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Sample records for supersonic helical tip

  1. Effect of Mach number on thermoelectric performance of SiC ceramics nose-tip for supersonic vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Xiao-Yi; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This paper focus on the effects of Mach number on thermoelectric energy conversion for the limitation of aero-heating and the feasibility of energy harvesting on supersonic vehicles. A model of nose-tip structure constructed with SiC ceramics is developed to numerically study the thermoelectric performance in a supersonic flow field by employing the computational fluid dynamics and the thermal conduction theory. Results are given in the cases of different Mach numbers. Moreover, the thermoelectric performance in each case is predicted with and without Thomson heat, respectively. Due to the increase of Mach number, both the temperature difference and the conductive heat flux between the hot side and the cold side of nose tip are increased. This results in the growth of the thermoelectric power generated and the energy conversion efficiency. With respect to the Thomson effect, over 50% of total power generated converts to Thomson heat, which greatly reduces the thermoelectric power and efficiency. However, whether the Thomson effect is considered or not, with the Mach number increasing from 2.5 to 4.5, the thermoelectric performance can be effectively improved. -- Highlights: • Thermoelectric SiC nose-tip structure for aerodynamic heat harvesting of high-speed vehicles is studied. • Thermoelectric performance is predicted based on numerical methods and experimental thermoelectric parameters. • The effects of Mach number on thermoelectric performance are studied in the present paper. • Results with respect to the Thomson effect are also explored. • Output power and energy efficiency of the thermoelectric nose-tip are increased with the increase of Mach number

  2. Local flow measurements at the inlet spike tip of a Mach 3 supersonic cruise airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, H. J.; Montoya, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The flow field at the left inlet spike tip of a YF-12A airplane was examined using at 26 deg included angle conical flow sensor to obtain measurements at free-stream Mach numbers from 1.6 to 3.0. Local flow angularity, Mach number, impact pressure, and mass flow were determined and compared with free-stream values. Local flow changes occurred at the same time as free-stream changes. The local flow usually approached the spike centerline from the upper outboard side because of spike cant and toe-in. Free-stream Mach number influenced the local flow angularity; as Mach number increased above 2.2, local angle of attack increased and local sideslip angle decreased. Local Mach number was generally 3 percent less than free-stream Mach number. Impact-pressure ratio and mass flow ratio increased as free-stream Mach number increased above 2.2, indicating a beneficial forebody compression effect. No degradation of the spike tip instrumentation was observed after more than 40 flights in the high-speed thermal environment encountered by the airplane. The sensor is rugged, simple, and sensitive to small flow changes. It can provide accurate imputs necessary to control an inlet.

  3. [TIPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzini, Augusto; Carrillo, Alvaro; Cantella, Raúl

    1998-01-01

    Esophageal hemorrage due to variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients represents a serious problem for the physician in charge, especially in this country where liver transplants are inexistent; and also, it is a drama for the patient and its familly. We propose here the Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS). Twenty one patients were part of a study where 23 TIPS were placed, observing an immediate improval in 18 of them, a rebleeding in 2, within the first 24 and 48 hours. An embolization of the coronary veins was performed in the procedure in 15 patients, and a second intervention due to rebleeding in 2 of them. In the latter patients, the embolization of the coronary veins was rutinary.The survival of the patients has been outstanding.We conclude that this interventional procedure is a worldwide reality in the treatment of esophageal hemorrage by variceal bleeding due to portal hipertension, and it does not cut down the probability of liver transplant, unfortunately inexistent in our country. This procedure results in a low morbimortality with an adequate quality of life.

  4. The Tip of the Four N-Terminal α-Helices of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin Contains the Interaction Site with Membrane Phosphatidylserine Facilitating Small GTPases Glucosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Varela Chavez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL is a powerful virulence factor responsible for severe toxic shock in man and animals. TcsL belongs to the large clostridial glucosylating toxin (LCGT family which inactivates small GTPases by glucosylation with uridine-diphosphate (UDP-glucose as a cofactor. Notably, TcsL modifies Rac and Ras GTPases, leading to drastic alteration of the actin cytoskeleton and cell viability. TcsL enters cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the N-terminal glucosylating domain (TcsL-cat into the cytosol. TcsL-cat was found to preferentially bind to phosphatidylserine (PS-containing membranes and to increase the glucosylation of Rac anchored to the lipid membrane. We have previously reported that the N-terminal four helical bundle structure (1–93 domain recognizes a broad range of lipids, but that TcsL-cat specifically binds to PS and phosphatidic acid. Here, we show using mutagenesis that the PS binding site is localized on the tip of the four-helix bundle which is rich in positively-charged amino acids. Residues Y14, V15, F17, and R18 on loop 1, between helices 1 and 2, in coordination with R68 from loop 3, between helices 3 and 4, form a pocket which accommodates L-serine. The functional PS-binding site is required for TcsL-cat binding to the plasma membrane and subsequent cytotoxicity. TcsL-cat binding to PS facilitates a high enzymatic activity towards membrane-anchored Ras by about three orders of magnitude as compared to Ras in solution. The PS-binding site is conserved in LCGTs, which likely retain a common mechanism of binding to the membrane for their full activity towards membrane-bound GTPases.

  5. Design, Fabrication, and Performance Test of a 100-W Helical-Blade Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine at Low Tip-Speed Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dowon Han

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A 100-W helical-blade vertical-axis wind turbine was designed, manufactured, and tested in a wind tunnel. A relatively low tip-speed ratio of 1.1 was targeted for usage in an urban environment at a rated wind speed of 9 m/s and a rotational speed of 170 rpm. The basic dimensions were determined through a momentum-based design method according to the IEC 61400-2 protocol. The power output was estimated by a mathematical model that takes into account the aerodynamic performance of the NACA0018 blade shape. The lift and drag of the blade with respect to the angle of attack during rotation were calculated using 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation to take into account stall region. The average power output calculated by the model was 108.34 W, which satisfies the target output of 100 W. The manufactured wind turbine was tested in a large closed-circuit wind tunnel, and the power outputs were measured for given wind speeds. At the design condition, the measured power output was 114.7 W, which is 5.9% higher than that of the mathematical model. This result validates the proposed design method and power estimation by the mathematical model.

  6. Helical-Tip Needle for Transthoracic Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsy of Lung Tumors: Results of a Pilot Prospective Comparative Study with a Standard Tru-Cut Needle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veltri, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.veltri@unito.it; Busso, Marco; Sardo, Diego; Angelino, Valeria; Priola, Adriano M. [University of Torino, Department of Radiology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital (Italy); Novello, Silvia [University of Torino, Department of Oncology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital (Italy); Barba, Matteo [University of Torino, Department of Radiology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital (Italy); Gatti, Gaia; Righi, Luisella [University of Torino, Department of Pathology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital (Italy)

    2017-06-15

    PurposeTo prospectively evaluate feasibility and diagnostic performance of the 14-gauge helical-tip (Spirotome™, Cook{sup ®} Medical, Bloomington, USA) needle in transthoracic needle biopsy (TTNB) of lung lesions, compared to a conventional 18-gauge Tru-Cut needle.Materials and MethodsStudy was institutional review board approved, with informed consent obtained. Data from synchronous Spirotome and Tru-Cut image-guided TTNB of 20 consecutive patients with malignant peripheral lung tumors larger than 3 cm were enrolled for pathologic characterization and mutational analysis. Samples obtained with Spirotome and Tru-Cut needle were compared for fragmentation, length, weight, morphologic and immunohistochemistry typifying, tumor cellularity (TC) and DNA concentration.ResultsThe technical success rate for TTNB with Spirotome was 100%, and no major complications occurred. Less fragmentation (mean 2 vs. 3 fragments, P = .418), greater weight (mean 13 vs. 8.5 mg, P = .027) and lower length (mean 10.2 vs. 12.6 mm, P = .174) were observed with Spirotome compared to Tru-Cut needle. Accuracy of Spirotome and Tru-Cut needle in defining cancer histotype was similar (90%). Absolute and relative TC (mean 42 vs. 38, 124 vs. 108/10HPF), and DNA concentration (mean 49.6 vs. 39.0 ng/μl) were higher with Spirotome compared to Tru-Cut needle, with no statistical significance (P = .787 and P = .140, respectively).Conclusions Percutaneous 14-gauge Spirotome TTNB of selected lesions is feasible and accurate. It provides adequate samples for diagnosis, comparable to 18-gauge Tru-Cut needle, with a higher amount of tumor tissue (weight, TC, DNA concentration) even in shorter samples.

  7. Supersonic compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.; Breidenthal, Robert E.

    2016-04-12

    A supersonic compressor including a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a diffuser. The diffuser includes a plurality of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions, for deceleration of gas to subsonic conditions and then for expansion of subsonic gas, to change kinetic energy of the gas to static pressure. The aerodynamic ducts include vortex generating structures for controlling boundary layer, and structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when the aerodynamic ducts are designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are provided having an aspect ratio of in excess of two to one, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.

  8. Low Density Supersonic Decelerators

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator project will demonstrate the use of inflatable structures and advanced parachutes that operate at supersonic speeds to more...

  9. Effect of swirling device on flow behavior in a supersonic separator for natural gas dehydration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, Chuang; Li, Anqi; Walther, Jens Honore

    2016-01-01

    is designed for an annular supersonic separator. The supersonic swirling separation flow of natural gas is calculated using the Reynolds Stress model. The results show that the viscous heating and strong swirling flow cause the adverse pressure in the annular channel, which may negatively affect......The supersonic separator is a revolutionary device to remove the condensable components from gas mixtures. One of the key issues for this novel technology is the complex supersonic swirling flow that is not well understood. A swirling device composed of an ellipsoid and several helical blades...

  10. Tips for TIPS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, C.F.

    2015-01-01

    The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure is one of the most technically challenging procedures in interventional radiology. During the procedure, interventional radiologists (IRs) insert very thin and long instruments through a little incision in the patient’s neck. They

  11. Helical filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, Nicholas; Lim, Khan; Durand, Magali; Baudelet, Matthieu; Richardson, Martin [Townes Laser Institute, CREOL—The College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Johnson, Eric [Micro-Photonics Laboratory – Center for Optical Material Science, Clemson, Anderson, South Carolina 29634 (United States)

    2014-06-30

    The shaping of laser-induced filamenting plasma channels into helical structures by guiding the process with a non-diffracting beam is demonstrated. This was achieved using a Bessel beam superposition to control the phase of an ultrafast laser beam possessing intensities sufficient to induce Kerr effect driven non-linear self-focusing. Several experimental methods were used to characterize the resulting beams and confirm the observed structures are laser air filaments.

  12. Bearing capacity of helical pile foundation in peat soil from different, diameter and spacing of helical plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatnanta, F.; Satibi, S.; Muhardi

    2018-03-01

    In an area dominated by thick peat soil layers, driven piles foundation is often used. These piles are generally skin friction piles where the pile tips do not reach hard stratum. Since the bearing capacity of the piles rely on the resistance of their smooth skin, the bearing capacity of the piles are generally low. One way to increase the bearing capacity of the piles is by installing helical plates around the pile tips. Many research has been performed on helical pile foundation. However, literature on the use of helical pile foundation on peat soil is still hardly found. This research focus on the study of axial bearing capacity of helical pile foundation in peat soil, especially in Riau Province. These full-scale tests on helical pile foundation were performed in a rectangular box partially embedded into the ground. The box is filled with peat soil, which was taken from Rimbo Panjang area in the district of Kampar, Riau Province. Several helical piles with different number, diameter and spacing of the helical plates have been tested and analysed. The tests result show that helical pile with three helical plates of uniform diameter has better bearing capacity compared to other helical piles with varying diameter and different number of helical plates. The bearing capacity of helical pile foundation is affected by the spacing between helical plates. It is found that the effective helical plates spacing for helical pile foundation with diameter of 15cm to 35cm is between 20cm to 30cm. This behaviour may be considered to apply to other type of helical pile foundations in peat soil.

  13. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

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  14. CPAP Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

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  15. Tipping Point

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  16. Tipping Point

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  17. Tipping Point

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  18. CPAP Tips

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  19. Technology Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathematics Teacher, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Some inexpensive or free ways that enable to capture and use images in work are mentioned. The first tip demonstrates the methods of using some of the built-in capabilities of the Macintosh and Windows-based PC operating systems, and the second tip describes methods to capture and create images using SnagIt.

  20. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

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  1. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point The Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash ...

  2. Helicity content and tokamak applications of helicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1986-05-01

    Magnetic helicity is approximately conserved by the turbulence associated with resistive instabilities of plasmas. To generalize the application of the concept of helicity, the helicity content of an arbitrary bounded region of space will be defined. The definition has the virtues that both the helicity content and its time derivative have simple expressions in terms of the poloidal and toroidal magnetic fluxes, the average toroidal loop voltage and the electric potential on the bounding surface, and the volume integral of E-B. The application of the helicity concept to tokamak plasmas is illustrated by a discussion of so-called MHD current drive, an example of a stable tokamak q profile with q less than one in the center, and a discussion of the possibility of a natural steady-state tokamak due to the bootstrap current coupling to tearing instabilities

  3. The Trojan. [supersonic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Trojan is the culmination of thousands of engineering person-hours by the Cones of Silence Design Team. The goal was to design an economically and technologically viable supersonic transport. The Trojan is the embodiment of the latest engineering tools and technology necessary for such an advanced aircraft. The efficient design of the Trojan allows for supersonic cruise of Mach 2.0 for 5,200 nautical miles, carrying 250 passengers. The per aircraft price is placed at $200 million, making the Trojan a very realistic solution for tomorrows transportation needs. The following is a detailed study of the driving factors that determined the Trojan's super design.

  4. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

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  5. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

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  6. Tipping Point

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  7. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sleeping? Here are some tips from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on how to safely and effectively use your CPAP device. Category Education License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ...

  8. CPAP Tips

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    Full Text Available ... opinion count. Sign in ... and use a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device when sleeping? Here are some tips from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on how to safely ...

  9. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... third story of a building. That kind of impact can kill a child or cause severe injuries. ... to prevent a tip-over tragedy. Share Post Facebook Twitter Google Plus Reddit Connect with Me:  Visit ...

  10. Supersonic copper clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.E.; Hansen, S.G.; Geusic, M.E.; Michalopoulos, D.L.; Smalley, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Copper clusters ranging in size from 1 to 29 atoms have been prepared in a supersonic beam by laser vaporization of a rotating copper target rod within the throat of a pulsed supersonic nozzle using helium for the carrier gas. The clusters were cooled extensively in the supersonic expansion [T(translational) 1 to 4 K, T(rotational) = 4 K, T(vibrational) = 20 to 70 K]. These clusters were detected in the supersonic beam by laser photoionization with time-of-flight mass analysis. Using a number of fixed frequency outputs of an exciplex laser, the threshold behavior of the photoionization cross section was monitored as a function of cluster size.nce two-photon ionization (R2PI) with mass selective detection allowed the detection of five new electronic band systems in the region between 2690 and 3200 A, for each of the three naturally occurring isotopic forms of Cu 2 . In the process of scanning the R2PI spectrum of these new electronic states, the ionization potential of the copper dimer was determined to be 7.894 +- 0.015 eV

  11. Helical type vacuum container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owada, Kimio.

    1989-01-01

    Helical type vacuum containers in the prior art lack in considerations for thermal expansion stresses to helical coils, and there is a possibility of coil ruptures. The object of the present invention is to avoid the rupture of helical coils wound around the outer surface of a vacuum container against heat expansion if any. That is, bellows or heat expansion absorbing means are disposed to a cross section of a helical type vacuum container. With such a constitution, thermal expansion of helical coils per se due to temperature elevation of the coils during electric supply can be absorbed by expansion of the bellows or absorption of the heat expansion absorbing means. Further, this can be attained by arranging shear pins in the direction perpendicular to the bellows axis so that the bellows are not distorted when the helical coils are wound around the helical type vacuum container. (I.S.)

  12. CPAP Tips

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  13. Tipping Point

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  14. CPAP Tips

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  15. CPAP Tips

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  16. CPAP Tips

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  17. Development of new tip-loss corrections based on vortex theory and vortex methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre; Gaunaa, Mac

    2014-01-01

    A new analytical formulation of the tip-loss factor is established based on helical vortex lament solutions. The derived tip-loss factor can be applied to wind-turbines, propellers or other rotary wings. Similar numerical formulations are used to assess the influence of wake expansion on tip...

  18. Tip enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, Satoshi

    2007-01-01

    This book discusses the recent advances in the area of near-field Raman scattering, mainly focusing on tip-enhanced and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. Some of the key features covered here are the optical structuring and manipulations, single molecule sensitivity, analysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes, and analytic applications in chemistry, biology and material sciences. This book also discusses the plasmonic materials for better enhancement, and optical antennas. Further, near-field microscopy based on second harmonic generation is also discussed. Chapters have been written by some of the leading scientists in this field, who present some of their recent work in this field.·Near-field Raman scattering·Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy·Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy·Nano-photonics·Nanoanalysis of Physical, chemical and biological materials beyond the diffraction limits·Single molecule detection

  19. Continuous supersonic plasma wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Nielsen, P.

    1969-01-01

    The normal magnetic field configuration of a Q device has been modified to obtain a 'magnetic Laval nozzle'. Continuous supersonic plasma 'winds' are obtained with Mach numbers ~3. The magnetic nozzle appears well suited for the study of the interaction of supersonic plasma 'winds' with either...

  20. Continuous supersonic plasma wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Nielsen, P.

    1968-01-01

    The B field configuration of a Q-device has been modified into a magnetic Laval nozzle. Continuous supersonic plasma flow is observed with M≈3......The B field configuration of a Q-device has been modified into a magnetic Laval nozzle. Continuous supersonic plasma flow is observed with M≈3...

  1. The Edge supersonic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Roxana; Bilbija, Dushan; Deutsch, Marc; Gallant, David; Rose, Don; Shreve, Gene; Smario, David; Suffredini, Brian

    1992-01-01

    As intercontinental business and tourism volumes continue their rapid expansion, the need to reduce travel times becomes increasingly acute. The Edge Supersonic Transport Aircraft is designed to meet this demand by the year 2015. With a maximum range of 5750 nm, a payload of 294 passengers and a cruising speed of M = 2.4, The Edge will cut current international flight durations in half, while maintaining competitive first class, business class, and economy class comfort levels. Moreover, this transport will render a minimal impact upon the environment, and will meet all Federal Aviation Administration Part 36, Stage III noise requirements. The cornerstone of The Edge's superior flight performance is its aerodynamically efficient, dual-configuration design incorporating variable-geometry wingtips. This arrangement combines the benefits of a high aspect ratio wing at takeoff and low cruising speeds with the high performance of an arrow-wing in supersonic cruise. And while the structural weight concerns relating to swinging wingtips are substantial, The Edge looks to ever-advancing material technologies to further increase its viability. Heeding well the lessons of the past, The Edge design holds economic feasibility as its primary focus. Therefore, in addition to its inherently superior aerodynamic performance, The Edge uses a lightweight, largely windowless configuration, relying on a synthetic vision system for outside viewing by both pilot and passengers. Additionally, a fly-by-light flight control system is incorporated to address aircraft supersonic cruise instability. The Edge will be produced at an estimated volume of 400 aircraft and will be offered to airlines in 2015 at $167 million per transport (1992 dollars).

  2. A note on supersonic flow control with nanosecond plasma actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J. G.; Cui, Y. D.; Li, J.; Khoo, B. C.

    2018-04-01

    A concept study on supersonic flow control using nanosecond pulsed plasma actuator is conducted by means of numerical simulation. The nanosecond plasma discharge is characterized by the generation of a micro-shock wave in ambient air and a residual heat in the discharge volume arising from the rapid heating of near-surface gas by the quick discharge. The residual heat has been found to be essential for the flow separation control over aerodynamic bodies like airfoil and backward-facing step. In this study, novel experiment is designed to utilize the other flow feature from discharge, i.e., instant shock wave, to control supersonic flow through shock-shock interaction. Both bow shock in front of a blunt body and attached shock anchored at the tip of supersonic projectile are manipulated via the discharged-induced shock wave in an appropriate manner. It is observed that drag on the blunt body is reduced appreciably. Meanwhile, a lateral force on sharp-edged projectile is produced, which can steer the body and give it an effective angle of attack. This opens a promising possibility for extending the applicability of this flow control technique in supersonic flow regime.

  3. Active Control of Supersonic Impinging Jets Using Supersonic Microjets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alvi, Farrukh

    2005-01-01

    .... Supersonic impinging jets occur in many applications including in STOVL aircraft where they lead to a highly oscillatory flow with very high unsteady loads on the nearby aircraft structures and the landing surfaces...

  4. A note on helicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, I.; Newmann, E.T.; Porter, J.; Winicour, J.; Lukacs, B.; Perjes, Z.; Sebestyen, A.

    1981-03-01

    The authors give a formal definition of the helicity operator for integral spin fields, which does not involve their momentum-space decomposition. The discussion is based upon a representation of the Pauli-Lubanski operator in terms of the action on tensor fields by the Killing vectors associated with the generators of the Poincare group. This leads to an identification of the helicity operator with the duality operator defined by the space-time alternating tensor. Helicity eigenstates then correspond to self-dual or anti-self-dual fields, in agreement with usage implicit in the literature. In addiition, the relationship between helicity eigenstates which are intrinsically non-classical, and states of right or left circular polarization in classical electrodynamics are discussed. (author)

  5. Helical CT defecography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrando, R.; Fiorini, G.; Beghello, A.; Cicio, G.R.; Derchi, L.E.; Consigliere, M.; Resasco, M.; Tornago, S.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the possible role of Helical CT defecography in pelvic floor disorders by comparing the results of the investigations with those of conventional defecography. The series analyzed consisted of 90 patients, namely 62 women and 28 men, ranging in age 24-82 years. They were all submitted to conventional defecography, and 18 questionable cases were also studied with Helical CT defecography. The conventional examination was performed during the 4 standard phases of resting, squeezing, Valsalva and straining; it is used a remote-control unit. The parameters for Helical CT defecography were: 5 mm beam collimation, pitch 2, 120 KV, 250 m As and 18-20 degrees gantry inclination to acquire coronal images of the pelvic floor. The rectal ampulla was distended with a bolus of 300 mL nonionic iodinated contrast agent (dilution: 3g/cc). The patient wore a napkin and was seated on the table, except for those who could not hold the position and were thus examined supine. Twenty-second helical scans were performed at rest and during evacuation; multiplanar reconstructions were obtained especially on the sagittal plane for comparison with conventional defecographic images. Coronal Helical CT defecography images permitted to map the perineal floor muscles, while sagittal reconstructions provided information on the ampulla and the levator ani. To conclude, Helical CT defecography performed well in study of pelvic floor disorders and can follow conventional defecography especially in questionable cases [it

  6. Detonation in supersonic radial outflow

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.; Korneev, Svyatoslav

    2014-01-01

    We report on the structure and dynamics of gaseous detonation stabilized in a supersonic flow emanating radially from a central source. The steady-state solutions are computed and their range of existence is investigated. Two-dimensional simulations

  7. Supersonic induction plasma jet modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selezneva, S.E.; Boulos, M.I.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been applied to study the argon plasma flow downstream of the induction plasma torch. It is shown that by means of the convergent-divergent nozzle adjustment and chamber pressure reduction, a supersonic plasma jet can be obtained. We investigate the supersonic and a more traditional subsonic plasma jets impinging onto a normal substrate. Comparing to the subsonic jet, the supersonic one is narrower and much faster. Near-substrate velocity and temperature boundary layers are thinner, so the heat flux near the stagnation point is higher in the supersonic jet. The supersonic plasma jet is characterized by the electron overpopulation and the domination of the recombination over the dissociation, resulting into the heating of the electron gas. Because of these processes, the supersonic induction plasma permits to separate spatially different functions (dissociation and ionization, transport and deposition) and to optimize each of them. The considered configuration can be advantageous in some industrial applications, such as plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition of diamond and polymer-like films and in plasma spraying of nanoscaled powders

  8. Helicity, Reconnection, and Dynamo Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Hantao

    1998-01-01

    The inter-relationships between magnetic helicity, magnetic reconnection, and dynamo effects are discussed. In laboratory experiments, where two plasmas are driven to merge, the helicity content of each plasma strongly affects the reconnection rate, as well as the shape of the diffusion region. Conversely, magnetic reconnection events also strongly affect the global helicity, resulting in efficient helicity cancellation (but not dissipation) during counter-helicity reconnection and a finite helicity increase or decrease (but less efficiently than dissipation of magnetic energy) during co-helicity reconnection. Close relationships also exist between magnetic helicity and dynamo effects. The turbulent electromotive force along the mean magnetic field (alpha-effect), due to either electrostatic turbulence or the electron diamagnetic effect, transports mean-field helicity across space without dissipation. This has been supported by direct measurements of helicity flux in a laboratory plasma. When the dynamo effect is driven by electromagnetic turbulence, helicity in the turbulent field is converted to mean-field helicity. In all cases, however, dynamo processes conserve total helicity except for a small battery effect, consistent with the observation that the helicity is approximately conserved during magnetic relaxation

  9. On the motion of multiple helical vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, D. H.; Boersma, J.

    2001-11-01

    The analysis of the self-induced velocity of a single helical vortex (Boersma & Wood 1999) is extended to include equally spaced multiple vortices. This arrangement approximates the tip vortices in the far wake of multi-bladed wind turbines, propellers, or rotors in ascending, descending, or hovering flight. The problem is reduced to finding, from the Biot Savart law, the additional velocity of a helix due to an identical helix displaced azimuthally. The resulting Biot Savart integral is further reduced to a Mellin Barnes integral representation which allows the asymptotic expansions to be determined for small and for large pitch. The Biot Savart integral is also evaluated numerically for a total of two, three and four vortices over a range of pitch values. The previous finding that the self-induced velocity at small pitch is dominated by a term inversely proportional to the pitch carries over to multiple vortices. It is shown that a far wake dominated by helical tip vortices is consistent with the one-dimensional representation that leads to the Betz limit on the power output of wind turbines. The small-pitch approximation then allows the determination of the blade&s bound vorticity for optimum power extraction. The present analysis is shown to give reasonable estimates for the vortex circulation in experiments using a single hovering rotor and a four-bladed propeller.

  10. Helical-D pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    A stabilized pinch configuration is described, consisting of a D-shaped plasma cross section wrapped tightly around a guiding axis. The open-quotes helical-Dclose quotes geometry produces a very large axial (toroidal) transform of magnetic line direction that reverses the pitch of the magnetic lines without the need of azimuthal (poloidal) plasma current. Thus, there is no need of a open-quotes dynamoclose quotes process and its associated fluctuations. The resulting configuration has the high magnetic shear and pitch reversal of the reversed field pinch (RFP). (Pitch = P = qR, where R = major radius). A helical-D pinch might demonstrate good confinement at q << 1

  11. Store Separations From a Supersonic Cone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simko, Richard J

    2006-01-01

    ... analyses of supersonic store separations. Also included in this research is a study of supersonic base pressure profiles, near-wake velocity profiles, wind tunnel shock interactions and force/moment studies on a conical store and parent vehicle...

  12. Review of the helicity formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreiro, F.; Cerrada, M.; Fernandez, E.

    1972-01-01

    Our purpose in these notes has been to present a brief and general review of the helicity formalism. We begin by discussing Lorentz invariance, spin and helicity ideas, in section 1 . In section 2 we deal with the construction of relativistic states and scattering amplitudes in the helicity basis and we study their transformation properties under discrete symmetries. Finally we present some more sophisticated topics like kinematical singularities of helicity amplitudes, kinematical constraints and crossing relations 3, 4, 5 respectively. (Author) 8 refs

  13. Helical Confinement Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beidler, C; Brakel, R; Burhenn, R; Dinklage, A; Erckmann, V; Feng, Y; Geiger, J; Hartmann, D; Hirsch, M; Jaenicke, R; Koenig, R; Laqua, H P; Maassberg, H; Wagner, F; Weller, A; Wobig, H [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Greifswald (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Stellarators, conceived 1951 by Lyman Spitzer in Princeton, are toroidal devices that confine a plasma in a magnetic field which originates from currents in coils outside the plasma. A plasma current driven by external means, for example by an ohmic transformer, is not required for confinement. Supplying the desired poloidal field component by external coils leads to a helically structured plasma topology. Thus stellarators - or helical confinement devices - are fully three-dimensional in contrast to the toroidal (rotational) symmetry of tokamaks. As stellarators can be free of an inductive current, whose radial distribution depends on the plasma parameters, their equilibrium must not be established via the evolving plasma itself, but to a first order already given by the vacuum magnetic field. They do not need an active control (like positional feedback) and therefore cannot suffer from its failure. The outstanding conceptual advantage of stellarators is the potential of steady state plasma operation without current drive. As there is no need for current drive, the recirculating power is expected to be smaller than in equivalent tokamaks. The lack of a net current avoids current driven instabilities; specifically, no disruptions, no resistive wall modes and no conventional or neoclassical tearing modes appear. Second order pressure-driven currents (Pfirsch-Schlueter, bootstrap) exist but they can be modified and even minimized by the magnetic design. The magnetic configuration of helical devices naturally possesses a separatrix, which allows the implementation of a helically structured divertor for exhaust and impurity control. (author)

  14. Supersonic propulsion technology. [variable cycle engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, A. G.; Coltrin, R. E.; Stitt, L. E.; Weber, R. J.; Whitlow, J. B., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Propulsion concepts for commercial supersonic transports are discussed. It is concluded that variable cycle engines, together with advanced supersonic inlets and low noise coannular nozzles, provide good operating performance for both supersonic and subsonic flight. In addition, they are reasonably quiet during takeoff and landing and have acceptable exhaust emissions.

  15. Manufacturing of a micro-tungsten carbide electrode using a supersonic-aided electrolysis process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, Feng-Tsai; Ho, Chi-Ting

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a novel micromachining technology for fabricating micro parts was described. The original diameter of a tungsten carbide rod was 3 mm, and it was first processed to a rod with a diameter of 50 µm by a precision-grinding process. It could then be machined to the desired diameter by a supersonic-aided electrolysis process. A high-aspect ratio of the micro-tungsten carbide rod was easily obtained by this process. The surface roughness of the sample that was processed by electrolysis with supersonic-aided agitation was compared with that of the sample obtained without agitation. The machined surface of the sample was smooth, and the reason may be that ionized particles in the anode could be removed by supersonic-aided agitation during the electrolysis process. A microelectrode with a tip of approximately 1 µm could be obtained by this process. (technical note)

  16. Coulomb double helical structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Tetsuo; Ishihara, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Structures of Coulomb clusters formed by dust particles in a plasma are studied by numerical simulation. Our study reveals the presence of various types of self-organized structures of a cluster confined in a prolate spheroidal electrostatic potential. The stable configurations depend on a prolateness parameter for the confining potential as well as on the number of dust particles in a cluster. One-dimensional string, two-dimensional zigzag structure and three-dimensional double helical structure are found as a result of the transition controlled by the prolateness parameter. The formation of stable double helical structures resulted from the transition associated with the instability of angular perturbations on double strings. Analytical perturbation study supports the findings of numerical simulations.

  17. Helically linked mirror arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranjan, P.

    1986-08-01

    A scheme is described for helical linking of mirror sections, which endeavors to combine the better features of toroidal and mirror devices by eliminating the longitudinal loss of mirror machines, having moderately high average β and steady state operation. This scheme is aimed at a device, with closed magnetic surfaces having rotational transform for equilibrium, one or more axisymmetric straight sections for reduced radial loss, a simple geometrical axis for the links and an overall positive magnetic well depth for stability. We start by describing several other attempts at linking of mirror sections, made both in the past and the present. Then a description of our helically linked mirror scheme is given. This example has three identical straight sections connected by three sections having helical geometric axes. A theoretical analysis of the magnetic field and single-particle orbits in them leads to the conclusion that most of the passing particles would be confined in the device and they would have orbits independent of pitch angle under certain conditions. Numerical results are presented, which agree well with the theoretical results as far as passing particle orbits are concerned

  18. Tips on Blood Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Test Pain, Discomfort and Anxiety Tips to Help Children through Their Medical Tests Tips to Help the Elderly through Their Medical Tests Find Us On Social Media: Facebook Twitter Google Plus Footer Menu Home About ...

  19. The TIPS Liquidity Premium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Martin Møller; Christensen, Jens H.E.; Simon Riddell, Simon

    We introduce an arbitrage-free term structure model of nominal and real yields that accounts for liquidity risk in Treasury inflation-protected securities (TIPS). The novel feature of our model is to identify liquidity risk from individual TIPS prices by accounting for the tendency that TIPS, lik...

  20. Tip studies using CFD and comparison with tip loss models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Johansen, J.

    2004-01-01

    The flow past a rotating LM8.2 blade equipped with two different tips are computed using CFD. The different tip flows are analysed and a comparison with two different tip loss models is made. Keywords: tip flow, aerodynamics, CFD......The flow past a rotating LM8.2 blade equipped with two different tips are computed using CFD. The different tip flows are analysed and a comparison with two different tip loss models is made. Keywords: tip flow, aerodynamics, CFD...

  1. Turbulence models in supersonic flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirani, E.; Ahmadikia, H.; Talebi, S.

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate five different turbulence models when used in rather complicated two-dimensional and axisymmetric supersonic flows. They are Baldwin-Lomax, k-l, k-ε, k-ω and k-ζ turbulence models. The compressibility effects, axisymmetric correction terms and some modifications for transition region are used and tested in the models. Two computer codes based on the control volume approach and two flux-splitting methods. Roe and Van Leer, are developed. The codes are used to simulate supersonic mixing layers, flow behind axisymmetric body, under expanded jet, and flow over hollow cylinder flare. The results are compared with experimental data and behavior of the turbulence models is examined. It is shown that both k-l and k-ζ models produce very good results. It is also shown that the compressibility correction in the model is required to obtain more accurate results. (author)

  2. Advanced supersonic propulsion study, phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, R. A.; Johnson, J.; Sabatella, J.; Sewall, T.

    1976-01-01

    The variable stream control engine is determined to be the most promising propulsion system concept for advanced supersonic cruise aircraft. This concept uses variable geometry components and a unique throttle schedule for independent control of two flow streams to provide low jet noise at takeoff and high performance at both subsonic and supersonic cruise. The advanced technology offers a 25% improvement in airplane range and an 8 decibel reduction in takeoff noise, relative to first generation supersonic turbojet engines.

  3. Supersonic Retropropulsion Flight Test Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Ethan A.; Dupzyk, Ian C.; Korzun, Ashley M.; Dyakonov, Artem A.; Tanimoto, Rebekah L.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Exploration Technology Development and Demonstration Program has proposed plans for a series of three sub-scale flight tests at Earth for supersonic retropropulsion, a candidate decelerator technology for future, high-mass Mars missions. The first flight test in this series is intended to be a proof-of-concept test, demonstrating successful initiation and operation of supersonic retropropulsion at conditions that replicate the relevant physics of the aerodynamic-propulsive interactions expected in flight. Five sub-scale flight test article concepts, each designed for launch on sounding rockets, have been developed in consideration of this proof-of-concept flight test. Commercial, off-the-shelf components are utilized as much as possible in each concept. The design merits of the concepts are compared along with their predicted performance for a baseline trajectory. The results of a packaging study and performance-based trade studies indicate that a sounding rocket is a viable launch platform for this proof-of-concept test of supersonic retropropulsion.

  4. Helical Tomotherapy Quality Assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balog, John; Soisson, Emilie

    2008-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy uses a dynamic delivery in which the gantry, treatment couch, and multileaf collimator leaves are all in motion during treatment. This results in highly conformal radiotherapy, but the complexity of the delivery is partially hidden from the end-user because of the extensive integration and automation of the tomotherapy control systems. This presents a challenge to the medical physicist who is expected to be both a system user and an expert, capable of verifying relevant aspects of treatment delivery. A related issue is that a clinical tomotherapy planning system arrives at a customer's site already commissioned by the manufacturer, not by the clinical physicist. The clinical physicist and the manufacturer's representative verify the commissioning at the customer site before acceptance. Theoretically, treatment could begin immediately after acceptance. However, the clinical physicist is responsible for the safe and proper use of the machine. In addition, the therapists and radiation oncologists need to understand the important machine characteristics before treatment can proceed. Typically, treatment begins about 2 weeks after acceptance. This report presents an overview of the tomotherapy system. Helical tomotherapy has unique dosimetry characteristics, and some of those features are emphasized. The integrated treatment planning, delivery, and patient-plan quality assurance process is described. A quality assurance protocol is proposed, with an emphasis on what a clinical medical physicist could and should check. Additionally, aspects of a tomotherapy quality assurance program that could be checked automatically and remotely because of its inherent imaging system and integrated database are discussed

  5. Do supersonic aircraft avoid contrails?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stenke

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The impact of a potential future fleet of supersonic aircraft on contrail coverage and contrail radiative forcing is investigated by means of simulations with the general circulation model ECHAM4.L39(DLR including a contrail parameterization. The model simulations consider air traffic inventories of a subsonic fleet and of a combined fleet of sub- and supersonic aircraft for the years 2025 and 2050, respectively. In case of the combined fleet, part of the subsonic fleet is replaced by supersonic aircraft. The combined air traffic scenario reveals a reduction in contrail cover at subsonic cruise levels (10 to 12 km in the northern extratropics, especially over the North Atlantic and North Pacific. At supersonic flight levels (18 to 20 km, contrail formation is mainly restricted to tropical regions. Only in winter is the northern extratropical stratosphere above the 100 hPa level cold enough for the formation of contrails. Total contrail coverage is only marginally affected by the shift in flight altitude. The model simulations indicate a global annual mean contrail cover of 0.372% for the subsonic and 0.366% for the combined fleet in 2050. The simulated contrail radiative forcing is most closely correlated to the total contrail cover, although contrails in the tropical lower stratosphere are found to be optically thinner than contrails in the extratropical upper troposphere. The global annual mean contrail radiative forcing in 2050 (2025 amounts to 24.7 mW m−2 (9.4 mW m−2 for the subsonic fleet and 24.2 mW m−2 (9.3 mW m−2 for the combined fleet. A reduction of the supersonic cruise speed from Mach 2.0 to Mach 1.6 leads to a downward shift in contrail cover, but does not affect global mean total contrail cover and contrail radiative forcing. Hence the partial substitution of subsonic air traffic leads to a shift of contrail occurrence from mid to low latitudes, but the resulting change in

  6. Employing Helicity Amplitudes for Resummation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moult, I.; Stewart, I.W.; Tackmann, F.J.; Waalewijn, W.J.

    2015-01-01

    Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are

  7. Flexible helical yarn swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, A P; Leshansky, A M; Pismen, L M

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the motion of a flexible Stokesian flagellar swimmer realised as a yarn made of two intertwined elastomer fibres, one active, that can reversibly change its length in response to a local excitation causing transition to the nematic state or swelling, and the other one, a passive isotropic elastomer with identical mechanical properties. A propagating chemical wave may provide an excitation mechanism ensuring a constant length of the excited region. Generally, the swimmer moves along a helical trajectory, and the propagation and rotation velocity are very sensitive to the ratio of the excited region to the pitch of the yarn, as well as to the size of a carried load. External excitation by a moving actuating beam is less effective, unless the direction of the beam is adjusted to rotation of the swimmer.

  8. LHD helical divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyabu, N.; Watanabe, T.; Ji Hantao

    1993-07-01

    The Large Helical Device (LHD) now under construction is a heliotron/torsatron device with a closed divertor system. The edge LHD magnetic structure has been studied in detail. A peculiar feature of the configuration is existence of edge surface layers, a complicated three dimensional magnetic structure which does not, however, seem to hamper the expected divertor functions. Two divertor operational modes are being considered for the LHD experiment, high density, cold radiative divertor operation as a safe heat removal scheme and high temperature divertor plasma operation. In the latter operation, a divertor plasma with temperature of a few kev, generated by efficient pumping, expects to lead to significant improvement in core plasma confinement. Conceptual designs of the LHD divertor components are under way. (author)

  9. Oblique-Flying-Wing Supersonic Transport Airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Velden, Alexander J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Oblique-flying-wing supersonic airplane proposed as possible alternative to B747B (or equivalent). Tranports passengers and cargo as fast as twice speed of sound at same cost as current subsonic transports. Flies at same holding speeds as present supersonic transports but requires only half takeoff distance.

  10. Supersonic wave detection method and supersonic detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Koichi; Seto, Takehiro; Ishizaki, Hideaki; Asano, Rin-ichi.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of and device for a detection suitable to a channel box which is used while covering a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor. Namely, a probe for transmitting/receiving supersonic waves scans on the surface of the channel box. A data processing device determines an index showing a selective orientation degree of crystal direction of the channel box based on the signals received by the probe. A judging device compares the determined index with a previously determined allowable range to judge whether the channel box is satisfactory or not based on the result of the comparison. The judgement are on the basis that (1) the bending of the channel box is caused by the difference of elongation of opposed surfaces, (2) the elongation due to irradiation is caused by the selective orientation of crystal direction, and (3) the bending of the channel box can be suppressed within a predetermined range by suppressing the index determined by the measurement of supersonic waves having a correlation with the selective orientation of the crystal direction. As a result, the performance of the channel box capable of enduring high burnup region can be confirmed in a nondestructive manner. (I.S.)

  11. Detonation in supersonic radial outflow

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.

    2014-11-07

    We report on the structure and dynamics of gaseous detonation stabilized in a supersonic flow emanating radially from a central source. The steady-state solutions are computed and their range of existence is investigated. Two-dimensional simulations are carried out in order to explore the stability of the steady-state solutions. It is found that both collapsing and expanding two-dimensional cellular detonations exist. The latter can be stabilized by putting several rigid obstacles in the flow downstream of the steady-state sonic locus. The problem of initiation of standing detonation stabilized in the radial flow is also investigated numerically. © 2014 Cambridge University Press.

  12. Theoretical aspects of magnetic helicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The magnetic helicity, usually defined as K=integralA.Bdv, where A is the vector potential and B the magnetic field, measures the topological linkage of magnetic fluxes. Helicity manifests itself in the twistedness and knottedness of flux tubes. Its significance is that it is an ideal MHD invariant. While the helicity formalism has proven very useful in understanding reversed field pinch and spheromak behavior, some problems exist in applying the method consistently for complex (e.g., toroidal) conductor geometries or in situations where magnetic flux penetrates conducting walls. Recent work has attempted to generalize K to allow for all possible geometries

  13. Helical Root Buckling: A Transient Mechanism for Stiff Interface Penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Jesse; Noar, Roslyn; Packer, Michael; Harrison, Maria; Cohen, Itai; Henley, Chris; Gerbode, Sharon

    2011-03-01

    Tilling in agriculture is commonly used to loosen the topmost layer of soil and promote healthy plant growth. As roots navigate this mechanically heterogeneous environment, they encounter interfaces between the compliant soil and the underlying compacted soil. Inspired by this problem, we used 3D time-lapse imaging of Medicago Truncatula plants to study root growth in two-layered transparent hydrogels. The layers are mechanically distinct; the top layer is more compliant than the bottom. We observe that the roots form a transient helical structure as they attempt to penetrate the bi-layer interface. Interpreting this phenotype as a form of buckling due to root elongation, we measured the helix size as a function of the surrounding gel modulus. Our measurements show that by twisting the root tip during growth, the helical structure recruits the surrounding medium for an enhanced penetration force allowing the plants access to the lower layer of gel.

  14. Godbillon Vey Helicity and Magnetic Helicity in Magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, G. M.; Hu, Q.; Anco, S.; Zank, G. P.

    2017-12-01

    The Godbillon-Vey invariant arises in homology theory, and algebraic topology, where conditions for a layered family of 2D surfaces forms a 3D manifold were elucidated. The magnetic Godbillon-Vey helicity invariant in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is a helicity invariant that occurs for flows, in which the magnetic helicity density hm= A\\cdotB=0 where A is the magnetic vector potential and B is the magnetic induction. Our purpose is to elucidate the evolution of the magnetic Godbillon-Vey field η =A×B/|A|2 and the Godbillon-Vey helicity hgv}= η \\cdot∇ × η in general MHD flows in which the magnetic helicity hm≠q 0. It is shown that hm acts as a source term in the Godbillon-Vey helicity transport equation, in which hm is coupled to hgv via the shear tensor of the background flow. The transport equation for hgv depends on the electric field potential ψ , which is related to the gauge for A, which takes its simplest form for the advected A gauge in which ψ =A\\cdot u where u is the fluid velocity.

  15. ADHD: Tips to Try

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español ADHD: Tips to Try KidsHealth / For Teens / ADHD: Tips to Try Print en español TDAH: Consejos que puedes probar ADHD , short for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder , is a ...

  16. Total Telephone Tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corder, Lloyd E.; And Others

    This manual of telephone behavior tips for business and sales professionals offers ways to handle the disgruntled caller and makes suggestions on topics relevant to the telephone. The manual is divided into the following sections and subsections: (1) Common Courtesy (staff tips, answering the telephone, screening calls, transferring calls, taking…

  17. Tip Cells in Angiogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Dallinga (Marchien); S.E.M. Boas (Sonja); I. Klaassen (Ingeborg); R.M.H. Merks (Roeland); C.J.F. van Noorden; R.O. Schlingemann (Reinier)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractIn angiogenesis, the process in which blood vessel sprouts grow out from a pre-existing vascular network, the so-called endothelial tip cells play an essential role. Tip cells are the leading cells of the sprouts; they guide following endothelial cells and sense their environment for

  18. Absolute intensities of supersonic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beijerinck, H.C.W.; Habets, A.H.M.; Verster, N.F.

    1977-01-01

    In a molecular beam experiment the center-line intensity I(0) (particles s -1 sterad -1 ) and the flow rate dN/dt (particles s -1 ) of a beam source are important features. To compare the performance of different types of beam sources the peaking factor, kappa, is defined as the ratio kappa=π(I(0)/dN/dt). The factor π is added to normalize to kappa=1 for an effusive source. The ideal peaking factor for the supersonic flow from a nozzle follows from continuum theory. Numerical values of kappa are available. Experimental values of kappa for an argon expansion are presented in this paper, confirming these calculations. The actual center-line intensity of a supersonic beam source with a skimmer is reduced in comparison to this ideal intensity if the skimmer shields part of the virtual source from the detector. Experimental data on the virtual source radius are given enabling one to predict this shielding quantitatively. (Auth.)

  19. Helicity multiplexed broadband metasurface holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Dandan; Yue, Fuyong; Li, Guixin; Zheng, Guoxing; Chan, Kinlong; Chen, Shumei; Chen, Ming; Li, King Fai; Wong, Polis Wing Han; Cheah, Kok Wai; Pun, Edwin Yue Bun; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Xianzhong

    2015-09-10

    Metasurfaces are engineered interfaces that contain a thin layer of plasmonic or dielectric nanostructures capable of manipulating light in a desirable manner. Advances in metasurfaces have led to various practical applications ranging from lensing to holography. Metasurface holograms that can be switched by the polarization state of incident light have been demonstrated for achieving polarization multiplexed functionalities. However, practical application of these devices has been limited by their capability for achieving high efficiency and high image quality. Here we experimentally demonstrate a helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with high efficiency and good image fidelity over a broad range of frequencies. The metasurface hologram features the combination of two sets of hologram patterns operating with opposite incident helicities. Two symmetrically distributed off-axis images are interchangeable by controlling the helicity of the input light. The demonstrated helicity multiplexed metasurface hologram with its high performance opens avenues for future applications with functionality switchable optical devices.

  20. Employing helicity amplitudes for resummation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.; Tackmann, Frank J.; Waalewijn, Wouter J.; Amsterdam Univ.

    2015-08-01

    Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. Using this basis allows one to seamlessly combine fixed-order helicity amplitudes at any order they are known with a resummation of higher-order logarithmic corrections. In particular, the virtual loop amplitudes can be employed in factorization theorems to make predictions for exclusive jet cross sections without the use of numerical subtraction schemes to handle real-virtual infrared cancellations. We also discuss matching onto SCET in renormalization schemes with helicities in 4- and d-dimensions. To demonstrate that our helicity operator basis is easy to use, we provide an explicit construction of the operator basis, as well as results for the hard matching coefficients, for pp → H+0,1,2 jets, pp → W/Z/γ+0,1,2 jets, and pp → 2,3 jets. These operator bases are completely crossing symmetric, so the results can easily be applied to processes with e + e - and e - p collisions.

  1. Mechanics of patterned helical Si springs on Si substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D L; Ye, D X; Khan, F; Tang, F; Lim, B K; Picu, R C; Wang, G C; Lu, T M

    2003-12-01

    The elastic response, including the spring constant, of individual Si helical-shape submicron springs, was measured using a tip-cantilever assembly attached to a conventional atomic force microscope. The isolated, four-turn Si springs were fabricated using oblique angle deposition with substrate rotation, also known as the glancing angle deposition, on a templated Si substrate. The response of the structures was modeled using finite elements, and it was shown that the conventional formulae for the spring constant required modifications before they could be used for the loading scheme used in the present experiment.

  2. Safety Tips: Basketball (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Safety Tips: Basketball KidsHealth / For Parents / Safety Tips: Basketball ... make sure they follow these tips. Why Basketball Safety Is Important Fortunately, very few basketball injuries are ...

  3. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are much less likely to require a TIPS. ... intentionally to solve the problem. Although extremely rare, children may also require a TIPS procedure. TIPS in ...

  4. Lightning Safety Tips and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Services Careers Contact Us Glossary Safety National Program Lightning Safety Tips and Resources Weather.gov > Safety > Lightning Safety Tips and Resources Lightning Resources Lightning strikes ...

  5. Nonlinear stability of supersonic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. N. (Principal Investigator); Bhat, T. R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The stability calculations made for a shock-free supersonic jet using the model based on parabolized stability equations are presented. In this analysis the large scale structures, which play a dominant role in the mixing as well as the noise radiated, are modeled as instability waves. This model takes into consideration non-parallel flow effects and also nonlinear interaction of the instability waves. The stability calculations have been performed for different frequencies and mode numbers over a range of jet operating temperatures. Comparisons are made, where appropriate, with the solutions to Rayleigh's equation (linear, inviscid analysis with the assumption of parallel flow). The comparison of the solutions obtained using the two approaches show very good agreement.

  6. Properties of Supersonic Impinging Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvi, F. S.; Iyer, K. G.; Ladd, J.

    1999-11-01

    A detailed study examining the behavior of axisymmetric supersonic jets impinging on a ground plane is described. Our objective is to better understand the aeroacoustics governing this complex flowfield which commonly occurs in the vicinity of STOVL aircraft. Flow issuing through a Mach 1.5 C-D and a converging sonic nozzle is examined over a wide parametric range. For some cases a large diameter circular 'lift' plate, with an annular hole through which the jet is issued, is attached at the nozzle exit to simulate a generic airframe. The impinging jet flowfield was examined using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), which provides the velocity field for the entire region and shadowgraph visualization techniques. Near-field acoustic, as well as, mean and unsteady pressure measurements on the ground and lift plate surfaces were also obtained. The velocity field data, together with the surface flow measurements have resulted in a much better understanding of this flow from a fundamental standpoint while also identifying critical regions of interest for practical applications. Some of these findings include the presence of a stagnation bubble with recirculating flow; a very high speed (transonic/supersonic) radial wall jet; presence of large, spatially coherent turbulent structures in the primary jet and wall jet and high unsteady loads on the ground plane and lift plates. The results of a companion CFD investigation and its comparison to the experimental data will also be presented. Very good agreement has been found between the computational and experimental results thus providing confidence in the development of computational tools for the study of such flows.

  7. Low Vision Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/lowvision.html MedlinePlus: Low Vision Tips We are sorry. MedlinePlus no longer maintains the For Low Vision Users page. You will still find health resources ...

  8. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes: Dental Tips For more copies contact: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse ... damage the gum and bone that hold your teeth in place and may lead to painful chewing ...

  9. Incontinence Treatment: Dietary Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helpful, please consider supporting IFFGD with a small tax-deductible donation. Lifestyle Changes Dietary Tips Medication Bowel ... arises requiring an expert’s care. © Copyright 1998-2018 International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, Inc. (IFFGD). All ...

  10. Pulling Helices inside Bacteria: Imperfect Helices and Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Jun F.; Rutenberg, Andrew D.

    2009-04-01

    We study steady-state configurations of intrinsically-straight elastic filaments constrained within rod-shaped bacteria that have applied forces distributed along their length. Perfect steady-state helices result from axial or azimuthal forces applied at filament ends, however azimuthal forces are required for the small pitches observed for MreB filaments within bacteria. Helix-like configurations can result from distributed forces, including coexistence between rings and imperfect helices. Levels of expression and/or bundling of the polymeric protein could mediate this coexistence.

  11. Evolution and breakdown of helical vortex wakes behind a wind turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemes, A; Jacono, D Lo; Sheridan, J; Blackburn, H M; Sherry, M

    2014-01-01

    The wake behind a three-bladed Glauert model rotor in a water channel was investigated. Planar particle image velocimetry was used to measure the velocity fields on the wake centre-line, with snapshots phase-locked to blade position of the rotor. Phase- locked averages of the velocity and vorticity fields are shown, with tip vortex interaction and entanglement of the helical filaments elucidated. Proper orthogonal decomposition and topology-based vortex identification are used to filter the PIV images for coherent structures and locate vortex cores. Application of these methods to the instantaneous data reveals unsteady behaviour of the helical filaments that is statistically quantifiable

  12. Transport barrier in Helical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Katsumi

    1998-01-01

    Experiments on the transport barrier in Helical plasmas are reviewed. There are two mechanisms of transport improvement, that results in the formation of the transport barrier. One is the improvement of neoclassical transport by reducing the ripple loss with radial electric field, which exist only in helical plasma. The other is the improvement of anomalous transport due to the suppression of fluctuations associated with a radial electric field shear both in tokamak and helical plasma. The formation of the transport barrier can be triggered by the radial electric field shear associated with the transition of the radial electric field (L/H transition or ion-electron root transition) or the peaked density or the optimization of magnetic field shear. The mechanisms of transport barrier formation are also discussed. (author). 60 refs

  13. Generalized helicity and Beltrami fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buniy, Roman V., E-mail: roman.buniy@gmail.com [Schmid College of Science, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom); Kephart, Thomas W., E-mail: tom.kephart@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    We propose covariant and non-abelian generalizations of the magnetic helicity and Beltrami equation. The gauge invariance, variational principle, conserved current, energy–momentum tensor and choice of boundary conditions elucidate the subject. In particular, we prove that any extremal of the Yang–Mills action functional 1/4 ∫{sub Ω}trF{sub μν}F{sup μν}d{sup 4}x subject to the local constraint ε{sup μναβ}trF{sub μν}F{sub αβ}=0 satisfies the covariant non-abelian Beltrami equation. -- Highlights: •We introduce the covariant non-abelian helicity and Beltrami equation. •The Yang–Mills action and instanton term constraint lead to the Beltrami equation. •Solutions of the Beltrami equation conserve helicity.

  14. Generalized helicity and Beltrami fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buniy, Roman V.; Kephart, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    We propose covariant and non-abelian generalizations of the magnetic helicity and Beltrami equation. The gauge invariance, variational principle, conserved current, energy–momentum tensor and choice of boundary conditions elucidate the subject. In particular, we prove that any extremal of the Yang–Mills action functional 1/4 ∫ Ω trF μν F μν d 4 x subject to the local constraint ε μναβ trF μν F αβ =0 satisfies the covariant non-abelian Beltrami equation. -- Highlights: •We introduce the covariant non-abelian helicity and Beltrami equation. •The Yang–Mills action and instanton term constraint lead to the Beltrami equation. •Solutions of the Beltrami equation conserve helicity

  15. Toroidal helical quartz forming machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, K.W.; Cole, T.R.

    1977-01-01

    The Scyllac fusion experimental machine used 10 cm diameter smooth bore discharge tubes formed into a simple toroidal shape prior to 1974. At about that time, it was discovered that a discharge tube was required to follow the convoluted shape of the load coil. A machine was designed and built to form a fused quartz tube with a toroidal shape. The machine will accommodate quartz tubes from 5 cm to 20 cm diameter forming it into a 4 m toroidal radius with a 1 to 5 cm helical displacement. The machine will also generate a helical shape on a linear tube. Two sets of tubes with different helical radii and wavelengths have been successfully fabricated. The problems encountered with the design and fabrication of this machine are discussed

  16. Influence of probe geometry on pitot-probe displacement in supersonic turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the varying effects of six different probe-tip and support-shaft configurations on pitot tube displacement. The study was stimulated by discrepancies between supersonic wind-tunnel tests conducted by Wilson and Young (1949) and Allen (1972). Wilson (1973) had concluded that these discrepancies were caused by differences in probe geometry. It is shown that in fact, no major differences in profiles of streamwise velocity over streamwise velocity at boundary-layer edge vs normal coordinate over boundary-layer total thickness result from geometry. The true cause of the discrepancies, however, remains to be discovered.

  17. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift

  18. Resonant helical fields in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, V.

    1990-01-01

    Poincare maps of magnetic field lines of a toroidal helical system were made. The magnetic field is a linear superposition of the magnetic fields produced by a toroidal plasma in equilibrium and by external helical currents. Analytical expression for the Poincare maps was no obtained since the magnetic field do not have symmetry. In order to obtain the maps, the equation minus derivative of l vector times B vector = 0 was numerically integrated. In the Poincare maps, the principal and the secondary magnetic island were observed. (author)

  19. Helical system. History and current state of helical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    This paper described the following: (1) history of nuclear fusion research of Japan's original heliotron method, (2) worldwide development of nuclear fusion research based on helical system such as stellarator, and (3) worldwide meaning of large helical device (LHD) aiming to demonstrate the steady-state performance of heliotron type in the parameter area extrapolable to the core plasma, and research results of LHD. LHD demonstrated that the helical system is excellent in steady operation performance at the world's most advanced level. In an experiment using deuterium gas in 2017, LHD achieved to reach 120 million degrees of ion temperature, which is one index of nuclear fusion condition, demonstrated the realization of high-performance plasma capable of extrapolating to future nuclear fusion reactors, and established the foundation for full-scale research toward the realization of nuclear fusion reactor. Besides experimental research, this paper also described the helical-type stationary nuclear fusion prototype reactor, FFHR-d1, which was based on progress of large-scale simulation at the world's most advanced level. A large-scale superconducting stellarator experimental device, W7-X, with the same scale as LHD, started experiment in December 2015, whose current state is also touched on here. (A.O.)

  20. Helicity and evanescent waves. [Energy transport velocity, helicity, Lorentz transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agudin, J L; Platzeck, A M [La Plata Univ. Nacional (Argentina); Albano, J R [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    1978-02-20

    It is shown that the projection of the angular momentum of a circularly polarized electromagnetic evanescent wave along the mean velocity of energy transport (=helicity) can be reverted by a Lorentz transformation, in spite of the fact that this velocity is c.

  1. Development of supersonic plasma flows by use of a magnetic nozzle and an ICRF heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inutake, M.; Ando, A.; Hattori, K.; Tobari, H.; Hosokawa, Y.; Sato, R.; Hatanaka, M.; Harata, K. [Tohoku Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Sendai (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    A high-beta, supersonic plasma flow plays a crucial role in MHD phenomena in space and fusion plasmas. There are a few experimental researches on production and control of a fast flowing plasma in spite of a growing significance in the magnetized-plasma flow dynamics. A magneto-plasma-dynamic arc-jet (MPDA) is one of promising devices to produce a supersonic plasma flow and has been utilized as an electric propulsion device with a higher specific impulse and a relatively larger thrust. We have improved the performance of an MPDA to produce a quasi-steady plasma flow with a transonic and supersonic Mach number in a highly-ionized state. There are two methods in order to control an ion-acoustic Mach number of the plasma flow exhausted from an MPDA: one is to use a magnetic Laval nozzle to convert a thermal energy to a flow energy and the other is a combined system of an ion heating and a divergent magnetic nozzle. The former is an analogous method to a compressible air flow and the latter is the method proposed in an advanced thruster for a manned interplanetary space mission. We have clarified the plasma flow characteristics in various shapes of a magnetic field configuration. It was demonstrated that the Mach number of the plasma flow could increase up to almost 3 in a divergent magnetic nozzle field. This paper reports recent results on the flow field improvements: one is on a magnetic-Laval-nozzle effects observed at the muzzle region of the MPDA, and the other is on ICRF (ion-cyclotron-range of frequency) heating of a supersonic plasma by use of a helical antenna. (authors)

  2. Role of coherent structures in supersonic impinging jetsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajan; Wiley, Alex; Venkatakrishnan, L.; Alvi, Farrukh

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a study examining the flow field and acoustic characteristics of a Mach 1.5 ideally expanded supersonic jet impinging on a flat surface and its control using steady microjets. Emphasis is placed on two conditions of nozzle to plate distances (h/d), of which one corresponds to where the microjet based active flow control is very effective in reducing flow unsteadiness and near-field acoustics and the other has minimal effectiveness. Measurements include unsteady pressures, nearfield acoustics using microphone and particle image velocimetry. The nearfield noise and unsteady pressure spectra at both h/d show discrete high amplitude impinging tones, which in one case (h/d = 4) are significantly reduced with control but in the other case (h/d = 4.5) remain unaffected. The particle image velocimetry measurements, both time-averaged and phase-averaged, were used to better understand the basic characteristics of the impinging jet flow field especially the role of coherent vortical structures in the noise generation and control. The results show that the flow field corresponding to the case of least control effectiveness comprise well defined, coherent, and symmetrical vortical structures and may require higher levels of microjet pressure supply for noise suppression when compared to the flow field more responsive to control (h/d = 4) which shows less organized, competing (symmetrical and helical) instabilities.

  3. A computational study of the supersonic coherent jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Mi Seon; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2003-01-01

    In steel-making process of iron and steel industry, the purity and quality of steel can be dependent on the amount of CO contained in the molten metal. Recently, the supersonic oxygen jet is being applied to the molten metal in the electric furnace and thus reduces the CO amount through the chemical reactions between the oxygen jet and molten metal, leading to a better quality of steel. In this application, the supersonic oxygen jet is limited in the distance over which the supersonic velocity is maintained. In order to get longer supersonic jet propagation into the molten metal, a supersonic coherent jet is suggested as one of the alternatives which are applicable to the electric furnace system. It has a flame around the conventional supersonic jet and thus the entrainment effect of the surrounding gas into the supersonic jet is reduced, leading to a longer propagation of the supersonic jet. In this regard, gasdynamics mechanism about why the combustion phenomenon surrounding the supersonic jet causes the jet core length to be longer is not yet clarified. The present study investigates the major characteristics of the supersonic coherent jet, compared with the conventional supersonic jet. A computational study is carried out to solve the compressible, axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations. The computational results of the supersonic coherent jet are compared with the conventional supersonic jets

  4. Parameterization and measurements of helical magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.; Okamura, M.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic fields with helical symmetry can be parameterized using multipole coefficients (a n , b n ). We present a parameterization that gives the familiar multipole coefficients (a n , b n ) for straight magnets when the helical wavelength tends to infinity. To measure helical fields all methods used for straight magnets can be employed. We show how to convert the results of those measurements to obtain the desired helical multipole coefficients (a n , b n )

  5. Applications of 2D helical vortex dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2010-01-01

    In the paper, we show how the assumption of helical symmetry in the context of 2D helical vortices can be exploited to analyse and to model various cases of rotating flows. From theory, examples of three basic applications of 2D dynamics of helical vortices embedded in flows with helical symmetry...... of the vorticity field are addressed. These included some of the problems related to vortex breakdown, instability of far wakes behind rotors and vortex theory of ideal rotors....

  6. Magnet pole tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Craig E.; Chasman, Chellis; Baltz, Anthony J.

    1984-04-24

    An improved magnet which more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

  7. ICRF heating on helical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Lyon, J.F.; Hoffman, D.J.; Murakami, M.; England, A.C.; Wilgen, J.B.; Jaeger, E.F.; Wang, C.; Batchelor, D.B.

    1995-01-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is currently in use on CHS and W7-AS and is a major element of the heating planned for steady state helical devices. In helical devices, the lack of a toroidal current eliminates both disruptions and the need for ICRF current drive, simplifying the design of antenna structures as compared to tokamak applications. However the survivability of plasma facing components and steady state cooling issues are directly applicable to tokamak devices. Results from LHD steady state experiments should be available on a time scale to strongly influence the next generation of steady state tokamak experiments. The helical plasma geometry provides challenges not faced with tokamak ICRF heating, including the potential for enhanced fast ion losses, impurity accumulation, limited access for antenna structures, and open magnetic field lines in the plasma edge. The present results and near term plans provide the basis for steady state ICRF heating of larger helical devices. An approach which includes direct electron, mode conversion, ion minority and ion Bernstein wave heating addresses these issues

  8. ICRF heating on helical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Lyon, J.F.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is currently in use on CHS and W7AS and is a major element of the heating planned for steady state helical devices. In helical devices, the lack of a toroidal current eliminates both disruptions and the need for ICRF current drive, simplifying the design of antenna structures as compared to tokamak applications. However the survivability of plasma facing components and steady state cooling issues are directly applicable to tokamak devices. Results from LHD steady state experiments should be available on a time scale to strongly influence the next generation of steady state tokamak experiments. The helical plasma geometry provides challenges not faced with tokamak ICRF heating, including the potential for enhanced fast ion losses, impurity accumulation, limited access for antenna structures, and open magnetic field lines in the plasma edge. The present results and near term plans provide the basis for steady state ICRF heating of larger helical devices. An approach which includes direct electron, mode conversion, ion minority and ion Bernstein wave heating addresses these issues

  9. The helical tomotherapy thread effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kissick, M.W.; Fenwick, J.; James, J.A.; Jeraj, R.; Kapatoes, J.M.; Keller, H.; Mackie, T.R.; Olivera, G.; Soisson, E.T.

    2005-01-01

    Inherent to helical tomotherapy is a dose variation pattern that manifests as a 'ripple' (peak-to-trough relative to the average). This ripple is the result of helical beam junctioning, completely unique to helical tomotherapy. Pitch is defined as in helical CT, the couch travel distance for a complete gantry rotation relative to the axial beam width at the axis of rotation. Without scattering or beam divergence, an analytical posing of the problem as a simple integral predicts minima near a pitch of 1/n where n is an integer. A convolution-superposition dose calculator (TomoTherapy, Inc.) included all the physics needed to explore the ripple magnitude versus pitch and beam width. The results of the dose calculator and some benchmark measurements demonstrate that the ripple has sharp minima near p=0.86(1/n). The 0.86 factor is empirical and caused by a beam junctioning of the off-axis dose profiles which differ from the axial profiles as well as a long scatter tail of the profiles at depth. For very strong intensity modulation, the 0.86 factor may vary. The authors propose choosing particular minima pitches or using a second delivery that starts 180 deg off-phase from the first to reduce these ripples: 'Double threading'. For current typical pitches and beam widths, however, this effect is small and not clinically important for most situations. Certain extremely large field or high pitch cases, however, may benefit from mitigation of this effect

  10. Improved flare tip design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogolek, P. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Energy Technology Centre

    2004-07-01

    This paper discusses the testing procedures and development of an improved flare tip design. Design objectives included performance equal to or better than utility flares at low wind speed; conversion efficiency; fuel slip; smoking; significant improvement at high wind speed; and no increase in trace emissions. A description of the testing facility of the flare tip was provided, with reference to the fact that the facility allowed for realistic near full scale gas flares in a single-pass flare test facility. Other details of the facility included: an adjustable ceiling; high capacity variable speed fan; sampling ports along working section in stack; windows along working section; and air cooled walls, floor, and ceiling. The fuels used in the flare tip included natural gas, propane, gasoline and inert gases. Details of wind speed, appurtenances and turbulence generating grids were presented, with reference to continuous gas emission measurements. A list of design constraints was provided. Flare performance included wind speed, turbulence and fuel composition. A chart of conversion inefficiencies with a correlation of wind speed and turbulence, fuel flow and pipe size was also presented. Several new tip designs were fabricated for testing, with screening tests for comparison to basic pipe and ranking designs. Significant improvements were found in one of the new designs, including results with 30 per cent propane in fuel. Emissions reduction from 10 to 35 per cent were noted. It was concluded that future work should focus on evaluating improved tip for stability at low wind speeds. Fuel slips are the primary source of emissions, and it was recommended that further research is necessary to improve existing flare tips. tabs, figs.

  11. Silent and Efficient Supersonic Bi-Directional Flying Wing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a Phase I study for a novel concept of a supersonic bi-directional (SBiDir) flying wing (FW) that has the potential to revolutionize supersonic flight...

  12. 75 FR 8427 - Civil Supersonic Aircraft Panel Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... entitled, ``State of the Art of Supersonics Aircraft Technology--What has progressed in science since 1973... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Civil Supersonic Aircraft Panel Discussion AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of meeting participation...

  13. Productivity tips for developers

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    I like to read about productivity tools and techniques, but the problem is - most of them are completely overrated, the tips are not that useful or they are too difficult to implement. But, sometimes I can find some stuff that really makes me think "damn, how could I live without this before?!". Today, I would like to share some of them and hopefully hear about the tips and tricks that you use. Maybe we can find a way to share them somehow (github repo/forum)?

  14. A fundamental study of the supersonic microjet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, M. S.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. D. [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Microjet flows are often encountered in many industrial applications of micro-electro-mechanical systems as well as in medical engineering fields such as a transdermal drug delivery system for needle-free injection of drugs into the skin. The Reynolds numbers of such microjets are usually several orders of magnitude below those of larger-scale jets. The supersonic microjet physics with these low Reynolds numbers are not yet understood to date. Computational modeling and simulation can provide an effective predictive capability for the major features of the supersonic microjets. In the present study, computations using the axisymmetic, compressible, Navier-Stokes equations are applied to understand the supersonic microjet flow physics. The pressure ratio of the microjets is changed to obtain both the under-and over-expanded flows at the exit of the micronozzle. Sonic and supersonic microjets are simulated and compared with some experimental results available. Based on computational results; two microjets are discussed in terms of total pressure, jet decay and supersonic core length.

  15. A fundamental study of the supersonic microjet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, M. S.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. D.

    2001-01-01

    Microjet flows are often encountered in many industrial applications of micro-electro-mechanical systems as well as in medical engineering fields such as a transdermal drug delivery system for needle-free injection of drugs into the skin. The Reynolds numbers of such microjets are usually several orders of magnitude below those of larger-scale jets. The supersonic microjet physics with these low Reynolds numbers are not yet understood to date. Computational modeling and simulation can provide an effective predictive capability for the major features of the supersonic microjets. In the present study, computations using the axisymmetic, compressible, Navier-Stokes equations are applied to understand the supersonic microjet flow physics. The pressure ratio of the microjets is changed to obtain both the under-and over-expanded flows at the exit of the micronozzle. Sonic and supersonic microjets are simulated and compared with some experimental results available. Based on computational results; two microjets are discussed in terms of total pressure, jet decay and supersonic core length

  16. Sports Dehydration Safety Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sports Dehydration Safety Tips Everything you need to know to keep your kids safe from dehydration when playing sports. To keep kids in top ... to stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids. Dehydration occurs when a body loses more water than ...

  17. Transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, G.

    2014-08-01

    A review of recent and historical work in the field of transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics has been conducted, focussing on applied research on wings and aircraft, present and future ground transportation, projectiles, rocket sleds and other related bodies which travel in close ground proximity in the compressible regime. Methods for ground testing are described and evaluated, noting that wind tunnel testing is best performed with a symmetry model in the absence of a moving ground; sled or rail testing is ultimately preferable, though considerably more expensive. Findings are reported on shock-related ground influence on aerodynamic forces and moments in and accelerating through the transonic regime - where force reversals and the early onset of local supersonic flow is prevalent - as well as more predictable behaviours in fully supersonic to hypersonic ground effect flows.

  18. An evaluation of supersonic STOVL technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, G. H., Jr.; Lampkin, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document the status of supersonic STOVL aircraft technology. The major focus is the presentation of summaries of pertinent aspects of supersonic STOVL technology, such as justification for STOVL aircraft, current designs and their recognized areas of uncertainty, recent research programs, current activities, plans, etc. The remainder of the paper is an evaluation of the performance differential between a current supersonic STOVL design and three production (or near production) fighters, one of them the AV-8B. The results indicate that there is not a large range difference between a STOL aircraft and a STOVL aircraft, and that other aspects of performance, such as field performance or combat maneuverability, may more than make up for this decrement.

  19. Generalized helicity and its time derivative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Marklin, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Spheromaks can be sustained against resistive decay by helicity injection because they tend to obey the minimum energy principle. This principle states that a plasma-laden magnetic configuration will relax to a state of minimum energy subject to the constraint that the magnetic helicity is conserved. Use of helicity as a constraint on the minimization of energy was first proposed by Woltjer in connection with astrophysical phenomena. Helicity does decay on the resistive diffusion time. However, if helicity is created and made to flow continuoiusly into a confinement geometry, these additional linked fluxes can relax and sustain the configuration indefinitely against the resistive decay. In this paper we will present an extension of the definition of helicity to include systems where B vector can penetrate the boundary and the penetration can be varying in time. We then discuss the sustainment of RFPs and spheromaks in terms of helicity injection

  20. Assembly of alginate microfibers to form a helical structure using micromanipulation with a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Tao; Huang, Qiang; Shi, Qing; Wang, Huaping; Li, Pengyun; Fukuda, Toshio; Hu, Chengzhi; Nakajima, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Helical structures assembled using alginate microfibers have a promising spatial architecture mimicking in vivo vessels for culturing vascular cells. However, the helical structure can only be assembled at the macroscale, since a microassembly-based approach has not yet been developed. In this paper, we propose a magnetic-field-based micromanipulation method to fabricate a helical microstructure. By microfluidic spinning, alginate microfibers encapsulating magnetic nanoparticles are synthesized to enable the control of an electromagnetic needle (EMN). We developed a microrobotic system to actuate a micropipette to fix a free end of the microfiber, and then move the EMN to reel the microfiber around a micropillar. The motion of the EMN is guided using an upright microscope and a side-view camera. Because of the limitation of operation space, a spacer sleeve was designed to keep the tip of the EMN attracted to the microfiber, and simultaneously to keep the other part of the EMN isolated from the microfiber. To ensure the availability of the microfiber for continuously coiling, we enable the EMN tip to slide on the surface of the microfiber without changing the tensioning of the microfiber for positioning control. Furthermore, stable and repeatable micromanipulation was achieved to form multi-turn microfiber coils based on the motion planning of the EMN. Finally, we successfully fabricated a helical microstructure that can be applied in vascular tissue engineering in the future. (paper)

  1. Vortex breakdown in a supersonic jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Levey, Brian S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports a study of a vortex breakdown in a supersonic jet. A supersonic vortical jets were created by tangential injection and acceleration through a convergent-divergent nozzle. Vortex circulation was varied, and the nature of the flow in vortical jets was investigated using several types of flow visualization, including focusing schlieren and imaging of Rayleigh scattering from a laser light sheet. Results show that the vortical jet mixed much more rapidly with the ambient air than a comparable straight jet. When overexpanded, the vortical jet exhibited considerable unsteadiness and showed signs of vortex breakdown.

  2. Supersonic cruise vehicle research/business jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A comparison study of a GE-21 variable propulsion system with a Multimode Integrated Propulsion System (MMIPS) was conducted while installed in small M = 2.7 supersonic cruise vehicles with military and business jet possibilities. The 1984 state of the art vehicles were sized to the same transatlantic range, takeoff distance, and sideline noise. The results indicate the MMIPS would result in a heavier vehicle with better subsonic cruise performance. The MMIPS arrangement with one fan engine and two satellite turbojet engines would not be appropriate for a small supersonic business jet because of design integration penalties and lack of redundancy.

  3. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or bypass, without the risks that accompany open surgery. TIPS is a minimally invasive procedure that typically has a shorter recovery time than surgery. Your TIPS should have less of an effect ...

  4. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... then placed in this tunnel to keep the pathway open. Patients who typically need a TIPS have ... and stomach. A TIPS procedure involves creating a pathway through the liver that connects the portal vein ( ...

  5. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and/or hydrothorax (in the chest). Budd-Chiari syndrome , a blockage in one or more veins that ... intentionally to solve the problem. Although extremely rare, children may also require a TIPS procedure. TIPS in ...

  6. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... filtered out by the liver. The TIPS may cause too much of these substances to bypass the ...

  7. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the esophagus and stomach. A TIPS procedure involves creating a pathway through the liver that connects the ... diseases. This can result in significant challenges in creating the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and ...

  8. Tips for Living with Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients Tips for Living Tips for Living with Scleroderma Ways to help manage your symptoms The Scleroderma ... help find improved therapies and a cure for scleroderma! Your gift today will be matched to have ...

  9. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TIPS. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A TIPS is used to ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  10. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... recovery time than surgery. Your TIPS should have less of an effect than open surgical bypass on ...

  11. A helical scintillating fiber hodoscope

    CERN Document Server

    Altmeier, M; Bisplinghoff, J; Bissel, T; Bollmann, R; Busch, M; Büsser, K; Colberg, T; Demiroers, L; Diehl, O; Dohrmann, F; Engelhardt, H P; Eversheim, P D; Felden, O; Gebel, R; Glende, M; Greiff, J; Gross, A; Gross-Hardt, R; Hinterberger, F; Jahn, R; Jeske, M; Jonas, E; Krause, H; Lahr, U; Langkau, R; Lindemann, T; Lindlein, J; Maier, R; Maschuw, R; Mayer-Kuckuck, T; Meinerzhagen, A; Naehle, O; Pfuff, M; Prasuhn, D; Rohdjess, H; Rosendaal, D; Von Rossen, P; Sanz, B; Schirm, N; Schulz-Rojahn, M; Schwarz, V; Scobel, W; Thomas, S; Trelle, H J; Weise, E; Wellinghausen, A; Wiedmann, W; Woller, K; Ziegler, R

    1999-01-01

    A novel scintillating fiber hodoscope in helically cylindric geometry has been developed for detection of low multiplicity events of fast protons and other light charged particles in the internal target experiment EDDA at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. The hodoscope consists of 640 scintillating fibers (2.5 mm diameter), arranged in four layers surrounding the COSY beam pipe. The fibers are helically wound in opposing directions and read out individually using 16-channel photomultipliers connected to a modified commercial encoding system. The detector covers an angular range of 9 deg. <= THETA<=72 deg. and 0 deg. <=phi (cursive,open) Greek<=360 deg. in the lab frame. The detector length is 590 mm, the inner diameter 161 mm. Geometry and granularity of the hodoscope afford a position resolution of about 1.3 mm. The detector design took into consideration a maximum of reliability and a minimum of maintenance. An LED array may be used for monitoring purposes. (author)

  12. Helical CT of ureteral disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cikman, Pablo; Bengio, Ruben; Bulacio, Javier; Zirulnik, Esteban; Garimaldi, Jorge

    2000-01-01

    Among the new applications of helical CT is the study of the ureteral pathology. The objective of this paper was to evaluate patients with suspected pathology of this organ and the repercussion in the therapeutic plans. We studied 23 patients with a helical CT protocol, without IV contrast injection and performed multiplanar reconstruction (MPR). We called this procedure Pielo CT. Thirteen ureteral stones were detected, 6 calculi, 2 urinary tract tumors, dilatation of the system in a patient with neo-bladder. In 2 patients, in whom ureteral pathology was ruled out, we found other alterations that explained the symptoms, (gallbladder stones, disk protrusion). The Pielo CT let decide a therapeutical approach in 20 or 21 patients with ureteral pathology. (author)

  13. Helicity formalism and spin effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmino, M.; Caruso, F.; Piovano, U.

    1990-01-01

    The helicity formalism and the technique to compute amplitudes for interaction processes involving leptons, quarks, photons and gluons are reviewed. Explicit calculations and examples of exploitation of symmetry properties are shown. The formalism is then applied to the discussion of several hadronic processes and spin effects: the experimental data, when related to the properties of the elementary constituent interactions, show many not understood features. Also the nucleon spin problem is briefly reviewed. (author)

  14. Radiation characteristics of helical tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeraj, Robert; Mackie, Thomas R.; Balog, John; Olivera, Gustavo; Pearson, Dave; Kapatoes, Jeff; Ruchala, Ken; Reckwerdt, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy is a dedicated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) system with on-board imaging capability (MVCT) and therefore differs from conventional treatment units. Different design goals resulted in some distinctive radiation field characteristics. The most significant differences in the design are the lack of flattening filter, increased shielding of the collimators, treatment and imaging operation modes and narrow fan beam delivery. Radiation characteristics of the helical tomotherapy system, sensitivity studies of various incident electron beam parameters and radiation safety analyses are presented here. It was determined that the photon beam energy spectrum of helical tomotherapy is similar to that of more conventional radiation treatment units. The two operational modes of the system result in different nominal energies of the incident electron beam with approximately 6 MeV and 3.5 MeV in the treatment and imaging modes, respectively. The off-axis mean energy dependence is much lower than in conventional radiotherapy units with less than 5% variation across the field, which is the consequence of the absent flattening filter. For the same reason the transverse profile exhibits the characteristic conical shape resulting in a 2-fold increase of the beam intensity in the center. The radiation leakage outside the field was found to be negligible at less than 0.05% because of the increased shielding of the collimators. At this level the in-field scattering is a dominant source of the radiation outside the field and thus a narrow field treatment does not result in the increased leakage. The sensitivity studies showed increased sensitivity on the incident electron position because of the narrow fan beam delivery and high sensitivity on the incident electron energy, as common to other treatment systems. All in all, it was determined that helical tomotherapy is a system with some unique radiation characteristics, which have been to a large extent

  15. Characterization of metal-coated fiber tip for NSOM lithography by tip-to-tip scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubicova, I.; Pudis, D.; Suslik, L.; Skriniarova, J.

    2011-01-01

    For the optical field characterization, a tip-to-tip scan of two metal-coated fiber tips with circular aperture at the apex was performed. The optical field irradiated from the fiber probe in illumination mode was analyzed by NSOM represented by fiber probe in collection mode. The near-field intensity profile of the source fiber tip in the plane perpendicular to the axis of the tip was taken. Experimental stage requires high resolution 3D motion system controlled by computer (Fig. 1). The source and the detector fiber tip were placed on the moving and static part of the 3D nanoposition system, respectively. As a light source, a modulated 473 nm DPSS laser was used. After the source fiber tip characterization, the NSOM lithography was performed. In the experimental setup from Fig. 1, the detector fiber tip was replaced by a sample fixed in a vacuum holder. As a sample, a 600 nm positive photoresist AZ 5214E was spin-coated on a GaAs substrate. Exposure was carried out by irradiation of the sample at desired positions through the fiber tip aperture. The sample was developed in AZ 400K developer for 30 s and rinsed in DI water. A promising tip-to-tip scanning technique for characterization of metal-coated fiber tips with aperture at the apex was presented. Nearly-circular aperture shapes were documented from NSOM measurements with diameter estimated to be less than 460 nm. By knowing the source-detector distance and the FWHM of the near-field intensity profile, the tip-to-tip scan proves an easy and fast method to analyze the fiber tip aperture properties. The fiber tip resolution was confirmed by preparation of 2D planar structures in thin photoresist layer, where the NSOM lithography uses the metal-coated fiber tip characterized in previous section. (authors)

  16. COMMERCIAL SUPERSONIC TRANSPORT PROGRAM. PHASE II-C REPORT. HIGH STRENGTH STEEL EVALUATION FOR SUPERSONIC AIRCRAFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JET TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT, *AIRFRAMES, SUPERSONIC AIRCRAFT, STEEL , STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES, FRACTURE(MECHANICS), FATIGUE(MECHANICS), STRESS CORROSION...MICROPHOTOGRAPHY, HIGH TEMPERATURE, NICKEL ALLOYS, COBALT ALLOYS, CARBON, BAINITE , COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT.

  17. Helical Antimicrobial Sulfono- {gamma} -AApeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yaqiong; Wu, Haifan; Teng, Peng; Bai, Ge; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cao, Chuanhai; Cai, Jianfeng

    2015-06-11

    Host-defense peptides (HDPs) such as magainin 2 have emerged as potential therapeutic agents combating antibiotic resistance. Inspired by their structures and mechanism of action, herein we report the fi rst example of antimicrobial helical sulfono- γ - AApeptide foldamers. The lead molecule displays broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against multi-drug-resistant Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Time-kill studies and fl uorescence microscopy suggest that sulfono- γ -AApeptides eradicate bacteria by taking a mode of action analogous to that of HDPs. Clear structure - function relationships exist in the studied sequences. Longer sequences, presumably adopting more-de fi ned helical structures, are more potent than shorter ones. Interestingly, the sequence with less helical propensity in solution could be more selective than the stronger helix-forming sequences. Moreover, this class of antimicrobial agents are resistant to proteolytic degradation. These results may lead to the development of a new class of antimicrobial foldamers combating emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  18. Magnetic helicity and active filament configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Zuccarello, F.; Poedts, S.; Soenen, A.; Zuccarello, F. P.

    2009-11-01

    Context: The role of magnetic helicity in active filament formation and destabilization is still under debate. Aims: Although active filaments usually show a sigmoid shape and a twisted configuration before and during their eruption, it is unclear which mechanism leads to these topologies. In order to provide an observational contribution to clarify these issues, we describe a filament evolution whose characteristics seem to be directly linked to the magnetic helicity transport in corona. Methods: We applied different methods to determine the helicity sign and the chirality of the filament magnetic field. We also computed the magnetic helicity transport rate at the filament footpoints. Results: All the observational signatures provided information on the positive helicity and sinistral chirality of the flux rope containing the filament material: its forward S shape, the orientation of its barbs, the bright and dark threads at 195 Å. Moreover, the magnetic helicity transport rate at the filament footpoints showed a clear accumulation of positive helicity. Conclusions: The study of this event showed a correspondence between several signatures of the sinistral chirality of the filament and several evidences of the positive magnetic helicity of the filament magnetic field. We also found that the magnetic helicity transported along the filament footpoints showed an increase just before the change of the filament shape observed in Hα images. We argued that the photospheric regions where the filament was rooted might be the preferential ways where the magnetic helicity was injected along the filament itself and where the conditions to trigger the eruption were yielded.

  19. Tip-modified Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with tip-modified propellers and the methods which, over a period of two decades, have been applied to develop such propellers. The development is driven by the urge to increase the efficiency of propellers and can be seen as analogous to fitting end plates and winglets to aircraft...... propeller, have efficiency increases of a reasonable magnitude in both open-water and behind-ship conditions....

  20. A supersonic fan equipped variable cycle engine for a Mach 2.7 supersonic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, T. S.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of a variable cycle turbofan engine with an axially supersonic fan stage as powerplant for a Mach 2.7 supersonic transport was evaluated. Quantitative cycle analysis was used to assess the effects of the fan inlet and blading efficiencies on engine performance. Thrust levels predicted by cycle analysis are shown to match the thrust requirements of a representative aircraft. Fan inlet geometry is discussed and it is shown that a fixed geometry conical spike will provide sufficient airflow throughout the operating regime. The supersonic fan considered consists of a single stage comprising a rotor and stator. The concept is similar in principle to a supersonic compressor, but differs by having a stator which removes swirl from the flow without producing a net rise in static pressure. Operating conditions peculiar to the axially supersonic fan are discussed. Geometry of rotor and stator cascades are presented which utilize a supersonic vortex flow distribution. Results of a 2-D CFD flow analysis of these cascades are presented. A simple estimate of passage losses was made using empirical methods.

  1. Supersonic flaw detection device for nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Moriki.

    1996-01-01

    In a supersonic flaw detection device to be attached to a body surface of a reactor pressure vessel for automatically detecting flaws of a welded portion of a horizontally connected nozzle by using supersonic waves, a running vehicle automatically running along a circumferential direction of the nozzle comprises a supersonic flaw detection means for detecting flaws of the welded portion of the nozzle by using supersonic waves, and an inclination angle sensor for detecting the inclination angle of the running vehicle relative to the central axis of the nozzle. The running distance of the vehicle running along the circumference of the nozzle, namely, the position of the running vehicle from a reference point of the nozzle can be detected accurately by dividing the distance around the nozzle by the inclination angle detected by the inclination angle sensor. Accordingly, disadvantages in the prior art, for example, that the detected values obtained by using an encoder are changed by slipping or idle running of the magnet wheels are eliminated, and accurate flaw detection can be conducted. In addition, an operation of visually adjusting the reference point for the device can be eliminated. An operator's exposure dose can be reduced. (N.H.)

  2. Study of Pressure Oscillations in Supersonic Parachute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Nimesh; Fukiba, Katsuyoshi; Mizuta, Kazuki; Maru, Yusuke

    2018-04-01

    Supersonic parachutes are a critical element of planetary mission whose simple structure, light-weight characteristics together with high ratio of aerodynamic drag makes them the most suitable aerodynamic decelerators. The use of parachute in supersonic flow produces complex shock/shock and wake/shock interaction giving rise to dynamic pressure oscillations. The study of supersonic parachute is difficult, because parachute has very flexible structure which makes obtaining experimental pressure data difficult. In this study, a supersonic wind tunnel test using two rigid bodies is done. The wind tunnel test was done at Mach number 3 by varying the distance between the front and rear objects, and the distance of a bundle point which divides suspension lines and a riser. The analysis of Schlieren movies revealed shock wave oscillation which was repetitive and had large pressure variation. The pressure variation differed in each case of change in distance between the front and rear objects, and the change in distance between riser and the rear object. The causes of pressure oscillation are: interaction of wake caused by front object with the shock wave, fundamental harmonic vibration of suspension lines, interference between shock waves, and the boundary layer of suspension lines.

  3. Three-dimensional supersonic vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Kandil, Hamdy A.; Liu, C. H.

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional supersonic vortex-breakdown problems in bound and unbound domains are solved. The solutions are obtained using the time-accurate integration of the unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The computational scheme is an implicit, upwind, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. Two vortex-breakdown applications are considered in the present paper. The first is for a supersonic swirling jet which is issued from a nozzle into a supersonic uniform flow at a lower Mach number than that of the swirling jet. The second is for a supersonic swirling flow in a configured circular duct. In the first application, an extensive study of the effects of grid fineness, shape and grid-point distribution on the vortex breakdown is presented. Four grids are used in this study and they show a substantial dependence of the breakdown bubble and shock wave on the grid used. In the second application, the bubble-type and helix-type vortex breakdown have been captured.

  4. Study on the Impact Characteristics of Coherent Supersonic Jet and Conventional Supersonic Jet in EAF Steelmaking Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guangsheng; Zhu, Rong; Cheng, Ting; Dong, Kai; Yang, Lingzhi; Wu, Xuetao

    2018-02-01

    Supersonic oxygen-supplying technologies, including the coherent supersonic jet and the conventional supersonic jet, are now widely applied in electric arc furnace steelmaking processes to increase the bath stirring, reaction rates, and energy efficiency. However, there has been limited research on the impact characteristics of the two supersonic jets. In the present study, by integrating theoretical modeling and numerical simulations, a hybrid model was developed and modified to calculate the penetration depth and impact zone volume of the coherent and conventional supersonic jets. The computational fluid dynamics results were validated against water model experiments. The results show that the lance height has significant influence on the jet penetration depth and jet impact zone volume. The penetration depth decreases with increasing lance height, whereas the jet impact zone volume initially increases and then decreases with increasing lance height. In addition, the penetration depth and impact zone volume of the coherent supersonic jet are larger than those of the conventional supersonic jet at the same lance height, which illustrates the advantages of the coherent supersonic jet in delivering great amounts of oxygen to liquid melt with a better stirring effect compared to the conventional supersonic jet. A newly defined parameter, the k value, reflects the velocity attenuation and the potential core length of the main supersonic jet. Finally, a hybrid model and its modifications can well predict the penetration depth and impact zone volume of the coherent and conventional supersonic jets.

  5. New formulae for magnetic relative helicity and field line helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Jean-Jacques

    2018-01-01

    We consider a magnetic field {B} occupying the simply connected domain D and having all its field lines tied to the boundary S of D. We assume here that {B} has a simple topology, i.e., the mapping {M} from positive to negative polarity areas of S associating to each other the two footpoints of any magnetic line, is continuous. We first present new formulae for the helicity H of {B} relative to a reference field {{B}}r having the same normal component {B}n on S, and for its field line helicity h relative to a reference vector potential {{C}}r of {{B}}r. These formulae make immediately apparent the well known invariance of these quantities under all the ideal MHD deformations that preserve the positions of the footpoints on S. They express indeed h and H either in terms of {M} and {B}n, or in terms of the values on S of a pair of Euler potentials of {B}. We next show that, for a specific choice of {{C}}r, the field line helicity h of {B} fully characterizes the magnetic mapping {M} and then the topology of the lines. Finally, we give a formula that describes the rate of change of h in a situation where the plasma moves on the perfectly conducting boundary S without changing {B}n and/or non-ideal processes, described by an unspecified term {N} in Ohm’s law, are at work in some parts of D.

  6. MHD stability analysis of helical system plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yuji

    2000-01-01

    Several topics of the MHD stability studies in helical system plasmas are reviewed with respect to the linear and ideal modes mainly. Difference of the method of the MHD stability analysis in helical system plasmas from that in tokamak plasmas is emphasized. Lack of the cyclic (symmetric) coordinate makes an analysis more difficult. Recent topic about TAE modes in a helical system is also described briefly. (author)

  7. Employing helicity amplitudes for resummation in SCET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.; Tackmann, Frank J.; Waalewijn, Wouter J.; Nikhef, Amsterdam

    2016-05-01

    Helicity amplitudes are the fundamental ingredients of many QCD calculations for multi-leg processes. We describe how these can seamlessly be combined with resummation in Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET), by constructing a helicity operator basis for which the Wilson coefficients are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. This basis is crossing symmetric and has simple transformation properties under discrete symmetries.

  8. Research status of fast flows and shocks in laboratory plasmas. Supersonic plasma flow and shock waves in various magnetic channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inutake, Masaaki; Ando, Akira

    2007-01-01

    Fast plasma flow is produced by Magneto-Plasma-Dynamic Arcjet (MPDA). The properties of fast flow and shock wave in various magnetic channels are reported by the experiment results. Fast plasma flow by MPDA, shocked flow in the magnetic channel, supersonic plasma flow in the divergence magnetic nozzle, ion acoustic wave in the mirror field, transonic flow and sonic throat in the magnetic Laval nozzle, fast flow in the helical magnetic channel, and future subjects are reported. Formation of the supersonic plasma flow by the divergence magnetic nozzle and effects of background gas, helical-kink instability in the fast plasma jet, and formation of convergence magnetic nozzle near outlet are described. From the phase difference of azimuthal and axial probe array signals, the plasma has twisted structure and it rotates in the same direction of the twist. Section of MPDA, principle of magnetic acceleration of MPDA, HITOP, relation among velocities, temperature, and Mach number of He ion and atom and the discharge current, distribution of magnetic-flux density in the direction of electromagnetic field, measurement of magnetic field near MPDA exit are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  9. A second-generation supersonic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, W.; Grayson, G.; Gump, J.; Hutko, G.; Kubicko, R.; Obrien, J.; Orndorff, R.; Oscher, R.; Polster, M.; Ulrich, C.

    1989-01-01

    Ever since the advent of commercial flight vehicles, one goal of designers has been to develop aircraft that can fly faster and carry more passengers than before. After the development of practical supersonic military aircraft, this desire was naturally manifested in a search for a practical supersonic commercial aircraft. The first and, to date, only supersonic civil transport is the Concorde, manufactured by a consortium of British and French aerospace companies. Unfortunately, due to a number of factors, including low passenger capacity and limited range, the Concorde has not been an economic success. It is for this reason that there is considerable interest in developing a design for a supersonic civil transport that addresses some of the inadequacies of the Concorde. For the design of such an aircraft to be feasible in the near term, certain guidelines must be established at the outset. Based upon the experience with the Concorde, whose 100-passenger capacity is not large enough for profitable operation, a minimum capacity of 250 passengers is desired. Second, to date, because of the limited range of the Concorde, supersonic commercial flight has been restricted to trans-Atlantic routes. In order to broaden the potential market, any new design must have the capability of trans-Pacific flight. A summary of the potential markets involved is presented. Also, because of both the cost and complexity involved with actively cooling an entire aircraft, an additional design constraint is that the aircraft as a whole be passively cooled. One additional design constraint is somewhat less quantitative in nature but of great importance nonetheless. Any time a new design is attempted, the tendency is to assume great strides in technology that serve as the basis for actual realization of the design. While it is not always possible to avoid this dependence on 'enabling technology,' since this design is desired for the near term, it is prudent, wherever possible, to rely on

  10. AERODYNAMICS OF WING TIP SAILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSHTAK AL-ATABI

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Observers have always been fascinated by soaring birds. An interesting feature of these birds is the existence of few feathers extending from the tip of the wing. In this paper, small lifting surfaces were fitted to the tip of a NACA0012 wing in a fashion similar to that of wing tip feathers. Experimental measurements of induced drag, longitudinal static stability and trailing vortex structure were obtained.The tests showed that adding wing tip surfaces (sails decreased the induced drag factor and increased the longitudinal static stability. Results identified two discrete appositely rotated tip vortices and showed the ability of wing tip surfaces to break them down and to diffuse them.

  11. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A HELICAL SAVONIUS ROTOR WITHOUT SHAFT AT 45° TWIST ANGLE USING CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachu Deb

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Helical Savonius rotor exhibits better performance characteristics at all the rotor angles compared to conventional Savonius rotor. However studies related to the performance measurement and flow physics of such rotor are very scarce. Keeping this in view, in this paper, a three dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis using commercial Fluent 6.2 software was done to predict the performance of a two-bucket helical Savonius rotor without shaft and with end plates in a complete cycle of rotation. A two-bucket helical Savonius rotor having height of 60 cm and diameter of 17 cm with 45° bucket twist angle was designed using Gambit. The buckets were connected at the top and bottom circular end plates, which are 1.1 times the rotor diameter. The k-ε turbulence model with second order upwind discretization scheme was adopted with standard wall condition. Power coefficients (Cp and torque coefficients (Ct at different tip speed ratios were evaluated at different rotor angles. From the investigation, it was observed that power coefficient increased with increase of tip speed ratio up to an optimum limit, but then decreased even further tip speed ratio was increased. Further investigation was done on the variations of Cp & Ct in a complete cycle of rotation from 0° to 360° in a step of 45° rotor corresponding to the optimum tip speed ratio. The value of Cp at all the rotor angles is positive. Moreover, velocity magnitude contours were analyzed for each rotor angle and it could be concluded that high aerodynamic torque and power can be expected when the rotor is positioned at 45º & 90º with respect to incoming flow.

  12. Supersonic expansion of argon into vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habets, A H.M.

    1977-01-21

    A theoretical description of a free supersonic expansion process is given. Three distinct regions in the expansion are discussed, namely the continuum region, the gradual transition to the collisionless regime, and the free-molecular-flow stage. Important topics are the peaking-factor formalism, the thermal-conduction model, and the virtual-source formalism. The formation of the molecular beam from the expansion and condensation phenomena occurring in the expanding gas are discussed. The molecular beam machine used in the measurements is described and special attention is given to the cryopumps used in the supersonic sources as well as to the time-of-flight analysis of the molecular beam velocity distributions. Finally, the processing of experimental data is discussed, particularly the least-squares determination of best-fit representations of the measurements.

  13. Li/Li2 supersonic nozzle beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.Y.R.; Crooks, J.B.; Yang, S.C.; Way, K.R.; Stwalley, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    The characterization of a lithium supersonic nozzle beam was made using spectroscopic techniques. It is found that at a stagnation pressure of 5.3 kPa (40 torr) and a nozzle throat diameter of 0.4 mm the ground state vibrational population of Li 2 can be described by a Boltzmann distribution with T/sub v/ = 195 +- 30 0 K. The rotational temperature is found to be T/sub r/ = 70 +- 20 0 K by band shape analysis. Measurements by quadrupole mass spectrometer indicates that approximately 10 mole per cent Li 2 dimers are formed at an oven body temperature of 1370 0 K n the supersonic nozzle expansion. This measured mole fraction is in good agreement with the existing dimerization theory

  14. Supersonic expansion of argon into vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habets, A.H.M.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical description of a free supersonic expansion process is given. Three distinct regions in the expansion are discussed, namely the continuum region, the gradual transition to the collisionless regime, and the free-molecular-flow stage. Important topics are the peaking-factor formalism, the thermal-conduction model, and the virtual-source formalism. The formation of the molecular beam from the expansion and condensation phenomena occurring in the expanding gas are discussed. The molecular beam machine used in the measurements is described and special attention is given to the cryopumps used in the supersonic sources as well as to the time-of-flight analysis of the molecular beam velocity distributions. Finally, the processing of experimental data is discussed, particularly the least-squares determination of best-fit representations of the measurements

  15. Beta-helical polymers from isocyanopeptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J.J.L.M.; Donners, J.J.J.M.; Gelder, de R.; Graswinckel, W.S.; Metselaar, G.A.; Rowan, A.E.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Nolte, R.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Polymerization of isocyanopeptides results in the formation of high molecular mass polymers that fold in a proteinlike fashion to give helical strands in which the peptide chains are arranged in ß-sheets. The ß-helical polymers retain their structure in water and unfold in a cooperative process at

  16. Magnetic islands created by resonant helical windings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, A.S.; Heller, M.V.; Caldas, I.L.

    1986-01-01

    The triggering of disruptive instabilities by resonant helical windings in large aspect-ratio tokamaks is associated to destruction of magnetic surfaces. The Chirikov condition is applied to estimate analytically the helical winding current thresholds for ergodization of the magnetic field lines. (Autor) [pt

  17. Helicity amplitudes for matter-coupled gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrovandi, R.; Novaes, S.F.; Spehler, D.

    1992-07-01

    The Weyl-van der Waerden spinor formalism is applied to the evaluation of helicity invariant amplitudes in the framework of linearized gravitation. The graviton couplings to spin-0, 1 - 2 , 1, and 3 - 2 particles are given, and, to exhibit the reach of this method, the helicity amplitudes for the process electron + positron → photon + graviton are obtained. (author)

  18. Stiffness versus architecture of single helical polyisocyanopeptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buul, van A.M.; Schwartz, E.; Brocorens, P.; Koepf, M.; Beljonne, D.; Maan, J.C.; Christianen, P.C.M.; Kouwer, P.H.J.; Nolte, R.J.M.; Engelkamp, H.; Blank, K.; Rowan, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    Helical structures play a vital role in nature, offering mechanical rigidity, chirality and structural definition to biological systems. Little is known about the influence of the helical architecture on the intrinsic properties of polymers. Here, we offer an insight into the nano architecture of

  19. Flow Studies of Decelerators at Supersonic Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1959-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests recorded the effect of decelerators on flow at various supersonic speeds. Rigid parachute models were tested for the effects of porosity, shroud length, and number of shrouds. Flexible model parachutes were tested for effects of porosity and conical-shaped canopy. Ribbon dive brakes on a missile-shaped body were tested for effect of tension cable type and ribbon flare type. The final test involved a plastic sphere on riser lines.

  20. Tips for Starting Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legislative Information Advisory & Coordinating Committees Strategic Plans & Reports Research Areas FAQs ... Starting Physical Activity Related Topics Section Navigation Tips to Help You Get Active ...

  1. Characterization of supersonic radiation diffusion waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Alastair S.; Guymer, Thomas M.; Morton, John; Williams, Benjamin; Kline, John L.; Bazin, Nicholas; Bentley, Christopher; Allan, Shelly; Brent, Katie; Comley, Andrew J.; Flippo, Kirk; Cowan, Joseph; Taccetti, J. Martin; Mussack-Tamashiro, Katie; Schmidt, Derek W.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; Obrey, Kimberly; Lanier, Nicholas E.; Workman, Jonathan B.; Stevenson, R. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Supersonic and diffusive radiation flow is an important test problem for the radiative transfer models used in radiation-hydrodynamics computer codes owing to solutions being accessible via analytic and numeric methods. We present experimental results with which we compare these solutions by studying supersonic and diffusive flow in the laboratory. We present results of higher-accuracy experiments than previously possible studying radiation flow through up to 7 high-temperature mean free paths of low-density, chlorine-doped polystyrene foam and silicon dioxide aerogel contained by an Au tube. Measurements of the heat front position and absolute measurements of the x-ray emission arrival at the end of the tube are used to test numerical and analytical models. We find excellent absolute agreement with simulations provided that the opacity and the equation of state are adjusted within expected uncertainties; analytical models provide a good phenomenological match to measurements but are not in quantitative agreement due to their limited scope. - Highlights: • The supersonic, diffusion of x-rays through sub-solid density materials is studied. • The data are more diffusive and of higher velocity than any prior work. • Scaled 1D analytic diffusion models reproduce the heat front evolution. • Refined radiation transport approximations are tested in numerical simulations. • Simulations match the data if material properties are adjusted within uncertainties

  2. Trends in Supersonic Separator design development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altam Rami Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Supersonic separator is a new technology with applications in hydrocarbon dew pointing and gas dehydration which can be used to condensate and separate water and heavy hydrocarbons from natural gas. Many researchers have studied the design, performance and efficiency, economic viability, and industrial applications of these separators. The purpose of this paper is to succinctly review recent progress in the design and application of supersonic separators and their limitations. This review has found that while several aspects of this study are well studied, considerable gaps within the published literature still exists in the areas such as turndown flexibility which is a critical requirement to cater for variation of mass flow and since almost all the available designs have a fixed geometry and therefore cannot be considered suitable for variable mass flow rate, which is a common situation in actual site. Hence, the focus needs to be more on designing a flexible geometry that can maintain a high separation efficiency regardless of inlet conditions and mass flow variations. This review is focusing only on the design and application of the supersonic separators without going through the experimental facilities, industrial platform, pilot plants as well as theoretical, analytical, and numerical modelling.

  3. Dynamics of zonal flows in helical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, H; Watanabe, T-H

    2005-03-25

    A theory for describing collisionless long-time behavior of zonal flows in helical systems is presented and its validity is verified by gyrokinetic-Vlasov simulation. It is shown that, under the influence of particles trapped in helical ripples, the response of zonal flows to a given source becomes weaker for lower radial wave numbers and deeper helical ripples while a high-level zonal-flow response, which is not affected by helical-ripple-trapped particles, can be maintained for a longer time by reducing their bounce-averaged radial drift velocity. This implies a possibility that helical configurations optimized for reducing neoclassical ripple transport can simultaneously enhance zonal flows which lower anomalous transport.

  4. Topology of helical fluid flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten; Brøns, Morten

    2014-01-01

    function for the topology of the streamline pattern in incompressible flows. On this basis, we perform a comprehensive study of the topology of the flow field generated by a helical vortex filament in an ideal fluid. The classical expression for the stream function obtained by Hardin (Hardin, J. C. 1982...... the zeroes of a single real function of one variable, and we show that three different flow topologies can occur, depending on a single dimensionless parameter. By including the self-induced velocity on the vortex filament by a localised induction approximation, the stream function is slightly modified...... and an extra parameter is introduced. In this setting two new flow topologies arise, but not more than two critical points occur for any combination of parameters....

  5. Helically coiled tube heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    In a heat exchanger such as a steam generator for a nuclear reactor, two or more bundles of helically coiled tubes are arranged in series with the tubes in each bundle integrally continuing through the tube bundles arranged in series therewith. Pitch values for the tubing in any pair of tube bundles, taken transverse to the path of the reactor coolant flow about the tubes, are selected as a ratio of two unequal integers to permit efficient operation of each tube bundle while maintaining the various tube bundles of the heat exchanger within a compact envelope. Preferably, the helix angle and tube pitch parallel to the path of coolant flow are constant for all tubes in a single bundle so that the tubes are of approximately the same length within each bundle

  6. The quantum Hall effect helicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, Keshav N., E-mail: keshav1001@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2015-04-16

    The quantum Hall effect in semiconductor heterostructures is explained by two signs in the angular momentum j=l±s and g=(2j+1)/(2l+1) along with the Landau factor (n+1/2). These modifications in the existing theories explain all of the fractional charges. The helicity which is the sign of the product of the linear momentum with the spin p.s plays an important role for the understanding of the data at high magnetic fields. In particular it is found that particles with positive sign in the spin move in one direction and those with negative sign move in another direction which explains the up and down stream motion of the particles.

  7. Tips for Good Electronic Presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Dennis

    1996-01-01

    Describes library uses of presentation graphics software and offers tips for creating electronic presentations. Tips include: audience retention; visual aid options; software package options; presentation planning; presentation showing; and use of text, colors, and graphics. Sidebars note common presentation errors and popular presentation…

  8. Evidence for Mixed Helicity in Erupting Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muglach, K.; Wang, Y.-M.; Kliem, B.

    2009-09-01

    Erupting filaments are sometimes observed to undergo a rotation about the vertical direction as they rise. This rotation of the filament axis is generally interpreted as a conversion of twist into writhe in a kink-unstable magnetic flux rope. Consistent with this interpretation, the rotation is usually found to be clockwise (as viewed from above) if the post-eruption arcade has right-handed helicity, but counterclockwise if it has left-handed helicity. Here, we describe two non-active-region filament events recorded with the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory in which the sense of rotation appears to be opposite to that expected from the helicity of the post-event arcade. Based on these observations, we suggest that the rotation of the filament axis is, in general, determined by the net helicity of the erupting system, and that the axially aligned core of the filament can have the opposite helicity sign to the surrounding field. In most cases, the surrounding field provides the main contribution to the net helicity. In the events reported here, however, the helicity associated with the filament "barbs" is opposite in sign to and dominates that of the overlying arcade.

  9. HEMISPHERIC HELICITY TREND FOR SOLAR CYCLE 24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Juan; Zhang Mei

    2011-01-01

    Using vector magnetograms obtained with the Spectro-polarimeter (SP) on board Hinode satellite, we studied two helicity parameters (local twist and current helicity) of 64 active regions that occurred in the descending phase of solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. Our analysis gives the following results. (1) The 34 active regions of the solar cycle 24 follow the so-called hemispheric helicity rule, whereas the 30 active regions of the solar cycle 23 do not. (2) When combining all 64 active regions as one sample, they follow the hemispheric helicity sign rule as in most other observations. (3) Despite the so-far most accurate measurement of vector magnetic field given by SP/Hinode, the rule is still weak with large scatters. (4) The data show evidence of different helicity signs between strong and weak fields, confirming previous result from a large sample of ground-based observations. (5) With two example sunspots we show that the helicity parameters change sign from the inner umbra to the outer penumbra, where the sign of penumbra agrees with the sign of the active region as a whole. From these results, we speculate that both the Σ-effect (turbulent convection) and the dynamo have contributed in the generation of helicity, whereas in both cases turbulence in the convection zone has played a significant role.

  10. Kawada's Contribution to Induced Velocity by Helical Vortices with Application to Propeller Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukumoto, Y.; Okulov, Valery; Wood, D. H.

    provides a comprehensive treatment of induced velocity by helical vortices with application to the propeller theory.Sandi Kawada was a pioneer of aeronautics engineering in Japan, and played a leading role in opening up this field in Japan. He was born on May 26, 1899 and died on July 16, 1970. Kawada......, turbo jet and high-speed aerodynamics (sub-sonic, transonic and super-sonic regimes). He committed in building a number of wind tunnels of the first generation in Japan. Among others, he led the Japanese society of aeronautics engineering with his theory of propellers. Aviation Laboratory...... Commander for the Allied Powers) banned the aircraft industry and the related research in Japan for 1945-1953. Kawada waved his route off aeronautics, entered into civil engineering and geophysical fluid mechanics, being featured by environ-ment aspect. In this way, Kawada left the aeronautical engineering...

  11. Polymorphic transformation of helical flagella of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sookkyung; Howard Berg Collaboration; William Ko Collaboration; Yongsam Kim Collaboration; Wanho Lee Collaboration; Charles Peskin Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria such as E. coli swim in an aqueous environment by utilizing the rotation of flagellar motors and alternate two modes of motility, runs and tumbles. Runs are steady forward swimming driven by bundles of flagellar filaments whose motors are turning CCW; tumbles involve a reorientation of the direction of swimming triggered by motor reversals. During tumbling, the helical flagellum undergoes polymorphic transformations, which is a local change in helical pitch, helical radius, and handedness. In this work, we investigate the underlying mechanism of structural conformation and how this polymorphic transition plays a role in bacterial swimming. National Science Foundation.

  12. Modelling simple helically delivered dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenwick, John D; Tome, Wolfgang A; Kissick, Michael W; Mackie, T Rock

    2005-01-01

    In a previous paper, we described quality assurance procedures for Hi-Art helical tomotherapy machines. Here, we develop further some ideas discussed briefly in that paper. Simple helically generated dose distributions are modelled, and relationships between these dose distributions and underlying characteristics of Hi-Art treatment systems are elucidated. In particular, we describe the dependence of dose levels along the central axis of a cylinder aligned coaxially with a Hi-Art machine on fan beam width, couch velocity and helical delivery lengths. The impact on these dose levels of angular variations in gantry speed or output per linear accelerator pulse is also explored

  13. Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) Plume Induced Environment Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, B. L.; Smith, S. D.; Van Norman, J. W.; Muppidi, S.; Clark, I

    2016-01-01

    Provide plume induced heating (radiation & convection) predictions in support of the LDSD thermal design (pre-flight SFDT-1) Predict plume induced aerodynamics in support of flight dynamics, to achieve targeted freestream conditions to test supersonic deceleration technologies (post-flight SFDT-1, pre-flight SFDT-2)

  14. A multi-modular helical magnetic millirobot navigating in curved tubular environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungmun Jeon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel multi-modular helical magnetic millirobot (MHMM able to navigate in curved tubular environments. The proposed MHMM is basically composed of head, middle, and tail modules serially connected by a universal joint, and can employ more modules if necessary. The head module is a helical body with a magnetic rotary tip attached to the front end. Thus, once located in a curved tube filled with a fluid, the MHMM can effectively generate navigating or unclogging motions simply actuated by an external rotating magnetic field. This paper also examines the dynamic characteristics of the MHMM under various working conditions to manipulate the MHMM in a stable and safe manner. Then, it demonstrates various controlled motions of the MHMM in an in-vitro pulsatile flow environment to show the validity of the proposed structure and method.

  15. Steady-state helices of the actin homolog MreB inside bacteria: Dynamics without motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Jun F.; Rutenberg, Andrew D.

    2007-09-01

    Within individual bacteria, we combine force-dependent polymerization dynamics of individual MreB protofilaments with an elastic model of protofilament bundles buckled into helical configurations. We use variational techniques and stochastic simulations to relate the pitch of the MreB helix, the total abundance of MreB, and the number of protofilaments. By comparing our simulations with mean-field calculations, we find that stochastic fluctuations are significant. We examine the quasistatic evolution of the helical pitch with cell growth, as well as time scales of helix turnover and de novo establishment. We find that while the body of a polarized MreB helix treadmills toward its slow-growing end, the fast-growing tips of laterally associated protofilaments move toward the opposite fast-growing end of the MreB helix. This offers a possible mechanism for targeted polar localization without cytoplasmic motor proteins.

  16. Spin-polarized scanning-tunneling probe for helical Luttinger liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sourin; Rao, Sumathi

    2011-06-10

    We propose a three-terminal spin-polarized STM setup for probing the helical nature of the Luttinger liquid edge state that appears in the quantum spin Hall system. We show that the three-terminal tunneling conductance depends on the angle (θ) between the magnetization direction of the tip and the local orientation of the electron spin on the edge while the two terminal conductance is independent of this angle. We demonstrate that chiral injection of an electron into the helical Luttinger liquid (when θ is zero or π) is associated with fractionalization of the spin of the injected electron in addition to the fractionalization of its charge. We also point out a spin current amplification effect induced by the spin fractionalization.

  17. 76 FR 30231 - Civil Supersonic Aircraft Panel Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... awareness of the continuing technological advancements in supersonic aircraft technology aimed at reducing... Wednesday, April 21, 2010, as part of the joint meeting of the 159th Acoustical Society of America and NOISE... advances in supersonic technology, and for the FAA, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA...

  18. At the Tipping Point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, H. S.

    2011-02-28

    There comes a time in every field of science when things suddenly change. While it might not be immediately apparent that things are different, a tipping point has occurred. Biology is now at such a point. The reason is the introduction of high-throughput genomics-based technologies. I am not talking about the consequences of the sequencing of the human genome (and every other genome within reach). The change is due to new technologies that generate an enormous amount of data about the molecular composition of cells. These include proteomics, transcriptional profiling by sequencing, and the ability to globally measure microRNAs and post-translational modifications of proteins. These mountains of digital data can be mapped to a common frame of reference: the organism’s genome. With the new high-throughput technologies, we can generate tens of thousands of data points from each sample. Data are now measured in terabytes and the time necessary to analyze data can now require years. Obviously, we can’t wait to interpret the data fully before the next experiment. In fact, we might never be able to even look at all of it, much less understand it. This volume of data requires sophisticated computational and statistical methods for its analysis and is forcing biologists to approach data interpretation as a collaborative venture.

  19. Tipping the scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    In the US, the October 1998 murder of a physician who performed abortions was an outward manifestation of the insidious battle against legal abortion being waged by radical Christian social conservatives seeking to transform the US democracy into a theocracy. This movement has been documented in a publication entitled, "Tipping the Scales: The Christian Right's Legal Crusade Against Choice" produced as a result of a 4-year investigation conducted by The Center for Reproductive Law and Policy. This publication describes how these fundamentalists have used sophisticated legal, lobbying, and communication strategies to further their goals of challenging the separation of church and state, opposing family planning and sexuality education that is not based solely on abstinence, promoting school prayer, and restricting homosexual rights. The movement has resulted in the introduction of more than 300 anti-abortion bills in states, 50 of which have passed in 23 states. Most Christian fundamentalist groups provide free legal representation to abortion clinic terrorists, and some groups solicit women to bring specious malpractice claims against providers. Sophisticated legal tactics are used by these groups to remove the taint of extremism and mask the danger posed to US constitutional principles being posed by "a well-financed and zealous brand of radical lawyers and their supporters."

  20. Plasmoid behavior in helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, R.; Nakajima, N.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: It is well known that an ablation cloud; a high density and low temperature plasmoid, drifts to the lower field side in tokamak plasmas, which leads to a good performance on fueling in tokamak. Such a good performance, however, has not been obtained yet in the planar axis heliotron; Large Helical Device (LHD) experiments, even if a pellet has been injected from the high field side. The purpose of the study is to clarify the difference on the plasmoid motion between tokamak and LHD plasmas by using the MHD simulation including ablation processes. It is found in tokamaks that the drift motion is induced by a tire tube force and 1/R force in the major radius direction, and that the pressure and density of the plasmoid have oscillation due to fast compressional Alfven wave. On the other hand, the upper and lower portions surrounding the plasmoid center drift to the higher field side, because 1/R force by magnetic field becomes negative in the major radius direction since the magnetic field surrounding the plasmoid is accumulated by the extremely large ablation pressure and the magnetic pressure perturbation becomes positive. It is also found that the plasmoid does not drift when the perturbation of the plasmoid is small. In addition, the motion of the plasmoid is investigated in LHD plasmas in four cases that the plasmoids are initially located at the inner and outer sides of the torus on the vertically and horizontally elongated poloidal cross sections. The plasmoids drift to the lower field sides in all cases. However, in the case that it is located at the inner side of the torus on the horizontally elongated poloidal cross section, it is found that the plasmoid drifts in the negative direction of the major radius and subsequently drifts in the positive direction of it. In other words, the plasmoid finally drifts in the positive direction of the major radius the same as the plasmoid located at the outer side of the torus. This fact might be one of the

  1. IPCS implications for future supersonic transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billig, L. O.; Kniat, J.; Schmidt, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    The Integrated Propulsion Control System (IPCS) demonstrates control of an entire supersonic propulsion module - inlet, engine afterburner, and nozzle - with an HDC 601 digital computer. The program encompasses the design, build, qualification, and flight testing of control modes, software, and hardware. The flight test vehicle is an F-111E airplane. The L.H. inlet and engine will be operated under control of a digital computer mounted in the weapons bay. A general description and the current status of the IPCS program are given.

  2. A systematic study of supersonic jet noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, J. F.; Letty, R. P.; Patel, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The acoustic fields for a rectangular and for an axisymmetric nozzle configuration are studied. Both nozzles are designed for identical flow parameters. It is tried to identify the dominant noise mechanisms. The other objective of the study is to establish scaling laws of supersonic jet noise. A shock tunnel is used in the investigations. Measured sound directivity, propagation direction of Mach waves obtained by shadowgraphs, and the slight dependence of the acoustic efficiency on the level of expansion indicate that Mach waves contribute significantly to the noise produced by a rectangular jet.

  3. Advanced supersonic propulsion study, phase 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Installation characteristics for a Variable Stream Control Engine (VSCE) were studied for three advanced supersonic airplane designs. Sensitivity of the VSCE concept to change in technology projections was evaluated in terms of impact on overall installed performance. Based on these sensitivity results, critical technology requirements were reviewed, resulting in the reaffirmation of the following requirements: low-noise nozzle system; a high performance, low emissions duct burner and main burner; hot section technology; variable geometry components; and propulsion integration features, including an integrated electronic control system.

  4. Helicity and Filament Channels? The Straight Twist!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important and most puzzling features of the coronal magnetic field is that it appears to have smooth magnetic structure with little evidence for non-potentiality except at special locations, photospheric polarity inversions lines where the non-potentiality is observed as a filament channel. This characteristic feature of the closed-field corona is highly unexpected given that photospheric motions continuously tangle its magnetic field. Although reconnection can eliminate some of the injected structure, it cannot destroy the helicity, which should build up to produce observable complexity. We propose that an inverse cascade process transports the injected helicity from the interior of closed flux regions to their boundaries, polarity inversion lines, creating filament channels. We describe how the helicity is injected and transported and calculate the relevant rates. We argue that one process, helicity transport, can explain both the observed lack and presence of structure in the coronal magnetic field.

  5. Spin versus helicity in processes involving transversity

    CERN Document Server

    Mekhfi, Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    We construct the spin formalism in order to deal in a direct and natural way with processes involving transversity which are now of increasing popularity. The helicity formalism which is more appropriate for collision processes of definite helicity has been so far used also to manage processes with transversity, but at the price of computing numerous helicity amplitudes generally involving unnecessary kinematical variables.In a second step we work out the correspondence between both formalisms and retrieve in another way all results of the helicity formalism but in simpler forms.We then compute certain processes for comparison.A special process:the quark dipole magnetic moment is shown to be exclusively treated within the spin formalism as it is directly related to the transverse spin of the quark inside the baryon.

  6. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mei; Park, S.Y.; Hirshfield, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude

  7. Helical magnetized wiggler for synchrotron radiation laser

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Mei; Hirshfield, J L

    1999-01-01

    A helical magnetized iron wiggler has been built for a novel infrared synchrotron radiation laser (SRL) experiment. The wiggler consists of four periods of helical iron structure immersed in a solenoid field. This wiggler is to impart transverse velocity to a prebunched 6 MeV electron beam, and thus to obtain a desired high orbit pitch ratio for the SRL. Field tapering at beam entrance is considered and tested on a similar wiggler. Analytic and simulated characteristics of wigglers of this type are discussed and the performance of the fabricated wigglers is demonstrated experimentally. A 4.7 kG peak field was measured for a 6.4 mm air gap and a 5.4 cm wiggler period at a 20 kG solenoid field. The measured helical fields compare favorably with the analytical solution. This type of helical iron wigglers has the potential to be scaled to small periods with strong field amplitude.

  8. Using helical compressors for coke gas condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Privalov, V E; Rezunenko, Yu I; Lelyanov, N V; Zarnitzkii, G Eh; Gordienko, A A; Derebenko, I F; Venzhega, A G; Leonov, N P; Gorokhov, N N

    1982-08-01

    Coke oven gas compression is discussed. Presently used multilevel piston compressors are criticized. The paper recommends using helical machines which combine advantages of using volume condensing compressors and compact high-efficiency centrifugal machines. Two kinds of helical compressors are evaluated: dry and oil-filled; their productivities and coke oven gas chemical composition are analyzed. Experiments using helical compressors were undertaken at the Yasinovskii plant. Flowsheet of the installation is shown. Performance results are given in a table. For all operating conditions content of insolubles in oil compounds is found to be lower than the acceptable value (0.08%). Compressor productivity measurements with variable manifold pressure are evaluated. Figures obtained show that efficient condensation of raw coke oven gas is possible. Increasing oil-filled compressor productivity is recommended by decreasing amount of oil injected and simultaneously increasing rotation speed. The dry helical compressor with water seal is found to be most promising for raw coke oven gas condensation. (10 refs.)

  9. Helicity evolution at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Pitonyak, Daniel; Sievert, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    We construct small-x evolution equations which can be used to calculate quark and anti-quark helicity TMDs and PDFs, along with the g 1 structure function. These evolution equations resum powers of α s ln 2  (1/x) in the polarization-dependent evolution along with the powers of α s ln (1/x) in the unpolarized evolution which includes saturation effects. The equations are written in an operator form in terms of polarization-dependent Wilson line-like operators. While the equations do not close in general, they become closed and self-contained systems of non-linear equations in the large-N c and large-N c   N f limits. As a cross-check, in the ladder approximation, our equations map onto the same ladder limit of the infrared evolution equations for the g 1 structure function derived previously by Bartels, Ermolaev and Ryskin http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s002880050285.

  10. Dynamics of helicity transport and Taylor relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, P.H.; Malkov, M.

    2003-01-01

    A simple model of the dynamics of Taylor relaxation is derived using symmetry principles alone. No statistical closure approximations are invoked or detailed plasma model properties assumed. Notably, the model predicts several classes of nondiffusive helicity transport phenomena, including traveling nonlinear waves and superdiffusive turbulent pulses. A universal expression for the scaling of the effective magnetic Reynolds number of a system undergoing Taylor relaxation is derived. Some basic properties of intermittency in helicity transport are examined

  11. Multiple helical modes of vortex breakdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Naumov, I. V.; Okulov, Valery

    2011-01-01

    Experimental observations of vortex breakdown in a rotating lid-driven cavity are presented. The results show that vortex breakdown for cavities with high aspect ratios is associated with the appearance of stable helical vortex multiplets. By using results from stability theory generalizing Kelvi......’s problem on vortex polygon stability, and systematically exploring the cavity flow, we succeeded in identifying two new stable vortex breakdown states consisting of triple and quadruple helical multiplets....

  12. On the helicity of open magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, C.; Yeates, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    We reconsider the topological interpretation of magnetic helicity for magnetic fields in open domains, and relate this to the relative helicity. Specifically, our domains stretch between two parallel planes, and each of these ends may be magnetically open. It is demonstrated that, while the magnetic helicity is gauge-dependent, its value in any gauge may be physically interpreted as the average winding number among all pairs of field lines with respect to some orthonormal frame field. In fact, the choice of gauge is equivalent to the choice of reference field in the relative helicity, meaning that the magnetic helicity is no less physically meaningful. We prove that a particular gauge always measures the winding with respect to a fixed frame, and propose that this is normally the best choice. For periodic fields, this choice is equivalent to measuring relative helicity with respect to a potential reference field. However, for aperiodic fields, we show that the potential field can be twisted. We prove by construction that there always exists a possible untwisted reference field.

  13. Diffusion in a tokamak with helical magnetic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatani, Masahiro

    1975-05-01

    In a tokamak with helical magnetic cells produced by a resonant helical magnetic field, diffusion in the collisional regime is studied. The diffusion coefficient is greatly enhanced near the resonant surface even for a weak helical magnetic field. A theoretical model for disruptive instabilities based on the enhanced transport due to helical magnetic cells is discussed. This may explain experiments of the tokamak with resonant helical fields qualitatively. (author)

  14. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... bleeding resistant to traditional medical treatments. The greatest difference in performing TIPS in children is their tremendous ...

  15. Fitness: Tips for Staying Motivated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Fitness Fitness is for life. Motivate yourself with these practical tips. By Mayo Clinic Staff Have ... 27, 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/fitness/art-20047624 . Mayo Clinic ...

  16. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... deeply you are sedated. When the needle is advanced through the liver and the pathway is expanded ... are the limitations of TIPS? Patients with more advanced liver disease are at greater risk for worsening ...

  17. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... to determine the severity of the condition. To help plan for the placement of the TIPS stent, ... Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not ...

  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the stomach and esophagus in patients with ... stomach, lower esophagus, and intestines, causing enlarged vessels, bleeding and the accumulation of fluid in the chest ...

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... in the chest or abdomen. This condition is most commonly seen in adults, often as a result ... minimally invasive procedures such as a TIPS are most often performed by a specially trained interventional radiologist ...

  20. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... open. Patients who typically need a TIPS have portal hypertension , meaning they have increased pressure in the portal ... problems leading to cirrhosis (scarring of the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are ...

  1. Energy Savers: Cool Summer Tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.

    2001-01-01

    A tri-fold brochure addressing energy-saving tips for homeowners ranging from low- or no-cost suggestions to higher cost suggestions for longer-term savings. Cooling, windows, weatherizing, and landscaping are addressed

  2. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... complex and lengthy procedures requiring extended fluoroscopy use) death (rare) top of page What are the limitations ... filtered out by the liver. The TIPS may cause too much of these substances to bypass the ...

  3. Girlfriends' Health and Safety Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Women? Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work Health Equity Girlfriends' Health and Safety Tips Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Having friends is an important part of life. Celebrate female friendship and support your girlfriends by ...

  4. Search Tips: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/searchtips.html Search Tips To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. How do I search MedlinePlus? The search box appears at the top ...

  5. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, allergies and medications you’re taking. You ... with ascites or variceal bleeding resistant to traditional medical treatments. The greatest difference in performing TIPS in ...

  6. Computerized automatic tip scanning operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, K.; Fukushima, T.; Nakai, H.; Yanagisawa, A.

    1984-01-01

    In BWR nuclear power stations the Traversing Incore Probe (TIP) system is one of the most important components in reactor monitoring and control. In previous TIP systems, however, operators have suffered from the complexity of operation and long operation time required. The system presented in this paper realizes the automatic operation of the TIP system by monitoring and driving it with a process computer. This system significantly reduces the burden on customer operators and improves plant efficiency by simplifying the operating procedure, augmenting the accuracy of the measured data, and shortening operating time. The process computer is one of the PODIA (Plant Operation by Displayed Information Automation) systems. This computer transfers control signals to the TIP control panel, which in turn drives equipment by microprocessor control. The process computer contains such components as the CRT/KB unit, the printer plotter, the hard copier, and the message typers required for efficient man-machine communications. Its operation and interface properties are described

  7. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  8. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be less than one in ...

  9. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... surgery. Your TIPS should have less of an effect than open surgical bypass on future liver transplantation ... Encephalopathy can be treated with certain medications, a special diet or, by revising the stent, but sometimes ...

  10. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be less than one in ... limitations of TIPS? Patients with more advanced liver disease are at greater risk for worsening liver failure ...

  11. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... is completed. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits A TIPS is designed to produce the same ... risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be less than one in ...

  12. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... hepatic vein to identify the portal venous system. Access is then gained from the hepatic vein into ... TIPS procedure to make sure that it remains open and functions properly. top of page Who interprets ...

  13. Tips to Prevent Mosquito Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discourage mosquitoes, ticks and other biting insects from landing on you. Here are tips for other preventive ... CDC Mosquito Control Methods - NPIC Exit Top of Page Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, ...

  14. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... while avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the stomach and esophagus in patients ... site. Using ultrasound, the doctor will identify your internal jugular vein , which is situated above your collarbone, ...

  15. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... and medical diseases. This can result in significant challenges in creating the TIPS. top of page Additional ... Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical questions ...

  16. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This ... here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging ...

  17. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Contrast Materials Venography Images related to Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) Sponsored ...

  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size ... X-Ray and CT Exams Contrast Materials Venography Images related to Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) Sponsored ...

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... observed. This procedure is usually completed in an hour or two but may take up to several ...

  20. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... the portal system using a TIPS needle (a special long needle extending from the neck into the ... Encephalopathy can be treated with certain medications, a special diet or, by revising the stent, but sometimes ...

  1. (Allium cepa) root tip mitosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    their chemical composition and genotoxic effects on cell reproduction. Two petrochemicals, air ... the chromosomes of the individual cells of the root tip could be a pointer to their ..... Chromosome technique: Theory and. Practice. Butterworths ...

  2. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)? What are some common uses of the procedure? How should I prepare? What does the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I ...

  3. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... in creating the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ...

  4. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... of bleeding that can occur can sometimes be life threatening and those patients are monitored in intensive ...

  5. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... blood draining from the bowel back to the heart while avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce ... blood away from the liver back to the heart). A stent is then placed in this tunnel ...

  6. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... portal vein to the hepatic vein in the liver. A small metal device called a stent is ... bowel back to the heart while avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the ...

  7. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose ...

  8. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... the liver. A small metal device called a stent is placed to keep the connection open and ... a small, tubular metal device commonly called a stent . During a TIPS procedure, interventional radiologists use image ...

  9. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... who typically need a TIPS have portal hypertension , meaning they have increased pressure in the portal vein ... the local anesthetic is injected. Most of the sensation is at the skin incision site, which is ...

  10. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... physician will numb an area just above your right collarbone with a local anesthetic . A very small ...

  11. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits A TIPS is designed to produce the ... skin that does not have to be stitched. Risks Any procedure where the skin is penetrated carries ...

  12. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... Patients who typically need a TIPS have portal hypertension , meaning they have increased pressure in the portal ... leading to cirrhosis (scarring of the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are ...

  13. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... above your collarbone, and guide a catheter, a long, thin, hollow plastic tube into the vessel. Using ...

  14. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... This can result in significant challenges in creating the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This page ...

  15. An Opportunity for Hydrogen Fueled Supersonic Airliners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Forbes

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper takes a new look at the prospects for developing supersonic civil airliners, considering global demographics, climate change issues, fuel prices and technological advances. Dramatic changes have occurred in the demographics, economics, and market intensity of the Eastern Hemisphere since the 1990s. Carbon reduction imperatives provide a major incentive to invest in developing hydrogen-fueled airliners. The “point-to-point” air route architecture has proved viable with long range mid-size airliners. With a cruise Mach number of 1.4, a large number of destinations become viable for overland supersonic flight. A conceptual design process is used to estimate cost per seat mile for a range of hydrocarbon and hydrogen fuel costs. An argument based on the ideal shape for minimal wave drag, estimates the drag penalty from using hydrogen. Viable aircraft geometries are shown to exist, that match the theoretical ideal shape, showing that the drag estimate is achievable. Conservative design arguments and market estimates suggest that hydrogen-fueled airliners can achieve seat-mile costs low enough to open a large worldwide market and justify a viable fleet size.

  16. Tip model of cold fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goennenwein, F.; Boersig, B.

    1991-01-01

    Cold fission is defined to be the limiting case of nuclear fission where virtually all of the available energy is converted into the total kinetic energy of the fragments. The fragments have, therefore, to be born in or at least close to their respective ground states. Starting from the viewpoint that cold fission corresponds to most compact scission configurations, energy constraints have been exploited to calculate minimum tip distances between the two nascent fragments in binary fission. Crucial input parameters to this tip model of cold fission are the ground-state deformations of fragment nuclei. It is shown that the minimum tip distances being compatible with energy conservation vary strongly with both the mass and charge fragmentation of the fission prone nucleus. The tip distances refer to nuclei with equivalent sharp surfaces. In keeping with the size of the surface width of leptodermous nuclei, only configurations where the tip distances are smaller than a few fm may be considered as valid scission configurations. From a comparison with experimental data on cold fission this critical tip distance appears to be 3.0 fm for the model parameters chosen. Whenever the model calculation yields tip distances being smaller than the critical value, a necessary condition for attaining cold fission is considered to be fulfilled. It is shown that this criterion allows to understand in fair agreement with experiment which mass fragmentations are susceptible to lead to cold fission and which fragment-charge divisions are the most favored in each isobaric mass chain. Being based merely on energy arguments, the model cannot aim at predicting fragment yields in cold fission. However, the tip model proposed appears well suited to delineate the phase space where cold fission phenomena may come into sight. (orig.)

  17. Dynamic helical CT mammography of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Fukushima, Hitoshi; Okamura, Ryuji; Nakamura, Yoshiaki; Morimoto, Taisuke; Urata, Yoji; Mukaihara, Sumio; Hayakawa, Katsumi

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether dynamic helical computed tomography (CT)-mammography could assist in selecting the most appropriate surgical method in women with breast cancer. Preoperative contrast-enhanced helical CT scanning of the breast was performed on 133 female patients with suspicion of breast cancer at the same time as clinical, mammographic, and/or ultrasonographic examinations. The patients were scanned in the prone position with a specially designed CT-compatible device. A helical scan was made with rapid intravenous bolus injection (3 ml/s) of 100 ml of iodine contrast material. Three-dimensional maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were reconstructed, and CT findings were correlated with surgical and histopathological findings. Histopathological analysis revealed 84 malignant lesions and seven benign lesions. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy levels of the CT scanning were 94.6%, 58.6%, and 78.9%. Helical scanning alone revealed additional contralateral carcinomas in three of four patients and additional ipsilateral carcinomas in three of five patients. However, the technique gave false-positive readings in 24 patients. The preoperative CT-mammogram altered the surgical method in six patients. Dynamic helical CT-mammography in the prone position may be one of the choices of adjunct imaging in patients with suspected breast cancer scheduled for surgery. (author)

  18. Introduction to the m = 1 helicity source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platts, D.A.; Jarboe, T.R.; Wright, B.L.

    1985-01-01

    The m = 1 Helicity Source, formerly called the Kinked Z-pinch, was developed as part of the Electrode Studies program at Los Alamos. The Electrode Studies program was initiated to study the control of electrode erosion in long discharge duration spheromak sources. Erosion control is necessary to reduce plasma impurities and to obtain adequate electrode lifetimes. The first task of the Electrode Studies program is to determine, from among a variety of configurations including the coaxial one, a helicity source geometry with good prospects for erosion control. The more efficient the helicity source the easier it will be to control erosion, but the source most also be easy to diagnose and modify if it is to be a useful test bed. The various erosion control techniques which have been proposed will require extensive experimentation to evaluate and optimize. Proposed techniques include, using refractory metals, profiling of the electrodes and magnetic fields, and various gas injection schemes including porous electrodes. It is considered necessary to do these experiments on an optimized helicity source so that the electrode geometries and plasma properties will be relevant. Therefore the present Electrode Studies program is aimed at developing an improved helicity source design

  19. Linear stability analysis of supersonic axisymmetric jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Wan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stabilities of supersonic jets are examined with different velocities, momentum thicknesses, and core temperatures. Amplification rates of instability waves at inlet are evaluated by linear stability theory (LST. It is found that increased velocity and core temperature would increase amplification rates substantially and such influence varies for different azimuthal wavenumbers. The most unstable modes in thin momentum thickness cases usually have higher frequencies and azimuthal wavenumbers. Mode switching is observed for low azimuthal wavenumbers, but it appears merely in high velocity cases. In addition, the results provided by linear parabolized stability equations show that the mean-flow divergence affects the spatial evolution of instability waves greatly. The most amplified instability waves globally are sometimes found to be different from that given by LST.

  20. Supersonic quasi-axisymmetric vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Kandil, Hamdy A.; Liu, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    An extensive computational study of supersonic quasi-axisymmetric vortex breakdown in a configured circular duct is presented. The unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are used. The NS equations are solved for the quasi-axisymmetric flows using an implicit, upwind, flux difference splitting, finite volume scheme. The quasi-axisymmetric solutions are time accurate and are obtained by forcing the components of the flowfield vector to be equal on two axial planes, which are in close proximity of each other. The effect of Reynolds number, for laminar flows, on the evolution and persistence of vortex breakdown, is studied. Finally, the effect of swirl ration at the duct inlet is investigated.

  1. Gas turbine engine with supersonic compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.

    2015-10-20

    A gas turbine engine having a compressor section using blades on a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a stator. The stator includes one or more of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions for deceleration of the gas to subsonic conditions and to deliver a high pressure gas to combustors. The aerodynamic ducts include structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are provided having an aspect ratio of two to one (2:1) or more, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.

  2. Numerical study of MHD supersonic flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryakhovskiy, A. I.; Schmidt, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    Supersonic MHD flow around a blunted body with a constant external magnetic field has been simulated for a number of geometries as well as a range of the flow parameters. Solvers based on Balbas-Tadmor MHD schemes and HLLC-Roe Godunov-type method have been developed within the OpenFOAM framework. The stability of the solution varies depending on the intensity of magnetic interaction The obtained solutions show the potential of MHD flow control and provide insights into for the development of the flow control system. The analysis of the results proves the applicability of numerical schemes, that are being used in the solvers. A number of ways to improve both the mathematical model of the process and the developed solvers are proposed.

  3. ARBITRARY INTERACTION OF PLANE SUPERSONIC FLOWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study.We consider the Riemann problem for parameters at collision of two plane flows at a certain angle. The problem is solved in the exact statement. Most cases of interference, both stationary and non-stationary gas-dynamic discontinuities, followed by supersonic flows can be reduced to the problem of random interaction of two supersonic flows. Depending on the ratio of the parameters in the flows, outgoing discontinuities turn out to be shock waves, or rarefactionwaves. In some cases, there is no solution at all. It is important to know how to find the domain of existence for the relevant decisions, as the type of shock-wave structures in these domains is known in advance. The Riemann problem is used in numerical methods such as the method of Godunov. As a rule, approximate solution is used, known as the Osher solution, but for a number of problems with a high precision required, solution of this problem needs to be in the exact statement. Main results.Domains of existence for solutions with different types of shock-wave structure have been considered. Boundaries of existence for solutions with two outgoing shock waves are analytically defined, as well as with the outgoing shock wave and rarefaction wave. We identify the area of Mach numbers and angles at which the flows interact and there is no solution. Specific flows with two outgoing rarefaction waves are not considered. Practical significance. The results supplement interference theory of stationary gas-dynamic discontinuities and can be used to develop new methods of numerical calculation with extraction of discontinuities.

  4. THERMAL AND AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCES OF THE SUPERSONIC MOTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan P Ninković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, Mach number of 4 can be taken as a boundary value for transition from conditions for supersonic, into the area of hypersonic flow, distinguishing two areas: area of supersonic in which the effects of the aerodynamic heating can be neglected and the area of hypersonic, in which the thermal effects become dominant. This paper presents the effects in static and dynamic areas, as well as presentation of G.R.O.M. software for determination of the values of aerodynamic derivatives, which was developed on the basis of linearized theory of supersonic flow. Validation of developed software was carried out through different types of testing, proving its usefulness for engineering practice in the area of supersonic wing aerodynamic loading calculations, even at high Mach numbers, with dominant thermal effects.

  5. 1 Ft. x 1 Ft. Supersonic Wind Tunnel, Bldg. 37

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (1x), located in the Engine Research Building, is one of the most active test facilities at the Glenn Research Center. Used...

  6. Entropy Minimization Design Approach of Supersonic Internal Passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Sousa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fluid machinery operating in the supersonic regime unveil avenues towards more compact technology. However, internal supersonic flows are associated with high aerodynamic and thermal penalties, which usually prevent their practical implementation. Indeed, both shock losses and the limited operational range represent particular challenges to aerodynamic designers that should be taken into account at the initial phase of the design process. This paper presents a design methodology for supersonic passages based on direct evaluations of the velocity field using the method of characteristics and computation of entropy generation across shock waves. This meshless function evaluation tool is then coupled to an optimization scheme, based on evolutionary algorithms that minimize the entropy generation across the supersonic passage. Finally, we assessed the results with 3D Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes calculations.

  7. Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Facility (Research Cell 22)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: RC22 is a continuous-flow, direct-connect supersonic-combustion research facility that is capable of simulating flight conditions from Mach 3.0 to Mach...

  8. Clinical application of helical CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Huiliang; Zhu Xinjin; Liang Rujian; Liang Jianhao; Ou Weiqian; Wen Haomao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of 16-slice helical CT colonography in the diagnosis of colon tumor and polypus. Methods: 16-slice helical CT volumetric scanning was performed in 18 patients with colonic disease, including colonic tumor (n=16) and colonic polypus (n=2). 3D images, virtual endoscopy and multiplanar reformation were obtained in the AW4.1 workstation. CT appearances were compared with operation and fiberoptic colonoscopy. Results: Satisfied results were achieved from 18 patients, no difference found in results between CT colonography and operation in 16 patients with colonic tumor. Conclusion: 16-slice helical CT colonography is of great value in preoperative staging of colonic tumor and have a high value in clinical application. (authors)

  9. Helicity antenna showers for hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Nadine; Skands, Peter [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Lifson, Andrew [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Clayton, VIC (Australia); ETH Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-10-15

    We present a complete set of helicity-dependent 2 → 3 antenna functions for QCD initial- and final-state radiation. The functions are implemented in the Vincia shower Monte Carlo framework and are used to generate showers for hadron-collider processes in which helicities are explicitly sampled (and conserved) at each step of the evolution. Although not capturing the full effects of spin correlations, the explicit helicity sampling does permit a significantly faster evaluation of fixed-order matrix-element corrections. A further speed increase is achieved via the implementation of a new fast library of analytical MHV amplitudes, while matrix elements from Madgraph are used for non-MHV configurations. A few examples of applications to QCD 2 → 2 processes are given, comparing the newly released Vincia 2.200 to Pythia 8.226. (orig.)

  10. Manipulation of wavefront using helical metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhaokun; Tao, Huan; Zhao, Ming

    2016-08-08

    Helical metamaterials, a kind of 3-dimensional structure, has relatively strong coupling effect among the helical nano-wires. Therefore, it is expected to be a good candidate for generating phase shift and controlling wavefront with high efficiency. In this paper, using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we studied the phase shift properties in the helical metamaterials. It is found that the phase shift occurs for both transmitted and reflected light waves. And the maximum of reflection coefficients can reach over 60%. In addition, the phase shift (φ) is dispersionless in the range of 600 nm to 860 nm, that is, it is only dominated by the initial angle (θ) of the helix. The relationship between them is φ = ± 2θ. Using Jones calculus we give a further explanation for these properties. Finally, by arranging the helixes in an array with a constant phase gradient, the phenomenon of anomalous refraction was also observed in a broad wavelength range.

  11. Helicity antenna showers for hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nadine; Lifson, Andrew; Skands, Peter

    2017-10-01

    We present a complete set of helicity-dependent 2→ 3 antenna functions for QCD initial- and final-state radiation. The functions are implemented in the Vincia shower Monte Carlo framework and are used to generate showers for hadron-collider processes in which helicities are explicitly sampled (and conserved) at each step of the evolution. Although not capturing the full effects of spin correlations, the explicit helicity sampling does permit a significantly faster evaluation of fixed-order matrix-element corrections. A further speed increase is achieved via the implementation of a new fast library of analytical MHV amplitudes, while matrix elements from Madgraph are used for non-MHV configurations. A few examples of applications to QCD 2→ 2 processes are given, comparing the newly released Vincia 2.200 to Pythia 8.226.

  12. Neutrino's helicity in a gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pansart, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    By using approximated solutions of Dirac's equation, we show that there is no helicity reversal for light neutrinos in the Schwarzschild metric nor in an expanding universe. The actual coupling between a particle spin and the angular momentum of a heavy rotating body induces a possible helicity reversal but with an unobservable probability proportional to m 2 p / E 2 , where m p is the particle mass and E its energy. In these calculations, the helicity is defined through the spin orientation with respect to the current and not with respect to the linear momentum. This definition gives simple expressions and is equal to the usual definition in the case of a flat space. (N.T.)

  13. Single-superfield helical-phase inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketov, Sergei V., E-mail: ketov@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minami-ohsawa 1-1, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Institute of Physics and Technology, Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Terada, Takahiro, E-mail: takahiro@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-01-10

    Large-field inflation in supergravity requires the approximate global symmetry needed to protect flatness of the scalar potential. In helical-phase inflation, the U(1) symmetry of the Kähler potential is assumed, the phase part of the complex scalar of a chiral superfield plays the role of inflaton, and the radial part is strongly stabilized. The original model of helical phase inflation, proposed by Li, Li and Nanopoulos (LLN), employs an extra (stabilizer) superfield. We propose a more economical new class of the helical phase inflationary models without a stabilizer superfield. As the specific examples, the quadratic, the natural, and the Starobinsky-type inflationary models are studied in our approach.

  14. Resonant helical fields in the TBR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, O.W.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of external resonant helical fields (RHF) in the tokamak TBR plasma discharges was investigated. These fields were created by helical windings wounded on the TBR vessel with the same helicity of rational magnetic surfaces, producing resonant efects on these surfaces. The characteristics of the MHZ activity (amplitude, frequency and poloidal and toroidal wave numbers, m=2,3,4 and n=1, respectively) during the plasma discharges were modified by eletrical winding currents of the order of 2% of the plasma current. These characterisitics were measured for diferent discharges safety factors at the limiter (q) between 3 and 4, with and without the RHF, with the atenuation of the oscillation amplitudes and the increasing of their frequencies. The existente of expontaneous and induced magnetic islands were investigated. The data were compared with results obtained in other tokamaks. (author) [pt

  15. The helical structure of DNA facilitates binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Otto G; Mahmutovic, Anel; Marklund, Emil; Elf, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The helical structure of DNA imposes constraints on the rate of diffusion-limited protein binding. Here we solve the reaction–diffusion equations for DNA-like geometries and extend with simulations when necessary. We find that the helical structure can make binding to the DNA more than twice as fast compared to a case where DNA would be reactive only along one side. We also find that this rate advantage remains when the contributions from steric constraints and rotational diffusion of the DNA-binding protein are included. Furthermore, we find that the association rate is insensitive to changes in the steric constraints on the DNA in the helix geometry, while it is much more dependent on the steric constraints on the DNA-binding protein. We conclude that the helical structure of DNA facilitates the nonspecific binding of transcription factors and structural DNA-binding proteins in general. (paper)

  16. Root tips moving through soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curlango-Rivera, Gilberto

    2011-01-01

    Root elongation occurs by the generation of new cells from meristematic tissue within the apical 1–2 mm region of root tips. Therefore penetration of the soil environment is carried out by newly synthesized plant tissue, whose cells are inherently vulnerable to invasion by pathogens. This conundrum, on its face, would seem to reflect an intolerable risk to the successful establishment of root systems needed for plant life. Yet root tip regions housing the meristematic tissues repeatedly have been found to be free of microbial infection and colonization. Even when spore germination, chemotaxis, and/or growth of pathogens are stimulated by signals from the root tip, the underlying root tissue can escape invasion. Recent insights into the functions of root border cells, and the regulation of their production by transient exposure to external signals, may shed light on long-standing observations. PMID:21455030

  17. Crack tip stress and strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, D.

    1975-01-01

    The study of potential energy variations in a loaded elastic solid containing a crack leads to determination of the crack driving force G. Generalization of this concept to cases other than linear elasticity leads to definition of the integral J. In a linear solid, the crack tip stress field is characterized by a single parameter: the stress-intensity factor K. When the crack tip plastic zone size is confined to the elastic singularity J=G, it is possible to establish relationship between these parameters and plastic strain (and in particular the crack tip opening displacement delta). The stress increases because of the triaxiality effect. This overload rises with increasing strain hardening. When the plastic zone size expands, using certain hypotheses, delta can be calculated. The plastic strain intensity is exclusively dependent on parameter J [fr

  18. Optical fiber meta-tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principe, Maria; Micco, Alberto; Crescitelli, Alessio; Castaldi, Giuseppe; Consales, Marco; Esposito, Emanuela; La Ferrara, Vera; Galdi, Vincenzo; Cusano, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    We report on the first example of a "meta-tip" configuration that integrates a metasurface on the tip of an optical fiber. Our proposed design is based on an inverted-Babinet plasmonic metasurface obtained by patterning (via focused ion beam) a thin gold film deposited on the tip of an optical fiber, so as to realize an array of rectangular aperture nanoantennas with spatially modulated sizes. By properly tuning the resonances of the aperture nanoantennas, abrupt variations can be impressed in the field wavefront and polarization. We fabricated and characterized several proof-of-principle prototypes operating an near-infrared wavelengths, and implementing the beam-steering (with various angles) of the cross-polarized component, as well as the excitation of surface waves. Our results pave the way to the integration of the exceptional field-manipulation capabilities enabled by metasurfaces with the versatility and ubiquity of fiber-optics technological platforms.

  19. Turbulent Helicity in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chkhetiani, Otto G.; Kurgansky, Michael V.; Vazaeva, Natalia V.

    2018-05-01

    We consider the assumption postulated by Deusebio and Lindborg (J Fluid Mech 755:654-671, 2014) that the helicity injected into the Ekman boundary layer undergoes a cascade, with preservation of its sign (right- or alternatively left-handedness), which is a signature of the system rotation, from large to small scales, down to the Kolmogorov microscale of turbulence. At the same time, recent direct field measurements of turbulent helicity in the steppe region of southern Russia near Tsimlyansk Reservoir show the opposite sign of helicity from that expected. A possible explanation for this phenomenon may be the joint action of different scales of atmospheric flows within the boundary layer, including the sea-breeze circulation over the test site. In this regard, we consider a superposition of the classic Ekman spiral solution and Prandtl's jet-like slope-wind profile to describe the planetary boundary-layer wind structure. The latter solution mimics a hydrostatic shallow breeze circulation over a non-uniformly heated surface. A 180°-wide sector on the hodograph plane exists, within which the relative orientation of the Ekman and Prandtl velocity profiles favours the left rotation with height of the resulting wind velocity vector in the lowermost part of the boundary layer. This explains the negative (left-handed) helicity cascade toward small-scale turbulent motions, which agrees with the direct field measurements of turbulent helicity in Tsimlyansk. A simple turbulent relaxation model is proposed that explains the measured positive values of the relatively minor contribution to turbulent helicity from the vertical components of velocity and vorticity.

  20. Numerical simulation of gap effect in supersonic flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Mo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The gap effect is a key factor in the design of the heat sealing in supersonic vehicles subjected to an aerodynamic heat load. Built on S-A turbulence model and Roe discrete format, the aerodynamic environment around a gap on the surface of a supersonic aircraft was simulated by the finite volume method. As the presented results indicate, the gap effect depends not only on the attack angle, but also on the Mach number.

  1. Growing quasi-modes in dynamics of supersonic collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkin, V.M.; Khudik, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    The hypothesis of globally stable self-similar regimes existence for supersonic Langmuir collapse plays a significant role in the attempts to construct a theory of strong Langmuir turbulence. A possibility for destruction of the stable against infinitely small perturbations self-similar regime of supersonic collapse by growing quasi-modes is demonstrated via the numerical solution of Cauchi problem for Zakharov equations. The quantitative criterion for the destruction of self-similar regimes is formulated. 9 refs.; 5 figs

  2. Numerical simulation and physical aspects of supersonic vortex breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. H.; Kandil, O. A.; Kandil, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    Existing numerical simulations and physical aspects of subsonic and supersonic vortex-breakdown modes are reviewed. The solution to the problem of supersonic vortex breakdown is emphasized in this paper and carried out with the full Navier-Stokes equations for compressible flows. Numerical simulations of vortex-breakdown modes are presented in bounded and unbounded domains. The effects of different types of downstream-exit boundary conditions are studied and discussed.

  3. ZBrush Professional Tips and Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Gaboury, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Learn to work effectively and creatively with all versions of ZBrush! ZBrush is used by top artists in Hollywood to model and sculpt characters in such films as Avatar, Iron Man, and Pirates of the Caribbean. In addition, this amazing technology is also used in jewelry design, forensic science, aerospace, video games, toy creation, and the medical field. Written by Pixologic's in-house ZBrush expert Paul Gaboury, this full-color, beautifully illustrated guide provides you with the ultimate tips and tricks to maximize your use of all versions of ZBrush. Reveals numerous little-known tips and tr

  4. Nonideal, helical, vortical magnetohydrodynamic steady states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agim, Y.Z.; Montgomery, D.

    1991-01-01

    The helically-deformed profiles of driven, dissipative magnetohydrodynamic equilibria are constructed through second order in helical amplitude. The resultant plasma configurations are presented in terms of contour plots of magnetic flux function, pressure, current flux function and the mass flux function, along with the stability boundary at which they are expected to appear. For the Wisconsin Phaedrus-T Tokamak, plasma profiles with significant m = 3, n = 1 perturbation seem feasible; for these, the plasma pressure peaks off-axis. For the smaller aspect ratio case, the configuration with m 1,n =1 is thought to be relevant to the density perturbation observed in JET after a pellet injection. (author)

  5. Equilibrium calculations for helical axis stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hender, T.C.; Carreras, B.A.

    1984-04-01

    An average method based on a vacuum flux coordinate system is presented. This average method permits the study of helical axis stellarators with toroidally dominated shifts. An ordering is introduced, and to lowest order the toroidally averaged equilibrium equations are reduced to a Grad-Shafranov equation. Also, to lowest order, a Poisson-type equation is obtained for the toroidally varying corrections to the equilibium. By including these corrections, systems that are toroidally dominated, but with significant helical distortion to the equilibrium, may be studied. Numerical solutions of the average method equations are shown to agree well with three-dimensional calculations

  6. Helical post stellarator. Part 1: Vacuum configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-08-01

    Results on a novel type of stellarator configuration, the Helical Post Stellarator (HPS), are presented. This configuration is different significantly from all previously known stellarators due to its unique geometrical characteristics and unique physical properties. Among those are: the magnetic field has only one toroidal period (M = 1), the plasma has an extremely low aspect ratio, A ∼ 1, and the variation of the magnetic field, B, along field lines features a helical ripple on the inside of the torus. Among the main advantages of a HPS for a fusion program are extremely compact, modular, and simple design compatible with significant rotational transform, large plasma volume, and improved particle transport characteristics

  7. Equilibrium studies of helical axis stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hender, T.C.; Carreras, B.A.; Garcia, L.; Harris, J.H.; Rome, J.A.; Cantrell, J.L.; Lynch, V.E.

    1984-01-01

    The equilibrium properties of helical axis stellarators are studied with a 3-D equilibrium code and with an average method (2-D). The helical axis ATF is shown to have a toroidally dominated equilibrium shift and good equilibria up to at least 10% peak beta. Low aspect ratio heliacs, with relatively large toroidal shifts, are shown to have low equilibrium beta limits (approx. 5%). Increasing the aspect ratio and number of field periods proportionally is found to improve the equilibrium beta limit. Alternatively, increasing the number of field periods at fixed aspect ratio which raises and lowers the toroidal shift improves the equilibrium beta limit

  8. Conversion from mutual helicity to self-helicity observed with IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L. P.; Peter, H.; Chen, F.; Zhang, J.

    2014-10-01

    Context. In the upper atmosphere of the Sun observations show convincing evidence for crossing and twisted structures, which are interpreted as mutual helicity and self-helicity. Aims: We use observations with the new Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to show the conversion of mutual helicity into self-helicity in coronal structures on the Sun. Methods: Using far UV spectra and slit-jaw images from IRIS and coronal images and magnetograms from SDO, we investigated the evolution of two crossing loops in an active region, in particular, the properties of the Si IV line profile in cool loops. Results: In the early stage two cool loops cross each other and accordingly have mutual helicity. The Doppler shifts in the loops indicate that they wind around each other. As a consequence, near the crossing point of the loops (interchange) reconnection sets in, which heats the plasma. This is consistent with the observed increase of the line width and of the appearance of the loops at higher temperatures. After this interaction, the two new loops run in parallel, and in one of them shows a clear spectral tilt of the Si IV line profile. This is indicative of a helical (twisting) motion, which is the same as to say that the loop has self-helicity. Conclusions: The high spatial and spectral resolution of IRIS allowed us to see the conversion of mutual helicity to self-helicity in the (interchange) reconnection of two loops. This is observational evidence for earlier theoretical speculations. Movie associated with Fig. 1 and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Study on thermal-hydraulic behavior in supersonic steam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yutaka; Fukuichi, Akira; Kawamoto, Yujiro; Iwaki, Chikako; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Mori, Michitsugu; Ohmori, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    Supersonic steam injector is the one of the most possible devices aiming at simplifying system and improving the safety and the credibility for next-generation nuclear reactor systems. The supersonic steam injector has dual functions of a passive jet pump without rotating machine and a compact and high efficiency heat exchanger, because it is operated by the direct contact condensation between supersonic steam and subcooled water jet. It is necessary to clarify the flow behavior in the supersonic steam injector which is governed by the complicated turbulent flow with a great shear stress of supersonic steam. However, in previous study, there is little study about the turbulent heat transfer and flow behavior under such a great shear stress at the gas-liquid interface. In the present study, turbulent flow behavior including the effect of the interface between water jet and supersonic steam is developed based on the eddy viscosity model. Radial velocity distributions and the turbulent heat transfer are calculated with the model. The calculation results are compared with the experimental results done with the transparent steam injector. (author)

  10. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do I get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of TIPS? ...

  11. Nanobits: customizable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; Shaik, Hassan Uddin; Sardan Sukas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    We present here a proof-of-principle study of scanning probe tips defined by planar nanolithography and integrated with AFM probes using nanomanipulation. The so-called 'nanobits' are 2-4 mu m long and 120-150 nm thin flakes of Si3N4 or SiO2, fabricated by electron beam lithography and standard s...

  12. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... thin, hollow plastic tube into the vessel. Using real time x-ray guidance, your doctor will then guide ... invasive procedure that typically has a shorter recovery time than surgery. Your TIPS should have less of an effect ...

  13. The tip of the iceberg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørst, Lill Rastad

    2010-01-01

      Abstract: The tip of the iceberg: Ice as a nonhuman actor of the climate change debate   The global climate change debate has the Arctic as a core region of concern and ice has become a central aspect of discourses. This article discusses ice representations from six different contexts linked...

  14. Gardening Health and Safety Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or who take certain medications (i.e. for depression, insomnia, or poor circulation). Eat healthy foods to help keep you energized. Extreme Heat Keep Your Cool in Hot Weather Tips for persons with disabilities and physical activity. Talk to your health care provider if you have physical, mental, or ...

  15. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  16. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in creating the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This page ... of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ... To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  17. Useful Tips on Avoiding Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamalainen, Maryellen

    2007-01-01

    Teachers are generally kind and nurturing people. Students who plagiarize their assignments from these kind and nurturing teachers are often given a second chance when caught and encouraged to do their work over, but it would be better to eliminate their need to plagiarize. The first tip for eliminating plagiarism has not so much to do with what…

  18. Assigning Effective Homework. Classroom Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each new school year brings high hopes, great expectations and challenges for both new and seasoned educators. The American Federation of Teachers (AFT) has developed a series called "Classroom Tips" to help educators start the year right and anticipate the year ahead. Over the past 40 years, most research studies on homework have found that…

  19. Dynamics and deformability of α-, 310- and π-helices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narwani Tarun Jairaj

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein structures are often represented as seen in crystals as (i rigid macromolecules (ii with helices, sheets and coils. However, both definitions are partial because (i proteins are highly dynamic macromolecules and (ii the description of protein structures could be more precise. With regard to these two points, we analyzed and quantified the stability of helices by considering α-helices as well as 310- and π-helices. Molecular dynamic (MD simulations were performed on a large set of 169 representative protein domains. The local protein conformations were followed during each simulation and analyzed. The classical flexibility index (B-factor was confronted with the MD root mean square flexibility (RMSF index. Helical regions were classified according to their level of helicity from high to none. For the first time, a precise quantification showed the percentage of rigid and flexible helices that underlie unexpected behaviors. Only 76.4% of the residues associated with α-helices retain the conformation, while this tendency drops to 40.5% for 310-helices and is never observed for π-helices. α-helix residues that do not remain as an α-helix have a higher tendency to assume β-turn conformations than 310- or π-helices. The 310-helices that switch to the α-helix conformation have a higher B-factor and RMSF values than the average 310-helix but are associated with a lower accessibility. Rare π-helices assume a β-turn, bend and coil conformations, but not α- or 310-helices. The view on π-helices drastically changes with the new DSSP (Dictionary of Secondary Structure of Proteins assignment approach, leading to behavior similar to 310-helices, thus underlining the importance of secondary structure assignment methods.

  20. Review of the helicity formalism; Revision del formalismo de helicidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreiro, F; Cerrada, M; Fernandez, E

    1972-07-01

    Our purpose in these notes has been to present a brief and general review of the helicity formalism. We begin by discussing Lorentz invariance, spin and helicity ideas, in section 1 . In section 2 we deal with the construction of relativistic states and scattering amplitudes in the helicity basis and we study their transformation properties under discrete symmetries. Finally we present some more sophisticated topics like kinematical singularities of helicity amplitudes, kinematical constraints and crossing relations 3, 4, 5 respectively. (Author) 8 refs.

  1. Exabyte helical scan devices at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constanta-Fanourakis, P.; Kaczar, K.; Oleynik, G.; Petravick, D.; Votava, M.; White, V.; Hockney, G.; Bracker, S.; de Miranda, J.M.

    1989-05-01

    Exabyte 8mm helical scan storage devices are in use at Fermilab in a number of applications. These devices have the functionality of magnetic tape, but use media which is much more economical and much more dense than conventional 9 track tape. 6 refs., 3 figs

  2. Helical axial injection concept for cyclotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    A concept for an external beam injection system using a helical beam path centered on the cyclotron axis is described. This system could be used to couple two accelerator stages, with or without intermediate stripping, in cases where conventional axial injection or radial injection are not practical.

  3. Helical axial injection concept for cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    A concept for an external beam injection system using a helical beam path centered on the cyclotron axis is described. This system could be used to couple two accelerator stages, with or without intermediate stripping, in cases where conventional axial injection or radial injection are not practical

  4. Electron image reconstruction of helical protein assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremers, A.F.M.

    1980-01-01

    The analysis of projections of large ordered biological systems obtained by electron microscopy of negatively stained specimens is described. The biological structures amenable to this approach are constructed from a large number of identical protein molecules, which are arranged according to helical symmetry. Electron images of these structures generally contain sufficient information in order to calculate a three-dimensional density map. (Auth.)

  5. Adaptive radiotherapy using helical tomotherapy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeswani, Sam; Ruchala, Kenneth; Olivera, Gustavo; Mackie, T.R.

    2008-01-01

    As commonly known in the field, adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is the use of feedback to modify a radiotherapy treatment. There are numerous ways in which this feedback can be received and used, and this presentation will discuss some of the implementations of ART being investigated with a helical TomoTherapy system

  6. Topological characteristics of helical repeat proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groves, M R; Barford, D

    The recent elucidation of protein structures based upon repeating amino acid motifs, including the armadillo motif, the HEAT motif and tetratricopeptide repeats, reveals that they belong to the class of helical repeat proteins. These proteins share the common property of being assembled from tandem

  7. A Prospective Evaluation of Helical Tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav; Rodrigues, George; Lewis, Craig; Venkatesan, Varagur M.; Yu, Edward; Hammond, Alex; Perera, Francisco; Ash, Robert; Dar, A. Rashid; Lock, Michael; Baily, Laura; Coad, Terry C; Trenka, Kris C.; Warr, Barbara; Kron, Tomas; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report results from two clinical trials evaluating helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods and Materials: Patients were enrolled in one of two prospective trials of HT (one for palliative and one for radical treatment). Both an HT plan and a companion three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan were generated. Pretreatment megavoltage computed tomography was used for daily image guidance. Results: From September 2004 to January 2006, a total of 61 sites in 60 patients were treated. In all but one case, a clinically acceptable tomotherapy plan for treatment was generated. Helical tomotherapy plans were subjectively equivalent or superior to 3D-CRT in 95% of plans. Helical tomotherapy was deemed equivalent or superior in two thirds of dose-volume point comparisons. In cases of inferiority, differences were either clinically insignificant and/or reflected deliberate tradeoffs to optimize the HT plan. Overall imaging and treatment time (median) was 27 min (range, 16-91 min). According to a patient questionnaire, 78% of patients were satisfied to very satisfied with the treatment process. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy demonstrated clear advantages over conventional 3D-CRT in this diverse patient group. The prospective trials were helpful in deploying this technology in a busy clinical setting

  8. Helicity-flip in particle production on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faeldt, G.

    1977-01-01

    Coherent nuclear production processes are generally analyzed assuming helicity conserving production amplitudes. In view of the uncertainties of the actual helicity structure this could be a dangerous assumption. It is shown that helicity-flip contributions might be part of the explanation of the small effective (pππ)-nucleon cross sections observed in coherent production. (Auth.)

  9. A real-scale helical coil winding trial of the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senba, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Tamaki, T.; Asano, K.; Suzuki, S.; Yamauchi, T.; Uchida, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Yamagiwa, T.; Suzuki, S.; Miyoshi, R.; Sasa, H.; Watanabe, S.; Tatemura, M.; Hatada, N.; Yamaguchi, S.; Imagawa, S.; Yanagi, N.; Satow, T.; Yamamoto, J.; Motojima, O.

    1995-01-01

    A real-scale helical coil winding trial of the Large Helical Device (LHD) has been conducted for a study of coil winding configuration and winding methods and for exhibiting the state of the art. It includes construction and test run of a specifically designed winding machine and development of various manufacturing methods for accurate coil winding. It has been carried out in Hitachi Works before in situ winding, and has provided much needed engineering data for construction of the LHD. (orig.)

  10. Simulation and stability analysis of supersonic impinging jet noise with microjet control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Nathaniel; Nichols, Joseph W.

    2014-11-01

    A model for an ideally expanded 1.5 Mach turbulent jet impinging on a flat plate using unstructured high-fidelity large eddy simulations (LES) and hydrodynamic stability analysis is presented. Note the LES configuration conforms exactly to experiments performed at the STOVL supersonic jet facility of the Florida Center for Advanced Aero-Propulsion allowing validation against experimental measurements. The LES are repeated for different nozzle-wall separation distances as well as with and without the addition of sixteen microjets positioned uniformly around the nozzle lip. For some nozzle-wall distances, but not all, the microjets result in substantial noise reduction. Observations of substantial noise reduction are associated with a relative absence of large-scale coherent vortices in the jet shear layer. To better understand and predict the effectiveness of microjet noise control, the application of global stability analysis about LES mean fields is used to extract axisymmetric and helical instability modes connected to the complex interplay between the coherent vortices, shocks, and acoustic feedback. We gratefully acknowledge computational resources provided by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility.

  11. Coupled Analysis of an Inlet and Fan for a Quiet Supersonic Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chima, Rodrick V.; Conners, Timothy R.; Wayman, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    A computational analysis of a Gulfstream isentropic external compression supersonic inlet coupled to a Rolls-Royce fan has been completed. The inlet was designed for a small, low sonic boom supersonic vehicle with a design cruise condition of M = 1.6 at 45,000 ft. The inlet design included an annular bypass duct that routed flow subsonically around an engine-mounted gearbox and diverted flow with high shock losses away from the fan tip. Two Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes codes were used for the analysis: an axisymmetric code called AVCS for the inlet and a three dimensional (3-D) code called SWIFT for the fan. The codes were coupled at a mixing plane boundary using a separate code for data exchange. The codes were used to determine the performance of the inlet/fan system at the design point and to predict the performance and operability of the system over the flight profile. At the design point the core inlet had a recovery of 96 percent, and the fan operated near its peak efficiency and pressure ratio. A large hub radial distortion generated in the inlet was not eliminated by the fan and could pose a challenge for subsequent booster stages. The system operated stably at all points along the flight profile. Reduced stall margin was seen at low altitude and Mach number where flow separated on the interior lips of the cowl and bypass ducts. The coupled analysis gave consistent solutions at all points on the flight profile that would be difficult or impossible to predict by analysis of isolated components.

  12. Coupled Analysis of an Inlet and Fan for a Quiet Supersonic Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chima, Rodrick V.; Conners, Timothy R.; Wayman, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    A computational analysis of a Gulfstream isentropic external compression supersonic inlet coupled to a Rolls-Royce fan was completed. The inlet was designed for a small, low sonic boom supersonic vehicle with a design cruise condition of M = 1.6 at 45,000 feet. The inlet design included an annular bypass duct that routed flow subsonically around an engine-mounted gearbox and diverted flow with high shock losses away from the fan tip. Two Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes codes were used for the analysis: an axisymmetric code called AVCS for the inlet and a 3-D code called SWIFT for the fan. The codes were coupled at a mixing plane boundary using a separate code for data exchange. The codes were used to determine the performance of the inlet/fan system at the design point and to predict the performance and operability of the system over the flight profile. At the design point the core inlet had a recovery of 96 percent, and the fan operated near its peak efficiency and pressure ratio. A large hub radial distortion generated in the inlet was not eliminated by the fan and could pose a challenge for subsequent booster stages. The system operated stably at all points along the flight profile. Reduced stall margin was seen at low altitude and Mach number where flow separated on the interior lips of the cowl and bypass ducts. The coupled analysis gave consistent solutions at all points on the flight profile that would be difficult or impossible to predict by analysis of isolated components.

  13. Pyrolysis of Helical Coordination Polymers for Metal-Sulfide-Based Helices with Broadband Chiroptical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Kenji; Yeom, Bongjun; Sada, Kazuki

    2017-06-27

    Fabrication of chiroptical materials with broadband response in the visible light region is vital to fully realize their potential applications. One way to achieve broadband chiroptical activity is to fabricate chiral nanostructures from materials that exhibit broadband absorption in the visible light region. However, the compounds used for chiroptical materials have predominantly been limited to materials with narrowband spectral response. Here, we synthesize Ag 2 S-based nanohelices derived from helical coordination polymers. The right- and left-handed coordination helices used as precursors are prepared from l- and d-glutathione with Ag + and a small amount of Cu 2+ . The pyrolysis of the coordination helices yields right- and left-handed helices of Cu 0.12 Ag 1.94 S/C, which exhibit chiroptical activity spanning the entire visible light region. Finite element method simulations substantiate that the broadband chiroptical activity is attributed to synergistic broadband light absorption and light scattering. Furthermore, another series of Cu 0.10 Ag 1.90 S/C nanohelices are synthesized by choosing the l- or d-Glu-Cys as starting materials. The pitch length of nanohelicies is controlled by changing the peptides, which alters their chiroptical properties. The pyrolysis of coordination helices enables one to fabricate helical Ag 2 S-based materials that enable broadband chiroptical activity but have not been explored owing to the lack of synthetic routes.

  14. Tips for Postpartum Dads and Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blues: Partners Interview with Wade Bowen Coping with Suicide & Loss Tips for Postpartum Dads and Partners Pregnancy and postpartum mood and anxiety disorders affect the whole family. Here are some tips ...

  15. Tips for Reducing Pesticide Impacts on Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Web page provides tips for pesticide users in residential and agricultural settings, as well as tips for certified pesticide applicators for ways to protect wildlife from potentially harmful effects of pesticides.

  16. Sound source location in cavitating tip vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, H.; Taghavi, R.; Arndt, R.E.A.

    1985-01-01

    Utilizing an array of three hydrophones, individual cavitation bursts in a tip vortex could be located. Theoretically, four hydrophones are necessary. Hence the data from three hydrophones are supplemented with photographic observation of the cavitating tip vortex. The cavitation sound sources are found to be localized to within one base chord length from the hydrofoil tip. This appears to correspond to the region of initial tip vortex roll-up. A more extensive study with a four sensor array is now in progress

  17. Radiofrequency Wire Recanalization of Chronically Thrombosed TIPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majdalany, Bill S., E-mail: bmajdala@med.umich.edu [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Elliott, Eric D., E-mail: eric.elliott@osumc.edu [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Michaels, Anthony J., E-mail: Anthony.michaels@osumc.edu; Hanje, A. James, E-mail: James.Hanje@osumc.edu [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine (United States); Saad, Wael E. A., E-mail: wsaad@med.umich.edu [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Radiofrequency (RF) guide wires have been applied to cardiac interventions, recanalization of central venous thromboses, and to cross biliary occlusions. Herein, the use of a RF wire technique to revise chronically occluded transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) is described. In both cases, conventional TIPS revision techniques failed to revise the chronically thrombosed TIPS. RF wire recanalization was successfully performed through each of the chronically thrombosed TIPS, demonstrating initial safety and feasibility in this application.

  18. Photoelectron spectroscopy of supersonic molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollard, J.E.

    1982-05-01

    A new technique for performing high resolution molecular photoelectron spectroscopy is described, beginning with its conceptual development, through the construction of a prototypal apparatus, to the initial applications on a particularly favorable molecular system. The distinguishing features of this technique are: (1) the introduction of the sample in the form of a collimated supersonic molecular beam; and (2) the use of an electrostatic deflection energy analyzer which is carefully optimized in terms of sensitivity and resolution. This combination makes it possible to obtain photoelectron spectra at a new level of detail for many small molecules. Three experiments are described which rely on the capability to perform rotationally-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy on the hydrogen molecule and its isotopes. The first is a measurement of the ionic vibrational and rotational spectroscopic constants and the vibrationally-selected photoionization cross sections. The second is a determination of the photoelectron asymmetry parameter, β, for selected rotational transitions. The third is an investigation of the rotational relaxation in a free jet expansion, using photoelectron spectroscopy as a probe of the rotational state population distributions. In the closing chapter an assessment is made of the successes and limitations of the technique, and an indication is given of areas for further improvement in future spectrometers

  19. Coherent structures in a supersonic complex nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magstadt, Andrew; Berry, Matthew; Glauser, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The jet flow from a complex supersonic nozzle is studied through experimental measurements. The nozzle's geometry is motivated by future engine designs for high-performance civilian and military aircraft. This rectangular jet has a single plane of symmetry, an additional shear layer (referred to as a wall jet), and an aft deck representative of airframe integration. The core flow operates at a Mach number of Mj , c = 1 . 6 , and the wall jet is choked (Mj , w = 1 . 0). This high Reynolds number jet flow is comprised of intense turbulence levels, an intricate shock structure, shear and boundary layers, and powerful corner vortices. In the present study, stereo PIV measurements are simultaneously sampled with high-speed pressure measurements, which are embedded in the aft deck, and far-field acoustics in the anechoic chamber at Syracuse University. Time-resolved schlieren measurements have indicated the existence of strong flow events at high frequencies, at a Strouhal number of St = 3 . 4 . These appear to result from von Kàrmàn vortex shedding within the nozzle and pervade the entire flow and acoustic domain. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied on the current data to identify coherent structures in the jet and study the influence of this vortex street. AFOSR Turbulence and Transition Program (Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0435) with program managers Dr. I. Leyva and Dr. R. Ponnappan.

  20. Photoelectron spectroscopy of supersonic molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollard, J.E.; Trevor, D.J.; Lee, Y.T.; Shirley, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    A high-resolution photoelectron spectrometer which uses molecular beam sampling is described. Photons from a rare-gas resonance lamp or UV laser are crossed with the beam from a differentially pumped supersonic nozzle source. The resulting photoelectrons are collected by an electrostatic analyzer of a unique design consisting of a 90 0 spherical sector preanalyzer, a system of lenses, and a 180 0 hemispherical deflector. A multichannel detection system based on dual microchannel plates with a resistive anode position encoder provides an increase in counting efficiency by a factor of 12 over the equivalent single channel detector. The apparatus has demonstrated an instrumental resolution of better than 10 meV FWHM, limited largely by the photon source linewidth. A quadrupole mass spectrometer is used to characterize the composition of the molecular beam. Extensive differential pumping is provided to protect the critical surfaces of the analyzer and mass spectrometer from contamination. Because of the near elimination of Doppler and rotational broadenings, the practical resolution is the highest yet obtained in molecular PES

  1. Molecular description of steady supersonic free jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, S.

    2017-09-01

    A detailed analysis of the non-local thermal equilibrium (n-LTE) problem in the paraxial zone of silence of supersonic free jets is reported. The study is based on a hybrid approach that combines Navier-Stokes equations with a kinetic equation derived from the generalized Boltzmann (Waldmann-Snider) equation. The resulting system is solved for those flow quantities not easily amenable to experimental measure (translational temperature, flow velocity, and entropy) in terms of the quantities that can be measured accurately (distance, number density, population of rotational states, and their gradients). The reported solutions are essentially exact and are formulated in terms of macroscopic quantities, as well as in terms of elementary collision processes. Emphasis is made on the influence of dissipative effects onto the flow (viscous and diabatic) and of the breakdown of thermal equilibrium onto the evolution of entropy and translational temperature. The influence of inelastic collisions onto these effects is analysed in depth. The reported equations are aimed at optimizing the experimental knowledge of the n-LTE problem and its quantitative interpretation in terms of state-to-state rates for inelastic collisions.

  2. Ion temperature gradient modes in toroidal helical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, T. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sugama, H.; Kanno, R.; Okamoto, M.

    2000-04-01

    Linear properties of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in helical systems are studied. The real frequency, growth rate, and eigenfunction are obtained for both stable and unstable cases by solving a kinetic integral equation with proper analytic continuation performed in the complex frequency plane. Based on the model magnetic configuration for toroidal helical systems like the Large Helical Device (LHD), dependences of the ITG mode properties on various plasma equilibrium parameters are investigated. Particularly, relative effects of {nabla}B-curvature drifts driven by the toroidicity and by the helical ripples are examined in order to compare the ITG modes in helical systems with those in tokamaks. (author)

  3. Ion temperature gradient modes in toroidal helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, T.; Sugama, H.; Kanno, R.; Okamoto, M.

    2000-04-01

    Linear properties of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in helical systems are studied. The real frequency, growth rate, and eigenfunction are obtained for both stable and unstable cases by solving a kinetic integral equation with proper analytic continuation performed in the complex frequency plane. Based on the model magnetic configuration for toroidal helical systems like the Large Helical Device (LHD), dependences of the ITG mode properties on various plasma equilibrium parameters are investigated. Particularly, relative effects of ∇B-curvature drifts driven by the toroidicity and by the helical ripples are examined in order to compare the ITG modes in helical systems with those in tokamaks. (author)

  4. Injector tip for an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Tsu Pin; Ye, Wen

    2003-05-20

    This invention relates to a the tip structure of a fuel injector as used in a internal combustion engine. Internal combustion engines using Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) technology require a tip structure that directs fuel spray in a downward direction. This requirement necessitates a tip design that is capable of withstanding mechanical stresses associated with the design.

  5. System design overview of JAXA small supersonic experimental airplane (NEXST-1)

    OpenAIRE

    Takami, Hikaru; 高見 光

    2007-01-01

    The system of JAXA small supersonic experimental airplane (NEXST-1: National EXperimental Supersonic Transport-1) has been briefly explained. Some design problems that the designers have encountered have also been briefly explained.

  6. Formation and sustainment of a very low aspect ratio tokamak using coaxial helicity injection. Final report, June 1, 1995--May 31, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Nelson, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    During the reporting period of this HIT grant (1 June 1995--31 May 1997) we've conducted further stability analysis, used the TIP diagnostic to measure plasma fields in HIT, and developed a single-parameter helicity injector model. HIT has undergone a significant upgrade to the HIT-II configuration which is described here. Parts for HIT-II have been designed, ordered, and received under this grant and are being assembled under the subsequent grant

  7. Biot-Savart helicity versus physical helicity: A topological description of ideal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahihi, Taliya; Eshraghi, Homayoon

    2014-08-01

    For an isentropic (thus compressible) flow, fluid trajectories are considered as orbits of a family of one parameter, smooth, orientation-preserving, and nonsingular diffeomorphisms on a compact and smooth-boundary domain in the Euclidian 3-space which necessarily preserve a finite measure, later interpreted as the fluid mass. Under such diffeomorphisms the Biot-Savart helicity of the pushforward of a divergence-free and tangent to the boundary vector field is proved to be conserved and since these circumstances present an isentropic flow, the conservation of the "Biot-Savart helicity" is established for such flows. On the other hand, the well known helicity conservation in ideal flows which here we call it "physical helicity" is found to be an independent constant with respect to the Biot-Savart helicity. The difference between these two helicities reflects some topological features of the domain as well as the velocity and vorticity fields which is discussed and is shown for simply connected domains the two helicities coincide. The energy variation of the vorticity field is shown to be formally the same as for the incompressible flow obtained before. For fluid domains consisting of several disjoint solid tori, at each time, the harmonic knot subspace of smooth vector fields on the fluid domain is found to have two independent base sets with a special type of orthogonality between these two bases by which a topological description of the vortex and velocity fields depending on the helicity difference is achieved since this difference is shown to depend only on the harmonic knot parts of velocity, vorticity, and its Biot-Savart vector field. For an ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flow three independent constant helicities are reviewed while the helicity of magnetic potential is generalized for non-simply connected domains by inserting a special harmonic knot field in the dynamics of the magnetic potential. It is proved that the harmonic knot part of the vorticity

  8. Magnetic helicity balance in the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stallard, B.W.; Hooper, E.B.; Woodruff, S.; Bulmer, R.H.; Hill, D.N.; McLean, H.S.; Wood, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic helicity balance between the helicity input injected by a magnetized coaxial gun, the rate-of-change in plasma helicity content, and helicity dissipation in electrode sheaths and Ohmic losses have been examined in the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment (SSPX) [E. B. Hooper, L. D. Pearlstein, and R. H. Bulmer, Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999)]. Helicity is treated as a flux function in the mean-field approximation, allowing separation of helicity drive and losses between closed and open field volumes. For nearly sustained spheromak plasmas with low fluctuations, helicity balance analysis implies a decreasing transport of helicity from the gun input into the spheromak core at higher spheromak electron temperature. Long pulse discharges with continuously increasing helicity and larger fluctuations show higher helicity coupling from the edge to the spheromak core. The magnitude of the sheath voltage drop, inferred from cathode heating and a current threshold dependence of the gun voltage, shows that sheath losses are important and reduce the helicity injection efficiency in SSPX

  9. Should the tip-apex distance (TAD) rule be modified for the proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA)? A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoloski, Andrej N; Osbrough, Anthony L; Yates, Piers J

    2013-10-17

    Unstable proximal femoral fractures are common and challenging for the orthopaedic surgeon. Often, these are treated with intramedullary nails. The most common mode of failure of any device to treat these fractures is cut-out. The Synthes proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) is unique because it is the only proximal femoral intramedullary nail which employs a helical blade in lieu of a lag screw. The optimal tip-apex distance is 25 mm or less for a dynamic hip screw. The optimal blade tip placement is not known for the PFNA. The aim of this study is to determine if the traditional tip-apex distance rule (TAD) less than 20 mm. There was no cut-out in cases where the TAD was from 20-30 mm. There were three implant-related failures (nail fracture, missed nail and loose locking screw), four implant-related femoral fractures, two non-unions, two delayed unions and one loss of reduction. The PFNA is a suitable fixation device for the treatment of unstable proximal femoral fractures. There were still a relatively large number of cut-outs, and the tip-apex distance in the failures showed a bimodal distribution, not like previously demonstrated with dynamic hip screw. We propose that the helical blade behaves differently to a screw, and placement too close to the subchondral bone may lead to penetration through the head.

  10. Flight calibration of compensated and uncompensated pitot-static airspeed probes and application of the probes to supersonic cruise vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, L. D.; Washington, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    Static pressure position error calibrations for a compensated and an uncompensated XB-70 nose boom pitot static probe were obtained in flight. The methods (Pacer, acceleration-deceleration, and total temperature) used to obtain the position errors over a Mach number range from 0.5 to 3.0 and an altitude range from 25,000 feet to 70,000 feet are discussed. The error calibrations are compared with the position error determined from wind tunnel tests, theoretical analysis, and a standard NACA pitot static probe. Factors which influence position errors, such as angle of attack, Reynolds number, probe tip geometry, static orifice location, and probe shape, are discussed. Also included are examples showing how the uncertainties caused by position errors can affect the inlet controls and vertical altitude separation of a supersonic transport.

  11. Helical CT of congenital ossicular anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osada, Hisato; Machida, Kikuo; Honda, Norinari

    2001-01-01

    Since January 1996 to December 2000, 26 cases of congenital ossicular anomaly could be diagnosed with helical CT. All cases were unilateral. In 8 patients with malformation of the external ear, CT showed malleoincudal fixation (n=5), malleoincudal fixation and deformed incuts long process (n=1), deformed incus long process (n=1), and partial fusion of malleus neck and incus long process (n=1). In 18 patients with normal external ear, CT showed defect of the incus long process (n=5), defect of both the incus long process and stapes superstructure (n=8, 2 patients with congenital cholesteatoma, 1 with hypoplastic oval window), defect of the stapes superstructure (n=2, 1 patient with oval window absence), defect of the malleus manubrium (n=1), ossification of the stampede's tendon (n=1), and monopod stapes (n=1). Helical CT can evaluate the auditory ossicular chain in detail and is useful for diagnosing congenital ossicular anomaly. (author)

  12. Weaving Knotted Vector Fields with Tunable Helicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Foster, David; Dennis, Mark R; Irvine, William T M

    2016-12-30

    We present a general construction of divergence-free knotted vector fields from complex scalar fields, whose closed field lines encode many kinds of knots and links, including torus knots, their cables, the figure-8 knot, and its generalizations. As finite-energy physical fields, they represent initial states for fields such as the magnetic field in a plasma, or the vorticity field in a fluid. We give a systematic procedure for calculating the vector potential, starting from complex scalar functions with knotted zero filaments, thus enabling an explicit computation of the helicity of these knotted fields. The construction can be used to generate isolated knotted flux tubes, filled by knots encoded in the lines of the vector field. Lastly, we give examples of manifestly knotted vector fields with vanishing helicity. Our results provide building blocks for analytical models and simulations alike.

  13. Vacuum systems for the ILC helical undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Malyshev, O B; Clarke, J A; Bailey, I R; Dainton, J B; Malysheva, L I; Barber, D P; Cooke, P; Baynham, E; Bradshaw, T; Brummitt, A; Carr, S; Ivanyushenkov, Y; Rochford, J; Moortgat-Pick, G A

    2007-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) positron source uses a helical undulator to generate polarized photons of ∼10MeV∼10MeV at the first harmonic. Unlike many undulators used in synchrotron radiation sources, the ILC helical undulator vacuum chamber will be bombarded by photons, generated by the undulator, with energies mostly below that of the first harmonic. Achieving the vacuum specification of ∼100nTorr∼100nTorr in a narrow chamber of 4–6mm4–6mm inner diameter, with a long length of 100–200m100–200m, makes the design of the vacuum system challenging. This article describes the vacuum specifications and calculations of the flux and energy of photons irradiating the undulator vacuum chamber and considers possible vacuum system design solutions for two cases: cryogenic and room temperature.

  14. SUPERCONDUCTING HELICAL SNAKE MAGNETS: CONSTRUCTION AND MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, W.W.; Anerella, M.; Courant, E.

    1999-01-01

    In order to collide polarized protons, the RHIC project will have two snakes in each ring and four rotators around each of two interaction regions. Two snakes on opposite sides of each ring can minimize depolarization during acceleration by keeping the spin tune at a half. Since the spin direction is normally along the vertical direction in a flat ring, spin rotators must be used around an interaction point to have longitudinal polarization in a collider experiment. Each snake or rotator will be composed of four helical dipoles to provide the required rotation of spin with minimal transverse orbit excursions in a compact length of 10m. The basic helical dipole is a superconducting magnet producing a transverse dipole field which is twisted about the magnet axis through 360 o in a length of 2.4 m. The design and construction of the magnets is described in this paper

  15. Summary of the First High-Altitude, Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test for the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ian G.; Adler, Mark; Manning, Rob

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator Project is developing and testing the next generation of supersonic aerodynamic decelerators for planetary entry. A key element of that development is the testing of full-scale articles in conditions relevant to their intended use, primarily the tenuous Mars atmosphere. To achieve this testing, the LDSD project developed a test architecture similar to that used by the Viking Project in the early 1970's for the qualification of their supersonic parachute. A large, helium filled scientific balloon is used to hoist a 4.7 m blunt body test vehicle to an altitude of approximately 32 kilometers. The test vehicle is released from the balloon, spun up for gyroscopic stability, and accelerated to over four times the speed of sound and an altitude of 50 kilometers using a large solid rocket motor. Once at those conditions, the vehicle is despun and the test period begins. The first flight of this architecture occurred on June 28th of 2014. Though primarily a shake out flight of the new test system, the flight was also able to achieve an early test of two of the LDSD technologies, a large 6 m diameter Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) and a large, 30.5 m nominal diameter supersonic parachute. This paper summarizes this first flight.

  16. Dual-Pump CARS Development and Application to Supersonic Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    A dual-pump Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) instrument has been developed to obtain simultaneous measurements of temperature and absolute mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in supersonic combustion and generate databases for validation and development of CFD codes. Issues that compromised previous attempts, such as beam steering and high irradiance perturbation effects, have been alleviated or avoided. Improvements in instrument precision and accuracy have been achieved. An axis-symmetric supersonic combusting coaxial jet facility has been developed to provide a simple, yet suitable flow to CFD modelers. Approximately one million dual-pump CARS single shots have been collected in the supersonic jet for varying values of flight and exit Mach numbers at several locations. Data have been acquired with a H2 co-flow (combustion case) or a N2 co-flow (mixing case). Results are presented and the effects of the compressibility and of the heat release are discussed.

  17. Flow Visualization in Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael Wayne

    This thesis is a collection of novel flow visualizations of two different flat-plate, zero pressure gradient, supersonic, turbulent boundary layers (M = 2.8, Re _theta ~ 82,000, and M = 2.5, Re_ theta ~ 25,000, respectively). The physics of supersonic shear flows has recently drawn increasing attention with the renewed interest in flight at super and hypersonic speeds. This work was driven by the belief that the study of organized, Reynolds -stress producing turbulence structures will lead to improved techniques for the modelling and control of high-speed boundary layers. Although flow-visualization is often thought of as a tool for providing qualitative information about complex flow fields, in this thesis an emphasis is placed on deriving quantitative results from image data whenever possible. Three visualization techniques were applied--'selective cut-off' schlieren, droplet seeding, and Rayleigh scattering. Two experiments employed 'selective cut-off' schlieren. In the first, high-speed movies (40,000 fps) were made of strong density gradient fronts leaning downstream at between 30^circ and 60^ circ and travelling at about 0.9U _infty. In the second experiment, the same fronts were detected with hot-wires and imaged in real time, thus allowing the examination of the density gradient fronts and their associated single-point mass -flux signals. Two experiments employed droplet seeding. In both experiments, the boundary layer was seeded by injecting a stream of acetone through a single point in the wall. The acetone is atomized by the high shear at the wall into a 'fog' of tiny (~3.5mu m) droplets. In the first droplet experiment, the fog was illuminated with copper-vapor laser sheets of various orientations. The copper vapor laser pulses 'froze' the fog motion, revealing a variety of organized turbulence structures, some with characteristic downstream inclinations, others with large-scale roll-up on the scale of delta. In the second droplet experiment, high

  18. Buoyant Helical Twin-Axial Wire Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    February 2017 The below identified patent application is available for licensing. Requests for information should be addressed to...300169 1 of 9 BUOYANT HELICAL TWIN-AXIAL WIRE ANTENNA CROSS REFERENCE TO OTHER PATENT APPLICATIONS [0001] This application is a divisional...application and claims the benefit of the filing date of United States Patent Application No. 14/280,889; filed on May 19, 2014; and entitled “Twin-Axial

  19. Molecular Dynamics with Helical Periodic Boundary Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kessler, Jiří; Bouř, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 21 (2014), s. 1552-1559 ISSN 0192-8651 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200551205; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : periodic boundary conditions * helical symmetry * molecular dynamics * protein structure * amyloid fibrils Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.589, year: 2014

  20. Simplification of the helical TEN2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, K.-H.

    1980-04-01

    The observation that the helical TEN2 laser can effectively be simplified by giving up the use of decoupling elements as well as by abolishing the segmentation of the electrode structure is examined. Although, as a consequence of this simplification, the operating pressure range was slightly decreased, the output power could be improved by roughly 30%, a result which is attributed to the new electrode geometry exhibiting lower inductance and lower damping losses.

  1. Field of a helical Siberian Snake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luccio, A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-02-01

    To preserve the spin polarization of a beam of high energy protons in a circular accelerator, magnets with periodic magnetic field, called Siberian Snakes are being used. Recently, it was proposed to build Siberian Snakes with superconducting helical dipoles. In a helical, or twisted dipole, the magnetic field is perpendicular to the axis of the helix and rotates around it as one proceeds along the magnet. In an engineering study of a 4 Tesla helical snake, the coil geometry is derived, by twisting, from the geometry of a cosine superconducting dipole. While waiting for magnetic measurement data on such a prototype, an analytical expression for the field of the helice is important, to calculate the particle trajectories and the spin precession in the helix. This model will also allow to determine the optical characteristics of the snake, as an insertion in the lattice of the accelerator. In particular, one can calculate the integrated multipoles through the magnet and the equivalent transfer matrix. An expression for the field in the helix body, i.e., excluding the fringe field was given in a classical paper. An alternate expression can be found by elaborating on the treatment of the field of a transverse wiggler obtained under the rather general conditions that the variables are separable. This expression exactly satisfies Maxwell`s div and curl equations for a stationary field, {del} {center_dot} B = 0, {del} x B = 0. This approach is useful in that it will allow one to use much of the work already done on the problem of inserting wigglers and undulators in the lattice of a circular accelerator.

  2. Flowfield Behavior of Supersonic Impinging Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, K. G.; Alvi, F. S.

    1998-11-01

    A detailed study is being conducted which examines the behavior of normally impinging, supersonic jets, issuing from axisymmetric a Mach 1.5 C-D and a sonic nozzle. Our goal is to understand the physics of this flowfield (commonly observed in STOVL aircraft) and its influence on the acoustic and aerodynamic loading on the ground plane and the airframe. The airframe is simulated by a circular disc ('lift' plate) with an annular hole from which the jet is issued. Tests are carried out for a wide range of pressure ratios and the ground plane distance is varied from 1.5 to 60 nozzle diameters. Flowfield measurements include Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and schlieren/shadowgraph visualization. Surface measurements on the ground and lift plates include mean and unsteady surface pressure distributions and the surface streamline visualization. Near-field acoustic measurements using a microphone are also obtained. For certain cases, the PIV measurements -- first of their kind, to our knowledge -- clearly show the presence of large-scale coherent turbulent structures which, upon jet impingement, propagate into the resulting wall jet. These structures are believed to generate very high unsteady pressure loads on the ground plane thus leading to ground erosion. They are also suspected to be the source of acoustic waves which lead to a feedback loop causing violent oscillations of the primary jet and can result in increased acoustic loading and subsequent damage to the aircraft. As a result of this detailed study over a wide parametric space, we hope to gain a much better understanding of the physical mechanisms governing this complex flow.

  3. Wave induced supersonic rotation in mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, Abraham

    2010-11-01

    Wave-particle interactions in ExB supersonically rotating plasmas feature an unusual effect: particles are diffused by waves in both potential energy and kinetic energy [1]. This wave-particle interaction generalizes the alpha channeling effect, in which radio frequency waves are used to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. In rotating plasmas, the alpha particles may be removed at low energy through the loss cone, and the energy lost may be transferred to the radial electric field. This eliminates the need for electrodes in the mirror throat, which have presented serious technical issues in past rotating plasma devices. A particularly simple way to achieve this effect is to use a high azimuthal mode number perturbation on the magnetic field [2]. In the rotating frame, this perturbation is seen as a wave near the alpha particle cyclotron harmonic, and can break the azimuthal symmetry and magnetic moment conservation without changing the particle's total energy. The particle may exit if it reduces its kinetic energy and becomes more trapped if it gains kinetic energy, leading to a steady state current that maintains the field. Simulations of single particles in rotating mirrors show that a stationary wave can extract enough energy from alpha particles for a reactor to be self-sustaining. Rotation can also be sustained by waves in plasmas without a kinetic energy source. This type of wave has been considered for plasma centrifuges used for isotope separation [3]. [4pt] [1] A. J. Fetterman and N. J. Fisch, Phys Rev Lett 101, 205003 (2008). [0pt] [2] A. J. Fetterman and N. J. Fisch, Phys. Plasmas 17, 042112 (2010). [0pt] [3] A. J. Fetterman and N. J. Fisch, Plasma Sources Sci. Tech. 18, 045003 (2009).

  4. Helical waves in easy-plane antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Yuriy G.; Li, Xi-Lai; Xu, Xinyi; Kim, Ki Wook

    2017-12-01

    Effective spin torques can generate the Néel vector oscillations in antiferromagnets (AFMs). Here, it is theoretically shown that these torques applied at one end of a normal AFM strip can excite a helical type of spin wave in the strip whose properties are drastically different from characteristic spin waves. An analysis based on both a Néel vector dynamical equation and the micromagnetic simulation identifies the direction of magnetic anisotropy and the damping factor as the two key parameters determining the dynamics. Helical wave propagation requires the hard axis of the easy-plane AFM to be aligned with the traveling direction, while the damping limits its spatial extent. If the damping is neglected, the calculation leads to a uniform periodic domain wall structure. On the other hand, finite damping decelerates the helical wave rotation around the hard axis, ultimately causing stoppage of its propagation along the strip. With the group velocity staying close to spin-wave velocity at the wave front, the wavelength becomes correspondingly longer away from the excitation point. In a sufficiently short strip, a steady-state oscillation can be established whose frequency is controlled by the waveguide length as well as the excitation energy or torque.

  5. Helical CT in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, Olivier; Leroy, Christophe; Sergent, Geraldine; Bulois, Philippe; Saint-Drenant, Sophie; Paris, Jean-Claude

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of helical CT in depicting the location of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. A three-phase helical CT of the abdomen was performed in 24 patients referred for acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The diagnosis of the bleeding site was established by CT when there was at least one of the following criteria: spontaneous hyperdensity of the peribowel fat; contrast enhancement of the bowel wall; vascular extravasation of the contrast medium; thickening of the bowel wall; polyp or tumor; or vascular dilation. Diverticula alone were not enough to locate the bleeding site. The results of CT were compared with the diagnosis obtained by colonoscopy, enteroscopy, or surgery. A definite diagnosis was made in 19 patients. The bleeding site was located in the small bowel in 5 patients and the colon in 14 patients. The CT correctly located 4 small bowel hemorrhages and 11 colonic hemorrhages. Diagnosis of the primary lesion responsible for the bleeding was made in 10 patients. Our results suggest that helical CT could be a good diagnostic tool in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding to help the physician to diagnose the bleeding site. (orig.)

  6. Superconducting Helical Snake Magnet for the AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Willen, Erich; Escallier, John; Ganetis, George; Ghosh, Arup; Gupta, Ramesh C; Harrison, Michael; Jain, Animesh K; Luccio, Alfredo U; MacKay, William W; Marone, Andrew; Muratore, Joseph F; Okamura, Masahiro; Plate, Stephen R; Roser, Thomas; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Wanderer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting helical magnet has been built for polarized proton acceleration in the Brookhaven AGS. This "partial Snake" magnet will help to reduce the loss of polarization of the beam due to machine resonances. It is a 3 T magnet some 1940 mm in magnetic length in which the dipole field rotates with a pitch of 0.2053 degrees/mm for 1154 mm in the center and a pitch of 0.3920 degrees/mm for 393 mm in each end. The coil cross-section is made of two slotted cylinders containing superconductor. In order to minimize residual offsets and deflections of the beam on its orbit through the Snake, a careful balancing of the coil parameters was necessary. In addition to the main helical coils, a solenoid winding was built on the cold bore tube inside the main coils to compensate for the axial component of the field that is experienced by the beam when it is off-axis in this helical magnet. Also, two dipole corrector magnets were placed on the same tube with the solenoid. A low heat leak cryostat was built so that t...

  7. Total scalp irradiation using helical tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, Nigel; Jaradat, Hazim; Welsh, James; Tome, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Homogeneous irradiation of the scalp poses technical and dosimetric challenges due to the extensive, superficial, curved treatment volume. Conventional treatments on a linear accelerator use multiple matched electron fields or a combination of electron and photon fields. Problems with these techniques include dose heterogeneity in the target due to varying source-to-skin distance (SSD) and angle of beam incidence, significant dose to the brain, and the potential for overdose or underdose at match lines between the fields. Linac-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans have similar problems. This work presents treatment plans for total scalp irradiation on a helical tomotherapy machine. Helical tomotherapy is well-suited for scalp irradiation because it has the ability to deliver beamlets that are tangential to the scalp at all points. Helical tomotherapy also avoids problems associated with field matching and use of more than one modality. Tomotherapy treatment plans were generated and are compared to plans for treatment of the same patient on a linac. The resulting tomotherapy plans show more homogeneous target dose and improved critical structure dose when compared to state-of-the-art linac techniques. Target equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for the best tomotherapy plan was slightly higher than for the linac plan, while the volume of brain tissue receiving over 30 Gy was reduced by two thirds. Furthermore, the tomotherapy plan can be more reliably delivered than linac treatments, because the patient is aligned prior to each treatment based on megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT)

  8. THE EFFECTS OF SPATIAL SMOOTHING ON SOLAR MAGNETIC HELICITY PARAMETERS AND THE HEMISPHERIC HELICITY SIGN RULE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocker, Stella Koch [Department of Physics, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH 44074 (United States); Petrie, Gordon, E-mail: socker@oberlin.edu, E-mail: gpetrie@nso.edu [National Solar Observatory, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The hemispheric preference for negative/positive helicity to occur in the northern/southern solar hemisphere provides clues to the causes of twisted, flaring magnetic fields. Previous studies on the hemisphere rule may have been affected by seeing from atmospheric turbulence. Using Hinode /SOT-SP data spanning 2006–2013, we studied the effects of two spatial smoothing tests that imitate atmospheric seeing: noise reduction by ignoring pixel values weaker than the estimated noise threshold, and Gaussian spatial smoothing. We studied in detail the effects of atmospheric seeing on the helicity distributions across various field strengths for active regions (ARs) NOAA 11158 and NOAA 11243, in addition to studying the average helicities of 179 ARs with and without smoothing. We found that, rather than changing trends in the helicity distributions, spatial smoothing modified existing trends by reducing random noise and by regressing outliers toward the mean, or removing them altogether. Furthermore, the average helicity parameter values of the 179 ARs did not conform to the hemisphere rule: independent of smoothing, the weak-vertical-field values tended to be negative in both hemispheres, and the strong-vertical-field values tended to be positive, especially in the south. We conclude that spatial smoothing does not significantly affect the overall statistics for space-based data, and thus seeing from atmospheric turbulence seems not to have significantly affected previous studies’ ground-based results on the hemisphere rule.

  9. Tangential inlet supersonic separators: a novel apparatus for gas purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, Chuang; Walther, Jens Honore; Yang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    A novel supersonic separator with a tangential inlet is designed to remove the condensable components from gas mixtures. The dynamic parameters of natural gas in the supersonic separation process are numerically calculated using the Reynolds stress turbulence model with the Peng-Robinson real gas...... be generated by the tangential inlet, and it increases to the maximum of 200 m/s at the nozzle throat due to decrease of the nozzle area of the converging part. The tangential velocity can maintain the value of about 160 m/s at the nozzle exit, and correspondingly generates the centrifugal acceleration of 3...

  10. Two-dimensional unsteady lift problems in supersonic flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaslet, Max A; Lomax, Harvard

    1949-01-01

    The variation of pressure distribution is calculated for a two-dimensional supersonic airfoil either experiencing a sudden angle-of-attack change or entering a sharp-edge gust. From these pressure distributions the indicial lift functions applicable to unsteady lift problems are determined for two cases. Results are presented which permit the determination of maximum increment in lift coefficient attained by an unrestrained airfoil during its flight through a gust. As an application of these results, the minimum altitude for safe flight through a specific gust is calculated for a particular supersonic wing of given strength and wing loading.

  11. Advanced supersonic technology and its implications for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, C.

    1979-01-01

    A brief overview of the NASA Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) program is presented. The SCR program has identified significant improvements in the areas of aerodynamics, structures, propulsion, noise reduction, takeoff and landing procedures, and advanced configuration concepts. These improvements tend to overcome most of the problems which led to the cancellation of the National SST program. They offer the promise of an advanced SST family of aircraft which are environmentally acceptable, have flexible range-payload capability, and are economically viable. The areas of technology addressed by the SCR program have direct application to advanced military aircraft and to supersonic executive aircraft.

  12. Investigation of supersonic jets shock-wave structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapryagaev, V. I.; Gubanov, D. A.; Kavun, I. N.; Kiselev, N. P.; Kundasev, S. G.; Pivovarov, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents an experimental studies overview of the free supersonic jet flow structure Ma = 1.0, Npr = 5, exhausting from a convergent profiled nozzle into a ambient space. Also was observed the jets in the presence of artificial streamwise vortices created by chevrons and microjets located on the nozzle exit. The technique of experimental investigation, schlieren-photographs and schemes of supersonic jets, and Pitot pressure distributions, are presented. A significant effect of vortex generators on the shock-wave structure of the flow is shown.

  13. Erosion of graphite surface exposed to hot supersonic hydrogen gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, O. P.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical model based on laminar boundary layer flow equations was developed to predict the erosion rate of a graphite (AGCarb-101) surface exposed to a hot supersonic stream of hydrogen gas. The supersonic flow in the nozzle outside the boundary layer formed over the surface of the specimen was determined by assuming one-dimensional isentropic conditions. An overall surface reaction rate expression based on experimental studies was used to describe the interaction of hydrogen with graphite. A satisfactory agreement was found between the results of the computation, and the available experimental data. Some shortcomings of the model and further possible improvements are discussed.

  14. Cryo-EM Structure Determination Using Segmented Helical Image Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, S A; Sachse, C

    2016-01-01

    Treating helices as single-particle-like segments followed by helical image reconstruction has become the method of choice for high-resolution structure determination of well-ordered helical viruses as well as flexible filaments. In this review, we will illustrate how the combination of latest hardware developments with optimized image processing routines have led to a series of near-atomic resolution structures of helical assemblies. Originally, the treatment of helices as a sequence of segments followed by Fourier-Bessel reconstruction revealed the potential to determine near-atomic resolution structures from helical specimens. In the meantime, real-space image processing of helices in a stack of single particles was developed and enabled the structure determination of specimens that resisted classical Fourier helical reconstruction and also facilitated high-resolution structure determination. Despite the progress in real-space analysis, the combination of Fourier and real-space processing is still commonly used to better estimate the symmetry parameters as the imposition of the correct helical symmetry is essential for high-resolution structure determination. Recent hardware advancement by the introduction of direct electron detectors has significantly enhanced the image quality and together with improved image processing procedures has made segmented helical reconstruction a very productive cryo-EM structure determination method. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hydrodynamic studies of CNT nanofluids in helical coil heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babita; Sharma, S. K.; Mital Gupta, Shipra; Kumar, Arinjay

    2017-12-01

    Helical coils are extensively used in several industrial processes such as refrigeration systems, chemical reactors, recovery processes etc to accommodate a large heat transfer area within a smaller space. Nanofluids are getting great attention due to their enhanced heat transfer capability. In heat transfer equipments, pressure drop is one of the major factors of consideration for pumping power calculations. So, the present work is aimed to study hydrodynamics of CNT nanofluids in helical coils. In this study, pressure drop characteristics of CNT nanofluid flowing inside horizontal helical coils are investigated experimentally. The helical coil to tube diameter was varied from 11.71 to 27.34 keeping pitch of the helical coil constant. Double distilled water was used as basefluid. SDBS and GA surfactants were added to stablilize CNT nanofluids. The volumetric fraction of CNT nanofluid was varied from 0.003 vol% to 0.051 vol%. From the experimental data, it was analyzed that the friction factor in helical coils is greater than that of straight tubes. Concentration of CNT in nanofluids also has a significant influence on the pressure drop/friction factor of helical coils. At a constant concentration of CNT, decreasing helical coil to tube diameter from 27.24 to 11.71, fanning friction factor of helical coil; f c increases for a constant value of p/d t. This increase in the value of fanning friction factor can be attributed to the secondary flow of CNT nanofluid in helical coils.

  16. On the Comparison of the Long Penetration Mode (LPM) Supersonic Counterflowing Jet to the Supersonic Screech Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Rebecca A.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Jones, Jess H.; Dougherty, N. Sam

    2015-01-01

    Classic tonal screech noise created by under-expanded supersonic jets; Long Penetration Mode (LPM) supersonic phenomenon -Under-expanded counter-flowing jet in supersonic free stream -Demonstrated in several wind tunnel tests -Modeled in several computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations; Discussion of LPM acoustics feedback and fluid interactions -Analogous to the aero-acoustics interactions seen in screech jets; Lessons Learned: Applying certain methodologies to LPM -Developed and successfully demonstrated in the study of screech jets -Discussion of mechanically induced excitation in fluid oscillators in general; Conclusions -Large body of work done on jet screech, other aero-acoustic phenomenacan have direct application to the study and applications of LPM cold flow jets

  17. Helical muon beam cooling channel engineering design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2015-01-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet. The first phase of this project saw the development of a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb 3 Sn-based HS test section. Two very novel ideas are required to realize the design. The first idea is the use of dielectric inserts in the RF cavities to make them smaller for a given frequency so that the cavities and associated plumbing easily fit inside the magnet cryostat. Calculations indicate that heat loads will be tolerable, while RF breakdown of the dielectric inserts will be suppressed by the pressurized hydrogen gas. The second new idea is the use of a multi-layer Nb 3 Sn helical solenoid. The technology demonstrations for the two aforementioned key components of a 10T, 805 MHz HCC were begun in this project. The work load in the Fermilab Technical Division made it difficult to test a multi-layer Nb 3 Sn solenoid as originally planned. Instead, a complementary project was approved by the

  18. Helical muon beam cooling channel engineering design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-08-07

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet. The first phase of this project saw the development of a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb3Sn-based HS test section. Two very novel ideas are required to realize the design. The first idea is the use of dielectric inserts in the RF cavities to make them smaller for a given frequency so that the cavities and associated plumbing easily fit inside the magnet cryostat. Calculations indicate that heat loads will be tolerable, while RF breakdown of the dielectric inserts will be suppressed by the pressurized hydrogen gas. The second new idea is the use of a multi-layer Nb3Sn helical solenoid. The technology demonstrations for the two aforementioned key components of a 10T, 805 MHz HCC were begun in this project. The work load in the Fermilab Technical Division made it difficult to test a multi-layer Nb3Sn solenoid as originally planned. Instead, a complementary

  19. Twitter Tips, Tricks, and Tweets

    CERN Document Server

    McFedries, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Maximize your fun and boost your productivity with this updated, full-color guide to tantalizing Twitter tips!. The popularity of Twitter continues to soar, and is fast becoming the most popular social networking site online. Whether you're looking to learn how to set up an account for the first time or are on the prowl for some cool third-party Twitter apps, this full-color guide will boost your entire Twitter experience. Allowing you to communicate with fellow Twitters within a 140-character limit, this fun and fascinating social networking tool is easier than maintaining a blog and quicker

  20. Windows 8 visual quick tips

    CERN Document Server

    McFedries, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Easy-in, easy-out format covers all the bells and whistles of Windows 8 If you want to learn how to work smarter and faster in Microsoft's Windows 8 operating system, this easy-to-use, compact guide delivers the goods. Designed for visual learners, it features short explanations and full-color screen shots on almost every page, and it's packed with timesaving tips and helpful productivity tricks. From enhancing performance and managing digital content to setting up security and much more, this handy guide will help you get more out of Windows 8. Uses full-color screen shots and short, step-by-

  1. System assessment of helical reactors in comparison with tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Imagawa, S.; Muroga, T.; Sagara, A.; Okamura, S.

    2002-10-01

    A comparative assessment of tokamak and helical reactors has been performed using equivalent physics/engineering model and common costing model. Higher-temperature plasma operation is required in tokamak reactors to increase bootstrap current fraction and to reduce current-drive (CD) power. In helical systems, lower-temperature operation is feasible and desirable to reduce helical ripple transport. The capital cost of helical reactor is rather high, however, the cost of electricity (COE) is almost same as that of tokamak reactor because of smaller re-circulation power (no CD power) and less-frequent blanket replacement (lower neutron wall loading). The standard LHD-type helical reactor with 5% beta value is economically equivalent to the standard tokamak with 3% beta. The COE of lower-aspect ratio helical reactor is on the same level of high-β N tokamak reactors. (author)

  2. Towards an Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elasticity Analysis of a Commercial Supersonic Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Kopasakis, George; Chwalowski, Pawel; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Silva, Walt A.; McNamara, Jack

    2016-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an aero-propulso-servo-elastic (APSE) model using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and linear structural deformations. The APSE model provides the integration of the following two previously developed nonlinear dynamic simulations: a variable cycle turbofan engine and an elastic supersonic commercial transport vehicle. The primary focus of this study is to provide a means to include relevant dynamics of a turbomachinery propulsion system into the aeroelastic studies conducted during a vehicle design, which have historically neglected propulsion effects. A high fidelity CFD tool is used here for the integration platform. The elastic vehicle neglecting the propulsion system serves as a comparison of traditional approaches to the APSE results. An overview of the methodology is presented for integrating the propulsion system and elastic vehicle. Static aeroelastic analysis comparisons between the traditional and developed APSE models for a wing tip detection indicate that the propulsion system impact on the vehicle elastic response could increase the detection by approximately ten percent.

  3. Commercial Supersonics Technology Project - Status of Airport Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James

    2016-01-01

    The Commercial Supersonic Technology Project has been developing databases, computational tools, and system models to prepare for a level 1 milestone, the Low Noise Propulsion Tech Challenge, to be delivered Sept 2016. Steps taken to prepare for the final validation test are given, including system analysis, code validation, and risk reduction testing.

  4. Highly Supersonic Ion Pulses in a Collisionless Magnetized Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Schrittwieser, R.

    1982-01-01

    The initial transient response of a collisionless plasma to a high positive voltage step is investigated. Four different pulses are observed. An electron plasma wave pulse is followed by an ion burst. The latter is overtaken and absorbed by a highly supersonic ion pulse. Thereafter, an ion...

  5. Commercial supersonic flight; the past and the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Moorselaar, M.

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary world is all about going faster than ever before. Various communication technologies allow us to interact and trade almost instantly with the entire world. Computers are faster than ever before. One thing, however, has slowed down, the speed at which we travel. Supersonic travel is no

  6. Conservation of power of the supersonic acoustic intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn

    2014-01-01

    The supersonic intensity is a quantity that represents the net acoustic output that a source couples into the medium; it can be regarded as a spatially low-pass filtered version of the active intensity. This spatial filtering can lead to significant error due to spatial truncation. In this paper,...

  7. Supersonic laser spray of aluminium alloy on a ceramic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riveiro, A.; Lusquinos, F.; Comesana, R.; Quintero, F.; Pou, J.

    2007-01-01

    Applying a ceramic coating onto a metallic substrate to improve its wear resistance or corrosion resistance has attracted the interest of many researchers during decades. However, only few works explore the possibility to apply a metallic layer onto a ceramic material. This work presents a novel technique to coat ceramic materials with metals: the supersonic laser spraying. In this technique a laser beam is focused on the surface of the precursor metal in such a way that the metal is transformed to the liquid state in the beam-metal interaction zone. A supersonic jet expels the molten material and propels it to the surface of the ceramic substrate. In this study, we present the preliminary results obtained using the supersonic laser spray to coat a commercial cordierite ceramic plate with an Al-Cu alloy using a 3.5 kW CO 2 laser and a supersonic jet of Argon. Coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and interferometric profilometry

  8. A study of air breathing rockets. 3: Supersonic mode combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuya, G.; Chinzel, N.; Kudo, K.; Murakami, A.; Komuro, T.; Ishii, S.

    An experimental study was made on supersonic mode combustors of an air breathing rocket engine. Supersonic streams of room-temperature air and hot fuel-rich rocket exhaust were coaxially mixed and burned in a concially diverging duct of 2 deg half-angle. The effect of air inlet Mach number and excess air ratio was investigated. Axial wall pressure distribution was measured to calculate one dimensional change of Mach number and stagnation temperature. Calculated results showed that supersonic combustion occurred in the duct. At the exit of the duct, gas sampling and Pitot pressure measurement was made, from which radial distributions of various properties were deduced. The distribution of mass fraction of elements from rocket exhaust showed poor mixing performance in the supersonic mode combustors compared with the previously investigated cylindrical subsonic mode combustors. Secondary combustion efficiency correlated well with the centerline mixing parameter, but not with Annushkin's non-dimensional combustor length. No major effect of air inlet Mach number or excess air ratio was seen within the range of conditions under which the experiment was conducted.

  9. Advanced supersonic propulsion study. [with emphasis on noise level reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatella, J. A. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the promising propulsion systems for advanced supersonic transport application, and to identify the critical propulsion technology requirements. It is shown that noise constraints have a major effect on the selection of the various engine types and cycle parameters. Several promising advanced propulsion systems were identified which show the potential of achieving lower levels of sideline jet noise than the first generation supersonic transport systems. The non-afterburning turbojet engine, utilizing a very high level of jet suppression, shows the potential to achieve FAR 36 noise level. The duct-heating turbofan with a low level of jet suppression is the most attractive engine for noise levels from FAR 36 to FAR 36 minus 5 EPNdb, and some series/parallel variable cycle engines show the potential of achieving noise levels down to FAR 36 minus 10 EPNdb with moderate additional penalty. The study also shows that an advanced supersonic commercial transport would benefit appreciably from advanced propulsion technology. The critical propulsion technology needed for a viable supersonic propulsion system, and the required specific propulsion technology programs are outlined.

  10. Statistical properties of edge plasma turbulence in the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, J. M.; Hnat, B.; Ohno, N.; Dendy, R. O.; Masuzaki, S.; Morisaki, T.; Komori, A.

    2008-09-01

    Ion saturation current (Isat) measurements made by three tips of a Langmuir probe array in the Large Helical Device are analysed for two plasma discharges. Absolute moment analysis is used to quantify properties on different temporal scales of the measured signals, which are bursty and intermittent. Strong coherent modes in some datasets are found to distort this analysis and are consequently removed from the time series by applying bandstop filters. Absolute moment analysis of the filtered data reveals two regions of power-law scaling, with the temporal scale τ ≈ 40 µs separating the two regimes. A comparison is made with similar results from the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak. The probability density function is studied and a monotonic relationship between connection length and skewness is found. Conditional averaging is used to characterize the average temporal shape of the largest intermittent bursts.

  11. Towards easy and reliable AFM tip shape determination using blind tip reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flater, Erin E.; Zacharakis-Jutz, George E.; Dumba, Braulio G.; White, Isaac A.; Clifford, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative determination of the geometry of an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe tip is critical for robust measurements of the nanoscale properties of surfaces, including accurate measurement of sample features and quantification of tribological characteristics. Blind tip reconstruction, which determines tip shape from an AFM image scan without knowledge of tip or sample shape, was established most notably by Villarrubia [J. Res. Natl. Inst. Stand. Tech. 102 (1997)] and has been further developed since that time. Nevertheless, the implementation of blind tip reconstruction for the general user to produce reliable and consistent estimates of tip shape has been hindered due to ambiguity about how to choose the key input parameters, such as tip matrix size and threshold value, which strongly impact the results of the tip reconstruction. These key parameters are investigated here via Villarrubia's blind tip reconstruction algorithms in which we have added the capability for users to systematically vary the key tip reconstruction parameters, evaluate the set of possible tip reconstructions, and determine the optimal tip reconstruction for a given sample. We demonstrate the capabilities of these algorithms through analysis of a set of simulated AFM images and provide practical guidelines for users of the blind tip reconstruction method. We present a reliable method to choose the threshold parameter corresponding to an optimal reconstructed tip shape for a given image. Specifically, we show that the trend in how the reconstructed tip shape varies with threshold number is so regular that the optimal, or Goldilocks, threshold value corresponds with the peak in the derivative of the RMS difference with respect to the zero threshold curve vs. threshold number. - Highlights: • Blind tip reconstruction algorithms have been implemented and augmented to determine the optimal input parameters. • We demonstrate the capabilities of the algorithms using a simulated AFM

  12. Influence of the tip mass on the tip-sample interactions in TM-AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pishkenari, Hossein Nejat, E-mail: nejat@mech.sharif.edu [Nano-Robotics Laboratory, Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, P.O. Box 11365-9465 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meghdari, Ali [Nano-Robotics Laboratory, Center of Excellence in Design, Robotics and Automation, School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, P.O. Box 11365-9465 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    This paper focuses on the influences of the tip mass ratio (the ratio of the tip mass to the cantilever mass), on the excitation of higher oscillation eigenmodes and also on the tip-sample interaction forces in tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). A precise model for the cantilever dynamics capable of accurate simulations is essential for the investigation of the tip mass effects on the interaction forces. In the present work, the finite element method (FEM) is used for modeling the AFM cantilever to consider the oscillations of higher eigenmodes oscillations. In addition, molecular dynamics (MD) is used to calculate precise data for the tip-sample force as a function of tip vertical position with respect to the sample. The results demonstrate that in the presence of nonlinear tip-sample interaction forces, the tip mass ratio plays a significant role in the excitations of higher eigenmodes and also in the normal force applied on the surface. Furthermore, it has been shown that the difference between responses of the FEM and point-mass models in different system operational conditions is highly affected by the tip mass ratio. -- Highlights: {yields} A strong correlation exists between the tip mass ratio and the 18th harmonic amplitude. {yields} Near the critical tip mass ratio a small change in the tip mass may lead to a significant force change. {yields} Inaccuracy of the lumped model depends significantly on the tip mass ratio.

  13. Tip Clearance Control Using Plasma Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Clearance Control Using Plasma Actuators 4 posed by Denton (1993). A number of investigators have used partial shrouds, or " winglet " designs to...SDBD actuator Plasma enhanced aerodynamics has been demonstrated in a range of applications involving sepa- ration control, lift enhancement, drag... aerodynamic benefits of a squealer tip geometry. Specifically, the squealer tip is known to reduce the discharge coefficient of the tip gap, thereby

  14. Numerical investigation of tip leakage vortex

    OpenAIRE

    Fredriksen, Vegard

    2017-01-01

    The Kaplan turbine has a small clearance gap between the blade tip and casing to allow the blades to rotate freely. This clearance gap is the cause of an undesirable Tip Leakage Vortex (TLV). A TLV might reduce the turbine efficiency, erode the turbine blades or cause instabilities for the power output. A literature study indicated that the tip clearance gap was a critical parameter affecting the behavior of the TLV. A research gap was observed for an operating Kaplan turbine where the ...

  15. Alteration of helical vortex core without change in flow topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Okulov, Valery; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2011-01-01

    topology. The helical symmetry as such is preserved, although the characteristic parameters of helical symmetry of the vortex core transfer from a smooth linear variation to a different trend under the influence of a non-uniform pressure gradient, causing an increase in helical pitch without changing its......The abrupt expansion of the slender vortex core with changes in flow topology is commonly known as vortex breakdown. We present new experimental observations of an alteration of the helical vortex core in wall bounded turbulent flow with abrupt growth in core size, but without change in flow...

  16. Helicity conservation under quantum reconnection of vortex rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccher, Simone; Ricca, Renzo L

    2015-12-01

    Here we show that under quantum reconnection, simulated by using the three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation, self-helicity of a system of two interacting vortex rings remains conserved. By resolving the fine structure of the vortex cores, we demonstrate that the total length of the vortex system reaches a maximum at the reconnection time, while both writhe helicity and twist helicity remain separately unchanged throughout the process. Self-helicity is computed by two independent methods, and topological information is based on the extraction and analysis of geometric quantities such as writhe, total torsion, and intrinsic twist of the reconnecting vortex rings.

  17. Superposition of helical beams by using a Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chunqing; Qi, Xiaoqing; Liu, Yidong; Weber, Horst

    2010-01-04

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a helical beam is of great interests in the high density optical communication due to its infinite number of eigen-states. In this paper, an experimental setup is realized to the information encoding and decoding on the OAM eigen-states. A hologram designed by the iterative method is used to generate the helical beams, and a Michelson interferometer with two Porro prisms is used for the superposition of two helical beams. The experimental results of the collinear superposition of helical beams and their OAM eigen-states detection are presented.

  18. Progress with helicity injection current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Raman, R.; Nelson, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) experiments in the NSTX and HIT-II devices are reported. NSTX has produced toroidal currents of 0.4 MA and pulse lengths of up to 0.33 s. These discharges nearly fill the NSTX main chamber, and show the n=1 rotating distortion characteristic of high-performance CHI plasmas. CHI has been used in HIT-II to provide a closed flux startup plasma for inductive drive. The CHI startup method saves transformer volt-seconds and greatly improves reproducibility and reliability of inductively driven discharges, even in the presence of diminishing wall conditions. (author)

  19. Heat loss by helicity injection in spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented for spheromak buildup and decay including thermal diffusivity associated with magnetic turbulence during helicity injection. It is shown that heat loss by magnetic turbulence scales more favorably than gyroBohm transport. Thus gyroBohm scaling for the proposed ignition experiment would be the conservative choice, though present experiments may be dominated by magnetic turbulence. Because of a change in boundary conditions when the gun is turned off, the model may account for the observed increase in electron temperature in CTX after turnoff

  20. Rotation influence on the plasma helical instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutkin, T.I.; Tsypin, V.S.; Boleslavskaya, G.I.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of the rotation on helical instability of a plasma with the fixed boundaries (HIFB) is investigated taking into account the compressibility. A case of infinitely long cylinder with distributed current is considered. Cases when a rotating plasma is confined by current magnetic field are analytically considered. It is shown that in the case of the fixed boundary taking into account the compressibility in the HIFB increment increases and the picture of the rotation influence on HIFB considerably changes. Besides, it is shown that in the case of high plasma pressures HIFB can stabilize as a result of the rotation

  1. RANS computations of tip vortex cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaix, Jean; Balarac, Guillaume; Dreyer, Matthieu; Farhat, Mohamed; Münch, Cécile

    2015-12-01

    The present study is related to the development of the tip vortex cavitation in Kaplan turbines. The investigation is carried out on a simplified test case consisting of a NACA0009 blade with a gap between the blade tip and the side wall. Computations with and without cavitation are performed using a R ANS modelling and a transport equation for the liquid volume fraction. Compared with experimental data, the R ANS computations turn out to be able to capture accurately the development of the tip vortex. The simulations have also highlighted the influence of cavitation on the tip vortex trajectory.

  2. Direct calculation of wind turbine tip loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, D.H.; Okulov, Valery; Bhattacharjee, D.

    2016-01-01

    . We develop three methods for the direct calculation of the tip loss. The first is the computationally expensive calculation of the velocities induced by the helicoidal wake which requires the evaluation of infinite sums of products of Bessel functions. The second uses the asymptotic evaluation......The usual method to account for a finite number of blades in blade element calculations of wind turbine performance is through a tip loss factor. Most analyses use the tip loss approximation due to Prandtl which is easily and cheaply calculated but is known to be inaccurate at low tip speed ratio...

  3. Dual-Pump CARS Development and Application to Supersonic Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnotti, Gaetano

    Successful design of hypersonic air-breathing engines requires new computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for turbulence and turbulence-chemistry interaction in supersonic combustion. Unfortunately, not enough data are available to the modelers to develop and validate their codes, due to difficulties in taking measurements in such a harsh environment. Dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is a non-intrusive, non-linear, laser-based technique that provides temporally and spatially resolved measurements of temperature and absolute mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in H2-air flames. A dual-pump CARS instrument has been developed to obtain measurements in supersonic combustion and generate databases for the CFD community. Issues that compromised previous attempts, such as beam steering and high irradiance perturbation effects, have been alleviated or avoided. Improvements in instrument precision and accuracy have been achieved. An axis-symmetric supersonic combusting coaxial jet facility has been developed to provide a simple, yet suitable flow to CFD modelers. The facility provides a central jet of hot "vitiated air" simulating the hot air entering the engine of a hypersonic vehicle flying at Mach numbers between 5 and 7. Three different silicon carbide nozzles, with exit Mach number 1, 1.6 and 2, are used to provide flows with the effects of varying compressibility. H2 co-flow is available in order to generate a supersonic combusting free jet. Dual-pump CARS measurements have been obtained for varying values of flight and exit Mach numbers at several locations. Approximately one million Dual-pump CARS single shots have been collected in the supersonic jet for varying values of flight and exit Mach numbers at several locations. Data have been acquired with a H2 co-flow (combustion case) or a N 2 co-flow (mixing case). Results are presented and the effects of the compressibility and of the heat release are discussed.

  4. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirav, Aviv; Gordin, Alexander; Poliak, Marina; Fialkov, Alexander B

    2008-02-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with supersonic molecular beams (SMBs) (also named Supersonic GC-MS) is based on GC and MS interface with SMBs and on the electron ionization (EI) of vibrationally cold analytes in the SMBs (cold EI) in a fly-through ion source. This ion source is inherently inert and further characterized by fast response and vacuum background filtration capability. The same ion source offers three modes of ionization including cold EI, classical EI and cluster chemical ionization (CI). Cold EI, as a main mode, provides enhanced molecular ions combined with an effective library sample identification, which is supplemented and complemented by a powerful isotope abundance analysis method and software. The range of low-volatility and thermally labile compounds amenable for analysis is significantly increased owing to the use of the contact-free, fly-through ion source and the ability to lower sample elution temperatures through the use of high column carrier gas flow rates. Effective, fast GC-MS is enabled particularly owing to the possible use of high column flow rates and improved system selectivity in view of the enhancement of the molecular ion. This fast GC-MS with SMB can be further improved via the added selectivity of MS-MS, which by itself benefits from the enhancement of the molecular ion, the most suitable parent ion for MS-MS. Supersonic GC-MS is characterized by low limits of detection (LOD), and its sensitivity is superior to that of standard GC-MS, particularly for samples that are hard for analysis. The GC separation of the Supersonic GC-MS can be improved with pulsed flow modulation (PFM) GC x GC-MS. Electron ionization LC-MS with SMB can also be combined with the Supersonic GC-MS, with fast and easy switching between these two modes of operation. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. New methods for analyzing transport phenomena in supersonic ejectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamberts, Olivier; Chatelain, Philippe; Bartosiewicz, Yann

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Simulation of a supersonic ejector with the open source software for CFD OpenFOAM. • Validation of the numerical tool based on flow structures obtained by schlieren. • Application of the momentum and energy tube analysis tools to a supersonic ejector. • Extension of this framework to exergy to construct exergy transport tubes. • Quantification of local transfers and losses of exergy within the ejector. - Abstract: This work aims at providing novel insights into the quantification and the location of the transfers and the irreversibilities within supersonic ejectors, and their connection with the entrainment. In this study, we propose two different and complementary approaches. First of all, recent analysis tools based on momentum and energy tubes (Meyers and Meneveau (2013)) are extended to the present compressible flow context and applied to the mean-flow structure of turbulent flow within the ejector. Furthermore, the transport equation for the mean-flow total exergy is derived and exergy transport tubes are proposed as a tool for the investigation of transport phenomena within supersonic ejectors. In addition to this topological approach, an analysis based on classical stream tubes is performed in order to quantitatively investigate transfers between the primary and the secondary streams all along the ejector. Finally, the present work identifies the location of exergy losses and their origins. Throughout this analysis, new local and cumulative parameters related to transfers and irreversibilities are introduced. The proposed methodology sheds light on the complex phenomena at play and may serve as a basis for the analysis of transport phenomena within supersonic ejectors. For the ejector under consideration, although global transfers are more important in on-design conditions, it is shown that the net gain in exergy of the secondary stream is maximum for a value of the back pressure that is close to the critical back pressure, as

  6. Electronic transport in single-helical protein molecules: Effects of multiple charge conduction pathways and helical symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Sourav, E-mail: sourav.kunduphy@gmail.com; Karmakar, S.N.

    2016-07-15

    We propose a tight-binding model to investigate electronic transport properties of single helical protein molecules incorporating both the helical symmetry and the possibility of multiple charge transfer pathways. Our study reveals that due to existence of both the multiple charge transfer pathways and helical symmetry, the transport properties are quite rigid under influence of environmental fluctuations which indicates that these biomolecules can serve as better alternatives in nanoelectronic devices than its other biological counterparts e.g., single-stranded DNA.

  7. Effect of insertion depth on helical antenna performance in a muscle-equivalent phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, J W; Meeson, S; Birch, M J [Department of Clinical Physics, Royal London Hospital, 56-76 Ashfield Street, London, E1 1BB (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-21

    Barrett's oesophagus is considered to increase the risk of cancer 30 fold. A set of helical microwave antennas was designed to investigate their potential use in the thermal therapy of Barrett's oesophagus. For treatment, a balloon filled with muscle-equivalent material encapsulates the antenna. The effects of insertion depth and coil-spacing on the thermal distribution produced by the antennas (20-35 mm) were characterized. The 35 mm helical antenna, with a coil-spacing of 3.6 mm resulted in uniform heating for an insertion depth of 40 mm. It was observed that the resultant temperature distribution produced, by the antennas, was dependent on the insertion depth within the phantom. For all antennas studied, deeper insertion resulted in two high intensity regions, approximately 1/4 and 3/4 along the antenna length. In contrast, shallow insertion resulted in predominant tip heating with undesirable heating at the phantom entry point. However, by manipulating the coil-spacing of the helix, uniform temperature profiles were achieved for a range of insertion depths.

  8. CURRENT AND KINETIC HELICITY OF LONG-LIVED ACTIVITY COMPLEXES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komm, Rudolf; Gosain, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    We study long-lived activity complexes and their current helicity at the solar surface and their kinetic helicity below the surface. The current helicity has been determined from synoptic vector magnetograms from the NSO/SOLIS facility, and the kinetic helicity of subsurface flows has been determined with ring-diagram analysis applied to full-disk Dopplergrams from NSO/GONG and SDO/HMI. Current and kinetic helicity of activity complexes follow the hemispheric helicity rule with mainly positive values (78%; 78%, respectively, with a 95% confidence level of 31%) in the southern hemisphere and negative ones (80%; 93%, respectively, with a 95% confidence level of 22% and 14%, respectively) in the northern hemisphere. The locations with the dominant sign of kinetic helicity derived from Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) and SDO/HMI data are more organized than those of the secondary sign even if they are not part of an activity complex, while locations with the secondary sign are more fragmented. This is the case for both hemispheres even for the northern one where it is not as obvious visually due to the large amount of magnetic activity present as compared to the southern hemisphere. The current helicity shows a similar behavior. The dominant sign of current helicity is the same as that of kinetic helicity for the majority of the activity complexes (83% with a 95% confidence level of 15%). During the 24 Carrington rotations analyzed here, there is at least one longitude in each hemisphere where activity complexes occur repeatedly throughout the epoch. These ''active'' longitudes are identifiable as locations of strong current and kinetic helicity of the same sign

  9. Neutrino helicity flips via electroweak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaemers, K.J.F.; Gandhi, R.; Lattimer, J.M.; Department of Earth and Space Sciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794)

    1989-01-01

    Electroweak mechanisms via which neutrinos may flip helicity are examined in detail. Exact and approximate expressions for a variety of flip processes relevant in astrophysics and cosmology, mediated by W, Z, and γ exchange, including their interference, are derived for both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos (with emphasis on the former). It is shown that in general flip and nonflip cross sections differ by more than just a multiplicative factor of m/sub ν/ 2 /4E/sub ν/ 2 contrary to what might be expected and that this additional dependence on helicities can be significant. It is also shown that within the context of the standard model with massive neutrinos, for νe yields νe scattering, σ/sub Z//sup flip//σ/sub γ//sup flip/ ∼ 10 4 , independent of particle masses and energies to a good approximation. As an application, using some general considerations and the fact that the observed bar nu/sub e/ burst from SN 1987A lasted several seconds, these weak-interaction flip cross sections are used to rule out μ and tau neutrino masses above 30 keV. Finally, some other consequences for astrophysics in general and supernovae in particular are briefly discussed

  10. Helical type thermonuclear device and control method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigaki, Yukio.

    1990-01-01

    In a conventional helical type thermonuclear device, electric current flows in the toroidal direction under magnetic fields of helical coils and vertical magnetic coils, by which a circulating electric field is caused. Therefore, there is a problem that electrons as a seed are generated by cosmic rays, etc., the electrons are confined in a magnetic field boundary, are accelerated by the circulating electric field, to reach a high energy level, collide against structures in a vacuum vessel and emit a great amount of X-rays. Then, compensation coils for offsetting the magnetic fields generated upon energization and deenergization of the vertical magnetic coils and the power source therefor are disposed at the positions opposing to each other on both sides of the vertical magnetic coils for controlling the variation coefficient rate of electric current upon energization and deenergization of the vertical magnetic coils. Since the compensation coils also offset the magnetic field generated upon energization and deenergization of the vertical magnetic field coils by this control, the circulating magnetic field is not caused in the vacuum vessel to reduce the X-ray radiation by electrons at high energy level. (N.H.)

  11. Determining How Magnetic Helicity Injection Really Works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul M Bellan

    2001-01-01

    OAK-B135 The goal of the Caltech program is to determine how helicity injection works by investigating the actual dynamics and topological evolution associated with magnetic relaxation. A new coaxial helicity injection source has been constructed and brought into operation. The key feature of this source is that it has maximum geometric simplicity. Besides being important for fusion research, this work also has astrophysical implications. Photos obtained using high-speed cameras show a clear sequence of events in the formation process. In particular, they show initial merging/reconnection processes, jet-like expansion, kinking, and separation of the plasma from the source. Various diagnostics have been developed, including laser induced fluorescence and soft x-ray detection using high speed diodes. Gas valves have been improved and a patent disclosure relating to puffed gas valves has been filed. Presentations on this work have been given in the form of invited talks at several university physics departments that were previously unfamiliar with laboratory plasma experiments

  12. Perspectives on confinement in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae

    1989-01-01

    A review on recent experimental results and theoretical models on anomalous transport and density limit in toroidal helical devices is presented. Importance of transport problems is discussed. Experiments on Heliotron-E, Wendelstein-VIIA and new devices, i.e., ATF, Wendelstein-VIIAS and CHS, are reviewed and an overview on confinement property is given. From recent experimental results one sees that there are anomalous transport, which increases with temperature, and density limit, and that they limit the energy confinement time as well as the attainable beta value. The confinement characteristics of the scrape off layer plasma and loss cone loss are discussed, and perspectives on the high temperature plasma are given. These anomalous transport and density limit will be difficult obstacles in realizing a reactor grade plasma in helical systems. It is an urgent task to draw a realistic picture of the confinement based on the present data base. The relevant knowledge now would be critically essential for the successful development of the research in 1990's. (author) 102 refs

  13. Neutrino helicity reversal and fundamental symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jentschura, U D; Wundt, B J

    2014-01-01

    A rather elusive helicity reversal occurs in a gedanken experiment in which a massive left-handed Dirac neutrino, traveling at a velocity u < c, is overtaken on a highway by a speeding vehicle (traveling at velocity v with u < v < c). Namely, after passing the neutrino, looking back, one would see a right-handed neutrino (which has never been observed in nature). The Lorentz-invariant mass of the right-handed neutrino is still the same as before the passing. The gedanken experiment thus implies the existence of right-handed, light neutrinos, which are not completely sterile. Furthermore, overtaking a bunch of massive right-handed Dirac neutrinos leads to gradual de-sterilization. We discuss the helicity reversal and the concomitant sterilization and de-sterilization mechanisms by way of an illustrative example calculation, with a special emphasis on massive Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. We contrast the formalism with a modified Dirac neutrino described by a Dirac equation with a pseudoscalar mass term proportional to the fifth current. (paper)

  14. Quality assurance of a helical tomotherapy machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenwick, J D; Tome, W A; Jaradat, H A; Hui, S K; James, J A; Balog, J P; DeSouza, C N; Lucas, D B; Olivera, G H; Mackie, T R; Paliwal, B R

    2004-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy has been developed at the University of Wisconsin, and 'Hi-Art II' clinical machines are now commercially manufactured. At the core of each machine lies a ring-gantry-mounted short linear accelerator which generates x-rays that are collimated into a fan beam of intensity-modulated radiation by a binary multileaf, the modulation being variable with gantry angle. Patients are treated lying on a couch which is translated continuously through the bore of the machine as the gantry rotates. Highly conformal dose-distributions can be delivered using this technique, which is the therapy equivalent of spiral computed tomography. The approach requires synchrony of gantry rotation, couch translation, accelerator pulsing and the opening and closing of the leaves of the binary multileaf collimator used to modulate the radiation beam. In the course of clinically implementing helical tomotherapy, we have developed a quality assurance (QA) system for our machine. The system is analogous to that recommended for conventional clinical linear accelerator QA by AAPM Task Group 40 but contains some novel components, reflecting differences between the Hi-Art devices and conventional clinical accelerators. Here the design and dosimetric characteristics of Hi-Art machines are summarized and the QA system is set out along with experimental details of its implementation. Connections between this machine-based QA work, pre-treatment patient-specific delivery QA and fraction-by-fraction dose verification are discussed

  15. CFD analysis of cloud cavitation on three tip-modified propellers with systematically varied tip geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, K. W.; Andersen, Poul

    2015-01-01

    The blade tip loading is often reduced as an effort to restrain sheet and tip vortex cavitation in the design of marine propellers. This CFD analysis demonstrates that an excessive reduction of the tip loading can cause cloud cavitation responsible for much of noise and surface erosion. Detached...

  16. Crack Tip Mechanics in Distortion Gradient Plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuentes-Alonso, Sandra; Martínez Pañeda, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    Gradient Plasticity (DGP), the influence on crack tip mechanics of DGP's distinguishing features that entail superior modelling capabilities has not been investigated yet. In this work crack tip fields are thoroughly examined by implementing the higher order theory of DGP in an implicit finite element...

  17. Jagged gives endothelial tip cells an edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchting, Steven; Eichmann, Anne

    2009-06-12

    Sprouting blood vessels have tip cells that lead and stalk cells that follow. Benedito et al. (2009) now show that competition between endothelial cells for the tip position is regulated by glycosylation of Notch receptors and by the opposing actions of the Notch ligands Jagged1 and Delta-like 4.

  18. Twelve Tips for Effective Electronic Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Joy

    1994-01-01

    Offers 12 tips for effective electronic presentation. This article is intended for readers who may be considering using electronic presentation for the first time. Offers reasons for its popularity and occasions when it may be used. The tips offer assistance in the design and presentation of electronic material. (LZ)

  19. Energy fluxes in helical magnetohydrodynamics and dynamo action

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... large-scale magnetic field arising due to non-helical interactions and (2) inverse energy flux of magnetic energy caused by helical interactions. Based on our flux results, a primitive model for galactic dynamo has been constructed. Our calculations yield dynamo time-scale for a typical galaxy to be of the order of 108 years.

  20. Alpha-Effect, Current and Kinetic Helicities for Magnetically Driven ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Key words. Sun—dynamo, helicity, turbulent convection. Extended abstract. Recent numerical simulations lead to the result that turbulence is much more mag- netically driven than believed. ... positive (and negative in the northern hemisphere), this being just opposite to what occurs for the current helicity which is negative ...

  1. Space vehicle electromechanical system and helical antenna winding fixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Stephen; Dallmann, Nicholas; Guenther, David; Enemark, Donald; Seitz, Daniel; Martinez, John; Storms, Steven

    2017-12-26

    A space vehicle electromechanical system may employ an architecture that enables convenient and practical testing, reset, and retesting of solar panel and antenna deployment on the ground. A helical antenna winding fixture may facilitate winding and binding of the helical antenna.

  2. Low-energy properties of fractional helical Luttinger liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, T.; Fritz, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371569559; Schuricht, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369284690; Loss, D.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the low-energy properties of (quasi) helical and fractional helical Luttinger liquids. In particular, we calculate the Drude peak of the optical conductivity, the density of states, as well as charge transport properties of the interacting system with and without attached Fermi liquid

  3. A helical naphthopyran dopant for photoresponsive cholesteric liquid crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yuna; Frigoli, Michel; Vanthuyne, Nicolas; Tamaoki, Nobuyuki

    2017-01-01

    The first photoresponsive cholesteric liquid crystal comprising a photoisomerizable helical naphthopyran derivative dopant and a nematic liquid crystal is reported. An unprecedented helical twisting power switching ratio of over 90% allowed us to demonstrate multi-cycle rotational motion of micro-objects by UV light irradiation.

  4. Helical modes generate antimagnetic rotational spectra in nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sham S.

    2018-03-01

    A systematic analysis of the antimagnetic rotation band using r -helicity formalism is carried out for the first time. The observed octupole correlation in a nucleus is likely to play a role in establishing the antimagnetic spectrum. Such octupole correlations are explained within the helical orbits. In a rotating field, two identical fermions (generally protons) with paired spins generate these helical orbits in such a way that its positive (i.e., up) spin along the axis of quantization refers to one helicity (right-handedness) while negative (down) spin along the same quantization-axis decides another helicity (left-handedness). Since the helicity remains invariant under rotation, therefore, the quantum state of a fermion is represented by definite angular momentum and helicity. These helicity represented states support a pear-shaped structure of a rotating system having z axis as the symmetry axis. A combined operation of parity, time-reversal, and signature symmetries ensures an absence of one of the signature partner band from the observed antimagnetic spectrum. This formalism has also been tested for the recently observed negative parity Δ I =2 antimagnetic spectrum in odd-A 101Pd nucleus and explains nicely its energy spectrum as well as the B (E 2 ) values. Further, this formalism is found to be fully consistent with twin-shears mechanism popularly known for such type of rotational bands. It also provides significant clue for extending these experiments in various mass regions spread over the nuclear chart.

  5. Experimental investigation of solar powered diaphragm and helical pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    For several years, many types of solar powered water pumping systems were evaluated, and in this paper, diaphragm and helical solar photovoltaic (PV) powered water pumping systems are discussed. Data were collected on diaphragm and helical pumps which were powered by different solar PV arrays at mul...

  6. Early warning of climate tipping points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Timothy M.

    2011-07-01

    A climate 'tipping point' occurs when a small change in forcing triggers a strongly nonlinear response in the internal dynamics of part of the climate system, qualitatively changing its future state. Human-induced climate change could push several large-scale 'tipping elements' past a tipping point. Candidates include irreversible melt of the Greenland ice sheet, dieback of the Amazon rainforest and shift of the West African monsoon. Recent assessments give an increased probability of future tipping events, and the corresponding impacts are estimated to be large, making them significant risks. Recent work shows that early warning of an approaching climate tipping point is possible in principle, and could have considerable value in reducing the risk that they pose.

  7. Stimuli-Directed Helical Chirality Inversion and Bio-Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyu Lv

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Helical structure is a sophisticated ubiquitous motif found in nature, in artificial polymers, and in supramolecular assemblies from microscopic to macroscopic points of view. Significant progress has been made in the synthesis and structural elucidation of helical polymers, nevertheless, a new direction for helical polymeric materials, is how to design smart systems with controllable helical chirality, and further use them to develop chiral functional materials and promote their applications in biology, biochemistry, medicine, and nanotechnology fields. This review summarizes the recent progress in the development of high-performance systems with tunable helical chirality on receiving external stimuli and discusses advances in their applications as drug delivery vesicles, sensors, molecular switches, and liquid crystals. Challenges and opportunities in this emerging area are also presented in the conclusion.

  8. Helicity conservation and twisted Seifert surfaces for superfluid vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Hayder

    2017-04-01

    Starting from the continuum definition of helicity, we derive from first principles its different contributions for superfluid vortices. Our analysis shows that an internal twist contribution emerges naturally from the mathematical derivation. This reveals that the spanwise vector that is used to characterize the twist contribution must point in the direction of a surface of constant velocity potential. An immediate consequence of the Seifert framing is that the continuum definition of helicity for a superfluid is trivially zero at all times. It follows that the Gauss-linking number is a more appropriate definition of helicity for superfluids. Despite this, we explain how a quasi-classical limit can arise in a superfluid in which the continuum definition for helicity can be used. This provides a clear connection between a microscopic and a macroscopic description of a superfluid as provided by the Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov equations. This leads to consistency with the definition of helicity used for classical vortices.

  9. High performance operational limits of tokamak and helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Kozo; Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    The plasma operational boundaries of tokamak and helical systems are surveyed and compared with each other. Global confinement scaling laws are similar and gyro-Bohm like, however, local transport process is different due to sawtooth oscillations in tokamaks and ripple transport loss in helical systems. As for stability limits, achievable tokamak beta is explained by ideal or resistive MHD theories. On the other hand, beta values obtained so far in helical system are beyond ideal Mercier mode limits. Density limits in tokamak are often related to the coupling between radiation collapse and disruptive MHD instabilities, but the slow radiation collapse is dominant in the helical system. The pulse length of both tokamak and helical systems is on the order of hours in small machines, and the longer-pulsed good-confinement plasma operations compatible with radiative divertors are anticipated in both systems in the future. (author)

  10. On Helical Projection and Its Application in Screw Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riliang Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available As helical surfaces, in their many and varied forms, are finding more and more applications in engineering, new approaches to their efficient design and manufacture are desired. To that end, the helical projection method that uses curvilinear projection lines to map a space object to a plane is examined in this paper, focusing on its mathematical model and characteristics in terms of graphical representation of helical objects. A number of interesting projective properties are identified in regard to straight lines, curves, and planes, and then the method is further investigated with respect to screws. The result shows that the helical projection of a cylindrical screw turns out to be a Jordan curve, which is determined by the screw's axial profile and number of flights. Based on the projection theory, a practical approach to the modeling of screws and helical surfaces is proposed and illustrated with examples, and its possible application in screw manufacturing is discussed.

  11. Internal transport barrier physics in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, M.; Minami, T.; Fujisawa, A.; Herranz, J.; Ida, K.; Yamagishi, O.; Yamada, H.; Maaberg, H.; Beidler, C.D.; Dinklage, A.; Estrada, T.; Castejon, F.; Murakami, S.

    2005-01-01

    The electron internal transport barrier (eITB) has been observed in wide range of helical systems, such as CHS [eg.,1], LHD [eg., 2], TJ-II [eg., 3] and W7-AS [eg., 4]. The eITB isA defined as highly peaked electron temperature (Te) profile with strongly positive radial electric field (Er) in the central region. These observations are reviewed in this paper to understand the device-independent common findings and also to draw the main differences. This is the first report from the International Stellarator Profile Database Activity. The formation of the strong central positive Er has been understood mainly as a result of the ambipolarity of neoclassical electron and ion fluxes, although some additional convective electron flux such as driven by ECRH is required in some situations. This 'neoclassical' physics peculiar to low collisional regime of helical plasmas provides the commonly observed existence of the ECRH power threshold (which is also depending on the density). This is contrastive characteristics to the ITB observed in tokamaks. The dependence of the ECRH power threshold on the magnetic configuration and on the heating scenario among these devices are currently being examined by taking the effective ripple and the trapped particle fraction as parameters to achieve the comprehensive understanding. The roles of low order rational surfaces on the onset of eITB formation and also on its radial size (location of the footpoint of the eITB) have been indicated in inward shifted configurations in LHD (depending on the relative locations of heating position and 2/1 island) and TJ-II (eITB becomes possible at higher density when 3/2 rational is introduced in the plasma core region). It is speculated that, for the latter case, the resonance causes an extra electron flux to trigger the positive Er. The interplay between low order rational surfaces and the formation of eITB still waits for the systematic experiment and theoretical analysis. The external controllability

  12. Patterns of uterine enhancement with helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, H.; Loyer, E.M.; Charnsangavej, C. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Box 57, The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd. Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Minami, M. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113 (Japan)

    1998-10-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the enhancement characteristics of the normal uterine body and cervix using dynamic contrast-enhanced helical CT. Methods: Thirty-eight women scheduled for pelvic CT for non-gynecologic malignancies underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced helical CT of the pelvis. Data acquisition was during the arterial phase (30-45 s after the start of injection), the parenchymal phase (90-120 s after the start of injection), and delayed phase (3-9 min after the start of injection). The images were evaluated by four radiologists for the pattern of myometrial and cervical enhancement. Correlation was made with the age and menstrual status of the patients. Results: In the uterine body, three types of enhancement were observed. Type 1 enhancement, seen in 16 patients (42%), was characterized by the visualization of a subendometrial zone of enhancement, 30-120 s after the start of injection. Eight of these patients also showed an enhancing zone in the outer myometrium. Both zones were transitory, and in all cases, the uterus became homogeneous in the delayed phase. This pattern was seen predominantly in premenopausal women with a mean age of 34 years. Type 2 enhancement, seen in 17 cases (45%), was defined by the absence of subendometrial enhancement in the early phase. Enhancement was either diffuse from the outset or originated in the outer myometrium. This pattern was seen nearly equally in premenopausal and postmenopausal women with a mean age of 40 years. Type 3 enhancement was seen in five postmenopausal patients (13%) with a mean age of 53 years and was characterized by faint diffuse enhancement. In the cervix, a zonal pattern of enhancement defining inner and outer stroma was seen in 23 patients (61%). Fifteen patients were premenopausal and eight were postmenopausal. Conclusion: In this study, we have shown a transitory zonal distribution of the contrast in the myometrium and cervix using dynamic contrast-enhanced helical CT

  13. Patterns of uterine enhancement with helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, H.; Loyer, E.M.; Charnsangavej, C.; Minami, M.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the enhancement characteristics of the normal uterine body and cervix using dynamic contrast-enhanced helical CT. Methods: Thirty-eight women scheduled for pelvic CT for non-gynecologic malignancies underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced helical CT of the pelvis. Data acquisition was during the arterial phase (30-45 s after the start of injection), the parenchymal phase (90-120 s after the start of injection), and delayed phase (3-9 min after the start of injection). The images were evaluated by four radiologists for the pattern of myometrial and cervical enhancement. Correlation was made with the age and menstrual status of the patients. Results: In the uterine body, three types of enhancement were observed. Type 1 enhancement, seen in 16 patients (42%), was characterized by the visualization of a subendometrial zone of enhancement, 30-120 s after the start of injection. Eight of these patients also showed an enhancing zone in the outer myometrium. Both zones were transitory, and in all cases, the uterus became homogeneous in the delayed phase. This pattern was seen predominantly in premenopausal women with a mean age of 34 years. Type 2 enhancement, seen in 17 cases (45%), was defined by the absence of subendometrial enhancement in the early phase. Enhancement was either diffuse from the outset or originated in the outer myometrium. This pattern was seen nearly equally in premenopausal and postmenopausal women with a mean age of 40 years. Type 3 enhancement was seen in five postmenopausal patients (13%) with a mean age of 53 years and was characterized by faint diffuse enhancement. In the cervix, a zonal pattern of enhancement defining inner and outer stroma was seen in 23 patients (61%). Fifteen patients were premenopausal and eight were postmenopausal. Conclusion: In this study, we have shown a transitory zonal distribution of the contrast in the myometrium and cervix using dynamic contrast-enhanced helical CT

  14. Transcaval TIPS in patients with failed revision of occluded previous TIPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Chang Kyu; Kim, Yong Joo; Shin, Tae Beom; Park, Hyo Yong; Kim, Tae Hun; Kang, Duk Sik [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-01

    To determine the feasibility of transcaval transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in patients with occluded previous TIPS. Between February 1996 and December 2000 we performed five transcaval TIPS procedures in four patients with recurrent gastric cardiac variceal bleeding. All four had occluded TIPS, which was between the hepatic and portal vein. The interval between initial TIPS placement and revisional procedures with transcaval TIPS varied between three and 31 months; one patient underwent transcaval TIPS twice, with a 31-month interval. After revision of the occluded shunt failed, direct cavoportal puncture at the retrohepatic segment of the IVC was attempted. Transcaval TIPS placement was technically successful in all cases. In three, tractography revealed slight leakage of contrast materials into hepatic subcapsular or subdiaphragmatic pericaval space. There was no evidence of propagation of extravasated contrast materials through the retroperitoneal space or spillage into the peritoneal space. After the tract was dilated by a bare stent, no patient experienced trans-stent bleeding and no serious procedure-related complications occurred. After successful shunt creation, variceal bleeding ceased in all patients. Transcaval TIPS placement is an effective and safe alternative treatment in patients with occluded previous TIPS and no hepatic veins suitable for new TIPS.

  15. The tipping point: A mathematical model for the profit-driven abandonment of restaurant tipping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Sara M.; Herbers, Eileen; Chen, Jack; Abrams, Daniel M.

    2018-02-01

    The custom of voluntarily tipping for services rendered has gone in and out of fashion in America since its introduction in the 19th century. Restaurant owners that ban tipping in their establishments often claim that social justice drives their decisions, but we show that rational profit-maximization may also justify the decisions. Here, we propose a conceptual model of restaurant competition for staff and customers, and we show that there exists a critical conventional tip rate at which restaurant owners should eliminate tipping to maximize profits. Because the conventional tip rate has been increasing steadily for the last several decades, our model suggests that restaurant owners may abandon tipping en masse when that critical tip rate is reached.

  16. Volume Dynamics Propulsion System Modeling for Supersonics Vehicle Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Paxson, Daniel E.; Ma, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Under the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program the Supersonics Project is working to overcome the obstacles to supersonic commercial flight. The proposed vehicles are long slim body aircraft with pronounced aero-servo-elastic modes. These modes can potentially couple with propulsion system dynamics; leading to performance challenges such as aircraft ride quality and stability. Other disturbances upstream of the engine generated from atmospheric wind gusts, angle of attack, and yaw can have similar effects. In addition, for optimal propulsion system performance, normal inlet-engine operations are required to be closer to compressor stall and inlet unstart. To study these phenomena an integrated model is needed that includes both airframe structural dynamics as well as the propulsion system dynamics. This paper covers the propulsion system component volume dynamics modeling of a turbojet engine that will be used for an integrated vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic model and for propulsion efficiency studies.

  17. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenou, M. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Harvey M. Kruger Family Center for Nano-science and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Additive Manufacturing Lab, Orbotech Ltd., P.O. Box 215, 81101 Yavne (Israel); Sa' ar, A. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Harvey M. Kruger Family Center for Nano-science and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Kotler, Z. [Additive Manufacturing Lab, Orbotech Ltd., P.O. Box 215, 81101 Yavne (Israel)

    2015-05-04

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10–100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets.

  18. Cosmic ray acceleration in sources of the supersonic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykov, A.M.; Toptygin, I.N.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of particle acceleration by the supersonic turbulence is studied. The supersonic turbulence is defined as an ensemble of large- and small-scale plasma motions, in which along with the ranges of smooth parameter variation there are randomly distributed shock wave fronts. Particle interaction with the large-scale turbulence is described by the transfer equation which is true at any relation between the Larmor radius and the transport length. The large-scale turbulence can accelerate particles only due to compressibility effects of the medium. The basic theoretical results concerning turbulence properties in compressed media are presented. Concrete physical conditions and the possibility of acceleration of cosmic rays in the interplanetary space, in the vicinity of suppergiant stars of the O and B class with a great loss of mass and strong stellar winds, in supernova remnants, in the interstellar medium and some extragalactic radio sources are considered [ru

  19. Direct formulation of the supersonic acoustic intensity in space domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn; Leclre, Quentin

    2012-01-01

    into the far field. To date, its calculation has been formulated in the wave number domain, filtering out the evanescent waves outside the radiation circle and reconstructing the acoustic field with only the propagating waves. In this study, the supersonic intensity is calculated directly in space domain......This paper proposes and examines a direct formulation in space domain of the so-called supersonic acoustic intensity. This quantity differs from the usual (active) intensity by excluding the circulating energy in the near-field of the source, providing a map of the acoustic energy that is radiated...... by means of a two-dimensional convolution between the acoustic field and a spatial filter mask that corresponds to the space domain representation of the radiation circle. Therefore, the acoustic field that propagates effectively to the far field is calculated via direct filtering in space domain...

  20. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenou, M.; Sa'ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10–100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets

  1. Modeling of Supersonic Combustion Systems for Sustained Hypersonic Flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Neill

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Through Computational Fluid Dynamics and validation, an optimal scramjet combustor has been designed based on twin-strut Hydrogen injection to sustain flight at a desired speed of Mach 8. An investigation undertaken into the efficacy of supersonic combustion through various means of injection saw promising results for Hydrogen-based systems, whereby strut-style injectors were selected over transverse injectors based on their pressure recovery performance and combustive efficiency. The final configuration of twin-strut injectors provided robust combustion and a stable region of net thrust (1873 kN in the nozzle. Using fixed combustor inlet parameters and injection equivalence ratio, the finalized injection method advanced to the early stages of two-dimensional (2-D and three-dimensional (3-D scramjet engine integration. The overall investigation provided a feasible supersonic combustion system, such that Mach 8 sustained cruise could be achieved by the aircraft concept in a computational design domain.

  2. Kr-PLIF for scalar imaging in supersonic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, V; Burns, R; Clemens, N T

    2011-11-01

    Experiments were performed to explore the use of two-photon planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of krypton gas for applications of scalar imaging in supersonic flows. Experiments were performed in an underexpanded jet of krypton, which exhibited a wide range of conditions, from subsonic to hypersonic. Excellent signal-to-noise ratios were obtained, showing the technique is suitable for single-shot imaging. The data were used to infer the distribution of gas density and temperature by correcting the fluorescence signal for quenching effects and using isentropic relations. The centerline variation of the density and temperature from the experiments agree very well with those predicted with an empirical correlation and a CFD simulation (FLUENT). Overall, the high signal levels and quantifiable measurements indicate that Kr-PLIF could be an effective scalar marker for use in supersonic and hypersonic flow applications.

  3. Effect of Microjet Injection on Supersonic Jet Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Podboy, G. G.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of microjet (jet) injection on the noise from supersonic jets is investigated. Three convergent-divergent (C-D) nozzles and one convergent nozzle, all having the same exit diameters, are used in the study. The jets are injected perpendicular to the primary jet close to the nozzle lip from six equally-spaced ports having a jet-to-primary-jet diameter ratio of 0.0054. Effects in the over-expanded, fully expanded as well as underexpanded flow regimes are explored. Relative to the effect on subsonic jets, larger reductions in the overall sound pressure level (OASPL) are achieved in most supersonic conditions. The largest reductions are typically associated with suppression of screech and transonic tones. For a shock-free, fully expanded case, the OASPL reductions achieved are comparable to that in the subsonic case; the same correlation, found for subsonic jet noise reduction at shallow observation angle, applies.

  4. Development and Testing of a New Family of Supersonic Decelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ian G.; Adler, Mark; Rivellini, Tommaso P.

    2013-01-01

    The state of the art in Entry, Descent, and Landing systems for Mars applications is largely based on technologies developed in the late 1960's and early 1970's for the Viking Lander program. Although the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory has made advances in EDL technology, these are predominantly in the areas of entry (new thermal protection systems and guided hypersonic flight) and landing (the sky crane architecture). Increases in entry mass, landed mass, and landed altitude beyond MSL capabilities will require advances predominantly in the field of supersonic decelerators. With this in mind, a multi-year program has been initiated to advance three new types of supersonic decelerators that would enable future large-robotic and human-precursor class missions to Mars.

  5. Tests of a thermal acoustic shield with a supersonic jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickup, N.; Mangiarotty, R. A.; Okeefe, J. V.

    1981-10-01

    Fuel economy is a key element in the design of a future supersonic transport (SST). Variable cycle engines are being developed to provide the most economic combination of characteristics for a range of cruise speeds extending from subsonic speeds for overland flights to the supersonic cruise speeds. For one of these engines, the VCE-702, some form of noise suppression is needed for takeoff/sideline thrusts. The considered investigation is primarily concerned with scale model static tests of one particular concept for achieving that reduction, the thermal acoustic shield (TAS), which could also benefit other candidate SST engines. Other noise suppression devices being considered for SST application are the coannular nozzle, an internally ventilated nozzle, and mechanical suppressors. A test description is provided, taking into account the model configurations, the instrumentation, the test jet conditions, and aspects of screech noise control. Attention is given to shield thickness effects, a spectrum analysis, suppression and performance loss, and installed performance.

  6. Temperature in subsonic and supersonic radiation fronts measured at OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Heather; Kline, John; Lanier, Nick; Perry, Ted; Fontes, Chris; Fryer, Chris; Brown, Colin; Morton, John

    2017-10-01

    Propagation of heat fronts relevant to astrophysical plasmas is challenging in the supersonic regime. Plasma Te changes affect opacity and equation of state without hydrodynamic change. In the subsonic phase density perturbations form at material interfaces as the plasma responds to radiation pressure of the front. Recent experiments at OMEGA studied this transition in aerogel foams driven by a hohlraum. In COAX, two orthogonal backlighters drive x-ray radiography and K-shell absorption spectroscopy to diagnose the subsonic shape of the front and supersonic Te profiles. Past experiments used absorption spectroscopy in chlorinated foams to measure the heat front; however, Cl dopant is not suitable for higher material temperatures at NIF. COAX has developed use of Sc and Ti dopants to diagnose Te between 60-100eV and 100-180eV. Analysis with PrismSPECT using OPLIB tabular opacity data will evaluate the platform's ability to advance radiation transport in this regime.

  7. Investigation of nozzle contours in the CSIR supersonic wind tunnel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vallabh, Bhavya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Contours in the CSIR Supersonic Wind Tunnel B Vallabha,b and BW Skewsa Received 17 February 2017, in revised form 23 June 2017 and accepted 25 June 2017 R & D Journal of the South African Institution of Mechanical Engineering 2017, 33, 32-41 http... with the Sivells’ nozzle design method and the method of characteristics technique to design the nozzle profiles for the full supersonic Mach number range 𝟏𝟏 ≀ 𝑎𝑎 ≀ 𝟒𝟒.5 of the facility. Automatic computation was used for the profile...

  8. Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene nanofibers prepared by CO2 laser supersonic drawing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Suzuki

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE nanofibers were prepared by carbon dioxide (CO2 laser irradiation of asspun ETFE fibers with four different melt flow rates (MFRs in a supersonic jet that was generated by blowing air into a vacuum chamber through the fiber injection orifice. The drawability and superstructure of fibers produced by CO2 laser supersonic drawing depend on the laser power, the chamber pressure, the fiber injection speed, and the MFR. Nanofibers obtained using a laser power of 20 W, a chamber pressure of 20 kPa, and an MFR of 308 g•10 min–1 had an average diameter of 0.303 µm and a degree of crystallinity of 54%.

  9. Chaotic coordinates for the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, S. R., E-mail: shudson@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Suzuki, Y. [National Institute for Natural Sciences, National Institute for Fusion Sciences, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    The theory of quadratic-flux-minimizing (QFM) surfaces is reviewed, and numerical techniques that allow high-order QFM surfaces to be efficiently constructed for experimentally relevant, non-integrable magnetic fields are described. As a practical example, the chaotic edge of the magnetic field in the Large Helical Device (LHD) is examined. A precise technique for finding the boundary surface is implemented, the hierarchy of partial barriers associated with the near-critical cantori is constructed, and a coordinate system, which we call chaotic coordinates, that is based on a selection of QFM surfaces is constructed that simplifies the description of the magnetic field, so that flux surfaces become “straight” and islands become “square.”.

  10. Helical spin rotators and snakes for RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ptitsin, V.I.; Shatunov, Yu.M.; Peggs, S.

    1995-01-01

    The RHIC collider, now under construction at BNL, will have the possibility of polarized proton-proton collisions up to a beam energy of 250 Gev. Polarized proton beams of such high energy can be only obtained with the use of siberian snakes, a special kind of spin rotator that rotates the particle spin by 180 degree around an axis lying in the horizontal plane. Siberian snakes help to preserve the beam polarization while numerous spin depolarizing resonances are crossed, during acceleration. In order to collide longitudinally polarized beams, it is also planned to install spin rotators around two interaction regions. This paper discusses snake and spin rotator designs based on sequences of four helical magnets. The schemes that were chosen to be applied at RHIC are presented

  11. ATLAS helicity analyses in beauty hadron decays

    CERN Document Server

    Smizanska, M

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS detector will allow a precise spatial reconstruction of the kinematics of B hadron decays. In combination with the efficient lepton identification applied already at trigger level, ATLAS is expected to provide large samples of exclusive decay channels cleanly separable from background. These data sets will allow spin-dependent analyses leading to the determination of production and decay parameters, which are not accessible if the helicity amplitudes are not separated. Measurement feasibility studies for decays B/sub s //sup 0/ to J/ psi phi and Lambda /sub b//sup 0/ to Lambda J/ psi , presented in this document, show the experimental precisions that can be achieved in determination of B/sub s//sup 0/ and Lambda /sub b //sup 0/ characteristics. (19 refs).

  12. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Changbiao.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically transported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value

  13. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically imported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value

  14. Microinstability Studies for the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rewoldt, G.; Ku, L.-P.; Tang, W.M.; Sugama, H.; Nakajima, N.; Watanabe, K.Y.; Murakami, S.; Yamada, H.; Cooper, W.A.

    2002-01-01

    Fully kinetic assessments of the stability properties of toroidal drift modes have been obtained for cases for the Large Helical Device (LHD). This calculation employs the comprehensive linear microinstability code FULL, as recently extended for nonaxisymmetric systems. The code retains the important effects in the linearized gyrokinetic equation, using the lowest-order ''ballooning representation'' for high toroidal mode number instabilities in the electrostatic limit. These effects include trapped particles, FLR, transit and bounce and magnetic drift frequency resonances, etc., for any number of plasma species. Results for toroidal drift waves destabilized by trapped electrons and ion temperature gradients are presented, using numerically-calculated three-dimensional MHD equilibria. These are reconstructed from experimental measurements. Quasilinear fluxes of particles and energy for each species are also calculated. Pairs of LHD discharges with different magnetic axis positions and with and without pellet injection are compared

  15. Characteristic features of edge transport barrier formed in helical divertor configuration of the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, K.; Ohdachi, S.; Watanabe, F.

    2006-10-01

    In a helical divertor configuration of the Large Helical Device (LHD), transport barrier was formed through low to high confinement (L-H) transition in the plasma edge region including ergodic field layer of which region is in the magnetic hill. The plasma stored energy or the averaged bulk plasma beta dia > (derived from diamagnetic measurement) starts to increase just after the transition. In the case that both dia > and line-averaged electron density e > at the transition are relatively high as dia >≥1.5% and e >≥2x10 19 m -3 , the increase is hampered by rapid growth of edge MHD modes and/or small ELM like activities just after the transition. On the other hand, the transition at lower e > (≤1.5x10 19 m -3 ) and dia > (<2%) leads to a continuous increase in the stored energy with a time scale longer than the global energy confinement time, without suffering from these MHD activities near the edge. The ETB typically formed in electron density profile extends into ergodic field layer defined in the vacuum field. The width of ETB is almost independent of the toroidal field strength from 0.5T to 1.5T and is much larger than the poloidal ion gyro-radius. When resonant helical field perturbations are applied to expand a magnetic island size at the rational surface of the rotational transform ι/2π=1 near the edge, the L-H transition is triggered at lower electron density compared with the case without the field perturbations. The application of large helical field perturbations also suppresses edge MHD modes and ELM like activities. (author)

  16. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  17. Supersonic Combustion of Hydrogen Jets System in Hypersonic Stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhapbasbaev, U.K.; Makashev, E.P.

    2003-01-01

    The data of calculated theoretical investigations of diffusive combustion of plane supersonic hydrogen jets in hypersonic stream received with Navier-Stokes parabola equations closed by one-para metrical (k-l) model of turbulence and multiply staged mechanism of hydrogen oxidation are given. Combustion mechanisms depending on the operating parameters are discussing. The influences of air stream composition and ways off fuel feed to the length of ignition delay and level quantity of hydrogen bum-out have been defined. The calculated theoretical results of investigations permit to make the next conclusions: 1. The diffusive combustion of the system of plane supersonic hydrogen jets in hypersonic flow happens in the cellular structures with alternation zones of intensive running of chemical reactions with their inhibition zones. 2. Gas dynamic and heat Mach waves cause a large - scale viscous formation intensifying mixing of fuel with oxidizer. 3. The system ignition of plane supersonic hydrogen jets in hypersonic airy co-flow happens with the formation of normal flame front of hydrogen airy mixture with transition to the diffusive combustion. 4. The presence of active particles in the flow composition initiates the ignition of hydrogen - airy mixture, provides the intensive running of chemical reactions and shortens the length of ignition delay. 5. The supersonic combustion of hydrogel-airy mixture is characterized by two zones: the intensive chemical reactions with an active energy heat release is occurring in the first zone and in the second - a slow hydrogen combustion limited by the mixing of fuel with oxidizer. (author)

  18. Advanced nuclear turbojet powerplant characteristics summary for supersonic aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, John W.

    1959-01-01

    The estimated powerplant characteristics of an advanced nuclear powerplant intended for use in a nuclear supersonic manned airplane is contained in this report. This nuclear powerplant consists of a 575 MW, high temperature, lithium-cooled, solid fuel element-type reactor coupled to six turbojet engines especially designed for a supersonic nuclear airplane. The lithium coolant passes from the reactor at 2000F directly to the engine radiators without the use of an intermediate heat exchanger. The engines are fitted with burners enabling the thrust produced by the nuclear powerplant to be augmented by the use of chemical fuel for the take-off, transonic acceleration and landing portions of the flight. The powerplant components have been selected for a maximum thrust-to-weight ratio at Mach 3 and 55,000 feet altitude on nuclear heat only operation compromised for net thrust produced with chemical fuel augmentation during the transonic portion of flight. The power plant data presented, therefore, are primarily applicable to an all supersonic mission on nuclear heat alone. The powerplant data presented in this report are an extension of data contained in PWAC-243, 'NJ-14 All-Nuclear Supersonic Bomber Powerplant Characteristics Summary, March 11, 1958', to a higher reactor power. In addition, the engine compressor pressure ratio has been increased to improve transonic thrust characteristics. Weight data are tabulated for the 575 MW powerplant. The engine envelope based on preliminary radiator size estimates is illustrated. A liquid metal system flow schematic and piping data are included. Shield information including reactor shield outline, assumptions, weights, and direct dose pattern at 50 feet is also included. Estimated performance on nuclear heat only operation and nuclear heat plus burning is presented for an envelope of flight conditions.

  19. Supersonic plasma jet interaction with gases and plasmas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nicolai, P.; Stenz, C.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Ribeyre, X.; Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Juha, Libor; Krouský, Eduard; Mašek, Karel; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Rohlena, Karel; Skála, Jiří; Ullschmied, Jiří; Kálal, M.; Klír, D.; Kravárik, J.; Kubeš, P.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 322, 1-4 (2009), 11-17 ISSN 0004-640X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : supersonic plasma jet * laser experiment * shock Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.404, year: 2009

  20. Visualization of supersonic diesel fuel jets using a shadowgraph technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianthong, Kulachate; Behnia, Masud; Milton, Brian E.

    2001-04-01

    High-speed liquid jets have been widely used to cut or penetrate material. It has been recently conjectured that the characteristics of high-speed fuel jets may also be of benefit to engines requiring direct fuel injection into the combustion chamber. Important factors are combustion efficiency and emission control enhancement for better atomization. Fundamental studies of very high velocity liquid jets are therefore very important. The characteristics and behavior of supersonic liquid jets have been studied with the aid of a shadowgraph technique. The high-speed liquid jet (in the supersonic range) is generated by the use of a vertical, single stage powder gun. The performance of the launcher and its relation to the jet exit velocity, with a range of nozzle shapes, has been examined. This paper presents the visual evidence of supersonic diesel fuel jets (velocity around 2000 m/s) investigated by the shadowgraph method. An Argon jet has been used as a light source. With a rise time of 0.07 microseconds, light duration of 0.2 microseconds and the use of high speed Polaroid film, the shadowgraph method can effectively capture the hypersonic diesel fuel jet and its strong leading edge shock waves. This provides a clearer picture of each stage of the generation of hypersonic diesel fuel jets and makes the study of supersonic diesel fuel jet characteristics and the potential for auto-ignition possible. Also, in the experiment, a pressure relief section has been used to minimize the compressed air or blast wave ahead of the projectile. However, the benefit of using a pressure relief section in the design is not clearly known. To investigate this effect, additional experiments have been performed with the use of the shadowgraph method, showing the projectile leaving and traveling inside the nozzle at a velocity around 1100 m/s.

  1. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, A.; Fisch, N.J.

    2010-01-01

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  2. Tipping device for large components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guigon, J.P.; Beraudier, D.

    1984-01-01

    For large components machining as components of a pressurized water reactor, it is necessary to have means allowing to present them in a position determined with regard to the machine tool used. The aim of the invention is a tipping device which consists of a base resting on the ground, a support-table mounted on this base, moving in rotation with the aid of at least a pivot joint of which axis is horizontal and parallel to the table and a gear pivot allowing to get a very good precision for the orientation of the piece and a very good stability whatever the orientation may be. The output shaft pinion of the base meshes with a gear wheel segment fixed to the table structure. Safety straps fasten the table structure to the base, as they are secured by horizontal pins. The toe pins run in straight slot holes incorporated in base jaws. The table rotation may be controlled by a spring-loaded braking mechanism which acts on the pivot axis and can be released by a hydraulic jack. The hydraulic pressure is used to prevent motor operation, unless the brakes have been released [fr

  3. Tipping Points, Great and Small

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Foster

    2010-12-01

    The Forum by Jordan et al. [2010] addressed environmental problems of various scales in great detail, but getting the critical message through to the formulators of public policies requires going back to basics, namely, that exponential growth (of a population, an economy, or most anything else) is not sustainable. When have you heard any politician or economist from anywhere across the ideological spectrum say anything other than that more growth is essential? There is no need for computer models to demonstrate “limits to growth,” as was done in the 1960s. Of course, as one seeks more details, the complexity of modeling will rapidly outstrip the capabilities of both observation and computing. This is common with nonlinear systems, even simple ones. Thus, identifying all possible “tipping points,” as suggested by Jordan et al. [2010], and then stopping just short of them, is impractical if not impossible. The main thing needed to avoid environmental disasters is a bit of common sense.

  4. THE TURBULENT DYNAMO IN HIGHLY COMPRESSIBLE SUPERSONIC PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federrath, Christoph [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Schober, Jennifer [Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R. G., E-mail: christoph.federrath@anu.edu.au [Institut für Astrophysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-12-20

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024{sup 3} cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = ν/η = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm ≥ 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm{sub crit}=129{sub −31}{sup +43}, showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present and early universe, we conclude that magnetic fields need to be taken into account during structure formation from the early to the present cosmic ages, because they suppress gas fragmentation and drive powerful jets and outflows, both greatly affecting the initial mass function of stars.

  5. Data Quality Assurance for Supersonic Jet Noise Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford A.; Henderson, Brenda S.; Bridges, James E.

    2010-01-01

    The noise created by a supersonic aircraft is a primary concern in the design of future high-speed planes. The jet noise reduction technologies required on these aircraft will be developed using scale-models mounted to experimental jet rigs designed to simulate the exhaust gases from a full-scale jet engine. The jet noise data collected in these experiments must accurately predict the noise levels produced by the full-scale hardware in order to be a useful development tool. A methodology has been adopted at the NASA Glenn Research Center s Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory to insure the quality of the supersonic jet noise data acquired from the facility s High Flow Jet Exit Rig so that it can be used to develop future nozzle technologies that reduce supersonic jet noise. The methodology relies on mitigating extraneous noise sources, examining the impact of measurement location on the acoustic results, and investigating the facility independence of the measurements. The methodology is documented here as a basis for validating future improvements and its limitations are noted so that they do not affect the data analysis. Maintaining a high quality jet noise laboratory is an ongoing process. By carefully examining the data produced and continually following this methodology, data quality can be maintained and improved over time.

  6. Heat, mass and force flows in supersonic shockwave interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, John Michael

    There is no cost effective way to deliver a payload to space and, with rising fuel prices, currently the price to travel commercially is also becoming more prohibitive to the public. During supersonic flight, compressive shock waves form around the craft which could be harnessed to deliver an additional lift on the craft. Using a series of hanging plates below a lifting wing design, the total lift generated can be increased above conventional values, while still maintaining a similar lift-to-drag ratio. Here, we study some of the flows involved in supersonic shockwave interaction. This analysis uses ANSYS Fluent Computational Fluid Dynamics package as the modeler. Our findings conclude an increase of up to 30% lift on the modeled craft while maintaining the lift-to-drag profile of the unmodified lifting wing. The increase in lift when utilizing the shockwave interaction could increase transport weight and reduce fuel cost for space and commercial flight, as well as mitigating negative effects associated with supersonic travel.

  7. A model for supersonic and hypersonic impactors for nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abouali, Omid; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2005-01-01

    In this study the performance of supersonic and hypersonic impactors for collection efficiency of nanoparticles (in the size range of 2-100 nm) under various operating conditions is analyzed. Axisymmetric forms of the compressible Navier-Stokes and energy equations are solved and the airflow and thermal condition in the impactor are evaluated. A Lagrangian particle trajectory analysis procedure is used and the deposition rates of different size particles under various operating conditions are studied. For dilute particle concentrations, the assumption of one-way interaction is used and the effect of particles on gas flow field is ignored. The importance of drag, lift and Brownian forces on particle motions in supersonic impactors is discussed. Sensitivity of the simulation results to the use of different assumptions for the Cunningham correction coefficient is studied. It is shown that accurate evaluation of the gas mean free path and the Cunningham correction factor is important for accurate simulation of nano-particle transport and deposition in supersonic/hypersonic impactors. The computer simulation results are compared favorably with the available experimental data

  8. Velocity field measurements on high-frequency, supersonic microactuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreth, Phillip A.; Ali, Mohd Y.; Fernandez, Erik J.; Alvi, Farrukh S.

    2016-05-01

    The resonance-enhanced microjet actuator which was developed at the Advanced Aero-Propulsion Laboratory at Florida State University is a fluidic-based device that produces pulsed, supersonic microjets by utilizing a number of microscale, flow-acoustic resonance phenomena. The microactuator used in this study consists of an underexpanded source jet that flows into a cylindrical cavity with a single, 1-mm-diameter exhaust orifice through which an unsteady, supersonic jet issues at a resonant frequency of 7 kHz. The flowfields of a 1-mm underexpanded free jet and the microactuator are studied in detail using high-magnification, phase-locked flow visualizations (microschlieren) and two-component particle image velocimetry. These are the first direct measurements of the velocity fields produced by such actuators. Comparisons are made between the flow visualizations and the velocity field measurements. The results clearly show that the microactuator produces pulsed, supersonic jets with velocities exceeding 400 m/s for roughly 60 % of their cycles. With high unsteady momentum output, this type of microactuator has potential in a range of ow control applications.

  9. Hydrogen tube vehicle for supersonic transport: 2. Speed and energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Arnold R. [Vehicle Projects Inc and Supersonic Tubevehicle LLC, 200 Violet St, Suite 100, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The central concept of a new idea in high-speed transport is that operation of a vehicle in a hydrogen atmosphere, because of the low density of hydrogen, would increase sonic speed by a factor of 3.8 and decrease drag by 15 relative to air. A hydrogen atmosphere requires that the vehicle operate within a hydrogen-filled tube or pipeline, which serves as a phase separator. The supersonic tube vehicle (STV) can be supersonic with respect to air outside the tube while remaining subsonic inside. It breathes hydrogen fuel for its propulsion fuel cells from the tube itself. This paper, second in a series on the scientific foundations of the supersonic tube vehicle, tests the hypothesis that the STV will be simultaneously fast and energy efficient by comparing its predicted speed and energy consumption with that of four long-haul passenger transport modes: road, rail, maglev, and air. The study establishes the speed ranking STV >> airplane > maglev > train > coach (intercity bus) and the normalized energy consumption ranking Airplane >> coach > maglev > train > STV. Consistent with the hypothesis, the concept vehicle is both the fastest and lowest energy consuming mode. In theory, the vehicle can cruise at Mach 2.8 while consuming less than half the energy per passenger of a Boeing 747 at a cruise speed of Mach 0.81. (author)

  10. TEM observations of crack tip: cavity interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, J.A.; Ohr, S.M.; Jesser, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Crack tip-cavity interactions have been studied by performing room temperature deformation experiments in a transmission electron microscope on ion-irradiated type 316 stainless steel with small helium containing cavities. Slip dislocations emitted from a crack tip cut, sheared, and thereby elongated cavities without a volume enlargement. As the crack tip approached, a cavity volume enlargement occurred. Instead of the cavities continuing to enlarge until they touch, the walls between the cavities fractured. Fracture surface dimples do not correlate in size or density with these enlarged cavities

  11. General architecture of the alpha-helical globule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murzin, A G; Finkelstein, A V

    1988-12-05

    A model is presented for the arrangement of alpha-helices in globular proteins. In the model, helices are placed on certain ribs of "quasi-spherical" polyhedra. The polyhedra are chosen so as to allow the close packing of helices around a hydrophobic core and to stress the collective interactions of the individual helices. The model predicts a small set of stable architectures for alpha-helices in globular proteins and describes the geometries of the helix packings. Some of the predicted helix arrangements have already been observed in known protein structures; others are new. An analysis of the three-dimensional structures of all proteins for which co-ordinates are available shows that the model closely approximates the arrangements and packing of helices actually observed. The average deviations of the real helix axes from those in the model polyhedra is +/- 20 degrees in orientation and +/- 2 A in position (1 A = 0.1 nm). We also show that for proteins that are not homologous, but whose helix arrangements are described by the same polyhedron, the root-mean-square difference in the position of the C alpha atoms in the helices is 1.6 to 3.0 A.

  12. MAGNETIC HELICITY FLUX IN THE PRESENCE OF SHEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, Alexander; Brandenburg, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic helicity has risen to be a major player in dynamo theory, with the helicity of the small-scale field being linked to the dynamo saturation process for the large-scale field. It is a nearly conserved quantity, which allows its evolution equation to be written in terms of production and flux terms. The flux term can be decomposed in a variety of fashions. One particular contribution that has been expected to play a significant role in dynamos in the presence of mean shear was isolated by Vishniac and Cho. Magnetic helicity fluxes are explicitly gauge dependent however, and the correlations that have come to be called the Vishniac-Cho flux were determined in the Coulomb gauge, which turns out to be fraught with complications in shearing systems. While the fluxes of small-scale helicity are explicitly gauge dependent, their divergences can be gauge independent. We use this property to investigate magnetic helicity fluxes of the small-scale field through direct numerical simulations in a shearing-box system and find that in a numerically usable gauge the divergence of the small-scale helicity flux vanishes, while the divergence of the Vishniac-Cho flux remains finite. We attribute this seeming contradiction to the existence of horizontal fluxes of small-scale magnetic helicity with finite divergences.

  13. Magnetic Helicity Flux in the Presence of Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Alexander; Brandenburg, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic helicity has risen to be a major player in dynamo theory, with the helicity of the small-scale field being linked to the dynamo saturation process for the large-scale field. It is a nearly conserved quantity, which allows its evolution equation to be written in terms of production and flux terms. The flux term can be decomposed in a variety of fashions. One particular contribution that has been expected to play a significant role in dynamos in the presence of mean shear was isolated by Vishniac & Cho. Magnetic helicity fluxes are explicitly gauge dependent however, and the correlations that have come to be called the Vishniac-Cho flux were determined in the Coulomb gauge, which turns out to be fraught with complications in shearing systems. While the fluxes of small-scale helicity are explicitly gauge dependent, their divergences can be gauge independent. We use this property to investigate magnetic helicity fluxes of the small-scale field through direct numerical simulations in a shearing-box system and find that in a numerically usable gauge the divergence of the small-scale helicity flux vanishes, while the divergence of the Vishniac-Cho flux remains finite. We attribute this seeming contradiction to the existence of horizontal fluxes of small-scale magnetic helicity with finite divergences.

  14. Magnetic Helicities and Dynamo Action in Magneto-rotational Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodo, G.; Rossi, P. [INAF/Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Cattaneo, F. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago IL 60637 (United States); Mignone, A., E-mail: bodo@oato.inaf.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2017-07-10

    We examine the relationship between magnetic flux generation, taken as an indicator of large-scale dynamo action, and magnetic helicity, computed as an integral over the dynamo volume, in a simple dynamo. We consider dynamo action driven by magneto-rotational turbulence (MRT) within the shearing-box approximation. We consider magnetically open boundary conditions that allow a flux of helicity in or out of the computational domain. We circumvent the problem of the lack of gauge invariance in open domains by choosing a particular gauge—the winding gauge—that provides a natural interpretation in terms of the average winding number of pairwise field lines. We use this gauge precisely to define and measure the helicity and the helicity flux for several realizations of dynamo action. We find in these cases that the system as a whole does not break reflectional symmetry and that the total helicity remains small even in cases when substantial magnetic flux is generated. We find no particular connection between the generation of magnetic flux and the helicity or the helicity flux through the boundaries. We suggest that this result may be due to the essentially nonlinear nature of the dynamo processes in MRT.

  15. Jet arrays in supersonic crossflow — An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohd Yousuf; Alvi, Farrukh

    2015-12-01

    Jet injection into a supersonic crossflow is a classical fluid dynamics problem with many engineering applications. Several experimental and numerical studies have been taken up to analyze the interaction of a single jet with the incoming crossflow. However, there is a dearth of the literature on the interaction of multiple jets with one another and with the crossflow. Jets in a supersonic crossflow are known to produce a three-dimensional bow-shock structure due to the blockage of the flow. Multiple jets in a streamwise linear array interact with both one another and the incoming supersonic flow. In this paper, a parametric study is carried out to analyze the effect of microjet (sub-mm diameter) injection in a Mach 1.5 supersonic crossflow using flow visualization and velocity field measurements. The variation of the microjet orifice diameter and spacing within an array is used to study the three-dimensional nature of the flow field around the jets. The strength of the microjet-generated shock, scaling of the shock wave angle with the momentum coefficient, averaged streamwise, spanwise, and cross-stream velocity fields, and microjet array trajectories are detailed in the paper. It was found that shock angles of the microjet-generated shocks scale with the momentum coefficient for the three actuator configurations tested. As the microjets issue in the crossflow, a pair of longitudinal counter-rotating vortices (CVPs) are formed. The vortex pairs remain coherent for arrays with larger spanwise spacing between the micro-orifices and exhibit significant three-dimensionality similar to that of a single jet in crossflow. As the spacing between the jets is reduced, the CVPs merge resulting in a more two-dimensional flow field. The bow shock resulting from microjet injection also becomes nearly two-dimensional as the spacing between the micro-orifices is reduced. Trajectory estimations yield that microjets in an array have similar penetration as single jets. A notional

  16. High-n helicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, N.; Cheng, C.Z.; Okamoto, M.

    1992-05-01

    The high-n Helicity-induced shear Alfven Eigenmodes (HAE) are considered both analytically and numerically for the straight helical magnetic system, where n is the toroidal mode number. The eigenmode equation for the high-n HAE modes is derived along the field line and with the aid of the averaging method is shown to reduce to the Mathieu equation asymptotically. The discrete HAE modes are shown to exist inside the continuum spectrum gaps. The continuous spectrum gaps appear around ω 2 = ω A 2 [N(lι-m)/2] 2 for N = 1,2,.., where ω A is the toroidal Alfven transit frequency, and l, m, and ι are the polarity of helical coils, the toroidal pitch number of helical coils, and the rotational transform, respectively. For the same ω A and ι, the frequency of the helical continuum gap is larger than that of the continuum gap in tokamak plasmas by |l-ι -1 m|. The polarity of helical coils l plays a crucial role in determining the spectrum gaps and the properties of the high-n HAE modes. The spectrum gaps near the magnetic axis are created by the helical ripple with circular flux surfaces for l = 1, and ≥ 3 helicals. For l = 2 helical systems, the spectrum gaps are created by the ellipticity of the flux surfaces. These analytical results for the continuum gaps and the existence of the high-n HAE modes in the continuum gaps are confirmed numerically for the l = 2 case, and we find that the HAE modes exist for mode structures with the even and the odd parities. (author)

  17. Progress Toward Analytic Predictions of Supersonic Hydrocarbon-Air Combustion: Computation of Ignition Times and Supersonic Mixing Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Scott Michael

    Combustion in scramjet engines is faced with the limitation of brief residence time in the combustion chamber, requiring fuel and preheated air streams to mix and ignite in a matter of milliseconds. Accurate predictions of autoignition times are needed to design reliable supersonic combustion chambers. Most efforts in estimating non-premixed autoignition times have been devoted to hydrogen-air mixtures. The present work addresses hydrocarbon-air combustion, which is of interest for future scramjet engines. Computation of ignition in supersonic flows requires adequate characterization of ignition chemistry and description of the flow, both of which are derived in this work. In particular, we have shown that activation energy asymptotics combined with a previously derived reduced chemical kinetic mechanism provides analytic predictions of autoignition times in homogeneous systems. Results are compared with data from shock tube experiments, and previous expressions which employ a fuel depletion criterion. Ignition in scramjet engines has a strong dependence on temperature, which is found by perturbing the chemically frozen mixing layer solution. The frozen solution is obtained here, accounting for effects of viscous dissipation between the fuel and air streams. We investigate variations of thermodynamic and transport properties, and compare these to simplified mixing layers which neglect these variations. Numerically integrating the mixing layer problem reveals a nonmonotonic temperature profile, with a peak occurring inside the shear layer for sufficiently high Mach numbers. These results will be essential in computation of ignition distances in supersonic combustion chambers.

  18. Radiation Field of a Square, Helical Beam Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans Lottrup

    1952-01-01

    square helices are used. Further, in connection with corresponding rigorous formulas for the field from a circular, helical antenna with a uniformly progressing current wave of constant amplitude the present formulas may be used for an investigation of the magnitude of the error introduced in Kraus......' approximate calculation of the field from a circular, helical antenna by replacing this antenna with an ``equivalent'' square helix. This investigation is carried out by means of a numerical example. The investigation shows that Kraus' approximate method of calculation yields results in fair agreement...

  19. Theoretical modeling of transport barriers in helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, S.; Itoh, K.; Ohyabu, N.

    2008-10-01

    A unified transport modelling to explain electron Internal Transport Barriers (e-ITB) in helical plasmas and Internal Diffusion Barriers (IDB) observed in Large Helical Device (LHD) is proposed. The e-ITB can be predicted with the effect of zonal flows to obtain the e-ITB in the low collisional regime when the radial variation of the particle anomalous diffusivity is included. Transport analysis in this article can newly show that the particle fuelling induces the IDB formation when this unified transport modelling is used in the high collisional regime. The density limit for the IDB in helical plasmas is also examined including the effect of the radiation loss. (author)

  20. Drift mode calculations for the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rewoldt, G.; Ku, L.-P.; Tang, W.M.; Sugama, H.; Nakajima, N.; Watanabe, K.Y.; Murakami, S.; Yamada, H.; Cooper, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    A fully kinetic assessment of the stability properties of toroidal drift modes has been obtained for a case for the Large Helical Device (LHD) [A.Iiyoshi, et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 1998, Nucl.Fusion 39, 1245 (1999)]. This calculation retains the important effects in the linearized gyrokinetic equation, using the lowest-order ''ballooning representation'' for high toroidal mode number instabilities in the electrostatic limit. Results for toroidal drift waves destabilized by trapped particle dynamics and ion temperature gradients are presented, using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics equilibria reconstructed from experimental measurements. The effects of helically-trapped particles and helical curvature are investigated

  1. Experimental Evidence of Helical Flow in Porous Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2015-01-01

    Helical flow leads to deformation of solute plumes and enhances transverse mixing in porous media. We present experiments in which macroscopic helical flow is created by arranging different materials to obtain an anisotropic macroscopic permeability tensor with spatially variable orientation....... The resulting helical flow entails twisting streamlines which cause a significant increase in lateral mass exchange and thus a large enhancement of plume dilution (up to 235%) compared to transport in homogenous media. The setup may be used to effectively mix solutes in parallel streams similarly to static...... mixers, but in porous media....

  2. Linear local stability of electrostatic drift modes in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, O.; Nakajima, N.; Sugama, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the stability of the drift wave in helical systems. For this purpose, we solve the linear local gyrokinetic-Poisson equation, in the electrostatic regime. As a model of helical plasmas, Large helical Device (LHD) is considered. The equation we apply is rather exact in the framework of linear gyrokinetic theory, where only the approximation is the ballooning representation. In this paper, we consider only collisionless cases. All the frequency regime can be naturally reated without any assumptions, and in such cases, ion temperature gradient modes (ITG), trapped electron modes (TEM), and electron temperature gradient modes (ETG) are expected to become unstable linearly independently. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic Helical Micro- and Nanorobots: Toward Their Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Famin Qiu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic helical micro- and nanorobots can perform 3D navigation in various liquids with a sub-micrometer precision under low-strength rotating magnetic fields (<10 mT. Since magnetic fields with low strengths are harmless to cells and tissues, magnetic helical micro/nanorobots are promising tools for biomedical applications, such as minimally invasive surgery, cell manipulation and analysis, and targeted therapy. This review provides general information on magnetic helical micro/nanorobots, including their fabrication, motion control, and further functionalization for biomedical applications.

  4. Sleep Tips: 7 Steps to Better Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn every night. Consider simple tips for better sleep, from setting a sleep schedule to including physical activity in your daily ... factors that can interfere with a good night's sleep — from work stress and family responsibilities to unexpected ...

  5. Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips for Taking Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association. There are many benefits to regular physical activity. ... if diabetes testing is appropriate for you. The American Diabetes Association recommends blood glucose screening if: You're age ...

  6. Tips to Help You Get Active

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Step in the Right Direction Tips to Help You Get Active View or Print All Sections ... and quality of life. Being more active may help you manage your weight. Starting Physical Activity Healthy ...

  7. Brain Injury Safety Tips and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... submit" name="commit" type="submit" value="Submit" /> Brain Injury Safety Tips and Prevention Recommend on Facebook ... not grass or dirt. More HEADS UP Video: Brain Injury Safety and Prevention frame support disabled and/ ...

  8. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: About Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is a serious disease. It means that one's blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Having too much glucose in a person's blood is not healthy. This paper offers tips for managing diabetes.

  9. Daily Tips for Good Oral Hygiene

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this article Daily Tips for Good Oral Hygiene Bacteria can live in your mouth in the form of plaque, causing cavities and gingivitis, which can lead to periodontal (gum) disease. In order to keep your mouth ...

  10. Impetigo: Tips for Treatment and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DO Videos Contact Close ‹ Back to Healthy Living Impetigo: Tips for Treatment and Prevention The symptoms of ... to other parts of their bodies. Causes of Impetigo Impetigo usually affects preschool and school-aged children, ...

  11. Can't sleep? Try these tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000853.htm Can't sleep? Try these tips To use the ... you get the rest you need. What you can do Some people have trouble falling asleep. Others ...

  12. Four Medication Safety Tips for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates 4 Medication Safety Tips for Older Adults Share Tweet ... you are experiencing could be due to medications. 4. Review Medications with Your Health Care Provider Ideally, ...

  13. Essential Outdoor Sun Safety Tips for Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weekend Warriors expand/collapse Vitamin D Essential Outdoor Sun Safety Tips for Winter Winter sports enthusiasts are ... skiing! Be Mindful of Time Spent in the Sun, Regardless of the Season If possible, ski early ...

  14. 6 Tips: IBS and Complementary Health Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health practice for IBS, here are 6 tips: Hypnotherapy (hypnosis). This practice involves the power of suggestion by ... IBS. According to reviews of the scientific literature, hypnotherapy may be a helpful treatment for managing IBS ...

  15. Compressor airfoil tip clearance optimization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, David A.; Pu, Zhengxiang

    2015-08-18

    A compressor airfoil tip clearance optimization system for reducing a gap between a tip of a compressor airfoil and a radially adjacent component of a turbine engine is disclosed. The turbine engine may include ID and OD flowpath boundaries configured to minimize compressor airfoil tip clearances during turbine engine operation in cooperation with one or more clearance reduction systems that are configured to move the rotor assembly axially to reduce tip clearance. The configurations of the ID and OD flowpath boundaries enhance the effectiveness of the axial movement of the rotor assembly, which includes movement of the ID flowpath boundary. During operation of the turbine engine, the rotor assembly may be moved axially to increase the efficiency of the turbine engine.

  16. Tips for Older Dietary Supplement Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information for Consumers Tips for Older Dietary Supplement Users Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... site are provided as a service to our users and do not represent FDA endorsement of these ...

  17. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, A.R.; Stanley, A.J.; Vijayananthan, A.; Moss, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    The creation of an intrahepatic portosystemic shunt via a transjugular approach (TIPS) is an interventional radiological procedure used to treat the complications of portal hypertension. TIPS insertion is principally indicated to prevent or arrest variceal bleeding when medical or endoscopic treatments fail, and in the management refractory ascites. This review discusses the development and execution of the technique, with focus on its clinical efficacy. Patient selection, imaging surveillance, revision techniques, and complications are also discussed.

  18. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, A.R. [Department of Radiology, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Melbourne (Australia)], E-mail: andrewowen@doctors.org.uk; Stanley, A.J. [Department of Gastroenterology, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Vijayananthan, A. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Moss, J.G. [Department of Radiology, Gartnavel General Hospital, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    The creation of an intrahepatic portosystemic shunt via a transjugular approach (TIPS) is an interventional radiological procedure used to treat the complications of portal hypertension. TIPS insertion is principally indicated to prevent or arrest variceal bleeding when medical or endoscopic treatments fail, and in the management refractory ascites. This review discusses the development and execution of the technique, with focus on its clinical efficacy. Patient selection, imaging surveillance, revision techniques, and complications are also discussed.

  19. Superconducting phase transition in STM tips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jaeck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany); Kern, Klaus [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    The superconducting properties of systems with dimensions comparable to the London penetration depth considerably differ from macroscopic systems. We have studied the superconducting phase transition of vanadium STM tips in external magnetic fields. Employing Maki's theory we extract the superconducting parameters such as the gap or the Zeeman splitting from differential conductance spectra. While the Zeeman splitting follows the theoretical description of a system with s=1/2 and g=2, the superconducting gaps as well as the critical fields depend on the specific tip. For a better understanding of the experimental results, we solve a one dimensional Usadel equation modeling the superconducting tip as a cone with the opening angle α in an external magnetic field. We find that only a small region at the apex of the tip is superconducting in high magnetic fields and that the order of the phase transition is directly determined by α. Further, the spectral broadening increases with α indicating an intrinsic broadening mechanism due to the conical shape of the tip. Comparing these calculations to our experimental results reveals the order of the superconducting phase transition of the STM tips.

  20. Design study of a normal conducting helical snake for AGS

    CERN Document Server

    Takano, Junpei; Okamura, Masahiro; Roser, Thomas; MacKay, William W; Luccio, Alfredo U; Takano, Koji

    2004-01-01

    A new normal conducting snake magnet is being fabricated for the Alternate Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) project, a superconducting type helical dipole magnets had been developed and it performed successfully in high-energy polarized proton acceleration. The new AGS helical snake has the same basic magnetic structure but is more complicated. To achieve no beam shift and no beam deflection in one magnetic device, helical pitches and rotating angles were carefully calculated. Compared to a superconducting magnet, a normal warm magnet must have a large cross- sectional area of conductors which make it difficult to design a magnet with large helical pitch. We developed a modified window frame structure to accommodate the large number of conductors. Its three dimensional magnetic field was simulated by using OPERA3D/TOSCA. 3 Refs.

  1. A 3D printed helical antenna with integrated lens

    KAUST Repository

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad; Shamim, Atif

    2015-01-01

    A novel antenna configuration comprising a helical antenna with an integrated lens is demonstrated in this work. The antenna is manufactured by a unique combination of 3D printing of plastic material (ABS) and inkjet printing of silver nano

  2. Particle orbit analysis for LHD helical axis configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Yamazaki, K.; Motojima, O.

    1993-04-01

    Fast ion orbits for helical magnetic axis configurations in LHD (Large Helical Device) are analyzed and compared with the standard circular axis case. Boundaries between passing and helically trapped particle regions show clear differences: in the non-planar axis case the helically trapped region spreads, near the magnetic axis, over a much wider band across the 90deg pitch angle value and shows a very marked asymmetry. The locally trapped particle region is also wider than in the standard case. The differences in the loss cone boundaries of the two cases are rather small, however, the effects of re-entering criteria are very important in both cases. On the contrary, effects of finite coil size are not significant. (author)

  3. Metallic and 3D-printed dielectric helical terahertz waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Dominik Walter; Anthony, Jessienta; Leonhardt, Rainer

    2015-12-28

    We investigate guidance of Terahertz (THz) radiation in metallic and 3D-printed dielectric helical waveguides in the frequency range from 0.2 to 1 THz. Our experimental results obtained from THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) measurements are in very good agreement with finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. We observe single-mode, low loss and low dispersive propagation of THz radiation in metallic helical waveguides over a broad bandwidth. The 3D-printed dielectric helical waveguides have substantially extended the bandwidth of a low loss dielectric tube waveguide as observed from the experimental and simulation results. The high flexibility of the helical design allows an easy incorporation into bench top THz devices.

  4. Helical-axis stellarators with noninterlocking planar coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, A.; Boozer, A.

    1983-08-01

    The properties of helical axis stellarator fields generated by unlinked, planar coils are described. It is shown that such fields can have a magnetic well and large rotational transform, implying large equilibrium and stability beta limits

  5. Helical-axis stellarators with noninterlocking planar coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, A.; Boozer, A.

    1983-08-01

    The properties of helical axis stellarator fields generated by unlinked, planar coils are described. It is shown that such fields can have a magnetic well and large rotational transform, implying large equilibrium and stability beta limits.

  6. Energy and helicity of magnetic torus knots and braids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberti, Chiara; Ricca, Renzo L.

    2018-02-01

    By considering steady magnetic fields in the shape of torus knots and unknots in ideal magnetohydrodynamics, we compute some fundamental geometric and physical properties to provide estimates for magnetic energy and helicity. By making use of an appropriate parametrization, we show that knots with dominant toroidal coils that are a good model for solar coronal loops have negligible total torsion contribution to magnetic helicity while writhing number provides a good proxy. Hence, by the algebraic definition of writhe based on crossing numbers, we show that the estimated values of writhe based on image analysis provide reliable information for the exact values of helicity. We also show that magnetic energy is linearly related to helicity, and the effect of the confinement of magnetic field can be expressed in terms of geometric information. These results can find useful application in solar and plasma physics, where braided structures are often present.

  7. Investigation into the heat transfer performance of helically ribbed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firth, R.J.

    1981-12-01

    The first part of an investigation into flow and heat transfer in annular channels and seven pin clusters is described. One of the main aims of the project is to improve cluster heat transfer prediction codes for helically ribbed surfaces. A study is made of the heat transfer and flow characteristics of a helically ribbed pin in an annular channel. It is shown that the swirling flow, which is induced by the helical ribs, gives rise to substantially enhanced diffusivity levels. This phenomenon had not been taken into account by previous analysis techniques. The methods for analysing heat transfer and pressure drop data from annular channels which were originally developed for non-swirling flow are generalised to accommodate swirling flow. The new methods are shown to be consistent with empirical data. Roughness parameter data is presented for helically ribbed surfaces with an axial rib pitch into height ratio of about 7. (author)

  8. Interaction of 18-residue peptides derived from amphipathic helical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhsudhan

    interaction of proteins and peptides with membranes (Segrest ... favour surface activity have been described by Eisenberg et ... amphipathicity and propensity for α-helical conformation ..... Membrane destabilisation occurs due to electrostatic.

  9. Energy fluxes in helical magnetohydrodynamics and dynamo action

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kinetic and magnetic helicities do not affect the renormalized parameters, ... Generation of magnetic field in plasma, usually referred to as 'dynamo', is one of the ..... energy fluxes for the inertial-range wave numbers where the same power.

  10. Acute pulmonary embolism in helical computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paslawski, M.

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common condition in which diagnostic and therapeutic delays contribute to substantial morbidity and mortality. Clinical diagnosis is difficult because the signs and symptoms re unspecific, and a differential diagnosis is extensive, including pneumonia or bronchitis, asthma, myocardial infraction, pulmonary edema, anxiety, dissection of the aorta, pericardial tamponade, lung cancer, primary pulmonary hypertension, rib fracture, and pneumothorax. The purpose of the study was to present the use of CT in diagnosing acute pulmonary embolism. A group of 23 patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism underwent CT examination with a helical CT scanner (Somatom Emotion, Siemens) before and after administration of 150 ml of Ultravist. Pulmonary embolism was found in the CT examinations of 13 patients. In two of these it was a central filling defect. Amputation of the artery was found in one. Parietal filling defect in three patients formed an acute angle with the vessel walls. Saddle emboli appearing as filling defects in the contrast column that hung over vessel bifurcations was found in two patients. In five patients,emboli were found in small segmental arteries. CT provides information not only on the pulmonary arteries, but also on the lung parenchyma, hila, mediastinum, and the heart. Alternative findings may be identified by CT chest examination, stablishing alternative diagnoses, including pulmonary disorders (such as pneumonia or fibrosis), pleural abnormalities, and cardiovascular disease (such as aortic dissection or pericardial tamponade). Another advantage of the CT is its widespread availability.(author)

  11. Polymer dynamics driven by a helical filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balin, Andrew; Shendruk, Tyler; Zoettl, Andreas; Yeomans, Julia

    Microbial flagellates typically inhabit complex suspensions of extracellular polymeric material which can impact the swimming speed of motile microbes, filter-feeding of sessile cells, and the generation of biofilms. There is currently a need to better understand how the fundamental dynamics of polymers near active cells or flagella impacts these various phenomena. We study the hydrodynamic and steric influence of a rotating helical filament on suspended polymers using Stokesian Dynamics simulations. Our results show that as a stationary rotating helix pumps fluid along its long axis, nearby polymers migrate radially inwards and are elongated in the process. We observe that the actuation of the helix tends to increase the probability of finding polymeric material within its pervaded volume. At larger Weissenberg numbers, this accumulation of polymers within the vicinity of the helix is greater. Further, we have analysed the stochastic work performed by the helix on the polymers and we show that this quantity is positive on average and increases with polymer contour length. Our results provide a basis for understanding the microscopic interactions that govern cell dynamics in complex media. This work was supported through funding from the ERC Advanced Grant 291234 MiCE and we acknowledge EMBO funding to TNS (ALTF181-2013).

  12. Electronic Band Structure of Helical Polyisocyanides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Benoît; Liégeois, Vincent; Fripiat, Joseph G; Harris, Frank E

    2017-10-19

    Restricted Hartree-Fock computations are reported for a methyl isocyanide polymer (repeating unit -C═N-CH 3 ), whose most stable conformation is expected to be a helical chain. The computations used a standard contracted Gaussian orbital set at the computational levels STO-3G, 3-21G, 6-31G, and 6-31G**, and studies were made for two line-group configurations motivated by earlier work and by studies of space-filling molecular models: (1) A structure of line-group symmetry L9 5 , containing a 9-fold screw axis with atoms displaced in the axial direction by 5/9 times the lattice constant, and (2) a structure of symmetry L4 1 that had been proposed, containing a 4-fold screw axis with translation by 1/4 of the lattice constant. Full use of the line-group symmetry was employed to cause most of the computational complexity to depend only on the size of the asymmetric repeating unit. Data reported include computed bond properties, atomic charge distribution, longitudinal polarizability, band structure, and the convoluted density of states. Most features of the description were found to be insensitive to the level of computational approximation. The work also illustrates the importance of exploiting line-group symmetry to extend the range of polymer structural problems that can be treated computationally.

  13. Pulmonary artery aneurysm in Bechcet's disease: helical computed tomography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, J.; Caballero, P.; Olivera, M. J.; Cajal, M. L.; Caniego, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a vasculitis of unknown etiology that affects arteries and veins of different sizes and can be associated with pulmonary artery aneurysms. We report the case of a patient with Behcet's disease and a pulmonary artery aneurysm who was studied by means of plain chest X ray, helical computed tomography and pulmonary arteriography. Helical computed tomography is a reliable technique for the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. (Author) 9 refs

  14. ADDITIVE SELF-HELICITY AS A KINK MODE THRESHOLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malanushenko, A.; Longcope, D. W.; Fan, Y.; Gibson, S. E.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose that additive self-helicity, introduced by Longcope and Malanushenko, plays a role in the kink instability for complex equilibria, similar to twist helicity for thin flux tubes. We support this hypothesis by a calculation of additive self-helicity of a twisted flux tube from the simulation of Fan and Gibson. As more twist gets introduced, the additive self-helicity increases, and the kink instability of the tube coincides with the drop of additive self-helicity, after the latter reaches the value of H A /Φ 2 ∼ 1.5 (where Φ is the flux of the tube and H A is the additive self-helicity). We compare the additive self-helicity to twist for a thin subportion of the tube to illustrate that H A /Φ 2 is equal to the twist number, studied by Berger and Field, when the thin flux tube approximation is applicable. We suggest that the quantity H A /Φ 2 could be treated as a generalization of a twist number, when the thin flux tube approximation is not applicable. A threshold on a generalized twist number might prove extremely useful studying complex equilibria, just as the twist number itself has proven useful studying idealized thin flux tubes. We explicitly describe a numerical method for calculating additive self-helicity, which includes an algorithm for identifying a domain occupied by a flux bundle and a method of calculating potential magnetic field confined to this domain. We also describe a numerical method to calculate twist of a thin flux tube, using a frame parallelly transported along the axis of the tube.

  15. Design windows and cost analysis on helical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozaki, Y.; Imagawa, S.; Sagara, A.

    2007-01-01

    The LHD type helical reactors are characterized by a large major radius but slender helical coil, which give us different approaches for power plants from tokamak reactors. For searching design windows of helical reactors and discussing their potential as power plants, we have developed a mass-cost estimating model linked with system design code (HeliCos), thorough studying the relationships between major plasma parameters and reactor parameters, and weight of major components. In regard to cost data we have much experience through preparing ITER construction. To compare the weight and cost of magnet systems between tokamak and helical reactors, we broke down magnet systems and cost factors, such as weights of super conducting strands, conduits, support structures, and winding unit costs, through estimating ITER cost data basis. Based on FFHR2m1 deign we considered a typical 3 GWth helical plant (LHD type) with the same magnet size, coil major radius Rc 14 m, magnetic energy 120 GJ, but increasing plasma densities. We evaluated the weight and cost of magnet systems of 3 GWth helical plant, the total magnet weights of 16,000ton and costs of 210 BYen, which are similar values of tokamak reactors (10,200 ton, 110 BYen in ITER 2002 report, and 21,900 ton, 275 BYen in ITER FDR1999). The costs of strands and winding occupy 70% of total magnet costs, and influence entire power plants economics. The design windows analysis and comparative economics studies to optimize the main reactor parameters have been carried out. Economics studies show that it is misunderstanding to consider helical coils are too large and too expensive to achieve power plants. But we should notice that the helical reactor design windows and economics are very sensitive to allowable blanket space (depend on ergodic layer conditions) and diverter configuration for decreasing heat loads. (orig.)

  16. Tokamak startup using point-source dc helicity injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, D J; Bongard, M W; Fonck, R J; Redd, A J; Sontag, A C

    2009-06-05

    Startup of a 0.1 MA tokamak plasma is demonstrated on the ultralow aspect ratio Pegasus Toroidal Experiment using three localized, high-current density sources mounted near the outboard midplane. The injected open field current relaxes via helicity-conserving magnetic turbulence into a tokamaklike magnetic topology where the maximum sustained plasma current is determined by helicity balance and the requirements for magnetic relaxation.

  17. Comparison between helical computed tomography angiography and intraoperative findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abijit Shetty

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Helical CT is important in delineating the arterial, venous, and ureteral anatomy and can show the important incidental findings. Left renal donors and males have more variations in their renal anatomy. Technically challenging laparoscopic nephrectomy on the multiple-vessel-side donor is possible with the aid of helical CT. The importance of the CT in evaluating donor renal anatomy for a technically challenging laparoscopic donor nephrectomy is commendable.

  18. Scale Dependence of Magnetic Helicity in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Balogh, Andre; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    We determine the magnetic helicity, along with the magnetic energy, at high latitudes using data from the Ulysses mission. The data set spans the time period from 1993 to 1996. The basic assumption of the analysis is that the solar wind is homogeneous. Because the solar wind speed is high, we follow the approach first pioneered by Matthaeus et al. by which, under the assumption of spatial homogeneity, one can use Fourier transforms of the magnetic field time series to construct one-dimensional spectra of the magnetic energy and magnetic helicity under the assumption that the Taylor frozen-in-flow hypothesis is valid. That is a well-satisfied assumption for the data used in this study. The magnetic helicity derives from the skew-symmetric terms of the three-dimensional magnetic correlation tensor, while the symmetric terms of the tensor are used to determine the magnetic energy spectrum. Our results show a sign change of magnetic helicity at wavenumber k approximately equal to 2AU(sup -1) (or frequency nu approximately equal to 2 microHz) at distances below 2.8AU and at k approximately equal to 30AU(sup -1) (or nu approximately equal to 25 microHz) at larger distances. At small scales the magnetic helicity is positive at northern heliographic latitudes and negative at southern latitudes. The positive magnetic helicity at small scales is argued to be the result of turbulent diffusion reversing the sign relative to what is seen at small scales at the solar surface. Furthermore, the magnetic helicity declines toward solar minimum in 1996. The magnetic helicity flux integrated separately over one hemisphere amounts to about 10(sup 45) Mx(sup 2) cycle(sup -1) at large scales and to a three times lower value at smaller scales.

  19. Double linearization theory applied to three-dimensional cascades oscillating under supersonic axial flow condition. Choonsoku jikuryu sokudo de sadosuru sanjigen shindo yokuretsu no niju senkei riron ni yoru hiteijo kukiryoku kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshimitsu, K; Nanba, M [Kgushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Iwai, S [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1993-11-25

    In order to examine the aerodynamic characteristics of a supersonic axial flow turbofan realizing flight of Mach number of 2-5, the double linearization theory was applied to a three dimensional oscillation cascade accompanying a steady load in a supersonic axial flow condition and unsteady pneumatic force and aerodynamic unstability of oscillation were studied. Moreover, the values based on the strip theory and the three-dimensional theory were comparatively evaluated. Fundamental assumptions were such that the order of steady and unsteady perturbation satisfies the holding condition of the double linearization thory in a supersonic-and equi-entropy flow of non-viscous perfect gas. The numerical calculation assumed parabolic distributions of camber and thickness in the blade shape. As a result, the strip theory prediction agreed well with the value given by the three-dimensional theory in the steady blade-plane pressure difference and in the work of an unsteady pneumatic force, showing its validity. Among the steady load components of angle of attack, camber and thickness, the component of camber whose absolute value is large has the strongest effect on the total work. The distribution reduced in the angle of attack and camber from hub toward tip gives a large and stable flutter margin. 5 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Concept and development of measurement method of time sensitivity profile (TSP) in X-ray CT. Comparison of non-helical, single-slice helical, and multi-slice helical scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujioka, Katsumi; Ida, Yoshihiro; Ohtsubo, Hironori; Takahashi, Yasukata; Niwa, Masayoshi

    2000-01-01

    We focused on the time element contained in a single CT image, and devised the concept of a time-sensitivity profile (TSP) describing how the time element is translated into an image. We calculated the data collection time range when the helical pitch is changed in non helical scans, single slice helical scans, and multi slice helical scans. We then calculated the time sensitivity profile (TSP) from the weighting applied when the data collection time range is translated into an image. TSP was also measured for each scanning method using our self-made moving phantom. TSPs obtained from the calculation and the experiments were very close. TSP showed interesting characteristics with each scanning method, especially in the case of multi slice helical scanning, in which TSP became shorter as helical pitch increased. We referred to the TSP's FWHM as the effective scanning time. When we conducted multi slice helical scanning at helical pitch 3, the effective scanning time increased to about 24% longer than that of a non helical scan. When we conducted multi slice helical scanning at helical pitch 5 or 6, the effective scanning time was about half that of a non helical scan. The time sensitivity profile (TSP) is a totally new concept that we consider an important element in discussing the time resolution of a CT scanner. The results of this review will provide significant data in determining the scanning parameters when scanning a moving object. (author)

  1. Effect of delta wing on the particle flow in a novel gas supersonic separator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, Chuang; Yang, Yan; Walther, Jens Honore

    2016-01-01

    The present work presents numerical simulations of the complex particle motion in a supersonic separator with a delta wing located in the supersonic flow. The effect of the delta wing on the strong swirling flow is analysed using the Discrete Particle Method. The results show that the delta wings...

  2. TIPS Evaluation Project Retrospective Study: Wave 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Susan M.; Mulvey, Kevin P.

    2003-01-01

    Measured substance abuse treatment professionals' knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding the Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) series and the 28 TIPs. Results for 3,267 respondents in wave 1 and 1,028 in wave 2 indicate that almost half of all professionals were aware of the TIPs. Attitudes toward TIPs were positive, but professionals…

  3. Unsteady Flow in a Supersonic Turbine with Variable Specific Heats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Griffin, Lisa W.; Huber, Frank; Sondak, Douglas L.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Modern high-work turbines can be compact, transonic, supersonic, counter-rotating, or use a dense drive gas. The vast majority of modern rocket turbine designs fall into these Categories. These turbines usually have large temperature variations across a given stage, and are characterized by large amounts of flow unsteadiness. The flow unsteadiness can have a major impact on the turbine performance and durability. For example, the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) fuel turbine, a high work, transonic design, was found to have an unsteady inter-row shock which reduced efficiency by 2 points and increased dynamic loading by 24 percent. The Revolutionary Reusable Technology Turbopump (RRTT), which uses full flow oxygen for its drive gas, was found to shed vortices with such energy as to raise serious blade durability concerns. In both cases, the sources of the problems were uncovered (before turbopump testing) with the application of validated, unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to the designs. In the case of the RRTT and the Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) turbines, the unsteady CFD codes have been used not just to identify problems, but to guide designs which mitigate problems due to unsteadiness. Using unsteady flow analyses as a part of the design process has led to turbine designs with higher performance (which affects temperature and mass flow rate) and fewer dynamics problems. One of the many assumptions made during the design and analysis of supersonic turbine stages is that the values of the specific heats are constant. In some analyses the value is based on an average of the expected upstream and downstream temperatures. In stages where the temperature can vary by 300 to 500 K, however, the assumption of constant fluid properties may lead to erroneous performance and durability predictions. In this study the suitability of assuming constant specific heats has been investigated by performing three-dimensional unsteady Navier

  4. Effect of Axisymmetric Aft Wall Angle Cavity in Supersonic Flow Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyakumar, S.; Assis, Shan M.; Jayaraman, K.

    2018-03-01

    Cavity plays a significant role in scramjet combustors to enhance mixing and flame holding of supersonic streams. In this study, the characteristics of axisymmetric cavity with varying aft wall angles in a non-reacting supersonic flow field are experimentally investigated. The experiments are conducted in a blow-down type supersonic flow facility. The facility consists of a supersonic nozzle followed by a circular cross sectional duct. The axisymmetric cavity is incorporated inside the duct. Cavity aft wall is inclined with two consecutive angles. The performance of the aft wall cavities are compared with rectangular cavity. Decreasing aft wall angle reduces the cavity drag due to the stable flow field which is vital for flame holding in supersonic combustor. Uniform mixing and gradual decrease in stagnation pressure loss can be achieved by decreasing the cavity aft wall angle.

  5. Fan Noise for a Concept Commercial Supersonic Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, David

    2017-01-01

    NASA is currently studying a commercial supersonic transport (CST) aircraft that could carry 35+ passengers at Mach 1.6+ with a 4000+nm range. The aircraft should also meet environmental goals for sonic boom, airport noise and emissions at cruise. With respect to airport noise, considerable effort has been put into predicting the noise due to the jet exhaust. This report describes an internal NASA effort to consider the contribution of fan noise to the overall engine noise of this class of aircraft.

  6. CFD investigations on supersonic ejectors for refrigeration applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartosiewicz, Y.; Aidoun, Z.; Mercadier, Y.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents numerical results of a supersonic ejector for refrigeration applications. One of the interesting features is that the current model is based on the NIST properties for the R142b refrigerant: to the authors knowledge, it is the first paper dealing with a local CFD model which takes into account shock-boundary layer interactions in a real refrigerant. The numerical results put demonstrate the crucial role of the secondary nozzle for the mixing rate performance. In addition, these results point out the need of an extensive validation of the turbulence model, especially in the modeling of the off-design mode. (author)

  7. Toward Active Control of Noise from Hot Supersonic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-21

    Mechanisms AGARD - CP -131, 1974, pp. 13.1-13.12. [23] Goldstein, M.E., "On identifying the true sources of aerodynamic sound," Journal of Fluid Mechanics Vol...either constant or begins to decay. For the resampled data (1/8 inch microphones resampled at 100 kHz), the change in 7( 73 ) follows the originally...supersonic jet and their acoustic radiation," Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 69, No.l, 1975, pp. 73 95. [5] Tain, C. K. W., "Mach wave radiation from high

  8. Helical Birods: An Elastic Model of Helically Wound Double-Stranded Rods

    KAUST Repository

    Prior, Christopher

    2014-03-11

    © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. We consider a geometrically accurate model for a helically wound rope constructed from two intertwined elastic rods. The line of contact has an arbitrary smooth shape which is obtained under the action of an arbitrary set of applied forces and moments. We discuss the general form the theory should take along with an insight into the necessary geometric or constitutive laws which must be detailed in order for the system to be complete. This includes a number of contact laws for the interaction of the two rods, in order to fit various relevant physical scenarios. This discussion also extends to the boundary and how this composite system can be acted upon by a single moment and force pair. A second strand of inquiry concerns the linear response of an initially helical rope to an arbitrary set of forces and moments. In particular we show that if the rope has the dimensions assumed of a rod in the Kirchhoff rod theory then it can be accurately treated as an isotropic inextensible elastic rod. An important consideration in this demonstration is the possible effect of varying the geometric boundary constraints; it is shown the effect of this choice becomes negligible in this limit in which the rope has dimensions similar to those of a Kirchhoff rod. Finally we derive the bending and twisting coefficients of this effective rod.

  9. Recent Results of Helical Nonneutral Plasmas on Compact Helical System (CHS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himura, H.; Yamamoto, Y.; Sanpei, A.; Masamune, S.; Wakabayashi, H.; Isobe, M.

    2006-01-01

    First of all, non-constant space potential φs and electron density ne on magnetic surfaces of helical nonneutral plasmas are verified experimentally. The difference in φs enlarges significantly at the outer region inside the closed magnetic surfaces, and the corresponding equipotential surfaces are inferred to shift upward vertically with respect to magnetic surfaces. Meanwhile, larger value of ne is clearly observed in the downward region (z < 0) of magnetic surfaces, which seems to be consistent with the φs measurement. These results are the first evidence which strongly suggests the equilibrium proposed for nonneutral plasmas confined in closed magnetic surfaces. Secondly, in order to investigate the mechanism of the multiple disruption of helical nonneutral plasmas observed in experiments, space and time evolutions of electron flux are measured carefully inside the magnetic surfaces, when the plasma disruption occurs. Surprisingly, a set of data show that the observed disruption is at first happened at ρ ∼ 0.8, where ρ is the normalized minor radius, and then, it seems to propagate inside magnetic surfaces

  10. Reconstruction of the Tip-Surface Interaction Potential by Analysis of the Brownian Motion of an Atomic Force Microscope Tip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, O.H.; Kuipers, L.; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    2000-01-01

    The thermal movement of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is used to reconstruct the tip-surface interaction potential. If a tip is brought into the vicinity of a surface, its movement is governed by the sum of the harmonic cantilever potential and the tip-surface interaction potential. By

  11. Hard-tip, soft-spring lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Wooyoung; Braunschweig, Adam B; Liao, Xing; Chai, Jinan; Lim, Jong Kuk; Zheng, Gengfeng; Mirkin, Chad A

    2011-01-27

    Nanofabrication strategies are becoming increasingly expensive and equipment-intensive, and consequently less accessible to researchers. As an alternative, scanning probe lithography has become a popular means of preparing nanoscale structures, in part owing to its relatively low cost and high resolution, and a registration accuracy that exceeds most existing technologies. However, increasing the throughput of cantilever-based scanning probe systems while maintaining their resolution and registration advantages has from the outset been a significant challenge. Even with impressive recent advances in cantilever array design, such arrays tend to be highly specialized for a given application, expensive, and often difficult to implement. It is therefore difficult to imagine commercially viable production methods based on scanning probe systems that rely on conventional cantilevers. Here we describe a low-cost and scalable cantilever-free tip-based nanopatterning method that uses an array of hard silicon tips mounted onto an elastomeric backing. This method-which we term hard-tip, soft-spring lithography-overcomes the throughput problems of cantilever-based scanning probe systems and the resolution limits imposed by the use of elastomeric stamps and tips: it is capable of delivering materials or energy to a surface to create arbitrary patterns of features with sub-50-nm resolution over centimetre-scale areas. We argue that hard-tip, soft-spring lithography is a versatile nanolithography strategy that should be widely adopted by academic and industrial researchers for rapid prototyping applications.

  12. Numerical analysis of turbine blade tip treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalaswamy, Nath S.; Whitaker, Kevin W.

    1992-01-01

    Three-dimensional solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for a turbine blade with a turning angle of 180 degrees have been computed, including blade tip treatments involving cavities. The geometry approximates a preliminary design for the GGOT (Generic Gas Oxidizer Turbine). The data presented here will be compared with experimental data to be obtained from a linear cascade using original GGOT blades. Results have been computed for a blade with 1 percent clearance, based on chord, and three different cavity sizes. All tests were conducted at a Reynolds number of 4 x 10 exp 7. The grid contains 39,440 points with 10 spanwise planes in the tip clearance region of 5.008E-04 m. Streamline plots and velocity vectors together with velocity divergence plots reveal the general flow behavior in the clearance region. Blade tip temperature calculations suggest placement of a cavity close to the upstream side of the blade tip for reduction of overall blade tip temperature. The solutions do not account for the relative motion between the endwall and the turbine blade. The solutions obtained are generally consistent with previous work done in this area,

  13. Centrifugal compressor tip clearance and impeller flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaatinen-Varri, Ahti; Tiainen, Jonna; Turunen-Saaresti, Teemu; Gronman, Aki; Ameli, Alireza; Backman, Jari [Laboratory of Fluid Dynamics, LUT School of Energy Systems, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Lappeenranta (Finland); Engeda, Abraham [Turbomachinery Laboratory, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Compressors consume a considerable portion of the electricity used in the industrial sector. Hence, improvements in compressor efficiency lead to energy savings and reduce environmental impacts. The efficiency of an unshrouded centrifugal compressor suffers from leakage flow over the blade tips. The effect of tip leakage flow on the passage flow differs between the full and splitter blade passages. In this study, the differences in the flow fields between the full and splitter blade passages were studied numerically in detail. An industrial high-speed compressor with a design pressure ratio of 1.78 was modelled. Numerical studies were conducted with six different tip clearances and three different diffuser widths. The results show that increasing tip clearance considerably increases the reversed flow into the impeller with an unpinched diffuser. The reversed flow then partly mixes into the flow in the same blade passage it entered the impeller and the rest migrates over the blade, mixing with the tip clearance flow. Furthermore, as the reversed and clearance flow mix into the wake, the wake is weakened. As pinch reduces both the reversed flow and clearance flow, the passage wakes are stronger with pinches. However, the pinch is beneficial as the losses at the impeller outlet decrease.

  14. Centrifugal compressor tip clearance and impeller flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaatinen-Varri, Ahti; Tiainen, Jonna; Turunen-Saaresti, Teemu; Gronman, Aki; Ameli, Alireza; Backman, Jari; Engeda, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Compressors consume a considerable portion of the electricity used in the industrial sector. Hence, improvements in compressor efficiency lead to energy savings and reduce environmental impacts. The efficiency of an unshrouded centrifugal compressor suffers from leakage flow over the blade tips. The effect of tip leakage flow on the passage flow differs between the full and splitter blade passages. In this study, the differences in the flow fields between the full and splitter blade passages were studied numerically in detail. An industrial high-speed compressor with a design pressure ratio of 1.78 was modelled. Numerical studies were conducted with six different tip clearances and three different diffuser widths. The results show that increasing tip clearance considerably increases the reversed flow into the impeller with an unpinched diffuser. The reversed flow then partly mixes into the flow in the same blade passage it entered the impeller and the rest migrates over the blade, mixing with the tip clearance flow. Furthermore, as the reversed and clearance flow mix into the wake, the wake is weakened. As pinch reduces both the reversed flow and clearance flow, the passage wakes are stronger with pinches. However, the pinch is beneficial as the losses at the impeller outlet decrease

  15. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) vortices in helical turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, H.

    1996-01-01

    The study of large-scale coherent hydrodynamic (HD) vortex generation has been extended to electrified charged dusty vortices to be termed as electrohydrodynamic (EHD) vortices, incorporating helical turbulence in electric and magnetic fields into that in fluid velocity, which are all created by an external DC electric field on the background. A new equation of EHD vortices is introduced on the basis of a set of EHD or electromagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) equations, including equations of state and a full set of Maxwell's equations by using functional techniques for estimating equations for an ensemble average, turbulent background, and additional random field. In fact, EHD vortices for a charged dusty fluid can be more explosive with larger instabilities than HD vortices. In addition, it is inferred that an external DC electric field could provide the origin of additional self-organization to a coalescence of fluid vortex and electric field lines as a manifestation of a new frozen-in field concept for electric fields when the electric Reynolds number is sufficiently high. This is discussed on the basis of a set of general transport equations for fluid vorticity, magnetic and electric fields that are rederived concisely. In particular, a novel concept of electric field line merging-reconnection is developed in close relation to fluid vortex line merging, indicating a coalescence of fluid vortex breakdown or merging point and electric field line reconnection point, X-type or O-type with possible application to tornadic thunderstorms. In fact, a thundercloud charge distribution so as to provide a coalescence of fluid vortex and electric field lines is quite possible without theoretical inconsistency, and is thought most likely to occur from observations available so far. (orig.)

  16. Effects of pressure angle and tip relief on the life of speed increasing gearbox: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, Sankar; Kumaresan, Manivarma; Muthusamy, Nataraj

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines failure of helical gear in speed increasing gearbox used in the wind turbine generator (WTG). In addition, an attempt has been made to get suitable gear micro-geometry such as pressure angle and tip relief to minimize the gear failure in the wind turbines. As the gear trains in the wind turbine gearbox is prearranged with higher speed ratio and the gearboxes experience shock load due to atmospheric turbulence, gust wind speed, non-synchronization of pitching, frequent grid drops and failure of braking, the gear failure occurs either in the intermediate or high speed stage pinion. KISS soft gear calculation software was used to determine the gear specifications and analysis is carried out in ANSYS software version.11.0 for the existing and the proposed gear to evaluate the performance of bending stress tooth deflection and stiffness. The main objective of this research study is to propose suitable gear micro-geometry that is tip relief and pressure angle blend for increasing tooth strength of the helical gear used in the wind turbine for trouble free operation.

  17. Nanobits - exchangable and customisable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yildiz, Izzet

    dimensions: tips suitable for imaging high-aspect ratio structures and sidewall profiles were designed. Tip diameters in the order of 30 nm were reproducibly obtained with the FIB milling and the smallest tip diameter achieved was ... process by providing direct picking up of the NanoBits by the AFM probe was investigated. Two different bending mechanisms were studied for out-of-plane bending studies: FIB irradiation- and the residual stress-driven bending in bimorph structures. With FIB irradiation studies, NanoBits were demonstrated...... of the structure which may be starting at 170°C. The fabricated NanoBits were assembled and their performance as AFM probes were tested at OFFIS. The NanoBits were successfully picked up by a microgripper, collected in a cartridge and mounted to an AFM probe. Performances of the assembled high-aspect-ratio Nano...

  18. Tipping elements in the Arctic marine ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Carlos M; Agustí, Susana; Wassmann, Paul; Arrieta, Jesús M; Alcaraz, Miquel; Coello, Alexandra; Marbà, Núria; Hendriks, Iris E; Holding, Johnna; García-Zarandona, Iñigo; Kritzberg, Emma; Vaqué, Dolors

    2012-02-01

    The Arctic marine ecosystem contains multiple elements that present alternative states. The most obvious of which is an Arctic Ocean largely covered by an ice sheet in summer versus one largely devoid of such cover. Ecosystems under pressure typically shift between such alternative states in an abrupt, rather than smooth manner, with the level of forcing required for shifting this status termed threshold or tipping point. Loss of Arctic ice due to anthropogenic climate change is accelerating, with the extent of Arctic sea ice displaying increased variance at present, a leading indicator of the proximity of a possible tipping point. Reduced ice extent is expected, in turn, to trigger a number of additional tipping elements, physical, chemical, and biological, in motion, with potentially large impacts on the Arctic marine ecosystem.

  19. Some observations of tip-vortex cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, R. E. A.; Arakeri, V. H.; Higuchi, H.

    1991-08-01

    Cavitation has been observed in the trailing vortex system of an elliptic platform hydrofoil. A complex dependence on Reynolds number and gas content is noted at inception. Some of the observations can be related to tension effects associated with the lack of sufficiently large-sized nuclei. Inception measurements are compared with estimates of pressure in the vortex obtained from LDV measurements of velocity within the vortex. It is concluded that a complete correlation is not possible without knowledge of the fluctuating levels of pressure in tip-vortex flows. When cavitation is fully developed, the observed tip-vortex trajectory flows. When cavitation is fully developed, the observed tip-vortex trajectory shows a surprising lack of dependence on any of the physical parameters varied, such as angle of attack, Reynolds number, cavitation number, and dissolved gas content.

  20. Tip vortices in the actuator line model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luis; Meneveau, Charles

    2017-11-01

    The actuator line model (ALM) is a widely used tool to represent the wind turbine blades in computational fluid dynamics without the need to resolve the full geometry of the blades. The ALM can be optimized to represent the `correct' aerodynamics of the blades by choosing an appropriate smearing length scale ɛ. This appropriate length scale creates a tip vortex which induces a downwash near the tip of the blade. A theoretical frame-work is used to establish a solution to the induced velocity created by a tip vortex as a function of the smearing length scale ɛ. A correction is presented which allows the use of a non-optimal smearing length scale but still provides the downwash which would be induced using the optimal length scale. Thanks to the National Science Foundation (NSF) who provided financial support for this research via Grants IGERT 0801471, IIA-1243482 (the WINDINSPIRE project) and ECCS-1230788.