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Sample records for supersonic laminar boundary

  1. Investigation of Shock-Induced Laminar Separation Bubble in a Supersonic Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasubramanian, Jayahar; Fasel, Hermann

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between an impinging oblique shock and a laminar boundary-layer on a flat plate is investigated using DNS. In particular, the two-dimensional separation bubble resulting from the shock/boundary-layer interaction (SBLI) at freestream Mach number of 2.0 is investigated in detail. The flow parameters used for the present investigation match the laboratory conditions in the experiments by Hakkinen et al. The skin friction and pressure distribution from the simulations are compared to the experimental measurements and numerical results available in the literature. Our results confirm the asymmetric nature of the separation bubble as reported in the literature. In addition to the steady flow field calculations, the response to low-amplitude disturbances is investigated in order to study the linear stability behavior of the separation bubble. For comparison, both the development of two-dimensional and three-dimensional (oblique) disturbances are studied with and without the impinging oblique shock. Furthermore, the effects of the shock incidence angle and Reynolds number are also investigated. Finally, three-dimensional simulations were performed in order to explore the laminar-turbulent transition process in the presence of a laminar separation bubble. Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under grant FA9550-14-1-0195.

  2. NASA F-16XL supersonic laminar flow control program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of the NASA supersonic laminar flow control program are provided. Successful application of laminar flow control to a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) offers significant benefits in reductions of take-off gross weight, mission fuel burn, cruise drag, structural temperatures, engine size, emissions, and sonic boom. The ultimate economic success of the proposed HSCT may depend on the successful adaption of laminar flow control, which offers the single most significant potential improvements in lift drag ratio (L/D) of all the aerodynamic technologies under consideration. The F-16XL Supersonic Laminar Flow Control (SLFC) Experiment was conceived based on the encouraging results of in-house and NASA supported industry studies to determine if laminar flow control is feasible for the HSCT. The primary objective is to achieve extensive laminar flow (50-60 percent chord) on a highly swept supersonic wing. Data obtained from the flight test will be used to validate existing Euler and Navier Stokes aerodynamic codes and transition prediction boundary layer stability codes. These validated codes and developed design methodology will be delivered to industry for their use in designing supersonic laminar flow control wings. Results from this experiment will establish preliminary suction system design criteria enabling industry to better size the suction system and develop improved estimates of system weight, fuel volume loss due to wing ducting, turbocompressor power requirements, etc. so that benefits and penalties can be more accurately assessed.

  3. Flight tests of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80 inch (203 cm) chord and 40 inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0° to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, was similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  4. Boundary Layers in Laminar Vortex Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Glenn Leslie

    A detailed experimental study of the flow in an intense, laminar, axisymmetric vortex has been conducted in the Purdue Tornado Vortex Simulator. The complicated nature of the flow in the boundary layer of laboratory vortices and presumably on that encountered in full-scale tornadoes has been examined. After completing a number of modifications to the existing facility to improve the quality of the flow in the simulator, hot-film anemometry was employed for making velocity-component and turbulence-intensity measurements of both the free-stream and boundary layer portions of the flow. The measurements represent the first experimental boundary layer investigation of a well-defined vortex flow to appear in the literature. These results were compared with recent theoretical work by Burggraf, Stewartson and Belcher (1971) and with an exact similarity solution for line-sink boundary layers developed by the author. A comparison is also made with the numerical simulation of Wilson (1981) in which the boundary conditions were matched to those of the present experimental investigation. Expressions for the vortex core radius, the maximum tangential velocity and the maximum pressure drop are given in terms of dimensionless modeling parameters. References. Burggraf, O. R., K. Stewartson and R. Belcher, Boundary layer. induced by a potential vortex. Phys. Fluids 14, 1821-1833 (1971). Wilson, T., M. S. thesis, Vortex Boundary Layer Dynamics, Univ. Calif. Davis (1981).

  5. Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer: DNS and RANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jing-Lei; MA Hui-Yang

    2007-01-01

    We assess the performance of a few turbulence models for Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of supersonic boundary layers, compared to the direct numerical simulations (DNS) of supersonic flat-plate turbulent boundary layers, carried out by Gao et al. [Chin. Phys. Lett. 22 (2005) 1709] and Huang et al. [Sci.Chin. 48 (2005) 614], as well as some available experimental data. The assessment is made for two test cases, with incoming Mach numbers and Reynolds numbers M = 2.25, Re = 365, 000/in, and M = 4.5, Re - 1.7 × 107/m,respectively. It is found that in the first case the prediction of RANS models agrees well with the DNS and the experimental data, while for the second case the agreement of the DNS models with experiment is less satisfactory.The compressibility effect on the RANS models is discussed.

  6. Elliptic Length Scales in Laminar, Two-Dimensional Supersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    adiabatic wall flows over compression ramps and flows with shock impingements. The new correlations are derived from existing numerical data and...developed for 2D, laminar adiabatic wall flows over compression ramps and flows with shock impingements. These correlations are derived from existing...characterizing the influence of shocks and compression ramps on flat plate flows is presented. New correlations for laminar compressive interactions on

  7. Optimization on a Network-based Parallel Computer System for Supersonic Laminar Wing Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Joseph A.; Cheung, Samson; Holst, Terry L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A set of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) routines and flow transition prediction tools are integrated into a network based parallel numerical optimization routine. Through this optimization routine, the design of a 2-D airfoil and an infinitely swept wing will be studied in order to advance the design cycle capability of supersonic laminar flow wings. The goal of advancing supersonic laminar flow wing design is achieved by wisely choosing the design variables used in the optimization routine. The design variables are represented by the theory of Fourier series and potential theory. These theories, combined with the parallel CFD flow routines and flow transition prediction tools, provide a design space for a global optimal point to be searched. Finally, the parallel optimization routine enables gradient evaluations to be performed in a fast and parallel fashion.

  8. The influence of boundary layers on supersonic inlet flow unstart induced by mass injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Hyungrok; Im, Seong-Kyun; Mungal, M. Godfrey; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2011-09-01

    A transverse jet is injected into a supersonic model inlet flow to induce unstart. Planar laser Rayleigh scattering from condensed CO2 particles is used to visualize flow dynamics during the unstart process, while in some cases, wall pressure traces are simultaneously recorded. Studies conducted over a range of inlet configurations reveal that the presence of turbulent wall boundary layers strongly affect the unstart dynamics. It is found that relatively thick turbulent boundary layers in asymmetric wall boundary layer conditions prompt the formation of unstart shocks; in symmetric boundary conditions lead to the propagation of pseudo-shocks; and in both cases facilitate fast inlet unstart, when compared with thin, laminar boundary layers. Incident shockwaves and associated reflections are found to affect the speed of pressure disturbances. These disturbances, which induce boundary layer separation, are found to precede the formation of unstart shocks. The results confirm the importance of and need to better understand shock-boundary layer interactions in inlet unstart dynamics.

  9. Multiple paths to subharmonic laminar breakdown in a boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1990-01-01

    Numerical simulations demonstrate that laminar breakdown in a boundary layer induced by the secondary instability of two-dimensional Tollmien-Schlichting waves to three-dimensional subharmonic disturbancews need not take the conventional lambda vortex/high-shear layer path.

  10. Off-Body Boundary-Layer Measurement Techniques Development for Supersonic Low-Disturbance Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Lewis R.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Wilkinson, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    Investigations were performed to develop accurate boundary-layer measurement techniques in a Mach 3.5 laminar boundary layer on a 7 half-angle cone at 0 angle of attack. A discussion of the measurement challenges is presented as well as how each was addressed. A computational study was performed to minimize the probe aerodynamic interference effects resulting in improved pitot and hot-wire probe designs. Probe calibration and positioning processes were also developed with the goal of reducing the measurement uncertainties from 10% levels to less than 5% levels. Efforts were made to define the experimental boundary conditions for the cone flow so comparisons could be made with a set of companion computational simulations. The development status of the mean and dynamic boundary-layer flow measurements for a nominally sharp cone in a low-disturbance supersonic flow is presented.

  11. Numerical study of the laminar shock boundary layer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzer, E.

    1985-02-01

    The interaction of an oblique shock wave with a laminar boundary layer on an adiabatic flat plate was analyzed numerically with solutions of the two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations using McCormack's explicit finite volume method. The agreement between numerical calculations and experimental results is good. Local and global properties of the interaction region are discussed regarding shock strength, separation bubble length using a similarity law, and separation environment. The asymetrical structure inside the separation bubble produces an asymetrical shape of the wall shear stress distribution. The calculation speed was increased by algorithm vectorization on a CRAY 1S supercomputer. Further investigations for determination of a similarity law in interaction with turbulent boundary layer, of the physical mechanisms of the laminar interaction, and for study of the wall temperature transfer are recommended.

  12. Simulation of hypersonic shock wave - laminar boundary layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianvashrad, N.; Knight, D.

    2017-06-01

    The capability of the Navier-Stokes equations with a perfect gas model for simulation of hypersonic shock wave - laminar boundary layer interactions is assessed. The configuration is a hollow cylinder flare. The experimental data were obtained by Calspan-University of Buffalo (CUBRC) for total enthalpies ranging from 5.07 to 21.85 MJ/kg. Comparison of the computed and experimental surface pressure and heat transfer is performed and the computed §ow¦eld structure is analyzed.

  13. An investigation of streaklike instabilities in laminar boundary layer flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Colin; Finney, Mark; Forthofer, Jason; McAllister, Sara; Gollner, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Observations of coherent structures in boundary layer flames, particularly wildland fires, motivated an investigation on flame instabilities within a boundary layer. This experimental study examined streaklike structures in a stationary diffusion flame stabilized within a laminar boundary layer. Flame streaks were found to align with pre-existing velocity perturbations, enabling stabilization of these coherent structures. Thermocouple measurements were used to quantify streamwise amplification of flame streaks. Temperature mapping indicated a temperature rise in the flame streaks, while the region in between these streaks, the trough, decreased in temperature. The heat flux to the surface was measured with a total heat flux gauge, and the heat flux below the troughs was found to be higher at all measurement locations. This was likely a function of the flame standoff distance, and indicated that the flame streaks were acting to modify the spanwise distribution of heat flux. Instabilities in boundary layer combustion can have an effect on the spanwise distribution of heat transfer. This finding has significant implications for boundary layer combustion, indicating that instantaneous properties can vary significantly in a three-dimensional flow field.

  14. Laminar boundary-layer flow of non-Newtonian fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, F. N.; Chern, S. Y.

    1979-01-01

    A solution for the two-dimensional and axisymmetric laminar boundary-layer momentum equation of power-law non-Newtonian fluid is presented. The analysis makes use of the Merk-Chao series solution method originally devised for the flow of Newtonian fluid. The universal functions for the leading term in the series are tabulated for n from 0.2 to 2. Equations governing the universal functions associated with the second and the third terms are provided. The solution together with either Lighthill's formula or Chao's formula constitutes a simple yet general procedure for the calculation of wall shear and surface heat transfer rate. The theory was applied to flows over a circular cylinder and a sphere and the results compared with published data.

  15. On the coupling between a supersonic boundary layer and a flexible surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    The coupling between a two-dimensional, supersonic, laminar boundary layer and a flexible surface is studied using direct numerical computations of the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the plate equation. The flexible surface is forced to vibrate by plane acoustic waves at normal incidence emanated by a sound source located on the side of the flexible surface opposite to the boundary layer. The effect of the source excitation frequency on the surface vibration and boundary layer stability is analyzed. We find that, for frequencies near the fifth natural frequency of the surface or lower, large disturbances are introduced in the boundary layer which may alter its stability characteristics. The interaction between a stable two-dimensional disturbance of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) type with the vibrating surface is also studied. We find that the disturbance level is higher over the vibrating flexible surface than that obtained when the surface is rigid, which indicates a strong coupling between flow and structure. However, in the absence of the sound source the disturbance level over the rigid and flexible surfaces are identical. This result is due to the high frequency of the TS disturbance which does not couple with the flexible surface.

  16. Flux change in viscous laminar flow under oscillating boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, R.; Mikada, H.; Goto, T.; Takekawa, J.

    2012-12-01

    The behavior of interstitial fluid is one of major interest in earth sciences in terms of the exploitation of water resources, the initiation of earthquakes, enhanced oil recovery (EOR), etc. Seismic waves are often known to increase the flux of interstitial fluid but the relationship between the flux and propagating seismic waves have not been well investigated in the past, although seismic stimulation has been applied in the oil industry for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Many observations indicated that seismic waves could stimulate the oil production due to lowering of apparent viscosity coefficient, to the coalescence and/or the dispersion of droplets of a phase in multiphase fluids. However, the detailed mechanism of seismic stimulation has not been fully understood, either. In this study, We attempt to understand the mechanism of the flux change in viscous laminar flow under oscillating boundary condition for the simulation of interstitial flow. Here, we analyze a monophase flow in a pore throat. We first assume a Hagen-Poiseuille flow of incompressible fluid through a pore-throat in a porous medium. We adopt the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) in which the motion of fluid is simulated through the variation of velocity distribution function representing the distribution of discrete particle velocities. We use an improved incompressible LBKG model (d2q9i) proposed in Zou et. al. (1995) to accurately accommodate the boundary conditions of pressure and velocity in the Hagen-Poiseuille flow. We also use an half-way bounce back boundary condition as the velocity boundary condition. Also, we assume a uniform pressure (density) difference between inlet and outlet flow, and the density difference could initiate the flow in our simulation. The oscillating boundary condition is given by the body force acting on fluid particles. In this simulation, we found that the flux change is negligible under small amplitude of oscillation in both horizontal and vertical directions

  17. Factors influencing flow steadiness in laminar boundary layer shock interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumuklu, Ozgur; Levin, Deborah A.; Gimelshein, Sergey F.; Austin, Joanna M.

    2016-11-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method has been used to model laminar shock wave boundary interactions of hypersonic flow over a 30/55-deg double-wedge and "tick-shaped" model configurations studied in the Hypervelocity Expansion Tube facility and T-ADFA free-piston shock tunnel, respectively. The impact of thermochemical effects on these interactions by changing the chemical composition from nitrogen to air as well as argon for a stagnation enthalpy of 8.0 MJ/kg flow are investigated using the 2-D wedge model. The simulations are found to reproduce many of the classic features related to Edney Type V strong shock interactions that include the attached, oblique shock formed over the first wedge, the detached bow shock from the second wedge, the separation zone, and the separation and reattachment shocks that cause complex features such as the triple point for both cases. However, results of a reacting air flow case indicate that the size of the separation length, and the movement of the triple point toward to the leading edge is much less than the nitrogen case.

  18. NASA Ames Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel (LFSWT) Tests of a 10 deg Cone at Mach 1.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Laub, James A.

    1997-01-01

    This work is part of the ongoing qualification of the NASA Ames Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel (LFSWT) as a low-disturbance (quiet) facility suitable for transition research. A 10 deg cone was tested over a range of unit Reynolds numbers (Re = 2.8 to 3.8 million per foot (9.2 to 12.5 million per meter)) and angles of incidence (O deg to 10 deg) at Mach 1.6. The location of boundary layer transition along the cone was measured primarily from surface temperature distributions, with oil flow interferometry and Schlieren flow visualization providing confirmation measurements. With the LFSWT in its normal quiet operating mode, no transition was detected on the cone in the test core, over the Reynolds number range tested at zero incidence and yaw. Increasing the pressure disturbance levels in the LFSWT test section by a factor of five caused transition onset on the cone within the test core, at zero incidence and yaw. When operating the LFSWT in its normal quiet mode, transition could only be detected in the test core when high angles of incidence (greater than 5 deg) for cones were set. Transition due to elevated pressure disturbances (Tollmien-Schlichting) and surface trips produced a skin temperature rise of order 4 F (2.2 C). Transition due to cross flows on the leeward side of the cone at incidence produced a smaller initial temperature rise of only order 2.5 F (1.4 C), which indicates a slower transition process. We can conclude that these cone tests add further proof that the LFSWT test core is normally low-disturbance (pressure fluctuations greater than 0.1%), as found by associated direct flow quality measurements discussed in this report. Furthermore, in a quiet test environment, the skin temperature rise is sensitive to the type of dominant instability causing transition. The testing of a cone in the LFSWT provides an excellent experiment for the development of advanced transition detection techniques.

  19. Effect of rod gap spacing on a suction panel for laminar flow and noise control in supersonic wind tunnels. M.S. Thesis - Old Dominion Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of a coordinated experimental and theoretical study of a sound shield concept which aims to provide a means of noise reduction in the test section of supersonic wind tunnels at high Reynolds numbers. The model used consists of a planar array of circular rods aligned with the flow, with adjustable gaps between them for boundary layer removal by suction, i.e., laminar flow control. One of the basic requirements of the present sound shield concept is to achieve sonic cross flow through the gaps in order to prevent lee-side flow disturbances from penetrating back into the shielded region. Tests were conducted at Mach 6 over a local unit Reynolds number range from about 1.2 x 10 to the 6th power to 13.5 x 10 to the 6th power per foot. Measurements of heat transfer, static pressure, and sound levels were made to establish the transition characteristics of the boundary layer on the rod array and the sound shielding effectiveness.

  20. A new method for laminar boundary layer transition visualization in flight: Color changes in liquid crystal coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, B. J.; Gall, P. D.; Croom, C. C.; Manuel, G. S.; Kelliher, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    The visualization of laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition plays an important role in flight and wind-tunnel aerodynamic testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. Visualization can help provide a more complete understanding of both transition location as well as transition modes; without visualization, the transition process can be very difficult to understand. In the past, the most valuable transition visualization methods for flight applications included sublimating chemicals and oil flows. Each method has advantages and limitations. In particular, sublimating chemicals are impractical to use in subsonic applications much above 20,000 feet because of the greatly reduced rates of sublimation at lower temperatures (less than -4 degrees Farenheit). Both oil flow and sublimating chemicals have the disadvantage of providing only one good data point per flight. Thus, for many important flight conditions, transition visualization has not been readily available. This paper discusses a new method for visualizing transition in flight by the use of liquid crystals. The new method overcomes the limitations of past techniques, and provides transition visualization capability throughout almost the entire altitude and speed ranges of virtually all subsonic aircraft flight envelopes. The method also has wide applicability for supersonic transition visualization in flight and for general use in wind tunnel research over wide subsonic and supersonic speed ranges.

  1. Measurements of laminar and turbulent flow in a curved duct with thin inlet boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. M. K. P.; Whitelaw, J. H.; Yianneskis, M.

    1981-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to measure the laminar and turbulent flow in a 90 deg square bend of strong curvature. The boundary layers at the inlet to the bend were approximately 25 percent and 15 percent of the hydraulic diameter for the laminar and turbulent flows, respectively. The development of the pressure driven secondary motion is more rapid for laminar flow: the maximum cross stream component measured was 60 percent of the bulk velocity in contrast to 40 percent for turbulent flow. The streamwise isotachs show that, for laminar flow, large velocities are found progressively nearer to the outer radius of the bend and along the sidewalls. For turbulent flow, the isotachs move towards the inner radius until about 60 deg around the bend where strong secondary motion results in a similar redistribution. Turbulence level and shear stress measurements are also presented.

  2. Stability of a laminar premixed supersonic free shear layer with chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, S.; Anderson, J. D., Jr.; Pai, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    The stability of a two-dimensional compressible supersonic flow in the wake of a flat plate is discussed. The fluid is a multi-species mixture which is undergoing finite rate chemical reactions. The spatial stability of an infinitesimal disturbance in the fluid is considered. Numerical solutions of the eigenvalue stability equations for both reactive and nonreactive supersonic flows are presented and discussed. The chemical reactions have significant influence on the stability behavior. For instance, a neutral eigenvalue is observed near the freestream Mach number of 2.375 for the nonreactive case, but disappears when the reaction is turned on. For reactive flows, the eigenvalues are not very dependent on the free stream Mach number.

  3. Prediction of Boundary Layer Transition Based on Modeling of Laminar Fluctuations Using RANS Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza; Taghavi; Z.; Mahmood; Salary; Amir; Kolaei

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a linear eddy-viscosity turbulence model for predicting bypass and natural transition in boundary layers by using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The model includes three transport equations, separately, to compute laminar kinetic energy, turbulent kinetic energy, and dissipation rate in a flow field. It needs neither correlations of intermittency factors nor knowledge of the transition onset. Two transition tests are carried out: flat plate boundary layer under zero ...

  4. Aerodynamic heating in gaps of thermal protection system tile arrays in laminar and turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental heat-transfer investigation was conducted on two staggered arrays of metallic tiles in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. This investigation was conducted for two purposes. The impingement heating distribution where flow in a longitudinal gap intersects a transverse gap and impinges on a downstream blocking tile was defined. The influence of tile and gap geometries was analyzed to develop empirical relationships for impingement heating in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Tests were conducted in a high temperature structures tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 7, a nominal total temperature of 1800 K, and free-stream unit Reynolds numbers from 1.0 x 10 million to 4.8 x 10 million per meter. The test results were used to assess the impingement heating effects produced by parameters that include gap width, longitudinal gap length, slope of the tile forward-facing wall, boundary-layer displacement thickness, Reynolds number, and local surface pressure.

  5. Flat plate heat transfer for laminar transition and turbulent boundary layers using a shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brostmeyer, J. D.; Nagamatsu, H. T.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer results are presented for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers for a Mach number of 0.12 with gas temperatures of 425 K and 1000 K over a flat plate at room temperature. The measurements were made in air for a Reynolds number range of 600 to 6 million. The heat transfer measurements were conducted in a 70-ft long, 4 in. diameter shock tube. Reflecting wedges were used to reflect the incident shock wave to produce a flow Mach number of 0.12 behind the reflected shock wave. Thin film platinum heat gages were mounted on the plate surface to measure the local heat flux. The laminar results for gas temperatures of 425 K to 1000 K agree well with theory. The turbulent results are also close to incompressible theory, with the 1000 K flow case being slightly higher. The transition results lie between the laminar and turbulent predictions.

  6. Study of laminar boundary layer instability noise study on a controlled diffusion airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Prateek; Sanjose, Marlene; Moreau, Stephane

    2016-11-01

    Detailed experimental study has been carried out on a Controlled Diffusion (CD) airfoil at 5° angle of attack and at chord based Reynolds number of 1 . 5 ×105 . All the measurements were done in an open-jet anechoic wind tunnel. The airfoil mock-up is held between two side plates, to keep the flow two-dimensional. PIV measurements have been performed in the wake and on the boundary layer of the airfoil. Pressure sensor probes on the airfoil were used to detect mean airfoil loading and remote microphone probes were used to measure unsteady pressure fluctuations on the surface of the airfoil. Furthermore the far field acoustic pressure was measured using an 1/2 inch ICP microphone. The results confirm very later transition of a laminar boundary layer to a turbulent boundary layer on the suction side of the airfoil. The process of transition of laminar to turbulent boundary layer comprises of turbulent reattachment of a separated shear layer. The pressure side of the boundary layer is found to be laminar and stable. Therefore tonal noise generated is attributed to events on suction side of the airfoil. The flow transition and emission of tones are further investigated in detail thanks to the complementary DNS study.

  7. Stability of the laminar boundary layer for an imperfect gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperas, G.

    The linear perturbation equations are derived for the general case of a compressible imperfect gas characterized by an equation of state utilizing a compressibility factor. The specific case of the Beattie-Bridgeman gas is chosen for calculation. Amplification curves calculated using the Beattie-Bridgeman equation of state for two representative flat plate boundary layers are presented.

  8. Hair receptor sensitivity to changes in laminar boundary layer shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickinson, B T, E-mail: btdickinson@lifetime.oregonstate.ed [Air Force Research Laboratory, Munitions Directorate, Eglin Air Force Base, FL 32542 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Biologists have shown that bat wings contain distributed arrays of flow-sensitive hair receptors. The hair receptors are hypothesized to feedback information on airflows over the bat wing for enhanced stability or maneuverability during flight. Here, we study the geometric specialization of hair-like structures for the detection of changes in boundary layer velocity profiles (shapes). A quasi-steady model that relates the flow velocity profile incident on the longitudinal axis of a hair to the resultant moment and shear force at the hair base is developed. The hair length relative to the boundary layer momentum thickness that maximizes the resultant moment and shear-force sensitivity to changes in boundary layer shape is determined. The sensitivity of the resultant moment and shear force is shown to be highly dependent on hair length. Hairs that linearly taper to a point are shown to provide greater output sensitivity than hairs of uniform cross-section. On an order of magnitude basis, the computed optimal hair lengths are in agreement with the range of hair receptor lengths measured on individual bat species. These results support the hypothesis that bats use hair receptors for detecting changes in boundary layer shape and provide geometric guidelines for artificial hair sensor design and application.

  9. Hair receptor sensitivity to changes in laminar boundary layer shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, B T

    2010-03-01

    Biologists have shown that bat wings contain distributed arrays of flow-sensitive hair receptors. The hair receptors are hypothesized to feedback information on airflows over the bat wing for enhanced stability or maneuverability during flight. Here, we study the geometric specialization of hair-like structures for the detection of changes in boundary layer velocity profiles (shapes). A quasi-steady model that relates the flow velocity profile incident on the longitudinal axis of a hair to the resultant moment and shear force at the hair base is developed. The hair length relative to the boundary layer momentum thickness that maximizes the resultant moment and shear-force sensitivity to changes in boundary layer shape is determined. The sensitivity of the resultant moment and shear force is shown to be highly dependent on hair length. Hairs that linearly taper to a point are shown to provide greater output sensitivity than hairs of uniform cross-section. On an order of magnitude basis, the computed optimal hair lengths are in agreement with the range of hair receptor lengths measured on individual bat species. These results support the hypothesis that bats use hair receptors for detecting changes in boundary layer shape and provide geometric guidelines for artificial hair sensor design and application.

  10. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Laminar Flow in Internally Finned Tubes under Various Boundary Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ze-NingWang; Qiang-TaiZhou

    1994-01-01

    Numerical solutions for fully developed laminar flow in internally finned tubes with trapezoidal and triangular fin profiles were given with Finite Elemant Method(FEM):The heat transfer charactieristics were obtained and compared under the boundary conditions of uniform heat flux,univform wall tepmerature,and the third boundary condition with finite wall thermal conductivity considered.The numerical results show that boundary conditions have pronounced effects on the temperature field.Furthermore,a new mechanism on the heat transfer augmentation of internally finned tubes is proposed.

  11. Similarity solutions to a laminar boundary layer problem in power law fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A suitable similarity transformation is introduced to reduce the laminar boundary layer equations of power law fluids to a class of singular nonlinear two-point boundary value problems. The skin friction and shear stress distributions for boundary layer flow over a moving flat plate are investigated by utilizing the shooting technique. Results indicate that for each fixed value of the power law exponent n or the velocity ratio parameter (, the skin friction and shear stress decrease with the increasing of n or ( respectively.

  12. Design features of a low-disturbance supersonic wind tunnel for transition research at low supersonic Mach numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Laub, James A.; King, Lyndell S.; Reda, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    A unique, low-disturbance supersonic wind tunnel is being developed at NASA-Ames to support supersonic laminar flow control research at cruise Mach numbers of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The distinctive design features of this new quiet tunnel are a low-disturbance settling chamber, laminar boundary layers along the nozzle/test section walls, and steady supersonic diffuser flow. This paper discusses these important aspects of our quiet tunnel design and the studies necessary to support this design. Experimental results from an 1/8th-scale pilot supersonic wind tunnel are presented and discussed in association with theoretical predictions. Natural laminar flow on the test section walls is demonstrated and both settling chamber and supersonic diffuser performance is examined. The full-scale wind tunnel should be commissioned by the end of 1993.

  13. Some Finite Difference Solutions of the Laminar Compressible Boundary Layer Showing the Effects of Upstream Transpiration Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, John T.

    1959-01-01

    Three numerical solutions of the partial differential equations describing the compressible laminar boundary layer are obtained by the finite difference method described in reports by I. Flugge-Lotz, D.C. Baxter, and this author. The solutions apply to steady-state supersonic flow without pressure gradient, over a cold wall and over an adiabatic wall, both having transpiration cooling upstream, and over an adiabatic wall with upstream cooling but without upstream transpiration. It is shown that for a given upstream wall temperature, upstream transpiration cooling affords much better protection to the adiabatic solid wall than does upstream cooling without transpiration. The results of the numerical solutions are compared with those of approximate solutions. The thermal results of the finite difference solution lie between the results of Rubesin and Inouye, and those of Libby and Pallone. When the skin-friction results of one finite difference solution are used in the thermal analysis of Rubesin and Inouye, improved agreement between the thermal results of the two methods of solution is obtained.

  14. Boundary layer control by a fish: Unsteady laminar boundary layers of rainbow trout swimming in turbulent flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka Yanase

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The boundary layers of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss [0.231±0.016 m total body length (L (mean±s.d.; N=6], swimming at 1.6±0.09 L s−1 (N=6 in an experimental flow channel (Reynolds number, Re=4×105 with medium turbulence (5.6% intensity were examined using the particle image velocimetry technique. The tangential flow velocity distributions in the pectoral and pelvic surface regions (arc length from the rostrum, lx=71±8 mm, N=3, and lx=110±13 mm, N=4, respectively were approximated by a laminar boundary layer model, the Falkner−Skan equation. The flow regime over the pectoral and pelvic surfaces was regarded as a laminar flow, which could create less skin-friction drag than would be the case with turbulent flow. Flow separation was postponed until vortex shedding occurred over the posterior surface (lx=163±22 mm, N=3. The ratio of the body-wave velocity to the swimming speed was in the order of 1.2. This was consistent with the condition of the boundary layer laminarization that had been confirmed earlier using a mechanical model. These findings suggest an energy-efficient swimming strategy for rainbow trout in a turbulent environment.

  15. Supersonic flow onto solid wedges, multidimensional shock waves and free boundary problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gui-Qiang

    2017-08-01

    When an upstream steady uniform supersonic flow impinges onto a symmetric straight-sided wedge, governed by the Euler equations, there are two possible steady oblique shock configurations if the wedge angle is less than the detachment angle -- the steady weak shock with supersonic or subsonic downstream flow (determined by the wedge angle that is less or larger than the sonic angle) and the steady strong shock with subsonic downstream flow, both of which satisfy the entropy condition. The fundamental issue -- whether one or both of the steady weak and strong shocks are physically admissible solutions -- has been vigorously debated over the past eight decades. In this paper, we survey some recent developments on the stability analysis of the steady shock solutions in both the steady and dynamic regimes. For the static stability, we first show how the stability problem can be formulated as an initial-boundary value type problem and then reformulate it into a free boundary problem when the perturbation of both the upstream steady supersonic flow and the wedge boundary are suitably regular and small, and we finally present some recent results on the static stability of the steady supersonic and transonic shocks. For the dynamic stability for potential flow, we first show how the stability problem can be formulated as an initial-boundary value problem and then use the self-similarity of the problem to reduce it into a boundary value problem and further reformulate it into a free boundary problem, and we finally survey some recent developments in solving this free boundary problem for the existence of the Prandtl-Meyer configurations that tend to the steady weak supersonic or transonic oblique shock solutions as time goes to infinity. Some further developments and mathematical challenges in this direction are also discussed.

  16. Micro Ramps in Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers: An experimental and numerical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The micro vortex generator (MVG) is used extensively in low speed aerodynamic problems and is now extended into the supersonic flow regime to solve undesired flow features that are associated with shock wave boundary layer interactions (SWBLI) such as flow separation and associated unsteadiness of t

  17. Three-dimensional vortex organization in a high-Reynolds-number supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, G.E.; Adrian, R.J.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.; Scarano, F.

    2010-01-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry was used to quantitatively visualize the three-dimensional coherent structures in a supersonic (Mach 2) turbulent boundary layer in the region between y/δ = 0.15 and 0.89. The Reynolds number based on momentum thickness Reθ = 34000. The instantaneous velocity f

  18. The three-dimensional flow organization past a micro-ramp in a supersonic boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Z.; Schrijer, F.F.J.; Scarano, F.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2012-01-01

    The three-dimensional instantaneous flow organization in the near wake of a micro-ramp interacting with a Mach 2.0 supersonic turbulent boundary layer is studied using tomographic particle image velocimetry. The mean flow reveals a wake with approximately circular cross section dominated by a pair o

  19. Wave analysis of the evolution of a single wave packet in supersonic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolaev, Yury G.; Yatskikh, Aleksey A.; Kosinov, Alexander D.; Semionov, Nickolay V.

    2016-10-01

    The evolution of the artificial wave packet in laminar flat-plate boundary layer was experimentally studied by hot-wire measurements at M=2. The localized disturbances were generated by pulse glow discharge. The wave analysis of evolution of wave packet was provided. It was found, that the most unstable waves are oblique, that consistent with results of linear theory.

  20. DNS of laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition induced by solid obstacles

    CERN Document Server

    Orlandi, Paolo; Bernardini, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Results of numerical simulations obtained by a staggered finite difference scheme together with an efficient immersed boundary method are presented to understand the effects of the shape of three-dimensional obstacles on the transition of a boundary layer from a laminar to a turbulent regime. Fully resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS), highlight that the closer to the obstacle the symmetry is disrupted the smaller is the transitional Reynolds number. It has been also found that the transition can not be related to the critical roughness Reynolds number used in the past. The simulations highlight the differences between wake and inflectional instabilities, proving that two-dimensional tripping devices are more efficient in promoting the transition. Simulations at high Reynolds number demonstrate that the reproduction of a real experiment with a solid obstacle at the inlet is an efficient tool to generate numerical data bases for understanding the physics of boundary layers. The quality of the numerical ...

  1. DNS of Laminar-Turbulent Transition in Swept-Wing Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, L.; Choudhari, M.; Li, F.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed to examine laminar to turbulent transition due to high-frequency secondary instability of stationary crossflow vortices in a subsonic swept-wing boundary layer for a realistic natural-laminar-flow airfoil configuration. The secondary instability is introduced via inflow forcing and the mode selected for forcing corresponds to the most amplified secondary instability mode that, in this case, derives a majority of its growth from energy production mechanisms associated with the wall-normal shear of the stationary basic state. An inlet boundary condition is carefully designed to allow for accurate injection of instability wave modes and minimize acoustic reflections at numerical boundaries. Nonlinear parabolized stability equation (PSE) predictions compare well with the DNS in terms of modal amplitudes and modal shape during the strongly nonlinear phase of the secondary instability mode. During the transition process, the skin friction coefficient rises rather rapidly and the wall-shear distribution shows a sawtooth pattern that is analogous to the previously documented surface flow visualizations of transition due to stationary crossflow instability. Fully turbulent features are observed in the downstream region of the flow.

  2. High-speed laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition induced by a discrete roughness element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Prahladh; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2013-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to study laminar to turbulent transition induced by a discrete hemispherical roughness element in a high-speed laminar boundary layer. The simulations are performed under conditions matching the experiments of Danehy et al. (AIAA Paper 2009-394, 2009) for free-stream Mach numbers of 3.37, 5.26 and 8.23. It is observed that the Mach 8.23 flow remains laminar downstream of the roughness, while the lower Mach numbers undergo transition. The Mach 3.37 flow undergoes transition closer to the bump when compared with Mach 5.26, in agreement with experimental observations. Transition is accompanied by an increase in Cf and Ch (Stanton number). Even for the case that did not undergo transition (Mach 8.23), streamwise vortices induced by the roughness cause a significant rise in Cf until 20 D downstream. The mean van Driest transformed velocity and Reynolds stress for Mach 3.37 and 5.26 show good agreement with available data. A local Reynolds number based on the wall properties is seen to correlate with the onset of transition for the cases considered. Partially supported by NASA.

  3. Direct spatial resonance in the laminar boundary layer due to a rotating-disk

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Turkyilmazoglu; J S B Gajjar

    2000-12-01

    Numerical treatment of the linear stability equations is undertaken to investigate the occurrence of direct spatial resonance events in the boundary layer flow due to a rotating-disk. A spectral solution of the eigenvalue problem indicates that algebraic growth of the perturbations shows up, prior to the amplification of exponentially growing instability waves. This phenomenon takes place while the flow is still in the laminar state and it also tends to persist further even if the non-parallelism is taken into account. As a result, there exists the high possibility of this instability mechanism giving rise to nonlinearity and transition, long before the unboundedly growing time-amplified waves.

  4. Behavior of Boundary Layer in Supersonic Flow with Applied Lorentz Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udagawa, Keisuke; Saito, Shinya; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Tomioka, Sadatake; Yamasaki, Hiroyuki

    Experimental study on behavior of boundary layer in supersonic flow with applied Lorentz force was carried out. In the experiment, Mach 1.5 supersonic wind tunnel driven by a shock-tube was used. At the test section, the current from the external DC power supply and the magnetic field of 2.4 Tesla were applied to the boundary layer developing on the bottom wall. Argon seeded with cesium was used as an electrically conducting gas. Effect of the direction of the Lorentz force on static pressure distribution was investigated, and the remarkable increase of static pressure at the test section was observed for the decelerating Lorentz force. It is noted that the acceleration of the flow inside the boundary layer was demonstrated for the first time without accelerating the main flow when the accelerating Lorentz force was applied. At the same time, the acceleration efficiency defined by a ratio of work done by the Lorentz force to energy input into the flow was found 54-61%. These results have suggested the possibility of the boundary layer separation control by applying the accelerating Lorentz force. In the case of the decelerating Lorentz force, the significant reduction of Mach number was observed not only inside the boundary layer but also in the main flow. The reduction of Mach number could be ascribed to the growth of the boundary layer due to gas heating inside the boundary layer. When the direction of the current was changed, the difference of light emission from the discharge inside the boundary layer was observed, and this was due to the difference of the electromotive force induced in the supersonic flow.

  5. Micro vortex generator control of axisymmetric high-speed laminar boundary layer separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch-Samper, D.; Vanstone, L.; Hillier, R.; Ganapathisubramani, B.

    2015-09-01

    Interest in the development of micro vortex generators (MVGs) to control high-speed flow separation has grown in the last decade. In contrast to conventional vortex generators, MVGs are fully submerged in the boundary layer and have the potential of inducing surface flow mixing with marginal drag penalty when suitably designed. Also, they do not result in undesired reduced mass flow such as with suction methods. The flow mechanisms at the location of MVGs are not yet fully understood, and optimal designs are difficult to establish given that both numerical predictions and experiments are particularly challenged for short element heights, yet optimal MVGs are generally expected to be at least shorter than half the local boundary layer thickness. The present work aims at investigating experimentally the fundamental flow physics concerning an individual MVG element (of `canonical' or simplified geometry) at a range of near-wall heights. A fully laminar base flow is considered so as to isolate the effect of incoming turbulence as well as the more complex physics that may occur when specific and/or multiple elements are used. Tests were performed in a gun tunnel at a freestream Mach number of 8.9 and Reynolds number of /m, and the basic test model consisted of a blunt-nosed cylinder which produced an axisymmetric laminar boundary layer with an edge Mach number of 3.4 and Reynolds number of /m at the MVG location. A laminar shock-wave/boundary layer interaction with separation was induced by a flare located further downstream on the model. Measurements consisted of time-resolved surface heat transfer obtained in the axial direction immediately downstream of the MVG and along the interaction, together with simultaneous high-speed schlieren imaging. The height () of the MVG element used in a `diamond' configuration (square planform with one vertex facing the flow) was adjusted between tests ranging from = 0.03 to 0.58, where the local undisturbed boundary layer thickness

  6. The Research of Laminar-Turbulent Transition in Hypersonic Three-Dimensional Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marat A.GOLDFELD; Evgeniy V. ORLIK

    2005-01-01

    @@ The results of experimental investigation of laminar-turbulent transition in three-dimensional flow under the high continuous pressure gradient including the flow with local boundary layer separation are presented. The experimental studies were performed within the Mach number range from 4 to 6 and Reynolds number 10~60 ×106 1/m, the angles of attack were 00 and 50. The experiments were carried out on the three-dimensional convergent inlet model with and without sidewalls. The influence of artificial turbulator of boundary layer on transition and flow structure was studied. The conducted researches have shown that adverse pressure gradient increase hastens transition and leads to decrease of transition area length. If pressure gradient rises velocity profile fullness increases and profile transformation from laminar to turbulent occurs. As a result of it the decrease of separation area length occurs. The same effect was reached with Reynolds number increase. These results are compared with the data on two-dimensional model with longitudinal curvature.

  7. PIV experiments in rough-wall, laminar-to-turbulent, oscillatory boundary-layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Mier, Jose M.; Christensen, Kenneth T.; Bateman, Allen; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2014-01-01

    Exploratory measurements of oscillatory boundary layers were conducted over a smooth and two different rough beds spanning the laminar, transitional and turbulent flow regimes using a multi-camera 2D-PIV system in a small oscillatory-flow tunnel (Admiraal et al. in J Hydraul Res 44(4):437-450, 2006). Results show how the phase lag between bed shear stress and free-stream velocity is better defined when the integral of the momentum equation is used to estimate the bed shear stress. Observed differences in bed shear stress and phase lag between bed shear stress and free-stream velocity are highly sensitive to the definition of the bed position ( y = b). The underestimation of turbulent stresses close to the wall is found to explain such differences when using the addition of Reynolds and viscous stresses to define both the bed shear stress and the phase lag. Regardless of the flow regime, in all experiments, boundary-layer thickness reached its maximum value at a phase near the flow reversal at the wall. Friction factors in smooth walls are better estimated using a theoretical equation first proposed by Batchelor (An introduction to fluid dynamics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1967) while the more recent empirical predictor of Pedocchi and Garcia (J Hydraul Res 47(4):438-444, 2009a) was found to be appropriate for estimating friction coefficients in the laminar-to-turbulent transition regime.

  8. Homotopy simulation of axisymmetric laminar mixed convection nanofluid boundary layer flow over a vertical cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freidooni Mehr N.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the semi-analytical/numerical technique known as the homotopy analysis method (HAM is employed to derive solutions for the laminar axisymmetric mixed convection boundary-layer nanofluid flow past a vertical cylinder. The similarity solutions are employed to transform the parabolic partial differential conservation equations into system of nonlinear, coupled ordinary differential equations, subject to appropriate boundary conditions. A comparison has been done to verify the obtained results with the purely numerical results of Grosan and Pop (2011 with excellent correlation achieved. The effects of nanoparticle volume fraction, curvature parameter and mixed convection or buoyancy parameter on the dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions, skin friction and wall temperature gradients are illustrated graphically. HAM is found to demonstrate excellent potential for simulating nanofluid dynamics problems. Applications of the study include materials processing and also thermal enhancement of energy systems.

  9. The Design and Use of a Temperature-Compensated Hot-Film Anemometer System for Boundary-Layer Flow Transition Detection on Supersonic Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiles, Harry R.

    1988-01-01

    An airborne temperature-compensated hot-film anemometer system has been designed, fabricated, and used to obtain in-flight airfoil boundary-layer flow transition data by the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility. Salient features of the anemometer include near constant sensitivity over the full flight envelope, installation without coaxial wiring, low-noise outputs, and self-contained signal conditioning with dynamic and steady-state outputs. The small size, low-power dissipation, and modular design make the anemometer suitable for use in modern high-performance research aircraft. Design of the temperature-compensated hot-film anemometer and its use for flow transition detection on a laminar flow flight research project are described. Also presented are data gathered in flight which is representative of the temperature-compensated hot-film anemometer operation at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flight conditions.

  10. EVOLUTION OF A 2-D DISTURBANCE IN A SUPERSONIC BOUNDARY LAYER AND THE GENERATION OF SHOCKLETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄章峰; 周恒

    2004-01-01

    Through direct numerical simulation, the evolution of a 2-D disturbance in a supersonic boundary layer has been investigated. At a chosen location, a small amplitude T-S wave was fed into the boundary layer to investigate its evolution. Characteristics of nonlinear evolution have been found. Two methods were applied for the detection of shocklets ,and it was found that when the amplitude of the disturbance reached a certain value,shocklets would be generated, which should be taken into consideration when nonlinear theory of hydrodynamic stability for compressible flows is to be established.

  11. NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF EVOLUTION OF DISTURBANCES IN SUPERSONIC SHARP CONE BOUNDARY LAYERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Ming; LUO Ji-sheng; CAO Wei

    2006-01-01

    The spatial evolution of 2-D disturbances in supersonic sharp cone boundary layers was investigated by direct numerical simulation (DNS) in high order compact difference scheme. The results suggested that, although the normal velocity in the sharp cone boundary layer was not small, the evolution of amplitude and phase for small amplitude disturbances would be well in accordance with the results obtained by the linear stability theory (LST) which supposes the flow was parallel. The evolution of some finite amplitude disturbances was also investigated, and the characteristic of the evolution was shown. Shocklets were also found when the amplitude of disturbances increased over some value.

  12. Characterizing the formation and regeneration of hairpin vortices in a laminar boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, Daniel R.; Maharjan, Rijan

    2015-12-01

    A free surface water channel is used to study hairpin vortex formation created by fluid injection through a narrow slot into a laminar boundary layer. Particle image velocimetry flow-field measurements of injections into quiescent cross-flow conditions confirm that elongated ring vortices are produced with a nondimensionalized circulation strength that is approximately linear with formation time. Unlike circular ring vortices, a limiting strength is not observed at a nondimensional formation time of 4 due to the proximity of the counter-rotating vortex pair. Identical injections are made into a laminar boundary layer at different free-stream velocities and streamwise slot positions (485 ≤ Reδ∗ ≤ 584) with average injection velocity ratios between 0.08 and 0.16. Visualizations indicate that the shear layer between the low x-momentum injected fluid and the boundary layer creates a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that forms the hairpin vortex head which then monotonically decreases in circulation strength with downstream distance. A similar process can form, or regenerate, a secondary hairpin vortex upstream of the primary vortex with a circulation strength of the head that is comparable to the strength of the primary head at the time of regeneration. However, the legs of the primary vortex continue to strengthen up to regeneration. The peak circulation in the legs is not directly correlated to the strength of the original elongated ring vortex. However, when the circulation is scaled with the injection momentum ratio it is linearly related to scaled injection time. It is proposed that the injection momentum ratio and nondimensionalized injection time based on the wall normal penetration time can be used to identify threshold conditions which produce a secondary vortex. It is suggested that this criterion may be used to identify the minimum strength of flow structures that would be capable of regeneration and thus transition initiation.

  13. Hypersonic Laminar Boundary Layer Velocimetry with Discrete Roughness on a Flat Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathel, Brett; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Watkins, A. Neal; Jones, Stephen B.; Lipford, William E.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Ivey, Christopher B.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Laminar boundary layer velocity measurements are made on a 10-degree half-angle wedge in a Mach 10 flow. Two types of discrete boundary layer trips were used to perturb the boundary layer gas. The first was a 2-mm tall, 4-mm diameter cylindrical trip. The second was a scaled version of the Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Detailed Test Objective (DTO) trip. Both 1-mm and 2.5-mm tall BLT DTO trips were tested. Additionally, side-view and plan-view axial boundary layer velocity measurements were made in the absence of these tripping devices. The free-stream unit Reynolds numbers tested for the cylindrical trips were 1.7x10(exp 6)/m and 3.3x10(exp 6)/m. The free-stream unit Reynolds number tested for the BLT DTO trips was 1.7x10(exp 6)/m. The angle of attack was kept at approximately 5-degrees for most of the tests resulting in a Mach number of approximately 8.3. These combinations of unit Reynolds numbers and angle of attack resulted in laminar flowfields. To study the precision of the measurement technique, the angle of attack was varied during one run. Nitric-oxide (NO) molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) was used to obtain averaged axial velocity values and associated uncertainties. These uncertainties are as low as 20 m/s. An interline, progressive scan CCD camera was used to obtain separate images of the initial reference and shifted NO molecules that had been tagged by the laser. The CCD configuration allowed for sub-microsecond sequential acquisition of both images. The maximum planar spatial resolution achieved for the side-view velocity measurements was 0.07-mm in the wall-normal direction by 1.45-mm in the streamwise direction with a spatial depth of 0.5-mm. For the plan-view measurements, the maximum planar spatial resolution in the spanwise and streamwise directions was 0.69-mm by 1.28-mm, respectively, with a spatial depth of 0.5-mm. Temperature sensitive paint (TSP) measurements are provided to compliment the velocity data and to provide further

  14. Thermophoretically augmented mass transfer rates to solid walls across laminar boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Predictions of mass transfer (heavy vapor and small particle deposition) rates to solid walls, including the effects of thermal (Soret) diffusion ('thermophoresis' for small particles), are made by numerically solving the two-dimensional self-similar forced convection laminar boundary-layer equations with variable properties, covering the particle size range from vapor molecules up to the size threshold for inertial (dynamical nonequilibrium) effects. The effect of thermophoresis is predicted to be particularly important for submicron particle deposition on highly cooled solid surfaces, with corresponding enhancement factors at atmospheric conditions being over a thousand-fold at T(w)/T(e) equal to about 0.6. As a consequence of this mass transfer mechanism, the particle size dependence of the mass transfer coefficient to a cooled wall will be much weaker than for the corresponding case of isothermal capture by Brownian-convective diffusion.

  15. A finite difference method for predicting supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows with tangential slot injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, E. W.; Lewis, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    An implicit finite difference method has been applied to tangential slot injection into supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows. In addition, the effects induced by the interaction between the boundary layer displacement thickness and the external pressure field are considered. In the present method, three different eddy viscosity models have been used to specify the turbulent momentum exchange. One model depends on the species concentration profile and the species conservation equation has been included in the system of governing partial differential equations. Results are compared with experimental data at stream Mach numbers of 2.4 and 6.0 and with results of another finite difference method. Good agreement was generally obtained for the reduction of wall skin friction with slot injection and with experimental Mach number and pitot pressure profiles. Calculations with the effects of pressure interaction included showed these effects to be smaller than effects of changing eddy viscosity models.

  16. On the Coupling Between a Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer and a Flexible Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frendi, Abdelkader

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical model and a computer code have been developed to fully couple the vibration of an aircraft fuselage panel to the surrounding flow field, turbulent boundary layer and acoustic fluid. The turbulent boundary layer model is derived using a triple decomposition of the flow variables and applying a conditional averaging to the resulting equations. Linearized panel and acoustic equations are used. Results from this model are in good agreement with existing experimental and numerical data. It is shown that in the supersonic regime, full coupling of the flexible panel leads to lower response and radiation from the panel. This is believed to be due to an increase in acoustic damping on the panel in this regime. Increasing the Mach number increases the acoustic damping, which is in agreement with earlier work.

  17. Direct Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer with Spanwise Wall Oscillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidan Ni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Direct numerical simulations (DNS of Mach = 2.9 supersonic turbulent boundary layers with spanwise wall oscillation (SWO are conducted to investigate the turbulent heat transport mechanism and its relation with the turbulent momentum transport. The turbulent coherent structures are suppressed by SWO and the drag is reduced. Although the velocity and temperature statistics are disturbed by SWO differently, the turbulence transports of momentum and heat are simultaneously suppressed. The Reynolds analogy and the strong Reynolds analogy are also preserved in all the controlled flows, proving the consistent mechanisms of momentum transport and heat transport in the turbulent boundary layer with SWO. Despite the extra dissipation and heat induced by SWO, a net wall heat flux reduction can be achieved with the proper selected SWO parameters. The consistent mechanism of momentum and heat transports supports the application of turbulent drag reduction technologies to wall heat flux controls in high-speed vehicles.

  18. Recovery of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer after an expansion corner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-bo; Hu, Zhiwei; Sandham, Neil D.

    2017-07-01

    Supersonic turbulent flows at Mach 2.7 over expansion corners with deflection angles of 0° (flat plate), 2°, and 4° have been studied using direct numerical simulation. Distributions of skin friction, pressure, velocity, and boundary layer growth show that the turbulent boundary layer experiences a recovery from a non-equilibrium to an equilibrium state downstream of the expansion corner. Analysis of velocity profiles indicates that the streamwise velocity undergoes a reduction in the near-wall region even though the velocity in the core part of the boundary layer is accelerated after the expansion corner. Growth of the boundary layer was evaluated and a higher shape factor was found in the expansion cases. Turbulence was found to be mostly suppressed downstream of the corner, and throughout the recovery region, even though turbulence is regenerated in the near-wall region. The expansion ramp increases the near-wall streak spacing compared to a flat plate, and turbulent kinetic energy profiles and budgets exhibit a characteristic two-layer structure. Near-wall turbulence recovers to a balance between the local production and dissipation equilibrium more quickly in the inner layer than in the outer layer. The two-layer structure is due to a history effect of turbulence decay in the outer part of the boundary layer downstream of the expansion corner, with limited momentum and energy exchange between the inner layer and the main stream.

  19. Laminar mixed convection boundary layer flow induced by a permeable surface stretched with prescribed skin friction boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mixed laminar boundary layer flow and heat transfer on a permeable stretched surface moving with prescribed skin friction are studied. Three major cases, which correspond to complete similarity solutions, are considered. The cases are combinations of power law indices n and m representing temperature and skin friction distributions, respectively. The first case (n = 0, m = 0.5 corresponds to isothermal stretched surface with skin friction at the surface scales as x 1/4. The second case (n = 1, m = 1 is a linear temperature and skin friction distribution along the vertical stretched surface. The third case (n = −1, m = 0 represents inverse temperature variation along the surface with prescribed skin friction of the order of x −1/2. Similarity solutions are obtained for the surface stretched in a stagnant air with Prandtl number = 0.72. The effect of suction/injection velocity (fw and the buoyancy parameter (λ is studied in detail. The results show that the heat transfer coefficient along the surface is enhanced for assisting flow (λ > 0 at any value of fw for the first and second cases, while it is reduced for the third case. However, the opposite is true for the opposing flow (λ < 0. Furthermore, suction enhances the heat transfer coefficient, whereas injection degrades it at any fixed λ for the first and second prescribed skin friction boundary conditions, and the opposite is true for the third case.

  20. Comparing Experiment and Computation of Hypersonic Laminar Boundary Layers with Isolated Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Iyer, Prahladh S.; Mahesh, Krishnan; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Johansen, Craig T.

    2014-01-01

    Streamwise velocity profile behavior in a hypersonic laminar boundary layer in the presence of an isolated roughness element is presented for an edge Mach number of 8.2. Two different roughness element types are considered: a 2-mm tall, 4-mm diameter cylinder, and a 2-mm radius hemisphere. Measurements of the streamwise velocity behavior using nitric oxide (NO) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) have been performed on a 20-degree wedge model. The top surface of this model acts as a flat-plate and is oriented at 5 degrees with respect to the freestream flow. Computations using direct numerical simulation (DNS) of these flows have been performed and are compared to the measured velocity profiles. Particular attention is given to the characteristics of velocity profiles immediately upstream and downstream of the roughness elements. In these regions, the streamwise flow can experience strong deceleration or acceleration. An analysis in which experimentally measured MTV profile displacements are compared with DNS particle displacements is performed to determine if the assumption of constant velocity over the duration of the MTV measurement is valid. This assumption is typically made when reporting MTV-measured velocity profiles, and may result in significant errors when comparing MTV measurements to computations in regions with strong deceleration or acceleration. The DNS computations with the cylindrical roughness element presented in this paper were performed with and without air injection from a rectangular slot upstream of the cylinder. This was done to determine the extent to which gas seeding in the MTV measurements perturbs the boundary layer flowfield.

  1. Transition prediction for supersonic and hypersonic boundary layers on a cone with angle of attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU CaiHong; ZHOU Heng

    2009-01-01

    Transition prediction for boundary layers has always been one of the urgent problems waiting for a solution for the development of aero-space technology, yet there is no reliable and effective method due to the complexity of the problem. The eN method has been regarded as an effective method for the transition prediction of boundary layers. However, it heavily relies on experiment or experience. And in cases with three-dimensional base flow, for instance, the boundary layer on a cone with angle of attack, the result of its application is not satisfactory. The authors have found its cause and proposed the method for its improvement, which did yield the fairly satisfactory result for a given test case, and also did not rely so much on experiment or experience. However, before people can really apply this method to practical problems, more test cases have to be studied. In this paper, more test cases for the appli- cation of the improved eN method to problems of transition prediction of supersonic and hypersonic boundary layers on cones with angle of attack will be studied. The results are compared with those obtained by experiments and/or direct numerical simulations, confirming that the improved eN method is effective and reliable. We also find that there may be more than one ZARF for each meridian plane, and which one should be chosen for the eN method has been clarified.

  2. DESIGN OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL SUPERSONIC TURBINE ROTOR BLADES WITH BOUNDARY-LAYER CORRECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program has been developed for the design of supersonic rotor blades where losses are accounted for by correcting the ideal blade geometry for boundary layer displacement thickness. The ideal blade passage is designed by the method of characteristics and is based on establishing vortex flow within the passage. Boundary-layer parameters (displacement and momentum thicknesses) are calculated for the ideal passage, and the final blade geometry is obtained by adding the displacement thicknesses to the ideal nozzle coordinates. The boundary-layer parameters are also used to calculate the aftermixing conditions downstream of the rotor blades assuming the flow mixes to a uniform state. The computer program input consists essentially of the rotor inlet and outlet Mach numbers, upper- and lower-surface Mach numbers, inlet flow angle, specific heat ratio, and total flow conditions. The program gas properties are set up for air. Additional gases require changes to be made to the program. The computer output consists of the corrected rotor blade coordinates, the principal boundary-layer parameters, and the aftermixing conditions. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 7094. This program was developed in 1971.

  3. A three-dimensional, compressible, laminar boundary-layer method for general fuselages. Volume 1: Numerical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Yong-Sun

    1990-01-01

    A procedure for calculating 3-D, compressible laminar boundary layer flow on general fuselage shapes is described. The boundary layer solutions can be obtained in either nonorthogonal 'body oriented' coordinates or orthogonal streamline coordinates. The numerical procedure is 'second order' accurate, efficient and independent of the cross flow velocity direction. Numerical results are presented for several test cases, including a sharp cone, an ellipsoid of revolution, and a general aircraft fuselage at angle of attack. Comparisons are made between numerical results obtained using nonorthogonal curvilinear 'body oriented' coordinates and streamline coordinates.

  4. Radiation and Viscous Dissipation Effects on Laminar Boundary Layer Flow Nanofluid over a Vertical Plate with a Convective Surface Boundary Condition with Suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gangadhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of laminar radiation and viscous dissipation effects on laminar boundary layer flow over a vertical plate with a convective surface boundary condition is studied using different types of nanoparticles. The general governing partial differential equations are transformed into a set of two nonlinear ordinary differential equations using unique similarity transformation. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are obtained using the Nachtsheim-Swigert Shooting iteration technique along with the fourth order Runga Kutta method. Two different types of nanoparticles copper water nanofluid and alumina water nanofluid are studied. The effects of radiation and viscous dissipation on the heat transfer characteristics are discussed in detail. It is observed that as Radiation parameter increases, temperature decreases for copper water and alumina water nanofluid and the heat transfer coefficient of nanofluids increases with the increase of convective heat transfer parameter for copper water and alumina water nanofluids.

  5. An experimental investigation of the supersonic turbulent boundary layer subjected to concave curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian-cheng; Wang, Zhen-guo; Zhao, Yu-xin

    2016-09-01

    By employing particle image velocimetry, the response of a Mach 2.95 turbulent boundary layer to the concave curvature is experimentally investigated. The radius of the concave wall is 350 mm, and the turning angle is 20∘. Logarithmic law is well preserved in the profile of streamwise velocity at all streamwise positions despite the impact of curvature. The varying trend of principal strain rate is found to be different at different heights within the boundary layer, which cannot be explained by the suggestion given by former researchers. Based on the three-layer model proposed in this paper, distribution of the principal strain rate is carefully analyzed. The streamwise increase of wall friction is suggested to be brought by the increase of velocity gradient in the thin subsonic layer. Increases of the static temperature and the related sound speed are responsible for that. Larger correlated turbulent motions could be introduced by the concave curvature. The probability density histograms of streamwise velocity reveal that the large scale hairpin packets are statistically well organized. The concave curvature is found to have the potential of reinforcing the organization, which explains the increase of turbulent level in the supersonic concave boundary layer.

  6. Investigation of Materials for Boundary Layer Control in a Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braafladt, Alexander; Lucero, John M.; Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2013-01-01

    During operation of the NASA Glenn Research Center 15- by 15-Centimeter Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT), a significant, undesirable corner flow separation is created by the three-dimensional interaction of the wall and floor boundary layers in the tunnel corners following an oblique-shock/ boundary-layer interaction. A method to minimize this effect was conceived by connecting the wall and floor boundary layers with a radius of curvature in the corners. The results and observations of a trade study to determine the effectiveness of candidate materials for creating the radius of curvature in the SWT are presented. The experiments in the study focus on the formation of corner fillets of four different radii of curvature, 6.35 mm (0.25 in.), 9.525 mm (0.375 in.), 12.7 mm (0.5 in.), and 15.875 mm (0.625 in.), based on the observed boundary layer thickness of 11.43 mm (0.45 in.). Tests were performed on ten candidate materials to determine shrinkage, surface roughness, cure time, ease of application and removal, adhesion, eccentricity, formability, and repeatability. Of the ten materials, the four materials which exhibited characteristics most promising for effective use were the heavy body and regular type dental impression materials, the basic sculpting epoxy, and the polyurethane sealant. Of these, the particular material which was most effective, the heavy body dental impression material, was tested in the SWT in Mach 2 flow, and was observed to satisfy all requirements for use in creating the corner fillets in the upcoming experiments on shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction.

  7. On the impact of adverse pressure gradient on the supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian-Cheng; Wang, Zhen-Guo; Zhao, Yu-Xin

    2016-11-01

    By employing the particle image velocimetry, the mean and turbulent characteristics of a Mach 2.95 turbulent boundary layer are experimentally investigated without the impact of curvature. The physical mechanism with which the streamwise adverse pressure gradient affects the supersonic boundary layer is revealed. The data are compared to that of the concave boundary layer with similar streamwise distributions of wall static pressure to clarify the separate impacts of the adverse pressure gradient and the concave curvature. The logarithmic law is observed to be well preserved for both of the cases. The dip below the logarithmic law is not observed in present investigation. Theoretical analysis indicates that it could be the result of compromise between the opposite impacts of the compression wave and the increased turbulent intensity. Compared to the zero pressure gradient boundary layer, the principal strain rate and the turbulent intensities are increased by the adverse pressure gradient. The shear layer formed due the hairpin packets could be sharpened by the compression wave, which leads to higher principal strain rate and the associated turbulent level. Due to the additional impact of the centrifugal instability brought by the concave wall, even higher turbulent intensities than that of the adverse pressure gradient case are introduced. The existence of velocity modes within the zero pressure gradient boundary layer suggests that the large scale motions are statistically well organized. The generation of new velocity modes due to the adverse pressure gradient indicates that the turbulent structure is changed by the adverse pressure gradient, through which more turbulence production that cannot be effectively predicted by the Reynolds-stress transport equations could be brought.

  8. Comparison of calculated and measured heat transfer coefficients for transonic and supersonic boundary-layer flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerst, C.; Schulz, A.; Wittig, S. [Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany). Lehrstuhl und Inst. fuer Thermische Stroemungsmaschinen

    1995-04-01

    The present study compares measured and computed heat transfer coefficients for high-speed boundary layer nozzle flows under engine Reynolds number conditions (U{sub {infinity}} = 230 {divided_by} 880 m/s, Re* = 0.37 {divided_by} 1.07 {times} 10{sup 6}). Experimental data have been obtained by heat transfer measurements in a two-dimensional, nonsymmetric, convergent-divergent nozzle. The nozzle wall is convectively cooled using water passages. The coolant heat transfer data and nozzle surface temperatures are used as boundary conditions for a three-dimensional finite-element code, which is employed to calculate the temperature distribution inside the nozzle wall. Heat transfer coefficients along the hot gas nozzle wall are derived from the temperature gradients normal to the surface. The results are compared with numerical heat transfer predictions using the low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model by Lam and Bremhorst. Influence of compressibility in the transport equations for the turbulence properties is taken into account by using the local averaged density. The results confirm that this simplification leads to good results for transonic and low supersonic flows.

  9. Existence of a natural instability not predicted by theory and connected to a wall deformation in a laminar boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougat, P.; Martin, F.

    1981-01-01

    Natural instability related to negative wall deformation was studied. It was shown that natural instabilities which propagate in a laminar boundary layer of a flat plate are in agreement with stability theory. It is found that if a wall has a deformation, a second frequency does exist, which is not predicted and is twice the first frequency. This second instable frequency only appears if there is a negative velocity gradient. The phenomenon is located very closely to the wall and drops off rapidly when moved away from it.

  10. Laminar flow heat transfer studies in a twisted square duct for constant wall heat flux boundary condition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rambir Bhadouriya; Amit Agrawal; S V Prabhu

    2015-04-01

    The problem of fluid flow and heat transfer was studied for flow inside twisted duct of square cross-section. Three-dimensional numerical solutions were obtained for steady fully developed laminar flow and for uniform wall heat flux boundary conditions using commercially available software. Reynolds number range considered was 100-3000. Twist ratio used are 2.5, 5, 10 and 20. Fluids considered are in Prandtl number range of 0.7-20. Product of friction factor and Reynolds number is found to be a function of Reynolds number and maximum values are observed for a twist ratio of 2.5 and Reynolds number of 3000. Maximum Nusselt number is observed for the same values along with Prandtl number of 20. Correlations for friction factor and Nusselt number are developed involving swirl parameter. Local distribution of friction factor ratio and Nusselt number across a cross-section is presented. Based on constant pumping power criteria, enhancement factor is defined to compare twisted ducts with straight ducts. Selection of twisted square duct is presented in terms of enhancement factor. It is found that twisted duct performs well in the laminar region for range of parameters studied. Heat transfer enhancement for Reynolds number of 3000 and Prandtl number of 0.7 for twist ratio of 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 is 20%, 17.8%, 16.1% and 13.7%, respectively. The results are significant because it will contribute to development of energy efficient compact size heat exchangers.

  11. In-flight active wave cancelation with delayed-x-LMS control algorithm in a laminar boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Bernhard; Fabbiane, Nicolò; Nemitz, Timotheus; Bagheri, Shervin; Henningson, Dan S.; Grundmann, Sven

    2016-10-01

    This manuscript demonstrates the first successful application of the delayed-x-LMS (dxLMS) control algorithm for TS-wave cancelation. Active wave cancelation of two-dimensional broadband Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) disturbances is performed with a single DBD plasma actuator. The experiments are conducted in flight on the pressure side of a laminar flow wing glove, mounted on a manned glider. The stability properties of the controller are investigated in detail with experimental flight data, DNS and stability analysis of the boundary layer. Finally, a model-free approach for dxLMS operation is introduced to operate the controller as a `black-box' system, which automatically adjusts the controller settings based on a group speed measurement of the disturbance wave packets. The modified dxLMS controller is operated without a model and is able to adapt to varying conditions that may occur during flight in atmosphere.

  12. Singularities of 3D laminar boundary layer equations and flow structure in their vicinity on conical bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaev, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    Singularities appearing in solutions of 3D laminar boundary layer (BL) equations, when two streamline families are collided, are discussed. For conical bodies, equations are investigated using asymptotic methods. Analytical solutions are obtained for the outer BL region; their singularities in the runoff plane are studied. The asymptotic flow structure near the singularity is constructed on the base of Navier-Stokes equations at large Reynolds numbers. For different flow regions analytical solutions are found and are matched with BL equation solutions. Properties of BL equations for the near-wall region in the runoff plane are investigated and a criterion of the solution disappearing is found. It is shown that this criterion separates two different topological flow structures and corresponds to the singularity appearance in this plane in solutions of full equations. Calculations confirmed obtained results are presented.

  13. In-Flight Active Wave Cancelation with Delayed-x-LMS Control Algorithm in a Laminar Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Bernhard; Fabbiane, Nicolo; Nemitz, Timotheus; Bagheri, Shervin; Henningson, Dan; Grundmann, Sven

    2016-11-01

    This manuscript demonstrates the first successful application of the delayed-x-LMS (dxLMS) control algorithm for TS-wave cancelation. Active wave cancelation of two-dimensional broad-band Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) disturbances is performed with a single DBD plasma actuator. The experiments are conducted in flight on the pressure side of a laminar flow wing glove, mounted on a manned glider. The stability properties of the controller are investigated in detail with experimental flight data, DNS and stability analysis of the boundary layer. Finally, a model-free approach for dxLMS operation is introduced to operate the controller as a "black box" system, which automatically adjusts the controller settings based on a group speed measurement of the disturbance wave packets. The modified dxLMS controller is operated without a model and is able to adapt to varying conditions that may occur during flight in atmosphere. DFG No.GR3524/4-1.

  14. An experimental study on laminar-turbulent transition at high free-stream turbulence in boundary layers with pressure gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernoray Valery

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We report here the results of a study on measurements and prediction of laminar-turbulent transition at high free-stream turbulence in boundary layers of the airfoil-like geometries with presence of the external pressure gradient changeover. The experiments are performed for a number of flow cases with different flow Reynolds number, turbulence intensity and pressure gradient distributions. The results were then compared to numerical calculations for same geometries and flow conditions. The experiments and computations are performed for the flow parameters which are typical for turbomachinery applications and the major idea of the current study is the validation of the turbulence model which can be used for such engineering applications.

  15. Pharmaceutical modulation of diffusion potentials at aqueous-aqueous boundaries under laminar flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Courtney J; Strutwolf, Jörg; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the modulation of the diffusion potential formed at the microfluidic aqueous-aqueous boundary by a pharmaceutical substance is presented. Co-flowing aqueous streams in a microchannel were used to form the stable boundary between the streams. Measurement of the open circuit potential between two silver/silver chloride electrodes enabled the diffusion potential at the boundary to be determined, which is concentration dependent. Experimental results for protonated propranolol as well as tetrapropylammonium are presented. This concept may be useful as a strategy for the detection of drug substances.

  16. Equations for a laminar boundary layer of a dilated liquid in a transverse magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samokhin, V.N.

    1984-01-01

    A system of equations is examined which describes the magnetohydrodynamic boundary layer of a dilated liquid in a transverse magnetic field. The self modeling problem with an exponential law of change in the speed of the external stream and magnetic induction is studied. Localization of the perturbation in the liquid speed in the boundary layer is established and the change in the properties of the solution associated with this is shown.

  17. Mathematical Physics of the Propagation of a Laminar Aerodynamic Boundary Layer, Using the Kinetic Theory of Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGraffenried, Albert L.

    2002-07-01

    The paper presents a derivation showing the propagation mechanisms fundamental to the growth of the laminar aerodynamic boundary layer. The molecular mechanisms basic to such growth are those presented by James Clerk Maxwell in his classic derivation of mu, the viscosity of a gas, based on the Kinetic Theory of Gases. Maxwell's derivation is modified by moving the scene of the analysis from a free-stream location (where he assumes a linear velocity gradient) to a location immediately adjacent an infinite flat plate, using an unknown velocity profile. Gas, initially quiescent above the flat plate, suddenly jumps to velocity U0 at time t=0+. The resultant growth of a boundary-layer velocity profile, vx)(y,t, is solved for in the following manner: a. Phi-up, the stream momentum crossing an element of area, da=dxdz per second per square centimeter, in an upward (+y) direction, is found by integrating through all volume below da, using an unknown velocity profile, vx)(y,t. Similarly, Phi-down, the stream momentum crossing da in a downward (-y) direction is found by integrating through all volume above da. The net stream momentum, Phy(y) equals Phi-up minus Phi-down. The acceleration, dvx/dt of an element of mass dm, equal to rho times dxdydz is set equal to minus the partial of Phi with respect to y, the net momentum-flux gradient, based on Newton's Law. In cylindrical coordinates, azimuth angle gamma is promptly integrated out. Elevation angle theta is integrated-out numerically, using a short BASIC program on a PC. Separation of Variables is assumed, specifically, vx)(y,t may be set equal to f1(y)f2(t), thus producing two separate integro-differential equations which are each set equal to a common constant, -Beta2. LaPlace transforming these two equations into the sy and st domains, applying the Method of Partial Fractions to the sy equation, the FORM of the solution is found, viz., exponential and hyperbolic functions. Boundary conditions are satisfied in order to

  18. The investigation of coherent structures in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer based on DNS database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Through temporal mode direct numerical simulation, flow field database of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with Mach number 4.5 and Reynolds number Reθ =1094 has been obtained. Commonly used detection meth- ods in experiments are applied to detecting coherent structures in the flow field, and it is found that coherent structures do exist in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer. The detected results show that a low-speed streak is de- tected by using the Mu-level method, the rising parts of this streak are detected by using the second quadrant method, and the crossing regions from a low-speed streak to the high-speed one are detected by using the VITA method respectively. Notwithstanding that different regions are detected by different methods, they are all accompanied by quasi-stream-wise vortex structures.

  19. The investigation of coherent structures in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer based on DNS database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG ZhangFeng; ZHOU Heng; LUO JiSheng

    2007-01-01

    Through temporal mode direct numerical simulation, flow field database of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with Mach number 4.5 and Reynolds number Reθ=1094 has been obtained. Commonly used detection methods in experiments are applied to detecting coherent structures in the flow field,and it is found that coherent structures do exist in the wall region of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer. The detected results show that a low-speed streak is detected by using the Mu-level method, the rising parts of this streak are detected by using the second quadrant method, and the crossing regions from a low-speed streak to the high-speed one are detected by using the VITA method respectively.Notwithstanding that different regions are detected by different methods, they are all accompanied by quasi-stream-wise vortex structures.

  20. Coherent Structures Generated by a Circular Jet Issuing into a Cross Laminar Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    Visualisations by LASER topogratphies and velocity measurements by LDV have allowed the study of the flow resulting form the interaction between a circular jet and a cross boundary layer.This type of flow is dominated by the presence of many complex vortices that come from the recombining of the vorticity created in the injction tube and that created along the chamber floor.

  1. Numerical investigations of shock wave interaction with laminar boundary layer on compressor profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowicz, M.; Flaszyński, P.

    2016-10-01

    The investigation of shockwave boundary layer interaction on suction side of transonic compressor blade is one of main objectives of TFAST project (Transition Location Effect on Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interaction). In order to look more closely into the flow structure on suction side of a profile, a design of generic test section in linear transonic wind tunnel was proposed. The experimental and numerical results of flow structure on a suction side of the compressor profile investigations are presented. The numerical simulations are carried out for EARSM (Explicit Algebraic Reynolds Stress Model) turbulence model with transition model. The result are compared with oil flow visualisation, schlieren pictures, Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) and static pressure.

  2. Laminar and turbulent channel flow simulations and the choice of appropriate boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baerwolff, G. [FB Mathematik, TU Berlin (Germany); Koster, F.

    1998-07-01

    Transitional flow over a backward-facing step is studied by large eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS). The simulation was performed at a Reynolds number of 3000 based on step height and inlet stream velocity. We compare the passive flow and the flow controlled by a two-dimensional acoustic manipulation in front of the separation line. The aim of the boundary layer control is to decrease the reattachment length. Huppertz and Janke (1995/1997) demonstrated experimentally a reduction of the reattachment length of approximately 30% for a cetain frequency of the acoustic disturbancies. Our statistical results show a good agreement with the experimental data of Huppertz and Janke. The problem of the choice of suitable outflow boundary conditions was considered with respect to the reduction of the length of the computational domain and the reduction of computational expenses respectively. (orig.)

  3. Approximate Analytical Solutions for a Class of Laminar Boundary-Layer Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seripah Awang Kechil; Ishak Hashim; Sim Siaw Jiet

    2007-01-01

    A simple and efficient approximate analytical technique is presented to obtain solutions to a class of two-point boundary value similarity problems in fluid mechanics. This technique is based on the decomposition method which yields a general analytic solution in the form of a convergent infinite series with easily computable terms. Comparative study is carried out to show the accuracy and effectiveness of the technique.

  4. Frequency selection mechanisms in the flow of a laminar boundary layer over a shallow cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadri, Ubaid Ali; Schmid, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the flow over shallow cavities as a representative configuration for modeling small surface irregularities in wall-bounded shear flows. Due to the globally stable nature of the flow, we perform a frequency response analysis, which shows a significant potential for the amplification of disturbance kinetic energy by harmonic forcing within a certain frequency band. Shorter and more shallow cavities exhibit less amplified responses, while energy from the base flow can be extracted predominantly from forcing that impacts the cavity head on. A structural sensitivity analysis, combined with a componentwise decomposition of the sensitivity tensor, reveals the regions of the flow that act most effectively as amplifiers. We find that the flow inside the cavity plays a negligible role, whereas boundary layer modifications immediately upstream and downstream of the cavity edges contribute significantly to the frequency response. The same regions constitute preferred locations for implementing active or passive control strategies to manipulate the frequency response of the flow.

  5. Finite-Difference Solution for Laminar or Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow over Axisymmetric Bodies with Ideal Gas, CF4, or Equilibrium Air Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, H. Harris, II; Millman, Daniel R.; Greendyke, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    A computer code was developed that uses an implicit finite-difference technique to solve nonsimilar, axisymmetric boundary layer equations for both laminar and turbulent flow. The code can treat ideal gases, air in chemical equilibrium, and carbon tetrafluoride (CF4), which is a useful gas for hypersonic blunt-body simulations. This is the only known boundary layer code that can treat CF4. Comparisons with experimental data have demonstrated that accurate solutions are obtained. The method should prove useful as an analysis tool for comparing calculations with wind tunnel experiments and for making calculations about flight vehicles where equilibrium air chemistry assumptions are valid.

  6. Supersonic compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.; Breidenthal, Robert E.

    2016-04-12

    A supersonic compressor including a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a diffuser. The diffuser includes a plurality of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions, for deceleration of gas to subsonic conditions and then for expansion of subsonic gas, to change kinetic energy of the gas to static pressure. The aerodynamic ducts include vortex generating structures for controlling boundary layer, and structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when the aerodynamic ducts are designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are provided having an aspect ratio of in excess of two to one, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.

  7. Turbulence measurements in axisymmetric supersonic boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gootzait, E.; Childs, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    Mean flow and turbulence measurements are presented for adiabatic compressible turbulent boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients. The gradients were induced on the wall of an axially symmetric wind tunnel by contoured centerbodies mounted on the wind tunnel centerline. The boundary layer turbulence downstream of a boundary layer bleed section in a zero pressure gradient was also examined. The measurements were obtained using a constant temperature hot-wire anemometer. The adverse pressure gradients were found to significantly alter the turbulence properties of the boundary layer. With flow through the bleed holes there was a measureable decrease in the rms longitudinal velocity fluctuations near the wall and the turbulent shear stress in the boundary layer was reduced.

  8. Numerical Investigation of Wall Cooling and Suction Effects on Supersonic Flat-Plate Boundary Layer Transition Using Large Eddy Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suozhu Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Reducing friction resistance and aerodynamic heating has important engineering significance to improve the performances of super/hypersonic aircraft, so the purpose of transition control and turbulent drag reduction becomes one of the cutting edges in turbulence research. In order to investigate the influences of wall cooling and suction on the transition process and fully developed turbulence, the large eddy simulation of spatially evolving supersonic boundary layer transition over a flat-plate with freestream Mach number 4.5 at different wall temperature and suction intensity is performed in the present work. It is found that the wall cooling and suction are capable of changing the mean velocity profile within the boundary layer and improving the stability of the flow field, thus delaying the onset of the spatial transition process. The transition control will become more effective as the wall temperature decreases, while there is an optimal wall suction intensity under the given conditions. Moreover, the development of large-scale coherent structures can be suppressed effectively via wall cooling, but wall suction has no influence.

  9. Supersonic flow past a flat lattice of cylindrical rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvernyuk, S. V.; Maksimov, F. A.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional supersonic laminar ideal gas flows past a regular flat lattice of identical circular cylinders lying in a plane perpendicular to the free-stream velocity are numerically simulated. The flows are computed by applying a multiblock numerical technique with local boundary-fitted curvilinear grids that have finite regions overlapping the global rectangular grid covering the entire computational domain. Viscous boundary layers are resolved on the local grids by applying the Navier-Stokes equations, while the aerodynamic interference of shock wave structures occurring between the lattice elements is described by the Euler equations. In the overlapping grid regions, the functions are interpolated to the grid interfaces. The regimes of supersonic lattice flow are classified. The parameter ranges in which the steady flow around the lattice is not unique are detected, and the mechanisms of hysteresis phenomena are examined.

  10. Digital data acquisition and preliminary instrumentation study for the F-16 laminar flow control vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostowari, Cyrus

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary studies have shown that maintenance of laminar flow through active boundary-layer control is viable. Current research activity at NASA Langley and NASA Dryden is utilizing the F-16XL-1 research vehicle fitted with a laminar-flow suction glove that is connected to a vacuum manifold in order to create and control laminar flow at supersonic flight speeds. This experimental program has been designed to establish the feasibility of obtaining laminar flow at supersonic speeds with highly swept wing and to provide data for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code calibration. Flight experiments conducted as supersonic speeds have indicated that it is possible to achieve laminar flow under controlled suction at flight Mach numbers greater than 1. Currently this glove is fitted with a series of pressure belts and flush mounted hot film sensors for the purpose of determining the pressure distributions and the extent of laminar flow region past the stagnation point. The present mode of data acquisition relies on out-dated on board multi-channel FM analogue tape recorder system. At the end of each flight, the analogue data is digitized through a long laborious process and then analyzed. It is proposed to replace this outdated system with an on board state-of-the-art digital data acquisition system capable of a through put rate of up to 1 MegaHertz. The purpose of this study was three-fold: (1) to develop a simple algorithm for acquiring data via 2 analogue-to-digital convertor boards simultaneously (total of 32 channels); (2) to interface hot-film/wire anemometry instrumentation with a PCAT type computer; and (3) to characterize the frequency response of a flush mounted film sensor. A brief description of each of the above tasks along with recommendations are given.

  11. High Enthalpy Effects on Two Boundary Layer Disturbances in Supersonic and Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    178 C.1 Modified Millikan and White relaxation times...131 6.30 This plot shows the LST stability diagram for the case of cold carbon dioxide injection at a rate of 6 g/s. The sharp drop in amplified...boundary layer. Whitehead[77] used surface oil flow to visualize CHAPTER 2. BACKGROUND 21 the flow features around isolated roughness elements in

  12. Heat and mass transfer in a dissociated laminar boundary layer of air with consideration of the finite rate of chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyegbesan, A. O.; Algermissen, J.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical investigation of heat and mass transfer in a dissociated laminar boundary layer of air on an isothermal flat plate is carried out for different degrees of cooling of the wall. A finite-difference chemical model is used to study elementary reactions involving NO2 and N2O. The analysis is based on equations of continuity, momentum, energy, conservation and state for the two-dimensional viscous flow of a reacting multicomponent mixtures. Attention is given to the effects of both catalyticity and noncatalyticity of the wall.

  13. Numerical simulation of the disturbances excitation in a supersonic boundary layer by the longitudinal sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, A. N.; Gaponov, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    The boundary layer receptivity process due to the interaction of three-dimensional slow acoustic disturbances is numerically investigated at a free stream Mach number of 2.0. Problem is solved in the linear approximation relatively excited disturbances by an acoustic wave. Numerical simulations were conducted with using the program complex Ansys. In general, matching the results of the approximate method (based on stability equations for low-frequency fluctuations) with direct numerical simulation data is satisfactory. Normalized solutions on the corresponding maxima of the velocity perturbations amplitudes are coincided well enough about a wall. The greatest discrepancy occurs in the area of the boundary layer edge where the approximation theory is inapplicable.

  14. Measurements of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer by focusing schlieren deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, S.; Settles, G. S.

    Some novel, non-intrusive, high-frequency, localized optical measurements of turbulence in compressible flows are described. The technique is based upon focusing schlieren optics coupled with high-speed quantitative measurement of light intensity fluctuations in the schlieren image. Measurements of density gradient fluctuations confined to a thin slice of the flowfield are thus obtained. The new instrument was used to investigate the structure of a two-dimensional, adiabatic, wind tunnel wall boundary layer at a Mach number of 3. The measurements were compared to data obtained using hot-wire anemometry and good agreement was found between the two. Distributions of broadband convection velocity of large-scale structures through the boundary later were also measured. In marked contrast to earlier results, it is shown here that the convection velocity is essentially identical to the local mean velocity. Further, results obtained using the VITA conditional sampling technique shed new light on the turbulent boundary layer structure. Overall, the data presented herein serve to validate the new measurement technique.

  15. Unsteadiness of Shock Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction in Supersonic Cascade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-JuanWang; Ke-JunCai; 等

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of the passive control of shock wave/boundary layer interaction for reducing the amplitude of the shock oscillation was conducted on the circular arc-wedge(CW) profile cascade in a 220290mm transonic compressor cascade wind tunnel.A perforated surface with a cavity beneath it was positioned on the suction surface of the blade at the location of shock impingement.The Schlieren and high-speed photographs for flow over pervorated blade are presented and compared with the results for solid blades,With the perforated surface,the high-speen photographs indicated an significant suppression of shock osciation.

  16. Incompressible Modes Excited by Supersonic Shear in Boundary Layers: Acoustic CFS Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    We present an instability for exciting incompressible modes (e.g. gravity or Rossby modes) at the surface of a star accreting through a boundary layer. The instability excites a stellar mode by sourcing an acoustic wave in the disk at the boundary layer, which carries a flux of energy and angular momentum with the opposite sign as the energy and angular momentum density of the stellar mode. We call this instability the acoustic CFS instability, because of the direct analogy to the Chandrasekhar-Friedman-Schutz instability for exciting modes on a rotating star by emission of energy in the form of gravitational waves. However, the acoustic CFS instability differs from its gravitational wave counterpart in that the fluid medium in which the acoustic wave propagates (i.e.\\ the accretion disk) typically rotates faster than the star in which the incompressible mode is sourced. For this reason, the instability can operate even for a non-rotating star in the presence of an accretion disk. We discuss applications of o...

  17. Incompressible Modes Excited by Supersonic Shear in Boundary Layers: Acoustic CFS Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.

    2017-02-01

    We present an instability for exciting incompressible modes (e.g., gravity or Rossby modes) at the surface of a star accreting through a boundary layer. The instability excites a stellar mode by sourcing an acoustic wave in the disk at the boundary layer, which carries a flux of energy and angular momentum with the opposite sign as the energy and angular momentum density of the stellar mode. We call this instability the acoustic Chandrasekhar–Friedman–Schutz (CFS) instability, because of the direct analogy to the CFS instability for exciting modes on a rotating star by emission of energy in the form of gravitational waves. However, the acoustic CFS instability differs from its gravitational wave counterpart in that the fluid medium in which the acoustic wave propagates (i.e., the accretion disk) typically rotates faster than the star in which the incompressible mode is sourced. For this reason, the instability can operate even for a non-rotating star in the presence of an accretion disk. We discuss applications of our results to high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations in accreting black hole and neutron star systems and dwarf nova oscillations in cataclysmic variables.

  18. An exact analytical solution of the unsteady magnetohydrodynamics nonlinear dynamics of laminar boundary layer due to an impulsively linear stretching sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabaleshwar, U. S.; Nagaraju, K. R.; Vinay Kumar, P. N.; Baleanu, Dumitru; Lorenzini, Giulio

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the theoretical analysis for the unsteady magnetohydrodynamic laminar boundary layer flow due to impulsively stretching sheet. The third-order highly nonlinear partial differential equation modeling the unsteady boundary layer flow brought on by an impulsively stretching flat sheet was solved by applying Adomian decomposition method and Pade approximants. The exact analytical solution so obtained is in terms of rapidly converging power series and each of the variants are easily computable. Variations in parameters such as mass transfer (suction/injection) and Chandrasekhar number on the velocity are observed by plotting the graphs. This particular problem is technically sound and has got applications in expulsion process and related process in fluid dynamics problems.

  19. An exact analytical solution of the unsteady magnetohydrodynamics nonlinear dynamics of laminar boundary layer due to an impulsively linear stretching sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabaleshwar, U. S.; Nagaraju, K. R.; Vinay Kumar, P. N.; Baleanu, Dumitru; Lorenzini, Giulio

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the theoretical analysis for the unsteady magnetohydrodynamic laminar boundary layer flow due to impulsively stretching sheet. The third-order highly nonlinear partial differential equation modeling the unsteady boundary layer flow brought on by an impulsively stretching flat sheet was solved by applying Adomian decomposition method and Pade approximants. The exact analytical solution so obtained is in terms of rapidly converging power series and each of the variants are easily computable. Variations in parameters such as mass transfer (suction/injection) and Chandrasekhar number on the velocity are observed by plotting the graphs. This particular problem is technically sound and has got applications in expulsion process and related process in fluid dynamics problems.

  20. A STUDY ON NUMERICAL METHOD OF NAVIER-STOKES EQUATION AND NON-LINEAR EVOLUTION OF THE COHERENT STRUCTURES IN A LAMINAR BOUNDARY LAYER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Chang-gen; CAO Wei-dong; QIAN Jian-hua

    2006-01-01

    A new method for direct numerical simulation of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is studied in the paper. The compact finite difference and the non-linear terms upwind compact finite difference schemes on non-uniform meshes in x and y directions are developed respectively. With the Fourier spectral expansion in the spanwise direction, three-dimensional N-S equation are converted to a system of two-dimensional equations. The third-order mixed explicit-implicit scheme is employed for time integration. The treatment of the three-dimensional non-reflecting outflow boundary conditions is presented, which is important for the numerical simulations of the problem of transition in boundary layers, jets, and mixing layer. The numerical results indicate that high accuracy, stabilization and efficiency are achieved by the proposed numerical method. In addition, a theory model for the coherent structure in a laminar boundary layer is also proposed, based on which the numerical method is implemented to the non-linear evolution of coherent structure. It is found that the numerical results of the distribution of Reynolds stress, the formation of high shear layer, and the event of ejection and sweeping, match well with the observed characteristics of the coherent structures in a turbulence boundary layer.

  1. Stability of compressible boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, Ali H.

    1989-01-01

    The stability of compressible 2-D and 3-D boundary layers is reviewed. The stability of 2-D compressible flows differs from that of incompressible flows in two important features: There is more than one mode of instability contributing to the growth of disturbances in supersonic laminar boundary layers and the most unstable first mode wave is 3-D. Whereas viscosity has a destabilizing effect on incompressible flows, it is stabilizing for high supersonic Mach numbers. Whereas cooling stabilizes first mode waves, it destabilizes second mode waves. However, second order waves can be stabilized by suction and favorable pressure gradients. The influence of the nonparallelism on the spatial growth rate of disturbances is evaluated. The growth rate depends on the flow variable as well as the distance from the body. Floquet theory is used to investigate the subharmonic secondary instability.

  2. Unsteady laminar mixed convection boundary layer flow near a vertical wedge due to oscillations in the free-stream and surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy N.C.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady laminar boundary layer characteristics of mixed convection flow past a vertical wedge have been investigated numerically. The free-stream velocity and surface temperature are assumed to be oscillating in the magnitude but not in the direction of the oncoming flow velocity. The governing equations have been solved by two distinct methods, namely, the straightforward finite difference method for the entire frequency range, and the extended series solution for low frequency range and the asymptotic series expansion method for high frequency range. The results demonstrate the effects of the Richardson number, Ri, introduced to quantify the influence of mixed convection and the Prandtl number, Pr, on the amplitudes and phase angles of the skin friction and heat transfer. In addition, the effects of these parameters are examined in terms of the transient skin friction and heat transfer.

  3. Evaporation, Heat Transfer, and Velocity Distribution in Two-Dimensional and Rotationally Symmetrical Laminar Boundary-Layer Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froessling, Nils

    1958-01-01

    The fundamental boundary layer equations for the flow, temperature and concentration fields are presented. Two dimensional symmetrical and unsymmetrical and rotationally symmetrical steady boundary layer flows are treated as well as the transfer boundary layer. Approximation methods for the calculation of the transfer layer are discussed and a brief survey of an investigation into the validity of the law that the Nusselt number is proportional to the cube root of the Prandtl number is presented.

  4. Dominance of Radiated Aerodynamic Noise on Boundary-Layer Transition in Supersonic-Hypersonic Wind Tunnels. Theory and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-03-01

    since the radiated pressure f luc tuat ions t ravel along inc l ine rays s im i la r to, but somewhat steeper than, Mach waves [see Refer- ence...Supersonic Wind Tunnels," AEDC-TN-61-153 (AD270596), January 1962. 311 A E D C-TR -77-107 157. Tucker, Maurice . "Approximate Calculation of

  5. A numerical method for solving the boundary layer equations of laminar natural convention about a vertical plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liancun Zheng; Chen Liang; Xinxin Zhang

    2007-01-01

    An improved shooting method was presented for solving the natural convention boundary layer equations,with a coupling of the velocity field to the temperature field.The numerical results are consistent with the approximate solution obtained by former researchers.

  6. Study of Transition from Laminar to Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Tilted Flat Plate Using Heat Transfer Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.Sanz; C.Nicot; R.Point; F.Plaza

    2007-01-01

    The boundary layer transition over a flat tilted plate has been studied by means of heat transfer measurements. A heat flux sensor has been developed, in order to measure the efficiency of convective heat transfer for various types of surfaces or flows. Its operation at constant temperature allows direct and fast measurements of heat flux. The present paper reports the development of the sensor and presents its application to the study of transition in a boundary layer depending on the angle of incidence of the external flow. An exponential relationship between critical Reynolds number and pressure gradient parameter has been found.

  7. Influence of high-intensity turbulence on laminar boundary layer development on a cylindrical leading edge: Enhancement to eddy diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Juli K.

    The growing demand for increased efficiency in turbine engine designs has sparked a growing interest for research of air flow around curved surfaces. The turbine's operating conditions result in material property constraints, especially in the first stage turbine vanes and blades. These turbine vane components experience extreme loading conditions of both high temperature and high turbulence intensities exiting the combustor. The surface of the turbine blades has cylindrical leading edges that promote stabilizing flow accelerations. These convex surfaces can cause a reduced eddy diffusivity across the boundary layer. This thesis reviews measurements of velocity and turbulence intensities taken just shy of the thirty degrees offset from the stagnation line of a two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge under a wide range of turbulence and flow conditions flow conditions. Flow conditions and velocity measurements were gathered with respect to the distance to the surface. The length of the measurements extended from the surface to beyond the boundary layer's edge. The instrumentation used to collect data was a single wire driven by a constant temperature anemometer bridge. The hot wire is specially modified to measure data near the cylindrical leading edges curved surface. The traversing system allowed the acquisition of high-resolution boundary layer data. The traversing system was installed internally to the cylindrical leading edge to reduce probe blockage.

  8. Two-Dimensional Analytical Solution of the Laminar Forced Convection in a Circular Duct with Periodic Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Astaraki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study analytical solution for forced convection heat transfer in a circular duct with a special boundary condition has been presented, because the external wall temperature is a periodic function of axial direction. Local energy balance equation is written with reference to the fully developed regime. Also governing equations are two-dimensionally solved, and the effect of duct wall thickness has been considered. The temperature distribution of fluid and solid phases is assumed as a periodic function of axial direction and finally temperature distribution in the flow field, solid wall, and local Nusselt number, is obtained analytically.

  9. Effects of mass transfer on a resonance instability in the laminar boundary layer flow over a rotating-disk

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Turkyilmazoglu

    2009-12-01

    Direct spatial resonance phenomenon occurring in the viscous incompressible boundary layer flow due to a rotating-disk is investigated in this paper based on the linear stability theory. The possible effects of suction and injection are explored on the direct spatial resonance instability mechanism detected earlier in the case of zero-suction. This instability leads to an algebraic growth of disturbances while the flow is yet in the laminar regime and this in turn, may initiate the non-linearity and transition, competing with the unboundedly growing time-amplified perturbations. In line with the physical intuition, results show that suction delays the onset of resonance instability by increasing the critical Reynolds number, whereas it is enhanced by the presence of injection. The critical parameter for direct spatial resonance instability always precedes the onset value for absolute instability mechanism, after a comparison with the previous work. Therefore, in the case of suction, the onset parameter is close to the transition value as determined from the earlier experimental observations. It is further examined the inviscid nature of both absolute as well as direct spatial resonance instabilities when suction or injection is applied through the disk, and is demonstrated that these instability mechanisms are not in any way an artifact of the parallel flow approximation assumed during the linearization of viscous incompressible stability equations.

  10. MHD forced convective laminar boundary layer flow from a convectively heated moving vertical plate with radiation and transpiration effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md Jashim; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, A I Md

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional steady forced convective flow of a Newtonian fluid past a convectively heated permeable vertically moving plate in the presence of a variable magnetic field and radiation effect has been investigated numerically. The plate moves either in assisting or opposing direction to the free stream. The plate and free stream velocities are considered to be proportional to x(m) whilst the magnetic field and mass transfer velocity are taken to be proportional to x((m-1)/2) where x is the distance along the plate from the leading edge of the plate. Instead of using existing similarity transformations, we use a linear group of transformations to transform the governing equations into similarity equations with relevant boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are presented to show the effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on the friction factor, rate of heat and mass transfer. It is found that the rate of heat transfer elevates with the mass transfer velocity, convective heat transfer, Prandtl number, velocity ratio and the magnetic field parameters. It is also found that the rate of mass transfer enhances with the mass transfer velocity, velocity ratio, power law index and the Schmidt number, whilst it suppresses with the magnetic field parameter. Our results are compared with the results existing in the open literature. The comparisons are satisfactory.

  11. Supersonic Chordwise Bending Flutter in Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-31

    such a flutter boundary can be made by utilizing the trend lines predicted from a supersonic analysis based on supersonic cascade theory (Appendix I...bonding agent was injected via hypodermic needles after the blade tabs were properly inserted, The integrity and repeatability of the mounting of the indi...in conjunction with NASTRAN predictions and supersonic cascade aerodynamic computa- tions. Comparisons between theory and experiment are discussed. DD

  12. Theoretical Analysis of Stationary Potential Flows and Boundary Layers at High Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswaititsch, K.; Wieghardt, K.

    1948-01-01

    The present report consists of two parts. The first part deals with the two-dimensional stationary flow in the presence of local supersonic zones. A numerical method of integration of the equation of gas dynamics is developed. Proceeding from solutions at great distance from the body the flow pattern is calculated step by step. Accordingly the related body form is obtained at the end of the calculation. The second part treats the relationship between the displacement thickness of laminar and turbulent boundary layers and the pressure distribution at high speeds. The stability of the boundary layer is investigated, resulting in basic differences in the behavior of subsonic and supersonic flows. Lastly, the decisive importance of the boundary layer for the pressure distribution, particularly for thin profiles, is demonstrated.

  13. Supersonic induction plasma jet modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selezneva, S.E. E-mail: svetlana2@hermes.usherbS_Selezneva2@hermes.usherb; Boulos, M.I

    2001-06-01

    Numerical simulations have been applied to study the argon plasma flow downstream of the induction plasma torch. It is shown that by means of the convergent-divergent nozzle adjustment and chamber pressure reduction, a supersonic plasma jet can be obtained. We investigate the supersonic and a more traditional subsonic plasma jets impinging onto a normal substrate. Comparing to the subsonic jet, the supersonic one is narrower and much faster. Near-substrate velocity and temperature boundary layers are thinner, so the heat flux near the stagnation point is higher in the supersonic jet. The supersonic plasma jet is characterized by the electron overpopulation and the domination of the recombination over the dissociation, resulting into the heating of the electron gas. Because of these processes, the supersonic induction plasma permits to separate spatially different functions (dissociation and ionization, transport and deposition) and to optimize each of them. The considered configuration can be advantageous in some industrial applications, such as plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition of diamond and polymer-like films and in plasma spraying of nanoscaled powders.

  14. Laminar Flow Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, David F.

    1992-10-01

    The major thrust of this book is to present a technique of analysis that aids the formulation, understanding, and solution of problems of viscous flow. The intent is to avoid providing a "canned" program to solve a problem, offering instead a way to recognize the underlying physical, mathematical, and modeling concepts inherent in the solutions. The reader must first choose a mathematical model and derive governing equations based on realistic assumptions, or become aware of the limitations and assumptions associated with existing models. An appropriate solution technique is then selected. The solution technique may be either analytical or numerical. Computer-aided analysis algorithms supplement the classical analyses. The book begins by deriving the Navier-Stokes equation for a viscous compressible variable property fluid. The second chapter considers exact solutions of the incompressible hydrodynamic boundary layer equations solved with and without mass transfer at the wall. Forced convection, free convection, and the compressible laminar boundary layer are discussed in the remaining chapters. The text unifies the various topics by tracing a logical progression from simple to complex governing differential equations and boundary conditions. Numerical, parametric, and directed analysis problems are included at the end of each chapter.

  15. Natural Laminar Flow Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steers, L. L.

    1981-01-01

    A supercritical airfoil section was designed with favorable pressure gradients on both the upper and lower surfaces. Wind tunnel tests were conducted in the Langley 8 Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. The outer wing panels of the F-111 TACT airplane were modified to incorporate partial span test gloves having the natural laminar, flow profile. Instrumentation was installed to provide surface pressure data as well as to determine transition location and boundary layer characteristics. The flight experiment encompassed 19 flights conducted with and without transition fixed at several locations for wing leading edge sweep angles which varied from 10 to 26 at Mach numbers from 0.80 to 0.85 and altitudes of 7620 meters and 9144 meters. Preliminary results indicate that a large portion of the test chord experienced laminar flow.

  16. Building a Practical Natural Laminar Flow Design Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Lynde, Michelle N.

    2017-01-01

    A preliminary natural laminar flow (NLF) design method that has been developed and applied to supersonic and transonic wings with moderate-to-high leading-edge sweeps at flight Reynolds numbers is further extended and evaluated in this paper. The modular design approach uses a knowledge-based design module linked with different flow solvers and boundary layer stability analysis methods to provide a multifidelity capability for NLF analysis and design. An assessment of the effects of different options for stability analysis is included using pressures and geometry from an NLF wing designed for the Common Research Model (CRM). Several extensions to the design module are described, including multiple new approaches to design for controlling attachment line contamination and transition. Finally, a modification to the NLF design algorithm that allows independent control of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) and cross flow (CF) modes is proposed. A preliminary evaluation of the TS-only option applied to the design of an NLF nacelle for the CRM is performed that includes the use of a low-fidelity stability analysis directly in the design module.

  17. Supersonic Plasma Flow Control Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    to liquid metals , for example, the conductivities of typical plasma and electrolyte flows are relatively low. Ref. 14 cites the conductivity of...heating is the dominant effect. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Supersonic, plasma , MHD , boundary-layer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...horns in operation on Mach 5 wind tunnel with a plasma discharge. 31 Figure 17 Front view of a 100 mA DC discharge generated with upstream pointing

  18. Mathematical Study of Laminar Boundary Layer Flow and Heat Transfer of Tangenthyperbolic Fluid Pasta Vertical Porous Plate with Biot Number Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandra Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we investigate the nonlinear steady boundary layer flow and heat transfer of an incompressible Tangent Hyperbolicnon-Newtonian fluid from a vertical porous plate. The transformed conservation equations are solved numerically subject to physically appropriate boundary conditions using a second-order accurate implicit finite-difference Keller Box technique. The numerical code is validated with previous studies. The influence of a number of emerging non-dimensional parameters, namely the Weissenberg number (We, the power law index (n, Prandtl number (Pr, Biot number (, and dimensionless local suction parameter(on velocity and temperature evolution in the boundary layer regime are examined in detail. Furthermore the effects of these parameters on surface heat transfer rate and local skin friction are also investigated. Validation with earlier Newtonian studies is presented and excellent correlation achieved. It is found that velocity, Skin friction and Nusselt number (heat transfer rate are reduced with increasing Weissenberg number (We, whereas, temperature is enhanced. Increasing power law index (n enhances velocity and Nusselt number (heat transfer rate but temperature and Skin friction decrease. An increase in the Biot number ( is observed to enhance velocity, temperature, local skin friction and Nusselt number. An increasing Prandtl number, Pr, is found to decrease both velocity, temperature and skin friction but elevates heat transfer rate (Nusselt number. The study is relevant to chemical materials processing applications.

  19. Prediction and rational correlation of thermophoretically reduced particle mass transfer to hot surfaces across laminar or turbulent forced-convection gas boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1986-01-01

    A formulation previously developed to predict and correlate the thermophoretically-augmented submicron particle mass transfer rate to cold surfaces is found to account for the thermophoretically reduced particle mass transfer rate to overheated surfaces such that thermophoresis brings about a 10-decade reduction below the convective mass transfer rate expected by pure Brownian diffusion and convection alone. Thermophoretic blowing is shown to produce effects on particle concentration boundary-layer (BL) structure and wall mass transfer rates similar to those produced by real blowing through a porous wall. The applicability of the correlations to developing BL-situations is demonstrated by a numerical example relevant to wet-steam technology.

  20. An Analysis of Shock Structure and Nonequilibrium Laminar Boundary Layers Induced by a Normal Shock Wave in an Ionized Argon Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    Moore and Erdos (Ref. 28) in solving the boundary layer equations for dissoci- tion and ionizing air in a nonequilibrium flow. * 21 Another powerful...8217 =o g =o ’ =o(4.31b) fit = 0 g" = 0 Zt =0 fi’ = 0 git = 0 where, the prime denotes differentiation with respect to 1. The edge of the sheath is now the...i LX ] (4.37e) where, C = pR/Pee and the prime denotes differentiation with respect to T. Equations 4.31 and 4.37 produce seven, seven, and five

  1. On plane submerged laminar jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, Wilfried; Sanchez, Antonio L.

    2016-11-01

    We address the laminar flow generated when a developed stream of liquid of kinematic viscosity ν flowing along channel of width 2 h discharges into an open space bounded by two symmetric plane walls departing from the channel rim with an angle α 1 . Attention is focused on values of the jet volume flux 2 Q such that the associated Reynolds number Re = Qh / ν is of order unity. The formulation requires specification of the boundary conditions far from the channel exit. If the flow is driven by the volume flux, then the far-field solution corresponds to Jeffery-Hamel self-similar flow. However, as noted by Fraenkel (1962), such solutions exist only for α potential flow driven by the jet entrainment, and a Falkner-Skan near-wall boundary layer. Numerical integrations of the Navier-Stokes equations are used to ascertain the existence of these different solutions.

  2. Control Parameters for Boundary-Layer Instabilities in Unsteady Shock Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaVar King Isaacson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the computation of a set of control parameters for the deterministic prediction of laminar boundary-layer instabilities induced by an imposed unsteady shock interaction. The objective of the study is exploratory in nature by computing a supersonic flight environment for flow over a blunt body and the deterministic prediction of the spectral entropy rates for the boundary layer subjected to an unsteady pressure disturbance. The deterministic values for the spectral entropy rate within the instabilities are determined for each control parameter. Computational results imply that the instabilities are of a span-wise vortex form, that the maximum vertical velocity wave vector components are produced in the region nearest the wall and that extended transient coherent structures are produced in the boundary layer at a vertical location slightly below the mid-point of the boundary layer.

  3. Supersonic Flutter of Laminated Curved Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ganapathi

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Supersonic flutter analysis of laminated composite curved panels is investigated using doubly-curved, quadrilateral, shear flexible, shell element based on field-consistency approach. The formulation includes transverse shear deformation, in-plane and rotary inertias. The aerodynamic force is evaluated using two-dimensional static aerodynamic approximation for high supersonic flow. Initially, the model developed here is verified for the flutter analysis of flat plates. Numerical results are presented for isotropic, orthotropic and laminated anisotropic curved panels. A detailed parametric study is carried out to observe the effects of aspect and thickness ratios, number of layers, lamination scheme, and boundary conditions on flutter boundary.

  4. Entropic lattice Boltzmann model for gas dynamics: Theory, boundary conditions, and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frapolli, N; Chikatamarla, S S; Karlin, I V

    2016-06-01

    We present in detail the recently introduced entropic lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows [N. Frapolli et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 061301(R) (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.92.061301]. The model is capable of simulating a wide range of laminar and turbulent flows, from thermal and weakly compressible flows to transonic and supersonic flows. The theory behind the construction of the model is laid out and its thermohydrodynamic limit is discussed. Based on this theory and the hydrodynamic limit thereof, we also construct the boundary conditions necessary for the simulation of solid walls. We present the inlet and outlet boundary conditions as well as no-slip and free-slip boundary conditions. Details necessary for the implementation of the compressible lattice Boltzmann model are also reported. Finally, simulations of compressible flows are presented, including two-dimensional supersonic and transonic flows around a diamond and a NACA airfoil, the simulation of the Schardin problem, and the three-dimensional simulation of the supersonic flow around a conical geometry.

  5. Development of a laser-induced heat flux technique for measurement of convective heat transfer coefficients in a supersonic flowfield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porro, A. Robert; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Hingst, Warren R.; Chriss, Randall M.; Seablom, Kirk D.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the local convective heat transfer coefficient on a model surface in a supersonic flow field. The technique uses a laser to apply a discrete local heat flux at the model test surface, and an infrared camera system determines the local temperature distribution due to heating. From this temperature distribution and an analysis of the heating process, a local convective heat transfer coefficient is determined. The technique was used to measure the load surface convective heat transfer coefficient distribution on a flat plate at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0. The flat plate boundary layer initially was laminar and became transitional in the measurement region. The experimental results agreed reasonably well with theoretical predictions of convective heat transfer of flat plate laminar boundary layers. The results indicate that this non-intrusive optical measurement technique has the potential to obtain high quality surface convective heat transfer measurements in high speed flowfields.

  6. On supersonic combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁生学

    1999-01-01

    Some basic concepts and features of supersonic combustion are explained from the view point of macroscopic aerodynamics. Two kinds of interpretations of supersonic combustion are proposed. The difference between supersonic combustion and subsonic combustion is discussed, and the mechanism of supersonic combustion propagation and the limitation of heat addition in supersonic flow are pointed out. The results of the calculation of deflagration in supersonic flow show that the entropy increment and the total pressure loss of the combustion products may decrease with the increase of combustion velocity. It is also demonstrated that the oblique detonation wave angle may not be controlled by the wedge angle under weak underdriven solution conditions and be determined only by combustion velocity. Therefore, the weak underdriven solution may become self-sustaining oblique detonation waves with a constant wave angle.

  7. Supersonic flow imaging via nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Due to influence of compressibility,shock wave,instabilities,and turbulence on supersonic flows, current flow visualization and imaging techniques encounter some problems in high spatiotemporal resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio(SNR)measurements.Therefore,nanoparticle based planar laser scattering method(NPLS)is developed here.The nanoparticles are used as tracer,and pulse planar laser is used as light source in NPLS;by recording images of particles in flow field with CCD, high spatiotemporal resolution supersonic flow imaging is realized.The flow-following ability of nanoparticles in supersonic flows is studied according to multiphase flow theory and calibrating experiment of oblique shock wave.The laser scattering characteristics of nanoparticles are analyzed with light scattering theory.The results of theoretical and experimental studies show that the dynamic behavior and light scattering characteristics of nanoparticles highly enhance the spatiotemporal resolution and SNR of NPLS,with which the flow field involving shock wave,expansion,Mach disk,boundary layer,sliding-line,and mixing layer can be imaged clearly at high spatiotemporal resolution.

  8. 层流翼型三维边界层横流驻波精确测量方法研究%On the Accurate Measurement Method of Standing Cross-flow for Three-dimensional Laminar Airfoil Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马彪; 白存儒; 杨广珺; 李栋

    2011-01-01

    Laminar flow control (LFC) of swept-back wing is a complex but very significant topic for drag reduction. The study of standing cross-flow has a great significance for LFC. For this reason, the experimental method of standing cross-flow measurement was analyzed and studied by using hot wire anemometer and sublimation method in a low turbulence wind tunnel. Corresponding technical details about the setup of hot wire anemometer system and process of sublimation surface spray are elaborated in this paper. The velocity profile curve in boundary layer, the image of sublimation result, the distance between standing waves and the wedge transition line were obtained in experiment. Synthetical analysis of experimental results shows that there is a high agreement between hot wire anemometer and sublimation method. This indicates that flow state in a 3-D boundary layer can be measured conveniently by hot wire anemometer; that at a suitable angle, the hot wire anemometer support does not impact the measurement; that hot wire probe has less effect on flow in boundary layer. So the results measured by hot wire anemometer may be regarded as actual flow in boundary layer. Analysis of experimental data shows that the combination of hot wire anemometer and sublimation method is a very effective method.%后掠机翼的层流控制对于气动减阻有着重要的意义,同时也是非常复杂的研究课题.而对横流驻波的研究是实现层流翼型的一个关健.为此,本文分析并研究了在低湍流度风洞中,采用热线风速仪(CTA)与表面升华法相结合研究由横流不稳定性产生的驻波及其对转捩影响的实验技术,阐述了该实验中架设热线测量系统与升华法表面喷涂的相关技术与细节.实验得到了边界层内的速度剖面图、升华法图形、驻波间距和楔形转捩线.实验结果的综合分析表明热线和升华法一致性很高.说明通过热线风速仪可以方便地测得三维边界层内的流动

  9. Casa de estructura laminar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mac L. Johansen, John

    1958-02-01

    Full Text Available Llevando hasta sus últimos extremos la utilización de las bóvedas laminares de hormigón se ha proyectado esta casa. No se trata de una realización práctica, sino de un estudio teórico y experimental sobre las posibilidades de este tipo de estructuras.

  10. Laminar streak enhancement using streamwise grooves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Carlos; Martín, Juan Ángel

    2011-11-01

    Laminar streak promotion in a flat plate boundary layer results in an increase of the stability of the Tollmien-Schlichting waves with respect to that of the 2D Blasius profile. This stabilization delays the laminar-turbulent transition, increasing the laminar phase of the flow. The stabilization effect is stronger for higher streak amplitudes, and therefore simple ways of generating high amplitude stable streaks are sought to be used as boundary layer flow control methods. In a recent experiment [Tallamelli & Franson,AIAA 2010-4291] high amplitude stable steady streaks have been produced using Miniature Vortex Generators (MGVs), where one array of MGVs is used to excite the streak and a second array is used downstream to enhance their amplitude. In this presentation we numerically explore the possibility of enhancing the streaks using a different passive mechanism: streamwise grooves carved in the plate. We will present some numerical simulations for different values of the spanwise period of the streaks and of the grooves, and we will show the combinations that provide maximum streak amplitude.

  11. Shockwave-boundary layer interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glepman, R.

    2014-01-01

    Shock wave-boundary layer interactions are a very common feature in both transonic and supersonic flows. They can be encountered on compressor and turbine blades, in supersonic jet inlets, on transonic wings, on the stabilization fins of missiles and in many more situations. Because of their major i

  12. Supersonic stall flutter of high-speed fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Stevans, W.; Jutras, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical model is proposed for predicting the onset of supersonic stall bending flutter in high-speed rotors. The analysis is based on a modified two-dimensional, compressible, unsteady actuator disk theory. The stability boundary predicted by the analysis is shown to be in good agreement with the measured boundary of a high speed fan. The prediction that the flutter mode would be a forward traveling wave sensitive to wheel speed and aerodynamic loading is confirmed by experimental measurements. In addition, the analysis shows that reduced frequency and dynamic head also play a significant role in establishing the supersonic stall bending flutter boundary of an unshrouded fan.

  13. A quiet flow Ludwieg tube for study of transition in compressible boundary layers: Design and feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven P.

    1991-01-01

    Laminar-turbulent transition in high speed boundary layers is a complicated problem which is still poorly understood, partly because of experimental ambiguities caused by operating in noisy wind tunnels. The NASA Langley experience with quiet tunnel design has been used to design a quiet flow tunnel which can be constructed less expensively. Fabrication techniques have been investigated, and inviscid, boundary layer, and stability computer codes have been adapted for use in the nozzle design. Construction of such a facility seems feasible, at a reasonable cost. Two facilities have been proposed: a large one, with a quiet flow region large enough to study the end of transition, and a smaller and less expensive one, capable of studying low Reynolds number issues such as receptivity. Funding for either facility remains to be obtained, although key facility elements have been obtained and are being integrated into the existing Purdue supersonic facilities.

  14. Laser transit anemometer and Pitot probe comparative measurements in a sharp cone boundary layer at Mach 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, W. W., Jr.; Ocheltree, S. L.; Russ, C. E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Laser transit anemometer (LTA) measurements of a 7 degree sharp cone boundary layer were conducted in the Air Force/AEDC Supersonic Tunnel A Mach 4 flow field. These measurements are compared with Pitot probe measurements and tricone theory provided by AEDC staff. Measurements were made both in laminar and turbulent boundary layers of the model. Comparison of LTA measurements with theory showed agreement to better than 1 percent for the laminar boundary layer cases. This level of agreement was obtained after small position corrections, 0.01 to 0.6 mm, were applied to the experimental data sets. Pitot probe data when compared with theory also showed small positioning errors. The Pitot data value was also limited due to probe interference with the flow near the model. The LTA turbulent boundary layer data indicated a power law dependence of 6.3 to 6.9. The LTA data was analyzed in the time (Tau) domain in which it was obtained and in the velocity domain. No significant differences were noted between Tau and velocity domain results except in one turbulent boundary layer case.

  15. Supersonic unstalled flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Goldstein, M. E.; Hartmann, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Recently two flutter analyses have been developed at NASA Lewis Research Center to predict the onset of supersonic unstalled flutter of a cascade of two-dimensional airfoils. The first of these analyzes the onset of supersonic flutter at low levels of aerodynamic loading (i.e., backpressure), while the second examines the occurrence of supersonic flutter at moderate levels of aerodynamic loading. Both of these analyses are based on the linearized unsteady inviscid equations of gas dynamics to model the flow field surrounding the cascade. The details of the development of the solution to each of these models have been published. The objective of the present paper is to utilize these analyses in a parametric study to show the effects of cascade geometry, inlet Mach number, and backpressure on the onset of single and multi degree of freedom unstalled supersonic flutter. Several of the results from this study are correlated against experimental qualitative observation to validate the models.

  16. Laminar Instability and Transition on the X-51A

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    92-0737, AIAA, January 2004. [2] Leslie M. Mack. Linear stability and the problem of supersonic boundary-layer transition. AIAA Journal, 13(3):278...Senior High School in 1999. He then attended Bethel University, graduating with a B.S. in physics and a minor in mathematics in 2003. The summer of 2002

  17. Hybrid Laminar Fin Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    the driving unit being an ejector . Reynolds numbers at cruise conditions a ½2 scale model has been chosen to be tested in the ONERA SI MA wind The...enabled laminar flow to be ONERA and based on advanced CFD -tools [3] the final fully demonstrated up to a Mach number of 0.6. For shape which is...for different Mach numbers. As A critical issue for the second item and therefore a part of a detailed analysis of these experimental results

  18. Linear models for sound from supersonic reacting mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, P. Shivakanth; Samanta, Arnab

    2016-12-01

    We perform a linearized reduced-order modeling of the aeroacoustic sound sources in supersonic reacting mixing layers to explore their sensitivities to some of the flow parameters in radiating sound. Specifically, we investigate the role of outer modes as the effective flow compressibility is raised, when some of these are expected to dominate over the traditional Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) -type central mode. Although the outer modes are known to be of lesser importance in the near-field mixing, how these radiate to the far-field is uncertain, on which we focus. On keeping the flow compressibility fixed, the outer modes are realized via biasing the respective mean densities of the fast (oxidizer) or slow (fuel) side. Here the mean flows are laminar solutions of two-dimensional compressible boundary layers with an imposed composite (turbulent) spreading rate, which we show to significantly alter the growth of instability waves by saturating them earlier, similar to in nonlinear calculations, achieved here via solving the linear parabolized stability equations. As the flow parameters are varied, instability of the slow modes is shown to be more sensitive to heat release, potentially exceeding equivalent central modes, as these modes yield relatively compact sound sources with lesser spreading of the mixing layer, when compared to the corresponding fast modes. In contrast, the radiated sound seems to be relatively unaffected when the mixture equivalence ratio is varied, except for a lean mixture which is shown to yield a pronounced effect on the slow mode radiation by reducing its modal growth.

  19. An averaging method for nonlinear laminar Ekman layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Lautrup, B.; Bohr, T.

    2003-01-01

    We study steady laminar Ekman boundary layers in rotating systems using,an averaging method similar to the technique of von Karman and Pohlhausen. The method allows us to explore nonlinear corrections to the standard Ekman theory even at large Rossby numbers. We consider both the standard self...

  20. Laminar Plasma Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Z; Barnes, C W; Barnes, D C; Wang, Zhehui; Pariev, Vladimir I.; Barnes, Cris W.; Barnes, Daniel C.

    2002-01-01

    A new kind of dynamo utilizing flowing laboratory plasmas has been identified. Conversion of plasma kinetic energy to magnetic energy is verified numerically by kinematic dynamo simulations for magnetic Reynolds numbers above 210. As opposed to intrinsically-turbulent liquid-sodium dynamos, the proposed plasma dynamos correspond to laminar flow topology. Modest plasma parameters, 1-20 eV temperatures, 10^{19}-10^{20} m^{-3} densities in 0.3-1.0 m scale-lengths driven by velocities on the order of the Alfven Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV), self-consistently satisfy the conditions needed for the magnetic field amplication. Growth rates for the plasma dynamos are obtained numerically with different geometry and magnetic Reynolds numbers. Magnetic-field-free coaxial plasma guns can be used to sustain the plasma flow and the dynamo.

  1. THERMAL AND AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCES OF THE SUPERSONIC MOTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan P Ninković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, Mach number of 4 can be taken as a boundary value for transition from conditions for supersonic, into the area of hypersonic flow, distinguishing two areas: area of supersonic in which the effects of the aerodynamic heating can be neglected and the area of hypersonic, in which the thermal effects become dominant. This paper presents the effects in static and dynamic areas, as well as presentation of G.R.O.M. software for determination of the values of aerodynamic derivatives, which was developed on the basis of linearized theory of supersonic flow. Validation of developed software was carried out through different types of testing, proving its usefulness for engineering practice in the area of supersonic wing aerodynamic loading calculations, even at high Mach numbers, with dominant thermal effects.

  2. Supersonic flows over cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianwen FANG; Meng DING; Jin ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of supersonic cold flows over cavities were investigated experimentally and numer-ically, and the effects of cavities of different sizes on super-sonic flow field were analyzed. The results indicate that the ratio of length to depth L/D within the range of 5-9 has little relevance to integral structures of cavity flow. The bevel angle of the rear wall does not alter the overall structure of the cavity flow within the range of 30°-60°, but it can exert obvious effect on the evolvement of shear layer and vortexes in cavities.

  3. Hypersonic Engine Leading Edge Experiments in a High Heat Flux, Supersonic Flow Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1994-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Three aerothermal load related concerns are the boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow, articulating panel seals in high temperature environments, and strut (or cowl) leading edges with shock-on-shock interactions. A multidisciplinary approach is required to address these technical concerns. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to experimentally evaluate the heat transfer and structural response of the strut (or cowl) leading edge. A recent experimental program conducted in this facility is discussed and related to cooling technology capability. The specific objective of the experiment discussed is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Heat transfer analyses of a similar leading edge concept cooled with gaseous hydrogen is included to demonstrate the complexity of the problem resulting from plastic deformation of the structures. Macro-photographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight.

  4. A Numerical Comparison of Symmetric and Asymmetric Supersonic Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kylen D.

    Supersonic wind tunnels are a vital aspect to the aerospace industry. Both the design and testing processes of different aerospace components often include and depend upon utilization of supersonic test facilities. Engine inlets, wing shapes, and body aerodynamics, to name a few, are aspects of aircraft that are frequently subjected to supersonic conditions in use, and thus often require supersonic wind tunnel testing. There is a need for reliable and repeatable supersonic test facilities in order to help create these vital components. The option of building and using asymmetric supersonic converging-diverging nozzles may be appealing due in part to lower construction costs. There is a need, however, to investigate the differences, if any, in the flow characteristics and performance of asymmetric type supersonic wind tunnels in comparison to symmetric due to the fact that asymmetric configurations of CD nozzle are not as common. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study has been conducted on an existing University of Michigan (UM) asymmetric supersonic wind tunnel geometry in order to study the effects of asymmetry on supersonic wind tunnel performance. Simulations were made on both the existing asymmetrical tunnel geometry and two axisymmetric reflections (of differing aspect ratio) of that original tunnel geometry. The Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations are solved via NASAs OVERFLOW code to model flow through these configurations. In this way, information has been gleaned on the effects of asymmetry on supersonic wind tunnel performance. Shock boundary layer interactions are paid particular attention since the test section integrity is greatly dependent upon these interactions. Boundary layer and overall flow characteristics are studied. The RANS study presented in this document shows that the UM asymmetric wind tunnel/nozzle configuration is not as well suited to producing uniform test section flow as that of a symmetric configuration, specifically one

  5. The Calculation of Supersonic Flows with Strong Viscous-Inviscid Interaction Using the Parabolized Navier - Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Mark

    This investigation is concerned with calculating strong viscous-inviscid interactions in two-dimensional laminar supersonic flows with and without separation. The equations solved are the so-called parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. The streamwise pressure gradient term is written as a combination of a forward and a backward difference to provide a path for upstream propogation of information. Global iteration is employed to repeatedly update the solution from an initial guess until convergence is achieved. Interacting boundary layer theory is discussed in order to provide some essential background information for the development of the present calculation technique. The numerical scheme used is an alternating direction explicit (ADE) procedure which is adapted from the Saul'yev method. This technique is chosen as an alternative to the more difficult to program multigrid strategy used by other investigators and the slower converging Gauss-Seidel method. Separated flows are computed using the ADE method. Only small or moderate separation bubbles are considered. This restriction permits simple approximations to the convective terms in reversed flow regions without introducing severe error since the reversed flow velocities are small. Results are presented for a number of geometries including compression ramps and humps on flat plates with separation. The present results are compared with those obtained by other investigators using the full Navier-Stokes equations and interacting boundary layer theory. Comparisons were found to be qualitatively good. The quantitative comparisons varied, however mesh refinement studies indicated that the parabolized Navier-Stokes solutions tended towards second-order accurate full Navier-Stokes solutions as well as interacting boundary layer solutions for which mesh refinement studies were also executed.

  6. Infinitesimal Conical Supersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemann, Adolf

    1947-01-01

    The calculation of infinitesimal conical supersonic flow has been applied first to the simplest examples that have also been calculated in another way. Except for the discovery of a miscalculation in an older report, there was found the expected conformity. The new method of calculation is limited more definitely to the conical case.

  7. Cubierta laminar prefabricada, Suiza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossdorf, Heinz

    1964-04-01

    Full Text Available The roof constructed recently near Olten, in Switzerland, consists of a series of cylindrical shell surfaces, with skylights between the successive shells. It covers an area of 13.500 m2, and the building is to be used as a storehouse and servicing installation for the Federation of Consumer Goods Society. The general nature of the design made it logical, from the outset, to construct the roof as a number of similar prefabricated units. This method had evident economic advantages. The repetition of similar cylindrical roof sections made it possible to reiterate also the particular constructive process which was adopted in this case. The prefabricated shell units have been reinforced with lateral ribs, which make them sufficiently stiff to be handled at the working site. Each unit is 25.20 m long and spans a width of 1.40 ms. The roof is made up of 18 such elements. A feature of this roof is that it has been subjected to a prestressing process, applied by cables, running along the extrados of the cylindrical surface of each unit. This improves the stability and strength of the shells, and induces favourable stresses which counteract noticeably the effects of the shear forces and bending moments. The edges of these shells have been reinforced by increasing the thickness of the ribs, thereby improving the end anchorage. In order to check the theoretical calculations for this structure, several tests were carried out on scale models.La cubierta recientemente construida en las cercanías de Olten (Suiza, de tipo laminar, especial, curvada, constituida por una serie de superficies cilíndricas sucesivas y con lucernario en las soluciones de continuidad que cada par de superficies parciales cilíndricas motiva, tiene por principal objeto cubrir una superficie de 13.500 m2 edificados con destino a los servicios y explotación de un almacén de la Federación de Sociedades de Consumo. Debido a las ideas generales básicas del proyecto se impuso, desde un

  8. Investigation on the pressure matching performance of the constant area supersonic-supersonic ejector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pressure matching performance of the constant area supersonic-supersonic ejector has been studied by varying the primary and secondary Mach numbers. The effect of the primary fluid injection configurations in ejector, namely peripheral and central, has been investigated as well. Schlieren pictures of flow structure in the former part of the mixing duct with different stagnation pressure ratio of the primary and secondary flows have been taken. Pressure ratios of the primary and secondary flows at the limiting condition have been obtained from the results of pressure and optical measurements. Additionally, a computational fluid dynamics analysis has been performed to clarify the physical meaning of the pressure matching performance diagram of the ejector. The obtained results show that the pressure matching performance of the constant area supersonic-supersonic ejector increases with the increase of the secondary Mach number, and the performance decreases slightly with the increase of the primary Mach number. The phenomenon of boundary layer separation induced by shock wave results in weaker pressure matching performance of the central ejector than that of the peripheral one. Furthermore, based on the observations of the experiment, a simplified analytical model has been proposed to predict the limiting pressure ratio, and the predicted values obtained by this model agree well with the experimental data.

  9. Numerical simulation of laminar jet-forced flow using lattice Boltzmann method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan LI; Ya-li DUAN; Yan GUO; Ru-xun LIU

    2009-01-01

    In the paper, a numerical study on symmetrical and asymmetrical laminar jet-forced flows is carried out by using a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) with a special boundary treatment. The simulation results are in very good agreement with the available numerical prediction. It is shown that the LBM is a competitive method for the laminar jet-forced flow in terms of computational efficiency and stability.

  10. The fractal measurement of experimental images of supersonic turbulent mixing layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO YuXin; YI ShiHe; TIAN LiFeng; HE Lin; CHENG ZhongYu

    2008-01-01

    Flow Visualization of supersonic mixing layer has been studied based on the high spatiotemporal resolution Nano-based Planar Laser Scattering (NPLS) method in SML-1 wind tunnel. The corresponding images distinctly reproduced the flow structure of laminar, transitional and turbulent region, with which the fractal meas-urement can be implemented. Two methods of measuring fractal dimension wereintroduced and compared. The fractal dimension of the transitional region and the fully developing turbulence region of supersonic mixing layer were measured based on the box-counting method. In the transitional region, the fractal dimension will increase with turbulent intensity. In the fully developing turbulent region, the fractal dimension will not vary apparently for different flow structures, which em-bodies the self-similarity of supersonic turbulence.

  11. The fractal measurement of experimental images of supersonic turbulent mixing layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Flow visualization of supersonic mixing layer has been studied based on the high spatiotemporal resolution Nano-based Planar Laser Scattering(NPLS) method in SML-1 wind tunnel. The corresponding images distinctly reproduced the flow structure of laminar,transitional and turbulent region,with which the fractal measurement can be implemented. Two methods of measuring fractal dimension were introduced and compared. The fractal dimension of the transitional region and the fully developing turbulence region of supersonic mixing layer were measured based on the box-counting method. In the transitional region,the fractal dimension will increase with turbulent intensity. In the fully developing turbulent region,the fractal dimension will not vary apparently for different flow structures,which em-bodies the self-similarity of supersonic turbulence.

  12. Interaction of a swept shock wave and a supersonic wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, G.; Zhao, Y. X.; Zhou, J.

    2017-03-01

    The interaction of a swept shock wave and a supersonic wake has been studied. The swept shock wave is generated by a swept compression sidewall, and the supersonic wake is generated by a wake generator. The flow field is visualized with the nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering method, and a supplementary numerical simulation is conducted by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results show that the pressure rise induced by the swept shock wave can propagate upstream in the wake, which makes the location where vortices are generated move upstream, thickens the laminar section of the wake, and enlarges the generated vortices. The wake is swept away from the swept compression sidewall by the pressure gradient of the swept shock wave. This pressure gradient is not aligned with the density gradient of the supersonic wake, so the baroclinic torque generates streamwise vorticity and changes the distribution of the spanwise vorticity. The wake shock is curved, so the flow downstream of it is non-uniform, leaving the swept shock wave being distorted. A three-dimensional Mach disk structure is generated when the wake shock interacts with the swept shock wave.

  13. Interaction of a swept shock wave and a supersonic wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, G.; Zhao, Y. X.; Zhou, J.

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of a swept shock wave and a supersonic wake has been studied. The swept shock wave is generated by a swept compression sidewall, and the supersonic wake is generated by a wake generator. The flow field is visualized with the nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering method, and a supplementary numerical simulation is conducted by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results show that the pressure rise induced by the swept shock wave can propagate upstream in the wake, which makes the location where vortices are generated move upstream, thickens the laminar section of the wake, and enlarges the generated vortices. The wake is swept away from the swept compression sidewall by the pressure gradient of the swept shock wave. This pressure gradient is not aligned with the density gradient of the supersonic wake, so the baroclinic torque generates streamwise vorticity and changes the distribution of the spanwise vorticity. The wake shock is curved, so the flow downstream of it is non-uniform, leaving the swept shock wave being distorted. A three-dimensional Mach disk structure is generated when the wake shock interacts with the swept shock wave.

  14. Laminar-turbulent transition delay on a swept wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodulin, V. I.; Ivanov, A. V.; Kachanov, Y. S.; Hanifi, A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper describes the results of experiments on robustness of laminar-turbulent transition control on a swept-wing using distributed micro-sized roughness (DMSR) elements. These elements introduce controlled stationary vortices which are able to significantly modify the base flow and its stability characteristics. We have performed parametric study first varying height and period of the DMSR elements in order to find the most stabilizing effect on boundary later flow in compare to uncontrolled reference case without DMSR. Significant downstream shift of laminar-turbulent transition position due to application of DMSR is found and well documented with help of thermography. The robustness of this flow control method was studied by variation of the wind-tunnel flow quality introducing significant sound background or introducing enhanced turbulence level (applying turbulizing grids). The wind-tunnel tests performed with turbulence-generating grids (at enhanced turbulence levels) have shown that laminar-turbulent transition moves upstream in this case, while DMSR-elements loose their effectiveness for transition control (no matter in quiet sound conditions or at elevated sound background). The experiments on acoustic influence have shown that without DMSR acoustic does not effect transition location. However, in case then laminar-turbulent transition is delayed by presence of DMSR, an additional transition delay was observed when harmonic acoustic waves of certain frequency were excited.

  15. Continuous supersonic plasma wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Nielsen, P.

    1968-01-01

    The B field configuration of a Q-device has been modified into a magnetic Laval nozzle. Continuous supersonic plasma flow is observed with M≈3......The B field configuration of a Q-device has been modified into a magnetic Laval nozzle. Continuous supersonic plasma flow is observed with M≈3...

  16. Continuous supersonic plasma wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Nielsen, P.

    1969-01-01

    The normal magnetic field configuration of a Q device has been modified to obtain a 'magnetic Laval nozzle'. Continuous supersonic plasma 'winds' are obtained with Mach numbers ~3. The magnetic nozzle appears well suited for the study of the interaction of supersonic plasma 'winds' with either...

  17. The Edge supersonic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Roxana; Bilbija, Dushan; Deutsch, Marc; Gallant, David; Rose, Don; Shreve, Gene; Smario, David; Suffredini, Brian

    1992-01-01

    As intercontinental business and tourism volumes continue their rapid expansion, the need to reduce travel times becomes increasingly acute. The Edge Supersonic Transport Aircraft is designed to meet this demand by the year 2015. With a maximum range of 5750 nm, a payload of 294 passengers and a cruising speed of M = 2.4, The Edge will cut current international flight durations in half, while maintaining competitive first class, business class, and economy class comfort levels. Moreover, this transport will render a minimal impact upon the environment, and will meet all Federal Aviation Administration Part 36, Stage III noise requirements. The cornerstone of The Edge's superior flight performance is its aerodynamically efficient, dual-configuration design incorporating variable-geometry wingtips. This arrangement combines the benefits of a high aspect ratio wing at takeoff and low cruising speeds with the high performance of an arrow-wing in supersonic cruise. And while the structural weight concerns relating to swinging wingtips are substantial, The Edge looks to ever-advancing material technologies to further increase its viability. Heeding well the lessons of the past, The Edge design holds economic feasibility as its primary focus. Therefore, in addition to its inherently superior aerodynamic performance, The Edge uses a lightweight, largely windowless configuration, relying on a synthetic vision system for outside viewing by both pilot and passengers. Additionally, a fly-by-light flight control system is incorporated to address aircraft supersonic cruise instability. The Edge will be produced at an estimated volume of 400 aircraft and will be offered to airlines in 2015 at $167 million per transport (1992 dollars).

  18. The hydrogen laminar jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Sanz, M. [Departamento de Motopropulsion y Termofluidomecanica, ETSI Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rosales, M. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain); Instituto de Innovacion en Mineria y Metalurgia, Avenida del Valle 738, Santiago (Chile); Sanchez, A.L. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    Numerical and asymptotic methods are used to investigate the structure of the hydrogen jet discharging into a quiescent air atmosphere. The analysis accounts in particular for the variation of the density and transport properties with composition. The Reynolds number of the flow R{sub j}, based on the initial jet radius a, the density {rho}{sub j} and viscosity {mu}{sub j} of the jet and the characteristic jet velocity u{sub j}, is assumed to take moderately large values, so that the jet remains slender and stable, and can be correspondingly described by numerical integration of the continuity, momentum and species conservation equations written in the boundary-layer approximation. The solution for the velocity and composition in the jet development region of planar and round jets, corresponding to streamwise distances of order R{sub j}a, is computed numerically, along with the solutions that emerge both in the near field and in the far field. The small value of the hydrogen-to-air molecular weight ratio is used to simplify the solution by considering the asymptotic limit of vanishing jet density. The development provides at leading-order explicit analytical expressions for the far-field velocity and hydrogen mass fraction that describe accurately the hydrogen jet near the axis. The information provided can be useful in particular to characterize hydrogen discharge processes from holes and cracks. (author)

  19. Mixing in Supersonic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Liubin

    2010-01-01

    In many astrophysical environments, mixing of heavy elements occurs in the presence of a supersonic turbulent velocity field. Here we carry out the first systematic numerical study of such passive scalar mixing in isothermal supersonic turbulence. Our simulations show that the ratio of the scalar mixing timescale, $\\tau_{\\rm c}$, to the flow dynamical time, $\\tau_{\\rm dyn}$ (defined as the flow driving scale divided by the rms velocity), increases with the Mach number, $M$, for $M \\lsim3$, and becomes essentially constant for $M \\gsim3.$ This trend suggests that compressible modes are less efficient in enhancing mixing than solenoidal modes. However, since the majority of kinetic energy is contained in solenoidal modes at all Mach numbers, the overall change in $\\tau_{\\rm c}/\\tau_{\\rm dyn}$ is less than 20\\% over the range $1 \\lsim M \\lsim 6$. At all Mach numbers, if pollutants are injected at around the flow driving scale, $\\tau_{\\rm c}$ is close to $\\tau_{\\rm dyn}.$ This suggests that scalar mixing is drive...

  20. Numerical Simulation of Laminar Flow Field in a Stirred Tank

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范茏; 王卫京; 杨超; 毛在砂

    2004-01-01

    Stirred tanks are used extensively in process industry and one of the most commonly used impellers in stirred tanks is the R.ushton disk turbine. Surprisingly few data are available regarding flow and mixing in stirred-tank reactors with Rushton turbine in the laminar regime, in particular the laminar flow in baffled tanks.In this paper, the laminar flow field in a baffled tank stirred by a standard R.ushton turbine is simulated with the improved inner-outer iterative method. The non-inertial coordinate system is used for the impeller region, which is in turn used as the boundary conditions for iteration. It is found that the simulation results are in good agreement with previous experiments. In addition, the flow number and impeller power number calculated from the simulated flow field are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. This numerical method allows prediction of flow structure requiring no experimental data as the boundary conditions and has the potential of being used to scale-up and design of related process equipment.

  1. Effect of Nonequilibrium Homogenous COndensation on Flow Fields in a Supersonic Nozzle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ToshiakiSetoguchi; ShenYu; 等

    1997-01-01

    When condensation occurs in a supersonic flow field,the flow is affected by the latent heat released.In the present study,a condensing flow was produced by an expansion of moist air in a supersonic circular nozzle,and,by inserting a wedge-type shock generator placed in the supersonic part of the nozzle,the experimental investigations were carried out to clarify the effect of condensation on the normal shock wave and the boundary layer.As a result,the position of the shock wave relative to the condensation zone was discussed,together with the effect of condensation on pressure fluctuations.Furthermore,a compressible viscous two-phase flow of moist air in a supersonic half nozzle was calculated to investigate the effect of condensation on boundary layer.

  2. Effect of heat loss on laminar flamelet species concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccanera, Marco; Lentini, Diego

    2016-10-01

    The effects of heat loss on the structure of laminar flamelets, which are the constitutive elements of turbulent flames under the most common operating conditions, are investigated for typical aeronautical gas-turbine operating conditions at take-off. The magnitude of heat loss is quantified via the "enthalpy defect" measured with respect to an adiabatic flame. A procedure to generate laminar flamelets with an assigned enthalpy defect at the boundaries is devised and applied to nonpremixed propane/air flames, as propane reproduces the essential features of higher hydrocarbon combustion. It is found, contrary to commonly held beliefs, that the enthalpy defect has a significant effect on the concentration not only of minor species, but also of main reaction products. Such effects are found in general to be more pronounced for fuel-rich conditions. An impact is anticipated on the formation rate of nitric oxides. The effects of scalar dissipation rate are also discussed.

  3. Modelling flow transition in a hypersonic boundary layer with Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang; FU Song

    2009-01-01

    Based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach, a laminar-turbulence transition model is proposed in this study that takes into account the effects of different instability modes associated with the variations in Mach numbers of compressible boundary layer flows. The model is based on k-ω-γ three-equation eddy-viscosity concept with k representing the fluctuating kinetic energy, ωthe specific dissipation rate and the intermittency factor γ.The particular features of the model are that: 1) k includes the non-turbulent, as well as turbulent fluctuations; 2) a transport equation for the intermittency factor γis proposed here with a source term set to trigger the transition onset; 3) through the introduction of a new length scale normal to wall, the present model employs the local variables only avoiding the use of the integral parameters, like the boundary layer thickness δ,which are often cost-ineffective with the modern CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) methods; 4) in the fully turbulent region, the model retreats to the well-known k-ωSST (Shear Stress Transport) model. This model is validated with a number of available experiments on boundary layer transitions including the incompressible, supersonic and hypersonic flows past flat plates, straight/flared cones at zero incidences, etc. It is demonstrated that the present model can be successfully applied to the engineering calculations of a variety of aerodynamic flow transition.

  4. Modelling flow transition in a hypersonic boundary layer with Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach,a laminar-turbulence transition model is proposed in this study that takes into account the effects of different instability modes associated with the variations in Mach numbers of compressible boundary layer flows.The model is based on k-ω-γ three-equation eddy-viscosity concept with k representing the fluctuating kinetic energy,ωthe specific dissipation rate and the intermittency factorγ.The particular features of the model are that:1)k includes the non-turbulent,as well as turbulent fluctuations;2)a transport equation for the intermittency factorγis proposed here with a source term set to trigger the transition onset;3)through the introduction of a new length scale normal to wall,the present model employs the local variables only avoiding the use of the integral parameters,like the boundary layer thicknessδ,which are often cost-ineffective with the modern CFD(Computational Fluid Dynamics)methods;4)in the fully turbulent region,the model retreats to the well-known k-ωSST(Shear Stress Transport)model.This model is validated with a number of available experiments on boundary layer transitions including the incompressible,supersonic and hypersonic flows past flat plates,straight/flared cones at zero incidences,etc.It is demonstrated that the present model can be successfully applied to the engineering calculations of a variety of aerodynamic flow transition.

  5. Investigation of Turbulent Laminar Patterns in Poiseuille-Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quoc; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios

    2014-11-01

    Laminar-turbulent intermittency has recently been observed in the transitional regime of pipe ... and plane Couette flow .... While many works focus on behavior of these patterns in plane Couette flow, little attention has been paid to Poiseuille flow and transition from Couette to Poiseuille flow. In this study, we investigate behavior of turbulent laminar patterns in Poiseuille-Couette flow, including pure Poiseuille and Couette flows at two limits. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) is used to simulate a Poiseuille-Couette channel at a size of 16 πh × 2h × 2 πh (corresponding to a resolution of 512 × 129 × 128 in x, y and z directions), with periodic boundary condition applied in the x and z directions (h is half of the channel height). The Reynolds number is 300, and the flow is at transitional regime in all simulations. Behavior of laminar turbulent patterns as the flow goes from Couette to Poiseuille flow will be presented in details. This would shed some light on the effect of different types of flow on these patterns, as well as how these patterns vary from fully Poiseuille flow to fully Couette flow.

  6. Conceptual design for a laminar-flying-wing aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, T. I.

    The laminar-flying-wing aircraft appears to be an attractive long-term prospect for reducing the environmental impact of commercial aviation. In assessing its potential, a relatively straightforward initial step is the conceptual design of a version with restricted sweep angle. Such a design is the topic of this thesis. Subject to constraints, this research aims to; provide insight into the parameters affecting practical laminar-flow-control suction power requirements; identify a viable basic design specification; and, on the basis of this, an assessment of the fuel efficiency through a detailed conceptual design study. It is shown that there is a minimum power requirement independent of the suction system design, associated with the stagnation pressure loss in the boundary layer. This requirement increases with aerofoil section thickness, but depends only weakly on Mach number and (for a thick, lightly-loaded laminar flying wing) lift coefficient. Deviation from the optimal suction distribution, due to a practical chamber-based architecture, is found to have very little effect on the overall suction coefficient. In the spanwise direction, through suitable choice of chamber depth, the pressure drop due to frictional and inertial effects may be rendered negligible. Finally, it is found that the pressure drop from the aerofoil surface to the pump collector ducts determines the power penalty. To identify the viable basic design specification, a high-level exploration of the laminar flying wing design space is performed. The characteristics of the design are assessed as a function of three parameters: thickness-to-chord ratio, wingspan, and unit Reynolds number. A feasible specification, with 20% thickness-to-chord, 80 m span and a unit Reynolds number of 8 x 106 m-1, is identified; it corresponds to a 187 tonne aircraft which cruises at Mach 0.67 and altitude 22,500 ft, with lift coefficient 0.14. On the basis of this specification, a detailed conceptual design is

  7. Performance of a Supersonic Ramp-type Side Inlet with Ram-scoop Throat Bleed and Varying Fuselage Boundary-layer Removal : Mach Number Range 1.5 to 2.0 / Glenn A. Mitchell and Robert C. Campbell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Glenn A; Campbell, Robert C

    1957-01-01

    Provided sufficient throat bleed was employed, maximum pressure recoveries of 0.87 to 0.88 at Mach number 2.0 were obtained for a fuselage-mounted 14 degrees ramp inlet regardless of the amount of fuselage boundary layer ingested. The addition of inlet side fairings yielded further increases in pressure recovery to 0.90 to 0.91, decreased critical drag coefficients, and increased critical mass-flow ratios. With throat bleed, peak pressure recoveries and calculated thrust-minus-drag values were comparable at two axial positions of the scoop and were highest with the greatest amount of fuselage boundary layer ingested.

  8. Laminar-turbulent transition on the flying wing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlenko, A. M.; Zanin, B. Yu.; Katasonov, M. M.

    2016-10-01

    Results of an experimental study of a subsonic flow past aircraft model having "flying wing" form and belonging to the category of small-unmanned aerial vehicles are reported. Quantitative data about the structure of the flow near the model surface were obtained by hot-wire measurements. It was shown, that with the wing sweep angle 34 °the laminar-turbulent transition scenario is identical to the one on a straight wing. The transition occurs through the development of a package of unstable oscillations in the boundary layer separation.

  9. Gas turbine engine with supersonic compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.

    2015-10-20

    A gas turbine engine having a compressor section using blades on a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a stator. The stator includes one or more of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions for deceleration of the gas to subsonic conditions and to deliver a high pressure gas to combustors. The aerodynamic ducts include structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are provided having an aspect ratio of two to one (2:1) or more, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.

  10. Tesseract supersonic business transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshotko, Eli; Garbinski, Gary; Fellenstein, James; Botting, Mary; Hooper, Joan; Ryan, Michael; Struk, Peter; Taggart, Ben; Taillon, Maggie; Warzynski, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This year, the senior level Aerospace Design class at Case Western Reserve University developed a conceptual design of a supersonic business transport. Due to the growing trade between Asia and the United States, a transpacific range was chosen for the aircraft. A Mach number of 2.2 was chosen, too, because it provides reasonable block times and allows the use of a large range of materials without a need for active cooling. A payload of 2,500 lbs. was assumed corresponding to a complement of nine passengers and crew, plus some light cargo. With these general requirements set, the class was broken down into three groups. The aerodynamics of the aircraft were the responsibility of the first group. The second developed the propulsion system. The efforts of both the aerodynamics and propulsion groups were monitored and reviewed for weight considerations and structural feasibility by the third group. Integration of the design required considerable interaction between the groups in the final stages. The fuselage length of the final conceptual design was 107.0 ft, while the diameter of the fuselage was 7.6 ft. The delta wing design consisted of an aspect ratio of 1.9 with a wing span of 47.75 ft and mid-chord length of 61.0 ft. A SNECMA MCV 99 variable-cycle engine design was chosen for this aircraft.

  11. Tesseract: Supersonic business transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshotko, Eli; Garbinski, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This year, the senior level Aerospace Design class at Case Western Reserve University developed a conceptual design of a supersonic business transport. Due to the growing trade between Asia and the United States, a transpacific range has been chosen for the aircraft. A Mach number of 2.2 was chosen too because it provides reasonable block times and allows the use of a large range of materials without a need for active cooling. A payload of 2500 lbs. has been assumed corresponding to a complement of nine (passengers and crew) plus some light cargo. With these general requirements set, the class was broken down into three groups. The aerodynamics of the aircraft were the responsibility of the first group. The second developed the propulsion system. The efforts of both the aerodynamics and propulsion groups were monitored and reviewed for weight considerations and structural feasibility by the third group. Integration of the design required considerable interaction between the groups in the final stages. The fuselage length of the final conceptual design was 107.0 ft. while the diameter of the fuselage was 7.6 ft. The delta wing design consisted of an aspect ratio of 1.9 with a wing span of 47.75 ft and midcord length of 61.0 ft. A SNEMCA MCV 99 variable-cycle engine design was chosen for this aircraft.

  12. Developing laminar flow in curved rectangular channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vriend, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    As an intermediate step between earlier investigations on fully developed laminar flow in curved channels of shallow rectancular wet cross-section and the mathematical modeling of turbulent flow in river bends, a mathematical model of developing laminar flow in such channels is investigated. The mos

  13. Shock Train and Pseudo-shock Phenomena in Supersonic Internal Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuyasu Matsuo

    2003-01-01

    When a normal shock wave interacts with a boundary layer along a wall surface in supersonic internal flows and the shock is strong enough to separate the boundary layer, the shock is bifurcated and a series of shocks called "shock train" is formed. The flow is decelerated from supersonic to subsonic through the whole interaction region that is referred to as "pseudo-shock". In the present paper some characteristics of the shock train and pseudo-shock and some examples of the pseudo-shocks in some flow devices are described.

  14. Supersonic Dislocation Bursts in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, E. N.; Zhao, S.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Dislocations are the primary agents of permanent deformation in crystalline solids. Since the theoretical prediction of supersonic dislocations over half a century ago, there is a dearth of experimental evidence supporting their existence. Here we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shocked silicon to reveal transient supersonic partial dislocation motion at approximately 15 km/s, faster than any previous in-silico observation. Homogeneous dislocation nucleation occurs near the shock front and supersonic dislocation motion lasts just fractions of picoseconds before the dislocations catch the shock front and decelerate back to the elastic wave speed. Applying a modified analytical equation for dislocation evolution we successfully predict a dislocation density of 1.5 × 1012 cm-2 within the shocked volume, in agreement with the present simulations and realistic in regards to prior and on-going recovery experiments in silicon.

  15. Experimental analysis of the shock dynamics on a transonic laminar airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brion, V.; Dandois, J.; Abart, J.-C.; Paillart, P.

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes an experimental analysis of the buffet phenomenon on a two-dimensional (2D), transonic, and laminar airfoil at a Reynolds number around 3 · 106. Investigations are carried out in ONERA's S3Ch transonic wind tunnel. The experimental setup allows to vary the Mach number, the angle of attack, and the state of the boundary layer upstream of the shock which can be turbulent or laminar depending on the presence of artificial tripping. Buffet occurs when either the angle of attack or the Mach number is set above a given threshold, which depends upon the particular airfoil, and, as shown here, on the state of the boundary layer. Above the threshold, the boundary layer / shock interaction destabilizes, causing the oscillation of the entire flow field. In the turbulent case, the shock wave moves back and forth over a significant portion of the chord at a frequency of about 75 Hz corresponding to a chord based on Strouhal number St ≃ 0.07, in agreement with previous researches on this phenomenon. In the laminar case, a similar unsteady situation occurs but at a frequency much higher, about 1130 Hz, which corresponds to a Strouhal number of about St ≃ 1. Flow oscillations are limited to the shock foot, the shock itself moving only lightly. The turbulent and laminar bu¨et thresholds are provided. An attempt to apply the classical feedback loop scenario to explain the unsteadiness of the flow in the laminar case is carried out but shows a deceptive agreement with the experimental data. Two other mechanisms of unsteadiness are additionally explored, one based on vortex shedding behind the airfoil and the other on the possible breathing of the laminar separation bubble, which give valuable insights into the §ow physics.

  16. Properties of Supersonic Evershed Downflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozuelo, S. Esteban; Bellot Rubio, L. R.; de la Cruz Rodríguez, J.

    2016-12-01

    We study supersonic Evershed downflows in a sunspot penumbra by means of high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric data acquired in the Fe i 617.3 nm line with the CRISP instrument at the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. Physical observables, such as Dopplergrams calculated from line bisectors and Stokes V zero-crossing wavelengths, and Stokes V maps in the far red-wing, are used to find regions where supersonic Evershed downflows may exist. We retrieve the line-of-sight velocity and the magnetic field vector in these regions using two-component inversions of the observed Stokes profiles with the help of the SIR code. We follow these regions during their lifetime to study their temporal behavior. Finally, we carry out a statistical analysis of the detected supersonic downflows to characterize their physical properties. Supersonic downflows are contained in compact patches moving outward, which are located in the mid- and outer penumbra. They are observed as bright, roundish structures at the outer end of penumbral filaments that resemble penumbral grains. The patches may undergo fragmentations and mergings during their lifetime; some of them are recurrent. Supersonic downflows are associated with strong and rather vertical magnetic fields with a reversed polarity compared to that of the sunspot. Our results suggest that downflows returning back to the solar surface with supersonic velocities are abruptly stopped in dense deep layers and produce a shock. Consequently, this shock enhances the temperature and is detected as a bright grain in the continuum filtergrams, which could explain the existence of outward-moving grains in the mid- and outer penumbra.

  17. Investigation on flow and mixing characteristics of supersonic mixing layer induced by forced vibration of cantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Tan, Jianguo; Lv, Liang

    2015-12-01

    The mixing process has been an important issue for the design of supersonic combustion ramjet engine, and the mixing efficiency plays a crucial role in the improvement of the combustion efficiency. In the present study, nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering (NPLS), particle image velocimetry (PIV) and large eddy simulation (LES) are employed to investigate the flow and mixing characteristics of supersonic mixing layer under different forced vibration conditions. The indexes of fractal dimension, mixing layer thickness, momentum thickness and scalar mixing level are applied to describe the mixing process. Results show that different from the development and evolution of supersonic mixing layer without vibration, the flow under forced vibration is more likely to present the characteristics of three-dimensionality. The laminar flow region of mixing layer under forced vibration is greatly shortened and the scales of rolled up Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices become larger, which promote the mixing process remarkably. The fractal dimension distribution reveals that comparing with the flow without vibration, the turbulent fluctuation of supersonic mixing layer under forced vibration is more intense. Besides, the distribution of mixing layer thickness, momentum thickness and scalar mixing level are strongly influenced by forced vibration. Especially, when the forcing frequency is 4000 Hz, the mixing layer thickness and momentum thickness are 0.0391 m and 0.0222 m at the far field of 0.16 m, 83% and 131% higher than that without vibration at the same position, respectively.

  18. Flight Research and Validation Formerly Experimental Capabilities Supersonic Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Experimental Capabilities Supersonic project, that is being reorganized into Flight Research and Validation. The work of Experimental Capabilities Project in FY '09 is reviewed, and the specific centers that is assigned to do the work is given. The portfolio of the newly formed Flight Research and Validation (FRV) group is also reviewed. The various projects for FY '10 for the FRV are detailed. These projects include: Eagle Probe, Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment (CCIE), Supersonic Boundary layer Transition test (SBLT), Aero-elastic Test Wing-2 (ATW-2), G-V External Vision Systems (G5 XVS), Air-to-Air Schlieren (A2A), In Flight Background Oriented Schlieren (BOS), Dynamic Inertia Measurement Technique (DIM), and Advanced In-Flight IR Thermography (AIR-T).

  19. Properties of Supersonic Evershed Downflows

    CERN Document Server

    Pozuelo, Sara Esteban; Rodriguez, Jaime de la Cruz

    2016-01-01

    We study supersonic Evershed downflows in a sunspot penumbra by means of high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric data acquired in the Fe I 617.3 nm line with the CRISP instrument at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. Physical observables, such as Dopplergrams calculated from line bisectors and Stokes V zero-crossing wavelengths, and Stokes V maps in the far red wing, are used to find regions where supersonic Evershed downflows may exist. We retrieve the LOS velocity and the magnetic field vector in these regions using two-component inversions of the observed Stokes profiles with the help of the SIR code. We follow these regions during their lifetime to study their temporal behavior. Finally, we carry out a statistical analysis of the detected supersonic downflows to characterize their physical properties. Supersonic downflows are contained in compact patches moving outward, which are located in the mid and outer penumbra. They are observed as bright, roundish structures at the outer end of penumbral filamen...

  20. DRE-Enhanced Swept-Wing Natural Laminar Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Mujeeb; Liao, Wei; Li, Fe; Choudhari, Meelan

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear parabolized stability equations and secondary instability analyses are used to provide a computational assessment of the potential use of the discrete roughness elements (DRE) technology for extending swept-wing natural laminar flow at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. Computations performed for the boundary layer on a natural laminar flow airfoil with a leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6deg, free-stream Mach number of 0.75 and chord Reynolds numbers of 17 x 10(exp 6), 24 x 10(exp 6) and 30 x 10(exp 6) suggest that DRE could delay laminar-turbulent transition by about 20% when transition is caused by stationary crossflow disturbances. Computations show that the introduction of small wavelength stationary crossflow disturbances (i.e., DRE) also suppresses the growth of most amplified traveling crossflow disturbances.

  1. Discrete-Roughness-Element-Enhanced Swept-Wing Natural Laminar Flow at High Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Mujeeb; Liao, Wei; Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear parabolized stability equations and secondary-instability analyses are used to provide a computational assessment of the potential use of the discrete-roughness-element technology for extending swept-wing natural laminar flow at chord Reynolds numbers relevant to transport aircraft. Computations performed for the boundary layer on a natural-laminar-flow airfoil with a leading-edge sweep angle of 34.6 deg, freestream Mach number of 0.75, and chord Reynolds numbers of 17 × 10(exp 6), 24 × 10(exp 6), and 30 × 10(exp 6) suggest that discrete roughness elements could delay laminar-turbulent transition by about 20% when transition is caused by stationary crossflow disturbances. Computations show that the introduction of small-wavelength stationary crossflow disturbances (i.e., discrete roughness element) also suppresses the growth of most amplified traveling crossflow disturbances.

  2. The Turbulent-Laminar Transition on the Rocket Surface During the Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Yurchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The variety of turbulent-laminar transition criteria in such environments as the launch vehicle injection points to the essential influence of spherical nose roughness, which is included in one form or another in the critical Reynolds numbers for a lot of explorers of blunt bodies. Some of researchers of the reentry bodies have founded the correlation functions between the momentum thickness Reynolds number and Max number as the transition criteria.In this article we have considered results of flight tests carried out using launch vehicles to define boundary layer regime on the payload fairing surface. The measurements were carried out using specially designed complex of gages consisted of calorimeters, surface temperature gages, and pressure gages. The turbulent-laminar transition was defined in accordance with the sharp change of calorimeter readings and flow separation pressure gages indication.The universal criterion of turbulent-laminar transition has been identified for blunted payload fairings i.e. Reynolds number Reek based on the boundary layer edge parameters in the sonic point of the payload fairing spherical nose and surface roughness height k, which gives the best correlation of all data of flight experiment conducted to define turbulent-laminar transition in boundary layer. The criterion allows defining time margins when boundary layer regime is turbulent at Reek=20±14 existing on space head surfaces and at Reek=6±5 the boundary layer regime is totally laminar.It was defined that under conditions when there are jointly high background disturbances of free stream flux at operation of main launch vehicle engines and influence of the surface roughness the critical value of Reynolds number is an order-diminished value as compared to the values obtained in wind tunnels and in free flight.It was found that with decreasing of roughness influence in growing boundary layer the flow disturbances evolution wide apart the payload fairing

  3. Sedimentary microbial oxygen demand for laminar flow over a sediment bed of finite length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Makoto; Stefan, Heinz G

    2005-09-01

    Dead organic material accumulated on the bed of a lake, reservoir or wetland often provides the substrate for substantial microbial activity as well as chemical processes that withdraw dissolved oxygen (DO) from the water column. A model to estimate the actual DO profile and the "sedimentary oxygen demand (SOD)" must specify the rate of microbial or chemical activity in the sediment as well as the diffusive supply of DO from the water column through the diffusive boundary layer into the sediment. Most previous experimental and field studies have considered this problem with the assumptions that the diffusive boundary layer is (a) turbulent and (b) fully developed. These assumptions require that (a) the flow velocity above the sediment bed is fast enough to produce turbulent mixing in the boundary layer, and (b) the sediment bed is long. In this paper a model for laminar flow and SOD over a sediment bed of finite length is presented and the results are compared with those for turbulent flow. Laminar flow near a sediment bed is encountered in quiescent water bodies such as lakes, reservoirs, river backwaters, wetlands and ponds under calm wind conditions. The diffusive oxygen transfer through the laminar diffusive boundary layer above the sediment surface can restrict the microbial or chemical oxygen uptake inside the sediment significantly. The developing laminar diffusive boundary layer above the sediment/water interface is modeled based on the analogy with heat transfer, and DO uptake inside the sediment is modeled by Michaelis-Menten microbial growth kinetics. The model predicts that the rate of SOD at the beginning of the reactive sediment bed is solely dependent on microbial density in the sediment regardless of flow velocity and type. The rate of SOD, and the DO penetration depth into the sediment decrease in stream-wise direction over the length of the sediment bed, as the diffusive boundary layer above the sediment/water interface thickens. With increasing

  4. ARBITRARY INTERACTION OF PLANE SUPERSONIC FLOWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study.We consider the Riemann problem for parameters at collision of two plane flows at a certain angle. The problem is solved in the exact statement. Most cases of interference, both stationary and non-stationary gas-dynamic discontinuities, followed by supersonic flows can be reduced to the problem of random interaction of two supersonic flows. Depending on the ratio of the parameters in the flows, outgoing discontinuities turn out to be shock waves, or rarefactionwaves. In some cases, there is no solution at all. It is important to know how to find the domain of existence for the relevant decisions, as the type of shock-wave structures in these domains is known in advance. The Riemann problem is used in numerical methods such as the method of Godunov. As a rule, approximate solution is used, known as the Osher solution, but for a number of problems with a high precision required, solution of this problem needs to be in the exact statement. Main results.Domains of existence for solutions with different types of shock-wave structure have been considered. Boundaries of existence for solutions with two outgoing shock waves are analytically defined, as well as with the outgoing shock wave and rarefaction wave. We identify the area of Mach numbers and angles at which the flows interact and there is no solution. Specific flows with two outgoing rarefaction waves are not considered. Practical significance. The results supplement interference theory of stationary gas-dynamic discontinuities and can be used to develop new methods of numerical calculation with extraction of discontinuities.

  5. Mixing with herringbone-inspired microstructures: overcoming the diffusion limit in co-laminar microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschewski, Julian; Jung, Stefan; Ruch, Patrick; Prasad, Nishant; Mazzotti, Sergio; Michel, Bruno; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-04-21

    Enhancing mixing is of uttermost importance in many laminar microfluidic devices, aiming at overcoming the severe performance limitation of species transport by diffusion alone. Here we focus on the significant category of microscale co-laminar flows encountered in membraneless redox flow cells for power delivery. The grand challenge is to achieve simultaneously convective mixing within each individual reactant, to thin the reaction depletion boundary layers, while maintaining separation of the co-flowing reactants, despite the absence of a membrane. The concept presented here achieves this goal with the help of optimized herringbone flow promoting microstructures with an integrated separation zone. Our electrochemical experiments using a model redox couple show that symmetric flow promoter designs exhibit laminar to turbulent flow behavior, the latter at elevated flow rates. This change in flow regime is accompanied by a significant change in scaling of the Sherwood number with respect to the Reynolds number from Sh ~ Re(0.29) to Sh ~ Re(0.58). The stabilized continuous laminar flow zone along the centerline of the channel allows operation in a co-laminar flow regime up to Re ~325 as we demonstrate by micro laser-induced fluorescence (μLIF) measurements. Micro particle image velocimetry (μPIV) proves the maintenance of a stratified flow along the centerline, mitigating reactant cross-over effectively. The present work paves the way toward improved performance in membraneless microfluidic flow cells for electrochemical energy conversion.

  6. A Coordinate Transformation for Unsteady Boundary Layer Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul G. A. CIZMAS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new coordinate transformation for unsteady, incompressible boundary layer equations that applies to both laminar and turbulent flows. A generalization of this coordinate transformation is also proposed. The unsteady boundary layer equations are subsequently derived. In addition, the boundary layer equations are derived using a time linearization approach and assuming harmonically varying small disturbances.

  7. ON THE ASYMPTOTIC BEHAVIOUR OF THE STEADY SUPERSONIC FLOWS AT INFINITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YONGQIAN

    2005-01-01

    This paper studies the asymptotic behaviour of steady supersonic flow past a piecewise smooth corner or bend. Under the hypothese that both vertex angle and the total variation of tangent along the boundary are small, it is shown that the solution can be obtained by a modified Glimm scheme, and that the asymptotic behaviour of the solution is determined by the velocity of incoming flow and the limit of the tangent of the boundary at infinity.

  8. Accuracy Of Hot-Wire Anemometry In Supersonic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Pamela; Mckenzie, Robert L.; Bershader, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity of hot-wire probe compared to laser-induced-florescence measurements. Report discusses factors affecting readings of hot-wire anemometer in turbulent supersonic boundary layer. Presents theoretical analysis of responses of hot-wire probe to changes in flow; also compares measurements by hot-wire probe with measurements of same flows by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Because LIF provides spatially and temporally resolved data on temperature, density, and pressure, provides independent means to determine responses of hot-wire anemometers to these quantities.

  9. Direct numerical simulation of laminar-turbulent flow over a flat plate at hypersonic flow speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, I. V.; Novikov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    A method for direct numerical simulation of a laminar-turbulent flow around bodies at hypersonic flow speeds is proposed. The simulation is performed by solving the full three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The method of calculation is oriented to application of supercomputers and is based on implicit monotonic approximation schemes and a modified Newton-Raphson method for solving nonlinear difference equations. By this method, the development of three-dimensional perturbations in the boundary layer over a flat plate and in a near-wall flow in a compression corner is studied at the Mach numbers of the free-stream of M = 5.37. In addition to pulsation characteristic, distributions of the mean coefficients of the viscous flow in the transient section of the streamlined surface are obtained, which enables one to determine the beginning of the laminar-turbulent transition and estimate the characteristics of the turbulent flow in the boundary layer.

  10. On the design of airfoils in which the transition of the boundary layer is delayed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Itiro

    1952-01-01

    A method is presented for designing suitable thickness distributions and mean camber lines for airfoils permitting extensive chordwise laminar flow. Wind tunnel and flight tests confirming the existence of laminar flow; possible maintenance of laminar flow by area suction; and the effects of wind tunnel turbulence and surface roughness on the promotion of premature boundary layer transition are discussed. In addition, estimates of profile drag and scale effect on maximum lift of the derived airfoils are made.

  11. Incompressible Laminar Flow Over a Three-Dimensional Rectangular Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates unsteady incompressible flow over cavities,Previous research in in compressible cavity-flow has included flow inside and past a 2-dimensional cavity,and flow inside a 3-dimensional cavity,driven by a moving lid.The present research is focused on incompressible flow past a 3-dimensional open shallow cavity.This involves the complex interaction etween the external flow and the re-circulating flow within the cavity.In particular,computation was performed on a 3-dimensonal shallow rectangular cavity with a laminar boundary layer at the cavity and a Reynolds number of 5,000 and 10,000,respectively,A CFD approach,based on the unsteady Navier-Stokes equation for 3-dimensional incompressible flow,was used in the study.Typical results of the computation are presented.Theses results reveal the highly unsteady and complex vortical structures at high Reynolds numbers.

  12. Oblique Laminar-Turbulent Interfaces in Plane Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, Yohann; Schlatter, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Localized structures such as turbulent stripes and turbulent spots are typical features of transitional wall-bounded flows in the subcritical regime. Based on an assumption for scale separation between large and small scales, we show analytically that the corresponding laminar-turbulent interfaces are always oblique with respect to the mean direction of the flow. In the case of plane Couette flow, the mismatch between the streamwise flow rates near the boundaries of the turbulence patch generates a large-scale flow with a nonzero spanwise component. Advection of the small-scale turbulent fluctuations (streaks) by the corresponding large-scale flow distorts the shape of the turbulence patch and is responsible for its oblique growth. This mechanism can be easily extended to other subcritical flows such as plane Poiseuille flow or Taylor-Couette flow.

  13. Micropolarity Effects on the Bickley-Plane-Laminar-Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Siddiqui, Abuzar Abid

    2015-01-01

    In this study, it was formulated the boundary-value-problem (BVP), comprising partial differential equations (PDEs), of steady flow for plane, laminar jet of a micropolar fluid. A new similarity transformation/solution was derived which is valid not only for the Newtonian fluids but also for the micropolar fluids. Obviously, this transformation will be transformed the PDEs into the ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These ODEs were solved numerically by the finite difference method. The obtained results were compared with existing results [1, 12] for the Newtonian fluids. The comparison was favourable. As the aciculate particles in a micropolar fluid can rotate without translation, the micropolarity effects must have influence on fluid-speed, microrotation, stresses, couple stresses and discharge. This influence was highlighted in the present study. If viscosity coupling parameter K1 (being the measure of micropolarity) increases then microrotation, fluid-flux, stresses and couple stresses intensify in t...

  14. Laminar film boiling on inclined isothermal flat plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagendra, H. R.

    1973-01-01

    Laminar film boiling from an inclined flat plate has been investigated analytically. Using the singular perturbation scheme, the complete set of Navier-Stokes equations is solved. The zeroth-order perturbation coinciding with the boundary-layer equations for vertical flat plates governs the problem. The higher-order perturbations become important near the leading edge and for large values of the inclination angle from the vertical. The assumption of zero interfacial velocity shows that, except for fluids having large (rho x mu) ratios, the results can be predicted using the vertical flat plate results by defining a modified Grashof parameter containing a cos phi term. When the interfacial shear is considered, the solutions indicate that for fluids having large (rho x mu) ratios, the heat transfer rates will be larger (approximately 15% maximum) than those predicted by the simplified model using zero interfacial velocity. In general, the inclination decreases the rate of heat transfer as well as the rate of evaporation.

  15. Experimental study for the detection of the laminar/turbulent aerodynamic transition on a wing aircraft, using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, S.; Dolfi, D.; Doisy, M.; Seraudie, A.; Arnal, D.; Coustols, E.; Mandle, J.

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of detection of the nature (laminar/turbulent/transitional) of the aerodynamic boundary layer of a profile of a wing aircraft model, using a Distributed FeedBack (DFB) Fiber Laser as optical fiber sensor. Signals to be measured are pressure variations : ΔP~1Pa at few 100Hz in the laminar region and ΔP~10Pa at few kHz in the turbulent region. Intermittent regime occurring in-between these two regions (transition) is characterized by turbulent bursts in laminar flow. Relevant pressure variations have been obtained in a low-speed research-type wind tunnel of ONERA Centre of Toulouse. In order to validate the measurements, a "classical" hot film sensor, the application and use of which have been formerly developed and validated by ONERA, has been placed at the neighborhood of the fiber sensor. The hot film allows measurement of the boundary layer wall shear stress whose characteristics are a well known signature of the boundary layer nature (laminar, intermittent or turbulent) [1]. In the three regimes, signals from the fiber sensor and the hot film sensor are strongly correlated, which allows us to conclude that a DFB fiber laser sensor is a good candidate for detecting the boundary layer nature, and thus for future integration in an aircraft wing. The work presented here has been realized within the framework of "Clean Sky", a Joint Technology Initiative of the European Union.

  16. Coherent structures in a supersonic complex nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magstadt, Andrew; Berry, Matthew; Glauser, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The jet flow from a complex supersonic nozzle is studied through experimental measurements. The nozzle's geometry is motivated by future engine designs for high-performance civilian and military aircraft. This rectangular jet has a single plane of symmetry, an additional shear layer (referred to as a wall jet), and an aft deck representative of airframe integration. The core flow operates at a Mach number of Mj , c = 1 . 6 , and the wall jet is choked (Mj , w = 1 . 0). This high Reynolds number jet flow is comprised of intense turbulence levels, an intricate shock structure, shear and boundary layers, and powerful corner vortices. In the present study, stereo PIV measurements are simultaneously sampled with high-speed pressure measurements, which are embedded in the aft deck, and far-field acoustics in the anechoic chamber at Syracuse University. Time-resolved schlieren measurements have indicated the existence of strong flow events at high frequencies, at a Strouhal number of St = 3 . 4 . These appear to result from von Kàrmàn vortex shedding within the nozzle and pervade the entire flow and acoustic domain. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied on the current data to identify coherent structures in the jet and study the influence of this vortex street. AFOSR Turbulence and Transition Program (Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0435) with program managers Dr. I. Leyva and Dr. R. Ponnappan.

  17. Investigations on controlled transition development in a laminar separation bubble by means of LDA and PIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, M.; Rist, U.; Wagner, S. [Institut fuer Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 21, 70550, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2004-01-01

    When a laminar boundary layer separates because of an adverse streamwise pressure gradient, the flow is subject to increased instability with respect to small-amplitude disturbances. Laminar-turbulent transition occurs under a rapid three-dimensional (3D) development within the separated shear layer. When the following turbulent boundary layer reattaches, a laminar separation bubble is formed. To allow controlled measurements, a small-amplitude Tollmien-Schlichting wave (TS wave) was introduced into the boundary layer without (case I) and with (case II) spanwise forcing of steady 3D disturbances. Combined application of laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) demonstrates the suitability of both measurement techniques to capture the development of unsteady, periodic phenomena. The transition mechanism occurring in the flow field under consideration is discussed, and results obtained by controlled measurements are compared to direct numerical simulations (DNS) and predictions from linear stability theory (LST). Flow visualizations and stereoscopic PIV measurements give better insight into the 3D breakdown of the separated shear layer. (orig.)

  18. Detonation in supersonic radial outflow

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.

    2014-11-07

    We report on the structure and dynamics of gaseous detonation stabilized in a supersonic flow emanating radially from a central source. The steady-state solutions are computed and their range of existence is investigated. Two-dimensional simulations are carried out in order to explore the stability of the steady-state solutions. It is found that both collapsing and expanding two-dimensional cellular detonations exist. The latter can be stabilized by putting several rigid obstacles in the flow downstream of the steady-state sonic locus. The problem of initiation of standing detonation stabilized in the radial flow is also investigated numerically. © 2014 Cambridge University Press.

  19. Laminar Film Boiling Heat Transfer on a Horizontal Cylinder Submerged in an Upward Crossflow of Saturated Liquids

    OpenAIRE

    茂地, 徹; 川江, 信治; 金丸, 邦康; 山田, 岹

    1988-01-01

    An analysis was made of the steady-state, forced convection film boiling heat transfer on an isothermal horizontal cylinder submerged in an upward crossflow of saturated liquids in the gravitational field. The boundary-layer equations of momentum and of energy for the laminar vapor film, including both the inertia force in the former and the convection term in the latter, were solved using an integral method. The analytical solution was obtained for the integrated boundary-layer equations. A ...

  20. Study of density field measurement based on NPLS technique in supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Due to the influence of shock wave and turbulence, supersonic density field exhibits strongly inhomogeneous and unsteady characteristics. Applying traditional density field measurement techniques to supersonic flows yields three problems: low spatiotemporal resolution, limitation of measuring 3D density field, and low signal to noise ratio (SNR). A new method based on Nano-based Planar Laser Scattering (NPLS) technique is proposed in this paper to measure supersonic density field. This method measures planar transient density field in 3D supersonic flow by calibrating the relationship between density and concentration of tracer particles, which would display the density fluctuation due to the influence of shock waves and vortexes. The application of this new method to density field measurement of supersonic optical bow cap is introduced in this paper, and the results reveal shock wave, turbulent boundary layer in the flow with the spatial resolution of 93.2 μm/pixel. By analyzing the results at interval of 5 μs, temporal evolution of density field can be observed.

  1. Study of density field measurement based on NPLS technique in supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN LiFeng; YI ShiHe; ZHAO YuXin; HE Lin; CHENG ZhongYu

    2009-01-01

    Due to the influence of shock wave and turbulence,supersonic density field exhibits strongly inho-mogeneous and unsteady characteristics.Applying traditional density field measurement techniques to supersonic flows yields three problems: low spatiotemporal resolution,limitation of measuring 3D density field,and low signal to noise ratio (SNR).A new method based on Nano-based Planar Laser Scattering (NPLS) technique is proposed in this paper to measure supersonic density field.This method measures planar transient density field in 3D supersonic flow by calibrating the relationship between density and concentration of tracer particles,which would display the density fluctuation due to the influence of shock waves and vortexes.The application of this new method to density field measurement of supersonic optical bow cap is introduced in this paper,and the results reveal shock wave,turbulent boundary layer in the flow with the spatial resolution of 93.2 pm/pixel.By analyzing the results at interval of 5 μs,temporal evolution of density field can be observed.

  2. A Study of Laminar Backward-Facing Step Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidson, Lars; Nielsen, Peter V.

    The laminar flow for a backwards facing step is studied. This work was initially part of the work presented in. In that work low-Reynolds number effects was studied, and the plan was also to include laminar flow. However, it turned out that when the numerical predictions of the laminar flow (Re...

  3. Gas flow measurement using laminar flow elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigand, J. [Meriam Instrument, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31

    An instrument that measures gas volumetric flow rate using a capillary tube laminar-flow principle is described. Irs construction, operation, accuracy, and rangeability are presented. Discussion includes integrating the differential-pressure-producing flowmeter with appropriate temperature find pressure devices to produce a digital flowmeter system capable of measuring volumetric and mass flow rates. Typical applications are described.

  4. Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-02-01

    The Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor (LEFR) is a modular, lab scale, single-user reactor for the study of catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP). This system can be employed to study a variety of reactor conditions for both in situ and ex situ CFP.

  5. Computational Design and Analysis of a Transonic Natural Laminar Flow Wing for a Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynde, Michelle N.; Campbell, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    A natural laminar flow (NLF) wind tunnel model has been designed and analyzed for a wind tunnel test in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at the NASA Langley Research Center. The NLF design method is built into the CDISC design module and uses a Navier-Stokes flow solver, a boundary layer profile solver, and stability analysis and transition prediction software. The NLF design method alters the pressure distribution to support laminar flow on the upper surface of wings with high sweep and flight Reynolds numbers. The method addresses transition due to attachment line contamination/transition, Gortler vortices, and crossflow and Tollmien-Schlichting modal instabilities. The design method is applied to the wing of the Common Research Model (CRM) at transonic flight conditions. Computational analysis predicts significant extents of laminar flow on the wing upper surface, which results in drag savings. A 5.2 percent scale semispan model of the CRM NLF wing will be built and tested in the NTF. This test will aim to validate the NLF design method, as well as characterize the laminar flow testing capabilities in the wind tunnel facility.

  6. Numerical prediction of laminar flow and heat transfer in internally finned tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rustum, I.M.

    1990-02-01

    An investigation was carried out to provide a detailed analysis of laminar fluid flow and heat transfer in internally finned pipes. Three mathematical models were formulated for this purpose, and shown to be capable of simulating the actual situation of pressure drop and heat transfer in such tubes. Steady, laminar forced convection heat transfer in the thermal entrance region of internally finned tubes was investigated numerically for the case of fully developed hydrodynamics using the H1 and T thermal boundary conditions. Steady, laminar fluid flow in the hydrodynamic entrance region of internally finned tubes was investigated numerically. Results are presented for the smooth tube geometry and sixteen geometries corresponding to various combinations of relative fin heights and number of fins. Steady, laminar mixed convection in the fully developed region of horizontal internally finned tubes was investigated for the case of uniform heat input axially and uniform wall temperature circumferentially. Fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics were found to be dependent on a modified Grashof number, Prandtl number, relative fin height, and number of fins. Internal finning was found to retard the onset of significant free convective effects and to suppress the enhancement in friction factor and Nusselt number compared to smooth tubes. 54 refs., 93 figs., 12 tabs.

  7. THEORETICAL ANALYSIS ON HYDRAULIC TRANSIENT RESULTED BY SUDDEN INCREASE OF INLET PRESSURE FOR LAMINAR PIPELINE FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓松圣; 周绍骑; 廖振方; 邱正阳; 曾顺鹏

    2004-01-01

    Hydraulic transient,which is resulted from sudden increase of inlet pressure for laminar pipeline flow,is studied.The partial differential equation,initial and boundary conditions for transient pressure were constructed,and the theoretical solution was obtained by variable-separation method.The partial differential equation,initial and boundary conditions for flow rate were obtained in accordance with the constraint correlation between flow rate and pressure while the transient flow rate distribution was also solved by variable-separation method.The theoretical solution conforms to numerical solution obtained by method of characteristics(MOC)very well.

  8. Supersonic Stall Flutter of High Speed Fans. [in turbofan engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Stevens, W.; Jutras, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical model is developed for predicting the onset of supersonic stall bending flutter in axial flow compressors. The analysis is based on a modified two dimensional, compressible, unsteady actuator disk theory. It is applied to a rotor blade row by considering a cascade of airfoils whose geometry and dynamic response coincide with those of a rotor blade element at 85 percent of the span height (measured from the hub). The rotor blades are assumed to be unshrouded (i.e., free standing) and to vibrate in their first flexural mode. The effects of shock waves and flow separation are included in the model through quasi-steady, empirical, rotor total-pressure-loss and deviation-angle correlations. The actuator disk model predicts the unsteady aerodynamic force acting on the cascade blading as a function of the steady flow field entering the cascade and the geometry and dynamic response of the cascade. Calculations show that the present model predicts the existence of a bending flutter mode at supersonic inlet Mach numbers. This flutter mode is suppressed by increasing the reduced frequency of the system or by reducing the steady state aerodynamic loading on the cascade. The validity of the model for predicting flutter is demonstrated by correlating the measured flutter boundary of a high speed fan stage with its predicted boundary. This correlation uses a level of damping for the blade row (i.e., the log decrement of the rotor system) that is estimated from the experimental flutter data. The predicted flutter boundary is shown to be in good agreement with the measured boundary.

  9. Aerodynamics characteristic of axisymmetric surface protuberance in supersonic regime

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    The present work deals with the problem of an axi-symmetric surface protuberance mounted on a spherical nosed body of revolution. The numerical computations are carried out for laminar supersonic viscous flow for trapezoidal shape axi-symmetric protuberances. A free stream Mach number ranging from 3 to 8 in steps of 1 at a fixed free stream Reynolds number of 1.8x10(4) has been used in the present study. The steady solutions are obtained using a time marching approach. A newly developed Particle Velocity Upwinding (PVU) scheme has been used for the computation. The spatial flow pattern exhibits a strong bow shock in front of the hemispherical nose, which engulfs the entire base body. Near the protuberance, the fluid particle decelerates due to the adverse pressure created by the protuberance and thus the flow separates in front of the protuberance. This point of separation is found to be a function of Mach number and the protuberance shape. A low-pressure expansion region dominates the base region of the obstacle. The reattachment point for the base separation is also a function of Mach number. As the Mach number is increased the reattachment point shifts toward the protuberances base. A weak recompression shock is also seen in the base, which affects the separated zone behind the protuberance. The important design parameters such as skin friction, heat transfer, drag, and surface pressure coefficients are reported extensively.

  10. Pdf prediction of supersonic hydrogen flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifler, P.; Kollmann, W.

    1993-01-01

    A hybrid method for the prediction of supersonic turbulent flows with combustion is developed consisting of a second order closure for the velocity field and a multi-scalar pdf method for the local thermodynamic state. It is shown that for non-premixed flames and chemical equilibrium mixture fraction, the logarithm of the (dimensionless) density, internal energy per unit mass and the divergence of the velocity have several advantages over other sets of scalars. The closure model is applied to a supersonic non-premixed flame burning hydrogen with air supplied by a supersonic coflow and the results are compared with a limited set of experimental data.

  11. Application of advanced computational codes in the design of an experiment for a supersonic throughflow fan rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jerry R.; Schmidt, James F.; Steinke, Ronald J.; Chima, Rodrick V.; Kunik, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Increased emphasis on sustained supersonic or hypersonic cruise has revived interest in the supersonic throughflow fan as a possible component in advanced propulsion systems. Use of a fan that can operate with a supersonic inlet axial Mach number is attractive from the standpoint of reducing the inlet losses incurred in diffusing the flow from a supersonic flight Mach number to a subsonic one at the fan face. The design of the experiment using advanced computational codes to calculate the components required is described. The rotor was designed using existing turbomachinery design and analysis codes modified to handle fully supersonic axial flow through the rotor. A two-dimensional axisymmetric throughflow design code plus a blade element code were used to generate fan rotor velocity diagrams and blade shapes. A quasi-three-dimensional, thin shear layer Navier-Stokes code was used to assess the performance of the fan rotor blade shapes. The final design was stacked and checked for three-dimensional effects using a three-dimensional Euler code interactively coupled with a two-dimensional boundary layer code. The nozzle design in the expansion region was analyzed with a three-dimensional parabolized viscous code which corroborated the results from the Euler code. A translating supersonic diffuser was designed using these same codes.

  12. A velocity-pressure integrated, mixed interpolation, Galerkin finite element method for high Reynolds number laminar flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1988-01-01

    A velocity-pressure integrated, mixed interpolation, Galerkin finite element method for the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. In the method, the velocity variables were interpolated using complete quadratic shape functions and the pressure was interpolated using linear shape functions. For the two dimensional case, the pressure is defined on a triangular element which is contained inside the complete biquadratic element for velocity variables; and for the three dimensional case, the pressure is defined on a tetrahedral element which is again contained inside the complete tri-quadratic element. Thus the pressure is discontinuous across the element boundaries. Example problems considered include: a cavity flow for Reynolds number of 400 through 10,000; a laminar backward facing step flow; and a laminar flow in a square duct of strong curvature. The computational results compared favorable with those of the finite difference methods as well as experimental data available. A finite elememt computer program for incompressible, laminar flows is presented.

  13. Conjugated laminar forced convective heat transfer from internally finned tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen-Quan Tao (Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., Shaanxi (China))

    1987-08-01

    The use of internal fins is a very effective means of augmenting heat transfer in a tubular heat exchanger, especially for the laminar flow case. Several theoretical investigations have been undertaken to determine heat transfer performance under fully developed conditions. Results reported in the literature are derived for prescribed thermal boundary conditions, wither with axially uniform heat flux with peripherally uniform temperature, or with constant temperature axially as well as circumferentially. However, for double pipe heat exchangers, the thermal boundary condition of the separating wall can not be prescribed a priori; it is determined by the thermal interaction between the fluid inside the tube and that in the annular space. Mikhailov and Shishedjiev (1981), and Tao (1986) have shown that Nusselt number of the tube and that of the annular are strongly dependent upon the heat capacity ratio of the two fluids. In this investigation, a performance analysis is conducted numerically for an internally finned tube which serves as the inner tube of a double pipe heat exchanger.

  14. Correlation of Preston-tube data with laminar skin friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, T. D.; Abu-Mostafa, A.; Steinle, F. W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Preston-tube data have been obtained on a sharp ten-degree cone in the NASA Ames Eleven-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.30 to 0.95 and unit Reynolds numbers of 9.84, 13.1, and 16.4 million per meter. The portions of these data, that were obtained within laminar boundary layers, have been correlated with the corresponding values of theoretical skin friction. The rms scatter of skin-friction coefficient about the correlation is of the order of one percent, which is comparable to the reported accuracy for calibrations of Preston-tubes in incompressible pipe-flows. In contrast to previous works on Preston-tube/skin-friction correlations, which are based on the physical height of the probe's face, this very satisfactory correlation for compressible boundary-layer flows is achieved by accounting for the effects of a variable 'effective' height of the probe. The coefficients, which appear in the correlation, are dependent on the particular tunnel environment. The general procedure can be used to define correlations for other wind tunnels.

  15. Heat transfer in hybrid media for laminar flow with recirculation; Transferencia de calor em meios hibridos para escoamentos laminares com recirculacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocamora Junior, Francisco Dias [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA-IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Estudos Avancados. Dept. de Energia Nuclear]. E-mail: rocamora@mec.ita.br; Delemos, Marcelo J.S. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA-IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. Tecnologico de Aeronautica. Dept. de Energia]. E-mail: delemos@mec.ita.br

    2000-07-01

    This work presents numerical solutions for flow and heat transfer in hybrid media (clear/porous medium). Laminar flow between parallel plates with recirculation induced by a porous obstacle was considered. The flow governing equations for both clear and porous media were solved using a single computational domain and appropriate interface boundary conditions. The theory proposed by Ochoa-Tapia e Whitaker (1995) was applied for considering the jump conditions at the interface. The influence of several parameters on flow and heat transfer, such as the thermal conductivity ratio, permeability, porosity and fluid superficial velocity, was discussed. (author)

  16. Insect contamination protection for laminar flow surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croom, Cynthia C.; Holmes, Bruce J.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of modern aircraft surfaces to achieve laminar flow was well-accepted in recent years. Obtaining the maximum benefit of laminar flow for aircraft drag reduction requires maintaining minimum leading-edge contamination. Previously proposed insect contamination prevention methods have proved impractical due to cost, weight, or inconvenience. Past work has shown that insects will not adhere to water-wetted surfaces, but the large volumes of water required for protection rendered such a system impractical. The results of a flight experiment conducted by NASA to evaluate the performance of a porous leading-edge fluid discharge ice protection system operated as an insect contamination protections system are presented. In addition, these flights explored the environmental and atmospheric conditions most suitable for insect accumulation.

  17. Hot Strip Laminar Cooling Control Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; WANG Guo-dong; LIU Xiang-hua

    2004-01-01

    The control model of laminar cooling system for hot strip, including air-cooling model, water-cooling model, temperature distribution model along thickness direction, feedforward control model, feedback control model and self-learning model, was introduced. PID arithmetic and Smith predictor controller were applied to feedback control. The sample of model parameter classification was given. The calculation process was shown by flow chart. The model has been proved to be simple, effective and of high precision.

  18. Laminar Flow in the Ocean Ekman Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, J. T. H.

    INTRODUCTION THE EFFECT OF A STABLE DENSITY GRADIENT THE FATAL FLAW FLOW VISUALIZATION THE DISCOVERY OF LAMINAR FLOW FINE STRUCTURE WAVE-INDUCED SHEAR INSTABILITY BILLOW TURBULENCE REVERSE TRANSITION REVISED PARADIGM ONE-DIMENSIONAL MODELLING OF THE UPPER OCEAN DIURNAL VARIATION BUOYANT CONVECTION BILLOW TURBULENCE IN THE DIURNAL THERMOCLINE CONSEQUENCES FOR THE EKMAN CURRENT PROFILE SOLAR RADIATION APPLICATIONS Slippery Seas of Acapulco Pollution Afternoon Effect in Sonar Patchiness Fisheries Climate DISCUSSION CONCLUSION REFERENCES

  19. Experimental Study on Physical Mechanism of Drag Reduction of Hydrophobic Materials in Laminar Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yong-Sheng; WEI Qin-Ding

    2006-01-01

    We experimentally study the physical mechanism of the drag reduction of hydrophobic materials in the macroscopic scale. The experiment includes the drag and velocity measurements of laminar boundary layer Sow over flat plates, and the observation of air bubbles on the surfaces. The plate surfaces have different wetting and roughness properties. In the drag measurements, the plates with bubbles on the surfaces lead to drag reduction, but not for those without bubbles. Velocity measurement confirms that the flow is laminar and gives apparent fluid slip on the plate wall with bubbles. In observation, air bubbles in macroscopic size emerge and enlarge on hydrophobic surfaces but not on hydrophilic surfaces. Therefore, the drag reduction of hydrophobic materials is explained by the generation of air bubbles of macroscopic size that cause the apparent velocity slip.

  20. Experiments on free and impinging supersonic microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phalnikar, K.A.; Kumar, R.; Alvi, F.S. [Florida A and M University and Florida State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The fluid dynamics of microflows has recently commanded considerable attention because of their potential applications. Until now, with a few exceptions, most of the studies have been limited to low speed flows. This experimental study examines supersonic microjets of 100-1,000 {mu}m in size with exit velocities in the range of 300-500 m/s. Such microjets are presently being used to actively control larger supersonic impinging jets, which occur in STOVL (short takeoff and vertical landing) aircraft, cavity flows, and flow separation. Flow properties of free as well as impinging supersonic microjets have been experimentally investigated over a range of geometric and flow parameters. The flowfield is visualized using a micro-schlieren system with a high magnification. These schlieren images clearly show the characteristic shock cell structure typically observed in larger supersonic jets. Quantitative measurements of the jet decay and spreading rates as well as shock cell spacing are obtained using micro-pitot probe surveys. In general, the mean flow features of free microjets are similar to larger supersonic jets operating at higher Reynolds numbers. However, some differences are also observed, most likely due to pronounced viscous effects associated with jets at these small scales. Limited studies of impinging microjets were also conducted. They reveal that, similar to the behavior of free microjets, the flow structure of impinging microjets strongly resembles that of larger supersonic impinging jets. (orig.)

  1. Experiments on free and impinging supersonic microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalnikar, K. A.; Kumar, R.; Alvi, F. S.

    2008-05-01

    The fluid dynamics of microflows has recently commanded considerable attention because of their potential applications. Until now, with a few exceptions, most of the studies have been limited to low speed flows. This experimental study examines supersonic microjets of 100-1,000 μm in size with exit velocities in the range of 300-500 m/s. Such microjets are presently being used to actively control larger supersonic impinging jets, which occur in STOVL (short takeoff and vertical landing) aircraft, cavity flows, and flow separation. Flow properties of free as well as impinging supersonic microjets have been experimentally investigated over a range of geometric and flow parameters. The flowfield is visualized using a micro-schlieren system with a high magnification. These schlieren images clearly show the characteristic shock cell structure typically observed in larger supersonic jets. Quantitative measurements of the jet decay and spreading rates as well as shock cell spacing are obtained using micro-pitot probe surveys. In general, the mean flow features of free microjets are similar to larger supersonic jets operating at higher Reynolds numbers. However, some differences are also observed, most likely due to pronounced viscous effects associated with jets at these small scales. Limited studies of impinging microjets were also conducted. They reveal that, similar to the behavior of free microjets, the flow structure of impinging microjets strongly resembles that of larger supersonic impinging jets.

  2. Effects of mass addition on blunt-body boundary-layer transition and heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaattari, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    The model bodies tested at Mach number 7.32 were hemispheres, blunt cones, and spherical segments. The mass addition consisted of air ejected through porous forward surfaces of the models. The experimental data consisted of heat transfer measurements from which boundary layer transitions were deduced. The data verified various applicable boundary layer codes in the laminar and transitional flow regimes. Empirical heating rate data correlations were developed for the laminar and turbulent flow regimes.

  3. Flow Simulation of Supersonic Inlet with Bypass Annular Duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, HyoungJin; Kumano, Takayasu; Liou, Meng-Sing; Povinelli, Louis A.; Conners, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    A relaxed isentropic compression supersonic inlet is a new concept that produces smaller cowl drag than a conventional inlet, but incurs lower total pressure recovery and increased flow distortion in the (radially) outer flowpath. A supersonic inlet comprising a bypass annulus to the relaxed isentropic compression inlet dumps out airflow of low quality through the bypass duct. A reliable computational fluid dynamics solution can provide considerable useful information to ascertain quantitatively relative merits of the concept, and further provide a basis for optimizing the design. For a fast and reliable performance evaluation of the inlet performance, an equivalent axisymmetric model whose area changes accounts for geometric and physical (blockage) effects resulting from the original complex three-dimensional configuration is proposed. In addition, full three-dimensional calculations are conducted for studying flow phenomena and verifying the validity of the equivalent model. The inlet-engine coupling is carried out by embedding numerical propulsion system simulation engine data into the flow solver for interactive boundary conditions at the engine fan face and exhaust plane. It was found that the blockage resulting from complex three-dimensional geometries in the bypass duct causes significant degradation of inlet performance by pushing the terminal normal shock upstream.

  4. Supersonic Virtual Valve Design for Numerical Simulation of a Large-Bore Natural Gas Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, G.-H.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Mitchell, C.

    2007-10-01

    In many applications of supersonic injection devices, three-dimensional computation that can model a complex supersonic jet has become critical. However, in spite of its increasing necessity, it is computationally costly to capture the details of supersonic structures in intricate three-dimensional geometries with moving boundaries. In large-bore stationary natural gas fueled engine research, one of the most promising mixing enhancement technologies currently used for natural gas engines is high-pressure fuel injection. Consequently, this creates considerable interest in three-dimensional computational simulations that can examine the entire injection and mixing process in engines using high-pressure injection and can determine the impact of injector design on engine performance. However, the cost of three-dimensional engine simulations-including a moving piston and the kinetics of combustion and pollutant production quickly becomes considerable in terms of simulation time requirements. One limiting factor is the modeling of the small length scales of the poppet valve flow. Such length scales can be three orders of magnitude smaller than cylinder length scales. The objective of this paper is to describe the development of a methodology for the design of a simple geometry supersonic virtual valve that can be substituted in three-dimensional numerical models for the complex shrouded poppet valve injection system actually installed in the engine to be simulated.

  5. Unsteady transonic aerodynamics and aeroelastic calculations at low-supersonic freestreams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Goorjian, Peter M.

    1988-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented to simulate transonic unsteady flows and corresponding aeroelasticity of wings at low-supersonic freestreams. The flow is modeled by using the transonic small-perturbation theory. The structural equations of motions are modeled using modal equations of motion directly coupled with aerodynamics. Supersonic freestreams are simulated by properly accounting for the boundary conditions based on pressure waves along the flow characteristics in streamwise planes. The flow equations are solved using the time-accurate, alternating-direction implicit finite-difference scheme. The coupled aeroelastic equations of motion are solved by an integration procedure based on the time-accurate, linear-acceleration method. The flow modeling is verified by comparing calculations with experiments for both steady and unsteady flows at supersonic freestreams. The unsteady computations are made for oscillating wings. Comparisons of computed results with experiments show good agreement. Aeroelastic responses are computed for a rectangular wing at Mach numbers ranging from subtransonic to upper-transonic (supersonic) freestreams. The extension of the transonic dip into the upper transonic regime is illustrated.

  6. Characteristics of pulsed plasma synthetic jet and its control effect on supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Di; Cui Wei; Li Yinghong; Li Fanyu; Jia Min; Sun Quan; Zhang Bailing

    2015-01-01

    The plasma synthetic jet is a novel flow control approach which is currently being stud-ied. In this paper its characteristic and control effect on supersonic flow is investigated both exper-imentally and numerically. In the experiment, the formation of plasma synthetic jet and its propagation velocity in quiescent air are recorded and calculated with time resolved schlieren method. The jet velocity is up to 100 m/s and no remarkable difference has been found after chang-ing discharge parameters. When applied in Mach 2 supersonic flow, an obvious shockwave can be observed. In the modeling of electrical heating, the arc domain is not defined as an initial condition with fixed temperature or pressure, but a source term with time-varying input power density, which is expected to better describe the influence of heating process. Velocity variation with different heat-ing efficiencies is presented and discussed and a peak velocity of 850 m/s is achieved in still air with heating power density of 5.0 · 1012 W/m3. For more details on the interaction between plasma syn-thetic jet and supersonic flow, the plasma synthetic jet induced shockwave and the disturbances in the boundary layer are numerically researched. All the results have demonstrated the control authority of plasma synthetic jet onto supersonic flow.

  7. Characteristics of pulsed plasma synthetic jet and its control effect on supersonic flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Di

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The plasma synthetic jet is a novel flow control approach which is currently being studied. In this paper its characteristic and control effect on supersonic flow is investigated both experimentally and numerically. In the experiment, the formation of plasma synthetic jet and its propagation velocity in quiescent air are recorded and calculated with time resolved schlieren method. The jet velocity is up to 100 m/s and no remarkable difference has been found after changing discharge parameters. When applied in Mach 2 supersonic flow, an obvious shockwave can be observed. In the modeling of electrical heating, the arc domain is not defined as an initial condition with fixed temperature or pressure, but a source term with time-varying input power density, which is expected to better describe the influence of heating process. Velocity variation with different heating efficiencies is presented and discussed and a peak velocity of 850 m/s is achieved in still air with heating power density of 5.0 × 1012 W/m3. For more details on the interaction between plasma synthetic jet and supersonic flow, the plasma synthetic jet induced shockwave and the disturbances in the boundary layer are numerically researched. All the results have demonstrated the control authority of plasma synthetic jet onto supersonic flow.

  8. Design project: LONGBOW supersonic interceptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoney, Robert; Baker, Matt; Capstaff, Joseph G.; Dishman, Robert; Fick, Gregory; Frick, Stephen N.; Kelly, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A recent white paper entitled 'From the Sea' has spotlighted the need for Naval Aviation to provide overland support to joint operations. The base for this support, the Aircraft Carrier (CVN), will frequently be unable to operate within close range of the battleground because of littoral land-based air and subsurface threats. A high speed, long range, carrier capable aircraft would allow the CVN to provide timely support to distant battleground operations. Such an aircraft, operating as a Deck-Launched Interceptor (DLI), would also be an excellent counter to Next Generation Russian Naval Aviation (NGRNA) threats consisting of supersonic bombers, such as the Backfire, equipped with the next generation of high-speed, long-range missiles. Additionally, it would serve as an excellent high speed Reconnaissance airplane, capable of providing Battle Force commanders with timely, accurate pre-mission targeting information and post-mission Bomb Damage Assessment (BDA). Recent advances in computational hypersonic airflow modeling has produced a method of defining aircraft shapes that fit a conical shock flow model to maximize the efficiency of the vehicle. This 'Waverider' concept provides one means of achieving long ranges at high speeds. A Request for Proposal (RFP) was issued by Professor Conrad Newberry that contained design requirements for an aircraft to accomplish the above stated missions, utilizing Waverider technology.

  9. On highly focused supersonic microjets

    CERN Document Server

    Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Willem, Claas; Peters, Ivo R; van der Meer, Deveraj; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-01-01

    By focusing a laser pulse in a liquid-filled glass-microcapillary open at one end, a small mass of liquid is instantaneously vapourised. This leads to a shock wave which travels towards the concave free surface where it generates a high-speed microjet. The initial shape of the meniscus plays a dominant role in the process. The velocity of the jet can reach supersonic speeds up to 850\\,m/s while maintaining a very sharp geometry. The entire evolution of the jet is observed by high-speed recordings of up to $10^6\\,$fps. A parametric study of the jet velocity as a function of the contact angle of the liquid-glass interface, the energy absorbed by the liquid, the diameter of the capillary tube, and the distance between the laser focus and the free surface is performed, and the results are rationalised. The method could be used for needle-free injection of vaccines or drugs.

  10. Supersonic Cloud Collision-II

    CERN Document Server

    Anathpindika, S

    2009-01-01

    In this, second paper of the sequel of two papers, we present five SPH simulations of fast head-on cloud collisions and study the evolution of the ram pressure confined gas slab. Anathpindika (2008) (hereafter paper I) considered highly supersonic cloud collisions and examined the effect of bending and shearing instabilities on the shocked gas slab. The post-collision shock here, as in paper I, is also modelled by a simple barotropic equation of state (EOS). However, a much stiffer EOS is used to model the shock resulting from a low velocity cloud collision. We explore the parameter space by varying the pre-collision velocity and the impact parameter. We observe that pressure confined gas slabs become Jeans unstable if the sound crossing time, $t_{cr}$, is much larger than the freefall time, $t_{ff}$, of putative clumps condensing out of them. Self gravitating clumps may spawn multiple/larger $N$-body star clusters. We also suggest that warmer gas slabs are unlikely to fragment and may end up as diffuse gas c...

  11. Silent and Efficient Supersonic Bi-Directional Flying Wing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a Phase I study for a novel concept of a supersonic bi-directional (SBiDir) flying wing (FW) that has the potential to revolutionize supersonic flight...

  12. Experimental design of laminar proportional amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellbaum, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental program was initiated at Langley Research Center to study the effects of various parameters on the design of laminar proportional beam deflection amplifiers. Matching and staging of amplifiers to obtain high-pressure gain was also studied. Variable parameters were aspect ratio, setback, control length, receiver distance, receiver width, width of center vent, and bias pressure levels. Usable pressure gains from 4 to 19 per stage can now be achieved, and five amplifiers were staged together to yield pressure gains up to 2,000,000.

  13. Turbulence in laminar premixed V-flames

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Xiaoqian(张孝谦); LEI; Yu(雷宇); WANG; Baorui(王宝瑞); WANG; Yue(王岳); WEI; Minggang(韦明罡)

    2003-01-01

    Strong velocity fluctuations had been found in the laminar premixed V-flames. These velocity fluctuations are closely related to the chemical reaction. But the effects of the upstream combustible mixture velocity on the velocity fluctuations inside the flame are quite weak. The probability distribution function (PDF) of the velocity in the centre region of the flame appears "flat top" shaped. By analyzing the experiment results the flame-flow interactions are found to affect the flame not only at large scale in the flow field but also at small scale inside the flame. These effects will give rise to flame generated small scale turbulences.

  14. Effect of Ablation on Heat Transfer & Performance of an Axisymmetric Supersonic Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, M. A.

    The theoretical prediction of heat transfer effects in compressible turbulent flows is fundamentally complex phenomenon. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is employed using Baldwin-Lomax turbulent model to simulate the effect of various nozzle geometry defects on the heat transfer state in supersonic nozzles. The study is done in terms of various heat transfer correlations and analogies by characteristic flow regimes numbers. Theses are calculated from modified Reynolds analogy for laminar flow over flat plate, the Dittus-Boelter correlation for fully developed turbulent flow, Sieder-Tate correlation for turbulent pipe flow with property variation and Bartz correlation for variable cross sections flow. In addition to these, modified Stanton correlation for high speed flows for pipe flow analogy is also used. The contribution of ablation on the formation of new nozzle contours at various regions is simulated using energy equation for charring ablators. The effect of heat transfer correlations on nozzle performance with various geometrical defects is also discussed. In addition to it, the supersonic flow behavior is also simulated in the nozzles in terms of pressure, temperature, Mach number and density distribution with ablated surfaces.

  15. Coherent structures in wave boundary layers. Part 2. Solitary motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Jensen, Palle Martin; Sørensen, Lone B.;

    2010-01-01

    in an oscillating water tunnel. Two kinds of measurements were made: bed shear stress measurements and velocity measurements. The experiments show that the solitary-motion boundary layer experiences three kinds of flow regimes as the Reynolds number is increased: (i) laminar regime; (ii) laminar regime where...... the boundary-layer flow experiences a regular array of vortex tubes near the bed over a short period of time during the deceleration stage; and (iii) transitional regime characterized with turbulent spots, revealed by single/multiple, or, sometimes, quite dense spikes in the bed shear stress traces...

  16. Laminar and weakly turbulent oceanic gravity currents performing inertial oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wirth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The small scale dynamics of a weakly turbulent oceanic gravity current is determined. The gravity current considered is initially at rest and adjusts by performing inertial oscillations to a geostrophic mean flow. The dynamics is explored with a hierarchy of mathematical models. The most involved are the fully 3-D Navier-Stokes equations subject to the Boussinesq approximation. A 1-D and 0-D mathematical model of the same gravity current dynamics are systematically derived. Using this hierarchy and the numerical solutions of the mathematical models, the turbulent dynamics at the bottom and the interface is explored and their interaction investigated. Three different regimes of the small scale dynamics of the gravity current are identified, they are characterised by laminar flow, coherent roll vortices and turbulent dynamics with coherent streaks and bursts.

    The problem of the rectification of the turbulent fluxes, that is, how to average out the fluctuations and calculate their average influence on the flow, is considered. It is shown that two different regimes of friction are superposed, an Ekman friction applies to the average geostrophic flow and a linear friction, not influenced by rotation, to the inertial oscillations. The combination of the two makes the bulk friction non-local in time for the 0-D model.

    The implications of the results for parametrisations of the Ekman dynamics and the small scale turbulent fluxes in the planetary boundary layer are discussed.

  17. Laminar and weakly turbulent oceanic gravity currents performing inertial oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wirth

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The small scale dynamics of a weakly turbulent oceanic gravity current is determined. The gravity current considered is initially at rest and adjusts by performing inertial oscillations to a geostrophic mean flow. The dynamics is explored with a hierarchy of mathematical models. The most involved are the fully 3-D Navier-Stokes equations subject to the Boussinesq approximation. A 1-D and 0-D mathematical model of the same gravity current dynamics are systematically derived. Using this hierarchy and the numerical solutions of the mathematical models, the turbulent dynamics at the bottom and the interface is explored and their interaction investigated. Three different regimes of the small scale dynamics of the gravity current are identified, they are characterised by laminar flow, coherent roll vortices and turbulent dynamics with coherent streaks and bursts.

    The problem of the rectification of the turbulent fluxes, that is how to average out the fluctuations and calculate their average influence on the flow is considered. It is shown that two different regimes of friction are superposed, an Ekman friction applies to the average geostrophic flow and a linear friction, not influenced by rotation, to the inertial oscillations. The combination of the two makes the bulk friction non-local in time for the 0-D model. The implications of the results for parametrisations of the Ekman dynamics and the small scale turbulent fluxes in the planetary boundary layer are discussed.

  18. Simulation of Random Waves and Associated Laminar Bottom Shear Stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao-Lin SHEN; Ching-Jer HUANG

    2008-01-01

    This work presents a new approach for simulating the random waves in viscous fluids and the associated bottom shear stresses. By generating the incident random waves in a numerical wave flume and solving the unsteady two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations and the fully nonlinear free surface boundary conditions for the fluid flows in the flume, the viscous flows and laminar bottom shear stresses induced by random waves are determined. The deterministic spectral amplitude method implemented by use of the fast Fourier transform algorithm was adopted to generate the incident random waves. The accuracy of the numerical scheme is confirmed by comparing the predicted wave spectrum with the target spectrum and by comparing the numerical transfer function between the shear stress and the surface elevation with the theoretical transfer function. The maximum bottom shear stress caused by random waves, computed by this wave model, is compared with that obtained by Myrhaug's model (1995). The transfer function method is also employed to determine the maximum shear stress, and is proved accurate.

  19. Wall functions for numerical modeling of laminar MHD flows

    CERN Document Server

    Widlund, O

    2003-01-01

    general wall function treatment is presented for the numerical modeling of laminar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows. The wall function expressions are derived analytically from the steady-state momentum and electric potential equations, making use only of local variables of the numerical solution. No assumptions are made regarding the orientation of the magnetic field relative to the wall, nor of the magnitude of the Hartmann number, or the wall conductivity. The wall functions are used for defining implicit boundary conditions for velocity and electric potential, and for computing mass flow and electrical currents in near wall-cells. The wall function treatment was validated in a finite volume formulation, and compared with an analytic solution for a fully developed channel flow in a transverse magnetic field. For the case with insulating walls, a uniform 20 x 20 grid, and Hartmann numbers Ha = [10,30,100], the accuracy of pressure drop and wall shear stress predictions was [1.1%,1.6%,0.5%], respectively. Com...

  20. Supersonic combustion engine testbed, heat lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoying, D.; Kelble, C.; Langenbahn, A.; Stahl, M.; Tincher, M.; Walsh, M.; Wisler, S.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a supersonic combustion engine testbed (SCET) aircraft is presented. The hypersonic waverider will utilize both supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMjet) and turbofan-ramjet engines. The waverider concept, system integration, electrical power, weight analysis, cockpit, landing skids, and configuration modeling are addressed in the configuration considerations. The subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic aerodynamics are presented along with the aerodynamic stability and landing analysis of the aircraft. The propulsion design considerations include: engine selection, turbofan ramjet inlets, SCRAMjet inlets and the SCRAMjet diffuser. The cooling requirements and system are covered along with the topics of materials and the hydrogen fuel tanks and insulation system. A cost analysis is presented and the appendices include: information about the subsonic wind tunnel test, shock expansion calculations, and an aerodynamic heat flux program.

  1. Simulating Supersonic Turbulence in Galaxy Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Scannapieco, Evan

    2010-01-01

    We present three-dimensional, adaptive mesh simulations of dwarf galaxy out- flows driven by supersonic turbulence. Here we develop a subgrid model to track not only the thermal and bulk velocities of the gas, but also its turbulent velocities and length scales. This allows us to deposit energy from supernovae directly into supersonic turbulence, which acts on scales much larger than a particle mean free path, but much smaller than resolved large-scale flows. Unlike previous approaches, we are able to simulate a starbursting galaxy modeled after NGC 1569, with realistic radiative cooling throughout the simulation. Pockets of hot, diffuse gas around individual OB associations sweep up thick shells of material that persist for long times due to the cooling instability. The overlapping of high-pressure, rarefied regions leads to a collective central outflow that escapes the galaxy by eating away at the exterior gas through turbulent mixing, rather than gathering it into a thin, unstable shell. Supersonic, turbul...

  2. Modification of flow perturbations in a laminar separation bubble by heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiko, A. V.; Dovgal, A. V.; Sorokin, A. M.

    2017-02-01

    Laminar boundary layer separation in conditions of localized heat transfer is investigated at low subsonic velocity through wind-tunnel measurements and linear stability analysis. A backward-facing step flow is subjected to a stationary temperature variation generated by Peltier elements installed on the test model directly downstream of the separation line. The experimental and theoretical data clarify the response of velocity disturbances in the separation region to the temperature variation, the latter appearing primarily as a modifier of the initial wave spectrum of the amplifying separated layer oscillations.

  3. A Hybrid Analytical-Numerical Solution to the Laminar Flow inside Biconical Ducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Antonini Alves

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work was presented a hybrid analytical-numerical solution to hydrodynamic problem of fully developed Newtonian laminar flow inside biconical ducts employing the Generalized Integral Transform Technique (GITT. In order to facilitate the analytical treatment and the application of the boundary conditions, a Conformal Transform was used to change the domain into a more suitable coordinate system. Thereafter, the GITT was applied on the momentum equation to obtain the velocity field. Numerical results were obtained for quantities of practical interest, such as maximum and minimum velocity, Fanning friction factor, Poiseuille number, Hagenbach factor and hydrodynamic entry length.

  4. A SIMILARITY METHOD FOR LAMINAR WAKE OF POWER-LAW FLUID FLOW AROUND A FLAT PLATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Cun-fang; Wang Mei-xia

    2003-01-01

    Based on the characteristic equation for power-law fluid and the Prandtl boundary layer equation, using the similarity method similar to that of Newtonian fluids, two similarity variables were given and a normal differential equation was derived for the laminar wake of power-law fluid flow produced by a flat plate. And numerical results were obtained. The results show that the power-law index n has evident influence on the velocity distribution in the wake. In the wake, velocity gradient is larger, and the wake is narrower for larger n.

  5. Natural laminar flow airfoil design considerations for winglets on low-speed airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandam, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Winglet airfoil section characteristics which significantly influence cruise performance and handling qualities of an airplane are discussed. A good winglet design requires an airfoil section with a low cruise drag coefficient, a high maximum lift coefficient, and a gradual and steady movement of the boundary layer transition location with angle of attack. The first design requirement provides a low crossover lift coefficient of airplane drag polars with winglets off and on. The other requirements prevent nonlinear changes in airplane lateral/directional stability and control characteristics. These requirements are considered in the design of a natural laminar flow airfoil section for winglet applications and chord Reynolds number of 1 to 4 million.

  6. Supersonic gas shell for puff pinch experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. S., III; Doggett, W. O.; Roth, I.; Stallings, C.

    1982-09-01

    An easy-to-fabricate, conical, annular supersonic nozzle has been developed for use in high-power, puff gas z-pinch experiments. A fast responding conical pressure probe has also been developed as an accurate supersonic gas flow diagnostic for evaluating the transient gas jet formed by the nozzle. Density profile measurements show that the magnitude and radial position of the gas annulus are fairly constant with distance from the nozzle, but the gas density in the center of the annulus increases with distance from the nozzle.

  7. Increased Mach Number Capability for the NASA Glenn 10x10 Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, J. W.; Saunders, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Computational simulations and wind tunnel testing were conducted to explore the operation of the Abe Silverstein Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center at test section Mach numbers above the current limit of Mach 3.5. An increased Mach number would enhance the capability for testing of supersonic and hypersonic propulsion systems. The focus of the explorations was on understanding the flow within the second throat of the tunnel, which is downstream of the test section and is where the supersonic flow decelerates to subsonic flow. Methods of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) were applied to provide details of the shock boundary layer structure and to estimate losses in total pressure. The CFD simulations indicated that the tunnel could be operated up to Mach 4.0 if the minimum width of the second throat was made smaller than that used for previous operation of the tunnel. Wind tunnel testing was able to confirm such operation of the tunnel at Mach 3.6 and 3.7 before a hydraulic failure caused a stop to the testing. CFD simulations performed after the wind tunnel testing showed good agreement with test data consisting of static pressures along the ceiling of the second throat. The CFD analyses showed increased shockwave boundary layer interactions, which was also observed as increased unsteadiness of dynamic pressures collected in the wind tunnel testing.

  8. Experimental investigation of wave boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2003-01-01

    A review is presented of experimental investigation of wave boundary layer. The review is organized in six main sections. The first section describes the wave boundary layer in a real-life environment and its simulation in the laboratory in an oscillating water tunnel and in a water tank...... with an oscillating seabed. A brief account is given of measured quantities, measurement techniques (LDA, PIV, flow visualization) and limitations/constraints in the experimental investigation of the wave boundary layer in the laboratory. The second section concentrates on uniform oscillating boundary layers...... with a smooth bed. The boundary layer process is described over the entire range of the Reynolds number (Re from practically nil to Re = O(107)), from the laminar regime to the transitional regime and to the fully developed turbulent regime. The third section focuses on the effect of the boundary roughness...

  9. Compressibility effects on the non-linear receptivity of boundary layers to dielectric barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denison, Marie F. C.

    The reduction of drag and aerodynamic heating caused by boundary layer transition is of central interest for the development of hypersonic vehicles. Receptivity to flow perturbation in the form of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave growth often determines the first stage of the transition process, which can be delayed by depositing specific excitations into the boundary layer. Weakly ionized Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) actuators are being investigated as possible sources of such excitations, but little is known today about their interaction with high-speed flows. In this framework, the first part of the thesis is dedicated to a receptivity study of laminar compressible boundary layers over a flat plate by linear stability analysis following an adjoint operator formulation, under DBD representative excitations assumed independent of flow conditions. The second part of the work concentrates on the development of a coupled plasma-Navier and Stokes solver targeted at the study of supersonic flow and compressibility effects on DBD forcing and non-parallel receptivity. The linear receptivity study of quasi-parallel compressible flows reveals several interesting features such as a significant shift of the region of maximum receptivity deeper into the flow at high Mach number and strong wave amplitude reduction compared to incompressible flows. The response to DBD relevant excitation distributions and to variations of the base flow conditions and system length scales follows these trends. Observed absolute amplitude changes and relative sensitivity modifications between source types are related to the evolution of the offset between forcing peak profile and relevant adjoint mode maximum. The analysis highlights the crucial importance of designing and placing the actuator in a way that matches its force field to the position of maximum boundary layer receptivity for the specific flow conditions of interest. In order to address the broad time and length scale spectrum

  10. An Experimental Study of Turbulent Skin Friction Reduction in Supersonic Flow Using a Microblowing Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Danny P.

    1999-01-01

    A new turbulent skin friction reduction technology, called the microblowing technique has been tested in supersonic flow (Mach number of 1.9) on specially designed porous plates with microholes. The skin friction was measured directly by a force balance and the boundary layer development was measured by a total pressure rake at the tailing edge of a test plate. The free stream Reynolds number was 1.0(10 exp 6) per meter. The turbulent skin friction coefficient ratios (C(sub f)/C(sub f0)) of seven porous plates are given in this report. Test results showed that the microblowing technique could reduce the turbulent skin friction in supersonic flow (up to 90 percent below a solid flat plate value, which was even greater than in subsonic flow).

  11. Experiments on hypersonic boundary layer transition on blunt cones with acoustic-absorption coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiplyuk, A.; Lukashevich, S.; Bountin, D.; Maslov, A.; Knaus, H.

    2012-01-01

    The laminar-turbulent transition is studied experimentally on a cone with an acoustic-absorption coating and with different nose bluntness in a high-speed flow. The acoustic-absorption coating is a felt metal sheet with a random microstructure. Experiments were carried out on a 1-meter length 7 degree cone at free-stream Mach number M = 8 and zero angle of attack. Locations of the laminar-turbulent transition are detected using heat flux distributions registered by calorimeter sensors. In addition, boundary layer pulsations are measured by means of ultrafast heat flux sensors. It is shown that the laminar-turbulent transition is caused by the second-mode instability, and the laminar run extends as the bluntness is increased. The porous coating effectively suppresses this instability for all tested bluntness values and 1.3-1.85 times extends the laminar run.

  12. Supersonic Injection of Aerated Liquid Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhari, Abhijit; Sallam, Khaled

    2016-11-01

    A computational study of the exit flow of an aerated two-dimensional jet from an under-expanded supersonic nozzle is presented. The liquid sheet is operating within the annular flow regime and the study is motivated by the application of supersonic nozzles in air-breathing propulsion systems, e.g. scramjet engines, ramjet engines and afterburners. The simulation was conducted using VOF model and SST k- ω turbulence model. The test conditions included: jet exit of 1 mm and mass flow rate of 1.8 kg/s. The results show that air reaches transonic condition at the injector exit due to the Fanno flow effects in the injector passage. The aerated liquid jet is alternately expanded by Prandtl-Meyer expansion fan and compressed by oblique shock waves due to the difference between the back (chamber) pressure and the flow pressure. The process then repeats itself and shock (Mach) diamonds are formed at downstream of injector exit similar to those typical of exhaust plumes of propulsion system. The present results, however, indicate that the flow field of supersonic aerated liquid jet is different from supersonic gas jets due to the effects of water evaporation from the liquid sheet. The contours of the Mach number, static pressure of both cases are compared to the theory of gas dynamics.

  13. Conditions for supersonic bent Marshak waves

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Qiang; Li, Jing; Dan, Jia-kun; Wang, Kun-lun; Zhou, Shao-tong

    2014-01-01

    Supersonic radiation diffusion approximation is a useful way to study the radiation transportation. Considering the bent Marshak wave theory in 2-dimensions, and an invariable source temperature, we get the supersonic radiation diffusion conditions which are about the Mach number $M>8(1+\\sqrt{\\ep})/3$, and the optical depth $\\tau>1$. A large Mach number requires a high temperature, while a large optical depth requires a low temperature. Only when the source temperature is in a proper region these conditions can be satisfied. Assuming the material opacity and the specific internal energy depend on the temperature and the density as a form of power law, for a given density, these conditions correspond to a region about source temperature and the length of the sample. This supersonic diffusion region involves both lower and upper limit of source temperature, while that in 1-dimension only gives a lower limit. Taking $\\rm SiO_2$ and the Au for example, we show the supersonic region numerically.

  14. Dielectric barrier discharge source for supersonic beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luria, K.; Lavie, N.; Even, U. [Sackler School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2009-10-15

    We present a new excitation source for pulsed supersonic beams. The excitation is based on dielectric barrier discharge in the beam. It produces cold beams of metastable atoms, dissociated neutral atoms from molecular precursors, and both positive and negative ions with high efficiency and reliability.

  15. Numerical and experimental investigations on supersonic ejectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartosiewicz, Y.; Aidoun, Z. [CETC-Varennes, Natural Resources Canada (Canada); Desevaux, P. [CREST-UMR 6000, Belfort (France); Mercadier, Y. [Sherbrooke Univ. (Canada). THERMAUS

    2005-02-01

    Supersonic ejectors are widely used in a range of applications such as aerospace, propulsion and refrigeration. The primary interest of this study is to set up a reliable hydrodynamics model of a supersonic ejector, which may be extended to refrigeration applications. The first part of this work evaluated the performance of six well-known turbulence models for the study of supersonic ejectors. The validation concentrated on the shock location, shock strength and the average pressure recovery prediction. Axial pressure measurements with a capillary probe performed previously [Int. J. Turbo Jet Engines 19 (2002) 71; Conference Proc., 10th Int. Symp. Flow Visualization, Kyoto, Japan, 2002], were compared with numerical simulations while laser tomography pictures were used to evaluate the non-mixing length. The capillary probe has been included in the numerical model and the non-mixing length has been numerically evaluated by including an additional transport equation for a passive scalar, which acted as an ideal colorant in the flow. At this point, the results show that the k-omega-sst model agrees best with experiments. In the second part, the tested model was used to reproduce the different operation modes of a supersonic ejector, ranging from on-design point to off-design. In this respect, CFD turned out to be an efficient diagnosis tool of ejector analysis (mixing, flow separation), for design, and performance optimization (optimum entrainment and recompression ratios). (Author)

  16. Steady laminar flow of fractal fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balankin, Alexander S.; Mena, Baltasar; Susarrey, Orlando; Samayoa, Didier

    2017-02-01

    We study laminar flow of a fractal fluid in a cylindrical tube. A flow of the fractal fluid is mapped into a homogeneous flow in a fractional dimensional space with metric induced by the fractal topology. The equations of motion for an incompressible Stokes flow of the Newtonian fractal fluid are derived. It is found that the radial distribution for the velocity in a steady Poiseuille flow of a fractal fluid is governed by the fractal metric of the flow, whereas the pressure distribution along the flow direction depends on the fractal topology of flow, as well as on the fractal metric. The radial distribution of the fractal fluid velocity in a steady Couette flow between two concentric cylinders is also derived.

  17. Turbulence characteristics in a supersonic cascade wake flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew, P.L.; Ng, W.F. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States))

    1994-10-01

    The turbulent character of the supersonic wake of a linear cascade of fan airfoils has been studied using a two-component laser-doppler anemometer. The cascade was tested in the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University intermittent wind tunnel facility, where the Mach and Reynolds numbers were 2.36 and 4.8 [times] 10[sup 6], respectively. In addition to mean flow measurements, Reynolds normal and shear stresses were measured as functions of cascade incidence angle and streamwise locations spanning the near-wake and the far-wake. The extremities of profiles of both the mean and turbulent wake properties were found to be strongly influenced by upstream shock-boundary-layer interactions, the strength of which varied with cascade incidence. In contrast, the peak levels of turbulence properties within the shear layer were found to be largely independent of incidence, and could be characterized in terms of the streamwise position only. The velocity defect turbulence level was found to be 23%, and the generally accepted value of the turbulence structural coefficient of 0.30 was found to be valid for this flow. The degree of similarity of the mean flow wake profiles was established, and those profiles demonstrating the most similarity were found to approach a state of equilibrium between the mean and turbulent properties. In general, this wake flow may be described as a classical free shear flow, upon which the influence of upstream shock-boundary-layer interactions has been superimposed.

  18. CFD-based Analysis of Aeroelastic behavior of Supersonic Fins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxing Cai

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to analyze the flutter boundary, transient loads of a supersonic fin, and the flutter with perturbation. Reduced order mode (ROM based on Volterra Series is presented to calculate the flutter boundary, and CFD/CSD coupling is used to compute the transient aerodynamic load. The Volterra-based ROM is obtained using the derivative of unsteady aerodynamic step-response, and the infinite plate spline is used to perform interpolation of physical quantities between the fluid and the structural grids. The results show that inertia force plays a significant role in the transient loads, the moment cause by inertia force is lager than the aerodynamic force, because of the huge transient loads, structure may be broken by aeroelasticity below the flutter dynamic pressure. Perturbations of aircraft affect the aeroelastic response evident, the reduction of flutter dynamic pressure by rolling perturbation form 15.4% to 18.6% when Mach from 2.0 to 3.0. It is necessary to analyze the aeroelasticity behaviors under the compositive force environment.

  19. The laminarescent region in the quasi-laminarization process: a vorticity dynamics perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Guillermo; Rodriguez, Daniel; Quinones, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    Incompressible turbulent boundary layers subject to severe acceleration or strong Favorable Pressure Gradient (FPG) might experience a quasi-laminarization or a reversion process characterized by a meaningful depression of Reynolds shear stresses and reduction of turbulent production attributed to the dominance of pressure forces. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of highly accelerated turbulent boundary layers is performed in order to shed some light on the energy redistribution, transport phenomena and vorticity dynamics of the laminarescent stage during the quasi-laminarization process. This region is one of the constituents of "The Island of Ignorance" according to Sreenivasan. In a recent article by Araya, Castillo and Hussain, DNS of an initially fully turbulent flow subjected to a very strong FPG has shown reduction of the Reynolds shear stresses with a logarithmic behavior in the mesolayer region, associated with the trend of the wall-normal advection in that region, i.e. V+ ∂U+ / ∂y+ 1 /y+ ( ∂u'v'̲+ / ∂y+) . NSF-CBET #1512393.

  20. Data Analysis for the NASA/Boeing Hybrid Laminar Flow Control Crossflow Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppink, Jenna L.; Wlezien, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Hybrid-Laminar Flow Control (HLFC) Crossflow Experiment, completed in 1995. generated a large database of boundary layer stability and transition data that was only partially analyzed before data analysis was abruptly ended in the late 1990's. Renewed interest in laminar flow technologies prompted additional data analysis, to integrate all data, including some post-test roughness and porosity measurements. The objective is to gain new insights into the effects of suction on boundary layer stability. A number of challenges were encountered during the data analysis, and their solutions are discussed in detail. They include the effect of the probe vibration, the effect of the time-varying surface temperature on traveling crossflow instabilities, and the effect of the stationary crossflow modes on the approximation of wall location. Despite the low turbulence intensity of the wind tunnel (0.01 to 0.02%), traveling crosflow disturbances were present in the data, in some cases at amplitudes up to 1% of the freestream velocity. However, the data suggests that transition was dominated by stationary crossflow. Traveling crossflow results and stationary data in the presence of suction are compared with linear parabolized stability equations results as a way of testing the quality of the results.

  1. On the evolution of laminar to turbulent transition and breakdown to turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Jovan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the basic conservation laws of fluid flow, we investigated transition and breakdown to turbulence of a laminar flat plate boundary layer exposed to small, statistically stationary, two-component, three-dimensional disturbances. The derived equations for the statistical properties of the disturbances are closed using the two-point correlation technique and invariant theory. By considering the equilibrium solutions of the modeled equations, the transition criterion is formulated in terms of a Reynolds number based on the intensity and the length scale of the disturbances. The deduced transition criterion determines conditions that guarantee maintenance of the local equilibrium between the production and the viscous dissipation of the disturbances and therefore the laminar flow regime in the flat plate boundary layer. The experimental and numerical databases for fully developed turbulent channel and pipe flows at different Reynolds numbers were utilized to demonstrate the validity of the derived transition criterion for the estimation of the onset of turbulence in wall-bounded flows.

  2. Convective Heat Transfer Augmentation by Flexible fins in Laminar Channel Pulsating flow

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Rakshitha U; Bhardwaj, Rajneesh

    2015-01-01

    Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of thin flexible fins coupled with convective heat transfer has applications in energy harvesting and in understanding functioning of several biological systems. We numerically investigate FSI of the thin flexible fins involving large-scale flow-induced deformation as a potential heat transfer enhancement technique. An in-house, strongly-coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver is employed in which flow and structure solvers are based on sharp-interface immersed boundary and finite element method, respectively. We consider twin flexible fins in a heated channel with laminar pulsating cross flow. The vortex ring past the fin sweep higher sources of vorticity generated on the channel walls out into the downstream - promoting the mixing of the fluid. The moving fin assists in convective mixing, augmenting convection in bulk and at the walls; and thereby reducing thermal boundary layer thickness and improving heat transfer at the channel walls. The thermal augmentation is...

  3. Micropolarity-Ramification of Laminar/Turbulent Circular-Plane-Jet

    CERN Document Server

    Siddiqui, Abuzar Abid

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we formulated the boundary-value-problem, comprising partial differential equations (PDEs) of steady flow for laminar/turbulent circular jet of a micropolar fluid. A new boundary layer-similarity transformation/solution was derived which is valid not only for the Newtonian fluids but also for the micropolar fluids. Through this transformation PDEs are transformed into the ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These ODEs were solved numerically by the finite-difference method. The obtained results were compared with existing results [9] for the Newtonian fluids. The comparison was favourable. The micropolarity influences were highlighted in the present work. The axial-fluid-speed and normal stress-component decreases but radial-fluid-speed, microspin and one of the normal stress-component increase as the micropolarity effect enhances. The fluid-speed, microspin, shear stresses, normal stresses and couple stresses are dominant in the vicinity of the jet-source whereas they all vanish as fa...

  4. Quasimolecular Dynamic Simulation for Bending Fracture of Laminar Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Recently, quasimolecular dynamics has been successfully used to simulate the deformation characteristics of actual size solid materials. In quasimolecular dynamics, which is an attempt to bridge the gap between atomistic and continuum simulations, molecules are aggregated into large units, called quasimolecules, to evaluate large scale material behavior. In this paper, a 2-dimensional numerical simulation using quasimolecular dynamics was performed to investigate laminar composite material fractures and crack propagation behavior in the uniform bending of laminar composite materials. It was verified that under bending deformation laminar composite materials deform quite differently from homogeneous materials

  5. Boundary layer transition studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-02-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  6. Boundary layer transition studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-01-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  7. Heat transfer of laminar mixed convection of liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Shang, De-Yi

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a new algorithm to calculate fluid flow and heat transfer of laminar mixed convection. It provides step-by-step tutorial help to learn quickly how to set up the theoretical and numerical models of laminar mixed convection, to consider the variable physical properties of fluids, to obtain the system of numerical solutions, to create a series of formalization equations for the convection heat transfer by using a curve-fitting approach combined with theoretical analysis and derivation. It presents the governing ordinary differential equations of laminar mixed convection, equivalently transformed by an innovative similarity transformation with the description of the related transformation process. A system of numerical calculations of the governing ordinary differential equations is presented for the water laminar mixed convection. A polynomial model is induced for convenient and reliable treatment of variable physical properties of liquids. The developed formalization equations of mixed convec...

  8. STUDY ON STRUCTURE OF SINGULAR POINTS OF LAMINAR FLAME SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiu-e; YIN Xian-jun

    2005-01-01

    Under some certain assumptions, the physical model of the air combustion system was simplified to a laminar flame system. The mathematical model of the laminar flame system, which was built according to thermodynamics theory and the corresponding conservative laws, was studied. With the aid of qualitative theory and method of ordinary differential equations, the location of singular points on the Rayleigh curves is determined,the qualitative structure and the stability of the singular points of the laminar flame system,which are located in the areas of deflagration and detonation, are given for different parameter values and uses of combustion. The phase portraits of the laminar flame system in the reaction-stagnation enthalpy and combustion velocity-stagnation enthalpy planes are shown in the corresponding figures.

  9. Formation of coherent structures in 3D laminar mixing flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speetjens, Michel; Clercx, Herman

    2009-11-01

    Mixing under laminar flow conditions is key to a wide variety of industrial systems of size extending from microns to meters. Examples range from the traditional (and still very relevant) mixing of viscous fluids via compact processing equipment down to emerging micro-fluidics applications. Profound insight into laminar mixing mechanisms is imperative for further advancement of mixing technology (particularly for complex micro-fluidics systems) yet remains limited to date. The present study concentrates on a fundamental transport phenomenon of potential relevance to laminar mixing: the formation of coherent structures in the web of 3D fluid trajectories due to fluid inertia. Such coherent structures geometrically determine the transport properties of the flow and better understanding of their formation and characteristics may offer ways to control and manipulate the mixing properties of laminar flows. The formation of coherent structures and its impact upon 3D transport properties is demonstrated by way of examples.

  10. A Compilation of Unsteady Turbulent Boundary Layer Experimental Data,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    HIRSCH KITAet ai, GOSTELOW EHERENSBERGER LU HO & CHEN KOBASHI & HAYAKAWA MAINARDI & PANDAY MARVIN* LORBER & COVERT MIZUSHINA I SAXENA RAMAPRIAN & TU...Laminar Boundary Layer by a Moving Belt. AIAA Paj_2r 69-40, New York, N.Y., 1969. (LT) Mainardi , H. and Panday, P. K.: A Study of Turbulent Pulsating...Flow in a (-cular Pipe. Eurovisc 77 - Unsteady Turbulent Boundary Layers and Shear Flows, Toulouse, France, Jar,. 2977. (TE-D) Mainardi , H. and Panday

  11. Turbulent Shear Layers in Supersonic Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Smits, Alexander J

    2006-01-01

    A good understanding of turbulent compressible flows is essential to the design and operation of high-speed vehicles. Such flows occur, for example, in the external flow over the surfaces of supersonic aircraft, and in the internal flow through the engines. Our ability to predict the aerodynamic lift, drag, propulsion and maneuverability of high-speed vehicles is crucially dependent on our knowledge of turbulent shear layers, and our understanding of their behavior in the presence of shock waves and regions of changing pressure. Turbulent Shear Layers in Supersonic Flow provides a comprehensive introduction to the field, and helps provide a basis for future work in this area. Wherever possible we use the available experimental work, and the results from numerical simulations to illustrate and develop a physical understanding of turbulent compressible flows.

  12. Study of active cooling for supersonic transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The potential benefits of using the fuel heat sink of hydrogen fueled supersonic transports for cooling large portions of the aircraft wing and fuselage are examined. The heat transfer would be accomplished by using an intermediate fluid such as an ethylene glycol-water solution. Some of the advantages of the system are: (1) reduced costs by using aluminum in place of titanium, (2) reduced cabin heat loads, and (3) more favorable environmental conditions for the aircraft systems. A liquid hydrogen fueled, Mach 2.7 supersonic transport aircraft design was used for the reference uncooled vehicle. The cooled aircraft designs were analyzed to determine their heat sink capability, the extent and location of feasible cooled surfaces, and the coolant passage size and spacing.

  13. Supersonic Motions of Galaxies in Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Faltenbacher, A; Nagai, D; Gottlöber, S; Faltenbacher, Andreas; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Nagai, Daisuke; Gottloeber, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    We study motions of galaxies in galaxy clusters formed in the concordance LCDM cosmology. We use high-resolution cosmological simulations that follow dynamics of dark matter and gas and include various physical processes critical for galaxy formation: gas cooling, heating and star formation. Analysing motions of galaxies and the properties of intracluster gas in the sample of eight simulated clusters at z=0, we study velocity dispersion profiles of the dark matter, gas, and galaxies. We measure the mean velocity of galaxy motions and gas sound speed as a function of radius and calculate the average Mach number of galaxy motions. The simulations show that galaxies, on average, move supersonically with the average Mach number of ~1.4, approximately independent of the cluster-centric radius. The supersonic motions of galaxies may potentially provide an important source of heating for the intracluster gas by driving weak shocks and via dynamical friction, although these heating processes appear to be inefficient ...

  14. Control of star formation by supersonic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    MacLow, M M; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the formation of stars in galaxies is central to much of modern astrophysics. For several decades it has been thought that stellar birth is primarily controlled by the interplay between gravity and magnetostatic support, modulated by ambipolar diffusion. Recently, however, both observational and numerical work has begun to suggest that support by supersonic turbulence rather than magnetic fields controls star formation. In this review we outline a new theory of star formation relying on the control by turbulence. We demonstrate that although supersonic turbulence can provide global support, it nevertheless produces density enhancements that allow local collapse. Inefficient, isolated star formation is a hallmark of turbulent support, while efficient, clustered star formation occurs in its absence. The consequences of this theory are then explored for both local star formation and galactic scale star formation. (Abstract abbreviated)

  15. The Two-Dimensional Supersonic Flow and Mixing with a Perpendicular Injection in a Scramjet Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Ali; S.Ahmed; A.K.M.Sadrul Islam

    2003-01-01

    A numerical investigation has been performed on supersonic mixing of hydrogen with air in a Scramjet(Supersonic Combustion Ramjet) combustor and its flame holding capability by solving Two-Dimensional full Navier-Stokes equations. The main flow is air entering through a finite width of inlet and gaseous hydrogen is injected perpendicularly from the side wall. An explicit Harten-Yee Non-MUSCL Modified-flux-type TVD scheme has been used to solve the system of equations, and a zero-equation algebraic turbulence model to calculate the eddy viscosity coefficient. In this study the enhancement of mixing and good flame holding capability of a supersonic combustor have been investigated by varying the distance of injector position from left boundary keeping constant the backward-facing step height and other calculation parameters. The results show that the configuration for small distance of injector position has high mixing efficiency but the upstream recirculation can not evolved properly which is an important factor for flame holding capability. On the other hand, the configuration for very long distance has lower mixing efficiency due to lower gradient of hydrogen mass concentration on the top of injector caused by the expansion of side jet in both upstream and downstream of injector. For moderate distance of injector position, large and elongated upstream recirculation can evolve which might be activated as a good flame holder.

  16. Aerodynamic Design and Numerical Analysis of Supersonic Turbine for Turbo Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chao; Zou, Zhengping; Kong, Qingguo; Cheng, Honggui; Zhang, Weihao

    2016-09-01

    Supersonic turbine is widely used in the turbo pump of modern rocket. A preliminary design method for supersonic turbine has been developed considering the coupling effects of turbine and nozzle. Numerical simulation has been proceeded to validate the feasibility of the design method. As the strong shockwave reflected on the mixing plane, additional numerical simulated error would be produced by the mixing plane model in the steady CFD. So unsteady CFD is employed to investigate the aerodynamic performance of the turbine and flow field in passage. Results showed that the preliminary design method developed in this paper is suitable for designing supersonic turbine. This periodical variation of complex shockwave system influences the development of secondary flow, wake and shock-boundary layer interaction, which obviously affect the secondary loss in vane passage. The periodical variation also influences the strength of reflecting shockwave, which affects the profile loss in vane passage. Besides, high circumferential velocity at vane outlet and short blade lead to high radial pressure gradient, which makes the low kinetic energy fluid moves towards hub region and produces additional loss.

  17. Conceptual Design of a Supersonic Jet Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Kareliusson, Joakim; Nordqvist, Melker

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is a response to the request for proposal issued by a joint collaboration between the AIAA Foundation and ASME/IGTI as a student competition to design a new turbofan engine intended for a conceptual supersonic business jet expected to enter service in 2025. Due to the increasing competition in the aircraft industry and the more stringent environmental legislations the new engine is expected to provide a lower fuel burn than the current engine intended for the aircraft to increase ...

  18. Chemically reacting supersonic flow calculation using an assumed PDF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshchi, M.

    1990-01-01

    This work is motivated by the need to develop accurate models for chemically reacting compressible turbulent flow fields that are present in a typical supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMJET) engine. In this paper the development of a new assumed probability density function (PDF) reaction model for supersonic turbulent diffusion flames and its implementation into an efficient Navier-Stokes solver are discussed. The application of this model to a supersonic hydrogen-air flame will be considered.

  19. Research of low boom and low drag supersonic aircraft design

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Xiaoqiang; Li Zhanke; Song Bifeng

    2014-01-01

    Sonic boom reduction will be an issue of utmost importance in future supersonic transport, due to strong regulations on acoustic nuisance. The paper describes a new multi-objective optimization method for supersonic aircraft design. The method is developed by coupling Seebass–George–Darden (SGD) inverse design method and multi-objective genetic algorithm. Based on the method, different codes are developed. Using a computational architecture, a conceptual supersonic aircraft design environment...

  20. A new approach to laminar flowmeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Fernando Lopez; Diaz, Alvaro Deibe; Lema, Marcos Rodriguez; Rodriguez, Santiago Vazquez

    2010-01-01

    After studying the performance and characteristics of actual laminar flowmeters a new disposition for this type of sensors is proposed in such a way that the measurement errors introduced by the intrinsic nature of the device can be minimized. The preliminary study shows that the developing entry region introduces non-linearity effects in all these devices. These effects bring about not only errors, but also a change in the slope of the linear calibration respect of the Poiseuille relation. After a subsequent analysis on how these non-linearity errors can be reduced, a new disposition of this type of flowmeters is introduced. This device makes used of flow elements having pressure taps at three locations along its length and connected to three isolated chambers. In this way, the static pressure can be measured at three locations and contributed to by the pressure taps at the level of each chamber. Thus the linearization error is reduced with an additional advantage of producing a reduced pressure drop.

  1. Laminar separation bubbles: Dynamics and control

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sourabh S Diwan; O N Ramesh

    2007-02-01

    This work is an experimental investigation of the dynamics and control of the laminar separation bubbles which are typically present on the suction surface of an aerofoil at a large angle of attack. A separation bubble is produced on the upper surface of a flat plate by appropriately contouring the top wall of the wind tunnel. First, a basic (unforced) separation bubble is obtained to set a benchmark for further experiments. Parametric study is done where the reference velocity is decreased to quantify its effect on the aspect ratio of the bubble. It is found that with decrease in Reynolds number, the height of the bubble increases at a greater rate than the length. This feature could be useful in characterising separation bubbles especially from the point of view of low Reynolds number aerofoil design. Artificial disturbance is introduced at two different initial amplitudes (infinitesimal and finite) upstream of separation location and hotwire anemometry is used to trace the wave packet as it is advected downstream. The evolution of wave packets is seen to take place in two distinct stages. Finite amplitude forcing causes periodic quenching of the bubble. Interestingly, even an infinitesimally small forcing is seen to modify and thereby control the separation bubble.

  2. Direct Numerical Simulation of laminar separation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, O. N.; Patwardhan, Saurabh; Mitra, Abhijit

    2012-11-01

    This work presents the DNS of laminar separation bubbles (LSB) that formed over a flat plate due to an imposed pressure gradient. Mean flow parameters such as mean velocity, static pressure distribution and the geometric parameters, such as aspect ratio of the LSB, over the plate closely corresponds to those found in experiments and literature. The locus of the inflection point of the mean velocity profile was found to lie outside the dividing streamline and this is expected to correspond to a convectively unstable bubble. A closer look of the LSB as when advects along the reverse flow streamline adjacent to the wall suggest that turbulence progressively decayed as one moved upstream. This is indicative of the phenomenon similar to relaminarisation in this region, presumably due to the decrease in pressure along the reverse flow streamline. The energy budget inside the dividing streamline showed interesting trends and these will be discussed during the presentation. Furthermore, the dynamics of free shear layer and nonlinearity will also be presented.

  3. Review of hybrid laminar flow control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, K. S. G.; Bertram, O.; Seibel, O.

    2017-08-01

    The aeronautic community always strived for fuel efficient aircraft and presently, the need for ecofriendly aircraft is even more, especially with the tremendous growth of air traffic and growing environmental concerns. Some of the important drivers for such interests include high fuel prices, less emissions requirements, need for more environment friendly aircraft to lessen the global warming effects. Hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) technology is promising and offers possibility to achieve these goals. This technology was researched for decades for its application in transport aircraft, and it has achieved a new level of maturity towards integration and safety and maintenance aspects. This paper aims to give an overview of HLFC systems research and associated flight tests in the past years both in the US and in Europe. The review makes it possible to distinguish between the successful approaches and the less successful or outdated approaches in HLFC research. Furthermore, the technology status shall try to produce first estimations regarding the mass, power consumption and performance of HLFC systems as well as estimations regarding maintenance requirements and possible subsystem definitions.

  4. Steady laminar flow of fractal fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balankin, Alexander S., E-mail: abalankin@ipn.mx [Grupo Mecánica Fractal, ESIME, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D.F., 07738 (Mexico); Mena, Baltasar [Laboratorio de Ingeniería y Procesos Costeros, Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Sisal, Yucatán, 97355 (Mexico); Susarrey, Orlando; Samayoa, Didier [Grupo Mecánica Fractal, ESIME, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D.F., 07738 (Mexico)

    2017-02-12

    We study laminar flow of a fractal fluid in a cylindrical tube. A flow of the fractal fluid is mapped into a homogeneous flow in a fractional dimensional space with metric induced by the fractal topology. The equations of motion for an incompressible Stokes flow of the Newtonian fractal fluid are derived. It is found that the radial distribution for the velocity in a steady Poiseuille flow of a fractal fluid is governed by the fractal metric of the flow, whereas the pressure distribution along the flow direction depends on the fractal topology of flow, as well as on the fractal metric. The radial distribution of the fractal fluid velocity in a steady Couette flow between two concentric cylinders is also derived. - Highlights: • Equations of Stokes flow of Newtonian fractal fluid are derived. • Pressure distribution in the Newtonian fractal fluid is derived. • Velocity distribution in Poiseuille flow of fractal fluid is found. • Velocity distribution in a steady Couette flow is established.

  5. A New Approach to Laminar Flowmeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Deibe

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available After studying the performance and characteristics of actual laminar flowmeters a new disposition for this type of sensors is proposed in such a way that the measurement errors introduced by the intrinsic nature of the device can be minimized. The preliminary study shows that the developing entry region introduces non-linearity effects in all these devices. These effects bring about not only errors, but also a change in the slope of the linear calibration respect of the Poiseuille relation. After a subsequent analysis on how these non-linearity errors can be reduced, a new disposition of this type of flowmeters is introduced. This device makes used of flow elements having pressure taps at three locations along its length and connected to three isolated chambers. In this way, the static pressure can be measured at three locations and contributed to by the pressure taps at the level of each chamber. Thus the linearization error is reduced with an additional advantage of producing a reduced pressure drop.

  6. Laminar flow resistance in short microtubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phares, D.J. [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Smedley, G.T.; Zhou, J. [Glaukos Corp., Laguna Hills, CA (United States). Dept. of Research and Development

    2005-06-01

    We have measured the pressure drop for the flow of liquid through a series of short microtubes ranging from 80 to 150 {mu}m in diameter with aspect ratios between L/D = 2 and L/D = 5. These dimensions were selected to resemble lumens of implantable microstents that are under consideration for the treatment of glaucoma. For physiologically relevant pressure drops and flow rates, we have determined that a fully-developed laminar pipe flow may be assumed throughout the microtube when (L/D) > 0.20Re, where Re is the Reynolds number based on the diameter, D, and L is the length of the tube. We have examined flow rates between 0.1 and 10 {mu}L/s, corresponding to Reynolds numbers between 1 and 150. For smooth microtubes, no difference from macroscopic flow is observed for the tube sizes considered. However, flow resistance is found to be sensitive to the relative surface roughness of the tube walls. (author)

  7. Supersonic and subsonic measurements of mesospheric ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, L. C.; Nickell, L. C.; Kennedy, B.; Powell, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    An Arcas rocket-parachute system was used at night to compare supersonic and subsonic ionization measurements below 75 km. A hemispherical nose-tip probe was used on ascent and a parachute-borne blunt probe on descent to measure polar conductivities, which were due entirely to positive and negative ions. The velocity of the supersonic probe was Mach 2.5 at 50 km and 1.75 at 70 km; the blunt probe was subsonic below 71 km. Between 65 and 75 km the ratio of negative to positive conductivities (and thus of mobilities) determined by the blunt probe was about 1.2, and it approached 1 below this altitude range. The ratio obtained by the nose-tip probe varied from 1.5 at 75 km to .6 at 65 km, thus indicating a rapid variation of the effects of the shock wave on the sampled ions. The absolute values of positive conductivity measured subsonically and supersonically were essentially identical from 60 to 75 km, indicating that the sampled ions were unchanged by the shock. However, below 60 km the shock apparently 'broke up' the positive ions, as indicated by higher measured conductivities.

  8. Supersonic Jet Excitation using Flapping Injection

    CERN Document Server

    Hafsteinsson, Haukur; Andersson, Niklas; Cuppoletti, Daniel; Gutmark, Ephraim; Prisell, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Supersonic jet noise reduction is important for high speed military aircraft. Lower acoustic levels would reduce structural fatigue leading to longer lifetime of the jet aircraft. It is not solely structural aspects which are of importance, health issues of the pilot and the airfield per- sonnel are also very important, as high acoustic levels may result in severe hearing damage. It remains a major challenge to reduce the overall noise levels of the aircraft, where the supersonic exhaust is the main noise source for near ground operation. Fluidic injection into the supersonic jet at the nozzle exhaust has been shown as a promising method for noise reduction. It has been shown to speed up the mix- ing process of the main jet, hence reducing the kinetic energy level of the jet and the power of the total acoustic radiation. Furthermore, the interaction mechanism between the fluidic injection and the shock structure in the jet exhaust plays a crucial role in the total noise radia- tion. In this study, LES is used...

  9. Supersonic Gas-Liquid Cleaning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Frank

    1996-01-01

    The Supersonic Gas-Liquid Cleaning System Research Project consisted mainly of a feasibility study, including theoretical and engineering analysis, of a proof-of-concept prototype of this particular cleaning system developed by NASA-KSC. The cleaning system utilizes gas-liquid supersonic nozzles to generate high impingement velocities at the surface of the device to be cleaned. The cleaning fluid being accelerated to these high velocities may consist of any solvent or liquid, including water. Compressed air or any inert gas is used to provide the conveying medium for the liquid, as well as substantially reduce the total amount of liquid needed to perform adequate surface cleaning and cleanliness verification. This type of aqueous cleaning system is considered to be an excellent way of conducting cleaning and cleanliness verification operations as replacements for the use of CFC 113 which must be discontinued by 1995. To utilize this particular cleaning system in various cleaning applications for both the Space Program and the commercial market, it is essential that the cleaning system, especially the supersonic nozzle, be characterized for such applications. This characterization consisted of performing theoretical and engineering analysis, identifying desirable modifications/extensions to the basic concept, evaluating effects of variations in operating parameters, and optimizing hardware design for specific applications.

  10. Skin Friction and Pressure Measurements in Supersonic Inlets Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Supersonic propulsion systems include internal ducts, and therefore, the flow often includes shock waves, shear layers, vortices, and separated flows. Passive flow...

  11. A Status Review of the Commercial Supersonic Technology (CST) Aeroservoelasticity (ASE) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Walter A.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Funk, Christy; Keller, Donald F.; Ringertz, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    An overview of recent progress regarding the computational aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic (ASE) analyses of a low-boom supersonic configuration is presented. The overview includes details of the computational models developed to date with a focus on unstructured CFD grids, computational aeroelastic analyses, sonic boom propagation studies that include static aeroelastic effects, and gust loads analyses. In addition, flutter boundaries using aeroelastic Reduced-Order Models (ROMs) are presented at various Mach numbers of interest. Details regarding a collaboration with the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH, Stockholm, Sweden) to design, fabricate, and test a full-span aeroelastic wind-tunnel model are also presented.

  12. Computations of the Magnus effect for slender bodies in supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturek, W. B.; Schiff, L. B.

    1980-01-01

    A recently reported Parabolized Navier-Stokes code has been employed to compute the supersonic flow field about spinning cone, ogive-cylinder, and boattailed bodies of revolution at moderate incidence. The computations were performed for flow conditions where extensive measurements for wall pressure, boundary layer velocity profiles and Magnus force had been obtained. Comparisons between the computational results and experiment indicate excellent agreement for angles of attack up to six degrees. The comparisons for Magnus effects show that the code accurately predicts the effects of body shape and Mach number for the selected models for Mach numbers in the range of 2-4.

  13. Temperature decline thermography for laminar-turbulent transition detection in aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hoesslin, Stefan; Stadlbauer, Martin; Gruendmayer, Juergen; Kähler, Christian J.

    2017-09-01

    Detailed knowledge about laminar-turbulent transition and heat transfer distribution of flows around complex aerodynamic components are crucial to achieve highest efficiencies in modern aerodynamical systems. Several measurement techniques have been developed to determine those parameters either quantitatively or qualitatively. Most of them require extensive instrumentation or give unreliable results as the boundary conditions are often not known with the required precision. This work introduces the simple and robust temperature decline method to qualitatively detect the laminar-turbulent transition and the respective heat transfer coefficients on a surface exposed to an air flow, according to patent application Stadlbauer et al. (Patentnr. WO2014198251 A1, 2014). This method provides results which are less sensitive to control parameters such as the heat conduction into the blade material and temperature inhomogeneities in the flow or blade. This method was applied to measurements with NACA0018 airfoils exposed to the flow of a calibration-free jet at various Reynolds numbers and angles of attack. For data analysis, a post-processing method was developed and qualified to determine a quantity proportional to the heat transfer coefficient into the flow. By plotting this quantity for each pixel of the surface, a qualitative, two-dimensional heat transfer map was obtained. The results clearly depicted the areas of onset and end of transition over the full span of the model and agreed with the expected behavior based on the respective flow condition. To validate the approach, surface hotfilm measurements were conducted simultaneously on the same NACA profile. Both techniques showed excellent agreement. The temperature decline method allows to visualize laminar-turbulent transitions on static or moving parts and can be applied on a very broad range of scales—from tiny airfoils up to large airplane wings.

  14. Investigation of Efficient Turbulence Model for Two-Dimensional Nozzle Designed for Supersonic Cruise Using STAR-CCM+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Mummidisetti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, investigation of various turbulence models has been carried out for predicting the efficient turbulence model for a two-dimensional nozzle designed for a supersonic cruise nozzle. Initially, a computational domain was created for a two-dimensional nozzle for a supersonic cruise, then, with an appropriate mesh size, various turbulence models has been used for simulations. The main objective of the present work is to determine the efficient turbulence model for nozzle designs. As till date, commercial software’s are implementing many advanced technique, the test of turbulence model is very much needed for today’s research. The results obtained from the computational approach were compared with experimental approach which was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.8 to 1.2 by NASA Langley Research Centre, Virginia. These supersonic cruise nozzles have a wide range of applications in designing Fighter jets and supersonic cruise aircraft's. The present work was conducted by using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics Software, STAR-CCM+. Initially, Nozzle at a free stream Mach number 0.9 was designed and all the initial and boundary conditions were calculated. From the results obtained in the present investigation, we can conclude that there was an excellent correlation between the experimental and computational data for K-Epsilon turbulence model.

  15. How the Venetian Blind Percept Emergesfrom the Laminar Cortical Dynamics of 3D Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eGrossberg

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The 3D LAMINART model of 3D vision and figure-ground perception is used to explain and simulate a key example of the Venetian blind effect and show how it is related to other well-known perceptual phenomena such as Panum's limiting case. The model shows how identified neurons that interact in hierarchically organized laminar circuits of the visual cortex can simulate many properties of 3D vision percepts, notably consciously seen surface percepts, which are predicted to arise when filled-in surface representations are integrated into surface-shroud resonances between visual and parietal cortex. The model describes how monocular and binocular oriented filtering interacts with later stages of 3D boundary formation and surface filling-in in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN and cortical areas V1, V2, and V4. It proposes how interactions between layers 4, 3B, and 2/3 in V1 and V2 contribute to stereopsis, and how binocular and monocular information combine to form 3D boundary and surface representations. The model suggests how surface-to-boundary feedback from V2 thin stripes to pale stripes enables computationally complementary boundary and surface formation properties to generate a single consistent percept, eliminate redundant 3D boundaries, and trigger figure-ground perception. The model also shows how false binocular boundary matches may be eliminated by Gestalt grouping properties. In particular, a disparity filter, which helps to solve the Correspondence Problem by eliminating false matches, is predicted to be realized as part of the boundary grouping process in layer 2/3 of cortical area V2. The model has been used to simulate the consciously seen 3D surface percepts in 18 psychophysical experiments. These percepts include the Venetian blind effect, Panum's limiting case, contrast variations of dichoptic masking and the correspondence problem, the effect of interocular contrast differences on stereoacuity, stereopsis with polarity

  16. Laminar-Turbulent transition on Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Hernandez, Gabriel Gerardo

    is obtained by a similarity transformation technique. This approach allows to transform the boundary layer equations that have included the effect of the Coriolis and centrifugal forces into a set of couple partial differential equations, that are more convenient to solve numerically. The solution have been...

  17. Experimental observations of a complex, supersonic nozzle concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magstadt, Andrew; Berry, Matthew; Glauser, Mark; Ruscher, Christopher; Gogineni, Sivaram; Kiel, Barry; Skytop Turbulence Labs, Syracuse University Team; Spectral Energies, LLC. Team; Air Force Research Laboratory Team

    2015-11-01

    A complex nozzle concept, which fuses multiple canonical flows together, has been experimentally investigated via pressure, schlieren and PIV in the anechoic chamber at Syracuse University. Motivated by future engine designs of high-performance aircraft, the rectangular, supersonic jet under investigation has a single plane of symmetry, an additional shear layer (referred to as a wall jet) and an aft deck representative of airframe integration. Operating near a Reynolds number of 3 ×106 , the nozzle architecture creates an intricate flow field comprised of high turbulence levels, shocks, shear & boundary layers, and powerful corner vortices. Current data suggest that the wall jet, which is an order of magnitude less energetic than the core, has significant control authority over the acoustic power through some non-linear process. As sound is a direct product of turbulence, experimental and analytical efforts further explore this interesting phenomenon associated with the turbulent flow. The authors acknowledge the funding source, a SBIR Phase II project with Spectral Energies, LLC. and AFRL turbine engine branch under the direction of Dr. Barry Kiel.

  18. Quasi-DC electrical discharge characterization in a supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpt, Alec; Hedlund, Brock; Leonov, Sergey; Ombrello, Timothy; Carter, Campbell

    2017-04-01

    A Quasi-DC (Q-DC) electrical discharge generates a highly transient filamentary plasma in high-speed airflow. Major specific properties of this type of discharge are realized due to a strong coupling of the plasma to the moving gas. The plasma, supplied by a DC voltage waveform, demonstrates a pulsed-periodic pattern of dynamics significantly affecting the flow structure. In this study, the dynamics and plasma parameters of the Q-DC discharge are analyzed in the Supersonic Test Rig (SBR-50) at the University of Notre Dame at Mach number M = 2, stagnation pressure P 0 = (0.9-2.6) × 105 Pa, stagnation temperature T 0 = 300 K, unit Reynolds number ReL = 7-25 × 106 m-1, and plasma power W pl = 3-21 kW. The plasma parameters are measured with current-voltage probes and optical emission spectroscopy. An unsteady pattern of interaction is depicted by high-speed image capturing. The result of the plasma-flow interaction is characterized by means of pressure measurements and schlieren visualization. It is considered that the Q-DC discharge may be employed for active control of duct-driven flows, cavity-based flow, and for effective control of shock wave-boundary layer interaction.

  19. Unsteady transverse injection of kerosene into a supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A shadowgraph and a new fuel injection system were used to study kerosene transversely injected into a supersonic flow. High pressure and velocity of injection can be attained. The pressure time histories were detected in oil-line and the shadowgraphs of the flow field were obtained at different time-delays. The inflow stagnation pressure was varied to change the local flow speed in test section. The results indicate that kerosene jet exhibits deep penetration and four regimes appear clearly during the fuel jet atomization in a high-speed flow. The jet disintegration is caused by surface waves propagating along the jet surface, and the breakup point is located at the wave trough. The surface waves are dominantly generated by aerodynamic force. The jet shock is close to windward surface of the jet. The shock reflects on and transmits in duct boundary layers. In the case of unsteady injection, the shock structure is very complicated and different from that of hydrogen injection. The results of kerosene injected into a quiescent gas and a subsonic flow are also provided for comparison.

  20. Unsteady transverse injection of kerosene into a supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐胜利; R.D.Archer; B.E.Milton; 岳朋涛

    2000-01-01

    A shadowgraph and a new fuel injection system were used to study kerosene transversely injected into a supersonic flow. High pressure and velocity of injection can be attained. The pressure time histories were detected in oil-line and the shadowgraphs of the flow field were obtained at different time-delays. The inflow stagnation pressure was varied to change the local flow speed in test section. The results indicate that kerosene jet exhibits deep penetration and four regimes appear clearly during the fuel jet atomization in a high-speed flow. The jet disintegration is caused by surface waves propagating along the jet surface, and the breakup point is located at the wave trough. The surface waves are dominantly generated by aerodynamic force. The jet shock is close to windward surface of the jet. The shock reflects on and transmits in duct boundary layers. In the case of unsteady injection, the shock structure is very complicated and different from that of hydrogen injection. The results of kerosene inj

  1. Analytical solutions of heat transfer for laminar flow in rectangular channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybiński Witold

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents two analytical solutions namely for Fanning friction factor and for Nusselt number of fully developed laminar fluid flow in straight mini channels with rectangular cross-section. This type of channels is common in mini- and microchannel heat exchangers. Analytical formulae, both for velocity and temperature profiles, were obtained in the explicit form of two terms. The first term is an asymptotic solution of laminar flow between parallel plates. The second one is a rapidly convergent series. This series becomes zero as the cross-section aspect ratio goes to infinity. This clear mathematical form is also inherited by the formulae for friction factor and Nusselt number. As the boundary conditions for velocity and temperature profiles no-slip and peripherally constant temperature with axially constant heat flux were assumed (H1 type. The velocity profile is assumed to be independent of the temperature profile. The assumption of constant temperature at the channel’s perimeter is related to the asymptotic case of channel’s wall thermal resistance: infinite in the axial direction and zero in the peripheral one. It represents typical conditions in a minichannel heat exchanger made of metal.

  2. Linear Stability Analysis of Laminar Premixed Fuel-Rich Double-Spray Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam Weinberg

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the stability of a double-spray premixed flame formed when both fuel and oxidizer are initially present in the form of sprays of evaporating liquid droplets. To simplify the inherent complexity that characterizes the analytic solution of multi-phase combustion processes, the analysis is restricted to fuel-rich laminar premixed double-spray flames, and assumes a single-step global chemical reaction mechanism. Steady-state solutions are obtained and the sensitivity of the flame temperature and the flame propagating velocity to the initial liquid fuel and/or oxidizer loads are established. The stability analysis revealed an increased proneness to cellular instability induced by the presence of the two sprays, and for the fuel-rich case considered here the influence of the liquid oxidizer was found to be more pronounced than that of the liquid fuel. Similar effects were noted for the neutral pulsating stability boundaries. The impact of unequal latent heats of vaporization is also investigated and found to be in keeping with the destabilizing influence of heat loss due to droplet evaporation. It should be noted that as far as the authors are aware no experimental evidence is available for (at least validation of the predictions. However, they do concur in a general and reasonable fashion with independent experimental evidence in the literature of the behavior of single fuel spray laminar premixed flames.

  3. Three-dimensional measurement of the laminar flow field inside a static mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speetjens, Michel; Jilisen, Rene; Bloemen, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Static mixers are widely used in industry for laminar mixing of viscous fluids as e.g. polymers and food stuffs. Moreover, given the similarities in flow regime, static mixers often serve as model for compact mixers for process intensification and even for micro-mixers. This practical relevance has motivated a host of studies on the mixing characteristics of static mixers and their small-scale counterparts. However, these studies are primarily theoretical and numerical. Experimental studies, in contrast, are relatively rare and typically restricted to local 2D flow characteristics or integral quantities (pressure drop, residence-time distributions). The current study concerns 3D measurements on the laminar flow field inside a static mixer using 3D Particle-Tracking Velocimetry (3D-PTV) Key challenges to the 3D-PTV image-processing procedure are the optical distortion and degradation of the particle imagery due to light refraction and reflection caused by the cylindrical boundary and the internal elements. Ways to tackle these challenges are discussed and first successful 3D measurements in an actual industrial static mixer are presented.

  4. Analytical solutions of heat transfer for laminar flow in rectangular channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybiński, Witold; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents two analytical solutions namely for Fanning friction factor and for Nusselt number of fully developed laminar fluid flow in straight mini channels with rectangular cross-section. This type of channels is common in mini- and microchannel heat exchangers. Analytical formulae, both for velocity and temperature profiles, were obtained in the explicit form of two terms. The first term is an asymptotic solution of laminar flow between parallel plates. The second one is a rapidly convergent series. This series becomes zero as the cross-section aspect ratio goes to infinity. This clear mathematical form is also inherited by the formulae for friction factor and Nusselt number. As the boundary conditions for velocity and temperature profiles no-slip and peripherally constant temperature with axially constant heat flux were assumed (H1 type). The velocity profile is assumed to be independent of the temperature profile. The assumption of constant temperature at the channel's perimeter is related to the asymptotic case of channel's wall thermal resistance: infinite in the axial direction and zero in the peripheral one. It represents typical conditions in a minichannel heat exchanger made of metal.

  5. Localized travelling waves in the asymptotic suction boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Kreilos, Tobias; Schneider, Tobias M

    2016-01-01

    We present two spanwise-localized travelling wave solutions in the asymptotic suction boundary layer, obtained by continuation of solutions of plane Couette flow. One of the solutions has the vortical structures located close to the wall, similar to spanwise-localized edge states previously found for this system. The vortical structures of the second solution are located in the free stream far above the laminar boundary layer and are supported by a secondary shear gradient that is created by a large-scale low-speed streak. The dynamically relevant eigenmodes of this solution are concentrated in the free stream, and the departure into turbulence from this solution evolves in the free stream towards the walls. For invariant solutions in free-stream turbulence, this solution thus shows that that the source of energy of the vortical structures can be a dynamical structure of the solution itself, instead of the laminar boundary layer.

  6. Boundary-layer control by electric fields A feasibility study

    CERN Document Server

    Mendes, R V

    1998-01-01

    A problem of great concern in aviation and submarine propulsion is the control of the boundary layer and, in particular, the methods to extend the laminar region as a means to decrease noise and fuel consumption. In this paper we study the flow of air along an airfoil when a layer of ionized gas and a longitudinal electric field are created in the boundary layer region. By deriving scaling solutions and more accurate numerical solutions we discuss the possibility of achieving significant boundary layer control for realistic physical parameters. Practical design formulas and criteria are obtained. We also discuss the perspectives for active control of the laminar-to-turbulent transition fluctuations by electromagnetic field modulation.

  7. Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) Plume Induced Environment Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, B. L.; Smith, S. D.; Van Norman, J. W.; Muppidi, S.; Clark, I

    2016-01-01

    Provide plume induced heating (radiation & convection) predictions in support of the LDSD thermal design (pre-flight SFDT-1) Predict plume induced aerodynamics in support of flight dynamics, to achieve targeted freestream conditions to test supersonic deceleration technologies (post-flight SFDT-1, pre-flight SFDT-2)

  8. 超音速导弹弹翼结构的气动热弹性分析%Aerodynamic Thermal Elasticity Analysis of Wing Structure of Supersonic Speed Missile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘立刚; 周凌; 孙辉

    2015-01-01

    The aerodynamic heat elasticity problem of the missile wing which flies in the low,moderate su-personic speed(Ma is less than 5)were studied. Firstly,the aerodynamic heat of the leading edge stagna-tion,the laminar area and the turbulent region were calculated separately and the temperature distribution curves of the missile wing surface were obtained. Secondly,the temperature field of the missile wing struc-ture with wall temperature as the boundary condition of temperature field was calculated with FEM soft-ware. Finally,the sequential coupling solution of the coupled-fields analysis module was used in FEM soft-ware for computing the thermal stress field,thermal strain field and thermal displacement field. According to the above arithmetic,the aerodynamic heat elasticity problem of a certain type of antiaircraft missile which flies in the maximum supersonic speed(Ma equals 3)was calculated. The following conclusions are obtained:the maximum of temperature of the missile wing surface caused by aerodynamic heat appears in the laminar and the turbulent flow connection and the maximum of thermal stress and thermal strain appear in the attachment point of the wing and the body of the missile. The maximum of thermal displacement ap-pears at the end of wing tip.%为了对弹翼这类典型结构在低、中超音速(Ma ﹤5)飞行状态下的气动热弹性问题进行校核分析;首先对前缘驻点、层流区和紊流区分别进行气动加热计算,得到弹翼蒙皮表面的温度分布曲线;其次,将壁温作为弹翼结构温度场表面边界条件,用通用有限元软件计算得到弹翼结构的温度场;最后,运用耦合场分析模块中的序贯耦合解法得到弹翼结构的热应力场,热应变场和热位移场;对飞行马赫数为3时的弹翼结构进行气动热弹性分析,得到如下结论:气动加热引起弹翼表面的最高温度出现在层流与紊流的转捩点;最大热应力与热应变均出现

  9. High speed titanium coating by Supersonic Laser Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    LUPOI, ROCCO

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED The importance of metal coating technologies drives the continuous improvement of metal deposition techniques for application in a wide range of industrial sectors. This work presents the foundations of a new process technology f or the deposition of t itanium coatings on steel tube substrates using supersonic powder streams and impact site laser heating , known as Supersonic Laser Deposition (SLD). M et...

  10. Laminar and turbulent heating predictions for mars entry vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyong; Yan, Chao; Zheng, Weilin; Zhong, Kang; Geng, Yunfei

    2016-11-01

    Laminar and turbulent heating rates play an important role in the design of Mars entry vehicles. Two distinct gas models, thermochemical non-equilibrium (real gas) model and perfect gas model with specified effective specific heat ratio, are utilized to investigate the aerothermodynamics of Mars entry vehicle named Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). Menter shear stress transport (SST) turbulent model with compressible correction is implemented to take account of the turbulent effect. The laminar and turbulent heating rates of the two gas models are compared and analyzed in detail. The laminar heating rates predicted by the two gas models are nearly the same at forebody of the vehicle, while the turbulent heating environments predicted by the real gas model are severer than the perfect gas model. The difference of specific heat ratio between the two gas models not only induces the flow structure's discrepancy but also increases the heating rates at afterbody of the vehicle obviously. Simple correlations for turbulent heating augmentation in terms of laminar momentum thickness Reynolds number, which can be employed as engineering level design and analysis tools, are also developed from numerical results. At the time of peak heat flux on the +3σ heat load trajectory, the maximum value of momentum thickness Reynolds number at the MSL's forebody is about 500, and the maximum value of turbulent augmentation factor (turbulent heating rates divided by laminar heating rates) is 5 for perfect gas model and 8 for real gas model.

  11. Spontaneous transfer of droplets across microfluidic laminar interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Nan-Nan; Wang, Wei; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2016-11-01

    The precise manipulation of droplets in microfluidics has revolutionized a myriad of drop-based technologies, such as multiple emulsion preparation, drop fusion, drop fission, drop trapping and drop sorting, which offer promising new opportunities in chemical and biological fields. In this paper, we present an interfacial-tension-directed strategy for the migration of droplets across liquid-liquid laminar streams. By carefully controlling the interfacial energies, droplets of phase A are able to pass across the laminar interfaces of two immiscible fluids from phase B to phase C due to a positive spreading coefficient of phase C over phase B. To demonstrate this, we successfully perform the transfer of water droplets across an oil-oil laminar interface and the transfer of oil droplets across an oil-water laminar interface. The whole transfer process is spontaneous and only takes about 50 ms. We find that the fluid dynamics have an impact on the transfer processes. Only if the flowrate ratios are well matched will the droplets pass through the laminar interface successfully. This interfacial-tension-directed transfer of droplets provides a versatile procedure to make new structures and control microreactions as exemplified by the fabrication of giant unilamellar vesicles and cell-laden microgels.

  12. Soot Formation in Freely-Propagating Laminar Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, K.-C.; Hassan, M. I.; Faeth, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    Soot formation within hydrocarbon-fueled flames is an important unresolved problem of combustion science. Thus, the present study is considering soot formation in freely-propagating laminar premixed flames, exploiting the microgravity environment to simplify measurements at the high-pressure conditions of interest for many practical applications. The findings of the investigation are relevant to reducing emissions of soot and continuum radiation from combustion processes, to improving terrestrial and spacecraft fire safety, and to developing methods of computational combustion, among others. Laminar premixed flames are attractive for studying soot formation because they are simple one-dimensional flows that are computationally tractable for detailed numerical simulations. Nevertheless, studying soot-containing burner-stabilized laminar premixed flames is problematical: spatial resolution and residence times are limited at the pressures of interest for practical applications, flame structure is sensitive to minor burner construction details so that experimental reproducibility is not very good, consistent burner behavior over the lengthy test programs needed to measure soot formation properties is hard to achieve, and burners have poor durability. Fortunately, many of these problems are mitigated for soot-containing, freely-propagating laminar premixed flames. The present investigation seeks to extend work in this laboratory for various soot processes in flames by observing soot formation in freely-propagating laminar premixed flames. Measurements are being made at both Normal Gravity (NG) and MicroGravity (MG), using a short-drop free-fall facility to provide MG conditions.

  13. Advanced Noise Abatement Procedures for a Supersonic Business Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Jones, Scott M.; Seidel, Jonathan A.; Huff, Dennis L.

    2017-01-01

    Supersonic civil aircraft present a unique noise certification challenge. High specific thrust required for supersonic cruise results in high engine exhaust velocity and high levels of jet noise during takeoff. Aerodynamics of thin, low-aspect-ratio wings equipped with relatively simple flap systems deepen the challenge. Advanced noise abatement procedures have been proposed for supersonic aircraft. These procedures promise to reduce airport noise, but they may require departures from normal reference procedures defined in noise regulations. The subject of this report is a takeoff performance and noise assessment of a notional supersonic business jet. Analytical models of an airframe and a supersonic engine derived from a contemporary subsonic turbofan core are developed. These models are used to predict takeoff trajectories and noise. Results indicate advanced noise abatement takeoff procedures are helpful in reducing noise along lateral sidelines.

  14. Analytical solution of laminar-laminar stratified two-phase flows with curved interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauner, N.; Rovinsky, J.; Maron, D.M. [Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel)

    1995-09-01

    The present study represents a complete analytical solution for laminar two-phase flows with curved interfaces. The solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for the two-phases in bipolar coordinates provides the `flow monograms` describe the relation between the interface curvature and the insitu flow geometry when given the phases flow rates and viscosity ratios. Energy considerations are employed to construct the `interface monograms`, whereby the characteristic interfacial curvature is determined in terms of the phases insitu holdup, pipe diameter, surface tension, fluids/wall adhesion and gravitation. The two monograms are then combined to construct the system `operational monogram`. The `operational monogram` enables the determination of the interface configuration, the local flow characteristics, such as velocity profiles, wall and interfacial shear stresses distribution as well as the integral characteristics of the two-phase flow: phases insitu holdup and pressure drop.

  15. Temperature measurement in laminar free convective flow using digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Mosarraf; Shakher, Chandra

    2009-04-01

    A method for measurement of temperature in laminar free convection flow of water is presented using digital holographic interferometry. The method is relatively simple and fast because the method uses lensless Fourier transform digital holography, for which the reconstruction algorithm is simple and fast, and also the method does not require use of any extra experimental efforts as in phase shifting. The quantitative unwrapped phase difference is calculated experimentally from two digital holograms recorded in two different states of water--one in the quiescent state, the other in the laminar free convection. Unknown temperature in laminar free convection is measured quantitatively using a known value of temperature in the quiescent state from the unwrapped phase difference, where the equation by Tilton and Taylor describing the variation of refractive index of water with temperature is used to connect the phase with temperature. Experiments are also performed to visualize the turbulent free convection flow.

  16. Cortical laminar necrosis in brain infarcts: chronological changes on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, 2-13-22, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka 534 (Japan); Nishikawa, M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, 2-13-22, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka 534 (Japan); Yasui, T. [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, 2-13-22, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka 534 (Japan)

    1997-07-10

    We studied the MRI characteristics of cortical laminar necrosis in ischaemic stroke. We reviewed 13 patients with cortical laminar high signal on T1-weighted images to analyse the chronological changes in signal intensity and contrast enhancement. High-density cortical lesions began to appear on T1-weighted images about 2 weeks after the ictus. At 1-2 months they were prominent. They began to fade from 3 months but could be seen up to 11 months. These cortical lesions showed isointensity or high intensity on T2-weighted images and did not show low intensity at any stage. Contrast enhancement of the laminar lesions was prominent at 1-2 months and became less apparent from 3 months, but could be seen up to 8 months. (orig.). With 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. A Cartesian embedded boundary method for hyperbolic conservation laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjogreen, B; Petersson, N A

    2006-12-04

    The authors develop an embedded boundary finite difference technique for solving the compressible two- or three-dimensional Euler equations in complex geometries on a Cartesian grid. The method is second order accurate with an explicit time step determined by the grid size away from the boundary. Slope limiters are used on the embedded boundary to avoid non-physical oscillations near shock waves. They show computed examples of supersonic flow past a cylinder and compare with results computed on a body fitted grid. Furthermore, they discuss the implementation of the method for thin geometries, and show computed examples of transonic flow past an airfoil.

  18. Aeroelastic passive control optimization of supersonic composite wing with external stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaeman, E.; Abdullah, N. A.; Kashif, S. M.

    2017-03-01

    This paper provides a study on passive aeroelastic control optimization, by means of aeroelastic tailoring, of a composite supersonic wing equipped with external stores. The objective of the optimization is to minimize wing weight by considering the aeroelastic flutter and divergence instability speeds as constraints at several flight altitudes. The optimization variables are the composite ply angle and skin thickness of the wing box, wing rib and its control surfaces. The aeroelastic instability speed is set as constraint such that it should be higher than the flutter speed of a metallic base line model of supersonic wing having previously published. A finite element analysis is applied to determine the stiffness and mass matric of the wing and its multi stores. The boundary element method in the form of doublet lattice method is used to model the unsteady aerodynamic load. The results indicate that, for the present wing configuration, the high modulus Graphite/Epoxy composite provides a desired higher flutter speed and lower wing weight compare to that of Kevlar/Epoxy composite as well as the base line metallic wing materials. The aeroelastic boundary thus can be enlarged to higher speed zone and in the same time reduce the structural weight which is important for a further optimization process.

  19. Handbook of Supersonic Aerodynamics Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1950-04-01

    Use only for the dis- charge coefficients of nozzles and orifices fc(lc) Kinetic /(lc) lam (lc) Liquid phase, alternate for Local condition...factor Isentropic stagnation condi- tions; total Jet Joule’s constant; mechanical equivalent of heat Kinematic viscosity Kinetic Laminar...viscosity. Cinematic viscosity, (ftf/feo) Speed of SOUdd, Kean free path of moleoulos. (ft) T (°F ab«.). P/J>0 0 «• «— ^0 (lb/ft5) lb-sec

  20. Laminar-turbulent patterning in wall-bounded shear flows: a Galerkin model

    CERN Document Server

    Seshasayanan, K

    2015-01-01

    On its way to turbulence, plane Couette flow - the flow between counter-translating parallel plates - displays a puzzling steady oblique laminar-turbulent pattern. We approach this problem via Galerkin modelling of the Navier-Stokes equations. The wall-normal dependence of the hydrodynamic field is treated by means of expansions on functional bases fitting the boundary conditions exactly. This yields a set of partial differential equations for the spatiotemporal dynamics in the plane of the flow. Truncating this set beyond lowest nontrivial order is numerically shown to produce the expected pattern, therefore improving over what was obtained at cruder effective wall-normal resolution. Perspectives opened by the approach are discussed.

  1. Two- and three-dimensional marginal separation of laminar, incompressible viscous jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, S.; Kluwick, A. [TU Vienna (Austria). Inst. of Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer

    2000-07-01

    If a laminar two-dimensional viscous jet flows past a wall which is curved up an adverse pressure gradient forms inside the jet owing to the streamline curvature. As a consequence, solutions based on the boundary layer approximation may terminate in the form of a Goldstein-singularity or may develop a marginal separation singularity. The latter one is characterized by the fact that the wall shear stress vanishes in a single point but immediately recovers and can be used to develop a local interaction strategy which is able to describe small separation regions. In the present study the results obtained by Zametaev for locally plane walls are extended to include the effects of two- and three-dimensional obstacles. Special emphasis is placed on the nonuniqueness of the solution for the wall shear stress distribution which is governed by a nonlinear integro-differential equation. (orig.)

  2. Laminar-turbulent patterning in wall-bounded shear flows: a Galerkin model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshasayanan, K [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, CNRS UMR 8550, École Normale Supérieure, F-75005 Paris (France); Manneville, P, E-mail: paul.manneville@polytechnique.edu [Laboratoire d’Hydrodynamique, CNRS UMR7646, École Polytechnique, F-91128, Palaiseau (France)

    2015-06-15

    On its way to turbulence, plane Couette flow–the flow between counter-translating parallel plates–displays a puzzling steady oblique laminar-turbulent pattern. We approach this problem via Galerkin modelling of the Navier–Stokes equations. The wall-normal dependence of the hydrodynamic field is treated by means of expansions on functional bases fitting the boundary conditions exactly. This yields a set of partial differential equations for spatiotemporal dynamics in the plane of the flow. Truncating this set beyond the lowest nontrivial order is numerically shown to produce the expected pattern, therefore improving over what was obtained at the cruder effective wall-normal resolution. Perspectives opened by this approach are discussed. (paper)

  3. Polar confinement of the Sun's interior magnetic field by laminar magnetostrophic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, Toby S

    2010-01-01

    The global-scale interior magnetic field B_i needed to account for the Sun's observed differential rotation can be effective only if confined in the polar caps. Axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic solutions are obtained showing that such confinement can be brought about by a very weak downwelling flow U~10^{-5}cm/s over each pole. Such downwelling is consistent with the helioseismic evidence. All three components of the magnetic field decay exponentially with altitude across a thin, laminar "magnetic confinement layer" located at the bottom of the tachocline. With realistic parameter values, the thickness of the confinement layer ~10^{-3} of the Sun's radius. Alongside baroclinic effects and stable thermal stratification, the solutions take into account the stable compositional stratification of the helium settling layer, if present as in today's Sun, and the small diffusivity of helium through hydrogen, chi. The small value of chi relative to magnetic diffusivity produces a double boundary-layer structure in wh...

  4. Influence of uniform magnetic field on laminar regimes of natural convection in an enclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondareva, N. S.; Sheremet, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    A numerical analysis of spatial laminar regimes of natural convection in an enclosure is conducted in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. The mathematical model formulated in dimensionless natural variables "velocity-pressure-temperature" has been implemented numerically by the method of control volume. The influence of the Rayleigh number (103 ≤ Ra ≤ 105) and the Hartmann number (0 ≤ Ha ≤ 100), the orientation of the magnetic induction vector (0 ≤ φ ≤ π/2) as well as of the geometric parameter (0.2 ≤ A ≤ 5), which reflects the enclosure relative length, on the velocity and temperature distributions as well as the average Nusselt number on a typical isothermal boundary has been studied in detail. A possibility of describing the integral heat exchange in the spatial object under consideration on the basis of the two-dimensional model has been established.

  5. The CAV program for numerical evaluation of laminar natural convection heat transfer in vertical rectangular cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Milos H.; Nowak, Edwin S.

    1993-12-01

    To analyze the laminar natural convection heat transfer and fluid flow distribution in vertical rectangular cavities with or without inner partitions, the personal computer finite difference program entitled CAV is used. The CAV program was tested successfully for slender cavities with aspect ratios as high as R = H/ L = 90 and for the Grashof numbers, based on the cavity height, up to GrH = 3 x10 9. To make the CAV program useful for a number of applications, various types of boundary conditions can also be imposed on the program calculations. Presented are program applications dealing with the 2-D numerical analysis of natural convection heat transfer in very slender window cavities with and without small inner partitions and recommendations are made for window design.

  6. Method and apparatus for detecting laminar flow separation and reattachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, John P. (Inventor); Mangalam, Sivaramakrishnan M. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for simultaneously detecting laminar separation and reattachment of a fluid stream such as an airstream from and to the upper surface of an airfoil by simultaneously sensing and comparing a plurality of output signals. Each signal represents the dynamic shear stress at one of an equal number of sensors spaced along a straight line on the surface of the airfoil that extends parallel to the airstream. The output signals are simultaneously compared to detect the sensors across which a reversal in phase of said output signal occurs, said detected sensors being in the region of laminar separation or reattachment.

  7. Supersonic Jet Interactions in a Plenum Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Venugopal

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding thè supersonic jet interactions in a plenum chamber is essential for thè design of hot launch systems. Static tests were conducted in a small-scale rocket motor ioaded with a typical nitramine propellaiit to produce a nozzle exit Mach number of 3. This supersonic jet is made to interact with plenum chambers having both open and closed sides. The distance between thè nozzle exit and thè back piate of plenum chamber are varied from 2. 5 to 7. 0 times thè nozzle exit diameter. The pressure rise in thè plenum chamber was measured using pressure transducers mounted at different locatìons. The pressure-time data were analysed to obtain an insight into thè flow field in thè plenum chamber. The maximum pressure exerted on thè back piate of plenum chamber is about 25-35 per cent. of thè maximum stagnation pressure developed in thè rocket motor. Ten static tests were carried out to obtain thè effect of axial distance between thè nozzle exit and thè plenum chamber back piate, and stagnation pressure in thè rocket motoron thè flow field in thè open-sided and closed-sided plenum chambers configurations.

  8. Numerical simulation of supersonic gap flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xu; Haiming, Huang; Guo, Huang; Song, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Various gaps in the surface of the supersonic aircraft have a significant effect on airflows. In order to predict the effects of attack angle, Mach number and width-to-depth ratio of gap on the local aerodynamic heating environment of supersonic flow, two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the finite volume method, where convective flux of space term adopts the Roe format, and discretization of time term is achieved by 5-step Runge-Kutta algorithm. The numerical results reveal that the heat flux ratio is U-shaped distribution on the gap wall and maximum at the windward corner of the gap. The heat flux ratio decreases as the gap depth and Mach number increase, however, it increases as the attack angle increases. In addition, it is important to find that chamfer in the windward corner can effectively reduce gap effect coefficient. The study will be helpful for the design of the thermal protection system in reentry vehicles.

  9. Numerical simulation of supersonic gap flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    Full Text Available Various gaps in the surface of the supersonic aircraft have a significant effect on airflows. In order to predict the effects of attack angle, Mach number and width-to-depth ratio of gap on the local aerodynamic heating environment of supersonic flow, two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the finite volume method, where convective flux of space term adopts the Roe format, and discretization of time term is achieved by 5-step Runge-Kutta algorithm. The numerical results reveal that the heat flux ratio is U-shaped distribution on the gap wall and maximum at the windward corner of the gap. The heat flux ratio decreases as the gap depth and Mach number increase, however, it increases as the attack angle increases. In addition, it is important to find that chamfer in the windward corner can effectively reduce gap effect coefficient. The study will be helpful for the design of the thermal protection system in reentry vehicles.

  10. Coupling dynamic of twin supersonic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ching-Wen; Cluts, Jordan; Samimy, Mo

    2015-11-01

    In a supersonic shock-containing jet, the interaction of large-scale structures in the jet's shear layer with the shock waves generates acoustic waves. The waves propagate upstream, excite the jet initial shear layer instability, establish a feedback loop at certain conditions, and generate screech noise. The screech normally contains different modes of various strengths. Similarly, twin-jet plumes contain screech tones. If the dynamics of the two jet plumes are synchronized, the screech amplitude could be significantly amplified. There is a proposed analytical model in the literature for screech synchronization in twin rectangular jets. This model shows that with no phase difference in acoustic waves arriving at neighboring nozzle lips, twin-jet plumes feature a strong coupling with a significant level of screech tones. In this work the maximum nozzle separation distance for sustained screech synchronization and strong coupling is analytically derived. This model is used with our round twin-jet experiments and the predicted coupling level agrees well with the experimental results. Near-field microphone measurements and schlieren visualization along with the analytical model are used to investigate the coupling mechanisms of twin supersonic jets. Supported by ONR.

  11. Non-intrusive measurements of convective heat transfer in smooth- and rough-wall microchannels: laminar flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natrajan, V. K.; Christensen, K. T.

    2010-11-01

    The convective heat transfer behavior of laminar flow through a smooth- and two rough-wall microchannels is investigated by performing non-intrusive and spatially resolved measurements of fluid temperature via two-color fluorescent thermometry under constant heat flux conditions at three of the four microchannel walls. Pressure-drop measurements reveal that the apparent friction factors for all surfaces agree well with established macroscale predictions for laminar flow through rectangular ducts with the onset of transition at Re > Recr = 1,800 for smooth-wall flow and deviation from laminar behavior at progressively lower Re with increasing surface roughness. The local Nu for smooth-wall flow agrees well with macroscale predictions in both the thermally developing and developed regimes. With increasing roughness, while an enhancement in local Nu is noted for flow in the thermally developing regime, no measurable influence is noted upon attainment of a thermally developed state. These observations are supported by the examination of temperature profiles across the microchannel at various axial positions and Re, which suggest that the thermal boundary layer may be regenerated locally by roughness in the thermal entrance region of the flow resulting in an increased axial distance (compared to smooth-wall behavior) at which thermally developed flow is attained in the presence of roughness. Finally, estimates of the bulk Nu indicate enhancement in convective heat transfer over the smooth-wall case for laminar flow at higher Re while the smooth-wall bulk Nu data are found to agree well with macroscale predictions.

  12. Boundary-layer predictions for small low-speed contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.; Bell, James H.

    1989-01-01

    The present scheme for the prediction of boundary-layer development in small, low-speed wind tunnel contraction sections proceeds by calculating the wall pressure distributions, and hence the wall velocity distributions, by means of a three-dimensional potential-flow method. For the family of contractions presently treated, the assumption of a laminar boundary layer appears to be justified; the measured boundary layer momentum thicknesses at the exit of the four contractions were found to lie within 10 percent of predicted values.

  13. Computatonal and experimental study of laminar flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smooke, M.D.; Long, M.B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research has centered on an investigation of the effects of complex chemistry and detailed transport on the structure and extinction of hydrocarbon flames in counterflow, cylindrical and coflowing axisymmetric configurations. The authors have pursued both computational and experimental aspects of the research in parallel. The computational work has focused on the application of accurate and efficient numerical methods for the solution of the one and two-dimensional nonlinear boundary value problems describing the various reacting systems. Detailed experimental measurements were performed on axisymmetric coflow flames using two-dimensional imaging techniques. In particular, spontaneous Raman scattering and laser induced fluorescence were used to measure the temperature, major and minor species profiles.

  14. High-resolution PIV measurements of a transitional shock wave-boundary layer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giepman, R. H. M.; Schrijer, F. F. J.; van Oudheusden, B. W.

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of boundary layer transition on an oblique shock wave reflection. The Mach number was 1.7, the unit Reynolds number was 35 × 106 m-1, and the pressure ratio over the interaction was 1.35. Particle image velocimetry is used as the main flow diagnostics tool, supported by oil-flow and Schlieren visualizations. At these conditions, the thickness of the laminar boundary layer is only 0.2 mm, and seeding proved to be problematic as practically no seeding was recorded in the lower 40 % of the boundary layer. The top 60 % could, however, still be resolved with good accuracy and is found to be in good agreement with the compressible Blasius solution. Due to the effects of turbulent mixing, the near-wall seeding deficiency disappears when the boundary layer transitions to a turbulent state. This allowed the seeding distribution to be used as an indicator for the state of the boundary layer, permitting to obtain an approximate intermittency distribution for the boundary layer transition region. This knowledge was then used for positioning the oblique shock wave in the laminar, transitional (50 % intermittency) or turbulent region of the boundary layer. Separation is only recorded for the laminar and transitional interactions. For the laminar interaction, a large separation bubble is found, with a streamwise length of 96. The incoming boundary layer is lifted over the separation bubble and remains in a laminar state up to the impingement point of the shock wave. After the shock, transition starts and a turbulent profile is reached approximately 80-90 downstream of the shock. Under the same shock conditions, the transitional interaction displays a smaller separation bubble (43), and transition is found to be accelerated over the separation bubble.

  15. Optimization of recirculating laminar air flow in operating room air conditioning systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enver Yalcin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The laminar flow air-conditioning system with 100% fresh air is used in almost all operating rooms without discrimination in Turkey. The laminar flow device which is working with 100% fresh air should be absolutely used in Type 1A operating rooms. However, there is not mandatory to use of 100% fresh air for Type 1B defined as places performed simpler operation. Compared with recirculating laminar flow, energy needs of the laminar flow with 100 % fresh air has been emerged about 40% more than re-circulated air flow. Therefore, when a recirculating laminar flow device is operated instead of laminar flow system with 100% fresh air in the Type 1B operating room, annual energy consumption will be reduced. In this study, in an operating room with recirculating laminar flow, optimal conditions have been investigated in order to obtain laminar flow form by analyzing velocity distributions at various supply velocities by using computational fluid dynamics method (CFD.

  16. Outer Magnetospheric Boundaries Cluster Results

    CERN Document Server

    Paschmann, Goetz; Schwartz, S J

    2006-01-01

    When the stream of plasma emitted from the Sun (the solar wind) encounters Earth's magnetic field, it slows down and flows around it, leaving behind a cavity, the magnetosphere. The magnetopause is the surface that separates the solar wind on the outside from the Earth's magnetic field on the inside. Because the solar wind moves at supersonic speed, a bow shock must form ahead of the magnetopause that acts to slow the solar wind to subsonic speeds. Magnetopause, bow shock and their environs are rich in exciting processes in collisionless plasmas, such as shock formation, magnetic reconnection, particle acceleration and wave-particle interactions. They are interesting in their own right, as part of Earth's environment, but also because they are prototypes of similar structures and phenomena that are ubiquitous in the universe, having the unique advantage that they are accessible to in situ measurements. The boundaries of the magnetosphere have been the target of direct in-situ measurements since the beginning ...

  17. Investigation of a turbulent spot and a tripped turbulent boundary layer flow using time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröder, A.; Geisler, R.; Elsinga, G.E.; Scarano, F.; Dierksheide, U.

    2007-01-01

    In this feasibility study the tomographic PIV technique has been applied to time resolved PIV recordings for the study of the growth of a turbulent spot in a laminar flat plate boundary layer and to visualize the topology of coherent flow structures within a tripped turbulent flat plate boundary lay

  18. Research on the noise produced by large scale structure in supersonic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclaughlin, D. K.; Lilley, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    Using a dual electrode glow discharge excitation device, a method of mode selection into either the n = 0 or n = + or - 1 azimuthal modes was developed and tested by Fourier analyzing experimental azimuthal phase and amplitude data. On a M = 2.1 moderate Reynolds number (Re = 68,000) jet with a laminar boundary layer, under n = 0 or n = +1 excitation, coherent axial wave evolution, mean flow, and sound pressure level directivity measurements were performed. The boundary layer of this same jet was excited usng a grit coating on the nozzle wall, and bandpassed axial wave evolution data obtained and compared to the masurements made by previous workers on a conventional high Reynolds number jet (Re = 5,000,000) using a hot-film type probe.

  19. Effect of roughness of the blunted cone nose-tip on laminar-turbulent transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bountin, D. A.; Gromyko, Yu. V.; Polivanov, P. A.; Sidorenko, A. A.; Maslov, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Hypersonic boundary layer stability and transition were studied experimentally and numerically for the test case of 7° cone model with blunt nose-tip. The experiments were performed for M=6, heat flux distributions and wall pressure pulsations were measured. It was obtained that the angle of cover and size of bluntness significantly affects on the transition location. Real hypersonic vehicle is equipped by thermal protection systems (TPS) which have a surface roughness (joints and connecting elements). Furthermore the surface of the elements of TPS is not smooth and has some relatively uniform roughness, which can vary during flight. Roughness size can change during thermal ablation or destruction, in addition elements of isolated roughness comparable with a thickness of the boundary layer may appear on surface (caverns, ledges, etc.,). These elements are additional receptivity areas where the additional perturbations are generated and developing in boundary layer that may cause premature laminar-turbulent transition. This effect has been studied for more than 50 years [17-3], but almost all the work devoted to the search of engineering correlations, but not to receptivity or stability problems. This effect needs to be studied more precisely.

  20. How the venetian blind percept emerges from the laminar cortical dynamics of 3D vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yongqiang; Grossberg, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The 3D LAMINART model of 3D vision and figure-ground perception is used to explain and simulate a key example of the Venetian blind effect and to show how it is related to other well-known perceptual phenomena such as Panum's limiting case. The model proposes how lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and hierarchically organized laminar circuits in cortical areas V1, V2, and V4 interact to control processes of 3D boundary formation and surface filling-in that simulate many properties of 3D vision percepts, notably consciously seen surface percepts, which are predicted to arise when filled-in surface representations are integrated into surface-shroud resonances between visual and parietal cortex. Interactions between layers 4, 3B, and 2/3 in V1 and V2 carry out stereopsis and 3D boundary formation. Both binocular and monocular information combine to form 3D boundary and surface representations. Surface contour surface-to-boundary feedback from V2 thin stripes to V2 pale stripes combines computationally complementary boundary and surface formation properties, leading to a single consistent percept, while also eliminating redundant 3D boundaries, and triggering figure-ground perception. False binocular boundary matches are eliminated by Gestalt grouping properties during boundary formation. In particular, a disparity filter, which helps to solve the Correspondence Problem by eliminating false matches, is predicted to be realized as part of the boundary grouping process in layer 2/3 of cortical area V2. The model has been used to simulate the consciously seen 3D surface percepts in 18 psychophysical experiments. These percepts include the Venetian blind effect, Panum's limiting case, contrast variations of dichoptic masking and the correspondence problem, the effect of interocular contrast differences on stereoacuity, stereopsis with polarity-reversed stereograms, da Vinci stereopsis, and perceptual closure. These model mechanisms have also simulated properties of 3D neon

  1. Supersonic Turbulent Convection and the Origin of the Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, A. J. R.; Dyt, C. P.

    2000-10-01

    We report a new set of calculations which support the view that supersonic turbulent convection played a major role in the formation of the solar system. A flux-corrected transport scheme (Zalesak, J. Comp. Phys.} 31 335 1979) is used to numerically simulate thermal convection in a 2D ideal gas layer that is heated from below and is stratified gravitationally across many scale heights. The temperature T0 at the top boundary and the temperature gradient (∂ T/∂ z)1 at the lower boundary are kept constant during the computation. The initial atmosphere is superadiabatic with polytropic index m = 1, specific heats ratio γ = 1.4 and temperature contrast T1}/T{0 = 11. This layer mimics a section of the outer layer of the proto-solar cloud (Dyt & Prentice, MNRAS 296 56 1998). Because the Reynolds number of the real atmosphere is so large, motions whose scale is less than the computational grid size are represented with a Smagorinsky sub-grid scale turbulence approximation (Chan et al, Ap.J.} 263 935 1982). That is, a velocity-dependent turbulent viscosity ν t and thermal diffusivity κ t are chosen so that the high wavenumber kinetic energy spectrum follows Kolmogorov's -5/3 law. The flow soon evolves to a configuration consisting of a network of giant convective cells. At cell boundaries, the downflows are spatially concentrated and rapid. Turbulent pressures t range up to 3 times the local gas pressure pgas. The convection eliminates nearly all of the superadiabaticity in the lower 90% of the atmosphere. In the top 10%, ∂ T/∂ z increases sharply and a steep density inversion occurs, with ρ increasing by a factor of 3-4. This result gives new credibility to the modern Laplacian theory of solar system origin (Moon & Planets} 19 341 1978; ibid 73 237 1996; Phys. Lett. A} 213 253 1996). Even so, we need t ≈ 10 pgas if the proto-solar cloud is to shed discrete gas rings whose orbits match the mean planetary spacings and whose chemical condensates match the

  2. An Introduction to the Supersonic Molecular Beam Injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Recently a new fuelling method with supersonic molecular beam injection (MBI) has been developed and used in the tokamaks experiments successfully. It is economical to develop and maintain. The advantages of supersonic MBI compared with the conventional of gas-puffing method are as follows: deep deposition of fuel, better fuelling efficiency, reduced recycling and pure plasma. Particle and energy confinement can be improved and density limit extended. This review described the Laval nozzle molecular beam and a simple collective model for the injection of a supersonic MBI into the tokamak plasma.

  3. Magnetic geometry and particle source drive of supersonic divertor regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufferand, H.; Ciraolo, G.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Tamain, Ph; Marandet, Y.; Serre, E.

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive picture of the mechanisms driving the transition from subsonic to supersonic flows in tokamak plasmas. We demonstrate that supersonic parallel flows into the divertor volume are ubiquitous at low density and governed by the divertor magnetic geometry. As the density is increased, subsonic divertor plasmas are recovered. On detachment, we show the change in particle source can also drive the transition to a supersonic regime. The comprehensive theoretical analysis is completed by simulations in ITER geometry. Such results are essential in assessing the divertor performance and when interpreting measurements and experimental evidence.

  4. Laminar hydromagnetic flows in an inclined heated layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Falsaperla

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate, analytically, stationary laminar flow solutions of an inclined layer filled with a hydromagnetic fluid heated from below and subject to the gravity field. In particular we describe in a systematic way the many basic solutions associated to the system. This extensive work is the basis to linear instability and nonlinear stability analysis of such motions.

  5. Numerical assessment of accurate measurements of laminar flame speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulier, Joules; Bizon, Katarzyna; Chaumeix, Nabiha; Meynet, Nicolas; Continillo, Gaetano

    2016-12-01

    In combustion, the laminar flame speed constitutes an important parameter that reflects the chemistry of oxidation for a given fuel, along with its transport and thermal properties. Laminar flame speeds are used (i) in turbulent models used in CFD codes, and (ii) to validate detailed or reduced mechanisms, often derived from studies using ideal reactors and in diluted conditions as in jet stirred reactors and in shock tubes. End-users of such mechanisms need to have an assessment of their capability to predict the correct heat released by combustion in realistic conditions. In this view, the laminar flame speed constitutes a very convenient parameter, and it is then very important to have a good knowledge of the experimental errors involved with its determination. Stationary configurations (Bunsen burners, counter-flow flames, heat flux burners) or moving flames (tubes, spherical vessel, soap bubble) can be used. The spherical expanding flame configuration has recently become popular, since it can be used at high pressures and temperatures. With this method, the flame speed is not measured directly, but derived through the recording of the flame radius. The method used to process the radius history will have an impact on the estimated flame speed. Aim of this work is to propose a way to derive the laminar flame speed from experimental recording of expanding flames, and to assess the error magnitude.

  6. LAMINAR SETTLING OF GLASS BEADS IN VISCO-PLASTIC LIQUIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikoláš Kesely

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a determination of the terminal settling velocity of coarse particles in quiescent visco-plastic liquids of Herschel-Bulkley type. Experiments on laminar settling of glass beads of different sizes were conducted in transparent Carbopol solutions of various rheological properties in a sedimentation column. The terminal settling velocity of a solitude bead was determined together with the rheological parameters of the Carbopol liquid. An evaluation of the experimental results confirms the existence of the laminar regime for all tests and compares the measured velocities with predictions by Wilson et al. method. Furthermore, an alternative method is proposed for a prediction of the terminal settling velocity in the laminar regime which uses a particle-based determination of the strain rate in the expression for the equivalent viscosity. A comparison with our experimental results shows that the predictions using the proposed method agree well with the experiments and the proposed method is in the laminar settling regime more accurate than the Wilson et al. method.

  7. Laminar Soot Processes Experiment Shedding Light on Flame Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP) experiment investigated soot processes in nonturbulent, round gas jet diffusion flames in still air. The soot processes within these flames are relevant to practical combustion in aircraft propulsion systems, diesel engines, and furnaces. However, for the LSP experiment, the flames were slowed and spread out to allow measurements that are not tractable for practical, Earth-bound flames.

  8. Numerical Analysis of Supersonic Film Cooling in Supersonic Flow in Hypersonic Inlet with Isolator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silong Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Supersonic film cooling is an efficient method to cool the engine with extremely high heat load. In order to study supersonic film cooling in a real advanced engine, a two-dimensional model of the hypersonic inlet in a scramjet engine with supersonic film cooling in the isolator is built and validated through experimental data. The simulation results show that the cooling effect under different coolant injection angles does not show clear differences; a small injection angle can ensure both the cooling effect and good aerodynamic performances (e.g., flow coefficient of the hypersonic inlet. Under selected coolant injection angle and inlet Mach number, the cooling efficiency increases along with the injection Mach number of the coolant flow, only causing a little total pressure loss in the isolator. Along with the increase of the inlet Mach number of the hypersonic inlet, the cooling efficiency does not present a monotonic change because of the complex shock waves. However, the wall temperature shows a monotonic increase when the inlet Mach number increases. The mass flow rate of coolant flow should be increased to cool the engine more efficiently according to the mass flow rate of the main stream when the inlet Mach number increases.

  9. Emerging boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvschal, Mette

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a processual ontology for the emergence of man-made, linear boundaries across northwestern Europe, particularly in the first millennium BC. Over a significant period of time, these boundaries became new ways of organizing the landscape and settlements—a phenomenon that has...... of this phenomenon emerged along equivalent trajectories. At the same time, variation in the regional incorporation of these linear phenomena points toward situation-specific applications and independent development....

  10. Boundary Spanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    The paper explores how locals span boundaries between corporate and local levels. The aim is to better comprehend potentialities and challenges when MNCs draws on locals’ culture specific knowledge. The study is based on an in-depth, interpretive case study of boundary spanning by local actors in...... approach with pattern matching is a way to shed light on the tacit local knowledge that organizational actors cannot articulate and that an exclusively inductive research is not likely to unveil....

  11. Linear stability analysis of supersonic axisymmetric jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Wan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stabilities of supersonic jets are examined with different velocities, momentum thicknesses, and core temperatures. Amplification rates of instability waves at inlet are evaluated by linear stability theory (LST. It is found that increased velocity and core temperature would increase amplification rates substantially and such influence varies for different azimuthal wavenumbers. The most unstable modes in thin momentum thickness cases usually have higher frequencies and azimuthal wavenumbers. Mode switching is observed for low azimuthal wavenumbers, but it appears merely in high velocity cases. In addition, the results provided by linear parabolized stability equations show that the mean-flow divergence affects the spatial evolution of instability waves greatly. The most amplified instability waves globally are sometimes found to be different from that given by LST.

  12. The shock waves in decaying supersonic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, M D; Zuev, J M; Smith, Michael D.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Zuev, Julia M.

    2000-01-01

    We here analyse numerical simulations of supersonic, hypersonic andmagnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is free to decay. Our goals are tounderstand the dynamics of the decay and the characteristic properties of theshock waves produced. This will be useful for interpretation of observations ofboth motions in molecular clouds and sources of non-thermal radiation. We find that decaying hypersonic turbulence possesses an exponential tail offast shocks and an exponential decay in time, i.e. the number of shocks isproportional to t exp (-ktv) for shock velocity jump v and mean initialwavenumber k. In contrast to the velocity gradients, the velocity ProbabilityDistribution Function remains Gaussian with a more complex decay law. The energy is dissipated not by fast shocks but by a large number of low Machnumber shocks. The power loss peaks near a low-speed turn-over in anexponential distribution. An analytical extension of the mapping closuretechnique is able to predict the basic decay features. Our analytic descrip...

  13. Aeroacoustic properties of supersonic elliptic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzie, Kevin W.; McLaughlin, Dennis K.

    1999-09-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic properties of supersonic elliptic and circular jets are experimentally investigated. The jets are perfectly expanded with an exit Mach number of approximately 1.5 and are operated in the Reynolds number range of 25 000 to 50 000. The reduced Reynolds number facilitates the use of conventional hot-wire anemometry and a glow discharge excitation technique which preferentially excites the varicose or flapping modes in the jets. In order to simulate the high-velocity and low-density effects of heated jets, helium is mixed with the air jets. This allows the large-scale structures in the jet shear layer to achieve a high enough convective velocity to radiate noise through the Mach wave emission process.

  14. Numerical Investigation of Vortex Generator Flow Control for External-Compression Supersonic Inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydar, Ezgihan

    Vortex generators (VGs) within external-compression supersonic inlets for Mach 1.6 were investigated to determine their ability to increase total pressure recovery and reduce total pressure distortion. Ramp and vane-type VGs were studied. The geometric factors of interest included height, length, spacing, angle-of-incidence, and positions upstream and downstream of the inlet terminal shock. The flow through the inlet was simulated numerically through the solution of the steady-state, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations on multi-block, structured grids using the Wind-US flow solver. The inlet performance was characterized by the inlet total pressure recovery and the radial and circumferential total pressure distortion indices at the engine face. Previous research of downstream VGs in the low-boom supersonic inlet demonstrated improvement in radial distortion up to 24% while my work on external-compression supersonic inlets improved radial distortion up to 86%, which is significant. The design of experiments and statistical analysis methods were applied to quantify the effect of the geometric factors of VGs and search for optimal VG arrays. From the analysis, VG angle-of-incidence and VG height were the most influential factors in increasing total pressure recovery and reducing distortion. The study on the two-dimensional external-compression inlet determined which passive flow control devices, such as counter-rotating vanes or ramps, reduce high distortion levels and improve the health of the boundary layer, relative to the baseline. Downstream vanes demonstrate up to 21% improvement in boundary layer health and 86% improvement in radial distortion. Upstream vanes demonstrated up to 3% improvement in boundary layer health and 9% improvement in radial distortion. Ramps showed no improvement in boundary layer health and radial distortion. Micro-VGs were preferred for their reduced viscous drag and improvement in total pressure recovery at the AIP. Although

  15. Supersonic Wing Optimization Using SpaRibs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, David; Mulani, Sameer B.; Liu, Qiang; Tamijani, Ali Y.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2014-01-01

    This research investigates the advantages of using curvilinear spars and ribs, termed SpaRibs, to design a supersonic aircraft wing-box in comparison to the use of classic design concepts that employ straight spars and ribs. The objective is to achieve a more efficient load-bearing mechanism and to passively control the deformation of the structure under the flight loads. Moreover, the use of SpaRibs broadens the design space and allows for natural frequencies and natural mode shape tailoring. The SpaRibs concept is implemented in a new optimization MATLAB-based framework referred to as EBF3SSWingOpt. This optimization scheme performs both the sizing and the shaping of the internal structural elements, connecting the optimizer with the analysis software. The shape of the SpaRibs is parametrically defined using the so called Linked Shape method. Each set of SpaRibs is placed in a one by one square domain of the natural space. The set of curves is subsequently transformed in the physical space for creating the wing structure geometry layout. The shape of each curve of each set is unique; however, mathematical relations link the curvature in an effort to reduce the number of design variables. The internal structure of a High Speed Commercial Transport aircraft concept developed by Boeing is optimized subjected to stress, subsonic flutter and supersonic flutter constraints. The results show that the use of the SpaRibs allows for the reduction of the aircraft's primary structure weight without violating the constraints. A weight reduction of about 15 percent is observed.

  16. Transient thermal response of turbulent compressible boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hongwei; Nalim, M. Razi; Merkle, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    and Smith, and the turbulent Prandtl number formulation originally developed by Kays and Crawford. The governing differential equations are discretized with the Keller-box method. The numerical accuracy is validated through grid-independence studies and comparison with the steady state solution......-dimensional semi-infinite flat plate. The compressible Reynolds-averaged boundary layer equations are transformed into incompressible form through the Dorodnitsyn-Howarth transformation and then solved with similarity transformations. Turbulence is modeled using a two-layer eddy viscosity model developed by Cebeci....... In turbulent flow as in laminar, the transient heat transfer rates are very different from that obtained from quasi-steady analysis. It is found that the time scale for response of the turbulent boundary layer to far-field temperature changes is 40% less than for laminar flow, and the turbulent local Nusselt...

  17. Anomalous argon excitation in pulse supersonic flows of Ar + CH sub 4 , Ar + SiH sub 4 and Ar + CH sub 4 + SiH sub 4 mixtures, activated with an electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Madirbaev, V Z; Korobejshchikov, N G; Sharafutdinov, R G

    2001-01-01

    The processes of energy exchange in the supersonic flows of the argon mixtures with methane and silane, activated by the electron beam, are studied. It is shown, that at the initial stage of condensation in the flux there takes place selective excitation of the argon atoms energy levels. The boundary parameters, whereby the effect of the anomalous radiation excitation is observed, are determined

  18. 1 Ft. x 1 Ft. Supersonic Wind Tunnel, Bldg. 37

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (1x), located in the Engine Research Building, is one of the most active test facilities at the Glenn Research Center. Used...

  19. Supersonic Jet Noise: Main Sources and Reduction Methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Azimi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The large velocity ratio and the presence of Shocks in the exhaust plume from low bypass engines or supersonic jetliners cause jet noise to be dominant component of overall aircraft noise, and therefore is an important issue in design of the next generation of civil supersonic transport. Jet noise reduction technology also has application in the design of highperformance tactical aircraft. Jet noise is of particular concern on aircraft carriers where it is necessary for deck crew to be in relatively close proximity to the aircraft at takeoff and landing. In this paper, a brief discussion about supersonic jet noise sources and a review of the main passive technologies employed for the reduction of supersonic jet noise are presented.

  20. Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Facility (Research Cell 22)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: RC22 is a continuous-flow, direct-connect supersonic-combustion research facility that is capable of simulating flight conditions from Mach 3.0 to Mach...

  1. Entropy Minimization Design Approach of Supersonic Internal Passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Sousa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fluid machinery operating in the supersonic regime unveil avenues towards more compact technology. However, internal supersonic flows are associated with high aerodynamic and thermal penalties, which usually prevent their practical implementation. Indeed, both shock losses and the limited operational range represent particular challenges to aerodynamic designers that should be taken into account at the initial phase of the design process. This paper presents a design methodology for supersonic passages based on direct evaluations of the velocity field using the method of characteristics and computation of entropy generation across shock waves. This meshless function evaluation tool is then coupled to an optimization scheme, based on evolutionary algorithms that minimize the entropy generation across the supersonic passage. Finally, we assessed the results with 3D Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes calculations.

  2. Supersonic beams at high particle densities: model description beyond the ideal gas approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Wolfgang; Rademann, Klaus; Even, Uzi

    2010-10-28

    Supersonic molecular beams constitute a very powerful technique in modern chemical physics. They offer several unique features such as a directed, collision-free flow of particles, very high luminosity, and an unsurpassed strong adiabatic cooling during the jet expansion. While it is generally recognized that their maximum flow velocity depends on the molecular weight and the temperature of the working fluid in the stagnation reservoir, not a lot is known on the effects of elevated particle densities. Frequently, the characteristics of supersonic beams are treated in diverse approximations of an ideal gas expansion. In these simplified model descriptions, the real gas character of fluid systems is ignored, although particle associations are responsible for fundamental processes such as the formation of clusters, both in the reservoir at increased densities and during the jet expansion. In this contribution, the various assumptions of ideal gas treatments of supersonic beams and their shortcomings are reviewed. It is shown in detail that a straightforward thermodynamic approach considering the initial and final enthalpy is capable of characterizing the terminal mean beam velocity, even at the liquid-vapor phase boundary and the critical point. Fluid properties are obtained using the most accurate equations of state available at present. This procedure provides the opportunity to naturally include the dramatic effects of nonideal gas behavior for a large variety of fluid systems. Besides the prediction of the terminal flow velocity, thermodynamic models of isentropic jet expansions permit an estimate of the upper limit of the beam temperature and the amount of condensation in the beam. These descriptions can even be extended to include spinodal decomposition processes, thus providing a generally applicable tool for investigating the two-phase region of high supersaturations not easily accessible otherwise.

  3. Numerical simulation of the generation mechanism of axisymmetric supersonic jet screech tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. D.; Gao, J. H.

    2005-08-01

    In this paper an axisymmetric computational aeroacoustic procedure is developed to investigate the generation mechanism of axisymmetric supersonic jet screech tones. The axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations and the two equations standard k-ɛ turbulence model modified by Turpin and Troyes ["Validation of a two-equation turbulence model for axisymmetric reacting and non-reaction flows," AIAA Paper No. 2000-3463 (2000)] are solved in the generalized curvilinear coordinate system. A generalized wall function is applied in the nozzle exit wall region. The dispersion-relation-preserving scheme is applied for space discretization. The 2N storage low-dissipation and low-dispersion Runge-Kutta scheme is employed for time integration. Much attention is paid to far-field boundary conditions and turbulence model. The underexpanded axisymmetric supersonic jet screech tones are simulated over the Mach number from 1.05 to 1.2. Numerical results are presented and compared with the experimental data by other researchers. The simulated wavelengths of A0, A1, A2, and B modes and part of simulated amplitudes agree very well with the measurement data by Ponton and Seiner ["The effects of nozzle exit lip thickness on plume resonance," J. Sound Vib. 154, 531 (1992)]. In particular, the phenomena of modes jumping have been captured correctly although the numerical procedure has to be improved to predict the amplitudes of supersonic jet screech tones more accurately. Furthermore, the phenomena of shock motions are analyzed. The predicted splitting and combination of shock cells are similar with the experimental observations of Panda ["Shock oscillation in underexpanded screeching jets," J. Fluid. Mech. 363, 173 (1998)]. Finally, the receptivity process is numerically studied and analyzed. It is shown that the receptivity zone is associated with the initial thin shear layer, and the incoming and reflected sound waves.

  4. Free convection film flows and heat transfer laminar free convection of phase flows and models for heat-transfer analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Shang, De-Yi

    2012-01-01

    This book presents recent developments in our systematic studies of hydrodynamics and heat and mass transfer in laminar free convection, accelerating film boiling and condensation of Newtonian fluids, as well as accelerating film flow of non-Newtonian power-law fluids (FFNF). These new developments provided in this book are (i) novel system of analysis models based on the developed New Similarity Analysis Method; (ii) a system of advanced methods for treatment of gas temperature- dependent physical properties, and liquid temperature- dependent physical properties; (iii) the organically combined models of the governing mathematical models with those on treatment model of variable physical properties; (iv) rigorous approach of overcoming a challenge on accurate solution of three-point boundary value problem related to two-phase film boiling and condensation; and (v) A pseudo-similarity method of dealing with thermal boundary layer of FFNF for greatly simplifies the heat-transfer analysis and numerical calculati...

  5. Laminar circular hydraulic jumps without separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Ratul; Tomar, Gaurav; Govindarajan, Rama

    2009-11-01

    The traditional inviscid criterion for the occurrence of a planar, standing hydraulic jump is to have the Froude number decrease downstream and go through a value of 1 at some location. Here, upstream propagating, small-amplitude, long, non-dispersive gravity waves are trapped, and non-linear steepening is said to result in a near-discontinuous height profile, but it is not clear how. Such a condition on the Froude number is shown in the present axisymmetric Navier-Stokes computations to hold for a circular jump as well. The relevance of non-linear steepening to a circular jump is therefore a question we wish to answer. In circular jumps, moreover, a region of recirculation is usually observed underneath the jump, underlining the importance of viscosity in this process. This led Tani (J. Phys. Soc. Japan, 1949) to hypothesise that boundary-layer separation was the cause of the circular jump. This hypothesis has been debated extensively and the possibility of circular jumps without separation hinted at. In our simulations, we are able to obtain circular hydraulic jumps without any flow separation. This, and the necessity or otherwise of viscosity in jump formation will be discussed.

  6. Imaging the transient boundary layer on a free rotating disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matijasević, Branimir; Guzović, Zvonimir; Martinis, Vinko

    2002-10-01

    This report presents a visual study of the transition process of the laminar boundary layer (BL) in a turbulent BL on a free rotating disc. The imaging is based on an experimental investigation that aimed to analyze the structure of the BL by relating it to the ratio between turbulent energy and vortex energy, the critical and the transient Reynolds numbers (Re), the vortex numbers and their dependence on Re, and on the distance from the rotating disc.

  7. Review and prospect of supersonic business jet design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yicheng; Smith, Howard

    2017-04-01

    This paper reviews the environmental issues and challenges appropriate to the design of supersonic business jets (SSBJs). There has been a renewed, worldwide interest in developing an environmentally friendly, economically viable and technologically feasible supersonic transport aircraft. A historical overview indicates that the SSBJ will be the pioneer for the next generation of supersonic airliners. As a high-end product itself, the SSBJ will likely take a market share in the future. The mission profile appropriate to this vehicle is explored considering the rigorous environmental constraints. Mitigation of the sonic boom and improvements aerodynamic efficiency in flight are the most challenging features of civil supersonic transport. Technical issues and challenges associated with this type of aircraft are identified, and methodologies for the SSBJ design are discussed. Due to the tightly coupled issues, a multidisciplinary design, analysis and optimization environment is regarded as the essential approach to the creation of a low-boom low-drag supersonic aircraft. Industrial and academic organizations have an interest in this type of vehicle are presented. Their investments in SSBJ design will hopefully get civil supersonic transport back soon.

  8. Shapes of Buoyant and Nonbuoyant Methane Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Peter B.; Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Urban, David L.

    1997-01-01

    Laminar gas jet diffusion flames represent a fundamental combustion configuration. Their study has contributed to numerous advances in combustion, including the development of analytical and computational combustion tools. Laminar jet flames are pertinent also to turbulent flames by use of the laminar flamelet concept. Investigations into the shapes of noncoflowing microgravity laminar jet diffusion flames have primarily been pursued in the NASA Lewis 2.2-second drop tower, by Cochran and coworkers and by Bahadori and coworkers. These studies were generally conducted at atmospheric pressure; they involved soot-containing flames and reported luminosity lengths and widths instead of the flame-sheet dimensions which are of Greater value to theory evaluation and development. The seminal model of laminar diffusion flames is that of Burke and Schumann, who solved the conservation of momentum equation for a jet flame in a coflowing ambient by assuming the velocity of fuel, oxidizer and products to be constant throughout. Roper and coworkers improved upon this model by allowing for axial variations of velocity and found flame shape to be independent of coflow velocity. Roper's suggestion that flame height should be independent of gravity level is not supported by past or present observations. Other models have been presented by Klajn and Oppenheim, Markstein and De Ris, Villermaux and Durox, and Li et al. The common result of all these models (except in the buoyant regime) is that flame height is proportional to fuel mass flowrate, with flame width proving much more difficult to predict. Most existing flame models have been compared with shapes of flames containing soot, which is known to obscure the weak blue emission of flame sheets. The present work involves measurements of laminar gas jet diffusion flame shapes. Flame images have been obtained for buoyant and nonbuoyant methane flames burning in quiescent air at various fuel flow-rates, burner diameters and ambient

  9. TranAir: A full-potential, solution-adaptive, rectangular grid code for predicting subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flows about arbitrary configurations. User's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, F. T.; Samant, S. S.; Bieterman, M. B.; Melvin, R. G.; Young, D. P.; Bussoletti, J. E.; Hilmes, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    The TranAir computer program calculates transonic flow about arbitrary configurations at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic freestream Mach numbers. TranAir solves the nonlinear full potential equations subject to a variety of boundary conditions modeling wakes, inlets, exhausts, porous walls, and impermeable surfaces. Regions with different total temperature and pressure can be represented. The user's manual describes how to run the TranAir program and its graphical support programs.

  10. Computational and experimental study of laminar flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smooke, Mitchell [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-05-29

    During the past three years, our research has centered on an investigation of the effects of complex chemistry and detailed transport on the structure and extinction of hydrocarbon flames in coflowing axisymmetric configurations. We have pursued both computational and experimental aspects of the research in parallel on both steady-state and time-dependent systems. The computational work has focused on the application of accurate and efficient numerical methods for the solution of the steady-state and time-dependent boundary value problems describing the various reacting systems. Detailed experimental measurements were performed on axisymmetric coflow flames using two-dimensional imaging techniques. Previously, spontaneous Raman scattering, chemiluminescence, and laser-induced fluorescence were used to measure the temperature, major and minor species profiles. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) has been used to investigate velocity distributions and for calibration of time-varying flames. Laser-induced incandescence (LII) with an extinction calibration was used to determine soot volume fractions, while soot surface temperatures were measured with three-color optical pyrometry using a color digital camera. A blackbody calibration of the camera allows for determination of soot volume fraction as well, which can be compared with the LII measurements. More recently, we have concentrated on a detailed characterization of soot using a variety of techniques including time-resolved LII (TiRe-LII) for soot primary particles sizes, multi-angle light scattering (MALS) for soot radius of gyration, and spectrally-resolved line of sight attenuation (spec-LOSA). Combining the information from all of these soot measurements can be used to determine the soot optical properties, which are observed to vary significantly depending on spatial location and fuel dilution. Our goal has been to obtain a more fundamental understanding of the important fluid dynamic and chemical interactions in

  11. 搅拌釜中层流流场的模拟%Numerical simulation of laminar flow field in a stirred tank

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范茏; 王卫京; 杨超; 毛在砂

    2004-01-01

    Stirred tanks are used extensively in process industry and one of the most commonly used impellers in stirred tanks is the Rushton disk turbine.Surprisingly few data are available regarding flow and mixing in stirred-tank reactors with Rushton turbine in the laminar regime,in particular the laminar flow in baffled tanks.In this paper,the laminar flow field in a baffled tank stirred by a standard Rushton turbine is simulated with the improved inner-outer iterative method.The non-inertial coordinate system is used for the impeller region,which is in turn used as the boundary conditions for iteration.It is found that the simulation results are in good agreement with previous experiments.In addition,the flow number and impeller power number calculated from the simulated flow field are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data.This numerical method allows prediction of flow structure requiring no experimental data as the boundary conditions and has the potential of being used to scale-up and design of related process equipment.

  12. Turbulent thermal boundary layers subjected to severe acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Guillermo; Castillo, Luciano

    2013-11-01

    Favorable turbulent boundary layers are flows of great importance in industry. Particularly, understanding the mechanisms of quasi-laminarization by means of a very strong favorable streamwise pressure gradient is indeed crucial in drag reduction and energy management applications. Furthermore, due to the low Reynolds numbers involved in the quasi-laminarization process, abundant experimental investigation can be found in the literature for the past few decades. However, several grey zones still remain unsolved, principally associated with the difficulties that experiments encounter as the boundary layer becomes smaller. In addition, little attention has been paid to the heat transfer in a quasi-laminarization process. In this investigation, DNS of spatially-developing turbulent thermal boundary layers with prescribed very strong favorable pressure gradients (K = 4 × 10-6) are performed. Realistic inflow conditions are prescribed based on the Dynamic Multi-scale Approach (DMA) [Araya et al. JFM, Vol. 670, pp. 581-605, 2011]. In this sense the flow carries the footprint of turbulence, particularly in the streamwise component of the Reynolds stresses.

  13. Some characteristics of bypass transition in a heated boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, K. H.; Reshotko, E.; O'Brien, J. E.

    Experimental measurements of both mean and conditionally sampled characteristics of laminar, transitional and low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers on a heated flat plate are presented. Measurements were obtained in air over a range of freestream turbulence intensities from 0.3 percent to 6 percent with a freestream velocity of 30.5 m/s and zero pressure gradient. Conditional sampling performed in the transitional boundary layers indicate the existence of a near-wall drop in intermittency, especially pronounced at low intermittencies. Nonturbulent intervals were observed to possess large levels of low-frequency unsteadiness, and turbulent intervals had peak intensities as much as 50 percent higher than were measured at fully turbulent stations. Heat transfer results were consistent with results of previous researches and Reynolds analogy factors were found to be well predicted by laminar and turbulent correlations which accounted for unheated starting length. A small dependence of the turbulent Reynolds analogy factors on freestream turbulence level was observed. Laminar boundary layer spectra indicated selective amplification of unstable frequencies. These instabilities appear to play a dominant role in the transition process only for the lowest freestream turbulence level studied, however.

  14. Numerical Simulations of Morphology, Flow Structures and Forces for a Sonic Jet Exhausting in Supersonic Crossflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B.H Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study is performed for a sonic jet issuing from a blunted cone to provide possible directional control in supersonic crossflow by solving the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations with the twoequation k −ω turbulence model. Results are presented in the form of static aerodynamic coefficients, computed at a free stream Mach number 4.0, with varying pressure ratios, incidence angle and keeping zero yaw and roll angles. The morphology and flow structure for the jet exhausting in crossflow at various pressure ratios is described in detail. The Flight control of the projectile can be accomplished by taking advantage of a complex shock-boundary layer interaction produced by jet interacting with the oncoming crossflow by altering pressure distribution in vicinity of the jet, a net increase in the net force can be utilized for maneuvering of vehicle and possible flight control. Computed static aerodynamic coefficients and pressure distribution using CFD analyses is with an accuracy of ± 5% in the supersonic range.

  15. OH PLIF Visualization of the UVa Supersonic Combustion Experiment: Configuration C

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Colin D.; Johansen, Craig T.; Danehy, Paul M.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cantu, Luca M. L.; Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D.; Rockwell, Robert D., Jr.; Goyne, Christopher P.; McDnaiel, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Non-intrusive hydroxyl radical (OH) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements were obtained in configuration C of the University of Virginia supersonic combustion experiment. The combustion of hydrogen fuel injected through an unswept compression ramp into a supersonic cross-flow was imaged over a range of streamwise positions. Images were corrected for optical distortion, variations in the laser sheet profile, and different camera views. Results indicate an effect of fuel equivalence ratio on combustion zone shape and local turbulence length scale. The streamwise location of the reaction zone relative to the fuel injector was also found to be sensitive to the fuel equivalence ratio. The flow boundary conditions in the combustor section, which are sensitive to the fuel flow rate, are believed to have caused this effect. A combination of laser absorption and radiative trapping effects are proposed to have caused asymmetry observed in the images. The results complement previously published OH PLIF data obtained for configuration A along with other non-intrusive measurements to form a database for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model validation.

  16. Implicit LES for Supersonic Microramp Vortex Generator: New Discoveries and New Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper serves as a summary of our recent work on LES for supersonic MVG. An implicitly implemented large eddy simulation (ILES by using the fifth-order WENO scheme is applied to study the flow around the microramp vortex generator (MVG at Mach 2.5 and Re⁡θ=1440. A number of new discoveries on the flow around supersonic MVG have been made including spiral points, surface separation topology, source of the momentum deficit, inflection surface, Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, vortex ring generation, ring-shock interaction, 3D recompression shock structure, and influence of MVG decline angles. Most of the new discoveries, which were made in 2009, were confirmed by experiment conducted by the UTA experimental team in 2010. A new 5-pair-vortex-tube model near the MVG is given based on the ILES observation. The vortex ring-shock interaction is found as the new mechanism of the reduction of the separation zone induced by the shock-boundary layer interaction.

  17. Laminar analysis of 7T BOLD using an imposed spatial activation pattern in human V1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimeni, Jonathan R; Fischl, Bruce; Greve, Douglas N; Wald, Lawrence L

    2010-10-01

    With sufficient image encoding, high-resolution fMRI studies are limited by the biological point-spread of the hemodynamic signal. The extent of this spread is determined by the local vascular distribution and by the spatial specificity of blood flow regulation, as well as by measurement parameters that (i) alter the relative sensitivity of the acquisition to activation-induced hemodynamic changes and (ii) determine the image contrast as a function of vessel size. In particular, large draining vessels on the cortical surface are a major contributor to both the BOLD signal change and to the spatial bias of the BOLD activation away from the site of neuronal activity. In this work, we introduce a laminar surface-based analysis method and study the relationship between spatial localization and activation strength as a function of laminar depth by acquiring 1mm isotropic, single-shot EPI at 7 T and sampling the BOLD signal exclusively from the superficial, middle, or deep cortical laminae. We show that highly-accelerated EPI can limit image distortions to the point where a boundary-based registration algorithm accurately aligns the EPI data to the surface reconstruction. The spatial spread of the BOLD response tangential to the cortical surface was analyzed as a function of cortical depth using our surface-based analysis. Although sampling near the pial surface provided the highest signal strength, it also introduced the most spatial error. Thus, avoiding surface laminae improved spatial localization by about 40% at a cost of 36% in z-statistic, implying that optimal spatial resolution in functional imaging of the cortex can be achieved using anatomically-informed spatial sampling to avoid large pial vessels.

  18. Correlation of Preston-tube data with laminar skin friction (Log No. J12984)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, T. D.; Abu-Mostafa, A.; Steinle, F. W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Preston tube data within laminar boundary layers obtained on a sharp ten-degree cone in the NASA Ames eleven-foot transonic wind tunnel are correlated with the corresponding values of theoretical skin friction. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.30 to 0.95 and unit Reynolds numbers of 9.84, 13.1, and 16.4 million per meter. The rms scatter of skin friction coefficient about the correlation is of the order of one percent, which is comparable to the reported accuracy for calibrations of Preston tubes in incompressible pipe flows. In contrast to previous works on Preston tube/skin friction correlations, which are based on the physical height of the probe's face, this satisfactory correlation for compressible boundary layer flows is achieved by accounting for the effects of a variable "effective" height of the probe. The coefficients, which appear in the correlation, are dependent on the particular tunnel environment. The general procedure can be used to define correlations for other wind tunnels.

  19. Magnetic field effect on laminar heat transfer in a pipe for thermal entry region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malekzadeh, Asadolah; Heydarinasab, Amir; Jahangiri, Mohammad [Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    The influence of a transverse magnetic field on the local heat transfer of an electrically-conducting laminar fluid flow with high Prandtl number through a pipe was studied experimentally. Experiments indicated an increase in the local Nusselt number. The coupled set of the equations of motion and the energy equation including the viscous and Joule dissipation terms becomes non-linear and is solved numerically using a finite difference scheme. Favorable comparisons with experimental results confirm the correctness of the numerical results. It is found that the influence of magnetic field can be diminished by reducing the angle between the flow direction and the direction of magnetic field. The wall temperature reduces as the value of Hartmann number increases and the reduction rate of the wall temperature decreases as the value of Hartmann number exceeds a certain value. The average Nusselt number asymptotically approaches its limit as the Hartmann number becomes larger. Also, curve fitting can be employed to derive an equation for the average Nusselt number as a function of the Hartmann number. This equation is similar to the Sieder-Tate equation. It is observed that increasing the Hartmann number has no considerable effect on the thermal boundary layer thickness but decreases the temperature of fluid layers inside the boundary layer.

  20. Interaction theory of hypersonic laminar near-wake flow behind an adiabatic circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, W. Schuyler; Johansen, C. T.

    2016-11-01

    The separation and shock wave formation on the aft-body of a hypersonic adiabatic circular cylinder were studied numerically using the open source software OpenFOAM. The simulations of laminar flow were performed over a range of Reynolds numbers (8× 10^3 free-stream Mach number of 5.9. Off-body viscous forces were isolated by controlling the wall boundary condition. It was observed that the off-body viscous forces play a dominant role compared to the boundary layer in displacement of the interaction onset in response to a change in Reynolds number. A modified free-interaction equation and correlation parameter has been presented which accounts for wall curvature effects on the interaction. The free-interaction equation was manipulated to isolate the contribution of the viscous-inviscid interaction to the overall pressure rise and shock formation. Using these equations coupled with high-quality simulation data, the underlying mechanisms resulting in Reynolds number dependence of the lip-shock formation were investigated. A constant value for the interaction parameter representing the part of the pressure rise due to viscous-inviscid interaction has been observed at separation over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The effect of curvature has been shown to be the primary contributor to the Reynolds number dependence of the free-interaction mechanism at separation. The observations in this work have been discussed here to create a thorough analysis of the Reynolds number-dependent nature of the lip-shock.

  1. Computational wing design in support of an NLF variable sweep transition flight experiment. [Natural Laminar Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, E. G.; Campbell, R. L.; Phillips, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    A natural laminar flow outer panel wing glove has been designed for a variable sweep fighter aircraft using state-of-the-art computational techniques. Testing of the design will yield wing pressure and boundary-layer data under actual flight conditions and environment. These data will be used to enhance the understanding of the interaction between crossflow and Tollmien-Schlichting disturbances on boundary-layer transition. The outer wing panel was contoured such that a wide range of favorable pressure gradients could be obtained on the wing upper surface. Extensive computations were performed to support the design effort which relied on two- and three-dimensional transonic design and analysis techniques. A detailed description of the design procedure that evolved during this study is presented. Results on intermediate designs at various stages in the design process demonstrate how the various physical and aerodynamic constraints were integrated into the design. Final results of the glove design analyzed as part of the complete aircraft configuration with a full-potential wing/body analysis code indicate that the aerodynamic design objectives were met.

  2. Laminar Natural Convection of Newtonian and Non – Newtonian Fluids Inside Triangular Enclosure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ala?a Abbas Muhadi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, steady two – dimensional laminar natural convection heat transfer of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids inside isosceles triangular enclosure has been analyzed numerically for a wide range of the modified Rayleigh numbers of (103 ≤ Ra ≤ 105, with non-dimensional parameter (NE of Prandtl – Eyring model ranging from (0 to 10, and modified Prandtl number take in the range (Pr* =1,10, and 100. Two types of boundary conditions have been considered. The first, when the inclined walls are heated with different uniform temperatures and the lower wall is insulated. The second, when the bottom wall is heated by applying a uniform heat flux while the inclined walls at the constant cold temperature. Also, the non-Newtonian fluids under consideration were assumed to obey the Prandtl – Eyring model..The results are presented in terms of isotherms and streamlines to show the behavior of the fluid flow and temperature fields. In addition, some graphics are presented the relation between average Nusselt number and the various parameters. The results show the effect of non – dimensional parameter (NE on the velocity and temperature profiles. They also show that the average Nusselt number is a strong function of modified Rayleigh number, modified Prandtl number, non-dimensional parameter, and the boundary conditions. Four different correlations have been made to show the dependence of the average Nusselt number on the non-dimensional parameter, the modified Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers.

  3. Blurring Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Nielsen, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    ; and 3) Services of general interest. In the Blurring Boundaries project, three aspects of the European Social Model have been particularly highlighted: the constitutionalisation of the European Social Model, its multi-level legal character, and the clash between market access justice at EU level...... of welfare functions into EU law both from an internal market law and a constitutional law perspective. The main problem areas covered by the Blurring Boundaries project were studied in sub-projects on: 1) Internal market law and welfare services; 2) Fundamental rights and non-discrimination law aspects...... and distributive justice at national level....

  4. Blurring Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Nielsen, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    ; and 3) Services of general interest. In the Blurring Boundaries project, three aspects of the European Social Model have been particularly highlighted: the constitutionalisation of the European Social Model, its multi-level legal character, and the clash between market access justice at EU level...... of welfare functions into EU law both from an internal market law and a constitutional law perspective. The main problem areas covered by the Blurring Boundaries project were studied in sub-projects on: 1) Internal market law and welfare services; 2) Fundamental rights and non-discrimination law aspects...... and distributive justice at national level....

  5. The Response of a Laminar Boundary Layer to Sound and Wall Vibration,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    equations for subsonic motion of an incompressible, Newtonian, constant viscosity fluid with .9. , . negligible thermal , buoyancy, and gravitational...experiments were two-dimensional, nearly pure tone oscillations. The present -6 experiment was conduted at B-S6xlO " , but with %-29.0 n/s and fW500 Hz. The

  6. Large-Eddy Simulation of Laminar-Turbulent Transition in a Swept-Wing Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huai, X.; Joslin, R. D.; Piomelli, U.

    2004-01-01

    A continuous adjoint approach for obtaining sensitivity derivatives on unstructured grids is developed and analyzed. The derivation of the costate equations is presented, and a second-order accurate discretization method is described. The relationship between the continuous formulation and a discrete formulation is explored for inviscid, as well as for viscous flow. Several limitations in a strict adherence to the continuous approach are uncovered, and an approach that circumvents these difficulties is presented. The issue of grid sensitivities, which do not arise naturally in the continuous formulation, is investigated and is observed to be of importance when dealing with geometric singularities. A method is described for modifying inviscid and viscous meshes during the design cycle to accommodate changes in the surface shape. The accuracy of the sensitivity derivatives is established by comparing with finite-difference gradients and several design examples are presented.

  7. Preliminary Experimental Study of Disturbances in a Laminar Boundary- Layer due to Distributed Surface Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    Edwards, 48 model 50), and Meriam manometer I Figure Page 16 A close up of the hot-wire probe during the 48 etching process 17 The hot-wire probe in...for the pitot probe is approximately five seconds. The probe is connected to a Meriam i,tanoirieter wh-ich ir A-1l ti, ma.sure 0.001 in. f20 (Fig. 15

  8. An Analysis of a Laminar Boundary Layer in High-Enthalpy Nozzle Flows,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-03

    2.36 < F 4 2.53 (27) From equation (11), it can be observed that the 1 index inside the integral sign is cancelled by the B index preceding the integral ... sign . Hence, it is regarded that the variation of 9 will not cause a large scale variation in i. Table 2 shows the difference in n, 0 and 5* caused by

  9. Hair Receptor Sensitivity to Changes in Laminar Boundary Layer Shape (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    mathematical models, which appear to stem from morphological differences between the structural support of bat wing hair receptors and arthropod...copyright owner. Biologists have shown that bat wings contain distributed arrays of flow-sensitive hair receptors. The hair receptors are hypothesized...to feedback information on airflows over the bat wing for enhanced stability or maneuverability during flight. Here, we study the geometric

  10. Gyrotactic trapping in laminar and turbulent Kolmogorov flow

    CERN Document Server

    Santamaria, Francesco; Cencini, Massimo; Boffetta, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplankton patchiness, namely the heterogeneous distribution of microalgae over multiple spatial scales, dramatically impacts marine ecology. A spectacular example of such heterogeneity occurs in thin phytoplankton layers (TPLs), where large numbers of photosynthetic microorganisms are found within a small depth interval. Some species of motile phytoplankton can form TPLs by gyrotactic trapping due to the interplay of their particular swimming style (directed motion biased against gravity) and the transport by a flow with shear along the direction of gravity. Here we consider gyrotactic swimmers in numerical simulations of the Kolmogorov shear flow, both in laminar and turbulent regimes. In the laminar case, we show that the swimmer motion is integrable and the formation of TPLs can be fully characterized by means of dynamical systems tools. We then study the effects of rotational Brownian motion or turbulent fluctuations (appearing when the Reynolds number is large enough) on TPLs. In both cases we show t...

  11. Hydrodynamic Fluctuations in Laminar Fluid Flow. II. Fluctuating Squire Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz de Zárate, José M.; Sengers, Jan V.

    2013-02-01

    We use fluctuating hydrodynamics to evaluate the enhancement of thermally excited fluctuations in laminar fluid flow using plane Couette flow as a representative example. In a previous publication (J. Stat. Phys. 144:774, 2011) we derived the energy amplification arising from thermally excited wall-normal fluctuations by solving a fluctuating Orr-Sommerfeld equation. In the present paper we derive the energy amplification arising from wall-normal vorticity fluctuation by solving a fluctuating Squire equation. The thermally excited wall-normal vorticity fluctuations turn out to yield the dominant contribution to the energy amplification. In addition, we show that thermally excited streaks, even in the absence of any externally imposed perturbations, are present in laminar fluid flow.

  12. Laminar flow of two miscible fluids in a simple network

    CERN Document Server

    Karst, Casey M; Geddes, John B

    2012-01-01

    When a fluid comprised of multiple phases or constituents flows through a network, non-linear phenomena such as multiple stable equilibrium states and spontaneous oscillations can occur. Such behavior has been observed or predicted in a number of networks including the flow of blood through the microcirculation, the flow of picoliter droplets through microfluidic devices, the flow of magma through lava tubes, and two-phase flow in refrigeration systems. While the existence of non-linear phenomena in a network with many inter-connections containing fluids with complex rheology may seem unsurprising, this paper demonstrates that even simple networks containing Newtonian fluids in laminar flow can demonstrate multiple equilibria. The paper describes a theoretical and experimental investigation of the laminar flow of two miscible Newtonian fluids of different density and viscosity through a simple network. The fluids stratify due to gravity and remain as nearly distinct phases with some mixing occurring only by d...

  13. Particle streak velocimetry and its application to impinging laminar jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergthorson, Jeff; Dimotakis, Paul

    2002-11-01

    The technique of Particle Streak Velocimetry (PSV) was improved to include digital imaging and image processing, allowing it to compete with PIV or LDV in terms of accuracy and ease of implementation. PSV provides advantages over other techniques, such as low particle mass loading, short run time experiments, and high accuracy velocity data through the direct measurement of Lagrangian trajectories. PSV, coupled with measurements of the static (Bernoulli) pressure drop across a well designed nozzle contraction, provided redundancy in the measurement of the axisymmetric impinging laminar jet. The impinging laminar jet was studied in the intermediate regime where the existence of a stagnation plate will affect the flow out of the nozzle. This nozzle separation to diameter ratio, L/d_j, regime has not been well characterized. The results indicate that a one-dimensional streamfunction formulation is not sufficient to characterize this flow.

  14. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow in liquid filled microtubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, K. V.; Adrian, R. J.

    2004-05-01

    The transition to turbulent flow is studied for liquids of different polarities in glass microtubes having diameters between 50 and 247 µm. The onset of transition occurs at Reynolds numbers of ~1,800 2,000, as indicated by greater-than-laminar pressure drop and micro-PIV measurements of mean velocity and rms velocity fluctuations at the centerline. Transition at anomalously low values of Reynolds number was never observed. Additionally, the results of more than 1,500 measurements of pressure drop versus flow rate confirm the macroscopic Poiseuille flow result for laminar flow resistance to within -1% systematic and ±2.5% rms random error for Reynolds numbers less than 1,800.

  15. A case of hypoglycemic brain injuries with cortical laminar necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Wan; Jin, Eun Sun; Hwang, Hyung-Sik; Yoo, Hyung-Joon; Jeong, Je Hoon

    2010-06-01

    We report a case of 68-yr-old male who died from brain injuries following an episode of prolonged hypoglycemia. While exploring controversies surrounding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings indicating the bad prognosis in patients with hypoglycemia-induced brain injuries, we here discuss interesting diffusion-MRI of hypoglycemic brain injuries and their prognostic importance focusing on laminar necrosis of the cerebral cortex.

  16. Some measurements in synthetic turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savas, O.

    1980-01-01

    Synthetic turbulent boundary layers are examined which were constructed on a flat plate by generating systematic moving patterns of turbulent spots in a laminar flow. The experiments were carried out in a wind tunnel at a Reynolds number based on plate length of 1,700,000. Spots were generated periodically in space and time near the leading edge to form a regular hexagonal pattern. The disturbance mechanism was a camshaft which displaced small pins momentarily into the laminar flow at frequencies up to 80 Hz. The main instrumentation was a rake of 24 hot wires placed across the flow in a line parallel to the surface. The main measured variable was local intermittency; i.e., the probability of observing turbulent flow at a particular point in space and time. The results are reported in x-t diagrams showing the evolution of various synthetic flows along the plate. The dimensionless celerity or phase velocity of the large eddies is found to be 0.88, independent of eddy scale. All patterns with sufficiently small scales eventually showed loss of coherence as they moved downstream. A novel phenomenon called eddy transposition was observed in several flows which contained appreciable laminar regions. The large eddies shifted in formation to new positions, intermediate to their original ones, while preserving their hexagonal pattern. The present results, together with some empirical properties of a turbulent spot, are used to estimate the best choice of scales for constructing a synthetic boundary layer suitable for detailed study. The values recommended are: spanwise scale/thickness = 2.5, streamwise scale/thickness = 8.

  17. Engineering correlations of variable-property effects on laminar forced convection mass transfer for dilute vapor species and small particles in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A simple engineering correlation scheme is developed to predict the variable property effects on dilute species laminar forced convection mass transfer applicable to all vapor molecules or Brownian diffusing small particle, covering the surface to mainstream temperature ratio of 0.25 T sub W/T sub e 4. The accuracy of the correlation is checked against rigorous numerical forced convection laminar boundary layer calculations of flat plate and stagnation point flows of air containing trace species of Na, NaCl, NaOH, Na2SO4, K, KCl, KOH, or K2SO4 vapor species or their clusters. For the cases reported here the correlation had an average absolute error of only 1 percent (maximum 13 percent) as compared to an average absolute error of 18 percent (maximum 54 percent) one would have made by using the constant-property results.

  18. On similarity and pseudo-similarity solutions of Falkner-Skan boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Guedda, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    The present work deals with the two-dimensional incompressible,laminar, steady-state boundary layer equations. First, we determinea family of velocity distributions outside the boundary layer suchthat these problems may have similarity solutions. Then, we examenin detail new exact solutions, called Pseudo--similarity, where the external velocity varies inversely-linear with the distance along the surface $ (U_e(x) = U_\\infty x^{-1}). The present work deals with the two-dimensional incompressible, laminar, steady-state boundary layer equations. First, we determine a family of velocity distributions outside the boundary layer such that these problems may have similarity solutions. Then, we examenin detail new exact solutions. The analysis shows that solutions exist only for a lateral suction. For specified conditions, we establish the existence of an infinite number of solutions, including monotonic solutions and solutions which oscillate an infinite number of times and tend to a certain limit. The properties o...

  19. Blurring Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Nielsen, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    This article builds on the results obtained in the so-called Blurring Boundaries project which was undertaken at the Law Department, Copenhagen Business School, in the period from 2007 to 2009. It looks at the sustainability of the Danish welfare state in an EU law context and on the integration ...

  20. Negotiating boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Ballegaard, Stinne Aaløkke

    2010-01-01

    To move treatment successfully from the hospital to that of technology assisted self-care at home, it is vital in the design of such technologies to understand the setting in which the health IT should be used. Based on qualitative studies we find that people engage in elaborate boundary work to ...

  1. Laminar flow downregulates Notch activity to promote lymphatic sprouting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dongwon; Park, Eunkyung; Jung, Eunson; Seong, Young Jin; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Lee, Esak; Hong, Mingu; Lee, Sunju; Ishida, Hiroaki; Burford, James; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Adams, Ralf H; Srikanth, Sonal; Gwack, Yousang; Chen, Christopher S; Vogel, Hans J; Koh, Chester J; Wong, Alex K; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2017-04-03

    The major function of the lymphatic system is to drain interstitial fluid from tissue. Functional drainage causes increased fluid flow that triggers lymphatic expansion, which is conceptually similar to hypoxia-triggered angiogenesis. Here, we have identified a mechanotransduction pathway that translates laminar flow-induced shear stress to activation of lymphatic sprouting. While low-rate laminar flow commonly induces the classic shear stress responses in blood endothelial cells and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), only LECs display reduced Notch activity and increased sprouting capacity. In response to flow, the plasma membrane calcium channel ORAI1 mediates calcium influx in LECs and activates calmodulin to facilitate a physical interaction between Krüppel-like factor 2 (KLF2), the major regulator of shear responses, and PROX1, the master regulator of lymphatic development. The PROX1/KLF2 complex upregulates the expression of DTX1 and DTX3L. DTX1 and DTX3L, functioning as a heterodimeric Notch E3 ligase, concertedly downregulate NOTCH1 activity and enhance lymphatic sprouting. Notably, overexpression of the calcium reporter GCaMP3 unexpectedly inhibited lymphatic sprouting, presumably by disturbing calcium signaling. Endothelial-specific knockouts of Orai1 and Klf2 also markedly impaired lymphatic sprouting. Moreover, Dtx3l loss of function led to defective lymphatic sprouting, while Dtx3l gain of function rescued impaired sprouting in Orai1 KO embryos. Together, the data reveal a molecular mechanism underlying laminar flow-induced lymphatic sprouting.

  2. Characteristics of laminar MHD fluid hammer in pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z.Y.; Liu, Y.J., E-mail: yajun@scut.edu.cn

    2016-01-01

    As gradually wide applications of MHD fluid, transportation as well as control with pumps and valves is unavoidable, which induces MHD fluid hammer. The paper attempts to combine MHD effect and fluid hammer effect and to investigate the characteristics of laminar MHD fluid hammer. A non-dimensional fluid hammer model, based on Navier–Stocks equations, coupling with Lorentz force is numerically solved in a reservoir–pipe–valve system with uniform external magnetic field. The MHD effect is represented by the interaction number which associates with the conductivity of the MHD fluid as well as the external magnetic field and can be interpreted as the ratio of Lorentz force to Joukowsky force. The transient numerical results of pressure head, average velocity, wall shear stress, velocity profiles and shear stress profiles are provided. The additional MHD effect hinders fluid motion, weakens wave front and homogenizes velocity profiles, contributing to obvious attenuation of oscillation, strengthened line packing and weakened Richardson annular effect. Studying the characteristics of MHD laminar fluid hammer theoretically supplements the gap of knowledge of rapid-transient MHD flow and technically provides beneficial information for MHD pipeline system designers to better devise MHD systems. - Highlights: • Characteristics of laminar MHD fluid hammer are discussed by simulation. • MHD effect has significant influence on attenuation of wave. • MHD effect strengthens line packing. • MHD effect inhibits Richardson annular effect.

  3. Detection of Cortical Laminar Architecture Using Manganese-Enhanced MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Afonso C.; Lee, Junghee; Wu, Carolyn W.-H.; Tucciarone, Jason; Pelled, Galit; Aoki, Ichio; Koretsky, Alan P.

    2008-01-01

    Changes in Manganese-Enhanced MRI (MEMRI) contrast across the rodent somatosensory cortex were compared to the cortical laminae as identified by tissue histology and administration of an anatomical tracer to cortex and thalamus. Across the cortical thickness, MEMRI signal intensity was low in layer I, increased in layer II, decreased in layer III until mid-layer IV, and increased again, peaking in layer V, before decreasing through layer VI. The reeler mouse mutant was used to confirm that the cortical alternation in MEMRI contrast was related to laminar architecture. Unlike in wild-type mice, the reeler cortex showed no appreciable changes in MEMRI signal, consistent[ACS1] with absence of cortical laminae in histological slides. The tract-tracing ability of MEMRI was used to further confirm assignments and demonstrate laminar specificity. Twelve to sixteen hours after stereotaxic injections of MnCl2 to the ventroposterior thalamic nuclei, an overall increase in signal intensity was detected in primary somatosensory cortex compared to other brain regions. Maximum intensity projection images revealed a distinctly bright stripe located 600 − 700 μm below the pial surface, in layer IV. The data show that both systemic and tract-tracing forms of MEMRI are useful for studying laminar architecture in the brain. PMID:17936913

  4. Approximate analytical solutions and approximate value of skin friction coefficient for boundary layer of power law fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Xiao-hong; ZHENG Lian-cun; JIANG Feng

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis for laminar boundary layer flow in a power law non-Newtonian fluids.The Adomian analytical decomposition technique is presented and an approximate analytical solution is obtained.The approximate analytical solution can be expressed in terms of a rapid convergent power series with easily computable terms.Reliability and efficiency of the approximate solution are verified by comparing with numerical solutions in the literature.Moreover,the approximate solution can be successfully applied to provide values for the skin friction coefficient of the laminar boundary layer flow in power law non-Newtonian fluids.

  5. Large Eddy Simulation of Transitional Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Moin, Parviz

    2009-11-01

    A sixth order compact finite difference code is employed to investigate compressible Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of subharmonic transition of a spatially developing zero pressure gradient boundary layer, at Ma = 0.2. The computational domain extends from Rex= 10^5, where laminar blowing and suction excites the most unstable fundamental and sub-harmonic modes, to fully turbulent stage at Rex= 10.1x10^5. Numerical sponges are used in the neighborhood of external boundaries to provide non-reflective conditions. Our interest lies in the performance of the dynamic subgrid scale (SGS) model [1] in the transition process. It is observed that in early stages of transition the eddy viscosity is much smaller than the physical viscosity. As a result the amplitudes of selected harmonics are in very good agreement with the experimental data [2]. The model's contribution gradually increases during the last stages of transition process and the dynamic eddy viscosity becomes fully active and dominant in the turbulent region. Consistent with this trend the skin friction coefficient versus Rex diverges from its laminar profile and converges to the turbulent profile after an overshoot. 1. Moin P. et. al. Phys Fluids A, 3(11), 2746-2757, 1991. 2. Kachanov Yu. S. et. al. JFM, 138, 209-247, 1983.

  6. Some numerical calculations by using linear classical sonic theories approached from sub- or supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Ando, S.

    1987-01-01

    The unsteady aerodynamics of a two-dimensional wing at sonic speed are studied by using so-called classical sonic theories (linear), approached from supersonic flow (M=1+0) or subsonic flow (M=1-0). In the former approach, the exact expressions of lift and lift distribution are obtained in terms of Fresnel integrals, while in the latter approach an integral equation must be solved, the kernel function of which is obtained from the subsonic Possio's equation and has a root singularity. The discrete analysis is adopted on the basis of the semicircle method (SCM) and the weighting function for subsonic-flow-Gauss-quadrature, as well as modified characteristics obtained from both approaches agree quite well with each other. The results obtained by the present computations are compared with those of DLM-C (subsonic 2D code) developed by ANDO et al, and are found to give a reasonable outer boundary for subsonic unsteady aerodynamics.

  7. The NASA High Speed ASE Project: Computational Analyses of a Low-Boom Supersonic Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Walter A.; DeLaGarza, Antonio; Zink, Scott; Bounajem, Elias G.; Johnson, Christopher; Buonanno, Michael; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Yoo, Seung Y.; Kopasakis, George; Christhilf, David M.; Chwalowski, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    A summary of NASA's High Speed Aeroservoelasticity (ASE) project is provided with a focus on a low-boom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed-Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. The summary includes details of the computational models developed to date including a linear finite element model (FEM), linear unsteady aerodynamic models, structured and unstructured CFD grids, and discussion of the FEM development including sizing and structural constraints applied to the N+2 configuration. Linear results obtained to date include linear mode shapes and linear flutter boundaries. In addition to the tasks associated with the N+2 configuration, a summary of the work involving the development of AeroPropulsoServoElasticity (APSE) models is also discussed.

  8. Nonlinear unsteady supersonic flow analysis for slender bodies of revolution: Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Panayotounakos

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We construct analytical solutions for the problem of nonlinear supersonic flow past slender bodies of revolution due to small amplitude oscillations. The method employed is based on the splitting of the time dependent small perturbation equation to a nonlinear time independent partial differential equation (P.D.E. concerning the steady flow, and a linear time dependent one, concerning the unsteady flow. Solutions in the form of three parameters family of surfaces for the first equation are constructed, while solutions including one arbitrary function for the second equation are extracted. As an application the evaluation of the small perturbation velocity resultants for a flow past a right circular cone is obtained making use of convenient boundary and initial conditions in accordance with the physical problem.

  9. Design and construction of a low-velocity boundary-layer temperature probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, B. F.; Moffat, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study performed to determine the probe geometry and thermal characteristics for a low-velocity boundary-layer temperature probe capable of eliminating conduction errors. Design curves for four common thermoelectric pairs are presented, and an experimental turbulent boundary-layer temperature profile is compared with the theoretical laminar sublayer equation to verify that the probe eliminates conduction errors.

  10. Stationary flow conditions in pulsed supersonic beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Wolfgang

    2013-10-21

    We describe a generally applicable method for the experimental determination of stationary flow conditions in pulsed supersonic beams, utilizing time-resolved electron induced fluorescence measurements of high pressure jet expansions of helium. The detection of ultraviolet photons from electronically excited helium emitted very close to the nozzle exit images the valve opening behavior-with the decided advantage that a photon signal is not affected by beam-skimmer and beam-residual gas interactions; it thus allows to conclusively determine those operation parameters of a pulsed valve that yield complete opening. The studies reveal that a "flat-top" signal, indicating constant density and commonly considered as experimental criterion for continuous flow, is insufficient. Moreover, translational temperature and mean terminal flow velocity turn out to be significantly more sensitive in testing for the equivalent behavior of a continuous nozzle source. Based on the widely distributed Even-Lavie valve we demonstrate that, in principle, it is possible to achieve quasi-continuous flow conditions even with fast-acting valves; however, the two prerequisites are a minimum pulse duration that is much longer than standard practice and previous estimates, and a suitable tagging of the appropriate beam segment.

  11. Supersonic Jet Noise Reduction Using Microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Cuppoletti, Dan; Malla, Bhupatindra

    2013-11-01

    Fluidic injection for jet noise reduction involves injecting secondary jets into a primary jet to alter the noise characteristics of the primary jet. A major challenge has been determining what mechanisms are responsible for noise reduction due to varying injector designs, injection parameters, and primary jets. The current study provides conclusive results on the effect of injector angle and momentum ux ratio on the acoustics and shock structure of a supersonic Md = 1.56 jet. It is shown that the turbulent mixing noise scales primarily with the injector momentum flux ratio. Increasing the injector momentum flux ratio increases streamwise vorticity generation and reduces peak turbulence levels. It is found that the shock-related noise components are most affected by the interaction of the shocks from the injectors with the primary shock structure of the jet. Increasing momentum flux ratio causes shock noise reduction until a limit where shock noise increases again. It is shown that the shock noise components and mixing noise components are reduced through fundamentally different mechanisms and maximum overall noise reduction is achieved by balancing the reduction of both components.

  12. Accretion of Supersonic Winds on Boson Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gracia-Linares, M

    2016-01-01

    We present the evolution of a supersonic wind interacting with a Boson Star (BS) and compare the resulting wind density profile with that of the shock cone formed when the wind is accreted by a non-rotating Black Hole (BH) of the same mass. The physical differences between these accretors are that a BS, unlike a BH has no horizon, it does not have a mechanical surface either and thus the wind is expected to trespass the BS. Despite these conditions, on the BS space-time the gas achieves a stationary flux with the gas accumulating in a high density elongated structure comparable to the shock cone formed behind a BH. The highest density resides in the center of the BS whereas in the case of the BH it is found on the downstream part of the BH near the event horizon. The maximum density of the gas is smaller in the BS than in the BH case. Our results indicate that the highest density of the wind is more similar on the BS to that on the BH when the BS has high self-interaction, when it is more compact and when the...

  13. Particle Streak Velocimetry of Supersonic Nozzle Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willits, J. D.; Pourpoint, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    A novel velocimetry technique to probe the exhaust flow of a laboratory scale combustor is being developed. The technique combines the advantages of standard particle velocimetry techniques and the ultra-fast imaging capabilities of a streak camera to probe high speed flows near continuously with improved spatial and velocity resolution. This "Particle Streak Velocimetry" technique tracks laser illuminated seed particles at up to 236 picosecond temporal resolution allowing time-resolved measurement of one-dimensional flows exceeding 2000 m/s as are found in rocket nozzles and many other applications. Developmental tests with cold nitrogen have been performed to validate and troubleshoot the technique with supersonic flows of much lower velocity and without background noise due to combusting flow. Flow velocities on the order of 500 m/s have been probed with titanium dioxide particles and a continuous-wave laser diode. Single frame images containing multiple streaks are analyzed to find the average slope of all incident particles corresponding to the centerline axial flow velocity. Long term objectives for these tests are correlation of specific impulse to theoretical combustion predictions and direct comparisons between candidate green fuels and the industry standard, monomethylhydrazine, each tested under identical conditions.

  14. Supersonic collisions between two gas streams

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H M; Ryu, D; Lee, Hyung Mok; Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    1995-01-01

    A star around a massive black hole can be disrupted tidally by the gravity of the black hole. Then, its debris may form a precessing stream which may even collide with itself. In order to understand the dynamical effects of the stream-stream collision on the eventual accretion of the stellar debris onto the black hole, we have studied how gas flow behaves when the outgoing stream collides supersonically with the incoming stream. We have investigated the problem analytically with one-dimensional plane-parallel streams and numerically with more realistic three-dimensional streams. A shock formed around the contact surface converts the bulk of the orbital streaming kinetic energy into thermal energy. In three-dimensional simulations, the accumulated hot post-shock gas then expands adiabatically and drives another shock into the low density ambient region. Through this expansion, thermal energy is converted back to the kinetic energy associated with the expanding motion. Thus, in the end, only a small fraction of...

  15. Drag Force Anemometer Used in Supersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fralick, Gustave C.

    1998-01-01

    To measure the drag on a flat cantilever beam exposed transversely to a flow field, the drag force anemometer (beam probe) uses strain gauges attached on opposite sides of the base of the beam. This is in contrast to the hot wire anemometer, which depends for its operation on the variation of the convective heat transfer coefficient with velocity. The beam probe retains the high-frequency response (up to 100 kHz) of the hot wire anemometer, but it is more rugged, uses simpler electronics, is relatively easy to calibrate, is inherently temperature compensated, and can be used in supersonic flow. The output of the probe is proportional to the velocity head of the flow, 1/2 rho u(exp 2) (where rho is the fluid density and u is the fluid velocity). By adding a static pressure tap and a thermocouple to measure total temperature, one can determine the Mach number, static temperature, density, and velocity of the flow.

  16. Supersonic Magnetic Flows in the Quiet Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Borrero, J M; Schlichenmaier, R; Schmidt, W; Berkefeld, T; Solanki, S K; Bonet, J A; Iniesta, J C del Toro; Domingo, V; Barthol, P; Gandorfer, A

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution we describe some recent observations of high-speed magnetized flows in the quiet Sun granulation. These observations were carried out with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment (IMaX) onboard the stratospheric balloon {\\sc Sunrise}, and possess an unprecedented spatial resolution and temporal cadence. These flows were identified as highly shifted circular polarization (Stokes $V$) signals. We estimate the LOS velocity responsible for these shifts to be larger than 6 km s$^{-1}$, and therefore we refer to them as {\\it supersonic magnetic flows}. The average lifetime of the detected events is 81.3 s and they occupy an average area of about 23\\,000 km$^2$. Most of the events occur within granular cells and correspond therefore to upflows. However some others occur in intergranular lanes or bear no clear relation to the convective velocity pattern. We analyze a number of representative examples and discuss them in terms of magnetic loops, reconnection events, and convective collapse.

  17. External-Compression Supersonic Inlet Design Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, John W.

    2011-01-01

    A computer code named SUPIN has been developed to perform aerodynamic design and analysis of external-compression, supersonic inlets. The baseline set of inlets include axisymmetric pitot, two-dimensional single-duct, axisymmetric outward-turning, and two-dimensional bifurcated-duct inlets. The aerodynamic methods are based on low-fidelity analytical and numerical procedures. The geometric methods are based on planar geometry elements. SUPIN has three modes of operation: 1) generate the inlet geometry from a explicit set of geometry information, 2) size and design the inlet geometry and analyze the aerodynamic performance, and 3) compute the aerodynamic performance of a specified inlet geometry. The aerodynamic performance quantities includes inlet flow rates, total pressure recovery, and drag. The geometry output from SUPIN includes inlet dimensions, cross-sectional areas, coordinates of planar profiles, and surface grids suitable for input to grid generators for analysis by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. The input data file for SUPIN and the output file from SUPIN are text (ASCII) files. The surface grid files are output as formatted Plot3D or stereolithography (STL) files. SUPIN executes in batch mode and is available as a Microsoft Windows executable and Fortran95 source code with a makefile for Linux.

  18. Calculation of a boundary layer with phase transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorosh, N. D.; Kharitonov, A. A.

    A method for the analysis of a laminar boundary layer with phase transformations is developed. It is noted that volume gas condensation can occur in the case of flow past a cooled surface, drops becoming aggregated in groups in the process of condensation. The concept of group density and concentration is proposed, and this approach is used to investigate a boundary layer near the stagnation point of a two-dimensional blunt body in a flow of molecular oxygen. Profiles of temperature, stream function, and concentration of liquid-oxygen droplet groups are determined for various values of the condensation rate.

  19. Effects of small boundary perturbation on the MHD duct flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahabaleshwar Ulavathi Shettar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the effects of small boundary perturbation on the laminar motion of a conducting fluid in a rectangular duct under applied transverse magnetic field. A small boundary perturbation of magnitude Є is applied on cross-section of the duct. Using the asymptotic analysis with respect to Є, we derive the effective model given by the explicit formulae for the velocity and induced magnetic field. Numerical results are provided confirming that the considered perturbation has nonlocal impact on the asymptotic solution.

  20. Stretched flow of Carreau nanofluid with convective boundary condition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Hayat; M Waqas; S A Shehzad; A Alsaedi

    2016-01-01

    The steady laminar boundary layer flow of Carreau nanofluid over a stretching sheet is investigated. Effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis are present. Heat transfer is characterized using convective boundary condition at the sheet. The governing partial differential equations are reduced into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations through suitable transformations. Results of velocity, temperature and concentration fields are computed via homotopic procedure. Numerical values of skin-friction coefficient, local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are computed and discussed. A comparative study with existing solutions in a limiting sense is made.

  1. A Grid Sourcing and Adaptation Study Using Unstructured Grids for Supersonic Boom Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Deere, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    NASA created the Supersonics Project as part of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program to advance technology that will make a supersonic flight over land viable. Computational flow solvers have lacked the ability to accurately predict sonic boom from the near to far field. The focus of this investigation was to establish gridding and adaptation techniques to predict near-to-mid-field (sources along the body the aircraft, far field sourcing and far field boundaries. The study then examined several techniques for grid adaptation. During the course of the study, volume sourcing was introduced as a new way to source grids using the grid generation code VGRID. Two different methods of using the volume sources were examined. The first method, based on manual insertion of the numerous volume sources, made great improvements in the prediction capability of USM3D for boom signatures. The second method (SSGRID), which uses an a priori adaptation approach to stretch and shear the original unstructured grid to align the grid and pressure waves, showed similar results with a more automated approach. Due to SSGRID s results and ease of use, the rest of the study focused on developing a best practice using SSGRID. The best practice created by this study for boom predictions using the CFD code USM3D involved: 1) creating a small cylindrical outer boundary either 1 or 2 body lengths in diameter (depending on how far below the aircraft the boom prediction is required), 2) using a single volume source under the aircraft, and 3) using SSGRID to stretch and shear the grid to the desired length.

  2. Changing Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodkin, Evelyn; Larsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, workfare-style policies have become part of the institutional architecture of welfare and labor market arrangements around the world. In this article, we offer a comparative, historical view of workfare´s advance. Our analysis recognizes the complexity and diversity of what we...... call the “policies of workfare” and highlights the different paths through which these policies have developed in the U.S. and parts of Europe. We argue that it is necessary to look beyond familiar policy labels and language in order to consider workfare-style policies as part of a broader political...... project that is altering the boundary between the democratic welfare state and the market economy. We see workfare policies as boundary-changing with potentially profound implications both for individuals disadvantaged by market arrangements and for societies seeking to grapple with the increasing...

  3. Design and Numerical Calculation of Variable Test Section for Small Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav DVOŘÁK

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with numerical modelling of transition in a separated boundary layer. The model of laminar/turbulent transition is based on the combination of empirical terms determining position of the transition and averaged Navier – Stokes equations closed by the k – ω SST turbulence model. The model of transition is applied in computation of 2D flow past NACA63A421 airfoil. Computation is performed using the commercial code ANSYS Fluent 6.3.26, in which the transition method is implemented as a User-Defined-Function. Computed distributions of Cp along the airfoil are verified by comparison with experimental data, which were obtained by measurements in a closed circuit wind tunnel at the constant Reynolds number and several angles of attack. Comparisons prove applicability of the implemented transitional model.

  4. Differences between laminar convections through parallel plain planes with uniform wall temperature and heat flux in terms of process parameter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Using the process parameter description,we analyzed the difference between the characteristics of laminar convections through parallel plain planes with uniform temperature and heat flux.The results show the following.(1)On the wall surface of the developing region,under uniform heat flux boundary condition,the heat flux normal to the wall surface is transported through a convection process although the velocity is zero;the velocity gradient contributes to this transport,but under uniform temperature boundary condition,the heat flux normal to the wall surface is transported through a difussion process.(2)Inside the flow of the developing region,whether under uniform temperature or heat flux boundary condition,the heat flux along the main flow direction and the heat flux normal to the wall surface are transported through a convection process,and the contributions of velocity and velocity gradient are dependent on the thermal boundary condition.(3)On the wall surface of the fully developed region,under uniform heat flux boundary condition,the heat flux normal to the wall surface is transported through a convection process;the velocity gradient contributes to this transport,but under uniform temperature boundary condition,the heat flux normal to the wall surface is transported through a diffusion process.(4)Inside the flow of the fully developed region,under uniform temperature boundary condition,the heat flux along the main flow direction and the heat flux normal to the wall surface are transported through a convection process,and the velocity and velocity gradient contribute to these transports;under uniform heat flux boundary condition,the heat flux along the main flow direction and the heat flux normal to the wall surface are transported through a convection process.Furthermore,the transport of the heat flux along the main flow direction is a no-net convection process;the velocity gradient contributes to the transport of the heat flux only in the normal direction

  5. A new technique for calculating reentry base heating. [analysis of laminar base flow field of two dimensional reentry body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, J. C. S.

    1973-01-01

    The laminar base flow field of a two-dimensional reentry body has been studied by Telenin's method. The flow domain was divided into strips along the x-axis, and the flow variations were represented by Lagrange interpolation polynomials in the transformed vertical coordinate. The complete Navier-Stokes equations were used in the near wake region, and the boundary layer equations were applied elsewhere. The boundary conditions consisted of the flat plate thermal boundary layer in the forebody region and the near wake profile in the downstream region. The resulting two-point boundary value problem of 33 ordinary differential equations was then solved by the multiple shooting method. The detailed flow field and thermal environment in the base region are presented in the form of temperature contours, Mach number contours, velocity vectors, pressure distributions, and heat transfer coefficients on the base surface. The maximum heating rate was found on the centerline, and the two-dimensional stagnation point flow solution was adquate to estimate the maximum heating rate so long as the local Reynolds number could be obtained.

  6. Dispersion of Own Frequency of Ion-Dipole by Supersonic Transverse Wave in Solid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minasyan V.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available First, we predict an existence of transverse electromagnetic field formed by supersonic transverse wave in solid. This electromagnetic wave acquires frequency and speed of sound, and it propagates along of direction propagation of supersonic wave. We also show that own frequency of ion-dipole depends on frequency of supersonic transverse wave.

  7. Simulation of underexpanded supersonic jet flows with chemical reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Debin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To achieve a detailed understanding of underexpanded supersonic jet structures influenced by afterburning and other flow conditions, the underexpanded turbulent supersonic jet with and without combustions are investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD method. A program based on a total variation diminishing (TVD methodology capable of predicting complex shocks is created to solve the axisymmetric expanded Navier–Stokes equations containing transport equations of species. The finite-rate ratio model is employed to handle species sources in chemical reactions. CFD solutions indicate that the structure of underexpanded jet is typically influenced by the pressure ratio and afterburning. The shock reflection distance and maximum value of Mach number in the first shock cell increase with pressure ratio. Chemical reactions for the rocket exhaust mostly exist in the mixing layer of supersonic jet flows. This tends to reduce the intensity of shocks existing in the jet, responding to the variation of thermal parameters.

  8. Simulation of underexpanded supersonic jet flows with chemical reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Debin; Yu Yong; Niu Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    To achieve a detailed understanding of underexpanded supersonic jet structures influenced by afterburning and other flow conditions, the underexpanded turbulent supersonic jet with and without combustions are investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. A program based on a total variation diminishing (TVD) methodology capable of predicting complex shocks is created to solve the axisymmetric expanded Navier-Stokes equations containing transport equations of species. The finite-rate ratio model is employed to handle species sources in chemical reactions. CFD solutions indicate that the structure of underexpanded jet is typically influenced by the pressure ratio and afterburning. The shock reflection distance and maximum value of Mach number in the first shock cell increase with pressure ratio. Chemical reactions for the rocket exhaust mostly exist in the mixing layer of supersonic jet flows. This tends to reduce the intensity of shocks existing in the jet, responding to the variation of thermal parameters.

  9. The Turbulent Dynamo in Highly Compressible Supersonic Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph; Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R G

    2014-01-01

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly-compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early Universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024^3 cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = nu/eta = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm >= 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm_crit = 129 (+43, -31), showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present a...

  10. Study of the shock structure of supersonic, dual, coaxial, jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. H.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, H. D. [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    The shock structure of supersonic, dual, coaxial jet is experimentally investigated. Eight different kinds of coaxial, dual nozzles are employed to observe the major features of the near field shock structure of the supersonic, coaxial, dual jets. Four convergent-divergent supersonic nozzles having the Mach number of 2.0 and 3.0, and are used to compare the coaxial jet flows discharging from two sonic nozzles. The primary pressure ratio is changed in the range between 4.0 and 10.0 and the assistant jet pressure ratio from 1.0 to 4.0. The results obtained show that the impinging angle, nozzle geometry and pressure ratio significantly affect the near field shock structure, Mach disk location and Mach disk diameter. The annular shock system is found depending the assistant and primary jet pressure ratios.

  11. Experimental study on interference effect of rarefaction wave on laminar propagating flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jinhua; LIU Yi; WANG Qingsong; CHEN Peng

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the interference effect of rarefaction wave on the laminar flame propagating structure and pressure characteristics of methane-air mixture, a small scale combustion chamber has been built. The techniques of high speed Schlieren photograph, pressure measurement and so on, are used to study the influence of rarefaction wave on the laminar flame propagating through methane-air mixture. The results show that, after the rarefaction wave acts on the propagation laminar flame, the laminar combustion is fully transformed into turbulent combustion just during several milliseconds, which leads to a sharp increase in the burning surface area and the pressure rise rate.

  12. Numerical Study of Laminar-Turbulent Transition on a Plate in a Low-Speen Tunnel with Contoured Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Laminar-turbulent transition flow phenomena on a flat plate in a low-speed wind tunnel at different Reynolds numbers were studied numerically.The flow calculation is based on an inviscid/boundary layer interaction method with modified Abu-Ghannam/Shaw(AGS) transition criterion.The test section has non-symmetrical contoured walls,and the plate is located biased the bottom side with a height ratio of 26:14.Intest case of steady flow,a laminar-turbulent transition takes place and a small separation bubble occurs on the upper side of the plate,when the inlet Reynolds number is as small as 0.631×10-6,.The predicted transition location agrees well with that of the test results,but the separation bubble is hardly to see from the calculated velocity profiles though the printed data of velocity in this region do show the negative values.The further numerical predictions with different Reynolds numbers corresponding to the incoming flow velocities show that when the Reynolds number is greater than 1.379×10-6,the separation bubble does not occur,which is coincident with the experimental results.The influence of the side wall geometry on the transition on the plate is also studied.

  13. On Laminar to Turbulent Transition of Arc-Jet Flow in the NASA Ames Panel Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcen, Tahir; Alunni, Antonella I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides experimental evidence and supporting computational analysis to characterize the laminar to turbulent flow transition in a high enthalpy arc-jet facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The arc-jet test data obtained in the 20 MW Panel Test Facility include measurements of surface pressure and heat flux on a water-cooled calibration plate, and measurements of surface temperature on a reaction-cured glass coated tile plate. Computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed to characterize the arc-jet test environment and estimate its parameters consistent with the facility and calibration measurements. The present analysis comprises simulations of the nonequilibrium flowfield in the facility nozzle, test box, and flowfield over test articles. Both laminar and turbulent simulations are performed, and the computed results are compared with the experimental measurements, including Stanton number dependence on Reynolds number. Comparisons of computed and measured surface heat fluxes (and temperatures), along with the accompanying analysis, confirm that that the boundary layer in the Panel Test Facility flow is transitional at certain archeater conditions.

  14. Boundary issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alan R.; Porder, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    What is our point of no return? Caesar proclaimed 'the die is cast' while crossing the Rubicon, but rarely does modern society find so visible a threshold in our continued degradation of ecosystems and the services they provide. Humans have always used their surroundings to make a living— sometimes successfully, sometimes not (Diamond 2005)—and we intuitively know that there are boundaries to our exploitation. But defining these boundaries has been a challenge since Malthus first prophesied that nature would limit the human population (Malthus 1798). In 2009, Rockström and colleagues tried to quantify what the 6.8 billion (and counting) of us could continue to get away with, and what we couldn't (Rockström et al 2009). In selecting ten 'planetary boundaries', the authors contend that a sustainable human enterprise requires treating a number of environmental thresholds as points of no return. They suggest we breach these Rubicons at our own peril, and that we've already crossed three: biodiversity loss, atmospheric CO2, and disruption of the global nitrogen (N) cycle. As they clearly hoped, the very act of setting targets has provoked scientific inquiry about their accuracy, and about the value of hard targets in the first place (Schlesinger 2009). Such debate is a good thing. Despite recent emphasis on the science of human-ecosystem interactions, understanding of our planetary boundaries is still in its infancy, and controversy can speed scientific progress (Engelhardt and Caplan 1987). A few weeks ago in this journal, Carpenter and Bennett (2011) took aim at one of the more controversial boundaries in the Rockström analysis: that for human alteration of the global phosphorus (P) cycle. Rockström's group chose riverine P export as the key indicator, suggesting that humans should not exceed a value that could trigger widespread marine anoxic events—and asserting that we have not yet crossed this threshold. There are defensible reasons for a marine

  15. boundary dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Camurdan

    1998-01-01

    are coupled by appropriate trace operators. This overall model differs from those previously studied in the literature in that the elastic chamber floor is here more realistically modeled by a hyperbolic Kirchoff equation, rather than by a parabolic Euler-Bernoulli equation with Kelvin-Voight structural damping, as in past literature. Thus, the hyperbolic/parabolic coupled system of past literature is replaced here by a hyperbolic/hyperbolic coupled model. The main result of this paper is a uniform stabilization of the coupled PDE system by a (physically appealing boundary dissipation.

  16. The impact of emerging technologies on an advanced supersonic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, C.; Maglieri, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of advances in propulsion systems, structure and materials, aerodynamics, and systems on the design and development of supersonic transport aircraft are analyzed. Efficient propulsion systems with variable-cycle engines provide the basis for improved propulsion systems; the propulsion efficienies of supersonic and subsonic engines are compared. Material advances consist of long-life damage-tolerant structures, advanced material development, aeroelastic tailoring, and low-cost fabrication. Improvements in the areas of aerodynamics and systems are examined. The environmental problems caused by engine emissions, airport noise, and sonic boom are studied. The characteristics of the aircraft designed to include these technical advances are described.

  17. Continuing Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics for Supersonic Retropropulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauerhamer, Daniel Guy; Trumble, Kerry A.; Kleb, Bil; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Edquist, Karl T.

    2011-01-01

    A large step in the validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for Supersonic Retropropulsion (SRP) is shown through the comparison of three Navier-Stokes solvers (DPLR, FUN3D, and OVERFLOW) and wind tunnel test results. The test was designed specifically for CFD validation and was conducted in the Langley supersonic 4 x4 Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel and includes variations in the number of nozzles, Mach and Reynolds numbers, thrust coefficient, and angles of orientation. Code-to-code and code-to-test comparisons are encouraging and possible error sources are discussed.

  18. Subsonic and Supersonic Jet Noise Calculations Using PSE and DNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, P.; Owis, Farouk

    1999-01-01

    Noise radiated from a supersonic jet is computed using the Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE) method. The evolution of the instability waves inside the jet is computed using the PSE method and the noise radiated to the far field from these waves is calculated by solving the wave equation using the Fourier transform method. We performed the computations for a cold supersonic jet of Mach number 2.1 which is excited by disturbances with Strouhal numbers St=.2 and .4 and the azimuthal wavenumber m=l. Good agreement in the sound pressure level are observed between the computed and the measured (Troutt and McLaughlin 1980) results.

  19. Quality improvement of melt extruded laminar systems using mixture design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasa, D; Perissutti, B; Campisi, B; Grassi, M; Grabnar, I; Golob, S; Mian, M; Voinovich, D

    2015-07-30

    This study investigates the application of melt extrusion for the development of an oral retard formulation with a precise drug release over time. Since adjusting the formulation appears to be of the utmost importance in achieving the desired drug release patterns, different formulations of laminar extrudates were prepared according to the principles of Experimental Design, using a design for mixtures to assess the influence of formulation composition on the in vitro drug release from the extrudates after 1h and after 8h. The effect of each component on the two response variables was also studied. Ternary mixtures of theophylline (model drug), monohydrate lactose and microcrystalline wax (as thermoplastic binder) were extruded in a lab scale vertical ram extruder in absence of solvents at a temperature below the melting point of the binder (so that the crystalline state of the drug could be maintained), through a rectangular die to obtain suitable laminar systems. Thanks to the desirability approach and a reliability study for ensuring the quality of the formulation, a very restricted optimal zone was defined within the experimental domain. Among the mixture components, the variation of microcrystalline wax content played the most significant role in overall influence on the in vitro drug release. The formulation theophylline:lactose:wax, 57:14:29 (by weight), selected based on the desirability zone, was subsequently used for in vivo studies. The plasma profile, obtained after oral administration of the laminar extruded system in hard gelatine capsules, revealed the typical trend of an oral retard formulation. The application of the mixture experimental design associated to a desirability function permitted to optimize the extruded system and to determine the composition space that ensures final product quality.

  20. IFTS measurements of a laboratory scale laminar flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoby, Michael R.; Harley, Jacob L.; Gross, Kevin C.

    2011-10-01

    A point-and-shoot, passive remote sensing technology is highly desired to accurately monitor the combustion efficiency (CE) of petrochemical flares. A Phase II DOE-funded SBIR effort is being led by Spectral Sciences, Inc. to develop the methodologies needed to enable remote CE measurements via spectral remote sensing. Part of this effort entails standing up a laboratory-scale flare measurement laboratory to develop and validate CE measurements. This paper presents an overview and summarizes current progress of the Air Force Institute of Technology's (AFIT) contribution to this multi-organization, two-year effort. As a first step, a Telops Hyper-Cam longwave infrared (LWIR, 750-1300cm-1 or 7.7-13.3μm) imaging Fourier-transformspectrometer (IFTS) is used to examine a laminar, calibration flame produced by a Hencken burner. Ethylene and propane were combusted under several different fuel/air mixing ratios. For each event, 300 hyperspectral datacubes were collected on a 172(W)×200(H) pixel window at a 1.5cm-1 spectral resolution. Each pixel had approximately a 1.5×1.5mm2 instantaneous field-of-view (IFOV). Structured emission is evident throughout the combustion region with several lines arising from H2O; other lines have not yet been assigned. These first known IFTS measurements of a laminar Hencken-burner flame are presented along with some preliminary analysis. While the laminar flame appears stationary to the eye, significant flame flicker at a fundamental frequency of 17Hz was observed in the LWIR, and this is expected to complicate spectral interpretation for species concentrations and temperature retrieval. Changes to the fuel-air ratio (FAR) produced sizable changes in spectral intensity. Combustion spectra of ethylene and propane corresponding to ideal FAR were nearly identical.

  1. Aircraft energy efficiency laminar flow control wing design study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, T. F., Jr.; Pride, J. D., Jr.; Fernald, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    An engineering design study was performed in which laminar flow control (LFC) was integrated into the wing of a commercial passenger transport aircraft. A baseline aircraft configuration was selected and the wing geometry was defined. The LFC system, with suction slots, ducting, and suction pumps was integrated with the wing structure. The use of standard aluminum technology and advanced superplastic formed diffusion bonded titanium technology was evaluated. The results of the design study show that the LFC system can be integrated with the wing structure to provide a structurally and aerodynamically efficient wing for a commercial transport aircraft.

  2. Surface Runoff in Watershed Modeling—Turbulent or Laminar Flows?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Grismer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Determination of overland sheet flow depths, velocities and celerities across the hillslope in watershed modeling is important towards estimation of surface storage, travel times to streams and soil detachment rates. It requires careful characterization of the flow processes. Similarly, determination of the temporal variation of hillslope-riparian-stream hydrologic connectivity requires estimation of the shallow subsurface soil hydraulic conductivity and soil-water retention (i.e., drainable porosities parameters. Field rainfall and runoff simulation studies provide considerable information and insight into these processes; in particular, that sheet flows are likely laminar and that shallow hydraulic conductivities and storage can be determined from the plot studies. Here, using a 1 m by 2 m long runoff simulation flume, we found that for overland flow rates per unit width of roughly 30–60 mm2/s and bedslopes of 10%–66% with varying sand roughness depths that all flow depths were predicted by laminar flow equations alone and that equivalent Manning’s n values were depth dependent and quite small relative to those used in watershed modeling studies. Even for overland flow rates greater than those typically measured or modeled and using Manning’s n values of 0.30–0.35, often assumed in physical watershed model applications for relatively smooth surface conditions, the laminar flow velocities were 4–5 times greater, while the laminar flow depths were 4–5 times smaller. This observation suggests that travel times, surface storage volumes and surface shear stresses associated with erosion across the landscape would be poorly predicted using turbulent flow assumptions. Filling the flume with fine sand and conducting runoff studies, we were unable to produce sheet flow, but found that subsurface flows were onflow rate, soil depth and slope dependent and drainable porosities were only soil depth and slope dependent. Moreover, both the sand

  3. Acute hepatic encephalopathy presenting as cortical laminar necrosis: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Mun; Kim, Yoon Hee; Roh, Sook Young

    2013-01-01

    We report on a 55-year-old man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis who presented with status epilepticus. Laboratory analysis showed markedly elevated blood ammonia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed widespread cortical signal changes with restricted diffusion, involving both temporo-fronto-parietal cortex, while the perirolandic regions and occipital cortex were uniquely spared. A follow-up brain MRI demonstrated diffuse cortical atrophy with increased signals on T1-weighted images in both the basal ganglia and temporal lobe cortex, representing cortical laminar necrosis. We suggest that the brain lesions, in our case, represent a consequence of toxic effect of ammonia.

  4. Laminar phase flow for an exponentially tapered Josephson oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benabdallah, A.; Caputo, J. G.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    2000-01-01

    Exponential tapering and inhomogeneous current feed were recently proposed as means to improve the performance of a Josephson flux flow oscillator. Extensive numerical results backed up by analysis are presented here that support this claim and demonstrate that exponential tapering reduces...... the small current instability region and leads to a laminar flow regime where the voltage wave form is periodic giving the oscillator minimal spectral width. Tapering also leads to an increased output power. Since exponential tapering is not expected to increase the difficulty of fabricating a flux flow...

  5. Numerical Simulation Model of Laminar Hydrogen/Air Diffusion Flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于溯源; 吕雪峰

    2002-01-01

    A numerical simulation model is developed for a laminar hydrogen/air diffusion flame. Nineteen species and twenty chemical reactions are considered. The chemical kinetics package (CHEMKIN) subroutines are employed to calculate species thermodynamic properties and chemical reaction rate constants. The flow field is calculated by simultaneously solving a continuity equation, an axial momentum equation and an energy equation in a cylindrical coordinate system. Thermal diffusion and Brownian diffusion are considered in the radial direction while they are neglected in the axial direction. The results suggest that the main flame is buoyancy-controlled.

  6. Propiedades de nanocompuestos de matriz termoestable con nuevos organosilicatos laminares

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo del Valle, Silvia; Salom Coll, Catalina; González Prolongo, Margarita; Arribas Arribas, Carmen; García del Cid, A.; Masegosa Fanego, Rosa María

    2013-01-01

    En este trabajo se han preparado nanocompuestos de matriz polímero termoestable del tipo poliéster insaturado y epoxídica utilizando como refuerzo nanosilicatos laminares que se han modificado específicamente para mejorar la interacción con la matriz. En concreto se han modificado montmorillonitas con cationes orgánicos reactivos con la matriz de poliéster insaturado. Asimismo se han silanizado montmorillonitas comerciales orgánicamente modificadas con el objetivo de formar enlaces químicos c...

  7. Use of laminar flow patterning for miniaturised biochemical assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regenberg, Birgitte; Krühne, Ulrich; Beyer, M.

    2004-01-01

    Laminar flow in microfluidic chambers was used to construct low (one dimensional) density arrays suitable for miniaturized biochemical assays. By varying the ratio of flows of two guiding streams flanking a sample stream, precise focusing and positioning of the latter was achieved, and reactive...... species carried in the sample stream were deposited on functionalized chip surfaces as discrete 50 mm wide lanes. Using different model systems we have confirmed the method's suitability for qualitative screening and quantification tasks in receptor-ligand assays, recording biotin......-streptavidin interactions, DNA-hybridization and DNA-triplex formation. The system is simple, fast, reproducible, flexible, and has small sample requirements....

  8. On laminar-turbulent transition in nanofluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Minakov, A. V.; Guzey, D. V.; Zhigarev, V. A.; Pryazhnikov, M. I.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents experimental data on the laminar-turbulent transition in the nanofluid flow in the pipe. The transition in the flows of such fluids is shown to have lower Reynolds numbers than in the base fluid. The degree of the flow destabilization increases with an increase in concentration of nanoparticles and a decrease in their size. On the other hand, in the turbulent flow regime, the presence of particles in the flow leads to the suppression of smallscale turbulent fluctuations. The correlation of the measured viscosity coefficient of considered nanofluids is presented.

  9. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF LAMINAR SQUARE IMPINGING JET FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qing-guang; XU Zhong; WU Yu-lin; ZHANG Yong-jian

    2005-01-01

    A theoretical study has been undertaken to determine the flow characteristics associated with a three-dimensional laminar impinging jet issuing from a square pipe nozzle. Interesting flow structures around the jet are detected. The numerical result reveals the existence of four streamwise velocity off-center peaks near the impingement plate, which is different from the rectangular jet impingement. The mechanism of the formation of the off-center velocity peaks and the parameters affecting the flow-field characteristics are discussed by comparison of the computed results with different nozzle-to-plate spacings and Reynolds numbers.

  10. Numerical simulation of laminar premixed combustion in a porous burner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Pinghui; CHEN Yiliang; LIU Minghou; DING Min; ZHANG Genxuan

    2007-01-01

    Premixed combustion in porous media differs substantially from combustion in free space. The interphase heat transfer between a gas mixture and a porous medium becomes dominant in the premixed combustion process. In this paper, the premixed combustion of CH4/air mixture in a porous medium is numerically simulated with a laminar combustion model. Radiative heat transfer in solids and convective heat transfer between the gas and the solid is especially studied. A smaller detailed reaction mechanism is also used and the results can show good prediction for many combustion phenomena.

  11. Acute hepatic encephalopathy presenting as cortical laminar necrosis: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jong Mun; Kim, Yoon Hee; Roh, Sook Young [Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital, Daejin Medical Center, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    We report on a 55-year-old man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis who presented with status epilepticus. Laboratory analysis showed markedly elevated blood ammonia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed widespread cortical signal changes with restricted diffusion, involving both temporo-fronto-parietal cortex, while the perirolandic regions and occipital cortex were uniquely spared. A follow-up brain MRI demonstrated diffuse cortical atrophy with increased signals on T1-weighted images in both the basal ganglia and temporal lobe cortex, representing cortical laminar necrosis. We suggest that the brain lesions, in our case, represent a consequence of toxic effect of ammonia.

  12. Observations on the non-mixed length and unsteady shock motion in a two dimensional supersonic ejector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Srisha M. V.; Jagadeesh, Gopalan

    2014-03-01

    Key features that drive the operation of a supersonic ejector are the complex gasdynamic interactions of the primary and secondary flows within a variable area duct and the phenomenon of compressible turbulent mixing between them, which have to be understood at a fundamental level. An experimental study has been carried out on the mixing characteristics of a two dimensional supersonic ejector with a supersonic primary flow (air) of Mach number 2.48 and the secondary flow (subsonic) which is induced from the ambient. The non-mixed length, which is the length within the ejector for which the primary and secondary flow remain visually distinct is used to characterize the mixing in the ejector. The operating pressures, flow rates and wall static pressures along the ejector have been measured. Two flow visualization tools have been implemented—time resolved schlieren and laser scattering flow visualization. An important contribution has been the development of in-house image processing algorithms on the MATLAB platform to detect the non-mixed length from the schlieren and laser scattering images. The ratio of mass flow rates of the secondary flow to primary flow (entrainment ratio) has been varied in a range of 0.15-0.69 for two locations of the primary nozzle in the ejector duct. Representative cases have been computed using commercial CFD tool (Fluent) to supplement the experiments. Significant outcomes of the study are—the non-mixed length quantified from the flow visualization images is observed to lie within 4.5 to 5.2 times the height of the mixing duct which is confirmed by the wall static pressure profiles. The flow through the supersonic ejector in the mixed regime is explained using corroborative evidences from different diagnostic tools. A reduction of the non-mixed length by 46.7% is observed at operating conditions when the nozzle is sufficiently overexpanded. The disturbance caused to the mixing layer due to unsteady shock-boundary layer interactions

  13. An Embedded Boundary Algorithm for Large Eddy Simulations in Complex Geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian CARLANESCU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a novel implementation of the embedded boundary algorithm in a Large Eddy Simulation CFD algorithm. The embedded boundary method aims at allowing the simulation of complex geometry flows on Cartesian computational grids, increasing the numerical accuracy of the method, while maintaining acceptable computational requirements and ease of implementation. The novelty of the present implementation consists in a new method for determining the interpolation points required for computing the state vector at the location required for a correct embedded boundary condition application. The paper also includes method validation results for two flow cases: a laminar Poiseuille flow and laminar and turbulent flows past circular cylinders. The simulation results are in good agreement with the analytical solution (where available and with experimental measurements in the literature.

  14. Laminar dispersion at low and high Peclet numbers in finite-length patterned microtubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrover, Alessandra; Cerbelli, Stefano

    2017-06-01

    Laminar dispersion of solutes in finite-length patterned microtubes is investigated at values of the Reynolds number below unity. Dispersion is strongly influenced by axial flow variations caused by patterns of periodic pillars and gaps in the flow direction. We focus on the Cassie-Baxter state, where the gaps are filled with air pockets, therefore enforcing free-slip boundary conditions at the flat liquid-air interface. The analysis of dispersion is approached by considering the temporal moments of solute concentration. Based on this approach, we investigate the dispersion properties in a wide range of values of the Peclet number, thus gaining insight into how the patterned structure of the microtube influences both the Taylor-Aris and the convection-dominated dispersion regimes. Numerical results for the velocity field and for the moment hierarchy are obtained by means of finite element method solution of the corresponding transport equations. We show that for different patterned geometries, in a range of Peclet values spanning up to six decades, the dispersion features in a patterned microtube are equivalent to those of a microtube characterized by a uniform slip velocity equal to the wall-average velocity of the patterned case. This suggests that two patterned micropipes with different geometry yet characterized by the same flow rate and average wall velocity will exhibit the same dispersion features as well as the same macroscopic pressure drop.

  15. The anchoring mechanism of a bluff-body stabilized laminar premixed flame

    KAUST Repository

    Kedia, Kushal S.

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the mechanism of the laminar premixed flame anchoring near a heat-conducting bluff-body. We use unsteady, fully resolved, two-dimensional simulations with detailed chemical kinetics and species transport for methane-air combustion. No artificial flame anchoring boundary conditions were imposed. Simulations show a shear-layer stabilized flame just downstream of the bluff-body, with a recirculation zone formed by the products of combustion. A steel bluff-body resulted in a slightly larger recirculation zone than a ceramic bluff-body; the size of which grew as the equivalence ratio was decreased. A significant departure from the conventional two-zone flame-structure is shown in the anchoring region. In this region, the reaction zone is associated with a large negative energy convection (directed from products to reactants) resulting in a negative flame-displacement speed. It is shown that the premixed flame anchors at an immediate downstream location near the bluff-body where favorable ignition conditions are established; a region associated with (1) a sufficiently high temperature impacted by the conjugate heat exchange between the heat-conducting bluff-body and the hot reacting flow and (2) a locally maximum stoichiometry characterized by the preferential diffusion effects. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  16. A new model for analyzing laminar forced convective enhanced heat transfer in latent functionally thermal fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wenqiang; BAI Fengwu

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a new model to analyze laminar forced convective enhanced heat transfer in latent functionally thermal fluid is developed. The main characteristics of the model are: I) a new formula of the specific heat at constant pressure is used; ii) a real heat transfer process is considered; that is, heat transfer processes occur not only between working fluid and microcapsules, but also between the mixture and tube wall; iii) the new method, which combines the newly developed axisymmetrical dual reciprocity boundary element method (DRBEM) with finite difference method (FDM), is used to solve the control equations of this problem. The new model is validated by experimental data.Some new physical results on the variational characteristics of the specific heat at constant pressure with space and time during phase-change process, the time-marching history of the phase-change interfaces and so on are obtained. Several main physical factors that affect enhanced heat transfer in latent functionally thermal fluid are numerically analyzed.Some new understandings for the mechanism of enhanced heat transfer in the functionally fluid are obtained.

  17. Laminar Mixed Convection in the Entrance Region of Horizontal and Inclined Semicircular Ducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef M. F. El Hasadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laminar mixed convection in the entrance region of horizontal and inclined semicircular ducts has been investigated. The governing momentum and energy equations were solved numerically using a marching technique with finite control volume approach following the SIMPLER algorithm. Results were obtained for thermal boundary condition of uniform heat input axially and uniform wall temperature circumferentially, incorporating Pr = 7, Re = 500, inclination angles (α = 0° and 20°, and a wide range of Grashof numbers. These results include velocity and temperature distributions at different axial locations as well as axial distribution of local Nusselt number and local wall friction factor. It was found that Nusselt number is close to the forced convection values near the entrance region, then decreases to minimum value as the distance from the entrance increases, and then rises due to the effect of free convection before reaching a constant value (fully developed. As Grashof number increases Nusselt number and wall friction factor increase in both developing and fully developed regions for horizontal and inclined ducts. A comparison with the experimental data in the thermal entrance region was also conducted and the comparison was satisfactory.

  18. Application of Entropy Concept for Shear Stress Distribution in Laminar Pipe Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Yeon Moon; Choo, Tai Ho; Jung, Donghwi; Seon, Yun Gwan; Kim, Joong Hoon

    2016-04-01

    In the river fluid mechanics, shear stress is calculated from frictional force caused by viscosity and fluctuating velocity. Traditional shear stress distribution equations have been widely used because of their simplicity. However, they have a critical limitation of requiring energy gradient which is generally difficult to estimate in practice. Especially, measuring velocity/velocity gradient on the boundary layer is difficult in practice. It requires point velocity throughout the entire cross section to calculate velocity gradient. This study proposes shear stress distribution equations for laminar flow based on entropy theory using mean velocity and entropy coefficient. The proposed equations are demonstrated and compared with measured shear stress distribution using Nikuradse's data. Results showed that the coefficient of determination is around 0.99 indicating that the proposed method well describes the true shear stress distribution. Therefore, it was proved that shear stress distribution can be easily and accurately estimated by using the proposed equations. (This research was supported by a gran(13AWMP-B066744-01) from Advanced Water Management Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean Government)

  19. The Response of an Elastic Splitter Plate Attached to a Cylinder to Laminar Pulsatile Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Kundu, Anup; Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Thompson, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    The flow-induced deformation of a thin, elastic splitter plate attached to the rear of a circular cylinder and subjected to laminar pulsatile inflow is investigated. The cylinder and elastic splitter plate are contained within a narrow channel and the Reynolds number is mostly restricted to Re = 100, primarily covering the two-dimensional flow regime. An in-house fluid-structure interaction code is employed for simulations, which couples a sharp-interface immersed boundary method for the fluid dynamics with a finite-element method to treat the structural dynamics. The structural solver is implicitly (two-way) coupled with the flow solver using a partitioned approach. This implicit coupling ensures numerical stability at low structure-fluid density ratios. A power spectrum analysis of the time-varying plate displacement shows that the plate oscillates at more than a single frequency for pulsatile inflow, compared to a single frequency observed for steady inflow. The multiple frequencies obtained for the former...

  20. Numerical simulation of laminar forced convection of water-CuO nanofluid inside a triangular duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghanajafi, Amir; Toghraie, Davood; Mehmandoust, Babak

    2017-01-01

    In this article, distilled water and CuO particles with volume fraction of 1%, 2% and 4% are numerically studied. The steady state flow regime is considered laminar with Reynolds number of 100, and nano-particles diameters are assumed 20 nm and 80 nm. The hydraulic diameter and the length of equilateral triangular channel are 8 mm and 1000 mm, respectively. The problem is solved for two different boundary conditions; firstly, constant heat flux for all sides as a validation approach; and secondly, constant heat flux for two sides and constant temperature for one side (hot plate). Convective heat transfer coefficient, Nusselt number, pressure loss through the channel, velocity distribution in cross section and temperature distribution on walls are investigated in detail. The fluid flow is supposed to be one-phase flow. It can be observed that nano-fluid leads to a remarkable enhancement on heat transfer coefficient. Furthermore, CuO particles increase pressure loss through the channel and velocity distribution in fully developed cross section of channel, as well. The computations reveal that the size of nano-particles has no significant influence on heat transfer properties. Besides, the study shows a good agreement between provided outcomes and experimental data available in the literature.

  1. Multiple laminar-turbulent transition cycles around a swept leading edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukund, R.; Narasimha, R.; Viswanath, P. R.; Crouch, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Certain interesting flow features involving multiple transition/relaminarization cycles on the leading edge of a swept wing at low speeds are reported here. The wing geometry tested had a circular nose and a leading edge sweep of 60°. Tests were made at a chord Reynolds number of 1.3 × 106 with model incidence α varied in the range of 3°-18° in discrete steps. Measurements made included wing chord-wise surface pressure distributions and wall shear stress fluctuations (using hot-film gages) within about 10 % of the chord in the leading edge zone. Results at α = 16° and 18° showed that several (often incomplete) transition cycles between laminar-like and turbulent-like flows occurred. These rather surprising results are attributable chiefly to the fact that the Launder acceleration parameter K (appropriately modified for swept wings) can exceed a critical range more than once along the contour of the airfoil in the leading edge region. Each such crossing results in a relaminarization followed by direct retransition to turbulence as K drops to sufficiently low values. It is further shown that the extent of each observed transition zone (of either type) is consistent with earlier data acquired in more detailed studies of direct transition and relaminarization. Swept leading edge boundary layers therefore pose strong challenges to numerical modelling.

  2. Direct velocity measurement and enhanced mixing in laminar flows over ultrahydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jia

    2005-11-01

    A series of experiment are presented studying the kinematics of water flowing over drag-reducing ultrahydrophobic surfaces. The surfaces are fabricated from silicon wafers using photolithography and are designed to incorporate patterns of microridges with precise spacing and alignment. These surfaces are reacted with an organosilane to achieve high hydrophobicity. Microridges with different widths, spacing and alignments are tested in a microchannel flow cell with rectangular cross-section. The velocity profile across the microchannel is measured with micro particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) capable of resolving the flow down to length scales well below the size of the surface features. A maximum slip velocity of >60% of the average velocity in the flow is observed at the center of the air-water interface supported between these hydrophobic microridges, and the no-slip boundary condition is found at the hydrophobic microridges. The μ-PIV measurements demonstrate that slip along the shear-free air-water interface supported between the hydrophobic micron-sized ridges is the primary mechanism responsible for the drag reduction. The experiment velocity and pressure drop measurement are compared with the prediction of numerical simulation and an analytical model. By aligning the hydrophobic microridges at an acute angle to the flow direction a secondary flow is produced which can significantly enhance mixing in this laminar flow.

  3. Laminar flow of an electrically conducting liquid through the channel of a cylindrical linear induction pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapusta, A.B.; Shamota, V.P.

    1979-04-01

    Laminar flow of an electrically conducting viscous incompressible fluid through the gap between two nonconducting, thin, and infinitely long coaxial cylinders is considered. The inner cylinder is filled with a ferromagnetic medium and the surface of the outer cylinder carries a distributed electric load of a uniform current density. The traveling external magnetic field in this problem is replaced with the uniform magnetic field of a long ring magnet moving parallel to the axis of the cylinders at a certain velocity. The continuity equation for the magnetic field reduces the system of second-degree differential MHD equations to a simpler form, with the Hartmann number and the magnetic Reynolds number as well as the N/sub Eu/(Euler).N/sub Re/(Reynolds) complex as the only parameters. The velocity distribution is found on the basis of the appropriate boundary conditions, for N/sub Ha/ = 2 and N/sub Ha/ is not equal to 2, respectively, and subsequently also the distribution of magnetic induction. The solution is exact and simply arrived at, applicable to any value of the Hartmann number or of other parameters. Numerical calculations indicate that large positive pressure gradients result in a high flow intensity at the outer wall, because the density of electromagnetic forces decreases along the radius. 1 reference, 3 figures.

  4. Laminar convective heat transfer characteristic of Al2O3/water nanofluid in a circular microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinavee, K.; Gogoi, T. K.; Pandey, M.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, laminar convective heat transfer characteristics Al2O3/water nanofluid in a circular microchannel is investigated using a two-phase (discrete phase) model. The computational fluid dynamic code FLUENT (ANSYS) is employed to solve the coupled momentum and energy equations with the boundary conditions of uniform wall heat flux and velocity at channel inlet. Detail analysis is done showing variation of wall temperature, fluid bulk mean temperature, heat transfer coefficient, Nusselt number, shear stress, friction, pressure drop, entropy generation etc. along the microchannel at two particle volume concentrations (1% and 4%) of the nanofluid. Comparison of results is provided between base and nanofluid and also for two cases, one with constant property and the other with variable temperature thermal conductivity and viscosity. Results show that heat transfer is enhanced in case of the nanofluid with low entropy generation and the heat transfer parameters increase with increase in nanoparticle volume concentration and Reynolds number. However, use of nanofluid also causes increase in pressure drop and shear stress. A comparison of the constant and variable property model showed that heat transfer is further enhanced; entropy, shear stress and pressure drop further decrease when temperature dependent properties of the nanofluid are considered instead of constant properties.

  5. Laminar forced convection with viscous dissipation in a Couette-Poiseuille flow between parallel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, Orhan; Avci, Mete [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey). Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-08-15

    In this study, analytical solutions are obtained to predict laminar heat-convection in a Couette-Poiseuille flow between two plane parallel plates with a simultaneous pressure gradient and an axial movement of the upper plate. A Newtonian fluid with constant properties is considered with an emphasis on the viscous-dissipation effect. Both hydrodynamically and thermally fully-developed flow cases are investigated. The axial heat-conduction in the fluid is neglected. Two different orientations of the thermal boundary-conditions are considered: the constant heat-flux at the upper plate with an adiabatic lower plate (Case A) and the constant heat-flux at the lower plate with an adiabatic upper plate (Case B). For different values of the relative velocity of the upper plate, the effect of the modified Brinkman number on the temperature distribution and the Nusselt number are discussed. Comparison of the present analytical results for a special case with those available in the literature indicates an excellent agreement. (author)

  6. A study of the prediction of cruise noise and laminar flow control noise criteria for subsonic air transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, G.; Mungur, P.

    1979-01-01

    General procedures for the prediction of component noise levels incident upon airframe surfaces during cruise are developed. Contributing noise sources are those associated with the propulsion system, the airframe and the laminar flow control (LFC) system. Transformation procedures from the best prediction base of each noise source to the transonic cruise condition are established. Two approaches to LFC/acoustic criteria are developed. The first is a semi-empirical extension of the X-21 LFC/acoustic criteria to include sensitivity to the spectrum and directionality of the sound field. In the second, the more fundamental problem of how sound excites boundary layer disturbances is analyzed by deriving and solving an inhomogeneous Orr-Sommerfeld equation in which the source terms are proportional to the production and dissipation of sound induced fluctuating vorticity. Numerical solutions are obtained and compared with corresponding measurements. Recommendations are made to improve and validate both the cruise noise prediction methods and the LFC/acoustic criteria.

  7. Final Report for the Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2030 to 2035 Period, N+3 Supersonic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, John; Norstrud, Nicole; Stelmack, Marc; Skoch, Craig

    2010-01-01

    The N+3 Final Report documents the work and progress made by Lockheed Martin Aeronautics in response to the NASA sponsored program "N+3 NRA Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2030 to 2035 Period." The key technical objective of this effort was to generate promising supersonic concepts for the 2030 to 2035 timeframe and to develop plans for maturing the technologies required to make those concepts a reality. The N+3 program is aligned with NASA's Supersonic Project and is focused on providing alternative system-level solutions capable of overcoming the efficiency, environmental, and performance barriers to practical supersonic flight

  8. Turbulent-laminar patterns in plane Poiseuille flow

    CERN Document Server

    Tuckerman, Laurette S; Schrobsdorff, Hecke; Schneider, Tobias M; Gibson, John F

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent-laminar banded patterns in plane Poiseuille flow are studied via direct numerical simulations in a tilted and translating computational domain using a parallel version of the pseudospectral code Channelflow. 3D visualizations via the streamwise vorticity of an instantaneous and a time-averaged pattern are presented, as well as 2D visualizations of the average velocity field and the turbulent kinetic energy. Simulations for Reynolds numbers descending from 2300 to 700 show the gradual development from uniform turbulence to a pattern with wavelength 20 half-gaps near Re=1900, to a pattern with wavelength 40 near Re=1300 and finally to laminar flow near Re=800. These transitions are tracked quantitatively via diagnostics using the amplitude and phase of the Fourier transform and its probability distribution. The propagation velocity of the pattern is approximately that of the mean flux and is a decreasing function of Reynolds number. Examination of the time-averaged flow shows that a turbulent band is ...

  9. Superhydrophobic drag reduction in laminar flows: a critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choongyeop; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Jin

    2016-12-01

    A gas in between micro- or nanostructures on a submerged superhydrophobic (SHPo) surface allows the liquid on the structures to flow with an effective slip. If large enough, this slippage may entail a drag reduction appreciable for many flow systems. However, the large discrepancies among the slippage levels reported in the literature have led to a widespread misunderstanding on the drag-reducing ability of SHPo surfaces. Today we know that the amount of slip, generally quantified with a slip length, is mainly determined by the structural features of SHPo surfaces, such as the pitch, solid fraction, and pattern type, and further affected by secondary factors, such as the state of the liquid-gas interface. Reviewing the experimental data of laminar flows in the literature comprehensively and comparing them with the theoretical predictions, we provide a global picture of the liquid slip on structured surfaces to assist in rational design of SHPo surfaces for drag reduction. Because the trapped gas, called plastron, vanishes along with its slippage effect in most application conditions, lastly we discuss the recent efforts to prevent its loss. This review is limited to laminar flows, for which the SHPo drag reduction is reasonably well understood.

  10. Cortical laminar necrosis in dengue encephalitis-a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Rizvi, Imran; Ingole, Rajan; Jain, Amita; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Kumar, Neeraj; Batra, Dhruv

    2017-04-20

    Dengue encephalitis is a rare neurological manifestation of dengue fever. Its clinical presentation is similar to other viral encephalitides and encephalopathy. No single specific finding on magnetic resonance imaging of dengue encephalitis has yet been documented. They are highly variable and atypical. A 15-year boy presented with fever, the headache and altered sensorium of 12-day duration. On neurological examination, his Glasgow Coma Scale score was 10 (E3M4V3). There was no focal neurological deficit. Laboratory evaluation revealed leukopenia and marked thrombocytopenia. Dengue virus IgM antibody was positive both in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed signal changes in bilateral parietooccipital and left frontal regions (left hemisphere more involved than the right hemisphere). There was gyriform enhancement bilateral parietooccipital regions consistent with cortical laminar necrosis. Bilaterally diffuse subcortical white matter was also involved and subtle T2 hyperintensity involving both basal ganglia was noted. Gradient echo sequence revealed presence of hemorrhage in the subcortical white matter. Patient was treated conservatively and received platelet transfusion. Patient became fully conscious after 7 days. In a patient with highly suggestive dengue e\\ephalitis, we describe an unusual magnetic resonance imaging finding. This report is possibly the first instance of cortical laminar necrosis in such a setting.

  11. Boundary layer structure in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Nan; Schumacher, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    The structure of the boundary layers in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection is studied by means of three-dimensional direct numerical simulations. We consider convection in a cylindrical cell at an aspect ratio one for Rayleigh numbers of Ra=3e+9 and 3e+10 at fixed Prandtl number Pr=0.7. Similar to the experimental results in the same setup and for the same Prandtl number, the structure of the laminar boundary layers of the velocity and temperature fields is found to deviate from the prediction of the Prandtl-Blasius-Pohlhausen theory. Deviations decrease when a dynamical rescaling of the data with an instantaneously defined boundary layer thickness is performed and the analysis plane is aligned with the instantaneous direction of the large-scale circulation in the closed cell. Our numerical results demonstrate that important assumptions which enter existing classical laminar boundary layer theories for forced and natural convection are violated, such as the strict two-dimensionality of the dynamics or the s...

  12. Compressibility Effects in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yu-Hui; PEI Jie; CHEN Jun; SHE Zhen-Su

    2008-01-01

    Local cascade (LC) scheme and space-time correlations are used to study turbulent structures and their convection behaviour in the near-wall region of compressible boundary layers at Ma = 0.8 and 1.3. The convection velocities of fluctuating velocity components u (streamwise) and v (vertical) are investigated by statistically analysing scale-dependent ensembles of LC structures. The results suggest that u is convected with entropy perturbations while v with an isentropic process. An abnormal thin layer distinct from the conventional viscous sub-layer is discovered in the immediate vicinity of the wall (y+≤1) in supersonic flows. While in the region 1 < y+ < 30,streamwise streaks dominate velocity, density and temperature fluctuations, the abnormal thin layer is dominated by spanwise streaks in vertical velocity and density fluctuations, where pressure and density fluctuations are strongly correlated. The LC scheme is proven to be effective in studying the nature of supersonic flows and compressibility effects on wall-bounded motions.

  13. Research of low boom and low drag supersonic aircraft design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xiaoqiang; Li Zhanke; Song Bifeng

    2014-01-01

    Sonic boom reduction will be an issue of utmost importance in future supersonic trans-port, due to strong regulations on acoustic nuisance. The paper describes a new multi-objective optimization method for supersonic aircraft design. The method is developed by coupling Seebass-George-Darden (SGD) inverse design method and multi-objective genetic algorithm. Based on the method, different codes are developed. Using a computational architecture, a concep-tual supersonic aircraft design environment (CSADE) is constructed. The architecture of CSADE includes inner optimization level and out optimization level. The low boom configuration is gener-ated in inner optimization level by matching the target equivalent area distribution and actual equivalent area distribution. And low boom/low drag configuration is generated in outer optimiza-tion level by using NSGA-II multi-objective genetic algorithm to optimize the control parameters of SGD method and aircraft shape. Two objective functions, low sonic boom and low wave drag, are considered in CSADE. Physically reasonable Pareto solutions are obtained from the present optimization. Some supersonic aircraft configurations are selected from Pareto front and the optimization results indicate that the swept forward wing configuration has benefits in both sonic boom reduction and wave drag reduction. The results are validated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis.

  14. Titanium honeycomb structure. [for supersonic aircraft wing structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R. A.; Elrod, S. D.; Lovell, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    A brazed titanium honeycomb sandwich system for supersonic transport wing cover panels provides the most efficient structure spanwise, chordwise, and loadwise. Flutter testing shows that high wing stiffness is most efficient in a sandwich structure. This structure also provides good thermal insulation if liquid fuel is carried in direct contact with the wing structure in integral fuel tanks.

  15. SIMULATION OF THE LASER DISCHARGE IN A SUPERSONIC GAS FLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tropina, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A heat model of the laser discharge in a supersonic turbulent gas flow has been developed. A numerical investigation of the error of the method of velocity measurements, which is based on the nitrogen molecules excitation, has been carried out. It is shown that fast gas heating by the discharge causes the velocity profiles deformation.

  16. 76 FR 30231 - Civil Supersonic Aircraft Panel Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... for attendees. The purpose of the meeting is to raise public awareness of the continuing technological... joint meeting of the 159th Acoustical Society of America and NOISE-CON 2010 in Baltimore, Maryland 21202. The purpose of these meetings is to raise public awareness on advances in supersonic technology,...

  17. Experimental study of mixing enhancement using pylon in supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Manmohan; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2016-01-01

    The Supersonic Combustion Ramjet (SCRAMJET) engine has been recognized as one of the most promising air breathing propulsion system for the supersonic/hypersonic flight mission requirements. Mixing and combustion of fuel inside scramjet engine is one of the major challenging tasks. In the current study the main focus has been to increase the penetration and mixing of the secondary jet inside the test chamber at supersonic speeds. In view of this, experiments are conducted to evaluate the effect of pylon on the mixing of secondary jet injection into supersonic mainstream flow at Mach 1.65. Two different pylons are investigated and the results are compared with those obtained by normal injection from a flat plate. The mixing studies are performed by varying the height of the pylon while keeping all other parameters the same. The study mainly focused on analyzing the area of spread and penetration depth achieved by different injection schemes based on the respective parameters. The measurements involved Mie scattering visualization and the flow features are analyzed using Schlieren images. The penetration height and spread area are the two parameters that are used for analyzing and comparing the performance of the pylons. It is observed that the secondary jet injection carried out from behind the big pylon resulted in maximum penetration and spread area of the jet as compared to the small pylon geometry. Moreover it is also evident that for obtaining maximum spreading and penetration of the jet, the same needs to be achieved at the injection location.

  18. Multiresolution analysis of density fluctuation in supersonic mixing layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Due to the difficulties in measuring supersonic density field, the multiresolution analysis of supersonic mixing layer based on experimental images is still a formidable challenge. By utilizing the recently developed nanoparticle based planar laser scattering method, the density field of a supersonic mixing layer was measured at high spatiotemporal resolution. According to the dynamic behavior of coherent structures, the multiresolution characteristics of density fluctuation signals and density field images were studied based on Taylor’s hypothesis of space-time conversion and wavelet analysis. The wavelet coefficients reflect the characteristics of density fluctuation signals at different scales, and the detailed coefficients reflect the differences of approximation at adjacent levels. The density fluctuation signals of supersonic mixing layer differ from the periodic sine signal and exhibit similarity to the fractal Koch signal. The similarity at different scales reveals the fractal characteristic of mixing layer flowfield. The two-dimensional wavelet decomposition and reconstruction of density field images extract the approximate and detailed signals at different scales, which effectively resolve the characteristic structures of the flowfield at different scales.

  19. A flamelet model for turbulent diffusion combustion in supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE; ChunHian

    2010-01-01

    In order to develop a turbulent diffusion combustion model for supersonic flow, the physical argument of the extension of the flamelet model to supersonic flow was presented, and the flow field of a hydrogen/air diffusion combustion generated by axisymmetric supersonic jets was numerically simulated by employing the flamelet model. Using the experimental data, value of the model coefficient of scalar dissipation in the flamelet model was revised specifically for supersonic flow. The computational results of the modified flamelet model were compared with the experimental results, and it was indicated that the precision of the modified flamelet model was satisfying. Based on the numerical results and flamelet theory, the influence mechanisms of turbulence fluctuation on the average state equation and chemical reaction rate were studied for the first time. It was found that the fluctuation correlation of species mass fractions and temperature has little effect on the averaged gas state equation; the temperature fluctuation decreases the product of H2O, but its effect is small; the fluctuation of species mass fractions increases the product of H2O in the region close to oxidizer while decreases the product of H2O in other regions; the fluctuation correlation of species mass fractions and temperature largely decreases the product of H2O.

  20. Toward Active Control of Noise from Hot Supersonic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    applied a double divergence directly to the incompressible Reynolds stress giving Ö U’UI dxgJ = -£ijk(sijUJk + ryWfc). (1) This neglected...SUPERSONIC JETS | QUARTERLY RPT. 6 ^ EXPERIMENTAL FACILITY j^i;r\\’ii Mo/ P I V • Page 6 • Prev • Wart • Last • Full Screen • Close

  1. Research of low boom and low drag supersonic aircraft design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xiaoqiang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sonic boom reduction will be an issue of utmost importance in future supersonic transport, due to strong regulations on acoustic nuisance. The paper describes a new multi-objective optimization method for supersonic aircraft design. The method is developed by coupling Seebass–George–Darden (SGD inverse design method and multi-objective genetic algorithm. Based on the method, different codes are developed. Using a computational architecture, a conceptual supersonic aircraft design environment (CSADE is constructed. The architecture of CSADE includes inner optimization level and out optimization level. The low boom configuration is generated in inner optimization level by matching the target equivalent area distribution and actual equivalent area distribution. And low boom/low drag configuration is generated in outer optimization level by using NSGA-II multi-objective genetic algorithm to optimize the control parameters of SGD method and aircraft shape. Two objective functions, low sonic boom and low wave drag, are considered in CSADE. Physically reasonable Pareto solutions are obtained from the present optimization. Some supersonic aircraft configurations are selected from Pareto front and the optimization results indicate that the swept forward wing configuration has benefits in both sonic boom reduction and wave drag reduction. The results are validated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD analysis.

  2. Aerodynamic coefficients of stationary dry inclined bridge cables in laminar flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteoni, Giulia; Georgakis, Christos; Ricciardelli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    conditions, i.e. dry, wet and icy, in laminar and turbulent flow, has been initiated at the new DTU/Force Climatic Wind Tunnel facility in Denmark. This paper covers selected results of the comparative study, i.e. aerodynamic coefficients of dry inclined cables in laminar flow conditions....

  3. Oxidative stress in hoof laminar tissue of horses with lethal gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskoski, Luciane Maria; Dittrich, Rosangela Locatelli; Valadão, Carlos Augusto Araújo; Brum, Juliana Sperotto; Brandão, Yara; Brito, Harald Fernando Vicente; de Sousa, Renato Silva

    2016-03-01

    Tissue damage caused by oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases in animals and man, and is believed to play a role in the development of laminitis in horses. The aim of this study was to investigate the oxidative stress associated with laminar lesions in horses with lethal gastrointestinal disorders. Laminar tissue samples of the hoof of 30 horses were used. Tissue samples were divided as follows: six healthy horses (control group-CG), and 24 horses that died after complications of gastrointestinal diseases (group suffering from gastrointestinal disorders-GDG). Superoxide dismutase (SOD2) and nitrotyrosine immunostaining and the severity of laminar lesions were evaluated. Presence of laminar lesions and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine and SOD2 were only evident in horses from the GDG group. Thus, oxidative stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of laminar lesions secondary to gastrointestinal disorders.

  4. Conditionally-Sampled Turbulent and Nonturbulent Measurements of Entropy Generation Rate in the Transition Region of Boundary Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. McEligot; J. R. Wolf; K. P. Nolan; E. J. Walsh; R. J. Volino

    2006-05-01

    Conditionally-sampled boundary layer data for an accelerating transitional boundary layer have been analyzed to calculate the entropy generation rate in the transition region. By weighing the nondimensional dissipation coefficient for the laminar-conditioned-data and turbulent-conditioned-data with the intermittency factor the average entropy generation rate in the transition region can be determined and hence be compared to the time averaged data and correlations for steady laminar and turbulent flows. It is demonstrated that this method provides, for the first time, an accurate and detailed picture of the entropy generation rate during transition. The data used in this paper have been taken from detailed boundary layer measurements available in the literature. This paper provides, using an intermittency weighted approach, a methodology for predicting entropy generation in a transitional boundary layer.

  5. Conditionally-Sampled Turbulent and Non-turbulent Measurements of Entropy Generation Rate in the Transition Region of Boundary Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmond J. Walsh; Kevin P. Nolan; Donald M. McEligot; Ralph J. Volino; Adrian Bejan

    2007-05-01

    Conditionally-sampled boundary layer data for an accelerating transitional boundary layer have been analyzed to calculate the entropy generation rate in the transition region. By weighing the nondimensional dissipation coefficient for the laminar-conditioned-data and turbulent-conditioned-data with the intermittency factor the average entropy generation rate in the transition region can be determined and hence be compared to the time averaged data and correlations for steady laminar and turbulent flows. It is demonstrated that this method provides, for the first time, an accurate and detailed picture of the entropy generation rate during transition. The data used in this paper have been taken from detailed boundary layer measurements available in the literature. This paper provides, using an intermittency weighted approach, a methodology for predicting entropy generation in a transitional boundary layer.

  6. Experimental study of the boundary layer over an airfoil in plunging motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. Rasi Marzabadi; M. R. Soltani

    2012-01-01

    This is an experimental study on the boundary layer over an airfoil under steady and unsteady conditions.It specifically deals with the effect of plunging oscillation on the laminar/turbulent characteristics of the boundary layer.The wind tunnel measurements involved surfacemounted hot-film sensors and boundary-layer rake.The experiments were conducted at Reynolds numbers of 0.42 × 106 to 0.84 × 106 and the reduced frequency was varied from 0.01 to 0.1 1.The results of the quasi-wall-shear stress as well as the boundary layer velocity profiles provided important information about the state of the boundary layer over the suction surface of the airfoil in both static and dynamic cases.For the static tests,boundary layer transition occurred through a laminar separation bubble.By increasing the angle of attack,disturbances and the transition location moved toward the leading edge.For the dynamic tests,earlier transition occurred with increasing rather than decreasing effective angle of attack.The mean angle of attack and the oscillating parameters significantly affected the state of the boundary layer.By increasing the reduced frequency,the boundary layer transition was promoted to the upstroke portion of the equivalent angle of attack,but the quasi skin friction coefficient was decreased.

  7. Supersonic flow about cone eith ijection of gas through its surface described by power law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, A. M.; Zakrevskiy, V. A.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of intensive mass transfer on the supersonic flow of gas about a cone of finite length is investigated. The mathematical model describing the interaction of the primary flow and the transverse flow formed by injection is the boundary problem for a system of equations presented with boundary conditions on the cone and on the contact discontinuity. It is found that the contact surface is nonrectilinear when the injected gas is described by a power law and that the thickness of the layer coming in contact with the cone increases as the intensity of the injection becomes higher. The distribution of the pressure coefficient along a finite cone is calculated as a function of the parameter(s) associated with the injection flow rate, and the Mach number of the oncoming stream. It is found that the pressure coefficient drops off along the generatrix of a cone for all velocities of injection and oncoming stream when the injection is distributed. As the injection intensity increases, the pressure coefficient on the surface increases.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation of Supersonic Inlet Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    percentage error in the first derivative may be computed as a function of the resolution, using kh = 2%/N, and error= 100 \\k’h — kh\\/kh. Figure 2 compares...the C-D schemes to the standard Pade schemes. Note that all the schemes show 100 % error for the two-delta waves (two points per wave). This is...are needed at the boundary nodes to close the system. Consider j = 1. The following general expression may be written for f[ and f": aQf [ + axf2 + h

  9. Thermal Design and Analysis of the Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test Vehicle for the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropietro, A. J.; Pauken, Michael; Sunada, Eric; Gray, Sandria

    2013-01-01

    The thermal design and analysis of the experimental Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) vehicle is presented. The SFDT vehicle is currently being designed as a platform to help demonstrate key technologies for NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project. The LDSD project is charged by NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) with the task of advancing the state of the art in Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems by developing and testing three new technologies required for landing heavier payloads on Mars. The enabling technologies under development consist of a large 33.5 meter diameter Supersonic Ringsail (SSRS) parachute and two different types of Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) devices - a robotic class, SIAD-R, that inflates to a 6 meter diameter torus, and an exploration class, SIAD-E, that inflates to an 8 meter diameter isotensoid. As part of the technology development effort, the various elements of the new supersonic decelerator system must be tested in a Mars-like environment. This is currently planned to be accomplished by sending a series of SFDT vehicles into Earth's stratosphere. Each SFDT vehicle will be lifted to a stable float altitude by a large helium carrier balloon. Once at altitude, the SFDT vehicles will be released from their carrier balloon and spun up via spin motors to provide trajectory stability. An onboard third stage solid rocket motor will propel each test vehicle to supersonic flight in the upper atmosphere. After main engine burnout, each vehicle will be despun and testing of the deceleration system will begin: first an inflatable decelerator will be deployed around the aeroshell to increase the drag surface area, and then the large parachute will be deployed to continue the deceleration and return the vehicle back to the Earth's surface. The SFDT vehicle thermal system must passively protect the vehicle structure and its components from cold temperatures experienced during the

  10. On the spatial linear growth of gravity-capillary water waves sheared by a laminar air flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsai, Y.S.; Grass, A.J.; Simons, R.R.

    2005-01-01

    The initial growth of mechanically generated small amplitude water waves below a laminar air stream was examined numerically and experimentally in order to explore the primary growth mechanism, that is, the interfacial instability of coupled laminar air and water flows. Measurements of the laminar v

  11. Definition of Turbulent Boundary-Layer with Entropy Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Rui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the entropy increment and the viscosity dissipation in turbulent boundary-layer is systematically investigated. Through theoretical analysis and direct numerical simulation (DNS, an entropy function fs is proposed to distinguish the turbulent boundary-layer from the external flow. This approach is proved to be reliable after comparing its performance in the following complex flows, namely, low-speed airfoil flows with different wall temperature, supersonic cavity-ramp flow dominated by the combination of free-shear layer, larger recirculation and shocks, and the hypersonic flow past an aeroplane configuration. Moreover, fs is deduced from the point of energy, independent of any particular turbulent quantities. That is, this entropy concept could be utilized by other engineering applications related with turbulent boundary-layer, such as turbulence modelling transition prediction and engineering thermal protection.

  12. Optimal Shockwave Boundary Layer Interaction Control for Supersonic Mixed Compression Inlets Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SynGenics Corporation proposes a program that incorporates systems engineering processes, Response Surface Methods, and state-of-the-art numerical methods to develop...

  13. Experimental Investigation of a Supersonic Boundary Layer Including Favorable Pressure Gradient Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    Inc. model R500A refrigeration-type dryers. It was then passed through a centrifugal moisture and particle separator, and filtered through a layer of...more seed particles than a clump of cold, dense fluid (it would have more "free space" between the fluid molecules for the seed particles to occupy...Calculation ................................................................................................. 3-3 3.3 Particle Validation

  14. Boundary-Layer Transition Experiments on Sharp, Slender Cones in Supersonic Freeflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-30

    filled with thermal insulation. Pin-supported., collapsable, thermal barriers were posi- tioned over the model entrance and txit holes to complete the...pressure level was adjusted, via suction, to match the desired test condition, thermocouples were withdrawn, the thermal barriers were dropped, and the...gun fired. Model traversal of the test chamber was always complete within two seconds after the signal was given to drop the thermal barriers . Figures

  15. Validation of Large Eddy Simulation in a Relaminarizing Boundary Layer Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Jiang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Coexistence of laminar, transitional and turbulent flow regimes is very common in blood flows through arteries, airflows in human respiratory systems, and indoor airflow etc. Due to the complexity of flow physics involved, most Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS turbulence models are not suitable for these flows because they are designed primarily for high Reynolds number turbulent flows. In this paper, large eddy simulation with dynamic subgrid scale model has been applied to simulate the flow in a relaminarizing boundary layer that undergoes reverse transition from turbulent state to laminar one. Simulated mean velocities and turbulent intensities are in good agreement with corresponding experimental data at different streamwise positions where different flow regimes exist. The appropriateness of dynamic subgrid scale model for the study of relaminarizing boundary layer flow is demonstrated by the variation of subgrid constant: it is somewhat constant in fully turbulent regime, decreases in transitional regime and reaches zero in laminar regime. Comparison of the experimental data and computational results from three low Reynolds number RANS models shows that they do not adequately predict the flow relaminarization. The present study suggests the use of large eddy simulation with dynamic model in the study of complex flows where a combination of flow regimes (laminar, transitional, and turbulent may exist.

  16. GASP cloud encounter statistics - Implications for laminar flow control flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasperson, W. H.; Nastrom, G. D.; Davis, R. E.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The cloud observation archive from the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) is analyzed in order to derive the probability of cloud encounter at altitudes normally flown by commercial airliners, for application to a determination of the feasability of Laminar Flow Control (LFC) on long-range routes. The probability of cloud encounter is found to vary significantly with season. Several meteorological circulation features are apparent in the latitudinal distribution of cloud cover. The cloud encounter data are shown to be consistent with the classical midlatitude cyclone model with more clouds encountered in highs than in lows. Aircraft measurements of route-averaged time-in-clouds fit a gamma probability distribution model which is applied to estimate the probability of extended cloud encounter, and the associated loss of LFC effectiveness along seven high-density routes. The probability is demonstrated to be low.

  17. Cortical laminar necrosis in brain infarcts: serial MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siskas, N.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Ioannidis, I.; Charitandi, A.; Dimitriadis, A.S. [Radiology Department, AHEPA University Hospital, Aristotele University of Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2003-05-01

    High-signal cortical lesions are observed on T1-weighted images in cases of brain infarct. Histological examination has demonstrated these to be ''cortical laminar necrosis'', without haemorrhage or calcification. We report serial MRI in this condition in 12 patients with brain infarcts. We looked at high-signal lesions on T1-weighted images, chronological changes in signal intensity and contrast enhancement. High-signal cortical lesions began to appear about 2 weeks after the ictus, were prominent at 1 - 2 months, then became less evident, but occasionally remained for up to 1.5 years. They gave high signal or were isointense on T2-weighted images and did not give low signal at any stage. Contrast enhancement of these lesions was prominent at 1 - 2 months, and less apparent from 3 months, but was seen up to 5 months. (orig.)

  18. Pulsating laminar pipe flows with sinusoidal mass flux variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünsal, B.; Ray, S.; Durst, F.; Ertunç, Ö.

    2005-11-01

    Combined analytical and experimental investigation of sinusoidal mass flow-controlled, pulsating, laminar and fully developed pipe flow was carried out. The experimental investigation employed a mass flow control unit built at LSTM-Erlangen for the present investigation. For the analytical investigation, the equations describing such flows were normalized to allow for a general solution, depending only on the normalized amplitude mA* of the mass flow pulsation and the normalized frequency F. The analytical and experimental results are presented in this normalized way and it is shown that good agreement between the results of the authors is obtained. A diagram is presented for the condition of flow reversal in terms of the dimensionless frequency F and the mass flow rate amplitude mA*.

  19. Lineage-specific laminar organization of cortical GABAergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciceri, Gabriele; Dehorter, Nathalie; Sols, Ignasi; Huang, Z Josh; Maravall, Miguel; Marín, Oscar

    2013-09-01

    In the cerebral cortex, pyramidal cells and interneurons are generated in distant germinal zones, and so the mechanisms that control their precise assembly into specific microcircuits remain an enigma. Here we report that cortical interneurons labeled at the clonal level do not distribute randomly but rather have a strong tendency to cluster in the mouse neocortex. This behavior is common to different classes of interneurons, independently of their origin. Interneuron clusters are typically contained within one or two adjacent cortical layers, are largely formed by isochronically generated neurons and populate specific layers, as revealed by unbiased hierarchical clustering methods. Our results suggest that different progenitor cells give rise to interneurons populating infra- and supragranular cortical layers, which challenges current views of cortical neurogenesis. Thus, specific lineages of cortical interneurons seem to be produced to primarily mirror the laminar structure of the cerebral cortex, rather than its columnar organization.

  20. Downstream plasma parameters in laminar shocks from ion kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedalin, M.

    2016-10-01

    Ion dynamics in oblique shocks is governed by the macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of the shock front. In laminar shocks, these fields are time-independent and depend only on the coordinate along the shock normal. The shock ramp is narrow and the ion motion across the shock is manifestly non-adiabatic. The ion distribution just behind the ramp is significantly non-gyrotropic. Gyrotropy is achieved well behind the ramp mainly due to the gyrophase mixing. The asymptotic values of the ion density and temperature are determined by the eventual collisionless relaxation of the gyrating ion distribution. Given a distribution at the downstream edge of the ramp, the moments of the distribution after gyrophase mixing are derived using proper spatial averaging. The obtained expressions can be used for independent determination of the downstream plasma state and implementation in Rankine-Hugoniot relations.