  2. High Turbulence

    CERN Multimedia

    EuHIT, Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    As a member of the EuHIT (European High-Performance Infrastructures in Turbulence - see here) consortium, CERN is participating in fundamental research on turbulence phenomena. To this end, the Laboratory provides European researchers with a cryogenic research infrastructure (see here), where the first tests have just been performed.

  3. Detonation in supersonic radial outflow

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.

    2014-11-07

    We report on the structure and dynamics of gaseous detonation stabilized in a supersonic flow emanating radially from a central source. The steady-state solutions are computed and their range of existence is investigated. Two-dimensional simulations are carried out in order to explore the stability of the steady-state solutions. It is found that both collapsing and expanding two-dimensional cellular detonations exist. The latter can be stabilized by putting several rigid obstacles in the flow downstream of the steady-state sonic locus. The problem of initiation of standing detonation stabilized in the radial flow is also investigated numerically. © 2014 Cambridge University Press.

  4. Mechanics of Turbulence of Multicomponent Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marov, Mikhail Ya.; Kolesnichenko, Aleksander V.

    2002-02-01

    Turbulence in multicomponent reacting gas mixtures is an important mechanism underlying numerous natural phenomena closely related to the study of our space environment. This book develops a new mathematical approach for modelling multicomponent gas turbulence that adequately describes the combined processes of dynamics and heat and mass transfer when chemical kinetics and turbulent mixing are equally important. The developed models include the evolutionary transfer equations for the single-point second correlation moments of turbulent fluctuations of thermohydrodynamical parameters. The phenomenological approach to the closure problem in hydrodynamic equations of mean motion at the level of the first order moments is based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes and enables defining relationships in a more general form as compared to those conventionally deduced using the mixing path concept. Based on the developed approach, turbulent exchange factors for a planetary upper atmosphere are evaluated, and a turbulent model of a protoplanetary accretion gas-dust disk involving heat and mass transfer and coagulation is also considered. As compared to previously published books on the problem of turbulence, this book deals, for the first time, with the complicated models of reacting gas mixtures. It is intended for graduate and postgraduate students in the fields of fluid gas dynamics, astrophysics, space physics, planetary sciences, and aeronomy, and especially for those dealing with computer modelling of the processes in such natural media. The book may also be of interest to specialists in the relevant fields of ecology, engineering, and material processing.

  5. The pdf approach to turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed discussion of the theory and application of probability density function (pdf) methods, which provide a complete statistical description of turbulent flow fields at a single point or a finite number of points. The basic laws governing the flow of Newtonian fluids are set up in the Eulerian and the Lagrangian frame, and the exact and linear equations for the characteristic functionals in those frames are discussed. Pdf equations in both frames are derived as Fourier transforms of the equations of the characteristic functions. Possible formulations for the nonclosed terms in the pdf equation are discussed, their properties are assessed, and closure modes for the molecular-transport and the fluctuating pressure-gradient terms are reviewed. The application of pdf methods to turbulent combustion flows, supersonic flows, and the interaction of turbulence with shock waves is discussed.

  6. Investigation on flow and mixing characteristics of supersonic mixing layer induced by forced vibration of cantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Tan, Jianguo; Lv, Liang

    2015-12-01

    The mixing process has been an important issue for the design of supersonic combustion ramjet engine, and the mixing efficiency plays a crucial role in the improvement of the combustion efficiency. In the present study, nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering (NPLS), particle image velocimetry (PIV) and large eddy simulation (LES) are employed to investigate the flow and mixing characteristics of supersonic mixing layer under different forced vibration conditions. The indexes of fractal dimension, mixing layer thickness, momentum thickness and scalar mixing level are applied to describe the mixing process. Results show that different from the development and evolution of supersonic mixing layer without vibration, the flow under forced vibration is more likely to present the characteristics of three-dimensionality. The laminar flow region of mixing layer under forced vibration is greatly shortened and the scales of rolled up Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices become larger, which promote the mixing process remarkably. The fractal dimension distribution reveals that comparing with the flow without vibration, the turbulent fluctuation of supersonic mixing layer under forced vibration is more intense. Besides, the distribution of mixing layer thickness, momentum thickness and scalar mixing level are strongly influenced by forced vibration. Especially, when the forcing frequency is 4000 Hz, the mixing layer thickness and momentum thickness are 0.0391 m and 0.0222 m at the far field of 0.16 m, 83% and 131% higher than that without vibration at the same position, respectively.

  7. Numerical analysis of Chevron nozzle effects on performance of the supersonic ejector-diffuser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanshi; Jin, Yingzi; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2013-10-01

    The supersonic nozzle is the most important device of an ejector-diffuser system. The best operation condition and optimal structure of supersonic nozzle are hardly known due to the complicated turbulent mixing, compressibility effects and even flow unsteadiness which are generated around the nozzle extent. In the present study, the primary stream nozzle was redesigned using convergent nozzle to activate the shear actions between the primary and secondary streams, by means of longitudinal vortices generated between the Chevron lobes. Exactly same geometrical model of ejector-diffuser system was created to validate the results of experimental data. The operation characteristics of the ejector system were compared between Chevron nozzle and conventional convergent nozzle for the primary stream. A CFD method has been applied to simulate the supersonic flows and shock waves inside the ejector. It is observed that the flow structure and shock system were changed and primary numerical analysis results show that the Chevron nozzle achieve a positive effect on the supersonic ejector-diffuser system performance. The ejector with Chevron nozzle can entrain more secondary stream with less primary stream mass flow rate.

  8. Turbulent Phenomena in the Aerobreakup of Liquid Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Horvath

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the computational simulation results of turbulent phenomena in a high velocity multiphase flow, where the predominantly turbulent phase is the gaseous phase. For reliable simulation results the code is validated by comparing results of a single phase supersonic turbulent flow to other simulation and experimental results and good agreement is found. This is a precondition for the simulation of the initial stages of the breakup of a liquid droplet in a high Weber number flow. The role of the subgrid-scale turbulence is investigated and two distinct regions are identified. In the second region turbulence phenomena seem to be the predominant factors for the characteristic shape. Simulation results are compared to experiments of the droplet breakup at high Weber number.

  9. Definition of Turbulent Boundary-Layer with Entropy Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Rui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the entropy increment and the viscosity dissipation in turbulent boundary-layer is systematically investigated. Through theoretical analysis and direct numerical simulation (DNS, an entropy function fs is proposed to distinguish the turbulent boundary-layer from the external flow. This approach is proved to be reliable after comparing its performance in the following complex flows, namely, low-speed airfoil flows with different wall temperature, supersonic cavity-ramp flow dominated by the combination of free-shear layer, larger recirculation and shocks, and the hypersonic flow past an aeroplane configuration. Moreover, fs is deduced from the point of energy, independent of any particular turbulent quantities. That is, this entropy concept could be utilized by other engineering applications related with turbulent boundary-layer, such as turbulence modelling transition prediction and engineering thermal protection.

  10. PIV Measurements of Supersonic Internally-Mixed Dual-Stream Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James E.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    While externally mixed, or separate flow, nozzle systems are most common in high bypass-ratio aircraft, they are not as attractive for use in lower bypass-ratio systems and on aircraft that will fly supersonically. The noise of such propulsion systems is also dominated by jet noise, making the study and noise reduction of these exhaust systems very important, both for military aircraft and future civilian supersonic aircraft. This paper presents particle image velocimetry of internally mixed nozzle with different area ratios between core and bypass, and nozzles that are ideally expanded and convergent. Such configurations independently control the geometry of the internal mixing layer and of the external shock structure. These allow exploration of the impact of shocks on the turbulent mixing layers, the impact of bypass ratio on broadband shock noise and mixing noise, and the impact of temperature on the turbulent flow field. At the 2009 AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference the authors presented data and analysis from a series of tests that looked at the acoustics of supersonic jets from internally mixed nozzles. In that paper the broadband shock and mixing noise components of the jet noise were independently manipulated by holding Mach number constant while varying bypass ratio and jet temperature. Significant portions of that analysis was predicated on assumptions regarding the flow fields of these jets, both shock structure and turbulence. In this paper we add to that analysis by presenting particle image velocimetry measurements of the flow fields of many of those jets. In addition, the turbulent velocity data documented here will be very useful for validation of computational flow codes that are being developed to design advanced nozzles for future aircraft.

  11. Numerical Methods For Chemically Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque, R. J.; Yee, H. C.

    1990-01-01

    Issues related to numerical stability, accuracy, and resolution discussed. Technical memorandum presents issues in numerical solution of hyperbolic conservation laws containing "stiff" (relatively large and rapidly changing) source terms. Such equations often used to represent chemically reacting flows. Usually solved by finite-difference numerical methods. Source terms generally necessitate use of small time and/or space steps to obtain sufficient resolution, especially at discontinuities, where incorrect mathematical modeling results in unphysical solutions.

  12. Algorithm For Computation Of Chemically Reacting Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Chen, Chein-Pin; Shang, Huan-Min

    1995-01-01

    Efficient algorithm developed for use in solving differential equations of transient, chemically reacting flows at all speeds from zero to high mach numbers. Mathematical models represent coupling of thermal, chemical, and dynamical effects. Original intended application is numerical simulation of flows in rocket engines; also applicable to other complex flows affected by finite-rate chemistry - for example, flows in turbines and in internal-combustion engines.

  13. Initiation of Explosives From the Bow Shock of a Supersonic Penetrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferm, Eric

    2009-06-01

    An analytic and computational study of supersonic penetration of an explosive is presented. The goal is the development of an initiation criterion relating projectile diameter and threshold projectile velocity determined by fundamental material and explosive parameters. The basis of the initiation criterion is an examination of the steady flow structure around a supersonic penetrator in the unreacted materials, yielding the states along the bow shock and the size and sonic character of the flow structure. The state is used to determine the time scale of the reacting explosive using initiation experiment results (Pop Plot). The size of the subsonic region is compared to the failure diameter to examine the viability of the initiation. The results are compared with experimental initiation criterion.

  14. A constitutive theory of reacting electrolyte mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Reis, Martina; Wang, Yongqi; Bono Maurizio Sacchi Bassi, Adalberto

    2013-11-01

    A constitutive theory of reacting electrolyte mixtures is formulated. The intermolecular interactions among the constituents of the mixture are accounted for through additional freedom degrees to each constituent of the mixture. Balance equations for polar reacting continuum mixtures are accordingly formulated and a proper set of constitutive equations is derived with basis in the Müller-Liu formulation of the second law of thermodynamics. Moreover, the non-equilibrium and equilibrium responses of the reacting mixture are investigated in detail by emphasizing the inner and reactive structures of the medium. From the balance laws and constitutive relations, the effects of molecular structure of constituents upon the fluid flow are studied. It is also demonstrated that the local thermodynamic equilibrium state can be reached without imposing that the set of independent constitutive variables is time independent, neither spatially homogeneous nor null. The resulting constitutive relations presented throughout this work are of relevance to many practical applications, such as swelling of clays, developing of bio and polymeric membranes, and use of electrorheological fluids in industrial processes. The first author acknowledges financial support from National Counsel of Technological and Scientific Development (CNPq) and German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD).

  15. Isotropically Driven Versus Outflow Driven Turbulence: Observational Consequences for Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Jonathan J.; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.

    2010-10-01

    Feedback from protostellar outflows can influence the nature of turbulence in star-forming regions even if they are not the primary source of velocity dispersion for all scales of molecular clouds. For the rate and power expected in star-forming regions, we previously (Carroll et al.) demonstrated that outflows could drive supersonic turbulence at levels consistent with the scaling relations from Matzner although with a steeper velocity power spectrum than expected for an isotropically driven supersonic turbulent cascade. Here, we perform higher resolution simulations and combine simulations of outflow driven turbulence with those of isotropically forced turbulence. We find that the presence of outflows within an ambient isotropically driven turbulent environment produces a knee in the velocity power spectrum at the outflow scale and a steeper slope at sub-outflow scales than for a purely isotropically forced case. We also find that the presence of outflows flattens the density spectrum at large scales effectively reducing the formation of large-scale turbulent density structures. These effects are qualitatively independent of resolution. We have also carried out Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for synthetic data from our simulations. We find that PCA as a tool for identifying the driving scale of turbulence has a misleading bias toward low amplitude large-scale velocity structures even when they are not necessarily the dominant energy containing scales. This bias is absent for isotropically forced turbulence but manifests strongly for collimated outflow driven turbulence.

  16. Physical Processes of Interstellar Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    I discuss the role of self-gravity and radiative heating and cooling in shaping the nature of the turbulence in the interstellar medium (ISM) of our galaxy. The heating and cooling cause it to be highly compressible, and, in some regimes of density and temperature, to become thermally unstable, tending to spontaneously segregate into warm/diffuse and cold/dense phases. On the other hand, turbulence is an inherently mixing process, tending to replenish the density and temperature ranges that would be forbidden under thermal processes alone. The turbulence in the ionized ISM appears to be transonic (i.e, with Mach numbers $\\Ms \\sim 1$), and thus to behave essentially incompressibly. However, in the neutral medium, thermal instability causes the sound speed of the gas to fluctuate by up to factors of $\\sim 30$, and thus the flow can be highly supersonic with respect to the dense/cold gas, although numerical simulations suggest that this behavior corresponds more to the ensemble of cold clumps than to the clumps'...

  17. The Turbulent Shock Origin of Proto--Stellar Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Padoan, P; Goodman, A A; Nordlund, A A; Padoan, Paolo; Juvela, Mika; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Nordlund, AAke

    2001-01-01

    The fragmentation of molecular clouds (MC) into protostellar cores is a central aspect of the process of star formation. Because of the turbulent nature of super-sonic motions in MCs, it has been suggested that dense structures such as filaments and clumps are formed by shocks in a turbulent flow. In this work we present strong evidence in favor of the turbulent origin of the fragmentation of MCs. The most generic result of turbulent fragmentation is that dense post shock gas traces a gas component with a smaller velocity dispersion than lower density gas, since shocks correspond to regions of converging flows, where the kinetic energy of the turbulent motion is dissipated. Using synthetic maps of spectra of molecular transitions, computed from the results of numerical simulations of super--sonic turbulence, we show that the dependence of velocity dispersion on gas density generates an observable relation between the rms velocity centroid and the integrated intensity (column density), Sigma(V_0)-I, which is i...

  18. INTERSTELLAR TURBULENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Falceta-Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Interstellar Medium (ISM is a complex, multi-phase system, where the history of the stars occurs. The processes of birth and death of stars are strongly coupled to the dynamics of the ISM. The observed chaotic and diffusive motions of the gas characterize its turbulent nature. Understanding turbulence is crucial for understanding the star-formation process and the energy-mass feedback from evolved stars. Magnetic fields, threading the ISM, are also observed, making this effort even more difficult. In this work, I briefly review the main observations and the characterization of turbulence from these observable quantities. Following on, I provide a review of the physics of magnetized turbulence. Finally, I will show the main results from theoretical and numerical simulations, which can be used to reconstruct observable quantities, and compare these predictions to the observations.

  19. Wall Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  20. GEOMETRIC TURBULENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article we have investigated the solutions of Maxwell's equations, Navier-Stokes equations and the Schrödinger associated with the solutions of Einstein's equations for empty space. It is shown that in some cases the geometric instability leading to turbulence on the mechanism of alternating viscosity, which offered by N.N. Yanenko. The mechanism of generation of matter from dark energy due to the geometric turbulence in the Big Bang has been discussed

  1. LES of an inclined jet into a supersonic cross-flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrante, Antonino; Matheou, Georgios; Dimotakis, Paul E; Stephens, Mike; Adams, Paul; Walters, Richard; Hand, Randall

    2008-01-01

    This short article describes flow parameters, numerical method, and animations of the fluid dynamics video LES of an Inclined Jet into a Supersonic Cross-Flow (http://hdl.handle.net/1813/11480). Helium is injected through an inclined round jet into a supersonic air flow at Mach 3.6. The video shows 2D contours of Mach number and magnitude of density gradient, and 3D iso-surfaces of Helium mass-fraction and vortical structures. Large eddy simulation with the sub-grid scale (LES-SGS) stretched vortex model of turbulent and scalar transport captures the main flow features: bow shock, Mach disk, shear layers, counter-rotating vortices, and large-scale structures.

  2. Application of POD on time-resolved schlieren in supersonic multi-stream rectangular jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M. G.; Magstadt, A. S.; Glauser, M. N.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we present an experimental investigation of a supersonic rectangular nozzle with aft deck used for three-stream engines. The jet utilizes a single expansion ramp nozzle (SERN) configuration along with multiple streams, operating at a bulk flow Mj,1 = 1.6 and bypass stream Mj,3 = 1.0. This idealized representation consists of two canonical flows: a supersonic convergent-divergent (CD) jet and a sonic wall jet. Time-resolved schlieren experiments were performed up to 100 kHz. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), as suggested by Lumley for structure identification in turbulent flows, is applied to the schlieren images and the spatial eigenfunctions and time-dependent coefficients are related to the flow structures. This research seeks to lay a foundation for fundamental testing of multi-stream SERNs and the identification of the flow physics that dominate these modern military nozzles.

  3. Spatial Convergence of Three Dimensional Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Michael A.; Anderson, W. Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Finite-volume and finite-element schemes, both implemented within the FUN3D flow solver, are evaluated for several test cases described on the Turbulence-Modeling Resource (TMR) web site. The cases include subsonic flow over a hemisphere cylinder, subsonic flow over a swept bump configuration, and supersonic flow in a square duct. The finite- volume and finite-element schemes are both used to obtain solutions for the first two cases, whereas only the finite-volume scheme is used for the supersonic duct. For the hemisphere cylinder, finite-element solutions obtained on tetrahedral meshes are compared with finite- volume solutions on mixed-element meshes. For the swept bump, finite-volume solutions have been obtained for both hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes and are compared with finite-element solutions obtained on tetrahedral meshes. For the hemisphere cylinder and the swept bump, solutions are obtained on a series of meshes with varying grid density and comparisons are made between drag coefficients, pressure distributions, velocity profiles, and profiles of the turbulence working variable. The square duct shows small variation due to element type or the spatial accuracy of turbulence model convection. It is demonstrated that the finite-element scheme on tetrahedral meshes yields similar accuracy as the finite- volume scheme on mixed-element and hexahedral grids, and demonstrates less sensitivity to the mesh topology (biased tetrahedral grids) than the finite-volume scheme.

  4. CFD Analysis of a Supersonic Air Ejector. Part II: Relation between Global Operation and Local Flow Features

    OpenAIRE

    Hemidi, Amel; Henry, François; Leclaire, Sébastien; Seynhaeve, Jean-Marie; Bartosiewicz, Yann

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents an original CFD analysis of the operation of a supersonic ejector. This study is based on CFD and experimental results obtained in the first part paper [1]. Results clearly demonstrates that a good predictions of the entrainment rate, even over a wide range of operating conditions, do not necessarily mean a good prediction of the local flow features. This issue is shown through the results obtained for two turbulence models, and also raises the problem ...

  5. Stability of compressible reacting mixing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, D. S.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Linear instability of compressible reacting mixing layers is analyzed with emphasis on the effects of heat release and compressibility. Laminar solutions of the compressible boundary-layer equations are used as the base flows. The parameters of this study are the adiabatic flame temperature, the Mach number of the upper stream, frequency, wavenumber, and the direction of propagation of the disturbance wave. Stability characteristics of the flow are presented. Three groups of unstable modes are found when the Mach number and/or heat release are large. Finally, it is shown that the unstable modes are two-dimensional for large heat release even in highly compressible flow.

  6. Radiative heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Modest, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    This introduction reviews why combustion and radiation are important, as well as the technical challenges posed by radiation. Emphasis is on interactions among turbulence, chemistry and radiation (turbulence-chemistry-radiation interactions – TCRI) in Reynolds-averaged and large-eddy simulations. Subsequent chapters cover: chemically reacting turbulent flows; radiation properties, Reynolds transport equation (RTE) solution methods, and TCRI; radiation effects in laminar flames; TCRI in turbulent flames; and high-pressure combustion systems. This Brief presents integrated approach that includes radiation at the outset, rather than as an afterthought. It stands as the most recent developments in physical modeling, numerical algorithms, and applications collected in one monograph.

  7. Experiments on free and impinging supersonic microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phalnikar, K.A.; Kumar, R.; Alvi, F.S. [Florida A and M University and Florida State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The fluid dynamics of microflows has recently commanded considerable attention because of their potential applications. Until now, with a few exceptions, most of the studies have been limited to low speed flows. This experimental study examines supersonic microjets of 100-1,000 {mu}m in size with exit velocities in the range of 300-500 m/s. Such microjets are presently being used to actively control larger supersonic impinging jets, which occur in STOVL (short takeoff and vertical landing) aircraft, cavity flows, and flow separation. Flow properties of free as well as impinging supersonic microjets have been experimentally investigated over a range of geometric and flow parameters. The flowfield is visualized using a micro-schlieren system with a high magnification. These schlieren images clearly show the characteristic shock cell structure typically observed in larger supersonic jets. Quantitative measurements of the jet decay and spreading rates as well as shock cell spacing are obtained using micro-pitot probe surveys. In general, the mean flow features of free microjets are similar to larger supersonic jets operating at higher Reynolds numbers. However, some differences are also observed, most likely due to pronounced viscous effects associated with jets at these small scales. Limited studies of impinging microjets were also conducted. They reveal that, similar to the behavior of free microjets, the flow structure of impinging microjets strongly resembles that of larger supersonic impinging jets. (orig.)

  8. Experiments on free and impinging supersonic microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalnikar, K. A.; Kumar, R.; Alvi, F. S.

    2008-05-01

    The fluid dynamics of microflows has recently commanded considerable attention because of their potential applications. Until now, with a few exceptions, most of the studies have been limited to low speed flows. This experimental study examines supersonic microjets of 100-1,000 μm in size with exit velocities in the range of 300-500 m/s. Such microjets are presently being used to actively control larger supersonic impinging jets, which occur in STOVL (short takeoff and vertical landing) aircraft, cavity flows, and flow separation. Flow properties of free as well as impinging supersonic microjets have been experimentally investigated over a range of geometric and flow parameters. The flowfield is visualized using a micro-schlieren system with a high magnification. These schlieren images clearly show the characteristic shock cell structure typically observed in larger supersonic jets. Quantitative measurements of the jet decay and spreading rates as well as shock cell spacing are obtained using micro-pitot probe surveys. In general, the mean flow features of free microjets are similar to larger supersonic jets operating at higher Reynolds numbers. However, some differences are also observed, most likely due to pronounced viscous effects associated with jets at these small scales. Limited studies of impinging microjets were also conducted. They reveal that, similar to the behavior of free microjets, the flow structure of impinging microjets strongly resembles that of larger supersonic impinging jets.

  9. The small-scale turbulent dynamo in smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Tricco, Terrence S; Federrath, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic turbulence is believed to be at the heart of star formation. We have performed smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD) simulations of the small-scale dynamo amplification of magnetic fields in supersonic turbulence. The calculations use isothermal gas driven at rms velocity of Mach 10 so that conditions are representative of star-forming molecular clouds in the Milky Way. The growth of magnetic energy is followed for 10 orders in magnitude until it reaches saturation, a few percent of the kinetic energy. The results of our dynamo calculations are compared with results from grid-based methods, finding excellent agreement on their statistics and their qualitative behaviour. The simulations utilise the latest algorithmic developments we have developed, in particular, a new divergence cleaning approach to maintain the solenoidal constraint on the magnetic field and a method to reduce the numerical dissipation of the magnetic shock capturing scheme. We demonstrate that our divergence cleaning met...

  10. Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Carl H

    2010-01-01

    Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids begins with big bang turbulence powered by spinning combustible combinations of Planck particles and Planck antiparticles. Particle prograde accretion on a spinning pair releases 42% of the particle rest mass energy to produce more fuel for turbulent combustion. Negative viscosity and negative turbulence stresses work against gravity, creating mass-energy and space-time from the vacuum. Turbulence mixes cooling temperatures until a quark-gluon strong-force SF freeze-out. Gluon-viscosity anti-gravity ({\\Lambda}SF) exponentially inflates the fireball to preserve big bang turbulence information at scales larger than ct as the first fossil turbulence. Cosmic microwave background CMB temperature anisotropies show big bang turbulence fossils along with fossils of weak plasma turbulence triggered (10^12 s) as plasma viscous forces permit gravitational fragmentation on supercluster to galaxy mass scales (10^13 s). Turbulent morphologies and viscous-turbulent lengths a...

  11. Aerodynamic noise emission from turbulent shear layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, S. P.

    1973-01-01

    The Phillips (1960) convected wave equation is employed in this paper to study aerodynamic noise emission processes in subsonic and supersonic shear layers. The wave equation in three spatial dimensions is first reduced to an ordinary differential equation by Fourier transformation and then solved via the WKBJ method. Three typical solutions are required for discussions in this paper. The current results are different from the classical conclusions. The effects of refraction, convection, Mach-number dependence and temperature dependence of turbulent noise emission are analyzed in the light of solutions to the Phillips equation.

  12. Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids begins with big bang turbulence powered by spinning combustible combinations of Planck particles and Planck antiparticles. Particle prograde accretions on a spinning pair releases 42% of the particle rest mass energy to produce more fuel for turbulent combustion. Negative viscous stresses and negative turbulence stresses work against gravity, extracting mass-energy and space-time from the vacuum. Turbulence mixes cooling temperatures until str...

  13. Findings from the Supersonic Qualification Program of the Mars Science Laboratory Parachute System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Anita; Steltzner, Adam; Witkowski, Allen; Candler, Graham; Pantano, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    supersonic wind tunnel testing of a rigid DGB parachute with entry-vehicle to validate two high fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. The computer codes utilized Large Eddy Simulation and Detached Eddy Simulation numerical approaches to accurately capture the turbulent wake of the entry vehicle and its coupling to the parachute bow-shock. The second phase was the development of fluid structure interaction (FSI) computational tools to predict parachute response to the supersonic flow field. The FSI development included the integration of the CFD from the first phase with a finite element structural model of the parachute membrane and cable elements. In this phase, a 4% of full-scale supersonic flexible parachute test program was conducted to provide validation data to the FSI code and an empirical dataset of the MSL parachute in a flight-like environment. The final phase is FSI simulations of the full-scale MSL parachute in a Mars type deployment. Findings from this program will be presented in terms of code development and validation, empirical findings from the supersonic testing, and drag performance during supersonic operation.

  14. CFD prediction of the reacting flow field inside a subscale scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitsomboon, T.; Northam, G. B.; Rogers, R. C.; Diskin, G. S.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes CFD code has been used to calculate the reacting flowfield inside a hydrogen-fueled, subscale scramjet combustor. Pilot fuel was injected transversely upstream of the combustor and the primary fuel was injected transversely downstream of a backward facing step. A finite rate combustion model with two-step kinetics was used. The CFD code used the explicit MacCormack algorithm with point-implicit treatment of the chemistry source terms. Turbulent mixing of the jets with the airstream was simulated by a simple mixing length scheme, whereas near wall turbulence was accounted for by the Baldwin-Lomax model. Computed results were compared with experimental wall pressure measurements.

  15. Scatter Broadening of Pulsars and Implications on the Interstellar Medium Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Siyao; Zhang, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Observations reveal a uniform Kolmogorov turbulence throughout the diffuse ionized interstellar medium (ISM) and supersonic turbulence preferentially located in the Galactic plane. Correspondingly, we consider the Galactic distribution of electron density fluctuations consisting of not only a Kolmogorov density spectrum but also a short-wave-dominated density spectrum with the density structure formed at small scales due to shocks. The resulting dependence of the scatter broadening time on the dispersion measure (DM) naturally interprets the existing observational data for both low- and high-DM pulsars. According to the criteria that we derive for a quantitative determination of scattering regimes over wide ranges of DMs and frequencies ν, we find that the pulsars with low DMs are primarily scattered by the Kolmogorov turbulence, while those at low Galactic latitudes with high DMs undergo more enhanced scattering dominated by the supersonic turbulence, where the corresponding density spectrum has a spectral index of ≈ 2.6. Furthermore, by considering a volume filling factor of the density structures with the dependence on ν as \\propto {ν }1.4 in the supersonic turbulence, our model can also explain the observed shallower ν scaling of the scattering time than the Kolmogorov scaling for the pulsars with relatively large DMs. The comparison between our analytical results and the scattering measurements of pulsars in turn makes a useful probe of the properties of the large-scale ISM turbulence, e.g., an injection scale of ∼100 pc, and also characteristics of small-scale density structures.

  16. Facilities GIS Modeling for the REACT System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Real-Time Emergency Action Coordination Tool (REACT) was developed under contract to NASA and deployed for use by the entire agency.  NASA REACT is a...

  17. Computational Comparison of the Interaction of a Lateral Jet on a Supersonic Generic Missile

    OpenAIRE

    Gnemmi, Patrick; Adeli, Reza; Longo, José Maria

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with the comparison of computations made at DLR and ISL on the interaction between a lateral jet issuing from a generic missile body and the oncoming supersonic cross-flow. Steady-state numerical simulations are carried out by 3D, viscous, turbulent, Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Codes; at DLR, a hybrid mesh is used for the TAU calculation, whereas at ISL a hexahedral mesh is used for the CFX computation. Experimental data acquired in the DLR wind tunnel TMK in Cologne act a...

  18. Constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer practice in supersonic flows. I - The normal wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, A. J.; Hayakawa, K.; Muck, K. C.

    1983-01-01

    The performance of a constant-temperature normal hot-wire in a supersonic flow is critically examined. It is shown that this instrument is inherently unsuitable for measuring turbulent temperature correlations because of the highly nonlinear response to temperature fluctuations, particularly at low overheat ratios. The instrument is therefore limited to measurements of mean and fluctuating mass-flow rates. Suitable calibration procedures, as well as the limits on spatial and temporal resolution are discussed, and corrections for mean stagnation temperature changes are suggested.

  19. CFD-Exergy analysis of the flow in a supersonic steam ejector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulenouar, M.; Ouadha, A.

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims to carry out a CFD-exergy based analysis to assess the main areas of loss in a supersonic steam ejector encountered in ejector refrigeration systems. The governing equations for a compressible flow are solved using finite volume approach based on SST k-ω model to handle turbulence effects. Flow rates and the computed mean temperatures and pressures have been used to calculate the exergy losses within the different regions of the ejector as well as its overall exergy efficiency. The primary mass flow rate, the secondary mass flow rate and the entrainment ratio predicted by the model have been compared with the experimental data from the literature.

  20. Numerical Simulations of the Single-mode, Reacting Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability Using Detailed Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attal, Nitesh; Ramaprabhu, Praveen

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of a shock wave with a chemically reacting front is of importance to the design of supersonic combustors and scramjets where mixing from the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI) could be tapped to increase combustion efficiency. We will describe results of shock-driven, reacting RMI of a sinusoidally perturbed, single-mode interface separating Hydrogen (fuel) and Oxygen at 300 K and 1625 K respectively. The non-premixed interface was accelerated by a Mach 1.2 shock traversing from the light (H2) to heavy (O2) fluid (Atwood number = 0.5) in a numerical shock tube of aspect ratio 12. The 2D simulations were performed using the compressible flow code FLASH, with modifications to handle detailed chemistry and temperature-dependent material properties. The initial thickness of the material interface was systematically varied to study the effect of the diffusion thickness on the flame and instability dynamics. Product formation and heat release as a result of chemical reactions were described according to the 9-species, 19-steps detailed reaction mechanism.

  1. Mathematical aspects of reacting and diffusing systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fife, Paul C

    1979-01-01

    Modeling and analyzing the dynamics of chemical mixtures by means of differ- tial equations is one of the prime concerns of chemical engineering theorists. These equations often take the form of systems of nonlinear parabolic partial d- ferential equations, or reaction-diffusion equations, when there is diffusion of chemical substances involved. A good overview of this endeavor can be had by re- ing the two volumes by R. Aris (1975), who himself was one of the main contributors to the theory. Enthusiasm for the models developed has been shared by parts of the mathematical community, and these models have, in fact, provided motivation for some beautiful mathematical results. There are analogies between chemical reactors and certain biological systems. One such analogy is rather obvious: a single living organism is a dynamic structure built of molecules and ions, many of which react and diffuse. Other analogies are less obvious; for example, the electric potential of a membrane can diffuse like a chemical, and ...

  2. Quick-Mixing Studies Under Reacting Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, May Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    The low-NO(x) emitting potential of rich-burn/quick-mix/lean-burn )RQL) combustion makes it an attractive option for engines of future stratospheric aircraft. Because NO(x) formation is exponentially dependent on temperature, the success of the RQL combustor depends on minimizing high temperature stoichiometric pocket formation in the quick-mixing section. An experiment was designed and built, and tests were performed to characterize reaction and mixing properties of jets issuing from round orifices into a hot, fuel-rich crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct. The reactor operates on propane and presents a uniform, non-swirling mixture to the mixing modules. Modules consisting of round orifice configurations of 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, and 18 holes were evaluated at a momentum-flux ratio of 57 and jet-to-mainstream mass-flaw ratio of 2.5. Temperatures and concentrations of O2, CO2, CO, HC, and NO(x) were obtained upstream, down-stream, and within the orifice plane to determine jet penetration as well as reaction processes. Jet penetration was a function of the number of orifices and affected the mixing in the reacting system. Of the six configurations tested, the 14-hole module produced jet penetration close to the module half-radius and yielded the best mixing and most complete combustion at a plane one duct diameter from the orifice leading edge. The results reveal that substantial reaction and heat release occur in the jet mixing zone when the entering effluent is hot and rich, and that the experiment as designed will serve to explore satisfactorily jet mixing behavior under realistic reacting conditions in future studies.

  3. The Relation between Interstellar Turbulence and Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Klessen, R S

    2004-01-01

    (ABBREVIATED) Understanding the formation of stars in galaxies is central to much of modern astrophysics. In this review the relation between interstellar turbulence and star formation is discussed. Supersonic turbulence can provide support against gravitational collapse on global scales, while at the same time it produces localized density enhancements that allow for collapse on small scales. The efficiency and timescale of stellar birth in Galactic gas clouds strongly depend on the properties of the interstellar turbulent velocity field, with slow, inefficient, isolated star formation being a hallmark of turbulent support, and fast, efficient, clustered star formation occurring in its absence. Star formation on scales of galaxies as a whole is expected to be controlled by the balance between gravity andturbulence, just like star formation on scales of individual interstellar gas clouds, but may be modulated by additional effects like cooling and differential rotation. The dominant mechanism for driving inte...

  4. Multiple collisions in turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    kuhle, Michel Voß; Wilkinson, Michael; Pumir, Alain

    2013-01-01

    In turbulent suspensions, collision rates determine how rapidly particles coalesce or react with each other. To determine the collision rate, many numerical studies rely on the 'Ghost Collision Approximation' (GCA), which simply records how often pairs of point particles come within a threshold distance. In many applications, the suspended particles stick (or in the case of liquid droplets, coalesce) upon collision, and it is the frequency of first contact which is of interest. If a pair of 'ghost' particles undergoes multiple collisions, the GCA may overestimate the true collision rate. Here, using fully resolved Direct Numerical Simulations of turbulent flows at moderate Reynolds number (R_\\lambda = 130), we investigate the prevalence and properties of multiple collisions. We demonstrate that the GCA leads to a systematic overestimate of the collision rate, which is of the order of 15% when the particle inertia is small, and slowly decreases when inertia increases. We investigate the probability P(N) for a ...

  5. Design project: LONGBOW supersonic interceptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoney, Robert; Baker, Matt; Capstaff, Joseph G.; Dishman, Robert; Fick, Gregory; Frick, Stephen N.; Kelly, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A recent white paper entitled 'From the Sea' has spotlighted the need for Naval Aviation to provide overland support to joint operations. The base for this support, the Aircraft Carrier (CVN), will frequently be unable to operate within close range of the battleground because of littoral land-based air and subsurface threats. A high speed, long range, carrier capable aircraft would allow the CVN to provide timely support to distant battleground operations. Such an aircraft, operating as a Deck-Launched Interceptor (DLI), would also be an excellent counter to Next Generation Russian Naval Aviation (NGRNA) threats consisting of supersonic bombers, such as the Backfire, equipped with the next generation of high-speed, long-range missiles. Additionally, it would serve as an excellent high speed Reconnaissance airplane, capable of providing Battle Force commanders with timely, accurate pre-mission targeting information and post-mission Bomb Damage Assessment (BDA). Recent advances in computational hypersonic airflow modeling has produced a method of defining aircraft shapes that fit a conical shock flow model to maximize the efficiency of the vehicle. This 'Waverider' concept provides one means of achieving long ranges at high speeds. A Request for Proposal (RFP) was issued by Professor Conrad Newberry that contained design requirements for an aircraft to accomplish the above stated missions, utilizing Waverider technology.

  6. On highly focused supersonic microjets

    CERN Document Server

    Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Willem, Claas; Peters, Ivo R; van der Meer, Deveraj; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-01-01

    By focusing a laser pulse in a liquid-filled glass-microcapillary open at one end, a small mass of liquid is instantaneously vapourised. This leads to a shock wave which travels towards the concave free surface where it generates a high-speed microjet. The initial shape of the meniscus plays a dominant role in the process. The velocity of the jet can reach supersonic speeds up to 850\\,m/s while maintaining a very sharp geometry. The entire evolution of the jet is observed by high-speed recordings of up to $10^6\\,$fps. A parametric study of the jet velocity as a function of the contact angle of the liquid-glass interface, the energy absorbed by the liquid, the diameter of the capillary tube, and the distance between the laser focus and the free surface is performed, and the results are rationalised. The method could be used for needle-free injection of vaccines or drugs.

  7. Supersonic Cloud Collision-II

    CERN Document Server

    Anathpindika, S

    2009-01-01

    In this, second paper of the sequel of two papers, we present five SPH simulations of fast head-on cloud collisions and study the evolution of the ram pressure confined gas slab. Anathpindika (2008) (hereafter paper I) considered highly supersonic cloud collisions and examined the effect of bending and shearing instabilities on the shocked gas slab. The post-collision shock here, as in paper I, is also modelled by a simple barotropic equation of state (EOS). However, a much stiffer EOS is used to model the shock resulting from a low velocity cloud collision. We explore the parameter space by varying the pre-collision velocity and the impact parameter. We observe that pressure confined gas slabs become Jeans unstable if the sound crossing time, $t_{cr}$, is much larger than the freefall time, $t_{ff}$, of putative clumps condensing out of them. Self gravitating clumps may spawn multiple/larger $N$-body star clusters. We also suggest that warmer gas slabs are unlikely to fragment and may end up as diffuse gas c...

  8. Turbulence Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    and complexity of thermochemistry . Accordingly a practical viewpoint is required to meet near-term work required for use in advanced CFD codes...teachers the opportunity to learn/explore/ teach turbulence issues. While such a product could be an invaluable eductaional tool (university), it also

  9. Turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  10. Burgers turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bec, Jeremie [Laboratoire Cassiopee UMR6202, CNRS, OCA, BP4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)]. E-mail: jeremie.bec@obs-nice.fr; Khanin, Konstantin [Department of Mathematics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., M5S 3G3 (Canada)]. E-mail: khanin@math.toronto.edu

    2007-08-15

    The last decades witnessed a renewal of interest in the Burgers equation. Much activities focused on extensions of the original one-dimensional pressureless model introduced in the thirties by the Dutch scientist J.M. Burgers, and more precisely on the problem of Burgers turbulence, that is the study of the solutions to the one- or multi-dimensional Burgers equation with random initial conditions or random forcing. Such work was frequently motivated by new emerging applications of Burgers model to statistical physics, cosmology, and fluid dynamics. Also Burgers turbulence appeared as one of the simplest instances of a nonlinear system out of equilibrium. The study of random Lagrangian systems, of stochastic partial differential equations and their invariant measures, the theory of dynamical systems, the applications of field theory to the understanding of dissipative anomalies and of multiscaling in hydrodynamic turbulence have benefited significantly from progress in Burgers turbulence. The aim of this review is to give a unified view of selected work stemming from these rather diverse disciplines.

  11. Does turbulence determine the initial mass function?

    CERN Document Server

    Liptai, David; Wurster, James; Bate, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that the initial mass function (IMF) is determined by the density probability distribution function (PDF) produced by supersonic turbulence. We compare 14 simulations of star cluster formation in 50 solar mass molecular cloud cores where the initial turbulence contains either purely solenoidal or purely compressive modes, in each case resolving fragmentation to the opacity limit to determine the resultant IMF. We find statistically indistinguishable IMFs between the two sets of calculations, despite a factor of two difference in the star formation rate and in the standard deviation of $\\log(\\rho)$. This suggests that the density PDF, while determining the star formation rate, is not the primary driver of the IMF.

  12. Quest for HI Turbulence Statistics New Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A; Esquivel, A; Esquivel, Alejandro

    2001-01-01

    HI data cubes are sources of unique information on interstellar turbulence. Doppler shifts due to supersonic motions contain information on turbulent velocity field which is otherwise difficult to obtain. However, the problem of separation of velocity and density fluctuations within HI data cubes is far from being trivial. Analytical description of the emissivity statistics of channel maps (velocity slices) in Lazarian & Pogosyan (2000) showed that the relative contribution of the density and velocity fluctuations depends on the thickness of the velocity slice. In particular, power-law assymptotics of the emissivity fluctuations change when the dispersion of the velocity at the scale under study becomes of the order of the velocity slice thickness (integrated width of the channel map). These results are the foundations of the Velocity-Channel Analysis (VCA) technique which allows to determine velocity and density statistics using 21-cm data cubes. The VCA has been successfully tested using data cubes obta...

  13. Silent and Efficient Supersonic Bi-Directional Flying Wing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a Phase I study for a novel concept of a supersonic bi-directional (SBiDir) flying wing (FW) that has the potential to revolutionize supersonic flight...

  14. The effect of turbulent clustering on particle reactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, Jonas; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Løvås, Terese

    2016-01-01

    The effect of turbulence on the heterogeneous (solid-fluid) reactions of solid particles is studied numerically with Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). A simplified reaction system is used, where the solid-fluid reaction is represented by a single isothermal reaction step. It is found that, due to the clustering of particles by the isotropic turbulence, the overall reaction rate is entirely controlled by the turbulence for large Damk\\"ohler numbers. The particle clustering significantly slows down the reaction rate for increasing Damk\\"ohler numbers which reaches an asymptotic limit that can be analytically derived. This implies that the effect of turbulence on heterogeneously reacting particles should be included in models that are used in CFD simulations of e.g. char burnout in combustors or gasifiers. Such a model, based on the chemical and turbulent time scales, is here proposed for the heterogeneous reaction rate in the presence of turbulence.

  15. An assumed pdf approach for the calculation of supersonic mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurle, R. A.; Drummond, J. P.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    In an effort to predict the effect that turbulent mixing has on the extent of combustion, a one-equation turbulence model is added to an existing Navier-Stokes solver with finite-rate chemistry. To average the chemical-source terms appearing in the species-continuity equations, an assumed pdf approach is also used. This code was used to analyze the mixing and combustion caused by the mixing layer formed by supersonic coaxial H2-air streams. The chemistry model employed allows for the formation of H2O2 and HO2. Comparisons are made with recent measurements using laser Raman diagnostics. Comparisons include temperature and its rms, and concentrations of H2, O2, N2, H2O, and OH. In general, good agreement with experiment was noted.

  16. The influence of boundary layers on supersonic inlet flow unstart induced by mass injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Hyungrok; Im, Seong-Kyun; Mungal, M. Godfrey; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2011-09-01

    A transverse jet is injected into a supersonic model inlet flow to induce unstart. Planar laser Rayleigh scattering from condensed CO2 particles is used to visualize flow dynamics during the unstart process, while in some cases, wall pressure traces are simultaneously recorded. Studies conducted over a range of inlet configurations reveal that the presence of turbulent wall boundary layers strongly affect the unstart dynamics. It is found that relatively thick turbulent boundary layers in asymmetric wall boundary layer conditions prompt the formation of unstart shocks; in symmetric boundary conditions lead to the propagation of pseudo-shocks; and in both cases facilitate fast inlet unstart, when compared with thin, laminar boundary layers. Incident shockwaves and associated reflections are found to affect the speed of pressure disturbances. These disturbances, which induce boundary layer separation, are found to precede the formation of unstart shocks. The results confirm the importance of and need to better understand shock-boundary layer interactions in inlet unstart dynamics.

  17. The Two-Dimensional Supersonic Flow and Mixing with a Perpendicular Injection in a Scramjet Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Ali; S.Ahmed; A.K.M.Sadrul Islam

    2003-01-01

    A numerical investigation has been performed on supersonic mixing of hydrogen with air in a Scramjet(Supersonic Combustion Ramjet) combustor and its flame holding capability by solving Two-Dimensional full Navier-Stokes equations. The main flow is air entering through a finite width of inlet and gaseous hydrogen is injected perpendicularly from the side wall. An explicit Harten-Yee Non-MUSCL Modified-flux-type TVD scheme has been used to solve the system of equations, and a zero-equation algebraic turbulence model to calculate the eddy viscosity coefficient. In this study the enhancement of mixing and good flame holding capability of a supersonic combustor have been investigated by varying the distance of injector position from left boundary keeping constant the backward-facing step height and other calculation parameters. The results show that the configuration for small distance of injector position has high mixing efficiency but the upstream recirculation can not evolved properly which is an important factor for flame holding capability. On the other hand, the configuration for very long distance has lower mixing efficiency due to lower gradient of hydrogen mass concentration on the top of injector caused by the expansion of side jet in both upstream and downstream of injector. For moderate distance of injector position, large and elongated upstream recirculation can evolve which might be activated as a good flame holder.

  18. Supersonic combustion engine testbed, heat lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoying, D.; Kelble, C.; Langenbahn, A.; Stahl, M.; Tincher, M.; Walsh, M.; Wisler, S.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a supersonic combustion engine testbed (SCET) aircraft is presented. The hypersonic waverider will utilize both supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMjet) and turbofan-ramjet engines. The waverider concept, system integration, electrical power, weight analysis, cockpit, landing skids, and configuration modeling are addressed in the configuration considerations. The subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic aerodynamics are presented along with the aerodynamic stability and landing analysis of the aircraft. The propulsion design considerations include: engine selection, turbofan ramjet inlets, SCRAMjet inlets and the SCRAMjet diffuser. The cooling requirements and system are covered along with the topics of materials and the hydrogen fuel tanks and insulation system. A cost analysis is presented and the appendices include: information about the subsonic wind tunnel test, shock expansion calculations, and an aerodynamic heat flux program.

  19. Effect of the nature of vitiated crossflow on the flow-field of a transverse reacting jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Pratikash P.; Busari, Oluwatobi; Lucht, Robert P.; Laster, Walter R.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of the nature of vitiated crossflow on the structure and dynamics of non-reacting/reacting transverse jets is investigated. In this study, the vitiated crossflow is produced either by a low-swirl burner (LSB) that adds a swirling component to the crossflow or a bluff-body burner (BBB) that produces a uniform crossflow. The jet fluid is injected through a contoured injector, which provides a top-hat velocity profile. The swirling crossflow exhibits considerable swirl at the point of injection of the transverse jet. Two component high-repetition-rate PIV measurements demonstrate the influence of a vitiated crossflow generated by a low-swirl/bluff-body burner on the near-wake flow-field of the jet. Measurements at a plane below the injection location of the jet indicate that there is a continuous entrainment of PIV particles in case of swirling crossflow. The time-averaged flow-field shows that the velocity field for reacting/non-reacting jets in the LSB crossflow exhibits higher velocity gradients, in the measurement plane along jet cross section, as compared to BBB crossflow. It is found that the vorticity magnitude is lower in case of jets in the BBB crossflow and there is a delay in the formation of the wake vortex structure. The conditional turbulent statistics of the jet flow-field in the two crossflows shows that there is a higher degree of intermittency related to the wake vortex structure in case of a BBB crossflow, which results in a non-Gaussian distribution of the turbulent statistics. The wake Strouhal number calculation shows the influence of the nature of crossflow on the rate of wake vortex shedding. The wake Strouhal number for the jets in BBB crossflow is found to be lower than for the LSB crossflow. A decrease in the wake Strouhal number is observed with an increase in the nozzle separation distance. There is an increase in the dilatation rate owing to heat release which results in higher wake Strouhal number for reacting jets as compared

  20. SHOCKFIND - An algorithm to identify magnetohydrodynamic shock waves in turbulent clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Lehmann, Andrew; Wardle, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The formation of stars occurs in the dense molecular cloud phase of the interstellar medium. Observations and numerical simulations of molecular clouds have shown that supersonic magnetised turbulence plays a key role for the formation of stars. Simulations have also shown that a large fraction of the turbulent energy dissipates in shock waves. The three families of MHD shocks --- fast, intermediate and slow --- distinctly compress and heat up the molecular gas, and so provide an important probe of the physical conditions within a turbulent cloud. Here we introduce the publicly available algorithm, SHOCKFIND, to extract and characterise the mixture of shock families in MHD turbulence. The algorithm is applied to a 3-dimensional simulation of a magnetised turbulent molecular cloud, and we find that both fast and slow MHD shocks are present in the simulation. We give the first prediction of the mixture of turbulence-driven MHD shock families in this molecular cloud, and present their distinct distributions of s...

  1. Relating a Jet-Surface Interaction Experiment to a Commercial Supersonic Transport Aircraft Using Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, Vance F. III; Friedlander, David

    2017-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations were performed for a commercial supersonic transport aircraft concept and experimental hardware models designed to represent the installed propulsion system of the conceptual aircraft in an upcoming test campaign. The purpose of the experiment is to determine the effects of jet-surface interactions from supersonic aircraft on airport community noise. RANS simulations of the commercial supersonic transport aircraft concept were performed to relate the representative experimental hardware to the actual aircraft. RANS screening simulations were performed on the proposed test hardware to verify that it would be free from potential rig noise and to predict the aerodynamic forces on the model hardware to assist with structural design. The simulations showed a large region of separated flow formed in a junction region of one of the experimental configurations. This was dissimilar with simulations of the aircraft and could invalidate the noise measurements. This configuration was modified and a subsequent RANS simulation showed that the size of the flow separation was greatly reduced. The aerodynamic forces found on the experimental models were found to be relatively small when compared to the expected loads from the model’s own weight.Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations were completed for two configurations of a three-stream inverted velocity profile (IVP) nozzle and a baseline single-stream round nozzle (mixed-flow equivalent conditions). For the Sideline and Cutback flow conditions, while the IVP nozzles did not reduce the peak turbulent kinetic energy on the lower side of the jet plume, the IVP nozzles did significantly reduce the size of the region of peak turbulent kinetic energy when compared to the jet plume of the baseline nozzle cases. The IVP nozzle at Sideline conditions did suffer a region of separated flow from the inner stream nozzle splitter that did produce an intense, but small, region of

  2. Suprathermal Ion Acceleration in Multiple Contracting and Reconnecting Inertial-scale Flux Ropes in the Supersonic Solar Wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, J. A.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    3D and 2D MHD turbulence simulations with a strong large-scale magnetic field show that the turbulence is filled with quasi-2D inertial-scale flux ropes that intermittently reconnect, while test particle simulations stress how suprathermal particles can be efficiently accelerated to produce power law spectra (kappa distributions) when traversing multiple flux ropes. Solar wind observations indicate that the statistical properties of the turbulence agree well with the MHD turbulence simulation. In addition, recent observations show the presence of different size inertial-scale magnetic islands in the slow solar wind near the heliospheric current sheet, evidence of island merging, and of heating of ions and electrons in their vicinity. At the same time, observations in the supersonic solar wind suggest the existence of suprathermal ion spectra in the solar wind frame where the distribution function is a power law in momentum with a -5 exponent. We present a new statistical transport theory to model the acceleration of superthermal ions traversing multiple contracting and reconnecting inertial-scale quasi-2D flux ropes in the supersonic solar wind. Steady-state analytical solutions for the accelerated suprathermal particle spectrum in a radially expanding solar wind will be explored to show under what conditions one can reproduce the observed superthermal power-law slope.

  3. Supersonic Flutter of Laminated Curved Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ganapathi

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Supersonic flutter analysis of laminated composite curved panels is investigated using doubly-curved, quadrilateral, shear flexible, shell element based on field-consistency approach. The formulation includes transverse shear deformation, in-plane and rotary inertias. The aerodynamic force is evaluated using two-dimensional static aerodynamic approximation for high supersonic flow. Initially, the model developed here is verified for the flutter analysis of flat plates. Numerical results are presented for isotropic, orthotropic and laminated anisotropic curved panels. A detailed parametric study is carried out to observe the effects of aspect and thickness ratios, number of layers, lamination scheme, and boundary conditions on flutter boundary.

  4. Supersonic gas shell for puff pinch experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. S., III; Doggett, W. O.; Roth, I.; Stallings, C.

    1982-09-01

    An easy-to-fabricate, conical, annular supersonic nozzle has been developed for use in high-power, puff gas z-pinch experiments. A fast responding conical pressure probe has also been developed as an accurate supersonic gas flow diagnostic for evaluating the transient gas jet formed by the nozzle. Density profile measurements show that the magnitude and radial position of the gas annulus are fairly constant with distance from the nozzle, but the gas density in the center of the annulus increases with distance from the nozzle.

  5. Nonlinear Krylov acceleration of reacting flow codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S.; Rawat, R.; Smith, P.; Pernice, M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We are working on computational simulations of three-dimensional reactive flows in applications encompassing a broad range of chemical engineering problems. Examples of such processes are coal (pulverized and fluidized bed) and gas combustion, petroleum processing (cracking), and metallurgical operations such as smelting. These simulations involve an interplay of various physical and chemical factors such as fluid dynamics with turbulence, convective and radiative heat transfer, multiphase effects such as fluid-particle and particle-particle interactions, and chemical reaction. The governing equations resulting from modeling these processes are highly nonlinear and strongly coupled, thereby rendering their solution by traditional iterative methods (such as nonlinear line Gauss-Seidel methods) very difficult and sometimes impossible. Hence we are exploring the use of nonlinear Krylov techniques (such as CMRES and Bi-CGSTAB) to accelerate and stabilize the existing solver. This strategy allows us to take advantage of the problem-definition capabilities of the existing solver. The overall approach amounts to using the SIMPLE (Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equations) method and its variants as nonlinear preconditioners for the nonlinear Krylov method. We have also adapted a backtracking approach for inexact Newton methods to damp the Newton step in the nonlinear Krylov method. This will be a report on work in progress. Preliminary results with nonlinear GMRES have been very encouraging: in many cases the number of line Gauss-Seidel sweeps has been reduced by about a factor of 5, and increased robustness of the underlying solver has also been observed.

  6. Turbulence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Shui, Wan; Johansson, Jens

    2011-01-01

    In this report a new turbulence model is presented.In contrast to the bulk of modern work, the model is a classical continuum model with a relatively simple constitutive equation. The constitutive equation is, as usual in continuum mechanics, entirely empirical. It has the usual Newton or Stokes...... term with stresses depending linearly on the strain rates. This term takes into account the transfer of linear momentum from one part of the fluid to another. Besides there is another term, which takes into account the transfer of angular momentum. Thus the model implies a new definition of turbulence....... The model is in a virgin state, but a number of numerical tests have been carried out with good results. It is published to encourage other researchers to study the model in order to find its merits and possible limitations....

  7. Analysis of reacting flowfields in low-thrust rocket engines and plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan Mitchell

    The mixing and combustion processes in small gaseous hydrogen-oxygen thrusters and plumes are studied by means of a computational model developed as a general purpose analytic procedure for solving low speed, reacting, internal flowfields. The model includes the full Navier-Stokes equations coupled with species diffusion equations for a hydrogen-oxygen reaction kinetics system as well as the option to use either the k-Epsilon or q-Omega low Reynolds number, two-equation turbulence models. Solution of the governing equations is accomplished by a finite-volume formulation with central-difference spatial discretizations and an explicit, four-stage, Runge Kutta time-integration procedure. The Runge-Kutta scheme appears to provide efficient convergence when applied to the calculation of turbulent, reacting flowfields in these small thrusters. Appropriate boundary conditions are developed to properly model propellant mass flowrates and regenerative wall cooling. The computational method is validated against measured engine performance parameters on a global level, as well as experimentally obtained exit plane and plume flowfield properties on a local level. The model does an excellent job of predicting the measured performance trends of an auxiliary thruster as a function of O/F ratio, although the performance levels are consistently underpredicted by approximately 4 percent. These differences arise because the extent to which the wall coolant layer and combustion gases mix and react is underpredicted. Predictions of velocity components, temperature and species number densities in the near-field plume regions of several low-thrust engines show reasonable agreement with experimental data obtained by two separate laser diagnostic techniques. Discrepancies between the predictions and measurements are primarily due to three-dimensional mixing processes which are not accounted for in the analysis. Both comparisons with experiment and the evident reason for errors in absolute

  8. Controlling turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    We show that a simple modification of the velocity profile in a pipe can lead to a complete collapse of turbulence and the flow fully relaminarises. The annihilation of turbulence is achieved by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component alone, greatly reducing control efforts. Several different control techniques are presented: one with a local modification of the flow profile by means of a stationary obstacle, one employing a nozzle injecting fluid through a small gap at the pipe wall and one with a moving wall, where a part of the pipe is shifted in the streamwise direction. All control techniques act on the flow such that the streamwise velocity profile becomes more flat and turbulence gradually grows faint and disappears. In a smooth straight pipe the flow remains laminar downstream of the control. Hence a reduction in skin friction by a factor of 8 and more can be accomplished. Stereoscopic PIV-measurements and movies of the development of the flow during relaminarisation are presented.

  9. Multiphase integral reacting flow computer code (ICOMFLO): User`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.

    1997-11-01

    A copyrighted computational fluid dynamics computer code, ICOMFLO, has been developed for the simulation of multiphase reacting flows. The code solves conservation equations for gaseous species and droplets (or solid particles) of various sizes. General conservation laws, expressed by elliptic type partial differential equations, are used in conjunction with rate equations governing the mass, momentum, enthalpy, species, turbulent kinetic energy, and turbulent dissipation. Associated phenomenological submodels of the code include integral combustion, two parameter turbulence, particle evaporation, and interfacial submodels. A newly developed integral combustion submodel replacing an Arrhenius type differential reaction submodel has been implemented to improve numerical convergence and enhance numerical stability. A two parameter turbulence submodel is modified for both gas and solid phases. An evaporation submodel treats not only droplet evaporation but size dispersion. Interfacial submodels use correlations to model interfacial momentum and energy transfer. The ICOMFLO code solves the governing equations in three steps. First, a staggered grid system is constructed in the flow domain. The staggered grid system defines gas velocity components on the surfaces of a control volume, while the other flow properties are defined at the volume center. A blocked cell technique is used to handle complex geometry. Then, the partial differential equations are integrated over each control volume and transformed into discrete difference equations. Finally, the difference equations are solved iteratively by using a modified SIMPLER algorithm. The results of the solution include gas flow properties (pressure, temperature, density, species concentration, velocity, and turbulence parameters) and particle flow properties (number density, temperature, velocity, and void fraction). The code has been used in many engineering applications, such as coal-fired combustors, air

  10. Mach Number Dependence of Turbulent Magnetic Field Amplification: Solenoidal versus Compressive Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph; Schober, Jennifer; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S; Schleicher, Dominik R G; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.114504

    2011-01-01

    We study the growth rate and saturation level of the turbulent dynamo in magnetohydrodynamical simulations of turbulence, driven with solenoidal (divergence-free) or compressive (curl-free) forcing. For models with Mach numbers ranging from 0.02 to 20, we find significantly different magnetic field geometries, amplification rates, and saturation levels, decreasing strongly at the transition from subsonic to supersonic flows, due to the development of shocks. Both extreme types of turbulent forcing drive the dynamo, but solenoidal forcing is more efficient, because it produces more vorticity.

  11. Bridging the gap between atmospheric physics and chemistry in studies of small-scale turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2003-01-01

    The current understanding of the influence of atmospheric turbulence on chemical reactions is briefly reviewed. The fundamentals of this influence and the consequences for the transport and mixing of the reactants are discussed. A classification of the turbulent reacting flows is proposed in terms o

  12. DNS of turbulent flows of dense gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacovelli, L.; Cinnella, P.; Gloerfelt, X.; Grasso, F.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of dense gas effects on compressible turbulence is investigated by means of numerical simulations of the decay of compressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence (CHIT) and of supersonic turbulent flows through a plane channel (TCF). For both configurations, a parametric study on the Mach and Reynolds numbers is carried out. The dense gas considered in these parametric studies is PP11, a heavy fluorocarbon. The results are systematically compared to those obtained for a diatomic perfect gas (air). In our computations, the thermodynamic behaviour of the dense gases is modelled by means of the Martin-Hou equation of state. For CHIT cases, initial turbulent Mach numbers up to 1 are analyzed using mesh resolutions up to 5123. For TCF, bulk Mach numbers up to 3 and bulk Reynolds numbers up to 12000 are investigated. Average profiles of the thermodynamic quantities exhibit significant differences with respect to perfect-gas solutions for both of the configurations. For high-Mach CHIT, compressible structures are modified with respect to air, with weaker eddy shocklets and stronger expansions. In TCF, the velocity profiles of dense gas flows are much less sensitive to the Mach number and collapse reasonably well in the logarithmic region without any special need for compressible scalings, unlike the case of air, and the overall flow behaviour is midway between that of a variable-property liquid and that of a gas.

  13. Numerical simulations of transverse liquid jet to a supersonic crossflow using a pure two-fluid model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixu Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A pure two-fluid model was used for investigating transverse liquid jet to a supersonic crossflow. The well-posedness problem of the droplet phase governing equations was solved by applying an equation of state in the kinetic theory. A k-ε-kp turbulence model was used to simulate the turbulent compressible multiphase flow. Separation of boundary layer in front of the liquid jet was predicted with a separation shock induced. A bow shock was found to interact with the separation shock in the simulation result, and the adjustment of shock structure caused by the interaction described the whipping phenomena. The predicted penetration height showed good agreement with the empirical correlations. In addition, the turbulent kinetic energies of both the gas and droplet phases were presented for comparison, and effects of the jet-to-air momentum flux ratio and droplet diameter on the penetration height were also examined in this work.

  14. Conditions for supersonic bent Marshak waves

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Qiang; Li, Jing; Dan, Jia-kun; Wang, Kun-lun; Zhou, Shao-tong

    2014-01-01

    Supersonic radiation diffusion approximation is a useful way to study the radiation transportation. Considering the bent Marshak wave theory in 2-dimensions, and an invariable source temperature, we get the supersonic radiation diffusion conditions which are about the Mach number $M>8(1+\\sqrt{\\ep})/3$, and the optical depth $\\tau>1$. A large Mach number requires a high temperature, while a large optical depth requires a low temperature. Only when the source temperature is in a proper region these conditions can be satisfied. Assuming the material opacity and the specific internal energy depend on the temperature and the density as a form of power law, for a given density, these conditions correspond to a region about source temperature and the length of the sample. This supersonic diffusion region involves both lower and upper limit of source temperature, while that in 1-dimension only gives a lower limit. Taking $\\rm SiO_2$ and the Au for example, we show the supersonic region numerically.

  15. Dielectric barrier discharge source for supersonic beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luria, K.; Lavie, N.; Even, U. [Sackler School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2009-10-15

    We present a new excitation source for pulsed supersonic beams. The excitation is based on dielectric barrier discharge in the beam. It produces cold beams of metastable atoms, dissociated neutral atoms from molecular precursors, and both positive and negative ions with high efficiency and reliability.

  16. Graphic Turbulence Guidance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  17. Graphical Turbulence Guidance - Composite

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  18. Studies of the unsteady supersonic base flows around three afterbodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhixiang Xiao; Song Fu

    2009-01-01

    Unsteady supersonic base flows around three afterbodies, cylindrical (Cy), boattailed (BT) and three-step (MS), are investigated in this paper. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and two RANS/LES (large-eddy simulation) hybrid methods, detached eddy simulation (DES) and delayed-DES (DDES), are used to predict the base flow characteristics around the baseline Cy afterbody. All the RANS and hybrid methods are based on the two-equation SST (shear-stress transport) model with compressible corrections (CC). According to the comparison of measurements, both DES and DDES can produce more satisfactory results than RANS. RANS can only present the "stable" flow patterns, while the hybrid methods can demonstrate unsteady flow structures. DDES and DES results are little different from one another although the latter exhibits better agreement with the experiment. DES is taken to investigate the 5 BT and three-step afterbodies. The mean flow data and the instantaneous turbulent coherent structures are compared against available measurements.

  19. A Course in Transport Phenomena in Multicomponent, Multiphase, Reacting Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, R. G.; Whitaker, S.

    1978-01-01

    This course concentrates on a rigorous development of the multicomponent transport equations, boundary conditions at phase interfaces, and volume-averaged transport equations for multiphase reacting systems. (BB)

  20. Formation of turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struminskii, V.V. (Sektor Mekhaniki Neodnorodnykh Sred, Moscow (USSR))

    1989-01-01

    Two essentially different forms of turbulence are identified in liquids and gases: (1) turbulent flow in the vicinity of solid or liquid boundaries and (2) turbulent flows evolving far from the walls. The generation mechanisms and principal characteristics of the two types of turbulent flows are discussed. It is emphasized that the two types of turbulent flows are caused by different physical mechanisms and should be considered separately in turbulence studies. 14 refs.

  1. Hybrid Large-Eddy/Reynolds-Averaged Simulation of a Supersonic Cavity Using VULCAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Jesse; McDaniel, James; Baurle, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of a supersonic recessed-cavity flow are performed using a hybrid large-eddy/Reynolds-averaged simulation approach utilizing an inflow turbulence recycling procedure and hybridized inviscid flux scheme. Calorically perfect air enters a three-dimensional domain at a free stream Mach number of 2.92. Simulations are performed to assess grid sensitivity of the solution, efficacy of the turbulence recycling, and the effect of the shock sensor used with the hybridized inviscid flux scheme. Analysis of the turbulent boundary layer upstream of the rearward-facing step for each case indicates excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Mean velocity and pressure results are compared to Reynolds-averaged simulations and experimental data for each case and indicate good agreement on the finest grid. Simulations are repeated on a coarsened grid, and results indicate strong grid density sensitivity. Simulations are performed with and without inflow turbulence recycling on the coarse grid to isolate the effect of the recycling procedure, which is demonstrably critical to capturing the relevant shear layer dynamics. Shock sensor formulations of Ducros and Larsson are found to predict mean flow statistics equally well.

  2. Computation of supersonic jet mixing noise for an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Kim, Chan M.

    1994-05-01

    The turbulent mixing noise of a supersonic jet is calculated for an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle at the design pressure ratio. Aerodynamic computations are performed using the PARC code with a k-epsilon turbulence model. Lighthill's acoustic analogy is adopted. The acoustics solution is based upon the methodology followed in the MGB code. The source correlation function is expressed as a linear combination of second-order tensors (Ribner's assumption). Assuming separable second-order correlations and incorporating Batchelor's isotropic turbulence model, the source term was calculated from the kinetic energy of turbulence. A Gaussian distribution for the time-delay of correlation was introduced. The CFD solution was used to obtain the source strength as well as the characteristic time-delay of correlation. The effect of sound/flow interaction was incorporated using the high frequency asymptotic solution to Lilley's equation for axisymmetric geometries. Acoustic results include sound pressure level directivity and spectra at different polar angles. The aerodynamic and acoustic results demonstrate favorable agreement with experimental data.

  3. Explosive turbulent magnetic reconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashimori, K; Yokoi, N; Hoshino, M

    2013-06-21

    We report simulation results for turbulent magnetic reconnection obtained using a newly developed Reynolds-averaged magnetohydrodynamics model. We find that the initial Harris current sheet develops in three ways, depending on the strength of turbulence: laminar reconnection, turbulent reconnection, and turbulent diffusion. The turbulent reconnection explosively converts the magnetic field energy into both kinetic and thermal energy of plasmas, and generates open fast reconnection jets. This fast turbulent reconnection is achieved by the localization of turbulent diffusion. Additionally, localized structure forms through the interaction of the mean field and turbulence.

  4. Measurements of Non-reacting and Reacting Flow Fields of a Liquid Swirl Flame Burner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHONG Cheng Tung; HOCHGREB Simone

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the liquid fuel spray and flow field characteristics inside a combustor is crucial for designing a fuel efficient and low emission device. Characterisation of the flow field of a model gas turbine liquid swirl burner is performed by using a 2-D particle imaging velocimetry(PIV) system. The flow field pattern of an axial flow burner with a fixed swirl intensity is compared under confined and unconfined conditions, i.e., with and without the combustor wall. The effect of temperature on the main swirling air flow is investigated under open and non-reacting conditions. The result shows that axial and radial velocities increase as a result of decreased flow density and increased flow volume. The flow field of the main swirling flow with liquid fuel spray injection is compared to non-spray swirling flow. Introduction of liquid fuel spray changes the swirl air flow field at the burner outlet, where the radial velocity components increase for both open and confined environment. Under reacting condition, the enclosure generates a corner recirculation zone that intensifies the strength of radial velocity. The reverse flow and corner recirculation zone assists in stabilizing the flame by preheating the reactants. The flow field data can be used as validation target for swirl combustion modelling.

  5. Experimental Investigation on the Effects of Chemical Heat Release in the Reacting Turbulent Plane Shear Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    detailed comparison between experimental and predicted profiles is made in Section 3.2 IIH 71. a0.21 U c 9.2 CL) 0 - .0-.005 . .5y Fi . 31 feto nMaue...eprtr rfls 72. b) 1.1 cc 010 - . . . h.y Fi.31 feto nTmeauePoie nerdfo Kords Ds 73. but this discussion concerns the effects of changing F. The three

  6. Smoothed Particle Magnetohydrodynamics Simulations of Protostellar Jets and Turbulent Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Tricco, Terrence S; Federrath, Christoph; Bate, Matthew R

    2013-01-01

    We presents results from Smoothed Particle Magnetohydrodynamics simulations of collapsing molecular cloud cores, and dynamo amplification of the magnetic field in the presence of Mach 10 magnetised turbulence. Our star formation simulations have produced, for the first time ever, highly collimated magnetised protostellar jets from the first hydrostatic core phase. Up to 40% of the initial core mass may be ejected through this outflow. The primary difficulty in performing these simulations is maintaining the divergence free constraint of the magnetic field, and to address this issue, we have developed a new divergence cleaning method which has allowed us to stably follow the evolution of these protostellar jets for long periods. The simulations performed of supersonic MHD turbulence are able to exponentially amplify magnetic energy by up to 10 orders of magnitude via turbulent dynamo. To reduce numerical dissipation, a new shock detection algorithm is utilised which is able to track magnetic shocks throughout ...

  7. Tsallis statistics as a tool for studying interstellar turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, A

    2009-01-01

    We used magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of interstellar turbulence to study the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of increments of density, velocity, and magnetic field. We found that the PDFs are well described by a Tsallis distribution, following the same general trends found in solar wind and Electron MHD studies. We found that the PDFs of density are different in subsonic and supersonic turbulence. In order to extend this work to ISM observations we studied maps of column density obtained from 3D MHD simulations. From the column density maps we found the parameters that fit to Tsallis distributions and demonstrated that these parameters vary with the Mach and Alfvenic Mach numbers of turbulence. This opens avenues for using Tsallis distributions to study the dynamical and magnetic states of interstellar gas.

  8. Stability and suppression of turbulence in relaxing molecular gas flows

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoryev, Yurii N

    2017-01-01

    This book presents an in-depth systematic investigation of a dissipative effect which manifests itself as the growth of hydrodynamic stability and suppression of turbulence in relaxing molecular gas flows. The work describes the theoretical foundations of a new way to control stability and laminar turbulent transitions in aerodynamic flows. It develops hydrodynamic models for describing thermal nonequilibrium gas flows which allow the consideration of suppression of inviscid acoustic waves in 2D shear flows. Then, nonlinear evolution of large-scale vortices and Kelvin-Helmholtz waves in relaxing shear flows are studied. Critical Reynolds numbers in supersonic Couette flows are calculated analytically and numerically within the framework of both linear and nonlinear classical energy hydrodynamic stability theories. The calculations clearly show that the relaxation process can appreciably delay the laminar-turbulent transition. The aim of the book is to show the new dissipative effect, which can be used for flo...

  9. Ribbon Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Venaille, Antoine; Vallis, Geoffrey K

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the non-linear equilibration of a two-layer quasi-geostrophic flow in a channel forced by an imposed unstable zonal mean flow, paying particular attention to the role of bottom friction. In the limit of low bottom friction, classical theory of geostrophic turbulence predicts an inverse cascade of kinetic energy in the horizontal with condensation at the domain scale and barotropization on the vertical. By contrast, in the limit of large bottom friction, the flow is dominated by ribbons of high kinetic energy in the upper layer. These ribbons correspond to meandering jets separating regions of homogenized potential vorticity. We interpret these result by taking advantage of the peculiar conservation laws satisfied by this system: the dynamics can be recast in such a way that the imposed mean flow appears as an initial source of potential vorticity levels in the upper layer. The initial baroclinic instability leads to a turbulent flow that stirs this potential vorticity field while conserving the...

  10. A Framework for the Modelling of Biphasic Reacting Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anantpinijwatna, Amata; Sin, Gürkan; O’Connell, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Biphasic reacting systems have a broad application range from organic reactions in pharmaceutical and agro-bio industries to CO 2 capture. However, mathematical modelling of biphasic reacting systems is a formidable challenge due to many phenomena underlying the process such as chemical equilibri...... systems: a PTC-based reaction system and pseudo-PTC system....

  11. The density structure and star formation rate of non-isothermal polytropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The interstellar medium of galaxies is governed by supersonic turbulence, which likely controls the star formation rate (SFR) and initial mass function (IMF) of stars. Turbulence also plays an important role during structure formation in the early Universe. Despite its ubiquity and importance, we have yet to understand the statistics of turbulence. ISM turbulence is non-universal, with a wide range of Mach numbers, magnetic fields strengths, and is driven by various stellar feedback and galactic processes. Although some of these parameters were explored, the bulk of previous work assumed that the gas is isothermal. However, cold molecular clouds form out of the warm atomic medium, with the gas passing through various chemical and thermodynamic phases that are not isothermal. Here we determine the role of temperature variations by modelling non-isothermal hydrodynamic turbulence with a polytropic equation of state (EOS), P~rho^Gamma. We use grid resolutions of 2048^3 cells and compare polytropic exponents Gamm...

  12. Statistical turbulence theory and turbulence phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The application of deductive turbulence theory for validity determination of turbulence phenomenology at the level of second-order, single-point moments is considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the phenomenological formula relating the dissipation to the turbulence energy and the Rotta-type formula for the return to isotropy. Methods which deal directly with most or all the scales of motion explicitly are reviewed briefly. The statistical theory of turbulence is presented as an expansion about randomness. Two concepts are involved: (1) a modeling of the turbulence as nearly multipoint Gaussian, and (2) a simultaneous introduction of a generalized eddy viscosity operator.

  13. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Compressible Reacting Boundary Layer using a Temporal Slow Growth Homogenization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topalian, Victor; Oliver, Todd; Ulerich, Rhys; Moser, Robert

    2013-11-01

    A DNS of a compressible, reacting boundary layer flow at Reθ ~ 430 was performed using a temporal slow-growth homogenization, for a multispecies flow model of air at supersonic regime. The overall scenario parameters are related to those of the flow over an ablating surface of a space capsule upon Earth's atmospheric re-entry. The simulation algorithm features Fourier spatial discretization in the streamwise and spanwise directions, B-splines in the wall normal direction, and is marched semi-implicitly in time using the SMR91 scheme. Flow statistics will be presented for relevant flow quantities, in particular those related with RANS modeling. Since analogous slow growth computations can be performed using RANS to predict the flow mean profiles, the use of data gathered from this type of simulation as a vehicle for the calibration and uncertainty quantification of RANS models will be discussed. This work is supported by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security Administration] under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  14. Study of active cooling for supersonic transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The potential benefits of using the fuel heat sink of hydrogen fueled supersonic transports for cooling large portions of the aircraft wing and fuselage are examined. The heat transfer would be accomplished by using an intermediate fluid such as an ethylene glycol-water solution. Some of the advantages of the system are: (1) reduced costs by using aluminum in place of titanium, (2) reduced cabin heat loads, and (3) more favorable environmental conditions for the aircraft systems. A liquid hydrogen fueled, Mach 2.7 supersonic transport aircraft design was used for the reference uncooled vehicle. The cooled aircraft designs were analyzed to determine their heat sink capability, the extent and location of feasible cooled surfaces, and the coolant passage size and spacing.

  15. Supersonic Motions of Galaxies in Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Faltenbacher, A; Nagai, D; Gottlöber, S; Faltenbacher, Andreas; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Nagai, Daisuke; Gottloeber, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    We study motions of galaxies in galaxy clusters formed in the concordance LCDM cosmology. We use high-resolution cosmological simulations that follow dynamics of dark matter and gas and include various physical processes critical for galaxy formation: gas cooling, heating and star formation. Analysing motions of galaxies and the properties of intracluster gas in the sample of eight simulated clusters at z=0, we study velocity dispersion profiles of the dark matter, gas, and galaxies. We measure the mean velocity of galaxy motions and gas sound speed as a function of radius and calculate the average Mach number of galaxy motions. The simulations show that galaxies, on average, move supersonically with the average Mach number of ~1.4, approximately independent of the cluster-centric radius. The supersonic motions of galaxies may potentially provide an important source of heating for the intracluster gas by driving weak shocks and via dynamical friction, although these heating processes appear to be inefficient ...

  16. Sub-Alfvenic Non-Ideal MHD Turbulence Simulations with Ambipolar Diffusion: I. Turbulence Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, R I; Li, P S; McKee, C F; Fisher, R

    2008-04-10

    Most numerical investigations on the role of magnetic fields in turbulent molecular clouds (MCs) are based on ideal magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD). However, MCs are weakly ionized, so that the time scale required for the magnetic field to diffuse through the neutral component of the plasma by ambipolar diffusion (AD) can be comparable to the dynamical time scale. We have performed a series of 256{sup 3} and 512{sup 3} simulations on supersonic but sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems with AD using the Heavy-Ion Approximation developed in Li et al. (2006). Our calculations are based on the assumption that the number of ions is conserved, but we show that these results approximately apply to the case of time-dependent ionization in molecular clouds as well. Convergence studies allow us to determine the optimal value of the ionization mass fraction when using the heavy-ion approximation for low Mach number, sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems. We find that ambipolar diffusion steepens the velocity and magnetic power spectra compared to the ideal MHD case. Changes in the density PDF, total magnetic energy, and ionization fraction are determined as a function of the AD Reynolds number. The power spectra for the neutral gas properties of a strongly magnetized medium with a low AD Reynolds number are similar to those for a weakly magnetized medium; in particular, the power spectrum of the neutral velocity is close to that for Burgers turbulence.

  17. Airborne Turbulence Detection and Warning ACLAIM Flight Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Stephen M.; Bagley, Hal R.; Soreide, Dave C.; Bowdle, David A.; Bogue, Rodney K.; Ehernberger, L. Jack

    1999-01-01

    The Airborne Coherent Lidar for Advanced Inflight Measurements (ACLAIM) is a NASA/Dryden-lead program to develop and demonstrate a 2 micrometers pulsed Doppler lidar for airborne look-ahead turbulence detection and warning. Advanced warning of approaching turbulence can significantly reduce injuries to passengers and crew aboard commercial airliners. The ACLAIM instrument is a key asset to the ongoing Turbulence component of NASA's Aviation Safety Program, aimed at reducing the accident rate aboard commercial airliners by a factor of five over the next ten years and by a factor of ten over the next twenty years. As well, the advanced turbulence warning capability can prevent "unstarts" in the inlet of supersonic aircraft engines by alerting the flight control computer which then adjusts the engine to operate in a less fuel efficient, and more turbulence tolerant, mode. Initial flight tests of the ACLAIM were completed in March and April of 1998. This paper and presentation gives results from these initial flights, with validated demonstration of Doppler lidar wind turbulence detection several kilometers ahead of the aircraft.

  18. Compressible Turbulent Channel Flows: DNS Results and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, P. G.; Coleman, G. N.; Bradshaw, P.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The present paper addresses some topical issues in modeling compressible turbulent shear flows. The work is based on direct numerical simulation of two supersonic fully developed channel flows between very cold isothermal walls. Detailed decomposition and analysis of terms appearing in the momentum and energy equations are presented. The simulation results are used to provide insights into differences between conventional time-and Favre-averaging of the mean-flow and turbulent quantities. Study of the turbulence energy budget for the two cases shows that the compressibility effects due to turbulent density and pressure fluctuations are insignificant. In particular, the dilatational dissipation and the mean product of the pressure and dilatation fluctuations are very small, contrary to the results of simulations for sheared homogeneous compressible turbulence and to recent proposals for models for general compressible turbulent flows. This provides a possible explanation of why the Van Driest density-weighted transformation is so successful in correlating compressible boundary layer data. Finally, it is found that the DNS data do not support the strong Reynolds analogy. A more general representation of the analogy is analysed and shown to match the DNS data very well.

  19. Conceptual Design of a Supersonic Jet Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Kareliusson, Joakim; Nordqvist, Melker

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is a response to the request for proposal issued by a joint collaboration between the AIAA Foundation and ASME/IGTI as a student competition to design a new turbofan engine intended for a conceptual supersonic business jet expected to enter service in 2025. Due to the increasing competition in the aircraft industry and the more stringent environmental legislations the new engine is expected to provide a lower fuel burn than the current engine intended for the aircraft to increase ...

  20. Research of low boom and low drag supersonic aircraft design

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Xiaoqiang; Li Zhanke; Song Bifeng

    2014-01-01

    Sonic boom reduction will be an issue of utmost importance in future supersonic transport, due to strong regulations on acoustic nuisance. The paper describes a new multi-objective optimization method for supersonic aircraft design. The method is developed by coupling Seebass–George–Darden (SGD) inverse design method and multi-objective genetic algorithm. Based on the method, different codes are developed. Using a computational architecture, a conceptual supersonic aircraft design environment...

  1. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The goals of the International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' are to expose the generic problem of Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing in Unsteady Flows to a wide scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the non-canonical turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together scientists from the areas which include, but are not limited to, high energy density physics, plasmas, fluid dynamics, turbulence, combustion, material science, geophysics, astrophysics, optics and telecommunications, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task. The Turbulent Mixing and Turbulence in Unsteady Flows, including multiphase flows, plays a key role in a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from astrophysical to nano-scales, under either high or low energy density conditions. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, properties of materials under high strain rates, strong shocks, explosions, blast waves, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, oceanography, atmospheric flows, unsteady boundary layers, hypersonic and supersonic flows, are a few examples to list. A grip on unsteady turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser-micromachining and free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in aeronautics. Unsteady Turbulent Processes are anisotropic, non-local and multi-scale, and their fundamental scaling, spectral and invariant properties depart from the classical Kolmogorov scenario. The singular aspects and similarity of the

  2. Explosive Turbulent Magnetic Reconnection

    OpenAIRE

    Higashimori, Katsuaki; Yokoi, Nobumitsu; Hoshino, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    We report simulation results for turbulent magnetic reconnection obtained using a newly developed Reynolds-averaged magnetohydrodynamics model. We find that the initial Harris current sheet develops in three ways, depending on the strength of turbulence: laminar reconnection, turbulent reconnection, and turbulent diffusion. The turbulent reconnection explosively converts the magnetic field energy into both kinetic and thermal energy of plasmas, and generates open fast reconnection jets. This ...

  3. Airfoils in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, Lasse

    of resolved inflow turbulence on airfoil simulations in CFD. The detached-eddy simulation technique is used because it can resolve the inflow turbulence without becoming too computationally expensive due to its limited requirements for mesh resolution in the boundary layer. It cannot resolve the turbulence...... synthetic turbulence in arbitrary domains. The purpose is to generate a synthetic turbulence field corresponding to the field encountered by a rotating blade....

  4. Supersonic and subsonic measurements of mesospheric ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, L. C.; Nickell, L. C.; Kennedy, B.; Powell, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    An Arcas rocket-parachute system was used at night to compare supersonic and subsonic ionization measurements below 75 km. A hemispherical nose-tip probe was used on ascent and a parachute-borne blunt probe on descent to measure polar conductivities, which were due entirely to positive and negative ions. The velocity of the supersonic probe was Mach 2.5 at 50 km and 1.75 at 70 km; the blunt probe was subsonic below 71 km. Between 65 and 75 km the ratio of negative to positive conductivities (and thus of mobilities) determined by the blunt probe was about 1.2, and it approached 1 below this altitude range. The ratio obtained by the nose-tip probe varied from 1.5 at 75 km to .6 at 65 km, thus indicating a rapid variation of the effects of the shock wave on the sampled ions. The absolute values of positive conductivity measured subsonically and supersonically were essentially identical from 60 to 75 km, indicating that the sampled ions were unchanged by the shock. However, below 60 km the shock apparently 'broke up' the positive ions, as indicated by higher measured conductivities.

  5. Supersonic Jet Excitation using Flapping Injection

    CERN Document Server

    Hafsteinsson, Haukur; Andersson, Niklas; Cuppoletti, Daniel; Gutmark, Ephraim; Prisell, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Supersonic jet noise reduction is important for high speed military aircraft. Lower acoustic levels would reduce structural fatigue leading to longer lifetime of the jet aircraft. It is not solely structural aspects which are of importance, health issues of the pilot and the airfield per- sonnel are also very important, as high acoustic levels may result in severe hearing damage. It remains a major challenge to reduce the overall noise levels of the aircraft, where the supersonic exhaust is the main noise source for near ground operation. Fluidic injection into the supersonic jet at the nozzle exhaust has been shown as a promising method for noise reduction. It has been shown to speed up the mix- ing process of the main jet, hence reducing the kinetic energy level of the jet and the power of the total acoustic radiation. Furthermore, the interaction mechanism between the fluidic injection and the shock structure in the jet exhaust plays a crucial role in the total noise radia- tion. In this study, LES is used...

  6. Supersonic Gas-Liquid Cleaning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Frank

    1996-01-01

    The Supersonic Gas-Liquid Cleaning System Research Project consisted mainly of a feasibility study, including theoretical and engineering analysis, of a proof-of-concept prototype of this particular cleaning system developed by NASA-KSC. The cleaning system utilizes gas-liquid supersonic nozzles to generate high impingement velocities at the surface of the device to be cleaned. The cleaning fluid being accelerated to these high velocities may consist of any solvent or liquid, including water. Compressed air or any inert gas is used to provide the conveying medium for the liquid, as well as substantially reduce the total amount of liquid needed to perform adequate surface cleaning and cleanliness verification. This type of aqueous cleaning system is considered to be an excellent way of conducting cleaning and cleanliness verification operations as replacements for the use of CFC 113 which must be discontinued by 1995. To utilize this particular cleaning system in various cleaning applications for both the Space Program and the commercial market, it is essential that the cleaning system, especially the supersonic nozzle, be characterized for such applications. This characterization consisted of performing theoretical and engineering analysis, identifying desirable modifications/extensions to the basic concept, evaluating effects of variations in operating parameters, and optimizing hardware design for specific applications.

  7. Skin Friction and Pressure Measurements in Supersonic Inlets Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Supersonic propulsion systems include internal ducts, and therefore, the flow often includes shock waves, shear layers, vortices, and separated flows. Passive flow...

  8. NO concentration imaging in turbulent nonpremixed flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefer, R.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The importance of NO as a pollutant species is well known. An understanding of the formation characteristics of NO in turbulent hydrocarbon flames is important to both the desired reduction of pollutant emissions and the validation of proposed models for turbulent reacting flows. Of particular interest is the relationship between NO formation and the local flame zone, in which the fuel is oxidized and primary heat release occurs. Planar imaging of NO provides the multipoint statistics needed to relate NO formation to the both the flame zone and the local turbulence characteristics. Planar imaging of NO has been demonstrated in turbulent flames where NO was seeded into the flow at high concentrations (2000 ppm) to determine the gas temperature distribution. The NO concentrations in these experiments were significantly higher than those expected in typical hydrocarbon-air flames, which require a much lower detectability limit for NO measurements. An imaging technique based on laser-induced fluorescence with sufficient sensitivity to study the NO formation mechanism in the stabilization region of turbulent lifted-jet methane flames.

  9. Effects of the jet-to-crossflow momentum ratio on a sonic jet into a supersonic crossflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Numerical investigation of a transverse sonic jet injected into a supersonic crossflow was carried out using large-eddy simulation for a free-stream Mach number M = 1.6 and a Reynolds number Re = 1.38×10~5 based on the jet diameter.Effects of the jet-to-crossflow momentum ratio on various fundamental mechanisms dictating the intricate flow phenomena,including flow structures, turbulent characters and frequency behaviors,have been studied.The complex flow structures and the relevant flow features are disc...

  10. Hybrid Reynolds-Averaged/Large-Eddy Simulations of a Coaxial Supersonic Free-Jet Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurle, Robert A.; Edwards, Jack R.

    2010-01-01

    Reynolds-averaged and hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations have been applied to a supersonic coaxial jet flow experiment. The experiment was designed to study compressible mixing flow phenomenon under conditions that are representative of those encountered in scramjet combustors. The experiment utilized either helium or argon as the inner jet nozzle fluid, and the outer jet nozzle fluid consisted of laboratory air. The inner and outer nozzles were designed and operated to produce nearly pressure-matched Mach 1.8 flow conditions at the jet exit. The purpose of the computational effort was to assess the state-of-the-art for each modeling approach, and to use the hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations to gather insight into the deficiencies of the Reynolds-averaged closure models. The Reynolds-averaged simulations displayed a strong sensitivity to choice of turbulent Schmidt number. The initial value chosen for this parameter resulted in an over-prediction of the mixing layer spreading rate for the helium case, but the opposite trend was observed when argon was used as the injectant. A larger turbulent Schmidt number greatly improved the comparison of the results with measurements for the helium simulations, but variations in the Schmidt number did not improve the argon comparisons. The hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations also over-predicted the mixing layer spreading rate for the helium case, while under-predicting the rate of mixing when argon was used as the injectant. The primary reason conjectured for the discrepancy between the hybrid simulation results and the measurements centered around issues related to the transition from a Reynolds-averaged state to one with resolved turbulent content. Improvements to the inflow conditions were suggested as a remedy to this dilemma. Second-order turbulence statistics were also compared to their modeled Reynolds-averaged counterparts to evaluate the effectiveness of common turbulence closure

  11. Spark ignition of aviation fuel in isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisman, Alex; Lu, Tianfeng; Borghesi, Giulio; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent spark ignition occurs in combustion engines where the spark must establish a viable flame kernel that leads to stable combustion. A competition exists between kernel growth, due to flame propagation, and kernel attenuation, due to flame stretch and turbulence. This competition can be measured by the Karlovitz number, Ka, and kernel viability decreases rapidly for Ka >> 1 . In this study, the evolution of an initially spherical flame kernel in a turbulent field is investigated at two cases: Ka- (Ka = 25) and Ka+ (Ka = 125) using direct numerical simulation (DNS). A detailed chemical mechanism for jet fuel (Jet-A) is used, which is relevant for many practical conditions, and the mechanism includes a pyrolysis sub-model which is important for the ignition of large hydrocarbon fuels. An auxiliary non-reacting DNS generates the initial field of isotropic turbulence with a turbulent Reynolds number of 500 (Ka-) and 1,500 (Ka+). The kernel is then imposed at the center of the domain and the reacting DNS is performed. The Ka- case survives and the Ka+ case is extinguished. An analysis of the turbulence chemistry interactions is performed and the process of extinction is described. Department of Energy - Office of Basic Energy Science under Award No. DE-SC0001198.

  12. Species Source Term Mapping for Reacting Flow CFD Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Simulations of reacting flow in applications such as scramjet engines are currently limited in their utility or accuracy by the chemistry sub-models employed....

  13. Simultaneous Temperature and Velocity Diagnostic for Reacting Flows Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A diagnostic technique is proposed for measuring temperature and velocity simultaneously in a high temperature reacting flow for aiding research in propulsion. The...

  14. Fossil turbulence revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    1999-01-01

    A theory of fossil turbulence presented in the 11th Liege Colloquium on Marine turbulence is "revisited" in the 29th Liege Colloquium "Marine Turbulence Revisited". The Gibson (1980) theory applied universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified fluid as it is constrained and fossilized by buoyancy forces. Towed oceanic microstructure measurements of Schedvin (1979) confirmed the predicted universal constants. Universal constants, spectra, hydrodynamic phase diagrams (HPDs) and other predictions of the theory have been reconfirmed by a wide variety of field and laboratory observations. Fossil turbulence theory has many applications; for example, in marine biology, laboratory and field measurements suggest phytoplankton species with different swimming abilities adjust their growth strategies differently by pattern recognition of several days of turbulence-fossil-turbulence dissipation and persistence times above thres...

  15. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Ralph L.; Stewart, Delbert D.; Evans, Christopher J.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond.

  16. Compressibility Effects in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yu-Hui; PEI Jie; CHEN Jun; SHE Zhen-Su

    2008-01-01

    Local cascade (LC) scheme and space-time correlations are used to study turbulent structures and their convection behaviour in the near-wall region of compressible boundary layers at Ma = 0.8 and 1.3. The convection velocities of fluctuating velocity components u (streamwise) and v (vertical) are investigated by statistically analysing scale-dependent ensembles of LC structures. The results suggest that u is convected with entropy perturbations while v with an isentropic process. An abnormal thin layer distinct from the conventional viscous sub-layer is discovered in the immediate vicinity of the wall (y+≤1) in supersonic flows. While in the region 1 < y+ < 30,streamwise streaks dominate velocity, density and temperature fluctuations, the abnormal thin layer is dominated by spanwise streaks in vertical velocity and density fluctuations, where pressure and density fluctuations are strongly correlated. The LC scheme is proven to be effective in studying the nature of supersonic flows and compressibility effects on wall-bounded motions.

  17. Magnetic field amplification in turbulent astrophysical plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in astrophysical accretion discs, and in the interstellar and intergalactic medium. They drive jets, suppress fragmentation in star-forming clouds and can have a significant impact on the accretion rate of stars. However, the exact amplification mechanisms of cosmic magnetic fields remain relatively poorly understood. Here I start by reviewing recent advances in the numerical and theoretical modelling of the 'turbulent dynamo', which may explain the origin of galactic and inter-galactic magnetic fields. While dynamo action was previously investigated in great detail for incompressible plasmas, I here place particular emphasis on highly compressible astrophysical plasmas, which are characterised by strong density fluctuations and shocks, such as the interstellar medium. I find that dynamo action works not only in subsonic plasmas, but also in highly supersonic, compressible plasmas, as well as for low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers. I further present new numerical simu...

  18. Characterization of the supersonic wake of a generic space launcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, A.-M.; Stephan, S.; Radespiel, R.

    2017-03-01

    The wake flow of a generic axisymmetric space-launcher model is investigated experimentally for flow cases with and without propulsive jet to gain insight into the wake-flow phenomena at a supersonic stage of the flight trajectory which is especially critical with respect to dynamic loads on the structure. Measurements are performed at Mach 2.9 and a Reynolds number Re D = 1.3 × 106 based on model diameter D. The nozzle exit velocity of the jet is at Mach 2.5, and the flow is moderately underexpanded ( p e/ p ∞ = 5.7). The flow topology is described based on velocity measurements in the wake by means of particle image velocimetry and schlieren visualizations. Mean and fluctuating mass-flux profiles are obtained from hot-wire measurements, and unsteady wall-pressure measurements on the main-body base are performed simultaneously. This way, the evolution of the wake flow and its spectral content can be observed along with the footprint of this highly dynamic flow on the launcher main-body base. For the case without propulsive jet, a large separated zone is forming downstream of the main body shoulder, and the flow is reattaching further downstream on the afterbody. The afterexpanding propulsive jet (air) causes a displacement of the shear layer away from the wall, preventing the reattachment of the flow. In the spectral analysis of the baseline case, a dominant frequency around St D = 0.25 is found in the pressure-fluctuation signal at the main-body base of the launcher. This frequency is related to the shedding of the separation bubble and is less pronounced in the presence of the propulsive jet. In the shear layer itself, the spectra obtained from the hot-wire signal have a more broadband low-frequency content, which also reflects the characteristic frequency of turbulent structures convected in the shear layer, a swinging motion ( St D = 0.6), as well as the radial flapping motion of the shear layer ( St D = 0.85), respectively. Moving downstream along the

  19. Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) Plume Induced Environment Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, B. L.; Smith, S. D.; Van Norman, J. W.; Muppidi, S.; Clark, I

    2016-01-01

    Provide plume induced heating (radiation & convection) predictions in support of the LDSD thermal design (pre-flight SFDT-1) Predict plume induced aerodynamics in support of flight dynamics, to achieve targeted freestream conditions to test supersonic deceleration technologies (post-flight SFDT-1, pre-flight SFDT-2)

  20. Investigation on the pressure matching performance of the constant area supersonic-supersonic ejector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pressure matching performance of the constant area supersonic-supersonic ejector has been studied by varying the primary and secondary Mach numbers. The effect of the primary fluid injection configurations in ejector, namely peripheral and central, has been investigated as well. Schlieren pictures of flow structure in the former part of the mixing duct with different stagnation pressure ratio of the primary and secondary flows have been taken. Pressure ratios of the primary and secondary flows at the limiting condition have been obtained from the results of pressure and optical measurements. Additionally, a computational fluid dynamics analysis has been performed to clarify the physical meaning of the pressure matching performance diagram of the ejector. The obtained results show that the pressure matching performance of the constant area supersonic-supersonic ejector increases with the increase of the secondary Mach number, and the performance decreases slightly with the increase of the primary Mach number. The phenomenon of boundary layer separation induced by shock wave results in weaker pressure matching performance of the central ejector than that of the peripheral one. Furthermore, based on the observations of the experiment, a simplified analytical model has been proposed to predict the limiting pressure ratio, and the predicted values obtained by this model agree well with the experimental data.

  1. Shock-generated turbulence in the innermost 50 pc of the galaxy center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Itzhak; Contini, Marcella

    2012-04-01

    The center of the Milky Way galaxy (MW) is an extreme environment which contains a massive black hole surrounded by a very dense star cluster, two other adjacent star clusters, and a giant molecular cloud which would serve as an incubator to a new generation of stars. The gas and dust in its vicinity are denser by 2-3 orders of magnitude than in other locations in the MW. This is also the case with the magnetic field. The kinematics of the gas is characterized by apparently random, supersonic flows. In this paper we provide observational evidence for the existence of a supersonic turbulence, most likely generated by the shock waves. Moreover, the mere existence of turbulence and its characteristics are shown to be instrumental in testing the validity and consistency of theoretical modeling of the spectra of the gas filaments.

  2. A skin friction law for compressible turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwell, Richard W.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    An algebraic skin friction law is derived for adiabatic, compressible, equilibrium, turbulent boundary layer flow. An outer solution in terms of the Clauser defect stream function is matched to an inner empirical expression composed of compressible laws of the wall and wake. The modified Crocco temperature-velocity relationship and the Clauser eddy viscousity model are used in the outer solution. The skin friction law pertains for all pressure gradients in the incompressible through supersonic range and for small pressure gradients in the hypersonic range. Excellent comparisons with experiment are obtained in the appropriate parameter ranges. The application to numerical computation is discussed.

  3. High speed titanium coating by Supersonic Laser Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    LUPOI, ROCCO

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED The importance of metal coating technologies drives the continuous improvement of metal deposition techniques for application in a wide range of industrial sectors. This work presents the foundations of a new process technology f or the deposition of t itanium coatings on steel tube substrates using supersonic powder streams and impact site laser heating , known as Supersonic Laser Deposition (SLD). M et...

  4. Numerical Simulations of Morphology, Flow Structures and Forces for a Sonic Jet Exhausting in Supersonic Crossflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B.H Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study is performed for a sonic jet issuing from a blunted cone to provide possible directional control in supersonic crossflow by solving the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations with the twoequation k −ω turbulence model. Results are presented in the form of static aerodynamic coefficients, computed at a free stream Mach number 4.0, with varying pressure ratios, incidence angle and keeping zero yaw and roll angles. The morphology and flow structure for the jet exhausting in crossflow at various pressure ratios is described in detail. The Flight control of the projectile can be accomplished by taking advantage of a complex shock-boundary layer interaction produced by jet interacting with the oncoming crossflow by altering pressure distribution in vicinity of the jet, a net increase in the net force can be utilized for maneuvering of vehicle and possible flight control. Computed static aerodynamic coefficients and pressure distribution using CFD analyses is with an accuracy of ± 5% in the supersonic range.

  5. OH PLIF Visualization of the UVa Supersonic Combustion Experiment: Configuration C

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Colin D.; Johansen, Craig T.; Danehy, Paul M.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cantu, Luca M. L.; Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D.; Rockwell, Robert D., Jr.; Goyne, Christopher P.; McDnaiel, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Non-intrusive hydroxyl radical (OH) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements were obtained in configuration C of the University of Virginia supersonic combustion experiment. The combustion of hydrogen fuel injected through an unswept compression ramp into a supersonic cross-flow was imaged over a range of streamwise positions. Images were corrected for optical distortion, variations in the laser sheet profile, and different camera views. Results indicate an effect of fuel equivalence ratio on combustion zone shape and local turbulence length scale. The streamwise location of the reaction zone relative to the fuel injector was also found to be sensitive to the fuel equivalence ratio. The flow boundary conditions in the combustor section, which are sensitive to the fuel flow rate, are believed to have caused this effect. A combination of laser absorption and radiative trapping effects are proposed to have caused asymmetry observed in the images. The results complement previously published OH PLIF data obtained for configuration A along with other non-intrusive measurements to form a database for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model validation.

  6. The flow feature of transverse hydrogen jet in presence of micro air jets in supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar Gerdroodbary, M.; Amini, Younes; Ganji, D. D.; Takam, ​M. Rahimi

    2017-03-01

    Scramjet is found to be the efficient method for the space shuttle. In this paper, numerical simulation is performed to investigate the fundamental flow physics of the interaction between an array of fuel jets and multi air jets in a supersonic transverse flow. Hydrogen as a fuel is released with a global equivalence ratio of 0.5 in presence of micro air jets on a flat plate into a Mach 4 crossflow. The fuel and air are injected through streamwise-aligned flush circular portholes. The hydrogen is injected through 4 holes with 7dj space when the air is injected in the interval of the hydrogen jets. The numerical simulation is performed by using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Menter's Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model. Both the number of air jets and jet-to-freestream total pressure ratio are varied in a parametric study. The interaction of the fuel and air jet in the supersonic flow present extremely complex feature of fuel and air jet. The results present various flow features depending upon the number and mass flow rate of micro air jets. These flow features were found to have significant effects on the penetration of hydrogen jets. A variation of the number of air jets, along with the jet-to-freestream total pressure ratio, induced a variety of flow structure in the downstream of the fuel jets.

  7. A Numerical Study on the Supersonic Steam Ejector Use in Steam Turbine System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Supersonic steam ejector is widely used in steam energy systems such as refrigeration, wood drying equipment, papermaking machine, and steam turbine. In this paper the Computational Fluids Dynamics (CFD method was employed to simulate a supersonic steam ejector, SST k-w turbulence model was adopted, and both real gas model and ideal gas model for fluid property were considered and compared. The mixing chamber angle, throat length, and nozzle exit position (NXP primary pressure and temperature effects on entrainment ratio were investigated. The results show that performance of the ejector is underestimated using ideal gas model, and the entrainment ratio is 20%–40% lower than that when using real gas model. There is an optimum mixing chamber angel and NXP makes the entrainment ratio achieve its maximum; as throat length is decreased within a range, the entrainment ratio remains unchanged. Primary fluid pressure has a critical value, and the entrainment ratio reaches its peak at working critical pressure; when working steam superheat degree increases, the entrainment ratio is increased.

  8. OH PLIF Visualization of the UVa Supersonic Combustion Experiment: Configuration A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Craig T.; McRae, Colin D.; Danehy, Paul M.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cantu, Luca M. L.; Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D.; Rockwell, Robert D., Jr.; Goyne, Chris P.; McDaniel, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical (OH) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements were performed in the University of Virginia supersonic combustion experiment. The test section was set up in configuration A, which includes a Mach 2 nozzle, combustor, and extender section. Hydrogen fuel was injected through an unswept compression ramp at two different equivalence ratios. Through the translation of the optical system and the use of two separate camera views, the entire optically accessible range of the combustor was imaged. Single-shot, average, and standard deviation images of the OH PLIF signal are presented at several streamwise locations. The results show the development of a highly turbulent flame structure and provide an experimental database to be used for numerical model assessment.

  9. Simulation of mixing and ignition of hydrogen in channels at supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vankova, O. S.; Valger, S. A.; Goldfeld, M. A.; Zakharova, Yu. V.; Fedorova, N. N.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the results of mathematical modeling of mixing and ignition of hydrogen jets in supersonic flow. Calculations were carried out on the basis of the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equations supplemented with k - ω SST turbulence model and detailed chemical kinetics. The solution was carried out in three stages. At the first stage, the kinetic schemes were tested by comparison with the experimental data on ignition of the hydrogen round jet supplied co axially with the M=2 air jet into the still air. The second 2D task was to study the process of mixing and ignition of hydrogen jets fed at various angles into the M=3 air flow at the channel with a cavity. At the third stage, the 3D problem of hydrogen jets supplied normally to a primary M=4 flow in the channel with backward-facing steps was computed under the condition of the experiments made at the hot-shot facility.

  10. Analysis of flow structures in supersonic plane mixing layers using the POD method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Qin; FU Song

    2008-01-01

    The proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method was applied to analyzing the database obtained from the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of supersonic plane mixing layers. The effect of different forms of the inner products in the POD method was investigated. It was observed that the mean flow contributes to a predominant part of the total flow energy, and the energy spectrum of the turbulence fluctuations covers a wide range of POD modes. The patterns of leading (high energy) POD modes reveal that the flow structures exhibit spanwise counter rotating rolls, as well as oblique vortices. These flow patterns are insensitive to the velocity of the observer. As the convective Mach number increases, the energy spectrum be-comes wider, the leading POD modes contain more complicated structures, and the flow becomes more chaotic.

  11. Analysis of flow structures in supersonic plane mixing layers using the POD method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The proper orthogonal decomposition(POD) method was applied to analyzing the database obtained from the direct numerical simulation(DNS) of supersonic plane mixing layers.The effect of different forms of the inner products in the POD method was investigated.It was observed that the mean flow contributes to a predominant part of the total flow energy,and the energy spectrum of the turbulence fluctuations covers a wide range of POD modes.The patterns of leading(high energy) POD modes reveal that the flow structures exhibit spanwise counter rotating rolls,as well as oblique vortices.These flow patterns are insensitive to the velocity of the observer.As the convective Mach number increases,the energy spectrum be-comes wider,the leading POD modes contain more complicated structures,and the flow becomes more chaotic.

  12. Advanced Noise Abatement Procedures for a Supersonic Business Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Jones, Scott M.; Seidel, Jonathan A.; Huff, Dennis L.

    2017-01-01

    Supersonic civil aircraft present a unique noise certification challenge. High specific thrust required for supersonic cruise results in high engine exhaust velocity and high levels of jet noise during takeoff. Aerodynamics of thin, low-aspect-ratio wings equipped with relatively simple flap systems deepen the challenge. Advanced noise abatement procedures have been proposed for supersonic aircraft. These procedures promise to reduce airport noise, but they may require departures from normal reference procedures defined in noise regulations. The subject of this report is a takeoff performance and noise assessment of a notional supersonic business jet. Analytical models of an airframe and a supersonic engine derived from a contemporary subsonic turbofan core are developed. These models are used to predict takeoff trajectories and noise. Results indicate advanced noise abatement takeoff procedures are helpful in reducing noise along lateral sidelines.

  13. Accumulation of motile elongated micro-organisms in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Caijuan; Sardina, Gaetano; Lushi, Enkeleida; Brandt, Luca

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of turbulence on marine life by performing numerical simulations of motile microorganisms, modelled as prolate spheroids, in isotropic homogeneous turbulence. We show that the clustering and patchiness observed in laminar flows, linear shear and vortex flows, are significantly reduced in a three-dimensional turbulent flow mainly because of the complex topology; elongated micro-orgamisms show some level of clustering in the case of swimmers without any preferential alignment whereas spherical swimmers remain uniformly distributed. Micro-organisms with one preferential swimming direction (e.g. gyrotaxis) still show significant clustering if spherical in shape, whereas prolate swimmers remain more uniformly distributed. Due to their large sensitivity to the local shear, these elongated swimmers react slower to the action of vorticity and gravity and therefore do not have time to accumulate in a turbulent flow. These results show how purely hydrodynamic effects can alter the ecology of microorganisms that can vary their shape and their preferential orientation.

  14. Accumulation of motile elongated micro-organisms in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Caijuan; Lushi, Enkeleida; Brandt, Luca

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of turbulence on marine life by performing numerical simulations of motile microorganisms, modelled as prolate spheroids, in isotropic homogeneous turbulence. We show that the clustering and patchiness observed in laminar flows, linear shear and vortex flows, are significantly reduced in a three-dimensional turbulent flow mainly because of the complex topology; elongated micro-orgamisms show some level of clustering in the case of swimmers without any preferential alignment whereas spherical swimmers remain uniformly distributed. Micro-organisms with one preferential swimming direction (e.g. gyrotaxis) still show significant clustering if spherical in shape, whereas prolate swimmers remain more uniformly distributed. Due to their large sensitivity to the local shear, these elongated swimmers react slower to the action of vorticity and gravity and therefore do not have time to accumulate in a turbulent flow. These results show how purely hydrodynamic effects can alter the ecology of microor...

  15. Turbulence and wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Arno J.; Peinke, Joachim; Mann, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The nature of turbulent flow towards, near and behind a wind turbine, the effect of turbulence on the electricity production and the mechanical loading of individual and clustered wind turbines, and some future issues are discussed.......The nature of turbulent flow towards, near and behind a wind turbine, the effect of turbulence on the electricity production and the mechanical loading of individual and clustered wind turbines, and some future issues are discussed....

  16. MHD Turbulence, Turbulent Dynamo and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Beresnyak, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    MHD Turbulence is common in many space physics and astrophysics environments. We first discuss the properties of incompressible MHD turbulence. A well-conductive fluid amplifies initial magnetic fields in a process called small-scale dynamo. Below equipartition scale for kinetic and magnetic energies the spectrum is steep (Kolmogorov -5/3) and is represented by critically balanced strong MHD turbulence. In this paper we report the basic reasoning behind universal nonlinear small-scale dynamo and the inertial range of MHD turbulence. We measured the efficiency of the small-scale dynamo $C_E=0.05$, Kolmogorov constant $C_K=4.2$ and anisotropy constant $C_A=0.63$ for MHD turbulence in high-resolution direct numerical simulations. We also discuss so-called imbalanced or cross-helical MHD turbulence which is relevant for in many objects, most prominently in the solar wind. We show that properties of incompressible MHD turbulence are similar to the properties of Alfv\\'enic part of MHD cascade in compressible turbul...

  17. Scatter broadening of pulsars and implications on the interstellar medium turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Siyao

    2016-01-01

    Observations reveal a uniform Kolmogorov turbulence throughout the diffuse ionized interstellar medium (ISM) and supersonic turbulence preferentially located in the Galactic plane. Correspondingly, we consider the Galactic distribution of electron density fluctuations consisting of not only a Kolmogorov density spectrum but also a short-wave-dominated density spectrum with the density structure formed at small scales due to shocks. The resulting dependence of the scatter broadening time on the dispersion measure (DM) naturally interprets the existing observational data for both low and high-DM pulsars. According to the criteria that we derive for a quantitative determination of scattering regimes over wide ranges of DMs and frequencies $\

  18. Mechanism for Self-Reacted Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venable, Richard; Bucher, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    A mechanism has been designed to apply the loads (the stirring and the resection forces and torques) in self-reacted friction stir welding. This mechanism differs somewhat from mechanisms used in conventional friction stir welding, as described below. The tooling needed to apply the large reaction loads in conventional friction stir welding can be complex. Self-reacted friction stir welding has become popular in the solid-state welding community as a means of reducing the complexity of tooling and to reduce costs. The main problems inherent in self-reacted friction stir welding originate in the high stresses encountered by the pin-and-shoulder assembly that produces the weld. The design of the present mechanism solves the problems. The mechanism includes a redesigned pin-and-shoulder assembly. The welding torque is transmitted into the welding pin by a square pin that fits into a square bushing with set-screws. The opposite or back shoulder is held in place by a Woodruff key and high-strength nut on a threaded shaft. The Woodruff key reacts the torque, while the nut reacts the tensile load on the shaft.

  19. Experimental Vortex Identification and Characterization in Reacting Jets in Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vedanth; Emerson, Ben; Lieuwen, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    Reacting jets in crossflow (JICF) is an important canonical flow field in combustion problems where there is strong coupling between heat release and the evolution of vortical structures. We use vortex identification studies to experimentally characterize the spatial evolution of vortex dynamics in a reacting JICF. A vortex identification algorithm was designed to operate on particle image velocimetry (PIV) data and its raw Mie scattering images. The algorithm uses the velocity fields to obtain comparisons between the strain rate and the rotation rate. Additionally, the algorithm uses the raw Mie scattering data to identify regions where the high acceleration at vortex cores has centrifuged seeding particles out of the vortex cores. Together, these methods are used to estimate the vortex location and circulation. Analysis was done on 10 kHz PIV data from a reacting JICF experiment, and the resulting vortex trajectory, and growth rate statistics are presented. Results are compared between non-reacting JICF and reacting studies performed with different jet density ratios and different levels of acoustic forcing. We observed how the density ratio, the frequency and amplitude of the acoustic forcing affected the vortex characteristics and growth rate.

  20. Design features of a low-disturbance supersonic wind tunnel for transition research at low supersonic Mach numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Laub, James A.; King, Lyndell S.; Reda, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    A unique, low-disturbance supersonic wind tunnel is being developed at NASA-Ames to support supersonic laminar flow control research at cruise Mach numbers of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The distinctive design features of this new quiet tunnel are a low-disturbance settling chamber, laminar boundary layers along the nozzle/test section walls, and steady supersonic diffuser flow. This paper discusses these important aspects of our quiet tunnel design and the studies necessary to support this design. Experimental results from an 1/8th-scale pilot supersonic wind tunnel are presented and discussed in association with theoretical predictions. Natural laminar flow on the test section walls is demonstrated and both settling chamber and supersonic diffuser performance is examined. The full-scale wind tunnel should be commissioned by the end of 1993.

  1. Analysis of turbulent free jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sislian, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of a supersonic axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel coflowing air stream is analyzed. Effective turbulent transport properties are determined using the (K-epsilon) model. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight reactions between six chemical species, H, O, H2O, OH, O2, and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved by an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions are obtained at two downstream locations of variables such as turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent dissipation rate, turbulent scale length, and viscosity. The results show that these variables attain peak values at the axis of symmetry. Computed distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass fraction are also given. A direct analytical approach to account for the effect of species concentration fluctuations on the mean production rate of species (the phenomenon of unmixedness) is also presented. However, the use of the method does not seem justified in view of the excessive computer time required to solve the resulting system of equations.

  2. Impact of turbulent mixing on isoprene chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-W.; Barth, M. C.; Trainer, M.

    2016-07-01

    Isoprene, a volatile organic compound that is mainly emitted from trees, rapidly reacts with hydroxyl radical (OH) during daytime and subsequently forms ozone and aerosols in the troposphere. The isoprene-OH reaction can be affected by the interplay between chemistry and mixing because the two processes occur at a similar time scale. We investigate the impact of turbulent mixing on isoprene-OH reactivity with large eddy simulations (LES) coupled with comprehensive chemistry. Our results show that the covariance of isoprene and OH causes ~20% decrease to ~10% increase of the horizontal average reaction rate, depending on nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) abundances, compared to the rate that neglects the covariance. This wide range of effects on reaction rates is caused by the primary production and loss reactions of OH in each NOx regime. Our research promotes the use of LES for better understanding the role of turbulence in isoprene-OH reaction and parameterizations in large-scale models.

  3. Flamelet Regime Diagram for Turbulent Combustion Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wai Lee; Ihme, Matthias; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    The flamelet model has been widely used in numerical combustion investigations, particularly for the closure of large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent reacting flows. In most cases, the simulation results demonstrated good agreements with their experimental counterparts. However, a systematic analysis of the flamelet model's applicability, as well as its potential limitations, is seldom conducted, and the model performance is usually based only on a-posteriori comparisons. The objective of this work is to derive a metric that can formally quantify the suitability of the flamelet model in different flame configurations. For this purpose, a flamelet regime diagram has been developed and studied in the context of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a turbulent lifted jet flame. The implementation of the regime diagram in LES has been investigated through explicit filtering of the DNS results.

  4. REACT: Resettable Hold Down and Release Actuator for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Nestor; Collado, Marcelo; Cabás, Ramiro

    2014-07-01

    A new HDRA based on SMA technology, called REACT, has been designed for development of loads and appendixes in space applications. This design involves a rod supported by spheres that block its axial movement during a preload application. The rod shape allows misalignment and blocks the rotation around axial axis for a proper installation of the device. Because of the high preload requirements for this type of actuators, finite element analysis (FEA) has been developed in order to check the structure resistance. The results of the FEA have constrained the REACT design, in terms of dimensions, materials, and shape of the mechanical parts. A complete test campaign for qualification of REACT is proposed. Several qualification models are intended to be built for testing in parallel. Therefore, it is a way to demonstrate margins which allows getting some statistics.

  5. Supersonic Jet Interactions in a Plenum Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Venugopal

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding thè supersonic jet interactions in a plenum chamber is essential for thè design of hot launch systems. Static tests were conducted in a small-scale rocket motor ioaded with a typical nitramine propellaiit to produce a nozzle exit Mach number of 3. This supersonic jet is made to interact with plenum chambers having both open and closed sides. The distance between thè nozzle exit and thè back piate of plenum chamber are varied from 2. 5 to 7. 0 times thè nozzle exit diameter. The pressure rise in thè plenum chamber was measured using pressure transducers mounted at different locatìons. The pressure-time data were analysed to obtain an insight into thè flow field in thè plenum chamber. The maximum pressure exerted on thè back piate of plenum chamber is about 25-35 per cent. of thè maximum stagnation pressure developed in thè rocket motor. Ten static tests were carried out to obtain thè effect of axial distance between thè nozzle exit and thè plenum chamber back piate, and stagnation pressure in thè rocket motoron thè flow field in thè open-sided and closed-sided plenum chambers configurations.

  6. Numerical simulation of supersonic gap flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xu; Haiming, Huang; Guo, Huang; Song, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Various gaps in the surface of the supersonic aircraft have a significant effect on airflows. In order to predict the effects of attack angle, Mach number and width-to-depth ratio of gap on the local aerodynamic heating environment of supersonic flow, two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the finite volume method, where convective flux of space term adopts the Roe format, and discretization of time term is achieved by 5-step Runge-Kutta algorithm. The numerical results reveal that the heat flux ratio is U-shaped distribution on the gap wall and maximum at the windward corner of the gap. The heat flux ratio decreases as the gap depth and Mach number increase, however, it increases as the attack angle increases. In addition, it is important to find that chamfer in the windward corner can effectively reduce gap effect coefficient. The study will be helpful for the design of the thermal protection system in reentry vehicles.

  7. Numerical simulation of supersonic gap flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    Full Text Available Various gaps in the surface of the supersonic aircraft have a significant effect on airflows. In order to predict the effects of attack angle, Mach number and width-to-depth ratio of gap on the local aerodynamic heating environment of supersonic flow, two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the finite volume method, where convective flux of space term adopts the Roe format, and discretization of time term is achieved by 5-step Runge-Kutta algorithm. The numerical results reveal that the heat flux ratio is U-shaped distribution on the gap wall and maximum at the windward corner of the gap. The heat flux ratio decreases as the gap depth and Mach number increase, however, it increases as the attack angle increases. In addition, it is important to find that chamfer in the windward corner can effectively reduce gap effect coefficient. The study will be helpful for the design of the thermal protection system in reentry vehicles.

  8. Coupling dynamic of twin supersonic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ching-Wen; Cluts, Jordan; Samimy, Mo

    2015-11-01

    In a supersonic shock-containing jet, the interaction of large-scale structures in the jet's shear layer with the shock waves generates acoustic waves. The waves propagate upstream, excite the jet initial shear layer instability, establish a feedback loop at certain conditions, and generate screech noise. The screech normally contains different modes of various strengths. Similarly, twin-jet plumes contain screech tones. If the dynamics of the two jet plumes are synchronized, the screech amplitude could be significantly amplified. There is a proposed analytical model in the literature for screech synchronization in twin rectangular jets. This model shows that with no phase difference in acoustic waves arriving at neighboring nozzle lips, twin-jet plumes feature a strong coupling with a significant level of screech tones. In this work the maximum nozzle separation distance for sustained screech synchronization and strong coupling is analytically derived. This model is used with our round twin-jet experiments and the predicted coupling level agrees well with the experimental results. Near-field microphone measurements and schlieren visualization along with the analytical model are used to investigate the coupling mechanisms of twin supersonic jets. Supported by ONR.

  9. Sub-Alfvenic Non-Ideal MHD Turbulence Simulations with Ambipolar Diffusion: I. Turbulence Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Pak Shing; Klein, Richard I; Fisher, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    Most numerical investigations on the role of magnetic fields in turbulent molecular clouds (MCs) are based on ideal magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD). However, MCs are weakly ionized, so that the time scale required for the magnetic field to diffuse through the neutral component of the plasma by ambipolar diffusion (AD) can be comparable to the dynamical time scale. We have performed a series of 256^3 and 512^3 simulations on supersonic but sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems with AD using the Heavy-Ion Approximation developed in Li, McKee, & Klein (2006). Our calculations are based on the assumption that the number of ions is conserved, but we show that these results approximately apply to the case of time-dependent ionization in molecular clouds as well. Convergence studies allow us to determine the optimal value of the ionization mass fraction when using the heavy-ion approximation for low Mach number, sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems. We find that ambipolar diffusion steepens the velocity and magnetic power spectr...

  10. On the Influence of Finite Rate Chemistry in LES of Self-Ignition in Vitiated Hot Confined Supersonic Air Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, M.; Fedina, E.; Fureby, C.; Sabel'nikov, V.; Tegnér, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is used to analyze supersonic flow, mix ing and combustion in a supersonic combustor equipped with a two-stage fuel injector strut. An explicit LES model, using a mixed subgrid model and two different tur bulence- chemistry interaction models is used in an unstructured finite volume framework. The LES model and its components, has been carefully validated in a large number of studies. The LES predictions are compared to experimental data such as the center line wall pressure distribution and OH-PLIF distributions in two cross- sections of the combustor, showing good qualitative and quantitative agreement. The LES results are furthermore used to elucidate the complex flow, mixing and combustion physics, imposed by the multi-injector, two-stage injector strut. The importance of the chemical kinetics, although weaker than anticipated, is noticeable and must be taken into account, as is the effects of the turbulence- chemistry interaction model. It is here demonstrated that a 7-step reaction scheme is sufficient to capture mixing, self-ignition and transition into turbulent combustion responsible for most of the thrust generation in a scramjet .

  11. Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers on a Strongly Heated Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    This paper concerns the theoretical and experimental modelling of the flat wall,highly heated,compressible turbulent boundary layer.Its final objective is to develop a numerical Navier-Stokes solver and to conclude on its capability to correctly represent complex aerothermic viscous flows near the wall.The paper presents a constructed numerical method with particular attention given to the turbulence modelling at low Reynolds number and comparisons with supersonic and transonic experimental data.For the transonic experiment,very high wall temperature(Tw=1100K)is realized.The method of this difficult experimental set up is discussed.The comparison between experimental and computational data conducts to the first conclusion and gives some indications for the future work.

  12. Mean velocity scaling for compressible wall turbulence with heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trettel, Andrew; Larsson, Johan

    2016-02-01

    The current state-of-the-art in accounting for mean property variations in compressible turbulent wall-bounded flows is the Van Driest transformation, which is inaccurate for non-adiabatic walls. An alternative transformation is derived, based on arguments about log-layer scaling and near-wall momentum conservation. The transformation is tested on supersonic turbulent channel flows and boundary layers, and it is found to produce an excellent collapse of the mean velocity profile at different Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers, and rates of wall heat transfer. In addition, the proposed transformation mathematically derives the semi-local scaling of the wall-normal coordinate and unifies the scaling of the velocity, the Reynolds stresses, and the wall-normal coordinate.

  13. Turbulent Soret Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2016-01-01

    We show, by direct numerical simulations, that heavy inertial particles (with Stokes number ${\\rm St}$) in inhomogeneously forced statistically stationary turbulent flows cluster at the minima of turbulent kinetic energy. We further show that two turbulent transport processes, turbophoresis and turbulent diffusion together determine the spatial distribution of the particles. The ratio of the corresponding transport coefficient -- the turbulent Soret coefficient -- increases with ${\\rm St}$ for small ${\\rm St}$, reaches a maxima for ${\\rm St}\\approx 10$ and decreases as $\\sim {\\rm St}^{-0.33}$ for large ${\\rm St}$.

  14. Modelling of structural effects on chemical reactions in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammelsaeter, H.R.

    1997-12-31

    Turbulence-chemistry interactions are analysed using algebraic moment closure for the chemical reaction term. The coupling between turbulence and chemical length and time scales generate a complex interaction process. This interaction process is called structural effects in this work. The structural effects are shown to take place on all scales between the largest scale of turbulence and the scales of the molecular motions. The set of equations describing turbulent correlations involved in turbulent reacting flows are derived. Interactions are shown schematically using interaction charts. Algebraic equations for the turbulent correlations in the reaction rate are given using the interaction charts to include the most significant couplings. In the frame of fundamental combustion physics, the structural effects appearing on the small scales of turbulence are proposed modelled using a discrete spectrum of turbulent scales. The well-known problem of averaging the Arrhenius law, the specific reaction rate, is proposed solved using a presumed single variable probability density function and a sub scale model for the reaction volume. Although some uncertainties are expected, the principles are addressed. Fast chemistry modelling is shown to be consistent in the frame of algebraic moment closure when the turbulence-chemistry interaction is accounted for in the turbulent diffusion. The modelling proposed in this thesis is compared with experimental data for an laboratory methane flame and advanced probability density function modelling. The results show promising features. Finally it is shown a comparison with full scale measurements for an industrial burner. All features of the burner are captured with the model. 41 refs., 33 figs.

  15. An Introduction to the Supersonic Molecular Beam Injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Recently a new fuelling method with supersonic molecular beam injection (MBI) has been developed and used in the tokamaks experiments successfully. It is economical to develop and maintain. The advantages of supersonic MBI compared with the conventional of gas-puffing method are as follows: deep deposition of fuel, better fuelling efficiency, reduced recycling and pure plasma. Particle and energy confinement can be improved and density limit extended. This review described the Laval nozzle molecular beam and a simple collective model for the injection of a supersonic MBI into the tokamak plasma.

  16. Magnetic geometry and particle source drive of supersonic divertor regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufferand, H.; Ciraolo, G.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Tamain, Ph; Marandet, Y.; Serre, E.

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive picture of the mechanisms driving the transition from subsonic to supersonic flows in tokamak plasmas. We demonstrate that supersonic parallel flows into the divertor volume are ubiquitous at low density and governed by the divertor magnetic geometry. As the density is increased, subsonic divertor plasmas are recovered. On detachment, we show the change in particle source can also drive the transition to a supersonic regime. The comprehensive theoretical analysis is completed by simulations in ITER geometry. Such results are essential in assessing the divertor performance and when interpreting measurements and experimental evidence.

  17. Modeling and design of reacting systems with phase transfer catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piccolo, Chiara; Hodges, George; Piccione, Patrick M.;

    2011-01-01

    , some of the design issues related to improved reaction operation are analyzed. Since the solubility of the different forms of the PTC in the organic solvent affects ultimately the catalyst partition coefficients, therefore, the organic solvent plays an important role in the design of PTC-based reacting...

  18. Termite Proteins Cross-React with Cockroach Allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimp are among a group of 8 foods that commonly cause food allergy, and shrimp allergens have been demonstrated to cross-react with arthropod proteins, such as those from cockroaches. Edible insects are beginning to be popularized as an alternate source of protein and have a high nutrition value....

  19. Moment estimation for chemically reacting systems by extended Kalman filtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruess, J; Milias-Argeitis, A; Summers, S; Lygeros, J

    2011-01-01

    In stochastic models of chemically reacting systems that contain bimolecular reactions, the dynamics of the moments of order up to n of the species populations do not form a closed system, in the sense that their time-derivatives depend on moments of order n + 1. To close the dynamics, the moments o

  20. Numerical Analysis of Supersonic Film Cooling in Supersonic Flow in Hypersonic Inlet with Isolator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silong Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Supersonic film cooling is an efficient method to cool the engine with extremely high heat load. In order to study supersonic film cooling in a real advanced engine, a two-dimensional model of the hypersonic inlet in a scramjet engine with supersonic film cooling in the isolator is built and validated through experimental data. The simulation results show that the cooling effect under different coolant injection angles does not show clear differences; a small injection angle can ensure both the cooling effect and good aerodynamic performances (e.g., flow coefficient of the hypersonic inlet. Under selected coolant injection angle and inlet Mach number, the cooling efficiency increases along with the injection Mach number of the coolant flow, only causing a little total pressure loss in the isolator. Along with the increase of the inlet Mach number of the hypersonic inlet, the cooling efficiency does not present a monotonic change because of the complex shock waves. However, the wall temperature shows a monotonic increase when the inlet Mach number increases. The mass flow rate of coolant flow should be increased to cool the engine more efficiently according to the mass flow rate of the main stream when the inlet Mach number increases.

  1. Recent advances in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy: Fundamental developments and applications in reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Sukesh [Spectral Energies, LLC, 5100 Springfield Street, Ste. 301, Dayton, OH 45431 (United States); Gord, James R. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States); Patnaik, Anil K. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States); Department of Physics, Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy is widely used for measuring temperature and species concentration in reacting flows. This paper reviews the advances made over the last twelve years in the development and application of CARS spectroscopy in gas-phase reacting flows. The advent of high-power nanosecond (ns) lasers and off-the-shelf compact picosecond (ps) and femtosecond (fs) lasers is enabling the rapid expansion of the application of single-shot or high-bandwidth CARS spectroscopy in a way that would have been quite unimaginable two decades ago. Furthermore, compact ps lasers are paving the way for the development of a fiber-based CARS system for use in harsh environments. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of recent progresses in ns-, ps-, and fs-CARS spectroscopy for gas-phase thermometry and species-concentration measurements since the second edition of A.C. Eckbreth's book entitled Laser Diagnostics for Combustion Temperature and Species, which was published in 1996. During the last two decades, four encompassing issues have driven the fundamental development and application of CARS spectroscopy in reacting flows: 1) measurement of temperature and concentration of multiple species with one CARS system, 2) extension of the application of traditional ns-CARS to challenging reacting flow environments, 3) performance of nonresonant background-free and collision-free measurements in high-pressure reacting flows, and 4) measurement of temperature and species concentration at high bandwidth, typically 1 kHz or greater, to address the instability and transient phenomena associated with turbulent reacting flows in the combustors and augmentors of modern propulsion systems. This review is focused on identifying and discussing the recent results of gas-phase CARS spectroscopy related to the four issues mentioned above. The feasibility of performing high-bandwidth CARS spectroscopy with one laser beam as well as the

  2. Gas turbine engine with supersonic compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.

    2015-10-20

    A gas turbine engine having a compressor section using blades on a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a stator. The stator includes one or more of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions for deceleration of the gas to subsonic conditions and to deliver a high pressure gas to combustors. The aerodynamic ducts include structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are provided having an aspect ratio of two to one (2:1) or more, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.

  3. Linear stability analysis of supersonic axisymmetric jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Wan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stabilities of supersonic jets are examined with different velocities, momentum thicknesses, and core temperatures. Amplification rates of instability waves at inlet are evaluated by linear stability theory (LST. It is found that increased velocity and core temperature would increase amplification rates substantially and such influence varies for different azimuthal wavenumbers. The most unstable modes in thin momentum thickness cases usually have higher frequencies and azimuthal wavenumbers. Mode switching is observed for low azimuthal wavenumbers, but it appears merely in high velocity cases. In addition, the results provided by linear parabolized stability equations show that the mean-flow divergence affects the spatial evolution of instability waves greatly. The most amplified instability waves globally are sometimes found to be different from that given by LST.

  4. Aeroacoustic properties of supersonic elliptic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzie, Kevin W.; McLaughlin, Dennis K.

    1999-09-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic properties of supersonic elliptic and circular jets are experimentally investigated. The jets are perfectly expanded with an exit Mach number of approximately 1.5 and are operated in the Reynolds number range of 25 000 to 50 000. The reduced Reynolds number facilitates the use of conventional hot-wire anemometry and a glow discharge excitation technique which preferentially excites the varicose or flapping modes in the jets. In order to simulate the high-velocity and low-density effects of heated jets, helium is mixed with the air jets. This allows the large-scale structures in the jet shear layer to achieve a high enough convective velocity to radiate noise through the Mach wave emission process.

  5. ARBITRARY INTERACTION OF PLANE SUPERSONIC FLOWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study.We consider the Riemann problem for parameters at collision of two plane flows at a certain angle. The problem is solved in the exact statement. Most cases of interference, both stationary and non-stationary gas-dynamic discontinuities, followed by supersonic flows can be reduced to the problem of random interaction of two supersonic flows. Depending on the ratio of the parameters in the flows, outgoing discontinuities turn out to be shock waves, or rarefactionwaves. In some cases, there is no solution at all. It is important to know how to find the domain of existence for the relevant decisions, as the type of shock-wave structures in these domains is known in advance. The Riemann problem is used in numerical methods such as the method of Godunov. As a rule, approximate solution is used, known as the Osher solution, but for a number of problems with a high precision required, solution of this problem needs to be in the exact statement. Main results.Domains of existence for solutions with different types of shock-wave structure have been considered. Boundaries of existence for solutions with two outgoing shock waves are analytically defined, as well as with the outgoing shock wave and rarefaction wave. We identify the area of Mach numbers and angles at which the flows interact and there is no solution. Specific flows with two outgoing rarefaction waves are not considered. Practical significance. The results supplement interference theory of stationary gas-dynamic discontinuities and can be used to develop new methods of numerical calculation with extraction of discontinuities.

  6. Supersonic Wing Optimization Using SpaRibs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, David; Mulani, Sameer B.; Liu, Qiang; Tamijani, Ali Y.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2014-01-01

    This research investigates the advantages of using curvilinear spars and ribs, termed SpaRibs, to design a supersonic aircraft wing-box in comparison to the use of classic design concepts that employ straight spars and ribs. The objective is to achieve a more efficient load-bearing mechanism and to passively control the deformation of the structure under the flight loads. Moreover, the use of SpaRibs broadens the design space and allows for natural frequencies and natural mode shape tailoring. The SpaRibs concept is implemented in a new optimization MATLAB-based framework referred to as EBF3SSWingOpt. This optimization scheme performs both the sizing and the shaping of the internal structural elements, connecting the optimizer with the analysis software. The shape of the SpaRibs is parametrically defined using the so called Linked Shape method. Each set of SpaRibs is placed in a one by one square domain of the natural space. The set of curves is subsequently transformed in the physical space for creating the wing structure geometry layout. The shape of each curve of each set is unique; however, mathematical relations link the curvature in an effort to reduce the number of design variables. The internal structure of a High Speed Commercial Transport aircraft concept developed by Boeing is optimized subjected to stress, subsonic flutter and supersonic flutter constraints. The results show that the use of the SpaRibs allows for the reduction of the aircraft's primary structure weight without violating the constraints. A weight reduction of about 15 percent is observed.

  7. Wall pressure fluctuations in the reattachment region of a supersonic free shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Alexander J.

    1994-01-01

    The primary aim of this research program was to investigate the mechanisms which cause the unsteady wall-pressure fluctuations in shock wave turbulent shear layer interactions. The secondary aim was to find means to reduce the magnitude of the fluctuating pressure loads by controlling the unsteady shock motion. The particular flow under study is the unsteady shock wave interaction formed in the reattachment zone of a separated supersonic flow. Similar flows are encountered in many practical situations, and they are associated with high levels of fluctuating wall pressure. The free shear layer is formed by the flow over a backward facing step, using an existing model, with the base pressure on the step adjusted so that there is no pressure discontinuity at the lip. The shear layer therefore develops in a zero pressure gradient. The primary advantage of this flow configuration is that the reattachment process can be studied in the absence of a separation shock. The mean flow data, and some preliminary hot-wire measurements of the mass-flux fluctuations were made by Baca and Settles, Baca, Williams and Bogdonoff, who showed that the shear layer became self-similar at about 17 delta(sub 0) downstream of the lip, and that it grew at a rate typical of the observed Mach number difference (about 1/3rd the incompressible growth rate). The turbulence measurements were later extended by Hayakawa, Smits and Bogdonoff under NASA Headquarters support.

  8. Comparison of calculated and measured heat transfer coefficients for transonic and supersonic boundary-layer flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerst, C.; Schulz, A.; Wittig, S. [Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany). Lehrstuhl und Inst. fuer Thermische Stroemungsmaschinen

    1995-04-01

    The present study compares measured and computed heat transfer coefficients for high-speed boundary layer nozzle flows under engine Reynolds number conditions (U{sub {infinity}} = 230 {divided_by} 880 m/s, Re* = 0.37 {divided_by} 1.07 {times} 10{sup 6}). Experimental data have been obtained by heat transfer measurements in a two-dimensional, nonsymmetric, convergent-divergent nozzle. The nozzle wall is convectively cooled using water passages. The coolant heat transfer data and nozzle surface temperatures are used as boundary conditions for a three-dimensional finite-element code, which is employed to calculate the temperature distribution inside the nozzle wall. Heat transfer coefficients along the hot gas nozzle wall are derived from the temperature gradients normal to the surface. The results are compared with numerical heat transfer predictions using the low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model by Lam and Bremhorst. Influence of compressibility in the transport equations for the turbulence properties is taken into account by using the local averaged density. The results confirm that this simplification leads to good results for transonic and low supersonic flows.

  9. 1 Ft. x 1 Ft. Supersonic Wind Tunnel, Bldg. 37

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (1x), located in the Engine Research Building, is one of the most active test facilities at the Glenn Research Center. Used...

  10. Supersonic Jet Noise: Main Sources and Reduction Methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Azimi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The large velocity ratio and the presence of Shocks in the exhaust plume from low bypass engines or supersonic jetliners cause jet noise to be dominant component of overall aircraft noise, and therefore is an important issue in design of the next generation of civil supersonic transport. Jet noise reduction technology also has application in the design of highperformance tactical aircraft. Jet noise is of particular concern on aircraft carriers where it is necessary for deck crew to be in relatively close proximity to the aircraft at takeoff and landing. In this paper, a brief discussion about supersonic jet noise sources and a review of the main passive technologies employed for the reduction of supersonic jet noise are presented.

  11. THERMAL AND AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCES OF THE SUPERSONIC MOTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan P Ninković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, Mach number of 4 can be taken as a boundary value for transition from conditions for supersonic, into the area of hypersonic flow, distinguishing two areas: area of supersonic in which the effects of the aerodynamic heating can be neglected and the area of hypersonic, in which the thermal effects become dominant. This paper presents the effects in static and dynamic areas, as well as presentation of G.R.O.M. software for determination of the values of aerodynamic derivatives, which was developed on the basis of linearized theory of supersonic flow. Validation of developed software was carried out through different types of testing, proving its usefulness for engineering practice in the area of supersonic wing aerodynamic loading calculations, even at high Mach numbers, with dominant thermal effects.

  12. Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Facility (Research Cell 22)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: RC22 is a continuous-flow, direct-connect supersonic-combustion research facility that is capable of simulating flight conditions from Mach 3.0 to Mach...

  13. Entropy Minimization Design Approach of Supersonic Internal Passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Sousa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fluid machinery operating in the supersonic regime unveil avenues towards more compact technology. However, internal supersonic flows are associated with high aerodynamic and thermal penalties, which usually prevent their practical implementation. Indeed, both shock losses and the limited operational range represent particular challenges to aerodynamic designers that should be taken into account at the initial phase of the design process. This paper presents a design methodology for supersonic passages based on direct evaluations of the velocity field using the method of characteristics and computation of entropy generation across shock waves. This meshless function evaluation tool is then coupled to an optimization scheme, based on evolutionary algorithms that minimize the entropy generation across the supersonic passage. Finally, we assessed the results with 3D Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes calculations.

  14. Lagrangian analysis of premixed turbulent combustion in hydrogen-air flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darragh, Ryan; Poludnenko, Alexei; Hamlington, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Lagrangian analysis has long been a tool used to analyze non-reacting turbulent flows, and has recently gained attention in the reacting flow and combustion communities. The approach itself allows one to separate local molecular effects, such as those due to reactions or diffusion, from turbulent advective effects along fluid pathlines, or trajectories. Accurate calculation of these trajectories can, however, be rather difficult due to the chaotic nature of turbulent flows and the added complexity of reactions. In order to determine resolution requirements and verify the numerical algorithm, extensive tests are described in this talk for prescribed steady, unsteady, and chaotic flows, as well as for direct numerical simulations (DNS) of non-reacting homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The Lagrangian analysis is then applied to DNS of premixed hydrogen-air flames at two different turbulence intensities for both single- and multi-step chemical mechanisms. Non-monotonic temperature and fuel-mass fraction evolutions are found to exist along trajectories passing through the flame brush. Such non-monotonicity is shown to be due to molecular diffusion resulting from large spatial gradients created by turbulent advection. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) under Award No. FA9550-14-1-0273, and the Department of Defense (DoD) High Performance Computing Modernization Program (HPCMP) under a Frontier project award.

  15. The first turbulent combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    2005-01-01

    The first turbulent combustion arises in a hot big bang cosmological model Gibson (2004) where nonlinear exothermic turbulence permitted by quantum mechanics, general relativity, multidimensional superstring theory, and fluid mechanics cascades from Planck to strong force freeze out scales with gravity balancing turbulent inertial-vortex forces. Interactions between Planck scale spinning and non-spinning black holes produce high Reynolds number turbulence and temperature mixing with huge Reynolds stresses driving the rapid inflation of space. Kolmogorovian turbulent temperature patterns are fossilized as strong-force exponential inflation stretches them beyond the scale of causal connection ct where c is light speed and t is time. Fossil temperature turbulence patterns seed nucleosynthesis, and then hydro-gravitational structure formation in the plasma epoch, Gibson (1996, 2000). Evidence about formation mechanisms is preserved by cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies. CMB spectra indicate hydr...

  16. Planck-Kerr Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, C H

    2003-01-01

    A quantum gravitational instability is identified at Planck scales between non-spinning extreme Schwarzschild black holes and spinning extreme Kerr black holes, which produces a turbulent Planck particle gas. Planck inertial vortex forces balance gravitational forces as the Planck turbulence cascades to larger scales and the universe expands and cools. Turbulent mixing of temperature fluctuations and viscous dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy provide irreversibilities necessary to sustain the process to the strong force freeze out temperature where inflation begins. Turbulent temperature fluctuations are fossilized when they are stretched by inflation beyond the horizon scale of causal connection. As the horizon of the expanding universe grows, the fluctuations seed patterns of nucleosynthesis, and these seed the formation of structure in the plasma epoch. Fossil big bang turbulence is supported by extended self similarity coefficients computed for cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies tha...

  17. One-dimensional turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerstein, A.R. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    One-Dimensional Turbulence is a new turbulence modeling strategy involving an unsteady simulation implemented in one spatial dimension. In one dimension, fine scale viscous and molecular-diffusive processes can be resolved affordably in simulations at high turbulence intensity. The mechanistic distinction between advective and molecular processes is thereby preserved, in contrast to turbulence models presently employed. A stochastic process consisting of mapping {open_quote}events{close_quote} applied to a one-dimensional velocity profile represents turbulent advection. The local event rate for given eddy size is proportional to the velocity difference across the eddy. These properties cause an imposed shear to induce an eddy cascade analogous in many respects to the eddy cascade in turbulent flow. Many scaling and fluctuation properties of self-preserving flows, and of passive scalars introduced into these flows, are reproduced.

  18. Turbulence generation by waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  19. Reference Solutions for Benchmark Turbulent Flows in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Pandya, Mohagna J.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    A grid convergence study is performed to establish benchmark solutions for turbulent flows in three dimensions (3D) in support of turbulence-model verification campaign at the Turbulence Modeling Resource (TMR) website. The three benchmark cases are subsonic flows around a 3D bump and a hemisphere-cylinder configuration and a supersonic internal flow through a square duct. Reference solutions are computed for Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model using a linear eddy-viscosity model for the external flows and a nonlinear eddy-viscosity model based on a quadratic constitutive relation for the internal flow. The study involves three widely-used practical computational fluid dynamics codes developed and supported at NASA Langley Research Center: FUN3D, USM3D, and CFL3D. Reference steady-state solutions computed with these three codes on families of consistently refined grids are presented. Grid-to-grid and code-to-code variations are described in detail.

  20. Non-ideal MHD turbulent decay in molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Downes, T P

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects are important in the dynamics of molecular clouds: both ambipolar diffusion and possibly the Hall effect have been identified as significant. We present the results of a suite of simulations with a resolution of 512-cubed of turbulent decay in molecular clouds incorporating a simplified form of both ambipolar diffusion and the Hall effect simultaneously. The initial velocity field in the turbulence is varied from being super-Alfv\\'enic and hypersonic, through to trans-Alfv\\'enic but still supersonic. We find that ambipolar diffusion increases the rate of decay of the turbulence increasing the decay from $t^{-1.25}$ to $t^{-1.4}$. The Hall effect has virtually no impact in this regard. The power spectra of density, velocity and the magnetic field are all affected by the non-ideal terms, being steepened significantly when compared with ideal MHD turbulence with exponents. The density power spectra components change from about 1.4 to about 2.1 for the i...

  1. A coupled implicit solution method for turbulent spray combustion in propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K.-H.; Shuen, J.-S.

    1993-01-01

    Many reacting flows in propulsion devices cannot be efficiently calculated by modern compressible flow CFD algorithms. Most low-speed reacting flow codes based on TEACH-type technologies are inefficient and lack robustness for complex flows. Tremendous progress has been made in high-speed compressible flow CFD in the past two decades; extending its application range to low-speed regimes is highly desirable. The objectives of this document is to present an efficient and robust algorithm for multi-phase chemically reacting flows at all speeds, with emphasis on low Mach number flows, and to calculate turbulent spray combustion flow in a gas turbine combustor.

  2. Azimuthally Varying Noise Reduction Techniques Applied to Supersonic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeb, Nicholas S.

    An experimental investigation into the effect of azimuthal variance of chevrons and fluidically enhanced chevrons applied to supersonic jets is presented. Flow field measurements of streamwise and cross-stream particle imaging velocimetry were employed to determine the causes of noise reduction, which was demonstrated through acoustic measurements. Results were obtained in the over- and under- expanded regimes, and at the design condition, though emphasis was placed on the overexpanded regime due to practical application. Surveys of chevron geometry, number, and arrangement were undertaken in an effort to reduce noise and/or incurred performance penalties. Penetration was found to be positively correlated with noise reduction in the overexpanded regime, and negatively correlated in underexpanded operation due to increased effective penetration and high frequency penalty, respectively. The effect of arrangement indicated the beveled configuration achieved optimal abatement in the ideally and underexpanded regimes due to superior BSAN reduction. The symmetric configuration achieved optimal overexpanded noise reduction due to LSS suppression from improved vortex persistence. Increases in chevron number generally improved reduction of all noise components for lower penetration configurations. Higher penetration configurations reached levels of saturation in the four chevron range, with the potential to introduce secondary shock structures and generate additional noise with higher number. Alternation of penetration generated limited benefit, with slight reduction of the high frequency penalty caused by increased shock spacing. The combination of alternating penetration with beveled and clustered configurations achieved comparable noise reduction to the standard counterparts. Analysis of the entire data set indicated initial improvements with projected area that saturated after a given level and either plateaued or degraded with additional increases. Optimal reductions

  3. Review and prospect of supersonic business jet design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yicheng; Smith, Howard

    2017-04-01

    This paper reviews the environmental issues and challenges appropriate to the design of supersonic business jets (SSBJs). There has been a renewed, worldwide interest in developing an environmentally friendly, economically viable and technologically feasible supersonic transport aircraft. A historical overview indicates that the SSBJ will be the pioneer for the next generation of supersonic airliners. As a high-end product itself, the SSBJ will likely take a market share in the future. The mission profile appropriate to this vehicle is explored considering the rigorous environmental constraints. Mitigation of the sonic boom and improvements aerodynamic efficiency in flight are the most challenging features of civil supersonic transport. Technical issues and challenges associated with this type of aircraft are identified, and methodologies for the SSBJ design are discussed. Due to the tightly coupled issues, a multidisciplinary design, analysis and optimization environment is regarded as the essential approach to the creation of a low-boom low-drag supersonic aircraft. Industrial and academic organizations have an interest in this type of vehicle are presented. Their investments in SSBJ design will hopefully get civil supersonic transport back soon.

  4. Triggering filamentation using turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Eeltink, D; Marchiando, N; Hermelin, S; Gateau, J; Brunetti, M; Wolf, J P; Kasparian, J

    2016-01-01

    We study the triggering of single filaments due to turbulence in the beam path for a laser of power below the filamenting threshold. Turbulence can act as a switch between the beam not filamenting and producing single filaments. This 'positive' effect of turbulence on the filament probability, combined with our observation of off-axis filaments suggests the underlying mechanism is modulation instability caused by transverse perturbations. We hereby experimentally explore the interaction of modulation instability and turbulence, commonly associated with multiple-filaments, in the single-filament regime.

  5. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Guangyuan, E-mail: gysungrad@gmail.com; Lignell, David O., E-mail: davidlignell@byu.edu [Chemical Engineering Department, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States); Hewson, John C., E-mail: jchewso@sandia.gov [Fire Science and Technology Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Gin, Craig R., E-mail: cgin@math.tamu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. Here, we present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. The particle implementation introduces a single model parameter β{sub p}, and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. These results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.

  6. Experimental thermodynamics experimental thermodynamics of non-reacting fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Neindre, B Le

    2013-01-01

    Experimental Thermodynamics, Volume II: Experimental Thermodynamics of Non-reacting Fluids focuses on experimental methods and procedures in the study of thermophysical properties of fluids. The selection first offers information on methods used in measuring thermodynamic properties and tests, including physical quantities and symbols for physical quantities, thermodynamic definitions, and definition of activities and related quantities. The text also describes reference materials for thermometric fixed points, temperature measurement under pressures, and pressure measurements. The publicatio

  7. Physical gasdynamics of reacting media. Fizicheskaia gazodinamika reagiruiushchikh sred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, B.V.; Grishin, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The fundamentals of the mechanics of reacting gases (aerothermochemistry) are presented in a systematic manner. Topics discussed include the kinetic theory of gases, elements of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics, transfer coefficients and mathematical models of gas flows, and transfer processes in a radiating gas. Attention is also given to similarity criteria and classification of aerothermochemical phenomena, elements of combustion theory, and some aspects of boundary layer theory. 81 references.

  8. Flow Field Effects on Nucleation in a Reacting Mixture Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    chemically reacting flows has been analysed by Fendell (1965) who considered the effect of the straining motion in a stagnation point flow on ignition...stagnation point diffusion flame ( Fendell , 1965, Linan, 1974). In the present study the effect of the strain rate or velocity gradient on nucleation kinetics...Symposium (International) on Corn- bustion, 799-810, Academic Press. Fendell , F. E. (1965). Ignition and extinction in combustion of initially unmixed

  9. Universal hierarchical symmetry for turbulence and general multi-scale fluctuation systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Su She; Zhi-Xiong Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Scaling is an important measure of multi-scale fluctuation systems. Turbulence as the most remarkable multi-scale system possesses scaling over a wide range of scales. She-Leveque (SL) hierarchical symmetry, since its publication in 1994, has received wide attention. A num-ber of experimental, numerical and theoretical work have been devoted to its verification, extension, and modification. Application to the understanding of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, motions of cosmic baryon fluids, cosmological supersonic turbulence, natural image, spiral turbulent patterns, DNA anomalous composition, human heart vari-ability are just a few among the most successful examples. A number of modified scaling laws have been derived in the framework of the hierarchical symmetry, and the SL model parameters are found to reveal both the organizational order of the whole system and the properties of the most signif-icant fluctuation structures. A partial set of work related to these studies are reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the nature of the hierarchical symmetry. It is suggested that the SL hierarchical symmetry is a new form of the self-orga-nization principle for multi-scale fluctuation systems, and can be employed as a standard analysis tool in the general multi-scale methodology. It is further suggested that the SL hierarchical symmetry implies the existence of a turbulence ensemble. It is speculated that the search for defining the turbulence ensemble might open a new way for deriving sta-tistical closure equations for turbulence and other multi-scale fluctuation systems.

  10. Detailed thermodynamic analyses of high-speed compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towery, Colin; Darragh, Ryan; Poludnenko, Alexei; Hamlington, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Interactions between high-speed turbulence and flames (or chemical reactions) are important in the dynamics and description of many different combustion phenomena, including autoignition and deflagration-to-detonation transition. The probability of these phenomena to occur depends on the magnitude and spectral content of turbulence fluctuations, which can impact a wide range of science and engineering problems, from the hypersonic scramjet engine to the onset of Type Ia supernovae. In this talk, we present results from new direct numerical simulations (DNS) of homogeneous isotropic turbulence with turbulence Mach numbers ranging from 0 . 05 to 1 . 0 and Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers as high as 700. A set of detailed analyses are described in both Eulerian and Lagrangian reference frames in order to assess coherent (structural) and incoherent (stochastic) thermodynamic flow features. These analyses provide direct insights into the thermodynamics of strongly compressible turbulence. Furthermore, presented results provide a non-reacting baseline for future studies of turbulence-chemistry interactions in DNS with complex chemistry mechanisms. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) under Award No. FA9550-14-1-0273, and the Department of Defense (DoD) High Performance Computing Modernization Program (HPCMP) under a Frontier project award.

  11. Observations on the non-mixed length and unsteady shock motion in a two dimensional supersonic ejector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Srisha M. V.; Jagadeesh, Gopalan

    2014-03-01

    Key features that drive the operation of a supersonic ejector are the complex gasdynamic interactions of the primary and secondary flows within a variable area duct and the phenomenon of compressible turbulent mixing between them, which have to be understood at a fundamental level. An experimental study has been carried out on the mixing characteristics of a two dimensional supersonic ejector with a supersonic primary flow (air) of Mach number 2.48 and the secondary flow (subsonic) which is induced from the ambient. The non-mixed length, which is the length within the ejector for which the primary and secondary flow remain visually distinct is used to characterize the mixing in the ejector. The operating pressures, flow rates and wall static pressures along the ejector have been measured. Two flow visualization tools have been implemented—time resolved schlieren and laser scattering flow visualization. An important contribution has been the development of in-house image processing algorithms on the MATLAB platform to detect the non-mixed length from the schlieren and laser scattering images. The ratio of mass flow rates of the secondary flow to primary flow (entrainment ratio) has been varied in a range of 0.15-0.69 for two locations of the primary nozzle in the ejector duct. Representative cases have been computed using commercial CFD tool (Fluent) to supplement the experiments. Significant outcomes of the study are—the non-mixed length quantified from the flow visualization images is observed to lie within 4.5 to 5.2 times the height of the mixing duct which is confirmed by the wall static pressure profiles. The flow through the supersonic ejector in the mixed regime is explained using corroborative evidences from different diagnostic tools. A reduction of the non-mixed length by 46.7% is observed at operating conditions when the nozzle is sufficiently overexpanded. The disturbance caused to the mixing layer due to unsteady shock-boundary layer interactions

  12. Heat transfer, velocity-temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress from Navier-Stokes computations of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. R.; Hingst, W. R.; Porro, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of 2-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows were calculated by using a compressible turbulent Navier-Stokes numerical computational code. Interaction flows caused by oblique shock wave impingement on the turbulent boundary layer flow were considered. The oblique shock waves were induced with shock generators at angles of attack less than 10 degs in supersonic flows. The surface temperatures were kept at near-adiabatic (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) and cold wall (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) conditions. The computational results were studied for the surface heat transfer, velocity temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress in the interaction flow fields. Comparisons of the computational results with existing measurements indicated that (1) the surface heat transfer rates and surface pressures could be correlated with Holden's relationship, (2) the mean flow streamwise velocity components and static temperatures could be correlated with Crocco's relationship if flow separation did not occur, and (3) the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model should be modified for turbulent shear stress computations in the interaction flows.

  13. Turbulent front speed in the Fisher equation: dependence on Damkohler number

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A; Babkovskaia, N

    2010-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations and mean-field theory are used to model reactive front propagation in a turbulent medium. In the mean-field approach, memory effects of turbulent diffusion are taken into account to estimate the front speed in cases when the Damkohler number is large. This effect is found to saturate the front speed to values comparable with the speed of the turbulent motions. By comparing with direct numerical simulations, it is found that the effective correlation time is much shorter than for non-reacting flows. The nonlinearity of the reaction term is found to make the front speed slightly faster.

  14. A Numerical Comparison of Symmetric and Asymmetric Supersonic Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kylen D.

    Supersonic wind tunnels are a vital aspect to the aerospace industry. Both the design and testing processes of different aerospace components often include and depend upon utilization of supersonic test facilities. Engine inlets, wing shapes, and body aerodynamics, to name a few, are aspects of aircraft that are frequently subjected to supersonic conditions in use, and thus often require supersonic wind tunnel testing. There is a need for reliable and repeatable supersonic test facilities in order to help create these vital components. The option of building and using asymmetric supersonic converging-diverging nozzles may be appealing due in part to lower construction costs. There is a need, however, to investigate the differences, if any, in the flow characteristics and performance of asymmetric type supersonic wind tunnels in comparison to symmetric due to the fact that asymmetric configurations of CD nozzle are not as common. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study has been conducted on an existing University of Michigan (UM) asymmetric supersonic wind tunnel geometry in order to study the effects of asymmetry on supersonic wind tunnel performance. Simulations were made on both the existing asymmetrical tunnel geometry and two axisymmetric reflections (of differing aspect ratio) of that original tunnel geometry. The Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations are solved via NASAs OVERFLOW code to model flow through these configurations. In this way, information has been gleaned on the effects of asymmetry on supersonic wind tunnel performance. Shock boundary layer interactions are paid particular attention since the test section integrity is greatly dependent upon these interactions. Boundary layer and overall flow characteristics are studied. The RANS study presented in this document shows that the UM asymmetric wind tunnel/nozzle configuration is not as well suited to producing uniform test section flow as that of a symmetric configuration, specifically one

  15. Spatially Resolved Temperature and Water Vapor Concentration Distributions in Supersonic Combustion Facilities by TDLAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busa, K. M.; McDaniel J. C.; Diskin, G. S.; DePiro, M. J.; Capriotti, D. P.; Gaffney, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the internal structure of high-enthalpy flows can provide valuable insight to the performance of scramjet combustors. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) is often employed to measure temperature and species concentration. However, TDLAS is a path-integrated line-of-sight (LOS) measurement, and thus does not produce spatially resolved distributions. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Tomography (TDLAT) is a non-intrusive measurement technique for determining two-dimensional spatially resolved distributions of temperature and species concentration in high enthalpy flows. TDLAT combines TDLAS with tomographic image reconstruction. More than 2500 separate line-of-sight TDLAS measurements are analyzed in order to produce highly resolved temperature and species concentration distributions. Measurements have been collected at the University of Virginia's Supersonic Combustion Facility (UVaSCF) as well as at the NASA Langley Direct-Connect Supersonic Combustion Test Facility (DCSCTF). Due to the UVaSCF s unique electrical heating and ability for vitiate addition, measurements collected at the UVaSCF are presented as a calibration of the technique. Measurements collected at the DCSCTF required significant modifications to system hardware and software designs due to its larger measurement area and shorter test duration. Tomographic temperature and water vapor concentration distributions are presented from experimentation on the UVaSCF operating at a high temperature non-reacting case for water vitiation level of 12%. Initial LOS measurements from the NASA Langley DCSCTF operating at an equivalence ratio of 0.5 are also presented. Results show the capability of TDLAT to adapt to several experimental setups and test parameters.

  16. Fossil turbulence and fossil turbulence waves can be dangerous

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Carl H

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. By this definition, turbulence always cascades from small scales where vorticity is created to larger scales where turbulence fossilizes. Fossil turbulence is any perturbation in a hydrophysical field produced by turbulence that persists after the fluid is no longer turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. Fossil turbulence patterns and fossil turbulence waves preserve and propagate energy and information about previous turbulence. Ignorance of fossil turbulence properties can be dangerous. Examples include the Osama bin Laden helicopter crash and the Air France 447 Airbus crash, both unfairly blamed on the pilots. Observations support the proposed definitions, and suggest even direct numerical simulations of turbulence require caution.

  17. Turbulence modelling; Modelisation de la turbulence isotherme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, D. [Electricite de France (EDF), Direction des Etudes et Recherches, 92 - Clamart (France)

    1997-12-31

    This paper is an introduction course in modelling turbulent thermohydraulics, aimed at computational fluid dynamics users. No specific knowledge other than the Navier Stokes equations is required beforehand. Chapter I (which those who are not beginners can skip) provides basic ideas on turbulence physics and is taken up in a textbook prepared by the teaching team of the ENPC (Benque, Viollet). Chapter II describes turbulent viscosity type modelling and the 2k-{epsilon} two equations model. It provides details of the channel flow case and the boundary conditions. Chapter III describes the `standard` (R{sub ij}-{epsilon}) Reynolds tensions transport model and introduces more recent models called `feasible`. A second paper deals with heat transfer and the effects of gravity, and returns to the Reynolds stress transport model. (author). 37 refs.

  18. Non-reacting Flow Analysis from Combustor Inlet to Outlet using Computational Fluid Dynamics Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ananda Reddy

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes non-reacting flow analysis of a gas turbine combustion system. The method is based on the solution of Navier-Strokes equations using generalised non-orthogonal coordinate system. The turbulence effects are modelled through the renormalisation group k-E model. The method has been applied to a practical gas turbine combustor. The combustionsystem includes swirler vane passages, fuel nozzles, rotor bleed, customer bleed, air-blast atomiser, swirl cone, and all holes in primary , dilution , dome, flare, and cooling ring. Thetotal geometry has been created using the pre-processors GAMBIT and CATIA, and the meshing has been done using GAMBIT, and the analysis carried out in a FLUENT solver. The interaction between the diffuser and the combustor external flows plays a key role in controlling the pressure loss, air flow distribution around the combustor liner, durability, and stability. The aero gas turbine combustor designs are generally guided by experimental methods and past experience; however, experimental methods are inherently slow, costly, especially at hightemperature engine-operating conditions. These drawbacks and the growing need to understand the complex flow-field phenomenon involved, have led to the development of a numericalmodel for predicting flow in the gas turbine combustor. These models are used to optimise the design of the combustor and its subcomponents, and reduce cost, time, and the number ofexperiments.

  19. Prediction of engine and near-field plume reacting flows in low-thrust chemical rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan M.; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    A computational model is employed to study the reacting flow within the engine and near-field plumes of several small gaseous hydrogen-oxygen thrusters. The model solves the full Navier-Stokes equations coupled with species diffusion equations for a hydrogen-oxygen reaction kinetics system and includes a two-equation q-omega model for turbulence. Predictions of global performance parameters and localized flowfield variables are compared with experimental data in order to assess the accuracy with which these flowfields are modeled and to identify aspects of the model which require improvement. Predicted axial and radial velocities 3 mm downstream of the exit plane show reasonable agreement with the measurements. The predicted peak in axial velocity in the hydrogen film coolant along the nozzle wall shows the best agreement; however, predictions within the core region are roughly 15 percent below measured values, indicating an underprediction of the extent to which the hydrogen diffuses and mixes with the core flow. There is evidence that this is due to three-dimensional mixing processes which are not included in the axisymmetric model.

  20. Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Hong G [University of Michigan; Trouve, Arnaud [University of Maryland; Rutland, Christopher J [University of Wisconsin; Chen, Jacqueline H [Sandia National Laboratories

    2012-08-13

    The TSTC project is a multi-university collaborative effort to develop a high-fidelity turbulent reacting flow simulation capability utilizing terascale, massively parallel computer technology. The main paradigm of our approach is direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring highest temporal and spatial accuracy, allowing quantitative observations of the fine-scale physics found in turbulent reacting flows as well as providing a useful tool for development of sub-models needed in device-level simulations. The code named S3D, developed and shared with Chen and coworkers at Sandia National Laboratories, has been enhanced with new numerical algorithms and physical models to provide predictive capabilities for spray dynamics, combustion, and pollutant formation processes in turbulent combustion. Major accomplishments include improved characteristic boundary conditions, fundamental studies of auto-ignition in turbulent stratified reactant mixtures, flame-wall interaction, and turbulent flame extinction by water spray. The overarching scientific issue in our recent investigations is to characterize criticality phenomena (ignition/extinction) in turbulent combustion, thereby developing unified criteria to identify ignition and extinction conditions. The computational development under TSTC has enabled the recent large-scale 3D turbulent combustion simulations conducted at Sandia National Laboratories.

  1. Turbulence and dynamo interlinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Santos-Lima, R.; Kowal, G.; Falceta-Gonçalves, D.

    2013-07-01

    The role of turbulence in astrophysical environments and its interplay with magnetic fields is still highly debated. In this lecture, we will discuss this issue in the framework of dynamo processes. We will first present a very brief summary of turbulent dynamo theories, then will focus on small scale turbulent dynamos and their particular relevance on the origin and maintenance of magnetic fields in the intra-cluster media (ICM) of galaxies. In these environments, the very low density of the flow requires a collisionless-MHD treatment. We will show the implications of this approach in the turbulent amplification of the magnetic fields in these environments. To finalize, we will also briefly address the connection between MHD turbulence and fast magnetic reconnection and its possible implications in the diffusion of magnetic flux in the dynamo process.

  2. Turbulence and Dynamo Interlinks

    CERN Document Server

    Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal

    2013-01-01

    The role of turbulence in astrophysical environments and its interplay with magnetic fields is still highly debated. In this lecture, we will discuss this issue in the framework of dynamo processes. We will first present a very brief summary of turbulent dynamo theories, then will focus on small scale turbulent dynamos and their particular relevance on the origin and maintenance of magnetic fields in the intra-cluster media (ICM) of galaxies. In these environments, the very low density of the flow requires a collisionless-MHD treatment. We will show the implications of this approach in the turbulent amplification of the magnetic fields in these environments. To finalize, we will also briefly address the connection between MHD turbulence and fast magnetic reconnection and its possible implications in the diffusion of magnetic flux in the dynamo process.

  3. Evaluation of Full Reynolds Stress Turbulence Models in FUN3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Julianne C.; Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2017-01-01

    Full seven-equation Reynolds stress turbulence models are promising tools for today’s aerospace technology challenges. This paper examines two such models for computing challenging turbulent flows including shock-wave boundary layer interactions, separation and mixing layers. The Wilcox and the SSG/LRR full second-moment Reynolds stress models have been implemented into the FUN3D (Fully Unstructured Navier-Stokes Three Dimensional) unstructured Navier-Stokes code and were evaluated for four problems: a transonic two-dimensional diffuser, a supersonic axisymmetric compression corner, a compressible planar shear layer, and a subsonic axisymmetric jet. Simulation results are compared with experimental data and results computed using the more commonly used Spalart-Allmaras (SA) one-equation and the Menter Shear Stress Transport (SST-V) two-equation turbulence models.

  4. A Semi-Implicit, Fourier-Galerkin/B-Spline Collocation Approach for DNS of Compressible, Reacting, Wall-Bounded Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Todd; Ulerich, Rhys; Topalian, Victor; Malaya, Nick; Moser, Robert

    2013-11-01

    A discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations appropriate for efficient DNS of compressible, reacting, wall-bounded flows is developed and applied. The spatial discretization uses a Fourier-Galerkin/B-spline collocation approach. Because of the algebraic complexity of the constitutive models involved, a flux-based approach is used where the viscous terms are evaluated using repeated application of the first derivative operator. In such an approach, a filter is required to achieve appropriate dissipation at high wavenumbers. We formulate a new filter source operator based on the viscous operator. Temporal discretization is achieved using the SMR91 hybrid implicit/explicit scheme. The linear implicit operator is chosen to eliminate wall-normal acoustics from the CFL constraint while also decoupling the species equations from the remaining flow equations, which minimizes the cost of the required linear algebra. Results will be shown for a mildly supersonic, multispecies boundary layer case inspired by the flow over the ablating surface of a space capsule entering Earth's atmosphere. This work is supported by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security Administration] under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  5. Stationary flow conditions in pulsed supersonic beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Wolfgang

    2013-10-21

    We describe a generally applicable method for the experimental determination of stationary flow conditions in pulsed supersonic beams, utilizing time-resolved electron induced fluorescence measurements of high pressure jet expansions of helium. The detection of ultraviolet photons from electronically excited helium emitted very close to the nozzle exit images the valve opening behavior-with the decided advantage that a photon signal is not affected by beam-skimmer and beam-residual gas interactions; it thus allows to conclusively determine those operation parameters of a pulsed valve that yield complete opening. The studies reveal that a "flat-top" signal, indicating constant density and commonly considered as experimental criterion for continuous flow, is insufficient. Moreover, translational temperature and mean terminal flow velocity turn out to be significantly more sensitive in testing for the equivalent behavior of a continuous nozzle source. Based on the widely distributed Even-Lavie valve we demonstrate that, in principle, it is possible to achieve quasi-continuous flow conditions even with fast-acting valves; however, the two prerequisites are a minimum pulse duration that is much longer than standard practice and previous estimates, and a suitable tagging of the appropriate beam segment.

  6. Accretion of Supersonic Winds on Boson Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gracia-Linares, M

    2016-01-01

    We present the evolution of a supersonic wind interacting with a Boson Star (BS) and compare the resulting wind density profile with that of the shock cone formed when the wind is accreted by a non-rotating Black Hole (BH) of the same mass. The physical differences between these accretors are that a BS, unlike a BH has no horizon, it does not have a mechanical surface either and thus the wind is expected to trespass the BS. Despite these conditions, on the BS space-time the gas achieves a stationary flux with the gas accumulating in a high density elongated structure comparable to the shock cone formed behind a BH. The highest density resides in the center of the BS whereas in the case of the BH it is found on the downstream part of the BH near the event horizon. The maximum density of the gas is smaller in the BS than in the BH case. Our results indicate that the highest density of the wind is more similar on the BS to that on the BH when the BS has high self-interaction, when it is more compact and when the...

  7. Particle Streak Velocimetry of Supersonic Nozzle Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willits, J. D.; Pourpoint, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    A novel velocimetry technique to probe the exhaust flow of a laboratory scale combustor is being developed. The technique combines the advantages of standard particle velocimetry techniques and the ultra-fast imaging capabilities of a streak camera to probe high speed flows near continuously with improved spatial and velocity resolution. This "Particle Streak Velocimetry" technique tracks laser illuminated seed particles at up to 236 picosecond temporal resolution allowing time-resolved measurement of one-dimensional flows exceeding 2000 m/s as are found in rocket nozzles and many other applications. Developmental tests with cold nitrogen have been performed to validate and troubleshoot the technique with supersonic flows of much lower velocity and without background noise due to combusting flow. Flow velocities on the order of 500 m/s have been probed with titanium dioxide particles and a continuous-wave laser diode. Single frame images containing multiple streaks are analyzed to find the average slope of all incident particles corresponding to the centerline axial flow velocity. Long term objectives for these tests are correlation of specific impulse to theoretical combustion predictions and direct comparisons between candidate green fuels and the industry standard, monomethylhydrazine, each tested under identical conditions.

  8. Supersonic collisions between two gas streams

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H M; Ryu, D; Lee, Hyung Mok; Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    1995-01-01

    A star around a massive black hole can be disrupted tidally by the gravity of the black hole. Then, its debris may form a precessing stream which may even collide with itself. In order to understand the dynamical effects of the stream-stream collision on the eventual accretion of the stellar debris onto the black hole, we have studied how gas flow behaves when the outgoing stream collides supersonically with the incoming stream. We have investigated the problem analytically with one-dimensional plane-parallel streams and numerically with more realistic three-dimensional streams. A shock formed around the contact surface converts the bulk of the orbital streaming kinetic energy into thermal energy. In three-dimensional simulations, the accumulated hot post-shock gas then expands adiabatically and drives another shock into the low density ambient region. Through this expansion, thermal energy is converted back to the kinetic energy associated with the expanding motion. Thus, in the end, only a small fraction of...

  9. Drag Force Anemometer Used in Supersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fralick, Gustave C.

    1998-01-01

    To measure the drag on a flat cantilever beam exposed transversely to a flow field, the drag force anemometer (beam probe) uses strain gauges attached on opposite sides of the base of the beam. This is in contrast to the hot wire anemometer, which depends for its operation on the variation of the convective heat transfer coefficient with velocity. The beam probe retains the high-frequency response (up to 100 kHz) of the hot wire anemometer, but it is more rugged, uses simpler electronics, is relatively easy to calibrate, is inherently temperature compensated, and can be used in supersonic flow. The output of the probe is proportional to the velocity head of the flow, 1/2 rho u(exp 2) (where rho is the fluid density and u is the fluid velocity). By adding a static pressure tap and a thermocouple to measure total temperature, one can determine the Mach number, static temperature, density, and velocity of the flow.

  10. Supersonic Magnetic Flows in the Quiet Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Borrero, J M; Schlichenmaier, R; Schmidt, W; Berkefeld, T; Solanki, S K; Bonet, J A; Iniesta, J C del Toro; Domingo, V; Barthol, P; Gandorfer, A

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution we describe some recent observations of high-speed magnetized flows in the quiet Sun granulation. These observations were carried out with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment (IMaX) onboard the stratospheric balloon {\\sc Sunrise}, and possess an unprecedented spatial resolution and temporal cadence. These flows were identified as highly shifted circular polarization (Stokes $V$) signals. We estimate the LOS velocity responsible for these shifts to be larger than 6 km s$^{-1}$, and therefore we refer to them as {\\it supersonic magnetic flows}. The average lifetime of the detected events is 81.3 s and they occupy an average area of about 23\\,000 km$^2$. Most of the events occur within granular cells and correspond therefore to upflows. However some others occur in intergranular lanes or bear no clear relation to the convective velocity pattern. We analyze a number of representative examples and discuss them in terms of magnetic loops, reconnection events, and convective collapse.

  11. External-Compression Supersonic Inlet Design Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, John W.

    2011-01-01

    A computer code named SUPIN has been developed to perform aerodynamic design and analysis of external-compression, supersonic inlets. The baseline set of inlets include axisymmetric pitot, two-dimensional single-duct, axisymmetric outward-turning, and two-dimensional bifurcated-duct inlets. The aerodynamic methods are based on low-fidelity analytical and numerical procedures. The geometric methods are based on planar geometry elements. SUPIN has three modes of operation: 1) generate the inlet geometry from a explicit set of geometry information, 2) size and design the inlet geometry and analyze the aerodynamic performance, and 3) compute the aerodynamic performance of a specified inlet geometry. The aerodynamic performance quantities includes inlet flow rates, total pressure recovery, and drag. The geometry output from SUPIN includes inlet dimensions, cross-sectional areas, coordinates of planar profiles, and surface grids suitable for input to grid generators for analysis by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. The input data file for SUPIN and the output file from SUPIN are text (ASCII) files. The surface grid files are output as formatted Plot3D or stereolithography (STL) files. SUPIN executes in batch mode and is available as a Microsoft Windows executable and Fortran95 source code with a makefile for Linux.

  12. PREFACE Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2010-12-01

    The goals of the International Conference 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, are to expose the generic problem of non-equilibrium turbulent processes to a broad scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together researchers from different areas, which include but are not limited to fluid dynamics, plasmas, high energy density physics, astrophysics, material science, combustion, atmospheric and Earth sciences, nonlinear and statistical physics, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, data processing and computations, optics and telecommunications, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task of non-equilibrium processes. Non-equilibrium turbulent processes play a key role in a broad variety of phenomena spanning astrophysical to atomistic scales and high or low energy density regimes. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, strong shocks and explosions, material transformation under high strain rate, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, non-canonical wall-bounded flows, hypersonic and supersonic boundary layers, dynamics of atmosphere and oceanography, are just a few examples. A grip on non-equilibrium turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser micro-machining, nano-electronics, free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in the areas of aeronautics and aerodynamics. Non-equilibrium turbulent processes are anisotropic, non-local, multi-scale and multi-phase, and often are driven by shocks or

  13. Numerical Investigation of Wall Cooling and Suction Effects on Supersonic Flat-Plate Boundary Layer Transition Using Large Eddy Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suozhu Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Reducing friction resistance and aerodynamic heating has important engineering significance to improve the performances of super/hypersonic aircraft, so the purpose of transition control and turbulent drag reduction becomes one of the cutting edges in turbulence research. In order to investigate the influences of wall cooling and suction on the transition process and fully developed turbulence, the large eddy simulation of spatially evolving supersonic boundary layer transition over a flat-plate with freestream Mach number 4.5 at different wall temperature and suction intensity is performed in the present work. It is found that the wall cooling and suction are capable of changing the mean velocity profile within the boundary layer and improving the stability of the flow field, thus delaying the onset of the spatial transition process. The transition control will become more effective as the wall temperature decreases, while there is an optimal wall suction intensity under the given conditions. Moreover, the development of large-scale coherent structures can be suppressed effectively via wall cooling, but wall suction has no influence.

  14. Facile Formation of Acetic Sulfuric Anhydride in a Supersonic Jet: Characterization by Microwave Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Anna; Smith, CJ; Mackenzie, Becca; Leopold, Ken

    2017-06-01

    Sulfur trioxide and acetic acid are shown to react under supersonic jet conditions to form acetic sulfuric anhydride, CH_{3}COOSO_{2}OH. Rotational spectra of the parent, ^{34}S, methyl ^{13}C, and fully deuterated isotopologues have been observed by chirped-pulse and conventional cavity microwave spectroscopy. A and E internal rotation states have been observed for each isotopologue studied and the methyl group internal rotation barriers have been determined (241.043(65) \\wn for the parent species). The reaction is analogous to that of our previous report on the reaction of sulfur trioxide and formic acid. DFT and CCSD calculations are also presented which indicate that the reaction proceeds via a π_{2} + π_{2} + σ_{2} cycloaddition reaction. These results support our previous conjecture that the reaction of SO_{3} with carboxylic acids is both facile and general. Possible implications for atmospheric aerosol formation are discussed.

  15. Computational and experimental investigation of supersonic convection over a laser heated target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marineau, Eric C.

    This research concerns the development and validation of simulation of the beam-target interaction to determine the target temperature distribution as a function of time for a given target geometry, surface radiation intensity and free stream flow condition. The effect of a turbulent supersonic flow was investigated both numerically and experimentally. Experiments were in the Virginia Tech supersonic wind tunnel with a Mach 4 nozzle, ambient total temperature, total pressure of 160 psi and Reynolds number of 5x107/m. The target consisted of a 6.35 mm stainless steel plate painted at black. The target was irradiated with a 300 Watt continuous beam Ytterbium fiber laser generating a 4 mm Gaussian beam at 1.08 micron 10 cm from the leading edge where a 4 mm turbulent boundary layer prevailed. An absorbed laser power of 65, 81, 101, 120 Watts was used leading to a maximum heat flux between 1035 to 1910 W/cm 2. The target surface and backside temperature was measured using a mid-wave infrared camera. The backside temperature was also measured using eight type-K thermocouples. Two tests are made, one with the flow-on and the other with the flow-off. For the flow-on case, the laser is turned on after the tunnel starts and the flow reaches a steady state. For the flow-off case, the plate is heated at the same power but without the supersonic flow. The cooling effect is seen by subtracting the flow-off temperature from the flow-on temperature. This temperature subtraction is useful in cancelling the bias errors such that the overall uncertainty is significantly reduced. A new conjugate heat transfer algorithm was implemented in the GASP solver and validated by predicting the temperature distribution inside a cooled nozzle wall. The conjugate heat transfer algorithm was used to simulate the experiments at 81 and 65 Watts. Most computations were performed using the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model on a 280; 320 cell grid. A grid convergence study was performed. At 65 Watts

  16. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) as a Probe for Supersonic Hydrogen-Fuel/Air Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, P. M.; O'Byrne, S.; Cutler, A. D.; Rodriguez, C. G.

    2003-01-01

    The dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) method was used to measure temperature and the absolute mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in a supersonic non-reacting fuel-air mixing experiment. Experiments were conducted in NASA Langley Research Center s Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Test Facility. Under normal operation of this facility, hydrogen and air burn to increase the enthalpy of the test gas and O2 is added to simulate air. This gas is expanded through a Mach 2 nozzle and into a combustor model where fuel is then injected, mixes and burns. In the present experiment the O2 of the test gas is replaced by N2. The lack of oxidizer inhibited combustion of the injected H2 fuel jet allowing the fuel/air mixing process to be studied. CARS measurements were performed 427 mm downstream of the nozzle exit and 260 mm downstream of the fuel injector. Maps were obtained of the mean temperature, as well as the N2, O2 and H2 mean mole fraction fields. A map of mean H2O vapor mole fraction was also inferred from these measurements. Correlations between different measured parameters and their fluctuations are presented. The CARS measurements are compared with a preliminary computational prediction of the flow.

  17. ReACT Methodology Proof of Concept Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bri Rolston; Sarah Freeman

    2014-03-01

    The Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) funded INL Researchers to evaluate a novel process for assessing and mitigating cyber security risks. The proof of concept level of the method was tested in an industry environment. This case study, plus additional case studies will support the further development of the method into a tool to assist industry in securing their critical networks. This report provides an understanding of the process developed in the Response Analysis and Characterization Tool (ReACT) project. This report concludes with lessons learned and a roadmap for final development of these tools for use by industry.

  18. Computational Enhancements for Direct Numerical Simulations of Statistically Stationary Turbulent Premixed Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Mukhadiyev, Nurzhan

    2017-05-01

    Combustion at extreme conditions, such as a turbulent flame at high Karlovitz and Reynolds numbers, is still a vast and an uncertain field for researchers. Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent flame is a superior tool to unravel detailed information that is not accessible to most sophisticated state-of-the-art experiments. However, the computational cost of such simulations remains a challenge even for modern supercomputers, as the physical size, the level of turbulence intensity, and chemical complexities of the problems continue to increase. As a result, there is a strong demand for computational cost reduction methods as well as in acceleration of existing methods. The main scope of this work was the development of computational and numerical tools for high-fidelity direct numerical simulations of premixed planar flames interacting with turbulence. The first part of this work was KAUST Adaptive Reacting Flow Solver (KARFS) development. KARFS is a high order compressible reacting flow solver using detailed chemical kinetics mechanism; it is capable to run on various types of heterogeneous computational architectures. In this work, it was shown that KARFS is capable of running efficiently on both CPU and GPU. The second part of this work was numerical tools for direct numerical simulations of planar premixed flames: such as linear turbulence forcing and dynamic inlet control. DNS of premixed turbulent flames conducted previously injected velocity fluctuations at an inlet. Turbulence injected at the inlet decayed significantly while reaching the flame, which created a necessity to inject higher than needed fluctuations. A solution for this issue was to maintain turbulence strength on the way to the flame using turbulence forcing. Therefore, a linear turbulence forcing was implemented into KARFS to enhance turbulence intensity. Linear turbulence forcing developed previously by other groups was corrected with net added momentum removal mechanism to prevent mean

  19. Turbulent thermal diffusion in strongly stratified turbulence: theory and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Amir, G; Eidelman, A; Elperin, T; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent thermal diffusion is a combined effect of the temperature stratified turbulence and inertia of small particles. It causes the appearance of a non-diffusive turbulent flux of particles in the direction of the turbulent heat flux. This non-diffusive turbulent flux of particles is proportional to the product of the mean particle number density and the effective velocity of inertial particles. The theory of this effect has been previously developed only for small temperature gradients and small Stokes numbers (Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 76}, 224, 1996). In this study a generalized theory of turbulent thermal diffusion for arbitrary temperature gradients and Stokes numbers has been developed. The laboratory experiments in the oscillating grid turbulence and in the multi-fan produced turbulence have been performed to validate the theory of turbulent thermal diffusion in strongly stratified turbulent flows. It has been shown that the ratio of the effective velocity of inertial particles to the characteristic ve...

  20. Edge turbulence in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedospasov, A. V.

    1992-12-01

    Edge turbulence is of decisive importance for the distribution of particle and energy fluxes to the walls of tokamaks. Despite the availability of extensive experimental data on the turbulence properties, its nature still remains a subject for discussion. This paper contains a review of the most recent theoretical and experimental studies in the field, including mainly the studies to which Wootton (A.J. Wooton, J. Nucl. Mater. 176 & 177 (1990) 77) referred to most in his review at PSI-9 and those published later. The available theoretical models of edge turbulence with volume dissipation due to collisions fail to fully interpret the entire combination of experimental facts. In the scrape-off layer of a tokamak the dissipation prevails due to the flow of current through potential shifts near the surface of limiters of divertor plates. The different origins of turbulence at the edge and in the core plasma due to such dissipation are discussed in this paper. Recent data on the electron temperature fluctuations enabled one to evaluate the electric probe measurements of turbulent flows of particles and heat critically. The latest data on the suppression of turbulence in the case of L-H transitions are given. In doing so, the possibility of exciting current instabilities in biasing experiments (rather than only to the suppression of existing turbulence) is given some attention. Possible objectives of further studies are also discussed.

  1. Numerical Simulations of Two-Phase Reacting Flow in a Single-Element Lean Direct Injection (LDI) Combustor Using NCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Wey, C. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations of Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single-element lean direct injection (LDI) combustor have been conducted by using the National Combustion Code (NCC). The simulations have been carried out using the time filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) approach ranging from the steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), unsteady RANS (URANS), to the dynamic flow structure simulation (DFS). The sub-grid model employed for turbulent mixing and combustion includes the well-mixed model, the linear eddy mixing (LEM) model, and the filtered mass density function (FDF/PDF) model. The starting condition of the injected liquid spray is specified via empirical droplet size correlation, and a five-species single-step global reduced mechanism is employed for fuel chemistry. All the calculations use the same grid whose resolution is of the RANS type. Comparisons of results from various models are presented.

  2. Numerical Studies of Quantum Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Makoto; Fujimoto, Kazuya; Yui, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    We review numerical studies of quantum turbulence. Quantum turbulence is currently one of the most important problems in low temperature physics and is actively studied for superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates. A key aspect of quantum turbulence is the dynamics of condensates and quantized vortices. The dynamics of quantized vortices in superfluid helium are described by the vortex filament model, while the dynamics of condensates are described by the Gross-Pitaevskii model. Both of these models are nonlinear, and the quantum turbulent states of interest are far from equilibrium. Hence, numerical studies have been indispensable for studying quantum turbulence. In fact, numerical studies have contributed to revealing the various problems of quantum turbulence. This article reviews the recent developments in numerical studies of quantum turbulence. We start with the motivation and the basics of quantum turbulence and invite readers to the frontier of this research. Though there are many important topics in the quantum turbulence of superfluid helium, this article focuses on inhomogeneous quantum turbulence in a channel, which has been motivated by recent visualization experiments. Atomic Bose-Einstein condensates are a modern issue in quantum turbulence, and this article reviews a variety of topics in the quantum turbulence of condensates, e.g., two-dimensional quantum turbulence, weak wave turbulence, turbulence in a spinor condensate, some of which have not been addressed in superfluid helium and paves the novel way for quantum turbulence researches. Finally, we discuss open problems.

  3. Experiments on Plasma Turbulence Created by Supersonic Plasma Flows with Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    afterglow the primaries are absent and the secondaries have a Maxwellian distribution. Probes are usually used to measure the energy distribution, but...floating potential and ion current are non -perturbing. But for a positive probe bias the probe raises the plasma potential when it is the only electron

  4. Turbulence Model Effects on Cold-Gas Lateral Jet Interaction in a Supersonic Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    symmetry of the geometry . The computational domains were meshed with MIME from Metacomp Technologies (18). In both computational domains, the forward...van Leer-Contact (HLLC) Riemann solver and a multidimensional Total-Variation-Diminishing (TVD) continuous flux limiter (19). The choice of... Riemann 10 problem at the boundary. For the cases modeling the wind tunnel wall, the cylindrical section of the outer boundary was modeled as a no

  5. Test Section Turbulence in the AEDC/VKF Supersonic/Hypersonic Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    the Tunnel A circuit. The stilling chamber shown in Fig. ld contains up to 12 screens of various mesh sizes. The purpose of the screens is to...5.0 in Tunnel A and the pitot acoustic data in Tunnel B indicate that the static pressure fluctuations vary as ( REDE )- i/4, which is in reasonable...decreases with increasing free-stream Reynolds number; that is, (~/~) is proportional to ( REDE )-0.23. . An evaluation of the pressure

  6. Numerical Investigation of Transitional and Turbulent Axisymmetric Wakes at Supersonic Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Therefore, it follows P1,m,-1 = Plm ,2 Plm ,-2 = Plm ,31 PVxlm,-l PVxlm,2 P1Jxlm,-2: = PVxlm,32 CHAPTER 3. NUMERICAL METHOD 38 PVrlm,-1 - PVrlm,2 PVrlm,-2...physical space in the same fashion as for the axisymmetric problem. This leads to the following boundary conditions at the azimuthal location 0 = hAO...1,0 = -- P_-Im,2,0 ;-;D,1m,-2,0 = - PVrim,3,0O Pfelm,-1,o = PeIm,2,o PeIm,-2,o = Pelm,3,o, (3.29d) while for k = 1 Plm ,l,1 = 0, PV{Imj,, = 0, PV"Ii

  7. The Multiscale Interaction of Vibrational Energy Transfer and Turbulent Combustion in Supersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-04

    vibrationally active species in both freestreams. Summary of jet mixing studies The effect of slow vibrational relaxation in a high-speed shear layer was...of the gases, while a vitiated coflow would include combustion products that could significantly affect the vibrational relaxation process. The...the mixing in the shear layer, which will be used to compare with the relaxation time of the vibrational energy, was defined as the eddy turnover time

  8. Effect of reacted acidic monomer with calcium on bonding performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, K; Ma, S; Aida, M; Maeda, T; Ikemi, T; Hirata, M; Nishiyama, N

    2011-05-01

    We determined the number of reacted and unreacted 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) molecules with calcium during the demineralization process of hydroxyapatite or dentin by 10-MDP-based one-step (Clearfil Tri-S Bond, TS) or two-step self-etch adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond Primer, SE). We then examined the effects of the number of reacted and/or unreacted 10-MDP molecules on the initial bond strength and bond durability of the resultant adhesive layer. The null hypotheses were that (1) the etching efficacy of tooth apatite by 10-MDP used in TS was the same as that in SE, and (2) the unreacted 10-MDP polymer included within the adhesive layer does not affect bond durability. Addition of hydroxyapatite or dentin to the TS and SE resulted in decreases in the NMR peak intensities for 10-MDP. The peak intensity for 10-MDP showed a greater reduction in SE than in TS, consistent with the observation that SE provided significantly higher initial mean bond strengths than TS. Further, the unreacted 10-MDP polymer within the adhesive layer did not decrease the mean bond strength, despite the application of 20,000x thermo-cycling.

  9. Sticky Tunes: How Do People React to Involuntary Musical Imagery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Victoria J.; Liikkanen, Lassi A.; Jakubowski, Kelly; Stewart, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of people experience involuntary musical imagery (INMI) or ‘earworms’; perceptions of spontaneous, repetitive musical sound in the absence of an external source. The majority of INMI episodes are not bothersome, while some cause disruption ranging from distraction to anxiety and distress. To date, little is known about how the majority of people react to INMI, in particular whether evaluation of the experience impacts on chosen response behaviours or if attempts at controlling INMI are successful or not. The present study classified 1046 reports of how people react to INMI episodes. Two laboratories in Finland and the UK conducted an identical qualitative analysis protocol on reports of INMI reactions and derived visual descriptive models of the outcomes using grounded theory techniques. Combined analysis carried out across the two studies confirmed that many INMI episodes were considered neutral or pleasant, with passive acceptance and enjoyment being among the most popular response behaviours. A significant number of people, however, reported on attempts to cope with unwanted INMI. The most popular and effective behaviours in response to INMI were seeking out the tune in question, and musical or verbal distraction. The outcomes of this study contribute to our understanding of the aetiology of INMI, in particular within the framework of memory theory, and present testable hypotheses for future research on successful INMI coping strategies. PMID:24497938

  10. Sticky tunes: how do people react to involuntary musical imagery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria J Williamson

    Full Text Available The vast majority of people experience involuntary musical imagery (INMI or 'earworms'; perceptions of spontaneous, repetitive musical sound in the absence of an external source. The majority of INMI episodes are not bothersome, while some cause disruption ranging from distraction to anxiety and distress. To date, little is known about how the majority of people react to INMI, in particular whether evaluation of the experience impacts on chosen response behaviours or if attempts at controlling INMI are successful or not. The present study classified 1046 reports of how people react to INMI episodes. Two laboratories in Finland and the UK conducted an identical qualitative analysis protocol on reports of INMI reactions and derived visual descriptive models of the outcomes using grounded theory techniques. Combined analysis carried out across the two studies confirmed that many INMI episodes were considered neutral or pleasant, with passive acceptance and enjoyment being among the most popular response behaviours. A significant number of people, however, reported on attempts to cope with unwanted INMI. The most popular and effective behaviours in response to INMI were seeking out the tune in question, and musical or verbal distraction. The outcomes of this study contribute to our understanding of the aetiology of INMI, in particular within the framework of memory theory, and present testable hypotheses for future research on successful INMI coping strategies.

  11. Turbulence new approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Belotserkovskii, OM; Chechetkin, VM

    2005-01-01

    The authors present the results of numerical experiments carried out to examine the problem of development of turbulence and convection. On the basis of the results, they propose a physical model of the development of turbulence. Numerical algorithms and difference schema for carrying out numerical experiments in hydrodynamics, are proposed. Original algorithms, suitable for calculation of the development of the processes of turbulence and convection in different conditions, even on astrophysical objects, are presented. The results of numerical modelling of several important phenomena having both fundamental and applied importance are described.

  12. Turbulent current drive mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Christopher J.; Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2017-08-01

    Mechanisms through which plasma microturbulence can drive a mean electron plasma current are derived. The efficiency through which these turbulent contributions can drive deviations from neoclassical predictions of the electron current profile is computed by employing a linearized Coulomb collision operator. It is found that a non-diffusive contribution to the electron momentum flux as well as an anomalous electron-ion momentum exchange term provide the most efficient means through which turbulence can modify the mean electron current for the cases considered. Such turbulent contributions appear as an effective EMF within Ohm's law and hence provide an ideal means for driving deviations from neoclassical predictions.

  13. Non-gaussian turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejstrup, J. [NEG Micon Project Development A/S, Randers (Denmark); Hansen, K.S. [Denmarks Technical Univ., Dept. of Energy Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark); Pedersen, B.J. [VESTAS Wind Systems A/S, Lem (Denmark); Nielsen, M. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics, Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The pdf`s of atmospheric turbulence have somewhat wider tails than a Gaussian, especially regarding accelerations, whereas velocities are close to Gaussian. This behaviour is being investigated using data from a large WEB-database in order to quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity. Models for non-Gaussian turbulence have been developed, by which artificial turbulence can be generated with specified distributions, spectra and cross-correlations. The artificial time series will then be used in load models and the resulting loads in the Gaussian and the non-Gaussian cases will be compared. (au)

  14. Homogeneous turbulence theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bershadskii, A.G.

    1985-06-01

    An exact solution for the nonlinear problem of the spectral energy function of a homogeneous turbulence is derived under the assumption that energy transfer under the effect of inertial forces is determined mainly by the interactions among vortices whose wavenumbers are only slightly different from each other. The results are experimentally verified for turbulence behind grids. Similar problems are solved for MHD turbulence and for a nonstationary spectral energy function. It is shown that at the initial stage of degeneration, the spectral energy function is little influenced by the Stewart number; this agrees with experimental data for the damping of longitudinal velocity pulsations behind a grid in a longitudinal magnetic field. 15 references.

  15. Aviation turbulence processes, detection, prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Lane, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Anyone who has experienced turbulence in flight knows that it is usually not pleasant, and may wonder why this is so difficult to avoid. The book includes papers by various aviation turbulence researchers and provides background into the nature and causes of atmospheric turbulence that affect aircraft motion, and contains surveys of the latest techniques for remote and in situ sensing and forecasting of the turbulence phenomenon. It provides updates on the state-of-the-art research since earlier studies in the 1960s on clear-air turbulence, explains recent new understanding into turbulence generation by thunderstorms, and summarizes future challenges in turbulence prediction and avoidance.

  16. Dispersion of Own Frequency of Ion-Dipole by Supersonic Transverse Wave in Solid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minasyan V.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available First, we predict an existence of transverse electromagnetic field formed by supersonic transverse wave in solid. This electromagnetic wave acquires frequency and speed of sound, and it propagates along of direction propagation of supersonic wave. We also show that own frequency of ion-dipole depends on frequency of supersonic transverse wave.

  17. The H i-to-H2 Transition in a Turbulent Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialy, Shmuel; Burkhart, Blakesley; Sternberg, Amiel

    2017-07-01

    We study the effect of density fluctuations induced by turbulence on the H i/H2 structure in photodissociation regions (PDRs) both analytically and numerically. We perform magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations for both subsonic and supersonic turbulent gas and chemical H i/H2 balance calculations. We derive atomic-to-molecular density profiles and the H i column density probability density function (PDF) assuming chemical equilibrium. We find that, while the H i/H2 density profiles are strongly perturbed in turbulent gas, the mean H i column density is well approximated by the uniform-density analytic formula of Sternberg et al. The PDF width depends on (a) the radiation intensity-to-mean density ratio, (b) the sonic Mach number, and (c) the turbulence decorrelation scale, or driving scale. We derive an analytic model for the H i PDF and demonstrate how our model, combined with 21 cm observations, can be used to constrain the Mach number and driving scale of turbulent gas. As an example, we apply our model to observations of H i in the Perseus molecular cloud. We show that a narrow observed H i PDF may imply small-scale decorrelation, pointing to the potential importance of subcloud-scale turbulence driving.

  18. Study of the shock structure of supersonic, dual, coaxial, jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. H.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, H. D. [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    The shock structure of supersonic, dual, coaxial jet is experimentally investigated. Eight different kinds of coaxial, dual nozzles are employed to observe the major features of the near field shock structure of the supersonic, coaxial, dual jets. Four convergent-divergent supersonic nozzles having the Mach number of 2.0 and 3.0, and are used to compare the coaxial jet flows discharging from two sonic nozzles. The primary pressure ratio is changed in the range between 4.0 and 10.0 and the assistant jet pressure ratio from 1.0 to 4.0. The results obtained show that the impinging angle, nozzle geometry and pressure ratio significantly affect the near field shock structure, Mach disk location and Mach disk diameter. The annular shock system is found depending the assistant and primary jet pressure ratios.

  19. Dissipation of Molecular Cloud Turbulence by Magnetohydrodynamic Shockwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Andrew; Wardle, Mark

    2015-08-01

    The character of star formation is intimately related to the supersonic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent dynamics of the giant molecular clouds in which stars form. A significant amount of the turbulent energy dissipates in low velocity shock waves. These shocks cause molecular line cooling of the compressed and heated gas, and so their radiative signatures probe the nature of the turbulence. In MHD fluids the three distinct families of shocks—fast, intermediate and slow—differ in how they compress and heat the molecular gas, and so observational differences between them may also distinguish driving modes of turbulent regions.Here we use a two-fluid model to compare the characteristics of one-dimensional fast and slow MHD shocks. Fast MHD shocks are magnetically driven, forcing ion species to stream through the neutral gas ahead of the shock front. This magnetic precursor heats the gas sufficiently to create a large, warm transition zone where all the fluid variables only weakly change in the shock front. In contrast, slow MHD shocks are driven by gas pressure where neutral species collide with ion species in a thin hot slab that closely resembles an ordinary gas dynamic shock.We computed observational diagnostics for fast and slow shocks at velocities vs = 2-4 km/s and preshock Hydrogen nuclei densities n(H) = 102-4 cm-3. We followed the abundances of molecules relevant for a simple oxygen chemistry and include cooling by CO, H2 and H2O. Estimates of intensities of CO rotational lines show that high-J lines, above J = 6→5, are more strongly excited in slow MHD shocks. We discuss how these shocks could help interpret recently observed anomalously strong mid- and high-J CO lines emitted by warm gas in the Milky Way and external galaxies, and implications for simulations of MHD turbulence.

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon, C.

    2004-10-01

    This is a handbook for a computational approach to reacting flows, including background material on statistical mechanics. In this sense, the title is somewhat misleading with respect to other books dedicated to the statistical theory of turbulence (e.g. Monin and Yaglom). In the present book, emphasis is placed on modelling (engineering closures) for computational fluid dynamics. The probabilistic (pdf) approach is applied to the local scalar field, motivated first by the nonlinearity of chemical source terms which appear in the transport equations of reacting species. The probabilistic and stochastic approaches are also used for the velocity field and particle position; nevertheless they are essentially limited to Lagrangian models for a local vector, with only single-point statistics, as for the scalar. Accordingly, conventional techniques, such as single-point closures for RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) and subgrid-scale models for LES (large-eddy simulations), are described and in some cases reformulated using underlying Langevin models and filtered pdfs. Even if the theoretical approach to turbulence is not discussed in general, the essentials of probabilistic and stochastic-processes methods are described, with a useful reminder concerning statistics at the molecular level. The book comprises 7 chapters. Chapter 1 briefly states the goals and contents, with a very clear synoptic scheme on page 2. Chapter 2 presents definitions and examples of pdfs and related statistical moments. Chapter 3 deals with stochastic processes, pdf transport equations, from Kramer-Moyal to Fokker-Planck (for Markov processes), and moments equations. Stochastic differential equations are introduced and their relationship to pdfs described. This chapter ends with a discussion of stochastic modelling. The equations of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics are addressed in chapter 4. Classical conservation equations (mass, velocity, internal energy) are derived from their

  1. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  2. Turbulence and Star Formation in a Sample of Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Erin; Chien, Li-Hsin; Hunter, Deidre A.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate turbulent gas motions in spiral galaxies and their importance to star formation in far outer disks, where the column density is typically far below the critical value for spontaneous gravitational collapse. Following the methods of Burkhart et al. on the Small Magellanic Cloud, we use the third and fourth statistical moments, as indicators of structures caused by turbulence, to examine the neutral hydrogen (H i) column density of a sample of spiral galaxies selected from The H i Nearby Galaxy Survey. We apply the statistical moments in three different methods—the galaxy as a whole, divided into a function of radii and then into grids. We create individual grid maps of kurtosis for each galaxy. To investigate the relation between these moments and star formation, we compare these maps with their far-ultraviolet images taken by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite.We find that the moments are largely uniform across the galaxies, in which the variation does not appear to trace any star-forming regions. This may, however, be due to the spatial resolution of our analysis, which could potentially limit the scale of turbulent motions that we are sensitive to greater than ∼700 pc. From comparison between the moments themselves, we find that the gas motions in our sampled galaxies are largely supersonic. This analysis also shows that the Burkhart et al. methods may be applied not just to dwarf galaxies but also to normal spiral galaxies.

  3. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aero Vehicles: Fractional Order Fits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence models are necessary for the design of both inlet/engine and flight controls, as well as for studying coupling between the propulsion and the vehicle structural dynamics for supersonic vehicles. Models based on the Kolmogorov spectrum have been previously utilized to model atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, a more accurate model is developed in its representative fractional order form, typical of atmospheric disturbances. This is accomplished by first scaling the Kolmogorov spectral to convert them into finite energy von Karman forms and then by deriving an explicit fractional circuit-filter type analog for this model. This circuit model is utilized to develop a generalized formulation in frequency domain to approximate the fractional order with the products of first order transfer functions, which enables accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  4. Numerical simulations of compressively driven interstellar turbulence: I. Isothermal gas

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Wolfram; Hupp, Markus; Kern, Sebastian; Niemeyer, Jens C

    2008-01-01

    We performed numerical simulations of supersonic isothermal turbulence driven by mostly compressive large-scale forcing, using both a static grid and adaptive mesh refinement with an effective resolution N=768^3. After a transient phase dominated by shocks, turbulence evolves into a steady state with an RMS Mach number about 2.5, in which cloud-like structures of over-dense gas are surrounded by highly rarefied gas. The index of the turbulence energy spectrum function beta = 2.0 in the shock-dominated phase. As the flow approaches statistical equilibrium, the spectrum flattens, with beta = 1.9. For the scaling exponent of the root mean square velocity fluctuation, we obtain gamma = 0.43 from the velocity structure functions of second order. These results are well within the range of observed scaling properties for the velocity dispersion in molecular clouds. Calculating structure functions of order p=1,...,5, we find for all scaling exponents significant deviations from the Kolmogorov-Burgers model proposed b...

  5. Scrambled and Unscrambled Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ramaprabhu, P; Lawrie, A G W

    2013-01-01

    The linked fluid dynamics videos depict Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence when driven by a complex acceleration profile involving two stages of acceleration interspersed with a stage of stabilizing deceleration. Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability occurs at the interface separating two fluids of different densities, when the lighter fluid is accelerated in to the heavier fluid. The turbulent mixing arising from the development of the miscible RT instability is of key importance in the design of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsules, and to the understanding of astrophysical events, such as Type Ia supernovae. By driving this flow with an accel-decel-accel profile, we have investigated how structures in RT turbulence are affected by a sudden change in the direction of the acceleration first from destabilizing acceleration to deceleration, and followed by a restoration of the unstable acceleration. By studying turbulence under such highly non-equilibrium conditions, we hope to develop an understanding of the response and ...

  6. Stochastic modelling of turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Emil Hedevang Lohse

    This thesis addresses stochastic modelling of turbulence with applications to wind energy in mind. The primary tool is ambit processes, a recently developed class of computationally tractable stochastic processes based on integration with respect to Lévy bases. The subject of ambit processes...... stochastic turbulence model based on ambit processes is proposed. It is shown how a prescribed isotropic covariance structure can be reproduced. Non-Gaussian turbulence models are obtained through non-Gaussian Lévy bases or through volatility modulation of Lévy bases. As opposed to spectral models operating...... is dissipated into heat due to the internal friction caused by viscosity. An existing stochastic model, also expressed in terms of ambit processes, is extended and shown to give a universal and parsimonious description of the turbulent energy dissipation. The volatility modulation, referred to above, has...

  7. Turbulence of swarming sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creppy, Adama; Praud, Olivier; Druart, Xavier; Kohnke, Philippa L.; Plouraboué, Franck

    2015-09-01

    Collective motion of self-sustained swarming flows has recently provided examples of small-scale turbulence arising where viscous effects are dominant. We report the first observation of universal enstrophy cascade in concentrated swarming sperm consistent with a body of evidence built from various independent measurements. We found a well-defined k-3 power-law decay of a velocity field power spectrum and relative dispersion of small beads consistent with theoretical predictions in 2D turbulence. Concentrated living sperm displays long-range, correlated whirlpool structures of a size that provides an integral scale of turbulence. We propose a consistent explanation for this quasi-2D turbulence based on self-structured laminated flow forced by steric interactions and alignment, a state of active matter that we call "swarming liquid crystal." We develop scaling arguments consistent with this interpretation.

  8. Color of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zare, Armin; Georgiou, Tryphon T

    2016-01-01

    Second-order statistics of turbulent flows can be obtained either experimentally or via direct numerical simulations. Statistics reflect fundamentals of flow physics and can be used to develop low-complexity turbulence models. Due to experimental or numerical limitations it is often the case that only partial flow statistics can be reliably known, i.e., only certain correlations between a limited number of flow field components are available. Thus, it is of interest to complete the statistical signature of the flow field in a way that is consistent with the known dynamics. This is an inverse problem and our approach utilizes stochastically-forced linearization around turbulent mean velocity profile. In general, white-in-time stochastic forcing is not sufficient to explain turbulent flow statistics. In contrast, colored-in-time forcing of the linearized equations allows for exact matching of available correlations. To accomplish this, we develop dynamical models that generate the required stochastic excitation...

  9. Supersonic stall flutter of high-speed fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Stevans, W.; Jutras, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical model is proposed for predicting the onset of supersonic stall bending flutter in high-speed rotors. The analysis is based on a modified two-dimensional, compressible, unsteady actuator disk theory. The stability boundary predicted by the analysis is shown to be in good agreement with the measured boundary of a high speed fan. The prediction that the flutter mode would be a forward traveling wave sensitive to wheel speed and aerodynamic loading is confirmed by experimental measurements. In addition, the analysis shows that reduced frequency and dynamic head also play a significant role in establishing the supersonic stall bending flutter boundary of an unshrouded fan.

  10. The impact of emerging technologies on an advanced supersonic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, C.; Maglieri, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of advances in propulsion systems, structure and materials, aerodynamics, and systems on the design and development of supersonic transport aircraft are analyzed. Efficient propulsion systems with variable-cycle engines provide the basis for improved propulsion systems; the propulsion efficienies of supersonic and subsonic engines are compared. Material advances consist of long-life damage-tolerant structures, advanced material development, aeroelastic tailoring, and low-cost fabrication. Improvements in the areas of aerodynamics and systems are examined. The environmental problems caused by engine emissions, airport noise, and sonic boom are studied. The characteristics of the aircraft designed to include these technical advances are described.

  11. Continuing Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics for Supersonic Retropropulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauerhamer, Daniel Guy; Trumble, Kerry A.; Kleb, Bil; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Edquist, Karl T.

    2011-01-01

    A large step in the validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for Supersonic Retropropulsion (SRP) is shown through the comparison of three Navier-Stokes solvers (DPLR, FUN3D, and OVERFLOW) and wind tunnel test results. The test was designed specifically for CFD validation and was conducted in the Langley supersonic 4 x4 Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel and includes variations in the number of nozzles, Mach and Reynolds numbers, thrust coefficient, and angles of orientation. Code-to-code and code-to-test comparisons are encouraging and possible error sources are discussed.

  12. Subsonic and Supersonic Jet Noise Calculations Using PSE and DNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, P.; Owis, Farouk

    1999-01-01

    Noise radiated from a supersonic jet is computed using the Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE) method. The evolution of the instability waves inside the jet is computed using the PSE method and the noise radiated to the far field from these waves is calculated by solving the wave equation using the Fourier transform method. We performed the computations for a cold supersonic jet of Mach number 2.1 which is excited by disturbances with Strouhal numbers St=.2 and .4 and the azimuthal wavenumber m=l. Good agreement in the sound pressure level are observed between the computed and the measured (Troutt and McLaughlin 1980) results.

  13. Dissipation in unsteady turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bos, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments and simulations have shown that unsteady turbulent flows, before reaching a dynamic equilibrium state, display a universal behaviour. We show that the observed universal non-equilibrium scaling can be explained using a non-equilibrium correction of Kolmogorov's energy spectrum. Given the universality of the experimental and numerical observations, the ideas presented here lay the foundation for the modeling of a wide class of unsteady turbulent flows.

  14. Stochastic tools in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lumey, John L

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic Tools in Turbulence discusses the available mathematical tools to describe stochastic vector fields to solve problems related to these fields. The book deals with the needs of turbulence in relation to stochastic vector fields, particularly, on three-dimensional aspects, linear problems, and stochastic model building. The text describes probability distributions and densities, including Lebesgue integration, conditional probabilities, conditional expectations, statistical independence, lack of correlation. The book also explains the significance of the moments, the properties of the

  15. Turbulent current drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbet, X.; Esteve, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Smolyakov, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Ohm's law is modified when turbulent processes are accounted for. Besides an hyper-resistivity, already well known, pinch terms appear in the electron momentum flux. Moreover it appears that turbulence is responsible for a source term in the Ohm's law, called here turbulent current drive. Two terms contribute to this source. The first term is a residual stress in the momentum flux, while the second contribution is an electro-motive force. A non zero average parallel wave number is needed to get a finite source term. Hence a symmetry breaking mechanism must be invoked, as for ion momentum transport. E × B shear flows and turbulence intensity gradients are shown to provide similar contributions. Moreover this source term has to compete with the collision friction term (resistivity). The effect is found to be significant for a large scale turbulence in spite of an unfavorable scaling with the ratio of the electron to ion mass. Turbulent current drive appears to be a weak effect in the plasma core, but could be substantial in the plasma edge where it may produce up to 10 % of the local current density.

  16. Turbulent Plasmoid Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Widmer, Fabien; Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2016-01-01

    The plasmoid instability may lead to fast magnetic reconnection through long current sheets(CS). It is well known that large-Reynolds-number plasmas easily become turbulent. We address the question whether turbulence enhances the energy conversion rate of plasmoid-unstable current sheets. We carry out appropriate numerical MHD simulations, but resolving simultaneously the relevant large-scale (mean-) fields and the corresponding small-scale, turbulent, quantities by means of direct numerical simulations (DNS) is not possible. Hence we investigate the influence of small scale turbulence on large scale MHD processes by utilizing a subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence model. We verify the applicability of our SGS model and then use it to investigate the influence of turbulence on the plasmoid instability. We start the simulations with Harris-type and force-free CS equilibria in the presence of a finite guide field in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane. We use the DNS results to investigate the growt...

  17. REAC/TS Radiation Accident Registry: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doran M. Christensen, DO, REAC/TS Associate Director and Staff Physician Becky Murdock, REAC/TS Registry and Health Physics Technician

    2012-12-12

    Over the past four years, REAC/TS has presented a number of case reports from its Radiation Accident Registry. Victims of radiological or nuclear incidents must meet certain dose criteria for an incident to be categorized as an “accident” and be included in the registry. Although the greatest numbers of “accidents” in the United States that have been entered into the registry involve radiation devices, the greater percentage of serious accidents have involved sealed sources of one kind or another. But if one looks at the kinds of accident scenarios that have resulted in extreme consequence, i.e., death, the greater share of deaths has occurred in medical settings.

  18. Reacting chemistry at the air-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Morgan, Thomas; Huwel, Lutz; Graham, William

    2016-09-01

    Plasma interaction with gas-liquid interfaces is becoming increasingly important in biological applications, chemical analysis and medicine. It introduces electrons, new ionic species and reactive species and contributes to chemical and electrical self-organization at the interface. To provide insight into the associated physics and chemistry at work in the evolution of the plasma in the air-water interface (AWI), a time-dependent one-dimensional modelling has been developed. The numerical simulation is used to solve the kinetic equations and help identify the important reaction mechanisms and describe the phenomena associated with hundreds of reacting pathways in gas-phase and liquid-phase AWI chemistry. This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 16K04998.

  19. Toward parallel, adaptive mesh refinement for chemically reacting flow simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devine, K.D.; Shadid, J.N.; Salinger, A.G. Hutchinson, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hennigan, G.L. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Adaptive numerical methods offer greater efficiency than traditional numerical methods by concentrating computational effort in regions of the problem domain where the solution is difficult to obtain. In this paper, the authors describe progress toward adding mesh refinement to MPSalsa, a computer program developed at Sandia National laboratories to solve coupled three-dimensional fluid flow and detailed reaction chemistry systems for modeling chemically reacting flow on large-scale parallel computers. Data structures that support refinement and dynamic load-balancing are discussed. Results using uniform refinement with mesh sequencing to improve convergence to steady-state solutions are also presented. Three examples are presented: a lid driven cavity, a thermal convection flow, and a tilted chemical vapor deposition reactor.

  20. 3D Reacting Flow Analysis of LANTR Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mark E. M.; Krivanek, Thomas M.; Hemminger, Joseph A.; Bulman, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents performance predictions for LANTR nozzles and the system implications for their use in a manned Mars mission. The LANTR concept is rocket thrust augmentation by injecting Oxygen into the nozzle to combust the Hydrogen exhaust of a Nuclear Thermal Rocket. The performance predictions are based on three-dimensional reacting flow simulations using VULCAN. These simulations explore a range of O2/H2 mixture ratios, injector configurations, and concepts. These performance predictions are used for a trade analysis within a system study for a manned Mars mission. Results indicate that the greatest benefit of LANTR will occur with In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). However, Hydrogen propellant volume reductions may allow greater margins for fitting tanks within the launch vehicle where packaging issues occur.

  1. Hybrid Reynolds-Averaged/Large-Eddy Simulations of a Co-Axial Supersonic Free-Jet Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurle, R. A.; Edwards, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Reynolds-averaged and hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations have been applied to a supersonic coaxial jet flow experiment. The experiment utilized either helium or argon as the inner jet nozzle fluid, and the outer jet nozzle fluid consisted of laboratory air. The inner and outer nozzles were designed and operated to produce nearly pressure-matched Mach 1.8 flow conditions at the jet exit. The purpose of the computational effort was to assess the state-of-the-art for each modeling approach, and to use the hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations to gather insight into the deficiencies of the Reynolds-averaged closure models. The Reynolds-averaged simulations displayed a strong sensitivity to choice of turbulent Schmidt number. The baseline value chosen for this parameter resulted in an over-prediction of the mixing layer spreading rate for the helium case, but the opposite trend was noted when argon was used as the injectant. A larger turbulent Schmidt number greatly improved the comparison of the results with measurements for the helium simulations, but variations in the Schmidt number did not improve the argon comparisons. The hybrid simulation results showed the same trends as the baseline Reynolds-averaged predictions. The primary reason conjectured for the discrepancy between the hybrid simulation results and the measurements centered around issues related to the transition from a Reynolds-averaged state to one with resolved turbulent content. Improvements to the inflow conditions are suggested as a remedy to this dilemma. Comparisons between resolved second-order turbulence statistics and their modeled Reynolds-averaged counterparts were also performed.

  2. Final Report for the Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2030 to 2035 Period, N+3 Supersonic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, John; Norstrud, Nicole; Stelmack, Marc; Skoch, Craig

    2010-01-01

    The N+3 Final Report documents the work and progress made by Lockheed Martin Aeronautics in response to the NASA sponsored program "N+3 NRA Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2030 to 2035 Period." The key technical objective of this effort was to generate promising supersonic concepts for the 2030 to 2035 timeframe and to develop plans for maturing the technologies required to make those concepts a reality. The N+3 program is aligned with NASA's Supersonic Project and is focused on providing alternative system-level solutions capable of overcoming the efficiency, environmental, and performance barriers to practical supersonic flight

  3. Turbulence and Fossil Turbulence in Oceans and Lakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pak-Tao Leung; Carl H. Gibson

    2004-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any of the other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. Energy cascades of irrotational flows from large scales to small are non-turbulent, even if they supply energy to turbulence. Turbulent flows are rotational and cascade from small scales to large, with feedback. Viscous forces limit the smallest turbulent eddy size to the Kolmogorov scale. In stratified fluids, buoyancy forces limit large vertical overturns to the Ozmidov scale and convert the largest turbulent eddies into a unique class of saturated, non-propagating, internal waves, termed fossil-vorticity-turbulence. These waves have the same energy but different properties and spectral forms than the original turbulence patch. The Gibson (1980, 1986) theory of fossil turbulence applies universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified fluid as its growth is constrained and fossilized by buoyancy forces. Quantitative hydrodynamic-phase-diagrams (HPDs) from the theory are used to classify microstructure patches according to their hydrodynamic states. When analyzed in HPD space, previously published oceanic datasets showed their dominant microstructure patches are fossilized at large scales in all layers. Laboratory and field measurements suggested phytoplankton species with different swimming abilities adjust their growth strategies by pattern recognition of turbulence-fossil-turbulence dissipation and persistence times that predict survival-relevant surface layer sea changes. New data collected near a Honolulu waste-water outfall showed the small-to-large evolution of oceanic turbulence microstructure from active to fossil states, and revealed the ability of fossil-density-turbulence patches to absorb, and vertically radiate, internal wave energy, information, and enhanced turbulent

  4. Dark matter merging induced turbulence as an efficient engine for gas cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Joaquin; Jimenez, Raul; Martí, Jose

    2012-02-01

    We have performed a cosmological numerical simulation of primordial baryonic gas collapsing on to a 3 × 107 M⊙ dark matter (DM) halo. We show that the large scale baryonic accretion process and the merger of few ˜ 106 M⊙ DM haloes, triggered by the gravitational potential of the biggest halo, are enough to create supersonic (?) shocks and develop a turbulent environment. In this scenario, the post-shocked regions are able to produce both H2 and deuterated H2 molecules very efficiently, reaching maximum abundances of ? and nHD˜ few × 10-6 nH, enough to cool the gas below 100 K in some regions. The kinetic energy spectrum of the turbulent primordial gas is close to a Burgers spectrum, ?, which could favour the formation of low-mass primordial stars. The solenoidal-to-total kinetic energy ratio is 0.65 ≲Rk≲ 0.7 for a wide range of wavenumbers; this value is close to the Rk≈ 2/3 natural equipartition energy value of a random turbulent flow. In this way, turbulence and molecular cooling seem to work together in order to produce potential star formation regions of cold dense gas in primordial environments. We conclude that both the mergers and the collapse process on to the main DM halo provide enough energy to develop supersonic turbulence which favours the molecular coolant formation: this mechanism, which could be universal and the main route towards the formation of the first galaxies, is able to create potential star-forming regions at high redshift.

  5. Velocity centroids as tracers of the turbulent velocity statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A E A

    2004-01-01

    We use the results of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to emulate spectroscopic observations, and produce maps of variations of velocity centroids to study their scaling properties. We compare them with those of the underlying velocity field, and analytic predictions presented in a previous paper (Lazarian & Esquivel 2003). We tested, with success, a criteria for recovering velocity statistics from velocity centroids derived in our previous work. That is, if >> (where S is a 2D map of ``unnormalized'', v velocity, and I integrated intensity map -column density-), then the structure function of the centroids is dominated by the structure function of velocity. We show that it is possible to extract the velocity statistics using centroids for subsonic and mildly supersonic turbulence (e.g. Mach numbers ~2.5). While, towards higher Mach numbers other effects could affect significantly the statistics of centroids.

  6. Turbulence measurements in high-speed wind tunnels using focusing laser differential interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulghum, Matthew R.

    Characterization of freestream disturbances and their effect on laminar boundary layer transition is of great importance in high-speed wind tunnel testing, where significant differences between the behavior of scale-model and free-flight transition have long been noted. However, the methods traditionally used to perform this characterization in low-speed flows present significant difficulties when applied to supersonic and especially hypersonic wind tunnels. The design and theory of a focusing laser differential interferometer (FLDI) instrument, originally invented by Smeets at the Institut Saint-Louis in the 1970s and used recently by Parziale in the CalTech T5 shock tunnel, is presented. It is a relatively-simple, non-imaging common-path interferometer for measuring refractive signals from transition and turbulence, and it has a unique ability to look through facility windows, ignore sidewall boundary-layers and vibration, and concentrate only on the refractive signal near a pair of sharp beam foci in the core flow. The instrument's low cost and ease of implementation make it a promising alternative to traditional hot-wire anemometry and particle-based methods for turbulence characterization. Benchtop experiments using a turbulent supersonic air jet demonstrate its focusing ability, frequency response, unwanted signal rejection, and ease of use. The instrument is used to optically interrogate the flow in the Penn State University Supersonic Wind Tunnel and USAF AEDC Hypervelocity Tunnel 9 for measurement of the overall intensity and spectra of freestream disturbances. Precise characterization of the strength and spectral content of the disturbances provides insight into their nature and potential effect upon boundary layer transition. A special feature of the FLDI instrument used here is the replacement of traditional fixed Wollaston prisms with variable Sanderson prisms for laser-beam separation and recombination.

  7. Unsteady turbulence cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Susumu; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    We have run a total of 311 direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of decaying three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in a periodic box with values of the Taylor length-based Reynolds number up to about 300 and an energy spectrum with a wide wave-number range of close to -5 /3 power-law dependence at the higher Reynolds numbers. On the basis of these runs, we have found a critical time when (i) the rate of change of the square of the integral length scale turns from increasing to decreasing, (ii) the ratio of interscale energy flux to high-pass filtered turbulence dissipation changes from decreasing to very slowly increasing in the inertial range, (iii) the signature of large-scale coherent structures disappears in the energy spectrum, and (iv) the scaling of the turbulence dissipation changes from the one recently discovered in DNSs of forced unsteady turbulence and in wind tunnel experiments of turbulent wakes and grid-generated turbulence to the classical scaling proposed by G. I. Taylor [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 151, 421 (1935), 10.1098/rspa.1935.0158] and A. N. Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 31, 538 (1941)]. Even though the customary theoretical basis for this Taylor-Kolmogorov scaling is a statistically stationary cascade where large-scale energy flux balances dissipation, this is not the case throughout the entire time range of integration in all our DNS runs. The recently discovered dissipation scaling can be reformulated physically as a situation in which the dissipation rates of the small and large scales evolve together. We advance two hypotheses that may form the basis of a theoretical approach to unsteady turbulence cascades in the presence of large-scale coherent structures.

  8. Research of low boom and low drag supersonic aircraft design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xiaoqiang; Li Zhanke; Song Bifeng

    2014-01-01

    Sonic boom reduction will be an issue of utmost importance in future supersonic trans-port, due to strong regulations on acoustic nuisance. The paper describes a new multi-objective optimization method for supersonic aircraft design. The method is developed by coupling Seebass-George-Darden (SGD) inverse design method and multi-objective genetic algorithm. Based on the method, different codes are developed. Using a computational architecture, a concep-tual supersonic aircraft design environment (CSADE) is constructed. The architecture of CSADE includes inner optimization level and out optimization level. The low boom configuration is gener-ated in inner optimization level by matching the target equivalent area distribution and actual equivalent area distribution. And low boom/low drag configuration is generated in outer optimiza-tion level by using NSGA-II multi-objective genetic algorithm to optimize the control parameters of SGD method and aircraft shape. Two objective functions, low sonic boom and low wave drag, are considered in CSADE. Physically reasonable Pareto solutions are obtained from the present optimization. Some supersonic aircraft configurations are selected from Pareto front and the optimization results indicate that the swept forward wing configuration has benefits in both sonic boom reduction and wave drag reduction. The results are validated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis.

  9. Titanium honeycomb structure. [for supersonic aircraft wing structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R. A.; Elrod, S. D.; Lovell, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    A brazed titanium honeycomb sandwich system for supersonic transport wing cover panels provides the most efficient structure spanwise, chordwise, and loadwise. Flutter testing shows that high wing stiffness is most efficient in a sandwich structure. This structure also provides good thermal insulation if liquid fuel is carried in direct contact with the wing structure in integral fuel tanks.

  10. 76 FR 30231 - Civil Supersonic Aircraft Panel Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... for attendees. The purpose of the meeting is to raise public awareness of the continuing technological... joint meeting of the 159th Acoustical Society of America and NOISE-CON 2010 in Baltimore, Maryland 21202. The purpose of these meetings is to raise public awareness on advances in supersonic technology,...

  11. Experimental study of mixing enhancement using pylon in supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Manmohan; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2016-01-01

    The Supersonic Combustion Ramjet (SCRAMJET) engine has been recognized as one of the most promising air breathing propulsion system for the supersonic/hypersonic flight mission requirements. Mixing and combustion of fuel inside scramjet engine is one of the major challenging tasks. In the current study the main focus has been to increase the penetration and mixing of the secondary jet inside the test chamber at supersonic speeds. In view of this, experiments are conducted to evaluate the effect of pylon on the mixing of secondary jet injection into supersonic mainstream flow at Mach 1.65. Two different pylons are investigated and the results are compared with those obtained by normal injection from a flat plate. The mixing studies are performed by varying the height of the pylon while keeping all other parameters the same. The study mainly focused on analyzing the area of spread and penetration depth achieved by different injection schemes based on the respective parameters. The measurements involved Mie scattering visualization and the flow features are analyzed using Schlieren images. The penetration height and spread area are the two parameters that are used for analyzing and comparing the performance of the pylons. It is observed that the secondary jet injection carried out from behind the big pylon resulted in maximum penetration and spread area of the jet as compared to the small pylon geometry. Moreover it is also evident that for obtaining maximum spreading and penetration of the jet, the same needs to be achieved at the injection location.

  12. NASA F-16XL supersonic laminar flow control program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of the NASA supersonic laminar flow control program are provided. Successful application of laminar flow control to a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) offers significant benefits in reductions of take-off gross weight, mission fuel burn, cruise drag, structural temperatures, engine size, emissions, and sonic boom. The ultimate economic success of the proposed HSCT may depend on the successful adaption of laminar flow control, which offers the single most significant potential improvements in lift drag ratio (L/D) of all the aerodynamic technologies under consideration. The F-16XL Supersonic Laminar Flow Control (SLFC) Experiment was conceived based on the encouraging results of in-house and NASA supported industry studies to determine if laminar flow control is feasible for the HSCT. The primary objective is to achieve extensive laminar flow (50-60 percent chord) on a highly swept supersonic wing. Data obtained from the flight test will be used to validate existing Euler and Navier Stokes aerodynamic codes and transition prediction boundary layer stability codes. These validated codes and developed design methodology will be delivered to industry for their use in designing supersonic laminar flow control wings. Results from this experiment will establish preliminary suction system design criteria enabling industry to better size the suction system and develop improved estimates of system weight, fuel volume loss due to wing ducting, turbocompressor power requirements, etc. so that benefits and penalties can be more accurately assessed.

  13. Multiresolution analysis of density fluctuation in supersonic mixing layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Due to the difficulties in measuring supersonic density field, the multiresolution analysis of supersonic mixing layer based on experimental images is still a formidable challenge. By utilizing the recently developed nanoparticle based planar laser scattering method, the density field of a supersonic mixing layer was measured at high spatiotemporal resolution. According to the dynamic behavior of coherent structures, the multiresolution characteristics of density fluctuation signals and density field images were studied based on Taylor’s hypothesis of space-time conversion and wavelet analysis. The wavelet coefficients reflect the characteristics of density fluctuation signals at different scales, and the detailed coefficients reflect the differences of approximation at adjacent levels. The density fluctuation signals of supersonic mixing layer differ from the periodic sine signal and exhibit similarity to the fractal Koch signal. The similarity at different scales reveals the fractal characteristic of mixing layer flowfield. The two-dimensional wavelet decomposition and reconstruction of density field images extract the approximate and detailed signals at different scales, which effectively resolve the characteristic structures of the flowfield at different scales.

  14. Toward Active Control of Noise from Hot Supersonic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    applied a double divergence directly to the incompressible Reynolds stress giving Ö U’UI dxgJ = -£ijk(sijUJk + ryWfc). (1) This neglected...SUPERSONIC JETS | QUARTERLY RPT. 6 ^ EXPERIMENTAL FACILITY j^i;r\\’ii Mo/ P I V • Page 6 • Prev • Wart • Last • Full Screen • Close

  15. Research of low boom and low drag supersonic aircraft design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xiaoqiang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sonic boom reduction will be an issue of utmost importance in future supersonic transport, due to strong regulations on acoustic nuisance. The paper describes a new multi-objective optimization method for supersonic aircraft design. The method is developed by coupling Seebass–George–Darden (SGD inverse design method and multi-objective genetic algorithm. Based on the method, different codes are developed. Using a computational architecture, a conceptual supersonic aircraft design environment (CSADE is constructed. The architecture of CSADE includes inner optimization level and out optimization level. The low boom configuration is generated in inner optimization level by matching the target equivalent area distribution and actual equivalent area distribution. And low boom/low drag configuration is generated in outer optimization level by using NSGA-II multi-objective genetic algorithm to optimize the control parameters of SGD method and aircraft shape. Two objective functions, low sonic boom and low wave drag, are considered in CSADE. Physically reasonable Pareto solutions are obtained from the present optimization. Some supersonic aircraft configurations are selected from Pareto front and the optimization results indicate that the swept forward wing configuration has benefits in both sonic boom reduction and wave drag reduction. The results are validated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD analysis.

  16. High-Fidelity Thermal Radiation Models and Measurements for High-Pressure Reacting Laminar and Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    symbols are for narrow-band database. Colors are black (current version) and red (previous version). radiation in Earth entry applications by Ozawa et al...Carlo simulations in high-temperature gases, J. Heat Transfer (2013), in print. 17. T. Ozawa , M. F. Modest and D. A. Levin, Spectral Module for Photon

  17. Numerical study of aerodynamic characteristics of FSW aircraft with dierent wing positions under supersonic condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Juanmian; Zhao Shuai; Wang Suozhu

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of forward-swept wing (FSW) positions on the aero-dynamic characteristics of aircraft under supersonic condition (Ma=1.5). The numerical method based on Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations, Spalart–Allmaras (S–A) turbu-lence model and implicit algorithm is utilized to simulate the flow field of the aircraft. The aerody-namic parameters and flow field structures of the horizontal tail and the whole aircraft are presented. The results demonstrate that the spanwise flow of FSW flows from the wingtip to the wing root, generating an upper wing surface vortex and a trailing edge vortex nearby the wing root. The vortexes generated by FSW have a strong downwash effect on the tail. The lower the vertical position of FSW, the stronger the downwash effect on tail. Therefore, the effective angle of attack of tail becomes smaller. In addition, the lift coefficient, drag coefficient and lift–drag ratio of tail decrease, and the center of pressure of tail moves backward gradually. For the whole aircraft, the lower the vertical position of FSW, the smaller lift, drag and center of pressure coefficients of aircraft. The closer the FSW moves towards tail, the bigger pitching moment and center of pres-sure coefficients of the whole aircraft, but the lift and drag characteristics of the horizontal tail and the whole aircraft are basically unchanged. The results have potential application for the design of new concept aircraft.

  18. Simulation and stability analysis of supersonic impinging jet noise with microjet control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Nathaniel; Nichols, Joseph W.

    2014-11-01

    A model for an ideally expanded 1.5 Mach turbulent jet impinging on a flat plate using unstructured high-fidelity large eddy simulations (LES) and hydrodynamic stability analysis is presented. Note the LES configuration conforms exactly to experiments performed at the STOVL supersonic jet facility of the Florida Center for Advanced Aero-Propulsion allowing validation against experimental measurements. The LES are repeated for different nozzle-wall separation distances as well as with and without the addition of sixteen microjets positioned uniformly around the nozzle lip. For some nozzle-wall distances, but not all, the microjets result in substantial noise reduction. Observations of substantial noise reduction are associated with a relative absence of large-scale coherent vortices in the jet shear layer. To better understand and predict the effectiveness of microjet noise control, the application of global stability analysis about LES mean fields is used to extract axisymmetric and helical instability modes connected to the complex interplay between the coherent vortices, shocks, and acoustic feedback. We gratefully acknowledge computational resources provided by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility.

  19. A computational study of supersonic combustion behind a wedge-shaped flameholder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fureby, C.; Fedina, E.; Tegnér, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, large eddy simulation (LES) has been used to examine supersonic flow, mixing, self-ignition and combustion in a model scramjet combustor and has been compared against the experimental data. The LES model is based on an unstructured finite-volume discretization, using monotonicity-preserving flux reconstruction of the filtered mass, momentum, species and energy equations. Both a two-step and a seven-step hydrogen-air mechanism are used to describe the chemical reactions. Additional comparisons are made with results from a previously presented flamelet model. The subgrid flow terms are modeled using a mixed model, whereas the subgrid turbulence-chemistry interaction terms are modeled using the partially stirred reactor model. Simulations are carried out on a scramjet model experimentally studied at Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt consisting of a one-sided divergent channel with a wedge-shaped flame holder at the base of which hydrogen is injected. The LES predictions are compared with experimental data for velocity, temperature, wall pressure at different cross sections as well as schlieren images, showing good agreement for both first- and second-order statistics. In addition, the LES results are used to illustrate and explain the intrinsic flow, and mixing and combustion features of this combustor.

  20. Impact of chevron spacing and asymmetric distribution on supersonic jet acoustics and flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeb, N.; Gutmark, E.; Kailasanath, K.

    2016-05-01

    An experimental investigation into the effect of chevron spacing and distribution on supersonic jets was performed. Cross-stream and streamwise particle imaging velocimetry measurements were used to relate flow field modification to sound field changes measured by far-field microphones in the overexpanded, ideally expanded, and underexpanded regimes. Drastic modification of the jet cross-section was achieved by the investigated configurations, with both elliptic and triangular shapes attained downstream. Consequently, screech was nearly eliminated with reductions in the range of 10-25 dB depending on the operating condition. Analysis of the streamwise velocity indicated that both the mean shock spacing and strength were reduced resulting in an increase in the broadband shock associated noise spectral peak frequency and a reduction in the amplitude, respectively. Maximum broadband shock associated noise amplitude reductions were in the 5-7 dB range. Chevron proximity was found to be the primary driver of peak vorticity production, though persistence followed the opposite trend. The integrated streamwise vorticity modulus was found to be correlated with peak large scale turbulent mixing noise reduction, though optimal overall sound pressure level reductions did not necessarily follow due to the shock/fine scale mixing noise sources. Optimal large scale mixing noise reductions were in the 5-6 dB range.

  1. Modernized scheme of thermal ignition and flame stabilization at flow supersonic speeds in channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfeld, M. A.; Nalivaychenko, D. G.; Starov, A. V.; Timofeev, K. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    For providing fuel ignition at the high supersonic flow velocity original device was developed. Main element of this device in the form of wall slotted channel has to provide the high flow temperature in the area of mixture. Numerical simulation has been performed based on solving the full averaged Navier-Stokes equations, supplemented k-ɛ turbulence model. The experiments were carried out in the hotshot wind tunnel IT-302M at the mode of the attached pipe. The flow parameters at the model entrance were following: M = 2 - 5.8, p0 = 12 - 390bar, T0 = 1170 - 2930K at equivalence ratio of hydrogen from 0.6 to 1.1. Self-ignition of the hydrogen in the slotted channel has occurred at total flow temperature of 2250K at the combustor entrance. The combustion process is extended to the entire channel of the combustor. When the facility worked with decreasing parameters of the flow, combustion continued until drop of the static temperature of about 230K at the entrance of the combustor.

  2. Transonic Investigation of Two-Dimensional Nozzles Designed for Supersonic Cruise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Francis J.; Deere, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation has been conducted to determine the off-design uninstalled drag characteristics of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle designed for a supersonic cruise civil transport. The overall objectives were to: (1) determine the effects of nozzle external flap curvature and sidewall boattail variations on boattail drag; (2) develop an experimental data base for 2D nozzles with long divergent flaps and small boattail angles and (3) provide data for correlating computational fluid dynamic predictions of nozzle boattail drag. The experimental investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.80 to 1.20 at nozzle pressure ratios up to 9. Three-dimensional simulations of nozzle performance were obtained with the computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D using turbulence closure and nonlinear Reynolds stress modeling. The results of this investigation indicate that excellent correlation between experimental and predicted results was obtained for the nozzle with a moderate amount of boattail curvature. The nozzle with an external flap having a sharp shoulder (no curvature) had the lowest nozzle pressure drag. At a Mach number of 1.2, sidewall pressure drag doubled as sidewall boattail angle was increased from 4deg to 8deg. Reducing the height of the sidewall caused large decreases in both the sidewall and flap pressure drags. Summary

  3. Hypersonic Engine Leading Edge Experiments in a High Heat Flux, Supersonic Flow Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1994-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Three aerothermal load related concerns are the boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow, articulating panel seals in high temperature environments, and strut (or cowl) leading edges with shock-on-shock interactions. A multidisciplinary approach is required to address these technical concerns. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to experimentally evaluate the heat transfer and structural response of the strut (or cowl) leading edge. A recent experimental program conducted in this facility is discussed and related to cooling technology capability. The specific objective of the experiment discussed is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Heat transfer analyses of a similar leading edge concept cooled with gaseous hydrogen is included to demonstrate the complexity of the problem resulting from plastic deformation of the structures. Macro-photographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight.

  4. Turbulence measurements in a transonic boundary layer and free-shear flow using laser velocimetry and hot-wire anemometry techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. A.; Rose, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the turbulence fluctuations in velocity and mass flux have been obtained in Mach 0.6 and 0.8 turbulent boundary layer and free-shear layer flows by laser velocimetry and hot-wire anemometry techniques. To evaluate the effects of compressibility, these transonic data are compared to available incompressible and supersonic results. Based on some simplifying assumptions, estimates of the rms density fluctuations are made for which error bounds are given. In addition to these fluctuation data, the compressible mean velocity data obtained with the laser velocimeter are presented and compared to pitot tube results. The investigation was conducted in the Ames 6- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at free-stream Mach numbers of 0.6 and 0.8 for a unit Reynolds number of about 10,000,000 per meter.

  5. Turbulence in Natural Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tirtha

    Problems in the area of land/biosphere-atmosphere interaction, hydrology, climate modeling etc. can be systematically organized as a study of turbulent flow in presence of boundary conditions in an increasing order of complexity. The present work is an attempt to study a few subsets of this general problem of turbulence in natural environments- in the context of neutral and thermally stratified atmospheric surface layer, the presence of a heterogeneous vegetation canopy and the interaction between air flow and a static water body in presence of flexible protruding vegetation. The main issue addressed in the context of turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer is whether it is possible to describe the macro-states of turbulence such as mean velocity and turbulent velocity variance in terms of the micro-states of the turbulent flow, i.e., a distribution of turbulent kinetic energy across a multitude of scales. This has been achieved by a `spectral budget approach' which is extended for thermal stratification scenarios as well, in the process unifying the seemingly different and unrelated theories of turbulence such as Kolmogorov's hypothesis, Heisenberg's eddy viscosity, Monin Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) etc. under a common framework. In the case of a more complex scenario such as presence of a vegetation canopy with edges and gaps, the question that is addressed is in what detail the turbulence is needed to be resolved in order to capture the bulk flow features such as recirculation patterns. This issue is addressed by a simple numerical framework and it has been found out that an explicit prescription of turbulence is not necessary in presence of heterogeneities such as edges and gaps where the interplay between advection, pressure gradients and drag forces are sufficient to capture the first order dynamics. This result can be very important for eddy-covariance flux calibration strategies in non-ideal environments and the developed numerical model can be

  6. Non-Gaussian PDF Modeling of Turbulent Boundary Layer Fluctuating Pressure Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinwolf, Alexander; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate properties of the probability density function (PDF) of turbulent boundary layer fluctuating pressures measured on the exterior of a supersonic transport aircraft. It is shown that fluctuating pressure PDFs differ from the Gaussian distribution even for surface conditions having no significant discontinuities. The PDF tails are wider and longer than those of the Gaussian model. For pressure fluctuations upstream of forward-facing step discontinuities and downstream of aft-facing step discontinuities, deviations from the Gaussian model are more significant and the PDFs become asymmetrical. Various analytical PDF distributions are used and further developed to model this behavior.

  7. Turbulent complex (dusty) plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Sergey; Schwabe, Mierk

    2017-04-01

    As a paradigm of complex system dynamics, solid particles immersed into a weakly ionized plasma, so called complex (dusty) plasmas, were (and continue to be) a subject of many detailed studies. Special types of dynamical activity have been registered, in particular, spontaneous pairing, entanglement and cooperative action of a great number of particles resulting in formation of vortices, self-propelling, tunneling, and turbulent movements. In the size domain of 1-10 mkm normally used in experiments with complex plasmas, the characteristic dynamic time-scale is of the order of 0.01-0.1 s, and these particles can be visualized individually in real time, providing an atomistic (kinetic) level of investigations. The low-R turbulent flow induced either by the instability in a complex plasma cloud or formed behind a projectile passing through the cloud is a typical scenario. Our simulations showed formation of a fully developed system of vortices and demonstrated that the velocity structure functions scale very close to the theoretical predictions. As an important element of self-organization, cooperative and turbulent particle motions are present in many physical, astrophysical, and biological systems. Therefore, experiments with turbulent wakes and turbulent complex plasma oscillations are a promising mean to observe and study in detail the anomalous transport on the level of individual particles.

  8. Turbulence and Stochastic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celani, Antonio; Mazzino, Andrea; Pumir, Alain

    sec:08-1In 1931 the monograph Analytical Methods in Probability Theory appeared, in which A.N. Kolmogorov laid the foundations for the modern theory of Markov processes [1]. According to Gnedenko: "In the history of probability theory it is difficult to find other works that changed the established points of view and basic trends in research work in such a decisive way". Ten years later, his article on fully developed turbulence provided the framework within which most, if not all, of the subsequent theoretical investigations have been conducted [2] (see e.g. the review by Biferale et al. in this volume [3]. Remarkably, the greatest advances made in the last few years towards a thorough understanding of turbulence developed from the successful marriage between the theory of stochastic processes and the phenomenology of turbulent transport of scalar fields. In this article we will summarize these recent developments which expose the direct link between the intermittency of transported fields and the statistical properties of particle trajectories advected by the turbulent flow (see also [4], and, for a more thorough review, [5]. We also discuss the perspectives of the Lagrangian approach beyond passive scalars, especially for the modeling of hydrodynamic turbulence.

  9. Turbulence introduction to theory and applications of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Westerweel, Jerry; Nieuwstadt, Frans T M

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a general introduction to the topic of turbulent flows. Apart from classical topics in turbulence, attention is also paid to modern topics. After studying this work, the reader will have the basic knowledge to follow current topics on turbulence in scientific literature. The theory is illustrated with a number of examples of applications, such as closure models, numerical simulations and turbulent diffusion, and experimental findings. The work also contains a number of illustrative exercises.

  10. Thermal Design and Analysis of the Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test Vehicle for the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropietro, A. J.; Pauken, Michael; Sunada, Eric; Gray, Sandria

    2013-01-01

    The thermal design and analysis of the experimental Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) vehicle is presented. The SFDT vehicle is currently being designed as a platform to help demonstrate key technologies for NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project. The LDSD project is charged by NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) with the task of advancing the state of the art in Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems by developing and testing three new technologies required for landing heavier payloads on Mars. The enabling technologies under development consist of a large 33.5 meter diameter Supersonic Ringsail (SSRS) parachute and two different types of Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) devices - a robotic class, SIAD-R, that inflates to a 6 meter diameter torus, and an exploration class, SIAD-E, that inflates to an 8 meter diameter isotensoid. As part of the technology development effort, the various elements of the new supersonic decelerator system must be tested in a Mars-like environment. This is currently planned to be accomplished by sending a series of SFDT vehicles into Earth's stratosphere. Each SFDT vehicle will be lifted to a stable float altitude by a large helium carrier balloon. Once at altitude, the SFDT vehicles will be released from their carrier balloon and spun up via spin motors to provide trajectory stability. An onboard third stage solid rocket motor will propel each test vehicle to supersonic flight in the upper atmosphere. After main engine burnout, each vehicle will be despun and testing of the deceleration system will begin: first an inflatable decelerator will be deployed around the aeroshell to increase the drag surface area, and then the large parachute will be deployed to continue the deceleration and return the vehicle back to the Earth's surface. The SFDT vehicle thermal system must passively protect the vehicle structure and its components from cold temperatures experienced during the

  11. Teens impulsively react rather than retreat from threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfuss, Michael; Caudle, Kristina; Drysdale, Andrew T; Johnston, Natalie E; Cohen, Alexandra O; Somerville, Leah H; Galván, Adriana; Tottenham, Nim; Hare, Todd A; Casey, B J

    2014-01-01

    There is a significant inflection in risk taking and criminal behavior during adolescence, but the basis for this increase remains largely unknown. An increased sensitivity to rewards has been suggested to explain these behaviors, yet juvenile offences often occur in emotionally charged situations of negative valence. How behavior is altered by changes in negative emotional processes during adolescence has received less attention than changes in positive emotional processes. The current study uses a measure of impulsivity in combination with cues that signal threat or safety to assess developmental changes in emotional responses to threat cues. We show that adolescents, especially males, impulsively react to threat cues relative to neutral ones more than adults or children, even when instructed not to respond. This adolescent-specific behavioral pattern is paralleled by enhanced activity in limbic cortical regions implicated in the detection and assignment of emotional value to inputs and in the subsequent regulation of responses to them when successfully suppressing impulsive responses to threat cues. In contrast, prefrontal control regions implicated in detecting and resolving competing responses show an adolescent-emergent pattern (i.e. greater activity in adolescents and adults relative to children) during successful suppression of a response regardless of emotion. Our findings suggest that adolescence is a period of heightened sensitivity to social and emotional cues that results in diminished regulation of behavior in their presence. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Adjoint based sensitivity analysis of a reacting jet in crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashittal, Palash; Sayadi, Taraneh; Schmid, Peter

    2016-11-01

    With current advances in computational resources, high fidelity simulations of reactive flows are increasingly being used as predictive tools in various industrial applications. In order to capture the combustion process accurately, detailed/reduced chemical mechanisms are employed, which in turn rely on various model parameters. Therefore, it would be of great interest to quantify the sensitivities of the predictions with respect to the introduced models. Due to the high dimensionality of the parameter space, methods such as finite differences which rely on multiple forward simulations prove to be very costly and adjoint based techniques are a suitable alternative. The complex nature of the governing equations, however, renders an efficient strategy in finding the adjoint equations a challenging task. In this study, we employ the modular approach of Fosas de Pando et al. (2012), to build a discrete adjoint framework applied to a reacting jet in crossflow. The developed framework is then used to extract the sensitivity of the integrated heat release with respect to the existing combustion parameters. Analyzing the sensitivities in the three-dimensional domain provides insight towards the specific regions of the flow that are more susceptible to the choice of the model.

  13. Dynamic Load Balancing Strategies for Parallel Reacting Flow Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisciuneri, Patrick; Meneses, Esteban; Givi, Peyman

    2014-11-01

    Load balancing in parallel computing aims at distributing the work as evenly as possible among the processors. This is a critical issue in the performance of parallel, time accurate, flow simulators. The constraint of time accuracy requires that all processes must be finished with their calculation for a given time step before any process can begin calculation of the next time step. Thus, an irregularly balanced compute load will result in idle time for many processes for each iteration and thus increased walltimes for calculations. Two existing, dynamic load balancing approaches are applied to the simplified case of a partially stirred reactor for methane combustion. The first is Zoltan, a parallel partitioning, load balancing, and data management library developed at the Sandia National Laboratories. The second is Charm++, which is its own machine independent parallel programming system developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The performance of these two approaches is compared, and the prospects for their application to full 3D, reacting flow solvers is assessed.

  14. 9519 biotite granodiorite reacted in a temperature gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, R.W.; Bayhurst, G.K.

    1980-10-01

    A biotite granodiorite from the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal system was reacted in a controlled temperature gradient with initially distilled water for 60d. Polished rock prisms were located in the gradient at 72, 119, 161, 209, 270, and 310/sup 0/C. Scanning electron microscope and microprobe analyses show the appearance of secondary phases: Ca-montmorillonite at 72/sup 0/C and 119/sup 0/C; zeolite, either stilbite or heulandite, at 161/sup 0/C; and another zeolite, thomsonite, at higher temperatures. Solution analyses show a steady state equilibrium exists between solution and overgrowths after about 2 weeks of reaction. The chemographic relations for the system are explored in some detail indicating the divariant assemblages may be placed in a reasonable sequence in intensive variable space. These relations predict high and low temperature effects not directly observed experimentally as well as relevant univariant equilibria. Solution chemistry indicates the Na-Ca-K geothermometer more adequately predicts temperature in this system than does the silica geothermometer.

  15. CERN reacts to increased costs to completion of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Aspects of LHC construction. The CERN Council, where the representatives of the 20 Member States of the Organization decide on scientific programmes and financial resources, held its 120th session on 14 December under the chairmanship of Prof. Maurice Bourquin (CH). CERN adjusts to the LHC Director-General, Luciano Maiani, stressed that CERN was now fully engaged in the LHC and outlined the first moves to react to the increased cost to completion of the LHC. The new accelerator is an extremely complex, high-tech project which CERN is building under very severe conditions. However, the technical challenges are solved and industrial production of accelerator elements, and installation are starting. Professor Maiani said that 2001 had been a very hard but decisive year for CERN. An important milestone had been passed during this meeting with the approval of the LHC dipole magnets contract, the last major contract for the accelerator. The new costs to completion of the LHC project are now clear. A first propos...

  16. Measurements and Modeling of the Mean and Turbulent Flow Structure in High-Speed Rough-Wall Non-Equilibrium Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    transverse velocity and density fluctuations ( /v uρ ρ′ ′ ), directly measured by combining the response from hot - wire anemometry with laser Doppler...R., “Combined Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Cross- Wire Anemometry Analysis for Supersonic Turbulent Flow,” AIAA Journal, Vol. 34, 1996, pp. 2269...Mechanics Reviews, Vol. 44, Jan. 1991, pp. 1-25. Robinson, S., Seegmiller, H., and Kussoy, M., “ Hot - Wire and Laser Doppler Anemometer Measurements

  17. Turbulence in complex terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Jakob [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmosheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a model of the spectral velocity-tensor in neutral flow over complex terrain. The resulting equations are implemented in a computer code using the mean flow generated by a linear mean flow model as input. It estimates turbulence structure over hills (except on the lee side if recirculation is present) in the so-called outer layer and also models the changes in turbulence statistics in the vicinity roughness changes. The generated turbulence fields are suitable as input for dynamic load calculations on wind turbines and other tall structures and is under implementation in the collection of programs called WA{sup s}P Engineering. (au) EFP-97; EU-JOULE-3. 15 refs.

  18. Turbulent black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids.

  19. Turbulence in the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Falceta-Goncalves, D; Falgarone, E; Chian, A C -L

    2014-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in the insterstellar medium and plays a major role in several processes such as the formation of dense structures and stars, the stability of molecular clouds, the amplification of magnetic fields, and the re-acceleration and diffusion of cosmic rays. Despite its importance, interstellar turbulence, alike turbulence in general, is far from being fully understood. In this review we present the basics of turbulence physics, focusing on the statistics of its structure and energy cascade. We explore the physics of compressible and incompressible turbulent flows, as well as magnetized cases. The most relevant observational techniques that provide quantitative insights of interstellar turbulence are also presented. We also discuss the main difficulties in developing a three-dimensional view of interstellar turbulence from these observations. Finally, we briefly present what could be the the main sources of turbulence in the interstellar medium.

  20. Vertical structure and turbulent saturation level in fully radiative protoplanetary disc models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaig, M.; Kley, W.; Kissmann, R.

    2010-12-01

    We investigate a massive (Sigma ~ 10 000 g cm-2 at 1 au) protoplanetary disc model by means of 3D radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The vertical structure of the disc is determined self-consistently by a balance between turbulent heating caused by the magnetorotational turbulence and radiative cooling. Concerning the vertical structure, two different regions can be distinguished: a gas-pressure-dominated, optically thick mid-plane region where most of the dissipation takes place, and a magnetically dominated, optically thin corona which is dominated by strong shocks. At the location of the photosphere, the turbulence is supersonic (M ~ 2), which is consistent with previous results obtained from the fitting of spectra of young stellar objects. It is known that the turbulent saturation level in simulations of MRI-induced turbulence does depend on numerical factors such as the numerical resolution and the box size. However, by performing a suite of runs at different resolutions (using up to 64 x 128 x 512 grid cells) and with varying box sizes (with up to 16 pressure scaleheights in the vertical direction), we find that both the saturation levels and the heating rates show a clear trend to converge once a sufficient resolution in the vertical direction has been achieved.

  1. Turbulence Measurements in Swirling Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Domkundwar

    1981-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigation have been conducted to find out the region of high turbulent intensities in a swirling jet passing through a divergent passage. A hot wire anemometer is used to measure the turbulence intensity using a four position method. It has been concluded that the jet spreads with increasing diffuser angle and the region of high turbulent intensity also spreads. The high turbulence intensity region lies around the recirculation zone and it decays rapidly along the main flow direction.

  2. Joint Agency Turbulence Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-21

    Time Series of Aircraft Longitudinal Gust Data For Penetration 1 on 1 July 1981 63 C5. Time Series of Turbulence Severity Estimates Derived From 400 m...spectral analysis of aircraft longitudinal gust data is shown in Figure B1. Figure B2 shows a modeled turbulence field. The model displays the expected...centered about Location C o %-. -. °,4 0- S E - oo -12 -4 - to 20 so O so s 7D -U. TIME (sec) Figure C4. Time Series of Aircraft Longitudinal Gust Data

  3. Time-resolved schlieren POD and aft deck pressure correlations on a rectangular supersonic nozzle and sonic wall jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Matthew; Magstadt, Andrew; Stack, Cory; Gaitonde, Datta; Glauser, Mark

    2016-11-01

    A multi-stream single expansion ramp nozzle (SERN) with aft deck, based on three-stream engine concepts, is currently undergoing experimental tests at Syracuse University's Skytop Turbulence Laboratory. In the context of this study, we view this as an idealized representation consisting of two canonical flows; a supersonic convergent-divergent (CD) nozzle and a sonic wall jet (representing the 3rd stream). The jet operates at a bulk flow of Mj , 1 = 1 . 6 and wall jet Mj , 3 = 1 . 0 . Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is then performed on the schlieren images and the time-dependent coefficients are related to the near-field deck pressure. Structures within the flow field are correlated to particular flow events and help track the downstream evolution of the jet. A multitude of scales are seen within the flow corresponding to a wide range of coherent structures. High fidelity LES is also performed on the same nozzle geometry and relations are made back to the experiments. AFOSR Turbulence and Transition Program (Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0435) with program managers Dr. I. Leyva and Dr. R. Ponnappan.

  4. Incorporation of SemiSpan SuperSonic Transport (S4T) Aeroservoelastic Models into SAREC-ASV Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christhilf, David M.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Stevens, William L.

    2010-01-01

    The Simulink-based Simulation Architecture for Evaluating Controls for Aerospace Vehicles (SAREC-ASV) was modified to incorporate linear models representing aeroservoelastic characteristics of the SemiSpan SuperSonic Transport (S4T) wind-tunnel model. The S4T planform is for a Technology Concept Aircraft (TCA) design from the 1990s. The model has three control surfaces and is instrumented with accelerometers and strain gauges. Control laws developed for wind-tunnel testing for Ride Quality Enhancement, Gust Load Alleviation, and Flutter Suppression System functions were implemented in the simulation. The simulation models open- and closed-loop response to turbulence and to control excitation. It provides time histories for closed-loop stable conditions above the open-loop flutter boundary. The simulation is useful for assessing the potential impact of closed-loop control rate and position saturation. It also provides a means to assess fidelity of system identification procedures by providing time histories for a known plant model, with and without unmeasured turbulence as a disturbance. Sets of linear models representing different Mach number and dynamic pressure conditions were implemented as MATLAB Linear Time Invariant (LTI) objects. Configuration changes were implemented by selecting which LTI object to use in a Simulink template block. A limited comparison of simulation versus wind-tunnel results is shown.

  5. Localized turbulence in pipe flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuik, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis the transition to turbulence in pipe flow is investigated. At low Reynolds numbers, the flow returns to the laminar state spontaneously. At high Reynolds number a small perturbation causes the flow to suddenly become turbulent. In the intermediate regime localized turbulence is observ

  6. Turbulent diffusion and galactic magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2009-01-01

    Using the test-field method for nearly irrotational turbulence driven by spherical expansion waves it is shown that the turbulent magnetic diffusivity increases with magnetic Reynolds numbers. Its value levels off at several times the rms velocity of the turbulence multiplied by the typical radius of the expansion waves. This result is discussed in the context of the galactic mean-field dynamo.

  7. Applications of turbulent and multi-phase combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Kuo, Kenneth Kuan-yun

    2012-01-01

    A hands-on, integrated approach to solving combustion problems in diverse areas An understanding of turbulence, combustion, and multiphase reacting flows is essential for engineers and scientists in many industries, including power genera-tion, jet and rocket propulsion, pollution control, fire prevention and safety, and material processing. This book offers a highly practical discussion of burning behavior and chemical processes occurring in diverse materials, arming readers with the tools they need to solve the most complex combustion problems facing the scientific community today. The

  8. Experimental Study of Turbulent Mixing and Selectivity of Competing Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    expressions available in a standard text ( Levenspiel , 1962): cA cA k2/k1 cA ( R 1-k/k (4) 2- 1 AO CAO and CB = CBO - 2 (CAo - CA) + CR (5) Once again...117 Lee, J. and R. S. Brodkey. "Light Probe for the Measurement of Turbulent Fluctuations." Rev. Sci. Instr., 34, 1086 (1963). - Levenspiel , 0...44, 255 (1966). Spielman, L. A. and 0. A. Levenspiel . "A Monte Carlo Treatment for Reacting and Coalescing Dispersed Phase Systems." Chem. Eng. Sci

  9. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Vitiated Air Effects on Hydrogen-fueled Supersonic Combustor Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Feiteng; SONG Wenyan; ZHANG Zhiqiang; LI Weiqiang; LI Jianping

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the vitiation effects of test air on the scramjet performance in the ground combustion heated facilities.The primary goal is to evaluate the effects of H2O and CO2,the two major vitiated species generated by combustion heater,on hydrogen-fueled supersonic combustor performance with experimental and numerical approaches.The comparative experiments in the clean air and vitiated air are conducted by using the resistance heated direct-connected facility,with the typical Mach 4 flight conditions simulated.The H2O and CO2 species with accurately controlled contents are added to the high enthalpy clean air from resistance heater,to synthesize the vitiated air of a combustion-type heater.Typically,the contents of H2O species can be varied within the range of 3.5%-30o% by mole,and 3.0%-10% for CO2 species.The total temperature,total pressure,Mach number and O2 mole fraction at the combustor entrance are well-matched between the clean air and vitiated air.The combustion experiments are completed at the fuel equivalence ratios of 0.53 and 0.42 respectively.Furthermore,three-dimensional (3D) reacting flow simulations of combustor towpath are performed to provide insight into flow field structures and combustion chemistry details that cannot resolved by experimental instruments available.Finally,the experimental data,combined with computational results,are employed to analyze the effects of H2O and CO2 vitiated air on supersonic combustion characteristics and performance.It is concluded that H2O and CO2 contaminants can significantly inhibit the combustion induced pressure rise measured from combustor wall,and the pressure profile decreases with the increasing H2O and CO2 contents in nonlinear trend;simulation results agree well with experimental data and the overall vitiation effects are captured; direct extrapolation of the results from vitiated air to predict the performance of actual flight conditions could result in over-fueling the combustor

  10. Turbulence-flame interactions in DNS of a laboratory high Karlovitz premixed turbulent jet flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiou; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a laboratory premixed turbulent jet flame was performed to study turbulence-flame interactions. The turbulent flame features moderate Reynolds number and high Karlovitz number (Ka). The orientations of the flame normal vector n, the vorticity vector ω and the principal strain rate eigenvectors ei are examined. The in-plane and out-of-plane angles are introduced to quantify the vector orientations, which also measure the flame geometry and the vortical structures. A general observation is that the distributions of these angles are more isotropic downstream as the flame and the flow become more developed. The out-of-plane angle of the flame normal vector, β, is a key parameter in developing the correction of 2D measurements to estimate the corresponding 3D quantities. The DNS results show that the correction factor is unity at the inlet and approaches its theoretical value of an isotropic distribution downstream. The alignment characteristics of n, ω and ei, which reflect the interactions of turbulence and flame, are also studied. Similar to a passive scalar gradient in non-reacting flows, the flame normal has a tendency to align with the most compressive strain rate, e3, in the flame, indicating that turbulence contributes to the production of scalar gradient. The vorticity dynamics are examined via the vortex stretching term, which was found to be the predominant source of vorticity generation balanced by dissipation, in the enstrophy transport equation. It is found that although the vorticity preferentially aligns with the intermediate strain rate, e2, the contribution of the most extensive strain rate, e1, to vortex stretching is comparable with that of the intermediate strain rate, e2. This is because the eigenvalue of the most extensive strain rate, λ1, is always large and positive. It is confirmed that the vorticity vector is preferentially positioned along the flame tangential plane, contributing

  11. Turbulence, bubbles and drops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der Roeland Cornelis Adriaan

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, several questions related to drop impact and Taylor-Couette turbulence are answered. The deformation of a drop just before impact can cause a bubble to be entrapped. For many applications, such as inkjet printing, it is crucial to control the size of this entrapped bubble. To study t

  12. Multilevel turbulence simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tziperman, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The authors propose a novel method for the simulation of turbulent flows, that is motivated by and based on the Multigrid (MG) formalism. The method, called Multilevel Turbulence Simulations (MTS), is potentially more efficient and more accurate than LES. In many physical problems one is interested in the effects of the small scales on the larger ones, or in a typical realization of the flow, and not in the detailed time history of each small scale feature. MTS takes advantage of the fact that the detailed simulation of small scales is not needed at all times, in order to make the calculation significantly more efficient, while accurately accounting for the effects of the small scales on the larger scale of interest. In MTS, models of several resolutions are used to represent the turbulent flow. The model equations in each coarse level incorporate a closure term roughly corresponding to the tau correction in the MG formalism that accounts for the effects of the unresolvable scales on that grid. The finer resolution grids are used only a small portion of the simulation time in order to evaluate the closure terms for the coarser grids, while the coarse resolution grids are then used to accurately and efficiently calculate the evolution of the larger scales. The methods efficiency relative to direct simulations is of the order of the ratio of required integration time to the smallest eddies turnover time, potentially resulting in orders of magnitude improvement for a large class of turbulence problems.

  13. Spirituality in Turbulent Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Margaret J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of spiritual leadership in turbulent, uncertain times. Describes several spiritual principles--for example, life is cyclical; all life is interconnected. Offers six suggestions for personal health: Start day peacefully, learn to be mindful, slow things down, create own measures, expect surprise, practice gratefulness. (PKP)

  14. Incremental Similarity and Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.; Hedevang, Emil; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    This paper discusses the mathematical representation of an empirically observed phenomenon, referred to as Incremental Similarity. We discuss this feature from the viewpoint of stochastic processes and present a variety of non-trivial examples, including those that are of relevance for turbulence...

  15. Non-Gaussian turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højstrup, Jørgen; Hansen, Kurt S.; Pedersen, Bo Juul;

    1999-01-01

    The pdf's of atmosperic turbulence have somewhat wider tails than a Gaussian, especially regarding accelerations, whereas velocities are close to Gaussian. This behaviour has been investigated using data from a large WEB-database in order to quantify the amount of non-gaussianity. Models for non-...

  16. Heart rate turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death. © 2013.

  17. On the role of supernovae-driven turbulence in the feeding of supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, Alexander; Power, Chris; King, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    It has long been recognised that the main obstacle to accretion of gas onto supermassive black holes (SMBHs) is large specific angular momentum. However, while the mean angular momentum in the bulge is very likely to be large, the deviations from the mean can also be significant. Indeed, inside bulges the gas velocity distribution can be randomised by the velocity kicks due to feedback from star formation. Here we perform hydrodynamical simulations of gaseous rotating shells infalling onto an SMBH, attempting to quantify the importance of velocity dispersion in the gas at relatively large distances from the black hole. We implement this dispersion by means of a supersonic turbulent velocity spectrum. We find that, while in the purely rotating case the circularisation process leads to efficient mixing of gas with different angular momentum, resulting in a low accretion rate, the inclusion of turbulence increases this accretion rate by up to several orders of magnitude. We show that this can be understood based...

  18. Evaluation of Full Reynolds Stress Turbulence Models in FUN3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Julianne C.; Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2017-01-01

    Full seven-equation Reynolds stress turbulence models are a relatively new and promising tool for todays aerospace technology challenges. This paper uses two stress-omega full Reynolds stress models to evaluate challenging flows including shock-wave boundary layer interactions, separation and mixing layers. The Wilcox and the SSG/LRR full second-moment Reynolds stress models have been implemented into the FUN3D (Fully Unstructured Navier-Stokes Three Dimensional) unstructured Navier-Stokes code and are evaluated for four problems: a transonic two-dimensional diffuser, a supersonic axisymmetric compression corner, a compressible planar shear layer, and a subsonic axisymmetric jet. Simulation results are compared with experimental data and results using the more commonly used Spalart-Allmaras (SA) one-equation and the Menter Shear Stress Transport (SST-V) two-equation turbulence models.

  19. The role of turbulence in coronal heating and solar wind expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R; Asgari-Targhi, Mahboubeh; Miralles, Mari Paz; Raymond, John C; Strachan, Leonard; Tian, Hui; Woolsey, Lauren N

    2015-05-13

    Plasma in the Sun's hot corona expands into the heliosphere as a supersonic and highly magnetized solar wind. This paper provides an overview of our current understanding of how the corona is heated and how the solar wind is accelerated. Recent models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence have progressed to the point of successfully predicting many observed properties of this complex, multi-scale system. However, it is not clear whether the heating in open-field regions comes mainly from the dissipation of turbulent fluctuations that are launched from the solar surface, or whether the chaotic 'magnetic carpet' in the low corona energizes the system via magnetic reconnection. To help pin down the physics, we also review some key observational results from ultraviolet spectroscopy of the collisionless outer corona.

  20. Analysis of turbulent boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of Turbulent Boundary Layers focuses on turbulent flows meeting the requirements for the boundary-layer or thin-shear-layer approximations. Its approach is devising relatively fundamental, and often subtle, empirical engineering correlations, which are then introduced into various forms of describing equations for final solution. After introducing the topic on turbulence, the book examines the conservation equations for compressible turbulent flows, boundary-layer equations, and general behavior of turbulent boundary layers. The latter chapters describe the CS method for calculati