WorldWideScience

Sample records for supersonic jet engine

  1. Conceptual Design of a Supersonic Jet Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Kareliusson, Joakim; Nordqvist, Melker

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is a response to the request for proposal issued by a joint collaboration between the AIAA Foundation and ASME/IGTI as a student competition to design a new turbofan engine intended for a conceptual supersonic business jet expected to enter service in 2025. Due to the increasing competition in the aircraft industry and the more stringent environmental legislations the new engine is expected to provide a lower fuel burn than the current engine intended for the aircraft to increase ...

  2. Mixed exhaust flow supersonic jet engine and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klees, G.W.

    1993-06-08

    A method of operating a supersonic jet engine installation is described comprising (a) providing an engine having a variable area air inlet means and an outlet to discharge engine exhaust; (b) providing a secondary air passageway means; (c) receiving ambient air in the air inlet means and providing the ambient air as primary air to the engine inlet and secondary air to the secondary air passageway means; (d) providing a mixing section having an inlet portion and an exit portion, utilizing the mixing section in directing the exhaust from the engine to primary convergent/divergent exit passageway segments, where the exhaust is discharged at supersonic velocity as primary flow components, and directing secondary air flow from the secondary air passageway means to secondary exit passageway segments which are interspersed with the primary segments and from which the secondary air is discharged at subsonic velocity as secondary flow components; and (e) providing an exhaust section to receive the primary and secondary flow components in a mixing region and causing the primary and secondary flow components to mix to create a supersonic mixed flow, the exhaust section having a variable area final nozzle through which the mixed flow is discharged.

  3. Development of semi-free jet test facility for supersonic engine; Choonsoku engine shiken shisetsu semi free jet shiken sochi no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, T.; Taguchi, H.; Omi, J.; Sakamoto, K. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-01-01

    IHI has been developing the SETF (Supersonic Engine Test Facility) to aim at the research and development of engines for the next generation commercial supersonic transport in the NAL (National Aerospace Laboratory in Japan). The SETF will supply the functions to test the supersonic engine performance in high altitude flight condition and supersonic intake-engine matching. The semi-free jet test mode was adopted for the supersonic intake-engine matching test, but this test configuration has not been conducted previously in Japan and there were a large number of unknown factors. IHI has developed a sub-scale test model in cooperation with NAL to identify the test conditions and a start sequence of the semi-free jet test mode. In addition, the designs of facility component were optimized and verified by using the CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) method. (author)

  4. Low-Boom and Low-Drag Optimization of the Twin Engine Version of Silent Supersonic Business Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Koma; Kumano, Takayasu; Yonezawa, Masahito; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Jeong, Shinkyu; Obayashi, Shigeru

    Multi-Objective Optimization has been applied to a design problem of the twin engine concept for Silent Supersonic Business Jet (SSBJ). This problem aims to find main wing, body, tail wing and engine nacelle configurations, which can minimize both sonic boom and drag in a supersonic cruising flight. The multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA) coupled with the Kriging model has been used to globally and effectively search for optimal design candidates in the multi-objective problem. The drag and the sonic boom have been evaluated by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation and the waveform parameter method. As a result, the present optimization has successfully obtained low-boom and low-drag design candidates, which are better than the baseline design by more than 40% regarding each performance. Moreover, the structure of design space has been visualized by the self-organizing map (SOM).

  5. Supersonic induction plasma jet modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selezneva, S.E. E-mail: svetlana2@hermes.usherbS_Selezneva2@hermes.usherb; Boulos, M.I

    2001-06-01

    Numerical simulations have been applied to study the argon plasma flow downstream of the induction plasma torch. It is shown that by means of the convergent-divergent nozzle adjustment and chamber pressure reduction, a supersonic plasma jet can be obtained. We investigate the supersonic and a more traditional subsonic plasma jets impinging onto a normal substrate. Comparing to the subsonic jet, the supersonic one is narrower and much faster. Near-substrate velocity and temperature boundary layers are thinner, so the heat flux near the stagnation point is higher in the supersonic jet. The supersonic plasma jet is characterized by the electron overpopulation and the domination of the recombination over the dissociation, resulting into the heating of the electron gas. Because of these processes, the supersonic induction plasma permits to separate spatially different functions (dissociation and ionization, transport and deposition) and to optimize each of them. The considered configuration can be advantageous in some industrial applications, such as plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition of diamond and polymer-like films and in plasma spraying of nanoscaled powders.

  6. Supersonic Injection of Aerated Liquid Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhari, Abhijit; Sallam, Khaled

    2016-11-01

    A computational study of the exit flow of an aerated two-dimensional jet from an under-expanded supersonic nozzle is presented. The liquid sheet is operating within the annular flow regime and the study is motivated by the application of supersonic nozzles in air-breathing propulsion systems, e.g. scramjet engines, ramjet engines and afterburners. The simulation was conducted using VOF model and SST k- ω turbulence model. The test conditions included: jet exit of 1 mm and mass flow rate of 1.8 kg/s. The results show that air reaches transonic condition at the injector exit due to the Fanno flow effects in the injector passage. The aerated liquid jet is alternately expanded by Prandtl-Meyer expansion fan and compressed by oblique shock waves due to the difference between the back (chamber) pressure and the flow pressure. The process then repeats itself and shock (Mach) diamonds are formed at downstream of injector exit similar to those typical of exhaust plumes of propulsion system. The present results, however, indicate that the flow field of supersonic aerated liquid jet is different from supersonic gas jets due to the effects of water evaporation from the liquid sheet. The contours of the Mach number, static pressure of both cases are compared to the theory of gas dynamics.

  7. Multiobjective Design Optimization of Supersonic Jet Engine in Different Cruise Mach Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Masamichi; Sato, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Taguchi, Hideyuki

    The aim of this paper is to apply a multi-objective optimization generic algorithm (MOGA) to the conceptual design of the hypersonic/supersonic vehicles with different cruise Mach number. The pre-cooled turbojet engine is employed as a propulsion system and some engine parameters such as the precooler size, compressor size, compression ratio and fuel type are varied in the analysis. The result shows that the optimum cruise Mach number is about 4 if hydrogen fuel is used. Methane fuel instead of hydrogen reduces the vehicle gross weight by 33% in case of the Mach 2 vehicle.

  8. Free-jet Tests of a 1.1-inch-diameter Supersonic Ram-jet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Joseph H; Trout, Otto F , Jr

    1957-01-01

    Results are presented of free-jet tests of a 1.1-inch-diameter hydrogen-burning ram-jet engine over a Mach number range from 1.42 to 2.28 and a Reynolds number range from 6.01 times 10 to the 6th power to 15.78 times 10 to the 6th power. Tests demonstrated the reliability and wide operating range of the engine and showed its suitability for installation on wind-tunnel models of airplane and missile configurations. A comparison of engine operation with combustion-chamber lengths of 3.33 and 1.51 engine diameters was made at a Mach number of 2.06. A maximum test thrust coefficient of 0.905 was obtained at fuel-air ratio of 0.034 and a Mach number of 2.06 for the engine with the 3.33-diameter combustion chamber.

  9. Supersonic Jet Noise: Main Sources and Reduction Methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Azimi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The large velocity ratio and the presence of Shocks in the exhaust plume from low bypass engines or supersonic jetliners cause jet noise to be dominant component of overall aircraft noise, and therefore is an important issue in design of the next generation of civil supersonic transport. Jet noise reduction technology also has application in the design of highperformance tactical aircraft. Jet noise is of particular concern on aircraft carriers where it is necessary for deck crew to be in relatively close proximity to the aircraft at takeoff and landing. In this paper, a brief discussion about supersonic jet noise sources and a review of the main passive technologies employed for the reduction of supersonic jet noise are presented.

  10. Advanced Noise Abatement Procedures for a Supersonic Business Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Jones, Scott M.; Seidel, Jonathan A.; Huff, Dennis L.

    2017-01-01

    Supersonic civil aircraft present a unique noise certification challenge. High specific thrust required for supersonic cruise results in high engine exhaust velocity and high levels of jet noise during takeoff. Aerodynamics of thin, low-aspect-ratio wings equipped with relatively simple flap systems deepen the challenge. Advanced noise abatement procedures have been proposed for supersonic aircraft. These procedures promise to reduce airport noise, but they may require departures from normal reference procedures defined in noise regulations. The subject of this report is a takeoff performance and noise assessment of a notional supersonic business jet. Analytical models of an airframe and a supersonic engine derived from a contemporary subsonic turbofan core are developed. These models are used to predict takeoff trajectories and noise. Results indicate advanced noise abatement takeoff procedures are helpful in reducing noise along lateral sidelines.

  11. Elevated Temperature Ballistic Impact Testing of PBO and Kevlar Fabrics for Application in Supersonic Jet Engine Fan Containment Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Roberts Gary D.; Revilock, Duane M., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Ballistic impact tests were conducted on fabric made from both Poly(phenylene benzobizoxazole) (PBO) and Kevlar 29 which were selected to be similar in weave pattern, areal density, and fiber denier. The projectiles were 2.54-cm- (1-in.-) long aluminum cylinders with a diameter of 1.27 cm (0.5 in.). The fabric specimens were clamped on four sides in a 30.5-cm- (12-in.-) square frame. Tests on PBO were conducted at room temperature and at 260 C (500 F). A number of PBO specimens were aged in air at 204 and 260 C (400 and 500 F) before impact testing. Kevlar specimens were tested only at room temperature and with no aging. The PBO absorbed significantly more energy than the Kevlar at both room and elevated temperatures. However, after aging at temperatures of 204 C (400 F) and above, the PBO fabric lost almost all of its energy absorbing ability. It was concluded that PBO fabric is not a feasible candidate for fan containment system applications in supersonic jet engines where operating temperatures exceed this level.

  12. Jet engine. Strahltriebwerk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, F.J.

    1990-11-15

    A gas turbine axial-flow compressor aggregate is mounted in a jet engine consisting of a high-temperature combustion chamber that is composed of conical rings forming slits and set together to a ring column and reaches up to the propelling nozzle, a compressed-air generator supplying the jet engine with compressed air at subsonic speeds and running into the propelling nozzle and a shell encasing the jet engine while leaving a certain intermediate space. The compressor aggregate has a relatively high fuel consumption and high emission rates, involves high production and maintenance costs and puts the blades at a high risk of overheating. The problem basic to the invention was to install a compressed-air generator in the jet engine that has lower fuel consumption and emission rates and is cheaper to manufacture and to service. The invention provides free-piston compressors for compressed-air generators arranged in a circle around the central high-temperature combustion chamber. The ring of compressors can rotate on bearings against the jet engine shell, so that each compressor can be turned to the bottom and serviced there. The jet engine is suitable as an engine for supersonic aircraft.

  13. Coupling dynamic of twin supersonic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ching-Wen; Cluts, Jordan; Samimy, Mo

    2015-11-01

    In a supersonic shock-containing jet, the interaction of large-scale structures in the jet's shear layer with the shock waves generates acoustic waves. The waves propagate upstream, excite the jet initial shear layer instability, establish a feedback loop at certain conditions, and generate screech noise. The screech normally contains different modes of various strengths. Similarly, twin-jet plumes contain screech tones. If the dynamics of the two jet plumes are synchronized, the screech amplitude could be significantly amplified. There is a proposed analytical model in the literature for screech synchronization in twin rectangular jets. This model shows that with no phase difference in acoustic waves arriving at neighboring nozzle lips, twin-jet plumes feature a strong coupling with a significant level of screech tones. In this work the maximum nozzle separation distance for sustained screech synchronization and strong coupling is analytically derived. This model is used with our round twin-jet experiments and the predicted coupling level agrees well with the experimental results. Near-field microphone measurements and schlieren visualization along with the analytical model are used to investigate the coupling mechanisms of twin supersonic jets. Supported by ONR.

  14. Supersonic Jet Excitation using Flapping Injection

    CERN Document Server

    Hafsteinsson, Haukur; Andersson, Niklas; Cuppoletti, Daniel; Gutmark, Ephraim; Prisell, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Supersonic jet noise reduction is important for high speed military aircraft. Lower acoustic levels would reduce structural fatigue leading to longer lifetime of the jet aircraft. It is not solely structural aspects which are of importance, health issues of the pilot and the airfield per- sonnel are also very important, as high acoustic levels may result in severe hearing damage. It remains a major challenge to reduce the overall noise levels of the aircraft, where the supersonic exhaust is the main noise source for near ground operation. Fluidic injection into the supersonic jet at the nozzle exhaust has been shown as a promising method for noise reduction. It has been shown to speed up the mix- ing process of the main jet, hence reducing the kinetic energy level of the jet and the power of the total acoustic radiation. Furthermore, the interaction mechanism between the fluidic injection and the shock structure in the jet exhaust plays a crucial role in the total noise radia- tion. In this study, LES is used...

  15. Aeroacoustic properties of supersonic elliptic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzie, Kevin W.; McLaughlin, Dennis K.

    1999-09-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic properties of supersonic elliptic and circular jets are experimentally investigated. The jets are perfectly expanded with an exit Mach number of approximately 1.5 and are operated in the Reynolds number range of 25 000 to 50 000. The reduced Reynolds number facilitates the use of conventional hot-wire anemometry and a glow discharge excitation technique which preferentially excites the varicose or flapping modes in the jets. In order to simulate the high-velocity and low-density effects of heated jets, helium is mixed with the air jets. This allows the large-scale structures in the jet shear layer to achieve a high enough convective velocity to radiate noise through the Mach wave emission process.

  16. Supersonic Jet Noise Reduction Using Microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Cuppoletti, Dan; Malla, Bhupatindra

    2013-11-01

    Fluidic injection for jet noise reduction involves injecting secondary jets into a primary jet to alter the noise characteristics of the primary jet. A major challenge has been determining what mechanisms are responsible for noise reduction due to varying injector designs, injection parameters, and primary jets. The current study provides conclusive results on the effect of injector angle and momentum ux ratio on the acoustics and shock structure of a supersonic Md = 1.56 jet. It is shown that the turbulent mixing noise scales primarily with the injector momentum flux ratio. Increasing the injector momentum flux ratio increases streamwise vorticity generation and reduces peak turbulence levels. It is found that the shock-related noise components are most affected by the interaction of the shocks from the injectors with the primary shock structure of the jet. Increasing momentum flux ratio causes shock noise reduction until a limit where shock noise increases again. It is shown that the shock noise components and mixing noise components are reduced through fundamentally different mechanisms and maximum overall noise reduction is achieved by balancing the reduction of both components.

  17. Self—Induced Oscillation of Supersonic Jet During Impingement on Cylindrical Body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HideoKashimura; ShenYu; 等

    1998-01-01

    The phenomena of the interaction between a supersonic jet and an obstacle are related to the problems of the aeronautical and other industrial engineerings.When a supersonic jet impinges on an obstacle,the self induced oscillation occurs under several conditions.The flow charactersitics caused by the impingement of underexpanded supersonic jet on an obstacle have been investigated.However,it seems that the mechanism of self induced oscillation and the factor which dominates if have not been detailed in the published papers,The characteristics of the self induced oscillation of the supersonic jet during the impingement on a cylindrical body are investigated using the visualization of flow fields and the numerical calculations in this study.

  18. Supersonic Jet Interactions in a Plenum Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Venugopal

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding thè supersonic jet interactions in a plenum chamber is essential for thè design of hot launch systems. Static tests were conducted in a small-scale rocket motor ioaded with a typical nitramine propellaiit to produce a nozzle exit Mach number of 3. This supersonic jet is made to interact with plenum chambers having both open and closed sides. The distance between thè nozzle exit and thè back piate of plenum chamber are varied from 2. 5 to 7. 0 times thè nozzle exit diameter. The pressure rise in thè plenum chamber was measured using pressure transducers mounted at different locatìons. The pressure-time data were analysed to obtain an insight into thè flow field in thè plenum chamber. The maximum pressure exerted on thè back piate of plenum chamber is about 25-35 per cent. of thè maximum stagnation pressure developed in thè rocket motor. Ten static tests were carried out to obtain thè effect of axial distance between thè nozzle exit and thè plenum chamber back piate, and stagnation pressure in thè rocket motoron thè flow field in thè open-sided and closed-sided plenum chambers configurations.

  19. Linear stability analysis of supersonic axisymmetric jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Wan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stabilities of supersonic jets are examined with different velocities, momentum thicknesses, and core temperatures. Amplification rates of instability waves at inlet are evaluated by linear stability theory (LST. It is found that increased velocity and core temperature would increase amplification rates substantially and such influence varies for different azimuthal wavenumbers. The most unstable modes in thin momentum thickness cases usually have higher frequencies and azimuthal wavenumbers. Mode switching is observed for low azimuthal wavenumbers, but it appears merely in high velocity cases. In addition, the results provided by linear parabolized stability equations show that the mean-flow divergence affects the spatial evolution of instability waves greatly. The most amplified instability waves globally are sometimes found to be different from that given by LST.

  20. Acoustic measurements of models of military style supersonic nozzle jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Wen Kuo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable-geometry nozzles to provide optimal thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. However, acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometries of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at Pennsylvania State University (PSU in partnership with GE Aviation and the NASA Glenn Research Center is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles, and to identify and test promising noise reduction techniques. An equally important objective is to develop methodology for using data obtained from small- and moderate-scale experiments to reliably predict the full-scale engine noise. The experimental results presented show reasonable agreement between small-scale and medium-scale jets, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones.

  1. Acoustic measurements of models of military style supersonic nozzle jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Wen Kuo; Jérémy Veltin; Dennis K. McLaughlin

    2014-01-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable-geometry nozzles to provide optimal thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. How-ever, acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometries of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at Pennsylvania State University (PSU) in partnership with GE Aviation and the NASA Glenn Research Center is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles, and to identify and test promising noise reduction techniques. An equally important objective is to develop methodology for using data obtained from small-and moderate-scale experiments to reliably predict the full-scale engine noise. The experimental results presented show reasonable agreement between small-scale and medium-scale jets, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones.

  2. Effect of Microjet Injection on Supersonic Jet Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Podboy, G. G.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of microjet (jet) injection on the noise from supersonic jets is investigated. Three convergent-divergent (C-D) nozzles and one convergent nozzle, all having the same exit diameters, are used in the study. The jets are injected perpendicular to the primary jet close to the nozzle lip from six equally-spaced ports having a jet-to-primary-jet diameter ratio of 0.0054. Effects in the over-expanded, fully expanded as well as underexpanded flow regimes are explored. Relative to the effect on subsonic jets, larger reductions in the overall sound pressure level (OASPL) are achieved in most supersonic conditions. The largest reductions are typically associated with suppression of screech and transonic tones. For a shock-free, fully expanded case, the OASPL reductions achieved are comparable to that in the subsonic case; the same correlation, found for subsonic jet noise reduction at shallow observation angle, applies.

  3. Noise reduction in supersonic jets by nozzle fluidic inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Philip J.; McLaughlin, Dennis K.; Kuo, Ching-Wen

    2013-08-01

    Professor Philip Doak spent a very productive time as a consultant to the Lockheed-Georgia Company in the early 1970s. The focus of the overall research project was the prediction and reduction of noise from supersonic jets. Now, 40 years on, the present paper describes an innovative methodology and device for the reduction of supersonic jet noise. The goal is the development of a practical active noise reduction technique for low bypass ratio turbofan engines. This method introduces fluidic inserts installed in the divergent wall of a CD nozzle to replace hard-wall corrugation seals, which have been demonstrated to be effective by Seiner (2005) [1]. By altering the configuration and operating conditions of the fluidic inserts, active noise reduction for both mixing and shock noise has been obtained. Substantial noise reductions have been achieved for mixing noise in the maximum noise emission direction and in the forward arc for broadband shock-associated noise. To achieve these reductions (on the order of greater than 4 and 2 dB for the two main components respectively), practically achievable levels of injection mass flow rates have been used. The total injected mass flow rates are less than 4% of the core mass flow rate and the effective operating injection pressure ratio has been maintained at or below the same level as the nozzle pressure ratio of the core flow.

  4. Simulation of underexpanded supersonic jet flows with chemical reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Debin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To achieve a detailed understanding of underexpanded supersonic jet structures influenced by afterburning and other flow conditions, the underexpanded turbulent supersonic jet with and without combustions are investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD method. A program based on a total variation diminishing (TVD methodology capable of predicting complex shocks is created to solve the axisymmetric expanded Navier–Stokes equations containing transport equations of species. The finite-rate ratio model is employed to handle species sources in chemical reactions. CFD solutions indicate that the structure of underexpanded jet is typically influenced by the pressure ratio and afterburning. The shock reflection distance and maximum value of Mach number in the first shock cell increase with pressure ratio. Chemical reactions for the rocket exhaust mostly exist in the mixing layer of supersonic jet flows. This tends to reduce the intensity of shocks existing in the jet, responding to the variation of thermal parameters.

  5. Simulation of underexpanded supersonic jet flows with chemical reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Debin; Yu Yong; Niu Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    To achieve a detailed understanding of underexpanded supersonic jet structures influenced by afterburning and other flow conditions, the underexpanded turbulent supersonic jet with and without combustions are investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. A program based on a total variation diminishing (TVD) methodology capable of predicting complex shocks is created to solve the axisymmetric expanded Navier-Stokes equations containing transport equations of species. The finite-rate ratio model is employed to handle species sources in chemical reactions. CFD solutions indicate that the structure of underexpanded jet is typically influenced by the pressure ratio and afterburning. The shock reflection distance and maximum value of Mach number in the first shock cell increase with pressure ratio. Chemical reactions for the rocket exhaust mostly exist in the mixing layer of supersonic jet flows. This tends to reduce the intensity of shocks existing in the jet, responding to the variation of thermal parameters.

  6. Study of the shock structure of supersonic, dual, coaxial, jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. H.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, H. D. [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    The shock structure of supersonic, dual, coaxial jet is experimentally investigated. Eight different kinds of coaxial, dual nozzles are employed to observe the major features of the near field shock structure of the supersonic, coaxial, dual jets. Four convergent-divergent supersonic nozzles having the Mach number of 2.0 and 3.0, and are used to compare the coaxial jet flows discharging from two sonic nozzles. The primary pressure ratio is changed in the range between 4.0 and 10.0 and the assistant jet pressure ratio from 1.0 to 4.0. The results obtained show that the impinging angle, nozzle geometry and pressure ratio significantly affect the near field shock structure, Mach disk location and Mach disk diameter. The annular shock system is found depending the assistant and primary jet pressure ratios.

  7. Study of the flow characteristics of supersonic coaxial jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.H. [Andong National University, Andong (Korea); Koo, B.S. [Andong National University Graudate School, Andong (Korea)

    2001-12-01

    Supersonic coaxial jets are investigated numerically by using the axisymmetric, Navier-Stokes equations which are solved using a fully implicit finite volume method. Three different kinds of coaxial nozzles are employed to understand the flow physics involved in the supersonic coaxial jets. Two convergent-divergent supersonic nozzles are designed to have the same Mach number 2.0, and used to compare the coaxial jet flows with those discharging from one constant-area nozzle. The impingement angle of the annular jets are varied. The primary pressure ratio is changed in the range from 2.0 to 10.0 and the assistant jet ratio from 1.0 to 3.0. The results obtained show that the fluctuations of the total pressure and Mach number along the jet axis are much higher in the constant-area nozzle than those in the convergent-divergent nozzles, and the constant-area nozzle lead to higher total pressure losses, compared with the convergent-divergent nozzles. The assistant jets from the annular nozzle affect the coaxial jet flows within the distance less than about ten times the nozzle throat diameter, but beyond it the coaxial jet is conical with self-similar velocity profiles. Increasing both the primary jet pressure ratio and the assistant jet pressure ratio produces a longer coaxial jet core. (author). 14 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Numerical investigation and optimization on mixing enhancement factors in supersonic jet-to-crossflow flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Huang, Wei; Li, Hao; Zhang, Tian-tian

    2016-10-01

    Sufficient mixing between the supersonic airstream and the injectant is critical for the design of scramjet engines. The information in the two-dimensional supersonic jet-to-crossflow flow field has been explored numerically and theoretically, and the numerical approach has been validated against the available experimental data in the open literature. The obtained results show that the extreme difference analysis approach can obtain deeper information than the variance analysis method, and the optimal strategy can be generated by the extreme difference analysis approach. The jet-to-crossflow pressure ratio is the most important influencing factor for the supersonic jet-to-crossflow flow field, following is the injection angle, and all the design variables have no remarkable impact on the separation length and the height of Mach disk in the range considered in the current study.

  9. Subsonic and Supersonic Jet Noise Calculations Using PSE and DNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, P.; Owis, Farouk

    1999-01-01

    Noise radiated from a supersonic jet is computed using the Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE) method. The evolution of the instability waves inside the jet is computed using the PSE method and the noise radiated to the far field from these waves is calculated by solving the wave equation using the Fourier transform method. We performed the computations for a cold supersonic jet of Mach number 2.1 which is excited by disturbances with Strouhal numbers St=.2 and .4 and the azimuthal wavenumber m=l. Good agreement in the sound pressure level are observed between the computed and the measured (Troutt and McLaughlin 1980) results.

  10. Research on the mechanics of underwater supersonic gas jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Honghui; Wang, Boyi; Dai, Zhenqing

    2010-03-01

    An experimental research was carried out to study the fluid mechanics of underwater supersonic gas jets. High pressure air was injected into a water tank through converging-diverging nozzles (Laval nozzles). The jets were operated at different conditions of over-, full- and under-expansions. The jet sequences were visualized using a CCD camera. It was found that the injection of supersonic air jets into water is always accompanied by strong flow oscillation, which is related to the phenomenon of shock waves feedback in the gas phase. The shock wave feedback is different from the acoustic feedback when a supersonic gas jet discharges into open air, which causes screech tone. It is a process that the shock waves enclosed in the gas pocket induce a periodic pressure with large amplitude variation in the gas jet. Consequently, the periodic pressure causes the jet oscillation including the large amplitude expansion. Detailed pressure measurements were also conducted to verify the shock wave feedback phenomenon. Three kinds of measuring methods were used, i.e., pressure probe submerged in water, pressure measurements from the side and front walls of the nozzle devices respectively. The results measured by these methods are in a good agreement. They show that every oscillation of the jets causes a sudden increase of pressure and the average frequency of the shock wave feedback is about 5-10 Hz.

  11. Research on the mechanics of underwater supersonic gas jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    An experimental research was carried out to study the fluid mechanics of underwater supersonic gas jets. High pressure air was injected into a water tank through converging-diverging nozzles (Laval nozzles). The jets were operated at different conditions of over-, full- and under-expansions. The jet sequences were visualized using a CCD camera. It was found that the injection of supersonic air jets into water is always accompanied by strong flow oscillation, which is related to the phenomenon of shock waves feedback in the gas phase. The shock wave feedback is different from the acoustic feedback when a supersonic gas jet discharges into open air, which causes screech tone. It is a process that the shock waves enclosed in the gas pocket induce a periodic pressure with large amplitude variation in the gas jet. Consequently, the periodic pressure causes the jet oscillation including the large amplitude expansion. Detailed pressure measurements were also conducted to verify the shock wave feedback phenomenon. Three kinds of measuring methods were used, i.e., pressure probe submerged in water, pressure measurements from the side and front walls of the nozzle devices respectively. The results measured by these methods are in a good agreement. They show that every oscillation of the jets causes a sudden increase of pressure and the average frequency of the shock wave feedback is about 5–10 Hz.

  12. The effects of profiles on supersonic jet noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Bhat, T. R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of velocity profiles on supersonic jet noise are studied by using stability calculations made for a shock-free coannular jet, with both the inner and outer flows supersonic. The Mach wave emission process is modeled as the noise generated by the large scale turbulent structures or the instability waves in the mixing region. Both the vortex-sheet and the realistic finite thickness shear layer models are considered. The stability calculations were performed for both inverted and normal velocity profiles. Comparisons are made with the results for an equivalent single jet, based on equal thrust, mass flow rate and exit area to that of the coannular jet. The advantages and disadvantages of these velocity profiles as far as noise radiation is concerned are discussed. It is shown that the Rayleigh's model prediction of the merits and demerits of different velocity profiles are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Supersonic combustion engine testbed, heat lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoying, D.; Kelble, C.; Langenbahn, A.; Stahl, M.; Tincher, M.; Walsh, M.; Wisler, S.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a supersonic combustion engine testbed (SCET) aircraft is presented. The hypersonic waverider will utilize both supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMjet) and turbofan-ramjet engines. The waverider concept, system integration, electrical power, weight analysis, cockpit, landing skids, and configuration modeling are addressed in the configuration considerations. The subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic aerodynamics are presented along with the aerodynamic stability and landing analysis of the aircraft. The propulsion design considerations include: engine selection, turbofan ramjet inlets, SCRAMjet inlets and the SCRAMjet diffuser. The cooling requirements and system are covered along with the topics of materials and the hydrogen fuel tanks and insulation system. A cost analysis is presented and the appendices include: information about the subsonic wind tunnel test, shock expansion calculations, and an aerodynamic heat flux program.

  14. Toward Active Control of Noise from Hot Supersonic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    applied a double divergence directly to the incompressible Reynolds stress giving Ö U’UI dxgJ = -£ijk(sijUJk + ryWfc). (1) This neglected...SUPERSONIC JETS | QUARTERLY RPT. 6 ^ EXPERIMENTAL FACILITY j^i;r\\’ii Mo/ P I V • Page 6 • Prev • Wart • Last • Full Screen • Close

  15. Instability of a supersonic shock free elliptic jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baty, R.S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Seiner, J.M.; Ponton, M.K. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (USA). Langley Research Center)

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the measured and the computed spatial stability properties of an aspect ratio 2 supersonic shock free elliptic jet. The shock free nature of the elliptic jet provides an ideal test of validity of modeling the large scale coherent structures in the initial mixing region of noncircular supersonic jets with linear hydrodynamic stability theory. Both aerodynamic and acoustic data were measured. The data are used to compute the mean velocity profiles and to provide a description of the spatial composition of pressure waves in the elliptic jet. A hybrid numerical scheme is applied to solve the Rayleigh problem governing the inviscid linear spatial stability of the jet. The measured mean velocity profiles are used to provide a qualitative model for the cross sectional geometry and the smooth velocity profiles used in the stability analysis. Computational results are presented for several modes of instability at two jet cross sections. The acoustic measurements show that a varicose instability is the jet's perferred mode of motion. The stability analysis predicts that the Strouhal number varies linearly as a function of axial distance in the jet's initial mixing region, which is in good qualitative agreement with previous measurements. 18 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Application of POD on time-resolved schlieren in supersonic multi-stream rectangular jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M. G.; Magstadt, A. S.; Glauser, M. N.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we present an experimental investigation of a supersonic rectangular nozzle with aft deck used for three-stream engines. The jet utilizes a single expansion ramp nozzle (SERN) configuration along with multiple streams, operating at a bulk flow Mj,1 = 1.6 and bypass stream Mj,3 = 1.0. This idealized representation consists of two canonical flows: a supersonic convergent-divergent (CD) jet and a sonic wall jet. Time-resolved schlieren experiments were performed up to 100 kHz. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), as suggested by Lumley for structure identification in turbulent flows, is applied to the schlieren images and the spatial eigenfunctions and time-dependent coefficients are related to the flow structures. This research seeks to lay a foundation for fundamental testing of multi-stream SERNs and the identification of the flow physics that dominate these modern military nozzles.

  17. On the Comparison of the Long Penetration Mode (LPM) Supersonic Counterflowing Jet to the Supersonic Screech Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Rebecca A.; Chang, Chau-Lyan.; Jones, Jess H.; Dougherty, N. Sam

    2015-01-01

    The authors provide a brief overview of the classic tonal screech noise problem created by underexpanded supersonic jets, briefly describing the fluid dynamic-acoustics feedback mechanism that has been long established as the basis for this well-known aeroacoustics problem. This is followed by a description of the Long Penetration Mode (LPM) supersonic underexpanded counterflowing jet phenomenon which has been demonstrated in several wind tunnel tests and modeled in several computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The authors provide evidence from test and CFD analysis of LPM that indicates that acoustics feedback and fluid interaction seen in LPM are analogous to the aeroacoustics interactions seen in screech jets. Finally, the authors propose applying certain methodologies to LPM which have been developed and successfully demonstrated in the study of screech jets and mechanically induced excitation in fluid oscillators for decades. The authors conclude that the large body of work done on jet screech, other aeroacoustic phenomena, and fluid oscillators can have direct application to the study and applications of LPM counterflowing supersonic cold flow jets.

  18. Study on the Characteristics of Supersonic Coanda Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShigeruMatsuo; ShenYu; 等

    1998-01-01

    Techniques using coanda effect have been applied to the fluid control devices.In this field,experimental studies were so far performed for the spiral jet obtained by the Coanda jet issuing from a conical cylinder with an annular slit ,thrust vectoring of supersonic Coanda jets and so on,It is important from the viewpoints of effective applications to investigate the characteristics of the supersonic coanda jet in detail,In the present study,The effects of pressure rations and nozzle configurations on the characteristics of the supersonic COanda jet have been investigated.experimentally by a schlieren optical method and pressure measurements.Furthermore.Navier-Stokes equations were solved numerically using a 2nd-order TVD finite-volume scheme with a 3rd-order three stage Runge-Kutta method for time integration,κ-ε model was used in the computations.The effects of initial conditions on Coanda flow were investigated numerically.As a result,the simulated flow fields were compared with experimental data in good agreement qualitatively.

  19. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, S C; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.; Dunn, J. P.; Brockington, S.; Case, A; Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven rail guns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: $n_e\\approx n_i \\sim 10^{16}$ cm$^{-3}$, $T_e \\approx T_i \\approx 1.4$ eV, $V_{\\rm jet}\\approx 30$-100 km/s, mean charge $\\bar{Z}\\approx 1$...

  20. Review and prospect of supersonic business jet design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yicheng; Smith, Howard

    2017-04-01

    This paper reviews the environmental issues and challenges appropriate to the design of supersonic business jets (SSBJs). There has been a renewed, worldwide interest in developing an environmentally friendly, economically viable and technologically feasible supersonic transport aircraft. A historical overview indicates that the SSBJ will be the pioneer for the next generation of supersonic airliners. As a high-end product itself, the SSBJ will likely take a market share in the future. The mission profile appropriate to this vehicle is explored considering the rigorous environmental constraints. Mitigation of the sonic boom and improvements aerodynamic efficiency in flight are the most challenging features of civil supersonic transport. Technical issues and challenges associated with this type of aircraft are identified, and methodologies for the SSBJ design are discussed. Due to the tightly coupled issues, a multidisciplinary design, analysis and optimization environment is regarded as the essential approach to the creation of a low-boom low-drag supersonic aircraft. Industrial and academic organizations have an interest in this type of vehicle are presented. Their investments in SSBJ design will hopefully get civil supersonic transport back soon.

  1. Gas dynamics of a supersonic radial jet. Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosarev, V. F.; Klinkov, S. V.; Zaikovskii, V. N.

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents the radial distributions of the pressure measured with a Pitot tube for the case of a radial jet with/without swirling of the input flow in the pre-chamber; the length of the supersonic part of the jet, dependency of the jet thickness as a function of the distance from the nozzle outlet, and approximating analytical formula for the jet thickness that generalizes the experimental data. Experimental data demonstrated that at the deposition distances lower than 4-6 gauges from the nozzle outlet, the solid particle velocity and temperature are almost uniform over the jet cross section. This means that the target surface can be allocated here without loss in coating quality and deposition coefficient. The maximal recommended distance where the deposition is still possible is the length of l s0 ~ 16 gauges.

  2. The flow feature of transverse hydrogen jet in presence of micro air jets in supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar Gerdroodbary, M.; Amini, Younes; Ganji, D. D.; Takam, ​M. Rahimi

    2017-03-01

    Scramjet is found to be the efficient method for the space shuttle. In this paper, numerical simulation is performed to investigate the fundamental flow physics of the interaction between an array of fuel jets and multi air jets in a supersonic transverse flow. Hydrogen as a fuel is released with a global equivalence ratio of 0.5 in presence of micro air jets on a flat plate into a Mach 4 crossflow. The fuel and air are injected through streamwise-aligned flush circular portholes. The hydrogen is injected through 4 holes with 7dj space when the air is injected in the interval of the hydrogen jets. The numerical simulation is performed by using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Menter's Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model. Both the number of air jets and jet-to-freestream total pressure ratio are varied in a parametric study. The interaction of the fuel and air jet in the supersonic flow present extremely complex feature of fuel and air jet. The results present various flow features depending upon the number and mass flow rate of micro air jets. These flow features were found to have significant effects on the penetration of hydrogen jets. A variation of the number of air jets, along with the jet-to-freestream total pressure ratio, induced a variety of flow structure in the downstream of the fuel jets.

  3. Jet Engine Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Technology Solutions, Lockheed Martin Robert S. Carnes , M.D. NRAC Member, Battelle Memorial Institute MajGen Paul A. Fratarangelo, USMC (Ret) NRAC...Development, Acquisition) (VADM Architzel). The Naval Research Advisory Committee members (Bowes, Bowler, Carnes and Fratarangelo) have broad...Lockheed Martin ADP Boeing: Jet Engine Noise Reduction for Tactical Fighter Aircraft Mr. Tom Kaemming, K. Viswanathan, Ph . D. Tactical Jet Noise

  4. Overexpanded viscous supersonic jet interacting with a unilateral barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrynin, B. M.; Maslennikov, V. G.; Sakharov, V. A.; Serova, E. V.

    1986-07-01

    The interaction of a two-dimensional supersonic jet with a unilateral barrier parallel to the flow symmetry plane was studied to account for effects due to gas viscosity and backgound-gas ejection from the region into which the jet expands. In the present experiments, the incident shock wave was reflected at the end of a shock tube equipped with a nozzle. The jet emerged into a pressure chamber 6 cu m in volume and the environmental pressure ratio of the flow in the quasi-stationary phase remained constant. The light source was an OGM-20 laser operating in the giant-pulse mode. Due to background-gas ejection, the gas density in the vicinity of the barrier is much less than on the unconfined side of the jet. The resulting flow is characterized by two distinct environmental pressure ratios: the flow is underexpanded near the barrier, while on the other side it is overexpanded.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Jet Behavior and Impingement Characteristics of Preheating Shrouded Supersonic Jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-sheng WEI; Rong ZHU; Ting CHENG; Fei ZHAO

    2016-01-01

    As a novel supersonic j et technology,preheating shrouded supersonic j et was developed to deliver oxygen into molten bath efficiently and affordably.However,there has been limited research on the jet behavior and im-pingement characteristics of preheating shrouded supersonic j ets.Computational fluid dynamics (CFD)models were established to investigate the effects of main and shrouding gas temperatures on the characteristics of flow field and impingement of shrouded supersonic j et.The preheating shrouded supersonic j et behavior was simulated and meas-ured by numerical simulation and j et measurement experiment respectively.The influence of preheating shrouded su-personic j et on gas j et penetration and fluid flow in liquid bath was calculated by the CFD model which was validated against water model experiments.The results show that the uptrend of the potential core length of shrouded super-sonic j et would be accelerated with increasing the main and shrouding gas temperatures.Also,preheating supersonic j ets demonstrated significant advantages in penetrating and stirring the liquid bath.

  6. DIAMOND PORT JET INTERACTION WITH SUPERSONIC FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Interaction flow field of the sonic air jet through diamond shaped orifices at different incidence angles (10 degrees, 27.5 degrees, 45 degrees and 90 degrees) and total pressures (0.10 MPa and 0. 46 MPa) with a Mach 5.0 freestream was studied experimentally. A 90 degrees circular injector was examined for comparison. Crosssection Mach number contours were acquired by a Pitot-cone five-hole pressure probe.The results indicate that the low Mach semicircular region close to the wall is the wake region. The boundary layer thinning is in the areas adjacent to the wake. For the detached case, the interaction shock extends further into the freestream, and the shock shape has more curvature, also the low-Mach upwash region is larger. The vortices of the plume and the height of the jet interaction shock increase with increasing incidence angle and jet pressure. 90 degrees diamond and circular injector have stronger plume vorticity, and for the circular injector low-Mach region is smaller than that for the diamond injector. Tapered ramp increases the plume vorticity, and the double ramp reduces the level of vorticity. The three-dimensional interaction shock shape was modeled from the surface shock shape, the center plane shock shape, and crosssectional shock shape. The shock total pressure was estimated with the normal component of the Mach number using normal shock theory. The shock induced total pressure losses decrease with decreasing jet incidence angle and injection pressure,where the largest losses are incurred by the 90 degrees, circular injector.

  7. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenou, M. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Harvey M. Kruger Family Center for Nano-science and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Additive Manufacturing Lab, Orbotech Ltd., P.O. Box 215, 81101 Yavne (Israel); Sa' ar, A. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Harvey M. Kruger Family Center for Nano-science and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Kotler, Z. [Additive Manufacturing Lab, Orbotech Ltd., P.O. Box 215, 81101 Yavne (Israel)

    2015-05-04

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10–100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets.

  8. Towards the characterization of noise sources in a supersonic three-stream jet using advanced analysis tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscher, Christopher; Gogineni, Sivaram

    2016-11-01

    Strict noise regulation set by governing bodies currently make supersonic commercial aviation impractical. One of the many challenges that exist in developing practical supersonic commercial aircraft is the noise produced by the engine's exhaust jet. A promising method of jet noise reduction for supersonic applications is through the addition of extra exhaust streams. Data for an axisymmetric three-stream nozzle were generated using the Naval Research Laboratory's JENRE code. This data will be compared to experimental results obtained by NASA for validation purposes. Once the simulation results show satisfactory agreement to the experiments, advanced analysis tools will be applied to the simulation data to characterize potential noise sources. The tools to be applied include methods that are based on proper orthogonal decomposition, wavelet decomposition, and stochastic estimation. Additionally, techniques such as empirical mode decomposition and momentum potential theorem will be applied to the data as well.

  9. Experimental investigation of the noise reduction of supersonic exhaust jets with fluidic inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Russell William Walter

    The noise produced by the supersonic, high temperature jets that exhaust from military aircraft is becoming a hazard to naval personnel and a disturbance to communities near military bases. Methods to reduce the noise produced from these jets in a practical full-scale environment are difficult. The development and analysis of distributed nozzle blowing for the reduction of radiated noise from supersonic jets is described. Model scale experiments of jets that simulate the exhaust jets from typical low-bypass ratio military jet aircraft engines during takeoff are performed. Fluidic inserts are created that use distributed blowing in the divergent section of the nozzle to simulate mechanical, hardwall corrugations, while having the advantage of being an active control method. This research focuses on model scale experiments to better understand the fluidic insert noise reduction method. Distributed blowing within the divergent section of the military-style convergent divergent nozzle alters the shock structure of the jet in addition to creating streamwise vorticity for the reduction of mixing noise. Enhancements to the fluidic insert design have been performed along with experiments over a large number of injection parameters and core jet conditions. Primarily military-style round nozzles have been used, with preliminary measurements of hardwall corrugations and fluidic inserts in rectangular nozzle geometries also performed. It has been shown that the noise reduction of the fluidic inserts is most heavily dependent upon the momentum flux ratio between the injector and core jet. Maximum reductions of approximately 5.5 dB OASPL have been observed with practical mass flow rates and injection pressures. The first measurements with fluidic inserts in the presence of a forward flight stream have been performed. Optimal noise reduction occurs at similar injector parameters in the presence of forward flight. Fluidic inserts in the presence of a forward flight stream were

  10. Numerical Study for Hysteresis Phenomena of Shock Wave Reflection in Overexpanded Axisymmetric Supersonic Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsuyoshi Yasunobu; Ken Matsuoka; Hideo Kashimura; Shigeru Matsuo; Toshiaki Setoguchi

    2006-01-01

    When the high-pressure gas is exhausted to the vacuum chamber from the supersonic nozzle, the overexpanded supersonic jet is formed at specific condition. In two-dimensional supersonic jet, furthermore, it is known that the hysteresis phenomena for the reflection type of shock wave in the flow field is occurred under the quasi-steady flow and for instance, the transitional pressure ratio between the regular reflection (RR) and Mach reflection (MR) is affected by this phenomenon. Many papers have described the hysteresis phenomena for underexpanded supersonic jet, but this phenomenon under the overexpanded axisymmetric jet has not been detailed in the past papers. The purpose of this study is to clear the hysteresis phenomena for the reflection type of shock wave at the overexpanded axisymmetric jet using the TVD method and to discuss the characteristic of hysteresis phenomena.

  11. LPWA using supersonic gas jet with tailored density profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononenko, O.; Bohlen, S.; Dale, J.; D'Arcy, R.; Dinter, M.; Erbe, J. H.; Indorf, G.; di Lucchio, L.; Goldberg, L.; Gruse, J. N.; Karstensen, S.; Libov, V.; Ludwig, K.; Martinez de La Ossa, A.; Marutzky, F.; Niroula, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Quast, M.; Schaper, L.; Schwinkendorf, J.-P.; Streeter, M.; Tauscher, G.; Weichert, S.; Palmer, C.; Horbatiuk, Taras

    2016-10-01

    Laser driven plasma wakefield accelerators have been explored as a potential compact, reproducible source of relativistic electron bunches, utilising an electric field of many GV/m. Control over injection of electrons into the wakefield is of crucial importance in producing stable, mono-energetic electron bunches. Density tailoring of the target, to control the acceleration process, can also be used to improve the quality of the bunch. By using gas jets to provide tailored targets it is possible to provide good access for plasma diagnostics while also producing sharp density gradients for density down-ramp injection. OpenFOAM hydrodynamic simulations were used to investigate the possibility of producing tailored density targets in a supersonic gas jet. Particle-in-cell simulations of the resulting density profiles modelled the effect of the tailored density on the properties of the accelerated electron bunch. Here, we present the simulation results together with preliminary experimental measurements of electron and x-ray properties from LPWA experiments using gas jet targets and a 25 TW, 25 fs Ti:Sa laser system at DESY.

  12. Gas turbine engine with supersonic compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.

    2015-10-20

    A gas turbine engine having a compressor section using blades on a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a stator. The stator includes one or more of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions for deceleration of the gas to subsonic conditions and to deliver a high pressure gas to combustors. The aerodynamic ducts include structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are provided having an aspect ratio of two to one (2:1) or more, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.

  13. Acoustic measurements of models of military style supersonic nozzle jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuo, C.W.; Veltin, J.; McLaughlin, D.K.

    2014-01-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable-geometry nozzles to provide optimal thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. However, acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and

  14. Acoustic measurements of models of military style supersonic nozzle jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuo, C.W.; Veltin, J.; McLaughlin, D.K.

    2014-01-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable-geometry nozzles to provide optimal thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. However, acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and t

  15. Experimental Investigation on Noise Suppression in Supersonic Jets from Convergent-Divergent Nozzles with Baffles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshiaki Miyazato; Yong-Hun Kweon; Toshiyuki Aoki; Mitsuharu Masuda; Kwon-Hee Lee; Heuy-Dong Kim; Toshiaki Setoguchi; Kazuyasu Matsuo

    2003-01-01

    The acoustic properties of supersonic jet noise from a convergent-divergent nozzle with a baffle have been studied experimentally over the range of nozzle pressure ratios from 2.0 to 8.0. Acoustic measurements were conducted in a carefully designed anechoic room providing a free-field environment. A new approach for screech noise suppression by a cross-wire is proposed. Schlieren photographs were taken to visualize the shock wave patterns in the supersonic jet with and without the cross-wire. The effects of the baffle and the cross-wire on acoustic properties are discussed. It is shown that the baffle has little effect on the screech frequency for the underexpanded supersonic jet without the cross-wire. Also, the cross-wire introduced in supersonic jets is found to lead to a significant reduction in overall sound pressure level.

  16. Re-Educating Jet-Engine-Researchers to Stay Relevant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Or, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    To stay relevantly supported, jet-engine researchers, designers and operators should follow changing uses of small and large jet engines, especially those anticipated to be used by/in the next generation, JET-ENGINE-STEERED ("JES") fleets of jet drones but fewer, JES-Stealth-Fighter/Strike Aircraft. In addition, some diminishing returns from isolated, non-integrating, jet-engine component studies, vs. relevant, supersonic, shock waves control in fluidic-JES-side-effects on compressor stall dynamics within Integrated Propulsion Flight Control ("IPFC"), and/or mechanical JES, constitute key relevant methods that currently move to China, India, South Korea and Japan. The central roles of the jet engine as primary or backup flight controller also constitute key relevant issues, especially under post stall conditions involving induced engine-stress while participating in crash prevention or minimal path-time maneuvers to target. And when proper instructors are absent, self-study of the JES-STVS REVOLUTION is an updating must, where STVS stands for wing-engine-airframe-integrated, embedded stealthy-jet-engine-inlets, restructured engines inside Stealth, Tailless, canard-less, Thrust Vectoring IFPC Systems. Anti-terror and Airliners Super-Flight-Safety are anticipated to overcome US legislation red-tape that obstructs JES-add-on-emergency-kits-use.

  17. Supersonic Jet Noise Reduction Using Flapping Injection and Pulsed Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsteinsson, Haukur; Eriksson, Lars-Erik; Cuppoletti, Daniel; Gutmark, Ephraim; Department of Applied Mechanics, Chalmers University of Technology Team; Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Cincinatti Team; Swedish Defence Material Administration, Sweden Team

    2013-11-01

    Aircraft are in general noisy and there is a high demand for reducing their noise levels. The jet exhaust is in most cases the main noise source of the aircraft, especially for low bypass ratio jet engines. Fluidic injection affecting the shear layer close to the nozzle exit is a promising noise reduction technique as it can be turned of while not needed and thus the negative effect on the engine performance will be minimized. In the presented work, LES is used to compare steady-state mass flow injection with steady-state mass flow flapping jet injection. The work is a direct continuation of a previous LES study on pulsed injection which showed that the pulsed injection induced pressure pulses in the jet which caused increased tonal noise in the downstream directions. The injection system considered in the presented work consists of eight evenly distributed injectors at the nozzle exit plane with a 90° injection angle relative to the flow direction. Flapping jet injection is believed to minimize the creation of these pressure pulses since it provides steady-state mass flow. This work is funded by Swedish Defense Material Administration (FMV).

  18. Supersonic Virtual Valve Design for Numerical Simulation of a Large-Bore Natural Gas Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, G.-H.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Mitchell, C.

    2007-10-01

    In many applications of supersonic injection devices, three-dimensional computation that can model a complex supersonic jet has become critical. However, in spite of its increasing necessity, it is computationally costly to capture the details of supersonic structures in intricate three-dimensional geometries with moving boundaries. In large-bore stationary natural gas fueled engine research, one of the most promising mixing enhancement technologies currently used for natural gas engines is high-pressure fuel injection. Consequently, this creates considerable interest in three-dimensional computational simulations that can examine the entire injection and mixing process in engines using high-pressure injection and can determine the impact of injector design on engine performance. However, the cost of three-dimensional engine simulations-including a moving piston and the kinetics of combustion and pollutant production quickly becomes considerable in terms of simulation time requirements. One limiting factor is the modeling of the small length scales of the poppet valve flow. Such length scales can be three orders of magnitude smaller than cylinder length scales. The objective of this paper is to describe the development of a methodology for the design of a simple geometry supersonic virtual valve that can be substituted in three-dimensional numerical models for the complex shrouded poppet valve injection system actually installed in the engine to be simulated.

  19. Impact of surface proximity on flow and acoustics of a rectangular supersonic jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Baier, Florian; Mora, Pablo; Kailsanath, Kailas; Viswanath, Kamal; Johnson, Ryan

    2016-11-01

    Advances in jet technology have pushed towards faster aircraft, leading to more streamlined designs and configurations, pushing engines closer to the aircraft frame. This creates additional noise sources stemming from interactions between the jet flow and surfaces on the aircraft body, and interaction between the jet and the ground during takeoff and landing. The paper studies the impact of the presence of a flat plate on the flow structures and acoustics in an M =1.5 (NPR =3.67) supersonic jet exhausting from a rectangular C-D nozzle. Comparisons are drawn between baseline cases without a plate and varying nozzle-plate distance at NPRs from 2.5 to 4.5, and temperature ratios of up to 3.0. At the shielded side and sideline of the plate noise is mitigated only when the plate is at the nozzle lip (h =0). Low frequency mixing noise is increased in the downstream direction only for h =0. Screech tones that exist only for low NTR are fully suppressed by the plate at h =0. However, for h>0 the reflection enhances screech at both reflected side and sideline. Low frequency mixing noise is enhanced by the plate at the reflected side at all plate distances, while broad band shock associated noise is reduced only at the sideline for h =0. Increased temperature mitigates the screech tones across all test conditions. The results are compared to a circular nozzle of equivalent diameter with an adjacent plate.

  20. Study of interfaces in an Axisymmetric Supersonic Jet using Background Oriented Schlieren (BOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverría, Carlos; Porta, David; Aguayo, Alejandro; Cardoso, Hiroki; Stern, Catalina

    2014-11-01

    We have used several techniques to study a small axisymmetric supersonic jet: Rayleigh scattering, Schlieren Toepler and PIV. Each technique gives different kind of information. In this paper, a BOS set-up is used to study the structure of the shock pattern. A shadowgraph of a dot matrix is obtained with and without a flow. The displacement field of the dots is related to changes in the index of refraction, which can be related, through the Gladstone-Dale equation, to changes in density. Previous results with this technique were not conclusive because of the relative size of the dots compared to the diameter of the nozzle. Measurements have been taken for three different exit speeds. We acknowledge support from UNAM through DGAPA PAPIIT IN117712 and the Graduate Program in Mechanical Engineering.

  1. High Temperature Supersonic Jet Noise - Fundamental Studies and Control using Advanced Actuation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-24

    decades, however methods of measurably controlling -reducing jet noise in an efficient and robust manner remain evasive. Previous research has shown...2016 1-May-2013 30-Apr-2016 High Temperature Supersonic Jet Noise - Fundamental Studies and Control using Advanced Actuation Methods The views...and Control using Advanced Actuation Methods Report Title Understanding and controlling jet noise has been the focus of analytical, computational and

  2. System identification of jet engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, N.

    2000-01-01

    System identification plays an important role in advanced control systems for jet engines, in which controls are performed adaptively using data from the actual engine and the identified engine. An identification technique for jet engine using the Constant Gain Extended Kalman Filter (CGEKF) is described. The filter is constructed for a two-spool turbofan engine. The CGEKF filter developed here can recognize parameter change in engine components and estimate unmeasurable variables over whole flight conditions. These capabilities are useful for an advanced Full Authority Digital Electric Control (FADEC). Effects of measurement noise and bias, effects of operating point and unpredicted performance change are discussed. Some experimental results using the actual engine are shown to evaluate the effectiveness of CGEKF filter.

  3. Astrophysics: Cosmic jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andy

    2010-02-01

    In some galaxies, matter falling onto a supermassive black hole is ejected in narrow jets moving at close to the speed of light. New observations provide insight into the workings of these cosmic accelerators.

  4. Twin Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  5. Laser Desorption Supersonic Jet Spectroscopy of Hydrated Tyrosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Hikari; Shimozono, Yoko; Ishiuchi, Shun-Ichi; Fujii, Masaaki; Carcabal, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    The structure of tyrosine (tyr) consists of amino-acid chain and phenol, and it has roughly two possible binding sites for water, amino-acid site and phenolic OH site. Investigating how water molecule binds to tyr will give fundamental information for hydrations of peptide and protein. Resonance enhanced multi photon ionization (REMPI) spectrum of tyr-water 1:1 cluster has already been reported by de Vries and co-workers, however, no analysis on the hydrated structures has been reported. In the REMPI spectrum, two clusters of bands are observed; one appears at ˜35600 cm^{-1} energy region which is the almost same with 0-0 transitions of tyr monomer, and another is observed at ˜300 cm^{-1} lower than the former. Based on the electronic transition energy of phenylalanine and the hydrated clusters, the former is expected to be derived from a structure that water binds to amino acid site. On the other hand, it is plausibly predicted that the latter originates from a structure that water binds to phenolic OH group, because the electronic transition of mono hydrated phenol is ˜300 cm^{-1} red-shifted from the monomer. We applied IR dip spectroscopy which can measure conformer selective IR spectra to the tyr-(H_{2}O)_{1} clusters by using laser desorption supersonic jet technique to confirm the assignments. Especially in the phenolic OH bound isomer, it was found that the intra molecular hydrogen bond within amino-acid chain, which is far from the water molecule and cannot interact directly with each other, is strengthened by the hydration. A. Abio-Riziq et al., J. Phys. Chem. A, 115, 6077 (2011). Y. Shimozono, et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., (2013) DOI: 10.1039/c3cp43573c. T. Ebata et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 8, 4783 (2006). T. Watanabe et al., J. Chem. Phys., 105, 408 (1996).

  6. Azimuthally Varying Noise Reduction Techniques Applied to Supersonic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeb, Nicholas S.

    An experimental investigation into the effect of azimuthal variance of chevrons and fluidically enhanced chevrons applied to supersonic jets is presented. Flow field measurements of streamwise and cross-stream particle imaging velocimetry were employed to determine the causes of noise reduction, which was demonstrated through acoustic measurements. Results were obtained in the over- and under- expanded regimes, and at the design condition, though emphasis was placed on the overexpanded regime due to practical application. Surveys of chevron geometry, number, and arrangement were undertaken in an effort to reduce noise and/or incurred performance penalties. Penetration was found to be positively correlated with noise reduction in the overexpanded regime, and negatively correlated in underexpanded operation due to increased effective penetration and high frequency penalty, respectively. The effect of arrangement indicated the beveled configuration achieved optimal abatement in the ideally and underexpanded regimes due to superior BSAN reduction. The symmetric configuration achieved optimal overexpanded noise reduction due to LSS suppression from improved vortex persistence. Increases in chevron number generally improved reduction of all noise components for lower penetration configurations. Higher penetration configurations reached levels of saturation in the four chevron range, with the potential to introduce secondary shock structures and generate additional noise with higher number. Alternation of penetration generated limited benefit, with slight reduction of the high frequency penalty caused by increased shock spacing. The combination of alternating penetration with beveled and clustered configurations achieved comparable noise reduction to the standard counterparts. Analysis of the entire data set indicated initial improvements with projected area that saturated after a given level and either plateaued or degraded with additional increases. Optimal reductions

  7. Characteristics of pulsed plasma synthetic jet and its control effect on supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Di; Cui Wei; Li Yinghong; Li Fanyu; Jia Min; Sun Quan; Zhang Bailing

    2015-01-01

    The plasma synthetic jet is a novel flow control approach which is currently being stud-ied. In this paper its characteristic and control effect on supersonic flow is investigated both exper-imentally and numerically. In the experiment, the formation of plasma synthetic jet and its propagation velocity in quiescent air are recorded and calculated with time resolved schlieren method. The jet velocity is up to 100 m/s and no remarkable difference has been found after chang-ing discharge parameters. When applied in Mach 2 supersonic flow, an obvious shockwave can be observed. In the modeling of electrical heating, the arc domain is not defined as an initial condition with fixed temperature or pressure, but a source term with time-varying input power density, which is expected to better describe the influence of heating process. Velocity variation with different heat-ing efficiencies is presented and discussed and a peak velocity of 850 m/s is achieved in still air with heating power density of 5.0 · 1012 W/m3. For more details on the interaction between plasma syn-thetic jet and supersonic flow, the plasma synthetic jet induced shockwave and the disturbances in the boundary layer are numerically researched. All the results have demonstrated the control authority of plasma synthetic jet onto supersonic flow.

  8. Characteristics of pulsed plasma synthetic jet and its control effect on supersonic flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Di

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The plasma synthetic jet is a novel flow control approach which is currently being studied. In this paper its characteristic and control effect on supersonic flow is investigated both experimentally and numerically. In the experiment, the formation of plasma synthetic jet and its propagation velocity in quiescent air are recorded and calculated with time resolved schlieren method. The jet velocity is up to 100 m/s and no remarkable difference has been found after changing discharge parameters. When applied in Mach 2 supersonic flow, an obvious shockwave can be observed. In the modeling of electrical heating, the arc domain is not defined as an initial condition with fixed temperature or pressure, but a source term with time-varying input power density, which is expected to better describe the influence of heating process. Velocity variation with different heating efficiencies is presented and discussed and a peak velocity of 850 m/s is achieved in still air with heating power density of 5.0 × 1012 W/m3. For more details on the interaction between plasma synthetic jet and supersonic flow, the plasma synthetic jet induced shockwave and the disturbances in the boundary layer are numerically researched. All the results have demonstrated the control authority of plasma synthetic jet onto supersonic flow.

  9. Experimental Study of Ignition over Impact-Driven Supersonic Liquid Fuel Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirut Matthujak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study experimentally investigates the mechanism of the ignition of the supersonic liquid fuel jet by the visualization. N-Hexadecane having the cetane number of 100 was used as a liquid for the jet in order to enhance the ignition potential of the liquid fuel jet. Moreover, the heat column and the high intensity CO2 laser were applied to initiate the ignition. The ignition over the liquid fuel jet was visualized by a high-speed digital video camera with a shadowgraph system. From the shadowgraph images, the autoignition or ignition of the supersonic liquid fuel jet, at the velocity of 1,186 m/s which is a Mach number relative to the air of 3.41, did not take place. The ignition still did not occur, even though the heat column or the high intensity CO2 laser was alone applied. The attempt to initiate the ignition over the liquid fuel jet was achieved by applying both the heat column and the high intensity CO2 laser. Observing the signs of luminous spots or flames in the shadowgraph would readily indicate the presence of ignitions. The mechanism of the ignition and combustion over the liquid fuel jet was clearly clarified. Moreover, it was found that the ignition over the supersonic liquid fuel jet in this study was rather the force ignition than being the auto-ignition induced by shock wave heating.

  10. On the Scaling Law for Broadband Shock Noise Intensity in Supersonic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanudula, Max

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model for the scaling of broadband shock noise intensity in supersonic jets was formulated on the basis of linear shock-shear wave interaction. An hypothesis has been postulated that the peak angle of incidence (closer to the critical angle) for the shear wave primarily governs the generation of sound in the interaction process rather than the noise generation contribution from off-peak incident angles. The proposed theory satisfactorily explains the well-known scaling law for the broadband shock -associated noise in supersonic jets.

  11. Effects of the jet-to-crossflow momentum ratio on a sonic jet into a supersonic crossflow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Numerical investigation of a transverse sonic jet injected into a supersonic crossflow was carried out using large-eddy simulation for a free-stream Mach number M = 1.6 and a Reynolds number Re = 1.38×10~5 based on the jet diameter.Effects of the jet-to-crossflow momentum ratio on various fundamental mechanisms dictating the intricate flow phenomena,including flow structures, turbulent characters and frequency behaviors,have been studied.The complex flow structures and the relevant flow features are disc...

  12. Experimental investigations on cavity-actuated under-expanded supersonic oscillating jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Bo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As one type of potential flow control actuators, cavity-actuated supersonic jet oscillators, which consist of a 2-D convergent nozzle and two face to face cavities, need to be investigated deeply to get the knowledge of their oscillating feature and underlying mechanism. Wind tunnel testing are conducted under different back pressures in a vacuum-type wind tunnel for two supersonic jet oscillators, to obtain their characteristics and the conditions for jet oscillating. The experimental results show that the continuous, nearly symmetric or asymmetric flipping between the two cavities appears over certain nozzle pressure ratio (NPR range for both oscillators according to schlieren visualizations. Compared to the free jet, the oscillating jet with large exit achieves larger mixing; the oscillating jet with small exit has less mixing, based on the analysis of jet axial peak velocity and the entrainment. The cross-junction mode for estimating the resonance frequency in a pipe with two closed side branches is modified and obtained comparable estimations of the frequency of jet flipping with experimental data, but further investigations are needed to discover the underlying mechanism for the jet flipping.

  13. Experimental investigations on cavity-actuated under-expanded supersonic oscillating jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Bo; Luo Xiaochen; Feng Feng; Wu Xiaosong

    2015-01-01

    As one type of potential flow control actuators, cavity-actuated supersonic jet oscillators, which consist of a 2-D convergent nozzle and two face to face cavities, need to be investigated dee-ply to get the knowledge of their oscillating feature and underlying mechanism. Wind tunnel testing are conducted under different back pressures in a vacuum-type wind tunnel for two supersonic jet oscillators, to obtain their characteristics and the conditions for jet oscillating. The experimental results show that the continuous, nearly symmetric or asymmetric flipping between the two cavities appears over certain nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) range for both oscillators according to schlieren visualizations. Compared to the free jet, the oscillating jet with large exit achieves larger mixing;the oscillating jet with small exit has less mixing, based on the analysis of jet axial peak velocity and the entrainment. The cross-junction mode for estimating the resonance frequency in a pipe with two closed side branches is modified and obtained comparable estimations of the frequency of jet flip-ping with experimental data, but further investigations are needed to discover the underlying mechanism for the jet flipping.

  14. Numerical study on the generation of a planar supersonic gas-jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putignano, M., E-mail: massimilianoputignano@quasar-group.org [Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom); University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Welsch, C.P. [University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01

    Planar supersonic gas-jets are valuable tools for different applications such as state of the art molecular spectroscopy and accelerator beam instrumentation; however, the details of their expansion and generation have not yet been analyzed extensively, despite numerous studies addressing these same questions for the simpler case of the axis-symmetric jet. In this paper, we investigate numerically the generation and evolution of planar supersonic gas-jets, extending the optimization studies done for axis-symmetric jets and focusing in particular on applications in accelerator beam instrumentation. We introduce a set of dedicated quality factors and use them to investigate the effects of changes to the geometry and thermodynamic state of the nozzle-skimmer system used to generate the planar jet. This analysis leads to an innovative, optimized nozzle-skimmer system design, which features advantages in terms of planar jet quality when compared to traditional setups. The proposed design also gives the possibility to modify, by variation of the thermodynamic quantities alone, the gas-jet characteristics in a wide range, including jet splitting and local density modulation. Density profiles of the generated jets are plotted for different parameter set.

  15. Lateral Reaction Jet Flow Interaction Effects on a Generic Fin-Stabilized Munition in Supersonic Crossflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    269–275. 9. Stahl, B.; Edmunds , H.; Gulhan, A. Experimental Investigation of Hot and Cold Side Jet Interaction With a Supersonic Cross Flow...LICHTENBERG-SCANLAN G MALEJKO T RECCHIA C STOUT W TOLEDO J TRAVAILLE E VAZQUEZ C WILSON 4 PM CAS (PDF) M BURKE R KIEBLER

  16. Study on Turbulent Behavior of Water Jet in Supersonic Steam Injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuichi, Akira; Abe, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Akiko; Kawamoto, Yujiro; Iwaki, Chikako; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Mori, Michitsugu; Ohmori, Shuichi

    One of the most interesting devices for light water reactor systems aimed at simplified system, improvement of safety and reliability is a supersonic steam injector. Supersonic steam injector is a passive jet pump without rotating machine and high efficient heat exchanger because of direct contact condensation between supersonic steam and a subcooled water jet. It is considered that flow behavior in the supersonic steam injector is related to complicated turbulent flow with large shear stress induced by velocity difference between steam and water and direct contact condensation. However, studies about turbulent flow under large shear stress with direct contact condensation are not enough. Especially, mechanisms of momentum and heat transfer are not clarified in detail. Objective of the present study is to investigate turbulent behaviors of a water jet and interface that play an important role in heat transfer and momentum transfer. Radial distribution of streamwise velocity and fluctuation of total pressure are measured by a pitot measurement. Visual measurement of the turbulent water jet is conducted by a high speed camera in order to identify location of unstable interface and its behavior. It is found that streamwise velocity increases as it approaches downstream of the mixing nozzle. Fluctuation of total pressure is large at water-steam mixture region. It is confirmed that waves propagated on the interface. And its velocity is obtained.

  17. Simple thermodynamics of jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrício, Pedro; Tavares, José M.

    2010-08-01

    We use the first and second laws of thermodynamics to analyze the behavior of an ideal jet engine. Simple analytical expressions for the thermal efficiency, the overall efficiency, and the reduced thrust are derived. We show that the thermal efficiency depends only on the compression ratio r and on the velocity of the aircraft. The other two performance measures depend also on the ratio of the temperature at the turbine to the inlet temperature in the engine, T3/Ti. An analysis of these expressions shows that it is not possible to choose an optimal set of values of r and T3/Ti that maximize both the overall efficiency and thrust. We study how irreversibilities in the compressor and the turbine decrease the overall efficiency of jet engines and show that this effect is more pronounced for smaller T3/Ti.

  18. Structural integrity of jet engines; Jet engine no kozo kenzensei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onabe, H. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Indutries, Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-02-05

    This paper outlines the structural integrity of jet engines. In turbo-jet aircraft, the accident caused by equipment statistically reaches 12.5%. For a rotor design, a disk, shaft, engine mount, and blade are very important. A technique that evaluates the structural integrity of a fan blade is prescribed. The FOD resistance (resistance against the damage by a foreign substance) is prescribed in the airworthiness examination procedure. In GE, a 3.6-kg drive test that is double the normal test is made for the developed fan blade. The structural integrity of the disk requires a 120% overspeed test and repeated rotation fatigue test. Retirement-for-Cause (RFC) is the concept for lengthen the operating life without damaging the safety of a disk. Non-destructive inspection technology is important for the RFC. The structural integrity of the shaft and engine mount becomes an issue as secondary damage when the blade was broken. Twin-engined aircraft requires an air route through which it can arrive at the airport within 60 minutes by a single engine. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Airframe-Jet Engine Integration Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher; Antcliff, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    It has been found experimentally that the noise radiated by a jet mounted under the wing of an aircraft exceeds that of the same jet in a stand-alone environment. The increase in noise is referred to as jet engine airframe integration noise. The objectives of the present investigation are, (1) To obtain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for jet engine airframe integration noise or installation noise. (2) To develop a prediction model for jet engine airframe integration noise. It is known that jet mixing noise consists of two principal components. They are the noise from the large turbulence structures of the jet flow and the noise from the fine scale turbulence. In this investigation, only the effect of jet engine airframe interaction on the fine scale turbulence noise of a jet is studied. The fine scale turbulence noise is the dominant noise component in the sideline direction. Thus we limit out consideration primarily to the sideline.

  20. Computer simulation and visualization of supersonic jet for gas cluster equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieshkin, A.; Ermakov, Y.; Chernysh, V.; Ivanov, I.; Kryukov, I.; Alekseev, K.; Kargin, N.; Insepov, Z.

    2015-09-01

    Supersonic nozzle is a key component of a gas cluster condensation system. We describe a flow visualization system using glow discharge with annular or plane electrodes. The geometric parameters of a supersonic jet under typical conditions used in a gas cluster ion beam accelerator are investigated. As well numerical simulations were performed. Dependence of inlet and ambient pressures and nozzle throat diameter on the shock bottle dimensions is described for different working gases. Influence of condensation rate on shock bottle axial size is discussed.

  1. Computer simulation and visualization of supersonic jet for gas cluster equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ieshkin, A. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ermakov, Y. [Scobeltsyn Nuclear Physics Research Institute, Lomonosov State Moscow University, GSP-1, Leninskiye Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Chernysh, V.; Ivanov, I. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kryukov, I. [Institute for Problems in Mechanics, Russian Academy of Sciences, prosp. Vernadskogo, 101, Block 1, Moscow 119526 (Russian Federation); Alekseev, K.; Kargin, N. [National Research Nuclear University «MEPhI», Kashirskoye shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Insepov, Z., E-mail: zinsepov@purdue.edu [Purdue University, 500 Central Drive, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Nazarbayev University Research and Innovation System, Kabanbay Batyr Avenue 53, Astana (Kazakhstan)

    2015-09-21

    Supersonic nozzle is a key component of a gas cluster condensation system. We describe a flow visualization system using glow discharge with annular or plane electrodes. The geometric parameters of a supersonic jet under typical conditions used in a gas cluster ion beam accelerator are investigated. As well numerical simulations were performed. Dependence of inlet and ambient pressures and nozzle throat diameter on the shock bottle dimensions is described for different working gases. Influence of condensation rate on shock bottle axial size is discussed.

  2. Computational Investigation of Swirling Supersonic Jets Generated Through a Nozzle-Twisted Lance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingming; Li, Qiang; Zou, Zongshu; An, Xizhong

    2017-02-01

    The dynamic characteristics of supersonic swirling jets generated through a nozzle-twisted lance are numerically studied. The essential features of the swirling jets are identified by defining a deviation angle. The effects of nozzle twist angle (NTA) on swirling flow intensity, coalescence characteristics, and dynamic parameter distributions of the jets are discussed. The rotational flow characteristics are revealed. The results show that the jets from the nozzle-twisted lance are imparted to a circumferential rotating movement around the lance axis, and such swirling flow is enhanced by increasing NTA. The enhanced swirling flow causes weaker coalescence of the jets, faster attenuations of the axial velocity, and higher heat transfer rate between the jets and surroundings. The supersonic core length, however, is found to be less sensitive to the swirling flow intensity. The radial spreading of the jets, changing non-monotonically with NTA, arrives at its maximum at 5 deg of NTA. Furthermore, the swirling flow induces a considerable tangential velocity component, and as a result, a holistic and effective horizontal swirling flow field develops. The y-vorticity distribution range and the corresponding magnitude turn larger with increasing NTA, which promote the vortex motion of the local fluid element and thus intensify the local mixing.

  3. Aeroacoustic Properties of Moderate Reynolds Number Elliptic and Rectangular Supersonic Jets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzie, Kevin Wayne

    1995-01-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic properties of supersonic elliptic, rectangular, and circular jets are experimentally investigated. All three jets are perfectly expanded with an exit Mach number of approximately 1.5 and are operated in the Reynolds number range of 25,000 to 50,000. The reduced Reynolds number facilitates the use of conventional hot-wire anemometry and a glow discharge excitation technique which preferentially excites the varicose or flapping modes in the jets. In order to simulate the high velocity and low density effects of heated jets, helium is mixed with the air jets. This allows the large-scale structures in the jet shear layer to achieve high enough convective velocity to radiate noise through the Mach wave emission process. Experiments in the present work focus on comparisons between the cold and simulated heated jet conditions and on the beneficial aeroacoustic properties of non-circular jets. Comparisons are also made between the elliptic and rectangular jets. When helium is added to the jets, the instability wave phase velocity is found to approach or exceed the ambient sound speed. The radiated noise is also louder and directed at a higher angle from the jet axis. In addition, near field hot-wire spectra are found to match the far-field acoustic spectra only for the helium/air mixture case. These results demonstrate that there are significant differences between unheated and heated asymmetric jets in the Mach 1.5 speed range, many of which have been found previously for circular jets. The asymmetric jets were also found to radiate less noise than the round jet at comparable operating conditions. Strong similarities were also found between the aerodynamic and acoustic properties of the elliptic and rectangular jets.

  4. Jet Engine Noise Generation, Prediction and Control. Chapter 86

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Dennis L.; Envia, Edmane

    2004-01-01

    Aircraft noise has been a problem near airports for many years. It is a quality of life issue that impacts millions of people around the world. Solving this problem has been the principal goal of noise reduction research that began when commercial jet travel became a reality. While progress has been made in reducing both airframe and engine noise, historically, most of the aircraft noise reduction efforts have concentrated on the engines. This was most evident during the 1950 s and 1960 s when turbojet engines were in wide use. This type of engine produces high velocity hot exhaust jets during takeoff generating a great deal of noise. While there are fewer commercial aircraft flying today with turbojet engines, supersonic aircraft including high performance military aircraft use engines with similar exhaust flow characteristics. The Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-229, pictured in Figure la, is an example of an engine that powers the F-15 and F-16 fighter jets. The turbofan engine was developed for subsonic transports, which in addition to better fuel efficiency also helped mitigate engine noise by reducing the jet exhaust velocity. These engines were introduced in the late 1960 s and power most of the commercial fleet today. Over the years, the bypass ratio (that is the ratio of the mass flow through the fan bypass duct to the mass flow through the engine core) has increased to values approaching 9 for modern turbofans such as the General Electric s GE-90 engine (Figure lb). The benefits to noise reduction for high bypass ratio (HPBR) engines are derived from lowering the core jet velocity and temperature, and lowering the tip speed and pressure ratio of the fan, both of which are the consequences of the increase in bypass ratio. The HBPR engines are typically very large in diameter and can produce over 100,000 pounds of thrust for the largest engines. A third type of engine flying today is the turbo-shaft which is mainly used to power turboprop aircraft and helicopters

  5. The Effect of Reflector with Sound-Absorbing Material on Supersonic Jet Noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.-H. KWEON; M. TSUCHIDA; Y. MIYAZATO; T. AOKI; H.-D. KIM; T. SETOGUCHI

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental work to investigate the effect of a reflector on supersonic jet noise radiated from a convergent-divergent nozzle with a design Mach number 2.0. In the present study, a metal reflector and reflectors made of three different sound-absorbing materials (grass wool and polyurethane foam) were employed,and the reflector size was varied. Acoustic measurement is carried out to obtain the acoustic characteristics such as frequency, amplitude of screech tone and overall sound pressure level (OASPL). A high-quality schlieren optical system is used to visualize the detailed structure of supersonic jet. The results obtained show that the acoustic characteristics of supersonic jet noise are strongly dependent upon the jet pressure ratio and the reflector size. It is also found that the reflector with sound-absorbing material reduces the screech tone amplitude by about 5-13dB and the overall sound pressure levels by about 2-5dB, compared with those of the metal reflector.

  6. Temperature Distribution on Inclined plate Caused by Interaction with Supersonic Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TsuyoshiYasunobu; ToshiakiSetoguchi; 等

    2000-01-01

    The phenomena of the interaction between a supersonic jet and an obstcle is a very interesting and important problem relating to the industrial engineering.This paper aims to investigate the characteristics of the two-dimensional temperature distribution on an inclined plate surface and the relation between the temperature distribution and some shock waves formed in the flow field,In this study,the measurement of temperature distribution on an inclined plate suface and the flow visualization has carried out for various conditions using the thermo-sensitive liquid crystal sheet and the schlieren method.The two dimensional temperature distribution on the plate surface is clearly obtained by the thermo-sensitive liquid crystal sheet,The relation between the temperature distribution on an inclined plate surface and some shock waves reached at a plate surface is discussed.In this paper,the characteristics of the temperature distribution and the maximum temperature,and some other experimental evidences are presented.

  7. LES of an inclined jet into a supersonic cross-flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrante, Antonino; Matheou, Georgios; Dimotakis, Paul E; Stephens, Mike; Adams, Paul; Walters, Richard; Hand, Randall

    2008-01-01

    This short article describes flow parameters, numerical method, and animations of the fluid dynamics video LES of an Inclined Jet into a Supersonic Cross-Flow (http://hdl.handle.net/1813/11480). Helium is injected through an inclined round jet into a supersonic air flow at Mach 3.6. The video shows 2D contours of Mach number and magnitude of density gradient, and 3D iso-surfaces of Helium mass-fraction and vortical structures. Large eddy simulation with the sub-grid scale (LES-SGS) stretched vortex model of turbulent and scalar transport captures the main flow features: bow shock, Mach disk, shear layers, counter-rotating vortices, and large-scale structures.

  8. Sound Radiation from a Supersonic Jet Passing Through a Partially Open Exhaust Duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2011-01-01

    The radiation of sound from a perfectly expanded Mach 2.5 cold supersonic jet of 25.4 mm exit diameter flowing through a partially open rigid-walled duct with an upstream i-deflector has been studied experimentally. In the experiments, the nozzle is mounted vertically, with the nozzle exit plane at a height of 73 jet diameters above ground level. Relative to the nozzle exit plane (NEP), the location of the duct inlet is varied at 10, 5, and -1 jet diameters. Far-field sound pressure levels were obtained at 54 jet diameters above ground with the aid of acoustic sensors equally spaced around a circular arc of radius equal to 80 jet diameters from the jet axis. Data on the jet acoustic field for the partially open duct were obtained and compared with those with a free jet and with a closed duct. The results suggest that for the partially open duct the overall sound pressure level (OASPL) decreases as the distance between the NEP and the duct inlet plane decreases, while the opposite trend is observed for the closed duct. It is also concluded that the observed peak frequency in the partially open duct increases above the free jet value as the angle from the duct axis is increased, and as the duct inlet plane becomes closer to the NEP.

  9. PIV Measurements of Supersonic Internally-Mixed Dual-Stream Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James E.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    While externally mixed, or separate flow, nozzle systems are most common in high bypass-ratio aircraft, they are not as attractive for use in lower bypass-ratio systems and on aircraft that will fly supersonically. The noise of such propulsion systems is also dominated by jet noise, making the study and noise reduction of these exhaust systems very important, both for military aircraft and future civilian supersonic aircraft. This paper presents particle image velocimetry of internally mixed nozzle with different area ratios between core and bypass, and nozzles that are ideally expanded and convergent. Such configurations independently control the geometry of the internal mixing layer and of the external shock structure. These allow exploration of the impact of shocks on the turbulent mixing layers, the impact of bypass ratio on broadband shock noise and mixing noise, and the impact of temperature on the turbulent flow field. At the 2009 AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference the authors presented data and analysis from a series of tests that looked at the acoustics of supersonic jets from internally mixed nozzles. In that paper the broadband shock and mixing noise components of the jet noise were independently manipulated by holding Mach number constant while varying bypass ratio and jet temperature. Significant portions of that analysis was predicated on assumptions regarding the flow fields of these jets, both shock structure and turbulence. In this paper we add to that analysis by presenting particle image velocimetry measurements of the flow fields of many of those jets. In addition, the turbulent velocity data documented here will be very useful for validation of computational flow codes that are being developed to design advanced nozzles for future aircraft.

  10. Nonlinear effects of energy sources and the jet at supersonic flow in the channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    The work is devoted to the mathematical modeling of the influence of transversal jet and the near-wall energy sources on the shock wave structure of supersonic flow in channel with variable cross section. Stable regimes with the region of transonic velocities are obtained. Their stability is confirmed by the width of the corridor of the input power in the area of the regime existence.

  11. Measurement of Supersonic Jet Noise with Optical Wave Microphone System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masataka KOSAKA; Kunisato SETO; MD. Tawhidul Islam KHAN; Yoichi NAKAZONO

    2005-01-01

    An optical wave microphone system is a new technique of sound measurement. This technique has been developed as a new plasma diagnostic technique to measure electron density fluctuations in the nuclear fusion research. Because the sound wave is a pressure or a density fluctuation, it is possible for this technique to measure the sound wave, too. The acoustical characteristics of the optical wave microphone system were examined by using a speaker as a first step. Next, feasibility of this device to measure jet noise was examined. It was found that the optical wave microphone system could measure the jet noise as well as a sound from speaker.Hence the optical wave microphone system can be considered one of the devices equivalent to condenser microphone. Because of these reason, this device is very convenient to scan the acoustic filed through jet flow from the inside to the out side and more preferable for not disturbing the observation field.

  12. Generation of intense plasma jets and microparticle beams by an arc in a supersonic vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, F.

    1990-04-01

    Temperatures up to 50000 have been reached in water vortex stabilized Gerdien arcs. In arcs confined within the cores of supersonic hydrogen vortices much higher temperatures should be possible. Furthermore if these arcs are thermally insulated by a strong magnetic field temperatures up to a 106 K may be attainable. At these temperatures and in passing through a Laval nozzle the arc plasma can reach jet velocities of 100km/sec. If small quantities of heavy elements are entrained by this high velocity plasma jet these heavy elements are carried along reaching the same speed and upon condensation can form beams of clusters and microparticles.

  13. Time-resolved schlieren POD and aft deck pressure correlations on a rectangular supersonic nozzle and sonic wall jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Matthew; Magstadt, Andrew; Stack, Cory; Gaitonde, Datta; Glauser, Mark

    2016-11-01

    A multi-stream single expansion ramp nozzle (SERN) with aft deck, based on three-stream engine concepts, is currently undergoing experimental tests at Syracuse University's Skytop Turbulence Laboratory. In the context of this study, we view this as an idealized representation consisting of two canonical flows; a supersonic convergent-divergent (CD) nozzle and a sonic wall jet (representing the 3rd stream). The jet operates at a bulk flow of Mj , 1 = 1 . 6 and wall jet Mj , 3 = 1 . 0 . Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is then performed on the schlieren images and the time-dependent coefficients are related to the near-field deck pressure. Structures within the flow field are correlated to particular flow events and help track the downstream evolution of the jet. A multitude of scales are seen within the flow corresponding to a wide range of coherent structures. High fidelity LES is also performed on the same nozzle geometry and relations are made back to the experiments. AFOSR Turbulence and Transition Program (Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0435) with program managers Dr. I. Leyva and Dr. R. Ponnappan.

  14. Supersonic jets of hydrogen and helium for laser wakefield acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Svensson, K.; Wojda, F.; Senje, L.; Burza, M.; Aurand, B.; Genoud, G.; Persson, A.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Lundh, O.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of laser wakefield accelerated electrons in supersonic gas flows of hydrogen and helium are investigated. At identical backing pressure, we find that electron beams emerging from helium show large variations in their spectral and spatial distributions, whereas electron beams accelerated in hydrogen plasmas show a higher degree of reproducibility. In an experimental investigation of the relation between neutral gas density and backing pressure, it is found that the resulting number density for helium is ∼30% higher than for hydrogen at the same backing pressure. The observed differences in electron beam properties between the two gases can thus be explained by differences in plasma electron density. This interpretation is verified by repeating the laser wakefield acceleration experiment using similar plasma electron densities for the two gases, which then yielded electron beams with similar properties.

  15. Mode Decomposition of a Supersonic Jet Using Momentum Potential Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidharan Nair, Unnikrishnan; Gaitonde, Datta

    2015-11-01

    We adopt Doak's momentum potential theory to investigate the acoustic, thermal and hydrodynamic modes in a Mach 1.3 cold jet. A statistically stationary LES of the jet is subjected to Helmholtz decomposition to yield the solenoidal and irrotational components of the momentum density. The irrotational component is further decomposed into acoustic and thermal modes. The data confirms the quantitative radial decay rates of the hydrodynamic and acoustic fields as well as the experimentally observed universal spectrum specific to the downstream and sideline directions. The irrotational field in the core exhibits an axially coherent jittering wave-packet with an internal frequency of St 0.4, yielding the highly directional downstream radiation at St 0.2. The intrusion of rolled up vortices from the expanding shear layer into the core induces a coherent perturbation zone in the irrotational component, which persists and propagates into the nearfield resulting in intermittent noise events. The interaction of the fluctuating solenoidal field with the fluctuating Lamb vector in the core of the jet is found to be the most prominent source, while its interaction with the fluctuating entropy gradient is found to be a sink in this cold jet.

  16. Control of Penetration and Mixing of an Excited Supersonic Jet Into a Supersonic Cross Stream (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    1 identified jet- shear layer to be a primary location where combustion took place. Increasing the interracial contact would of course be beneficial...afforded by the injection scheme and de- fines the relationship between the perimeter and the area of a given contour compared to a perfect circle. A

  17. H-mode fueling optimization with the supersonic deuterium jet in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Gates, D A; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Lundberg, D P; Maingi, R; Menard, J E; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Stotler, D P

    2008-06-18

    High-performance, long-pulse 0.7-1.2 MA 6-7 MW NBI-heated small-ELM H-mode plasma discharges are developed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) as prototypes for confinement and current drive extrapolations to future spherical tori. It is envisioned that innovative lithium coating techniques for H-mode density pumping and a supersonic deuterium jet for plasma refueling will be used to achieve the low pedestal collisionality and low n{sub e}/n{sub G} fractions (0.3-0.6), both of which being essential conditions for maximizing the non-inductive (bootstrap and beam driven) current fractions. The low field side supersonic gas injector (SGI) on NSTX consists of a small converging-diverging graphite Laval nozzle and a piezoelectric gas valve. The nozzle is capable of producing a deuterium jet with Mach number M {le} 4, estimated gas density at the nozzle exit n {le} 5 x 10{sup 23} m{sup -3}, estimated temperature T {ge} 70 K, and flow velocity v = 2:4 km/s. The nozzle Reynolds number Reis {approx_equal} 6000. The nozzle and the valve are enclosed in a protective carbon fiber composite shroud and mounted on a movable probe at a midplane port location. Despite the beneficial L-mode fueling experience with supersonic jets in limiter tokamaks, there is a limited experience with fueling of high-performance H-mode divertor discharges and the associated density, MHD stability, and MARFE limits. In initial supersonic deuterium jet fueling experiments in NSTX, a reliable H-mode access, a low NBI power threshold, P{sub LH} {le} 2 MW, and a high fueling efficiency (0.1-0.4) have been demonstrated. Progress has also been made toward a better control of the injected fueling gas by decreasing the uncontrolled high field side (HFS) injector fueling rate by up to 95 % and complementing it with the supersonic jet fueling. These results motivated recent upgrades to the SGI gas delivery and control systems. The new SGI-Upgrade (SGI-U) capabilities include multi-pulse ms

  18. Jet engine R and D and I; Watashi to jet engine kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murashima, K. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-06-10

    My efforts towards at the development of aeroengines since the end of the war are described. The J3-7 engine propelled the T1 trainer plane, and was installed as booster aboard the P2J antisubmarine patrol aircraft. It was the first jet engine that Japan produced after the end of the war, and had been in use until quite recently. I took part in the construction of a prototype of the JR100 series designed to serve as VTOL (vertical take-off and landing) aircraft lift engines, and in the test thereof. As the shift from turbojet to turbofan proceeded, I participated in the development of the FJR710 engine under the guidance of National Aerospace Laboratory, and the product was installed aboard an experimental STOL (short take-off and landing) aircraft Asuka. I next joined a Defense Agency initiative for a reheat turbofan to replace the J3 aboard trainer plane, and the result was the low bypass ratio/high output F3 engine. In 1989, Ministry of International Trade and Industry decided for a large-scale project of developing an engine for a next-generation supersonic transport, and the HYPR (Super/Hypersonic Transport Propulsion System) project was started. The project was participated in by manufacturers from overseas, which were GE, P and W, RR, and SNECMA. The foreign corporations worked on an equal footing with the Japanese parties, and collaboration between the participants was smooth, with each party endeavoring in the field they were good at. The project will be concluded as scheduled in fiscal 1998. (NEDO)

  19. Numerical Simulations of Morphology, Flow Structures and Forces for a Sonic Jet Exhausting in Supersonic Crossflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B.H Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study is performed for a sonic jet issuing from a blunted cone to provide possible directional control in supersonic crossflow by solving the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations with the twoequation k −ω turbulence model. Results are presented in the form of static aerodynamic coefficients, computed at a free stream Mach number 4.0, with varying pressure ratios, incidence angle and keeping zero yaw and roll angles. The morphology and flow structure for the jet exhausting in crossflow at various pressure ratios is described in detail. The Flight control of the projectile can be accomplished by taking advantage of a complex shock-boundary layer interaction produced by jet interacting with the oncoming crossflow by altering pressure distribution in vicinity of the jet, a net increase in the net force can be utilized for maneuvering of vehicle and possible flight control. Computed static aerodynamic coefficients and pressure distribution using CFD analyses is with an accuracy of ± 5% in the supersonic range.

  20. CFD Analysis of Supersonic Coaxial Jets on Effect of Spreading Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kathiresan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prevailing high-speed air-breathing propulsion systems invariably banks on coaxial jets which plays a vigorous role in stabilization of flames and combustion emission. Coaxial jets have applications in supersonic ejectors, noise control techniques and enhancement of mixing. Coaxial jet nozzles regulate spreading rates by developing virtuous mean flow and shortening primary flow potential core length. In the present paper, two-dimensional coaxial jet profiles of different area ratios are designed and analyzed. The models were designed in ANSYS Design Modeler and the numerical simulation was done in ANSYS FLUENT 14.5 using the two dimensional density based energy equation and k- ε turbulence model with primary supersonic flow and secondary subsonic flow. The contours of turbulence intensity, acoustics power level and axial-velocity are investigated along the flow direction. This study shows that increasing the area ratio results in less turbulence which in turn increases the potential core length,acoustics power level, turbulent kinetic energy and generates more noise.

  1. Numerical simulation of the generation mechanism of axisymmetric supersonic jet screech tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. D.; Gao, J. H.

    2005-08-01

    In this paper an axisymmetric computational aeroacoustic procedure is developed to investigate the generation mechanism of axisymmetric supersonic jet screech tones. The axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations and the two equations standard k-ɛ turbulence model modified by Turpin and Troyes ["Validation of a two-equation turbulence model for axisymmetric reacting and non-reaction flows," AIAA Paper No. 2000-3463 (2000)] are solved in the generalized curvilinear coordinate system. A generalized wall function is applied in the nozzle exit wall region. The dispersion-relation-preserving scheme is applied for space discretization. The 2N storage low-dissipation and low-dispersion Runge-Kutta scheme is employed for time integration. Much attention is paid to far-field boundary conditions and turbulence model. The underexpanded axisymmetric supersonic jet screech tones are simulated over the Mach number from 1.05 to 1.2. Numerical results are presented and compared with the experimental data by other researchers. The simulated wavelengths of A0, A1, A2, and B modes and part of simulated amplitudes agree very well with the measurement data by Ponton and Seiner ["The effects of nozzle exit lip thickness on plume resonance," J. Sound Vib. 154, 531 (1992)]. In particular, the phenomena of modes jumping have been captured correctly although the numerical procedure has to be improved to predict the amplitudes of supersonic jet screech tones more accurately. Furthermore, the phenomena of shock motions are analyzed. The predicted splitting and combination of shock cells are similar with the experimental observations of Panda ["Shock oscillation in underexpanded screeching jets," J. Fluid. Mech. 363, 173 (1998)]. Finally, the receptivity process is numerically studied and analyzed. It is shown that the receptivity zone is associated with the initial thin shear layer, and the incoming and reflected sound waves.

  2. Engine room cooling system using jet pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, J.W.; Lee, S.H. [Daewoo Heavy Industries Ltd. (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    Construction machinery includes an engine enclosure separated from a cooling system enclosure by a wall to reduce noise and advance cooling system performance. For this structure, however, the axial fan cannot be of benefit to the engine room, and so the temperature rise in the engine room makes several bad conditions. This paper proposes that hot air in engine room is evacuated by secondary pipe using jet pump. This paper demonstrates the structure and the effect of jet pump and useful guideline on design of area, length, and shape of secondary pipe to maximize the effect of jet pump. (author). 4 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Experimental evidence for collisional shock formation via two obliquely merging supersonic plasma jets

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, Elizabeth C; Hsu, Scott C; Adams, Colin S; Gilmore, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    We report spatially resolved experimental measurements of the oblique merging of two supersonic laboratory plasma jets. The jets are formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns using injected argon, and have electron density $\\sim 10^{14}$ cm$^{-3}$, electron temperature $\\approx 1.4$ eV, ionization fraction near unity, and velocity $\\approx 40$ km/s just prior to merging. The jet merging produces a few-cm-thick stagnation layer, as observed in both fast-framing camera images and multi-chord interferometer data, consistent with collisional shock formation [E. C. Merritt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 085003 (2013)]. The observed stagnation layer emission morphology is consistent with hydrodynamic oblique shock theory at early times, and then undergoes an evolution at later times that is coincident with the theoretically predicted transition to detached shock formation.

  4. Investigation of nonlinear effects in the instabilities and noise radiation of supersonic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, S. I.; McLaughlin, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    The nonlinear interactions of fluctuating components which produce noise in supersonic jet flows were studied experimentally. Attention was given to spectral components interactions and the spectral effects of increasing Re. A jet exhausted in perfectly expanded conditions was monitored by microphones in the maximum noise emission direction. Trials were run at Mach 1.4 and 2.1 and the Re was varied from 5000-20,000 and 9000-25,000, respectively. Hot-wire data were gathered to examine the mode-mode interactions and a point glow discharge was used to excite the jets. The noise was found to exhibit discrete frequency components and a single tone instability at Re below 10,000. Mode interactions were found to weaken after the instabilities reached a crescendo and then decayed, leading to a nonlinear spectral broadening effect.

  5. Effect of emerging technology on a convertible, business/interceptor, supersonic-cruise jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beissner, F. L., Jr.; Lovell, W. A.; Robins, A. W.; Swanson, E. E.

    1986-01-01

    This study was initiated to assess the feasibility of an eight-passenger, supersonic-cruise long range business jet aircraft that could be converted into a military missile carrying interceptor. The baseline passenger version has a flight crew of two with cabin space for four rows of two passenger seats plus baggage and lavatory room in the aft cabin. The ramp weight is 61,600 pounds with an internal fuel capacity of 30,904 pounds. Utilizing an improved version of a current technology low-bypass ratio turbofan engine, range is 3,622 nautical miles at Mach 2.0 cruise and standard day operating conditions. Balanced field takeoff distance is 6,600 feet and landing distance is 5,170 feet at 44,737 pounds. The passenger section from aft of the flight crew station to the aft pressure bulkhead in the cabin was modified for the interceptor version. Bomb bay type doors were added and volume is sufficient for four advanced air-to-air missiles mounted on a rotary launcher. Missile volume was based on a Phoenix type missile with a weight of 910 pounds per missile for a total payload weight of 3,640 pounds. Structural and equipment weights were adjusted and result in a ramp weight of 63,246 pounds with a fuel load of 30,938 pounds. Based on a typical intercept mission flight profile, the resulting radius is 1,609 nautical miles at a cruise Mach number of 2.0.

  6. Detonation Jet Engine. Part 2--Construction Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Volkov, Konstantin N.

    2016-01-01

    We present the most relevant works on jet engine design that utilize thermodynamic cycle of detonative combustion. Detonation engines of various concepts, pulse detonation, rotational and engine with stationary detonation wave, are reviewed. Main trends in detonation engine development are discussed. The most important works that carried out…

  7. Mixing characteristics of a moderate aspect ratio screeching supersonic rectangular jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentich, Griffin; Upadhyay, Puja; Kumar, Rajan

    2016-05-01

    Flow field characteristics of a moderate aspect ratio supersonic rectangular jet were examined at two overexpanded, a perfectly expanded, and an underexpanded jet conditions. The underexpanded and one overexpanded operating condition were of maximum screech, while the second overexpanded condition was of minimum screech intensity. Streamwise particle image velocimetry was performed along both major and minor axes of the jet and the measurements were made up to 30 nozzle heights, h, where h is the small dimension of the nozzle. Select cross planes were examined using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry to investigate the jet development and the role streamwise vortices play in jet spreading at each operating condition. The results show that streamwise vortices present at the nozzle corners along with vortices excited by screech tones play a major role in the jet evolution. All cases except for the perfectly expanded operating condition exhibited axis switching at streamwise locations ranging from 11 to 16 nozzle heights downstream of the exit. The overexpanded condition of maximum screech showed the most upstream switch over, while the underexpanded case showed the farthest downstream. Both of the maximum screeching cases developed into a diamond cross-sectional profile far downstream of the exit, while the ideally expanded case maintained a rectangular shape. The overexpanded minimum screeching case eventually decayed into an oblong profile.

  8. Experimental studies of collisional plasma shocks and plasma interpenetration via merging supersonic plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.

    2015-11-01

    Over the past 4 years on the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL, we have studied obliquely and head-on-merging supersonic plasma jets of an argon/impurity or hydrogen/impurity mixture. The jets are formed/launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns. In successive experimental campaigns, we characterized the (a) evolution of plasma parameters of a single plasma jet as it propagated up to ~ 1 m away from the railgun nozzle, (b) density profiles and 2D morphology of the stagnation layer and oblique shocks that formed between obliquely merging jets, and (c) collisionless interpenetration transitioning to collisional stagnation between head-on-merging jets. Key plasma diagnostics included a fast-framing CCD camera, an 8-chord visible interferometer, a survey spectrometer, and a photodiode array. This talk summarizes the primary results mentioned above, and highlights analyses of inferred post-shock temperatures based on observations of density gradients that we attribute to shock-layer thickness. We also briefly describe more recent PLX experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor-instability evolution with magnetic and viscous effects, and potential future collisionless shock experiments enabled by low-impurity, higher-velocity plasma jets formed by contoured-gap coaxial guns. Supported by DOE Fusion Energy Sciences and LANL LDRD.

  9. Global mode decomposition of supersonic impinging jet noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Nathaniel; Nichols, Joseph W.

    2015-11-01

    We apply global stability analysis to an ideally expanded, Mach 1.5, turbulent jet that impinges on a flat surface. The analysis extracts axisymmetric and helical instability modes, involving coherent vortices, shocks, and acoustic feedback, which we use to help explain and predict the effectiveness of microjet control. High-fidelity large eddy simulations (LES) were performed at nozzle-to-wall distances of 4 and 4.5 throat diameters with and without sixteen microjets positioned uniformly around the nozzle lip. These flow configurations conform exactly to experiments performed at Florida State University. Stability analysis about LES mean fields predicted the least stable global mode with a frequency that matched the impingement tone observed in experiments at a nozzle-to-wall distance of 4 throat diameters. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations were solved at five nozzle-to-wall distances to create base flows that were used to investigate the influence of this parameter. A comparison of the eigenvalue spectra computed from the stability analysis about LES and RANS base flows resulted in good agreement. We also investigate the effect of the boundary layer state as it emerges from the nozzle using a multi-block global mode solver. Computational resources were provided by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility.

  10. Global Mode-Based Control of Supersonic Jet Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Mahesh; Freund, Jonathan; Bodony, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The loudest source of high-speed jet noise appears to be describable by unsteady wavepackets that resemble instabilities. We seek to reduce their acoustic impact by developing a novel control strategy that uses global modes to model their dynamics and structural sensitivity of the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes operator to determine effective linear feedback control. Using co-located actuators and sensors we demonstrate the method on an axisymmetric Mach 1.5 fitted with a nozzle. Direct numerical simulations using this control show significant noise reduction, with additional reduction with increase in control gain. Eigenanalysis of the uncontrolled and controlled mean flows reveal fundamental changes in the spectrum at frequencies lower than that used by the control. The non-normality of the global modes is shown to enable this control to affect a wide range of frequencies. The low-frequency wavepacket components are made less acoustically efficient, which is reflected in the far-field noise spectrum. Mean flow alterations are minor near the nozzle and only become apparent further downstream. Office of Naval Research and National Science Foundation.

  11. Computational Comparison of the Interaction of a Lateral Jet on a Supersonic Generic Missile

    OpenAIRE

    Gnemmi, Patrick; Adeli, Reza; Longo, José Maria

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with the comparison of computations made at DLR and ISL on the interaction between a lateral jet issuing from a generic missile body and the oncoming supersonic cross-flow. Steady-state numerical simulations are carried out by 3D, viscous, turbulent, Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Codes; at DLR, a hybrid mesh is used for the TAU calculation, whereas at ISL a hexahedral mesh is used for the CFX computation. Experimental data acquired in the DLR wind tunnel TMK in Cologne act a...

  12. Mixing of Supersonic Jets in a RBCC Strutjet Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, S.; Hawk, Clark W.; Bakker, P. G.; Parkinson, D.; Turner, M.

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. It is desirable to delay this mixing process in the air-augmented mode of operation present during take-off and low speed flight. A scale model of the Strutjet device was built and tested to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strut exit plane in simulated sea level take-off conditions. The Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostic method has been employed to observe the mixing of the turbine exhaust gas with the gases from both the primary rockets and the ingested air. The ratio of the pressure in the turbine exhaust to that in the rocket nozzle wall at the point where the two jets meet, is the independent variable in these experiments. Tests were accomplished at values of 1.0 (the original design point), 1.5 and 2.0 for this parameter at 8 locations downstream of the rocket nozzle exit. The results illustrate the development of the mixing zone from the exit plane of the strut to a distance of about 18 equivalent rocket nozzle exit diameters downstream (18"). These images show the turbine exhaust to be confined until a short distance downstream. The expansion into the ingested air is more pronounced at a pressure ratio of 1.0 and 1.5 and shows that mixing with this air would likely begin at a distance of 2" downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Of the pressure ratios tested in this research, 2.0 is the best value for delaying the mixing at the operating conditions considered.

  13. Dynamics and density distributions in a capillary-discharge waveguide with an embedded supersonic jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlis, N. H., E-mail: nmatlis@gmail.com; Gonsalves, A. J.; Steinke, S.; Tilborg, J. van; Shaw, B.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Geddes, C. G. R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Matlis, E. H. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-11-28

    We present an analysis of the gas dynamics and density distributions within a capillary-discharge waveguide with an embedded supersonic jet. This device provides a target for a laser plasma accelerator which uses longitudinal structuring of the gas-density profile to enable control of electron trapping and acceleration. The functionality of the device depends sensitively on the details of the density profile, which are determined by the interaction between the pulsed gas in the jet and the continuously-flowing gas in the capillary. These dynamics are captured by spatially resolving recombination light from several emission lines of the plasma as a function of the delay between the jet and the discharge. We provide a phenomenological description of the gas dynamics as well as a quantitative evaluation of the density evolution. In particular, we show that the pressure difference between the jet and the capillary defines three regimes of operation with qualitatively different longitudinal density profiles and show that jet timing provides a sensitive method for tuning between these regimes.

  14. Experimental characterization of a transition from collisionless to collisional interaction between head-on-merging supersonic plasma jets

    CERN Document Server

    Moser, A L

    2014-01-01

    We present results from experiments on the head-on merging of two supersonic plasma jets in an initially collisionless regime for the counter-streaming ions [A. L. Moser & S. C. Hsu, Phys. Plasmas, submitted (2014)]. The plasma jets are of either an argon/impurity or hydrogen/impurity mixture and are produced by pulsed-power-driven railguns. Based on time- and space-resolved fast-imaging, multi-chord interferometry, and survey-spectroscopy measurements of the overlapping region between the merging jets, we observe that the jets initially interpenetrate, consistent with calculated inter-jet ion collision lengths, which are long. As the jets interpenetrate, a rising mean-charge state causes a rapid decrease in the inter-jet ion collision length. Finally, the interaction becomes collisional and the jets stagnate, eventually producing structures consistent with collisional shocks. These experimental observations can aid in the validation of plasma collisionality and ionization models for plasmas with complex ...

  15. Turbine ram jet engine. Turbinen-Staustrahltriebwerk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabs, A.

    1991-04-25

    A turbine ram jet engine is described with a ram compressed air duct, which is formed between an outer duct wall and a housing-like jacket of a basic turbine engine and is to be shut off on the incoming air side with means of shutting off, by which the ram compressed air duct is shut off with the basic engine switched on and the ram jet engine switched off with simultaneous release of suction air into the basic engine. The jacket should form an air shaft opening out polygonally in the direction of the end of the ram compressed air duct on the inlet side and should have penetrations, where the means of shutting off at the penetrations are hinged flaps, which open up the penetrations with the ram jet engine switched on and thus form a shut-off body of the air shaft symmetrically opposite the ram air flow.

  16. Cooling Effect of Water Injection on a High-Temperature Supersonic Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature and high pressure supersonic jet is one of the key problems in the design of solid rocket motors. To reduce the jet temperature and noise, cooling water is typically injected into the exhaust plume. Numerical simulations for the gas-liquid multiphase flow field with mixture multiphase model were developed and a series of experiments were carried out. By introducing the energy source terms caused by the vaporization of liquid water into the energy equation, a coupling solution was developed to calculate the multiphase flow field. The temperature data predictions agreed well with the experimental results. When water was injected into the plume, the high temperature core region area was reduced, and the temperature on the head face was much lower than that without water. The relationship between the reduction of temperature on the bottom plate and the momentum ratio is developed, which can be used to predict the cooling effect of water injection in many cases.

  17. A pulsed supersonic gas jet target for precision spectroscopy at the HITRAP facility at GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiedemann, D. [Institut für Kernphysik der Goethe Universität, Max von Laue Straße 1, D-60438, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Stiebing, K.E., E-mail: stiebing@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Institut für Kernphysik der Goethe Universität, Max von Laue Straße 1, D-60438, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Winters, D.F.A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, D-64291, Darmstadt (Germany); Quint, W. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, D-64291, Darmstadt (Germany); Physikalisches Institut der Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 226, D-69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Varentsov, V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe (FAIR), Darmstadt (Germany); Warczak, A.; Malarz, A. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Stöhlker, Th. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, D-64291, Darmstadt (Germany); Physikalisch-Astronomische Fakultät der Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743, Jena (Germany)

    2014-11-11

    A pulsed supersonic gas jet target for experiments at the HITRAP facility at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt has been designed and built as a multi-purpose installation for key experiments on fundamental atomic physics in strong fields. This setup is currently installed at the Institut für Kernphysik of Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (IKF), in order to explore its operation prior to its installation at the HITRAP facility. Design and performance of the target are described. The measured target densities of 5.9×10{sup 12} atoms/cm{sup 3} for helium and 8.1×10{sup 12} atoms/cm³ for argon at the stagnation pressure of 30 bar match the required values. The target-beam diameter of 0.9 mm and the pulsed operation mode (jet built-up-time ≤15 ms) are well suited for the use at HITRAP.

  18. Effect of Homogeneous Condensation on the Interaction of Supersonic Moist Air Jets with Resonance Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M Ashraful.Alam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hartmann tube, can use for flow-control, is a device which generates high intensity sound through the shock wave oscillations, are created by the interaction of the supersonic jet. In this study, two-phase flow simulations are carried out to characterize the effect of non-equilibrium condensation on the unsteady flowfield of the Hartmann resonance tube. This present numerical work provides a new insight on the flow dynamics and acoustics of the resonance tube – including the shock nature, the tube gas heating, and the effect of non-equilibrium condensation on the flow structure. A TVD numerical method is applied to the Reynolds and Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, and droplet growth equation of liquid phase production. The simulations are performed over a range of nozzle pressure ratios. The numerically simulated flow structure of under-expanded supersonic jets is compared with experimental data. Moreover, the predicted frequency of end wall pressure fluctuations is compared with the experimental results.

  19. a Highly-Integrated Supersonic-Jet Fourier Transform Microwave Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Qian; Feng, Gang; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2017-06-01

    A highly integrated supersonic-jet Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer of coaxially oriented beam-resonator arrangement (COBRA) type, covering 2-20GHz, has been recently built at Chongqing University, China. Built up almost entirely in an NI PXIe chassis, we take the advantage of the NI PXIe-5451 Dual-channel arbitrary waveform generator and the PXIe-5654 RF signal generator to create a spectrometer with wobbling capacity for fast resonator tuning. Based on the I/Q modulation, associate with PXI control and sequence boards built at the Leibniz Universitat Hannover, the design of the spectrometer is much simpler and very compact. The Fabry-Pérot resonator is semi-confocal with a spherical reflector of 630 mm diameter and a radius of 900 mm curvature and one circulator plate reflector of 630 mm diameter. The vacuum is effectuated by a three-stage mechanical (two-stage rotary vane and roots booster) pump at the fore line of a DN630 ISO-F 20000 L/s oil-diffusion pump. The supersonic-jet expansion is pulsed by a general valve Series 9 solenoid valve which is controlled by a general valve IOTA one driver governed by the experiment-sequence generation. First molecular examples to illustrate the performance of the new setup will include OCS and CF_3CHFCl.

  20. Multi-chord fiber-coupled interferometry of supersonic plasma jets and comparisons with synthetic data

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, Elizabeth C; Gilmore, Mark A; Thoma, Carsten; Loverich, John; Hsu, Scott C

    2012-01-01

    A multi-chord fiber-coupled interferometer [Merritt et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 033506 (2012)] is being used to make time-resolved density measurements of supersonic argon plasma jets on the Plasma Liner Experiment [Hsu et al., Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc. 56, 307 (2011)]. The long coherence length of the laser (>10 m) allows signal and reference path lengths to be mismatched by many meters without signal degradation, making for a greatly simplified optical layout. Measured interferometry phase shifts are consistent with a partially ionized plasma in which an initially positive phase shift becomes negative when the ionization fraction drops below a certain threshold. In this case, both free electrons and bound electrons in ions and neutral atoms contribute to the index of refraction. This paper illustrates how the interferometry data, aided by numerical modeling, are used to derive total jet density, jet propagation velocity (~15-50 km/s), jet length (~20-100 cm), and 3D expansion.

  1. Ignition, Flame Structure and Near-Wall Burning in Transverse Hydrogen Jets in Supersonic Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Mirko; Godfrey Mungal, M.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2010-11-01

    The work aims at investigating near-wall ignition and flame structure in transverse underexpanded hydrogen jets in high-enthalpy supersonic crossflows generated in an expansion tube. Crossflow conditions are held fixed at M=2.4, p=40 kPa and T 1400 K, while jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratios J in the range 0.3-5.0 are considered. Schlieren and OH^* chemiluminescence imaging are used to characterize flow structure, ignition and flame penetration, while the instantaneous reaction zone is identified with planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of OH on side- and plan-view planes. The upstream separation length is found to scale as J^0.44D (D jet diameter). Similarly, the ignition point xig strongly depends on J: xig tends to a limiting value of ˜22D as J->0, and the flame is anchored in the upstream recirculation region and lee-side of the jet for J>3. Flame penetration is well described by the traditional form k(x/DJ)^m where both k and m are found to depend on J but these parameters reach a limiting value of k 1 and m 0.3 for J>2. The roles of the unsteady bow shock, the separation and recirculation regions on the near-wall ignition, stabilization and mixing at large J are discussed.

  2. The Effect of Spherical Surface on Noise Suppression of a Supersonic Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md. Tawhidul Islam Khan; Kunisato Seto; Zhixiang Xu; H. Ohta

    2003-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to eliminate the screech tone generated from a supersonic jet.Compressed air was passed through a circular convergent nozzle preceded by a straight tube of same diameter. In order to reduce the jet screech a spherical reflector was used and placed at the nozzle exit. The placement of the spherical reflector at the nozzle exit controlled the location of the image source as well as minimized the sound pressure at the nozzle exit.The weak sound pressure did not excite the unstable disturbance at the exit.Thus the loop of the feedback mechanism could not be accomplished and the jet screech was eliminated. The technique of screech reduction with a flat plate was also examined and compared with the present method. A good and effective performance in canceling the screech component by the new method was found by the investigation. Experimental results indicate that the new system suppresses not only the screech tones but also the broadband noise components and reduces the overall noise of the jet flow. The spherical reflector was found very effective in reducing overall sound pressure level in the upstream region of the nozzle compared to a flat plate. The proposed spherical reflector can, accordingly, protect the upstream noise propagation.

  3. Relating a Jet-Surface Interaction Experiment to a Commercial Supersonic Transport Aircraft Using Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, Vance F. III; Friedlander, David

    2017-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations were performed for a commercial supersonic transport aircraft concept and experimental hardware models designed to represent the installed propulsion system of the conceptual aircraft in an upcoming test campaign. The purpose of the experiment is to determine the effects of jet-surface interactions from supersonic aircraft on airport community noise. RANS simulations of the commercial supersonic transport aircraft concept were performed to relate the representative experimental hardware to the actual aircraft. RANS screening simulations were performed on the proposed test hardware to verify that it would be free from potential rig noise and to predict the aerodynamic forces on the model hardware to assist with structural design. The simulations showed a large region of separated flow formed in a junction region of one of the experimental configurations. This was dissimilar with simulations of the aircraft and could invalidate the noise measurements. This configuration was modified and a subsequent RANS simulation showed that the size of the flow separation was greatly reduced. The aerodynamic forces found on the experimental models were found to be relatively small when compared to the expected loads from the model’s own weight.Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations were completed for two configurations of a three-stream inverted velocity profile (IVP) nozzle and a baseline single-stream round nozzle (mixed-flow equivalent conditions). For the Sideline and Cutback flow conditions, while the IVP nozzles did not reduce the peak turbulent kinetic energy on the lower side of the jet plume, the IVP nozzles did significantly reduce the size of the region of peak turbulent kinetic energy when compared to the jet plume of the baseline nozzle cases. The IVP nozzle at Sideline conditions did suffer a region of separated flow from the inner stream nozzle splitter that did produce an intense, but small, region of

  4. Surface treatment by propane operated static jet engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2003-03-01

    Based on the principle of the jet engine, by projecting abrasive materials in hot gas at supersonic speed, 'thermo-blasting' is an industrial solution for surface treatment which combines propane, innovation and environmental protection. From the very outset, these three reasons incited Primagaz to take part in the perfection and development of the system designed by Thermo-Blast International SA. This young company from Pau (Southern France) which also validated its design with Turbomeca and the ENSAM in Paris, is currently enjoying a growing reputation at international level. In order to remain the world leader in its field and retain its technological advance, Thermo-Blast continues to refine its process with the support of Primagaz and D.B. Consultants with regard to optimising gas combustion techniques. (author)

  5. A Design of Experiments Investigation of Offset Streams for Supersonic Jet Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brenda; Papamoschou, Dimitri

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation into the noise characteristics of a dual-stream jet with four airfoils inserted in the fan nozzle was conducted. The intent of the airfoils was to deflect the fan stream relative to the core stream and, therefore, impact the development of the secondary potential core and noise radiated in the peak jet-noise direction. The experiments used a full-factorial Design of Experiments (DoE) approach to identify parameters and parameter interactions impacting noise radiation at two azimuthal microphone array locations, one of which represented a sideline viewing angle. The parameters studied included airfoil angle-of-attack, airfoil azimuthal location within the fan nozzle, and airfoil axial location relative to the fan-nozzle trailing edge. Jet conditions included subsonic and supersonic fan-stream Mach numbers. Heated jets conditions were simulated with a mixture of helium and air to replicate the exhaust velocity and density of the hot jets. The introduction of the airfoils was shown to impact noise radiated at polar angles in peak-jet noise direction and to have no impact on noise radiated at small and broadside polar angles and to have no impact on broadband-shock-associated noise. The DoE analysis showed the main effects impacting noise radiation at sideline-azimuthal-viewing angles included airfoil azimuthal angle for the airfoils on the lower side of the jet near the sideline array and airfoil trailing edge distance (with airfoils located at the nozzle trailing edge produced the lowest sound pressure levels). For an array located directly beneath the jet (and on the side of the jet from which the fan stream was deflected), the main effects impacting noise radiation included airfoil angle-of-attack and airfoil azimuthal angle for the airfoils located on the observation side of the jet as well and trailing edge distance. Interaction terms between multiple configuration parameters were shown to have significant impact on the radiated

  6. Enceladus' Supersonic Gas Jets' Role in Diurnal Variability of Particle Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Candice; Esposito, Larry W.; Portyankina, Ganna; Hendrix, Amanda; Colwell, Joshua E.; Aye, Klaus-Michael

    2016-10-01

    Introduction: The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has observed 6 occultations of stars by Enceladus' plume from 2005 to 2011 [1]. Supersonic gas jets were detected, imbedded in the overall expulsion of gas at escape velocity along the tiger stripe fissures that cross Enceladus' south pole [2]. The gas flux can be calculated [1], and is observed to vary just 15% in over 6 years, representing a steady output of ~200 kg/sec. In contrast, the brightness of the particle jets, a proxy for the amount of particles expelled, varies 3x with orbital longitude [3], implicating tidal stresses. This is not necessarily inconsistent with the steady gas flux, which had not been measured at apokrone until now.2016 epsilon Orionis Occultation: In order to investigate whether gas flow increases dramatically at apokrone an occultation observation was inserted into the Cassini tour on March 11, 2016 on orbit 233. Enceladus was at a mean anomaly of 208 at the time of the occultation. Using the same methodology as previously employed the column density has been determined to be 1.5 x 1016 cm-2, giving a gas flux of 250 kg/sec. This value is 20% higher than the average 210 kg/sec, but only 15% higher than the occultations at a mean anomaly of 236; i.e. higher than the others but not by a factor of 2 or 3. The overall expulsion of gas from the south pole of Enceladus thus does not seem to change dramatically with orbital position.Jets: The line of sight to the star pierced the Baghdad I gas jet. The jet data, in contrast to the integrated plume, look significantly different in this dataset. The column density of the jet is higher than observed in previous occultations. The collimation of the jet is more pronounced and from that we derive a mach number of 8-9, compared to a previous value for this jet of 6. We conclude that the higher velocity and increased quantity of gas in the jet close to apokrone indicate that the jets are the primary contributors to the increased

  7. Ultra-high-speed digital in-line holography system applied to particle-laden supersonic underexpanded jet flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Buchmann, Nicolas A.; Soria, Julio

    2012-01-01

    for magnified digital in-line holography is created, using an ultra-high-speed camera capable of frame rates of up to 1.0MHz. To test the new technique an axisymmetric supersonic underexpanded particle-laden jet is investigated. The results show that the new technique allows for the acquisition of time resolved...

  8. Supersonic micro-jets and their application to few-cycle laser-driven electron acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Karl

    2009-07-23

    This thesis covers the few-cycle laser-driven acceleration of electrons in a laser-generated plasma. The laser system employed in this work is a new development based on optical parametric chirped pulse amplification and is the only multi-TW few-cycle laser in the world. In the experiment, the laser beam is focused onto a supersonic helium gas jet which leads to the formation of a plasma channel. The laser pulse, having an intensity of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} propagates through the plasma with an electron density of 2 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} and forms via a highly nonlinear interaction a strongly anharmonic plasma wave. The amplitude of the wave is so large that the wave breaks, thereby injecting electrons from the background plasma into the accelerating phase. The energy transfer from the laser pulse to the plasma is so strong that the maximum propagation distance is limited to the 100 m range. Therefore, gas jets specifically tuned to these requirements have to be employed. The properties of microscopic supersonic gas jets are thoroughly analyzed in this work. Based on numeric flow simulation, this study encompasses several extensive parameter studies that illuminate all relevant features of supersonic flows in microscopic gas nozzles. This allowed the optimized design of de Laval nozzles with exit diameters ranging from 150 {mu}m to 3 mm. The employment of these nozzles in the experiment greatly improved the electron beam quality. After these optimizations, the laser-driven electron accelerator now yields monoenergetic electron pulses with energies up to 50 MeV and charges between one and ten pC. The electron beam has a typical divergence of 5 mrad and comprises an energy spectrum that is virtually free from low energetic background. The electron pulse duration could not yet be determined experimentally but simulations point towards values in the range of 1 fs. The acceleration gradient is estimated from simulation and experiment to be approximately 0.5 TV/m. The

  9. Mixing characteristics of a transverse jet injection into supersonic crossflows through an expansion wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoyang; Wang, Zhenguo; Wang, Hongbo; Sun, Mingbo

    2016-12-01

    Mixing characteristics of a transverse jet injection into supersonic crossflows through an expansion plate are investigated using large eddy simulation (LES), where the expansion effects on the mixing are analyzed emphatically by comparing to the flat-plate counterpart. An adaptive central-upwind weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme along with multi-threaded and multi-process MPI/OpenMP parallel is adopted to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the calculations. Progressive mesh refinement study is performed to assess the grid resolution and solution convergence. Statistic results obtained are compared to the experimental data and recently performed classical numerical simulation, which validates the reliability of the present LES codes. Firstly, the jet mixing mechanisms in the flowfield with expansion plate are revealed. It indicates that the large-scale vortices in the windward side of jet plume induced by Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability contribute to the mixing in the near-field, while the entrainment by the counter-rotating vortices and molecular diffusion dominate the mixing process in the far-field. Furthermore, the effects of wall expansion on the flow and mixing characteristics are discussed. The boundary layer across the expansion corner is relaminarized and the profiles of streamwise velocity are distinctly changed. Then the separation region ahead of jet plume is more close to the wall, and the breaking process of large-scale vortices in the windward side of jet plume starts earlier. However, the favorable pressure gradient generated by wall expansion reduces the mixing efficiency and brings a greater total pressure loss.

  10. Mapping the Interactions between Shocks and Mixing Layers in a 3-Stream Supersonic Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewalle, Jacques; Ruscher, Christopher; Kan, Pinqing; Tenney, Andrew; Gogineni, Sivaram; Kiel, Barry

    2015-11-01

    Pressure is obtained from an LES calculation of the supersonic jet (Ma1 = 1 . 6) issuing from a rectangular nozzle in a low-subsonic co-flow; a tertiary flow, also rectangular with Ma3 = 1 insulates the primary jet from an aft-deck plate. The developing jet exhibits complex three-dimensional interactions between oblique shocks, multiple mixing layers and corner vortices, which collectively act as a skeleton for the flow. Our study is based on several plane sections through the pressure field, with short signals (0.1 s duration at 80 kHz sampling rate). Using wavelet-based band-pass filtering and cross-correlations, we map the directions of propagation of information among the various ``bones'' in the skeleton. In particular, we identify upstream propagation in some frequency bands, 3-dimensional interactions between the various shear layers, and several key bones from which the pressure signals, when taken as reference, provide dramatic phase-locking for parts of the skeleton. We acknowledge the support of AFRL through an SBIR grant.

  11. Simulation and stability analysis of supersonic impinging jet noise with microjet control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Nathaniel; Nichols, Joseph W.

    2014-11-01

    A model for an ideally expanded 1.5 Mach turbulent jet impinging on a flat plate using unstructured high-fidelity large eddy simulations (LES) and hydrodynamic stability analysis is presented. Note the LES configuration conforms exactly to experiments performed at the STOVL supersonic jet facility of the Florida Center for Advanced Aero-Propulsion allowing validation against experimental measurements. The LES are repeated for different nozzle-wall separation distances as well as with and without the addition of sixteen microjets positioned uniformly around the nozzle lip. For some nozzle-wall distances, but not all, the microjets result in substantial noise reduction. Observations of substantial noise reduction are associated with a relative absence of large-scale coherent vortices in the jet shear layer. To better understand and predict the effectiveness of microjet noise control, the application of global stability analysis about LES mean fields is used to extract axisymmetric and helical instability modes connected to the complex interplay between the coherent vortices, shocks, and acoustic feedback. We gratefully acknowledge computational resources provided by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility.

  12. 3 TUNNELS IN THE ENGINE RESEARCH BUILDING ERB - IN CELL CE-26 VARIABLE REYNOLDS NUMBER SUPERSONIC NO

    Science.gov (United States)

    1956-01-01

    3 TUNNELS IN THE ENGINE RESEARCH BUILDING ERB - IN CELL CE-26 VARIABLE REYNOLDS NUMBER SUPERSONIC NOZZLE - CELL CE-4 6X6 INCH MACH NUMBER 2.96 SUPERSONIC AIRPLANE - CELL 1-NW 1X1 FOOT MACH 3.12 SUPERSONIC TUNNEL

  13. Argon Nanoclusters with Fivefold Symmetry in Supersonic Gas Jets and Superfluid Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylchenko, O. G.; Boltnev, R. E.; Khmelenko, V. V.; Kiryukhin, V.; Konotop, O. P.; Lee, D. M.; Krainyukova, N. V.

    2017-04-01

    In this study argon nanoclusters (800 to ˜ 6500 atoms) formed in supersonic gas jets are compared to the nanoclusters stabilized in superfluid helium. High-energy electron and X-ray diffraction methods are utilized. Both techniques allow investigation of isolated clusters. It is shown that the theoretical prediction of the so-called multiply twinned particles with fivefold symmetry, such as icosahedra (ico) and decahedra (dec) is valid in the investigated cluster size interval. Around the point of the expected ico-to-dec size-dependent transformation at a cluster size of ˜ 2000 atoms, hexagonal ico and the statistical distribution of structures with a tendency for dec to replace ico are observed. Kinetic reasons, as well as temperature-related effects, could be responsible for the latter observations.

  14. Supersonic cluster jet source for debris-free extreme ultraviolet production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubiak, G.D.; Bernardez, L.J.

    1997-09-01

    The supersonic cluster jet has been developed and characterized for use as a target medium to produce a clean source of extreme ultraviolet radiation for extreme ultraviolet lithography and other applications. Spectroscopic characterization of the laser plasma emission produced from Xe, O{sub 2} and Kr cluster gas targets has been performed. Xe is the most efficient target gas, exhibiting a conversion efficiency at 13.5 nm of 0.8% into the relevant 2.5% spectral bandwidth. The other target gases are less efficient in the spectral region of interest and, in the case of oxygen, emit {approximately}5 times less off-band radiation. The angular distribution of the Xe plasma emission has also been characterized.

  15. Two-color resonance photoionization spectrum of nickelocene in a supersonic jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketkov, S. Yu.; Selzle, H. L.; Schlag, E. W.; Titova, S. N.; Kalakutskaya, L. V.

    2004-10-01

    Two-color photoionization of nickelocene molecules cooled in a supersonic jet is performed using a tunable nanosecond pulsed laser. The first stage of the multiphoton excitation is the transition from the highest occupied molecular orbital of nickelocene to the lowest Rydberg level. Conditions are found under which molecular ions (η 5-C5H5)2Ni+ are the only product of the multiphoton ionization in the one-color experiment. Irradiation of an excited molecule by an intense pulse of another laser increases significantly the yield of molecular ions. The dependence of the yield of (η5-C5H5)2Ni+ ions on the frequency of the second laser makes it possible to determine the adiabatic ionization potential of nickelocene as 6.138±0.012eV.

  16. Towards high-resolution laser ionization spectroscopy of the heaviest elements in supersonic gas jet expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, R.; Barzakh, A.; Bastin, B.; Beerwerth, R.; Block, M.; Creemers, P.; Grawe, H.; de Groote, R.; Delahaye, P.; Fléchard, X.; Franchoo, S.; Fritzsche, S.; Gaffney, L. P.; Ghys, L.; Gins, W.; Granados, C.; Heinke, R.; Hijazi, L.; Huyse, M.; Kron, T.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lecesne, N.; Loiselet, M.; Lutton, F.; Moore, I. D.; Martínez, Y.; Mogilevskiy, E.; Naubereit, P.; Piot, J.; Raeder, S.; Rothe, S.; Savajols, H.; Sels, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Thomas, J-C; Traykov, E.; Van Beveren, C.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Wendt, K.; Zadvornaya, A.

    2017-01-01

    Resonant laser ionization and spectroscopy are widely used techniques at radioactive ion beam facilities to produce pure beams of exotic nuclei and measure the shape, size, spin and electromagnetic multipole moments of these nuclei. However, in such measurements it is difficult to combine a high efficiency with a high spectral resolution. Here we demonstrate the on-line application of atomic laser ionization spectroscopy in a supersonic gas jet, a technique suited for high-precision studies of the ground- and isomeric-state properties of nuclei located at the extremes of stability. The technique is characterized in a measurement on actinium isotopes around the N=126 neutron shell closure. A significant improvement in the spectral resolution by more than one order of magnitude is achieved in these experiments without loss in efficiency. PMID:28224987

  17. Hybrid Reynolds-Averaged/Large-Eddy Simulations of a Coaxial Supersonic Free-Jet Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurle, Robert A.; Edwards, Jack R.

    2010-01-01

    Reynolds-averaged and hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations have been applied to a supersonic coaxial jet flow experiment. The experiment was designed to study compressible mixing flow phenomenon under conditions that are representative of those encountered in scramjet combustors. The experiment utilized either helium or argon as the inner jet nozzle fluid, and the outer jet nozzle fluid consisted of laboratory air. The inner and outer nozzles were designed and operated to produce nearly pressure-matched Mach 1.8 flow conditions at the jet exit. The purpose of the computational effort was to assess the state-of-the-art for each modeling approach, and to use the hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations to gather insight into the deficiencies of the Reynolds-averaged closure models. The Reynolds-averaged simulations displayed a strong sensitivity to choice of turbulent Schmidt number. The initial value chosen for this parameter resulted in an over-prediction of the mixing layer spreading rate for the helium case, but the opposite trend was observed when argon was used as the injectant. A larger turbulent Schmidt number greatly improved the comparison of the results with measurements for the helium simulations, but variations in the Schmidt number did not improve the argon comparisons. The hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations also over-predicted the mixing layer spreading rate for the helium case, while under-predicting the rate of mixing when argon was used as the injectant. The primary reason conjectured for the discrepancy between the hybrid simulation results and the measurements centered around issues related to the transition from a Reynolds-averaged state to one with resolved turbulent content. Improvements to the inflow conditions were suggested as a remedy to this dilemma. Second-order turbulence statistics were also compared to their modeled Reynolds-averaged counterparts to evaluate the effectiveness of common turbulence closure

  18. The smallest man-made jet engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Samuel; Solovev, Alexander A; Harazim, Stefan M; Deneke, Christoph; Mei, Yong Feng; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2011-12-01

    The design of catalytic engines powered by chemical fuels is an exciting and emerging field in multidisciplinary scientific communities. Recent progress in nanotechnology has enabled scientists to shrink the size of macroengines down to microscopic, but yet powerful, engines. Since a couple of years ago, we have reported our progress towards the control and application of catalytic microtubular engines powered by the breakdown of hydrogen peroxide fuel which produces a thrust of oxygen bubbles. Efforts were undertaken in our group to prove whether the fabrication of nanoscale jets is possible. Indeed, the smallest jet engine (600 nm in diameter and 1 picogram of weight) was synthesized based on heteroepitaxially grown layers. These nanojets are able to self-propel in hydrogen peroxide solutions and are promising for the realisation of multiple tasks.

  19. Application of Tomo-PIV in a large-scale supersonic jet flow facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    2016-09-01

    Particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) has been used extensively at NASA GRC over the last 15 years to build a benchmark data set of hot and cold jet flow measurements in an effort to understand acoustic noise sources in high-speed jets. Identifying the noise sources in high-speed jets is critical for ultimately modifying the nozzle hardware design/operation and therefore reducing the jet noise. Tomographic PIV (Tomo-PIV) is an innovative approach for acquiring and extracting velocity information across extended volumes of a flow field, enabling the computation of additional fluid mechanical properties not typically available using traditional PIV techniques. The objective of this work was to develop and implement the Tomo-PIV measurement capability and apply it in a large-scale outdoor test facility, where seeding multiple flow streams and operating in the presence of daylight presents formidable challenges. The newly developed Tomo-PIV measurement capability was applied in both a subsonic M 0.9 flow and an under-expanded M 1.4 heated jet flow field. Measurements were also obtained using traditional two-component (2C) PIV and stereo PIV in the M 0.9 flow field for comparison and validation of the Tomo-PIV results. In the case of the M 1.4 flow, only the 2C PIV was applied to allow a comparison with the Tomo-PIV measurement. The Tomo-PIV fields-of-view covered 180 × 180 × 10 mm, and the reconstruction domains were 3500 × 3500 × 200 voxels. These Tomo-PIV measurements yielded all three components of vorticity across entire planes for the first time in heated supersonic jet flows and provided the first full 3D reconstruction of the Mach disk and oblique shock intersections inside of the barrel shocks. Measuring all three components of vorticity across multiple planes in the flow, potentially reduces the number of measurement configurations (streamwise and cross-stream PIV) required to fully characterize the mixing-enhanced nozzle flows routinely studied in

  20. Detonation Jet Engine. Part 1--Thermodynamic Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Volkov, Konstantin N.

    2016-01-01

    We present the most relevant works on jet engine design that utilize thermodynamic cycle of detonative combustion. The efficiency advantages of thermodynamic detonative combustion cycle over Humphrey combustion cycle at constant volume and Brayton combustion cycle at constant pressure were demonstrated. An ideal Ficket-Jacobs detonation cycle, and…

  1. Impact of chevron spacing and asymmetric distribution on supersonic jet acoustics and flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeb, N.; Gutmark, E.; Kailasanath, K.

    2016-05-01

    An experimental investigation into the effect of chevron spacing and distribution on supersonic jets was performed. Cross-stream and streamwise particle imaging velocimetry measurements were used to relate flow field modification to sound field changes measured by far-field microphones in the overexpanded, ideally expanded, and underexpanded regimes. Drastic modification of the jet cross-section was achieved by the investigated configurations, with both elliptic and triangular shapes attained downstream. Consequently, screech was nearly eliminated with reductions in the range of 10-25 dB depending on the operating condition. Analysis of the streamwise velocity indicated that both the mean shock spacing and strength were reduced resulting in an increase in the broadband shock associated noise spectral peak frequency and a reduction in the amplitude, respectively. Maximum broadband shock associated noise amplitude reductions were in the 5-7 dB range. Chevron proximity was found to be the primary driver of peak vorticity production, though persistence followed the opposite trend. The integrated streamwise vorticity modulus was found to be correlated with peak large scale turbulent mixing noise reduction, though optimal overall sound pressure level reductions did not necessarily follow due to the shock/fine scale mixing noise sources. Optimal large scale mixing noise reductions were in the 5-6 dB range.

  2. Geometric factors affecting noise suppresion and thrust loss of divergent-lobe supersonic jet noise suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, R. G.; Groesbeck, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The thrust loss and noise suppression of a divergent-lobe supersonic jet noise suppressor were experimentally determined over a range of nozzle pressure ratios of 1.5 to 4.0. These small-scale cold flow tests were made to determine the effect on thrust and noise of: suppressor length, rearward facing step height, suppressor divergence angle, and ejector shroud length and location. Noise suppression was achieved at nozzle pressure ratios of 2.5 and greater. Maximum lobe jet noise attenuation of 15 db with thrust loss differences of 1.5 percent compared to the convergent nozzle were obtained at a nozzle pressure ratio of 3.5 with an ejector shroud two nozzle diameters long. Without the ejector the attenuation was 13 db with thrust loss differences of 11 percent. Short suppressors approximately one primary nozzle throat diameter long performed as well as longer suppressors. Rearward facing step height had a significant effect on noise suppression. Ejector shrouds two nozzle diameters in length are feasible.

  3. Schlieren study of a sonic jet injected into a supersonic cross flow using high-current pulsed LEDs

    CERN Document Server

    Giskes, Ella; Segerink, Frans B; Venner, Cornelis H

    2016-01-01

    In the research of supersonic flows, flow visualization continues to be an important tool, and even today it is difficult to create high quality images. In this study we present a low-cost and easy-to use Schlieren setup. The setup makes use of LEDs, pulsed with high currents to increase the optical output to sufficient levels, exploiting the advantages of LED light over conventional light sources. As a test-case we study the interaction of a Mach 1.7 cross flow and a transverse underexpanded jet, which is commonly studied considering the mixing and combustion in scramjet engines. Using 130 nanosecond LED light pulses, we captured the flow structures sharply and in great detail. We observed a large-gradient wave, which was seen in numerical studies but hitherto not reported in experiments. Furthermore, we demonstrate that time-correlated images can be obtained with this Schlieren setup, so that also flow unsteadiness can be studied, such as the movement of shock waves and vortices.

  4. Experimental investigation of acoustic self-oscillation influence on decay process for underexpanded supersonic jet in submerged space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, V. Yu.; Arefyev, K. Yu.; Ilchenko, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    Intensification of mixing between the gaseous working body ejected through a jet nozzle with ambient medium is an important scientific and technical problem. Effective mixing can increase the total efficiency of power and propulsion apparatuses. The promising approach, although poorly studied, is generation of acoustic self-oscillation inside the jet nozzle: this impact might enhance the decay of a supersonic jet and improve the mixing parameters. The paper presents peculiar properties of acoustic self-excitation in jet nozzle. The paper presents results of experimental study performed for a model injector with a set of plates placed into the flow channel, enabling the excitation of acoustic self-oscillations. The study reveals the regularity of under-expanded supersonic jet decay in submerged space for different flow modes. Experimental data support the efficiency of using the jet nozzle with acoustic self-oscillation in application to the systems of gas fuel supply. Experimental results can be used for designing new power apparatuses for aviation and space industry and for process plants.

  5. Jet engine noise and infrared plume correlation field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunio, Phillip M.; Weber, Reed A.; Knobel, Kimberly R.; Smith, Christine; Draudt, Andy

    2015-09-01

    Jet engine noise can be a health hazard and environmental pollutant, particularly affecting personnel working in close proximity to jet engines, such as airline mechanics. Mitigating noise could reduce the potential for hearing loss in runway workers; however, there exists a very complex relationship between jet engine design parameters, operating conditions, and resultant noise power levels, and understanding and characterizing this relationship is a key step in mitigating jet engine noise effects. We demonstrate initial results highlighting the utility of high-speed imaging (hypertemporal imaging) in correlating the infrared signatures of jet engines with acoustic noise. This paper builds on prior theoretical analysis of jet engine infrared signatures and their potential relationships to jet engine acoustic emissions. This previous work identified the region of the jet plume most likely to emit both in infrared and in acoustic domains, and it prompted the investigation of wave packets as a physical construct tying together acoustic and infrared energy emissions. As a means of verifying these assertions, a field campaign to collect relevant data was proposed, and data collection was carried out with a bank of infrared instruments imaging a T700 turboshaft engine undergoing routine operational testing. The detection of hypertemporal signatures in association with acoustic signatures of jet engines enables the use of a new domain in characterizing jet engine noise. This may in turn enable new methods of predicting or mitigating jet engine noise, which could lead to socioeconomic benefits for airlines and other operators of large numbers of jet engines.

  6. A 3-D discontinuous Galerkin Method for jet engine buzz-saw noise propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remaki, M.; Habashi, W.G. [McGill Univ., Computational Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: remaki@cfdlab.mcgill.ca; wagdi.habashi@mcgill.ca; Ait-Ali-Yahia, D. [Pratt and Whitney Canada, CFD Group, Longueuil, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: djaffar.Ait-Ali-Yahia@pwc.ca; Jay, A. [Pratt and Whitney Canada, Dept. of Acoustics and Installation, Longueuil, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: alexandre.jay@pwc.ca

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents a 3-D methodology for solving jet engine aero-acoustics problems in the presence of strong shocks and rarefactions. For example, turbofan engines suffer from Multiple Pure Tone noise, also called Buzz-saw noise, generated by the fan when the blade rotational tip speed is supersonic. These waves are composed of a series of shocks and rarefactions produced by a coalescence of shocks due to non-uniformities in the blade spacing and in the blade stagger angles, arising from manufacturing tolerances.

  7. Dynamic characteristics and control of jet engines. Jet engine no dynamics to seigyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, N. (National Aerospace Lab., Chofu, Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-06-10

    The recent controller of a jet engine is called as Full Authority Digital Engine Controller (FADEC). This means that the whole operation from starting to shut down of an engine is carried out by the electric digital control. Many studies on the control of a jet engine by the electric digital control have been conducted since the past, this advantages were also clarified, but, since the reliability of electrical machines was low, this was not put into use at once. However, FADEC became possible since the technical reform concerning to the increasing reliability and environment-resisting property, small type with low weight and low cost of electrical machines was performed. In this paper, FADEC system was summarized, in connection with this system, studies on the dynamics and multi-variables control of a jet engine were described. 15 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Ultra light weight jet engine JR100; Chokeiryo jet engine JR100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuki, M. [Nippon Institute of Technology, Saitama (Japan)

    1999-03-20

    As a part of the jet lift V/STOL research by National Aerospace Laboratory, a study of trial manufacture of ultra light weight jet engine JR 100 started in FY 1964. The study was aimed at obtaining a lift engine for VTOL and founding the base for the future jet lift VTOL, and at taking in the results of the jet engine element study accumulated so far and manufacturing an advanced engine. Decided on the use of domestic materials for JR 100, the materials to be used are almost iron-based ones. Through the efforts for weight reduction in structure and processing, a thrust/weight ratio of 10 was realized. At the same time, the production/processing of light weight materials such as titanium alloys was proceeded with, and by adopting the materials to JR 200 system, a thrust/weight ratio of 15 was realized. Together with these, for the purpose of reducing the fuel consumption rate, studies started on fan for lift fan engine and high temperature turbine (an inlet temperature of 1250 degrees C was achieved), to get low noise/high efficiency fan. By the research results, the basis for jet lift VTOL was established, and it became the basis for the development of turbo fan engine FJR 710. (NEDO)

  9. Biosurface engineering through ink jet printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohidus Samad; Fon, Deniece; Li, Xu; Tian, Junfei; Forsythe, John; Garnier, Gil; Shen, Wei

    2010-02-01

    The feasibility of thermal ink jet printing as a robust process for biosurface engineering was demonstrated. The strategy investigated was to reconstruct a commercial printer and take advantage of its colour management interface. High printing resolution was achieved by formulating bio-inks of viscosity and surface tension similar to those of commercial inks. Protein and enzyme denaturation during thermal ink jet printing was shown to be insignificant. This is because the time spent by the biomolecules in the heating zone of the printer is negligible; in addition, the air and substrate of high heat capacity absorb any residual heat from the droplet. Gradients of trophic/tropic factors can serve as driving force for cell growth or migration for tissue regeneration. Concentration gradients of proteins were printed on scaffolds to show the capability of ink jet printing. The printed proteins did not desorb upon prolonged immersion in aqueous solutions, thus allowing printed scaffold to be used under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Our group portrait was ink jet printed with a protein on paper, illustrating that complex biopatterns can be printed on large area. Finally, patterns of enzymes were ink jet printed within the detection and reaction zones of a paper diagnostic.

  10. Jet Engine Exhaust Analysis by Subtractive Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    and J. J. Brooks. Development of a portable miniature collection system for the exposure as- sessment within the microenvironment for carcinogens ...65 A-2. Recovery of acrylonitrile from standard sample generation system ...... ............. 66 B-I. Jet engine exhaust sampling and analysis...7 n-Butane 0.16 2.6 minutes 8 Propylene oxide 3.14 52 minutes 9 Acrylonitrile 9.35 2.6 hours 10 Phenanthrene 1.9 x 106 61 years 11 4-Bromodiphenyl

  11. Multiblock grid generation for jet engine configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mark E. M.

    1992-01-01

    The goal was to create methods for generating grids with minimal human intervention that are applicable to a wide range of problems and compatible with existing numerical methods and with existing and proposed computers. The following topics that are related to multiblock grid generation are briefly covered in viewgraph form: finding a domain decomposition, dimensioning grids, grid smoothing, manipulating grids and decompositions, and some specializations for jet engine configurations.

  12. Jet Engine Exhaust Nozzle Flow Effector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Silox, Richard J. (Inventor); Buehrle, Ralph D. (Inventor); Cagle, Christopher M. (Inventor); Cabell, Randolph H. (Inventor); Hilton, George C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A jet engine exhaust nozzle flow effector is a chevron formed with a radius of curvature with surfaces of the flow effector being defined and opposing one another. At least one shape memory alloy (SMA) member is embedded in the chevron closer to one of the chevron's opposing surfaces and substantially spanning from at least a portion of the chevron's root to the chevron's tip.

  13. Failure analysis of jet engine turbine blade

    OpenAIRE

    MILAN T. JOVANOVIĆ; Vesna Maksimović; Ivana Cvijović-Alagić

    2016-01-01

    Jet engine turbine blade cast by investment precision casting of Ni-base superalloy, which failed during exploatation, was the subject of investigation. Failure analysis was executed applying optical microscopy (OM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using replica technique, scaning electron microscopy (SEM) and stress rupture life tests. On the ground of obtained results it was concluded that the failure occurred as a result of structural changes caused by turbine blade overheating abov...

  14. Failure analysis of jet engine turbine blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan T. Jovanović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Jet engine turbine blade cast by investment precision casting of Ni-base superalloy, which failed during exploatation, was the subject of investigation. Failure analysis was executed applying optical microscopy (OM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM using replica technique, scaning electron microscopy (SEM and stress rupture life tests. On the ground of obtained results it was concluded that the failure occurred as a result of structural changes caused by turbine blade overheating above the exploitation temperature.

  15. Active Control of Jet Engine Inlet Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-31

    investigation was performed with no pressure applied across the fan. To measure the high-frequency, unsteady jet velocity, an IFA 300 hot - wire anemometry ...flow at the engine face. Recommendations for the measurement devices include hot -film or hot - wire sensors and wall-mounted, high frequency pressure...the blade and creates flow instabilities that convect through the later compressor stages. This report presents a study performed to gain an

  16. Computation of supersonic jet mixing noise for an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Kim, Chan M.

    1994-05-01

    The turbulent mixing noise of a supersonic jet is calculated for an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle at the design pressure ratio. Aerodynamic computations are performed using the PARC code with a k-epsilon turbulence model. Lighthill's acoustic analogy is adopted. The acoustics solution is based upon the methodology followed in the MGB code. The source correlation function is expressed as a linear combination of second-order tensors (Ribner's assumption). Assuming separable second-order correlations and incorporating Batchelor's isotropic turbulence model, the source term was calculated from the kinetic energy of turbulence. A Gaussian distribution for the time-delay of correlation was introduced. The CFD solution was used to obtain the source strength as well as the characteristic time-delay of correlation. The effect of sound/flow interaction was incorporated using the high frequency asymptotic solution to Lilley's equation for axisymmetric geometries. Acoustic results include sound pressure level directivity and spectra at different polar angles. The aerodynamic and acoustic results demonstrate favorable agreement with experimental data.

  17. Design and first operation of a supersonic gas jet based beam profile monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilis Tzoganis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Noninterceptive beam profile monitors are of great importance for many particle accelerators worldwide. Extra challenges are posed by high energy, high intensity machines and low energy low intensity accelerators. For these applications, existing diagnostics are no longer suitable due to the high power of the beam or the very low intensity. In addition, many other accelerators, from medical to industrial will benefit from a noninvasive, real time beam profile monitor. In this paper we present a new beam profile monitor with a novel design for the nozzle and skimmer configuration to generate a supersonic gas jet meeting ultrahigh vacuum conditions and we describe the first results for such a beam profile monitor at the Cockcroft Institute. This monitor is able to measure two-dimensional profiles of the particle beam while causing negligible disturbance to the beam or to the accelerator vacuum. The ultimate goal for this diagnostic is to provide a versatile and universal beam profile monitor suitable for measuring any beams.

  18. Entropy generation and jet engine optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Lucia, Umberto

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, it was shown that, with an original approach to hydrodynamic cavitation, a phenomenological model was realized in order to compute some of the physical parameters needed for the design of the most common technological applications (turbo-machinery, etc.) with an economical saving in planning because this analysis could allow engineers to reduce the experimental tests and the consequent costs in the design process. Here the same approach has been used to obtain range of some physical quantity for jet engine optimization.

  19. Numerical simulations of transverse liquid jet to a supersonic crossflow using a pure two-fluid model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixu Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A pure two-fluid model was used for investigating transverse liquid jet to a supersonic crossflow. The well-posedness problem of the droplet phase governing equations was solved by applying an equation of state in the kinetic theory. A k-ε-kp turbulence model was used to simulate the turbulent compressible multiphase flow. Separation of boundary layer in front of the liquid jet was predicted with a separation shock induced. A bow shock was found to interact with the separation shock in the simulation result, and the adjustment of shock structure caused by the interaction described the whipping phenomena. The predicted penetration height showed good agreement with the empirical correlations. In addition, the turbulent kinetic energies of both the gas and droplet phases were presented for comparison, and effects of the jet-to-air momentum flux ratio and droplet diameter on the penetration height were also examined in this work.

  20. Sound generated by instability waves of supersonic flows. I Two-dimensional mixing layers. II - Axisymmetric jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Burton, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the phenomenon of sound generation by spatially growing instability waves in high-speed flows. It is pointed out that this process of noise generation is most effective when the flow is supersonic relative to the ambient speed of sound. The inner and outer asymptotic expansions corresponding to an excited instability wave in a two-dimensional mixing layer and its associated acoustic fields are constructed in terms of the inner and outer spatial variables. In matching the solutions, the intermediate matching principle of Van Dyke and Cole is followed. The validity of the theory is tested by applying it to an axisymmetric supersonic jet and comparing the calculated results with experimental measurements. Very favorable agreements are found both in the calculated instability-wave amplitude distribution (the inner solution) and the near pressure field level contours (the outer solution) in each case.

  1. On the correlation analysis of electric field inside jet engine

    OpenAIRE

    A Krishna; Khattab, T.; Abdelaziz, A.F.; Guizani, M.

    2014-01-01

    A Simple channel modeling method based on correlation analysis of the electric field inside jet engine is presented. The analysis of the statistical propagation characteristics of electromagnetic field inside harsh jet engine environment is presented by using `Ansys® HFSS'. In this paper, we propose a method to locate the best position for receiving probes inside jet engine with minimum correlation between the receiver points which have strong average electric field. Moreover, a MIMO system c...

  2. Event-Shape Engineering and Jet Quenching

    CERN Document Server

    Christiansen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Event-Shape Engineering (ESE) is a tool that enables some control of the initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions in a similar way as the centrality enables some control of the number of participants. Utilizing ESE, the path length in and out-of plane can be varied while keeping the medium properties (centrality) fixed. In this proceeding it is argued that this provides additional experimental information about jet quenching. Finally, it is suggested that if ESE studies are done in parallel for light and heavy quarks one can determine, in a model independent way, if the path-length dependence of their quenching differs.

  3. The Effect of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Energy Bypass on Specific Thrust for a Supersonic Turbojet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyo, Theresa L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of a thermodynamic cycle analysis of a supersonic turbojet engine with a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy bypass system that explores a wide range of MHD enthalpy extraction parameters. Through the analysis described here, it is shown that applying a magnetic field to a flow path in the Mach 2.0 to 3.5 range can increase the specific thrust of the turbojet engine up to as much as 420 N/(kg/s) provided that the magnitude of the magnetic field is in the range of 1 to 5 Tesla. The MHD energy bypass can also increase the operating Mach number range for a supersonic turbojet engine into the hypersonic flight regime. In this case, the Mach number range is shown to be extended to Mach 7.0.

  4. Supersonic Stall Flutter of High Speed Fans. [in turbofan engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Stevens, W.; Jutras, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical model is developed for predicting the onset of supersonic stall bending flutter in axial flow compressors. The analysis is based on a modified two dimensional, compressible, unsteady actuator disk theory. It is applied to a rotor blade row by considering a cascade of airfoils whose geometry and dynamic response coincide with those of a rotor blade element at 85 percent of the span height (measured from the hub). The rotor blades are assumed to be unshrouded (i.e., free standing) and to vibrate in their first flexural mode. The effects of shock waves and flow separation are included in the model through quasi-steady, empirical, rotor total-pressure-loss and deviation-angle correlations. The actuator disk model predicts the unsteady aerodynamic force acting on the cascade blading as a function of the steady flow field entering the cascade and the geometry and dynamic response of the cascade. Calculations show that the present model predicts the existence of a bending flutter mode at supersonic inlet Mach numbers. This flutter mode is suppressed by increasing the reduced frequency of the system or by reducing the steady state aerodynamic loading on the cascade. The validity of the model for predicting flutter is demonstrated by correlating the measured flutter boundary of a high speed fan stage with its predicted boundary. This correlation uses a level of damping for the blade row (i.e., the log decrement of the rotor system) that is estimated from the experimental flutter data. The predicted flutter boundary is shown to be in good agreement with the measured boundary.

  5. Electronic absorption spectroscopy of PAHs in supersonic jets and ultracold liquid helium droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisken, Friedrich; Staicu, Angela; Krasnokutski, Serge; Henning, Thomas

    Neutral and cationic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are discussed as possible carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), still unassigned astrophysical absorption features observed in the spectra of reddened stars (Salama et al. 1999). Despite the importance of this class of molecules for astrophysics and nanophysics (PAHs can be regarded as nanoscale fragments of a sheet of graphite), the spectroscopic characterization of PAHs under well-defined conditions (low temperature and collision-free environment) has remained a challenge. Recently we have set up a cavity ring-down spectrometer combined with a pulsed supersonic jet expansion to study neutral and cationic PAHs under astrophysical conditions. PAHs studied so far include the neutral molecules anthracene (Staicu et al. 2004) and pyrene (Rouillé et al. 2004) as well as the cationic species naphthalene+ and anthracene+ (Sukhorukov et al. 2004). Employing another molecular beam apparatus, the same molecules (except of the cationic species) were also studied in liquid helium droplets (Krasnokutski et al. 2005, Rouillé et al. 2004). This novel technique combines several advantages of conventional matrix spectroscopy with those of gas phase spectroscopy. Notable advantages are the possibility to study molecules with low vapor pressure and to use a mass spectrometer facilitating spectral assignments. The most recent studies were devoted to phenanthrene and the more complicated (2,3)-benzofluorene. These molecules were investigated in the gas phase by cavity ring-down spectroscopy and in liquid helium droplets using depletion spectroscopy. For benzofluorene the present studies constitute the first reported measurements both in the gas phase and in helium droplets. The origin of the S1 ← S0 gas phase transition could be located at 29 894.3 cm-1, and a series of vibronic bands was recorded below 31 500 cm-1. In contrast to previously studied PAHs, the shift induced by the helium droplets was very

  6. MODELING SUPERSONIC-JET DEFLECTION IN THE HERBIG–HARO 110-270 SYSTEM WITH HIGH-POWER LASERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Dawei; Li, Yutong; Lu, Xin; Yin, Chuanlei; Su, Luning; Liao, Guoqian; Zhang, Jie [National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Wu, Junfeng; Wang, Lifeng; He, Xiantu [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Zhong, Jiayong; Wei, Huigang; Zhang, Kai; Han, Bo; Zhao, Gang [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Jiang, Shaoen; Du, Kai; Ding, Yongkun [Research Center for Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhu, Jianqiang, E-mail: ytli@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jzhang@sjtu.edu.cn [National Laboratory on High Power Lasers and Physics, Shanghai, 201800 (China)

    2015-12-10

    Herbig–Haro (HH) objects associated with newly born stars are typically characterized by two high Mach number jets ejected in opposite directions. However, HH 110 appears to only have a single jet instead of two. Recently, Kajdi et al. measured the proper motions of knots in the whole system and noted that HH 110 is a continuation of the nearby HH 270. It has been proved that the HH 270 collides with the surrounding mediums and is deflected by 58°, reshaping itself as HH 110. Although the scales of the astrophysical objects are very different from the plasmas created in the laboratory, similarity criteria of physical processes allow us to simulate the jet deflection in the HH 110/270 system in the laboratory with high power lasers. A controllable and repeatable laboratory experiment could give us insight into the deflection behavior. Here we show a well downscaled experiment in which a laser-produced supersonic-jet is deflected by 55° when colliding with a nearby orthogonal side-flow. We also present a two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation with the Euler program, LARED-S, to reproduce the deflection. Both are in good agreement. Our results show that the large deflection angle formed in the HH 110/270 system is probably due to the ram pressure from a flow–flow collision model.

  7. Asymptotic structure of low frequency supersonic heated jet noise using LES data to re-construct a turbulence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Mohammed; Sescu, Adrian; Sassanis, Vasileios; Bres, Guillaume; Towne, Aaron; Lele, Sanjiva

    2016-11-01

    The Goldstein-Sescu-Afsar asymptotic theory postulated that the appropriate distinguished limit in which non-parallel mean flow effects introduces a leading order change in the 'propagator' (which is related adjoint linearized Euler Green's function) within Goldstein's acoustic analogy must be when the jet spread rate is the same order as Strouhal number. We analyze the low frequency structure of the acoustic spectrum using Large-eddy simulations of two axi-symmetric jets (heated & unheated) at constant supersonic jet Mach number to obtain the mean flow for the asymptotic theory. This approach provides excellent quantitative agreement for the peak jet noise when the coefficients of the turbulence model are tuned for good agreement with the far-field acoustic data. Our aim in this talk, however, is to show the predictive capability of the asymptotics when the turbulence model in the acoustic analogy is 'exactly' re-constructed by numerically matching the length scale coefficients of an algebraic-exponential model for the 1212-component of the Reynolds stress auto-covariance tensor (1 is streamwise & 2 is radial direction) with LES data at any spatial location and temporal frequency. In this way, all information is obtained from local unsteady flow. We thank Professor Parviz Moin for supporting this work as part of the Center for Turbulence Research Summer Program 2016.

  8. Advanced Jet Noise Exhaust Concepts in NASA's N+2 Supersonics Validation Study and the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project's Upcoming Hybrid Wing Body Acoustics Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Doty, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic and flow-field experiments were conducted on exhaust concepts for the next generation supersonic, commercial aircraft. The concepts were developed by Lockheed Martin (LM), Rolls-Royce Liberty Works (RRLW), and General Electric Global Research (GEGR) as part of an N+2 (next generation forward) aircraft system study initiated by the Supersonics Project in NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program. The experiments were conducted in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The exhaust concepts presented here utilized lobed-mixers and ejectors. A powered third-stream was implemented to improve ejector acoustic performance. One concept was found to produce stagnant flow within the ejector and the other produced discrete-frequency tones (due to flow separations within the model) that degraded the acoustic performance of the exhaust concept. NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project has been investigating a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft as a possible configuration for meeting N+2 system level goals for noise, emissions, and fuel burn. A recently completed NRA led by Boeing Research and Technology resulted in a full-scale aircraft design and wind tunnel model. This model will be tested acoustically in NASA Langley's 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel and will include dual jet engine simulators and broadband engine noise simulators as part of the test campaign. The objectives of the test are to characterize the system level noise, quantify the effects of shielding, and generate a valuable database for prediction method development. Further details of the test and various component preparations are described.

  9. Bibliography of Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) program from 1980 to 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, S.

    1984-01-01

    A bibliography for the Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) and Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) Programs is presented. An annotated bibliography for the last 123 formal reports and a listing of titles for 44 articles and presentations is included. The studies identifies technologies for producing efficient supersonic commercial jet transports for cruise Mach numbers from 2.0 to 2.7.

  10. Euler solutions for an unbladed jet engine configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mark E. M.

    1992-01-01

    An Euler solution for an axisymmetric jet engine configuration without blade effects is presented. The Euler equations are solved on a multiblock grid which covers a domain including the inlet, bybass duct, core passage, nozzle, and the far field surrounding the engine. The simulation is verified by considering five theoretical properties of the solution. The solution demonstrates both multiblock grid generation techniques and a foundation for a full jet engine throughflow calculation.

  11. Ultra-high-speed digital in-line holography system applied to particle-laden supersonic underexpanded jet flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Buchmann, Nicolas A.; Soria, Julio

    2012-01-01

    for magnified digital in-line holography is created, using an ultra-high-speed camera capable of frame rates of up to 1.0MHz. To test the new technique an axisymmetric supersonic underexpanded particle-laden jet is investigated. The results show that the new technique allows for the acquisition of time resolved...

  12. IC ENGINE SUPERCHARGING AND EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION USING JET COMPRESSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhimoulame Kalaisselvane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Supercharging is a process which is used to improve the performance of an engine by increasing the specific power output whereas exhaust gas recirculation reduces the NOx produced by engine because of supercharging. In a conventional engine, supercharger functions as a compressor for the forced induction of the charge taking mechanical power from the engine crankshaft. In this study, supercharging is achieved using a jet compressor. In the jet compressor, the exhaust gas is used as the motive stream and the atmospheric air as the propelled stream. When high pressure motive stream from the engine exhaust is expanded in the nozzle, a low pressure is created at the nozzle exit. Due to this low pressure, atmospheric air is sucked into the expansion chamber of the compressor, where it is mixed and pressurized with the motive stream. The pressure of the mixed stream is further increased in the diverging section of the jet compressor. A percentage volume of the pressurized air mixture is then inducted back into the engine as supercharged air and the balance is let out as exhaust. This process not only saves the mechanical power required for supercharging but also dilutes the constituents of the engine exhaust gas thereby reducing the emission and the noise level generated from the engine exhaust. The geometrical design parameters of the jet compressor were obtained by solving the governing equations using the method of constant rate of momentum change. Using the theoretical design parameters of the jet compressor, a computational fluid dinamics analysis using FLUENT software was made to evaluate the performance of the jet compressor for the application of supercharging an IC engine. This evaluation turned out to be an efficient diagnostic tool for determining performance optimization and design of the jet compressor. A jet compressor was also fabricated for the application of supercharging and its performance was studied.

  13. Effects of Nozzle Geometry and Intermittent Injection of Aerodynamic Tab on Supersonic Jet Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Mikiya; Sano, Takayuki; Fukuda, Masayuki; Kojima, Takayuki; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Shiga, Seiichi; Obokata, Tomio

    Effects of the nozzle geometry and intermittent injection of aerodynamic tabs on exhaust noise from a rectangular plug nozzle were investigated experimentally. In JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency), a pre-cooled turbojet engine for an HST (Hypersonic transport) is planned. A 1/100-scaled model of the rectangular plug nozzle is manufactured, and the noise reduction performance of aerodynamic tabs, which is small air jet injection from the nozzle wall, was investigated. Compressed air is injected through the rectangular plug nozzle into the atmosphere at the nozzle pressure ratio of 2.7, which corresponds to the take-off condition of the vehicle. Aerodynamic tabs were installed at the sidewall ends, and 4 kinds of round nozzles and 2 kinds of wedge nozzles were applied. Using a high-frequency solenoid valve, intermittent gas injection is also applied. It is shown that, by use of wedge nozzles, the aerodynamic tab mass flow rate, necessary to gain 2.3dB reduction in OASPL (Overall sound pressure level), decreases by 29% when compared with round nozzles. It is also shown that, by use of intermittent injection, the aerodynamic tab mass flow rate, necessary to gain 2.3dB reduction in OASPL, decreases by about 40% when compared with steady injection. By combination of wedge nozzles and intermittent injection, the aerodynamic tab mass flow rate significantly decreases by 57% when compared with the conventional strategy.

  14. Evidence for two forms, double hydrogen tunneling, and proximity of excited states in bridge-substituted porphycenes: supersonic jet studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovin, Alexander; Sepioł, Jerzy; Urbańska, Natalia; Pietraszkiewicz, Marek; Mordziński, Andrzej; Waluk, Jacek

    2006-03-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence and dispersed fluorescence spectra measured in supersonic jets for 9,10,19,20-tetra-n-methylporphycene and 9,10,19,20-tetra-n-propylporphycene reveal, for both compounds, the presence of two different species which are assigned to trans and cis tautomeric forms. Doublet splitting of lines is observed, disappearing upon deuteration of the inner nitrogen atoms. This finding is interpreted as an indication of double hydrogen tunneling. The values of tunneling splitting are obtained for both ground and lowest singlet excited states. The splitting is similar for cis and trans forms, and the barrier for tautomerization is larger in the excited state. Due to the coupling of hydrogen motion with rotation of alkyl substituents, tautomerization occurs in an asymmetric double minimum potential, with the ordering of energy minima reversed upon excitation. The second singlet excited state is found to lie very close to S(1), thus facilitating an efficient radiationless depopulation.

  15. Multi-Measurement Correlations in the Near-Field of a Complex Supersonic Jet Using Time-Resolved Schlieren Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Andrew; Coleman, Thomas; Lewalle, Jacques; Glauser, Mark; Gogineni, Sivaram

    2016-11-01

    Supersonic flow from a three-stream non-axisymmetric jet is visualized using time resolved schlieren photography (up to 400,000 frames per second) while pressure on the aft deck plate of the nozzle is simultaneously sampled using kulites. Time series are constructed using the schlieren photographs and conditioned to reduce the effects of signal drift and clipping where necessary. The effect of this detrending and clipping reconstruction on signal statistics is examined. In addition, signals constructed from near field schlieren will be correlated with one another to visualize the propagation of information in the near field. The goal of utilizing space-time correlations is to assist in identifying and tracking the evolution of individual structures in the near field. The schlieren signals will also be correlated with the deck pressure traces to assist in unraveling the interaction of flow structures.

  16. Facile Formation of Acetic Sulfuric Anhydride in a Supersonic Jet: Characterization by Microwave Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Anna; Smith, CJ; Mackenzie, Becca; Leopold, Ken

    2017-06-01

    Sulfur trioxide and acetic acid are shown to react under supersonic jet conditions to form acetic sulfuric anhydride, CH_{3}COOSO_{2}OH. Rotational spectra of the parent, ^{34}S, methyl ^{13}C, and fully deuterated isotopologues have been observed by chirped-pulse and conventional cavity microwave spectroscopy. A and E internal rotation states have been observed for each isotopologue studied and the methyl group internal rotation barriers have been determined (241.043(65) \\wn for the parent species). The reaction is analogous to that of our previous report on the reaction of sulfur trioxide and formic acid. DFT and CCSD calculations are also presented which indicate that the reaction proceeds via a π_{2} + π_{2} + σ_{2} cycloaddition reaction. These results support our previous conjecture that the reaction of SO_{3} with carboxylic acids is both facile and general. Possible implications for atmospheric aerosol formation are discussed.

  17. UV–UV hole burning and IR dip spectroscopy of homophenylalanine by laser desorption supersonic jet technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Woon Yong; Ishiuchi, Shun-ichi [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Çarçabal, Pierre [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, CNRS, Université Paris Sud XI, Bâtiment 210, 91405 Orsay (France); Oba, Hikari [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Fujii, Masaaki, E-mail: mfujii@res.titech.ac.jp [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Homophenylalanine was measured by laser desorption supersonic jet spectroscopy. • Ten conformers were found by UV–UV hole burning spectroscopy. • The observed conformers were assigned by the combination of UV and IR spectra. • Franck–Condon simulations were employed to assign the flexible molecule. - Abstract: Conformer selected electronic and vibrational spectra of homophenylalanine, phenylalanine analogue molecule, were measured by UV–UV hole burning and IR dip spectroscopy combined with laser desorption technique. 10 conformers were found by UV–UV hole burning spectroscopy and their structures were assigned by IR dip and UV absorption spectra with aid of quantum chemical calculations in both S{sub 0} and S{sub 1}. This study shows that the combination of simulated IR and UV spectra is powerful to assign flexible molecules.

  18. Mathematical Model of the Jet Engine Fuel System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimko, Marek

    2015-05-01

    The paper discusses the design of a simplified mathematical model of the jet (turbo-compressor) engine fuel system. The solution will be based on the regulation law, where the control parameter is a fuel mass flow rate and the regulated parameter is the rotational speed. A differential equation of the jet engine and also differential equations of other fuel system components (fuel pump, throttle valve, pressure regulator) will be described, with respect to advanced predetermined simplifications.

  19. Mathematical Model of the Jet Engine Fuel System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimko Marek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the design of a simplified mathematical model of the jet (turbo-compressor engine fuel system. The solution will be based on the regulation law, where the control parameter is a fuel mass flow rate and the regulated parameter is the rotational speed. A differential equation of the jet engine and also differential equations of other fuel system components (fuel pump, throttle valve, pressure regulator will be described, with respect to advanced predetermined simplifications.

  20. Hybrid Reynolds-Averaged/Large-Eddy Simulations of a Co-Axial Supersonic Free-Jet Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurle, R. A.; Edwards, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Reynolds-averaged and hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations have been applied to a supersonic coaxial jet flow experiment. The experiment utilized either helium or argon as the inner jet nozzle fluid, and the outer jet nozzle fluid consisted of laboratory air. The inner and outer nozzles were designed and operated to produce nearly pressure-matched Mach 1.8 flow conditions at the jet exit. The purpose of the computational effort was to assess the state-of-the-art for each modeling approach, and to use the hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations to gather insight into the deficiencies of the Reynolds-averaged closure models. The Reynolds-averaged simulations displayed a strong sensitivity to choice of turbulent Schmidt number. The baseline value chosen for this parameter resulted in an over-prediction of the mixing layer spreading rate for the helium case, but the opposite trend was noted when argon was used as the injectant. A larger turbulent Schmidt number greatly improved the comparison of the results with measurements for the helium simulations, but variations in the Schmidt number did not improve the argon comparisons. The hybrid simulation results showed the same trends as the baseline Reynolds-averaged predictions. The primary reason conjectured for the discrepancy between the hybrid simulation results and the measurements centered around issues related to the transition from a Reynolds-averaged state to one with resolved turbulent content. Improvements to the inflow conditions are suggested as a remedy to this dilemma. Comparisons between resolved second-order turbulence statistics and their modeled Reynolds-averaged counterparts were also performed.

  1. Equilibrium chemical reaction of supersonic hydrogen-air jets (the ALMA computer program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghobashi, S.

    1977-01-01

    The ALMA (axi-symmetrical lateral momentum analyzer) program is concerned with the computation of two dimensional coaxial jets with large lateral pressure gradients. The jets may be free or confined, laminar or turbulent, reacting or non-reacting. Reaction chemistry is equilibrium.

  2. ON THE POSSIBILITY OF BURNING ACCELERATION IN THE COMBUSTION CHAMBERS OF ADVANCED JET ENGINES BY DEEPLY SUBCRITICAL MICROWAVE DISCHARGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the problem of increasing the speed of propagation of the flame front as applied to the problems of reducing noxious emissions of nitrogen oxides formed during operation of jet engines and industrial turbines, as well as the stabilization of a supersonic combustion. We investigate the possibility of reducing the induction time using non-equilibrium cold plasma produced by an electromagnetic vibrator in beam quasi-optical MW radiation. The positive effect of cold non-equilibrium plasma on increasing the rate of occurrence of oxidation reactions in the air is well known and undisputed. The presented results of the experiments demonstrate the advantage of the method developed in terms of efficiency and suppression of nitrogen oxide emissions. Also they show that combustion stabilization is achieved similarly in a supersonic flow.

  3. Acoustically shielded exhaust system for high thrust jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John P. (Inventor); Lee, Robert (Inventor); Majjigi, Rudramuni K. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A flade exhaust nozzle for a high thrust jet engine is configured to form an acoustic shield around the core engine exhaust flowstream while supplementing engine thrust during all flight conditions, particularly during takeoff. The flade airflow is converted from an annular 360.degree. flowstream to an arcuate flowstream extending around the lower half of the core engine exhaust flowstream so as to suppress exhaust noise directed at the surrounding community.

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Supersonic Nozzle and Integration into a Variable Cycle Engine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Friedlander, David; Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an integrated nonlinear dynamic simulation for a variable cycle turbofan engine and nozzle that can be integrated with an overall vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) model. A previously developed variable cycle turbofan engine model is used for this study and is enhanced here to include variable guide vanes allowing for operation across the supersonic flight regime. The primary focus of this study is to improve the fidelity of the model's thrust response by replacing the simple choked flow equation convergent-divergent nozzle model with a MacCormack method based quasi-1D model. The dynamic response of the nozzle model using the MacCormack method is verified by comparing it against a model of the nozzle using the conservation element/solution element method. A methodology is also presented for the integration of the MacCormack nozzle model with the variable cycle engine.

  5. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Velocity Measurements in Supersonic Underexpanded Impinging Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Barthel, Brett; Alderfer, David W.; Novak, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on an application of nitric oxide (NO) flow-tagging velocimetry to impinging underexpanded jet flows issuing from a Mach 2.6 nozzle. The technique reported herein utilizes a single laser, single camera system to obtain planar maps of the streamwise component of velocity. Whereas typical applications of this technique involve comparing two images acquired at different time delays, this application uses a single image and time delay. The technique extracts velocity by assuming that particular regions outside the jet flowfield have negligible velocity and may therefore serve as a stationary reference against which to measure motion of the jet flowfield. By taking the average of measurements made in 100 single-shot images for each flow condition, streamwise velocities of between -200 and +1,000 m/s with accuracies of between 15 and 50 m/s are reported within the jets. Velocity measurements are shown to explain otherwise seemingly anomalous impingement surface pressure measurements.

  6. Predictions of a Supersonic Jet-in-Crossflow: Comparisons Among CFD Solvers and with Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    outflow boundaries were specified as modified Riemann invariants conditions at the freestream flow conditions. The computational inlet is a planar face and...jet-on cases. Figure 6. ARL computational mesh. Figure 7. ARL geometry and mesh in jet nozzle area. D ow nl oa de d by J am es D...The inviscid flux function was a second-order, upwind scheme using a Harten-Lax-van Leer-Contact (HLLC) Riemann solver and a multi- dimensional Total

  7. Noise Characteristics of a Four-Jet Impingement Device Inside a Broadband Engine Noise Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, Christoph; Housman, Jeffrey A.; Kiris, Cetin C.; Hutcheson, Florence V.

    2015-01-01

    The noise generation mechanisms for four directly impinging supersonic jets are investigated employing implicit large eddy simulations with a higher-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory shock-capturing scheme. Impinging jet devices are often used as an experimental apparatus to emulate a broadband noise source. Although such devices have been used in many experiments, a detailed investigation of the noise generation mechanisms has not been conducted before. Thus, the underlying physical mechanisms that are responsible for the generation of sound waves are not well understood. The flow field is highly complex and contains a wide range of temporal and spatial scales relevant for noise generation. Proper orthogonal decomposition of the flow field is utilized to characterize the unsteady nature of the flow field involving unsteady shock oscillations, large coherent turbulent flow structures, and the sporadic appearance of vortex tubes in the center of the impingement region. The causality method based on Lighthill's acoustic analogy is applied to link fluctuations of flow quantities inside the source region to the acoustic pressure in the far field. It will be demonstrated that the entropy fluctuation term in the Lighthill's stress tensor plays a vital role in the noise generation process. Consequently, the understanding of the noise generation mechanisms is employed to develop a reduced-order linear acoustic model of the four-jet impingement device. Finally, three linear acoustic FJID models are used as broadband noise sources inside an engine nacelle and the acoustic scattering results are validated against far-field acoustic experimental data.

  8. Computer Jet-Engine-Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disbrow, James D.; Duke, Eugene L.; Ray, Ronald J.

    1992-01-01

    "Intelligent Computer Assistant for Engine Monitoring" (ICAEM), computer-based monitoring system intended to distill and display data on conditions of operation of two turbofan engines of F-18, is in preliminary state of development. System reduces burden on propulsion engineer by providing single display of summary information on statuses of engines and alerting engineer to anomalous conditions. Effective use of prior engine-monitoring system requires continuous attention to multiple displays.

  9. Computer Jet-Engine-Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disbrow, James D.; Duke, Eugene L.; Ray, Ronald J.

    1992-01-01

    "Intelligent Computer Assistant for Engine Monitoring" (ICAEM), computer-based monitoring system intended to distill and display data on conditions of operation of two turbofan engines of F-18, is in preliminary state of development. System reduces burden on propulsion engineer by providing single display of summary information on statuses of engines and alerting engineer to anomalous conditions. Effective use of prior engine-monitoring system requires continuous attention to multiple displays.

  10. Experimental characterization of railgun-driven supersonic plasma jets motivated by high energy density physics applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, S C; Moser, A L; Awe, T J; Brockington, S J E; Davis, J S; Adams, C S; Case, A; Cassibry, J T; Dunn, J P; Gilmore, M A; Lynn, A G; Messer, S J; Witherspoon, F D

    2012-01-01

    We report experimental results on the parameters, structure, and evolution of high-Mach-number (M) argon plasma jets formed and launched by a pulsed-power-driven railgun. The nominal initial average jet parameters in the data set analyzed are density \\approx 2 x 10^(16) cm^(-3), electron temperature \\approx 1.4 eV, velocity \\approx 30 km/s, M \\approx 14, ionization fraction \\approx 0.96, diameter \\approx 5 cm, and length \\approx 20 cm. These values approach the range needed by the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX), which is designed to use merging plasma jets to form imploding spherical plasma liners that can reach peak pressures of 0.1-1 Mbar at stagnation. As these jets propagate a distance of approximately 40 cm, the average density drops by one order of magnitude, which is up to an order of magnitude less than the drop predicted by the ideal hydrodynamic theory of a constant-M jet.

  11. Experimental characterization of railgun-driven supersonic plasma jets motivated by high energy density physics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Awe, T. J.; Davis, J. S.; Dunn, J. P. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Brockington, S. J. E.; Case, A.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D. [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, Virginia 20151 (United States); Cassibry, J. T. [Propulsion Research Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Gilmore, M. A.; Lynn, A. G. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    We report experimental results on the parameters, structure, and evolution of high-Mach-number (M) argon plasma jets formed and launched by a pulsed-power-driven railgun. The nominal initial average jet parameters in the data set analyzed are density Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}, electron temperature Almost-Equal-To 1.4 eV, velocity Almost-Equal-To 30 km/s, M Almost-Equal-To 14, ionization fraction Almost-Equal-To 0.96, diameter Almost-Equal-To 5 cm, and length Almost-Equal-To 20 cm. These values approach the range needed by the Plasma Liner Experiment, which is designed to use merging plasma jets to form imploding spherical plasma liners that can reach peak pressures of 0.1-1 Mbar at stagnation. As these jets propagate a distance of approximately 40 cm, the average density drops by one order of magnitude, which is at the very low end of the 8-160 times drop predicted by ideal hydrodynamic theory of a constant-M jet.

  12. Heat flux reduction mechanism induced by a combinational opposing jet and cavity concept in supersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Jiang, Yan-ping; Yan, Li; Liu, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The thermal protection on the surface of hypersonic vehicles attracts an increasing attention worldwide, especially when the vehicle enters the atmosphere at high speed. In the current study, the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations coupled with the Menter's shear stress transport (SST) model have been employed to investigate the heat flux reduction mechanism induced by the variations of the cavity configuration, the jet pressure ratio and the injectant molecular weight in the combinational opposing jet and cavity concept. The length of the cavity is set to be 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm in order to make sure that the cavity configuration is the "open" cavity, and the jet pressure ratio is set to be 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 in order to make sure that the flow field is steady. The injectant is set to be nitrogen and helium. The obtained results show that the aft angle of the cavity only has a slight impact on the heat flux reduction, and the heat flux peak decreases with the decrease of the length of the cavity. The design of the thermal protection system for the hypersonic blunt body is a multi-objective design exploration problem, and the heat flux distribution depends on the jet pressure ratio, the aft wall of the cavity and the injectant molecular weight. The heat flux peak decreases with the increase of the jet pressure ratio when the aft angle of the cavity is large enough, and this value is 45°.

  13. Computational study of a contoured plug-nozzle as a supersonic jet noise suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavaran, A.; Das, A. P.; Das, I.S.

    1996-01-01

    The report summarizes a computational jet noise study of an ideal contoured plug-nozzle (CPN). The gasdynamics of the jet flows have been predicted using the CFD code, NPARC with k-epsilon turbulence model; these data are then used as inputs to perform the noise computations based on the modified version of General Electric MGB code. The study covers a range of operating pressure ratio, 2.0 less than xi less than 5.0 (shockless flow at design pressure ratio, xi(d) = 3.62). The agreement of the computational aeroacoustics results with the available experimental data may be considered to be favorable. The computational results indicate consistent noise reduction effectiveness of the CPN at all operating pressure ratios. At the design pressure ratio (shockless), the codes predict overall sound pressure levels within +3.O dB of the experimental data. But at the off-design pressure ratios (flaws with shocks), the agreement is rather mixed. The theory overpredicts the OASPL's at all pressure ratios except at lower angles to the jet axis in overexpanded mode (xi less than xi(d)), the deviations being within 4.5 dB. The mechanism of shock formations in the CPN jet flows is noted to be basically different from those in the convergent-divergent nozzle jet flows.

  14. Molecular relaxation in supersonic free jets of N2 and CH4 from stimulated Raman spectroscopy and time-of-flight measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Abad, Laura; Bermejo, Dionisio; Herrero, Víctor J.; Santos, J.; Tanarro, Isabel

    1997-01-01

    The relaxation of the energy stored in the translational and rotational degrees of freedom of N2 and CH4 in the course of free jet expansions has been experimentally studied. Rotational temperatures along the expansion axis were obtained by means of stimulated Raman spectroscopy, and terminal flow velocities and translational temperatures were determined from supersonic beam time-of-flight measurements. From these measurements low-temperature cross sections for rotational relaxation have been...

  15. Research on the noise produced by large scale structure in supersonic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclaughlin, D. K.; Lilley, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    Using a dual electrode glow discharge excitation device, a method of mode selection into either the n = 0 or n = + or - 1 azimuthal modes was developed and tested by Fourier analyzing experimental azimuthal phase and amplitude data. On a M = 2.1 moderate Reynolds number (Re = 68,000) jet with a laminar boundary layer, under n = 0 or n = +1 excitation, coherent axial wave evolution, mean flow, and sound pressure level directivity measurements were performed. The boundary layer of this same jet was excited usng a grit coating on the nozzle wall, and bandpassed axial wave evolution data obtained and compared to the masurements made by previous workers on a conventional high Reynolds number jet (Re = 5,000,000) using a hot-film type probe.

  16. Experimental investigation on structures and velocity of liquid jets in a supersonic crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-guo; Wu, Liyin; Li, Qinglian; Li, Chun

    2014-09-01

    Particle image velocimetry was applied in the study focusing on the structure and velocity of water jets injected into a Ma = 2.1 crossflow. The instantaneous structures of the jet, including surface waves in the near-injector region and vortices in the far-field, were visualized clearly. Spray velocity increases rapidly to 66% of the mainstream velocity in the region of x/d AIAA J. 46, 2674-2686 (2008)] and Wang et al. [AIAA J. 50, 1360-1366 (2012)]), the atomization process involves very complex flow physics. These physical processes include strong vortical structures, small-scale wave formation, stripping of small droplets from the jet surface, formations of ligaments, and droplets with a wide range of sizes.

  17. Specific features of the radial distributions of plasma parameters in the initial segment of a supersonic jet generated by a pulsed capillary discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashchina, A. S.; Efimov, A. V.; Chinnov, V. F.; Ageev, A. G.

    2017-07-01

    Results are presented from spectroscopic studies of the initial segment of a supersonic plasma jet generated by a pulsed capillary discharge with an ablative carbon-containing polymer wall. Specific features of the spatial distributions of the electron density and intensities of spectral components caused, in particular, by the high electron temperature in the central zone, much exceeding the normal temperature, as well as by the high nonisobaricity of the initial segment of the supersonic jet, are revealed. Measurements of the radiative properties of the hot jet core (the intensity and profile of the Hα and Hβ Balmer lines and the relative intensities of C II lines) with high temporal (1-50 μs) and spatial (30-50 μm) resolutions made it possible to determine general features of the pressure and temperature distributions near the central shock. The presence of molecular components exhibiting their emission properties at the periphery of the plasma jet allowed the authors to estimate the parameters of the plasma in the jet region where "detached" shock waves form.

  18. Effect of Seeding Particles on the Shock Structure of a Supersonic Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, David; Echeverría, Carlos; Stern, Catalina

    2012-11-01

    The original goal of our work was to measure. With PIV, the velocity field of a supersonic flow produced by the discharge of air through a 4mm cylindrical nozzle. The results were superposed to a shadowgraph and combined with previous density measurements made with a Rayleigh scattering technique. The idea was to see if there were any changes in the flow field, close to the high density areas near the shocks. Shadowgraphs were made with and without seeding particles, (spheres of titanium dioxide). Surprisingly, it was observed that the flow structure with particles was shifted in the direction opposite to the flow with respect to the flow structure obtained without seeds. This result might contradict the belief that the seeding particles do not affect the flow and that the speed of the seeds correspond to the local speed of the flow. We acknowledge support from DGAPA UNAM through project IN117712 and from Facultad de Ciencias UNAM.

  19. Ion-viscosity effects on plasma-liner formation and implosion via merging supersonic plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillo, Kevin; Cassibry, Jason; Samulyak, Roman; Shih, Wen; Hsu, Scott; PLX-Alpha Team

    2016-10-01

    The PLX- α project endeavors to study plasma-liner formation and implosion by merging a spherical array of plasma jets as a candidate standoff driver for MIF. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics is used to model the liner formation and implosion processes. SPH is a meshless Lagrangian method to simulate fluid flows by dividing a fluid into a set of particles and using a summation interpolant function to calculate the properties and gradients for each of these particles. Ion viscosity is anticipated to be an important mechanism for momentum transport during liner formation, implosion, and stagnation. To study this, ion viscosity was incorporated into the code. To provide confidence in the numerical output and to help identify the difference between numerical and physical diffusion, a series of test cases were performed, consisting of Couette flow, Gresho vortex, and a Taylor-Green vortex. An L2-norm analysis was performed to measure the error and convergence. Simulations of conical (6 jets) and 4 π (60 jets) liners with and without ion viscosity reveal potential effects of viscosity on ram pressure, Mach-number degradation, and evolution of liner perturbations during jet merging and liner implosion.

  20. Turbine ram-jet engine. Turbinen-Staustrahltriebwerk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildner, W.

    1990-10-25

    A turbine ram-jet engine with a ram pressure air duct surrounding the basic turbine engine as an annulus is described, in which with the ram jet switched off with simultaneous release of suction air into the basic engine, the supply of ram pressure air is shut off. A suction side air inflow corss section of the basic engine can be released or shut off by axial adjustment of a drop-shaped body relative to a flow divider. A ring slide axially adjustable opposite to this body, should be provided, which shuts off the ram pressure air duct with the incoming crossection of the basic engine open and opens it for the shut-off state of the incoming crossection. Further, the ram pressure air duct should be expanded at the level of shut-off zone formed by a body with local counter-surface contact and the ring slider in the upstream direction.

  1. Diagnosis of the jet-propelled engine by vibration analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mariusz ŻOKOWSKI; Marek SZCZEKALA; Jarosław SPYCHAŁA

    2009-01-01

    In this paper presented works connected with the preparation of the active experiment with the jet-propelled engine. The experiment was prepared and done at the Air Force Institute of Technology. The main aim of this preparation was the explanation of the causes of the damages of military aerial ships after air incidents, notified damages in the process of exploitation and obtainment of the vibration answer on simulated damages.The exit test of the jet-propelled engine was the point of the re...

  2. Diagnosis of the jet-propelled engine by vibration analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz ŻOKOWSKI

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper presented works connected with the preparation of the active experiment with the jet-propelled engine. The experiment was prepared and done at the Air Force Institute of Technology. The main aim of this preparation was the explanation of the causes of the damages of military aerial ships after air incidents, notified damages in the process of exploitation and obtainment of the vibration answer on simulated damages.The exit test of the jet-propelled engine was the point of the reference after the repair in the Military Aviation Depot.

  3. Identifying Coherent Structures in a 3-Stream Supersonic Jet Flow using Time-Resolved Schlieren Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Andrew; Coleman, Thomas; Berry, Matthew; Magstadt, Andy; Gogineni, Sivaram; Kiel, Barry

    2015-11-01

    Shock cells and large scale structures present in a three-stream non-axisymmetric jet are studied both qualitatively and quantitatively. Large Eddy Simulation is utilized first to gain an understanding of the underlying physics of the flow and direct the focus of the physical experiment. The flow in the experiment is visualized using long exposure Schlieren photography, with time resolved Schlieren photography also a possibility. Velocity derivative diagnostics are calculated from the grey-scale Schlieren images are analyzed using continuous wavelet transforms. Pressure signals are also captured in the near-field of the jet to correlate with the velocity derivative diagnostics and assist in unraveling this complex flow. We acknowledge the support of AFRL through an SBIR grant.

  4. Wedge Shock and Nozzle Exhaust Plume Interaction in a Supersonic Jet Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Raymond; Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Heath, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the nozzle exhaust plume. Aft body shock waves that interact with the exhaust plume contribute to the near-field pressure signature of a vehicle. The plume and shock interaction was studied using computational fluid dynamics and compared with experimental data from a coaxial convergent-divergent nozzle flow in an open jet facility. A simple diamond-shaped wedge was used to generate the shock in the outer flow to study its impact on the inner jet flow. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the opposite plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the nozzle exhaust plume was modified by the presence of the wedge. Both the experimental results and computational predictions show changes in plume deflection.

  5. The formation of interstellar jets by the convergence of supersonic conical flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, J.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Rozyczka, M.

    1988-01-01

    The interaction of a stellar wind with a nonuniform environment leads, under the assumption of steady state, to the formation of an ovoidal cavity with acute ending tips. The stellar wind recollected by the walls of the cavity ends up being deposited at the tips. Here, it is shown that this focusing effect leads to the formation of a narrow cylindrical stream or 'jet' of reshocked stellar wind matter moving directly away from the star with a large velocity. A 'typical' T Tauri star may produce jets with densities of 1000-10,000/cu cm, velocities about 100 km/s, widths about 0.00001-0.001 pc over a length of 0.001-0.01 pc. The opening angles are 7 deg or less.

  6. Reduction of shock induced noise in imperfectly expanded supersonic jets using convex optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Sam

    2007-11-01

    Imperfectly expanded jets generate screech noise. The imbalance between the backpressure and the exit pressure of the imperfectly expanded jets produce shock cells and expansion or compression waves from the nozzle. The instability waves and the shock cells interact to generate the screech sound. The mathematical model consists of cylindrical coordinate based full Navier-Stokes equations and large-eddy-simulation turbulence modeling. Analytical and computational analysis of the three-dimensional helical effects provide a model that relates several parameters with shock cell patterns, screech frequency and distribution of shock generation locations. Convex optimization techniques minimize the shock cell patterns and the instability waves. The objective functions are (convex) quadratic and the constraint functions are affine. In the quadratic optimization programs, minimization of the quadratic functions over a set of polyhedrons provides the optimal result. Various industry standard methods like regression analysis, distance between polyhedra, bounding variance, Markowitz optimization, and second order cone programming is used for Quadratic Optimization.

  7. Computation of supersonic jet mixing noise for an axisymmetric CD nozzle using k-epsilon turbulence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavaran, A.; Krejsa, E. A.; Kim, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    The turbulent mixing noise of a supersonic jet is calculated for a round convergent-divergent nozzle at the design pressure ratio. Aerodynamic computations are performed using the PARC code with a k-epsilon turbulence model. Lighthill's acoustic analogy combined with Ribner's assumption is adopted. The acoustics solution is based upon the methodology followed by GE in the MGB code. The source correlation function is expressed as a linear combination of second-order tensors. Assuming separable second-order correlations and incorporating Batchelor's isotropic turbulence model, the source term was calculated from the kinetic energy of turbulence. A Gaussian distribution for the time-delay of correlation was introduced. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solution was used to obtain the source strength as well as the characteristic time-delay of correlation. The effect of sound/flow interaction was incorporated using the high frequency asymptotic solution to Lilley's equation for axisymmetric geometries. Acoustic results include sound pressure level directivity and spectra at different polar angles. The aerodynamic and acoustic results demonstrate favorable agreement with experimental data.

  8. Aero-optical effects of an optical seeker with a supersonic jet for hypersonic vehicles in near space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guangming; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Bin

    2016-06-10

    The aero-optical effects of an optical seeker with a supersonic jet for hypersonic vehicles in near space were investigated by three suites of cases, in which the altitude, angle of attack, and Mach number were varied in a large range. The direct simulation Monte Carlo based on the Boltzmann equation was used for flow computations and the ray-tracing method was used to simulate beam transmission through the nonuniform flow field over the optical window. Both imaging displacement and phase deviation were proposed as evaluation parameters, and along with Strehl ratio they were used to quantitatively evaluate aero-optical effects. The results show that aero-optical effects are quite weak when the altitude is greater than 30 km, the imaging displacement is related to the incident angle of a beam, and it is minimal when the incident angle is approximately 15°. For reducing the aero-optical effects, the optimal location of an aperture should be in the middle of the optical window.

  9. The Effect of the Recombination Shock behind a Backward Step on the Mixing Characteristics of an Inclined Sonic Methane Jet in a Supersonic Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, A. C. Y.; Chang, B. Y. C.; Su, C. Y. H.; Yuan, D. H. F.

    The scramjet engines have been extensively studied for use in aircraft and future space transportation systems operating at speeds of about Mach 5 and above. At these high flight velocities, the incoming air is slowed down and maintained supersonic speed within the combustor

  10. Dynamics of the Coherent Structures in a Supersonic Rectangular Jet of Aspect Ratio 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Kamal; Corrigan, Andrew; Johnson, Ryan; Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Gutmark, Ephraim; University of Cincinnati Team; LaboratoriesComputational Physics; Fluid Dynamics Team

    2016-11-01

    Asymmetric exhaust nozzle configurations, in particular rectangular, are likely to become more important in the future for both civilian and military aircraft. Various nozzle geometry features including the presence of sharp corners impact the evolution of the cross-sectional shape of the jet and its mixing features. Asymmetric nozzles potentially offer a passive way of affecting mixing for low aspect ratio jets through both large-scale entrainment due to coherent structures and fine scale mixing at the corners. Data is presented that show the dynamic evolution of the coherent structures for an ideally expanded rectangular nozzle of aspect ratio 2. The sense of the vortex pairs setup through the self-induction at the corners and stretching of the azimuthal vortex ring into streamwise vortices results in diagonal elongation of the time-averaged jet cross-section and contraction at the sides. The phase averaged velocity contours further clearly show the effect of mixing at the sharp corners and the deformation of the rectangular exit cross-section as it propagates downstream. It is observed that the dominant vortex pairs in this case work against axis-switching.

  11. Investigating potential correlations between jet engine noise and plume dynamics in the hypertemporal infrared domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunio, Phillip M.; Weber, Reed; Knobel, Kimberly; Wager, Jason; Lopez, Gerardo

    2014-09-01

    Jet engine noise can be a hazard and environmental pollutant, affecting personnel working in close proximity to jet engines. Mitigating the effects of jet engine noise could reduce the potential for hearing loss in runway workers, but engine noise is not yet sufficiently well-characterized that it can easily be mitigated for new engine designs. That is, there exists a very complex relationship between jet engine design parameters, operating conditions, and resultant noise power levels. In this paper, we propose to evaluate the utility of high-speed imaging (also called hypertemporal imaging) in correlating the infrared signatures of jet aircraft engines with acoustic noise from the jet engines. This paper will focus on a theoretical analysis of jet engine infrared signatures, and will define potentially-detectable characteristics of such signatures in the hypertemporal domain. A systematic test campaign to determine whether such signatures actually exist and can be correlated with acoustic jet engine characteristics will be proposed. The detection of any hypertemporal signatures in association with acoustic signatures of jet engines will enable the use of a new domain in characterizing jet engine noise. This may in turn enable new methods of predicting or mitigating jet engine noise, which could lead to benefits for operators of large numbers of jet engines.

  12. Doping He droplets by laser ablation with a pulsed supersonic jet source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzy, R.; Singer, M.; Izadnia, S.; LaForge, A. C., E-mail: aaron.laforge@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Stienkemeier, F. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Laser ablation offers the possibility to study a rich number of atoms, molecules, and clusters in the gas phase. By attaching laser ablated materials to helium nanodroplets, one can gain highly resolved spectra of isolated species in a cold, weakly perturbed system. Here, we present a new setup for doping pulsed helium nanodroplet beams by means of laser ablation. In comparison to more well-established techniques using a continuous nozzle, pulsed nozzles show significant differences in the doping efficiency depending on certain experimental parameters (e.g., position of the ablation plume with respect to the droplet formation, nozzle design, and expansion conditions). In particular, we demonstrate that when the ablation region overlaps with the droplet formation region, one also creates a supersonic beam of helium atoms seeded with the sample material. The processes are characterized using a surface ionization detector. The overall doping signal is compared to that of conventional oven cell doping showing very similar dependence on helium stagnation conditions, indicating a comparable doping process. Finally, the ablated material was spectroscopically studied via laser induced fluorescence.

  13. A simple counter-flow cooling system for a supersonic free-jet beam source assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, M; Fahy, A; Martens, J; Dastoor, P C

    2016-05-01

    A simple design for an inexpensive, cooled, free-jet beam source is described. The source assembly features an integrated cooling system as supplied by a counter-flow of chilled nitrogen, and is composed primarily of off-the-shelf tube fittings. The design facilitates rapid implementation and eases subsequent alignment with respect to any downstream beamline aperture. The source assembly outlined cools the full length of the stagnation volume, offering temperature control down to 100 K and long-term temperature stability better than ±1 K.

  14. A simple counter-flow cooling system for a supersonic free-jet beam source assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, M.; Fahy, A.; Martens, J.; Dastoor, P. C., E-mail: Paul.Dastoor@newcastle.edu.au [Centre for Organic Electronics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    A simple design for an inexpensive, cooled, free-jet beam source is described. The source assembly features an integrated cooling system as supplied by a counter-flow of chilled nitrogen, and is composed primarily of off-the-shelf tube fittings. The design facilitates rapid implementation and eases subsequent alignment with respect to any downstream beamline aperture. The source assembly outlined cools the full length of the stagnation volume, offering temperature control down to 100 K and long-term temperature stability better than ±1 K.

  15. Near Field Screech Noise Computation for an Underexpanded Supersonic Jet by the CE/SE Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Hultgren, Lennart S.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2001-01-01

    The space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method is employed to numerically study the near-field axisymmetric screech-tone noise of a typical underexpanded circular jet issuing from a sonic nozzle. For the computed cases, corresponding to fully expanded Mach numbers of 1.10, 1.15 and 1.19, the self-sustained feedback loop is automatically established. The computed shock-cell structure, acoustic wave length, screech tone frequencies, and sound pressure levels are in good agreement with experimental results.

  16. Recontouring of Jet Engine Compressor Blades by Flow Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Herwart Hönen; Matthias Panten

    2001-01-01

    In modern jet propulsion systems the core engine has an essential influence on the total engine performance. Especially the high pressure compressor plays an important role in this scheme. Substantial factors here are losses due to tip clearance effects and aerodynamic airfoil quality. During flight operation the airfoils are subject to wear and tear on the leading edge. These effects cause a shortening of the chord length and the leading edge profiles become deformed. This results in a deter...

  17. Rotor Systems of Aircraft Jet Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Kamenický

    2000-01-01

    engine's both coaxial rotors, their supports (including their hydrodynamic dampers, and its casing as well. Besides the short description of the engine design peculiarities and of its calculating model, there is also a short description of the used method of calculations, with focus on its peculiarities as well. Finally, some results of calculations and conclusions that follow from them are presented.

  18. Studies on Pulse Jet Engine by Wind Tunnel Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Toshihiro Nakano; Michael Zeutzius; Hideo Miyanishi; Toshiaki Setoguchi; Kenji Kaneko

    2001-01-01

    Simple design and efficiency make pulse jet engines attractive for aeronautical short-term operation applications. An active control system extends the operating range and reduces the fuel consumption considerably so that this old technology might gain a new interest. The results on wind tunnel experiments have been reported together with the impact of combustion mode (pulse or steady) on system performance.

  19. Detonation of CHO working substances in a laser jet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageichik, A. A.; Repina, E. V.; Rezunkov, Yu. A.; Safronov, A. L.

    2009-03-01

    Laser-induced ablation of materials (including polymers and a variety of polycrystalline substances with a CHO chemical composition) is studied theoretically and experimentally. Based on experimental data, a parametric physicochemical model of detonation of these materials is put forward with the aim to estimate the efficiency of laser thrust formation in jet engines.

  20. Characterization of cluster/monomer ratio in pulsed supersonic gas jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaohui; Shim, Bonggu; Wang, Xiaoming; Downer, Mike

    2008-11-01

    While Rayleigh scatter and interferometry are standard methods for determining average cluster size and total atomic density, respectively, in cluster gas jets, determination of cluster mass fraction has required additional input from gasdynamic simulations. Here we determine cluster mass fraction experimentally with fs-time-resolved measurement of refractive index using frequency domain interferometery (FDI) after ionization and heating by a pump pulse. The essence of this method is that the negative index contribution of monomer plasma appears immediately after ionization by the pump, whereas the positive contribution of clustered plasma becomes significant only after clusters expand to a Mie resonance condition, enabling separation of monomer and cluster densities in the time domain. This method allows us to investigate various influences (nozzle geometry, temperature, etc.) on cluster fraction, which varies widely in nominally identical gas jets, and is a critical parameter in realizing phase-matched harmonic generation at high laser intensity, which would lead to an efficient table-top soft X-ray source.

  1. Global-mode based linear feedback control of a supersonic jet for noise reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Mahesh; Freund, Jonathan; Bodony, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    The loudest source of high-speed jet noise appears to be describable by unsteady wavepackets that resemble instabilities. We seek to reduce their acoustic impact with a control strategy that uses global modes to model their dynamics and structural sensitivity of the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes operator to identify an effective linear feedback control. For a case with co-located actuators and sensors adjacent the nozzle, we demonstrate the method on an axisymmetric Mach 1.5 jet. Direct numerical simulations using this control show significant noise reduction. Eigenanalysis of the controlled mean flows reveal fundamental changes in the spectrum at frequencies lower than that used by the control, with the quieter flows having unstable eigenvalues that correspond to eigenfunctions without significant support in the acoustic field. A specific trend is observed in the mean flow quantities as the flow becomes quieter, with changes in the mean flow becoming significant only further downstream of the nozzle exit. The quieter flows also have a stable shock-cell structure that extends further downstream. A phase plot of the POD coefficients for the flows show that the quieter flows are more regular in time. Funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  2. Prediction of jet engine parameters for control design using genetic programming

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Arellano, G; Cant, R; Nolle, L

    2014-01-01

    The simulation of a jet engine behavior is widely used in many different aspects of the engine development and maintenance. Achieving high quality jet engine control systems requires the iterative use of these simulations to virtually test the performance of the engine avoiding any possible damage on the real engine. Jet engine simulations involve the use of mathematical models which are complex and may not always be available. This paper introduces an approach based on Genetic Programming (G...

  3. Investigation of the on-axis atom number density in the supersonic gas jet under high gas backing pressure by simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanglong Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The supersonic gas jets from conical nozzles are simulated using 2D model. The on-axis atom number density in gas jet is investigated in detail by comparing the simulated densities with the idealized densities of straight streamline model in scaling laws. It is found that the density is generally lower than the idealized one and the deviation between them is mainly dependent on the opening angle of conical nozzle, the nozzle length and the gas backing pressure. The density deviation is then used to discuss the deviation of the equivalent diameter of a conical nozzle from the idealized deq in scaling laws. The investigation on the lateral expansion of gas jet indicates the lateral expansion could be responsible for the behavior of the density deviation. These results could be useful for the estimation of cluster size and the understanding of experimental results in laser-cluster interaction experiments.

  4. Acoustic interactions between an altitude test facility and jet engine plumes: Theory and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Jones, R. R., III; Tam, C. K.; Massey, K. C.; Fleming, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the described effort was to develop an understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in the flow/acoustic interactions experienced in full-scale altitude engine test facilities. This is done by conducting subscale experiments and through development of a theoretical model. Model cold jet experiments with an axisymmetric convergent nozzle are performed in a test setup that stimulates a supersonic jet exhausting into a cylindrical diffuser. The measured data consist of detailed flow visualization data and acoustic spectra for a free and a ducted plume. It is shown that duct resonance is most likely responsible by theoretical calculations. Theoretical calculations also indicate that the higher discrete tones observed in the measurements are related to the screech phenomena. Limited experiments on the sensitivity of a free 2-D, C-D nozzle to externally imposed sound are also presented. It is shown that a 2-D, C-D nozzle with a cutback is less excitable than a 2-D C-D nozzle with no cutback. At a pressure ratio of 1.5 unsteady separation from the diverging walls of the nozzle is noticed. This separation switches from one wall to the opposite wall thus providing an unsteady deflection of the plume. It is shown that this phenomenon is related to the venting provided by the cutback section.

  5. Experimental study of mixing enhancement using pylon in supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Manmohan; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2016-01-01

    The Supersonic Combustion Ramjet (SCRAMJET) engine has been recognized as one of the most promising air breathing propulsion system for the supersonic/hypersonic flight mission requirements. Mixing and combustion of fuel inside scramjet engine is one of the major challenging tasks. In the current study the main focus has been to increase the penetration and mixing of the secondary jet inside the test chamber at supersonic speeds. In view of this, experiments are conducted to evaluate the effect of pylon on the mixing of secondary jet injection into supersonic mainstream flow at Mach 1.65. Two different pylons are investigated and the results are compared with those obtained by normal injection from a flat plate. The mixing studies are performed by varying the height of the pylon while keeping all other parameters the same. The study mainly focused on analyzing the area of spread and penetration depth achieved by different injection schemes based on the respective parameters. The measurements involved Mie scattering visualization and the flow features are analyzed using Schlieren images. The penetration height and spread area are the two parameters that are used for analyzing and comparing the performance of the pylons. It is observed that the secondary jet injection carried out from behind the big pylon resulted in maximum penetration and spread area of the jet as compared to the small pylon geometry. Moreover it is also evident that for obtaining maximum spreading and penetration of the jet, the same needs to be achieved at the injection location.

  6. Effects of real viscosity on plasma liner formation and implosion from supersonic plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillo, Kevin; Cassibry, Jason; Hsu, Scott; PLX-Alpha Team

    2015-11-01

    The PLX- α project endeavors to study plasma liner formation and implosion by merging of a spherical array of plasma jets as a candidate standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion (MIF). Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is being used to model the liner formation and implosion processes. SPH is a meshless Lagrangian method to simulate fluid flows by dividing a fluid into a set of particles and using a summation interpolant function to calculate the properties and gradients for each of these particles. The SPH code was used to simulate test cases in which the number of plasma guns and initial conditions for the plasma were varied. Linear stabilizations were observed, but the possibility exists that this stabilization was due to the implementation of artificial viscosity in the code. A real viscosity model was added to our SPHC model using the Braginskii ion viscosity. Preliminary results for test cases that incorporate real viscosity are presented.

  7. Assessment of potential asbestos exposures from jet engine overhaul work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynarek, S P; Van Orden, D R

    2012-06-01

    Asbestos fibers have been used in a wide variety of products and numerous studies have shown that exposures from the use or manipulation of these products can vary widely. Jet engines contained various components (gaskets, clamps, o-rings and insulation) that contained asbestos that potentially could release airborne fibers during routine maintenance or during an engine overhaul. To evaluate the potential exposures to aircraft mechanics, a Pratt & Whitney JT3D jet engine was obtained and overhauled by experienced mechanics using tools and work practices similar to those used since the time this engine was manufactured. This study has demonstrated that the disturbance of asbestos-containing gaskets, o-rings, and other types of asbestos-containing components, while performing overhaul work to a jet engine produces very few airborne fibers, and that virtually none of these aerosolized fibers is asbestos. The overhaul work was observed to be dirty and oily. The exposures to the mechanics and bystanders were several orders of magnitude below OSHA exposure regulations, both current and historic. The data presented underscore the lack of risk to the health of persons conducting this work and to other persons in proximity to it from airborne asbestos.

  8. In-flight imaging of transverse gas jets injected into transonic and supersonic crossflows: Design and development. M.S. Thesis, Mar. 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kon-Sheng Charles

    1994-01-01

    The design and development of an airborne flight-test experiment to study nonreacting gas jets injected transversely into transonic and supersonic crossflows is presented. Free-stream/crossflow Mach numbers range from 0.8 to 2.0. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of an iodine-seeded nitrogen jet is used to visualize the jet flow. Time-dependent images are obtained with a high-speed intensified video camera synchronized to the laser pulse rate. The entire experimental assembly is configured compactly inside a unique flight-test-fixture (FTF) mounted under the fuselage of the F-104G research aircraft, which serves as a 'flying wind tunnel' at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The aircraft is flown at predetermined speeds and altitudes to permit a perfectly expanded (or slightly underexpanded) gas jet to form just outside the FTF at each free-stream Mach number. Recorded gas jet images are then digitized to allow analysis of jet trajectory, spreading, and mixing characteristics. Comparisons will be made with analytical and numerical predictions. This study shows the viability of applying highly sophisticated groundbased flow diagnostic techniques to flight-test vehicle platforms that can achieve a wide range of thermo/fluid dynamic conditions. Realistic flow environments, high enthalpies, unconstrained flowfields, and moderate operating costs are also realized, in contrast to traditional wind-tunnel testing.

  9. UV laser spectroscopic measurements in jet engine combustion exit flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirley, J.A. (United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Laser diagnostic measurements, which are excited with a narrowband krypton fluoride laser, have been made at the exit of a jet engine combustor. Spectra of Raman scattering and laser induced fluorescence were measured with a 0.5 meter spectrograph equipped with a diode array detector. For these demonstration tests, the combustor was operated at two flow rates including conditions corresponding to the 90 percent power level, with jet fuel and methane. Nitrogen Raman spectra are free of band interference. However, the signal levels are lower than expected. Sources of signal losses are discussed. 27 refs.

  10. Ground based measurements of particulate emissions from supersonic transports. Concorde olympus engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitefield, Ph.D.; Hagen, D.E. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Cloud and Aerosol Sciences Lab.; Lilenfeld, H.V. [McDonnell Douglas Corp., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The application of a mobile aerosol monitoring facility, the Mobile Aerosol Sampling System (MASS) is described to characterize engine aerosol emissions from the Rolls Royce Olympus Engine. The multi-configurational MASS has been employed in both ground and airborne field operations. It has been successfully flown on research aircrafts. In ground tests the MASS has participated in numerous jet engine related ground tests, and has been deployed to resolve aerosol generation problems in a high power chemical laser system. In all cases the measurements were made on samples taken from a harsh physical and chemical environment, with both high and low temperature and pressure, and in the presence of highly reactive gases. (R.P.) 9 refs.

  11. Application of numerical analysis to jet engine combustor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    To, H. (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-04-01

    The design and development process of jet engine combustors in Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. was presented which is featured by iterated numerical analyses in earlier stages of design. The analytical methods used, models applied and features were given together with verification results of numerical analyses of a velocity profile in a dump diffuser, flow and temperature distribution in a combustion liner, and liner skin temperature distribution. As examples in design and development of an airblast fuel injector type high temperature combustor, analytical results of the followings were given: flows through a diffuser, flows through a combustion liner, flows through liner cooling slots and liner skin temperature distribution. In addition, results of three-dimensional flow analysis were given in terms of optimization of design parameters for a jet-swirl combustor and calculation of a centrifugal force for a jet-swirl combustor liner as examples. 6 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Jet Engine hot parts IR Analysis Procedure (J-EIRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Joseph F.

    1993-01-01

    A thermal radiation analysis method called Jet Engine IR Analysis Procedure (J-EIRP) was developed to evaluate jet engine cavity hot parts source radiation. The objectives behind J-EIRP were to achieve the greatest accuracy in model representation and solution, while minimizing computer resources and computational time. The computer programs that comprise J-EIRP were selected on the basis of their performance, accuracy, and flexibility to solve both simple and complex problems. These programs were intended for use on a personal computer, but include the ability to solve large problems on a mainframe or supercomputer. J-EIRP also provides the user with a tool for developing thermal design experience and engineering judgment through analysis experimentation, while using minimal computer resources. A sample jet engine cavity analysis demonstrates the procedure and capabilities within J-EIRP, and is compared to a simplified method for approximating cavity radiation. The goal is to introduce the terminology and solution process used in J-EIRP and to provide insight into the radiation heat transfer principles used in this procedure.

  13. Entropy generation and jet engine optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Lucia, Umberto

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, it was shown that, with an original approach to hydrodynamic cavitation, a phenomenological model was realized in order to compute some of the physical parameters needed for the design of the most common technological applications (turbo-machinery, etc.) with an economical saving in planning because this analysis could allow engineers to reduce the experimental tests and the consequent costs in the design process. Here the same approach has been used to obtain range of some physical ...

  14. Directional transport of impinging capillary jet on wettability engineered surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Chatterjee, Souvick; Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2015-11-01

    Impingement of capillary jet on a surface is important for applications like heat transfer, or for liquid manipulation in bio-microfluidic devices. Using wettability engineered surfaces, we demonstrate pump-less and directional transport of capillary jet on a flat surface. Spatial contrast of surface energy and a wedge-shape geometry of the wettability confined track on the substrate facilitate formation of instantaneous spherical bulges upon jet impingement; these bulges are further transported along the superhydrophilic tracks due to Laplace pressure gradient. Critical condition warranted for formation of liquid bulge along the varying width of the superhydrophilic track is calculated analytically and verified experimentally. The work throws light on novel fluid phenomena of unidirectional jet impingement on wettability confined surfaces and provides a platform for innovative liquid manipulation technique for further application. By varying the geometry and wettability contrast on the surface, one can achieve volume flow rates of ~ O(100 μL/sec) and directionally guided transport of the jet liquid, pumplessly at speeds of ~ O(10cm/sec).

  15. Application of numerical analysis to jet engine combustor design. Jet engine nenshoki sekkei eno suchi kaiseki no tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuji, H. (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-11-01

    Numerical methods are applied in practice to complement and support jet engine combustor design and development. Part of the conventional design-trial fabrication-testing performance evaluation cycle replaced by iterated numerical analysis applied in a preliminary cycle of design-evaluation, undertaken before proceeding to actual trial fabrication testing and final evaluation. Presented examples are of numerical methods applied to design/development of a high temperature combustor of airblast fuel injector type, in which analysis is undertaken of flows through diffuser and through combustion liner, of temperature distributions, of flows through liner cooling slots, and liner skin temperature distributions. Furthermore, results of three-dimensional flow analysis are applied to optimizing the design parameters of a jet-swirl combustor and to calculation of the centrifugal force in a jet swirl combustion liner. 3 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Micro-Jet Test Facility for Aerospace Propulsion Engineering Education

    OpenAIRE

    López Juste, Gregorio; Montañés García, José Luis; Velázquez, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology that has been developed and implemented at the School ofAeronautics (ETSIA) of the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM) to familiarize aerospaceengineering students with the operation of real complex jet engine systems. This methodology has atwo-pronged approach: students carry out preparatory work by using, first, a gas turbineperformance prediction numerical code; then they validate their assumptions and results on anexperimental test rig. When lookin...

  17. Numerical simulation of tangling in jet engine turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Cendón Franco, David Angel; Erice Echávarri, Borja; Galvez Diaz-Rubio, Francisco; Sanchez Galvez, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    The numerical analysis of certain safety related problems presents serious difficulties, since the large number of components present leads to huge finite elementmodels that can only be solved by using large and expensive computers or by making rough approaches to the problem. Tangling, or clashing, in the turbine of a jet engine airplane is an example of such problems. This is caused by the crash and friction between rotor and stator blades in the turbine after an eventual shaft failure. Whe...

  18. Studies on Pulse Jet Engine by Wind Tunnel Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Nakano

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple design and efficiency make pulse jet engines attractive for aeronautical short-term operation applications. An active control system extends the operating range and reduces the fuel consumption considerably so that this old technology might gain a new interest. The results on wind tunnel experiments have been reported together with the impact of combustion mode (pulse or steady on system performance.

  19. Jet-Engine Exhaust Nozzle With Thrust-Directing Flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, David J.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent/divergent jet-engine exhaust nozzle has cruciform divergent passage containing flaps that move to deflect flow of exhaust in either or both planes perpendicular to main fore-and-aft axis of undeflected flow. Prototype of thrust-vector-control nozzles installed in advanced, high-performance airplanes to provide large pitching (usually, vertical) and yawing (usually, horizontal) attitude-control forces independent of attitude-control forces produced by usual aerodynamic control surfaces.

  20. Laser pointing in the vicinity of jet engine plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleijpen, Ric H. M. A.

    2009-09-01

    Target tracking and laser-based pointing from airborne platforms can be degraded significantly by the propagation environment around an airborne platform including zones of severe turbulence generated by rotor downwash and engine exhausts. This is the topic of the EDA study group ERG 108.019 on "Laser beam propagation and imaging through severe environments". This paper reports on experiments on optical propagation in the vicinity of a plume of a scaled down jet engine, performed by this co-operation group. The group is also working on methods for estimating the extent of the turbulence effects on the tracking and pointing performance under these conditions.

  1. Hypersonic Engine Leading Edge Experiments in a High Heat Flux, Supersonic Flow Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1994-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Three aerothermal load related concerns are the boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow, articulating panel seals in high temperature environments, and strut (or cowl) leading edges with shock-on-shock interactions. A multidisciplinary approach is required to address these technical concerns. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to experimentally evaluate the heat transfer and structural response of the strut (or cowl) leading edge. A recent experimental program conducted in this facility is discussed and related to cooling technology capability. The specific objective of the experiment discussed is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Heat transfer analyses of a similar leading edge concept cooled with gaseous hydrogen is included to demonstrate the complexity of the problem resulting from plastic deformation of the structures. Macro-photographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight.

  2. 78 FR 7464 - Large Scale Networking (LSN) ; Joint Engineering Team (JET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... Large Scale Networking (LSN) ; Joint Engineering Team (JET) AGENCY: The Networking and Information... research networking and networking to support science applications. The JET reports to the Large Scale Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group (CG). Public Comments: The government seeks individual input;...

  3. Combustion instability investigations on the BR710 jet engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konrad, W.; Brehm, N.; Kameier, F. [BMW Rolls-Royce AeroEngines, Dahlewitz (Germany); Freeman, C. [Rolls-Royce PLC, Derby (United Kingdom). Advanced Propulsion Systems; Day, I.J. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Whittle Lab.

    1998-01-01

    During the development of the BR710 jet engine, audible combustor instabilities (termed rumble) occurred. Amplitudes measured with test cell microphones were up to 130 dB at around 100 Hz. Disturbances of this amplitude are clearly undesirable, even if only present during start-up, and a research program was initiated to eliminate the problem. Presented here is the methodical and structured approach used to identify, understand, and remove the instability. Some reference is made to theory, which was used for guidance, but the focus of the work is on the research done to find the cause of the problem and to correct it. The investigation followed two separate, but parallel, paths--one looking in detail at individual components of the engine to identify possible involvement in the instability and the other looking at the pressure signals from various parts of a complete engine to help pinpoint the source of the disturbance. The main cause of the BR710 combustor rumble was found to be a self-excited aerodynamic instability arising from the design of the fuel injector head. In the end, minor modifications lead to spray pattern changes, which greatly reduced the combustor noise. As a result of this work, new recommendation are made for reducing the risk of combustion instabilities in jet engines.

  4. Investigation of engine jet/wing-tip vortex interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huppertz, G.; Fares, E.; Abstiens, R.; Schroder, W. [Aerodynamisches Institut, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    The wing-tip vortex of a rectangular wing half-model with a model engine is studied experimentally and numerically. The airfoil has a supercritical BAC 3-11/RES/30/21 geometry with a chord length of c = 150 mm. The investigations include three different span-wise positions of the engine and two jet velocities with a constant free stream velocity of u{infinity}=27 m/s yielding Rec = 2.8 x 10{sup 5}. The numerical simulation is divided into two parts. First the flow around the airfoil is calculated. In a second step the data is taken as an input to calculate the wake downstream of the trailing edge. Experiments include 2C- and 3C-PIV-measurements for the velocity distribution of the jet and the wing-tip vortices. The experimental and numerical results show the significance of the stream-wise velocity component for the analysis of the jet/wing-tip vortex interaction. (author)

  5. Damage-Tolerant Fan Casings for Jet Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    All turbofan engines work on the same principle. A large fan at the front of the engine draws air in. A portion of the air enters the compressor, but a greater portion passes on the outside of the engine this is called bypass air. The air that enters the compressor then passes through several stages of rotating fan blades that compress the air more, and then it passes into the combustor. In the combustor, fuel is injected into the airstream, and the fuel-air mixture is ignited. The hot gasses produced expand rapidly to the rear, and the engine reacts by moving forward. If there is a flaw in the system, such as an unexpected obstruction, the fan blade can break, spin off, and harm other engine components. Fan casings, therefore, need to be strong enough to contain errant blades and damage-tolerant to withstand the punishment of a loose blade-turned-projectile. NASA has spearheaded research into improving jet engine fan casings, ultimately discovering a cost-effective approach to manufacturing damage-tolerant fan cases that also boast significant weight reduction. In an aircraft, weight reduction translates directly into fuel burn savings, increased payload, and greater aircraft range. This technology increases safety and structural integrity; is an attractive, viable option for engine manufacturers, because of the low-cost manufacturing; and it is a practical alternative for customers, as it has the added cost saving benefits of the weight reduction.

  6. Physics of Acoustic Radiation from Jet Engine Inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Parrish, Sarah A.; Envia, Edmane; Chien, Eugene W.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of acoustic radiation from a jet engine inlet are performed using advanced computational aeroacoustics (CAA) algorithms and high-quality numerical boundary treatments. As a model of modern commercial jet engine inlets, the inlet geometry of the NASA Source Diagnostic Test (SDT) is used. Fan noise consists of tones and broadband sound. This investigation considers the radiation of tones associated with upstream propagating duct modes. The primary objective is to identify the dominant physical processes that determine the directivity of the radiated sound. Two such processes have been identified. They are acoustic diffraction and refraction. Diffraction is the natural tendency for an acoustic wave to follow a curved solid surface as it propagates. Refraction is the turning of the direction of propagation of sound waves by mean flow gradients. Parametric studies on the changes in the directivity of radiated sound due to variations in forward flight Mach number and duct mode frequency, azimuthal mode number, and radial mode number are carried out. It is found there is a significant difference in directivity for the radiation of the same duct mode from an engine inlet when operating in static condition and in forward flight. It will be shown that the large change in directivity is the result of the combined effects of diffraction and refraction.

  7. Analytical and computational investigations of a magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) energy-bypass system for supersonic gas turbine engines to enable hypersonic flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyo, Theresa Louise

    Historically, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used rocket-powered vehicles as launch vehicles for access to space. A familiar example is the Space Shuttle launch system. These vehicles carry both fuel and oxidizer onboard. If an external oxidizer (such as the Earth's atmosphere) is utilized, the need to carry an onboard oxidizer is eliminated, and future launch vehicles could carry a larger payload into orbit at a fraction of the total fuel expenditure. For this reason, NASA is currently researching the use of air-breathing engines to power the first stage of two-stage-to-orbit hypersonic launch systems. Removing the need to carry an onboard oxidizer leads also to reductions in total vehicle weight at liftoff. This in turn reduces the total mass of propellant required, and thus decreases the cost of carrying a specific payload into orbit or beyond. However, achieving hypersonic flight with air-breathing jet engines has several technical challenges. These challenges, such as the mode transition from supersonic to hypersonic engine operation, are under study in NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program. One propulsion concept that is being explored is a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy- bypass generator coupled with an off-the-shelf turbojet/turbofan. It is anticipated that this engine will be capable of operation from takeoff to Mach 7 in a single flowpath without mode transition. The MHD energy bypass consists of an MHD generator placed directly upstream of the engine, and converts a portion of the enthalpy of the inlet flow through the engine into electrical current. This reduction in flow enthalpy corresponds to a reduced Mach number at the turbojet inlet so that the engine stays within its design constraints. Furthermore, the generated electrical current may then be used to power aircraft systems or an MHD accelerator positioned downstream of the turbojet. The MHD accelerator operates in reverse of the MHD generator, re-accelerating the

  8. Variable geometry inlet design for scram jet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, Daniel P. (Inventor); Drake, Alan (Inventor); Andreadis, Dean (Inventor); Beckel, Stephen A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved variable geometry inlet for a scram jet engine having at least one combustor module. The variable geometry inlet comprises each combustor module having two sidewalls. Each of the sidewalls has a central portion with a thickness and a tapered profile forward of the central portion. The tapered profile terminates in a sharp leading edge. The variable geometry inlet further comprises each module having a lower wall and a movable cowl flap positioned forward of the lower wall. The movable cowl flap has a leading edge and the leading edges of the sidewalls intersect the leading edge of the cowl flap.

  9. A jet engine noise measurement and prediction tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Dorland, Wade D; Maung, Thein; Nesman, Tom; Wang, Ten-See

    2002-11-01

    In this paper, the authors describe an innovative jet engine noise measurement and prediction tool. The tool measures sound-pressure levels and frequency spectra in the far field. In addition, the tool provides predicted results while the measurements are being made. The predictions are based on an existing computational fluid dynamics database coupled to an empirical acoustic radiation model based on the far-field approximation to the Lighthill acoustic analogy. Preliminary tests of this acoustic measurement and prediction tool produced very encouraging results.

  10. Jet Engine Nozzle Exit Configurations and Associated Systems and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengle, Vinod G. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Nozzle exit configurations and associated systems and methods are disclosed. An aircraft system in accordance with one embodiment includes a jet engine exhaust nozzle having an internal flow surface and an exit aperture, with the exit aperture having a perimeter that includes multiple projections extending in an aft direction. Aft portions of individual neighboring projections are spaced apart from each other by a gap, and a geometric feature of the multiple can change in a monotonic manner along at least a portion of the perimeter.

  11. Condensation in jet engine intake ducts during stationary operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J.B. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Whittle Lab.

    1995-04-01

    The paper describes on analysis of the condensation of moist air in very long intake ducts of jet engines during stationary operation. Problems arising from such condensation include fan over speed and increased stagnation pressure loss in the intake duct. The analysis demonstrates that, for moderate values of relative humidity, homogeneous condensation will occur in an outer annulus adjacent to the intake cowling if the local flow Mach number attains values of about 1.0. In the central region of the intake duct, where design Mach numbers of 0.8 may be attained, homogeneous condensation is unlikely to occur except, possibly, when the relative humidity is close to 100 percent and the ambient temperature very high. However, if the intake duct is very long, significant heterogeneous condensation on foreign particles present in the atmosphere is possible. The concentration of foreign nuclei required for this type of condensation is comparable to the likely levels of contamination at many industrial test sites. The effects of condensation on engine test results are twofold. First, condensation is a thermodynamically irreversible process and results in an increase of entropy and hence loss of total pressure in the intake duct. Uncorrected measurements using Pitot probes may not record this loss correctly. Second, the mass and energy transfer between the phases during the condensation process has a tendency to accelerate the flow approaching the engine, an effect that may be counteracted by a reduction in mass flow rate in order to maintain the static pressure constant. These conclusions are in agreement with experimental results obtained on-site during the testing of a jet engine fitted with a very long intake duct.

  12. Visualizations of Gas fuel Jet and Combustion Flame on Hydrogen Rotary Engine

    OpenAIRE

    田端, 道彦; 香川, 良二

    2011-01-01

    [Abstract] In this paper, it is a purpose to obtain basic information of a hydrogen jet and combustion flame characteristics of the hydrogen rotary engine. The jet characteristics of the hydrogen gas injector were measured by using the high-speed shadowgraph method. As the result, the jet penetration of the low density gas was weak. The mixing of the direction of the jet axis was disturbed for the low jet pressure. Next, the combustion flame propagation of the hydrogen rotary engine was visua...

  13. Structure and intermolecular vibrations of 7-azaindole-water 2:1 complex in a supersonic jet expansion: Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and quantum chemistry calculation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Montu K Hazra; Moitrayee Mukherjee; V Ramanathan; Tapas Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectra of a 2:1 complex between 7-azaindole and water, known as `non-reactive dimer’ of the molecule, have been measured in a supersonic jet expansion. The dispersed fluorescence spectrum of the electronic origin band of the complex shows a very large number of low-frequency vibrational features corresponding to different intermolecular modes of the complex in the ground electronic state. Geometries of several possible isomeric structures of the complex and their vibrational frequencies at harmonic approximation were calculated by electronic structure theory method at MP2/6-31G∗∗ level. An excellent agreement is observed between the measured and calculated intermolecular vibrational mode frequencies for the energetically most favoured structure of the complex, where the water molecule is inserted within one of the two N$\\cdots$H-N hydrogen bonds of the 7AI dimer.

  14. Optical technology applied to jet engine; Jet engine seigyo eno hikari gijutsu no tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, T.; Ebina, K.; Endo, M. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    Pyrometer that can be mounted on an aircraft engine is developed for measuring engine turbine blade temperatures. Energy radiated from the blade surface is collected by a lens and then forwarded to a photoelectric conversion photodiode through a heat-resistant optical fiber. A cleaning/purging mechanism is provided in case the lens collects dirt that will attenuate the signal for the indication of a temperature that is lower than the true temperature (in a cold shift phenomenon). The pyrometer is tested on an engine, when a measurement accuracy of {+-}10degC is attained without cold shift taking place. It responds to changes more swiftly than conventional types, which justifies its application to the control of engines. Since it works effectively to connect a bunch of optical fibers, rather than conventional electric wires, to the printed circuit board for guiding optical signals to a printed circuit board in a digital control unit, an optical backplane structure is developed. This structure is designed to be an optical waveguide type which can incorporate into itself some mechanisms of synthesizer, optical waveguide coupler, and light filter, in case of need for handling multiple transmission. The pyrometer is tested on an aircraft engine in operation at high and low temperatures, and demonstrates satisfying light-receiving and light-emitting properties. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Applications of active adaptive noise control to jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoureshi, Rahmat; Brackney, Larry

    1993-01-01

    During phase 2 research on the application of active noise control to jet engines, the development of multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) active adaptive noise control algorithms and acoustic/controls models for turbofan engines were considered. Specific goals for this research phase included: (1) implementation of a MIMO adaptive minimum variance active noise controller; and (2) turbofan engine model development. A minimum variance control law for adaptive active noise control has been developed, simulated, and implemented for single-input/single-output (SISO) systems. Since acoustic systems tend to be distributed, multiple sensors, and actuators are more appropriate. As such, the SISO minimum variance controller was extended to the MIMO case. Simulation and experimental results are presented. A state-space model of a simplified gas turbine engine is developed using the bond graph technique. The model retains important system behavior, yet is of low enough order to be useful for controller design. Expansion of the model to include multiple stages and spools is also discussed.

  16. On the Installation of Jet Engine Nacelles on a Wing Fourth Partial Report: Pressure-Distribution Measurements on a Sweptback Wing with Jet Engine Nacelle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschner, R.

    1949-01-01

    The present report, which deals with pressure-distribution measurements made on a sweptback wing with a jet engine nacelle, is similar to a report on pressure-distribution measurements on a rectangular wing with a jet engine nacelle (second partial report). Here, in investigations preliminary to high-speed measurements, as in the second partial report, useful arrangements and fillet designs have been discovered.

  17. Jet aircraft engine exhaust emissions database development: Year 1990 and 2015 scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Z. Harry; Metwally, Munir; Vanalstyne, Richard; Ward, Clay A.

    1994-01-01

    Studies relating to environmental emissions associated with the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) military jet and charter jet aircraft were conducted by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Transport Aircraft. The report includes engine emission results for baseline 1990 charter and military scenario and the projected jet engine emissions results for a 2015 scenario for a Mach 1.6 HSCT charter and military fleet. Discussions of the methodology used in formulating these databases are provided.

  18. Acoustic Characterization of Compact Jet Engine Simulator Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Michael J.; Haskin, Henry H.

    2013-01-01

    Two dual-stream, heated jet, Compact Jet Engine Simulator (CJES) units are designed for wind tunnel acoustic experiments involving a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) vehicle. The newly fabricated CJES units are characterized with a series of acoustic and flowfield investigations to ensure successful operation with minimal rig noise. To limit simulator size, consistent with a 5.8% HWB model, the CJES units adapt Ultra Compact Combustor (UCC) technology developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Stable and controllable operation of the combustor is demonstrated using passive swirl air injection and backpressuring of the combustion chamber. Combustion instability tones are eliminated using nonuniform flow conditioners in conjunction with upstream screens. Through proper flow conditioning, rig noise is reduced by more than 20 dB over a broad spectral range, but it is not completely eliminated at high frequencies. The low-noise chevron nozzle concept designed for the HWB test shows expected acoustic benefits when installed on the CJES unit, and consistency between CJES units is shown to be within 0.5 dB OASPL.

  19. Real-time measurements of jet aircraft engine exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Fred; Arnott, Pat; Zielinska, Barbara; Sagebiel, John; Kelly, Kerry E; Wagner, David; Lighty, JoAnn S; Sarofim, Adel F

    2005-05-01

    Particulate-phase exhaust properties from two different types of ground-based jet aircraft engines--high-thrust and turboshaft--were studied with real-time instruments on a portable pallet and additional time-integrated sampling devices. The real-time instruments successfully characterized rapidly changing particulate mass, light absorption, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content. The integrated measurements included particulate-size distributions, PAH, and carbon concentrations for an entire test run (i.e., "run-integrated" measurements). In all cases, the particle-size distributions showed single modes peaking at 20-40nm diameter. Measurements of exhaust from high-thrust F404 engines showed relatively low-light absorption compared with exhaust from a turboshaft engine. Particulate-phase PAH measurements generally varied in phase with both net particulate mass and with light-absorbing particulate concentrations. Unexplained response behavior sometimes occurred with the real-time PAH analyzer, although on average the real-time and integrated PAH methods agreed within the same order of magnitude found in earlier investigations.

  20. Production laser hardfacing of jet engine turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhamel, R. F.; Banas, C. M.; Kosenski, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    A high wear point exists at the notch between adjacent blades forming the outer shroud of a jet engine turbine stage. This notch is commonly hardfaced to reduce wear and improve turbine blade endurance. Until recently, the blades were manually hardfaced by the gas tungsten arc process. A laser hardfacing process was developed for this application which has increased production rates and reduced rework requirements. The laser's precise energy control, inherent repeatability, and ability to be automated are the principal reasons for these process improvements. Laser hardfacing fundamentals and process development are described. Production equipment characteristics are reviewed and unique features of the process are identified. Finally, the results of several years of production hardfacing experiences are discussed.

  1. Shape memory alloy actuated adaptive exhaust nozzle for jet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gangbing (Inventor); Ma, Ning (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The proposed adaptive exhaust nozzle features an innovative use of the shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators for actively control of the opening area of the exhaust nozzle for jet engines. The SMA actuators remotely control the opening area of the exhaust nozzle through a set of mechanism. An important advantage of using SMA actuators is the reduction of weight of the actuator system for variable area exhaust nozzle. Another advantage is that the SMA actuator can be activated using the heat from the exhaust and eliminate the need of other energy source. A prototype has been designed and fabricated. The functionality of the proposed SMA actuated adaptive exhaust nozzle is verified in the open-loop tests.

  2. Jet engine performance enhancement through use of a wave-rotor topping cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jack; Paxson, Daniel E.

    1993-01-01

    A simple model is used to calculate the thermal efficiency and specific power of simple jet engines and jet engines with a wave-rotor topping cycle. The performance of the wave rotor is based on measurements from a previous experiment. Applied to the case of an aircraft flying at Mach 0.8, the calculations show that an engine with a wave rotor topping cycle may have gains in thermal efficiency of approximately 1 to 2 percent and gains in specific power of approximately 10 to 16 percent over a simple jet engine with the same overall compression ratio. Even greater gains are possible if the wave rotor's performance can be improved.

  3. Flow Matching Results of an MHD Energy Bypass System on a Supersonic Turbojet Engine Using the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyo, Theresa L.

    2011-01-01

    Flow matching has been successfully achieved for an MHD energy bypass system on a supersonic turbojet engine. The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) environment helped perform a thermodynamic cycle analysis to properly match the flows from an inlet employing a MHD energy bypass system (consisting of an MHD generator and MHD accelerator) on a supersonic turbojet engine. Working with various operating conditions (such as the applied magnetic field, MHD generator length and flow conductivity), interfacing studies were conducted between the MHD generator, the turbojet engine, and the MHD accelerator. This paper briefly describes the NPSS environment used in this analysis. This paper further describes the analysis of a supersonic turbojet engine with an MHD generator/accelerator energy bypass system. Results from this study have shown that using MHD energy bypass in the flow path of a supersonic turbojet engine increases the useful Mach number operating range from 0 to 3.0 Mach (not using MHD) to a range of 0 to 7.0 Mach with specific net thrust range of 740 N-s/kg (at ambient Mach = 3.25) to 70 N-s/kg (at ambient Mach = 7). These results were achieved with an applied magnetic field of 2.5 Tesla and conductivity levels in a range from 2 mhos/m (ambient Mach = 7) to 5.5 mhos/m (ambient Mach = 3.5) for an MHD generator length of 3 m.

  4. A supersonic jet target for the cross section measurement of the 12C(α, γ)16O reaction with the recoil mass separator ERNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapagnani, D.; Buompane, R.; Di Leva, A.; Gialanella, L.; Busso, M.; De Cesare, M.; De Stefano, G.; Duarte, J. G.; Gasques, L. R.; Morales Gallegos, L.; Palmerini, S.; Romoli, M.; Tufariello, F.

    2017-09-01

    12C(α, γ)16O cross section plays a key-role in the stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis of massive stars. Hence, it must be determined with the precision of about 10% at the relevant Gamow energy of 300 keV. The ERNA (European Recoil mass separator for Nuclear Astrophysics) collaboration measured, for the first time, the total cross section of 12C(α, γ)16O by means of the direct detection of the 16O ions produced in the reaction down to an energy of Ecm = 1.9 MeV. To extend the measurement at lower energy, it is necessary to limit the extension of the He gas target. This can be achieved using a supersonic jet, where the oblique shock waves and expansion fans formed at its boundaries confine the gas, which can be efficiently collected using a catcher. A test version of such a system has been designed, constructed and experimentally characterized as a bench mark for a full numerical simulation using FV (Finite Volume) methods. The results of the commissioning of the jet test version and the design of the new system that will be used in combination with ERNA are presented and discussed.

  5. Rotationally inelastic scattering in CH4+He, Ne, and Ar: State-to-state cross sections via direct infrared laser absorption in crossed supersonic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, William B.; Schiffman, Aram; Hutson, Jeremy M.; Nesbitt, David J.

    1996-09-01

    Absolute integral state-to-state cross sections are reported for rotationally inelastic scattering in crossed jets of CH4 with the rare gases He, Ne, Ar, at center of mass collision energies of 460±90, 350±70, and 300±60 cm-1, respectively. CH4 seeded in Ar buffer gas is cooled in a pulsed supersonic expansion into the three lowest rotational levels allowed by nuclear spin statistics corresponding to A(J=0), F(J=1), and E(J=2) symmetry. Rotational excitation occurs in single collisions with rare gas atoms from a second pulsed supersonic jet. The column integrated densities of CH4 in both initial and final scattering states are subsequently probed in the jet intersection region via direct absorption of light from a narrow bandwidth (0.0001 cm-1), single mode color center laser. Total inelastic cross sections for collisional loss out of the J=0, 1, and 2 methane states are determined in absolute units from the linear decrease of infrared absorption signals as a function of collider gas concentration. Tuning of the ir laser source also permits probing of the collisionally excited rotational states with quantum state and velocity resolution; column integrated scattering densities are measured for all energetically accessible final states and used to infer absolute inelastic cross sections for state-to-state energy transfer. The observed trends are in good qualitative agreement with quantum state resolved pressure broadening studies; however, the dependences of the rotationally inelastic cross sections on nuclear spin modification (i.e., J) and rotational inelasticity (i.e., ΔJ) is not well predicted by conventional angular momentum or energy gap models. More rigorous comparison with the quantum state-resolved scattering data is obtained from full close coupled scattering calculations on trial potential energy surfaces by Buck and co-workers [Chem. Phys. Lett. 98, 199 (1983); Mol. Phys. 55, 1233, 1255 (1985)] for each of the three CH4+rare gas systems. Agreement

  6. Numerical and experimental investigations on supersonic ejectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartosiewicz, Y.; Aidoun, Z. [CETC-Varennes, Natural Resources Canada (Canada); Desevaux, P. [CREST-UMR 6000, Belfort (France); Mercadier, Y. [Sherbrooke Univ. (Canada). THERMAUS

    2005-02-01

    Supersonic ejectors are widely used in a range of applications such as aerospace, propulsion and refrigeration. The primary interest of this study is to set up a reliable hydrodynamics model of a supersonic ejector, which may be extended to refrigeration applications. The first part of this work evaluated the performance of six well-known turbulence models for the study of supersonic ejectors. The validation concentrated on the shock location, shock strength and the average pressure recovery prediction. Axial pressure measurements with a capillary probe performed previously [Int. J. Turbo Jet Engines 19 (2002) 71; Conference Proc., 10th Int. Symp. Flow Visualization, Kyoto, Japan, 2002], were compared with numerical simulations while laser tomography pictures were used to evaluate the non-mixing length. The capillary probe has been included in the numerical model and the non-mixing length has been numerically evaluated by including an additional transport equation for a passive scalar, which acted as an ideal colorant in the flow. At this point, the results show that the k-omega-sst model agrees best with experiments. In the second part, the tested model was used to reproduce the different operation modes of a supersonic ejector, ranging from on-design point to off-design. In this respect, CFD turned out to be an efficient diagnosis tool of ejector analysis (mixing, flow separation), for design, and performance optimization (optimum entrainment and recompression ratios). (Author)

  7. Digital integrated control of a Mach 2.5 mixed-compression supersonic inlet and an augmented mixed-flow turbofan engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterton, P. G.; Arpasi, D. J.; Baumbick, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A digitally implemented integrated inlet-engine control system was designed and tested on a mixed-compression, axisymmetric, Mach 2.5, supersonic inlet with 45 percent internal supersonic area contraction and a TF30-P-3 augmented turbofan engine. The control matched engine airflow to available inlet airflow. By monitoring inlet terminal shock position and over-board bypass door command, the control adjusted engine speed so that in steady state, the shock would be at the desired location and the overboard bypass doors would be closed. During engine-induced transients, such as augmentor light-off and cutoff, the inlet operating point was momentarily changed to a more supercritical point to minimize unstarts. The digital control also provided automatic inlet restart. A variable inlet throat bleed control, based on throat Mach number, provided additional inlet stability margin.

  8. Meteorological Conditions Causing Jet-Engine Poweloss Events: Current Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strapp, J. W.; Ratvasky, T. P.

    2009-09-01

    The aviation industry is currently investigating a regular occurrence of jet engine-powerloss events which have now been attributed to the ingestion of atmospheric ice particles, usually in the vicinity of deep convection. There is a limited amount of information on the cloud microphysical properties near the cores of deep convection due to the potential hazards of flying in these areas, and due to the fact that it is a very challenging environment for current instrumentation. Most of the information that has been used to deduce the details of the conditions that cause engine powerloss has been extracted from the event-aircraft flight data recorders, pilot interviews, ground radar and satellite, a series of flight test programs in the 1950s and again in the 1990s, and the most recently available limited data from the cloud physics community. These have led to the conclusion that engine events occur due to flight through high mass concentrations of ice particles, probably with ice water contents (IWCs) in excess of 2 grams per cubic meter, and perhaps as high as 8. The limited microphysical data available has been used to suggest a median mass diameter of the ice particles of ~200 microns, with some evidence that it may be as low as 40 microns. These small particle sizes in the presence of high mass concentration is consistent with the lack of radar echoes > 20 dBZ observed on the pilot's radar, a consistent observation during engine events. The Engine Harmonization Working Group, an industry/regulator/government committee investigating engine powerloss, has concluded that the level of understanding of the properties of these clouds is inadequate to provide guidance to industry for engine design and testing. In order to address this issue, NASA and Environment Canada are planning to instrument an aircraft to make measurements in high IWC regions of tropical monsoon and continental convection. There is also a significant effort to upgrade and develop new

  9. Infrared absorption imaging of 2D supersonic jet expansions: Free expansion, cluster formation, and shock wave patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zischang, Julia; Suhm, Martin A

    2013-07-14

    N2O/He gas mixtures are expanded through a 10 × 0.5 mm(2) slit nozzle and imaged by direct absorption vibrational spectroscopy, employing a HgCdTe focal plane array detector after interferometric modulation. N2O cluster formation in the free supersonic expansion is visualized. The expansion structure behind the frontal shock is investigated as a function of background pressure. At high pressures, a sequence of stationary density peaks along a narrow directed flow channel is characterized. The potential of the technique for the elucidation of aggregation mechanisms is emphasized.

  10. The laboratory test rig with miniature jet engine to research aviation fuels combustion process

    OpenAIRE

    Gawron Bartosz; Białecki Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    This article presents laboratory test rig with a miniature turbojet engine (MiniJETRig – Miniature Jet Engine Test Rig), that was built in the Air Force Institute of Technology. The test rig has been developed for research and development works aimed at modelling and investigating processes and phenomena occurring in full scale jet engines. In the article construction of a test rig is described, with a brief discussion on the functionality of each of its main components. Additionally examples...

  11. Hyper-accreting black hole as GRB central engine. I: Baryon loading in GRB jets

    CERN Document Server

    Lei, Wei-Hua; Liang, En-Wei

    2012-01-01

    A hyper-accreting stellar-mass black hole has been long speculated as the best candidate of central engine of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Recent rich observations of GRBs by space missions such as Swift and Fermi pose new constraints on GRB central engine models. In this paper, we study the baryon loading processes of a GRB jet launched from a black hole central engine. We consider a relativistic jet powered by $\

  12. Initial Flow Matching Results of MHD Energy Bypass on a Supersonic Turbojet Engine Using the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyo, Theresa L.

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary flow matching has been demonstrated for a MHD energy bypass system on a supersonic turbojet engine. The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) environment was used to perform a thermodynamic cycle analysis to properly match the flows from an inlet to a MHD generator and from the exit of a supersonic turbojet to a MHD accelerator. Working with various operating conditions such as the enthalpy extraction ratio and isentropic efficiency of the MHD generator and MHD accelerator, interfacing studies were conducted between the pre-ionizers, the MHD generator, the turbojet engine, and the MHD accelerator. This paper briefly describes the NPSS environment used in this analysis and describes the NPSS analysis of a supersonic turbojet engine with a MHD generator/accelerator energy bypass system. Results from this study have shown that using MHD energy bypass in the flow path of a supersonic turbojet engine increases the useful Mach number operating range from 0 to 3.0 Mach (not using MHD) to an explored and desired range of 0 to 7.0 Mach.

  13. Engine jet entrainment in the near field of an aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, F.; Jacquin, L.; Laverdant, A. [Office National d`Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), 92 - Chatillon (France)

    1997-12-31

    A simplified approach has been applied to analyse the mixing and entrainment processes of the engine exhaust through their interaction with the vortex wake of an aircraft. These investigations are focused on the near filed, extending from exit nozzle to the beginning of the vortex phase (i.e. to about twenty seconds after the wake is generated). This study is performed using an integral model and a numerical simulation for a two-engine large civil aircraft. The properties of the wing-tip vortices on the calculation of the dilution ratio (defined as a tracer concentration) have been shown. The mixing process is also affected by the buoyancy effect, but only after the jet regime, when the trapping in the vortex core has occurred. Qualitative comparison with contrail photography shows similar features. Finally the distortion and stretching of the plume streamlines inside the vortices can be observed, and the role of the descent of the vortices on the maximum tracer concentration has been discussed. (author) 19 refs.

  14. Investigation at Mach Numbers 2.98 and 2.18 of Axially Symmetric Free-jet Diffusion with a Ram-jet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunczak, Henry R

    1952-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a free-jet diffuser in reducing the over-all pressure ratios required to operate a free jet with a large air-breathing engine as a test vehicle. Efficient operation of the free jet was determined with and without the considerations required for producing suitable engine-inlet flow conditions. A minimum operating pressure ration of 5.5 was attained with a ratio of nozzle-exit to engine-inlet area of 1.85. Operation of the free jet with unstable engine-inlet flow (buzz) is also included.

  15. Use of cross-correlation measurements to investigate noise generating regions of a real jet engine and a model jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meecham, W. C.; Hurdle, P. M.

    1974-01-01

    Cross-correlations are reported of the jet static pressure fluctuations (as measured with a B and K microphone fitted with a nose cone), with the far-field radiated sound pressure. These measurements were made for various probe positions and a large number of far-field positions (at various angles). In addition, the tests were run for a number of different jet exit velocities. The measured, normalized cross-correlation functions vary between 0.004 and 0.155. These values depend upon the angular position of the far-field microphone, the jet exit Mach number, and the position of the probe. In addition, the cross-correlation technique was employed to study the symmetry of the far-field radiated sound about the jet axis. Third-octave analyses of both the probe signal and the far-field radiated sound were made. This is the first time correlation measurements have been made on a jet engine. In addition, a report is given on an extensive noise survey of a model jet. The correlations are related to sound source functions and jet source regions are discussed.

  16. Laser drilling of thermal barrier coated jet-engine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, H. K.

    Aero engine hot end components are often covered with ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs). Laser drilling in the TBC coated components can be a source of service life TBC degradation and spallation. The present study aims to understand the mechanisms of TBC delamination and develop techniques to drill holes without damaging the TBC, Nimonic 263 workpieces coated with TBC are used in the experiments. Microwave non-destructive testing (NDT) is employed to monitor the integrity of the coating /substrate interfaces of the post-laser drilled materials. A numerical modelling technique is used to investigate the role of melt ejection on TBC delamination. The model accounts for the vapour and the assist gas flow effects in the process. Broadly, melt ejection induced mechanical stresses for the TBC coating / bond coating and thermal effects for the bond coating / substrate interfaces are found the key delamination mechanisms. Experiments are carried out to validate the findings from the model. Various techniques that enable laser drilling without damaging the TBC are demonstrated. Twin jet assisted acute angle laser drilling is one successful technique that has been analysed using the melt ejection simulation. Optimisation of the twin jet assisted acute angle laser drilling process parameters is carried out using Design of Experiments (DoE) and statistical modelling approaches. Finally, an industrial case study to develop a high speed, high quality laser drilling system for combustor cans is described. Holes are drilled by percussion and trepan drilling in TBC coated and uncoated Haynes 230 workpieces. The production rate of percussion drilling is significantly higher than the trepan drilling, however metallurgical hole quality and reproducibility is poor. A number of process parameters are investigated to improve these characteristics. Gas type and gas pressure effects on various characteristics of the inclined laser drilled holes are investigated through theoretical

  17. A survey of drag and heat reduction in supersonic flows by a counterflowing jet and its combinations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei HUANG

    2015-01-01

    题目:逆向喷流及其组合体在超声速气流中减阻防热功效研究进展  概总结归纳国内外逆向喷流及其组合体在超声速气流中减阻防热功效的研究进展,并给出逆向喷流在某些应用领域的建议,特别是喷流的不稳定性保护、减阻与热防护之间的权衡以及流动模态转换的工作参数和结构参数临界点选取等。%Drag reduction and thermal protection is very important for hypersonic vehicles, and a counterflowing jet and its combinations is one of the most promising drag and heat release reduction strategies. In the current survey, research progress on the drag and heat release reduction induced by a counterflowing jet and its combinations is summarized. Three combinatorial configurations are considered, namely the combination of the counterflowing jet and a forward-facing cavity, the combination of the counterflowing jet and an aerospike, and the combination of the counterflowing jet and energy deposition. In conclusion, some recommendations are provided, especially for jet instability protection, for the tradeoff between drag and heat release re-ductions, and for the critical points for the operational and geometric parameters in the flow mode transition.

  18. Effect of Compressibility on Contrail Ice Particle Growth in an Engine Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, François; Maglaras, Ephi; Morency, François; Vancassel, Xavier

    2014-06-01

    In order to understand the formation process of condensation trails (contrails), the flow in the near field of an aircraft engine jet is studied by using the three-dimensional Large Eddy Simulation technique. The configuration consists of a hot round jet laden with soot particles. The particles are tracked using the Lagrangian approach, and their growth is calculated by a microphysics water vapour deposition model. A series of simulations are performed at a realistic Reynolds number (Re = 3.2 · 106) for two different jet Mach numbers: quasi-incompressible jet flow (M = 0.2) and compressible jet flow (M = 1). Whatever the Mach number used the ice crystals first appear at the edges of the jet where the hot and moist flow mixes with the cold and dry ambient air. Both the thermal transfers and the mass coupling, which are more significant for the quasi-incompressible jet flow, control the growth process.

  19. Manufacturing technology for advanced jet engines; Jisedai jetto engine no seizo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirakawa, H. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1997-04-05

    A part of the latest production technologies for aircraft jet engines is introduced. Outline of the turbofan engine, turbo-prop engine, and turbo-shaft engine are given. Every one of them employs a gas turbine engine comprising a compressor, combustor, and a turbine as the output generator. Increase in the turbine inlet temperature is effective for making the gas turbine engine more efficient. The development tread of heat resisting materials for realizing higher temperature is shown. The current status and future aspect of the manufacturing technology is discussed for each main component of the engine. Technological development for decreasing weight is important because the weight of the fan member increases when the fan diameter is increased to increase the bypass ratio. FRP is adopted for the blades and casing to decrease the weight of the compressor, and studies have been made on fiber reinforced materials to reduce the weight of the disks. The outlines of the latest manufacturing technologies for the combustor and turbine are introduced. 2 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Coherent structures in a supersonic complex nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magstadt, Andrew; Berry, Matthew; Glauser, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The jet flow from a complex supersonic nozzle is studied through experimental measurements. The nozzle's geometry is motivated by future engine designs for high-performance civilian and military aircraft. This rectangular jet has a single plane of symmetry, an additional shear layer (referred to as a wall jet), and an aft deck representative of airframe integration. The core flow operates at a Mach number of Mj , c = 1 . 6 , and the wall jet is choked (Mj , w = 1 . 0). This high Reynolds number jet flow is comprised of intense turbulence levels, an intricate shock structure, shear and boundary layers, and powerful corner vortices. In the present study, stereo PIV measurements are simultaneously sampled with high-speed pressure measurements, which are embedded in the aft deck, and far-field acoustics in the anechoic chamber at Syracuse University. Time-resolved schlieren measurements have indicated the existence of strong flow events at high frequencies, at a Strouhal number of St = 3 . 4 . These appear to result from von Kàrmàn vortex shedding within the nozzle and pervade the entire flow and acoustic domain. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied on the current data to identify coherent structures in the jet and study the influence of this vortex street. AFOSR Turbulence and Transition Program (Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0435) with program managers Dr. I. Leyva and Dr. R. Ponnappan.

  1. 78 FR 70076 - Large Scale Networking (LSN)-Joint Engineering Team (JET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... Large Scale Networking (LSN)--Joint Engineering Team (JET) AGENCY: The Networking and Information... and non-Federal participants with interest in high performance research networking and networking to support science applications. The JET reports to the Large Scale Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group...

  2. 77 FR 58415 - Large Scale Networking (LSN); Joint Engineering Team (JET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... Large Scale Networking (LSN); Joint Engineering Team (JET) AGENCY: The Networking and Information... agencies and non-Federal participants with interest in high performance research networking and networking to support science applications. The JET reports to the Large Scale Networking (LSN)...

  3. Analysis of the reverse jet influence on particle ingestion at the engine inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasheninnikov, S. Yu.; Pudovikov, D. E.

    2015-06-01

    The reverse mode of an operating near-ground jet engine is considered. The air flow and particle trajectories under the engine intake are calculated. On the base of numerical and theoretical analysis of the air flow and particle trajectories, some conclusions about reducing the probability of transportation of large particles to the engine are drawn.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Tangling in Jet Engine Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendón, David A.; Erice, Borja; Gálvez, Francisco; Sánchez-Gálvez, Vicente

    2012-12-01

    The numerical analysis of certain safety related problems presents serious difficulties, since the large number of components present leads to huge finite element models that can only be solved by using large and expensive computers or by making rough approaches to the problem. Tangling, or clashing, in the turbine of a jet engine airplane is an example of such problems. This is caused by the crash and friction between rotor and stator blades in the turbine after an eventual shaft failure. When facing the study of an event through numerical modelling, the accurate simulation of this problem would require the engineer to model all the rotor and stator blades existing in the turbine stage, using a small element size in all pieces. Given that the number of stator and rotor blades is usually around 200, such simulations would require millions of elements. This work presents a new numerical methodology, specifically developed for the accurate modelling of the tangling problem that, depending on the turbine configuration, is able to reduce the number of nodes up to an order of magnitude without losing accuracy. The methodology, which benefits from the cyclic configuration of turbines, is successfully applied to the numerical analysis of a hypothetical tangling event in a turbine, providing valuable data such as the rotating velocity decrease of the turbine, the braking torque and the damage suffered by the blades. The methodology is somewhat general and can be applied to any problem in which damage caused by the interaction between a rotating and static piece is to be analysed.

  5. Automated Infrared Inspection Of Jet Engine Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantel, T.; Bowman, D.; Halase, J.; Kenue, S.; Krisher, R.; Sippel, T.

    1986-03-01

    The detection of blocked surface cooling holes in hollow jet engine turbine blades and vanes during either manufacture or overhaul can be crucial to the integrity and longevity of the parts when in service. A fully automated infrared inspection system is being established under a tri-service's Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) contract administered by the Air Force to inspect these surface cooling holes for blockages. The method consists of viewing the surface holes of the blade with a scanning infrared radiometer when heated air is flushed through the blade. As the airfoil heats up, the resultant infrared images are written directly into computer memory where image analysis is performed. The computer then makes a determination of whether or not the holes are open from the inner plenum to the exterior surface and ultimately makes an accept/reject decision based on previously programmed criteria. A semiautomatic version has already been implemented and is more cost effective and more reliable than the previous manual inspection methods.

  6. Jet Engine Fan Blade Containment Using an Alternate Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, K.S.; Pereira, J.M.; Revilock, D.M.; Matheny, P.

    2008-01-01

    With a goal of reducing jet engine weight, simulations of a fan blade containment system with an alternate geometry were tested and analyzed. A projectile simulating a fan blade was shot at two alternate geometry containment case configurations using a gas gun. The first configuration was a flat plate representing a standard case configuration. The second configuration was a flat plate with a radially convex curve section at the impact point. The curved surface was designed to force the blade to deform plastically, dissipating energy before the full impact of the blade is received by the plate. The curved case was able to tolerate a higher impact velocity before failure. The computational model was developed and correlated with the tests and a weight savings assessment was performed. For the particular test configuration used in this study the ballistic impact velocity of the curved plate was approximately 60 m/s (200 ft/s) greater than that of the flat plate. For the computational model to successfully duplicate the test, the very high strain rate behavior of the materials had to be incorporated.

  7. Rotor Dynamic Analysis of RM12 Jet Engine Rotor using ANSYS

    OpenAIRE

    Srikrishnanivas, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Rotordynamics is a field under mechanics, mainly deals with the vibration of rotating structures. In recent days, the study about rotordynamics has gained more importance within Jet engine industries. The main reason is Jet engine consists of many rotating parts constitutes a complex dynamic system. While designing rotors of high speed turbo machineries, it is of prime importance to consider rotordynamics characteristics in to account. Considering these characteristics at the design phase may...

  8. Underexpanded Supersonic Plume Surface Interactions: Applications for Spacecraft Landings on Planetary Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, M.; Sengupta, A.; Renno, N. O.; Norman, J. W.; Gulick, D. S.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical and experimental investigations of both far-field and near-field supersonic steady jet interactions with a flat surface at various atmospheric pressures are presented in this paper. These studies were done in assessing the landing hazards of both the NASA Mars Science Laboratory and Phoenix Mars spacecrafts. Temporal and spatial ground pressure measurements in conjunction with numerical solutions at altitudes of approx.35 nozzle exit diameters and jet expansion ratios (e) between 0.02 and 100 are used. Data from steady nitrogen jets are compared to both pulsed jets and rocket exhaust plumes at Mach approx.5. Due to engine cycling, overpressures and the plate shock dynamics are different between pulsed and steady supersonic impinging jets. In contrast to highly over-expanded (e plumes, results show that there is a relative ground pressure load maximum for moderately underexpanded (e approx.2-5) jets which demonstrate a long collimated plume shock structure. For plumes with e much >5 (lunar atmospheric regime), the ground pressure is minimal due to the development of a highly expansive shock structure. We show this is dependent on the stability of the plate shock, the length of the supersonic core and plume decay due to shear layer instability which are all a function of the jet expansion ratio. Asymmetry and large gradients in the spatial ground pressure profile and large transient overpressures are predominantly linked to the dynamics of the plate shock. More importantly, this study shows that thruster plumes exhausting into martian environments possess the largest surface pressure loads and can occur at high spacecraft altitudes in contrast to the jet interactions at terrestrial and lunar atmospheres. Theoretical and analytical results also show that subscale supersonic cold gas jets adequately simulate the flow field and loads due to rocket plume impingement provided important scaling parameters are in agreement. These studies indicate the critical

  9. Suppression of unimolecular decay of laser desorbed peptide and protein ions by entrainment in rarefied supersonic gas jets under weak electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hieke, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.hieke@stanford.edu [Department of Structural Biology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, 299 Campus Drive West, Fairchild Building, 148, Stanford, California 94305-5126 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    Unimolecular decay of sample ions imposes a limit on the usable laser fluence in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) ion sources. Traditionally, some modest degree of collisional sample ion cooling has been achieved by connecting MALDI ion sources directly to gas-filled radio frequency (RF) multipoles. It was also discovered in the early 1990s that gas-filled RF multipoles exhibit increased ion transmission efficiency due to collisional ion focusing effects. This unexpected experimental finding was later supported by elementary Monte Carlo simulations. Both experiments and simulations assumed a resting background gas with typical pressures of the order of 1 Pa. However, considerable additional improvements can be achieved if laser desorbed sample ions are introduced immediately after desorption, still within the ion source, in an axisymmetric rarefied supersonic gas jet with peak pressure of the order of 100 Pa and flow velocities >300 m/s, and under weak electric fields. We describe here the design principle and report performance data of an ion source coined “MALDI-2,” which incorporates elements of both rarefied aerodynamics and particle optics. Such a design allows superb suppression of metastable fragmentation due to rapid collisional cooling in <10 μs and nearly perfect injection efficiency into the attached RF ion guide, as numerous experiments have confirmed.

  10. Simulations of Ultrarelativistic Magnetodynamic Jets from Gamma-ray Burst Engines

    CERN Document Server

    Tchekhovskoy, Alexander; Narayan, Ramesh

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) require an engine capable of driving a jet of plasma to ultrarelativistic bulk Lorentz factors of up to several hundred and into narrow opening angles of a few degrees. We test whether the popular magnetic-driving paradigm can generate the required Lorentz factors and opening angles by finding global axisymmetric stationary solutions of magnetically-dominated (electromagnetically pure) ultrarelativistic jets. Our global solutions are obtained via time-dependent ideal relativistic magnetodynamical numerical simulations that follow the jet from the central engine to beyond six orders of magnitude in radius. Our model is primarily motivated by the collapsar model, in which a jet is produced by a spinning black hole or neutron star and then propagates through a massive stellar envelope. However, the results can be applied to other GRB models and other systems with relativistic jets. We find that the size of (and pressures within) the presupernova progenitor star can determine the terminal ...

  11. Aircraft dual-shaft jet engine with indirect action fuel flow controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudosie, Alexandru-Nicolae

    2017-06-01

    The paper deals with an aircraft single-jet engine's control system, based on a fuel flow controller. Considering the engine as controlled object and its thrust the most important operation effect, from the multitude of engine's parameters only its rotational speed n is measurable and proportional to its thrust, so engine's speed has become the most important controlled parameter. Engine's control system is based on fuel injection Qi dosage, while the output is engine's speed n. Based on embedded system's main parts' mathematical models, the author has described the system by its block diagram with transfer functions; furthermore, some Simulink-Matlab simulations are performed, concerning embedded system quality (its output parameters time behavior) and, meanwhile, some conclusions concerning engine's parameters mutual influences are revealed. Quantitative determinations are based on author's previous research results and contributions, as well as on existing models (taken from technical literature). The method can be extended for any multi-spool engine, single- or twin-jet.

  12. Aerodynamic acceleration of heavy particles in a supersonic jet of a binary mixture of gases with disparate-mass components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarev, Alexander V.; Tatarenko, Kira A.; Amerik, Alexander Yu.

    2017-08-01

    The method of moments for the ellipsoidal distribution function was used for solving the Boltzmann equation describing binary gas mixtures with large mass disparity and highly diluted heavy component. Analysis of the system of moment equations results in a simple analytic expression for the terminal slip velocities of components that depends on the conditions in the source of jet, composition of mixture, and C6 constant of the attractive branch of the interaction potential. The results are in good agreement with experimental data including low pressure conditions when the Miller-Andres correlation is unsatisfactory.

  13. Study of Efficiency Control by Hybrid Jet Engine Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Maksimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes main control aspects of thrust jet engines, which use fuel components in different states of aggregation (solid fuels - liquid oxidant, a solid oxidizer - liquid fuel. Following the analytical review of literature a conclusion has been drawn that it is technically and functionally complicated to provide a process of thrust control by changing the mass flow and the combustion rate of a solid fuel charge.The objective of this work is to give a theoretical prediction of how the thermal knife impacts on the local combustion rate.The paper presents a diagram of interaction between thermal knife and solid fuel. There are three modes, namely: pyrolysis, transition (from pyrolysis to cutting charge, and fuel cut. In the computational model generation it is assumed that the solid fuel combustion rate is not dependent on the combustion direction, and the temperature distribution along the length of the charge (in the direction perpendicular to the face obeys the Michelson dependence without considering a resistance of the heated layer at the surface of the combustion charge. The paper considers mechanical interaction of the thermal knife with the surface of charge. The Hertz formula describes the relationship between the pressing force, the penetration depth and the radius of thermal knife mark in the fuel.Numerical modeling methods and direct calculations allow us to obtain relationships to describe the changing local combustion rate under the action of the thermal knife on a solid fuel charge in its mechanical penetration, depending on the blade geometry, mechanical properties of charge and pressing force.

  14. Transpiring Cooling of a Scram-Jet Engine Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang H.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Song, Kyo D.; Ries,Heidi

    1997-01-01

    The peak cold-wall heating rate generated in a combustion chamber of a scram-jet engine can exceed 2000 Btu/sq ft sec (approx. 2344 W/sq cm). Therefore, a very effective heat dissipation mechanism is required to sustain such a high heating load. This research focused on the transpiration cooling mechanism that appears to be a promising approach to remove a large amount of heat from the engine wall. The transpiration cooling mechanism has two aspects. First, initial computations suggest that there is a reduction, as much as 75%, in the heat flux incident on the combustion chamber wall due to the transpirant modifying the combustor boundary layer. Secondly, the heat reaching the combustor wall is removed from the structure in a very effective manner by the transpirant. It is the second of these two mechanisms that is investigated experimentally in the subject paper. A transpiration cooling experiment using a radiant heating method, that provided a heat flux as high as 200 Btu/sq ft sec ( approx. 234 W/sq cm) on the surface of a specimen, was performed. The experiment utilized an arc-lamp facility (60-kW radiant power output) to provide a uniform heat flux to a test specimen. For safety reasons, helium gas was used as the transpirant in the experiments. The specimens were 1.9-cm diameter sintered, powdered-stainless-steel tubes of various porosities and a 2.54cm square tube with perforated multi-layered walls. A 15-cm portion of each specimen was heated. The cooling effectivenes and efficiencies by transpiration for each specimen were obtained using the experimental results. During the testing, various test specimens displayed a choking phenomenon in which the transpirant flow was limited as the heat flux was increased. The paper includes a preliminary analysis of the transpiration cooling mechanism and a scaling conversion study that translates the results from helium tests into the case when a hydrogen medium is used.

  15. Analysis of Performance of Jet Engine from Characteristics of Components II : Interaction of Components as Determined from Engine Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Arthur W; Alpert, Sumner; Beede, William; Kovach, Karl

    1949-01-01

    In order to understand the operation and the interaction of jet-engine components during engine operation and to determine how component characteristics may be used to compute engine performance, a method to analyze and to estimate performance of such engines was devised and applied to the study of the characteristics of a research turbojet engine built for this investigation. An attempt was made to correlate turbine performance obtained from engine experiments with that obtained by the simpler procedure of separately calibrating the turbine with cold air as a driving fluid in order to investigate the applicability of component calibration. The system of analysis was also applied to prediction of the engine and component performance with assumed modifications of the burner and bearing characteristics, to prediction of component and engine operation during engine acceleration, and to estimates of the performance of the engine and the components when the exhaust gas was used to drive a power turbine.

  16. Supersonic free jet, molecular free regime; Fondamenti fisici dei fasci molecolari supersonici. Parte 7. Il getto libero supersonico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanna, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione; Tomassetti, G. [L' Aquila Univ., L' Aquila (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    1999-07-01

    The structure of the free jet emitted by a converging nozzle as obtained by the method of characteristics by Ashkenas e Sherman is described in details. In particular the dependence of the field variable by the distance from the nozzle is given. The transition from continuum to molecular free regime is then considered and the sudden freeze approximation is introduced. The processing of monoatomic and polyatomic gasses is also considered. [Italian] Le caratteristiche del campo di flusso in regime continuo di un getto libero supersonico ottenute col metodo delle caratteristiche da Ashekanas e Sherman sono messe in evidenza. In paricolare le relazioni analitiche per i parametri di flusso in funzione della distanza dal nozzle sono riportate. Viene poi considerata la transizione al regime molecolare ed e' introdotta la sudden freeze approximation. Vengono anche considerate le situazioni di non equilibrio tra gradi di liberta' interni ed esterni.

  17. The laboratory test rig with miniature jet engine to research aviation fuels combustion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawron Bartosz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents laboratory test rig with a miniature turbojet engine (MiniJETRig – Miniature Jet Engine Test Rig, that was built in the Air Force Institute of Technology. The test rig has been developed for research and development works aimed at modelling and investigating processes and phenomena occurring in full scale jet engines. In the article construction of a test rig is described, with a brief discussion on the functionality of each of its main components. Additionally examples of measurement results obtained during the realization of the initial tests have been included, presenting the capabilities of the test rig.

  18. Enhanced combustion by jet ignition in a turbocharged cryogenic port fuel injected hydrogen engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boretti, Alberto A.; Watson, Harry C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Melbourne, 3010 Melbourne (Australia)

    2009-03-15

    The Hydrogen Assisted Jet Ignition (HAJI) is a physico-chemical combustion enhancement system developed at the University of Melbourne. Jet ignition can ignite ultra-lean air/fuel mixtures which are far beyond the stable ignition limit of a spark plug. Jet ignition may further enhance the combustion properties of hydrogen enabling the development of a diesel-like, almost throttle-less, control of load by quantity of fuel injected for higher thermal efficiencies all over the range of loads. The object of this paper is to show the benefits of jet ignition and present the latest results obtained on a four cylinder engine having the jet ignition coupled with cryogenic hydrogen injection and turbo charging. (author)

  19. NACA Conference on Turbojet Engines for Supersonic Propulsion. A Compilation of Technical Material Presented

    Science.gov (United States)

    1953-10-01

    particular, in combination with a static-pressure rise across the rotor, have had low turbine efficiency. On the other hand, the gains w be realized by being...does not have the disadvantages associated itith compressor surge, compressor off-design- point operation, or low turbine -inlet temperatures at take...either the high turbine-inlet-temperature nonafterburning engines or low turbine -inlet-temperature afterburning engines. For this case where high turbine

  20. Where's the Bend? Locating the First Folded Structure in Straight Chain Alkylbenzenes in a Supersonic Jet Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, Daniel M.; Bocklitz, Sebastian; Suhm, Martin A.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2016-06-01

    Alkylbenzenes make up 20-30% of petroleum fuels and are important intermediates in combustion. In gasoline, these alkyl chains are relatively short, but extend to 20 or more carbons in length in diesel fuels. While one tends to think of these chains as extending out away from the phenyl ring in an all-trans configuration, dispersive interactions between segments of the alkyl chain and between the alkyl chain and the ring will stabilize more compact geometries in which the alkyl chain folds back on itself and extends over the aromatic π cloud. This talk seeks to answer the following question: How long must the alkyl chain be before it starts to fold back over itself? Studies of the pure n-alkanes by the Suhm group have shown the turn to favorably occur for a chain about 17 carbon atoms in length. The studies presented here focus on the affect the aromatic ring has on when this turn becomes favorable. Jet-cooled laser-induced fluorescence excitation and single-conformation IR spectra have been recorded in the alkyl CH stretch region for a series of alkylbenzenes with chain lengths ranging from two to ten carbon atoms. We show, through a combination of experiment, high level calculation, and theoretical modeling, that conformations begin to form that fold back over the aromatic ring at about n=8.

  1. On the wall jet from the ring crevice of an internal combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloutman, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Green, R.M. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Numerical simulations and experiments of the jetting of gases from the ring crevices of a laboratory engine shortly after exhaust valve opening showed an unanticipated radial flow of the crevice gases into the main combustion chamber. We report well-resolved numerical simulations of a wall jet that show that this radial motion is driven by vorticity generation in the wall boundary layer and at the corner of the piston crown.

  2. Experiments on free and impinging supersonic microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phalnikar, K.A.; Kumar, R.; Alvi, F.S. [Florida A and M University and Florida State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The fluid dynamics of microflows has recently commanded considerable attention because of their potential applications. Until now, with a few exceptions, most of the studies have been limited to low speed flows. This experimental study examines supersonic microjets of 100-1,000 {mu}m in size with exit velocities in the range of 300-500 m/s. Such microjets are presently being used to actively control larger supersonic impinging jets, which occur in STOVL (short takeoff and vertical landing) aircraft, cavity flows, and flow separation. Flow properties of free as well as impinging supersonic microjets have been experimentally investigated over a range of geometric and flow parameters. The flowfield is visualized using a micro-schlieren system with a high magnification. These schlieren images clearly show the characteristic shock cell structure typically observed in larger supersonic jets. Quantitative measurements of the jet decay and spreading rates as well as shock cell spacing are obtained using micro-pitot probe surveys. In general, the mean flow features of free microjets are similar to larger supersonic jets operating at higher Reynolds numbers. However, some differences are also observed, most likely due to pronounced viscous effects associated with jets at these small scales. Limited studies of impinging microjets were also conducted. They reveal that, similar to the behavior of free microjets, the flow structure of impinging microjets strongly resembles that of larger supersonic impinging jets. (orig.)

  3. Experiments on free and impinging supersonic microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalnikar, K. A.; Kumar, R.; Alvi, F. S.

    2008-05-01

    The fluid dynamics of microflows has recently commanded considerable attention because of their potential applications. Until now, with a few exceptions, most of the studies have been limited to low speed flows. This experimental study examines supersonic microjets of 100-1,000 μm in size with exit velocities in the range of 300-500 m/s. Such microjets are presently being used to actively control larger supersonic impinging jets, which occur in STOVL (short takeoff and vertical landing) aircraft, cavity flows, and flow separation. Flow properties of free as well as impinging supersonic microjets have been experimentally investigated over a range of geometric and flow parameters. The flowfield is visualized using a micro-schlieren system with a high magnification. These schlieren images clearly show the characteristic shock cell structure typically observed in larger supersonic jets. Quantitative measurements of the jet decay and spreading rates as well as shock cell spacing are obtained using micro-pitot probe surveys. In general, the mean flow features of free microjets are similar to larger supersonic jets operating at higher Reynolds numbers. However, some differences are also observed, most likely due to pronounced viscous effects associated with jets at these small scales. Limited studies of impinging microjets were also conducted. They reveal that, similar to the behavior of free microjets, the flow structure of impinging microjets strongly resembles that of larger supersonic impinging jets.

  4. Modelling of the wall jet in a direct injection diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desantes, J.M.; Lapuerta, M.; Salavert, J.M. (Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (ES). Dept. Maquinas y Motores Termicos)

    1992-01-01

    As a part of a phenomenological model, a method for simulating the wall/jet interaction in a direct injection diesel engine is proposed. The method is based on the application of the momentum conservation equation in the different directions in which the wall jet is spread, and takes into account both the interaction with the combustion chamber geometry and with swirl. It takes as initial conditions the results of calculating the free jet, which is divided into packages. The predictions provide good agreement with those by other researchers. (author).

  5. Pacer Comet 4: Automated Jet Engine Testing of a TF33-P100 Pratt & Whitney Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Rex Bolding

    Pacer Comet 4 found its life out of necessity to replace an obsolescent Pacer Comet 3 engine test system at Tinker AFB in Oklahoma City, OK. Pacer Comet 3 (PC3) was created and installed in the early 1980's to test jet engines from a wide range of planes. PC3 had several problems from a maintenance standpoint: contractors designed and installed the system but the contract did not include the OEM data package. Without drawings or design knowledge, fixing the smallest of problems could turn into a multi-day project. In addition to high cost, as the OEM companies of proprietary parts went out of business, it became impossible to find a replacement for a failed part. These issues set the framework for the Pacer Comet 4 (PC4) system. PC4 was created as an organic AF and Department of Defense collaboration to fix the issues with PC3. PC4 provides the customer with a complete data package including multiple drawing sets and data sheets for all parts used, as well as design files for all PCBs created in house. PC4 has a standard to use commercially available off the shelf parts (COTS). The reason for this is sustainability in maintenance. If a part is to fail, it should be able to be purchased from any manufacturer that meets the specs of the original product. No proprietary parts are used, except as directed by the engine's OEM. This thesis will focus on the design and installation of the on-frame data acquisition PC4 system for the Pratt & Whitney TF33-P100A-QEC engine that is currently in use on the E3 Sentry. This thesis will show efficiency improvements for maintenance sustainability (70% cabling reduction) as well as discuss performance improvements in both test and production environments.

  6. Numerical Model of a Variable-Combined-Cycle Engine for Dual Subsonic and Supersonic Cruise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Fernandez-Villace

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Efficient high speed propulsion requires exploiting the cooling capability of the cryogenic fuel in the propulsion cycle. This paper presents the numerical model of a combined cycle engine while in air turbo-rocket configuration. Specific models of the various heat exchanger modules and the turbomachinery elements were developed to represent the physical behavior at off-design operation. The dynamic nature of the model allows the introduction of the engine control logic that limits the operation of certain subcomponents and extends the overall engine operational envelope. The specific impulse and uninstalled thrust are detailed while flying a determined trajectory between Mach 2.5 and 5 for varying throttling levels throughout the operational envelope.

  7. Performance Evaluation of Particle Sampling Probes for Emission Measurements of Aircraft Jet Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Poshin; Chen, Da-Ren; Sanders, Terry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Considerable attention has been recently received on the impact of aircraft-produced aerosols upon the global climate. Sampling particles directly from jet engines has been performed by different research groups in the U.S. and Europe. However, a large variation has been observed among published data on the conversion efficiency and emission indexes of jet engines. The variation results surely from the differences in test engine types, engine operation conditions, and environmental conditions. The other factor that could result in the observed variation is the performance of sampling probes used. Unfortunately, it is often neglected in the jet engine community. Particle losses during the sampling, transport, and dilution processes are often not discussed/considered in literatures. To address this issue, we evaluated the performance of one sampling probe by challenging it with monodisperse particles. A significant performance difference was observed on the sampling probe evaluated under different temperature conditions. Thermophoretic effect, nonisokinetic sampling and turbulence loss contribute to the loss of particles in sampling probes. The results of this study show that particle loss can be dramatic if the sampling probe is not well designed. Further, the result allows ones to recover the actual size distributions emitted from jet engines.

  8. Black hole, jet, and disk the universal engine

    CERN Document Server

    Falcke, H

    1995-01-01

    In this paper I review the results of our ongoing project to investigate the coupling between accretion disk and radio jet in galactic nuclei and stellar mass black holes. We find a good correlation between the UV bump luminosity and the radio luminosities of AGN, which improves upon the usual [OIII]/radio correlations. Taking mass and energy conservation in the jet/disk system into account we can successfully model the correlation for radio-loud and radio-weak quasars. We find that jets are comparable in power to the accretion disk luminosity, and the difference between radio-loud and radio-weak may correspond to two natural stages of the relativistic electron distribution -- assuming that radio weak quasars have jets as well. The distribution of flat- and steep-spectrum sources is explained by bulk Lorentz factors gamma_j ~ 5-10. The absence of radio-loud quasars below a critical optical luminosity coincides with the FR I/FR II break and could be explained by a powerdependent, ``closing'' torus. This points...

  9. A study of flow and initial stage of water condensation in the exhaust jet of the aircraft turbofan engine

    OpenAIRE

    Lobanova, Maria,; Tsirkunov, Yury,

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes the results of numerical study of flow in the exhaust jet of turbofan engine CFM 56-3. Influence of computational domain decomposition, grid refinement and flow model on the jet flow field is discussed. Special attention is payed to simulation of nucleation and condensation processes in the exhaust jet. Growth of water clusters in the jet and cluster distribution in size are obtained.; International audience; The paper describes the results of numerical study of flow in th...

  10. On the design and structural analysis of jet engine fan blade structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoo, Leye M.

    2013-07-01

    Progress in the design and structural analysis of commercial jet engine fan blades is reviewed and presented. This article is motivated by the key role fan blades play in the performance of advanced gas turbine jet engines. The fundamentals of the associated physics are emphasized. Recent developments and advancements have led to an increase and improvement in fan blade structural durability, stability and reliability. This article is intended as a high level review of the fan blade environment and current state of structural design to aid further research in developing new and innovative fan blade technologies.

  11. Vehicle implementation of a port injected M100 engine using plasma jet ignition and prompt EGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiner, D.P.; Mallory, R.W.; Rao, V.K.; Bardon, M.F. [Royal Military Coll. of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada); Battista, V. [Department of Transport, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1994-10-01

    Overhead projection slides used at the 1994 Windsor Workshop on Alternative Fuels describing a port-injected engine using plasma jet ignition and prompt EGR were presented. Benefits of the engine were described, accompanied by technical information of its working concepts. Schematics and a comparison of the plasma jet ignition system with conventional spark plug ignition systems were outlined. Cold starting benefits and ignition hypothesis was summarized. Results of graphical analyses of cold-starting with high and normal cranking speeds were reviewed. 16 figs.

  12. The influence of jet engine noise on hearing of technical staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesław Konopka

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to high sound pressure levels (SPLs, noise produced by jet planes may be harmful to hearing of people working in their proximity. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of exposure to jet engine noise on technical staff hearing. Material and Methods: The study comprised 60 men, aged 24–50 years, employed in army as technical staff and exposed to jet engine noise for 6–20 years. The control group were 50 non-noise exposed males, aged 25–51 years. Exposure to noise emitted by jet engines was evaluated. Pure-tone audiometry (PTA and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE were recorded in both groups. Results: Jet engines emitted broadband noise with spectrum dominated by components in the frequency range 315–6300 Hz (1/3-octave bands. Maximum A-weighted SPL during tests reached values of approx. 120–130 dB. Consequently, engine-servicing personnel (even in the case of a single engine test was exposed to noise (at A-weighted daily noise exposure level above 95 dB exceeding permissible levels. Averaged audiometric hearing threshold levels of technical staff were higher (≤ 17 dB HL, p < 0.001 than in the control group. Similarly, the DPOAE amplitude was lower (≤ 17 dB SPL, p < 0.01 in the noise-exposed subjects compared to the non-exposed ones. Significant reduction of DPOAE levels was mainly noted for high frequencies (3–6 kHz. Conclusions: Despite the usage of hearing protection devices, both PTA and DPOAE consistently showed poorer hearing in engine-servicing personnel vs. control group. Med Pr 2014;65(5:583–592

  13. A NARROW SHORT-DURATION GRB JET FROM A WIDE CENTRAL ENGINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffell, Paul C.; Quataert, Eliot [Astronomy Department and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); MacFadyen, Andrew I., E-mail: duffell@berkeley.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University (United States)

    2015-11-01

    We use two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic numerical calculations to show that highly collimated relativistic jets can be produced in neutron star merger models of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) without the need for a highly directed engine or a large net magnetic flux. Even a hydrodynamic engine generating a very wide sustained outflow on small scales can, in principle, produce a highly collimated relativistic jet, facilitated by a dense surrounding medium that provides a cocoon surrounding the jet core. An oblate geometry to the surrounding gas significantly enhances the collimation process. Previous numerical simulations have shown that the merger of two neutron stars produces an oblate, expanding cloud of dynamical ejecta. We show that this gas can efficiently collimate the central engine power much like the surrounding star does in long-duration GRB models. For typical short-duration GRB central engine parameters, we find jets with opening angles of an order of 10° in which a large fraction of the total outflow power of the central engine resides in highly relativistic material. These results predict large differences in the opening angles of outflows from binary neutron star mergers versus neutron star–black hole mergers.

  14. A Narrow Short-duration GRB Jet from a Wide Central Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffell, Paul C.; Quataert, Eliot; MacFadyen, Andrew I.

    2015-11-01

    We use two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic numerical calculations to show that highly collimated relativistic jets can be produced in neutron star merger models of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) without the need for a highly directed engine or a large net magnetic flux. Even a hydrodynamic engine generating a very wide sustained outflow on small scales can, in principle, produce a highly collimated relativistic jet, facilitated by a dense surrounding medium that provides a cocoon surrounding the jet core. An oblate geometry to the surrounding gas significantly enhances the collimation process. Previous numerical simulations have shown that the merger of two neutron stars produces an oblate, expanding cloud of dynamical ejecta. We show that this gas can efficiently collimate the central engine power much like the surrounding star does in long-duration GRB models. For typical short-duration GRB central engine parameters, we find jets with opening angles of an order of 10° in which a large fraction of the total outflow power of the central engine resides in highly relativistic material. These results predict large differences in the opening angles of outflows from binary neutron star mergers versus neutron star-black hole mergers.

  15. The politics of donating technological artifacts: techno-nationalism and the donations of the world’s first jet engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giffard, Hermione

    2014-01-01

    The Smithsonian Institution’s aviation collection includes two early jet engines, both of which were given to the museum by foreign donors. The first, a prototype of Britain’s first jet engine, which flew during World War II, was donated by the British state in 1949. The second, a replica of Germany

  16. The politics of donating technological artifacts: techno-nationalism and the donations of the world’s first jet engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giffard, Hermione

    2014-01-01

    The Smithsonian Institution’s aviation collection includes two early jet engines, both of which were given to the museum by foreign donors. The first, a prototype of Britain’s first jet engine, which flew during World War II, was donated by the British state in 1949. The second, a replica of

  17. The politics of donating technological artifacts: techno-nationalism and the donations of the world’s first jet engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giffard, Hermione

    2014-01-01

    The Smithsonian Institution’s aviation collection includes two early jet engines, both of which were given to the museum by foreign donors. The first, a prototype of Britain’s first jet engine, which flew during World War II, was donated by the British state in 1949. The second, a replica of Germany

  18. The lean burn direct injection jet ignition gas engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boretti, Alberto A.; Watson, Harry C. [School of Science and Engineering, University of Ballarat, PO Box 663, Ballarat, Victoria 3353 (Australia)

    2009-09-15

    This paper presents a new in-cylinder mixture preparation and ignition system for various fuels including hydrogen, methane and propane. The system comprises a centrally located direct injection (DI) injector and a jet ignition (JI) device for combustion of the main chamber (MC) mixture. The fuel is injected in the MC with a new generation, fast actuating, high pressure, high flow rate DI injector capable of injection shaping and multiple events. This injector produces a bulk, lean stratified mixture. The JI system uses a second DI injector to inject a small amount of fuel in a small pre-chamber (PC). In the spark ignition (SI) version, a spark plug then ignites a slightly rich mixture. In the auto ignition version, a DI injector injects a small amount of higher pressure fuel in the small PC having a hot glow plug (GP) surface, and the fuel auto ignites in the hot air or when in contact with the hot surface. Either way the MC mixture is then bulk ignited through multiple jets of hot reacting gases. Bulk ignition of the lean, jet controlled, stratified MC mixture resulting from coupling DI with JI makes it possible to burn MC mixtures with fuel to air equivalence ratios reducing almost to zero for a throttle-less control of load diesel-like and high efficiencies over almost the full range of loads. (author)

  19. Study of heat transfer in CI engine using heat transfer correlation based on intake jet velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharief, A. [Sri Siddharhta Inst. of Technology, Tumkur, Karnataka (India); Samaga, B.S.; Shrinivas Rao, B.R. [Nitte Mahalinga Adyantaya Institute of Technology, Karkala, Karnataka (India); JAntonyc, A. [Sahyadri Inst. of Technology, Mangalore, Karnataka (India)

    2009-07-01

    A reliable heat transfer formulation is needed to simulate reciprocating combustion engines. In order to reduce heat loss and improve thermal efficiency, it is necessary to calculate the rate of heat transfer from the working fluid to the combustion chamber walls. The thermal stresses in the engine components must also be determined. In this study, the author calculated heat transfer coefficient in a diesel engine using a heat transfer correlation based on intake jet velocity instead of mean piston speed. Experiments were conducted in a diesel engine with natural aspiration of hot air at 150 to 300 degrees C. Peak temperature was 1100 degrees C at various loads. The convective heat transfer coefficient and radiative heat transfer coefficient component was also determined separately at various loads. This model based on intake jet velocity instead of mean piston speed was found to be more realistic when considering the influence of gas velocities on the thermal boundary layer thickness. 11 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of an Auxiliary Cooling System for Jet Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leamy, Kevin; Griffiths, Jim; Andersen, Paul; Joco, Fidel; Laski, Mark; Balser, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the technical effort of the Active Cooling for Enhanced Performance (ACEP) program sponsored by NASA. It covers the design, fabrication, and integrated systems testing of a jet engine auxiliary cooling system, or turbocooler, that significantly extends the use of conventional jet fuel as a heat sink. The turbocooler is designed to provide subcooled cooling air to the engine exhaust nozzle system or engine hot section. The turbocooler consists of three primary components: (1) a high-temperature air cycle machine driven by engine compressor discharge air, (2) a fuel/ air heat exchanger that transfers energy from the hot air to the fuel and uses a coating to mitigate fuel deposits, and (3) a high-temperature fuel injection system. The details of the turbocooler component designs and results of the integrated systems testing are documented. Industry Version-Data and information deemed subject to Limited Rights restrictions are omitted from this document.

  1. Optimal Replacement Policy of Jet Engine Modules from the Aircarrier's Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Domitrović

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for optimising preventive maintenanceof aircraft jet engine was developed by dynamic programming.Replacement planning for jet engine modules is regardedas a multistage decision process, while optimum modulereplacement is considered as a problem of equipment replacement.The goal of the optimal replacement policy of jet enginemodules is a defined series of decisions resulting in minimummaintenance costs. The model was programmed inC++ programming language and tested by using CFM56 jetengine data. The optimum maintenance strategy costs werecompared to costs of simpler experience-based maintenancestrategies. The results of the comparison j usti.JY further developmentand usage of the model in order to achieve significant costreduction for airline carriers.

  2. Episodic Jets as the Central Engine of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Most Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have erratic light curves, which demand that the GRB central engine launches an episodic outflow. Recent Fermi observations of some GRBs indicate a lack of the thermal photosphere component as predicted by the baryonic fireball model, which suggests a magnetic origin of GRBs. In view that powerful episodic jets have been observed along with continuous jets in other astrophysical black hole systems, here we propose an intrinsically episodic, magnetically-dominated jet model for GRB central engine. Accumulation and eruption of free magnetic energy in the corona of a differentially-rotating, turbulent accretion flow around a hyperaccreting black hole lead to ejections of episodic, magnetically dominated plasma blobs. These blobs are accelerated magnetically, collide with each other at large radii, trigger rapid magnetic reconnection and turbulence, efficient particle acceleration and radiation, and power the observed episodic prompt gamma-ray emission from GRBs.

  3. Episodic Jets as the Central Engine of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Feng; Zhang, Bing

    2012-09-01

    Most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have erratic light curves, which demand that the GRB central engine launches an episodic outflow. Recent Fermi observations of some GRBs indicate a lack of the thermal photosphere component as predicted by the baryonic fireball model, which suggests a magnetic origin of GRBs. Given that powerful episodic jets have been observed along with continuous jets in other astrophysical black hole systems, here we propose an intrinsically episodic, magnetically dominated jet model for the GRB central engine. Accumulation and eruption of free magnetic energy in the corona of a differentially rotating, turbulent accretion flow around a hyperaccreting black hole lead to ejections of episodic, magnetically dominated plasma blobs. These blobs are accelerated magnetically, collide with each other at large radii, trigger rapid magnetic reconnection and turbulence, efficient particle acceleration, and radiation, and power the observed episodic prompt gamma-ray emission from GRBs.

  4. [Calculation and simulation on infrared radiation of hot jet from engine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Xun; Tong, Zhong-Xiang; Wang, Chao-Zhe; Tong, Qi; Li, He; Zhang, Zhi-Bo

    2013-01-01

    Spectral distribution of infrared radiation from plume by the method to calculate infrared radiance of the gaze direction in small sight field was calculated. Based on numerical value and form of radiative transfer equation, infrared radiant intensity of the gaze direction was calculated using the Malkmus statistical narrow-band model and CG approach. Flow field and mole fraction distribution were simulated using a FLUENT computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software. Infrared imaging simulation model of hot jet was established. The hot jet's infrared images of liquid rocket engine were generated. The results demonstrate that the method can detect well-resolved fine structure of flow field. And the model is also applicable to calculation and simulation on infrared radiation of hot jet from engine.

  5. Preliminary Report on Experimental Investigation of Engine Dynamics and Controls for a 48-inch Ram-jet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasu, George; Hart, Clint E; Dunbar, William R

    1956-01-01

    Engine dynamics and controls data are presented for a ram-jet engine which was operated in a free-jet facility at a Mach number of 2.76 and altitudes from 68,000 to 82,000 feet. The predominant engine dynamic characteristics was dead time, with values ranging from 0.018 to 0.053 sec. The control systems were designed to hold a constant ratio of a diffuser static pressure to an inlet-cone reference static pressure. Response times and percent overshoot to fuel-flow disturbances that would have caused subcritical operation without control are included for a wide range of control settings. For all settings, the control response was fast enough (0.08 to 0.5 sec) to prevent subcritical operation.

  6. Environmental Assessment for Installation of a New Jet Engine Test Cell, Edwards Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    processes, the operation of internal combustion engines (e.g., auxiliary ground equipment, boilers, turbine engines, etc.) and adhesives /sealant...include jet and motor fuel, other types of petroleum products, paints, thinners, adhesives , cleaners, lead-acid batteries, hydraulic fluids and...of the recorded specimens consist of isolated fragments of tooth enamel or bone that are not securely dated. Irvingtonian fossil localities have

  7. Aerothermodynamic analysis of a Coanda/Refraction jet engine test facility.

    OpenAIRE

    Maraoui, André

    1988-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A computer model of the Coanda Refraction Jet Engine Test Cell facility was developed using the PHOENICS computer code. The PIIOENICS code was utilized to determine the steady state aerothermal characteristics of the test cell during the testing of an E404 gas turbine engine with afterburner in operation. Computer generated aerothermodynamic field variables of pressure, velocity and temperature parameters were compared t...

  8. Integrated Computer Aided Planning and Manufacture of Advanced Technology Jet Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. K. Subhas

    1987-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights an attempt at evolving a computer aided manufacturing system on a personal computer. A case study of an advanced technology jet engine component is included to illustrate various outputs from the system. The proposed system could be an alternate solution to sophisticated and expensive CAD/CAM workstations.

  9. A Narrow Short-Duration GRB Jet from a Wide Central Engine

    CERN Document Server

    Duffell, Paul C; MacFadyen, Andrew I

    2015-01-01

    We use two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic numerical calculations to show that highly collimated relativistic jets can be produced in neutron star merger models of short-duration gamma ray bursts without the need for a highly directed engine or a large net magnetic flux. Even a hydrodynamic engine generating a very wide sustained outflow on small scales can in principle produce a highly collimated relativistic jet, facilitated by a dense surrounding medium which provides a cocoon surrounding the jet core. An oblate geometry to the surrounding gas significantly enhances the collimation process. Previous numerical simulations have shown that the merger of two neutron stars produces an oblate, expanding cloud of dynamical ejecta. We show that this gas can efficiently collimate the central engine power much as the surrounding star does in long-duration GRB models. For typical short-duration GRB central engine parameters, we find jets with opening angles of order 10 degrees in which a large fraction of the t...

  10. Loadings in thermal barrier coatings of jet engine turbine blades an experimental research and numerical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Sadowski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses complex loadings of turbine blades and protective layer Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC), under real working airplane jet conditions. They obey both multi-axial mechanical loading and sudden temperature variation during starting and landing of the airplanes. In particular, two types of blades are analyzed: stationary and rotating, which are widely applied in turbine engines produced by airplane factories.

  11. Volatile properties of jet engine combustor particles during the partemis campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyeki, S.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Petzold, A. [Deutsche Luft- und Raumfahrt, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Wilson, C.W.

    2002-03-01

    The influence of fuel sulphur content (FSC) on exhaust particle properties from a jet engine combustor test rig was investigated during the EC PartEmis project. Volatile properties were measured using a Volatility Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (V-TDMA). Measurements indicated that particles with diameter d <30 nm were more volatile than larger particles. (author)

  12. Jet engine with electromagnetic field excitation of expendable solid-state material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsybin, O. Yu.; Makarov, S. B.; Ostapenko, O. N.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic field action on a solid-state natural raw material is considered here in the context of producing a mechanical reactive momentum. We suggest the development of a jet engine that possesses fast control and low thrust based on desorption or sputtering of particles flow from a solid surface.

  13. Boundary conditions towards realistic simulation of jet engine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamankar, Nitin S.

    Strict noise regulations at major airports and increasing environmental concerns have made prediction and attenuation of jet noise an active research topic. Large eddy simulation coupled with computational aeroacoustics has the potential to be a significant research tool for this problem. With the emergence of petascale computer clusters, it is now computationally feasible to include the nozzle geometry in jet noise simulations. In high Reynolds number experiments on jet noise, the turbulent boundary layer on the inner surface of the nozzle separates into a turbulent free shear layer. Inclusion of a nozzle with turbulent inlet conditions is necessary to simulate this phenomenon realistically. This will allow a reasonable comparison of numerically computed noise levels with the experimental results. Two viscous wall boundary conditions are implemented for modeling the nozzle walls. A characteristic-based approach is compared with a computationally cheaper, extrapolation-based formulation. In viscous flow over a circular cylinder under two different regimes, excellent agreement is observed between the results of the two approaches. The results agree reasonably well with reference experimental and numerical results. Both the boundary conditions are thus found to be appropriate, the extrapolation-based formulation having an edge with its low cost. This is followed with the crucial step of generation of a turbulent boundary layer inside the nozzle. A digital filter-based turbulent inflow condition, extended in a new way to non-uniform curvilinear grids is implemented to achieve this. A zero pressure gradient flat plate turbulent boundary layer is simulated at a high Reynolds number to show that the method is capable of producing sustained turbulence. The length of the adjustment region necessary for synthetic inlet turbulence to recover from modeling errors is estimated. A low Reynolds number jet simulation including a round nozzle geometry is performed and the method

  14. Jet engine applications for materials with nanometer-scale dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appleby, J.W. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    The performance of advanced military and commercial gas turbine engines is often linked to advances in materials technology. High performance gas turbine engines being developed require major material advances in strength, toughness, reduced density and improved temperature capability. The emerging technology of nanostructured materials has enormous potential for producing materials with significant improvements in these properties. Extraordinary properties demonstrated in the laboratory include material strengths approaching theoretical limit, ceramics that demonstrate ductility and toughness, and materials with ultra-high hardness. Nanostructured materials and coatings have the potential for meeting future gas turbine engine requirements for improved performance, reduced weight and lower fuel consumption.

  15. Jet engine applications for materials with nanometer-scale dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, J. W., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of advanced military and commercial gas turbine engines is often linked to advances in materials technology. High performance gas turbine engines being developed require major material advances in strength, toughness, reduced density and improved temperature capability. The emerging technology of nanostructured materials has enormous potential for producing materials with significant improvements in these properties. Extraordinary properties demonstrated in the laboratory include material strengths approaching theoretical limit, ceramics that demonstrate ductility and toughness, and materials with ultra-high hardness. Nanostructured materials and coatings have the potential for meeting future gas turbine engine requirements for improved performance, reduced weight and lower fuel consumption.

  16. Combustion Characteristics of Liquid Normal Alkane Fuels in a Model Combustor of Supersonic Combustion Ramjet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    今村, 宰; 石川, 雄太; 鈴木, 俊介; 福本, 皓士郎; 西田, 俊介; 氏家, 康成; 津江, 光洋

    Effect of kinds of one-component n-alkane liquid fuels on combustion characteristics was investigated experimentally using a model combustor of scramjet engine. The inlet condition of a model combustor is 2.0 of Mach number, up to 2400K of total temperature, and 0.38MPa of total pressure. Five kinds of n-alkane are tested, of which carbon numbers are 7, 8, 10, 13, and 16. They are more chemically active and less volatile with an increase of alkane carbon number. Fuels are injected to the combustor in the upstream of cavity with barbotage nitrogen gas and self-ignition performance was investigated. The result shows that self-ignition occurs with less equivalence ratio when alkane carbon number is smaller. This indicates that physical characteristic of fuel, namely volatile of fuel, is dominant for self-ignition behavior. Effect on flame-holding performance is also examined with adding pilot hydrogen and combustion is kept after cutting off pilot hydrogen with the least equivalence ratio where alkane carbon number is from 8 to 10. These points are discussed qualitatively from the conflict effect of chemical and physical properties on alkane carbon number.

  17. Performance of Axial-Flow Supersonic Compressor of XJ55-FF-1 Turbojet Engine. II - Performance of Inlet Guide Vanes as Separate Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Robert C.; Tysl, Edward R.

    1949-01-01

    The inlet wide vanes for the supersonic compressor of the XJ55-FF-1 engine were studied as a separate component in order to determine the performance prior to installation in the compressor test rig. Turning angles approached design values, and increased approximately to through the inlet Mach number range from 0.30 to choke. A sharp break in turning angle was experienced when the choke condition was reached. The total-pressure loss through the guide vanes was approximately 1 percent for the unchoked conditions and from 5 to 6 percent when choked.

  18. Direct E-jet printing of three-dimensional fibrous scaffold for tendon tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yang; Wang, Zuyong; Ying Hsi Fuh, Jerry; San Wong, Yoke; Wang, Wilson; San Thian, Eng

    2017-04-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) offers a promising strategy to restore diseased tendon tissue. However, a suitable scaffold for tendon TE has not been achieved with current fabrication techniques. Herein, we report the development of a novel electrohydrodynamic jet printing (E-jetting) for engineering 3D tendon scaffold with high porosity and orientated micrometer-size fibers. The E-jetted scaffold comprised tubular multilayered micrometer-size fibrous bundles, with interconnected spacing and geometric anisotropy along the longitudinal direction of the scaffold. Fiber diameter, stacking pattern, and interfiber distance have been observed to affect the structural stability of the scaffold, of which the enhanced mechanical strength can be obtained for scaffolds with thick fibers as the supporting layer. Human tenocytes showed a significant increase in cellular metabolism on the E-jetted scaffolds as compared to that on conventional electrospun scaffolds (2.7-, 2.8-, and 3.1-fold increase for 150, 300, and 600 µm interfiber distance, respectively; p scaffolds provided structural support for human tenocytes to align with controlled orientation along the longitudinal direction of the scaffold, and promoted the expression of collagen type I. For the first time, E-jetting has been explored as a novel scaffolding approach for tendon TE, and offers a 3D fibrous scaffold to promote organized tissue reconstruction for potential tendon healing. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 616-627, 2017.

  19. Experimental Investigation on Space-dispersed Double-wall Jet Combustion System for DI Diesel Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭鹏江; 高希彦

    2012-01-01

    A space-dispersed double-wall jet combustion system was developed by adopting the wall-guiding spray method and the stratification theory.The experimental test was carried out to optimize the structural parameters of the diesel-engine combustion system,including chamber structure,swirl ratio of cylinder head,included angle of jet orifice,number and diameter of jet orifice,fuel injection pressure and timing.The effect of double-wall jet combustion system on combustion and engine performance was tested to obtain the best performance indexes,and the double-wall jet combustion system was compared to the prototype.The results show that NOx is reduced from 712 PPm to 487 PPm at 2 100 r/min,and from 593 PPm to 369 PPm at 3 000 r/min,which are reduced by 31.6% and 37.7%,respectively.The smoke intensity was reduced form 3.67 BSU to 2.1 BSU,and the oil consumption was reduced from 240.5 g/(kW·h) to 225.4 g/(kW·h),which was decreased by 6.3% at low speed.The pressure in the cylinder was obviously reduced from 115 bar to 108 bar,which was reduced by 6%.

  20. Assessment of an anomaly detector for jet engine health monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastien Borguet; Olivier Léonard

    2011-01-01

    The goal of module performance analysis is to reliably assess the health of the main components of an aircraft engine. A predictive maintenance strategy can leverage this information to increase operability and safety as well as to reduce costs. Degradation undergone by an engine can be divided into gradual deterioration and accidental events. Kalman filters have proven very efficient at tracking progressive deterioration but are poor performers in the face of abrupt events. Adaptive estimati...

  1. Component-specific modeling. [jet engine hot section components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Tipton, M. T.; Weber, G.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for a 3 year program to develop methodology for component-specific modeling of aircraft hot section components (turbine blades, turbine vanes, and burner liners). These accomplishments include: (1) engine thermodynamic and mission models, (2) geometry model generators, (3) remeshing, (4) specialty three-dimensional inelastic structural analysis, (5) computationally efficient solvers, (6) adaptive solution strategies, (7) engine performance parameters/component response variables decomposition and synthesis, (8) integrated software architecture and development, and (9) validation cases for software developed.

  2. Formation And Ingestion Of Vortices Into Jet Engines During Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ho Wei; Jermy, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Vortices can be produced and ingested into the intake of a turbofan and turbojet aero engine during high power operation near solid surfaces. This can happen either on the runway during take-off or during engine test runs in a test cell. The vortex can throw debris into the intake or cause the compressor to stall causing significant damage to the engine and may require major overhaul. The ability to predict the onset of a vortex is therefore extremely valuable to the industry and could potentially save millions of dollars in overhaul costs. The factors that determines whether or not a vortex forms include engine thrust level, geometric factors such as the distance between the engine core and the ground and the size of the engine core, and flow conditions such as ambient vorticity and height of boundary layer. Computational fluid dynamic studies have been carried out by the authors to attempt to predict the effects that these factors have on the threshold of vortex formation. These works include the first reported studies of numerical predictions of the vortex formation threshold on both the runway or test cell scenarios and include factors that have not been previously studied either numerically or experimentally.

  3. Hyperaccreting Black Hole as Gamma-Ray Burst Central Engine. I. Baryon Loading in Gamma-Ray Burst Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Bing; Liang, En-Wei

    2013-03-01

    A hyperaccreting stellar-mass black hole has been long speculated as the best candidate for the central engine of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Recent rich observations of GRBs by space missions such as Swift and Fermi pose new constraints on GRB central engine models. In this paper, we study the baryon-loading processes of a GRB jet launched from a black hole central engine. We consider a relativistic jet powered by \

  4. The new 1.8 I DI turbo-jet gasoline engine from Fiat Powertrain Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriesse, Dirk; Comignaghi, Emilio; Lucignano, Gennaro; Oreggioni, Aldo; Quinto, Stefano; Sacco, Dario [Fiat Powertrain Technologies, Arese-Turin (Italy)

    2008-07-01

    The newly developed 1.8 ltr gasoline DI Turbo-Jet engine extends the gasoline product portfolio of Fiat Powertrain Technologies after the successful launch of the 1.4 ltr T-jet engine family in 2007. FPT retains the turbo downsizing concept the most efficient measure to meet the required reduction of CO2 emissions enhancing in the meantime the fun to drive characteristics of the gasoline engine, with the aim to equal at least those of DI turbo diesel units. The adoption of the turbocharger permits as well to differentiate the engines by tuning according to the brand requirements of the various Fiat Group car platforms. The common mechanical base is ideal to provide both the best thermodynamic efficiency and the cost advantages given by the production volumes. Thanks to the direct injection, the double continuously variable cam phasing and turbo charging the new 1.8 ltr DI Turbo-Jet engine develops high specific maximum torque and power values: the HP variant reaches nearly 200 Nm/l and 100 kW/l. The excellent low end torque and fast turbo response are obtained by newly developed advanced EMS scavenging strategies. The final result is highlighted by the 23.1 bar BMEP value at 1400 rpm for the Soft version which is the benchmark today for all gasoline turbocharged engines on the market. Emission levels meet the new Euro 5 standards with a large margin thanks to multiple injection and high pressure stratified charge start strategies even using a packaging friendly low volume close coupled catalytic system. To reach the stringent NVH requirements the engine is mechanically optimised by adopting a slightly over square bore/stroke ratio, a long conrod, a moderate rated engine speed and low alternating masses. Excellent results are obtained which equal those of competitor engines without the use of secondary order balancing shafts. (orig.)

  5. Primary atomization of liquid jets issuing from rocket engine coaxial injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Roger D.

    1993-01-01

    The investigation of liquid jet breakup and spray development is critical to the understanding of combustion phenomena in liquid-propellant rocket engines. Much work has been done to characterize low-speed liquid jet breakup and dilute sprays, but atomizing jets and dense sprays have yielded few quantitative measurements due to their optical opacity. This work focuses on a characteristic of the primary breakup process of round liquid jets, namely the length of the intact liquid core. The specific application considered is that of shear-coaxial type rocket engine injectors. Real-time x-ray radiography, capable of imaging through the dense two-phase region surrounding the liquid core, has been used to make the measurements. Nitrogen and helium were employed as the fuel simulants while an x-ray absorbing potassium iodide aqueous solution was used as the liquid oxygen (LOX) simulant. The intact-liquid-core length data have been obtained and interpreted to illustrate the effects of chamber pressure (gas density), injected-gas and liquid velocities, and cavitation. The results clearly show that the effect of cavitation must be considered at low chamber pressures since it can be the dominant breakup mechanism. A correlation of intact core length in terms of gas-to-liquid density ratio, liquid jet Reynolds number, and Weber number is suggested. The gas-to-liquid density ratio appears to be the key parameter for aerodynamic shear breakup in this study. A small number of hot-fire, LOX/hydrogen tests were also conducted to attempt intact-LOX-core measurements under realistic conditions in a single-coaxial-element rocket engine. The tests were not successful in terms of measuring the intact core, but instantaneous imaging of LOX jets suggests that LOX jet breakup is qualitatively similar to that of cold-flow, propellant-simulant jets. The liquid oxygen jets survived in the hot-fire environment much longer than expected, and LOX was even visualized exiting the chamber nozzle

  6. An experimental investigation of reacting and nonreacting coaxial jet mixing in a laboratory rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Stephen Alexander

    Coaxial jets are commonly used as injectors in propulsion and combustion devices due to both the simplicity of their geometry and the rapid mixing they provide. In liquid rocket engines it is common to use coaxial jets in the context of airblast atomization. However, interest exists in developing rocket engines using a full flow staged combustion cycle. In such a configuration both propellants are injected in the gaseous phase. In addition, gaseous coaxial jets have been identified as an ideal test case for the validation of the next generation of injector modeling tools. For these reasons an understanding of the fundamental phenomena which govern mixing in gaseous coaxial jets and the effect of combustion on these phenomena in coaxial jet diffusion flames is needed. A study was performed to better understand the scaling of the stoichiometric mixing length in reacting and nonreacting coaxial jets with velocity ratios greater than one and density ratios less than one. A facility was developed that incorporates a single shear coaxial injector in a laboratory rocket engine capable of ten atmospheres. Optical access allows the use of flame luminosity and laser diagnostic techniques such as Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF). Stoichiometric mixing lengths (LS), which are defined as the distance along the centerline where the stoichiometric condition occurs, were measured using PLIF. Acetone was seeded into the center jet to provide direct PLIF measurement of the average and instantaneous mixture fraction fields for a range of momentum flux ratios for the nonreacting cases. For the coaxial jet diffusion flames, LS was measured from OH radical contours. For nonreacting cases the use of a nondimensional momentum flux ratio was found to collapse the mixing length data. The flame lengths of coaxial jet diffusion flames were also found to scale with the momentum flux ratio but different scaling constants are required which depended on the chemistry of the reaction. The

  7. A new model of the central engine of GRB and the cosmic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiziev, P.; Staicova, D.

    Despite the volume of already existing observational data, current models still cannot explain completely the excessive energy output and the time variability of gamma-ray bursts(GRB). One of the reasons for this is the lack of a good model of the central engine of GRB. A major problem in the proposed models with a black hole (BH) in the center is that they don't explain the observed evidences of late time activity of the central engine. In this paper we are starting the search for a possible model of that central engine as a rotating compact body of still unknown nature. The formation of jets in the new model lies entirely on the fundamental Teukolsky Master Equation. We demonstrate that this general model can describe the formation of collimated GRB-jets of various forms. Some preliminary results are presented.

  8. A new model of the Central Engine of GRB and the Cosmic Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Fiziev, P P

    2009-01-01

    Despite all the already existing observational data, current models still cannot explain completely the excessive energy output and the time variability of GRB. One of the reasons for this is the lack of a good model of the central engine of GRB. A major problem in the proposed models with a black hole (BH) in the center is that they don't explain the observed evidences of late time activity of the central engine. In this paper we are starting the search for a possible model of that central engine as a rotating compact body of still unknown nature. The formation of jets in the new model lies entirely on the fundamental Teukolsky Master Equation. We demonstrate that this general model can describe the formation of collimated GRB-jets of various forms. Some preliminary results are presented.

  9. Hydraulic fluids and jet engine oil: pyrolysis and aircraft air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, C; Leung, V

    2001-01-01

    Incidents of smoke in aircraft cabins often result from jet engine oil and/or hydraulic fluid that leaks into ventilation air, which can be subjected to temperatures that exceed 500 degrees C. Exposed flight-crew members have reported symptoms, including dizziness, nausea, disorientation, blurred vision, and tingling in the legs and arms. In this study, the authors investigated pyrolysis products of one jet engine oil and two hydraulic fluids at 525 degrees C. Engine oil was an important source of carbon monoxide. Volatile agents and organophosphate constituents were released from all the agents tested; however, the neurotoxin trimethyl propane phosphate was not found. The authors hypothesized that localized condensation of pyrolysis products in ventilation ducts, followed by mobilization when cabin heat demand was high, accounted for mid-flight incidents. The authors recommended that carbon monoxide data be logged continuously to capture levels during future incidents.

  10. Three-dimensional Simulations of Long Duration Gamma-ray Burst Jets: Timescales from Variable Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cámara, D.; Lazzati, Davide; Morsony, Brian J.

    2016-08-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves are characterized by marked variability, each showing unique properties. The origin of this variability, at least for a fraction of long GRBs, may be the result of an unsteady central engine. It is thus important to study the effects that an episodic central engine has on the jet propagation and, eventually, on the prompt emission within the collapsar scenario. Thus, in this study we follow the interaction of pulsed outflows with their progenitor stars with hydrodynamic numerical simulations in both two and three dimensions. We show that the propagation of unsteady jets is affected by the interaction with the progenitor material well after the break-out time, especially for jets with long quiescent times comparable to or larger than a second. We also show that this interaction can lead to an asymmetric behavior in which pulse durations and quiescent periods are systematically different. After the pulsed jets drill through the progenitor and the interstellar medium, we find that, on average, the quiescent epochs last longer than the pulses (even in simulations with symmetrical active and quiescent engine times). This could explain the asymmetry detected in the light curves of long quiescent time GRBs.

  11. Numerical modeling of a Jet Ignition Direct Injection (JIDI) LPG engine

    OpenAIRE

    albert boretti

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents indirectly validated simulations of the operation of a LPG engine fitted with Direct Injection (DI) and Jet Ignition (JI). It is demonstrated that the engine may have diesel like efficiencies and load control by quantity of fuel injected.  As the liquid propane quickly evaporates after injection in the main chamber, the main chamber mixture may be much closer to stoichiometry than a diesel for a better specific power at low engine speeds. This design also works at the high ...

  12. Assessment of an Anomaly Detector for Jet Engine Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Borguet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of module performance analysis is to reliably assess the health of the main components of an aircraft engine. A predictive maintenance strategy can leverage this information to increase operability and safety as well as to reduce costs. Degradation undergone by an engine can be divided into gradual deterioration and accidental events. Kalman filters have proven very efficient at tracking progressive deterioration but are poor performers in the face of abrupt events. Adaptive estimation is considered as an appropriate solution to this deficiency. This paper reports the evaluation of the detection capability of an adaptive diagnosis tool on the basis of simulated scenarios that may be encountered during the operation of a commercial turbofan engine. The diagnosis tool combines a Kalman filter and a secondary system that monitors the residuals. This auxiliary component implements a generalised likelihood ratio test in order to detect abrupt events.

  13. Eye and respiratory irritants in jet engine exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Y

    1986-11-01

    It has been noted that eye and respiratory irritation frequently occurred in the ground crews and pilots working on the field behind an aircraft with a low smoke combustor (LSC) engine. This study was attempted to analyze the exhaust sampled at about 50 m behind the LSC J79 engines at idle power setting by means of a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique. Nine kinds of lower aliphatic carbonyl compound (seven aldehydes and two ketones) were identified. The concentration of formaldehyde was the highest among them, showing the value above the threshold reported by previous investigators. Concentration of NOx was simultaneously measured by a gas detector tube in the same sample. The exhaust of a conventional J79 engine, which has rarely caused irritation, was also analyzed by the same technique and the results were compared. It was concluded that formaldehyde plays a major role in causing irritation.

  14. Laser pointing in the vicinity of jet engine plumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleijpen, H.M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Target tracking and laser-based pointing from airborne platforms can be degraded significantly by the propagation environment around an airborne platform including zones of severe turbulence generated by rotor downwash and engine exhausts. This is the topic of the EDA study group ERG 108.019 on "Las

  15. Laser pointing in the vicinity of jet engine plumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleijpen, H.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Target tracking and laser-based pointing from airborne platforms can be degraded significantly by the propagation environment around an airborne platform including zones of severe turbulence generated by rotor downwash and engine exhausts. This is the topic of the EDA study group ERG 108.019 on “Las

  16. Primary VOC emissions from Commercial Aircraft Jet Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Dogushan; Huang, Rujin; Slowik, Jay; Brem, Benjamin; Durdina, Lukas; Rindlisbacher, Theo; Baltensperger, Urs; Prevot, Andre

    2014-05-01

    Air traffic is growing continuously [1]. The increasing number of airplanes leads to an increase of aviation emissions giving rise to environmental concerns globally by high altitude emissions and, locally on air quality at the ground level [2]. The overall impact of aviation emissions on the environment is likely to increase when the growing air transportation trend [2] is considered. The Aviation Particle Regulatory Instrumentation Demonstration Experiment (APRIDE)-5 campaign took place at Zurich Airport in 2013. In this campaign, aircraft exhaust is sampled during engine acceptance tests after engine overhaul at the facilities of SR Technics. Direct sampling from the engine core is made possible due to the unique fixed installation of a retractable sampling probe and the use of a standardized sampling system designed for the new particulate matter regulation in development for aircraft engines. Many of the gas-phase aircraft emissions, e.g. CO2, NOX, CO, SO2, hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds (VOC) were detected by the instruments in use. This study, part of the APRIDE-5 campaign, focuses on the primary VOC emissions in order to produce emission factors of VOC species for varying engine operating conditions which are the surrogates for the flight cycles. Previously, aircraft plumes were sampled in order to quantify VOCs by a proton transfer reaction quadrupole mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) [3]. This earlier study provided a preliminary knowledge on the emission of species such as methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, benzene and toluene by varying engine thrust levels. The new setup was (i) designed to sample from the diluted engine exhaust and the new tool and (ii) used a high resolution time of flight PTR-MS with higher accuracy for many new species, therefore providing a more detailed and accurate inventory. We will present the emission factors for species that were quantified previously, as well as for many additional VOCs detected during the campaign

  17. Volcanic ash vs. sand and dust - "to stick or not to stick" in jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueppers, U.; Song, W.; Lavallée, Y.; Hess, K. U.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Safe air travel activity requires clean flight corridors. But particles scattered in the atmosphere, whether volcanic ash, dust or sand, may present a critical threat to aviation safety. When these foreign particles are ingested into jet engines, whose interiors (e.g., the combustor and turbine blades) reach 1200-2000 °C, they can abrade, melt, and stick to the internal components of the engine, clogging ventilation traps of the cooling system as well as imparting substantial damage and potentially resulting in catastrophic system failure. To date, no criterion predicts ash behaviour at high temperature. Here, we experimentally develop the first quantitative model to predict melting and sticking conditions for the compositional range of volcanic ash encountered worldwide (Fig.1). The assumption that volcanic ash can be approximated by sand or dust is wholly inadequate, leading to an overestimation of sticking temperature and a correspondingly severe underestimation of the thermal hazard. Our findings confirm that the melting/softening behaviour of volcanic ash at high temperatures is essentially controlled by the composition of erupted ash - which may serve as an accurate proxy of the thermal hazard potential of volcanic ash interaction with jet engines. The criterion proposed here successfully parameterizes the potentially complex "melting" process of volcanic ash and can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash upon ingestion into hot jet engines.

  18. Measurement and characterization of fully transient diesel fuel jet processes in an optical engine with production injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Nicholas; Rothamer, David

    2016-10-01

    The effects of transient rate-of-injection profiles on high-pressure diesel fuel jets have been studied in an optically accessible internal combustion engine. High-speed optical imaging measurements were applied over a range of ambient conditions, fuel types, and injection parameters. This paper demonstrates that during the early part of the injection, while the liquid core is disintegrating, the penetration is functionally linked to the inviscid orifice exit velocity up until a downstream distance hypothesized to be the jet breakup length. The jets then transitioned to a mixing dominated penetration behavior afterward. Therefore, for cases that exhibit transient rate-of-injection profiles, quasi-steady penetration analytical solutions for penetration have poor agreement with the empirical data. The development of an adaptive edgefinding algorithm for accurately detecting jets in engines is detailed. These findings indicate that empirical correlations widely used throughout the engine community for estimating jet penetration do not accurately represent actual injection parameters under transient conditions.

  19. JET BREAKUP AND SPRAY FORMATION IN A DIESEL ENGINE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GLIMM,J.; LI,X.; KIM,M.N.; OH,W.; MARCHESE,A.; SAMULYAK,R.; TZANOS,C.

    2003-06-17

    The breakup of injected fuel into spray is of key interest to the design of a fuel efficient, nonpolluting diesel engine. We report preliminary progress on the numerical simulation of diesel fuel injection spray with the front tracking code FronTier. Our simulation design is set to match experiments at ANL, and our present agreement is semi-quantitative. Future efforts will include mesh refinement studies, which will better model the turbulent flow.

  20. Analysis of the turbojet engine for propulsion of supersonic fighter airplanes / David S. Gabriel, Richard P. Krebs, E.Clinton Wilcox, Stanley L.Koutz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, David S; Krebs, Richard P; Wilcox, E Clinton; Koutz, Stanley L

    1953-01-01

    An analytical investigation was made of two supersonic interceptor type airplanes to determine the most desirable turbojet engine characteristics for this application The airplanes were designed differently primarily because of the amount of subsonic flight incorporated in the flight plan--one flight having none and the other, a cruise radius of 400 nautical miles. Several power plant design variables were varied independently to determine the effect of changes in each parameter on airplane performance. These parameters included compressor pressure ratio, compressor efficiency, turbine-inlet temperature, afterburner temperature, engine specific weight, and air-handling capacity. The effects of using a convergent-divergent exhaust nozzle and of changing the design flight Mach number were also investigated.

  1. Development of the Compact Jet Engine Simulator from concept to useful test rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoedebecke, Blake Louis

    Two Compact Jet Engine Simulator (CJES) units were designed for integrated wind tunnel acoustic experiments involving a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) vehicle. To meet the 5.8% scale of the HWB model, Ultra Compact Combustor technology from the Air Force Research Laboratory was used. The CJES units were built and integrated with a control system in the NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel. The combustor liners, plug--vane and flow conditioner components were built in-house at Langley Research Center. The operation of the CJES units was mapped and fixes found for combustor instability tones and rig flow noise. The original concept remained true, but the internal hardware evolved through out the process. The CJES units sucssfully completed the HWB validation test and can be used for acoustic testing or propulsion integration studies that require jet engines.

  2. Non-self-sustained microwave discharge and the concept of a microwave air jet engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batanov, G M; Gritsinin, S I; Kossyi, I A [General Physics Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, 119991, Vavilov Street 38, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2002-10-21

    A new type of microwave discharge - near-surface non-self-sustained discharge (NSND) - has been realized and investigated. A physical model of this discharge is presented. For the first time NSND application for microwave air jet engines has been proposed. Measurements under laboratory conditions modelling the microwave air jet engine operation shows the qualitative agreement between the model of NSND and actual processes near the target irradiated by a powerful microwave beam. Characteristic dependences of recoil momentum of target on the background pressure and microwave pulse duration obtained in experiments are presented. Measured cost of thrust produced by the NSND is no more than 3.0 kW N{sup -1}, which is close to the predicted values.

  3. Design of a fuzzy logic controller for a jet engine fuel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilouchian, A. [Florida Atlantic Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Juliano, M.; Healy, T.; Davis, J. [Florida Atlantic Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Boca Raton, FL (United States)

    2000-08-01

    The design, implementation and evaluation of two types of fuzzy logic controllers (FLC) are presented. The system under consideration is the control of fuel delivery in a jet engine test bench. Two methods of designing FLCs were experimented with. The first method included the development of a tool that inputs the rules, membership functions, and outputs the appropriate consequences. The second method was based on bivariate curve development and scaling. The evaluations of the proposed controllers were performed with an existing proportional-integral (PI) controller. Both of the design methodologies were proven to be superior in comparison with the conventional controller currently utilised for the control of combustion pressure on jet engines. (Author)

  4. Optimisation 3D du nez d'un SuperSonic Business Jet basée sur l'adaptation de maillages. Application à la réduction du bang sonique

    OpenAIRE

    Alauzet, Frédéric; Mohammadi, Bijan

    2003-01-01

    Ce rapport traite d'un problème d'optimisation de forme 3D du nez d'un SuperSonic Business Jet (SSBJ) sous des contraintes aérodynamiques et accoustiques. La contrainte accoustique concerne la génération du bang sonique par l'avion. On présente une méthode d'optimisation de faible dimension pour analyser l'impact du nez sur ces contraintes. Plus précisément, après avoir paramétrisé le nez de l'avion, on échantillonne l'espace de contrôle, puis on construit la surface de réponse qui nous donne...

  5. JET ENGINE INLET DISTORTION SCREEN AND DESCRIPTOR EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Pečinka

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Total pressure distortion is one of the three basic flow distortions (total pressure, total temperature and swirl distortion that might appear at the inlet of a gas turbine engine (GTE during operation. Different numerical parameters are used for assessing the total pressure distortion intensity and extent. These summary descriptors are based on the distribution of total pressure in the aerodynamic interface plane. There are two descriptors largely spread around the world, however, three or four others are still in use and can be found in current references. The staff at the University of Defence decided to compare the most common descriptors using basic flow distortion patterns in order to select the most appropriate descriptor for future department research. The most common descriptors were identified based on their prevalence in widely accessible publications. The construction and use of these descriptors are reviewed in the paper. Subsequently, they are applied to radial, angular, and combined distortion patterns of different intensities and with varied mass flow rates. The tests were performed on a specially designed test bench using an electrically driven standalone industrial centrifugal compressor, sucking air through the inlet of a TJ100 small turbojet engine. Distortion screens were placed into the inlet channel to create the desired total pressure distortions. Of the three basic distortions, only the total pressure distortion descriptors were evaluated. However, both total and static pressures were collected using a multi probe rotational measurement system.

  6. Developing Criteria for Sample Sizes in Jet Engine Analytical Component Inspections and the Associated Confidence Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    5 Sample The samples taken from each population will not be random samples . They will be nonprobability , purposive samples . More specifically, they...section will justify why statistical techniques based on the assumption of a random sample , will be used. First, this is the only possible method of...w lu 88 12 21 029 AFIT/GSM/LSM/88S-22 DEVELOPING CRITERIA FOR SAMPLE SIZES IN JET ENGINE ANALYTICAL COMPONENT INSPECTIONS AND THE ASSOCIATED

  7. Hygroscopic properties of jet engine combustor particles during the partemis campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gysel, M.; Nyeki, S.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Petzold, A. [Deutsche Luft- und Raumfahrt, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Wilson, C.W.

    2002-03-01

    The influence of fuel sulphur content (FSC) on particle properties from a jet engine combustor test rig was investigated during the EC-project PartEmis. Hygroscopic growth factors were measured using a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (H-TDMA). While particles were hydrophobic at low FSC, hygroscopic growth factors increased significantly with increasing FSC. Under similar conditions small particles were more hygroscopic than large particles. (author)

  8. Dynamic behavior of a magnetic bearing supported jet engine rotor with auxiliary bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, George T.; Xie, Huajun; Sinha, S. C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the dynamic behavior of a rotor system supported by auxiliary bearings. The steady-state behavior of a simulation model based upon a production jet engine is explored over a wide range of operating conditions for varying rotor imbalance, support stiffness, and damping. Interesting dynamical phenomena, such as chaos, subharmonic responses, and double-valued responses, are presented and discussed.

  9. Significance of chamber pressure to complex multi-phase physics in jet engine fuel injection processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, Rainer; Oefelein, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Injection processes in jet engines at chamber pressures in excess of the thermodynamic critical pressure of the liquid fuel are not well understood. Under some conditions, a distinct two-phase interface may not exist anymore which eliminates the presence of classical spray atomization phenomena. A comprehensive model for jet engine fuel injections is derived to quantify the conditions under which the interfacial dynamics transition to diffusion-dominated mixing processes without surface tension. At certain conditions, the model shows two-phase interfaces with substantially increased thicknesses and distinctively reduced mean free paths in comparison to ambient pressure conditions. Then, the underlying assumptions of a distinct two-phase interface do not apply anymore and the interface along with its surface tension is shown to deteriorate as it broadens substantially. As a consequence of this physical complexity, the conceptual view of spray atomization and evaporation as an appropriate model for jet engine injection processes is, contrary to conventional wisdom, questionable at certain operating conditions. Instead, a Large Eddy Simulation using a dense-fluid approximation is applied which takes the complex thermo-physics of real-fluid behavior into account.

  10. Technology of laser repair welding of nickel superalloy inner flaps of jet engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Klimpel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper: work out laser welding repair technology of cracked MIG 29 jet engine inner flaps made of cast nickel superalloy ŻS-3DK (ЖС-3ДК, Russian designation.Design/methodology/approach: The study were based on the analysis of laser HPDL powder INCONEL 625 welding of nickel superalloy using wide range of welding parameters to provide highest quality repair welds.Findings: Study of automatic welding technologies GTA, PTA and laser HPDL has shown that just laser welding can provide high quality repair welds. In order to establish the properties of welded joints repair cracks in the inner flap HPDL laser, studied the hardness, mechanical properties and erosive wear resistance.Research limitations/implications: It was found that only laser HPDL welding can provide high quality repair welds.Practical implications: The technology can be applied for repair cracked MIG 29 jet engine inner flaps.Originality/value: Repairing cracked MIG 29 jet engine inner flaps.

  11. A two-dimensional Euler solution for an unbladed jet engine configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mark E. M.

    1992-01-01

    A two dimensional, nonaxisymmetric Euler solution in a geometry representative of a jet engine configuration without blades is presented. The domain, including internal and external flow, is covered with a multiblock grid. In order to construct this grid, a domain decomposition technique is used to subdivide the domain, and smooth grids are dimensioned and placed in each block. The Euler solution is verified by examining five theoretical properties. The result demonstrates techniques for performing numerical solutions in complex geometries and provides a foundation for complete engine throughflow calculations.

  12. Acoustic Pyrometry Applied to Gas Turbines and Jet Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fralick, Gustave C.

    1999-01-01

    Internal gas temperature is one of the most fundamental parameters related to engine efficiency and emissions production. The most common methods for measuring gas temperature are physical probes, such as thermocouples and thermistors, and optical methods, such as Coherent Anti Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) or Rayleigh scattering. Probes are relatively easy to use, but they are intrusive, their output must be corrected for errors due to radiation and conduction, and their upper use temperature is limited. Optical methods are nonintrusive, and they measure some intrinsic property of the gas that is directly related to its temperature (e.g., lifetime or the ratio of line strengths). However, optical methods are usually difficult to use, and optical access is not always available. Lately, acoustic techniques have been receiving some interest as a way to overcome these limitations.

  13. Numerical modeling of a Jet Ignition Direct Injection (JIDI LPG engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    albert boretti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents indirectly validated simulations of the operation of a LPG engine fitted with Direct Injection (DI and Jet Ignition (JI. It is demonstrated that the engine may have diesel like efficiencies and load control by quantity of fuel injected.  As the liquid propane quickly evaporates after injection in the main chamber, the main chamber mixture may be much closer to stoichiometry than a diesel for a better specific power at low engine speeds. This design also works at the high engine speeds impossible for the diesel, as combustion within the main chamber is controlled by the turbulent mixing rather than the vaporization and diffusion processes of the injected fuel of the diesel. 

  14. Alleviation of Facility/Engine Interactions in an Open-Jet Scramjet Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, Cindy W.; Emami, Saied

    2001-01-01

    Results of a series of shakedown tests to eliminate facility/engine interactions in an open-jet scramjet test facility are presented. The tests were conducted with the NASA DFX (Dual-Fuel eXperimental scramjet) engine in the NASA Langley Combustion Heated Scramjet Test Facility (CHSTF) in support of the Hyper-X program, The majority of the tests were conducted at a total enthalpy and pressure corresponding to Mach 5 flight at a dynamic pressure of 734 psf. The DFX is the largest engine ever tested in the CHSTF. Blockage, in terms of the projected engine area relative to the nozzle exit area, is 81% with the engine forebody leading edge aligned with the upper edge of the facility nozzle such that it ingests the nozzle boundary layer. The blockage increases to 95% with the engine forebody leading edge positioned 2 in. down in the core flow. Previous engines successfully tested in the CHSTF have had blockages of no more than 51%. Oil flow studies along with facility and engine pressure measurements were used to define flow behavior. These results guided modifications to existing aeroappliances and the design of new aeroappliances. These changes allowed fueled tests to be conducted without facility interaction effects in the data with the engine forebody leading edge positioned to ingest the facility nozzle boundary layer. Interaction effects were also reduced for tests with the engine forebody leading edge positioned 2 in. into the core flow, however some interaction effects were still evident in the engine data. A new shroud and diffuser have been designed with the goal of allowing fueled tests to be conducted with the engine forebody leading edge positioned in the core without facility interaction effects in the data. Evaluation tests of the new shroud and diffuser will be conducted once ongoing fueled engine tests have been completed.

  15. Supersonic compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.; Breidenthal, Robert E.

    2016-04-12

    A supersonic compressor including a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a diffuser. The diffuser includes a plurality of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions, for deceleration of gas to subsonic conditions and then for expansion of subsonic gas, to change kinetic energy of the gas to static pressure. The aerodynamic ducts include vortex generating structures for controlling boundary layer, and structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when the aerodynamic ducts are designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are provided having an aspect ratio of in excess of two to one, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.

  16. Hybrid Active/Passive Jet Engine Noise Suppression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, C. A.; Arcas, N.; Walker, B. E.; Hersh, A. S.; Rice, E. J.

    1999-01-01

    A novel adaptive segmented liner concept has been developed that employs active control elements to modify the in-duct sound field to enhance the tone-suppressing performance of passive liner elements. This could potentially allow engine designs that inherently produce more tone noise but less broadband noise, or could allow passive liner designs to more optimally address high frequency broadband noise. A proof-of-concept validation program was undertaken, consisting of the development of an adaptive segmented liner that would maximize attenuation of two radial modes in a circular or annular duct. The liner consisted of a leading active segment with dual annuli of axially spaced active Helmholtz resonators, followed by an optimized passive liner and then an array of sensing microphones. Three successively complex versions of the adaptive liner were constructed and their performances tested relative to the performance of optimized uniform passive and segmented passive liners. The salient results of the tests were: The adaptive segmented liner performed well in a high flow speed model fan inlet environment, was successfully scaled to a high sound frequency and successfully attenuated three radial modes using sensor and active resonator arrays that were designed for a two mode, lower frequency environment.

  17. Experimental Study of the Jet Engine Exhaust Flow Field of Aircraft and Blast Fences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifu Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A combined blast fence is introduced in this paper to improve the solid blast fences and louvered ones. Experiments of the jet engine exhaust flow (hereinafter jet flow for short field and tests of three kinds of blast fences in two positions were carried out. The results show that the pressure and temperature at the centre of the jet flow decrease gradually as the flow moves farther away from the nozzle. The pressure falls fast with the maximum rate of 41.7%. The dynamic pressure 150 m away from the nozzle could reach 58.8 Pa, with a corresponding wind velocity of 10 m/s. The temperature affected range of 40°C is 113.5×20 m. The combined blast fence not only reduces the pressure of the flow in front of it but also solves the problems that the turbulence is too strong behind the solid blast fences and the pressure is too high behind the louvered blast fences. And the pressure behind combined blast fence is less than 10 Pa. The height of the fence is related to the distance from the jet nozzle. The nearer the fence is to the nozzle, the higher it is. When it is farther from the nozzle, its height can be lowered.

  18. Condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhausts of rocket engines: 1. Model calculation of the physical conditions in a jet exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platov, Yu. V.; Alpatov, V. V.; Klyushnikov, V. Yu.

    2014-01-01

    Model calculations have been performed for the temperature and pressure of combustion products in the jet exhaust of rocket engines of last stages of Proton, Molniya, and Start launchers operating in the upper atmosphere at altitudes above 120 km. It has been shown that the condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide can begin at distances of 100-150 and 450-650 m away from the engine nozzle, respectively.

  19. Recent development of melting process and criteria for jet engine alloys. Saikin no jet engine yo gokin no criteria to yosei gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degawa, T. (The University of British Columbia, (Canada))

    1991-09-20

    Super-alloys and Ti alloy were taken up as key materials for jet engines to describe their design criteria and the current state in destruction mechanical approaches. Also, as a solution to improving the material reliability, the clean alloy melting technique was touched upon as to its current state. Changes in high-temperature creep life and tenacity in the super-alloys (directions in the improvement efforts) are shown. In the recent movements in the clean melting technique, attentions are drawn on the ingot melting method using a cold hearth as an excellent method. Discussions were given on sizes of defects in the materials that affect dynamic destruction of rotating bodies such as turbines, and the relations are shown between the initial permissible defect size and the yield stress in various types of super-alloys. 31 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Jet propagation and evaporation in diesel-engine injection. Strahlausbreitung und Verdampfung bei der dieselmotorischen Einspritzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanoff, C.G.; Schaller, J.K.; Ante, A.

    1992-01-01

    The first two years of the research project were dedicated to the development of a holographic method and its application in the study on diesel fuel jets. Recording and reconstruction geometries were optimized to allow individual droplets to be resolved even at maximal droplet densities. Pretrials were used to test the holographic method. Resolution of droplet densities of 10[sup 11] droplets per cbm has been achieved to date. Maximum speed measured was 200 m/s. First images of diesel injection jet prove that it is possible to perform holographic measurements. The third year of the project will involve measurements to be performed and interpreted in the chamber under diesel-engine conditions. (orig./HW).

  1. HBL variability at high energies: clues on jet structure and driving engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costamante, Luigi

    High-energy-peaked BLLac objects (HBL) are characterized by the highest energy electrons in the whole blazar class. They show strong variability on many different timescales, in particular in the X-ray and gamma-ray bands, which are close to the peaks of their spectral energy distribution (SED). This variability carries information on two different aspects: on how the central engine drives the jet (long time series analysis) and on the details of the acceleration and emission processes in each single dissipative event. In the latter case, the study of flares (down to few minutes in gamma-rays) with time-resolved spectroscopy and correlations in different bands is now providing new clues on the structure of the jet, exposing the limits of the one-zone interpretation for the SED peaks. I will discuss the recent progresses allowed by multi-wavelength campaigns with new-generation instruments.

  2. Early afterglow, magnetized central engine, and a quasi-universal jet configuration for long GRBs

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B; Kobayashi, S; Lloyd-Ronning, N M; Mészáros, P; Dai, Xinyu; Kobayashi, Shiho; Lloyd-Ronning, Nicole M.; Meszaros, Peter; Zhang, Bing

    2003-01-01

    Two separate topics are discussed. (1) We describe the classifications of the long GRB early afterglow lightcurves within the framework of the fireball shock model, focusing on the interplay between the reverse and forward shock emission components. We will also provide evidence that the central engine of at least two bursts are entrained with strong magnetic fields, and discuss the implications of this result for our understanding of the GRB phenomenon; (2) We argue that the current gamma-ray burst (GRB) and X-ray flash (XRF) data are consistent with a picture that all GRB-XRF jets are structured and quasi-universal, with a typical Gaussian-like jet structure.

  3. Cooperative Multi-Agent Mobile Sensor Platforms for Jet Engine Inspection: Concept and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Wong, Edmond; Krasowski, Michael J.; Greer, Lawrence C.

    2003-01-01

    Cooperative behavior algorithms utilizing swarm intelligence are being developed for mobile sensor platforms to inspect jet engines on-wing. Experiments are planned in which several relatively simple autonomous platforms will work together in a coordinated fashion to carry out complex maintenance-type tasks within the constrained working environment modeled on the interior of a turbofan engine. The algorithms will emphasize distribution of the tasks among multiple units; they will be scalable and flexible so that units may be added in the future; and will be designed to operate on an individual unit level to produce the desired global effect. This proof of concept demonstration will validate the algorithms and provide justification for further miniaturization and specialization of the hardware toward the true application of on-wing in situ turbine engine maintenance.

  4. Development of a Temperature Sensor for Jet Engine and Space Mission Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik; Culley, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    Electronics for Distributed Turbine Engine Control and Space Exploration Missions are expected to encounter extreme temperatures and wide thermal swings. In particular, circuits deployed in a jet engine compartment are likely to be exposed to temperatures well exceeding 150 C. To meet this requirement, efforts exist at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), in support of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program/Subsonic Fixed Wing Project, to develop temperature sensors geared for use in high temperature environments. The sensor and associated circuitry need to be located in the engine compartment under distributed control architecture to simplify system design, improve reliability, and ease signal multiplexing. Several circuits were designed using commercial-off-the-shelf as well as newly-developed components to perform temperature sensing at high temperatures. The temperature-sensing circuits will be described along with the results pertaining to their performance under extreme temperature.

  5. A quadratic programming framework for constrained and robust jet engine health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borguet, S.; Léonard, O.

    2009-09-01

    Kalman filters are largely used in the jet engine community for condition monitoring purpose. This algorithm gives a good estimate of the engine condition provided that the residuals between the model prediction and the measurements are zero-mean, Gaussian random variables. In the case of sensor faults, this assumption does not hold anymore and consequently, the diagnosis is spoiled. This contribution presents a recursive estimation algorithm based on a Quadratic Programming (QP) formulation which provides robustness against sensor faults and allows constraints on the health parameters to be specified. The improvements in estimation accuracy brought by this new algorithm are illustrated on a series of typical test-cases that may be encountered on current turbofan engines.

  6. Organ printing: computer-aided jet-based 3D tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Vladimir; Boland, Thomas; Trusk, Thomas; Forgacs, Gabor; Markwald, Roger R

    2003-04-01

    Tissue engineering technology promises to solve the organ transplantation crisis. However, assembly of vascularized 3D soft organs remains a big challenge. Organ printing, which we define as computer-aided, jet-based 3D tissue-engineering of living human organs, offers a possible solution. Organ printing involves three sequential steps: pre-processing or development of "blueprints" for organs; processing or actual organ printing; and postprocessing or organ conditioning and accelerated organ maturation. A cell printer that can print gels, single cells and cell aggregates has been developed. Layer-by-layer sequentially placed and solidified thin layers of a thermo-reversible gel could serve as "printing paper". Combination of an engineering approach with the developmental biology concept of embryonic tissue fluidity enables the creation of a new rapid prototyping 3D organ printing technology, which will dramatically accelerate and optimize tissue and organ assembly.

  7. Jet Engine Powerloss in Ice Particle Conditions: An Aviation Industry Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strapp, J. W.

    2009-09-01

    Since about the 1990, there have been in excess of 100 engine powerloss events in jet aircraft that have now been attributed to the ingestion of ice particles. These powerloss events are observed in essentially all engine types, and on all airframes. Almost all cases have occurred in the vicinity of deep convection usually associated with warm and moist atmospheres. Events have occurred all throughout the world, although there is a somewhat higher concentration in the area of southeast Asia. Powerloss can result from stall, surge, flameout and rollback events in the engine. Many are momentary, with engines relighting automatically, while others require a manual engine relight. In some cases, particularly in rollback cases on smaller commuter-transport aircraft, engine power has only been recovered by melting of ice buildup in the engine below the freezing level. There have been cases of multiple simultaneous engine powerloss, and one case of a landing with no engine power. The frequency of the events, and the potential for multiple-engine powerloss, has led the FAA to note that that these occurrences constitute a significant safety issue. Analysis of the events using aircraft flight data recorder information, pilot interviews, standard meteorological radar and satellite data, and information from several past flight test programs, have led to the conclusion that the powerloss is due to ice buildup in the engine from high concentrations of ice particles in the atmosphere, and that supercooled LWC is not required. This is an unconventional form of icing that had not been previously considered possible by engine designers. The Engine Harmonization Working Group (EHWG), an industry-led committee composed of engine manufacturers, airframe manufacturers, regulators, and government agencies have been studying the powerloss issue since 2004, and have suggested a 4-part technical plan to resolve the issue, which includes improvement of instrumentation to measure high ice

  8. 40 CFR 1045.660 - How do I certify outboard or personal watercraft engines for use in jet boats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I certify outboard or personal watercraft engines for use in jet boats? 1045.660 Section 1045.660 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM SPARK-IGNITION PROPULSION MARINE ENGINES AND VESSELS...

  9. Experimental investigation of the structure of supersonic two-dimensional air microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, Ivan; Aniskin, Vladimir; Mironov, Sergey

    2016-10-01

    We have experimentally studied the structure of supersonic underexpanded room-temperature air jets escaping from micronozzles with characteristic heights from 47 to 175 µm and widths within 2410-3900 µm in a range of Reynolds numbers of 1280-9460. The dimensions of the first shock cell are established. The supersonic core length of supersonic underexpanded air jets has been determined for the first time. A flow regime with a large supersonic core length has observed for air jets escaping from a 47µm high nozzle.

  10. An experimental study of the structure of supersonic flat underexpanded microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniskin, V. M.; Maslov, A. A.; Mironov, S. G.; Tsyryulnikov, I. S.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2015-05-01

    We have experimentally studied the structure of supersonic flat underexpanded room-temperature air jets escaping from micro nozzles with characteristic heights from 47 to 175 μm and widths within 2410-3900 μm in a range of Reynolds numbers of 1280-9460. The dimensions of the first shock cell are established. The supersonic core length of supersonic flat underexpanded air jets has been determined for the first time. A flow regime with a large supersonic core length has been observed for air jets escaping from a 47-μm-high nozzle.

  11. Testing exposure of a jet engine to a dilute volcanic-ash cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Mastin, L. G.; Schneider, D. J.; Holliday, C. R.; Murray, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    An experiment to test the effects of volcanic-ash ingestion by a jet engine is being planned for 2014 by a consortium of U.S. Government agencies and engine manufacturers, under the auspices of NASA's Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research Program. The experiment, using a 757-type engine, will be an on-ground, on-wing test carried out at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The experiment will involve the use of advanced jet-engine sensor technology for detecting and diagnosing engine health. A primary test objective is to determine the effect on the engine of many hours of exposure to ash concentrations (1 and 10 mg/cu m) representative of ash clouds many 100's to >1000 km from a volcanic source, an aviation environment of great interest since the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, eruption. A natural volcanic ash will be used; candidate sources are being evaluated. Data from previous ash/aircraft encounters, as well as published airborne measurements of the Eyjafjallajökull ash cloud, suggest the ash used should be composed primarily of glassy particles of andesitic to rhyolitic composition (SiO2 of 57-77%), with some mineral crystals, and a few tens of microns in size. Collected ash will be commercially processed less than 63 microns in size with the expectation that the ash particles will be further pulverized to smaller sizes in the engine during the test. For a nominally planned 80 hour test at multiple ash-concentration levels, the test will require roughly 500 kg of processed (appropriately sized) ash to be introduced into the engine core. Although volcanic ash clouds commonly contain volcanic gases such as sulfur dioxide, testing will not include volcanic gas or aerosol interactions as these present complex processes beyond the scope of the planned experiment. The viscous behavior of ash particles in the engine is a key issue in the experiment. The small glassy ash particles are expected to soften in the engine's hot combustion chamber, then stick to cooler

  12. Demonstration of a Packaged Capacitive Pressure Sensor System Suitable for Jet Turbofan Engine Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Meredith, Roger D.; Harsh, Kevin; Pilant, Evan; Usrey, Michael W.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Hunter, Gary W.; Zorman, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the development and characterization of a packaged pressure sensor system suitable for jet engine health monitoring is demonstrated. The sensing system operates from 97 to 117 MHz over a pressure range from 0 to 350 psi and a temperature range from 25 to 500 deg. The sensing system consists of a Clapp-type oscillator that is fabricated on an alumina substrate and is comprised of a Cree SiC MESFET, MIM capacitors, a wire-wound inductor, chip resistors and a SiCN capacitive pressure sensor. The pressure sensor is located in the LC tank circuit of the oscillator so that a change in pressure causes a change in capacitance, thus changing the resonant frequency of the sensing system. The chip resistors, wire-wound inductors and MIM capacitors have all been characterized at temperature and operational frequency, and perform with less than 5% variance in electrical performance. The measured capacitive pressure sensing system agrees very well with simulated results. The packaged pressure sensing system is specifically designed to measure the pressure on a jet turbofan engine. The packaged system can be installed by way of borescope plug adaptor fitted to a borescope port exposed to the gas path of a turbofan engine.

  13. Carbonaceous aerosol in jet engine exhaust: emission characteristics and implications for heterogeneous chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, A.; Schroeder, F.P.; Kaercher, B. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Wessling (Germany). Institut fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Stroem, J. [Stockholm University (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    1999-08-01

    Characteristic parameters of black carbon aerosol (BC) emitted from jet engine were measured during ground tests and in-flight behind the same aircraft. Size distribution features were a primary BC mode at a model diameter D {approx} 0.045 {mu}m, and a BC agglomeration mode at D < 0.2 {mu}m. The total BC number concentration at the engine exit was 2.9 x 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3} with good agreement between model results and in-flight measured number concentrations of non-volatile particles with D {>=} 0.014 {mu}m. A comparison between total number concentration of BC particles and the non-volatile fraction of the total aerosol at the exit plane suggests that the non-volatile fraction of jet engine exhaust aerosol consists almost completely of BC. In-flight BC mass emission indices ranged from 0.11 to 0.15 g BC (kg fuel){sup -1}. The measured in-flight particle emission value was 1.75 {+-} 0.15 x 10{sup 15} kg{sup -1} with corresponding ground test values of 1.0-8.7 x 10{sup 14} kg{sup -1}. Both size distribution properties and mass emission indices can be scaled from ground test to in-flight conditions. Implications for atmosphere BC loading, BC and cirrus interaction and the potential of BC for perturbation of atmospheric chemistry are briefly outlined. (author)

  14. High-fidelity Simulation of Jet Noise from Rectangular Nozzles . [Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Model for Noise Reduction in Advanced Jet Engines and Automobiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    This Phase II project validated a state-of-the-art LES model, coupled with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) far-field acoustic solver, to support the development of advanced engine concepts. These concepts include innovative flow control strategies to attenuate jet noise emissions. The end-to-end LES/ FW-H noise prediction model was demonstrated and validated by applying it to rectangular nozzle designs with a high aspect ratio. The model also was validated against acoustic and flow-field data from a realistic jet-pylon experiment, thereby significantly advancing the state of the art for LES.

  15. Future Jet Technologies. Part B. F-35 Future Risks v. JS-Education of Pilots & Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Or, Benjamin

    2011-09-01

    Design of “Next-Generation” airframes based on supermarket-jet-engine-components is nowadays passé. A novel integration methodology [Gal-Or, “Editorial-Review, Part A”, 2011, Gal-Or, “Vectored Propulsion, Supermaneuverability and Robot Aircraft”, Springer Verlag, Gal-Or, Int'l. J. of Thermal and Fluid Sciences 7: 1-6, 1998, “Introduction”, 2011] is nowadays in. For advanced fighter aircraft it begins with JS-based powerplant, which takes up to three times longer to mature vis-à-vis the airframe, unless “committee's design” enforces a dormant catastrophe. Jet Steering (JS) or Thrust Vectoring Flight Control, is a classified, integrated engine-airframe technology aimed at maximizing post-stall-maneuverability, flight safety, efficiency and flight envelopes of manned and unmanned air vehicles, especially in the “impossible-to-fly”, post-stall flight domains where the 100+ years old, stall-spin-limited, Conventional Flight Control fails. Worldwide success in adopting the post-stall, JS-revolution, opens a new era in aviation, with unprecedented design variables identified here for a critical review of F-35 future risks v. future fleets of jet-steered, pilotless vehicles, like the X-47B/C. From the educational point of view, it is also instructive to comprehend the causes of long, intensive opposition to adopt post-stall, JS ideas. A review of such debates may also curb a future opposition to adopt more advanced, JS-based technologies, tests, strategies, tactics and missions within the evolving air, marine and land applications of JS. Most important, re-education of pilots and engineers requires adding post-stall, JS-based studies to curriculum & R&D.

  16. Spreading dynamic of viscous volcanic ash in stimulated jet engine conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    song, wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado

    2016-04-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash is widely recognised as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The volcanic ash deposition process in a jet turbine is potentially complex. Volcanic ash in the air stream enters the inner liners of the combustors and partially or completely melts under the flames up to 2000 °C, at which point part of the ash deposits in the combustor fuel nozzle. Molten volcanic particles within high energy airflow escape the combustor to enter the turbine and impact the stationary (e.g., inlet nozzle guide vanes) and rotating airfoils (e.g., first stage high-pressure turbine blades) at high speed (up to Mach 1.25) in different directions, with the result that ash may stick, flow and remain liquid or solidify. Thus, the wetting behaviour of molten volcanic ash particle is fundamental to investigate impingement phenomena of ash droplet on the surface of real jet engine operation. The topic of wetting has received tremendous interest from both fundamental and applied points of view. However, due to the interdisciplinary gap between jet engine engineering and geology science, explicit investigation of wetting behaviour of volcanic ash at high temperature is in its infancy. We have taken a big step towards meeting this challenge. Here, we experimentally and theoretically investigate the wetting behaviour of viscous volcanic ash over a wide temperature range from 1100 to 1550 °C using an improved sessile-drop method. The results of our experiment demonstrate that temperature and viscosity play a critical role in determining the wetting possibility and governing the spreading kinetics of volcanic ash at high temperatures. Our systemic analysis of spreading of molten volcanic ash systems allows us to report on the fundamental differences between the mechanisms controlling spreading of organic liquids at room temperature and molten volcanic ash droplets.

  17. In Operation Detection and Correction of Rotor Imbalance in Jet Engines Using Active Vibration Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchala, Daniel W.; Palazzolo, Alan B.; Kascak, Albert F.; Montague, Gerald T.; Brown, Gerald V.; Lawrence, Charles; Klusman, Steve

    1994-01-01

    Jet Engines may experience severe vibration due to the sudden imbalance caused by blade failure. This research investigates employment of on board magnetic bearings or piezoelectric actuators to cancel these forces in flight. This operation requires identification of the source of the vibrations via an expert system, determination of the required phase angles and amplitudes for the correction forces, and application of the desired control signals to the magnetic bearings or piezo electric actuators. This paper will show the architecture of the software system, details of the control algorithm used for the sudden imbalance correction project described above, and the laboratory test results.

  18. A multiblock grid generation technique applied to a jet engine configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mark E. M.

    1992-01-01

    Techniques are presented for quickly finding a multiblock grid for a 2D geometrically complex domain from geometrical boundary data. An automated technique for determining a block decomposition of the domain is explained. Techniques for representing this domain decomposition and transforming it are also presented. Further, a linear optimization method may be used to solve the equations which determine grid dimensions within the block decomposition. These algorithms automate many stages in the domain decomposition and grid formation process and limit the need for human intervention and inputs. They are demonstrated for the meridional or throughflow geometry of a bladed jet engine configuration.

  19. Jet engine nozzle exit configurations, including projections oriented relative to pylons, and associated systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengle, Vinod G. (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Nozzle exit configurations and associated systems and methods are disclosed. An aircraft system in accordance with one embodiment includes a jet engine exhaust nozzle having an internal flow surface and an exit aperture, with the exit aperture having a perimeter that includes multiple projections extending in an aft direction. Aft portions of individual neighboring projections are spaced apart from each other by a gap, and a geometric feature of the multiple can change in a monotonic manner along at least a portion of the perimeter. Projections near a support pylon and/or associated heat shield can have particular configurations, including greater flow immersion than other projections.

  20. Investigation of Hygro-Thermal Aging on Carbon/Epoxy Materials for Jet Engine Fan Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlman, Lee W.; Roberts, Gary D.; Miller, Sandi G.; Pereira, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    This poster summarizes 2 years of aging on E862 epoxy and E862 epoxy with triaxial braided T700s carbon fiber composite. Several test methods were used to characterize chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of both the resin and composite materials. The aging cycle that was used included varying temperature and humidity exposure. The goal was to evaluate the environmental effects on a potential jet engine fan section material. Some changes were noted in the resin which resulted in increased brittleness, though this did not significantly affect the tensile and impact test results. A potential decrease in compression strength requires additional investigation.

  1. In Operation Detection and Correction of Rotor Imbalance in Jet Engines Using Active Vibration Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchala, Daniel W.; Palazzolo, Alan B.; Kascak, Albert F.; Montague, Gerald T.; Brown, Gerald V.; Lawrence, Charles; Klusman, Steve

    1994-01-01

    Jet Engines may experience severe vibration due to the sudden imbalance caused by blade failure. This research investigates employment of on board magnetic bearings or piezoelectric actuators to cancel these forces in flight. This operation requires identification of the source of the vibrations via an expert system, determination of the required phase angles and amplitudes for the correction forces, and application of the desired control signals to the magnetic bearings or piezo electric actuators. This paper will show the architecture of the software system, details of the control algorithm used for the sudden imbalance correction project described above, and the laboratory test results.

  2. Design of Combustor for Long-range Ram-jet Engine and Performance of Rectangular Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayle, Warren D; Koch, Richard G

    1954-01-01

    The report describes the design of a piloted combustor intended for a ram-jet engine of long flight range. The unit comprises a large annular basket of V-type cross-section, the inner surface of which is slotted and bent into small V-gutters. At the trailing edge of the basket, eight V-gutters are used to propagate the flame into the main stream. A rectangular analog of this combustor was tested at air-flow conditions corresponding to those that might be obtained during cruise. At these conditions, combustion efficiencies of as much as 90 percent were calculated for the combustor at the design equivalence ratio of 0.52. The performance of the unit was relatively insensitive to mounting and flow variables; the greatest effect on efficiency was that of the manner and location of the fuel injection. A full-scale version of this combustor has been designed for a 48-inch-diameter engine.

  3. Analysis of complex decisionmaking processes. [with application to jet engine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J. D.; Ollila, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    The analysis of corporate decisionmaking processes related to major system developments is unusually difficult because of the number of decisionmakers involved in the process and the long development cycle. A method for analyzing such decision processes is developed and illustrated through its application to the analysis of the commercial jet engine development process. The method uses interaction matrices as the key tool for structuring the problem, recording data, and analyzing the data to establish the rank order of the major factors affecting development decisions. In the example, the use of interaction matrices permitted analysts to collect and analyze approximately 50 factors that influenced decisions during the four phases of the development cycle, and to determine the key influencers of decisions at each development phase. The results of this study indicate that the cost of new technology installed on an aircraft is the prime concern of the engine manufacturer.

  4. Mathematical model of an indirect action fuel flow controller for aircraft jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudosie, Alexandru-Nicolae

    2017-06-01

    The paper deals with a fuel mass flow rate controller with indirect action for aircraft jet engines. The author has identified fuel controller's main parts and its operation mode, then, based on these observations, one has determined motion equations of each main part, which have built system's non-linear mathematical model. In order to realize a better study this model was linearised (using the finite differences method) and then adimensionalized. Based on this new form of the mathematical model, after applying Laplace transformation, the embedded system (controller+engine) was described by the block diagram with transfer functions. Some Simulink-Matlab simulations were performed, concerning system's time behavior for step input, which lead to some useful conclusions and extension possibilities.

  5. Static and dynamic novelty detection methods for jet engine health monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayton, Paul; Utete, Simukai; King, Dennis; King, Steve; Anuzis, Paul; Tarassenko, Lionel

    2007-02-15

    Novelty detection requires models of normality to be learnt from training data known to be normal. The first model considered in this paper is a static model trained to detect novel events associated with changes in the vibration spectra recorded from a jet engine. We describe how the distribution of energy across the harmonics of a rotating shaft can be learnt by a support vector machine model of normality. The second model is a dynamic model partially learnt from data using an expectation-maximization-based method. This model uses a Kalman filter to fuse performance data in order to characterize normal engine behaviour. Deviations from normal operation are detected using the normalized innovations squared from the Kalman filter.

  6. Reduced Noise Gas Turbine Engine System and Supersonic Exhaust Nozzle System Using Elector to Entrain Ambient Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhey, Jagdish S. (Inventor); Pierluissi, Anthony F. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    One embodiment of the present invention is a unique gas turbine engine system. Another embodiment is a unique exhaust nozzle system for a gas turbine engine. Other embodiments include apparatuses, systems, devices, hardware, methods, and combinations for gas turbine engine systems and exhaust nozzle systems for gas turbine engines. Further embodiments, forms, features, aspects, benefits, and advantages of the present application will become apparent from the description and figures provided herewith.

  7. Biomimetic thermal barrier coating in jet engine to resist volcanic ash deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Major, Zsuzsanna; Schulz, Uwe; Muth, Tobias; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-04-01

    The threat of volcanic ash to aviation safety is attracting extensive attention when several commercial jet aircraft were damaged after flying through volcanic ash clouds from the May 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helen in Washington, U.S. and especially after the air traffic disruption in 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. A major hazard presented by volcanic ash to aircraft is linked to the wetting and spreading of molten ash droplets on engine component surfaces. Due to the fact ash has a lower melting point, around 1100 °C, than the gas temperature in the hot section (between 1400 to 2000 °C), this cause the ash to melt and potentially stick to the internal components (e.g., combustor and turbine blades), this cause the ash to melt and potentially stick to the internal components of the engine creating, substantial damage or even engine failure after ingestion. Here, inspiring form the natural surface of lotus leaf (exhibiting extreme water repellency, known as 'lotus effect'), we firstly create the multifunctional surface thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) by producing a hierarchical structure with femtosecond laser pulses. In detail, we investigate the effect of one of primary femtosecond laser irradiation process parameter (scanning speed) on the hydrophobicity of water droplets onto the two kinds of TBCs fabricated by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and air plasma spray (APS), respectively as well as their corresponding to morphology. It is found that, comparison with the original surface (without femtosecond laser ablation), all of the irradiated samples demonstrate more significant hydrophobic properties due to nanostructuring. On the basis of these preliminary room-temperature results, the wettability of volcanic ash droplets will be analysed at the high temperature to constrain the potential impact of volcanic ash on the jet engines.

  8. Modeling absorption spectra for detection of the combustion products of jet engines by laser remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsekhovskaya, Olga K; Kashirskii, Danila E; Egorov, Oleg V; Shefer, Olga V

    2016-05-10

    The absorption spectra of exhaust gases (H2O, CO, CO2, NO, NO2, and SO2) and aerosol (soot and Al2O3) particles were modeled at different temperatures for the first time and suitable spectral ranges were determined for conducting laser remote sensing of the combustion products of jet engines. The calculations were conducted on the basis of experimental concentrations of the substances and the sizes of the aerosol particles. The temperature and geometric parameters of jet engine exhausts were also taken from the literature. The absorption spectra were obtained via the line-by-line method, making use of the spectral line parameters from the authors' own high-temperature databases (for NO2 and SO2 gases) and the HITEMP 2010 database, and taking into account atmospheric transmission. Finally, the theoretical absorption spectra of the exhaust gases were plotted at temperatures of 400, 700, and 1000 K, and the impact of aerosol particles on the total exhaust spectra was estimated in spectral ranges suitable for remote sensing applications.

  9. Experimental observations of a complex, supersonic nozzle concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magstadt, Andrew; Berry, Matthew; Glauser, Mark; Ruscher, Christopher; Gogineni, Sivaram; Kiel, Barry; Skytop Turbulence Labs, Syracuse University Team; Spectral Energies, LLC. Team; Air Force Research Laboratory Team

    2015-11-01

    A complex nozzle concept, which fuses multiple canonical flows together, has been experimentally investigated via pressure, schlieren and PIV in the anechoic chamber at Syracuse University. Motivated by future engine designs of high-performance aircraft, the rectangular, supersonic jet under investigation has a single plane of symmetry, an additional shear layer (referred to as a wall jet) and an aft deck representative of airframe integration. Operating near a Reynolds number of 3 ×106 , the nozzle architecture creates an intricate flow field comprised of high turbulence levels, shocks, shear & boundary layers, and powerful corner vortices. Current data suggest that the wall jet, which is an order of magnitude less energetic than the core, has significant control authority over the acoustic power through some non-linear process. As sound is a direct product of turbulence, experimental and analytical efforts further explore this interesting phenomenon associated with the turbulent flow. The authors acknowledge the funding source, a SBIR Phase II project with Spectral Energies, LLC. and AFRL turbine engine branch under the direction of Dr. Barry Kiel.

  10. Performance deterioration based on in-service engine data: JT9D jet engine diagnostics program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, G. P.

    1979-01-01

    Results of analyses of engine performance deterioration trends and levels with respect to service usage are presented. Thirty-two JT9D-7A engines were selected for this purpose. The selection of this engine fleet provided the opportunity of obtaining engine performance data starting before the first flight through initial service such that the trend and levels of engine deterioration related to both short and long term deterioration could be more carefully defined. The performance data collected and analyzed included in-flight, on wing (ground), and test stand prerepair and postrepair performance calibrations with expanded instrumentation where feasible. The results of the analyses of these data were used to: (1) close gaps in previously obtained historical data as well as augment the historical data with more carefully obtained data; (2) refine preliminary models of performance deterioration with respect to usage; (3) establish an understanding of the relationships between ground and altitude performance deterioration trends; (4) refine preliminary recommendations concerning means to reduce and control deterioration; and (5) identify areas where additional effort is required to develop an understanding of complex deterioration issues.

  11. Application of numerical analysis method to jet engine combustion design. Jet engine yo nenshoki no sekkei ni okeru suchi kaiseki no tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negoro, T.; Arai, M.; Kuyama, T.; Nakahata, T.; Hirokawa, M. (Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-01-20

    This paper describes features and applications of numerical analysis for jet engine combustor design. The numerical analysis for flow fields in a combustor has set a limitation on objects to be analyzed for each component element in the combustor or each design element, and carried out the analysis upon selecting basic formulas and models. The numerical analysis is effective to predict qualitatively the effects on flow patterns in the whole combustor liner interior or temperature distributions in the combustor liner interior, but is not sufficiently effective for use as quantitative evaluation. An application suggested that a parallel shape is more preferable that does not squeeze a flow outlet on the outer side that can be expected of providing sufficiently large recirculation flow region, as a result of analyzing the flow patterns around fuel injection valves. Dump diffuser analysis revealed that the above shape is preferable in supplying air stably from the annulus part into the liner interior through air holes. It was verified that the analysis of flows in the combustor liner has identified features of the flows qualitatively. 4 refs., 13 figs.

  12. Numerical flow analysis using the CFD method in axial flow compressor used for a jet engine. Jet engine yo jikuryu asshukuki no nagare kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, M.; Hashimoto, K.; Suga, S.; Matsuoka, A. (Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-10-20

    Numerical fluid dynamics is used to solve numerically the Navier-Stokes equations including viscosity using a computer for the purpose of evaluating aerodynamic performance of compressor cascades, an element to constitute a jet engine. This paper discusses effectiveness and problems in this computation. A viscous flow analysis using this method was applied to actual two-dimensional compressor cascades that work in transonic regions. The analytic result may be summarized as follows: The method has high analytic accuracy and can predict aerodynamic characteristics if no separation occurs or it is limited in a flow field; however, the method does not assure quantitative accuracy for a flow accompanying separation and strong in non-steadiness; at this stage the method cannot be applied to three-dimensional problems, but is effective in identifying a flow field qualitatively; and while the supercomputer VP 200 required only two to three minutes to analyze a two-dimensional flow with 14000 lattices, the three-dimensional viscosity analysis required five hours. This method may be used effectively in a basic discussion stage for the initial design and in a simulation stage for improving a design. 11 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Chemistry Characterization of Jet Aircraft Engine Particulate by XPS: Results from APEX III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Wal, Randy L.; Bryg, Victoria M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports XPS analysis of jet exhaust particulate from a B737, Lear, ERJ, and A300 aircraft during the APEX III NASA led field campaign. Carbon hybridization and bonding chemistry are identified by high-resolution scans about the C1s core-shell region. Significant organic content as gauged by the sp3/sp2 ratio is found across engines and platforms. Polar oxygen functional groups include carboxylic, carbonyl and phenol with combined content of 20 percent or more. By lower resolution survey scans various elements including transition metals are identified along with lighter elements such as S, N, and O in the form of oxides. Burning additives within lubricants are probable sources of Na, Ba, Ca, Zn, P and possibly Sn. Elements present and their percentages varied significantly across all engines, not revealing any trend or identifiable cause for the differences, though the origin is likely the same for the same element when observed. This finding suggests that their presence can be used as a tracer for identifying soots from aircraft engines as well as diagnostic for monitoring engine performance and wear.

  14. Chemistry characterization of jet aircraft engine particulate matter by XPS: Results from APEX III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Wal, Randy L.; Bryg, Victoria M.; Huang, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of jet exhaust particulate matter (PM) from a B737, Lear, ERJ and A300 aircraft during the APEX III NASA led field campaign. Carbon hybridization and bonding chemistry are identified by high-resolution scans about the C1s core-shell region. Significant organic content as gauged by the sp3/sp2 ratio is found across engines and powers. Polar oxygen functional groups include carboxylic, carbonyl and phenol with combined content of 20% or more. By survey scans various elements including transition metals are identified along with lighter elements such as S, N and O in the form of oxides. Additives within lubricants are probable sources of Na, Ba, Ca, Zn, P and possibly Sn. Elements present and their percentages varied significantly across all engines, not revealing any trend or identifiable cause for the differences, though the origin is likely the same for the same element when observed. This finding suggests that their collective presence could serve as an environmental tracer for identifying PM originating from aircraft engines and serving as a diagnostic for engine performance and wear.

  15. Comparison of the constituents of two jet engine lubricating oils and their volatile pyrolytic degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, C; Leung, V

    2000-03-01

    Leaking oil seals in jet engines, at locations prior to the compressor stage, can be a cause of smoke in the cabins of BAe-146 aircraft. Compressed combustion air is bled off to pressurize the cabin and to provide a source of fresh air. Bleed air is diverted from a location just prior to the combustion chamber at a temperature around 500 degrees C. To prevent oil breakdown products from entering the cabin air, catalytic converters have been used to clean the air. During an oil seal failure this device becomes overloaded and smoke is observed in the cabin. Some aircraft companies have removed the catalytic converters and claim an improvement in air quality. During an oil seal failure, however, the flight crew is potentially exposed to the thermal breakdown products of the engine oils. Because very little is known regarding the thermal breakdown products of jet engine lubrication oils, two commercially available oils were investigated under laboratory conditions at 525 degrees C to measure the release of CO, CO2,NO2, and HCN as well as volatiles which were analyzed using GC-Mass spectrometry in an attempt to see if the neurotoxic agents tricresyl phosphates (TCPs) and trimethyl propane phosphate (TMPP) would be present or formed. TMPP was not found in these experiments. Some CO2 was generated along with CO which reached levels in excess of 100 ppm. HCN and NO2 were not detected. GC compositions of the two bulk oils and their breakdown products were almost identical. The presence of TCPs was confirmed in the bulk oils and in the volatiles. Localized condensation in the ventilation ducts and filters in the air conditioning packs are likely the reason why the presence of TCPs has not been demonstrated in cabin air. It was recommended that this needed to be verified in aircraft.

  16. Two-Component Simultaneous LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimeter) Turbulence Measurements in an Axisymmetric Nozzle Afterbody Subsonic Flow Field with a Cold, Underexpanded Supersonic Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    Diffracted Laser Vclocimeter to Turbulence Measurement in a Subsonic Jet." AEDC- TR-76-36 (AD-A025355), May 1976. . Knott , P. and Mossey, P. "Parametric...0 . 5 I 1 8 3 ~ . ~ 306 2 3 I I O0 V = = 7 1 3 . 0 f i / s e c T t = 6 4 0 . 3 ° R SEQ ~D fiB VjF’V. V/V. IVI/V. M S / V . SJV. S ~ S

  17. Jet Car Track Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located in Lakehurst, New Jersey, the Jet Car Track Site supports jet cars with J57 engines and has a maximum jet car thrust of 42,000 pounds with a maximum speed of...

  18. OT2_cceccare_5: Peering into the engine of a jet-driven bowshock : TMC1B1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, C.

    2011-09-01

    Jet-driven bowshocks seem to be rather ubiquitous in star-forming regions. If the large-scale bow is commonly observed and its kinematics, the actual engine of the outflow, the Mach disk region where the gas is accelerated, has never been detected until now. Recently, we have found observational evidence of the long-searched engine of outflows in the giant molecular bowshock TMC1B1 together with the driving jet, in Taurus (d=140 pc). which allows Herschel to resolve the cooling region of the shock. We propose to use Herschel to investigate the dynamics and physical structure of TMC1B1, a potential benchmark for jet-driven bowshocks studies.

  19. Investigation of Flow Conditioners for Compact Jet Engine Simulator Rig Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Michael J.; Haskin, Henry H.

    2011-01-01

    The design requirements for two new Compact Jet Engine Simulator (CJES) units for upcoming wind tunnel testing lead to the distinct possibility of rig noise contamination. The acoustic and aerodynamic properties of several flow conditioner devices are investigated over a range of operating conditions relevant to the CJES units to mitigate the risk of rig noise. An impinging jet broadband noise source is placed in the upstream plenum of the test facility permitting measurements of not only flow conditioner self-noise, but also noise attenuation characteristics. Several perforated plate and honeycomb samples of high porosity show minimal self-noise but also minimal attenuation capability. Conversely, low porosity perforated plate and sintered wire mesh conditioners exhibit noticeable attenuation but also unacceptable self-noise. One fine wire mesh sample (DP450661) shows minimal selfnoise and reasonable attenuation, particularly when combined in series with a 15.6 percent open area (POA) perforated plate upstream. This configuration is the preferred flow conditioner system for the CJES, providing up to 20 dB of broadband attenuation capability with minimal self-noise.

  20. Supersonic gas shell for puff pinch experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. S., III; Doggett, W. O.; Roth, I.; Stallings, C.

    1982-09-01

    An easy-to-fabricate, conical, annular supersonic nozzle has been developed for use in high-power, puff gas z-pinch experiments. A fast responding conical pressure probe has also been developed as an accurate supersonic gas flow diagnostic for evaluating the transient gas jet formed by the nozzle. Density profile measurements show that the magnitude and radial position of the gas annulus are fairly constant with distance from the nozzle, but the gas density in the center of the annulus increases with distance from the nozzle.

  1. Acoustics of dual-stream high-speed jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debiasi, Marco Tullio

    2000-10-01

    This work presents the results of noise measurements in high-speed, round jets whose Mach number and velocity simulate the conditions of jet engines at take-off. The Mach number of the jet potential core ranged from 1.27 to 1.77 and the velocity ranged from 550 m/s to 1010 m/s. Most of the jets were silenced with a coflow that prevented the formation of Mach waves, a dominant contribution to supersonic jet noise. This method, called Mach Wave Elimination, relies on the shielding effect of the coflow which makes the motion of the eddies subsonic with respect to the surrounding streams, thus impeding the creation of Mach waves. Schlieren photography and pitot probe surveys were used to detect the principal features and the growth rate of the jets. Microphone measurements were performed inside an anechoic chamber at many positions around the jet exit. The results were corrected for the microphone response and for the effect of human sensitivity to sound. Equal-thrust comparison of different experimental results shows that elimination of Mach waves is very effective in reducing noise in the direction of strongest emission. Except for localized shock-associated components, noise emission was found to be insensitive to nozzle exit pressure and to depend principally on the values of fully-expanded Mach number and velocity in the jet potential core. Jets with a shorter Mach wave emitting region exhibited better noise suppression. Best results were obtained with an eccentric coflow that allows the shear layer of the upper part of the jet to grow naturally while silencing the jet in the downward direction. Coflows are capable of reducing the near-field screech peaks by up to 10 dB in imperfectly-expanded jets. Scaling the experimental results to a fall-size engine shows that eccentric coflows reduce the noise perceived in the direction of peak emission by up to 11 dB. Preliminary analysis of the application of this silencing technique to engine design indicates that Mach

  2. Volatile properties of jet engine combustor particles during the hot-end simulator (HES) PartEmis campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyeki, S.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Petzold, A.; Wilson, C.W.

    2003-03-01

    Test rig measurements on a combustor in 2001 were extended in 2002 on a Hot-End Simulator (HES), designed to simulate the turbine section of a jet engine. Volatile properties were measured using a Volatility Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (VTDMA). Initial analyses indicate that the HES has a negligible influence on particle properties. (author)

  3. A joint numerical and experimental study of the jet of an aircraft engine installation with advanced techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, V.; Molton, P.; Bézard, H.; Deck, S.; Jacquin, L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the results obtained during the European Union JEDI (JEt Development Investigations) project carried out in cooperation between ONERA and Airbus. The aim of these studies was first to acquire a complete database of a modern-type engine jet installation set under a wall-to-wall swept wing in various transonic flow conditions. Interactions between the engine jet, the pylon, and the wing were studied thanks to ¤advanced¥ measurement techniques. In parallel, accurate Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) simulations were carried out from simple ones with the Spalart Allmaras model to more complex ones like the DRSM-SSG (Differential Reynolds Stress Modef of Speziale Sarkar Gatski) turbulence model. In the end, Zonal-Detached Eddy Simulations (Z-DES) were also performed to compare different simulation techniques. All numerical results are accurately validated thanks to the experimental database acquired in parallel. This complete and complex study of modern civil aircraft engine installation allowed many upgrades in understanding and simulation methods to be obtained. Furthermore, a setup for engine jet installation studies has been validated for possible future works in the S3Ch transonic research wind-tunnel. The main conclusions are summed up in this paper.

  4. Service the Two-Piece Flo-Jet Carburetor. Fuel System. Student Manual 3. Small Engine Repair Series. First Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Pamela

    This student manual, part of a small-engine repair series on servicing fuel systems, is designed for use by special needs students in Texas. The manual explains in pictures and short sentences, written on a low reading level, the job of servicing two-piece flo-jet carburetors. Along with the steps of this repair job, specific safety and caution…

  5. Real Time Diagnostics of Jet Engine Exhaust Plumes Using a Chirped QC Laser Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, K. G.; Duxbury, G.; Langford, N.

    2010-06-01

    Quantitative measurements of real-time variations of the chemical composition of a jet engine exhaust plume is demonstrated using a 4.86 μmn intra-pulse quantum cascade laser spectrometer. The measurements of the gas turbine exhaust were carried out in collaboration with John Black and Mark Johnson at Rolls Royce. The recording of five sets of averaged spectra a second has allowed us to follow the build up of the combustion products within the exhaust, and to demonstrate the large variation of the integrated absorption of these absorption lines with temperature. The absorption cross sections of the lines of both carbon monoxide and water increase with temperature, whereas those of the three main absorption lines of carbon dioxide decrease. At the steady state limit the absorption lines of carbon dioxide are barely visible, and the spectrum is dominated by absorption lines of carbon monoxide and water.

  6. A new performance evaluation scheme for jet engine vibration signal denoising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadooghi, Mohammad Saleh; Esmaeilzadeh Khadem, Siamak

    2016-08-01

    Denoising of a cargo-plane jet engine compressor vibration signal is investigated in this article. Discrete wavelet transform and two families of Donoho-Johnston and parameter method thresholding, are applied to vibration signal. Eighty four combinations of wavelet thresholding and mother wavelet are evaluated. A new performance evaluation scheme for optimal selection of mother wavelet and thresholding method combination is proposed in this paper, which is make a trade off between four performance criteria of signal to noise ratio, percentage root mean square difference, Cross-correlation, and mean square error. Dmeyer mother wavelet (dmey) combined with Rigorous SURE thresholding has the maximum trade off value and was selected as the most appropriate combination for denoising of the signal. It was shown that inappropriate combination leads to data losing. Also higher performance of proposed trade off with respect to other criteria was proven graphically.

  7. High-speed, high-temperature magnetic bearings for jet turbine engine application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekhiche, M.; Nichols, S.; Hevenhill, D.; Oleksy, J.; Young, J.; Kirtley, J.L. [SatCon Technology Corporation, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2000-08-01

    In order to double today's jet turbine engines' propulsion capability, lightweight, high-efficiency, high-speed and hightemperature components are sought. These requirements put the conventional components such as the mechanical bearings under excessive constraints and make them obsolete. In this context, SatCon Technology Corporation has developed a high-speed, high- temperature (50 krpm, 600 deg. C) magnetic bearing system that has the potential of meeting the requirements described above. This magnetic bearing system, comprised of two radial and one double acting thrust bearings, was successfully tested to 50,000 rpm. This paper describes the development of this system from its design, through its fabrication and final testing. Details on the system and component requirements are presented, along with a step-by step design and trade-off analysis. Test data and their discussion are provided as well. (orig.)

  8. Traction coefficient in a roller-inner ring EHD contact in a jet engine roller bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sottomayor, A. [INEGI-CETRIB, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto (Portugal); Campos, A. [INEGI-CETRIB, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto (Portugal); Seabra, J. [Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica e Gestao Industrial, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto (Portugal)

    1997-08-01

    A simplified non-newtonian EHD model developed previously is used for the analysis of a roller-inner ring contact in a jet engine roller bearing. The lubricant behaves according to the viscoelastic rheological model, with a Ree-Eyring fluid, and the lubricant parameters are function of the pressure, temperature and rolling speed. The traction coefficient results obtained with this model are compared with previous experimental results obtained in a twin-disk machine. Finally, the influence of the operating conditions (pressure, temperature, rolling speed and slide-to-roll ratio) and of the waviness of the contacting surfaces, on the traction coefficient inside the roller-inner ring contact, is analysed. (orig.)

  9. Development and testing of dry chemicals in advanced extinguishing systems for jet engine nacelle fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, R. L.; Ling, A. C. (Editor); Mayer, L. A.; Myronik, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    The effectiveness of dry chemical in extinguishing and delaying reignition of fires resulting from hydrocarbon fuel leaking onto heated surfaces such as can occur in jet engine nacelles is studied. The commercial fire extinguishant dry chemical tried are sodium and potassium bicarbonate, carbonate, chloride, carbamate (Monnex), metal halogen, and metal hydroxycarbonate compounds. Synthetic and preparative procedures for new materials developed, a new concept of fire control by dry chemical agents, descriptions of experiment assemblages to test dry chemical fire extinguishant efficiencies in controlling fuel fires initiated by hot surfaces, comparative testing data for more than 25 chemical systems in a 'static' assemblage with no air flow across the heated surface, and similar comparative data for more than ten compounds in a dynamic system with air flows up to 350 ft/sec are presented.

  10. Chemically reacting supersonic flow calculation using an assumed PDF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshchi, M.

    1990-01-01

    This work is motivated by the need to develop accurate models for chemically reacting compressible turbulent flow fields that are present in a typical supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMJET) engine. In this paper the development of a new assumed probability density function (PDF) reaction model for supersonic turbulent diffusion flames and its implementation into an efficient Navier-Stokes solver are discussed. The application of this model to a supersonic hydrogen-air flame will be considered.

  11. Surface destructive mechanism on high-temperature ablation, supersonic-erosion, dreg-adherence and corrosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jun; CHEN Jian-min; ZHOU Hui-di; LI Tie-hu; ZHANG Qiu-yu

    2004-01-01

    The exhaust and flame from a supersonic airborne missile high-energy smoke-born engine (SAMHSE) may lead to high-temperature ablation, supersonic-erosion, dreg-adherence (HTASED) and corrosion on the launcher slide track, causing serious problems to the operation and decreasing the lifetime of the launcher. Therefore, it is imperative to study the destructive mechanism so as to guarantee the smooth operation and increase the lifetime of military equipments. Accordingly, HTASED and corrosion were systematically observed and analyzed with the emphasis placed on the mechanism investigations making use of a series evaluation tests, typical missile engine simulation tests, national military standard methods, scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical corrosion tests. It is found that the thermal impact of high-temperature flame and supersonic erosion of corrosive melting particle jet of the SAMHSE lead to surface defects of micro-cracks, denudation and corrosive residue. Some defects reach to metal base becoming to "corrosive channels". Repetitive HTASED may cause ablation-adhesion fatigue stress, which enhances the surface corrosion and destruction. HTASED and corrosion are related to the type of a SAMHSE fuel and experience of the launcher. Surface destruction is related to synergistic effects of the HTASED. The ablated and failed Al or steel surface is liable to electrochemical corrosion characterized by pitting in humid and salt-spray environment.

  12. Ultra small engines for model aircraft; Mokei hikokiyo chokogata jet engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, H.

    1998-12-10

    Turbojet engines for model aircraft are described. The first one was the T-240 of JPX Corporation, consisting of a 1-stage centrifugal compressor, an annular combustor, and a 1-stage axial flow turbine, fueled by LPG (liquid petroleum gas). Liquefied propane widely available on the market was first chosen as the fuel because regulations over high-pressure gas were rather lax in Europe. Since liquid fuel was easier to handle, however, shift occurred, from liquefied gas to JP-4 and then to kerosene. As for the means of ignition, electric sparks are handy for igniting kerosene, and electrically heated glow plugs for fuels higher in volatility. As for the means of injection, liquid fuel is gasified in a heated fuel pipe or aerified under pressure. For start-up, compressed air and motors driven by Ni-Cd cells are in common use. Start-up, ignition, combustion, self-sustained combustion, and then the throttle is slowly opened for taking off. Every manufacture is now ready to provide a control for throttling fuel flow upon detecting excess speed or excess exhaust temperature, which is important for the protection of gas turbines. (NEDO)

  13. Effects of Nozzle Scale, Total Temperature and an Afterburner on Jet Noise from a Pre-Cooled Turbojet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Mikiya; Sano, Takayuki; Fukuda, Masayuki; Kojima, Takayuki; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Nishida, Shunsuke; Imamura, Osamu; Shiga, Seiichi; Tsue, Mitsuhiro

    Effects of nozzle scale, total temperature, and an afterburner on jet noise characteristics from a pre-cooled turbojet engine are investigated experimentally. In JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency), a pre-cooled turbojet engine for an HST (Hypersonic transport) is under development. In the present study, 1.0%- and 2.4%-scaled models of the rectangular plug nozzle (Nozzles I and II) are manufactured, and the jet noise characteristics are investigated under a wide range of total temperatures. For Nozzle I, no air-heater is utilized and the total temperature is 290K. For Nozzle II, a pebble heater and an afterburner (AB) are utilized upstream of the nozzle model, and the total temperature is varied from 520K (pebble heater) to 1540K (pebble heater + AB). The total pressure is set at 0.27 and 0.30MPa(a) for both nozzle models. Jet noise is measured using a high-frequency microphone set at 135 deg from the engine inlet, and normalized jet noise spectra are obtained based on AUjn law and Helmholtz number. For cases without afterburner, the normalized spectra agrees well regardless of the nozzle scale and total temperature where the velocity index lies from n = 7.7 to 9.2, and the correlation factor between the two facilities is shown to be about 1dB. For the case with afterburner, the normalized spectrum does not agree with other conditions where the velocity index n seems to be about 4.

  14. Engineering anisotropic biphasic Janus-type polymer nanofiber scaffold networks via centrifugal jet spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khang, Alex; Ravishankar, Prashanth; Krishnaswamy, Aditya; Anderson, Patrick K; Cone, Stephanie G; Liu, Zizhao; Qian, Xianghong; Balachandran, Kartik

    2017-11-01

    Biphasic materials, comprised of an ordered arrangement of two different material phases within a material, have the potential for a wide variety of applications including filtration, protective clothing and tissue engineering. This study reports for the first time, a process for engineering biphasic Janus-type polymeric nanofiber (BJPNF) networks via the centrifugal jet spinning technique. BJPNF alignment and fiber diameter was dependent on fabrication rotational speed as well as solution composition. The biphasic character of these BJPNFs, which was controlled via the rotational speed of fabrication, was confirmed at the individual nanofiber scale using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and at the bulk, macro-scale using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Biphasic character was also demonstrated at the functional level via differing affinities on either side of the BJPNF for cell attachment. Our work thus presents a method for fabricating BJPNF scaffold networks where there might be a need for different properties on either side of a material. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2455-2464, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Instabilities in the Gamma Ray Burst central engine. What makes the jet variable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiuk, Agnieszka; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Perna, Rosalba; Di Matteo, Tiziana

    2011-02-01

    Both types of long and short gamma ray bursts involve a stage of a hyper-Eddington accretion of hot and dense plasma torus onto a newly born black hole. The prompt gamma ray emission originates in jets at some distance from this `central engine' and in most events is rapidly variable, having a form of sipkes and subpulses. This indicates at the variable nature of the engine itself, for which a plausible mechanism is an internal instability in the accreting flow. We solve numerically the structure and evolution of the neutrino-cooled torus. We take into account the detailed treatment of the microphysics in the nuclear equation of state that includes the neutrino trapping effect. The models are calculated for both Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes. We find that for sufficiently large accretion rates (>~10Msolar s-1 for non-rotating black hole, and >~1Msolar s-1 for rotating black hole, depending on its spin), the inner regions of the disk become opaque, while the helium nuclei are being photodissociated. The sudden change of pressure in this region leads to the development of a viscous and thermal instability, and the neutrino pressure acts similarly to the radiation pressure in sub-Eddington disks. In the case of rapidly rotating black holes, the instability is enhanced and appears for much lower accretion rates. We also find the important and possibly further destabilizing role of the energy transfer from the rotating black hole to the torus via the magnetic coupling.

  16. Instabilities in the Gamma Ray Burst central engine. What makes the jet variable?

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Ye-Fei; Di Matteo, Tiziana

    2010-01-01

    Both types of long and short gamma ray bursts involve a stage of a hyper-Eddington accretion of hot and dense plasma torus onto a newly born black hole. The prompt gamma ray emission originates in jets at some distance from this 'central engine' and in most events is rapidly variable, having a form of spikes and subpulses. This indicates at the variable nature of the engine itself, for which a plausible mechanism is an internal instability in the accreting flow. We solve numerically the structure and evolution of the neutrino-cooled torus. We take into account the detailed treatment of the microphysics in the nuclear equation of state that includes the neutrino trapping effect. The models are calculated for both Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes. We find that for sufficiently large accretion rates (> 10 Msun/s for non-rotating black hole, and >1 Msun/s for rotating black hole, depending on its spin), the inner regions of the disk become opaque, while the helium nuclei are being photodissociated. The sudden c...

  17. Small Engine Technology (SET) - Task 13 ANOPP Noise Prediction for Small Engines: Jet Noise Prediction Module, Wing Shielding Module, and System Studies Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Lysbeth; Golub, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This Final Report has been prepared by AlliedSignal Engines and Systems, Phoenix, Arizona, documenting work performed during the period May 1997 through June 1999, under the Small Engines Technology Program, Contract No. NAS3-27483, Task Order 13, ANOPP Noise Prediction for Small Engines. The report specifically covers the work performed under Subtasks 4, 5 and 6. Subtask 4 describes the application of a semi-empirical procedure for jet noise prediction, subtask 5 describes the development of a procedure to predict the effects of wing shielding, and subtask 6 describes the results of system studies of the benefits of the new noise technology on business and regional aircraft.

  18. Structure of 7-azaindole···2-fluoropyridine dimer in a supersonic jet: competition between N-H···N and N-H···F interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sumit; Kaul, Indu; Biswas, Partha; Das, Aloke

    2011-09-22

    In the present work, we have investigated the structure of 7-azaindole···2-fluoropyridine dimer in a supersonic jet by employing resonant two photon ionization (R2PI), IR-UV, and UV-UV double resonance spectroscopic techniques combined with quantum chemistry calculations. The R2PI spectrum of the dimer is recorded by electronic excitation of the 7-azaindole moiety, and a few low frequency intermolecular vibrations of the dimer are clearly observed in the spectrum. The electronic origin band of the dimer is red-shifted by 1278 cm(-1) from the S(1) ← S(0) origin band of 7-azaindole monomer. The presence of a single conformer of the dimer is confirmed by IR-UV and UV-UV hole-burning spectroscopic techniques. RIDIR (Resonant ion dip infrared) spectrum of the dimer shows a red-shift of 265 cm(-1) in the N-H stretching frequency with respect to that of the 7-azaindole monomer. Two planar double hydrogen bonded cyclic structures of the dimer have been predicted from DFT calculations. Comparison of experimental and theoretical N-H stretching frequencies confirms that the observed dimer is stabilized by N-H···N and C-H···N hydrogen bonding interactions. The less stable conformer with N-H···F and C-H···N interactions are not observed in the experiment. The competition between N-H···N and N-H···F interactions in the two dimeric structures are discussed from natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The current results demonstrate that fluorine makes a hydrogen bond of intermediate strength through cooperative interaction of another hydrogen bond (C-H···N) present in the dimer, although fluorine is believed to be very weak hydrogen bond acceptor.

  19. Competition between hydrogen bonding and dispersion interactions in the indole···pyridine dimer and (indole)2···pyridine trimer studied in a supersonic jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sumit; Biswas, Partha; Kaul, Indu; Das, Aloke

    2011-07-01

    Structures of the indole···pyridine dimer and (indole)2···pyridine trimer have been investigated in a supersonic jet using resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) and IR-UV double resonance spectroscopic techniques combined with quantum chemistry calculations. R2PI spectra of the dimer and the trimer recorded by electronic excitation of the indole moiety show that the red-shift in the band origin of the dimer with respect to the 0(0)(0) band of the monomer is larger compared to that of the trimer. The presence of only one conformer in the case of both the dimer and the trimer has been confirmed from IR-UV hole-burning spectroscopy. The structures of the dimer and the trimer have been determined from resonant ion dip infrared (RIDIR) spectra combined with ab initio as well as DFT/M05-2X and DFT/M06-2X calculations. It has been found that the dimer, observed in the experiment, has a V-shaped geometry stabilized by N–H···N and C–H···N hydrogen bonding interactions, as well as C–H···π and π···π dispersion interactions. The geometry of the trimer has been found to be a cyclic one stabilized by N–H···N, N–H···π, C–H···π, and C–H···N interactions. The most important finding of this current study is the observation of the mixed dimer and trimer, which are stabilized by hydrogen bonding as well as dispersion interactions.

  20. Inlet-engine matching for SCAR including application of a bicone variable geometry inlet. [Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserbauer, J. F.; Gerstenmaier, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Airflow characteristics of variable cycle engines (VCE) designed for Mach 2.32 can have transonic airflow requirements as high as 1.6 times the cruise airflow. This is a formidable requirement for conventional, high performance, axisymmetric, translating centerbody mixed compression inlets. An alternate inlet is defined where the second cone of a two cone centerbody collapses to the initial cone angle to provide a large off-design airflow capability, and incorporates modest centerbody translation to minimize spillage drag. Estimates of transonic spillage drag are competitive with those of conventional translating centerbody inlets. The inlet's cruise performance exhibits very low bleed requirements with good recovery and high angle of attack capability.

  1. Volcanic jet noise: infrasonic source processes and atmospheric propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoza, R. S.; Fee, D.; Ogden, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic eruption columns are complex flows consisting of (possibly supersonic) injections of ash-gas mixtures into the atmosphere. A volcanic eruption column can be modeled as a lower momentum-driven jet (the gas-thrust region), which transitions with altitude into a thermally buoyant plume. Matoza et al. [2009] proposed that broadband infrasonic signals recorded during this type of volcanic activity represent a low-frequency form of jet noise. Jet noise is produced at higher acoustic frequencies by smaller-scale man-made jet flows (e.g., turbulent jet flow from jet engines and rockets). Jet noise generation processes could operate at larger spatial scales and produce infrasonic frequencies in the lower gas-thrust portion of the eruption column. Jet-noise-like infrasonic signals have been observed at ranges of tens to thousands of kilometers from sustained volcanic explosions at Mount St. Helens, WA; Tungurahua, Ecuador; Redoubt, AK; and Sarychev Peak, Kuril Islands. Over such distances, the atmosphere cannot be considered homogeneous. Long-range infrasound propagation takes place primarily in waveguides formed by vertical gradients in temperature and horizontal winds, and exhibits strong spatiotemporal variability. The timing and location of volcanic explosions can be estimated from remote infrasonic data and could be used with ash cloud dispersion forecasts for hazard mitigation. Source studies of infrasonic volcanic jet noise, coupled with infrasound propagation modeling, hold promise for being able to constrain more detailed eruption jet parameters with remote, ground-based geophysical data. Here we present recent work on the generation and propagation of volcanic jet noise. Matoza, R. S., D. Fee, M. A. Garcés, J. M. Seiner, P. A. Ramón, and M. A. H. Hedlin (2009), Infrasonic jet noise from volcanic eruptions, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L08303, doi:10.1029/2008GL036486.

  2. Three-dimensional simulations of long duration gamma-ray burst jets: time scales from variable engines

    CERN Document Server

    Loopez-Camara, Diego; Morsony, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst light curves are characterized by marked variability, each showing unique properties. The origin of such variability, at least for a fraction of long GRBs, may be the result of an unsteady central engine. It is thus important to study the effects that an episodic central engine has on the jet propagation and, eventually, on the prompt emission within the collapsar scenario. Thus, in this study we follow the interaction of pulsed outflows with their progenitor stars with hydrodynamic numerical simulations in both two and three dimensions. We show that the propagation of unsteady jets is affected by the interaction with the progenitor material well after the break-out time, especially for jets with long quiescent times, comparable to or larger than a second. We also show that this interaction can lead to an asymmetric behavior in which pulse durations and quiescent periods are systematically different. After the pulsed jets drill through the progenitor and the interstellar medium, we find that, ...

  3. Transonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Model of a Proposed Six-Engine Hull-Type Seaplane Designed for Supersonic Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wornom, Dewey E.

    1960-01-01

    Force tests of a model of a proposed six-engine hull-type seaplane were performed in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel. The results of these tests have indicated that the model had a subsonic zero-lift drag coefficient of 0.0240 with the highest zero-lift drag coefficient slightly greater than twice the subsonic drag level. Pitchup tendencies were noted for subsonic Mach numbers at relatively high lift coefficients. Wing leading-edge droop increased the maximum lift-drag ratio approximately 8 percent at a Mach number of 0.80 but this effect was negligible at a Mach number of 0.90 and above. The configuration exhibited stable lateral characteristics over the test Mach number range.

  4. Flow and acoustic features of a supersonic tapered nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, E.; Bowman, H. L.; Schadow, K. C.

    1992-05-01

    The acoustic and flow characteristics of a supersonic tapered jet were measured for free and shrouded flow configurations. Measurements were performed for a full range of pressure ratios including over- and underexpanded and design conditions. The supersonic tapered jet is issued from a converging-diverging nozzle with a 3∶1 rectangular slotted throat and a conical diverging section leading to a circular exit. The jet was compared to circular and rectangular supersonic jets operating at identical conditions. The distinct feature of the jet is the absence of screech tones in the entire range of operation. Its near-field pressure fluctuations have a wide band spectrum in the entire range of measurements, for Mach numbers of 1 to 2.5, for over- and underexpanded conditions. The free jet's spreading rate is nearly constant and similar to the rectangular jet, and in a shroud, the pressure drop it is inducing is linearly proportional to the primary jet Mach number. This behavior persisted in high adverse pressure gradients at overexpanded conditions, and with nozzle divergence angles of up to 35°, no inside flow separation was observed.

  5. Aeroengine. Development of a finishing robot for jet engine parts; Kokukiyo enigne. Buhin shiage robot no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manabe, T.; Kametani, A.; Iwamoto, M.; Danjo, K.; Hishida, H.; Ninomiya, T. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    2000-04-01

    Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (KHI) has developed a precise finishing robot system and applied it to the finishing processes of jet engine parts. There has been a strong need for such a system as finishing processes are both labor intensive and time-consuming activities. Realization of a suitable solution has been held back in the past due to the delicate treatment required by the fine and complicated parts. However, by developing a device with the ability to control the tool/work contact force during operation, KHI has succeeded in producing the new robotic finishing system. The system is capable of performing many types of finishing operations, such as chamfering, deburring and brushing. Systems have now been and will further be introduced into the jet engine division of KHI. Already they are contributing to labor saving, cost reduction, and processing quality control. KHI will continue to promote rationalization of production processes by introducing varieties of our robot systems where needed. (author)

  6. On supersonic combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁生学

    1999-01-01

    Some basic concepts and features of supersonic combustion are explained from the view point of macroscopic aerodynamics. Two kinds of interpretations of supersonic combustion are proposed. The difference between supersonic combustion and subsonic combustion is discussed, and the mechanism of supersonic combustion propagation and the limitation of heat addition in supersonic flow are pointed out. The results of the calculation of deflagration in supersonic flow show that the entropy increment and the total pressure loss of the combustion products may decrease with the increase of combustion velocity. It is also demonstrated that the oblique detonation wave angle may not be controlled by the wedge angle under weak underdriven solution conditions and be determined only by combustion velocity. Therefore, the weak underdriven solution may become self-sustaining oblique detonation waves with a constant wave angle.

  7. Engineering hybrid polymer-protein super-aligned nanofibers via rotary jet spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrossamay, Mohammad R; Balachandran, Kartik; Capulli, Andrew K; Golecki, Holly M; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Goss, Josue A; Kim, Hansu; Shin, Kwanwoo; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2014-03-01

    Cellular microenvironments are important in coaxing cells to behave collectively as functional, structured tissues. Important cues in this microenvironment are the chemical, mechanical and spatial arrangement of the supporting matrix in the extracellular space. In engineered tissues, synthetic scaffolding provides many of these microenvironmental cues. Key requirements are that synthetic scaffolds should recapitulate the native three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical fibrillar structure, possess biomimetic surface properties and demonstrate mechanical integrity, and in some tissues, anisotropy. Electrospinning is a popular technique used to fabricate anisotropic nanofiber scaffolds. However, it suffers from relatively low production rates and poor control of fiber alignment without substantial modifications to the fiber collector mechanism. Additionally, many biomaterials are not amenable for fabrication via high-voltage electrospinning methods. Hence, we reasoned that we could utilize rotary jet spinning (RJS) to fabricate highly aligned hybrid protein-polymer with tunable chemical and physical properties. In this study, we engineered highly aligned nanofiber constructs with robust fiber alignment from blends of the proteins collagen and gelatin, and the polymer poly-ε-caprolactone via RJS and electrospinning. RJS-spun fibers retain greater protein content on the surface and are also fabricated at a higher production rate compared to those fabricated via electrospinning. We measured increased fiber diameter and viscosity, and decreasing fiber alignment as protein content increased in RJS hybrid fibers. RJS nanofiber constructs also demonstrate highly anisotropic mechanical properties mimicking several biological tissue types. We demonstrate the bio-functionality of RJS scaffold fibers by testing their ability to support cell growth and maturation with a variety of cell types. Our highly anisotropic RJS fibers are therefore able to support cellular alignment

  8. On the Scaling of Small, Heat Simulated Jet Noise Measurements to Moderate Size Exhaust Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Dennis K.; Bridges, James; Kuo, Ching-Wen

    2010-01-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable geometry nozzles to provide optimum thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. However, the acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometry of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at The Pennsylvania State University and the NASA Glenn Research Center- in partnership with GE Aviation is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles. An equally important objective is to validate methodology for using data obtained from small and moderate scale experiments to reliably predict the most important components of full scale engine noise. The experimental results presented show reasonable agreement between small scale and moderate scale jet acoustic data, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones. Unresolved issues however are identified that are currently receiving our attention, in particular the effect of the small bypass ratio airflow. Future activities will identify and test promising noise reduction techniques in an effort to predict how well such concepts will work with full scale engines in flight conditions.

  9. New technology for controlling NOx from jet engine test cells. Phase 1. Final report, August 1988-February 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    For some time the U.S. Air Force has been concerned with NOx emissions from jet engine test cells operated by the Air Force. While there are no regulations limiting the NOx emissions of these facilities, such regulations could develop in the near future and would pose significant problems for the Air Force because no available technology is suited for application to jet engine test cells. This report describes laboratory studies of a new NOx control process based on the surprising ability of barium oxide to rapidly capture NO, a process that could be ideally suited to controlling NOx emission from jet engine test cells. Thus, experiments were done in which a simulated exhaust gas containing NO was passed through a bed of either granular barium oxide or barium oxide supported on high-strength alumina. Quantitative NO removals were achieved at space velocities ranging from 2010 to 28,000 v/v/hr temperatures from 21 deg C to 610 deg C, oxygen concentrations of 1.1 to 15.3 percent, and initial NO concentrations from 94 to 1700 ppm. When NO2 was present in the simulated exhaust, it was also removed. The barium oxide was able to capture NO and NO2 in amounts up to at least 23.5 percent of its initial weight. The practical implication is that NOx emissions of a jet engine test cell could be controlled by replacing the acoustic panels now used to decrease the cell`s emission of sound with a set of panel bed filters filled with barium oxide. These panel bed filters would also absorb sound, could fit in the space in the test cell now occupied by the acoustic panels, and would remove NO and NO2 from the exhaust before it is discharged to the environment. This NOx removal would occur spontaneously. without any actions by the personnel operating the test cell and without distracting them in any way from their normal tasks.

  10. Neurobehavioral and respiratory findings in jet engine repair workers: A comparison of exposed and unexposed volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, K H

    1999-04-01

    Workers repairing jet engines had respiratory, rheumatic, and neurobehavioral symptoms. They had welded and ground stainless steel parts using hard metal tools and cleaned metal with chlorinated and fluorinated organic solvents. We compared 154 workers and 112 unexposed subjects, all volunteers of similar ages and with similar educational levels, for abnormalities on chest radiographs, spirometric measurements, and questionnaires. Also appraised were performance of reaction time, balance, blink reflex latency, color discrimination, Culture Fair, vocabulary, slotted pegboard, trail making A and B, profile of mood states (POMS), and frequencies of 35 symptoms. Compared to unexposed subjects, workers had significantly more respiratory symptoms but no differences in pulmonary function. They had significantly prolonged simple and choice reaction time (P<0.0001), and abnormal balance with eyes open and eyes closed (P<0. 0001), and abnormal color discrimination. Blink reflex latency was abnormal in both exposed workers and in local unexposed compared to other reference groups. Focus of the inquiry on lung disease helped ensure that for neurobehavioral tests confounding factors were minimal and known biases were small. We tentatively attribute the neurobehavioral impairments and increased symptom frequencies to chlorinated solvent exposure. Excessive respiratory symptoms are attributed to welding stainless steel combined with cigarette smoking. Specifically, manganese exposure may have affected the respiratory and the central nervous systems.

  11. Ballistic Impact Response of Kevlar 49 and Zylon under Conditions Representing Jet Engine Fan Containment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Revilock, Duane M.

    2007-01-01

    A ballistic impact test program was conducted to provide validation data for the development of numerical models of blade out events in fabric containment systems. The impact response of two different fiber materials - Kevlar 49 (E.I. DuPont Nemours and Company) and Zylon AS (Toyobo Co., Ltd.) was studied by firing metal projectiles into dry woven fabric specimens using a gas gun. The shape, mass, orientation and velocity of the projectile were varied and recorded. In most cases the tests were designed such that the projectile would perforate the specimen, allowing measurement of the energy absorbed by the fabric. The results for both Zylon and Kevlar presented here represent a useful set of data for the purposes of establishing and validating numerical models for predicting the response of fabrics under conditions simulating those of a jet engine blade release situation. In addition some useful empirical observations were made regarding the effects of projectile orientation and the relative performance of the different materials.

  12. Numerical investigation on super-cooled large droplet icing of fan rotor blade in jet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Keisuke; Suzuki, Masaya; Yamamoto, Makoto

    2014-10-01

    Icing (or ice accretion) is a phenomenon in which super-cooled water droplets impinge and accrete on a body. It is well known that ice accretion on blades and vanes leads to performance degradation and has caused severe accidents. Although various anti-icing and deicing systems have been developed, such accidents still occur. Therefore, it is important to clarify the phenomenon of ice accretion on an aircraft and in a jet engine. However, flight tests for ice accretion are very expensive, and in the wind tunnel it is difficult to reproduce all climate conditions where ice accretion can occur. Therefore, it is expected that computational fluid dynamics (CFD), which can estimate ice accretion in various climate conditions, will be a useful way to predict and understand the ice accretion phenomenon. On the other hand, although the icing caused by super-cooled large droplets (SLD) is very dangerous, the numerical method has not been established yet. This is why SLD icing is characterized by splash and bounce phenomena of droplets and they are very complex in nature. In the present study, we develop an ice accretion code considering the splash and bounce phenomena to predict SLD icing, and the code is applied to a fan rotor blade. The numerical results with and without the SLD icing model are compared. Through this study, the influence of the SLD icing model is numerically clarified.

  13. An experimental study of fault propagation in a jet-engine controller. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gwan Seung

    1990-01-01

    An experimental analysis of the impact of transient faults on a microprocessor-based jet engine controller, used in the Boeing 747 and 757 aircrafts is described. A hierarchical simulation environment which allows the injection of transients during run-time and the tracing of their impact is described. Verification of the accuracy of this approach is also provided. A determination of the probability that a transient results in latch, pin or functional errors is made. Given a transient fault, there is approximately an 80 percent chance that there is no impact on the chip. An empirical model to depict the process of error exploration and degeneration in the target system is derived. The model shows that, if no latch errors occur within eight clock cycles, no significant damage is likely to happen. Thus, the overall impact of a transient is well contained. A state transition model is also derived from the measured data, to describe the error propagation characteristics within the chip, and to quantify the impact of transients on the external environment. The model is used to identify and isolate the critical fault propagation paths, the module most sensitive to fault propagation and the module with the highest potential of causing external pin errors.

  14. Study on development of ejector of Bubble Jet Engine (BJE) - measurement of thrust -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, B; Nakashima, K; Shigematsu, T; Morishita, K, E-mail: ono@post.cc.sasebo.ac.j [Sasebo National College of Technology1-1, Okishin-cho, Sasebo City, Nagasaki Pref., 857-1193 (Japan)

    2009-02-01

    The AUV (Autonomous Under-water Vehicle), which is used for the present seabed investigations, has obtained the thrust with the screw driven by the battery. However, it has a disadvantage because of its size and cost. Therefore, this research is carried out to propose the Bubble Jet Engine (BJE) as an alternative propulsion device. It can directly transform combustion energy into kinetic energy, so it is expected that BJE can also rise the level of propulsion efficiency. This research aims at measuring exhaled mass flow rate and thrust to design ejectors, which become the core of BJE, and exploring practical possibility of BJE. Vertical type gas-water ejector experimental apparatus for measuring water entrainment was employed in order to understand the characteristics of operation conditions, such as inlet distance, air pressure of nozzle, diameter of nozzle, and so on. In addition, experiments for measuring the thrust in the condition of ejector were executed with horizontal type apparatus in water. However, the influence of the ejector to improve thrust can't have been recognized with high-pressure air at room temperature yet.

  15. Characterization of Synthetic GTL Jet Fuel for use in Gas Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Reza; Kannaiyan, Kumaran

    2010-11-01

    Stringent emission regulations have instigated the search for alternative-clean source of energy. Recently, Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) fuel has grabbed the global attention by its clean combustion characteristics owing to the absence of aromatics and Sulphur. However, this will introduce potential risks and benefits. Last fall Qatar airways has proven the feasibility of using GTL as a potential alternative clean fuel by a 3200 mile flight using a fuel blend of 50% JetA + 50% GTL. Researchers from Texas A & M University at Qatar (TAMUQ) in collaboration with their counterparts in Rolls-Royce (RR), UK, and German Aerospace Laboratory (DLR) are in a joint effort to establish an in-depth characterization of the combustion performance of GTL fuel in gas turbine engines. In TAMUQ, the research focus is to investigate the spray characteristics of GTL fuels. The results will be compared with that of standard fuel and correlate with combustion results to gain insights on GTL performance. This will help designers to optimize the nozzle geometry to improve the combustor performance. The objective of this talk is to introduce this ongoing effort and to discuss the experimental facility and preliminary results.

  16. Study on development of ejector of Bubble Jet Engine (BJE) - measurement of thrust -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, B.; Nakashima, K.; Shigematsu, T.; Morishita, K.

    2009-02-01

    The AUV (Autonomous Under-water Vehicle), which is used for the present seabed investigations, has obtained the thrust with the screw driven by the battery. However, it has a disadvantage because of its size and cost. Therefore, this research is carried out to propose the Bubble Jet Engine (BJE) as an alternative propulsion device. It can directly transform combustion energy into kinetic energy, so it is expected that BJE can also rise the level of propulsion efficiency. This research aims at measuring exhaled mass flow rate and thrust to design ejectors, which become the core of BJE, and exploring practical possibility of BJE. Vertical type gas-water ejector experimental apparatus for measuring water entrainment was employed in order to understand the characteristics of operation conditions, such as inlet distance, air pressure of nozzle, diameter of nozzle, and so on. In addition, experiments for measuring the thrust in the condition of ejector were executed with horizontal type apparatus in water. However, the influence of the ejector to improve thrust can't have been recognized with high-pressure air at room temperature yet.

  17. Finite difference time domain modeling of steady state scattering from jet engines with moving turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Deirdre A.; Langdon, H. Scott; Beggs, John H.; Steich, David J.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1992-01-01

    The approach chosen to model steady state scattering from jet engines with moving turbine blades is based upon the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. The FDTD method is a numerical electromagnetic program based upon the direct solution in the time domain of Maxwell's time dependent curl equations throughout a volume. One of the strengths of this method is the ability to model objects with complicated shape and/or material composition. General time domain functions may be used as source excitations. For example, a plane wave excitation may be specified as a pulse containing many frequencies and at any incidence angle to the scatterer. A best fit to the scatterer is accomplished using cubical cells in the standard cartesian implementation of the FDTD method. The material composition of the scatterer is determined by specifying its electrical properties at each cell on the scatterer. Thus, the FDTD method is a suitable choice for problems with complex geometries evaluated at multiple frequencies. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with the FDTD method.

  18. Plasma-enhanced mixing and flameholding in supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firsov, Alexander; Savelkin, Konstantin V.; Yarantsev, Dmitry A.; Leonov, Sergey B.

    2015-01-01

    The results of experimental study of plasma-based mixing, ignition and flameholding in a supersonic model combustor are presented in the paper. The model combustor has a length of 600 mm and cross section of 72 mm width and 60 mm height. The fuel is directly injected into supersonic airflow (Mach number M=2, static pressure Pst=160–250 Torr) through wall orifices. Two series of tests are focused on flameholding and mixing correspondingly. In the first series, the near-surface quasi-DC electrical discharge is generated by flush-mounted electrodes at electrical power deposition of Wpl=3–24 kW. The scope includes parametric study of ignition and flame front dynamics, and comparison of three schemes of plasma generation: the first and the second layouts examine the location of plasma generators upstream and downstream from the fuel injectors. The third pattern follows a novel approach of combined mixing/ignition technique, where the electrical discharge distributes along the fuel jet. The last pattern demonstrates a significant advantage in terms of flameholding limit. In the second series of tests, a long discharge of submicrosecond duration is generated across the flow and along the fuel jet. A gasdynamic instability of thermal cavity developed after a deposition of high-power density in a thin plasma filament promotes the air–fuel mixing. The technique studied in this work has weighty potential for high-speed combustion applications, including cold start/restart of scramjet engines and support of transition regime in dual-mode scramjet and at off-design operation. PMID:26170434

  19. The influence of walls on jet propagation and ignition under diesel engine conditions. Einfluss von Waenden auf Strahlausbreitung und Zuendverhalten unter dieselmotorischen Bedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Huanxin.

    1991-08-01

    This research on the influence of walls on jet propagation and ingnition behaviour of a diesel jet was carried out in a pressure chamber with different wall inserts. By using two-side schlieren optics and other optical measuring methods it was possible to identify jet characteristics, especially locations of ignition and ingition delays in the injection jet precisely and to analyse them statistically. Wall temperature, wall spacing, impact angle, chamber air temperature and chamber pressure, injection pressure and injection quantity were vaired within the range important for a diesel engine. (orig./HW).

  20. A methodology for the evaluation of the turbine jet engine fragment threat to generic air transportable containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, D.C.; Pierce, J.D.

    1993-06-01

    Uncontained, high-energy gas turbine engine fragments are a potential threat to air-transportable containers carried aboard jet aircraft. The threat to a generic example container is evaluated by probability analyses and penetration testing to demonstrate the methodology to be used in the evaluation of a specific container/aircraft/engine combination. Fragment/container impact probability is the product of the uncontained fragment release rate and the geometric probability that a container is in the path of this fragment. The probability of a high-energy rotor burst fragment from four generic aircraft engines striking one of the containment vessels aboard a transport aircraft is approximately 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} strikes/hour. Finite element penetration analyses and tests can be performed to identify specific fragments which have the potential to penetrate a generic or specific containment vessel. The relatively low probability of engine fragment/container impacts is primarily due to the low release rate of uncontained, hazardous jet engine fragments.

  1. Laser-Induced Fluorescence of 1-Methylnaphthalene in a Supersonic Jet Expansion%1-甲基萘的振动分辨激光诱导荧光光谱研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王录飞; 吴其俊; 祖莉莉

    2011-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectrum of So→S1 transition of 1-methylnaphthalene was obtained in supersonic jet condition. Theoretical calculations were conducted to study the geometry and energy of 1-methylnaphthalene at the ground and first excited state. Geometry optimization for the ground state was performed by DFT/B3LYP methods using 6-311 ++G

  2. Experimental study on characteristics of bubble growth and pressure wave propagation by supersonic gas jets under water%水下超声速燃气射流气泡的生长及压力波传播特性实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤龙生; 刘宇; 吴智锋; 赵文胜

    2011-01-01

    To investigate effects of supersonic gas jets under water, gas generator and underwater testing system is used to study the growth and evolution of gas bubble by supersonic gas jets and pressure pulse propagation characteristics under water. The characteristic of pressure pulse attenuation is investigated. The experimental results show that the growth and collapse of the gas bubble cause the pressure pulse, and the pulsation can quickly decay under water.%为获取燃气射流对上游水域的影响特性,采用燃气发生器和水下实验系统,研究了水下超声速燃气射流的气泡生长及演变过程,以及气泡压力波在水中的传播特性,并研究了压力波在水介质中的衰减规律.研究表明,燃气泡生长和"破碎"伴生着压力脉动在水介质中传播,气泡压力波的能量在水介质中快速衰减.

  3. 1 Ft. x 1 Ft. Supersonic Wind Tunnel, Bldg. 37

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (1x), located in the Engine Research Building, is one of the most active test facilities at the Glenn Research Center. Used...

  4. On highly focused supersonic microjets

    CERN Document Server

    Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Willem, Claas; Peters, Ivo R; van der Meer, Deveraj; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-01-01

    By focusing a laser pulse in a liquid-filled glass-microcapillary open at one end, a small mass of liquid is instantaneously vapourised. This leads to a shock wave which travels towards the concave free surface where it generates a high-speed microjet. The initial shape of the meniscus plays a dominant role in the process. The velocity of the jet can reach supersonic speeds up to 850\\,m/s while maintaining a very sharp geometry. The entire evolution of the jet is observed by high-speed recordings of up to $10^6\\,$fps. A parametric study of the jet velocity as a function of the contact angle of the liquid-glass interface, the energy absorbed by the liquid, the diameter of the capillary tube, and the distance between the laser focus and the free surface is performed, and the results are rationalised. The method could be used for needle-free injection of vaccines or drugs.

  5. Negative chemiions formed in jet fuel combustion: new insights from jet engine and laboratory measurements using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiendler, A.; Aberle, S.; Arnold, F. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclaear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany). Atmospheric Physics Div.

    2000-07-01

    Measurements were made of mass numbers and composition of negative chemiions produced in jet fuel combustion in the exhaust of a jet engine and of a burner in the laboratory. The measurements made by a novel quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer apparatus revealed the presence of three major ion families: ions containing an HSO{sub 4}{sup -} ''core's' or an NO{sub 3}{sup -} ''core's' and {sup O}HC-ions{sup .} The latter which contain C and H atoms and in part also 0 atoms can be divided into two subfamilies with even and odd mass numbers. It is proposed that the O HC ions are formed by free-electron attachment to HC and OHC molecules and/or ion-molecule reactions of primary negative chemiions with HC and OHC molecules. It is also proposed that HSO{sub 4}{sup -}- and NO{sub 3}{sup -}- containing ions are formed by ion-molecule reactions involving OHC ions and the sulfur- and reactive nitrogen-containing molecules H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, SO{sub 3} and NO, NO{sub 2}, HNO{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3}. (author)

  6. The main technical progress directions in air-jet engine design branch, which are worked out by the “Single theory of continuous flow propulsions”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Борис Шамшадович Мамедов

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The main technical progress directions in air-jet engine design branch, which are worked out by the “Single theory of continuous flow propulsions” are highlighted. They are connected with providing the fly security by air-jet engines gas-dynamic work steady increasing with full elimination zone of rigid (spring stroke in the cross section B-B of the air-jet engines, with bypass turbojet engine’s thrust increasing with simultaneously fuel consumption lowering, with inlet and outlet decibel characteristic and radial dementias lowering, with high pressure compressor’s last working wheels blades increasing, with regulating law air-jet engine’s introduction to provide maximum thrust with the purpose of flying (thrust efficiency increasing

  7. Positive ion chemistry in the exhaust plumes of an air craft jet engine and a burner: investigations with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiendler, A.; Aberle, S.; Arnold, F. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany). Atmospheric Physics Div.

    2000-07-01

    Using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer detailed composition analyses were made of positive ions in the exhaust of an aircraft jet engine and of a jet fuel burner. For both scenarios complex organic ions with large mass numbers were most abundant. By employing the MS{sup 2}-mode of the quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer, mass selected trapped ions were intendently broken up and characteristic fragment ions were observed. The latter indicate that the parent ions contain hydrogen, carbon and oxygen which is indicative of oxygenated hydrocarbons. This contrasts recent composition measurements of negative ions in aircraft jet engine exhaust made by our group which revealed that negative ions contain the inorganic acid H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Our present measurements support the view that positive ions in aircraft jet engine exhaust contain preferably organic molecules. (author)

  8. Design and Control of a Proof-of-Concept Active Jet Engine Intake Using Shape Memory Alloy Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gangbing; Ma, Ning; Penney, Nicholas; Barr, Todd; Lee, Ho-Jun; Arnold, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    The design and control of a novel proof-of-concept active jet engine intake using Nickel-Titanium (Ni-Ti or Nitinol) shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuators is used to demonstrate the potential of an adaptive intake to improve the fuel efficiency of a jet engine. The Nitinol SMA material is selected for this research due to the material's ability to generate large strains of up to 5 percent for repeated operations, a high power-to-weight ratio, electrical resistive actuation, and easy fabrication into a variety of shapes. The proof-of-concept engine intake employs an overlapping leaf design arranged in a concentric configuration. Each leaf is mounted on a supporting bar that rotates upon actuation by SMA wires electrical resistive heating. Feedback control is enabled through the use of a laser range sensor to detect the movement of a leaf and determine the radius of the intake area. Due to the hysteresis behavior inherent in SMAs, a nonlinear robust controller is used to direct the SMA wire actuation. The controller design utilizes the sliding-mode approach to compensate for the nonlinearities associated with the SMA actuator. Feedback control experiments conducted on a fabricated proof-of-concept model have demonstrated the capability to precisely control the intake area and achieve up to a 25 percent reduction in intake area. The experiments demonstrate the feasibility of engine intake area control using the proposed design.

  9. Development and Application of A Membrane-Based Thermodenuder for Measurement of Volatile Particles Emitted by A Jet Turbine Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of volatile particles emitted by modern jet engines is a daunting task. Besides the complexity in sampling jet aircraft exhaust, the main difficulty lies at how to faithfully capture the phase-partition dynamics of volatile particles as they travel downstream from the engine exhaust nozzle. As a result, the physico-chemical properties of the exhaust are also transformed. We have developed a sampling instrument that aims at enabling study of the phase-partition dynamics. The objective of this research project was to design and evaluate a new thermodenuder for performing phase separation of the engine-emitted volatile particles. The backbone of the new thermodenuder is a thin metallic membrane. The membrane enables extraction of molecules that can be thermally desorbed from the condensed particulate phases and collected for subsequent chemical analysis. Toward realization of the technique in the future field aircraft emissions measurement we tested this new thermo-denuding device using laboratory-generated particles that were made of non-volatile or semi-volatile chemicals. The particle penetration efficiency, a measure of the device performance, of this thermodenuder was found to be better than 99%. Results obtained from the tests executed at a number of operating temperature conditions show reasonably good thermal separation. We have scheduled to apply this new device to characterize emissions from a T63 turboshaft engine in the spring of 2010 and are expecting to show the engine results at the conference. The test results based on the laboratory-generated particles were encouraging for the intended application. With excellent particle transmission efficiency and an ability to simultaneously measure the composition in the gas and particle phases of the engine particles, we believe the new technology will make a great contribution to measurement research of engine emissions.

  10. Jet-engine-based units for cleaning transport media and thawing frozen soil at mining, metallurgical, and transportation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khechuev, Y.D.

    2008-01-15

    In recent years, it has become much more difficult to deal with the adhesion and freezing of moist overburden or soil during mining and transport operations due to the increase in the volume of the various materials being mined and transported - coal, ore, fluxes, structural materials, etc. The most productive and effective methods to deal with the sticking and freezing of soil and rock are gas dynamic methods. These methods employ high-speed jets of hot gases from jet engines and can be 15-30 times more productive than mechanical methods and machinery. Proceeding on the basis of calculations, completed studies, and field tests, the Gortekhtrans Department of Research Institute for Problems of the Kursk Magnetic Anomaly (NIIKMA) has developed several highly efficient units that employ this technology.

  11. A multi-band flare in the M 87 jet 80 pc away from the central engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C. S.; Ros, E.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Lister, M. L.

    The radio-loud active galactic nucleus M 87 hosts a powerful jet fueled by a super-massive black hole in its center. A bright feature 80 pc away from the central engine of M 87, namely HST-1, has shown a multi-band flare that peaked in 2005. Early radio, optical and X-ray observations have suggested that HST-1 is superluminal, and is possibly related to the TeV flare observed by HESS around 2005. Therefore, it was suggested that HST-1 has blazar-like activity. To examine the blazar-like nature for this superluminal knot in the M 87 jet, we analyzed VLBA 2 cm data of 15 epochs from 2000 to 2009. HST-1 is successfully detected with milliarcsecond resolution from 2003 to 2007, and our findings do not support that HST-1 has a blazar-like nature.

  12. Review:Progress in research on mixing techniques for transverse injection flow fields in supersonic crossflows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei HUANG; Li YAN

    2013-01-01

    The transverse injection flow field has an important impact on the flowpath design of scramjet engines.At present a combination of the transverse injection scheme and any other flame holder has been widely employed in hypersonic propulsion systems to promote the mixing process between the fuel and the supersonic freestream;combustion efficiency has been improved thereby,as well as engine thrust.Research on mixing techniques for the transverse injection flow field is summarized from four aspects,namely the jet-to-crossflow pressure ratio,the geometric configuration of the injection port,the number of injection ports,and the injection angle.In conclusion,urgent investigations of mixing techniques of the transverse injection flow field are proposed,especially data mining in the quantitative analytical results for transverse injection flow field,based on results from multi-objective design optimization theory.

  13. Tesseract supersonic business transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshotko, Eli; Garbinski, Gary; Fellenstein, James; Botting, Mary; Hooper, Joan; Ryan, Michael; Struk, Peter; Taggart, Ben; Taillon, Maggie; Warzynski, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This year, the senior level Aerospace Design class at Case Western Reserve University developed a conceptual design of a supersonic business transport. Due to the growing trade between Asia and the United States, a transpacific range was chosen for the aircraft. A Mach number of 2.2 was chosen, too, because it provides reasonable block times and allows the use of a large range of materials without a need for active cooling. A payload of 2,500 lbs. was assumed corresponding to a complement of nine passengers and crew, plus some light cargo. With these general requirements set, the class was broken down into three groups. The aerodynamics of the aircraft were the responsibility of the first group. The second developed the propulsion system. The efforts of both the aerodynamics and propulsion groups were monitored and reviewed for weight considerations and structural feasibility by the third group. Integration of the design required considerable interaction between the groups in the final stages. The fuselage length of the final conceptual design was 107.0 ft, while the diameter of the fuselage was 7.6 ft. The delta wing design consisted of an aspect ratio of 1.9 with a wing span of 47.75 ft and mid-chord length of 61.0 ft. A SNECMA MCV 99 variable-cycle engine design was chosen for this aircraft.

  14. Tesseract: Supersonic business transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshotko, Eli; Garbinski, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This year, the senior level Aerospace Design class at Case Western Reserve University developed a conceptual design of a supersonic business transport. Due to the growing trade between Asia and the United States, a transpacific range has been chosen for the aircraft. A Mach number of 2.2 was chosen too because it provides reasonable block times and allows the use of a large range of materials without a need for active cooling. A payload of 2500 lbs. has been assumed corresponding to a complement of nine (passengers and crew) plus some light cargo. With these general requirements set, the class was broken down into three groups. The aerodynamics of the aircraft were the responsibility of the first group. The second developed the propulsion system. The efforts of both the aerodynamics and propulsion groups were monitored and reviewed for weight considerations and structural feasibility by the third group. Integration of the design required considerable interaction between the groups in the final stages. The fuselage length of the final conceptual design was 107.0 ft. while the diameter of the fuselage was 7.6 ft. The delta wing design consisted of an aspect ratio of 1.9 with a wing span of 47.75 ft and midcord length of 61.0 ft. A SNEMCA MCV 99 variable-cycle engine design was chosen for this aircraft.

  15. J-85 jet engine noise measured in the ONERA S1 wind tunnel and extrapolated to far field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Julienne, Alain; Atencio, Adolph, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Noise from a J-85 turbojet with a conical, convergent nozzle was measured in simulated flight in the ONERA S1 Wind Tunnel. Data are presented for several flight speeds up to 130 m/sec and for radiation angles of 40 to 160 degrees relative to the upstream direction. The jet was operated with subsonic and sonic exhaust speeds. A moving microphone on a 2 m sideline was used to survey the radiated sound field in the acoustically treated, closed test section. The data were extrapolated to a 122 m sideline by means of a multiple-sideline source-location method, which was used to identify the acoustic source regions, directivity patterns, and near field effects. The source-location method is described along with its advantages and disadvantages. Results indicate that the effects of simulated flight on J-85 noise are significant. At the maximum forward speed of 130 m/sec, the peak overall sound levels in the aft quadrant were attentuated approximately 10 dB relative to sound levels of the engine operated statically. As expected, the simulated flight and static data tended to merge in the forward quadrant as the radiation angle approached 40 degrees. There is evidence that internal engine or shock noise was important in the forward quadrant. The data are compared with published predictions for flight effects on pure jet noise and internal engine noise. A new empirical prediction is presented that relates the variation of internally generated engine noise or broadband shock noise to forward speed. Measured near field noise extrapolated to far field agrees reasonably well with data from similar engines tested statically outdoors, in flyover, in a wind tunnel, and on the Bertin Aerotrain. Anomalies in the results for the forward quadrant and for angles above 140 degrees are discussed. The multiple-sideline method proved to be cumbersome in this application, and it did not resolve all of the uncertainties associated with measurements of jet noise close to the jet. The

  16. Effect of Engine Installation on Jet Noise using a Hybrid LES/RANS Approach Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Installation effects arising from propulsion airframe interaction are known to produce substantial variations in the in-situ jet noise. A hybrid LES/RANS...

  17. Linking the central engine to the jet properties in radio loud AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Olguín-Iglesias, A; Chavushyan, V; Valtaoja, E; Añorve, C; Nilsson, K; Kotilainen, J; Tornikoski, M

    2015-01-01

    We explore the connection between the black hole mass and its relativistic jet for a sample of radio-loud AGN (z < 1), in which the relativistic jet parameters are well estimated by means of long term monitoring with the 14m Mets\\"ahovi millimeter wave telescope and the Very Long Base-line Array (VLBA). NIR host galaxy images taken with the NOTCam on the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) and retrieved from the 2MASS all-sky survey allowed us to perform a detailed surface brightness decomposition of the host galaxies in our sample and to estimate reliable black hole masses via their bulge luminosities. We present early results on the correlations between black hole mass and the relativistic jet parameters. Our preliminary results suggest that the more massive the black hole is, the faster and the more luminous jet it produces.

  18. Transport of exhaust products in the near trail of a jet engine under atmospheric conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karcher, B. [Universitat Muenchen, Freising (Germany)

    1994-07-01

    The transport of exhaust effluents and the possibility of water ice contrail formation are investigated under the specific fluid dynamical conditions in the near exhaust trail of a subsonic jet aircraft at cruise altitude. By means of a computational model describing the two-dimensional turbulent mixing of a single jet of hot exhaust gas with the atmosphere, representative results are discussed on the temperature and saturation ratio evolutions of air parcels in the jet flow field as well as on radial distributions of exhaust effluents undergoing chemical reactions behind the nozzle exit with prescribed, typical net reaction rates. The results underline the importance of a simultaneous treatment of spatially resolved jet expansion together with microphysical and chemical processes, because this coupling leads to distinct concentration patterns for various classes of chemical reactants and is essential for the detailed prediction of contrails.

  19. Linking the central engine to the jet properties in radio loud AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olguín-Iglesias, A.; León-Tavares, J.; Chavushyan, V.; Valtaoja, E.; Añorve, C.; Nilsson, K.; Kotilainen, J.; Tornikoski, M.

    2015-03-01

    We explore the connection between the black hole mass and its relativistic jet for a sample of radio-loud AGN (z < 1), in which the relativistic jet parameters are well estimated by means of long term monitoring with the 14m Metsähovi millimeter wave telescope and the Very Long Base-line Array (VLBA). NIR host galaxy images taken with the NOTCam on the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) and retrieved from the 2MASS all-sky survey allowed us to perform a detailed surface brightness decomposition of the host galaxies in our sample and to estimate reliable black hole masses via their bulge luminosities. We present early results on the correlations between black hole mass and the relativistic jet parameters. Our preliminary results suggest that the more massive the black hole is, the faster and the more luminous jet it produces.

  20. Engine jet entrainment in the near field of an aircraft; Entrainement du jet d`un reacteur dans le champ aerodynamique proche d`un avion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, F.; Jacquin, L.; Laverdant, A.

    1997-12-31

    A simplified approach has been applied to analyse the mixing and entrainment processes of the engine exhaust through their interaction with the vortex wake of an aircraft. Our investigation is focused on the near field, extending from exit nozzle to the beginning of the vortex phase (i.e. to about twenty seconds after the wake is generated). This study is performed using an integral model and a numerical simulation for a two engine large civil aircraft. The properties of the wing-tip vortices on the calculation of the dilution ratio (defined as a tracer concentration) have been shown. The mixing process is also affected by the buoyancy effect, but only after the jet regime, when the trapping in the vortex core has occurred. Qualitative comparison with contrail photography shows similar features. Finally the distortion and stretching of the plume streamlines inside the vortices can be observed, and the role of the descent of the vortices on the maximum tracer concentration has been discussed. (author) 19 refs.

  1. Noise data for a twin-engine commercial jet aircraft flying conventional, steep, and two-segment approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, E. C., Jr.; Mueller, A. W.; Hamilton, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Center-line noise measurements of a twin-engine commercial jet aircraft were made during steep landing approach profiles, and during two-segment approach profiles for comparison with similar measurements made during conventional approaches. The steep and two-segment approaches showed significant noise reductions when compared with the -3 deg base line. The measured noise data were also used to develop a method for estimating the noise under the test aircraft at thrust and altitude conditions typical of current landing procedures and of landing procedures under development for the Advanced Air Traffic Control System.

  2. Hygroscopic properties of jet engine combustor particles during the hot-end simulator (HES) PartEmis campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gysel, M.; Nyeki, S.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Petzold, A.; Wilson, C.W.

    2003-03-01

    The influence of the turbine section of a jet engine on particle properties was investigated by means of a hot end simulator (HES) during the EC project PartEmis. Hygroscopic growth factors were measured using a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (H-TDMA). The results suggest a slight in-crease of particle hygroscopicity through the HES, but the main particle features are determined at the combustor exit already, i.e. particle hygroscopicity increases with increasing fuel sulphur content (FSC). (author)

  3. The methodology of variable management of propellant fuel consumption by jet-propulsion engines of a spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtun, V. S.

    2012-12-01

    Traditionally, management of propellant fuel consumption on board of a spacecraft is only associated with the operation of jet-propulsion engines (JPE) that are actuator devices of motion control systems (MCS). The efficiency of propellant fuel consumption depends not only on the operation of the MCS, but also, to one extent or another, on all systems functioning on board of a spacecraft, and on processes that occur in them and involve conversion of variable management of propellant fuel consumption by JPEs as a constituent part of the control of the complex process of spacecraft flight.

  4. Spreading of Exhaust Jet from 16 Inch Ream Jet at Mach Number 2.0 / Fred Wilcox, Donald Pennington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Fred; Pennington, Donald

    1952-01-01

    An investigation of the jet-spreading characteristics of a 16 inch ram-jet engine was conducted in the 8 by 6 foot supersonic tunnel at a Mach number of 2.0; both a converging nozzle having a contraction ratio of 0.71 and a cylindrical extension to the combustion chamber were used. The jet boundaries determined by means of pitot pressure surveys were compared with boundaries calculated from one-dimensional continuity and momentum relations. For the cylindrical nozzle, the jet reaches its maximum diameter, 4 percent greater than calculated, about 0.6 nozzle-exit diameter downstream of the nozzle exit. The maximum diameter for the converging nozzle was 7 percent greater than calculated from one dimensional relations and occurred from 1 to 1.5 nozzle-exit diameters downstream of the exit. Non dimensional maximum jet diameters agreed closely with results of an investigation by Rousso and Baughman; these data were obtained with low-temperature jets exhausting into a stream at a Mach number of 1.91 from nozzles having exit diameters of 0.75 inch.

  5. Supersonic unstalled flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Goldstein, M. E.; Hartmann, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Recently two flutter analyses have been developed at NASA Lewis Research Center to predict the onset of supersonic unstalled flutter of a cascade of two-dimensional airfoils. The first of these analyzes the onset of supersonic flutter at low levels of aerodynamic loading (i.e., backpressure), while the second examines the occurrence of supersonic flutter at moderate levels of aerodynamic loading. Both of these analyses are based on the linearized unsteady inviscid equations of gas dynamics to model the flow field surrounding the cascade. The details of the development of the solution to each of these models have been published. The objective of the present paper is to utilize these analyses in a parametric study to show the effects of cascade geometry, inlet Mach number, and backpressure on the onset of single and multi degree of freedom unstalled supersonic flutter. Several of the results from this study are correlated against experimental qualitative observation to validate the models.

  6. A study to estimate and compare the total particulate matter emission indices (EIN) between traditional jet fuel and two blends of Jet A/Camelina biofuel used in a high by-pass turbofan engine: A case study of Honeywell TFE-109 engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shila, Jacob Joshua Howard

    The aviation industry is expected to grow at an annual rate of 5% until the year 2031 according to Boeing Outlook Report of 2012. Although the aerospace manufacturers have introduced new aircraft and engines technologies to reduce the emissions generated by aircraft engines, about 15% of all aircraft in 2032 will be using the older technologies. Therefore, agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Astronautics Administration (NASA), Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) among others together with some academic institutions have been working to characterize both physical and chemical characteristics of the aircraft particulate matter emissions to further understand their effects to the environment. The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is also working to establish an inventory with Particulate Matter emissions for all the aircraft turbine engines for certification purposes. This steps comes as a result of smoke measurements not being sufficient to provide detailed information on the effects of Particulate Matter (PM) emissions as far as the health and environmental concerns. The use of alternative fuels is essential to reduce the impacts of emissions released by Jet engines since alternative aviation fuels have been studied to lower particulate matter emissions in some types of engines families. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the emission indices of the biofuel blended fuels were lower than the emission indices of the traditional jet fuel at selected engine thrust settings. The biofuel blends observed were 75% Jet A-25% Camelina blend biofuel, and 50% Jet A-50% Jet A blend biofuel. The traditional jet fuel in this study was the Jet A fuel. The results of this study may be useful in establishing a baseline for aircraft engines' PM inventory. Currently the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) engines emissions database contains only gaseous emissions data for only the TFE 731

  7. Transient combustion process of an IDI diesel engine with dual-throat jet at cold-starting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.; Zhu, X.; He, X.; Peng, L.

    1996-09-01

    The dual-throat jet technique has been successfully used to improve cold-starting of the swirl-type IDI diesel engines. It has been proven that, with the aid of the second throat connecting the swirl chamber and the main combustion chamber, the cold-starting process was more stable, quieter and cleaner. An intensive fundamental experimental investigation of the transient process of the ignition and combustion at cold-starting has-been conducted on a swirl-chamber IDI diesel engine with the help of high-speed photography. Based on the results of this investigation, the following conclusions have been made: (1) there exist three types of heat release rate pattern at the cold-starting, different patterns will result in different engine behavior; (2) the secondary throat has two effects on the engine starting characteristics: (a) improvement of the ignition conditions in the main chamber by directly delivering pilot fuel; (b) improvement of the fuel/air mixing process by intensifying turbulence in the swirl chamber, which depends on the geometrical shape and orientation of the throat; (3) the counter stream of air against the fuel spray accelerates dispersion and atomization of the fuel spray in the swirl chamber. It plays the primary role in assisting the cold starting of the engine.

  8. Spectroscopic support of laser remote sensing of the sulfur dioxide gas in the jet of engine exhaust gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsekhovskaya, O. K.; Kashirskii, D. E.; Egorov, O. V.

    2013-09-01

    The feasibility of SO2 registration in the plume of a jet engine as one of the methods of monitoring of its operation quality is investigated. Spectral characteristics are calculated using the line by line method, information-computing complex TRAVA developed by the authors, and the compiled spectroscopic database on high-temperature SO2. Unlike the HITRAN database, the original spectroscopic data possess predictability up to T = 1500 K. It is established that in case of active SO2 detection using a CO laser, the laser line corresponding to the 32-31 Р5 transition is promising for temperatures T = 300-1100 K. In addition, the most suitable range of the spectrum for passive sensing of hot SO2 in the engine plume - 1330.0-1331.6 cm-1 - is established in which the useful signal level exceeds background radiation for a minimum SO2 concentration (5 ppm).

  9. Low cycle fatigue numerical estimation of a high pressure turbine disc for the AL-31F jet engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spodniak Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the description of an approximate numerical estimation approach of a low cycle fatigue of a high pressure turbine disc for the AL-31F turbofan jet engine. The numerical estimation is based on the finite element method carried out in the SolidWorks software. The low cycle fatigue assessment of a high pressure turbine disc was carried out on the basis of dimensional, shape and material disc characteristics, which are available for the particular high pressure engine turbine. The method described here enables relatively fast setting of economically feasible low cycle fatigue of the assessed high pressure turbine disc using a commercially available software. The numerical estimation of accuracy of a low cycle fatigue depends on the accuracy of required input data for the particular investigated object.

  10. Low cycle fatigue numerical estimation of a high pressure turbine disc for the AL-31F jet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spodniak, Miroslav; Klimko, Marek; Hocko, Marián; Žitek, Pavel

    This article deals with the description of an approximate numerical estimation approach of a low cycle fatigue of a high pressure turbine disc for the AL-31F turbofan jet engine. The numerical estimation is based on the finite element method carried out in the SolidWorks software. The low cycle fatigue assessment of a high pressure turbine disc was carried out on the basis of dimensional, shape and material disc characteristics, which are available for the particular high pressure engine turbine. The method described here enables relatively fast setting of economically feasible low cycle fatigue of the assessed high pressure turbine disc using a commercially available software. The numerical estimation of accuracy of a low cycle fatigue depends on the accuracy of required input data for the particular investigated object.

  11. The formation of interstellar jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Canto, J.; Rozyczka, M.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of interstellar jets by convergence of supersonic conical flows and the further dynamical evolution of these jets are investigated theoretically by means of numerical simulations. The results are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail. Strong radiative cooling is shown to result in jets with Mach numbers 2.5-29 propagating to lengths 50-100 times their original widths, with condensation of swept-up interstellar matter at Mach 5 or greater. The characteristics of so-called molecular outflows are well reproduced by the simulations of low-Mach-number and quasi-adiabatic jets.

  12. Numerical laser beam propagation using a Large Eddy Simulation refractive index field representing a jet engine exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöqvist, Lars; Henriksson, Markus; Fedina, Ekaterina; Fureby, Christer

    2010-10-01

    The exhaust from jet engines introduces extreme turbulence levels in local environments around aircrafts. This may degrade the performance of electro-optical missile warning and laser-based DIRCM systems used to protect aircrafts against heat-seeking missiles. Full scale trials using real engines are expensive and difficult to perform motivating numerical simulations of the turbulence properties within the jet engine exhaust. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) is a computational fluid dynamics method that can be used to calculate spatial and temporal refractive index dynamics of the turbulent flow in the engine exhaust. From LES simulations the instantaneous refractive index in each grid point can be derived and interpolated to phase screens for numerical laser beam propagation or used to estimate aberration effects from optical path differences. The high computation load of LES limits the available data in terms of the computational volume and number of time steps. In addition the phase screen method used in laser beam propagation may also be too slow. For this reason extraction of statistical parameters from the turbulence field and statistical beam propagation methods are studied. The temporal variation of the refractive index is used to define a spatially varying structure constant. Ray-tracing through the mean refractive index field provides integrated static aberrations and the path integrated structure constant. These parameters can be used in classical statistical parameterised models describing propagation through turbulence. One disadvantage of using the structure constant description is that the temporal information is lost. Methods for studying the variation of optical aberrations based on models of Zernike coefficients are discussed. The results of the propagation calculations using the different methods are compared to each other and to available experimental data. Advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are briefly discussed.

  13. Comparison of PM emissions from a commercial jet engine burning conventional, biomass, and Fischer-Tropsch fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Prem; Hagen, Donald E; Whitefield, Philip D

    2011-12-15

    Rising fuel costs, an increasing desire to enhance security of energy supply, and potential environmental benefits have driven research into alternative renewable fuels for commercial aviation applications. This paper reports the results of the first measurements of particulate matter (PM) emissions from a CFM56-7B commercial jet engine burning conventional and alternative biomass- and, Fischer-Tropsch (F-T)-based fuels. PM emissions reductions are observed with all fuels and blends when compared to the emissions from a reference conventional fuel, Jet A1, and are attributed to fuel properties associated with the fuels and blends studied. Although the alternative fuel candidates studied in this campaign offer the potential for large PM emissions reductions, with the exception of the 50% blend of F-T fuel, they do not meet current standards for aviation fuel and thus cannot be considered as certified replacement fuels. Over the ICAO Landing Takeoff Cycle, which is intended to simulate aircraft engine operations that affect local air quality, the overall PM number-based emissions for the 50% blend of F-T fuel were reduced by 34 ± 7%, and the mass-based emissions were reduced by 39 ± 7%.

  14. Condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhausts of rocket engines: 1. Heterogeneous condensation of combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platov, Yu. V.; Semenov, A. I.; Filippov, B. V.

    2014-01-01

    Condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhausts of rocket engines during last stages of Proton, Molniya, and Start launchers operating in the upper atmospheric with different types of fuels is considered. Particle heating is taken into account with emission of latent heat of condensation and energy loss due to radiation and heat exchange with combustion products. Using the solution of the heat balance and condensed particle mass equations, the temporal change in the temperature and thickness of the condensate layer is obtained. Practically, no condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the jet exhaust of a Start launcher occurs. In plumes of Proton and Molniya launchers, the condensation of water vapor and carbon dioxide can start at distances of 120-170 m and 450-650 m from the engine nozzle, respectively. In the course of condensation, the thickness of the "water" layer on particles can exceed 100 Å, and the thickness of carbon dioxide can exceed 60 Å.

  15. Technical design note: differential infrared thermography of methane jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golzke, Hendrik; Leick, Philippe; Dreizler, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    In this note a novel approach for temperature measurements of methane jets is presented. Differential infrared thermography (DIT) is a contactless, tracer-free temperature determination method for semi-transparent objects, based on an infrared camera. DIT does not rely on a specific a priori value for the emissivity, but typically assumes constant emissivity within the relevant wavelength band. This is reasonable for complex hydrocarbons (i.e. as in liquid fuel sprays) but no longer justified for the discrete absorption spectrum of simple molecules such as methane. An alternative approximation is suggested and discussed, and the feasibility of DIT for the study of supercritical methane jets in a pressure chamber at conditions relevant for internal combustion engines is demonstrated. As DIT also determines the gas emissivity, a combined two-dimensional temperature and projected density visualisation becomes possible and is shown to highlight supersonic structurues such as Mach disks.

  16. DBD Plasma Actuators for Flow Control in Air Vehicles and Jet Engines - Simulation of Flight Conditions in Test Chambers by Density Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashpis, David E.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma actuators for active flow control in aircraft and jet engines need to be tested in the laboratory to characterize their performance at flight operating conditions. DBD plasma actuators generate a wall-jet electronically by creating weakly ionized plasma, therefore their performance is affected by gas discharge properties, which, in turn, depend on the pressure and temperature at the actuator placement location. Characterization of actuators is initially performed in a laboratory chamber without external flow. The pressure and temperature at the actuator flight operation conditions need to be simultaneously set in the chamber. A simplified approach is desired. It is assumed that the plasma discharge depends only on the gas density, while other temperature effects are assumed to be negligible. Therefore, tests can be performed at room temperature with chamber pressure set to yield the same density as in operating flight conditions. The needed chamber pressures are shown for altitude flight of an air vehicle and for jet engines at sea-level takeoff and altitude cruise conditions. Atmospheric flight conditions are calculated from standard atmosphere with and without shock waves. The engine data was obtained from four generic engine models; 300-, 150-, and 50-passenger (PAX) aircraft engines, and a military jet-fighter engine. The static and total pressure, temperature, and density distributions along the engine were calculated for sea-level takeoff and for altitude cruise conditions. The corresponding chamber pressures needed to test the actuators were calculated. The results show that, to simulate engine component flows at in-flight conditions, plasma actuator should be tested over a wide range of pressures. For the four model engines the range is from 12.4 to 0.03 atm, depending on the placement of the actuator in the engine. For example, if a DBD plasma actuator is to be placed at the compressor exit of a 300 PAX engine, it

  17. Bioprinting by laser-induced forward transfer for tissue engineering applications: jet formation modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezel, C; Hallo, L [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, UMR 5107 Universite Bordeaux 1-CNRS-CEA, 33405 Talence, Cedex (France); Souquet, A; Guillemot, F, E-mail: mezel@celia.u-bordeaux1.f [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Universite Bordeaux 2 - UMR 577, 146 Rue Leo Saignat, 33076 Bordeaux Cedex (France)

    2010-03-15

    In this paper, a nanosecond LIFT process is analyzed both from experimental and modeling points of view. Experimental results are first presented and compared to simple estimates obtained from physical analysis, i.e. energy balance, jump relations and analytical pocket dynamics. Then a self-consistent 2D axisymmetric modeling strategy is presented. It is shown that data accessible from experiments, i.e. jet diameter and velocity, can be reproduced. Moreover, some specific mechanisms involved in the rear-surface deformation and jet formation may be described by some scales of hydrodynamic process, i.e. shock waves propagation and expansion waves, as a consequence of the laser heating. It shows that the LIFT process is essentially driven by hydrodynamics and thermal transfer, and that a coupled approach including self-consistent laser energy deposition, heating by thermal conduction and specific models for matter is required.

  18. Bioprinting by laser-induced forward transfer for tissue engineering applications: jet formation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mézel, C; Souquet, A; Hallo, L; Guillemot, F

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, a nanosecond LIFT process is analyzed both from experimental and modeling points of view. Experimental results are first presented and compared to simple estimates obtained from physical analysis, i.e. energy balance, jump relations and analytical pocket dynamics. Then a self-consistent 2D axisymmetric modeling strategy is presented. It is shown that data accessible from experiments, i.e. jet diameter and velocity, can be reproduced. Moreover, some specific mechanisms involved in the rear-surface deformation and jet formation may be described by some scales of hydrodynamic process, i.e. shock waves propagation and expansion waves, as a consequence of the laser heating. It shows that the LIFT process is essentially driven by hydrodynamics and thermal transfer, and that a coupled approach including self-consistent laser energy deposition, heating by thermal conduction and specific models for matter is required.

  19. VSOP-2 : a space VLBI mission to image central engines and jet launching regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameno, Seiji; Tsuboi, Masato; Murata, Yasuhiro; Doi, Akihiro; Asaki, Yoshiharu; Mochizuki, Nanako; Hagiwara, Yoshi-Aki; Kino, Motoki; Nagai, Hiroshi; Asada, Keiichi; Inoue, Makoto; Sudou, Hiroshi; Sawada-Satoh, Satoko

    VSOP-2 is a space VLBI program using the spacecraft ASTRO-G to be launched in 2015 by the Japan Aerospace eXploration Agency. The array consisting of a 9-m antenna in orbit and ground radio telescopes offers angular resolutions of 40, 80, and 210 microarcsec at 43, 22, and 8 GHz, respectively. The resolution allows us to image accretion disks and jet launching regions in nearby active galactic nuclei such as M 87. Dual polarization receivers enable full Stokes images at all frequency to illustrate magnetic fields in jets. Phase referencing is capable for astrometry by 60-sec-cycle switching maneuvers. Higher sensitivity than the VSOP (HALCA) is achieved by cooled receivers at 22 and 43 GHz, 1-Gbps wideband downlink, and longer coherent integration. We will introduce the mission overview, observational specifications, and key sciences of the VSOP-2. We call for community's scientific contributions to the mission.

  20. Design, fabrication, and testing of a SMA hybrid composite jet engine chevron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis L.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Cano, Roberto J.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2006-01-01

    Control of jet noise continues to be an important research topic. Exhaust nozzle chevrons have been shown to reduce jet noise, but parametric effects are not well understood. Additionally, thrust loss due to chevrons at cruise suggests significant benefit from deployable chevrons. The focus of this study is development of an active chevron concept for the primary purpose of parametric studies for jet noise reduction in the laboratory and technology development to leverage for full scale systems. The active chevron concept employed in this work consists of a laminated composite structure with embedded shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators, termed a SMA hybrid composite (SMAHC). The actuators are embedded on one side of the middle surface such that thermal excitation generates a moment and deflects the structure. A brief description of the chevron design is given followed by details of the fabrication approach. Results from bench top tests are presented and correlated with numerical predictions from a model for such structures that was recently implemented in MSC.Nastran and ABAQUS. Excellent performance and agreement with predictions is demonstrated. Results from tests in a representative flow environment are also presented. Excellent performance is again achieved for both open- and closed-loop tests, the latter demonstrating control to a specified immersion into the flow. The actuation authority and immersion performance is shown to be relatively insensitive to nozzle pressure ratio (NPR). Very repeatable immersion control with modest power requirements is demonstrated.