WorldWideScience

Sample records for supersonic commercial aircraft

  1. Structural concept trends for commercial supersonic cruise aircraft design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakat, I. F.; Davis, G. W.; Saelman, B.

    1980-01-01

    Structural concept trends for future commercial supersonic transport aircraft are considered. Highlights, including the more important design conditions and requirements, of two studies are discussed. Knowledge of these design parameters, as determined through studies involving the application of flexible mathematical models, enabled inclusion of aeroelastic considerations in the structural-material concepts evaluation. The design trends and weight data of the previous contractual study of Mach 2.7 cruise aircraft were used as the basis for incorporating advanced materials and manufacturing approaches to the airframe for reduced weight and cost. Structural studies of design concepts employing advanced aluminum alloys, advanced composites, and advanced titanium alloy and manufacturing techniques are compared for a Mach 2.0 arrow-wing configuration concept. Appraisals of the impact of these new materials and manufacturing concepts to the airframe design are shown and compared. The research and development to validate the potential sources of weight and cost reduction identified as necessary to attain a viable advanced commercial supersonic transport are discussed.

  2. Relating a Jet-Surface Interaction Experiment to a Commercial Supersonic Transport Aircraft Using Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, Vance F. III; Friedlander, David

    2017-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations were performed for a commercial supersonic transport aircraft concept and experimental hardware models designed to represent the installed propulsion system of the conceptual aircraft in an upcoming test campaign. The purpose of the experiment is to determine the effects of jet-surface interactions from supersonic aircraft on airport community noise. RANS simulations of the commercial supersonic transport aircraft concept were performed to relate the representative experimental hardware to the actual aircraft. RANS screening simulations were performed on the proposed test hardware to verify that it would be free from potential rig noise and to predict the aerodynamic forces on the model hardware to assist with structural design. The simulations showed a large region of separated flow formed in a junction region of one of the experimental configurations. This was dissimilar with simulations of the aircraft and could invalidate the noise measurements. This configuration was modified and a subsequent RANS simulation showed that the size of the flow separation was greatly reduced. The aerodynamic forces found on the experimental models were found to be relatively small when compared to the expected loads from the model’s own weight.Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations were completed for two configurations of a three-stream inverted velocity profile (IVP) nozzle and a baseline single-stream round nozzle (mixed-flow equivalent conditions). For the Sideline and Cutback flow conditions, while the IVP nozzles did not reduce the peak turbulent kinetic energy on the lower side of the jet plume, the IVP nozzles did significantly reduce the size of the region of peak turbulent kinetic energy when compared to the jet plume of the baseline nozzle cases. The IVP nozzle at Sideline conditions did suffer a region of separated flow from the inner stream nozzle splitter that did produce an intense, but small, region of

  3. N plus 3 Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transport Aircraft Entering Service in the 2030-2035 Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welge, H. Robert; Bonet, John; Magee, Todd; Tompkins, Daniel; Britt, Terry R.; Nelson, Chet; Miller, Gregory; Stenson, Douglas; Staubach, J. Brent; Bala, Naushir; hide

    2011-01-01

    Boeing, with Pratt & Whitney, General Electric, Rolls-Royce, M4 Engineering, Wyle Laboratories and Georgia Institute of Technology, conducted a study of supersonic commercial aircraft concepts and enabling technologies for the year 2030-2035 timeframe. The work defined the market and environmental/regulatory conditions that could evolve by the 2030/35 time period, from which vehicle performance goals were derived. Relevant vehicle concepts and technologies are identified that are anticipated to meet these performance and environmental goals. A series of multidisciplinary analyses trade studies considering vehicle sizing, mission performance and environmental conformity determined the appropriate concepts. Combinations of enabling technologies and the required technology performance levels needed to meet the desired goals were identified. Several high priority technologies are described in detail, including roadmaps with risk assessments that outline objectives, key technology challenges, detailed tasks and schedules and demonstrations that need to be performed. A representative configuration is provided for reference purposes, along with associated performance estimates based on these key technologies.

  4. Research of low boom and low drag supersonic aircraft design

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Xiaoqiang; Li Zhanke; Song Bifeng

    2014-01-01

    Sonic boom reduction will be an issue of utmost importance in future supersonic transport, due to strong regulations on acoustic nuisance. The paper describes a new multi-objective optimization method for supersonic aircraft design. The method is developed by coupling Seebass–George–Darden (SGD) inverse design method and multi-objective genetic algorithm. Based on the method, different codes are developed. Using a computational architecture, a conceptual supersonic aircraft design environment...

  5. Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2018 to 2020 Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, John; Norstrud, Nicole; Sokhey, Jack; Martens, Steve; Alonso, Juan J.

    2013-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company (LM), working in conjunction with General Electric Global Research (GE GR), Rolls-Royce Liberty Works (RRLW), and Stanford University, herein presents results from the "N+2 Supersonic Validations" contract s initial 22 month phase, addressing the NASA solicitation "Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2018 to 2020 Period." This report version adds documentation of an additional three month low boom test task. The key technical objective of this effort was to validate integrated airframe and propulsion technologies and design methodologies. These capabilities aspired to produce a viable supersonic vehicle design with environmental and performance characteristics. Supersonic testing of both airframe and propulsion technologies (including LM3: 97-023 low boom testing and April-June nozzle acoustic testing) verified LM s supersonic low-boom design methodologies and both GE and RRLW's nozzle technologies for future implementation. The N+2 program is aligned with NASA s Supersonic Project and is focused on providing system-level solutions capable of overcoming the environmental and performance/efficiency barriers to practical supersonic flight. NASA proposed "Initial Environmental Targets and Performance Goals for Future Supersonic Civil Aircraft". The LM N+2 studies are built upon LM s prior N+3 100 passenger design studies. The LM N+2 program addresses low boom design and methodology validations with wind tunnel testing, performance and efficiency goals with system level analysis, and low noise validations with two nozzle (GE and RRLW) acoustic tests.

  6. Commercial Aircraft Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehst, David A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-26

    This report summarizes the results of theoretical research performed during 3 years of P371 Project implementation. In results of such research a new scientific conceptual technology of quasi-passive individual infrared protection of heat-generating objects – Spatial Displacement of Thermal Image (SDTI technology) was developed. Theoretical substantiation and description of working processes of civil aircraft individual IR-protection system were conducted. The mathematical models and methodology were presented, there were obtained the analytical dependencies which allow performing theoretical research of the affect of intentionally arranged dynamic field of the artificial thermal interferences with variable contrast onto main parameters of optic-electronic tracking and homing systems.

  7. Research of low boom and low drag supersonic aircraft design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xiaoqiang; Li Zhanke; Song Bifeng

    2014-01-01

    Sonic boom reduction will be an issue of utmost importance in future supersonic trans-port, due to strong regulations on acoustic nuisance. The paper describes a new multi-objective optimization method for supersonic aircraft design. The method is developed by coupling Seebass-George-Darden (SGD) inverse design method and multi-objective genetic algorithm. Based on the method, different codes are developed. Using a computational architecture, a concep-tual supersonic aircraft design environment (CSADE) is constructed. The architecture of CSADE includes inner optimization level and out optimization level. The low boom configuration is gener-ated in inner optimization level by matching the target equivalent area distribution and actual equivalent area distribution. And low boom/low drag configuration is generated in outer optimiza-tion level by using NSGA-II multi-objective genetic algorithm to optimize the control parameters of SGD method and aircraft shape. Two objective functions, low sonic boom and low wave drag, are considered in CSADE. Physically reasonable Pareto solutions are obtained from the present optimization. Some supersonic aircraft configurations are selected from Pareto front and the optimization results indicate that the swept forward wing configuration has benefits in both sonic boom reduction and wave drag reduction. The results are validated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis.

  8. Research of low boom and low drag supersonic aircraft design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xiaoqiang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sonic boom reduction will be an issue of utmost importance in future supersonic transport, due to strong regulations on acoustic nuisance. The paper describes a new multi-objective optimization method for supersonic aircraft design. The method is developed by coupling Seebass–George–Darden (SGD inverse design method and multi-objective genetic algorithm. Based on the method, different codes are developed. Using a computational architecture, a conceptual supersonic aircraft design environment (CSADE is constructed. The architecture of CSADE includes inner optimization level and out optimization level. The low boom configuration is generated in inner optimization level by matching the target equivalent area distribution and actual equivalent area distribution. And low boom/low drag configuration is generated in outer optimization level by using NSGA-II multi-objective genetic algorithm to optimize the control parameters of SGD method and aircraft shape. Two objective functions, low sonic boom and low wave drag, are considered in CSADE. Physically reasonable Pareto solutions are obtained from the present optimization. Some supersonic aircraft configurations are selected from Pareto front and the optimization results indicate that the swept forward wing configuration has benefits in both sonic boom reduction and wave drag reduction. The results are validated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD analysis.

  9. Commercial aircraft composite technology

    CERN Document Server

    Breuer, Ulf Paul

    2016-01-01

    This book is based on lectures held at the faculty of mechanical engineering at the Technical University of Kaiserslautern. The focus is on the central theme of societies overall aircraft requirements to specific material requirements and highlights the most important advantages and challenges of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) compared to conventional materials. As it is fundamental to decide on the right material at the right place early on the main activities and milestones of the development and certification process and the systematic of defining clear requirements are discussed. The process of material qualification - verifying material requirements is explained in detail. All state-of-the-art composite manufacturing technologies are described, including changes and complemented by examples, and their improvement potential for future applications is discussed. Tangible case studies of high lift and wing structures emphasize the specific advantages and challenges of composite technology. Finally,...

  10. Aeroelastic coupling in sonic boom optimization of a supersonic aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    Vázquez, Mariano; Dervieux, Alain; Koobus, Bruno

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a multi-disciplinary optimization problem where the initial shape of a wing is sought in order to cope, after elastic deformation by the flow, with some optimality conditions. We propose a medium-strong coupling which allows to consider different softwares communicating a small number of times. Applications to the optimization of the AGARD Wing 445.6 and a flexible supersonic aircraft wing are presented.

  11. Radiative forcing from particle emissions by future supersonic aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pitari

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we focus on the direct radiative forcing (RF of black carbon (BC and sulphuric acid particles emitted by future supersonic aircraft, as well as on the ozone RF due to changes produced by emissions of both gas species (NOx, H2O and aerosol particles capable of affecting stratospheric ozone chemistry. Heterogeneous chemical reactions on the surface of sulphuric acid stratospheric particles (SSA-SAD are the main link between ozone chemistry and supersonic aircraft emissions of sulphur precursors (SO2 and particles (H2O–H2SO4. Photochemical O3 changes are compared from four independent 3-D atmosphere-chemistry models (ACMs, using as input the perturbation of SSA-SAD calculated in the University of L'Aquila model, which includes on-line a microphysics code for aerosol formation and growth. The ACMs in this study use aircraft emission scenarios for the year 2050 developed by AIRBUS as a part of the EU project SCENIC, assessing options for fleet size, engine technology (NOx emission index, Mach number, range and cruising altitude. From our baseline modeling simulation, the impact of supersonic aircraft on sulphuric acid aerosol and BC mass burdens is 53 and 1.5 μg/m2, respectively, with a direct RF of −11.4 and 4.6 mW/m2 (net RF=−6.8 mW/m2. This paper discusses the similarities and differences amongst the participating models in terms of changes to O3 precursors due to aircraft emissions (NOx, HOx,Clx,Brx and the stratospheric ozone sensitivity to them. In the baseline case, the calculated global ozone change is −0.4 ±0.3 DU, with a net radiative forcing (IR+UV of −2.5± 2 mW/m2. The fraction of this O3-RF attributable to SSA-SAD changes is, however, highly variable among the models, depending on the NOx removal

  12. Conceptual design of high speed supersonic aircraft: A brief review on SR-71 (Blackbird) aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hui; Khawaja, H.; Moatamedi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents the conceptual design of high-speed supersonic aircraft. The study focuses on SR-71 (Blackbird) aircraft. The input to the conceptual design is a mission profile. Mission profile is a flight profile of the aircraft defined by the customer. This paper gives the SR-71 aircraft mission profile specified by US air force. Mission profile helps in defining the attributes the aircraft such as wing profile, vertical tail configuration, propulsion system, etc. Wing profile and vertical tail configurations have direct impact on lift, drag, stability, performance and maneuverability of the aircraft. A propulsion system directly influences the performance of the aircraft. By combining the wing profile and the propulsion system, two important parameters, known as wing loading and thrust to weight ratio can be calculated. In this work, conceptual design procedure given by D. P. Raymer (AIAA Educational Series) is applied to calculate wing loading and thrust to weight ratio. The calculated values are compared against the actual values of the SR-71 aircraft. Results indicates that the values are in agreement with the trend of developments in aviation.

  13. Aerodynamic design trends for commercial aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbig, R.; Koerner, H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent research on advanced-configuration commercial aircraft at DFVLR is surveyed, with a focus on aerodynamic approaches to improved performance. Topics examined include transonic wings with variable camber or shock/boundary-layer control, wings with reduced friction drag or laminarized flow, prop-fan propulsion, and unusual configurations or wing profiles. Drawings, diagrams, and graphs of predicted performance are provided, and the need for extensive development efforts using powerful computer facilities, high-speed and low-speed wind tunnels, and flight tests of models (mounted on specially designed carrier aircraft) is indicated.

  14. Shock Waves Oscillations in the Interaction of Supersonic Flows with the Head of the Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Volkov, Konstantin N.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we reviewed the shock wave oscillation that occurs when supersonic flows interact with conic, blunt or flat nose of aircraft, taking into account the aerospike attached to it. The main attention was paid to the problem of numerical modeling of such oscillation, flow regime classification, and cases where aerospike attachment can…

  15. Titanium honeycomb structure. [for supersonic aircraft wing structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R. A.; Elrod, S. D.; Lovell, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    A brazed titanium honeycomb sandwich system for supersonic transport wing cover panels provides the most efficient structure spanwise, chordwise, and loadwise. Flutter testing shows that high wing stiffness is most efficient in a sandwich structure. This structure also provides good thermal insulation if liquid fuel is carried in direct contact with the wing structure in integral fuel tanks.

  16. 76 FR 30231 - Civil Supersonic Aircraft Panel Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... for attendees. The purpose of the meeting is to raise public awareness of the continuing technological... joint meeting of the 159th Acoustical Society of America and NOISE-CON 2010 in Baltimore, Maryland 21202. The purpose of these meetings is to raise public awareness on advances in supersonic technology,...

  17. Commercial Aircraft Integrated Vehicle Health Management Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Joni K.; Jones, Sharon Monica; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Leone, Karen M.; Sandifer, Carl E.; Thomas, Megan A.

    2010-01-01

    Statistical data and literature from academia, industry, and other government agencies were reviewed and analyzed to establish requirements for fixture work in detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and mitigation for IVHM related hardware and software. Around 15 to 20 percent of commercial aircraft accidents between 1988 and 2003 involved inalftfnctions or failures of some aircraft system or component. Engine and landing gear failures/malfunctions dominate both accidents and incidents. The IVI vl Project research technologies were found to map to the Joint Planning and Development Office's National Research and Development Plan (RDP) as well as the Safety Working Group's National Aviation Safety Strategic. Plan (NASSP). Future directions in Aviation Technology as related to IVHlvl were identified by reviewing papers from three conferences across a five year time span. A total of twenty-one trend groups in propulsion, aeronautics and aircraft categories were compiled. Current and ftiture directions of IVHM related technologies were gathered and classified according to eight categories: measurement and inspection, sensors, sensor management, detection, component and subsystem monitoring, diagnosis, prognosis, and mitigation.

  18. Flying qualities design criteria applicable to supersonic cruise aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalk, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive set of flying qualities design criteria was prepared for use in the supersonic cruise research program. The framework for stating the design criteria is established and design criteria are included which address specific failures, approach to dangerous flight conditions, flight at high angle of attack, longitudinal and lateral directional stability and control, the primary flight control system, and secondary flight controls. Examples are given of lateral directional design criteria limiting lateral accelerations at the cockpit, time to roll through 30 deg of bank, and time delay in the pilot's command path. Flight test data from the Concorde certification program are used to substantiate a number of the proposed design criteria.

  19. Flight assessment of a large supersonic drone aircraft for research use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstrom, C. V.; Peele, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    An assessment is made of the capabilities of the BQM-34E supersonic drone aircraft as a test bed research vehicle. This assessment is made based on a flight conducted for the purpose of obtaining flight test measurements of wing loads at various maneuver flight conditions. Flight plan preparation, flight simulation, and conduct of the flight test are discussed along with a presentation of the test data obtained and an evaluation of how closely the flight test followed the test plan.

  20. Final Report for the Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2030 to 2035 Period, N+3 Supersonic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, John; Norstrud, Nicole; Stelmack, Marc; Skoch, Craig

    2010-01-01

    The N+3 Final Report documents the work and progress made by Lockheed Martin Aeronautics in response to the NASA sponsored program "N+3 NRA Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2030 to 2035 Period." The key technical objective of this effort was to generate promising supersonic concepts for the 2030 to 2035 timeframe and to develop plans for maturing the technologies required to make those concepts a reality. The N+3 program is aligned with NASA's Supersonic Project and is focused on providing alternative system-level solutions capable of overcoming the efficiency, environmental, and performance barriers to practical supersonic flight

  1. Numerical study of aerodynamic characteristics of FSW aircraft with dierent wing positions under supersonic condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Juanmian; Zhao Shuai; Wang Suozhu

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of forward-swept wing (FSW) positions on the aero-dynamic characteristics of aircraft under supersonic condition (Ma=1.5). The numerical method based on Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations, Spalart–Allmaras (S–A) turbu-lence model and implicit algorithm is utilized to simulate the flow field of the aircraft. The aerody-namic parameters and flow field structures of the horizontal tail and the whole aircraft are presented. The results demonstrate that the spanwise flow of FSW flows from the wingtip to the wing root, generating an upper wing surface vortex and a trailing edge vortex nearby the wing root. The vortexes generated by FSW have a strong downwash effect on the tail. The lower the vertical position of FSW, the stronger the downwash effect on tail. Therefore, the effective angle of attack of tail becomes smaller. In addition, the lift coefficient, drag coefficient and lift–drag ratio of tail decrease, and the center of pressure of tail moves backward gradually. For the whole aircraft, the lower the vertical position of FSW, the smaller lift, drag and center of pressure coefficients of aircraft. The closer the FSW moves towards tail, the bigger pitching moment and center of pres-sure coefficients of the whole aircraft, but the lift and drag characteristics of the horizontal tail and the whole aircraft are basically unchanged. The results have potential application for the design of new concept aircraft.

  2. Pilot Human Factors in Stall/Spin Accidents of Supersonic Fighter Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S. B.; Enevoldson, E. K.; Nguyen, L. T.

    1983-01-01

    A study has been made of pilot human factors related to stall/spin accidents of supersonic fighter aircraft. The military specifications for flight at high angles of attack are examined. Several pilot human factors problems related to stall/spin are discussed. These problems include (1) unsatisfactory nonvisual warning cues; (2) the inability of the pilot to quickly determine if the aircraft is spinning out of control, or to recognize the type of spin; (3) the inability of the pilot to decide on and implement the correct spin recovery technique; (4) the inability of the pilot to move, caused by high angular rotation; and (5) the tendency of pilots to wait too long in deciding to abandon the irrecoverable aircraft. Psycho-physiological phenomena influencing pilot's behavior in stall/spin situations include (1) channelization of sensory inputs, (2) limitations in precisely controlling several muscular inputs, (3) inaccurate judgment of elapsed time, and (4) disorientation of vestibulo-ocular inputs. Results are given of pilot responses to all these problems in the F14A, F16/AB, and F/A-18A aircraft. The use of departure spin resistance and automatic spin prevention systems incorporated on recent supersonic fighters are discussed. These systems should help to improve the stall/spin accident record with some compromise in maneuverability.

  3. An Interactive Method of Characteristics Java Applet to Design and Analyze Supersonic Aircraft Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The Method of Characteristics (MOC) is a classic technique for designing supersonic nozzles. An interactive computer program using MOC has been developed to allow engineers to design and analyze supersonic nozzle flow fields. The program calculates the internal flow for many classic designs, such as a supersonic wind tunnel nozzle, an ideal 2D or axisymmetric nozzle, or a variety of plug nozzles. The program also calculates the plume flow produced by the nozzle and the external flow leading to the nozzle exit. The program can be used to assess the interactions between the internal, external and plume flows. By proper design and operation of the nozzle, it may be possible to lessen the strength of the sonic boom produced at the rear of supersonic aircraft. The program can also calculate non-ideal nozzles, such as simple cone flows, to determine flow divergence and nonuniformities at the exit, and its effect on the plume shape. The computer program is written in Java and is provided as free-ware from the NASA Glenn central software server.

  4. Full Flight Envelope Direct Thrust Measurement on a Supersonic Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Timothy R.; Sims, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Direct thrust measurement using strain gages offers advantages over analytically-based thrust calculation methods. For flight test applications, the direct measurement method typically uses a simpler sensor arrangement and minimal data processing compared to analytical techniques, which normally require costly engine modeling and multisensor arrangements throughout the engine. Conversely, direct thrust measurement has historically produced less than desirable accuracy because of difficulty in mounting and calibrating the strain gages and the inability to account for secondary forces that influence the thrust reading at the engine mounts. Consequently, the strain-gage technique has normally been used for simple engine arrangements and primarily in the subsonic speed range. This paper presents the results of a strain gage-based direct thrust-measurement technique developed by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and successfully applied to the full flight envelope of an F-15 aircraft powered by two F100-PW-229 turbofan engines. Measurements have been obtained at quasi-steady-state operating conditions at maximum non-augmented and maximum augmented power throughout the altitude range of the vehicle and to a maximum speed of Mach 2.0 and are compared against results from two analytically-based thrust calculation methods. The strain-gage installation and calibration processes are also described.

  5. Computer-aided methods for analysis and synthesis of supersonic cruise aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Computer-aided methods are reviewed which are being developed by Langley Research Center in-house work and by related grants and contracts. Synthesis methods to size structural members to meet strength and stiffness (flutter) requirements are emphasized and described. Because of the strong interaction among the aerodynamic loads, structural stiffness, and member sizes of supersonic cruise aircraft structures, these methods are combined into systems of computer programs to perform design studies. The approaches used in organizing these systems to provide efficiency, flexibility of use in an iterative process, and ease of system modification are discussed.

  6. Escorting commercial aircraft to reduce the MANPAD threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Nicholas; Richardson, M. A.; Butters, B.; Walmsley, R.; Ayling, R.; Taylor, B.

    2005-11-01

    This paper studies the Man-Portable Air Defence System (MANPADS) threat against large commercial aircraft using flight profile analysis, engagement modelling and simulation. Non-countermeasure equipped commercial aircraft are at risk during approach and departure due to the large areas around airports that would need to be secured to prevent the use of highly portable and concealable MANPADs. A software model (CounterSim) has been developed and was used to simulate an SA-7b and large commercial aircraft engagement. The results of this simulation have found that the threat was lessened when a escort fighter aircraft is flown in the 'Centreline Low' position, or 25 m rearward from the large aircraft and 15 m lower, similar to the Air-to-Air refuelling position. In the model a large aircraft on approach had a 50% chance of being hit or having a near miss (within 20m) whereas escorted by a countermeasure equipped F-16 in the 'Centerline Low' position, this was reduced to only 14%. Departure is a particularly vulnerable time for large aircraft due to slow climb rates and the inability to fly evasive manoeuvres. The 'Centreline Low' escorted departure greatly reduced the threat to 16% hit or near miss from 62% for an unescorted heavy aircraft. Overall the CounterSim modelling has showed that escorting a civilian aircraft on approach and departure can reduce the MANPAD threat by 3 to 4 times.

  7. Fabrication and evaluation of advanced titanium structural panels for supersonic cruise aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, L.

    1977-01-01

    Flightworthy primary structural panels were designed, fabricated, and tested to investigate two advanced fabrication methods for titanium alloys. Skin-stringer panels fabricated using the weldbraze process, and honeycomb-core sandwich panels fabricated using a diffusion bonding process, were designed to replace an existing integrally stiffened shear panel on the upper wing surface of the NASA YF-12 research aircraft. The investigation included ground testing and Mach 3 flight testing of full-scale panels, and laboratory testing of representative structural element specimens. Test results obtained on full-scale panels and structural element specimens indicate that both of the fabrication methods investigated are suitable for primary structural applications on future civil and military supersonic cruise aircraft.

  8. Application of supersonic particle deposition to enhance the structural integrity of aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, N.; Jones, R.; Sih, G. C.

    2014-01-01

    Aircraft metal components and structures are susceptible to environmental degradation throughout their original design life and in many cases their extended lives. This paper summarizes the results of an experimental program to evaluate the ability of Supersonic Particle Deposition (SPD), also known as cold spray, to extend the limit of validity (LOV) of aircraft structural components and to restore the structural integrity of corroded panels. In this study [LU1]the potential for the SPD to seal the mechanically fastened joints and for this seal to remain intact even in the presence of multi-site damage (MSD) has been evaluated. By sealing the joint the onset of corrosion damage in the joint can be significantly retarded, possibly even eliminated, thereby dramatically extending the LOV of mechanically fastened joints. The study also shows that SPD can dramatically increase the damage tolerance of badly corroded wing skins.

  9. Adaptive Aft Signature Shaping of a Low-Boom Supersonic Aircraft Using Off-Body Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordaz, Irian; Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    The design and optimization of a low-boom supersonic aircraft using the state-of-the- art o -body aerodynamics and sonic boom analysis has long been a challenging problem. The focus of this paper is to demonstrate an e ective geometry parameterization scheme and a numerical optimization approach for the aft shaping of a low-boom supersonic aircraft using o -body pressure calculations. A gradient-based numerical optimization algorithm that models the objective and constraints as response surface equations is used to drive the aft ground signature toward a ramp shape. The design objective is the minimization of the variation between the ground signature and the target signature subject to several geometric and signature constraints. The target signature is computed by using a least-squares regression of the aft portion of the ground signature. The parameterization and the deformation of the geometry is performed with a NASA in- house shaping tool. The optimization algorithm uses the shaping tool to drive the geometric deformation of a horizontal tail with a parameterization scheme that consists of seven camber design variables and an additional design variable that describes the spanwise location of the midspan section. The demonstration cases show that numerical optimization using the state-of-the-art o -body aerodynamic calculations is not only feasible and repeatable but also allows the exploration of complex design spaces for which a knowledge-based design method becomes less effective.

  10. Indoor air quality investigation on commercial aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S C; Poon, C S; Li, X D; Luk, F

    1999-09-01

    Sixteen flights had been investigated for indoor air quality (IAQ) on Cathay Pacific aircraft from June 1996 to August 1997. In general, the air quality on Cathay Pacific aircraft was within relevant air quality standards because the average age of aircraft was less than 2 years. Carbon dioxide (CO2) levels on all flights measured were below the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) standard (30,000 ppm). The CO2 level was substantially higher during boarding and de-boarding than cruise due to low fresh air supply. Humidity on the aircraft was low, especially for long-haul flights. Minimum humidity during cruise was below the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) minimum humidity standard (20%). The average temperature was within a comfortable temperature range of 23 +/- 2 degrees C. The vertical temperature profile on aircraft was uniform and below the International Standard Organization (ISO) standard. Carbon monoxide levels were below the FAA standard (50 ppm). Trace amount of ozone detected ranged from undetectable to 90 ppb, which was below the FAA standard. Particulate level was low for most non-smoking flights, but peaks were observed during boarding and de-boarding. The average particulate level in smoking flights (138 micrograms/m3) was higher than non-smoking flights (7.6 micrograms/m3). The impact on IAQ by switching from low-mode to high-mode ventilation showed a reduction in CO2 levels, temperature, and relative humidity.

  11. 78 FR 47778 - The Boeing Company Boeing Commercial Aircraft (BCA) Auburn, Washington; The Boeing Company Boeing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ...; TA-W-82,705E] The Boeing Company Boeing Commercial Aircraft (BCA) Auburn, Washington; The Boeing Company Boeing Commercial Aircraft (BCA) Everett, Washington; The Boeing Company Boeing Commercial Aircraft (BCA) Puyallup, Washington; The Boeing Company Boeing Commercial Aircraft (BCA) Including Four...

  12. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of Supersonic Aircraft Configurations via an Adjoint Formulation on Parallel Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, James; Alonso, Juan Jose; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Jameson, Antony

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the application of a control theory-based aerodynamic shape optimization method to the problem of supersonic aircraft design. The design process is greatly accelerated through the use of both control theory and a parallel implementation on distributed memory computers. Control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations whose solution allows for the evaluation of design gradient information at a fraction of the computational cost required by previous design methods (13, 12, 44, 38). The resulting problem is then implemented on parallel distributed memory architectures using a domain decomposition approach, an optimized communication schedule, and the MPI (Message Passing Interface) Standard for portability and efficiency. The final result achieves very rapid aerodynamic design based on higher order computational fluid dynamics methods (CFD). In our earlier studies, the serial implementation of this design method (19, 20, 21, 23, 39, 25, 40, 41, 42, 43, 9) was shown to be effective for the optimization of airfoils, wings, wing-bodies, and complex aircraft configurations using both the potential equation and the Euler equations (39, 25). In our most recent paper, the Euler method was extended to treat complete aircraft configurations via a new multiblock implementation. Furthermore, during the same conference, we also presented preliminary results demonstrating that the basic methodology could be ported to distributed memory parallel computing architectures [241. In this paper, our concem will be to demonstrate that the combined power of these new technologies can be used routinely in an industrial design environment by applying it to the case study of the design of typical supersonic transport configurations. A particular difficulty of this test case is posed by the propulsion/airframe integration.

  13. Finite-difference modeling of commercial aircraft using TSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennock, S.T.; Poggio, A.J.

    1994-11-15

    Future aircraft may have systems controlled by fiber optic cables, to reduce susceptibility to electromagnetic interference. However, the digital systems associated with the fiber optic network could still experience upset due to powerful radio stations, radars, and other electromagnetic sources, with potentially serious consequences. We are modeling the electromagnetic behavior of commercial transport aircraft in support of the NASA Fly-by-Light/Power-by-Wire program, using the TSAR finite-difference time-domain code initially developed for the military. By comparing results obtained from TSAR with data taken on a Boeing 757 at the Air Force Phillips Lab., we hope to show that FDTD codes can serve as an important tool in the design and certification of U.S. commercial aircraft, helping American companies to produce safe, reliable air transportation.

  14. Advanced energy systems (APU) for large commercial aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westenberger, A.; Bleil, J.; Arendt, M. [Airbus Deutschland GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-06-01

    The intention of using a highly integrated component using on fuel cell technology installed on board of large commercial passenger aircraft for the generation of onboard power for the systems demand during an entire aircraft mission was subject of several studies. The results of these studies have been based on the simulation of the whole system in the context of an aircraft system environment. In front of the work stood the analyses of different fuel cell technologies and the analyses of the aircraft system environment. Today onboard power is provided on ground by an APU and in flight by the main engines. In order to compare fuel cell technology with the today's usual gas turbine operational characteristics have been analysed. A second analysis was devoted to the system demand for typical aircraft categories. The MEA system concept was supposed in all cases. The favourable concept represented an aircraft propelled by conventional engines with starter generator units, providing AC electrical power, covering in total proximately half of the power demand and a component based on fuel cell technology. This component provided electrical DC power, clean potable water, thermal energy at 180 degrees Celsius and nitrogen enriched air for fire suppression and fire extinguishing agent. In opposite of a usual gas turbine based APU, this new unit was operated as the primary power system. (orig.)

  15. Nuclear containment structure subjected to commercial and fighter aircraft crash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadique, M.R., E-mail: rehan.sadique@gmail.com; Iqbal, M.A., E-mail: iqbalfce@iitr.ernet.in; Bhargava, P., E-mail: bhpdpfce@iitr.ernet.in

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Nuclear containment response has been studied against aircraft crash. • Concrete damaged plasticity and Johnson–Cook elasto-viscoplastic models were employed. • Boeing 747-400 and Boeing 767-400 aircrafts caused global failure of containment. • Airbus A320 and Boeing 707-320 aircrafts caused local damage. • Tension damage of concrete was found more prominent compared to compression damage. -- Abstract: The response of a boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear containment vessel has been studied against commercial and fighter aircraft crash using a nonlinear finite element code ABAQUS. The aircrafts employed were Boeing 747-400, Boeing 767-400, Airbus A-320, Boeing 707-320 and Phantom F4. The containment was modeled as a three-dimensional deformable reinforced concrete structure while the loading of aircraft was assigned using the respective reaction–time curve. The location of strike was considered near the junction of dome and cylinder, and the angle of incidence, normal to the containment surface. The material behavior of the concrete was incorporated using the damaged plasticity model while that of the reinforcement, the Johnson–Cook elasto-viscoplastic model. The containment could not sustain the impact of Boeing 747-400 and Boeing 767-400 aircrafts and suffered rupture of concrete around the impact region leading to global failure. On the other hand, the maximum local deformation at the point of impact was found to be 0.998 m, 0.099 m, 0.092 m, 0.089 m, and 0.074 m against Boeing 747-400, Phantom F4, Boeing 767, Boeing 707-320 and Airbus A-320 aircrafts respectively. The results of the present study were compared with those of the previous analytical and numerical investigations with respect to the maximum deformation and overall behavior of the containment.

  16. Preliminary performance of a vertical-attitude takeoff and landing, supersonic cruise aircraft concept having thrust vectoring integrated into the flight control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, A. W.; Beissner, F. L., Jr.; Domack, C. S.; Swanson, E. E.

    1985-01-01

    A performance study was made of a vertical attitude takeoff and landing (VATOL), supersonic cruise aircraft concept having thrust vectoring integrated into the flight control system. Those characteristics considered were aerodynamics, weight, balance, and performance. Preliminary results indicate that high levels of supersonic aerodynamic performance can be achieved. Further, with the assumption of an advanced (1985 technology readiness) low bypass ratio turbofan engine and advanced structures, excellent mission performance capability is indicated.

  17. Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2018-2020 Period Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, John; Buonanno, Michael; Yao, Jixian; Murugappan, Mugam; Paliath, Umesh; Cheung, Lawrence; Malcevic, Ivan; Ramakrishnan, Kishore; Pastouchenko, Nikolai; Wood, Trevor; Martens, Steve; Viars, Phil; Tersmette, Trevor; Lee, Jason; Simmons, Ron; Plybon, David; Alonso, Juan; Palacios, Francisco; Lukaczyk, Trent; Carrier, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company (LM), working in conjunction with General Electric Global Research (GE GR) and Stanford University, executed a 19 month program responsive to the NASA sponsored "N+2 Supersonic Validation: Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2018-2020 Period" contract. The key technical objective of this effort was to validate integrated airframe and propulsion technologies and design methodologies necessary to realize a supersonic vehicle capable of meeting the N+2 environmental and performance goals. The N+2 program is aligned with NASA's Supersonic Project and is focused on providing system level solutions capable of overcoming the efficiency, environmental, and performance barriers to practical supersonic flight. The N+2 environmental and performance goals are outlined in the technical paper, AIAA-2014-2138 (Ref. 1) along with the validated N+2 Phase 2 results. Our Phase 2 efforts built upon our Phase 1 studies (Ref. 2) and successfully demonstrated the ability to design and test realistic configurations capable of shaped sonic booms over the width of the sonic boom carpet. Developing a shaped boom configuration capable of meeting the N+2 shaped boom targets is a key goal for the N+2 program. During the LM Phase 1 effort, LM successfully designed and tested a shaped boom trijet configuration (1021) capable of achieving 85 PLdB under track (forward and aft shock) and up to 28 deg off-track at Mach 1.6. In Phase 2 we developed a refined configuration (1044-2) that extended the under 85 PLdB sonic boom level over the entire carpet of 52 deg off-track at a cruise Mach number of 1.7. Further, the loudness level of the configuration throughout operational conditions calculates to an average of 79 PLdB. These calculations rely on propagation employing Burger's (sBOOM) rounding methodology, and there are indications that the configuration average loudness would actually be 75 PLdB. We also added

  18. Primary VOC emissions from Commercial Aircraft Jet Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Dogushan; Huang, Rujin; Slowik, Jay; Brem, Benjamin; Durdina, Lukas; Rindlisbacher, Theo; Baltensperger, Urs; Prevot, Andre

    2014-05-01

    . References 1."Annual Review 2013", International Air Transport Association (IATA) 2014, Page 8, available on: http://www.iata.org/about/Documents/iata-annual-review-2013-en.pdf. 2."Summary for Policymakers: IPCC Special Report Aviation and the Global Atmosphere", 1999, pp. 5-10. 3."Hydrocarbon emissions from in-use commercial aircraft during airport operations", Herndon S.C., Rogers T., Dunlea E.J., Jayne J.T., Miake-Lye R., Knighton B., Environ Sci. Technol. 2006 Jul 15;40(14):4406-13.

  19. Towards an Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elasticity Analysis of a Commercial Supersonic Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Kopasakis, George; Chwalowski, Pawel; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Silva, Walt A.; McNamara, Jack

    2016-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an aero-propulso-servo-elastic (APSE) model using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and linear structural deformations. The APSE model provides the integration of the following two previously developed nonlinear dynamic simulations: a variable cycle turbofan engine and an elastic supersonic commercial transport vehicle. The primary focus of this study is to provide a means to include relevant dynamics of a turbomachinery propulsion system into the aeroelastic studies conducted during a vehicle design, which have historically neglected propulsion effects. A high fidelity CFD tool is used here for the integration platform. The elastic vehicle neglecting the propulsion system serves as a comparison of traditional approaches to the APSE results. An overview of the methodology is presented for integrating the propulsion system and elastic vehicle. Static aeroelastic analysis comparisons between the traditional and developed APSE models for a wing tip detection indicate that the propulsion system impact on the vehicle elastic response could increase the detection by approximately ten percent.

  20. Characterization of emissions from commercial aircraft engines during the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (APEX) 1 to 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fine particulate matter emissions from aircraft operations at large airports located in areas of the U. S. designated as non-attainment for the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for PM-2.5 are of major environmental concern. PM emissions data for commercial aircraft engin...

  1. Theoretical prediction of interference loading on aircraft stores: Part II - Supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, C. H., Jr.; Fernandes, F.

    1973-01-01

    Linear theory is used, without two dimensional or slender body assumptions, to predict flow field produced by aircraft wing, nose, inlet, and pylons. Aircraft shock wave locations are predicted, and their effect on flow field is included through transformation of aircraft geometry. Program was written in FORTRAN IV for CDC 6400 computer.

  2. The Effect of Reducing Cruise Altitude on the Topology and Emissions of a Commercial Transport Aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, research has been conducted for alternative commercial transonic aircraft design configurations, such as the strut- braced wing and the truss-braced wing aircraft designs, in order to improve aircraft performance and reduce the impact of aircraft emissions as compared to a typical cantilever wing design. Research performed by Virginia Tech in conjunction with NASA Langley Research Center shows that these alternative configurations result in 20% or more reduction in fuel...

  3. Effects of varying podded nacelle-nozzle installations on transonic aeropropulsive characteristics of a supersonic fighter aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, F. J.; Reubush, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    The aeropropulsive characteristics of an advanced twin engine fighter designed for supersonic cruise was investigated in the 16 foot Transonic Tunnel. The performance characteristics of advanced nonaxisymmetric nozzles installed in various nacelle locations, the effects of thrust induced forces on overall aircraft aerodynamics, the trim characteristics, and the thrust reverser performance were evaluated. The major model variables included nozzle power setting; nozzle duct aspect ratio; forward, mid, and aft nacelle axial locations; inboard and outboard underwing nacelle locations; and underwing and overwing nacelle locations. Thrust vectoring exhaust nozzle configurations included a wedge nozzle, a two dimensional convergent divergent nozzle, and a single expansion ramp nozzle, each with deflection angles up to 30 deg. In addition to the nonaxisymmetric nozzles, an axisymmetric nozzle installation was also tested. The use of a canard for trim was also assessed.

  4. Contract Issues in the Sale of Commercial Aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    two industry segments , transportation equip- ment, and missiles and space. rriasportation aquipment operations are concerned with the development...estimated that ten percent of the wide body fle -t is for sale in the used aircraft markt . The price for used narrow body aircraft has fallen also [Ref

  5. Challenge to Aviation: Hatching a Leaner Pterosauer. [Improving Commercial Aircraft Design for Greater Fuel Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, F. E.

    1975-01-01

    Modifications in commercial aircraft design, particularly the development of lighter aircraft, are discussed as effective means of reducing aviation fuel consumption. The modifications outlined include: (1) use of the supercritical wing; (2) generation of the winglet; (3) production and flight testing of composite materials; and, (4) implementation of fly-by-wire control systems. Attention is also given to engineering laminar air flow control, improving cargo payloads, and adapting hydrogen fuels for aircraft use.

  6. Integrated Design of a Long-Haul Commercial Aircraft Optimized for Formation Flying

    OpenAIRE

    Dijkers, H.P.A.; Van Nunen, R.; Bos, D.A.; Gutleb, T.L.M.; Herinckx, L.E.; Radfar, H.; Van Rompuy, E.; Sayin, S.E.; Wit, J; Beelaerts van Blokland, W.W.A.

    2011-01-01

    The airline industry is under continuous pressure to reduce emissions and costs. This paper investigates the feasibility for commercial airlines to use formation flight to reduce emissions and fuel burn. To fly in formation, an aircraft needs to benefit from the wake vortices of the preceding aircraft. This requires a stable aerodynamic flow, accurate navigation and a highly sophisticated aircraft to counteract the negative consequences of flying in formation. It is found that the most stable...

  7. Application of Adjoint Methodology to Supersonic Aircraft Design Using Reversed Equivalent Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallabhandi, Sriram K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to shape an aircraft to equivalent area based objectives using the discrete adjoint approach. Equivalent areas can be obtained either using reversed augmented Burgers equation or direct conversion of off-body pressures into equivalent area. Formal coupling with CFD allows computation of sensitivities of equivalent area objectives with respect to aircraft shape parameters. The exactness of the adjoint sensitivities is verified against derivatives obtained using the complex step approach. This methodology has the benefit of using designer-friendly equivalent areas in the shape design of low-boom aircraft. Shape optimization results with equivalent area cost functionals are discussed and further refined using ground loudness based objectives.

  8. Impact of supersonic and subsonic aircraft on ozone: Including heterogeneous chemical reaction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnison, Douglas E.; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary calculations suggest that heterogeneous reactions are important in calculating the impact on ozone from emissions of trace gases from aircraft fleets. In this study, three heterogeneous chemical processes that occur on background sulfuric acid aerosols are included and their effects on O3, NO(x), Cl(x), HCl, N2O5, ClONO2 are calculated.

  9. A study on the utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structure: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The overall wing study objectives are to study and plan the effort by commercial transport aircraft manufacturers to accomplish the transition from current conventional materials and practices to extensive use of advanced composites in wings of aircraft that will enter service in the 1985-1990 time period. Specific wing study objectives are to define the technology and data needed to support an aircraft manufacturer's commitment to utilize composites primary wing structure in future production aircraft and to develop plans for a composite wing technology program which will provide the needed technology and data.

  10. A Preliminary Evaluation of Supersonic Transport Category Vehicle Operations in the National Airspace System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Matthew C.; Guminsky, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Several public sector businesses and government agencies, including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration are currently working on solving key technological barriers that must be overcome in order to realize the vision of low-boom supersonic flights conducted over land. However, once these challenges are met, the manner in which this class of aircraft is integrated in the National Airspace System may become a potential constraint due to the significant environmental, efficiency, and economic repercussions that their integration may cause. Background research was performed on historic supersonic operations in the National Airspace System, including both flight deck procedures and air traffic controller procedures. Using this information, an experiment was created to test some of these historic procedures in a current-day, emerging Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) environment and observe the interactions between commercial supersonic transport aircraft and modern-day air traffic. Data was gathered through batch simulations of supersonic commercial transport category aircraft operating in present-day traffic scenarios as a base-lining study to identify the magnitude of the integration problems and begin the exploration of new air traffic management technologies and architectures which will be needed to seamlessly integrate subsonic and supersonic transport aircraft operations. The data gathered include information about encounters between subsonic and supersonic aircraft that may occur when supersonic commercial transport aircraft are integrated into the National Airspace System, as well as flight time data. This initial investigation is being used to inform the creation and refinement of a preliminary Concept of Operations and for the subsequent development of technologies that will enable overland supersonic flight.

  11. A Status Review of the Commercial Supersonic Technology (CST) Aeroservoelasticity (ASE) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Walter A.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Funk, Christy; Keller, Donald F.; Ringertz, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    An overview of recent progress regarding the computational aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic (ASE) analyses of a low-boom supersonic configuration is presented. The overview includes details of the computational models developed to date with a focus on unstructured CFD grids, computational aeroelastic analyses, sonic boom propagation studies that include static aeroelastic effects, and gust loads analyses. In addition, flutter boundaries using aeroelastic Reduced-Order Models (ROMs) are presented at various Mach numbers of interest. Details regarding a collaboration with the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH, Stockholm, Sweden) to design, fabricate, and test a full-span aeroelastic wind-tunnel model are also presented.

  12. Development and validation of bonded composite doubler repairs for commercial aircraft.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2007-07-01

    A typical aircraft can experience over 2,000 fatigue cycles (cabin pressurizations) and even greater flight hours in a single year. An unavoidable by-product of aircraft use is that crack, impact, and corrosion flaws develop throughout the aircraft's skin and substructure elements. Economic barriers to the purchase of new aircraft have placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair methods. The use of bonded composite doublers offers the airframe manufacturers and aircraft maintenance facilities a cost effective method to safely extend the lives of their aircraft. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is now possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance Center at Sandia National Labs (AANC), Boeing, and Federal Express completed a pilot program to validate and introduce composite doubler repair technology to the U.S. commercial aircraft industry. This project focused on repair of DC-10 fuselage structure and its primary goal was to demonstrate routine use of this repair technology using niche applications that streamline the design-to-installation process. As composite doubler repairs gradually appear in the commercial aircraft arena, successful flight operation data is being accumulated. These commercial aircraft repairs are not only demonstrating the engineering and economic advantages of composite doubler technology but they are also establishing the ability of commercial maintenance depots to safely adopt this repair technique. This report presents the array of engineering activities that were completed in order to make this technology available for widespread commercial aircraft use. Focused laboratory testing was conducted to compliment the field data and to address specific issues regarding damage tolerance and flaw growth in composite doubler repairs. Fatigue and strength tests were performed on a simulated wing

  13. Analysis of impact of large commercial aircraft on a prestressed containment building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoungsoo, E-mail: kylee@pvamu.edu [Center for Energy and Environmental Sustainability, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie view, TX, 77446 (United States); Han, Sang Eul, E-mail: hsang@inha.ac.kr [Department of Architectural Engineering, School of Architecture, Inha University, 253 Yonghyundong Nam-gu, Incheon, 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jung-Wuk, E-mail: j.hong@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, KAIST, 373-1 Guseon-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Aircraft impact analyses are performed using the missile–target interaction method. • A large commercial B747 aircraft is considered with erosion effect. • The rigid wall impact test shows the validity of the developed aircraft model. • The parametric studies on the fictitious containment building are performed. • The plastic failure of the target is governed by the impulse of aircraft at the first momentum peak. - Abstract: In this paper, the results of nonlinear dynamic analyses of a concrete containment building under extreme loads are presented. The impact of a large commercial B747 airliner is investigated as the extreme load, and a rigid wall impact test is performed using commercial nonlinear finite element codes. The impact forces exerted by the aircraft are verified compared with the time-dependent impact force provided by OECD/NEA (2002), which was calculated based on the so-called Riera method. The rigid wall impact analysis shows that the finite element model of a B747 is appropriate for the purpose of the aircraft crash analysis exposed to the external hazard of “Beyond Design-Basis Events” defined by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Finally, the applicability of this methodology is further studied and verified by conducting parametric studies on the critical infrastructures of nuclear power plant containment structures.

  14. Bibliography on aircraft fire hazards and safety. Volume 2: Safety. Part 1: Key numbers 1 to 524

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelouch, J. J., Jr. (Compiler); Hacker, P. T. (Compiler)

    1974-01-01

    Bibliographic citations are presented to describe and define aircraft safety methods, equipment, and criteria. Some of the subjects discussed are: (1) fire and explosion suppression using whiffle balls, (2) ultraviolet flame detecting sensors, (3) evaluation of flame arrestor materials for aircraft fuel systems, (4) crash fire prevention system for supersonic commercial aircraft, and (5) fire suppression for aerospace vehicles.

  15. Commercial Aircraft Maintenance Experience Relating to Engine External Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soditus, Sharon M.

    2006-01-01

    Airlines are extremely sensitive to the amount of dollars spent on maintaining the external engine hardware in the field. Analysis reveals that many problems revolve around a central issue, reliability. Fuel and oil leakage due to seal failure and electrical fault messages due to wire harness failures play a major role in aircraft delays and cancellations (D&C's) and scheduled maintenance. Correcting these items on the line requires a large investment of engineering resources and manpower after the fact. The smartest and most cost effective philosophy is to build the best hardware the first time. The only way to do that is to completely understand and model the operating environment, study the field experience of similar designs and to perform extensive testing.

  16. 27 CFR 44.207 - To commercial vessels and aircraft for consumption as supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false To commercial vessels and aircraft for consumption as supplies. 44.207 Section 44.207 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO EXPORTATION...

  17. 27 CFR 44.263 - To commercial vessels and aircraft for consumption as supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false To commercial vessels and aircraft for consumption as supplies. 44.263 Section 44.263 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO EXPORTATION...

  18. Integrated Design of a Long-Haul Commercial Aircraft Optimized for Formation Flying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkers, H.P.A.; Van Nunen, R.; Bos, D.A.; Gutleb, T.L.M.; Herinckx, L.E.; Radfar, H.; Van Rompuy, E.; Sayin, S.E.; De Wit, J.; Beelaerts van Blokland, W.W.A.

    2011-01-01

    The airline industry is under continuous pressure to reduce emissions and costs. This paper investigates the feasibility for commercial airlines to use formation flight to reduce emissions and fuel burn. To fly in formation, an aircraft needs to benefit from the wake vortices of the preceding aircra

  19. Integrated Design of a Long-Haul Commercial Aircraft Optimized for Formation Flying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkers, H.P.A.; Van Nunen, R.; Bos, D.A.; Gutleb, T.L.M.; Herinckx, L.E.; Radfar, H.; Van Rompuy, E.; Sayin, S.E.; De Wit, J.; Beelaerts van Blokland, W.W.A.

    2011-01-01

    The airline industry is under continuous pressure to reduce emissions and costs. This paper investigates the feasibility for commercial airlines to use formation flight to reduce emissions and fuel burn. To fly in formation, an aircraft needs to benefit from the wake vortices of the preceding

  20. 27 CFR 44.196 - To district director of customs for consumption as supplies on commercial vessels and aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for consumption as supplies on commercial vessels and aircraft. Where tobacco products, or cigarette... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false To district director of customs for consumption as supplies on commercial vessels and aircraft. 44.196 Section 44.196...

  1. Analysis of the Effects of Thermal Environment on Optical Systems for Navigation Guidance and Control in Supersonic Aircraft Based on Empirical Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemin Cheng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The thermal environment is an important factor in the design of optical systems. This study investigated the thermal analysis technology of optical systems for navigation guidance and control in supersonic aircraft by developing empirical equations for the front temperature gradient and rear thermal diffusion distance, and for basic factors such as flying parameters and the structure of the optical system. Finite element analysis (FEA was used to study the relationship between flying and front dome parameters and the system temperature field. Systematic deduction was then conducted based on the effects of the temperature field on the physical geometry and ray tracing performance of the front dome and rear optical lenses, by deriving the relational expressions between the system temperature field and the spot size and positioning precision of the rear optical lens. The optical systems used for navigation guidance and control in supersonic aircraft when the flight speed is in the range of 1–5 Ma were analysed using the derived equations. Using this new method it was possible to control the precision within 10% when considering the light spot received by the four-quadrant detector, and computation time was reduced compared with the traditional method of separately analysing the temperature field of the front dome and rear optical lens using FEA. Thus, the method can effectively increase the efficiency of parameter analysis and computation in an airborne optical system, facilitating the systematic, effective and integrated thermal analysis of airborne optical systems for navigation guidance and control.

  2. Analysis of the Effects of Thermal Environment on Optical Systems for Navigation Guidance and Control in Supersonic Aircraft Based on Empirical Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xuemin; Yang, Yikang; Hao, Qun

    2016-10-17

    The thermal environment is an important factor in the design of optical systems. This study investigated the thermal analysis technology of optical systems for navigation guidance and control in supersonic aircraft by developing empirical equations for the front temperature gradient and rear thermal diffusion distance, and for basic factors such as flying parameters and the structure of the optical system. Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to study the relationship between flying and front dome parameters and the system temperature field. Systematic deduction was then conducted based on the effects of the temperature field on the physical geometry and ray tracing performance of the front dome and rear optical lenses, by deriving the relational expressions between the system temperature field and the spot size and positioning precision of the rear optical lens. The optical systems used for navigation guidance and control in supersonic aircraft when the flight speed is in the range of 1-5 Ma were analysed using the derived equations. Using this new method it was possible to control the precision within 10% when considering the light spot received by the four-quadrant detector, and computation time was reduced compared with the traditional method of separately analysing the temperature field of the front dome and rear optical lens using FEA. Thus, the method can effectively increase the efficiency of parameter analysis and computation in an airborne optical system, facilitating the systematic, effective and integrated thermal analysis of airborne optical systems for navigation guidance and control.

  3. Radiation Safety Issues in High Altitude Commercial Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1995-01-01

    The development of a global economy makes the outlook for high speed commercial intercontinental flight feasible, and the development of various configurations operating from 20 to 30 km have been proposed. In addition to the still unresolved issues relating to current commercial operations (12-16 km), the higher dose rates associated with the higher operating altitudes makes il imperative that the uncertainties in the atmospheric radiation environment and the associated health risks be re-examined. Atmospheric radiation associated with the galactic cosmic rays forms a background level which may, under some circumstances, exceed newly recommended allowable exposure limits proposed on the basis of recent evaluations of the A -bomb survivor data (due to increased risk coefficients). These larger risk coefficients, within the context of the methodology for estimating exposure limits, are resulting in exceedingly low estimated allowable exposure limits which may impact even present day flight operations and was the reason for the CEC workshop in Luxembourg (1990). At higher operating altitudes, solar particles events can produce exposures many orders of magnitude above background levels and pose significant health risks to the most sensitive individuals (such as during pregnancy). In this case the appropriate quality factors are undefined, and some evidence exists which indicates that the quality factor for stochastic effects is a substantial underestimate.

  4. The global decentralization of commercial aircraft production: Implications for United States-based manufacturing activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, David John

    This research explores the role of industrial offset agreements and international subcontracting patterns in the global decentralization of US commercial aircraft production. Particular attention is given to the manufacturing processes involved in the design and assembly of large passenger jets (100 seats or more). It is argued that the current geography of aircraft production at the global level has been shaped by a new international distribution of input costs and technological capability. Specifically, low-cost producers within several of the newly emerging markets (NEMs) have acquired front-end manufacturing expertise as a direct result of industrial offset contracts and/or other forms of technology transfer (e.g. international joint-ventures, imports of advanced machine tools). The economic and technological implications of industrial offset (compensatory trade) are examined with reference to the commercial future of US aircraft production. Evidence gathered via personal interviews with both US and foreign producers suggests that the current Western duopoly (Boeing and Airbus) faces a rather uncertain future. In particular, the dissertation shows that the growth of subcontracting and industrial offset portends the transformation of Boeing from an aircraft manufacturer to a systems integrator. The economic implications of this potential reconfiguration of the US aircraft industry are discussed in the context of several techno-market futures, some of which look rather bleak for US workers in this industry.

  5. Physical characterization of the fine particle emissions from commercial aircraft engines during the Aircraft Particle Emissions Experiment (APEX) 1 to 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    The f1me particulate matter (PM) emissions from nine commercial aircraft engine models were determined by plume sampling during the three field campaigns of the Aircraft Particle Emissions Experiment (APEX). Ground-based measurements were made primarily at 30 m behind the engine ...

  6. A Commercial Aircraft Fuel Burn and Emissions Inventory for 2005–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donata K. Wasiuk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The commercial aircraft fuel burn and emission estimates of CO2, CO, H2O, hydrocarbons, NOx and SOx for 2005–2011 are given as the 4-D Aircraft Fuel Burn and Emissions Inventory. On average, the annual fuel burn and emissions of CO2, H2O, NOx, and SOx increased by 2%–3% for 2005–2011, however, annual CO and HC emissions decreased by 1.6% and 8.7%, respectively because of improving combustion efficiency in recent aircraft. Approximately 90% of the global annual aircraft NOx emissions were emitted in the NH between 2005 and 2011. Air traffic within the three main industrialised regions of the NH (Asia, Europe, and North America alone accounted for 80% of the global number of departures, resulting in 50% and 45% of the global aircraft CO2 and NOx emissions, respectively, during 2005–2011. The current Asian fleet appears to impact our climate strongly (in terms of CO2 and NOx when compared with the European and North American fleet. The changes in the geographical distribution and a gradual shift of the global aircraft NOx emissions as well as a subtle but steady change in regional emissions trends are shown in particular comparatively rising growth rates between 0 and 30°N and decreasing levels between 30 and 60°N.

  7. Study on utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structures. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, I. F.; Ostrom, R. B.; Cardinale, S. V.

    1978-01-01

    The effort required by commercial transport manufacturers to accomplish the transition from current construction materials and practices to extensive use of composites in aircraft wings was investigated. The engineering and manufacturing disciplines which normally participate in the design, development, and production of an aircraft were employed to ensure that all of the factors that would enter a decision to commit to production of a composite wing structure were addressed. A conceptual design of an advanced technology reduced energy aircraft provided the framework for identifying and investigating unique design aspects. A plan development effort defined the essential technology needs and formulated approaches for effecting the required wing development. The wing development program plans, resource needs, and recommendations are summarized.

  8. Commercial aircraft as a source of automated meteorological data for GATE and DST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, P. R.; Steinberg, R.

    1975-01-01

    Specially-equipped wide-body commercial aircraft which are flying tropical and Southern Hemispheric routes are providing a new and unique source of meteorological data with a 100 km spatial resolution. Data have been gathered for the GATE, and the planning for a similar effort for the DST is in progress. These aircraft not only provide synoptic data in critical areas devoid of conventional data, but are, in effect, meteorological research platforms that can provide valuable information on mesoscale phenomena. By 1976 it is anticipated that there will be over 80 such aircraft flying global routes. These specially-equipped jets could also be effectively used for EGGE by providing the nucleus of a supplementary observing system for gathering world-wide meteorological data.

  9. Study on utilization of advanced composites in commercial aircraft wing structures, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, I. F.; Ostrom, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    A plan is defined for a composite wing development effort which will assist commercial transport manufacturers in reaching a level of technology readiness where the utilization of composite wing structure is a cost competitive option for a new aircraft production plan. The recommended development effort consists of two programs: a joint government/industry material development program and a wing structure development program. Both programs are described in detail.

  10. Development of Techniques for the In Situ Observation of OH and HO2 for Studies of the Impact of High-Altitude Supersonic Aircraft on the Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James G.

    1994-01-01

    This three-year project supported the construction, calibration, and deployment of a new instrument to measure the OH and HO2 radicals on the NASA ER-2 aircraft. The instrument has met and exceeded all of its design goals. The instrumentation represents a true quantum leap in performance over that achieved in previous HO(x) instruments built in our group. Sensitivity for OH was enhanced by over two orders of magnitude as the weight fell from approximately 1500 to less than 200 Kg. Reliability has been very high: HO(x) data are available for all flights during the first operational mission, the Stratospheric Photochemistry, Aerosols, and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE). The results of that experiment have been reported in the scientific literature and at conferences. Additionally, measurements of H2O and O3 were made and have been reported in the scientific literature. The measurements demonstrate the important role that OH and HO2 play in determining the concentration of ozone in the lower stratosphere. During the SPADE campaign, the measurements demonstrate that the catalytic removal is dominated by processes involving the odd-hydrogen and halogen radical extremely important constraint for photochemical models that are being used to assess the potential deleterious effects of super-sonic aircraft effluent on the burden of stratospheric ozone. A list of the papers that came from this research are included, along with a copy of the paper, 'Aircraft-borne, laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the in situ detection of hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals'.

  11. Multiaxis control power from thrust vectoring for a supersonic fighter aircraft model at Mach 0.20 to 2.47

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Francis J.; Bare, E. Ann

    1987-01-01

    The aeropropulsive characteristics of an advanced twin-engine fighter aircraft designed for supersonic cruise have been studied in the Langley 16-Foot Tansonic Tunnel and the Lewis 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Tunnel. The objective was to determine multiaxis control-power characteristics from thrust vectoring. A two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle was designed to provide yaw vector angles of 0, -10, and -20 deg combined with geometric pitch vector angles of 0 and 15 deg. Yaw thrust vectoring was provided by yaw flaps located in the nozzle sidewalls. Roll control was obtained from differential pitch vectoring. This investigation was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.20 to 2.47. Angle of attack was varied from 0 to about 19 deg, and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from about 1 (jet off) to 28, depending on Mach number. Increments in force or moment coefficient that result from pitch or yaw thrust vectoring remain essentially constant over the entire angle-of-attack range of all Mach numbers tested. There was no effect of pitch vectoring on the lateral aerodynamic forces and moments and only very small effects of yaw vectoring on the longitudinal aerodynamic forces and moments. This result indicates little cross-coupling of control forces and moments for combined pitch-yaw vectoring.

  12. The Design and Use of a Temperature-Compensated Hot-Film Anemometer System for Boundary-Layer Flow Transition Detection on Supersonic Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiles, Harry R.

    1988-01-01

    An airborne temperature-compensated hot-film anemometer system has been designed, fabricated, and used to obtain in-flight airfoil boundary-layer flow transition data by the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility. Salient features of the anemometer include near constant sensitivity over the full flight envelope, installation without coaxial wiring, low-noise outputs, and self-contained signal conditioning with dynamic and steady-state outputs. The small size, low-power dissipation, and modular design make the anemometer suitable for use in modern high-performance research aircraft. Design of the temperature-compensated hot-film anemometer and its use for flow transition detection on a laminar flow flight research project are described. Also presented are data gathered in flight which is representative of the temperature-compensated hot-film anemometer operation at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flight conditions.

  13. Commercial aircraft engine emissions characterization of in-use aircraft at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Scott C; Jayne, John T; Lobo, Prem; Onasch, Timothy B; Fleming, Gregg; Hagen, Donald E; Whitefield, Philip D; Miake-Lye, Richard C

    2008-03-15

    The emissions from in-use commercial aircraft engines have been analyzed for selected gas-phase species and particulate characteristics using continuous extractive sampling 1-2 min downwind from operational taxi- and runways at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Using the aircraft tail numbers, 376 plumes were associated with specific engine models. In general, for takeoff plumes, the measured NOx emission index is lower (approximately 18%) than that predicted by engine certification data corrected for ambient conditions. These results are an in-service observation of the practice of "reduced thrust takeoff". The CO emission index observed in ground idle plumes was greater (up to 100%) than predicted by engine certification data for the 7% thrust condition. Significant differences are observed in the emissions of black carbon and particle number among different engine models/technologies. The presence of a mode at approximately 65 nm (mobility diameter) associated with takeoff plumes and a smaller mode at approximately 25 nm associated with idle plumes has been observed. An anticorrelation between particle mass loading and particle number concentration is observed.

  14. An Aileron Flutter Experiment and Analysis Using Semi-Span Model for the Small Supersonic Experimental Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Kenichi; Tamayama, Masato; Kikuchi, Takao; Machida, Shigeru; Nakamichi, Jiro

    This paper reports a wind-tunnel experiment and analysis that have been conducted under the National Experimental Airplane for Supersonic Transports (NEXST-1) project of JAXA. In order to perform the flight experiment, the design of the vehicle was examined from the stand point of aeroelasticity. The aileron buzz as well as flutter was of much concern for its aileron system on the main wing. Therefore, both wind-tunnel test and analysis were carried out by using a semi-span model with fuselage. Although the buzz was not observed in the test, damping responses of the aileron rotation mode were obtained. Critical damping was observed in supersonic flow, that meant a buzz could occur in ``region C'' of Lambourne's classification. Linear unsteady aerodynamic analysis is applicable to this type of buzz and the characteristics of the buzz of the model is discussed.

  15. Modeling flight attendants' exposure to secondhand smoke in commercial aircraft: historical trends from 1955 to 1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruiling; Dix-Cooper, Linda; Hammond, S Katharine

    2015-01-01

    Flight attendants were exposed to elevated levels of secondhand smoke (SHS) in commercial aircraft when smoking was allowed on planes. During flight attendants' working years, their occupational SHS exposure was influenced by various factors, including the prevalence of active smokers on planes, fliers' smoking behaviors, airplane flight load factors, and ventilation systems. These factors have likely changed over the past six decades and would affect SHS concentrations in commercial aircraft. However, changes in flight attendants' exposure to SHS have not been examined in the literature. This study estimates the magnitude of the changes and the historic trends of flight attendants' SHS exposure in U.S. domestic commercial aircraft by integrating historical changes of contributing factors. Mass balance models were developed and evaluated to estimate flight attendants' exposure to SHS in passenger cabins, as indicated by two commonly used tracers (airborne nicotine and particulate matter (PM)). Monte Carlo simulations integrating historical trends and distributions of influence factors were used to simulate 10,000 flight attendants' exposure to SHS on commercial flights from 1955 to 1989. These models indicate that annual mean SHS PM concentrations to which flight attendants were exposed in passenger cabins steadily decreased from approximately 265 μg/m(3) in 1955 and 1960 to 93 μg/m(3) by 1989, and airborne nicotine exposure among flight attendants also decreased from 11.1 μg/m(3) in 1955 to 6.5 μg/m(3) in 1989. Using duration of employment as an indicator of flight attendants' cumulative occupational exposure to SHS in epidemiological studies would inaccurately assess their lifetime exposures and thus bias the relationship between the exposure and health effects. This historical trend should be considered in future epidemiological studies.

  16. Insecticide Exposures on Commercial Aircraft: A Literature Review and Screening Level Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddalena, Randy I.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this project was to provide initial estimates of the relationship between insecticide use on passenger aircraft and exposure levels present in the cabin environment. The work was initially divided into three tasks including 1) a review of insecticide application practices in commercial aircraft, 2) exploratory measurements of insecticide concentrations in treated aircraft and 3) screening level exposure modeling. Task 1 gathered information that is needed to assess the time-concentration history of insecticides in the airline cabin. The literature review focused on application practices, information about the cabin environment and existing measurements of exposure concentrations following treatment. Information from the airlines was not available for estimating insecticide application rates in the U.S. domestic fleet or for understanding how frequently equipment rotate into domestic routes following insecticide treatment. However, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends several methods for treating aircraft with insecticide. Although there is evidence that these WHO guidelines may not always be followed, and that practices vary by airline, destination, and/or applicator company, the guidelines in combination with information related to other indoor environments provides a plausible basis for estimating insecticide loading rates on aircraft. The review also found that while measurements of exposure concentrations following simulated aerosol applications are available, measurements following residual treatment of aircraft or applications in domestic aircraft are lacking. Task 2 focused on developing an approach to monitor exposure concentrations in aircraft using a combination of active and passive sampling methods. An existing active sampling approach was intended to provide data immediately following treatment while a passive sampler was developed to provide wider coverage of the fleet over longer sampling periods. The passive sampler, based

  17. Production-teaching-research of a Commercial Aircraft Corporation in the Chinese Industry Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Lin; WANG Shuang-yuan; WEI Lin-wan

    2012-01-01

    For the future development of a commercial aircraft corporation, this paper focused on the research and technological innovation model in an industrial chain and explored how to promote the sustainable development of technological innovation on the basis of the Chinese aviation industry. It puts forward several ways to reinforce cooperation, such as strengthening policies and regulations, government's support for research cooperations, accelerating construction of the production-teaching-research oriented public technology platform and service system, and firming the industry awareness of universities and research institutes, and so on.

  18. Detection and Analysis of High Ice Concentration Events and Supercooled Drizzle from IAGOS Commercial Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Martin; Baumgardner, Darrel; Lloyd, Gary; Beswick, Karl; Freer, Matt; Durant, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Hazardous encounters with high ice concentrations that lead to temperature and airspeed sensor measurement errors, as well as engine rollback and flameout, continue to pose serious problems for flight operations of commercial air carriers. Supercooled liquid droplets (SLD) are an additional hazard, especially for smaller commuter aircraft that do not have sufficient power to fly out of heavy icing conditions or heat to remove the ice. New regulations issued by the United States and European regulatory agencies are being implemented that will require aircraft below a certain weight class to carry sensors that will detect and warn of these types of icing conditions. Commercial aircraft do not currently carry standard sensors to detect the presence of ice crystals in high concentrations because they are typical found in sizes that are below the detection range of aircraft weather radar. Likewise, the sensors that are currently used to detect supercooled water do not respond well to drizzle-sized drops. Hence, there is a need for a sensor that can fill this measurement void. In addition, the forecast models that are used to predict regions of icing rely on pilot observations as the only means to validate the model products and currently there are no forecasts for the prevalence of high altitude ice crystals. Backscatter Cloud Probes (BCP) have been flying since 2011 under the IAGOS project on six Airbus commercial airliners operated by Lufthansa, Air France, China Air, Iberia and Cathay Pacific, and measure cloud droplets, ice crystals and aerosol particles larger than 5 μm. The BCP can detect these particles and measures an optical equivalent diameter (OED) but is not able to distinguish the type of particle, i.e. whether they are droplets, ice crystals, dust or ash. However, some qualification can be done based on measured temperature to discriminate between liquid water and ice. The next generation BCP (BCPD, Backscatter Cloud Probe with polarization detection) is

  19. Synthetic Vision System Commercial Aircraft Flight Deck Display Technologies for Unusual Attitude Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Ellis, Kyle E.; Arthur, Jarvis J.; Nicholas, Stephanie N.; Kiggins, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    A Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) study of 18 worldwide loss-of-control accidents and incidents determined that the lack of external visual references was associated with a flight crew's loss of attitude awareness or energy state awareness in 17 of these events. Therefore, CAST recommended development and implementation of virtual day-Visual Meteorological Condition (VMC) display systems, such as synthetic vision systems, which can promote flight crew attitude awareness similar to a day-VMC environment. This paper describes the results of a high-fidelity, large transport aircraft simulation experiment that evaluated virtual day-VMC displays and a "background attitude indicator" concept as an aid to pilots in recovery from unusual attitudes. Twelve commercial airline pilots performed multiple unusual attitude recoveries and both quantitative and qualitative dependent measures were collected. Experimental results and future research directions under this CAST initiative and the NASA "Technologies for Airplane State Awareness" research project are described.

  20. Chemical characterization of the fine particle emissions from commercial aircraft engines during the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (APEX) 1 to 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper addresses the need for detailed chemical information on the fine particulate matter (PM2.5) generated by commercial aviation engines. The exhaust plumes of nine engine models were sampled during the three test campaigns of the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (AP...

  1. Methodology to estimate particulate matter emissions from certified commercial aircraft engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayson, Roger L; Fleming, Gregg G; Lovinelli, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Today, about one-fourth of U.S. commercial service airports, including 41 of the busiest 50, are either in nonattainment or maintenance areas per the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. U.S. aviation activity is forecasted to triple by 2025, while at the same time, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is evaluating stricter particulate matter (PM) standards on the basis of documented human health and welfare impacts. Stricter federal standards are expected to impede capacity and limit aviation growth if regulatory mandated emission reductions occur as for other non-aviation sources (i.e., automobiles, power plants, etc.). In addition, strong interest exists as to the role aviation emissions play in air quality and climate change issues. These reasons underpin the need to quantify and understand PM emissions from certified commercial aircraft engines, which has led to the need for a methodology to predict these emissions. Standardized sampling techniques to measure volatile and nonvolatile PM emissions from aircraft engines do not exist. As such, a first-order approximation (FOA) was derived to fill this need based on available information. FOA1.0 only allowed prediction of nonvolatile PM. FOA2.0 was a change to include volatile PM emissions on the basis of the ratio of nonvolatile to volatile emissions. Recent collaborative efforts by industry (manufacturers and airlines), research establishments, and regulators have begun to provide further insight into the estimation of the PM emissions. The resultant PM measurement datasets are being analyzed to refine sampling techniques and progress towards standardized PM measurements. These preliminary measurement datasets also support the continued refinement of the FOA methodology. FOA3.0 disaggregated the prediction techniques to allow for independent prediction of nonvolatile and volatile emissions on a more theoretical basis. The Committee for Aviation Environmental Protection of the International Civil

  2. Passenger thermal comfort and behavior: a field investigation in commercial aircraft cabins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, W; Wu, T; Ouyang, Q; Zhu, Y

    2017-01-01

    Passengers' behavioral adjustments warrant greater attention in thermal comfort research in aircraft cabins. Thus, a field investigation on 10 commercial aircrafts was conducted. Environment measurements were made and a questionnaire survey was performed. In the questionnaire, passengers were asked to evaluate their thermal comfort and record their adjustments regarding the usage of blankets and ventilation nozzles. The results indicate that behavioral adjustments in the cabin and the use of blankets or nozzle adjustments were employed by 2/3 of the passengers. However, the thermal comfort evaluations by these passengers were not as good as the evaluations by passengers who did not perform any adjustments. Possible causes such as differences in metabolic rate, clothing insulation and radiation asymmetry are discussed. The individual difference seems to be the most probable contributor, suggesting possibly that passengers who made adjustments had a narrower acceptance threshold or a higher expectancy regarding the cabin environment. Local thermal comfort was closely related to the adjustments and significantly influenced overall thermal comfort. Frequent flying was associated with lower ratings for the cabin environment.

  3. Analysis of nonequilibrium chemical processes in the plume of subsonic and supersonic aircraft with hydrogen and hydrocarbon combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starik, A.M.; Lebedev, A.B.; Titova, N.S. [Central Inst. of Aviation Motors, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    On the basic of quasi one dimensional mixing model the numerical analysis of nonequilibrium chemical processes in the plume of subsonic and hypersonic aircraft is presented. It was found that species HNO, HNO{sub 3}, HNO{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O{sub 5}, ClO{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2} could be formed as a result of nonequilibrium processes in the plume and their concentrations can essentially exceed both background values in free stream of atmosphere and their values at the nozzle exit plane. (author) 10 refs.

  4. Experimental studies of thermal environment and contaminant transport in a commercial aircraft cabin with gaspers on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B; Duan, R; Li, J; Huang, Y; Yin, H; Lin, C-H; Wei, D; Shen, X; Liu, J; Chen, Q

    2016-10-01

    Gaspers installed in commercial airliner cabins are used to improve passengers' thermal comfort. To understand the impact of gasper airflow on the air quality in a cabin, this investigation measured the distributions of air velocity, air temperature, and gaseous contaminant concentration in five rows of the economy-class section of an MD-82 commercial aircraft. The gaseous contaminant was simulated using SF6 as a tracer gas with the source located at the mouth of a seated manikin close to the aisle. Two-fifths of the gaspers next to the aisle were turned on in the cabin, and each of them supplied air at a flow rate of 0.66 l/s. The airflow rate in the economy-class cabin was controlled at 10 l/s per passenger. Data obtained in a previous study of the cabin with all gaspers turned off were used for comparison. The results show that the jets from the gaspers had a substantial impact on the air velocity and contaminant transport in the cabin. The air velocity in the cabin was higher, and the air temperature slightly more uniform, when the gaspers were on than when they were off, but turning on the gaspers may not have improved the air quality.

  5. 78 FR 61388 - TA-W-82,705, the Boeing Company Boeing Commercial Aircraft, (BCA) Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... Employment and Training Administration TA-W-82,705, the Boeing Company Boeing Commercial Aircraft, (BCA..., Washington; TA-W-82,705A, the Boeing Company Boeing Commercial Aircraft, (BCA) Including On-Site Leased... International, Volt Services and Yoh Services Everett, Washington; TA-W-82,705B, The Boeing Company...

  6. 19 CFR 122.49c - Master crew member list and master non-crew member list requirement for commercial aircraft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Master crew member list and master non-crew member... Commercial Aircraft Arriving In, Continuing Within, and Overflying the United States § 122.49c Master crew member list and master non-crew member list requirement for commercial aircraft arriving in,...

  7. Near-field commercial aircraft contribution to nitrogen oxides by engine, aircraft type, and airline by individual plume sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carslaw, David C; Ropkins, Karl; Laxen, Duncan; Moorcroft, Stephen; Marner, Ben; Williams, Martin L

    2008-03-15

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) concentrations were measured in individual plumes from aircraft departing on the northern runway at Heathrow Airport in west London. Over a period of four weeks 5618 individual plumes were sampled by a chemiluminescence monitor located 180 m from the runway. Results were processed and matched with detailed aircraft movement and aircraft engine data using chromatographic techniques. Peak concentrations associated with 29 commonly used engines were calculated and found to have a good relationship with N0x emissions taken from the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) databank. However, it is found that engines with higher reported NOx emissions result in proportionately lower NOx concentrations than engines with lower emissions. We show that it is likely that aircraft operational factors such as takeoff weight and aircraftthrust setting have a measurable and important effect on concentrations of N0x. For example, NOx concentrations can differ by up to 41% for aircraft using the same airframe and engine type, while those due to the same engine type in different airframes can differ by 28%. These differences are as great as, if not greater than, the reported differences in NOx emissions between different engine manufacturers for engines used on the same airframe.

  8. Properties of small cirrus ice crystals from commercial aircraft measurements and implications for flight operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Beswick

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of cloud ice crystal size distributions have been made by a backscatter cloud probe (BCP mounted on five commercial airliners flying international routes that cross five continents. Bulk cloud parameters were also derived from the size distributions. As of 31 December 2014, a total of 4399 flights had accumulated data from 665 hours in more than 19 000 cirrus clouds larger than 5 km in length. The BCP measures the equivalent optical diameter (EOD of individual crystals in the 5–90 µm range from which size distributions are derived and recorded every 4 seconds. The cirrus cloud property database, an ongoing development stemming from these measurements, registers the total crystal number and mass concentration, effective and median volume diameters and extinction coefficients derived from the size distribution. This information is accompanied by the environmental temperature, pressure, aircraft position, date and time of each sample. The seasonal variations of the cirrus cloud properties measured from 2012 to 2014 are determined for six geographic regions in the tropics and extratropics. Number concentrations range from a few per litre for thin cirrus to several hundreds of thousands for heavy cirrus. Temperatures range from 205 to 250 K and effective radii from 12 to 20 µm. A comparison of the regional and seasonal number and mass size distributions, and the bulk microphysical properties derived from them, demonstrates that cirrus properties cannot be easily parameterised by temperature or by latitude. The seasonal changes in the size distributions from the extratropical Atlantic and Eurasian air routes are distinctly different, showing shifts from mono-modal to bi-modal spectra out of phase with one another. This phase difference may be linked to the timing of deep convection and cold fronts that lead to the cirrus formation. Likewise, the size spectra of cirrus over the tropical Atlantic and Eastern Brazil differ from each

  9. High-Fidelity Aerostructural Optimization of Nonplanar Wings for Commercial Transport Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Shahriar

    Although the aerospace sector is currently responsible for a relatively small portion of global anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, the growth of the airline industry raises serious concerns about the future of commercial aviation. As a result, the development of new aircraft design concepts with the potential to improve fuel efficiency remains an important priority. Numerical optimization based on high-fidelity physics has become an increasingly attractive tool over the past fifteen years in the search for environmentally friendly aircraft designs that reduce fuel consumption. This approach is able to discover novel design concepts and features that may never be considered without optimization. This can help reduce the economic costs and risks associated with developing new aircraft concepts by providing a more realistic assessment early in the design process. This thesis provides an assessment of the potential efficiency improvements obtained from nonplanar wings through the application of fully coupled high-fidelity aerostructural optimization. In this work, we conduct aerostructural optimization using the Euler equations to model the flow along with a viscous drag estimate based on the surface area. A major focus of the thesis is on finding the optimal shape and performance benefits of nonplanar wingtip devices. Two winglet configurations are considered: winglet-up and winglet-down. These are compared to optimized planar wings of the same projected span in order to quantify the possible drag reductions offered by winglets. In addition, the drooped wing is studied in the context of exploratory optimization. The main results show that the winglet-down configuration is the most efficient winglet shape, reducing the drag by approximately 2% at the same weight in comparison to a planar wing. There are two reasons for the superior performance of this design. First, this configuration moves the tip vortex further away from the wing. Second, the winglet

  10. Technology transfer and catch-up; Lessons from the commercial aircraft industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.; Heerkens, Johannes M.G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses the technology development and technology transfer strategies in the aircraft manufacturing industry for four industrially developing countries. It is concluded from four case studies that technology catch-up is extremely difficult due to aircraft technology characteristics.

  11. Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, Bart D.; Lissaman, Peter B. S.; Morgan, Walter R.; Radkey, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing's top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gasses for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well.

  12. Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, B.D.; Lissaman, P.B.S.; Morgan, W.R.; Radkey, R.L.

    1998-09-22

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing`s top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gases for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well. 31 figs.

  13. Noise data for a twin-engine commercial jet aircraft flying conventional, steep, and two-segment approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, E. C., Jr.; Mueller, A. W.; Hamilton, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Center-line noise measurements of a twin-engine commercial jet aircraft were made during steep landing approach profiles, and during two-segment approach profiles for comparison with similar measurements made during conventional approaches. The steep and two-segment approaches showed significant noise reductions when compared with the -3 deg base line. The measured noise data were also used to develop a method for estimating the noise under the test aircraft at thrust and altitude conditions typical of current landing procedures and of landing procedures under development for the Advanced Air Traffic Control System.

  14. A maintenance model for k-out-of-n subsystems aboard a fleet of advanced commercial aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Proposed highly reliable fault-tolerant reconfigurable digital control systems for a future generation of commercial aircraft consist of several k-out-of-n subsystems. Each of these flight-critical subsystems will consist of n identical components, k of which must be functioning properly in order for the aircraft to be dispatched. Failed components are recoverable; they are repaired in a shop. Spares are inventoried at a main base where they may be substituted for failed components on planes during layovers. Penalties are assessed when failure of a k-out-of-n subsystem causes a dispatch cancellation or delay. A maintenance model for a fleet of aircraft with such control systems is presented. The goals are to demonstrate economic feasibility and to optimize.

  15. PM emissions measurements of in-service commercial aircraft engines during the Delta-Atlanta Hartsfield Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Prem; Hagen, Donald E.; Whitefield, Philip D.; Raper, David

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the results of the physical characterization of aircraft engine PM emission measurements conducted during the Delta-Atlanta Hartsfield Study at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Engine exit plane PM emissions were sampled from on-wing engines on several in-service commercial transport aircraft from the fleet of Delta Airlines. The size distributions were lognormal in nature with a single mode. The geometric mean diameter was found to increase with increasing engine thrust, ranging from 15 nm at idle to 40 nm at takeoff. PM number- and mass-based emission indices were observed to be higher at the idle conditions (4% and 7%), lowest at 15%-30% thrust, and then increase with increasing thrust. Emissions measurements were also conducted during an advected plume study where over 300 exhaust plumes generated by a broad mix of commercial transports were sampled 100-350 m downwind from aircraft operational runways during normal airport operations. The range of values measured at take-off for the different engine types in terms of PM number-based emission index was between 7 × 1015-9 × 1017 particles/kg fuel burned, and that for PM mass-based emission index was 0.1-0.6 g/kg fuel burned. PM characteristics of aircraft engine specific exhaust were found to evolve over time as the exhaust plume expands, dilutes with ambient air, and cools. The data from these measurements will enhance the emissions inventory development for a subset of engines operating in the commercial fleet and improve/validate current environmental impact predictive tools with real world aircraft engine specific PM emissions inputs.

  16. Identification of lubrication oil in the particulate matter emissions from engine exhaust of in-service commercial aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenhong; Herndon, Scott C; Ziemba, Luke D; Timko, Michael T; Liscinsky, David S; Anderson, Bruce E; Miake-Lye, Richard C

    2012-09-04

    Lubrication oil was identified in the organic particulate matter (PM) emissions of engine exhaust plumes from in-service commercial aircraft at Chicago Midway Airport (MDW) and O'Hare International Airport (ORD). This is the first field study focused on aircraft lubrication oil emissions, and all of the observed plumes described in this work were due to near-idle engine operations. The identification was carried out with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF AMS) via a collaborative laboratory and field investigation. A characteristic mass marker of lubrication oil, I(85)/I(71), the ratio of ion fragment intensity between m/z = 85 and 71, was used to distinguish lubrication oil from jet engine combustion products. This AMS marker was based on ion fragmentation patterns measured using electron impact ionization for two brands of widely used lubrication oil in a laboratory study. The AMS measurements of exhaust plumes from commercial aircraft in this airport field study reveal that lubrication oil is commonly present in organic PM emissions that are associated with emitted soot particles, unlike the purely oil droplets observed at the lubrication system vent. The characteristic oil marker, I(85)/I(71), was applied to quantitatively determine the contribution from lubrication oil in measured aircraft plumes, which ranges from 5% to 100%.

  17. Integration of structural health monitoring solutions onto commercial aircraft via the Federal Aviation Administration structural health monitoring research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindell, Paul; Doyle, Jon; Roach, Dennis

    2017-02-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) started a research program in structural health monitoring (SHM) in 2011. The program's goal was to understand the technical gaps of implementing SHM on commercial aircraft and the potential effects on FAA regulations and guidance. The program evolved into a demonstration program consisting of a team from Sandia National Labs Airworthiness Assurance NDI Center (AANC), the Boeing Corporation, Delta Air Lines, Structural Monitoring Systems (SMS), Anodyne Electronics Manufacturing Corp (AEM) and the FAA. This paper will discuss the program from the selection of the inspection problem, the SHM system (Comparative Vacuum Monitoring-CVM) that was selected as the inspection solution and the testing completed to provide sufficient data to gain the first approved use of an SHM system for routine maintenance on commercial US aircraft.

  18. Decoupling Method for Transient Thermal Status of Low Supersonic Aircrafts%低超声速飞行器瞬态热状况解耦算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振环; 孙海锋; 夏新林; 李洋

    2016-01-01

    Considering complexity of coupled fluid⁃solid calculation of low supersonic aircraft under unsteady flight condition, real time aerodynamic heat by outer fluid field is converted into floated third type boundary conditions for decoupled calculation. Take three⁃dimensional head cone experiencing accelerating diving as example, floated temperature and radiation equilibrium methods are adopted to extract surface heat transfer coefficients for decoupling calculation. Results are compared with coupled results to validate reliability of decoupling methods. It shows that with dispersed state points representing unsteady process, temperature distributions of cone surface at different state points by decoupling methods agree well with coupling ones. Calculating efficiency of decoupling methods is superior to coupling ones. Maximum relative errors of decoupling methods are both within 2%, even as external aerodynamic environment changes dramatically.%针对低超声速飞行器非稳态飞行条件下内外流固耦合一体化计算的复杂性,将飞行器外部流场的实时气动热转化为浮动的第三类边界条件进行解耦。以加速俯冲的超声速三维头锥体为例,分别采用浮动温差法和辐射平衡法提取表面对流换热系数进行解耦计算,并与直接耦合计算结果进行比较,验证两种解耦算法的可靠性。结果表明,将非稳态飞行过程离散为不同飞行状态点,通过提取对流换热系数解耦计算得到的不同状态点的锥体表面温度分布与直接耦合计算得到的结果吻合较好。两种解耦算法在计算效率方面均要优于耦合计算方法;在外界气动环境发生剧烈变化的过程中,最大相对误差均不超过2%。

  19. Towards the characterization of noise sources in a supersonic three-stream jet using advanced analysis tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscher, Christopher; Gogineni, Sivaram

    2016-11-01

    Strict noise regulation set by governing bodies currently make supersonic commercial aviation impractical. One of the many challenges that exist in developing practical supersonic commercial aircraft is the noise produced by the engine's exhaust jet. A promising method of jet noise reduction for supersonic applications is through the addition of extra exhaust streams. Data for an axisymmetric three-stream nozzle were generated using the Naval Research Laboratory's JENRE code. This data will be compared to experimental results obtained by NASA for validation purposes. Once the simulation results show satisfactory agreement to the experiments, advanced analysis tools will be applied to the simulation data to characterize potential noise sources. The tools to be applied include methods that are based on proper orthogonal decomposition, wavelet decomposition, and stochastic estimation. Additionally, techniques such as empirical mode decomposition and momentum potential theorem will be applied to the data as well.

  20. Damage tolerance assessment of bonded composite doubler repairs for commercial aircraft applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, D.

    1998-08-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration has sponsored a project at its Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) to validate the use of bonded composite doublers on commercial aircraft. A specific application was chosen in order to provide a proof-of-concept driving force behind this test and analysis project. However, the data stemming from this study serves as a comprehensive evaluation of bonded composite doublers for general use. The associated documentation package provides guidance regarding the design, analysis, installation, damage tolerance, and nondestructive inspection of these doublers. This report describes a series of fatigue and strength tests which were conducted to study the damage tolerance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Tension-tension fatigue and ultimate strength tests attempted to grow engineered flaws in coupons with composite doublers bonded to aluminum skin. An array of design parameters, including various flaw scenarios, the effects of surface impact, and other off-design conditions, were studied. The structural tests were used to: (1) assess the potential for interply delaminations and disbonds between the aluminum and the laminate, and (2) determine the load transfer and crack mitigation capabilities of composite doublers in the presence of severe defects. A series of specimens were subjected to ultimate tension tests in order to determine strength values and failure modes. It was demonstrated that even in the presence of extensive damage in the original structure (cracks, material loss) and in spite of non-optimum installations (adhesive disbonds), the composite doubler allowed the structure to survive more than 144,000 cycles of fatigue loading. Installation flaws in the composite laminate did not propagate over 216,000 fatigue cycles. Furthermore, the added impediments of impact--severe enough to deform the parent aluminum skin--and hot-wet exposure did not effect the doubler`s performance. Since the tests were conducting

  1. Technology transfer and catch-up; Lessons from the commercial aircraft industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, Harm-Jan; Bruijn, de Erik J.; Heerkens, Hans

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses the technology development and technology transfer strategies in the aircraft manufacturing industry for four industrially developing countries. It is concluded from four case studies that technology catch-up is extremely difficult due to aircraft technology characteristics. Base

  2. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell APU Feasibility Study for a Long Range Commercial Aircraft Using UTC ITAPS Approach. Volume 1; Aircraft Propulsion and Subsystems Integration Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Hari; Yamanis, Jean; Welch, Rick; Tulyani, Sonia; Hardin, Larry

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this contract effort was to define the functionality and evaluate the propulsion and power system benefits derived from a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) based Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) for a future long range commercial aircraft, and to define the technology gaps to enable such a system. The study employed technologies commensurate with Entry into Service (EIS) in 2015. United Technologies Corporation (UTC) Integrated Total Aircraft Power System (ITAPS) methodologies were used to evaluate system concepts to a conceptual level of fidelity. The technology benefits were captured as reductions of the mission fuel burn and emissions. The baseline aircraft considered was the Boeing 777-200ER airframe with more electric subsystems, Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) engines, and an advanced APU with ceramics for increased efficiency. In addition to the baseline architecture, four architectures using an SOFC system to replace the conventional APU were investigated. The mission fuel burn savings for Architecture-A, which has minimal system integration, is 0.16 percent. Architecture-B and Architecture-C employ greater system integration and obtain fuel burn benefits of 0.44 and 0.70 percent, respectively. Architecture-D represents the highest level of integration and obtains a benefit of 0.77 percent.

  3. Characterization of the frequency and nature of bleed air contamination events in commercial aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehadi, M; Jones, B; Hosni, M

    2016-06-01

    Contamination of the bleed air used to pressurize and ventilate aircraft cabins is of concern due to the potential health and safety hazards for passengers and crew. Databases from the Federal Aviation Administration, NASA, and other sources were examined in detail to determine the frequency of bleed air contamination incidents. The frequency was examined on an aircraft model basis with the intent of identifying aircraft make and models with elevated frequencies of contamination events. The reported results herein may help investigators to focus future studies of bleed air contamination incidents on smaller number of aircrafts. Incident frequency was normalized by the number of aircraft, number of flights, and flight hours for each model to account for the large variations in the number of aircraft of different models. The focus of the study was on aircraft models that are currently in service and are used by major airlines in the United States. Incidents examined in this study include those related to smoke, oil odors, fumes, and any symptom that might be related to exposure to such contamination, reported by crew members, between 2007 and 2012, for US-based carriers for domestic flights and all international flights that either originated or terminated in the US. In addition to the reported frequency of incidents for different aircraft models, the analysis attempted to identify propulsion engines and auxiliary power units associated with aircrafts that had higher frequencies of incidents. While substantial variations were found in frequency of incidents, it was found that the contamination events were widely distributed across nearly all common models of aircraft.

  4. Supersonic Wing Optimization Using SpaRibs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, David; Mulani, Sameer B.; Liu, Qiang; Tamijani, Ali Y.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2014-01-01

    This research investigates the advantages of using curvilinear spars and ribs, termed SpaRibs, to design a supersonic aircraft wing-box in comparison to the use of classic design concepts that employ straight spars and ribs. The objective is to achieve a more efficient load-bearing mechanism and to passively control the deformation of the structure under the flight loads. Moreover, the use of SpaRibs broadens the design space and allows for natural frequencies and natural mode shape tailoring. The SpaRibs concept is implemented in a new optimization MATLAB-based framework referred to as EBF3SSWingOpt. This optimization scheme performs both the sizing and the shaping of the internal structural elements, connecting the optimizer with the analysis software. The shape of the SpaRibs is parametrically defined using the so called Linked Shape method. Each set of SpaRibs is placed in a one by one square domain of the natural space. The set of curves is subsequently transformed in the physical space for creating the wing structure geometry layout. The shape of each curve of each set is unique; however, mathematical relations link the curvature in an effort to reduce the number of design variables. The internal structure of a High Speed Commercial Transport aircraft concept developed by Boeing is optimized subjected to stress, subsonic flutter and supersonic flutter constraints. The results show that the use of the SpaRibs allows for the reduction of the aircraft's primary structure weight without violating the constraints. A weight reduction of about 15 percent is observed.

  5. The Edge supersonic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Roxana; Bilbija, Dushan; Deutsch, Marc; Gallant, David; Rose, Don; Shreve, Gene; Smario, David; Suffredini, Brian

    1992-01-01

    As intercontinental business and tourism volumes continue their rapid expansion, the need to reduce travel times becomes increasingly acute. The Edge Supersonic Transport Aircraft is designed to meet this demand by the year 2015. With a maximum range of 5750 nm, a payload of 294 passengers and a cruising speed of M = 2.4, The Edge will cut current international flight durations in half, while maintaining competitive first class, business class, and economy class comfort levels. Moreover, this transport will render a minimal impact upon the environment, and will meet all Federal Aviation Administration Part 36, Stage III noise requirements. The cornerstone of The Edge's superior flight performance is its aerodynamically efficient, dual-configuration design incorporating variable-geometry wingtips. This arrangement combines the benefits of a high aspect ratio wing at takeoff and low cruising speeds with the high performance of an arrow-wing in supersonic cruise. And while the structural weight concerns relating to swinging wingtips are substantial, The Edge looks to ever-advancing material technologies to further increase its viability. Heeding well the lessons of the past, The Edge design holds economic feasibility as its primary focus. Therefore, in addition to its inherently superior aerodynamic performance, The Edge uses a lightweight, largely windowless configuration, relying on a synthetic vision system for outside viewing by both pilot and passengers. Additionally, a fly-by-light flight control system is incorporated to address aircraft supersonic cruise instability. The Edge will be produced at an estimated volume of 400 aircraft and will be offered to airlines in 2015 at $167 million per transport (1992 dollars).

  6. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49/epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three L-1011s, were inspected after three years' service, and found to be performing satisfactorily. There are six Kevlar-49 panels on each aircraft, including sandwich and solid laminate wing-body panels, and 150 C service aft engine fairings. The service history to date indicates that Kevlar-49 epoxy composite materials have satisfactory service characteristics for use in aircraft secondary structure.

  7. Retrieving clear-air turbulence information from regular commercial aircraft using Mode-S and ADS-B broadcast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Kopeć

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Navigational information broadcast by commercial aircraft in the form of Mode-S and ADS-B messages can be considered a new and valid source of upper air turbulence measurements. A set of three processing methods is proposed and analysed using a quality record of turbulence encounters made by a research aircraft. The proposed methods are based on processing the vertical acceleration or the background wind into the eddy dissipation rate. All the necessary parameters are conveyed in the Mode-S/ADS-B messages. The comparison of the results of application of the processing against a reference eddy dissipation rate obtained using on-board accelerometer indicate a significant potential of those methods. The advantages and limitation of the presented approaches are discussed.

  8. Analytical and experimental evaluations of the effect of broad property fuels on combustors for commercial aircraft gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were conducted in three contract activities funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Lewis Research Center, to assess the impacts of broad property fuels on the design, performance, durability, emissions and operational characteristics of current and advanced combustors for commercial aircraft gas turbine engines. The effect of fuel thermal stability on engine and airframe fuel system was evaluated. Trade-offs between fuel properties, exhaust emissions and combustor life were also investigated. Results indicate major impacts of broad property fuels on allowable metal temperatures in fuel manifolds and injector support, combustor cyclic durability and somewhat lesser impacts on starting characteristics, lightoff, emissions and smoke.

  9. TCV software test and validation tools and technique. [Terminal Configured Vehicle program for commercial transport aircraft operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straeter, T. A.; Williams, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes techniques for testing and validating software for the TCV (Terminal Configured Vehicle) program which is intended to solve problems associated with operating a commercial transport aircraft in the terminal area. The TCV research test bed is a Boeing 737 specially configured with digital computer systems to carry out automatic navigation, guidance, flight controls, and electronic displays research. The techniques developed for time and cost reduction include automatic documentation aids, an automatic software configuration, and an all software generation and validation system.

  10. Impact of Cabin Ozone Concentrations on Passenger Reported Symptoms in Commercial Aircraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Allen, Joseph G.; Weschler, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    Due to elevated ozone concentrations at high altitudes, the adverse effect of ozone on air quality, human perception and health may be more pronounced in aircraft cabins. The association between ozone and passenger-reported symptoms has not been investigated under real conditions since smoking...... was banned on aircraft and ozone converters became more common. Indoor environmental parameters were measured at cruising altitude on 83 US domestic and international flights. Passengers completed a questionnaire about symptoms and satisfaction with the indoor air quality. Average ozone concentrations were...

  11. Analysis of Complexity Evolution Management and Human Performance Issues in Commercial Aircraft Automation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Sanjay S.; Hansman, R. John

    2000-01-01

    Autoflight systems in the current generation of aircraft have been implicated in several recent incidents and accidents. A contributory aspect to these incidents may be the manner in which aircraft transition between differing behaviours or 'modes.' The current state of aircraft automation was investigated and the incremental development of the autoflight system was tracked through a set of aircraft to gain insight into how these systems developed. This process appears to have resulted in a system without a consistent global representation. In order to evaluate and examine autoflight systems, a 'Hybrid Automation Representation' (HAR) was developed. This representation was used to examine several specific problems known to exist in aircraft systems. Cyclomatic complexity is an analysis tool from computer science which counts the number of linearly independent paths through a program graph. This approach was extended to examine autoflight mode transitions modelled with the HAR. A survey was conducted of pilots to identify those autoflight mode transitions which airline pilots find difficult. The transitions identified in this survey were analyzed using cyclomatic complexity to gain insight into the apparent complexity of the autoflight system from the perspective of the pilot. Mode transitions which had been identified as complex by pilots were found to have a high cyclomatic complexity. Further examination was made into a set of specific problems identified in aircraft: the lack of a consistent representation of automation, concern regarding appropriate feedback from the automation, and the implications of physical limitations on the autoflight systems. Mode transitions involved in changing to and leveling at a new altitude were identified across multiple aircraft by numerous pilots. Where possible, evaluation and verification of the behaviour of these autoflight mode transitions was investigated via aircraft-specific high fidelity simulators. Three solution

  12. Hearing status among aircraft maintenance personnel in a commercial airline company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Smedje

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to study subjective and objective hearing loss in a population of aircraft maintenance workers and identify predictors. A total of 327 aircraft maintenance personnel answered a self-administered work environment questionnaire (response rate 76% and underwent audiometric test. The mean values for the hearing threshold at 3, 4, and 6 kHz for the ear with the most hearing loss were compared with a Swedish population database of persons not occupationally exposed to noise. Equivalent noise exposure during a working day was measured. Relationships between subjective and objective hearing loss and possible predictors (age, years of employment, self-reported exposure to solvents, blood pressure, and psycho-social factors were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. At younger ages (<40 years, aircraft maintenance workers had higher hearing thresholds (1-3 dB compared to the reference group, but such a difference was not found in older employees. Relationships were found between age and objective hearing loss, and between exposure to solvents and reported subjective hearing loss. Equivalent noise exposure during working days were 70-91 dB(A with a maximal noise level of 119 dB(A. Aircraft maintenance workers are exposed to equivalent noise levels above the Swedish occupational standard, including some very high peak exposures. Younger employees have a higher age-matched hearing threshold level compared with a reference group. Thus, there is a need for further preventive measures.

  13. Hearing status among aircraft maintenance personnel in a commercial airline company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedje, Greta; Lunden, Maria; Gärtner, Lotta; Lundgren, Håkan; Lindgren, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to study subjective and objective hearing loss in a population of aircraft maintenance workers and identify predictors. A total of 327 aircraft maintenance personnel answered a self-administered work environment questionnaire (response rate 76%) and underwent audiometric test. The mean values for the hearing threshold at 3, 4, and 6 kHz for the ear with the most hearing loss were compared with a Swedish population database of persons not occupationally exposed to noise. Equivalent noise exposure during a working day was measured. Relationships between subjective and objective hearing loss and possible predictors (age, years of employment, self-reported exposure to solvents, blood pressure, and psycho-social factors) were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. At younger ages (aircraft maintenance workers had higher hearing thresholds (1-3 dB) compared to the reference group, but such a difference was not found in older employees. Relationships were found between age and objective hearing loss, and between exposure to solvents and reported subjective hearing loss. Equivalent noise exposure during working days were 70-91 dB(A) with a maximal noise level of 119 dB(A). Aircraft maintenance workers are exposed to equivalent noise levels above the Swedish occupational standard, including some very high peak exposures. Younger employees have a higher age-matched hearing threshold level compared with a reference group. Thus, there is a need for further preventive measures.

  14. Full-Scale Structural and NDI Validation Tests of Bonded Composite Doublers for Commercial Aircraft Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1999-02-01

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. Most of the concerns surrounding composite doubler technology pertain to long-term survivability, especially in the presence of non-optimum installations, and the validation of appropriate inspection procedures. This report focuses on a series of full-scale structural and nondestructive inspection (NDI) tests that were conducted to investigate the performance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Full-scale tests were conducted on fuselage panels cut from retired aircraft. These full-scale tests studied stress reductions, crack mitigation, and load transfer capabilities of composite doublers using simulated flight conditions of cabin pressure and axial stress. Also, structures which modeled key aspects of aircraft structure repairs were subjected to extreme tension, shear and bending loads to examine the composite laminate's resistance to disbond and delamination flaws. Several of the structures were loaded to failure in order to determine doubler design margins. Nondestructive inspections were conducted throughout the test series in order to validate appropriate techniques on actual aircraft structure. The test results showed that a properly designed and installed composite doubler is able to enhance fatigue life, transfer load away from damaged structure, and avoid the introduction of new stress risers (i.e. eliminate global reduction in the fatigue life of the structure). Comparisons with test data obtained prior to the doubler installation revealed that stresses in the parent material can be reduced 30%--60% through the use of the composite doubler. Tests to failure demonstrated that the bondline is able to transfer plastic strains into the doubler and that

  15. Measurements of nitrous acid in commercial aircraft exhaust at the Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ben H; Santoni, Gregory W; Wood, Ezra C; Herndon, Scott C; Miake-Lye, Richard C; Zahniser, Mark S; Wofsy, Steven C; Munger, J William

    2011-09-15

    The Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX), conducted in January of 2009 in Palmdale, California, quantified aerosol and gaseous emissions from a DC-8 aircraft equipped with CFM56-2C1 engines using both traditional and synthetic fuels. This study examines the emissions of nitrous acid (HONO) and nitrogen oxides (NO(x) = NO + NO(2)) measured 145 m behind the grounded aircraft. The fuel-based emission index (EI) for HONO increases approximately 6-fold from idle to takeoff conditions but plateaus between 65 and 100% of maximum rated engine thrust, while the EI for NO(x) increases continuously. At high engine power, NO(x) EI is greater when combusting traditional (JP-8) rather than Fischer-Tropsch fuels, while HONO exhibits the opposite trend. Additionally, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was identified in exhaust plumes emitted only during engine idle. Chemical reactions responsible for emissions and comparison to previous measurement studies are discussed.

  16. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy composite panels in wide-bodies commercial transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three L-1011s, were inspected after 9 years of service. There are six Kevlar-49 panels on each aircraft: a left hand and right hand set of a wing body sandwich fairing; a solid laminate under wing fillet panel; and a 422 K (300 F) service aft engine fairing. The fairings have accumulated a total of 70,000 hours, with one ship set having over 24,000 hours service. The Kevlar-49 components were found to be performing satisfactorily in service with no major problems, or any condition requiring corrective action. The only defects noted were minor impact damage, a few minor disbonds and a minor degree of fastener hole fraying and elongation. These are for the most part comparable to damage noted on fiberglass fairings. The service history to date indicates that Kevlar-49 epoxy composite materials have satisfactory service characteristics for use in aircraft secondary structure.

  17. An improved infrared carbon monoxide analyser for routine measurements aboard commercial airbus aircraft: Technical validation and first scientific results of the MOZAIC III programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Nedelec

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The European-funded MOZAIC programme (Measurements of ozone and water vapour by Airbus in-service aircraft has been operational since 1994 aboard 5 commercial Airbus A340. It has gathered ozone and water vapour data between the ground and an altitude of 12 km from more than 20 000 long-range flights. A new infrared carbon monoxide analyser has been developed for installation on the MOZAIC equipped aircraft. Improvements in the basic characteristics of a commercial CO analysers have achieved performance suitable for routine aircraft measurements : ±5 ppbv, ±5% precision for a 30 s response time. The first year of operation on board 4 aircraft with more than 900 flights has proven the reliability and the usefulness of this CO analyser. The first scientific results are presented here, including UTLS exchange events and pollution within the boundary layer.

  18. Development and validation of nondestructive inspection techniques for composite doubler repairs on commercial aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1998-05-01

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single boron-epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. In order for the use of composite doublers to achieve widespread use in the civil aviation industry, it is imperative that methods be developed which can quickly and reliably assess the integrity of the doubler. In this study, a specific composite application was chosen on an L-1011 aircraft in order to focus the tasks on application and operation issues. Primary among inspection requirements for these doublers is the identification of disbonds, between the composite laminate and aluminum parent material, and delaminations in the composite laminate. Surveillance of cracks or corrosion in the parent aluminum material beneath the doubler is also a concern. No single nondestructive inspection (NDI) method can inspect for every flaw type, therefore it is important to be aware of available NDI techniques and to properly address their capabilities and limitations. A series of NDI tests were conducted on laboratory test structures and on full-scale aircraft fuselage sections. Specific challenges, unique to bonded composite doubler applications, were highlighted. An array of conventional and advanced NDI techniques were evaluated. Flaw detection sensitivity studies were conducted on applicable eddy current, ultrasonic, X-ray and thermography based devices. The application of these NDI techniques to composite doublers and the results from test specimens, which were loaded to provide a changing flaw profile, are presented in this report. It was found that a team of these techniques can identify flaws in composite doubler installations well before they reach critical size.

  19. Supersonic compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.; Breidenthal, Robert E.

    2016-04-12

    A supersonic compressor including a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a diffuser. The diffuser includes a plurality of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions, for deceleration of gas to subsonic conditions and then for expansion of subsonic gas, to change kinetic energy of the gas to static pressure. The aerodynamic ducts include vortex generating structures for controlling boundary layer, and structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when the aerodynamic ducts are designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are provided having an aspect ratio of in excess of two to one, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.

  20. The Study of Delta Wing Structure Plan of A Supersonic Aircraft%一种超音速飞机三角机翼结构方案研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘健; 杨华保; 王建; 尚琳

    2011-01-01

    针对某超音速飞机的三角翼,设计了带平行翼梁的梁式三角翼结构和带内撑梁的梁式三角翼结构两种方案;分析了三角翼两种结构方案的受力特点,并采用有限元方法对比分析了两种结构方案的强度和刚度特点.通过分析和比较得出了带平行翼梁的梁式三角翼结构受力特性更好,更适合于能够布置中央翼的三角翼飞机.%Two types of wing structure plan were designed for a supersonic aircraft, which were the delta wing structure containing parallel beams and the delta wing structure with support beams. The two types of wing structure's mechanics characteristics were analyzed, and their stiffness and strength were compared with FEA. Through analysis and compare of the two types of wing structure, the delta wing structure containing parallel beams is better than the other and is more suitable for the aircraft with delta wing which can be arranged the central wing.

  1. Safety assessment of A92 reactor building for large commercial aircraft crash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostov, M., E-mail: marin.kostov@riskeng.bg [Risk Engineering Ltd., Sofia (Bulgaria); Henkel, F.O. [Woelfel Beratende Ingenieure, Hoechberg (Germany); Andonov, A. [Risk Engineering Ltd., Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2014-04-01

    The current paper presents key elements of the comprehensive analyses of the effects due to a large aircraft collision with the reactor building of Belene NPP in Bulgaria. The reactor building is a VVER A92; it belongs to the third+ generation and includes structural measures for protection against an aircraft impact as standard design. The A92 reactor building implements a double shell concept and is composed of thick RC external walls and an external shell which surrounds an internal pre-stressed containment and the internal walls of the auxiliary building. The malevolent large aircraft impact is considered as a beyond design base accident (Design Extended Conditions, DEC). The main issues under consideration are the structural integrity, the equipment safety due to the induced vibrations, and the fire safety of the entire installation. Many impact scenarios are analyzed varying both impact locations and loading intensity. A large number of non-linear dynamic analyses are used for assessment of the structural response and capacity, including different type of structural models, different finite element codes, and different material laws. The corresponding impact loadings are represented by load time functions calculated according to three different approaches, i.e. loading determined by Riera's method (Riera, 1968), load time function calculated by finite element analysis (Henkel and Klein, 2007), and coupled dynamic analysis with dynamic interaction between target and projectile. Based on the numerical results and engineering assessments the capacity of the A92 reactor building to resist a malevolent impact of a large aircraft is evaluated. Significant efforts are spent on safety assessment of equipment by using an evaluation procedure based on damage indicating parameters. As a result of these analyses several design modifications of structure elements are performed. There are changes of the layout of reinforcement, special arrangements and spatial

  2. Supersonic Jet Noise: Main Sources and Reduction Methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Azimi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The large velocity ratio and the presence of Shocks in the exhaust plume from low bypass engines or supersonic jetliners cause jet noise to be dominant component of overall aircraft noise, and therefore is an important issue in design of the next generation of civil supersonic transport. Jet noise reduction technology also has application in the design of highperformance tactical aircraft. Jet noise is of particular concern on aircraft carriers where it is necessary for deck crew to be in relatively close proximity to the aircraft at takeoff and landing. In this paper, a brief discussion about supersonic jet noise sources and a review of the main passive technologies employed for the reduction of supersonic jet noise are presented.

  3. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three L-1011s, were inspected after 10 years of service. There are six Kevlar-49 panels on each aircraft: a left-hand and right-hand set of a wing-body sandwich fairing; a solid laminate under-wing fillet panel; and a 422 K (300 F) service aft engine fairing. The three L-1011s include one each in service with Eastern, Air Canada, and TWA. The fairings have accumulated a total of 79,568 hours, with one ship set having nearly 28,000 hours service. The inspections were conducted at the airlines' major maintenance bases with the participation of Lockheed Engineering. The Kevlar-49 components were found to be performing satisfactorily in service with no major problems, or any condition requiring corrective action. The only defects noted were minor impact damage, a few minor disbonds and a minor degree of fastener hole fraying and elongation. These are for the most part comparable to damage noted on fiberglass fairings. The service history obtained in this program indicates that Kevlar-49 epoxy composite materials have satisfactory service characteristics for use in aircraft secondary structure.

  4. Emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants from commercial aircraft at international airports in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sang-Keun; Shon, Zang-Ho

    2012-12-01

    The emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and air pollutants from aircraft in the boundary layer at four major international airports in Korea over a two-year period (2009-2010) were estimated using the Emissions and Dispersion Modeling System (EDMS) (i.e. activity-based (Landing/Take-Off (LTO) cycle) methodology). Both domestic and international LTOs and ground support equipment at the airports were considered. The average annual emissions of GHGs (CO2, N2O, CH4 and H2O) at all four airports during the study period were 1.11 × 103, 1.76 × 10-2, -1.85 × 10-3 and 3.84 × 108 kt yr-1, respectively. The emissions of air pollutants (NOx, CO, VOCs and particulate matter) were 5.20, 4.12, 7.46 × 10-1 and 3.37 × 10-2 kt yr-1, respectively. The negative CH4 emission indicates the consumption of atmospheric CH4 in the engine. The monthly and daily emissions of GHGs and air pollutants showed no significant variations at all airports examined. The emissions of GHGs and air pollutants for each aircraft operational mode differed considerably, with the largest emission observed in taxi-out mode.

  5. NO and NO2 emission ratios measured from in-use commercial aircraft during taxi and takeoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Scott C; Shorter, Joanne H; Zahniser, Mark S; Nelson, David D; Jayne, John; Brown, Robert C; Miake-Lye, Richard C; Waitz, Ian; Silva, Phillip; Lanni, Thomas; Demerjian, Ken; Kolb, Charles E

    2004-11-15

    In August 2001, the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory simultaneously measured NO, NO2, and CO2 within 350 m of a taxiway and 550 m of a runway at John F. Kennedy Airport. The meteorological conditions were such that taxi and takeoff plumes from individual aircraft were clearly resolved against background levels. NO and NO2 concentrations were measured with 1 s time resolution using a dual tunable infrared laser differential absorption spectroscopy instrument, utilizing an astigmatic multipass Herriott cell. The CO2 measurements were also obtained at 1 s time resolution using a commercial non-dispersive infrared absorption instrument. Plumes were measured from over 30 individual planes, ranging from turbo props to jumbo jets. NOx emission indices were determined by examining the correlation between NOx (NO + NO2) and CO2 during the plume measurements. Several aircraft tail numbers were unambiguously identified, allowing those specific airframe/engine combinations to be determined. The resulting NOx emission indices from positively identified in-service operating airplanes are compared with the published International Civil Aviation Organization engine certification test database collected on new engines in certification test cells.

  6. Is Model-Based Development a Favorable Approach for Complex and Safety-Critical Computer Systems on Commercial Aircraft?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2014-01-01

    A system is safety-critical if its failure can endanger human life or cause significant damage to property or the environment. State-of-the-art computer systems on commercial aircraft are highly complex, software-intensive, functionally integrated, and network-centric systems of systems. Ensuring that such systems are safe and comply with existing safety regulations is costly and time-consuming as the level of rigor in the development process, especially the validation and verification activities, is determined by considerations of system complexity and safety criticality. A significant degree of care and deep insight into the operational principles of these systems is required to ensure adequate coverage of all design implications relevant to system safety. Model-based development methodologies, methods, tools, and techniques facilitate collaboration and enable the use of common design artifacts among groups dealing with different aspects of the development of a system. This paper examines the application of model-based development to complex and safety-critical aircraft computer systems. Benefits and detriments are identified and an overall assessment of the approach is given.

  7. Stratospheric aircraft: Impact on the stratosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, H.

    1992-02-01

    The steady-state distribution of natural stratospheric ozone is primarily maintained through production by ultraviolet photolysis of molecular oxygen, destruction by a catalytic cycle involving nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and relocation by air motions within the stratosphere. Nitrogen oxides from the exhausts of a commercially viable fleet of supersonic transports would exceed the natural source of stratospheric nitrogen oxides if the t should be equipped with 1990 technology jet engines. This model-free comparison between a vital natural global ingredient and a proposed new industrial product shows that building a large fleet of passenger stratospheric aircraft poses a significant global problem. NASA and aircraft industries have recognized this problem and are studying the redesign of jet aircraft engines in order to reduce the nitrogen oxides emissions. In 1989 atmospheric models identified two other paths by which the ozone destroying effects of stratospheric aircraft might be reduced or eliminated: (1) Use relatively low supersonic Mach numbers and flight altitudes. For a given rate of nitrogen oxides injection into the stratosphere, the calculated reduction of total ozone is a strong function of altitude, and flight altitudes well below 20 kilometers give relatively low calculated ozone reductions. (2) Include heterogeneous chemistry in the two-dimensional model calculations. Necessary conditions for answering the question on the title above are to improve the quality of our understanding of the lower stratosphere and to broaden our knowledge of hetergeneous stratospheric chemistry. This article reviews recently proposed new mechanisms for heterogeneous reactions on the global stratospheric sulfate aerosols.

  8. Stratospheric aircraft: Impact on the stratosphere?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, H.

    1992-02-01

    The steady-state distribution of natural stratospheric ozone is primarily maintained through production by ultraviolet photolysis of molecular oxygen, destruction by a catalytic cycle involving nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and relocation by air motions within the stratosphere. Nitrogen oxides from the exhausts of a commercially viable fleet of supersonic transports would exceed the natural source of stratospheric nitrogen oxides if the t should be equipped with 1990 technology jet engines. This model-free comparison between a vital natural global ingredient and a proposed new industrial product shows that building a large fleet of passenger stratospheric aircraft poses a significant global problem. NASA and aircraft industries have recognized this problem and are studying the redesign of jet aircraft engines in order to reduce the nitrogen oxides emissions. In 1989 atmospheric models identified two other paths by which the ozone destroying effects of stratospheric aircraft might be reduced or eliminated: (1) Use relatively low supersonic Mach numbers and flight altitudes. For a given rate of nitrogen oxides injection into the stratosphere, the calculated reduction of total ozone is a strong function of altitude, and flight altitudes well below 20 kilometers give relatively low calculated ozone reductions. (2) Include heterogeneous chemistry in the two-dimensional model calculations. Necessary conditions for answering the question on the title above are to improve the quality of our understanding of the lower stratosphere and to broaden our knowledge of hetergeneous stratospheric chemistry. This article reviews recently proposed new mechanisms for heterogeneous reactions on the global stratospheric sulfate aerosols.

  9. Tesseract supersonic business transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshotko, Eli; Garbinski, Gary; Fellenstein, James; Botting, Mary; Hooper, Joan; Ryan, Michael; Struk, Peter; Taggart, Ben; Taillon, Maggie; Warzynski, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This year, the senior level Aerospace Design class at Case Western Reserve University developed a conceptual design of a supersonic business transport. Due to the growing trade between Asia and the United States, a transpacific range was chosen for the aircraft. A Mach number of 2.2 was chosen, too, because it provides reasonable block times and allows the use of a large range of materials without a need for active cooling. A payload of 2,500 lbs. was assumed corresponding to a complement of nine passengers and crew, plus some light cargo. With these general requirements set, the class was broken down into three groups. The aerodynamics of the aircraft were the responsibility of the first group. The second developed the propulsion system. The efforts of both the aerodynamics and propulsion groups were monitored and reviewed for weight considerations and structural feasibility by the third group. Integration of the design required considerable interaction between the groups in the final stages. The fuselage length of the final conceptual design was 107.0 ft, while the diameter of the fuselage was 7.6 ft. The delta wing design consisted of an aspect ratio of 1.9 with a wing span of 47.75 ft and mid-chord length of 61.0 ft. A SNECMA MCV 99 variable-cycle engine design was chosen for this aircraft.

  10. Tesseract: Supersonic business transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshotko, Eli; Garbinski, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This year, the senior level Aerospace Design class at Case Western Reserve University developed a conceptual design of a supersonic business transport. Due to the growing trade between Asia and the United States, a transpacific range has been chosen for the aircraft. A Mach number of 2.2 was chosen too because it provides reasonable block times and allows the use of a large range of materials without a need for active cooling. A payload of 2500 lbs. has been assumed corresponding to a complement of nine (passengers and crew) plus some light cargo. With these general requirements set, the class was broken down into three groups. The aerodynamics of the aircraft were the responsibility of the first group. The second developed the propulsion system. The efforts of both the aerodynamics and propulsion groups were monitored and reviewed for weight considerations and structural feasibility by the third group. Integration of the design required considerable interaction between the groups in the final stages. The fuselage length of the final conceptual design was 107.0 ft. while the diameter of the fuselage was 7.6 ft. The delta wing design consisted of an aspect ratio of 1.9 with a wing span of 47.75 ft and midcord length of 61.0 ft. A SNEMCA MCV 99 variable-cycle engine design was chosen for this aircraft.

  11. Comparison of Military and Commercial Design-to-Cost Aircraft Procurement and Operational Support Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    oAft"uAt S 3. PA 7- 2 Figure 18. Typical Commercial Test Plan 52 The military Category I flight test program accomplishes essentially the same tesi ...Bur~-s cide . - perating Procedures, etc._ - as they relate to AVACS. i910 SPECIFIC (continued) 10. The nearly unanimous comment, that there is

  12. Travel health: a survey of life jacket designs currently in use on commercial aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Irmgard L

    2002-01-01

    Although any travel harbors potential health problems, travel across water poses the additional risk of involuntary contact with water in the event of an emergency. Studies suggest that fatal boat-related accidents have occurred due to the passengers' inability to don their life jackets. With the dramatic increase of long-haul flights, it was decided to investigate if potential safety hazards can be identified leading to similar problems in relation to the life jackets provided onboard aircraft. It was assumed that the variety of designs combined with a possible lack of attention paid to safety instructions could represent such a problem. Safety instruction cards in passengers' seat pockets usually depict the life jacket model used on a particular aircraft. Ninety-eight such safety cards from 53 airlines were analyzed and categorized to identify the range and variety of designs currently in use. Twelve different categories of life jacket models could be distinguished with some airlines using more than one model. It was also found that not all cards show a clear depiction of the models used, the cards of two airlines show two different designs on the same cards, and two other companies chose to change the model halfway through the pictured donning procedure. There is a wide variety of life jacket designs in use with the safety cards not always giving accurate instructions. This variety also has implications for the safety demonstration at the beginning of a flight. Further research is recommended into a range of topics, one being the quality and content of these instructions, and also into other personal floating devices provided for the safety of travelers in the event of an emergency over water.

  13. Biomimetic FAA-certifiable, artificial muscle structures for commercial aircraft wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Ronald M.; Barrett, Cassandra M.

    2014-07-01

    This paper is centered on a new form of adaptive material which functions much in the same way as skeletal muscle tissue, is structurally modeled on plant actuator cells and capable of rapidly expanding or shrinking by as much as an order of magnitude in prescribed directions. Rapid changes of plant cell shape and sizes are often initiated via ion-transport driven fluid migration and resulting turgor pressure variation. Certain plant cellular structures like those in Mimosa pudica (sensitive plant), Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa tree), or Dionaea muscipula (Venus Flytrap) all exhibit actuation physiology which employs such turgor pressure manipulation. The paper begins with dynamic micrographs of a sectioned basal articulation joint from A. julibrissin. These figures show large cellular dimensional changes as the structure undergoes foliage articulation. By mimicking such structures in aircraft flight control mechanisms, extremely lightweight pneumatic control surface actuators can be designed. This paper shows several fundamental layouts of such surfaces with actuator elements made exclusively from FAA-certifiable materials, summarizes their structural mechanics and shows actuator power and energy densities that are higher than nearly all classes of conventional adaptive materials available today. A sample flap structure is shown to possess the ability to change its shape and structural stiffness as its cell pressures are manipulated, which in turn changes the surface lift-curve slope when exposed to airflows. Because the structural stiffness can be altered, it is also shown that the commanded section lift-curve slope can be similarly controlled between 1.2 and 6.2 rad-1. Several aircraft weight reduction principles are also shown to come into play as the need to concentrate loads to pass through point actuators is eliminated. The paper concludes with a summary of interrelated performance and airframe-level improvements including enhanced gust rejection, load

  14. Studies of aircraft differential maneuvering. Report 75-27: Calculating of differential-turning barrier surfaces. Report 75-26: A user's guide to the aircraft energy-turn and tandem-motion computer programs. Report 75-7: A user's guide to the aircraft energy-turn hodograph program. [numerical analysis of tactics and aircraft maneuvers of supersonic attack aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, H. J.; Lefton, L.

    1976-01-01

    The numerical analysis of composite differential-turn trajectory pairs was studied for 'fast-evader' and 'neutral-evader' attitude dynamics idealization for attack aircraft. Transversality and generalized corner conditions are examined and the joining of trajectory segments discussed. A criterion is given for the screening of 'tandem-motion' trajectory segments. Main focus is upon the computation of barrier surfaces. Fortunately, from a computational viewpoint, the trajectory pairs defining these surfaces need not be calculated completely, the final subarc of multiple-subarc pairs not being required. Some calculations for pairs of example aircraft are presented. A computer program used to perform the calculations is included.

  15. Study of active cooling for supersonic transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The potential benefits of using the fuel heat sink of hydrogen fueled supersonic transports for cooling large portions of the aircraft wing and fuselage are examined. The heat transfer would be accomplished by using an intermediate fluid such as an ethylene glycol-water solution. Some of the advantages of the system are: (1) reduced costs by using aluminum in place of titanium, (2) reduced cabin heat loads, and (3) more favorable environmental conditions for the aircraft systems. A liquid hydrogen fueled, Mach 2.7 supersonic transport aircraft design was used for the reference uncooled vehicle. The cooled aircraft designs were analyzed to determine their heat sink capability, the extent and location of feasible cooled surfaces, and the coolant passage size and spacing.

  16. Enhanced Vision Flight Deck Technology for Commercial Aircraft Low-Visibility Surface Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Norman, R. Michael; Kramer, Lynda J.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Ellis, Kyle K. E.; Harrison, Stephanie J.; Comstock, J. Ray

    2013-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center and the FAA collaborated in an effort to evaluate the effect of Enhanced Vision (EV) technology display in a commercial flight deck during low visibility surface operations. Surface operations were simulated at the Memphis, TN (FAA identifier: KMEM) air field during nighttime with 500 Runway Visual Range (RVR) in a high-fidelity, full-motion simulator. Ten commercial airline flight crews evaluated the efficacy of various EV display locations and parallax and mini cation effects. The research paper discusses qualitative and quantitative results of the simulation experiment, including the effect of EV display placement on visual attention, as measured by the use of non-obtrusive oculometry and pilot mental workload. The results demonstrated the potential of EV technology to enhance situation awareness which is dependent on the ease of access and location of the displays. Implications and future directions are discussed.

  17. On the unification of aircraft ultrafine particle emission data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B.; Busen, R. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Turco, R.P.; Yu Fangqun [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Danilin, M.Y.; Weisenstein, D.K. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Miake-Lye, R.C. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    To predict the environmental impacts of future commercial aviation, intensive studies have been launched to measure the properties and effects of aircraft emissions. These observations have revealed an extremely wide variance with respect to the number and sizes of the particles produced in the exhaust plumes. Aircraft aerosol ultimately contributes to the population of cloud-forming nuclei, and may lead to significant global radiative and chemical perturbations. In this paper, recent discoveries are coordinated and unified in the form of a physically consistent plume aerosol model that explains most of the observational variance. Using this new approach, it is now practical to carry out reliable global atmospheric simulations of aircraft effects, as demonstrated by a novel assessment of the perturbation of the stratospheric aerosol layer by a supersonic aircraft fleet. (orig.)

  18. On the unification of aircraft ultrafine particle emission data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B.; Busen, R. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Turco, R.P.; Yu Fangqun [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Danilin, M.Y.; Weisenstein, D.K. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Miake-Lye, R.C. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    To predict the environmental impacts of future commercial aviation, intensive studies have been launched to measure the properties and effects of aircraft emissions. These observations have revealed an extremely wide variance with respect to the number and sizes of the particles produced in the exhaust plumes. Aircraft aerosol ultimately contributes to the population of cloud-forming nuclei, and may lead to significant global radiative and chemical perturbations. In this paper, recent discoveries are coordinated and unified in the form of a physically consistent plume aerosol model that explains most of the observational variance. Using this new approach, it is now practical to carry out reliable global atmospheric simulations of aircraft effects, as demonstrated by a novel assessment of the perturbation of the stratospheric aerosol layer by a supersonic aircraft fleet. (orig.)

  19. Conceptual Design of a Supersonic Jet Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Kareliusson, Joakim; Nordqvist, Melker

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is a response to the request for proposal issued by a joint collaboration between the AIAA Foundation and ASME/IGTI as a student competition to design a new turbofan engine intended for a conceptual supersonic business jet expected to enter service in 2025. Due to the increasing competition in the aircraft industry and the more stringent environmental legislations the new engine is expected to provide a lower fuel burn than the current engine intended for the aircraft to increase ...

  20. Flow field analysis of aircraft configurations using a numerical solution to the three-dimensional unified supersonic/hypersonic small disturbance equations, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunness, R. C., Jr.; Knight, C. J.; Dsylva, E.

    1972-01-01

    The unified small disturbance equations are numerically solved using the well-known Lax-Wendroff finite difference technique. The method allows complete determination of the inviscid flow field and surface properties as long as the flow remains supersonic. Shock waves and other discontinuities are accounted for implicity in the numerical method. This technique was programed for general application to the three-dimensional case. The validity of the method is demonstrated by calculations on cones, axisymmetric bodies, lifting bodies, delta wings, and a conical wing/body combination. Part 1 contains the discussion of problem development and results of the study. Part 2 contains flow charts, subroutine descriptions, and a listing of the computer program.

  1. A Study of the Utilization of Advanced Composites in Fuselage Structures of Commercial Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, D. J.; Sumida, P. T.; Bunin, B. L.; Janicki, G. S.; Walker, J. V.; Fox, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the technology and data needed to support the introduction of advanced composites in the future production of fuselage structure in large transport aircraft. Fuselage structures of six candidate airplanes were evaluated for the baseline component. The MD-100 was selected on the basis of its representation of 1990s fuselage structure, an available data base, its impact on the schedule and cost of the development program, and its availability and suitability for flight service evaluation. Acceptance criteria were defined, technology issues were identified, and a composite fuselage technology development plan, including full-scale tests, was identified. The plan was based on composite materials to be available in the mid to late 1980s. Program resources required to develop composite fuselage technology are estimated at a rough order of magnitude to be 877 man-years exclusive of the bird strike and impact dynamic test components. A conceptual composite fuselage was designed, retaining the basic MD-100 structural arrangement for doors, windows, wing, wheel wells, cockpit enclosure, major bulkheads, etc., resulting in a 32 percent weight savings.

  2. Supersonic combustion engine testbed, heat lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoying, D.; Kelble, C.; Langenbahn, A.; Stahl, M.; Tincher, M.; Walsh, M.; Wisler, S.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a supersonic combustion engine testbed (SCET) aircraft is presented. The hypersonic waverider will utilize both supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMjet) and turbofan-ramjet engines. The waverider concept, system integration, electrical power, weight analysis, cockpit, landing skids, and configuration modeling are addressed in the configuration considerations. The subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic aerodynamics are presented along with the aerodynamic stability and landing analysis of the aircraft. The propulsion design considerations include: engine selection, turbofan ramjet inlets, SCRAMjet inlets and the SCRAMjet diffuser. The cooling requirements and system are covered along with the topics of materials and the hydrogen fuel tanks and insulation system. A cost analysis is presented and the appendices include: information about the subsonic wind tunnel test, shock expansion calculations, and an aerodynamic heat flux program.

  3. Advanced Noise Abatement Procedures for a Supersonic Business Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Jones, Scott M.; Seidel, Jonathan A.; Huff, Dennis L.

    2017-01-01

    Supersonic civil aircraft present a unique noise certification challenge. High specific thrust required for supersonic cruise results in high engine exhaust velocity and high levels of jet noise during takeoff. Aerodynamics of thin, low-aspect-ratio wings equipped with relatively simple flap systems deepen the challenge. Advanced noise abatement procedures have been proposed for supersonic aircraft. These procedures promise to reduce airport noise, but they may require departures from normal reference procedures defined in noise regulations. The subject of this report is a takeoff performance and noise assessment of a notional supersonic business jet. Analytical models of an airframe and a supersonic engine derived from a contemporary subsonic turbofan core are developed. These models are used to predict takeoff trajectories and noise. Results indicate advanced noise abatement takeoff procedures are helpful in reducing noise along lateral sidelines.

  4. CFD Study of NOx Emissions in a Model Commercial Aircraft Engine Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Man; FU Zhenbo; LIN Yuzhen; LI Jibao

    2012-01-01

    Air worthiness requirements of the aircraft engine emission bring new challenges to the combustor research and design.With the motivation to design high performance and clean combustor,computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is utilized as the powerful design approach.In this paper,Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations of reactive two-phase flow in an experimental low emission combustor is performed.The numerical approach uses an implicit compressible gas solver together with a Lagrangian liquid-phase tracking method and the extended coherent flamelet model for turbulence-combustion interaction.The NOx formation is modeled by the concept of post-processing,which resolves the NOx transport equation with the assumption of frozen temperature distribution.Both turbulence-combustion interaction model and NOx formation model are firstly evaluated by the comparison of experimental data published in open literature of a lean direct injection (LDI) combustor.The test rig studied in this paper is called low emission stirred swirl (LESS) combustor,which is a two-stage model combustor,fueled with liquid kerosene (RP-3) and designed by Beihang University (BUAA).The main stage of LESS combustor employs the principle of lean prevaporized and premixed (LPP) concept to reduce pollutant,and the pilot stage depends on a diffusion flame for flame stabilization.Detailed numerical results including species distribution,turbulence performance and burning performance are qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated.Numerical prediction of NOx emission shows a good agreement with test data at both idle condition and full power condition of LESS combustor.Preliminary results of the flame structure are shown in this paper.The flame stabilization mechanism and NOx reduction effort are also discussed with in-depth analysis.

  5. UWB EMI To Aircraft Radios: Field Evaluation on Operational Commercial Transport Airplanes. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oria, A. J. (Editor); Ely, Jay J.; Martin, Warren L.; Shaver, Timothy W.; Fuller, Gerald L.; Zimmerman, John; Fuschino, Robert L.; Larsen, William E.

    2005-01-01

    Ultrawideband (UWB) transmitters may soon be integrated into a wide variety of portable electronic devices (PEDs) that passengers routinely carry on board commercial airplanes. Airlines and the FAA will have difficulty controlling passenger use of UWB transmitters during flights with current airline policies and existing wireless product standards. The aeronautical community is concerned as to whether evolving FCC UWB rules are adequate to protect legacy and emerging aeronautical radio systems from electromagnetic interference (EMI) from emerging UWB products. To address these concerns, the NASA Office of Space Communications and Chief Spectrum Managers assembled a multidisciplinary team from NASA LaRC, NASA JPL, NASA ARC, FAA, United Airlines, Sky West Airlines, and Eagles Wings Inc. to carry out a comprehensive series of tests aimed at determining the nature and extent of any EMI to aeronautical communication and navigation systems from UWB devices meeting FCCapproved and proposed levels for unlicensed handheld transmitters.

  6. Investigation of Efficient Turbulence Model for Two-Dimensional Nozzle Designed for Supersonic Cruise Using STAR-CCM+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Mummidisetti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, investigation of various turbulence models has been carried out for predicting the efficient turbulence model for a two-dimensional nozzle designed for a supersonic cruise nozzle. Initially, a computational domain was created for a two-dimensional nozzle for a supersonic cruise, then, with an appropriate mesh size, various turbulence models has been used for simulations. The main objective of the present work is to determine the efficient turbulence model for nozzle designs. As till date, commercial software’s are implementing many advanced technique, the test of turbulence model is very much needed for today’s research. The results obtained from the computational approach were compared with experimental approach which was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.8 to 1.2 by NASA Langley Research Centre, Virginia. These supersonic cruise nozzles have a wide range of applications in designing Fighter jets and supersonic cruise aircraft's. The present work was conducted by using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics Software, STAR-CCM+. Initially, Nozzle at a free stream Mach number 0.9 was designed and all the initial and boundary conditions were calculated. From the results obtained in the present investigation, we can conclude that there was an excellent correlation between the experimental and computational data for K-Epsilon turbulence model.

  7. A High-Fidelity Simulation of a Generic Commercial Aircraft Engine and Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Ryan D.; Csank, Jeffrey; Lavelle, Thomas M.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2010-01-01

    A new high-fidelity simulation of a generic 40,000 lb thrust class commercial turbofan engine with a representative controller, known as CMAPSS40k, has been developed. Based on dynamic flight test data of a highly instrumented engine and previous engine simulations developed at NASA Glenn Research Center, this non-proprietary simulation was created especially for use in the development of new engine control strategies. C-MAPSS40k is a highly detailed, component-level engine model written in MATLAB/Simulink (The MathWorks, Inc.). Because the model is built in Simulink, users have the ability to use any of the MATLAB tools for analysis and control system design. The engine components are modeled in C-code, which is then compiled to allow faster-than-real-time execution. The engine controller is based on common industry architecture and techniques to produce realistic closed-loop transient responses while ensuring that no safety or operability limits are violated. A significant feature not found in other non-proprietary models is the inclusion of transient stall margin debits. These debits provide an accurate accounting of the compressor surge margin, which is critical in the design of an engine controller. This paper discusses the development, characteristics, and capabilities of the C-MAPSS40k simulation

  8. Commercial multicopter unmanned aircraft system as a tool for early stage forest survey after wind damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokros, Martin; Vybostok, Jozef; Merganic, Jan; Tomastik, Julian; Cernava, Juraj

    2017-04-01

    In recent years unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are objects of research in many areas. This trend can be seen also in forest research where researchers are focusing on height, diameter and tree crown measurements, monitoring of forest fire, forest gaps and health condition. Our research is focusing on the use of UAS for detecting areas disturbed by wind and deriving the volume of fallen trees for management purposes. This information is crucial after the wind damage happened. We used DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ and acquired the imagery of one forest stand (5.7 ha). The UAS is a quadcopter "all in one" solution. It has a built-in camera with gimbal and a remote controller. The camera is controlled through the application (android/ios). The built-in camera has an image resolution of 4384×3288 (14 megapixels). We have placed five crosses within the plot to be able to georeference the point cloud from UAS. Their positions were measured by Topcon Hiper GGD survey-grade GNSS receiver. We measured the border of damaged area by four different GNSS devices - GeoExplorer 6000, Trimble Nomad, Garmin GPSMAP 60 CSx and by smartphone Sony Xperia X. To process images from UAS we used Agisoft Photoscan Professional, while ArcGIS 10.2 was used to calculate and compare the areas . From the UAS point cloud we calculated DTM and DSM and deducted them. The areas where the difference was close to zero (-0.2 to 0.2) were signed as potentially wind damage areas. Then we filtered the areas that were not signed correctly (for example routes). The calculated area from UAS was 2.66 ha, GeoExplorer 6000 was 2.20 ha, Nomad was 2.06 ha, Garmin was 2.21 ha and from Xperia was the area 2.24 ha. The differences between UAS and GPS devices vary from 0.42 ha to 0.6 ha. The differences were mostly caused by inability to detect small spots of fallen trees on UAS data. These small spots are difficult to measure by GPS devices because the signal is very poor under tree crowns and also it is difficult to find

  9. Fiber-channel audio video standard for military and commercial aircraft product lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Jack E.

    2002-08-01

    Fibre channel is an emerging high-speed digital network technology that combines to make inroads into the avionics arena. The suitability of fibre channel for such applications is largely due to its flexibility in these key areas: Network topologies can be configured in point-to-point, arbitrated loop or switched fabric connections. The physical layer supports either copper or fiber optic implementations with a Bit Error Rate of less than 10-12. Multiple Classes of Service are available. Multiple Upper Level Protocols are supported. Multiple high speed data rates offer open ended growth paths providing speed negotiation within a single network. Current speeds supported by commercially available hardware are 1 and 2 Gbps providing effective data rates of 100 and 200 MBps respectively. Such networks lend themselves well to the transport of digital video and audio data. This paper summarizes an ANSI standard currently in the final approval cycle of the InterNational Committee for Information Technology Standardization (INCITS). This standard defines a flexible mechanism whereby digital video, audio and ancillary data are systematically packaged for transport over a fibre channel network. The basic mechanism, called a container, houses audio and video content functionally grouped as elements of the container called objects. Featured in this paper is a specific container mapping called Simple Parametric Digital Video (SPDV) developed particularly to address digital video in avionics systems. SPDV provides pixel-based video with associated ancillary data typically sourced by various sensors to be processed and/or distributed in the cockpit for presentation via high-resolution displays. Also highlighted in this paper is a streamlined Upper Level Protocol (ULP) called Frame Header Control Procedure (FHCP) targeted for avionics systems where the functionality of a more complex ULP is not required.

  10. Experiments on free and impinging supersonic microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phalnikar, K.A.; Kumar, R.; Alvi, F.S. [Florida A and M University and Florida State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The fluid dynamics of microflows has recently commanded considerable attention because of their potential applications. Until now, with a few exceptions, most of the studies have been limited to low speed flows. This experimental study examines supersonic microjets of 100-1,000 {mu}m in size with exit velocities in the range of 300-500 m/s. Such microjets are presently being used to actively control larger supersonic impinging jets, which occur in STOVL (short takeoff and vertical landing) aircraft, cavity flows, and flow separation. Flow properties of free as well as impinging supersonic microjets have been experimentally investigated over a range of geometric and flow parameters. The flowfield is visualized using a micro-schlieren system with a high magnification. These schlieren images clearly show the characteristic shock cell structure typically observed in larger supersonic jets. Quantitative measurements of the jet decay and spreading rates as well as shock cell spacing are obtained using micro-pitot probe surveys. In general, the mean flow features of free microjets are similar to larger supersonic jets operating at higher Reynolds numbers. However, some differences are also observed, most likely due to pronounced viscous effects associated with jets at these small scales. Limited studies of impinging microjets were also conducted. They reveal that, similar to the behavior of free microjets, the flow structure of impinging microjets strongly resembles that of larger supersonic impinging jets. (orig.)

  11. Experiments on free and impinging supersonic microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalnikar, K. A.; Kumar, R.; Alvi, F. S.

    2008-05-01

    The fluid dynamics of microflows has recently commanded considerable attention because of their potential applications. Until now, with a few exceptions, most of the studies have been limited to low speed flows. This experimental study examines supersonic microjets of 100-1,000 μm in size with exit velocities in the range of 300-500 m/s. Such microjets are presently being used to actively control larger supersonic impinging jets, which occur in STOVL (short takeoff and vertical landing) aircraft, cavity flows, and flow separation. Flow properties of free as well as impinging supersonic microjets have been experimentally investigated over a range of geometric and flow parameters. The flowfield is visualized using a micro-schlieren system with a high magnification. These schlieren images clearly show the characteristic shock cell structure typically observed in larger supersonic jets. Quantitative measurements of the jet decay and spreading rates as well as shock cell spacing are obtained using micro-pitot probe surveys. In general, the mean flow features of free microjets are similar to larger supersonic jets operating at higher Reynolds numbers. However, some differences are also observed, most likely due to pronounced viscous effects associated with jets at these small scales. Limited studies of impinging microjets were also conducted. They reveal that, similar to the behavior of free microjets, the flow structure of impinging microjets strongly resembles that of larger supersonic impinging jets.

  12. Instrumentation on commercial aircraft for monitoring the atmospheric composition on a global scale: the IAGOS system, technical overview of ozone and carbon monoxide measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillipe Nédélec

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the In-service Aircraft of a Global Observing System (IAGOS developed for operations on commercial long-range Airbus aircraft (A330/A340 for monitoring the atmospheric composition. IAGOS is the continuation of the former Measurement of OZone and water vapour on Airbus In-service airCraft (MOZAIC programme (1994–2014 with five aircraft operated by European airlines over 20 yr. MOZAIC has provided unique scientific database used worldwide by the scientific community. In continuation of MOZAIC, IAGOS aims to equip a fleet up to 20 aircraft around the world and for operations over decades. IAGOS started in July 2011 with the first instruments installed aboard a Lufthansa A340-300, and a total of six aircraft are already in operation. We present the technical aircraft system concept, with basic instruments for O3, CO, water vapour and clouds; and optional instruments for measuring either NOy, NOx, aerosols or CO2/CH4. In this article, we focus on the O3 and CO instrumentation while other measurements are or will be described in specific papers. O3 and CO are measured by optimised but well-known methods such as UV absorption and IR correlation, respectively. We describe the data processing/validation and the data quality control for O3 and CO. Using the first two overlapping years of MOZAIC/IAGOS, we conclude that IAGOS can be considered as the continuation of MOZAIC with the same data quality of O3 and CO measurements.

  13. Research on the Cockpit Design Characteristics for Commercial Aircraft%商用飞机驾驶舱造型设计特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘岗; 刘春荣

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces the history and current situation of cockpit modeling design from Commercial Air-craft Corporation of China and other nations. First of all,a wide research was taken including an investigation of 5 different aircrafts and a collection of different types of aircraft cockpit pictures. Based on these, the design logic of different aircraft manufacturers was concluded. Sixty six cockpits from 12 aircraft companies are used as the cus-tomer research and cluster analysis and 10 typical cockpits are chosen from them. After that, the cockpit design characteristics and differences from main aircraft manufacturers are analyzed. The research provides a good refer-ence for new aircraft cockpit design.%介绍了国内外商用飞机驾驶舱设计的历史及现状,在分析多类飞机驾驶舱造型设计图片资料的基础上,探讨主要飞机制造商驾驶舱造型设计的特征。依据驾驶舱造型的相似性,对国际上12家商用飞机制造商的66款机型的驾驶舱进行聚类分析和多维尺度分析,挑选出10款有代表性的驾驶舱。在提取代表性驾驶舱造型特征线后,分析主要飞机制造商的驾驶舱造型设计特点及差异,为新型飞机驾驶舱造型设计提供参考。

  14. Design project: LONGBOW supersonic interceptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoney, Robert; Baker, Matt; Capstaff, Joseph G.; Dishman, Robert; Fick, Gregory; Frick, Stephen N.; Kelly, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A recent white paper entitled 'From the Sea' has spotlighted the need for Naval Aviation to provide overland support to joint operations. The base for this support, the Aircraft Carrier (CVN), will frequently be unable to operate within close range of the battleground because of littoral land-based air and subsurface threats. A high speed, long range, carrier capable aircraft would allow the CVN to provide timely support to distant battleground operations. Such an aircraft, operating as a Deck-Launched Interceptor (DLI), would also be an excellent counter to Next Generation Russian Naval Aviation (NGRNA) threats consisting of supersonic bombers, such as the Backfire, equipped with the next generation of high-speed, long-range missiles. Additionally, it would serve as an excellent high speed Reconnaissance airplane, capable of providing Battle Force commanders with timely, accurate pre-mission targeting information and post-mission Bomb Damage Assessment (BDA). Recent advances in computational hypersonic airflow modeling has produced a method of defining aircraft shapes that fit a conical shock flow model to maximize the efficiency of the vehicle. This 'Waverider' concept provides one means of achieving long ranges at high speeds. A Request for Proposal (RFP) was issued by Professor Conrad Newberry that contained design requirements for an aircraft to accomplish the above stated missions, utilizing Waverider technology.

  15. Advanced aerodynamic design for commercial aircraft%民机空气动力设计先进技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱自强

    2016-01-01

    文章简要地介绍了两种民机空气动力先进设计技术的概念及其研究进展。一为层流流动主动控制技术。其核心措施是减弱流动的不稳定性,推迟转捩的发生,从而增大层流流动区域。目前混合层流流动控制方法发展比较充分,有望应用于未来民机的设计中。另一为新型非常规布局,包括翼身融合体、支撑机翼、吞吸机身边界层等新型气动布局,这些均有望大大提高未来民机的性能。%The concepts and the research on two kinds of advanced aerodynamic technolo-gy are briefly reviewed. One is laminar flow active control, which focuses on increasing the lami-nar flow region through decreasing flow instability and delaying the transition. A hybrid laminar flow control method has now been developed and probably will be used in future design. The other is a new type of aerodynamic shape, which can greatly increase the performance of commercial transport aircraft. Three new types of configuration——the blended wing body, strut-braced wing, and body boundary layer ingestion will be briefly described.

  16. Review and prospect of supersonic business jet design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yicheng; Smith, Howard

    2017-04-01

    This paper reviews the environmental issues and challenges appropriate to the design of supersonic business jets (SSBJs). There has been a renewed, worldwide interest in developing an environmentally friendly, economically viable and technologically feasible supersonic transport aircraft. A historical overview indicates that the SSBJ will be the pioneer for the next generation of supersonic airliners. As a high-end product itself, the SSBJ will likely take a market share in the future. The mission profile appropriate to this vehicle is explored considering the rigorous environmental constraints. Mitigation of the sonic boom and improvements aerodynamic efficiency in flight are the most challenging features of civil supersonic transport. Technical issues and challenges associated with this type of aircraft are identified, and methodologies for the SSBJ design are discussed. Due to the tightly coupled issues, a multidisciplinary design, analysis and optimization environment is regarded as the essential approach to the creation of a low-boom low-drag supersonic aircraft. Industrial and academic organizations have an interest in this type of vehicle are presented. Their investments in SSBJ design will hopefully get civil supersonic transport back soon.

  17. On supersonic combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁生学

    1999-01-01

    Some basic concepts and features of supersonic combustion are explained from the view point of macroscopic aerodynamics. Two kinds of interpretations of supersonic combustion are proposed. The difference between supersonic combustion and subsonic combustion is discussed, and the mechanism of supersonic combustion propagation and the limitation of heat addition in supersonic flow are pointed out. The results of the calculation of deflagration in supersonic flow show that the entropy increment and the total pressure loss of the combustion products may decrease with the increase of combustion velocity. It is also demonstrated that the oblique detonation wave angle may not be controlled by the wedge angle under weak underdriven solution conditions and be determined only by combustion velocity. Therefore, the weak underdriven solution may become self-sustaining oblique detonation waves with a constant wave angle.

  18. Supersonic Jet Excitation using Flapping Injection

    CERN Document Server

    Hafsteinsson, Haukur; Andersson, Niklas; Cuppoletti, Daniel; Gutmark, Ephraim; Prisell, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Supersonic jet noise reduction is important for high speed military aircraft. Lower acoustic levels would reduce structural fatigue leading to longer lifetime of the jet aircraft. It is not solely structural aspects which are of importance, health issues of the pilot and the airfield per- sonnel are also very important, as high acoustic levels may result in severe hearing damage. It remains a major challenge to reduce the overall noise levels of the aircraft, where the supersonic exhaust is the main noise source for near ground operation. Fluidic injection into the supersonic jet at the nozzle exhaust has been shown as a promising method for noise reduction. It has been shown to speed up the mix- ing process of the main jet, hence reducing the kinetic energy level of the jet and the power of the total acoustic radiation. Furthermore, the interaction mechanism between the fluidic injection and the shock structure in the jet exhaust plays a crucial role in the total noise radia- tion. In this study, LES is used...

  19. The impact of emerging technologies on an advanced supersonic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, C.; Maglieri, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of advances in propulsion systems, structure and materials, aerodynamics, and systems on the design and development of supersonic transport aircraft are analyzed. Efficient propulsion systems with variable-cycle engines provide the basis for improved propulsion systems; the propulsion efficienies of supersonic and subsonic engines are compared. Material advances consist of long-life damage-tolerant structures, advanced material development, aeroelastic tailoring, and low-cost fabrication. Improvements in the areas of aerodynamics and systems are examined. The environmental problems caused by engine emissions, airport noise, and sonic boom are studied. The characteristics of the aircraft designed to include these technical advances are described.

  20. 某超声速飞行器保护罩用弹射器的高温防护特性%Thermal Protection Performances of Ejector for a Supersonic Aircraft Retainer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘世毅; 韩言勋; 刘媛媛

    2015-01-01

    The ejector is used to hold down and shoot off the retainer of a supersonic aircraft. The retainer is located at the head of the vehicle, therefore the temperature increases quickly with the impact of aerodynamic drag. For the sake of safety and reliability, the ejector needs thermal protection to meet the safety requirement of the powder in the pyrotechnic device. The theoretical analysis, numerical calculations and experiments of high temperature resistant characteristics of the ejector are introduced in this paper. The environment temperature around the device is reduced obviously by means of slowing heat transfer, optimizing structure, and using heat insulation and phase change material. The experiments validate that the ejector could reduce the efficiency of heat exchange effectively, and the temperature of the cartridge could satisfy the safety demand in the extra high thermal conditions. This research could contribute to the design and experiment of high temperature protection of pyrotechnic devices in spacecraft.%某型弹射器应用于超声速飞行器保护罩的连接固定与弹射分离。由于保护罩位于飞行器头部,受到气动阻力的影响,升温迅速。为了保证弹射器能够在飞行过程中正常安全工作,使装药部位的温度满足火药安全使用要求,需要对其采取热防护措施。文章围绕弹射器的耐高温性能设计开展了相关理论分析、数值仿真及试验验证工作。通过减小热传导途径,优化产品结构设计,采取隔热、相变吸热等措施降低弹射器内部的环境温度。经过热传导试验验证,在模拟飞行器极端的高温环境条件下,弹射器结构能够有效降低热传导效率,保证主装药部位的温度满足火药安全使用要求。该方法为航天火工装置的高温防护设计与验证提供了有效的技术途径。

  1. 19 CFR 122.49a - Electronic manifest requirement for passengers onboard commercial aircraft arriving in the United...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic manifest requirement for passengers.... CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew...

  2. Quality assessment of Automatic Dependent Surveillance Contract (ADS-C wind and temperature observation from commercial aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. de Haan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft observations of wind and temperature are very important for upper air meteorology. In this article, the quality of the meteorological information of an Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Contract (ADS-C message is assessed. The ADS-C messages broadcast by the aircraft are received at air traffic control centres for surveillance and airline control centres for general aircraft and dispatch management. A comparison is performed against a global numerical prediction (NWP model and wind and temperature observations derived from Enhanced Surveillance (EHS air-traffic control radar which interrogates all aircraft in selective mode (Mode-S EHS. Almost 16 000 ADS-C reports with meteorological information were compiled from the Royal Dutch Airlines (KLM database. The length of the data set is 76 consecutive days and started on 1 January 2011. The wind and temperature observations are of good quality when compared to the global NWP forecast fields from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF. Comparison of ADS-C wind and temperature observations against Mode-S EHS derived observations in the vicinity of Amsterdam Airport Schiphol shows that the wind observations are of similar quality and the temperature observations of ADS-C are of better quality than those from Mode-S EHS. However, the current ADS-C data set has a lower vertical resolution than Mode-S EHS. High vertical resolution can be achieved by requesting more ADS-C when aircraft are ascending or descending, but could result in increased data communication costs.

  3. Airborne aldehydes in cabin-air of commercial aircraft: Measurement by HPLC with UV absorbance detection of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Wolfgang; Beckmann, Bibiana; Wrbitzky, Renate

    2016-04-15

    This paper presents the strategy and results of in-flight measurements of airborne aldehydes during normal operation and reported "smell events" on commercial aircraft. The aldehyde-measurement is a part of a large-scale study on cabin-air quality. The aims of this study were to describe cabin-air quality in general and to detect chemical abnormalities during the so-called "smell-events". Adsorption and derivatization of airborne aldehydes on 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine coated silica gel (DNPH-cartridge) was applied using tailor-made sampling kits. Samples were collected with battery supplied personal air sampling pumps during different flight phases. Furthermore, the influence of ozone was investigated by simultaneous sampling with and without ozone absorption unit (ozone converter) assembled to the DNPH-cartridges and found to be negligible. The method was validated for 14 aldehydes and found to be precise (RSD, 5.5-10.6%) and accurate (recovery, 98-103 %), with LOD levels being 0.3-0.6 μg/m(3). According to occupational exposure limits (OEL) or indoor air guidelines no unusual or noticeable aldehyde pollution was observed. In total, 353 aldehyde samples were taken from two types of aircraft. Formaldehyde (overall average 5.7 μg/m(3), overall median 4.9 μg/m(3), range 0.4-44 μg/m(3)), acetaldehyde (overall average 6.5 μg/m(3), overall median 4.6, range 0.3-90 μg/m(3)) and mostly very low concentrations of other aldehydes were measured on 108 flights. Simultaneous adsorption and derivatization of airborne aldehydes on DNPH-cartridges to the Schiff bases and their HPLC analysis with UV absorbance detection is a useful method to measure aldehydes in cabin-air of commercial aircraft.

  4. 民机结构设计中的系统工程问题%Systems Engineering for Commercial Aircraft Structural Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张绪

    2015-01-01

    Systems engineering has been widely applied into highly-integrated complex commercial aircraft development.As an important component,the aircraft structural design will receive innovation with systems engineering introduced.Systems engineering processes in commercial aircraft structural design include function analysis,requirements analysis,structural synthesis, structure production,structural integration,structural tests and so on.Structural requirements are built based on structural design levels and shall be validated and verified.Other systems engineering process include interface management,configuration management and technical risk management.%系统工程在高度集成的复杂民机产品的研制中已得到广泛应用。作为民机设计的重要组成部分,民机结构设计中如能引入系统工程过程和方法,必能有效促进民机结构设计工作的革新。民机结构设计的系统工程过程包括功能分析、需求分析、结构设计、零部件生产、部段和全机结构集成及试验试飞等过程。民机结构需求体系须按照结构设计层级进行制定,并依次进行需求确认和需求验证。民机结构设计相关的系统工程问题还包括接口管理、构型管理、技术风险管理等。

  5. Climate impact of supersonic air traffic: an approach to optimize a potential future supersonic fleet – results from the EU-project SCENIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gulstad

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The demand for intercontinental transportation is increasing and people are requesting short travel times, which supersonic air transportation would enable. However, besides noise and sonic boom issues, which we are not referring to in this investigation, emissions from supersonic aircraft are known to alter the atmospheric composition, in particular the ozone layer, and hence affect climate significantly more than subsonic aircraft. Here, we suggest a metric to quantitatively assess different options for supersonic transport with regard to the potential destruction of the ozone layer and climate impacts. Options for fleet size, engine technology (nitrogen oxide emission level, cruising speed, range, and cruising altitude, are analyzed, based on SCENIC emissions scenarios for 2050, which underlay the requirements to be as realistic as possible in terms of e.g. economic markets and profitable market penetration. This methodology is based on a number of atmosphere-chemistry and climate models to reduce model dependencies. The model results differ significantly in terms of the response to a replacement of subsonic aircraft by supersonic aircraft. However, model differences are smaller when comparing the different options for a supersonic fleet. The base scenario, where supersonic aircraft get in service in 2015, a first fleet fully operational in 2025 and a second in 2050, lead in our simulations to a near surface temperature increase in 2050 of around 7 mK and with constant emissions afterwards to around 21 mK in 2100. The related total radiative forcing amounts to 22 mWm²in 2050, with an uncertainty between 9 and 29 mWm². A reduced supersonic cruise altitude or speed (from March 2 to Mach 1.6 reduces both, climate impact and ozone destruction, by around 40%. An increase in the range of the supersonic aircraft leads to more emissions at lower latitudes since more routes to SE Asia are taken into account, which increases ozone depletion, but

  6. Quality assessment of Automatic Dependent Surveillance Contract (ADS-C wind and temperature observation from commercial aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. de Haan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft observations of wind and temperature are very important for upper air meteorology. In this article, the quality of the meteorological information of an Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Contract (ADS-C message is assessed. The ADS-C messages are received at air traffic control centres for surveillance and airline control centres for general aircraft and dispatch management. Comparison against a global numerical prediction (NWP model and Mode-S Enhanced Surveillance (EHS derived wind and temperature observations is performed. Almost 16 thousand ADS-C reports with meteorological information were compiled from the Royal Dutch Airlines (KLM database. The length of the data set is 76 days. The wind and temperature observations are of good quality when compared to the global NWP forecast fields from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF. Comparison of ADS-C wind and temperature observations against Mode-S EHS derived observations in the vicinity of Amsterdam Airport Schiphol shows that the wind observations are of similar quality and the temperature observations of ADS-C are of better quality than those from Mode-S EHS. However, the current ADS-C data set has a lower vertical resolution than Mode-S EHS. High vertical resolution can be achieved by requesting more ADS-C when aircraft are ascending or descending, but could result in increased data communication costs.

  7. Propulsion controlled aircraft computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, easily retrofit Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) system for use on a wide range of commercial and military aircraft consists of an propulsion controlled aircraft computer that reads in aircraft data including aircraft state, pilot commands and other related data, calculates aircraft throttle position for a given maneuver commanded by the pilot, and then displays both current and calculated throttle position on a cockpit display to show the pilot where to move throttles to achieve the commanded maneuver, or is automatically sent digitally to command the engines directly.

  8. Flight service evaluation of kevlar-49 epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft: Flight service report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three L-1011s, were inspected after 7 years service. There are six Kevlar-49 panels on each aircraft: a left hand and right hand set of a wing-body sandwich fairing; a slid laminate under-wing fillet panel; and a 422 K service aft engine fairing. The three L-1011s include one each in service with Eastern, Air Canada, and TWA. The fairings have accumulated a total of 52,500 hours, with one ship set having 17.700 hours service. The inspections were conducted at the airlines' major maintenance bases with the participation of Lockheed Engineering. The Kevlar-49 components were found to be performing satisfactorily in service with no major problems or any condition requiring corrective action. The only defects noted were minor impact damage and a minor degree of fastener hole fraying and elongation. These are for the most part comparable to damage noted on fiberglass fairings. The service history to date indicates that Kevlar-49 epoxy composite materials have satisfactory service characteristics for use in aircraft secondary structure.

  9. Turbulent Shear Layers in Supersonic Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Smits, Alexander J

    2006-01-01

    A good understanding of turbulent compressible flows is essential to the design and operation of high-speed vehicles. Such flows occur, for example, in the external flow over the surfaces of supersonic aircraft, and in the internal flow through the engines. Our ability to predict the aerodynamic lift, drag, propulsion and maneuverability of high-speed vehicles is crucially dependent on our knowledge of turbulent shear layers, and our understanding of their behavior in the presence of shock waves and regions of changing pressure. Turbulent Shear Layers in Supersonic Flow provides a comprehensive introduction to the field, and helps provide a basis for future work in this area. Wherever possible we use the available experimental work, and the results from numerical simulations to illustrate and develop a physical understanding of turbulent compressible flows.

  10. Supersonic unstalled flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Goldstein, M. E.; Hartmann, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Recently two flutter analyses have been developed at NASA Lewis Research Center to predict the onset of supersonic unstalled flutter of a cascade of two-dimensional airfoils. The first of these analyzes the onset of supersonic flutter at low levels of aerodynamic loading (i.e., backpressure), while the second examines the occurrence of supersonic flutter at moderate levels of aerodynamic loading. Both of these analyses are based on the linearized unsteady inviscid equations of gas dynamics to model the flow field surrounding the cascade. The details of the development of the solution to each of these models have been published. The objective of the present paper is to utilize these analyses in a parametric study to show the effects of cascade geometry, inlet Mach number, and backpressure on the onset of single and multi degree of freedom unstalled supersonic flutter. Several of the results from this study are correlated against experimental qualitative observation to validate the models.

  11. 19 CFR 122.49b - Electronic manifest requirement for crew members and non-crew members onboard commercial aircraft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... system approved by CBP and must set forth the information specified in paragraph (b)(3) of this section...; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial... “non-crew member” is limited to all-cargo flights. (On a passenger or dual flight (passengers and cargo...

  12. Building vibrations induced by noise from rotorcraft and propeller aircraft flyovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Hubbard, Harvey H.

    1992-01-01

    Noise and building vibrations were measured for a series of helicopter and propeller-driven aircraft flyovers at WFF during May 1978. The building response data are compared with similar data acquired earlier at sites near Dulles and Kennedy Airports for operation of commercial jet transports, including the Concorde supersonic transport. Results show that noise-induced vibration levels in windows and walls are directly proportional to sound pressure level and that for a given noise level, the acceleration levels induced by a helicopter or a propeller-driven aircraft flyover cannot be distinguished from the acceleration levels induced by a commercial jet transport flyover. Noise-induced building acceleration levels were found to be lower than those levels which might be expected to cause structural damage and were also lower than some acceleration levels induced by such common domestic events as closing windows and doors.

  13. Supersonic flows over cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianwen FANG; Meng DING; Jin ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of supersonic cold flows over cavities were investigated experimentally and numer-ically, and the effects of cavities of different sizes on super-sonic flow field were analyzed. The results indicate that the ratio of length to depth L/D within the range of 5-9 has little relevance to integral structures of cavity flow. The bevel angle of the rear wall does not alter the overall structure of the cavity flow within the range of 30°-60°, but it can exert obvious effect on the evolvement of shear layer and vortexes in cavities.

  14. Bibliography of Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) program from 1980 to 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, S.

    1984-01-01

    A bibliography for the Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) and Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) Programs is presented. An annotated bibliography for the last 123 formal reports and a listing of titles for 44 articles and presentations is included. The studies identifies technologies for producing efficient supersonic commercial jet transports for cruise Mach numbers from 2.0 to 2.7.

  15. Nonlinear analysis of commercial aircraft impact on a reactor building—Comparison between integral and decoupled crash simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siefert, A., E-mail: siefert@woelfel.de; Henkel, F.O.

    2014-04-01

    Since 9/11, the crash of a commercial aeroplane on the reactor building of a nuclear power plant is a realistic design scenario. Before that the structural behaviour under a crash of a military plane was investigated by a procedure using load-time functions (Riera, 1968). Thereby, the computation of the load-time-function was based on a conceptional model considering the main stiffness parts and masses by discrete elements. With respect to the homogeneous structural set-up of a military plane, the application of this model and the derived load-time-function applied as lumped load case seems very feasible. Contrary thereto the structural set-up of a commercial aeroplane, with e.g. the high mass concentration of the turbine or the high stiffness of the wing box compared to other parts, is different. This can be counteracted by using a more detailed finite element (FE) model for the computation of the load-time-function and by dividing the load case for the reactor building in different main load zones. Although this represents a more detailed investigation, the procedure of using a load-time-function still has the disadvantage to separate the real scenario into two steps. Thereby, the direct interaction between the structure and the aeroplane including all softening effects due to material respectively structural compliances is neglected. This leads to the general conclusion that by applying load-time-functions the results are conservative compared to the real behaviour. Due to the increased capabilities of numerical software solutions it is also possible nowadays to carry out integral crash simulations, combining all effects within one simulation. Compared to the procedure of using load-time-functions, the numerical complexity and therefore the amount of work for this integral method are increased. Within this paper both procedures (load-time function by detailed FE-model and the integral method) are exemplarily compared to each other by a crash analysis of an

  16. Large capacity oblique all-wing transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Thomas L.; Phillips, James A.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Waters, Mark H.

    1996-01-01

    Dr. R. T. Jones first developed the theory for oblique wing aircraft in 1952, and in subsequent years numerous analytical and experimental projects conducted at NASA Ames and elsewhere have established that the Jones' oblique wing theory is correct. Until the late 1980's all proposed oblique wing configurations were wing/body aircraft with the wing mounted on a pivot. With the emerging requirement for commercial transports with very large payloads, 450-800 passengers, Jones proposed a supersonic oblique flying wing in 1988. For such an aircraft all payload, fuel, and systems are carried within the wing, and the wing is designed with a variable sweep to maintain a fixed subsonic normal Mach number. Engines and vertical tails are mounted on pivots supported from the primary structure of the wing. The oblique flying wing transport has come to be known as the Oblique All-Wing (OAW) transport. This presentation gives the highlights of the OAW project that was to study the total concept of the OAW as a commercial transport.

  17. Infinitesimal Conical Supersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemann, Adolf

    1947-01-01

    The calculation of infinitesimal conical supersonic flow has been applied first to the simplest examples that have also been calculated in another way. Except for the discovery of a miscalculation in an older report, there was found the expected conformity. The new method of calculation is limited more definitely to the conical case.

  18. Using Commercial Digital Cameras and Structure-for-Motion Software to Map Snow Cover Depth from Small Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, M.; Nolan, M.; Larsen, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    A long-standing goal in snow hydrology has been to map snow cover in detail, either mapping snow depth or snow water equivalent (SWE) with sub-meter resolution. Airborne LiDAR and air photogrammetry have been used successfully for this purpose, but both require significant investments in equipment and substantial processing effort. Here we detail a relatively inexpensive and simple airborne photogrammetric technique that can be used to measure snow depth. The main airborne hardware consists of a consumer-grade digital camera attached to a survey-quality, dual-frequency GPS. Photogrammetric processing is done using commercially available Structure from Motion (SfM) software that does not require ground control points. Digital elevation models (DEMs) are made from snow-free acquisitions in the summer and snow-covered acquisitions in winter, and the maps are then differenced to arrive at snow thickness. We tested the accuracy and precision of snow depths measured using this system through 1) a comparison with airborne scanning LiDAR, 2) a comparison of results from two independent and slightly different photogrameteric systems, and 3) comparison to extensive on-the-ground measured snow depths. Vertical accuracy and precision are on the order of +/-30 cm and +/- 8 cm, respectively. The accuracy can be made to approach that of the precision if suitable snow-free ground control points exists and are used to co-register summer to winter DEM maps. Final snow depth accuracy from our series of tests was on the order of ±15 cm. This photogrammetric method substantially lowers the economic and expertise barriers to entry for mapping snow.

  19. Depreciation of aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Edward P

    1922-01-01

    There is a widespread, and quite erroneous, impression to the effect that aircraft are essentially fragile and deteriorate with great rapidity when in service, so that the depreciation charges to be allowed on commercial or private operation are necessarily high.

  20. A Numerical Comparison of Symmetric and Asymmetric Supersonic Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kylen D.

    Supersonic wind tunnels are a vital aspect to the aerospace industry. Both the design and testing processes of different aerospace components often include and depend upon utilization of supersonic test facilities. Engine inlets, wing shapes, and body aerodynamics, to name a few, are aspects of aircraft that are frequently subjected to supersonic conditions in use, and thus often require supersonic wind tunnel testing. There is a need for reliable and repeatable supersonic test facilities in order to help create these vital components. The option of building and using asymmetric supersonic converging-diverging nozzles may be appealing due in part to lower construction costs. There is a need, however, to investigate the differences, if any, in the flow characteristics and performance of asymmetric type supersonic wind tunnels in comparison to symmetric due to the fact that asymmetric configurations of CD nozzle are not as common. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study has been conducted on an existing University of Michigan (UM) asymmetric supersonic wind tunnel geometry in order to study the effects of asymmetry on supersonic wind tunnel performance. Simulations were made on both the existing asymmetrical tunnel geometry and two axisymmetric reflections (of differing aspect ratio) of that original tunnel geometry. The Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations are solved via NASAs OVERFLOW code to model flow through these configurations. In this way, information has been gleaned on the effects of asymmetry on supersonic wind tunnel performance. Shock boundary layer interactions are paid particular attention since the test section integrity is greatly dependent upon these interactions. Boundary layer and overall flow characteristics are studied. The RANS study presented in this document shows that the UM asymmetric wind tunnel/nozzle configuration is not as well suited to producing uniform test section flow as that of a symmetric configuration, specifically one

  1. The Benefits and Its Implementation of Concurrent Engineering in Commercial Aircraft Development Program%并行工程在商用飞机研发项目中的益处及其实施方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于海燕

    2015-01-01

    使用较少经费和较短时间研发出质量优越的商用飞机是各飞机研发团队的共同目标. 阐述了通过使用科学的方法和管理技术,例如并行工程,是商用飞机研发项目达成上述目标的途径之一,介绍了一种具备可操作性的实施并行工程的方法.%It is the ultimate goal for commercial aircraft design team to develop a commercial aircraft with out-standing quality while spending less and completing in a shorter time. This paper describes how to achieve such goals via scientific methods and management techniques like concurrent engineering in commercial aircraft develop-ment programs. In the end, a feasible approach to implement concurrent engineering is also briefly introduced.

  2. Study of Users’ Kansei on Commercial Aircraft Cockpit Interior Design%民机驾驶舱内饰设计感性评价研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王黎静; 曹琪琰; 莫兴智; 俞金海; 李宝峰

    2014-01-01

    基于感性工学方法,研究民用飞机驾驶舱内饰设计的设计要素和用户感性评价之间的关系。通过分析感性工学方法的一般流程,结合驾驶舱内饰设计的特点,通过驾驶舱样本图片筛选、感性意向认知研究、设计要素体系构建,最终建立驾驶舱内饰设计要素和用户感性评价之间的关联模型。在方法实施过程中,使用语义差分法获取被试对样本图片的感性评价;运用形态分析法进行设计要素分解;采用反向传播(Back propagation, BP)神经网络法构建设计要素与感性评价之间的关联模型,确定设计要素和感性评价值之间的关系,实现感性评价值的预测。以驾驶舱T形区内饰为示例进行方法说明与验证,关联模型可以实现对样本感性评价值的预测,且预测值与实际主观评价值保持一致。结果表明,建立的关联模型是可用于驾驶舱内饰感性评价值的预测,感性工学方法可以应用于驾驶舱的内饰设计的感性评价。%Kansei engineering(KE) is applied to study the relationship between commercial aircraft cockpit interior design and users’ kansei. Through studying the procedure of KE and the characteristics of cockpit interior design, the process of KE in the field of commercial aircraft cockpit interior is introduced, which contains four steps: selection of picture samples, study of users’ kansei, construction of design element index and construction of the association model. Semantic differential method is used to obtain users’ kansei values. Morphological analysis is used to study the design elements. The relationship model between users’ feelings and design elements is found based onback propagation artificial neural. The example of cockpit T-shape area shows the result of the predicted kansei values and the users’ subjective kansei values agreed. This proves the relationship model can be used to predict the kansei

  3. Climate impact of supersonic air traffic: an approach to optimize a potential future supersonic fleet - results from the EU-project SCENIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewe, V.; Stenke, A.; Ponater, M.; Sausen, R.; Pitari, G.; Iachetti, D.; Rogers, H.; Dessens, O.; Pyle, J.; Isaksen, I. S. A.; Gulstad, L.; Søvde, O. A.; Marizy, C.; Pascuillo, E.

    2007-10-01

    The demand for intercontinental transportation is increasing and people are requesting short travel times, which supersonic air transportation would enable. However, besides noise and sonic boom issues, which we are not referring to in this investigation, emissions from supersonic aircraft are known to alter the atmospheric composition, in particular the ozone layer, and hence affect climate significantly more than subsonic aircraft. Here, we suggest a metric to quantitatively assess different options for supersonic transport with regard to the potential destruction of the ozone layer and climate impacts. Options for fleet size, engine technology (nitrogen oxide emission level), cruising speed, range, and cruising altitude, are analyzed, based on SCENIC emission scenarios for 2050, which underlay the requirements to be as realistic as possible in terms of e.g., economic markets and profitable market penetration. This methodology is based on a number of atmosphere-chemistry and climate models to reduce model dependencies. The model results differ significantly in terms of the response to a replacement of subsonic aircraft by supersonic aircraft, e.g., concerning the ozone impact. However, model differences are smaller when comparing the different options for a supersonic fleet. Those uncertainties were taken into account to make sure that our findings are robust. The base case scenario, where supersonic aircraft get in service in 2015, a first fleet fully operational in 2025 and a second in 2050, leads in our simulations to a near surface temperature increase in 2050 of around 7 mK and with constant emissions afterwards to around 21 mK in 2100. The related total radiative forcing amounts to 22 mWm2 in 2050, with an uncertainty between 9 and 29 mWm2. A reduced supersonic cruise altitude or speed (from Mach 2 to Mach 1.6) reduces both, climate impact and ozone destruction, by around 40%. An increase in the range of the supersonic aircraft leads to more emissions at

  4. Supersonic Gas-Liquid Cleaning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Frank

    1996-01-01

    The Supersonic Gas-Liquid Cleaning System Research Project consisted mainly of a feasibility study, including theoretical and engineering analysis, of a proof-of-concept prototype of this particular cleaning system developed by NASA-KSC. The cleaning system utilizes gas-liquid supersonic nozzles to generate high impingement velocities at the surface of the device to be cleaned. The cleaning fluid being accelerated to these high velocities may consist of any solvent or liquid, including water. Compressed air or any inert gas is used to provide the conveying medium for the liquid, as well as substantially reduce the total amount of liquid needed to perform adequate surface cleaning and cleanliness verification. This type of aqueous cleaning system is considered to be an excellent way of conducting cleaning and cleanliness verification operations as replacements for the use of CFC 113 which must be discontinued by 1995. To utilize this particular cleaning system in various cleaning applications for both the Space Program and the commercial market, it is essential that the cleaning system, especially the supersonic nozzle, be characterized for such applications. This characterization consisted of performing theoretical and engineering analysis, identifying desirable modifications/extensions to the basic concept, evaluating effects of variations in operating parameters, and optimizing hardware design for specific applications.

  5. Toward Reduced Aircraft Community Noise Impact Via a Perception-Influenced Design Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This is an exciting time for aircraft design. New configurations, including small multi-rotor uncrewed aerial systems, fixed- and tilt-wing distributed electric propulsion aircraft, high-speed rotorcraft, hybrid-electric commercial transports, and low-boom supersonic transports, are being made possible through a host of propulsion and airframe technology developments. The resulting noise signatures may be radically different, both spectrally and temporally, than those of the current fleet. Noise certification metrics currently used in aircraft design do not necessarily reflect these characteristics and therefore may not correlate well with human response. Further, as operations and missions become less airport-centric, e.g., those associated with on-demand mobility or package delivery, vehicles may operate in closer proximity to the population than ever before. Fortunately, a new set of tools are available for assessing human perception during the design process in order to affect the final design in a positive manner. The tool chain utilizes system noise prediction methods coupled with auralization and psychoacoustic testing, making possible the inclusion of human response to noise, along with performance criteria and certification requirements, into the aircraft design process. Several case studies are considered to illustrate how this approach could be used to influence the design of future aircraft.

  6. Advanced Jet Noise Exhaust Concepts in NASA's N+2 Supersonics Validation Study and the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project's Upcoming Hybrid Wing Body Acoustics Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Doty, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic and flow-field experiments were conducted on exhaust concepts for the next generation supersonic, commercial aircraft. The concepts were developed by Lockheed Martin (LM), Rolls-Royce Liberty Works (RRLW), and General Electric Global Research (GEGR) as part of an N+2 (next generation forward) aircraft system study initiated by the Supersonics Project in NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program. The experiments were conducted in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The exhaust concepts presented here utilized lobed-mixers and ejectors. A powered third-stream was implemented to improve ejector acoustic performance. One concept was found to produce stagnant flow within the ejector and the other produced discrete-frequency tones (due to flow separations within the model) that degraded the acoustic performance of the exhaust concept. NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project has been investigating a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft as a possible configuration for meeting N+2 system level goals for noise, emissions, and fuel burn. A recently completed NRA led by Boeing Research and Technology resulted in a full-scale aircraft design and wind tunnel model. This model will be tested acoustically in NASA Langley's 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel and will include dual jet engine simulators and broadband engine noise simulators as part of the test campaign. The objectives of the test are to characterize the system level noise, quantify the effects of shielding, and generate a valuable database for prediction method development. Further details of the test and various component preparations are described.

  7. 48 CFR 246.408-71 - Aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aircraft. 246.408-71... Aircraft. (a) The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has certain responsibilities and prerogatives in connection with some commercial aircraft and of aircraft equipment and accessories (Pub. L. 85-726 (72 Stat...

  8. Development of Longitudinal Equivalent System Models for Selected U.S. Navy Tactical Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    revaraa side II nacaaaary and Identlly by block number) Aircraft Longitudinal Flying Qualities Equivalent Systems Frequency Response Matching...is a twin turbofan powered, land and carrier based, subsonic, anti- submarine warfare aircraft . Longitudinal control is accomplished via a...based, supersonic fighter aircraft . Longitudinal control is accomplished via an irreversible mechanical flight control system which transmits

  9. Continuous supersonic plasma wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Nielsen, P.

    1968-01-01

    The B field configuration of a Q-device has been modified into a magnetic Laval nozzle. Continuous supersonic plasma flow is observed with M≈3......The B field configuration of a Q-device has been modified into a magnetic Laval nozzle. Continuous supersonic plasma flow is observed with M≈3...

  10. Continuous supersonic plasma wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Nielsen, P.

    1969-01-01

    The normal magnetic field configuration of a Q device has been modified to obtain a 'magnetic Laval nozzle'. Continuous supersonic plasma 'winds' are obtained with Mach numbers ~3. The magnetic nozzle appears well suited for the study of the interaction of supersonic plasma 'winds' with either...

  11. Numerical simulation of supersonic gap flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xu; Haiming, Huang; Guo, Huang; Song, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Various gaps in the surface of the supersonic aircraft have a significant effect on airflows. In order to predict the effects of attack angle, Mach number and width-to-depth ratio of gap on the local aerodynamic heating environment of supersonic flow, two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the finite volume method, where convective flux of space term adopts the Roe format, and discretization of time term is achieved by 5-step Runge-Kutta algorithm. The numerical results reveal that the heat flux ratio is U-shaped distribution on the gap wall and maximum at the windward corner of the gap. The heat flux ratio decreases as the gap depth and Mach number increase, however, it increases as the attack angle increases. In addition, it is important to find that chamfer in the windward corner can effectively reduce gap effect coefficient. The study will be helpful for the design of the thermal protection system in reentry vehicles.

  12. Numerical simulation of supersonic gap flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    Full Text Available Various gaps in the surface of the supersonic aircraft have a significant effect on airflows. In order to predict the effects of attack angle, Mach number and width-to-depth ratio of gap on the local aerodynamic heating environment of supersonic flow, two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the finite volume method, where convective flux of space term adopts the Roe format, and discretization of time term is achieved by 5-step Runge-Kutta algorithm. The numerical results reveal that the heat flux ratio is U-shaped distribution on the gap wall and maximum at the windward corner of the gap. The heat flux ratio decreases as the gap depth and Mach number increase, however, it increases as the attack angle increases. In addition, it is important to find that chamfer in the windward corner can effectively reduce gap effect coefficient. The study will be helpful for the design of the thermal protection system in reentry vehicles.

  13. Microphysical properties and high ice water content in continental and oceanic Mescoscale Convective Systems and potential implications for commercial aircraft at flight altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayet, J.-F.; Shcherbakov, V.; Bugliaro, L.; Protat, A.; Delanoë, J.; Pelon, J.; Garnier, A.

    2013-08-01

    Two complementary case studies are conducted to analyse convective system properties in the region where strong cloud-top lidar backscatter anomalies are observed as reported by Platt et al. (2011). These anomalies were reported for the first time using in-situ microphysical measurements in an isolated continental convective cloud over Germany during the CIRCLE2 experiment (Gayet et al., 2012). In this case, quasi collocated in situ observations with CALIPSO, CloudSat and Meteosat-9/SEVIRI observations confirm that regions of backscatter anomalies represent the most active and dense convective cloud parts with likely the strongest core updrafts and unusual high values of the particle concentration, extinction and ice water content (IWC), with the occurrence of small ice crystal sizes. Similar spaceborne observations are then analyzed in a maritime mesoscale cloud system (MCS) on 20 June 2008 located off the Brazil coast between 0° and 3° N latitude. Near cloud-top backscatter anomalies are evidenced in a region which corresponds to the coldest temperatures with maximum cloud top altitudes derived from collocated CALIPSO/IIR and Meteosat-9/SEVIRI infrared brightness temperatures. The interpretation of CALIOP data highlights significant differences of microphysical properties from those observed in the continental isolated convective cloud. Indeed, SEVIRI retrievals in the visible confirm much smaller ice particles near-top of the isolated continental convective cloud, i.e. effective radius (Reff) ~15 μm against 22-27 μm in the whole MCS area. 94 GHz Cloud Profiling Radar observations from CloudSat are then used to describe the properties of the most active cloud regions at and below cloud top. The cloud ice water content and effective radius retrieved with the CloudSat 2B-IWC and DARDAR inversion techniques, show that at usual cruise altitudes of commercial aircraft (FL 350 or ~10 700 m level), high IWC (i.e. up to 2 to 4 g m-3) could be identified according to

  14. Unsteady flow in a supersonic cascade with strong in-passage shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Braun, W.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Linearized theory is used to study the unsteady flow in a supersonic cascade with in-passage shock waves. We use the Wiener-Hopf technique to obtain a closed-form analytical solution for the supersonic region. To obtain a solution for the rotational flow in the subsonic region we must solve an infinite set of linear algebraic equations. The analysis shows that it is possible to correlate quantitatively the oscillatory shock motion with the Kutta condition at the trailing edges of the blades. This feature allows us to account for the effect of shock motion on the stability of the cascade. Unlike the theory for a completely supersonic flow, the present study predicts the occurrence of supersonic bending flutter. It therefore provides a possible explanation for the bending flutter that has recently been detected in aircraft-engine compressors at higher blade loadings.

  15. Mixing in Supersonic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Liubin

    2010-01-01

    In many astrophysical environments, mixing of heavy elements occurs in the presence of a supersonic turbulent velocity field. Here we carry out the first systematic numerical study of such passive scalar mixing in isothermal supersonic turbulence. Our simulations show that the ratio of the scalar mixing timescale, $\\tau_{\\rm c}$, to the flow dynamical time, $\\tau_{\\rm dyn}$ (defined as the flow driving scale divided by the rms velocity), increases with the Mach number, $M$, for $M \\lsim3$, and becomes essentially constant for $M \\gsim3.$ This trend suggests that compressible modes are less efficient in enhancing mixing than solenoidal modes. However, since the majority of kinetic energy is contained in solenoidal modes at all Mach numbers, the overall change in $\\tau_{\\rm c}/\\tau_{\\rm dyn}$ is less than 20\\% over the range $1 \\lsim M \\lsim 6$. At all Mach numbers, if pollutants are injected at around the flow driving scale, $\\tau_{\\rm c}$ is close to $\\tau_{\\rm dyn}.$ This suggests that scalar mixing is drive...

  16. Proceedings of the 13th NAL Symposium on Aircraft Computational Aerodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Organ. Commit. of NAL Symp.; 航空機計算空気力学シンポジウム運営委員会

    1996-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics), three dimensional display technique, HOPE, grid generation, transonic wing design, helicopter rotor noise, flow around aircraft configuration, tip vortex, supersonic combustion, film cooling, centrifugal compressor, fan blade flow, space plane, hypersonic rarefied nitrogen flow, shock wave, oscillating wing, unstructured grid, hull shape, wall turbulence, incompressive turbulence channel flow, supersonic flow, large-scale...

  17. Integrated Research/Education University Aircraft Design Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    long- range supersonic aircraft without tail surfaces. No tail surfaces or reduced size tail surfaces may lead to less drag, less weight, lower...Nelson, C.P., and Livne, E., "Low-Speed Stability and Control of a Reduced Scale Long- Range Supersonic Configuration with Reduced- Size or No Vertical Tail...location and size The front right access panel is over the power board. The two symmetric access panels give access to the battery and the pneumatics

  18. Modified Linear Theory Aircraft Design Tools and Sonic Boom Minimization Strategy Applied to Signature Freezing via F-function Lobe Balancing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Timothy Paul

    Commercial supersonic travel has strong business potential; however, in order for the Federal Aviation Administration to lift its ban on supersonic flight overland, designers must reduce aircraft sonic boom strength to an acceptable level. An efficient methodology and associated tools for designing aircraft for minimized sonic booms are presented. The computer-based preliminary design tool, RapidF, based on modified linear theory, enables quick assessment of an aircraft's sonic boom with run times less than 30 seconds on a desktop computer. A unique feature of RapidF is that it tracks where on the aircraft each segment of the of the sonic boom came from, enabling precise modifications, speeding the design process. Sonic booms from RapidF are compared to flight test data, showing that it is capability of predicting a sonic boom duration, overpressure, and interior shock locations. After the preliminary design is complete, scaled flight tests should be conducted to validate the low boom design. When conducting such tests, it is insufficient to just scale the length; thus, equations to scale the weight and propagation distance are derived. Using RapidF, a conceptual supersonic business jet design is presented that uses F-function lobe balancing to create a frozen sonic boom using lifting surfaces. The leading shock is reduced from 1.4 to 0.83 psf, and the trailing shock from 1.2 to 0.87 psf, 41% and 28% reductions respectfully. By changing the incidence angle of the surfaces, different sonic boom shapes can be created, and allowing the lobes to be re-balanced for new flight conditions. Computational fluid dynamics is conducted to validate the sonic boom predictions. Off-design analysis is presented that varies weight, altitude, Mach number, and propagation angle, demonstrating that lobe-balance is robust. Finally, the Perceived Level of Loudness metric is analyzed, resulting in a modified design that incorporates other boom minimization techniques to further reduce

  19. Microphysical properties and high ice water content in continental and oceanic mesoscale convective systems and potential implications for commercial aircraft at flight altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayet, J.-F.; Shcherbakov, V.; Bugliaro, L.; Protat, A.; Delanoë, J.; Pelon, J.; Garnier, A.

    2014-01-01

    -IWC and DARDAR (raDAR/liDAR) inversion techniques, show that at usual cruise altitudes of commercial aircraft (FL 350 or ~ 10 700 m level), high IWC (i.e. up to 2 to 4 g m-3) could be identified according to specific IWC-Z (Z being the reflectivity factor) relationships. These values correspond to a maximum reflectivity factor of +18 dBZ (at 94 GHz). Near-top cloud properties also indicate signatures of microphysical characteristics according to the cloud-stage evolution as revealed by SEVIRI images to identify the development of new cells within the MCS cluster. It is argued that the availability of real-time information (on the kilometre-scale) about cloud top IR brightness temperature decreases with respect to the cloud environment would help identify MCS cloud areas with potentially high ice water content and small particle sizes against which onboard meteorological radars may not be able to provide timely warning.

  20. Supersonic induction plasma jet modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selezneva, S.E. E-mail: svetlana2@hermes.usherbS_Selezneva2@hermes.usherb; Boulos, M.I

    2001-06-01

    Numerical simulations have been applied to study the argon plasma flow downstream of the induction plasma torch. It is shown that by means of the convergent-divergent nozzle adjustment and chamber pressure reduction, a supersonic plasma jet can be obtained. We investigate the supersonic and a more traditional subsonic plasma jets impinging onto a normal substrate. Comparing to the subsonic jet, the supersonic one is narrower and much faster. Near-substrate velocity and temperature boundary layers are thinner, so the heat flux near the stagnation point is higher in the supersonic jet. The supersonic plasma jet is characterized by the electron overpopulation and the domination of the recombination over the dissociation, resulting into the heating of the electron gas. Because of these processes, the supersonic induction plasma permits to separate spatially different functions (dissociation and ionization, transport and deposition) and to optimize each of them. The considered configuration can be advantageous in some industrial applications, such as plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition of diamond and polymer-like films and in plasma spraying of nanoscaled powders.

  1. A NASA study of the impact of technology on future multimission aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Jeffrey J.

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual aircraft design study was recently completed which compared three supersonic multimission tactical aircraft. The aircraft were evaluated in two technology timeframes and were sized with consistent methods and technology assumptions so that the aircraft could be compared in operational utility or cost analysis trends. The three aircraft are a carrier-based Fighter/Attack aircraft, a land-based Multirole Fighter, and a Short Takeoff/Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft. This paper describes the design study ground rules used and the aircraft designed. The aircraft descriptions include weights, dimensions and layout, design mission and maneuver performance, and fallout mission performance. The effect of changing technology and mission requirements on the STOVL aircraft and the impact of aircraft navalization are discussed. Also discussed are the effects on the STOVL aircraft of both Thrust/Weight required in hover and design mission radius.

  2. Research on Commercial Aircraft Manufacturer’s Service Management--The Servitization of manufacturing%飞机制造商客户服务管理研究--以制造业服务化为视角

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈竞; 魏法杰

    2016-01-01

    我国支线飞机ARJ21目前正从投入商业运营到批量化生产,为确保飞行安全和商业成功,飞机制造商必须通过高效的客户服务为航空公司的运营提供帮助。制造业服务化是高端制造业的重要特征,因此商用飞机的客户服务不止是依附于航空器的增值服务,更是商用飞机市场竞争的核心竞争力的重要组成部分,同时也是高端制造业重要的利润来源。从广义虚拟经济视角,本文提出了服务导向的商用飞机制造商客户服务的服务质量评价方法。%With China' s ifrst domestically developed jet, ARJ21 launching its ifrst commercial services, and moving forward to its mass production, to secure the aviation safety and business success, It is imperative for aircraft manufacturer to provide superior customer service to its airline customers to help them optimize the use of their aircraft. The servitization of manufacturing is highly essential in the high-end industry, aircraft manufacturer’s customer service serves not only as a core competency in the market, but also a major source of profit. From the perspective of generalized virtual economy, a service-driven service quality measurement methodology is introduced in this paper for the aircraft manufacturer’s customer service quality evaluation.

  3. Stochastic Methods for Aircraft Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelz, Richard B.; Ogot, Madara

    1998-01-01

    The global stochastic optimization method, simulated annealing (SA), was adapted and applied to various problems in aircraft design. The research was aimed at overcoming the problem of finding an optimal design in a space with multiple minima and roughness ubiquitous to numerically generated nonlinear objective functions. SA was modified to reduce the number of objective function evaluations for an optimal design, historically the main criticism of stochastic methods. SA was applied to many CFD/MDO problems including: low sonic-boom bodies, minimum drag on supersonic fore-bodies, minimum drag on supersonic aeroelastic fore-bodies, minimum drag on HSCT aeroelastic wings, FLOPS preliminary design code, another preliminary aircraft design study with vortex lattice aerodynamics, HSR complete aircraft aerodynamics. In every case, SA provided a simple, robust and reliable optimization method which found optimal designs in order 100 objective function evaluations. Perhaps most importantly, from this academic/industrial project, technology has been successfully transferred; this method is the method of choice for optimization problems at Northrop Grumman.

  4. Supersonic Dislocation Bursts in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, E. N.; Zhao, S.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Dislocations are the primary agents of permanent deformation in crystalline solids. Since the theoretical prediction of supersonic dislocations over half a century ago, there is a dearth of experimental evidence supporting their existence. Here we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shocked silicon to reveal transient supersonic partial dislocation motion at approximately 15 km/s, faster than any previous in-silico observation. Homogeneous dislocation nucleation occurs near the shock front and supersonic dislocation motion lasts just fractions of picoseconds before the dislocations catch the shock front and decelerate back to the elastic wave speed. Applying a modified analytical equation for dislocation evolution we successfully predict a dislocation density of 1.5 × 1012 cm-2 within the shocked volume, in agreement with the present simulations and realistic in regards to prior and on-going recovery experiments in silicon.

  5. Aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.; Anderson, M.R.; Miake-Lye, R.C.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics; Sorokin, A.A.; Buriko, Y.I. [Scientific Research Center `Ecolen`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The extent to which fuel sulfur is converted to SO{sub 3} during combustion and the subsequent turbine flow in supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines is estimated numerically. The analysis is based on: a flamelet model with non-equilibrium sulfur chemistry for the combustor, and a one-dimensional, two-stream model with finite rate chemical kinetics for the turbine. The results indicate that between 2% and 10% of the fuel sulfur is emitted as SO{sub 3}. It is also shown that, for a high fuel sulfur mass loading, conversion in the turbine is limited by the level of atomic oxygen at the combustor exit, leading to higher SO{sub 2} oxidation efficiency at lower fuel sulfur loadings. While SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} are the primary oxidation products, the model results further indicate H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} levels on the order of 0.1 ppm for supersonic expansions through a divergent nozzle. This source of fully oxidized S(6) (SO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) exceeds previously calculated S(6) levels due to oxidation of SO{sub 2} by OH in the exhaust plume outside the engine nozzle. (author) 26 refs.

  6. Laser aircraft. [using kerosene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, A.; Sun, K.; Jones, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of a laser-powered aircraft is discussed. Laser flight would be completely compatible with existing airports and air-traffic control, with the airplane using kerosene only power, up to a cruising altitude of 9 km where the laser satellite would lock on and beam laser energy to it. Two major components make up the laser turbofan, a heat exchanger for converting laser radiation into thermal energy, and conventional turbomachinery. The laser power satellite would put out 42 Mw using a solar-powered thermal engine to generate electrical power for the closed-cycle supersonic electric discharge CO laser, whose radiators, heat exchangers, supersonic diffuser, and ducting will amount to 85% of the total subsystem mass. Relay satellites will be used to intercept the beam from the laser satellite, correct outgoing beam aberrations, and direct the beam to the next target. A 300-airplane fleet with transcontinental range is projected to save enough kerosene to equal the energy content of the entire system, including power and relay satellites, in one year.

  7. Properties of Supersonic Evershed Downflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozuelo, S. Esteban; Bellot Rubio, L. R.; de la Cruz Rodríguez, J.

    2016-12-01

    We study supersonic Evershed downflows in a sunspot penumbra by means of high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric data acquired in the Fe i 617.3 nm line with the CRISP instrument at the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. Physical observables, such as Dopplergrams calculated from line bisectors and Stokes V zero-crossing wavelengths, and Stokes V maps in the far red-wing, are used to find regions where supersonic Evershed downflows may exist. We retrieve the line-of-sight velocity and the magnetic field vector in these regions using two-component inversions of the observed Stokes profiles with the help of the SIR code. We follow these regions during their lifetime to study their temporal behavior. Finally, we carry out a statistical analysis of the detected supersonic downflows to characterize their physical properties. Supersonic downflows are contained in compact patches moving outward, which are located in the mid- and outer penumbra. They are observed as bright, roundish structures at the outer end of penumbral filaments that resemble penumbral grains. The patches may undergo fragmentations and mergings during their lifetime; some of them are recurrent. Supersonic downflows are associated with strong and rather vertical magnetic fields with a reversed polarity compared to that of the sunspot. Our results suggest that downflows returning back to the solar surface with supersonic velocities are abruptly stopped in dense deep layers and produce a shock. Consequently, this shock enhances the temperature and is detected as a bright grain in the continuum filtergrams, which could explain the existence of outward-moving grains in the mid- and outer penumbra.

  8. Technical and environmental challenges for the next generation supersonic transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacull, M. [Aerospatiale (France); Hume, Ch. [British Aerospace (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    The next century will be marked by the entry into service of new supersonic transport. The real question concerning the next generation supersonic transport is not will it happen, but when, and how. There is a general agreement that such an airplane will result from a worldwide venture. Who will participate, to what extend and how we will put the vehicle and partners together, are an interesting concern that will need some time to resolve. The other challenges will be to design, build and market an aircraft that will be a viable product: for the passenger, who wants the service of a fast airliner with a reasonable surcharge; for the airline which wants competitive operating cost so that it will make sense to introduce such an airplane in its fleet; for the manufacturer, which not only does not want to go bankruptcy, but seeks to make a profit in the long term within the environmental constraints: no adverse impact on high atmosphere ozone; compliance with noise requirements, operations compatible with sonic boom. This paper does not try to answer all these question, but rather highlight major technical and environmental issues for the next generation supersonic transport. The topics discussed are: general specification, noise, atmospheric emissions, sonic boom, aerodynamics, structures, engine integration, systems. (authors)

  9. Toward Improved CFD Predictions of Slender Airframe Aerodynamics Using the F-16XL Aircraft (CAWAPI-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckring, James M.; Rizzi, Arthur; Davis, M. Bruce

    2014-01-01

    A coordinated project has been underway to improve CFD predictions of slender airframe aerodynamics. The work is focused on two flow conditions and leverages a unique flight data set obtained with an F-16XL aircraft. These conditions, a low-speed high angleof- attack case and a transonic low angle-of-attack case, were selected from a prior prediction campaign wherein the CFD failed to provide acceptable results. In this paper the background, objectives and approach to the current project are presented. The work embodies predictions from multiple numerical formulations that are contributed from multiple organizations, and the context of this campaign to other multi-code, multiorganizational efforts is included. The relevance of this body of work toward future supersonic commercial transport concepts is also briefly addressed.

  10. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 62: The Influence of Knowledge Diffusion on Aeronautics Innovation: The Research, Development, and Production of Large Commercial Aircraft in France, Germany, and the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golich, Vicki L.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper focuses on how European public policies-individually and collectively - influence the diffusion of knowledge and technology. It begins with an overview of the roles played historically and currently by European governments in the Research, Development and Production (RD&P) of Large Commercial Aircraft (LCA). The analytical framework brings together literature from global political economy, comparative politics, business management, and science and technology policy studies. It distinguishes between the production of knowledge, on the one hand, and the dissemination of knowledge, on the other. France, Germany, and the United Kingdom serve as the analytical cases. The paper concludes with a call for additional research in this area, some tentative lessons learned, and a discussion of the consequences of national strategies and policies for the diffusion of knowledge and technology in an era of globalizaton.

  11. S.C. Advanced Training Aircraft IAR 99 (A SOIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan STEFANESCU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of subsonic single control aircraft and especially of double–control ones, instead of supersonic combat aircraft in the military pilot training programs in the operational units, has be-come a necessity due to the economic and financial world-wide crisis which began during the 70’s-80’s, with the advent of the oil crisis, affecting many countries, which have their own Military Air Forces.

  12. Properties of Supersonic Evershed Downflows

    CERN Document Server

    Pozuelo, Sara Esteban; Rodriguez, Jaime de la Cruz

    2016-01-01

    We study supersonic Evershed downflows in a sunspot penumbra by means of high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric data acquired in the Fe I 617.3 nm line with the CRISP instrument at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. Physical observables, such as Dopplergrams calculated from line bisectors and Stokes V zero-crossing wavelengths, and Stokes V maps in the far red wing, are used to find regions where supersonic Evershed downflows may exist. We retrieve the LOS velocity and the magnetic field vector in these regions using two-component inversions of the observed Stokes profiles with the help of the SIR code. We follow these regions during their lifetime to study their temporal behavior. Finally, we carry out a statistical analysis of the detected supersonic downflows to characterize their physical properties. Supersonic downflows are contained in compact patches moving outward, which are located in the mid and outer penumbra. They are observed as bright, roundish structures at the outer end of penumbral filamen...

  13. Coherent structures in a supersonic complex nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magstadt, Andrew; Berry, Matthew; Glauser, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The jet flow from a complex supersonic nozzle is studied through experimental measurements. The nozzle's geometry is motivated by future engine designs for high-performance civilian and military aircraft. This rectangular jet has a single plane of symmetry, an additional shear layer (referred to as a wall jet), and an aft deck representative of airframe integration. The core flow operates at a Mach number of Mj , c = 1 . 6 , and the wall jet is choked (Mj , w = 1 . 0). This high Reynolds number jet flow is comprised of intense turbulence levels, an intricate shock structure, shear and boundary layers, and powerful corner vortices. In the present study, stereo PIV measurements are simultaneously sampled with high-speed pressure measurements, which are embedded in the aft deck, and far-field acoustics in the anechoic chamber at Syracuse University. Time-resolved schlieren measurements have indicated the existence of strong flow events at high frequencies, at a Strouhal number of St = 3 . 4 . These appear to result from von Kàrmàn vortex shedding within the nozzle and pervade the entire flow and acoustic domain. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied on the current data to identify coherent structures in the jet and study the influence of this vortex street. AFOSR Turbulence and Transition Program (Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0435) with program managers Dr. I. Leyva and Dr. R. Ponnappan.

  14. High performance forward swept wing aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, David G. (Inventor); Aoyagi, Kiyoshi (Inventor); Dudley, Michael R. (Inventor); Schmidt, Susan B. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A high performance aircraft capable of subsonic, transonic and supersonic speeds employs a forward swept wing planform and at least one first and second solution ejector located on the inboard section of the wing. A high degree of flow control on the inboard sections of the wing is achieved along with improved maneuverability and control of pitch, roll and yaw. Lift loss is delayed to higher angles of attack than in conventional aircraft. In one embodiment the ejectors may be advantageously positioned spanwise on the wing while the ductwork is kept to a minimum.

  15. 民机非包容性转子失效危害防护设计研究%Research on hazard protection design of uncontained rotor failure on commercial aircraft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍海滨; 付仁合; 王伟

    2011-01-01

    民用飞机的发动机转子非包容性失效给飞机的安全运行带来巨大的风险,为了将这种转子非包容性失效可能带来的危害降至最小,需要合理的评估碎片的危害水平,以及采取合理的安全预防措施.尽管在FAA (Federal Aviation Administration)用于评估碎片危害水平的UEDDAM(Uncontained Engine Debris Damage Analysis Model)软件工具中采用了加强防护设计以减少碎片危害,但是没有对具体的分析流程和碎片能量衰减的计算模型进行说明.为此,在现有的碎片危害分析方法的基础上,考虑到碎片在侵彻过程中会有能量衰减,分析了降低碎片危害的三种安全预防措施,通过对比确定了加强防护设计对于降低碎片危害的重要意义及其分析的流程.通过对飞机结构中关键区域定义的理解,明确了在飞机的不同部位需要采取不同的加强防护设计,并详细介绍了整体加强防护设计和局部加强防护设计的流程.%The uncontained rotor failure of commercial aircraft turbines causes enormous risk to aircraft safe operation. In order to minimize the harm of uncontained rotor failure, it is necessary to evaluate fragments harm level rationally and adopt reasonable safety precaution. Even though the software tools of UEDDAM ( Uncontained Engine Debris Damage Analysis Model), which FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) has applied for the evaluation of uncontained rotor fragments harm level, adopt consolidation design of shielding to reduce the harm of fragments, it does not have the explanation of definite flow analysis and energy dissipation model. For this reason, on the basis of analysis methods of fragments hazard, considering the energy dissipation of the debris during the penetration, three measures on how to reduce the harm of commercial aircraft turbine rotor fragments were analyzed. By comparing a-bove measures, the important significance of strengthen safe precautionary design for

  16. Defense Logistics Agency Did Not Obtain Fair and Reasonable Prices From Meggitt Aircraft Braking Systems for Sole-Source Commercial Spare Parts (REDACTED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-08

    Mission Our mission is to provide independent, relevant, and timely oversight of the Department of Defense that supports the warfighter; promotes ...oversight organization in the Federal Government by leading change, speaking truth, and promoting excellence—a diverse organization, working...determine the 2013 contract prices; • did not sufficiently analyze the “commercial of a type” parts1 to determine whether the sales of comparable parts

  17. 75 FR 8427 - Civil Supersonic Aircraft Panel Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... America and NOISE-CON 2010 and it will be held at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, Grand Ballroom... Society of America and ] NOISE-CON 2010. It will be held at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, Grand... Space Administration (NASA), and industry to get feedback from interested persons. Public involvement...

  18. Advanced materials and fabrication processes for supersonic cruise aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guess, M. K.; Kaneko, R. S.; Wald, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    Research and development programs to develop high-strength aluminum alloys and low-cost materials and fabrication techniques for titanium alloys are being conducted. Thirteen aluminum alloy compositions are being evaluated. A section of a production component was fabricated using superplastic forming and diffusion bonding (SPF/DB) and fabrication studies are being conducted on three low temperature forming beta titanium alloys. Cost studies indicate substantial structural cost reduction potentials resulting from the use of both aluminum alloys and low-cost titanium fabrication techniques. Lowest overall costs are indicated for a composite/aluminum or composite titanium structure.

  19. Assessing and controlling the effect of aircraft on the environment: Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppoff, I. G.; Grobman, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    The air pollution created by aircraft engines around airports and the global atmospheric problem of supersonic aircraft operating in the stratosphere are discussed. Methods for assessing the air pollution impact are proposed. The use of atmospheric models to determine the air pollution extent is described. Methods for controlling the emissions of aircraft engines are examined. Diagrams of the atmospheric composition resulting from exhaust gas emissions are developed.

  20. Distributed Data Mining for Aircraft Health Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA, DoD, and commercial aircraft operators need to transform vast amounts of aircraft data accumulated in distributed databases into actionable knowledge. We...

  1. Aircraft Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nødskov, Kim; Kværnø, Ole

    There are many indications that China is actively researching the design of an aircraft carrier. It is unknown whether China will initiate the actual acquisition of a carrier, but the indications that are available of their research into aircraft carriers and carrier-capable aircraft, as well...... as their purchases of aircraft carrier systems, makes it more than likely that the country is preparing such an acquisition. China has territorial disputes in the South China Sea over the Spratly Islands and is also worried about the security of its sea lines of communications, by which China transports the majority...... of its foreign trade, as well as its oil imports, upon which the country is totally dependent. China therefore has good reasons for acquiring an aircraft carrier to enable it to protect its national interests. An aircraft carrier would also be a prominent symbol of China’s future status as a great power...

  2. Supersonic Plasma Flow Control Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    to liquid metals , for example, the conductivities of typical plasma and electrolyte flows are relatively low. Ref. 14 cites the conductivity of...heating is the dominant effect. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Supersonic, plasma , MHD , boundary-layer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...horns in operation on Mach 5 wind tunnel with a plasma discharge. 31 Figure 17 Front view of a 100 mA DC discharge generated with upstream pointing

  3. Supersonic Chordwise Bending Flutter in Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-31

    such a flutter boundary can be made by utilizing the trend lines predicted from a supersonic analysis based on supersonic cascade theory (Appendix I...bonding agent was injected via hypodermic needles after the blade tabs were properly inserted, The integrity and repeatability of the mounting of the indi...in conjunction with NASTRAN predictions and supersonic cascade aerodynamic computa- tions. Comparisons between theory and experiment are discussed. DD

  4. Supersonic flow imaging via nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Due to influence of compressibility,shock wave,instabilities,and turbulence on supersonic flows, current flow visualization and imaging techniques encounter some problems in high spatiotemporal resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio(SNR)measurements.Therefore,nanoparticle based planar laser scattering method(NPLS)is developed here.The nanoparticles are used as tracer,and pulse planar laser is used as light source in NPLS;by recording images of particles in flow field with CCD, high spatiotemporal resolution supersonic flow imaging is realized.The flow-following ability of nanoparticles in supersonic flows is studied according to multiphase flow theory and calibrating experiment of oblique shock wave.The laser scattering characteristics of nanoparticles are analyzed with light scattering theory.The results of theoretical and experimental studies show that the dynamic behavior and light scattering characteristics of nanoparticles highly enhance the spatiotemporal resolution and SNR of NPLS,with which the flow field involving shock wave,expansion,Mach disk,boundary layer,sliding-line,and mixing layer can be imaged clearly at high spatiotemporal resolution.

  5. Identification of Aircraft Hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Ashley

    2006-12-08

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).

  6. IDENTIFICATION OF AIRCRAFT HAZARDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.L. Ashley

    2005-03-23

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in the ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2004, Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and on crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987, Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. NUREG-0800 is being used here as a reference because some of the same considerations apply. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of the identified aircraft hazards based on the criteria that apply to Category 1 and 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 (see Section 4). The scope of this technical report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the MGR at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (see Section 7).

  7. Hydrogen aircraft technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, G. D.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation is conducted of the technology development status, economics, commercial feasibility, and infrastructural requirements of LH2-fueled aircraft, with additional consideration of hydrogen production, liquefaction, and cryostorage methods. Attention is given to the effects of LH2 fuel cryotank accommodation on the configurations of prospective commercial transports and military airlifters, SSTs, and HSTs, as well as to the use of the plentiful heatsink capacity of LH2 for innovative propulsion cycles' performance maximization. State-of-the-art materials and structural design principles for integral cryotank implementation are noted, as are airport requirements and safety and environmental considerations.

  8. Aircraft Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Albion H. (Inventor); Uden, Edward (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention is an aircraft wing design that creates a bell shaped span load, which results in a negative induced drag (induced thrust) on the outer portion of the wing; such a design obviates the need for rudder control of an aircraft.

  9. PIV Measurements of Supersonic Internally-Mixed Dual-Stream Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James E.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    While externally mixed, or separate flow, nozzle systems are most common in high bypass-ratio aircraft, they are not as attractive for use in lower bypass-ratio systems and on aircraft that will fly supersonically. The noise of such propulsion systems is also dominated by jet noise, making the study and noise reduction of these exhaust systems very important, both for military aircraft and future civilian supersonic aircraft. This paper presents particle image velocimetry of internally mixed nozzle with different area ratios between core and bypass, and nozzles that are ideally expanded and convergent. Such configurations independently control the geometry of the internal mixing layer and of the external shock structure. These allow exploration of the impact of shocks on the turbulent mixing layers, the impact of bypass ratio on broadband shock noise and mixing noise, and the impact of temperature on the turbulent flow field. At the 2009 AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference the authors presented data and analysis from a series of tests that looked at the acoustics of supersonic jets from internally mixed nozzles. In that paper the broadband shock and mixing noise components of the jet noise were independently manipulated by holding Mach number constant while varying bypass ratio and jet temperature. Significant portions of that analysis was predicated on assumptions regarding the flow fields of these jets, both shock structure and turbulence. In this paper we add to that analysis by presenting particle image velocimetry measurements of the flow fields of many of those jets. In addition, the turbulent velocity data documented here will be very useful for validation of computational flow codes that are being developed to design advanced nozzles for future aircraft.

  10. Aircraft Attitude Control by Fuzzy Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Akio; Matsuba, Takashi

    The fuzzy control law to improve dutch roll characteristics of aircraft was designed and its control performance was evaluated. First, the control law was designed for a small-high speed aircraft at low altitude and low-speed flight conditions. The control law was then applied to flight conditions from minimum speed to supersonic speed and from sea level to high altitude. The control performance for these conditions was evaluated. Furthermore, this control law was adapted to a large transport aircraft with no parameter changes. The evaluation showed good control performance to improve the dutch roll characteristics under all flight conditions for both small high-speed aircraft and large transport aircraft without the parameter changes. This means that the fuzzy control proved to provide effective flexible application to aircraft stability augmentation. If an aircraft in actual flight is in strong air turbulence, inputs to the fuzzy controller may exceed the limit of its effective range. To cope with this problem, the countermeasures were introduced, their methods tested, and their effectiveness proved.

  11. Performance Evaluation Method for Dissimilar Aircraft Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, H. J.

    1979-01-01

    A rationale is presented for using the square of the wingspan rather than the wing reference area as a basis for nondimensional comparisons of the aerodynamic and performance characteristics of aircraft that differ substantially in planform and loading. Working relationships are developed and illustrated through application to several categories of aircraft covering a range of Mach numbers from 0.60 to 2.00. For each application, direct comparisons of drag polars, lift-to-drag ratios, and maneuverability are shown for both nondimensional systems. The inaccuracies that may arise in the determination of aerodynamic efficiency based on reference area are noted. Span loading is introduced independently in comparing the combined effects of loading and aerodynamic efficiency on overall performance. Performance comparisons are made for the NACA research aircraft, lifting bodies, century-series fighter aircraft, F-111A aircraft with conventional and supercritical wings, and a group of supersonic aircraft including the B-58 and XB-70 bomber aircraft. An idealized configuration is included in each category to serve as a standard for comparing overall efficiency.

  12. Analyzing the structure of the optical path difference of the supersonic film cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Haolin; Yi, Shihe; Fu, Jia; He, Lin

    2016-10-01

    While high-speed aircraft are flying in the atmosphere, its optical-hood is subjected to severe aerodynamic heating. Supersonic film cooling method can effectively isolate external heating, but the flow structures formed by the supersonic film cooling can cause the beam degradation and affect the imaging quality. To research the aero-optics of supersonic film cooling, an experimental model was adopted in this paper, its mainstream Mach number 3.4, designed jet Mach number 2.5, measured jet Mach number 2.45. High-resolution images of flow were acquired by the nano-based planar laser scattering (NPLS) technique, by reconstructing the density field of supersonic film cooling, and then, the optical path difference (OPD) were acquired by the ray-tracing method. Depending on the comparison between K-H vortex and OPD distribution, the valleys of OPD correspond to the vortex `rollers' and the peaks to the `braids'. However, the corresponding relationship becomes quite irregular for the flow field with developed vortices, and cannot be summarized in this manner. And then, the OPD were analyzed by correlation function and structure function, show that, there is a relationship between the shape of OPD correlation function and the vortex structure, the correlation function type changed with the development of the vortex. The correctness that the mixing layer makes a main contribution to the aero-optics of supersonic film cooling was verified, and the structure function of aero-optical distortion has a power relationship that is similar to that of atmospheric optics. At last, the power spectrum corresponding to the typical region of supersonic film cooling were acquired by improved periodgram.

  13. Rapid Parameterization Schemes for Aircraft Shape Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    A rapid shape parameterization tool called PROTEUS is developed for aircraft shape optimization. This tool can be applied directly to any aircraft geometry that has been defined in PLOT3D format, with the restriction that each aircraft component must be defined by only one data block. PROTEUS has eight types of parameterization schemes: planform, wing surface, twist, body surface, body scaling, body camber line, shifting/scaling, and linear morphing. These parametric schemes can be applied to two types of components: wing-type surfaces (e.g., wing, canard, horizontal tail, vertical tail, and pylon) and body-type surfaces (e.g., fuselage, pod, and nacelle). These schemes permit the easy setup of commonly used shape modification methods, and each customized parametric scheme can be applied to the same type of component for any configuration. This paper explains the mathematics for these parametric schemes and uses two supersonic configurations to demonstrate the application of these schemes.

  14. Static aeroelastic analysis for generic configuration aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, IN; Miura, Hirokazu; Chargin, Mladen K.

    1987-01-01

    A static aeroelastic analysis capability that can calculate flexible air loads for generic configuration aircraft was developed. It was made possible by integrating a finite element structural analysis code (MSC/NASTRAN) and a panel code of aerodynamic analysis based on linear potential flow theory. The framework already built in MSC/NASTRAN was used and the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix is computed externally and inserted in the NASTRAN by means of a DMAP program. It was shown that deformation and flexible airloads of an oblique wing aircraft can be calculated reliably by this code both in subsonic and supersonic speeds. Preliminary results indicating importance of flexibility in calculating air loads for this type of aircraft are presented.

  15. Detonation in supersonic radial outflow

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.

    2014-11-07

    We report on the structure and dynamics of gaseous detonation stabilized in a supersonic flow emanating radially from a central source. The steady-state solutions are computed and their range of existence is investigated. Two-dimensional simulations are carried out in order to explore the stability of the steady-state solutions. It is found that both collapsing and expanding two-dimensional cellular detonations exist. The latter can be stabilized by putting several rigid obstacles in the flow downstream of the steady-state sonic locus. The problem of initiation of standing detonation stabilized in the radial flow is also investigated numerically. © 2014 Cambridge University Press.

  16. Development of semi-free jet test facility for supersonic engine; Choonsoku engine shiken shisetsu semi free jet shiken sochi no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, T.; Taguchi, H.; Omi, J.; Sakamoto, K. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-01-01

    IHI has been developing the SETF (Supersonic Engine Test Facility) to aim at the research and development of engines for the next generation commercial supersonic transport in the NAL (National Aerospace Laboratory in Japan). The SETF will supply the functions to test the supersonic engine performance in high altitude flight condition and supersonic intake-engine matching. The semi-free jet test mode was adopted for the supersonic intake-engine matching test, but this test configuration has not been conducted previously in Japan and there were a large number of unknown factors. IHI has developed a sub-scale test model in cooperation with NAL to identify the test conditions and a start sequence of the semi-free jet test mode. In addition, the designs of facility component were optimized and verified by using the CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) method. (author)

  17. Reference aircraft for ICAO Working Group E

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The results of an advanced supersonic transport aircraft/engine integration study to be used as a detail preliminary design case to assist in the assessment of noise standards applicable to future supersonic transports are summarized. The design considered reflects the application of the advanced technologies which are projected to be available for program initiation in the 1980-1985 time period. Suppression characteristics included were obtained in simulated forward flight in the Rolls-Royce spin rig using a small scale model. The engine size selected produces a noise no greater than 108 EPNdB at any of the three Far Part 36 (Stage 2) defined measuring points and is sized slightly larger than the optimum cruise size to meet this noise constraint condition.

  18. Amphibious Aircraft

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A brief self composed research article on Amphibious Aircrafts discussing their use, origin and modern day applications along with their advantages and disadvantages...

  19. Aircraft Disinsection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some countries may require aircraft coming from countries where certain insects or insect-borne diseases are present, such as malaria and Zika virus, to be treated with insecticide. Find out about regulation of pesticides for this treatment.

  20. Gas-Liquid Supersonic Cleaning and Cleaning Verification Spray System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Lewis M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) recently entered into a nonexclusive license agreement with Applied Cryogenic Solutions (ACS), Inc. (Galveston, TX) to commercialize its Gas-Liquid Supersonic Cleaning and Cleaning Verification Spray System technology. This technology, developed by KSC, is a critical component of processes being developed and commercialized by ACS to replace current mechanical and chemical cleaning and descaling methods used by numerous industries. Pilot trials on heat exchanger tubing components have shown that the ACS technology provides for: Superior cleaning in a much shorter period of time. Lower energy and labor requirements for cleaning and de-scaling uper.ninih. Significant reductions in waste volumes by not using water, acidic or basic solutions, organic solvents, or nonvolatile solid abrasives as components in the cleaning process. Improved energy efficiency in post-cleaning heat exchanger operations. The ACS process consists of a spray head containing supersonic converging/diverging nozzles, a source of liquid gas; a novel, proprietary pumping system that permits pumping liquid nitrogen, liquid air, or supercritical carbon dioxide to pressures in the range of 20,000 to 60,000 psi; and various hoses, fittings, valves, and gauges. The size and number of nozzles can be varied so the system can be built in configurations ranging from small hand-held spray heads to large multinozzle cleaners. The system also can be used to verify if a part has been adequately cleaned.

  1. Robots for Aircraft Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center charged USBI (now Pratt & Whitney) with the task of developing an advanced stripping system based on hydroblasting to strip paint and thermal protection material from Space Shuttle solid rocket boosters. A robot, mounted on a transportable platform, controls the waterjet angle, water pressure and flow rate. This technology, now known as ARMS, has found commercial applications in the removal of coatings from jet engine components. The system is significantly faster than manual procedures and uses only minimal labor. Because the amount of "substrate" lost is minimal, the life of the component is extended. The need for toxic chemicals is reduced, as is waste disposal and human protection equipment. Users of the ARMS work cell include Delta Air Lines and the Air Force, which later contracted with USBI for development of a Large Aircraft Paint Stripping system (LARPS). LARPS' advantages are similar to ARMS, and it has enormous potential in military and civil aircraft maintenance. The technology may also be adapted to aircraft painting, aircraft inspection techniques and paint stripping of large objects like ships and railcars.

  2. The Effect of the Recombination Shock behind a Backward Step on the Mixing Characteristics of an Inclined Sonic Methane Jet in a Supersonic Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, A. C. Y.; Chang, B. Y. C.; Su, C. Y. H.; Yuan, D. H. F.

    The scramjet engines have been extensively studied for use in aircraft and future space transportation systems operating at speeds of about Mach 5 and above. At these high flight velocities, the incoming air is slowed down and maintained supersonic speed within the combustor

  3. Atlas occipitalization in a supersonic fighter pilot involved in a midair collision: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gips, Hadas; Hiss, Jehuda; Davidson, Benjamin

    2010-11-01

    We report a case of a midair collision between two F16 fighter aircraft, in which one pilot survived and the other was ejected upon impact and his remains recovered from sea. In autopsy, no patholgy was detected, other than the expected evidence of mechanical trauma. No defects in the aircraft or faults in the parachute or ejection mechanism were found. Reconstruction of the shattered skull base and the cervical vertebrae revealed fusion of the atlanto-occipital joint (occipitalization) and a left paracondylar process. The effective diameter of the spinal canal was decreased by the abnormal articulation. Such malformations can cause a wide range of neurologic deficits. Considering the skill and alertness needed to operate a supersonic fighter aircraft, with the pressure applied by the heavy protective head gear and various G forces endured by the spinal column during flight, we postulate that the collision was related to the pilot's sudden incapacitation.

  4. Pdf prediction of supersonic hydrogen flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifler, P.; Kollmann, W.

    1993-01-01

    A hybrid method for the prediction of supersonic turbulent flows with combustion is developed consisting of a second order closure for the velocity field and a multi-scalar pdf method for the local thermodynamic state. It is shown that for non-premixed flames and chemical equilibrium mixture fraction, the logarithm of the (dimensionless) density, internal energy per unit mass and the divergence of the velocity have several advantages over other sets of scalars. The closure model is applied to a supersonic non-premixed flame burning hydrogen with air supplied by a supersonic coflow and the results are compared with a limited set of experimental data.

  5. ASDAR (aircraft to satellite data relay) flight test report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, E. J.; Lovell, R. R.; Conroy, M. J.; Culp, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    The aircraft to Satellite Data Relay (ASDAR), an airborne data collection system that gathers meteorological data from existing aircraft instrumentation and relays it to ground user via a geo-synchronous meteorological satellite, is described and the results of the first test flight on a commercial Boeing 747 aircraft are presented. The flight test was successful and verified system performance in the anticipated environment.

  6. Advanced aircraft electric power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segrest, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    The role of electric energy in both military and commercial aircraft increases in importance with every advancement in airframe performance and avionic technology. Microcircuits and volatile memories impact power continuity and quality, digital flight control and stability augmentation require high reliability. This paper presents the system concept, hardware development and status of the Navy program.

  7. Advanced Supersonic Nozzle Concepts: Experimental Flow Visualization Results Paired With LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Matthew; Magstadt, Andrew; Stack, Cory; Gaitonde, Datta; Glauser, Mark; Syracuse University Team; The Ohio State University Team

    2015-11-01

    Advanced supersonic nozzle concepts are currently under investigation, utilizing multiple bypass streams and airframe integration to bolster performance and efficiency. This work focuses on the parametric study of a supersonic, multi-stream jet with aft deck. The single plane of symmetry, rectangular nozzle, displays very complex and unique flow characteristics. Flow visualization techniques in the form of PIV and schlieren capture flow features at various deck lengths and Mach numbers. LES is compared to the experimental results to both validate the computational model and identify limitations of the simulation. By comparing experimental results to LES, this study will help create a foundation of knowledge for advanced nozzle designs in future aircraft. SBIR Phase II with Spectral Energies, LLC under direction of Barry Kiel.

  8. Flight Recorders - Alternative Concept for Commercial Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Turiak

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the issue of deployable flight data recorders. It gives an insight into pros and cons of this solution based on experience gained in military application. Advantages of such solution are at least worth considering as they may help reduce the number of accidents and save lives in the first place. And should the accident happen the location and extraction of evidence is much easier.

  9. Improvements in Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines for the 90s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Prasad

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available The gas turbine propulsion system has been playing the most significant role in the evolution and development of present-day aircraft, and has become the limiting technology for developing most new aircraft. However, the jet engine still remains the preferred propulsion choice. Aircraft gas turbines in one form or the other, viz. turbojet, turbofan, turboprop or turboshaft, have been used in commercial passenger aircraft, high performance military aircraft and in rotary wing aircraft (helicopters. The emphasis in engine development programmes world over seems to be in reducing fuel consumption, increasing thrust and in reducing weight.

  10. Optics in aircraft engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, James; Malhotra, Subhash

    The authors describe optical IR&D (independent research and development) programs designed to demonstrate and evaluate optical technologies for incorporation into next-generation military and commercial aircraft engines. Using a comprehensive demonstration program to validate this technology in an on-engine environment, problems encountered can be resolved early and risk can be minimized. In addition to specific activities related to the optics demonstration on the fighter engine, there are other optical programs underway, including a solenoid control system, a light off detection system, and an optical communication link. Research is also underway in simplifying opto-electronics and exploiting multiplexing to further reduce cost and weight.

  11. Utilization of simple and double control subsonic aircraft for advanced combat training of the military pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan STEFANESCU

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of subsonic single control aircraft and especially of double–control ones, instead of supersonic combat aircraft in the military pilot training programs in the operational units, has be-come a necessity due to the economic and financial world-wide crisis which began during the 70’s-80’s, with the advent of the oil crisis, affecting many countries, which have their own Military Air Forces.

  12. Design Methods and Optimization for Morphing Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, William A.

    2005-01-01

    This report provides a summary of accomplishments made during this research effort. The major accomplishments are in three areas. The first is the use of a multiobjective optimization strategy to help identify potential morphing features that uses an existing aircraft sizing code to predict the weight, size and performance of several fixed-geometry aircraft that are Pareto-optimal based upon on two competing aircraft performance objectives. The second area has been titled morphing as an independent variable and formulates the sizing of a morphing aircraft as an optimization problem in which the amount of geometric morphing for various aircraft parameters are included as design variables. This second effort consumed most of the overall effort on the project. The third area involved a more detailed sizing study of a commercial transport aircraft that would incorporate a morphing wing to possibly enable transatlantic point-to-point passenger service.

  13. Aircraft cybernetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The use of computers for aircraft control, flight simulation, and inertial navigation is explored. The man-machine relation problem in aviation is addressed. Simple and self-adapting autopilots are described and the assets and liabilities of digital navigation techniques are assessed.

  14. Economics Analysis Method for Commercial Aircraft Based on market demand%基于市场需求的商用飞机经济性分析方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任启鸿; 王如华

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft economics is is one of essential factors in aircraft competition, and it is also a critical measure-ment in aircraft development and purchasing. This paper establishes an Aircraft economics assessment model based operating cost and market demand.%商用飞机的经济性是影响航空市场竞争的关键因素之一,也是航空公司进行飞机选型和制造商开展型号研制的重要指标之一。基于商用飞机运营成本以及市场需求,建立了经济性评估模型。并进行案例分析,比较不同座级飞机在不同市场的经济适应性以及竞争力。

  15. On highly focused supersonic microjets

    CERN Document Server

    Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Willem, Claas; Peters, Ivo R; van der Meer, Deveraj; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-01-01

    By focusing a laser pulse in a liquid-filled glass-microcapillary open at one end, a small mass of liquid is instantaneously vapourised. This leads to a shock wave which travels towards the concave free surface where it generates a high-speed microjet. The initial shape of the meniscus plays a dominant role in the process. The velocity of the jet can reach supersonic speeds up to 850\\,m/s while maintaining a very sharp geometry. The entire evolution of the jet is observed by high-speed recordings of up to $10^6\\,$fps. A parametric study of the jet velocity as a function of the contact angle of the liquid-glass interface, the energy absorbed by the liquid, the diameter of the capillary tube, and the distance between the laser focus and the free surface is performed, and the results are rationalised. The method could be used for needle-free injection of vaccines or drugs.

  16. Supersonic Cloud Collision-II

    CERN Document Server

    Anathpindika, S

    2009-01-01

    In this, second paper of the sequel of two papers, we present five SPH simulations of fast head-on cloud collisions and study the evolution of the ram pressure confined gas slab. Anathpindika (2008) (hereafter paper I) considered highly supersonic cloud collisions and examined the effect of bending and shearing instabilities on the shocked gas slab. The post-collision shock here, as in paper I, is also modelled by a simple barotropic equation of state (EOS). However, a much stiffer EOS is used to model the shock resulting from a low velocity cloud collision. We explore the parameter space by varying the pre-collision velocity and the impact parameter. We observe that pressure confined gas slabs become Jeans unstable if the sound crossing time, $t_{cr}$, is much larger than the freefall time, $t_{ff}$, of putative clumps condensing out of them. Self gravitating clumps may spawn multiple/larger $N$-body star clusters. We also suggest that warmer gas slabs are unlikely to fragment and may end up as diffuse gas c...

  17. Silent and Efficient Supersonic Bi-Directional Flying Wing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a Phase I study for a novel concept of a supersonic bi-directional (SBiDir) flying wing (FW) that has the potential to revolutionize supersonic flight...

  18. Handling Qualities Prediction of an F-16XL-Based Reduced Sonic Boom Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Bruce; Yoo, Seung

    2010-01-01

    A major goal of the Supersonics Project under NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics program is sonic boom reduction of supersonic aircraft. An important part of this effort is development and validation of sonic boom prediction tools used in aircraft design. NASA Dryden s F- 16XL was selected as a potential testbed aircraft to provide flight validation. Part of this task was predicting the handling qualities of the modified aircraft. Due to the high cost of modifying the existing F-16XL control laws, it was desirable to find modifications that reduced the aircraft sonic boom but did not degrade baseline aircraft handling qualities allowing for the potential of flight test without changing the current control laws. This was not a requirement for the initial modification design work, but an important consideration for proceeding to the flight test option. The primary objective of this work was to determine an aerodynamic and mass properties envelope of the F-16XL aircraft. The designers could use this envelope to determine the effect of proposed modifications on aircraft handling qualities.

  19. Simulating Supersonic Turbulence in Galaxy Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Scannapieco, Evan

    2010-01-01

    We present three-dimensional, adaptive mesh simulations of dwarf galaxy out- flows driven by supersonic turbulence. Here we develop a subgrid model to track not only the thermal and bulk velocities of the gas, but also its turbulent velocities and length scales. This allows us to deposit energy from supernovae directly into supersonic turbulence, which acts on scales much larger than a particle mean free path, but much smaller than resolved large-scale flows. Unlike previous approaches, we are able to simulate a starbursting galaxy modeled after NGC 1569, with realistic radiative cooling throughout the simulation. Pockets of hot, diffuse gas around individual OB associations sweep up thick shells of material that persist for long times due to the cooling instability. The overlapping of high-pressure, rarefied regions leads to a collective central outflow that escapes the galaxy by eating away at the exterior gas through turbulent mixing, rather than gathering it into a thin, unstable shell. Supersonic, turbul...

  20. Supersonic Flutter of Laminated Curved Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ganapathi

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Supersonic flutter analysis of laminated composite curved panels is investigated using doubly-curved, quadrilateral, shear flexible, shell element based on field-consistency approach. The formulation includes transverse shear deformation, in-plane and rotary inertias. The aerodynamic force is evaluated using two-dimensional static aerodynamic approximation for high supersonic flow. Initially, the model developed here is verified for the flutter analysis of flat plates. Numerical results are presented for isotropic, orthotropic and laminated anisotropic curved panels. A detailed parametric study is carried out to observe the effects of aspect and thickness ratios, number of layers, lamination scheme, and boundary conditions on flutter boundary.

  1. Supersonic gas shell for puff pinch experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. S., III; Doggett, W. O.; Roth, I.; Stallings, C.

    1982-09-01

    An easy-to-fabricate, conical, annular supersonic nozzle has been developed for use in high-power, puff gas z-pinch experiments. A fast responding conical pressure probe has also been developed as an accurate supersonic gas flow diagnostic for evaluating the transient gas jet formed by the nozzle. Density profile measurements show that the magnitude and radial position of the gas annulus are fairly constant with distance from the nozzle, but the gas density in the center of the annulus increases with distance from the nozzle.

  2. Plume and Shock Interaction Effects on Sonic Boom in the 1-foot by 1-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Raymond; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan; Winski, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    The desire to reduce or eliminate the operational restrictions of supersonic aircraft over populated areas has led to extensive research at NASA. Restrictions are due to the disturbance of the sonic boom, caused by the coalescence of shock waves formed by the aircraft. A study has been performed focused on reducing the magnitude of the sonic boom N-wave generated by airplane components with a focus on shock waves caused by the exhaust nozzle plume. Testing was completed in the 1-foot by 1-foot supersonic wind tunnel to study the effects of an exhaust nozzle plume and shock wave interaction. The plume and shock interaction study was developed to collect data for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation of a nozzle plume passing through the shock generated from the wing or tail of a supersonic vehicle. The wing or tail was simulated with a wedgeshaped shock generator. This test entry was the first of two phases to collect schlieren images and off-body static pressure profiles. Three wedge configurations were tested consisting of strut-mounted wedges of 2.5- degrees and 5-degrees. Three propulsion configurations were tested simulating the propulsion pod and aft deck from a low boom vehicle concept, which also provided a trailing edge shock and plume interaction. Findings include how the interaction of the jet plume caused a thickening of the shock generated by the wedge (or aft deck) and demonstrate how the shock location moved with increasing nozzle pressure ratio.

  3. Supersonic Injection of Aerated Liquid Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhari, Abhijit; Sallam, Khaled

    2016-11-01

    A computational study of the exit flow of an aerated two-dimensional jet from an under-expanded supersonic nozzle is presented. The liquid sheet is operating within the annular flow regime and the study is motivated by the application of supersonic nozzles in air-breathing propulsion systems, e.g. scramjet engines, ramjet engines and afterburners. The simulation was conducted using VOF model and SST k- ω turbulence model. The test conditions included: jet exit of 1 mm and mass flow rate of 1.8 kg/s. The results show that air reaches transonic condition at the injector exit due to the Fanno flow effects in the injector passage. The aerated liquid jet is alternately expanded by Prandtl-Meyer expansion fan and compressed by oblique shock waves due to the difference between the back (chamber) pressure and the flow pressure. The process then repeats itself and shock (Mach) diamonds are formed at downstream of injector exit similar to those typical of exhaust plumes of propulsion system. The present results, however, indicate that the flow field of supersonic aerated liquid jet is different from supersonic gas jets due to the effects of water evaporation from the liquid sheet. The contours of the Mach number, static pressure of both cases are compared to the theory of gas dynamics.

  4. Conditions for supersonic bent Marshak waves

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Qiang; Li, Jing; Dan, Jia-kun; Wang, Kun-lun; Zhou, Shao-tong

    2014-01-01

    Supersonic radiation diffusion approximation is a useful way to study the radiation transportation. Considering the bent Marshak wave theory in 2-dimensions, and an invariable source temperature, we get the supersonic radiation diffusion conditions which are about the Mach number $M>8(1+\\sqrt{\\ep})/3$, and the optical depth $\\tau>1$. A large Mach number requires a high temperature, while a large optical depth requires a low temperature. Only when the source temperature is in a proper region these conditions can be satisfied. Assuming the material opacity and the specific internal energy depend on the temperature and the density as a form of power law, for a given density, these conditions correspond to a region about source temperature and the length of the sample. This supersonic diffusion region involves both lower and upper limit of source temperature, while that in 1-dimension only gives a lower limit. Taking $\\rm SiO_2$ and the Au for example, we show the supersonic region numerically.

  5. Dielectric barrier discharge source for supersonic beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luria, K.; Lavie, N.; Even, U. [Sackler School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2009-10-15

    We present a new excitation source for pulsed supersonic beams. The excitation is based on dielectric barrier discharge in the beam. It produces cold beams of metastable atoms, dissociated neutral atoms from molecular precursors, and both positive and negative ions with high efficiency and reliability.

  6. Numerical and experimental investigations on supersonic ejectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartosiewicz, Y.; Aidoun, Z. [CETC-Varennes, Natural Resources Canada (Canada); Desevaux, P. [CREST-UMR 6000, Belfort (France); Mercadier, Y. [Sherbrooke Univ. (Canada). THERMAUS

    2005-02-01

    Supersonic ejectors are widely used in a range of applications such as aerospace, propulsion and refrigeration. The primary interest of this study is to set up a reliable hydrodynamics model of a supersonic ejector, which may be extended to refrigeration applications. The first part of this work evaluated the performance of six well-known turbulence models for the study of supersonic ejectors. The validation concentrated on the shock location, shock strength and the average pressure recovery prediction. Axial pressure measurements with a capillary probe performed previously [Int. J. Turbo Jet Engines 19 (2002) 71; Conference Proc., 10th Int. Symp. Flow Visualization, Kyoto, Japan, 2002], were compared with numerical simulations while laser tomography pictures were used to evaluate the non-mixing length. The capillary probe has been included in the numerical model and the non-mixing length has been numerically evaluated by including an additional transport equation for a passive scalar, which acted as an ideal colorant in the flow. At this point, the results show that the k-omega-sst model agrees best with experiments. In the second part, the tested model was used to reproduce the different operation modes of a supersonic ejector, ranging from on-design point to off-design. In this respect, CFD turned out to be an efficient diagnosis tool of ejector analysis (mixing, flow separation), for design, and performance optimization (optimum entrainment and recompression ratios). (Author)

  7. Experimental observations of a complex, supersonic nozzle concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magstadt, Andrew; Berry, Matthew; Glauser, Mark; Ruscher, Christopher; Gogineni, Sivaram; Kiel, Barry; Skytop Turbulence Labs, Syracuse University Team; Spectral Energies, LLC. Team; Air Force Research Laboratory Team

    2015-11-01

    A complex nozzle concept, which fuses multiple canonical flows together, has been experimentally investigated via pressure, schlieren and PIV in the anechoic chamber at Syracuse University. Motivated by future engine designs of high-performance aircraft, the rectangular, supersonic jet under investigation has a single plane of symmetry, an additional shear layer (referred to as a wall jet) and an aft deck representative of airframe integration. Operating near a Reynolds number of 3 ×106 , the nozzle architecture creates an intricate flow field comprised of high turbulence levels, shocks, shear & boundary layers, and powerful corner vortices. Current data suggest that the wall jet, which is an order of magnitude less energetic than the core, has significant control authority over the acoustic power through some non-linear process. As sound is a direct product of turbulence, experimental and analytical efforts further explore this interesting phenomenon associated with the turbulent flow. The authors acknowledge the funding source, a SBIR Phase II project with Spectral Energies, LLC. and AFRL turbine engine branch under the direction of Dr. Barry Kiel.

  8. Acoustic measurements of models of military style supersonic nozzle jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Wen Kuo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable-geometry nozzles to provide optimal thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. However, acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometries of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at Pennsylvania State University (PSU in partnership with GE Aviation and the NASA Glenn Research Center is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles, and to identify and test promising noise reduction techniques. An equally important objective is to develop methodology for using data obtained from small- and moderate-scale experiments to reliably predict the full-scale engine noise. The experimental results presented show reasonable agreement between small-scale and medium-scale jets, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones.

  9. CFD-based Analysis of Aeroelastic behavior of Supersonic Fins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxing Cai

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to analyze the flutter boundary, transient loads of a supersonic fin, and the flutter with perturbation. Reduced order mode (ROM based on Volterra Series is presented to calculate the flutter boundary, and CFD/CSD coupling is used to compute the transient aerodynamic load. The Volterra-based ROM is obtained using the derivative of unsteady aerodynamic step-response, and the infinite plate spline is used to perform interpolation of physical quantities between the fluid and the structural grids. The results show that inertia force plays a significant role in the transient loads, the moment cause by inertia force is lager than the aerodynamic force, because of the huge transient loads, structure may be broken by aeroelasticity below the flutter dynamic pressure. Perturbations of aircraft affect the aeroelastic response evident, the reduction of flutter dynamic pressure by rolling perturbation form 15.4% to 18.6% when Mach from 2.0 to 3.0. It is necessary to analyze the aeroelasticity behaviors under the compositive force environment.

  10. Flight tests of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80 inch (203 cm) chord and 40 inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0° to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, was similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  11. Acoustic measurements of models of military style supersonic nozzle jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Wen Kuo; Jérémy Veltin; Dennis K. McLaughlin

    2014-01-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable-geometry nozzles to provide optimal thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. How-ever, acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometries of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at Pennsylvania State University (PSU) in partnership with GE Aviation and the NASA Glenn Research Center is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles, and to identify and test promising noise reduction techniques. An equally important objective is to develop methodology for using data obtained from small-and moderate-scale experiments to reliably predict the full-scale engine noise. The experimental results presented show reasonable agreement between small-scale and medium-scale jets, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones.

  12. Bibliography of Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) program from 1977 to mid-1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, S.

    1980-01-01

    The supersonic cruise research (SCR) program, initiated in July 1972, includes system studies and the following disciplines: propulsion, stratospheric emission impact, structures and materials, aerodynamic performance, and stability and control. In a coordinated effort to provide a sound basis for any future consideration that may be given by the United States to the development of an acceptable commercial supersonic transport, integration of the technical disciplines was undertaken, analytical tools were developed, and wind tunnel, flight, and laboratory investigations were conducted. The present bibliography covers the time period from 1977 to mid-1980. It is arranged according to system studies and the above five SCR disciplines. There are 306 NASA reports and 135 articles, meeting papers, and company reports cited.

  13. Aircraft landing using GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David Gary

    The advent of the Global Positioning System (GPS) is revolutionizing the field of navigation. Commercial aviation has been particularly influenced by this worldwide navigation system. From ground vehicle guidance to aircraft landing applications, GPS has the potential to impact many areas of aviation. GPS is already being used for non-precision approach guidance; current research focuses on its application to more critical regimes of flight. To this end, the following contributions were made: (1) Development of algorithms and a flexible software architecture capable of providing real-time position solutions accurate to the centimeter level with high integrity. This architecture was used to demonstrate 110 automatic landings of a Boeing 737. (2) Assessment of the navigation performance provided by two GPS-based landing systems developed at Stanford, the Integrity Beacon Landing System, and the Wide Area Augmentation System. (3) Preliminary evaluation of proposed enhancements to traditional techniques for GPS positioning, specifically, dual antenna positioning and pseudolite augmentation. (4) Introduction of a new concept for positioning using airport pseudolites. The results of this research are promising, showing that GPS-based systems can potentially meet even the stringent requirements of a Category III (zero visibility) landing system. Although technical and logistical hurdles still exist, it is likely that GPS will soon provide aircraft guidance in all phases of flight, including automatic landing, roll-out, and taxi.

  14. Influence of environmental factors on corrosion damage of aircraft structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion is one of the important structural integrity concerns of aging aircraft, and it is estimated that a significant portion of airframe maintenance budgets is directed towards corrosion-related problems for both military and commercial aircraft. In order to better understand how environmental factors influence the corrosion damage initiation and propagation on aircraft structure and to predict pre-corrosion test pieces of fatigue life and structural integrity of an effective approach, this paper uses ...

  15. Aircraft Electric Secondary Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Technologies resulted to aircraft power systems and aircraft in which all secondary power is supplied electrically are discussed. A high-voltage dc power generating system for fighter aircraft, permanent magnet motors and generators for aircraft, lightweight transformers, and the installation of electric generators on turbine engines are among the topics discussed.

  16. A Grid Sourcing and Adaptation Study Using Unstructured Grids for Supersonic Boom Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Deere, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    NASA created the Supersonics Project as part of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program to advance technology that will make a supersonic flight over land viable. Computational flow solvers have lacked the ability to accurately predict sonic boom from the near to far field. The focus of this investigation was to establish gridding and adaptation techniques to predict near-to-mid-field (sources along the body the aircraft, far field sourcing and far field boundaries. The study then examined several techniques for grid adaptation. During the course of the study, volume sourcing was introduced as a new way to source grids using the grid generation code VGRID. Two different methods of using the volume sources were examined. The first method, based on manual insertion of the numerous volume sources, made great improvements in the prediction capability of USM3D for boom signatures. The second method (SSGRID), which uses an a priori adaptation approach to stretch and shear the original unstructured grid to align the grid and pressure waves, showed similar results with a more automated approach. Due to SSGRID s results and ease of use, the rest of the study focused on developing a best practice using SSGRID. The best practice created by this study for boom predictions using the CFD code USM3D involved: 1) creating a small cylindrical outer boundary either 1 or 2 body lengths in diameter (depending on how far below the aircraft the boom prediction is required), 2) using a single volume source under the aircraft, and 3) using SSGRID to stretch and shear the grid to the desired length.

  17. Plasma Fairings for Quieting Aircraft Landing Gear Noise Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A major component of airframe noise for commercial transport aircraft is the deployed landing gear. The noise from the gear originates due to complex, unsteady bluff...

  18. Hybrid-Electric and Distributed Propulsion Technologies for Large Commercial Transports: A NASA Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madavan, Nateri K.; Del Rosario, Ruben; Jankovsky, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Develop and demonstrate technologies that will revolutionize commercial transport aircraft propulsion and accelerate development of all-electric aircraft architectures. Enable radically different propulsion systems that can meet national environmental and fuel burn reduction goals for subsonic commercial aircraft. Focus on future large regional jets and single-aisle twin (Boeing 737- class) aircraft for greatest impact on fuel burn, noise and emissions. Research horizon is long-term but with periodic spinoff of technologies for introduction in aircraft with more- and all-electric architectures. Research aligned with new NASA Aeronautics strategic R&T thrusts in areas of transition to low-carbon propulsion and ultra-efficient commercial transports.

  19. Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer: DNS and RANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jing-Lei; MA Hui-Yang

    2007-01-01

    We assess the performance of a few turbulence models for Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of supersonic boundary layers, compared to the direct numerical simulations (DNS) of supersonic flat-plate turbulent boundary layers, carried out by Gao et al. [Chin. Phys. Lett. 22 (2005) 1709] and Huang et al. [Sci.Chin. 48 (2005) 614], as well as some available experimental data. The assessment is made for two test cases, with incoming Mach numbers and Reynolds numbers M = 2.25, Re = 365, 000/in, and M = 4.5, Re - 1.7 × 107/m,respectively. It is found that in the first case the prediction of RANS models agrees well with the DNS and the experimental data, while for the second case the agreement of the DNS models with experiment is less satisfactory.The compressibility effect on the RANS models is discussed.

  20. Supersonic Motions of Galaxies in Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Faltenbacher, A; Nagai, D; Gottlöber, S; Faltenbacher, Andreas; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Nagai, Daisuke; Gottloeber, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    We study motions of galaxies in galaxy clusters formed in the concordance LCDM cosmology. We use high-resolution cosmological simulations that follow dynamics of dark matter and gas and include various physical processes critical for galaxy formation: gas cooling, heating and star formation. Analysing motions of galaxies and the properties of intracluster gas in the sample of eight simulated clusters at z=0, we study velocity dispersion profiles of the dark matter, gas, and galaxies. We measure the mean velocity of galaxy motions and gas sound speed as a function of radius and calculate the average Mach number of galaxy motions. The simulations show that galaxies, on average, move supersonically with the average Mach number of ~1.4, approximately independent of the cluster-centric radius. The supersonic motions of galaxies may potentially provide an important source of heating for the intracluster gas by driving weak shocks and via dynamical friction, although these heating processes appear to be inefficient ...

  1. Control of star formation by supersonic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    MacLow, M M; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the formation of stars in galaxies is central to much of modern astrophysics. For several decades it has been thought that stellar birth is primarily controlled by the interplay between gravity and magnetostatic support, modulated by ambipolar diffusion. Recently, however, both observational and numerical work has begun to suggest that support by supersonic turbulence rather than magnetic fields controls star formation. In this review we outline a new theory of star formation relying on the control by turbulence. We demonstrate that although supersonic turbulence can provide global support, it nevertheless produces density enhancements that allow local collapse. Inefficient, isolated star formation is a hallmark of turbulent support, while efficient, clustered star formation occurs in its absence. The consequences of this theory are then explored for both local star formation and galactic scale star formation. (Abstract abbreviated)

  2. Chemically reacting supersonic flow calculation using an assumed PDF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshchi, M.

    1990-01-01

    This work is motivated by the need to develop accurate models for chemically reacting compressible turbulent flow fields that are present in a typical supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMJET) engine. In this paper the development of a new assumed probability density function (PDF) reaction model for supersonic turbulent diffusion flames and its implementation into an efficient Navier-Stokes solver are discussed. The application of this model to a supersonic hydrogen-air flame will be considered.

  3. Supersonic and subsonic measurements of mesospheric ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, L. C.; Nickell, L. C.; Kennedy, B.; Powell, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    An Arcas rocket-parachute system was used at night to compare supersonic and subsonic ionization measurements below 75 km. A hemispherical nose-tip probe was used on ascent and a parachute-borne blunt probe on descent to measure polar conductivities, which were due entirely to positive and negative ions. The velocity of the supersonic probe was Mach 2.5 at 50 km and 1.75 at 70 km; the blunt probe was subsonic below 71 km. Between 65 and 75 km the ratio of negative to positive conductivities (and thus of mobilities) determined by the blunt probe was about 1.2, and it approached 1 below this altitude range. The ratio obtained by the nose-tip probe varied from 1.5 at 75 km to .6 at 65 km, thus indicating a rapid variation of the effects of the shock wave on the sampled ions. The absolute values of positive conductivity measured subsonically and supersonically were essentially identical from 60 to 75 km, indicating that the sampled ions were unchanged by the shock. However, below 60 km the shock apparently 'broke up' the positive ions, as indicated by higher measured conductivities.

  4. Skin Friction and Pressure Measurements in Supersonic Inlets Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Supersonic propulsion systems include internal ducts, and therefore, the flow often includes shock waves, shear layers, vortices, and separated flows. Passive flow...

  5. Emerging nondestructive inspection methods for aging aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, A; Dahlke, L; Gieske, J [and others

    1994-01-01

    This report identifies and describes emerging nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods that can potentially be used to inspect commercial transport and commuter aircraft for structural damage. The nine categories of emerging NDI techniques are: acoustic emission, x-ray computed tomography, backscatter radiation, reverse geometry x-ray, advanced electromagnetics, including magnetooptic imaging and advanced eddy current techniques, coherent optics, advanced ultrasonics, advanced visual, and infrared thermography. The physical principles, generalized performance characteristics, and typical applications associated with each method are described. In addition, aircraft inspection applications are discussed along with the associated technical considerations. Finally, the status of each technique is presented, with a discussion on when it may be available for use in actual aircraft maintenance programs. It should be noted that this is a companion document to DOT/FAA/CT-91/5, Current Nondestructive Inspection Methods for Aging Aircraft.

  6. Electrochromic windows - Applications for aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Caroline S.; Greenberg, Charles B.

    1989-04-01

    A transparent, solid-state, electrochromic device is described. It demonstrates deep switching in the near infrared and visible spectral regions and good room temperature cycling stability. The response appears reasonably uniform over a 14 cm x 28 cm area, which gives hope for achieving large parts for cockpit and cabin windows. The reversible darkening of the transparency, controlled by an applied voltage or current, has potential application in aircraft to reduce glare and solar heat load to pilots and passengers. The active material in the device is a thin tungsten oxide film which is incorporated into a complex, multilayered structure, essentially that of a transparent battery. The performance of the window is discussed in terms of its configuration, its similarities with commercial batteries and issues critical to aircraft.

  7. Simulation Packages Expand Aircraft Design Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In 2001, NASA released a new approach to computational fluid dynamics that allows users to perform automated analysis on complex vehicle designs. In 2010, Palo Alto, California-based Desktop Aeronautics acquired a license from Ames Research Center to sell the technology. Today, the product assists organizations in the design of subsonic aircraft, space planes, spacecraft, and high speed commercial jets.

  8. Aircraft energy efficiency laminar flow control wing design study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, T. F., Jr.; Pride, J. D., Jr.; Fernald, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    An engineering design study was performed in which laminar flow control (LFC) was integrated into the wing of a commercial passenger transport aircraft. A baseline aircraft configuration was selected and the wing geometry was defined. The LFC system, with suction slots, ducting, and suction pumps was integrated with the wing structure. The use of standard aluminum technology and advanced superplastic formed diffusion bonded titanium technology was evaluated. The results of the design study show that the LFC system can be integrated with the wing structure to provide a structurally and aerodynamically efficient wing for a commercial transport aircraft.

  9. Bioturbosina: Producción de cultivos energéticos para la aviación comercial Jet Biofuel: Production of energy-related crops for commercial aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibis Sepúlveda González

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Las más grandes compañías de fabricación de aviones, entre ellas Boeing y Airbus y la asociación internacional de líneas aéreas International Air Transport Association (IATA, decidieron jugar un doble papel: contribuir en la disminución de emisiones de gases efecto invernadero y asegurar la disponibilidad de combustible barato. Para ello se ha hecho un plan para agregar a la turbosina una fracción creciente de bioturbosina. En México esto se trabajó en el "plan de vuelo para los biocombustibles sustentables", convocado por ASA entre junio de 2010 y marzo de 2011. La bioturbosina debe reducir la emisión de GEI en más 50% en su ciclo de vida, con respecto a la turbosina. También se espera que, gracias a la tecnología, en el tiempo baje el costo de la bioturbosina mientras, por escasez, suba el del petróleo (Herrera y Morgan, 2010; García, 2010. De esta manera, a nivel mundial estas compañías han establecido que para 2015 se debe adicionar 1% de bioturbosina a la turbosina, para 2017; 10%, para 2020; 15% y así sucesivamente hasta cambiar al menos 50% del origen del combustible aéreo para 2050. En México se vende 2% del combustible aéreo del mundo. Esto significa una demanda inicial de 40 millones de litros de bioturbosina para 2015 y de unos 700 millones de litros para 2020. El grupo encargado de la promoción del biocombustible aéreo a nivel mundial (Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels- RSB, con sede en la École Politechnique Federale de Lausanne estableció 12 principios que deben cumplirse para ser aceptados como proveedores de aceites para bioturbosina. Estos tienen que ver con sustentabilidad ecológica y equidad social. En la ponencia se analizan las condiciones de México para responder a esta primera demanda real de biocombustibles, así como sus probables efectos.The largest aircraft making companies, among them Boeing and Airbus, and International Air Transport Association (IATA, decided to take double role: to

  10. Human Health Effects of Ozone Depletion From Stratospheric Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, Chowen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report presents EPA's initial response to NASA's request to advise on potential environmental policy issues associated with the future development of supersonic flight technologies. Consistent with the scope of the study to which NASA and EPA agreed, EPA has evaluated only the environmental concerns related to the stratospheric ozone impacts of a hypothetical HSCT fleet, although recent research indicates that a fleet of HSCT is predicted to contribute to climate warming as well. This report also briefly describes the international and domestic institutional frameworks established to address stratospheric ozone depletion, as well as those established to control pollution from aircraft engine exhaust emissions.

  11. Impact of surface proximity on flow and acoustics of a rectangular supersonic jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Baier, Florian; Mora, Pablo; Kailsanath, Kailas; Viswanath, Kamal; Johnson, Ryan

    2016-11-01

    Advances in jet technology have pushed towards faster aircraft, leading to more streamlined designs and configurations, pushing engines closer to the aircraft frame. This creates additional noise sources stemming from interactions between the jet flow and surfaces on the aircraft body, and interaction between the jet and the ground during takeoff and landing. The paper studies the impact of the presence of a flat plate on the flow structures and acoustics in an M =1.5 (NPR =3.67) supersonic jet exhausting from a rectangular C-D nozzle. Comparisons are drawn between baseline cases without a plate and varying nozzle-plate distance at NPRs from 2.5 to 4.5, and temperature ratios of up to 3.0. At the shielded side and sideline of the plate noise is mitigated only when the plate is at the nozzle lip (h =0). Low frequency mixing noise is increased in the downstream direction only for h =0. Screech tones that exist only for low NTR are fully suppressed by the plate at h =0. However, for h>0 the reflection enhances screech at both reflected side and sideline. Low frequency mixing noise is enhanced by the plate at the reflected side at all plate distances, while broad band shock associated noise is reduced only at the sideline for h =0. Increased temperature mitigates the screech tones across all test conditions. The results are compared to a circular nozzle of equivalent diameter with an adjacent plate.

  12. Aircraft tooling and the automated equipment; internship at Electroimpact, Seattle USA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Sman, E.

    2013-01-01

    If we consider the enormous amount of parts that are necessary to build a commercial aircraft, it becomes clear that assembling all parts with great accuracy is a challenge. The development of new tooling solutions and automated equipment for the manufacturing of commercial and military aircraft is

  13. Novel matrix resins for composites for aircraft primary structures, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Edmund P.; Puckett, P. M.; Maynard, S.; Bishop, M. T.; Bruza, K. J.; Godschalx, J. P.; Mullins, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the contract is the development of matrix resins with improved processability and properties for composites for primarily aircraft structures. To this end, several resins/systems were identified for subsonic and supersonic applications. For subsonic aircraft, a series of epoxy resins suitable for RTM and powder prepreg was shown to give composites with about 40 ksi compressive strength after impact (CAI) and 200 F/wet mechanical performance. For supersonic applications, a thermoplastic toughened cyanate prepreg system has demonstrated excellent resistance to heat aging at 360 F for 4000 hours, 40 ksi CAI and useful mechanical properties at greater than or equal to 310 F. An AB-BCB-maleimide resin was identified as a leading candidate for the HSCT. Composite panels fabricated by RTM show CAI of approximately 50 ksi, 350 F/wet performance and excellent retention of mechanical properties after aging at 400 F for 4000 hours.

  14. AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE HANGAR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    GEAMBASU Gabriel George

    2017-01-01

    .... The first part of research describes the aircraft maintenance process that has to be done after an updated maintenance manual according with aircraft type, followed by a short introduction about maintenance hangar...

  15. Patient Transport via Commercial Airlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnab, Andrew John

    1992-01-01

    Because the frequency of patient transport from one hospital to another is increasing and the popularity of air travel continues to rise, physicians should be aware of the procedures for patient transport by commercial airlines. Major airlines in Canada have experienced personnel and established procedures that facilitate the transportation of patients with special medical needs. By working with the airline medical health officers and using up-to-date equipment, physicians can achieve safe, cost-effective transport of appropriate patients via commercial aircraft. PMID:21221401

  16. Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) Plume Induced Environment Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, B. L.; Smith, S. D.; Van Norman, J. W.; Muppidi, S.; Clark, I

    2016-01-01

    Provide plume induced heating (radiation & convection) predictions in support of the LDSD thermal design (pre-flight SFDT-1) Predict plume induced aerodynamics in support of flight dynamics, to achieve targeted freestream conditions to test supersonic deceleration technologies (post-flight SFDT-1, pre-flight SFDT-2)

  17. Investigation on the pressure matching performance of the constant area supersonic-supersonic ejector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pressure matching performance of the constant area supersonic-supersonic ejector has been studied by varying the primary and secondary Mach numbers. The effect of the primary fluid injection configurations in ejector, namely peripheral and central, has been investigated as well. Schlieren pictures of flow structure in the former part of the mixing duct with different stagnation pressure ratio of the primary and secondary flows have been taken. Pressure ratios of the primary and secondary flows at the limiting condition have been obtained from the results of pressure and optical measurements. Additionally, a computational fluid dynamics analysis has been performed to clarify the physical meaning of the pressure matching performance diagram of the ejector. The obtained results show that the pressure matching performance of the constant area supersonic-supersonic ejector increases with the increase of the secondary Mach number, and the performance decreases slightly with the increase of the primary Mach number. The phenomenon of boundary layer separation induced by shock wave results in weaker pressure matching performance of the central ejector than that of the peripheral one. Furthermore, based on the observations of the experiment, a simplified analytical model has been proposed to predict the limiting pressure ratio, and the predicted values obtained by this model agree well with the experimental data.

  18. Aeroelastic analysis of circular cylindrical and truncated conical shells subjected to a supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, Farhad

    Shells of revolution, particularly cylindrical and conical shells, are one of the basic structural elements in the aerospace structures. With the advent of high speed aircrafts, these shells can show dynamic instabilities when they are exposed to a supersonic flow. Therefore, aeroelastic analysis of these elements is one of the primary design criteria which aeronautical engineers are dealing with. This analysis can be done with the help of finite element method (FEM) coupled with the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) or by experimental methods but it is time consuming and very expensive. The purpose of this dissertation is to develop such a numerical tool to do aeroelastic analysis in a fast and precise way. Meanwhile during the design stage, where the different configurations, loading and boundary conditions may need to be analyzed, this numerical method can be used very easily with the high order of reliability. In this study structural modeling is a combination of linear Sanders thin shell theory and classical finite element method. Based on this hybrid finite element method, the shell displacements are found from the exact solutions of shell theory rather than approximating by polynomial function done in traditional finite element method. This leads to a precise and fast convergence. Supersonic aerodynamic modeling is done based on the piston theory and modified piston theory with the shell curvature term. The stress stiffening due to lateral pressure and axial compression are also taken into accounts. Fluid-structure interaction in the presence of inside quiescent fluid is modeled based on the potential theory. In this method, fluid is considered as a velocity potential variable at each node of the shell element where its motion is expressed in terms of nodal elastic displacements at the fluid-structure interface. This proposed hybrid finite element has capabilities to do following analysis: (i) Buckling and vibration of an empty or partially fluid filled

  19. Methodology for the Design of Streamline-Traced External-Compression Supersonic Inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, John W.

    2014-01-01

    A design methodology based on streamline-tracing is discussed for the design of external-compression, supersonic inlets for flight below Mach 2.0. The methodology establishes a supersonic compression surface and capture cross-section by tracing streamlines through an axisymmetric Busemann flowfield. The compression system of shock and Mach waves is altered through modifications to the leading edge and shoulder of the compression surface. An external terminal shock is established to create subsonic flow which is diffused in the subsonic diffuser. The design methodology was implemented into the SUPIN inlet design tool. SUPIN uses specified design factors to design the inlets and computes the inlet performance, which includes the flow rates, total pressure recovery, and wave drag. A design study was conducted using SUPIN and the Wind-US computational fluid dynamics code to design and analyze the properties of two streamline-traced, external-compression (STEX) supersonic inlets for Mach 1.6 freestream conditions. The STEX inlets were compared to axisymmetric pitot, two-dimensional, and axisymmetric spike inlets. The STEX inlets had slightly lower total pressure recovery and higher levels of total pressure distortion than the axisymmetric spike inlet. The cowl wave drag coefficients of the STEX inlets were 20% of those for the axisymmetric spike inlet. The STEX inlets had external sound pressures that were 37% of those of the axisymmetric spike inlet, which may result in lower adverse sonic boom characteristics. The flexibility of the shape of the capture cross-section may result in benefits for the integration of STEX inlets with aircraft.

  20. High speed titanium coating by Supersonic Laser Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    LUPOI, ROCCO

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED The importance of metal coating technologies drives the continuous improvement of metal deposition techniques for application in a wide range of industrial sectors. This work presents the foundations of a new process technology f or the deposition of t itanium coatings on steel tube substrates using supersonic powder streams and impact site laser heating , known as Supersonic Laser Deposition (SLD). M et...

  1. Unmanned aircraft systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unmanned platforms have become increasingly more common in recent years for acquiring remotely sensed data. These aircraft are referred to as Unmanned Airborne Vehicles (UAV), Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA), Remotely Piloted Vehicles (RPV), or Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), the official term used...

  2. Energy Conversion and Storage Requirements for Hybrid Electric Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Among various options for reducing greenhouse gases in future large commercial aircraft, hybrid electric option holds significant promise. In the hybrid electric aircraft concept, gas turbine engine is used in combination with an energy storage system to drive the fan that propels the aircraft, with gas turbine engine being used for certain segments of the flight cycle and energy storage system being used for other segments. The paper will provide an overview of various energy conversion and storage options for hybrid electric aircraft. Such options may include fuel cells, batteries, super capacitors, multifunctional structures with energy storage capability, thermoelectric, thermionic or a combination of any of these options. The energy conversion and storage requirements for hybrid electric aircraft will be presented. The role of materials in energy conversion and storage systems for hybrid electric aircraft will be discussed.

  3. Aircraft Anomaly Detection Using Performance Models Trained on Fleet Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorinevsky, Dimitry; Matthews, Bryan L.; Martin, Rodney

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an application of data mining technology called Distributed Fleet Monitoring (DFM) to Flight Operational Quality Assurance (FOQA) data collected from a fleet of commercial aircraft. DFM transforms the data into aircraft performance models, flight-to-flight trends, and individual flight anomalies by fitting a multi-level regression model to the data. The model represents aircraft flight performance and takes into account fixed effects: flight-to-flight and vehicle-to-vehicle variability. The regression parameters include aerodynamic coefficients and other aircraft performance parameters that are usually identified by aircraft manufacturers in flight tests. Using DFM, the multi-terabyte FOQA data set with half-million flights was processed in a few hours. The anomalies found include wrong values of competed variables, (e.g., aircraft weight), sensor failures and baises, failures, biases, and trends in flight actuators. These anomalies were missed by the existing airline monitoring of FOQA data exceedances.

  4. Model predictions of latitude-dependent ozone depletion due to supersonic transport operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borucki, W. J.; Whitten, R. C.; Watson, V. R.; Woodward, H. T.; Riegel, C. A.; Capone, L. A.; Becker, T.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented from a two-dimensional model of the stratosphere that simulates the seasonal movement of ozone by both wind and eddy transport, and contains all the chemistry known to be important. The calculated reductions in ozone due to NO2 injection from a fleet of supersonic transports are compared with the zonally averaged results of a three-dimensional model for a similar episode of injection. The agreement is good in the northern hemisphere, but is not as good in the southern hemisphere. Both sets of calculations show a strong corridor effect in that the predicted ozone depletions are largest to the north of the flight corridor for aircraft operating in the northern hemisphere.

  5. On the Coupling Between a Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer and a Flexible Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frendi, Abdelkader

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical model and a computer code have been developed to fully couple the vibration of an aircraft fuselage panel to the surrounding flow field, turbulent boundary layer and acoustic fluid. The turbulent boundary layer model is derived using a triple decomposition of the flow variables and applying a conditional averaging to the resulting equations. Linearized panel and acoustic equations are used. Results from this model are in good agreement with existing experimental and numerical data. It is shown that in the supersonic regime, full coupling of the flexible panel leads to lower response and radiation from the panel. This is believed to be due to an increase in acoustic damping on the panel in this regime. Increasing the Mach number increases the acoustic damping, which is in agreement with earlier work.

  6. Unsteady Euler algorithm with unstructured dynamic mesh for complex-aircraft aeroelastic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batina, John T.

    1989-01-01

    A finite-volume unstructured-grid FEM scheme with multistage Runge-Kutta time stepping is applied to the three-dimensional time-dependent Euler equations for inviscid flows on complex aircraft configurations undergoing structural deformation. The derivation of the model, the solution procedure, and the computer implementation are described, and results are presented graphically for a NASA Langley supersonic fighter aircraft model in steady and unsteady (harmonic oscillation in complete-vehicle bending mode) flow regimes. Good agreement between FEM predictions and experimental data is demonstrated.

  7. Space Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    A robust and competitive commercial space sector is vital to continued progress in space. The United States is committed to encouraging and facilitating the growth of a U.S. commercial space sector that supports U.S. needs, is globally competitive, and advances U.S. leadership in the generation of new markets and innovation-driven entrepreneurship. Energize competitive domestic industries to participate in global markets and advance the development of: satellite manufacturing; satellite-based services; space launch; terrestrial applications; and increased entrepreneurship. Purchase and use commercial space capabilities and services to the maximum practical extent Actively explore the use of inventive, nontraditional arrangements for acquiring commercial space goods and services to meet United States Government requirements, including measures such as public-private partnerships, . Refrain from conducting United States Government space activities that preclude, discourage, or compete with U.S. commercial space activities. Pursue potential opportunities for transferring routine, operational space functions to the commercial space sector where beneficial and cost-effective.

  8. Commercial Intratheater Airlift: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Use in U.S. Central Command

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    mobility for both inter - and intratheater operations. However, while AFDD 2-6 provides explicit guidance for the inclusion of Civil Reserve Air Fleet...other types of commercial aircraft made ITA deliveries, including rotary-wing aircraft and very small fixed- wing aircraft, such as the CASA C-212

  9. Design features of a low-disturbance supersonic wind tunnel for transition research at low supersonic Mach numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Laub, James A.; King, Lyndell S.; Reda, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    A unique, low-disturbance supersonic wind tunnel is being developed at NASA-Ames to support supersonic laminar flow control research at cruise Mach numbers of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The distinctive design features of this new quiet tunnel are a low-disturbance settling chamber, laminar boundary layers along the nozzle/test section walls, and steady supersonic diffuser flow. This paper discusses these important aspects of our quiet tunnel design and the studies necessary to support this design. Experimental results from an 1/8th-scale pilot supersonic wind tunnel are presented and discussed in association with theoretical predictions. Natural laminar flow on the test section walls is demonstrated and both settling chamber and supersonic diffuser performance is examined. The full-scale wind tunnel should be commissioned by the end of 1993.

  10. FLEXSTAB: A computer program for the prediction of loads and stability and control of flexible aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkin, B. R.; Erickson, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    Capabilities of the FLEXSTAB Computer Program System are described and illustrated. Aeroelastic analysis of a wide variety of aircraft configurations is performed. The aerodynamic theory used in FLEXSTAB is applicable to both steady and unsteady, subsonic and supersonic flow for multiple wing-body tail nacelle configurations with a plane of symmetry. For unsteady flow calculations, an unsteady aerodynamic theory is used which is appropriate for the low reduced frequencies associated with aircraft flight dynamics. The aircraft is modeled as either a rigid or flexible structure. The computer trims the aircraft in steady reference flight and computes both static and dynamic stability and control derivatives and the stability behavior about the trim condition. The airplane lifting pressure distribution, aerodynamic and inertia loads and deflected shape are also computed.

  11. Titanium alloys Russian aircraft and aerospace applications

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseyev, Valentin N

    2005-01-01

    This text offers previously elusive information on state-of-the-art Russian metallurgic technology of titanium alloys. It details their physical, mechanical, and technological properties, as well as treatments and applications in various branches of modern industry, particularly aircraft and aerospace construction. Titanium Alloys: Russian Aircraft and Aerospace Applications addresses all facets of titanium alloys in aerospace and aviation technology, including specific applications, fundamentals, composition, and properties of commercial alloys. It is useful for all students and researchers interested in the investigation and applications of titanium.

  12. Sonic Boom Mitigation Through Aircraft Design and Adjoint Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallabhandi, Siriam K.; Diskin, Boris; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to design of the supersonic aircraft outer mold line (OML) by optimizing the A-weighted loudness of sonic boom signature predicted on the ground. The optimization process uses the sensitivity information obtained by coupling the discrete adjoint formulations for the augmented Burgers Equation and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) equations. This coupled formulation links the loudness of the ground boom signature to the aircraft geometry thus allowing efficient shape optimization for the purpose of minimizing the impact of loudness. The accuracy of the adjoint-based sensitivities is verified against sensitivities obtained using an independent complex-variable approach. The adjoint based optimization methodology is applied to a configuration previously optimized using alternative state of the art optimization methods and produces additional loudness reduction. The results of the optimizations are reported and discussed.

  13. Supersonic Jet Interactions in a Plenum Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Venugopal

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding thè supersonic jet interactions in a plenum chamber is essential for thè design of hot launch systems. Static tests were conducted in a small-scale rocket motor ioaded with a typical nitramine propellaiit to produce a nozzle exit Mach number of 3. This supersonic jet is made to interact with plenum chambers having both open and closed sides. The distance between thè nozzle exit and thè back piate of plenum chamber are varied from 2. 5 to 7. 0 times thè nozzle exit diameter. The pressure rise in thè plenum chamber was measured using pressure transducers mounted at different locatìons. The pressure-time data were analysed to obtain an insight into thè flow field in thè plenum chamber. The maximum pressure exerted on thè back piate of plenum chamber is about 25-35 per cent. of thè maximum stagnation pressure developed in thè rocket motor. Ten static tests were carried out to obtain thè effect of axial distance between thè nozzle exit and thè plenum chamber back piate, and stagnation pressure in thè rocket motoron thè flow field in thè open-sided and closed-sided plenum chambers configurations.

  14. Coupling dynamic of twin supersonic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ching-Wen; Cluts, Jordan; Samimy, Mo

    2015-11-01

    In a supersonic shock-containing jet, the interaction of large-scale structures in the jet's shear layer with the shock waves generates acoustic waves. The waves propagate upstream, excite the jet initial shear layer instability, establish a feedback loop at certain conditions, and generate screech noise. The screech normally contains different modes of various strengths. Similarly, twin-jet plumes contain screech tones. If the dynamics of the two jet plumes are synchronized, the screech amplitude could be significantly amplified. There is a proposed analytical model in the literature for screech synchronization in twin rectangular jets. This model shows that with no phase difference in acoustic waves arriving at neighboring nozzle lips, twin-jet plumes feature a strong coupling with a significant level of screech tones. In this work the maximum nozzle separation distance for sustained screech synchronization and strong coupling is analytically derived. This model is used with our round twin-jet experiments and the predicted coupling level agrees well with the experimental results. Near-field microphone measurements and schlieren visualization along with the analytical model are used to investigate the coupling mechanisms of twin supersonic jets. Supported by ONR.

  15. Interactive Inverse Design Optimization of Fuselage Shape for Low-Boom Supersonic Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wu; Shields, Elwood; Le, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces a tool called BOSS (Boom Optimization using Smoothest Shape modifications). BOSS utilizes interactive inverse design optimization to develop a fuselage shape that yields a low-boom aircraft configuration. A fundamental reason for developing BOSS is the need to generate feasible low-boom conceptual designs that are appropriate for further refinement using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based preliminary design methods. BOSS was not developed to provide a numerical solution to the inverse design problem. Instead, BOSS was intended to help designers find the right configuration among an infinite number of possible configurations that are equally good using any numerical figure of merit. BOSS uses the smoothest shape modification strategy for modifying the fuselage radius distribution at 100 or more longitudinal locations to find a smooth fuselage shape that reduces the discrepancies between the design and target equivalent area distributions over any specified range of effective distance. For any given supersonic concept (with wing, fuselage, nacelles, tails, and/or canards), a designer can examine the differences between the design and target equivalent areas, decide which part of the design equivalent area curve needs to be modified, choose a desirable rate for the reduction of the discrepancies over the specified range, and select a parameter for smoothness control of the fuselage shape. BOSS will then generate a fuselage shape based on the designer's inputs in a matter of seconds. Using BOSS, within a few hours, a designer can either generate a realistic fuselage shape that yields a supersonic configuration with a low-boom ground signature or quickly eliminate any configuration that cannot achieve low-boom characteristics with fuselage shaping alone. A conceptual design case study is documented to demonstrate how BOSS can be used to develop a low-boom supersonic concept from a low-drag supersonic concept. The paper also contains a study

  16. Application and Development of Carbon Brake Disc Materials for Commercial Aircraft%大型商用飞机炭刹车盘材料的应用进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季光明

    2011-01-01

    From the 70 years of the 20th century(1970s), the research and application of carbon brake disc composite has experienced five generations. C/C composite material has become the first choice of carbon brake disc for corrmlercial aircraft and has been widely used in Airbus and Boeing because of its excellent features of light weight, good friction characteristics, long life and high heat-absorbing capacity. The domestic carbon brake material has made considerable development after several years of development, and has been used as PMA in B757 and A320. However, the further improvement of density uniformity, quality consistency of domestic carbon brake material, anti-oxidation coating reliabilit, and low cost technology is necessary.%炭刹车盘材料具有质量轻、摩擦特性好、使用寿命长、吸热能力高等一系列优良特性。从20世纪70年代问世以来,炭刹车盘复合材料的研制和应用总共经历了五代发展历程,已经成为商用飞机炭刹车副的首选材料,被广泛应用于空客和波音系列飞机。经过几十年的发展,国内炭刹车材料取得了长足的发展,已经作为PMA件应用于B757和A320机型,但仍需进一步提高国产炭刹车材料的密度均匀性、质量一致性、抗氧化涂层的可靠性及降低生产成本。

  17. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Droney, Christopher K.

    2011-01-01

    This Final Report summarizes the work accomplished by the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team in Phase 1, which includes the time period of October 2008 through March 2010. The team consisted of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, General Electric, and Georgia Tech. The team completed the development of a comprehensive future scenario for world-wide commercial aviation, selected baseline and advanced configurations for detailed study, generated technology suites for each configuration, conducted detailed performance analysis, calculated noise and emissions, assessed technology risks, and developed technology roadmaps. Five concepts were evaluated in detail: 2008 baseline, N+3 reference, N+3 high span strut braced wing, N+3 gas turbine battery electric concept, and N+3 hybrid wing body. A wide portfolio of technologies was identified to address the NASA N+3 goals. Significant improvements in air traffic management, aerodynamics, materials and structures, aircraft systems, propulsion, and acoustics are needed. Recommendations for Phase 2 concept and technology projects have been identified.

  18. Detection of respiratory viruses on air filters from aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korves, T M; Johnson, D; Jones, B W; Watson, J; Wolk, D M; Hwang, G M

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of identifying viruses from aircraft cabin air, we evaluated whether respiratory viruses trapped by commercial aircraft air filters can be extracted and detected using a multiplex PCR, bead-based assay. The ResPlex II assay was first tested for its ability to detect inactivated viruses applied to new filter material; all 18 applications of virus at a high concentration were detected. The ResPlex II assay was then used to test for 18 respiratory viruses on 48 used air filter samples from commercial aircraft. Three samples tested positive for viruses, and three viruses were detected: rhinovirus, influenza A and influenza B. For 33 of 48 samples, internal PCR controls performed suboptimally, suggesting sample matrix effect. In some cases, influenza and rhinovirus RNA can be detected on aircraft air filters, even more than 10 days after the filters were removed from aircraft. With protocol modifications to overcome PCR inhibition, air filter sampling and the ResPlex II assay could be used to characterize viruses in aircraft cabin air. Information about viruses in aircraft could support public health measures to reduce disease transmission within aircraft and between cities. © The MITRE corporation. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. An Introduction to the Supersonic Molecular Beam Injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Recently a new fuelling method with supersonic molecular beam injection (MBI) has been developed and used in the tokamaks experiments successfully. It is economical to develop and maintain. The advantages of supersonic MBI compared with the conventional of gas-puffing method are as follows: deep deposition of fuel, better fuelling efficiency, reduced recycling and pure plasma. Particle and energy confinement can be improved and density limit extended. This review described the Laval nozzle molecular beam and a simple collective model for the injection of a supersonic MBI into the tokamak plasma.

  20. Magnetic geometry and particle source drive of supersonic divertor regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufferand, H.; Ciraolo, G.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Tamain, Ph; Marandet, Y.; Serre, E.

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive picture of the mechanisms driving the transition from subsonic to supersonic flows in tokamak plasmas. We demonstrate that supersonic parallel flows into the divertor volume are ubiquitous at low density and governed by the divertor magnetic geometry. As the density is increased, subsonic divertor plasmas are recovered. On detachment, we show the change in particle source can also drive the transition to a supersonic regime. The comprehensive theoretical analysis is completed by simulations in ITER geometry. Such results are essential in assessing the divertor performance and when interpreting measurements and experimental evidence.

  1. Numerical Analysis of Supersonic Film Cooling in Supersonic Flow in Hypersonic Inlet with Isolator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silong Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Supersonic film cooling is an efficient method to cool the engine with extremely high heat load. In order to study supersonic film cooling in a real advanced engine, a two-dimensional model of the hypersonic inlet in a scramjet engine with supersonic film cooling in the isolator is built and validated through experimental data. The simulation results show that the cooling effect under different coolant injection angles does not show clear differences; a small injection angle can ensure both the cooling effect and good aerodynamic performances (e.g., flow coefficient of the hypersonic inlet. Under selected coolant injection angle and inlet Mach number, the cooling efficiency increases along with the injection Mach number of the coolant flow, only causing a little total pressure loss in the isolator. Along with the increase of the inlet Mach number of the hypersonic inlet, the cooling efficiency does not present a monotonic change because of the complex shock waves. However, the wall temperature shows a monotonic increase when the inlet Mach number increases. The mass flow rate of coolant flow should be increased to cool the engine more efficiently according to the mass flow rate of the main stream when the inlet Mach number increases.

  2. 75 FR 22439 - Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Lead Emissions From Piston-Engine Aircraft Using Leaded...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... fuel that is used in commercial aircraft, most military aircraft, or other turbine-engine powered... largely converted to jet turbine-engine propelled aircraft. However, the use of avgas containing 4 grams... certain high performance engines such as race cars. \\33\\ See http://www.epa.gov/airtrends/lead.html...

  3. Aircraft Noise Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This contribution addresses the state-of-the-art in the field of aircraft noise prediction, simulation and minimisation. The point of view taken in this context is that of comprehensive models that couple the various aircraft systems with the acoustic sources, the propagation and the flight trajectories. After an exhaustive review of the present predictive technologies in the relevant fields (airframe, propulsion, propagation, aircraft operations, trajectory optimisation), the paper add...

  4. Gas turbine engine with supersonic compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.

    2015-10-20

    A gas turbine engine having a compressor section using blades on a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a stator. The stator includes one or more of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions for deceleration of the gas to subsonic conditions and to deliver a high pressure gas to combustors. The aerodynamic ducts include structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are provided having an aspect ratio of two to one (2:1) or more, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.

  5. Linear stability analysis of supersonic axisymmetric jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Wan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stabilities of supersonic jets are examined with different velocities, momentum thicknesses, and core temperatures. Amplification rates of instability waves at inlet are evaluated by linear stability theory (LST. It is found that increased velocity and core temperature would increase amplification rates substantially and such influence varies for different azimuthal wavenumbers. The most unstable modes in thin momentum thickness cases usually have higher frequencies and azimuthal wavenumbers. Mode switching is observed for low azimuthal wavenumbers, but it appears merely in high velocity cases. In addition, the results provided by linear parabolized stability equations show that the mean-flow divergence affects the spatial evolution of instability waves greatly. The most amplified instability waves globally are sometimes found to be different from that given by LST.

  6. The shock waves in decaying supersonic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, M D; Zuev, J M; Smith, Michael D.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Zuev, Julia M.

    2000-01-01

    We here analyse numerical simulations of supersonic, hypersonic andmagnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is free to decay. Our goals are tounderstand the dynamics of the decay and the characteristic properties of theshock waves produced. This will be useful for interpretation of observations ofboth motions in molecular clouds and sources of non-thermal radiation. We find that decaying hypersonic turbulence possesses an exponential tail offast shocks and an exponential decay in time, i.e. the number of shocks isproportional to t exp (-ktv) for shock velocity jump v and mean initialwavenumber k. In contrast to the velocity gradients, the velocity ProbabilityDistribution Function remains Gaussian with a more complex decay law. The energy is dissipated not by fast shocks but by a large number of low Machnumber shocks. The power loss peaks near a low-speed turn-over in anexponential distribution. An analytical extension of the mapping closuretechnique is able to predict the basic decay features. Our analytic descrip...

  7. Aeroacoustic properties of supersonic elliptic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzie, Kevin W.; McLaughlin, Dennis K.

    1999-09-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic properties of supersonic elliptic and circular jets are experimentally investigated. The jets are perfectly expanded with an exit Mach number of approximately 1.5 and are operated in the Reynolds number range of 25 000 to 50 000. The reduced Reynolds number facilitates the use of conventional hot-wire anemometry and a glow discharge excitation technique which preferentially excites the varicose or flapping modes in the jets. In order to simulate the high-velocity and low-density effects of heated jets, helium is mixed with the air jets. This allows the large-scale structures in the jet shear layer to achieve a high enough convective velocity to radiate noise through the Mach wave emission process.

  8. Effects of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} injections by supersonic aviation on sulfate aerosol and ozone in the troposphere and stratosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyominov, I.G.; Zadorozhny, A.M. [Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russian Federation); Elansky, N.F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Atmospheric Physics

    1997-12-31

    The impact of supersonic aviation on atmospheric ozone and sulfate aerosol is examined with the help of a two-dimensional dynamical/radiative/chemical model of ozonosphere including aerosol physics. For SO{sub 2} emissions from aircraft as gas, gas/particles (90%/10%) mix, and particles of 0.01 {mu}m radius the sulphate aerosol surface density at maximum of changes increases against its background value by {approx}50%, {approx}75%, and {approx}200%, respectively. This effect of SO{sub 2} emissions with insignificant NO{sub x} injection leads to a significant decrease of total ozone by 2015 in the entire atmosphere. For NO{sub x} emissions which are anticipated in future (EI(NO{sub x}) = 15) any kind of SO{sub 2} emission results in significant weakening of supersonic aviation impact on ozone layer in the Northern Hemisphere. (author) 14 refs.

  9. ARBITRARY INTERACTION OF PLANE SUPERSONIC FLOWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study.We consider the Riemann problem for parameters at collision of two plane flows at a certain angle. The problem is solved in the exact statement. Most cases of interference, both stationary and non-stationary gas-dynamic discontinuities, followed by supersonic flows can be reduced to the problem of random interaction of two supersonic flows. Depending on the ratio of the parameters in the flows, outgoing discontinuities turn out to be shock waves, or rarefactionwaves. In some cases, there is no solution at all. It is important to know how to find the domain of existence for the relevant decisions, as the type of shock-wave structures in these domains is known in advance. The Riemann problem is used in numerical methods such as the method of Godunov. As a rule, approximate solution is used, known as the Osher solution, but for a number of problems with a high precision required, solution of this problem needs to be in the exact statement. Main results.Domains of existence for solutions with different types of shock-wave structure have been considered. Boundaries of existence for solutions with two outgoing shock waves are analytically defined, as well as with the outgoing shock wave and rarefaction wave. We identify the area of Mach numbers and angles at which the flows interact and there is no solution. Specific flows with two outgoing rarefaction waves are not considered. Practical significance. The results supplement interference theory of stationary gas-dynamic discontinuities and can be used to develop new methods of numerical calculation with extraction of discontinuities.

  10. Design of a digital ride quality augmentation system for commuter aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, T. A.; Amin, S. P.; Paduano, J. D.; Downing, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    Commuter aircraft typically have low wing loadings, and fly at low altitudes, and so they are susceptible to undesirable accelerations caused by random atmospheric turbulence. Larger commercial aircraft typically have higher wing loadings and fly at altitudes where the turbulence level is lower, and so they provide smoother rides. This project was initiated based on the goal of making the ride of the commuter aircraft as smooth as the ride experienced on the major commercial airliners. The objectives of this project were to design a digital, longitudinal mode ride quality augmentation system (RQAS) for a commuter aircraft, and to investigate the effect of selected parameters on those designs.

  11. 1 Ft. x 1 Ft. Supersonic Wind Tunnel, Bldg. 37

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (1x), located in the Engine Research Building, is one of the most active test facilities at the Glenn Research Center. Used...

  12. THERMAL AND AERODYNAMIC PERFORMANCES OF THE SUPERSONIC MOTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan P Ninković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, Mach number of 4 can be taken as a boundary value for transition from conditions for supersonic, into the area of hypersonic flow, distinguishing two areas: area of supersonic in which the effects of the aerodynamic heating can be neglected and the area of hypersonic, in which the thermal effects become dominant. This paper presents the effects in static and dynamic areas, as well as presentation of G.R.O.M. software for determination of the values of aerodynamic derivatives, which was developed on the basis of linearized theory of supersonic flow. Validation of developed software was carried out through different types of testing, proving its usefulness for engineering practice in the area of supersonic wing aerodynamic loading calculations, even at high Mach numbers, with dominant thermal effects.

  13. Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Facility (Research Cell 22)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: RC22 is a continuous-flow, direct-connect supersonic-combustion research facility that is capable of simulating flight conditions from Mach 3.0 to Mach...

  14. Entropy Minimization Design Approach of Supersonic Internal Passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Sousa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fluid machinery operating in the supersonic regime unveil avenues towards more compact technology. However, internal supersonic flows are associated with high aerodynamic and thermal penalties, which usually prevent their practical implementation. Indeed, both shock losses and the limited operational range represent particular challenges to aerodynamic designers that should be taken into account at the initial phase of the design process. This paper presents a design methodology for supersonic passages based on direct evaluations of the velocity field using the method of characteristics and computation of entropy generation across shock waves. This meshless function evaluation tool is then coupled to an optimization scheme, based on evolutionary algorithms that minimize the entropy generation across the supersonic passage. Finally, we assessed the results with 3D Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes calculations.

  15. An experimental system for release simulation of internal stores in a supersonic wind tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic parameters obtained from separation experiments of internal stores in a wind tunnel are significant in aircraft designs. Accurate wind tunnel tests can help to improve the release stability of the stores and in-flight safety of the aircrafts in supersonic environments. A simulative system for free drop experiments of internal stores based on a practical project is provided in this paper. The system contains a store release mechanism, a control system and an attitude measurement system. The release mechanism adopts a six-bar linkage driven by a cylinder, which ensures the release stability. The structure and initial aerodynamic parameters of the stores are also designed and adjusted. A high speed vision measurement system for high speed rolling targets is utilized to measure the pose parameters of the internal store models and an optimizing method for the coordinates of markers is presented based on a priori model. The experimental results show excellent repeatability of the system, and indicate that the position measurement precision is less than 0.13 mm, and the attitude measurement precision for pitch and yaw angles is less than 0.126°, satisfying the requirements of practical wind tunnel tests. A separation experiment for the internal stores is also conducted in the FL-3 wind tunnel of China Aerodynamics Research Institute.

  16. Control strategies for aircraft airframe noise reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yong; Wang Xunnian; Zhang Dejiu

    2013-01-01

    With the development of low-noise aircraft engine,airframe noise now represents a major noise source during the commercial aircraft's approach to landing phase.Noise control efforts have therefore been extensively focused on the airframe noise problems in order to further reduce aircraft overall noise.In this review,various control methods explored in the last decades for noise reduction on airframe components including high-lift devices and landing gears are summarized.We introduce recent major achievements in airframe noise reduction with passive control methods such as fairings,deceleration plates,splitter plates,acoustic liners,slat cove cover and side-edge replacements,and then discuss the potential and control mechanism of some promising active flow control strategies for airframe noise reduction,such as plasma technique and air blowing/suction devices.Based on the knowledge gained throughout the extensively noise control testing,a few design concepts on the landing gear,high-lift devices and whole aircraft are provided for advanced aircraft low-noise design.Finally,discussions and suggestions are given for future research on airframe noise reduction.

  17. Cable Tensiometer for Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The invention is a cable tensiometer that can be used on aircraft for real-time, in-flight cable tension measurements. The invention can be used on any aircraft cables with high precision. The invention is extremely light-weight, hangs on the cable being tested and uses a dual bending beam design with a high mill-volt output to determine tension.

  18. Investigation and design of a C-Wing passenger aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    Karan BIKKANNAVAR; Scholz, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    A novel nonplanar wing concept called C-Wing is studied and implemented on a commercial aircraft to reduce induced drag which has a significant effect on fuel consumption. A preliminary sizing method which employs an optimization algorithm is utilized. The Airbus A320 aircraft is used as a reference aircraft to evaluate design parameters and to investigate the C-Wing design potential beyond current wing tip designs. An increase in aspect ratio due to wing area reduction at 36m span results in...

  19. Propulsion controlled aircraft research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, C. Gordon

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility has been conducting flight, ground simulator, and analytical studies to investigate the use of thrust modulation on multi-engine aircraft for emergency flight control. Two general methods of engine only control have been studied; manual manipulation of the throttles by the pilot, and augmented control where a computer commands thrust levels in response to pilot attitude inputs and aircraft motion feedbacks. This latter method is referred to as the Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) System. A wide variety of aircraft have been investigated. Simulation studies have included the B720, F-15, B727, B747 and MD-11. A look at manual control has been done in actual flight on the F15, T-38, B747, Lear 25, T-39, MD-11 and PA-30 Aircraft. The only inflight trial of the augmented (PCA) concept has been on an F15, the results of which will be presented below.

  20. Aircraft operations management manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The NASA aircraft operations program is a multifaceted, highly diverse entity that directly supports the agency mission in aeronautical research and development, space science and applications, space flight, astronaut readiness training, and related activities through research and development, program support, and mission management aircraft operations flights. Users of the program are interagency, inter-government, international, and the business community. This manual provides guidelines to establish policy for the management of NASA aircraft resources, aircraft operations, and related matters. This policy is an integral part of and must be followed when establishing field installation policy and procedures covering the management of NASA aircraft operations. Each operating location will develop appropriate local procedures that conform with the requirements of this handbook. This manual should be used in conjunction with other governing instructions, handbooks, and manuals.

  1. A One Dimensional, Time Dependent Inlet/Engine Numerical Simulation for Aircraft Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrard, Doug; Davis, Milt, Jr.; Cole, Gary

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) have developed a closely coupled computer simulation system that provides a one dimensional, high frequency inlet/engine numerical simulation for aircraft propulsion systems. The simulation system, operating under the LeRC-developed Application Portable Parallel Library (APPL), closely coupled a supersonic inlet with a gas turbine engine. The supersonic inlet was modeled using the Large Perturbation Inlet (LAPIN) computer code, and the gas turbine engine was modeled using the Aerodynamic Turbine Engine Code (ATEC). Both LAPIN and ATEC provide a one dimensional, compressible, time dependent flow solution by solving the one dimensional Euler equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. Source terms are used to model features such as bleed flows, turbomachinery component characteristics, and inlet subsonic spillage while unstarted. High frequency events, such as compressor surge and inlet unstart, can be simulated with a high degree of fidelity. The simulation system was exercised using a supersonic inlet with sixty percent of the supersonic area contraction occurring internally, and a GE J85-13 turbojet engine.

  2. Computational investigation of powder coating of nanoparticles in supersonic and hypersonic impactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nima Niksefat; Mousa Farhadi; Kurosh Sedighi; Salman Nourouzi

    2013-01-01

    In this study,numerical simulation of flow field in a supersonic/hypersonic impactor with one or two nozzles was carried out using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT.The objective was to investigate the effects of working parameters such as pressure ratio (50 < Po/Pb < 800),nozzle diameters (D=0.23,0.27,0.45 mm),nozzle to plate distance (0.5 < L/D< 50),particle diameter (1 nm< dp < 100 nm) and angle between two nozzles.A single-phase 3D unsteady-state model was implemented by the software.For this purpose,a user-defined function (UDF) was employed to implement nanoparticles for different assumptions of Cunningham correction factor.An axisymmetric form of the compressible Navier-Stokes and energy equations was used for both fluid flow and temperature;Lagrangian particle trajectory analysis was used for particle motion.Using the variable Cunningham correction factor showed suitable agreement with experimental data in comparison with other methods.Results show that increase of the distance between nozzle and impaction plate causes increase of Mach number,the distance between bow shock and impaction plate,and the collection efficiency.Maximum jet velocity,distance between bow shock and impaction plate and collection efficiency increase by using two nozzles in supersonic and hypersonic impactors.

  3. Magnetic field exposure of commercial airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood; Nicholas; Butler; Lackland; Hoel; Mohr

    2000-10-01

    PURPOSE: Airline pilots are exposed to magnetic fields generated by the aircraft's electrical and electronic systems. The purpose of this study was to directly measure the flight deck magnetic fields to which commercial airline pilots are exposed when flying on different aircraft types over a 75-hour flight-duty month.METHODS: Magentic field measurements were taken using personal dosimeters capable of measuring magnetic fields in the 40-800 Hz frequency range. Dosimeters were carried by either the Captain or the First Officer on Boeing 737/200, Boeing 747/400, Boeing 767/300ER, and Airbus 320 aircraft. The data were analyzed by aircraft type, with statistics based on block hours. Block hours begin when the aircraft departs the gate prior to take off and end when the aircraft returns to the gate after landing.RESULTS: Approximately 1008 block hours were recorded at a sampling rate of 3 seconds. Total block time exposure to the pilots ranged from a harmonic geometric mean of 6.7 milliGauss (mG) for the Boeing 767/300ER to 12.7 mG for the Boeing 737/200.CONCLUSIONS: Measured flight deck magnetic field levels were substantially above the 0.8 to 1 mG level typically found in the home or office and suggest the need for further study to evaluate potential health effects of long-term exposure.

  4. Unmanned aircraft systems as wingmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Richard; Barnes, Laura; Fields, MaryAnne

    2010-04-01

    This paper introduces a concept towards integrating manned and Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UASs) into a highly functional team though the design and implementation of 3-D distributed formation/flight control algorithms with the goal to act as wingmen for a manned aircraft. This method is designed to minimize user input for team control, dynamically modify formations as required, utilize standard operating formations to reduce pilot resistance to integration, and support splinter groups for surveillance and/or as safeguards between potential threats and manned vehicles. The proposed work coordinates UAS members by utilizing artificial potential functions whose values are based on the state of the unmanned and manned assets including the desired formation, obstacles, task assignments, and perceived intentions. The overall unmanned team geometry is controlled using weighted potential fields. Individual UAS utilize fuzzy logic controllers for stability and navigation as well as a fuzzy reasoning engine for flight path intention prediction. Approaches are demonstrated in simulation using the commercial simulator X-Plane and controllers designed in Matlab/Simulink. Experiments include trail and right echelon formations as well as splinter group surveillance.

  5. Aerodynamic aircraft design methods and their notable applications: Survey of the activity in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Kozo; Takanashi, Susumu

    1991-01-01

    An overview of aerodynamic aircraft design methods and their recent applications in Japan is presented. A design code which was developed at the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL) and is in use now is discussed, hence, most of the examples are the result of the collaborative work between heavy industry and the National Aerospace Laboratory. A wide variety of applications in transonic to supersonic flow regimes are presented. Although design of aircraft elements for external flows are the main focus, some of the internal flow applications are also presented. Recent applications of the design code, using the Navier Stokes and Euler equations in the analysis mode, include the design of HOPE (a space vehicle) and Upper Surface Blowing (USB) aircraft configurations.

  6. Predicting Visibility of Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew; Ramirez, Cesar V.; Salud, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Visual detection of aircraft by human observers is an important element of aviation safety. To assess and ensure safety, it would be useful to be able to be able to predict the visibility, to a human observer, of an aircraft of specified size, shape, distance, and coloration. Examples include assuring safe separation among aircraft and between aircraft and unmanned vehicles, design of airport control towers, and efforts to enhance or suppress the visibility of military and rescue vehicles. We have recently developed a simple metric of pattern visibility, the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO). In this report we examine whether the SSO can predict visibility of simulated aircraft images. We constructed a set of aircraft images from three-dimensional computer graphic models, and measured the luminance contrast threshold for each image from three human observers. The data were well predicted by the SSO. Finally, we show how to use the SSO to predict visibility range for aircraft of arbitrary size, shape, distance, and coloration. PMID:19462007

  7. New sonic shockwave multi-element sensors mounted on a small airfoil flown on F-15B testbed aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    An experimental device to pinpoint the location of a shockwave that develops in an aircraft flying at transonic and supersonic speeds was recently flight-tested at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The shock location sensor, developed by TAO Systems, Hampton, Va., utilizes a multi-element hot-film sensor array along with a constant-voltage anemometer and special diagnostic software to pinpoint the exact location of the shockwave and its characteristics as it develops on an aircraft surface. For this experiment, the 45-element sensor was mounted on the small Dryden-designed airfoil shown in this illustration. The airfoil was attached to the Flight Test Fixture mounted underneath the fuselage of Dryden's F-15B testbed aircraft. Tests were flown at transonic speeds of Mach 0.7 to 0.9, and the device isolated the location of the shock wave to within a half-inch. Application of this technology could assist designers of future supersonic aircraft in improving the efficiency of engine air inlets by controlling the shockwave, with a related improvement in aircraft performance and fuel economy.

  8. Stationary flow conditions in pulsed supersonic beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Wolfgang

    2013-10-21

    We describe a generally applicable method for the experimental determination of stationary flow conditions in pulsed supersonic beams, utilizing time-resolved electron induced fluorescence measurements of high pressure jet expansions of helium. The detection of ultraviolet photons from electronically excited helium emitted very close to the nozzle exit images the valve opening behavior-with the decided advantage that a photon signal is not affected by beam-skimmer and beam-residual gas interactions; it thus allows to conclusively determine those operation parameters of a pulsed valve that yield complete opening. The studies reveal that a "flat-top" signal, indicating constant density and commonly considered as experimental criterion for continuous flow, is insufficient. Moreover, translational temperature and mean terminal flow velocity turn out to be significantly more sensitive in testing for the equivalent behavior of a continuous nozzle source. Based on the widely distributed Even-Lavie valve we demonstrate that, in principle, it is possible to achieve quasi-continuous flow conditions even with fast-acting valves; however, the two prerequisites are a minimum pulse duration that is much longer than standard practice and previous estimates, and a suitable tagging of the appropriate beam segment.

  9. Supersonic Jet Noise Reduction Using Microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Cuppoletti, Dan; Malla, Bhupatindra

    2013-11-01

    Fluidic injection for jet noise reduction involves injecting secondary jets into a primary jet to alter the noise characteristics of the primary jet. A major challenge has been determining what mechanisms are responsible for noise reduction due to varying injector designs, injection parameters, and primary jets. The current study provides conclusive results on the effect of injector angle and momentum ux ratio on the acoustics and shock structure of a supersonic Md = 1.56 jet. It is shown that the turbulent mixing noise scales primarily with the injector momentum flux ratio. Increasing the injector momentum flux ratio increases streamwise vorticity generation and reduces peak turbulence levels. It is found that the shock-related noise components are most affected by the interaction of the shocks from the injectors with the primary shock structure of the jet. Increasing momentum flux ratio causes shock noise reduction until a limit where shock noise increases again. It is shown that the shock noise components and mixing noise components are reduced through fundamentally different mechanisms and maximum overall noise reduction is achieved by balancing the reduction of both components.

  10. Accretion of Supersonic Winds on Boson Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gracia-Linares, M

    2016-01-01

    We present the evolution of a supersonic wind interacting with a Boson Star (BS) and compare the resulting wind density profile with that of the shock cone formed when the wind is accreted by a non-rotating Black Hole (BH) of the same mass. The physical differences between these accretors are that a BS, unlike a BH has no horizon, it does not have a mechanical surface either and thus the wind is expected to trespass the BS. Despite these conditions, on the BS space-time the gas achieves a stationary flux with the gas accumulating in a high density elongated structure comparable to the shock cone formed behind a BH. The highest density resides in the center of the BS whereas in the case of the BH it is found on the downstream part of the BH near the event horizon. The maximum density of the gas is smaller in the BS than in the BH case. Our results indicate that the highest density of the wind is more similar on the BS to that on the BH when the BS has high self-interaction, when it is more compact and when the...

  11. Particle Streak Velocimetry of Supersonic Nozzle Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willits, J. D.; Pourpoint, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    A novel velocimetry technique to probe the exhaust flow of a laboratory scale combustor is being developed. The technique combines the advantages of standard particle velocimetry techniques and the ultra-fast imaging capabilities of a streak camera to probe high speed flows near continuously with improved spatial and velocity resolution. This "Particle Streak Velocimetry" technique tracks laser illuminated seed particles at up to 236 picosecond temporal resolution allowing time-resolved measurement of one-dimensional flows exceeding 2000 m/s as are found in rocket nozzles and many other applications. Developmental tests with cold nitrogen have been performed to validate and troubleshoot the technique with supersonic flows of much lower velocity and without background noise due to combusting flow. Flow velocities on the order of 500 m/s have been probed with titanium dioxide particles and a continuous-wave laser diode. Single frame images containing multiple streaks are analyzed to find the average slope of all incident particles corresponding to the centerline axial flow velocity. Long term objectives for these tests are correlation of specific impulse to theoretical combustion predictions and direct comparisons between candidate green fuels and the industry standard, monomethylhydrazine, each tested under identical conditions.

  12. Supersonic collisions between two gas streams

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H M; Ryu, D; Lee, Hyung Mok; Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    1995-01-01

    A star around a massive black hole can be disrupted tidally by the gravity of the black hole. Then, its debris may form a precessing stream which may even collide with itself. In order to understand the dynamical effects of the stream-stream collision on the eventual accretion of the stellar debris onto the black hole, we have studied how gas flow behaves when the outgoing stream collides supersonically with the incoming stream. We have investigated the problem analytically with one-dimensional plane-parallel streams and numerically with more realistic three-dimensional streams. A shock formed around the contact surface converts the bulk of the orbital streaming kinetic energy into thermal energy. In three-dimensional simulations, the accumulated hot post-shock gas then expands adiabatically and drives another shock into the low density ambient region. Through this expansion, thermal energy is converted back to the kinetic energy associated with the expanding motion. Thus, in the end, only a small fraction of...

  13. Drag Force Anemometer Used in Supersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fralick, Gustave C.

    1998-01-01

    To measure the drag on a flat cantilever beam exposed transversely to a flow field, the drag force anemometer (beam probe) uses strain gauges attached on opposite sides of the base of the beam. This is in contrast to the hot wire anemometer, which depends for its operation on the variation of the convective heat transfer coefficient with velocity. The beam probe retains the high-frequency response (up to 100 kHz) of the hot wire anemometer, but it is more rugged, uses simpler electronics, is relatively easy to calibrate, is inherently temperature compensated, and can be used in supersonic flow. The output of the probe is proportional to the velocity head of the flow, 1/2 rho u(exp 2) (where rho is the fluid density and u is the fluid velocity). By adding a static pressure tap and a thermocouple to measure total temperature, one can determine the Mach number, static temperature, density, and velocity of the flow.

  14. Supersonic Magnetic Flows in the Quiet Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Borrero, J M; Schlichenmaier, R; Schmidt, W; Berkefeld, T; Solanki, S K; Bonet, J A; Iniesta, J C del Toro; Domingo, V; Barthol, P; Gandorfer, A

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution we describe some recent observations of high-speed magnetized flows in the quiet Sun granulation. These observations were carried out with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment (IMaX) onboard the stratospheric balloon {\\sc Sunrise}, and possess an unprecedented spatial resolution and temporal cadence. These flows were identified as highly shifted circular polarization (Stokes $V$) signals. We estimate the LOS velocity responsible for these shifts to be larger than 6 km s$^{-1}$, and therefore we refer to them as {\\it supersonic magnetic flows}. The average lifetime of the detected events is 81.3 s and they occupy an average area of about 23\\,000 km$^2$. Most of the events occur within granular cells and correspond therefore to upflows. However some others occur in intergranular lanes or bear no clear relation to the convective velocity pattern. We analyze a number of representative examples and discuss them in terms of magnetic loops, reconnection events, and convective collapse.

  15. External-Compression Supersonic Inlet Design Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, John W.

    2011-01-01

    A computer code named SUPIN has been developed to perform aerodynamic design and analysis of external-compression, supersonic inlets. The baseline set of inlets include axisymmetric pitot, two-dimensional single-duct, axisymmetric outward-turning, and two-dimensional bifurcated-duct inlets. The aerodynamic methods are based on low-fidelity analytical and numerical procedures. The geometric methods are based on planar geometry elements. SUPIN has three modes of operation: 1) generate the inlet geometry from a explicit set of geometry information, 2) size and design the inlet geometry and analyze the aerodynamic performance, and 3) compute the aerodynamic performance of a specified inlet geometry. The aerodynamic performance quantities includes inlet flow rates, total pressure recovery, and drag. The geometry output from SUPIN includes inlet dimensions, cross-sectional areas, coordinates of planar profiles, and surface grids suitable for input to grid generators for analysis by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. The input data file for SUPIN and the output file from SUPIN are text (ASCII) files. The surface grid files are output as formatted Plot3D or stereolithography (STL) files. SUPIN executes in batch mode and is available as a Microsoft Windows executable and Fortran95 source code with a makefile for Linux.

  16. Tropospheric sampling with aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daum, P.H.; Springston, S.R.

    1991-03-01

    Aircraft constitute a unique environment which places stringent requirements on the instruments used to measure the concentrations of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. Some of these requirements such as minimization of size, weight, and power consumption are general; others are specific to individual techniques. This review presents the basic principles and considerations governing the deployment of trace gas and aerosol instrumentation on an aircraft. An overview of common instruments illustrates these points and provides guidelines for designing and using instruments on aircraft-based measurement programs.

  17. SOLAR AIRCRAFT DESIGN

    OpenAIRE

    RAHMATI, Sadegh; GHASED, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Generally domain Aircraft uses conventional fuel. These fuel having limited life, high cost and pollutant. Also nowadays price of petrol and other fuels are going to be higher, because of scarcity of those fuels. So there is great demand of use of non-exhaustible unlimited source of energy like solar energy. Solar aircraft is one of the ways to utilize solar energy. Solar aircraft uses solar panel to collect the solar radiation for immediate use but it also store the remaining part ...

  18. Lightning hazards to aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn, P. B.

    1978-01-01

    Lightning hazards and, more generally, aircraft static electricity are discussed by a representative for the Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory. An overview of these atmospheric electricity hazards to aircraft and their systems is presented with emphasis on electrical and electronic subsystems. The discussion includes reviewing some of the characteristics of lightning and static electrification, trends in weather and lightning-related mishaps, some specific threat mechanisms and susceptible aircraft subsystems and some of the present technology gaps. A roadmap (flow chart) is presented to show the direction needed to address these problems.

  19. V/STOL tilt rotor aircraft study. Volume 2: Preliminary design of research aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    A preliminary design study was conducted to establish a minimum sized, low cost V/STOL tilt-rotor research aircraft with the capability of performing proof-of-concept flight research investigations applicable to a wide range of useful military and commercial configurations. The analysis and design approach was based on state-of-the-art methods and maximum use of off-the-shelf hardware and systems to reduce development risk, procurement cost and schedules impact. The rotors to be used are of 26 foot diameter and are the same as currently under construction and test as part of NASA Tilt-Rotor Contract NAS2-6505. The aircraft has a design gross weight of 12,000 lbs. The proposed engines to be used are Lycoming T53-L-13B rated at 1550 shaft horsepower which are fully qualified. A flight test investigation is recommended which will determine the capabilities and limitations of the research aircraft.

  20. Supersonic and Subsonic Aircraft Noise Effects on Animals: A Literature Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    Bull. 38: 328. Boutelier, C. 1970. Reactions Animales an Bang Sonique. Revue de Medicine Aeronautique et Spatiale (Paris) 34: 79-81. Abstr. in...Laying Birds. RAE Tech. Report 71084. Runyan, L. J. and E. J. Kane. 1973a. Sonic Boom Literature Survey: Volume I State of the Art . FAA Report No. FAA-RD

  1. Computational Study of an Axisymmetric Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle for a Supersonic Aircraft Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deere, Karen A.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2007-01-01

    A computational investigation of an axisymmetric Dual Throat Nozzle concept has been conducted. This fluidic thrust-vectoring nozzle was designed with a recessed cavity to enhance the throat shifting technique for improved thrust vectoring. The structured-grid, unsteady Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver PAB3D was used to guide the nozzle design and analyze performance. Nozzle design variables included extent of circumferential injection, cavity divergence angle, cavity length, and cavity convergence angle. Internal nozzle performance (wind-off conditions) and thrust vector angles were computed for several configurations over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 1.89 to 10, with the fluidic injection flow rate equal to zero and up to 4 percent of the primary flow rate. The effect of a variable expansion ratio on nozzle performance over a range of freestream Mach numbers up to 2 was investigated. Results indicated that a 60 circumferential injection was a good compromise between large thrust vector angles and efficient internal nozzle performance. A cavity divergence angle greater than 10 was detrimental to thrust vector angle. Shortening the cavity length improved internal nozzle performance with a small penalty to thrust vector angle. Contrary to expectations, a variable expansion ratio did not improve thrust efficiency at the flight conditions investigated.

  2. Investigation of convergent-divergent nozzles applicable to reduced-power supersonic cruise aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrier, B. L.; Re, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was conducted of isolated convergent-divergent nozzles to determine the effect of several design parameters on nozzle performance. Tests were conducted using high pressure air for propulsion simulation at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 2.86 at an angle of attack of 0 deg and at nozzle pressure ratios from jet off to 46.0. Three power settings (dry, partial afterburning, and maximum afterburning), three nozzle lengths, and nozzle expansion ratios from 1.22 to 2.24 were investigated. In addition, the effects of nozzle throat radius and a cusp in the external boattail geometry were studied. The results of this study indicate that, for nozzles operating near design conditions, increasing nozzle length increases nozzle thrust-minus-drag performance. Nozzle throat radius and an external boattail cusp had negligible effects on nozzle drag or internal performance.

  3. AIRTV: Broadband Direct to Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbello, R.; Stone, R.; Bennett, S. B.; Bertenyi, E.

    2002-01-01

    Airlines have been continuously upgrading their wide-body, long-haul aircraft with IFE (in-flight entertainment) systems that can support from 12 to 24 channels of video entertainment as well as provide the infrastructure to enable in-seat delivery of email and internet services. This is a direct consequence of increased passenger demands for improved in-flight services along with the expectations that broadband delivery systems capable of providing live entertainment (news, sports, financial information, etc.) and high speed data delivery will soon be available. The recent events of Sept. 11 have slowed the airline's upgrade of their IFE systems, but have also highlighted the compelling need for broadband aeronautical delivery systems to include operational and safety information. Despite the impact of these events, it is estimated that by 2005 more than 3000 long haul aircraft (servicing approximately 1 billion passengers annually) will be fully equipped with modern IFE systems. Current aircraft data delivery systems, which use either Inmarsat or NATS, are lacking in bandwidth and consequently are unsuitable to satisfy passenger demands for broadband email/internet services or the airlines' burgeoning data requirements. Present live video delivery services are limited to regional coverage and are not readily expandable to global or multiregional service. Faced with a compelling market demand for high data transport to aircraft, AirTV has been developing a broadband delivery system that will meet both passengers' and airlines' needs. AirTV is a global content delivery system designed to provide a range of video programming and data services to commercial airlines. When AirTV is operational in 2004, it will provide a broadband connection directly to the aircraft, delivering live video entertainment, internet/email service and essential operational and safety data. The system has been designed to provide seamless global service to all airline routes except for those

  4. Essentials of aircraft armaments

    CERN Document Server

    Kaushik, Mrinal

    2017-01-01

    This book aims to provide a complete exposure about armaments from their design to launch from the combat aircraft. The book details modern ammunition and their tactical roles in warfare. The proposed book discusses aerodynamics, propulsion, structural as well as navigation, control, and guidance of aircraft armament. It also introduces the various types of ammunition developed by different countries and their changing trends. The book imparts knowledge in the field of design, and development of aircraft armaments to aerospace engineers and covers the role of the United Nations in peacekeeping and disarmament. The book will be very useful to researchers, students, and professionals working in design and manufacturing of aircraft armaments. The book will also serve air force and naval aspirants, and those interested in working on defence research and developments organizations. .

  5. Aircraft Fire Protection Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Navy Aircraft Protection Laboratory provides complete test support for all Navy air vehicle fire protection systems. The facility allows for the simulation of a...

  6. Aircraft Fire Protection Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Navy Aircraft Protection Laboratory provides complete test support for all Navy air vehicle fire protection systems.The facility allows for the simulation of a...

  7. Solar thermal aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  8. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-06-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  9. Aerodynamic Study on Supersonic Flows in High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi KATANODA; Takeshi MATSUOKA; Seiji KURODA; Jin KAWAKITA; Hirotaka FUKANUMA; Kazuyasu MATSUO

    2005-01-01

    @@ To clarify the characteristics of gas flow in high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun, aerodynamic research is performed using a special gun. The gun has rectangular cross-sectional area and sidewalls of optical glass to visualize the internal flow. The gun consists of a supersonic nozzle with the design Mach number of 2.0 followed by a straight passage called barrel. Compressed dry air up to 0.78 MPa is used as a process gas instead of combustion gas which is used in a commercial HVOF gun. The high-speed gas flows with shock waves in the gun and jets are visualized by schlieren technique. Complicated internal and external flow-fields containing various types of shock wave as well as expansion wave are visualized.

  10. Aircraft Based Imaging Probe for the Study of Icing Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Icing environments are of great concern in commercial and military aviation. An aircraft-based, imaging probe is being proposed for the reliable and accurate...

  11. Dispersion of Own Frequency of Ion-Dipole by Supersonic Transverse Wave in Solid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minasyan V.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available First, we predict an existence of transverse electromagnetic field formed by supersonic transverse wave in solid. This electromagnetic wave acquires frequency and speed of sound, and it propagates along of direction propagation of supersonic wave. We also show that own frequency of ion-dipole depends on frequency of supersonic transverse wave.

  12. Automatic aircraft recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmam, Hatem; Kim, Jijoong

    2002-08-01

    Automatic aircraft recognition is very complex because of clutter, shadows, clouds, self-occlusion and degraded imaging conditions. This paper presents an aircraft recognition system, which assumes from the start that the image is possibly degraded, and implements a number of strategies to overcome edge fragmentation and distortion. The current vision system employs a bottom up approach, where recognition begins by locating image primitives (e.g., lines and corners), which are then combined in an incremental fashion into larger sets of line groupings using knowledge about aircraft, as viewed from a generic viewpoint. Knowledge about aircraft is represented in the form of whole/part shape description and the connectedness property, and is embedded in production rules, which primarily aim at finding instances of the aircraft parts in the image and checking the connectedness property between the parts. Once a match is found, a confidence score is assigned and as evidence in support of an aircraft interpretation is accumulated, the score is increased proportionally. Finally a selection of the resulting image interpretations with the highest scores, is subjected to competition tests, and only non-ambiguous interpretations are allowed to survive. Experimental results demonstrating the effectiveness of the current recognition system are given.

  13. Simulation of underexpanded supersonic jet flows with chemical reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Debin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To achieve a detailed understanding of underexpanded supersonic jet structures influenced by afterburning and other flow conditions, the underexpanded turbulent supersonic jet with and without combustions are investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD method. A program based on a total variation diminishing (TVD methodology capable of predicting complex shocks is created to solve the axisymmetric expanded Navier–Stokes equations containing transport equations of species. The finite-rate ratio model is employed to handle species sources in chemical reactions. CFD solutions indicate that the structure of underexpanded jet is typically influenced by the pressure ratio and afterburning. The shock reflection distance and maximum value of Mach number in the first shock cell increase with pressure ratio. Chemical reactions for the rocket exhaust mostly exist in the mixing layer of supersonic jet flows. This tends to reduce the intensity of shocks existing in the jet, responding to the variation of thermal parameters.

  14. Simulation of underexpanded supersonic jet flows with chemical reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Debin; Yu Yong; Niu Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    To achieve a detailed understanding of underexpanded supersonic jet structures influenced by afterburning and other flow conditions, the underexpanded turbulent supersonic jet with and without combustions are investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. A program based on a total variation diminishing (TVD) methodology capable of predicting complex shocks is created to solve the axisymmetric expanded Navier-Stokes equations containing transport equations of species. The finite-rate ratio model is employed to handle species sources in chemical reactions. CFD solutions indicate that the structure of underexpanded jet is typically influenced by the pressure ratio and afterburning. The shock reflection distance and maximum value of Mach number in the first shock cell increase with pressure ratio. Chemical reactions for the rocket exhaust mostly exist in the mixing layer of supersonic jet flows. This tends to reduce the intensity of shocks existing in the jet, responding to the variation of thermal parameters.

  15. The Turbulent Dynamo in Highly Compressible Supersonic Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph; Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R G

    2014-01-01

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly-compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early Universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024^3 cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = nu/eta = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm >= 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm_crit = 129 (+43, -31), showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present a...

  16. Study of the shock structure of supersonic, dual, coaxial, jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. H.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, H. D. [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    The shock structure of supersonic, dual, coaxial jet is experimentally investigated. Eight different kinds of coaxial, dual nozzles are employed to observe the major features of the near field shock structure of the supersonic, coaxial, dual jets. Four convergent-divergent supersonic nozzles having the Mach number of 2.0 and 3.0, and are used to compare the coaxial jet flows discharging from two sonic nozzles. The primary pressure ratio is changed in the range between 4.0 and 10.0 and the assistant jet pressure ratio from 1.0 to 4.0. The results obtained show that the impinging angle, nozzle geometry and pressure ratio significantly affect the near field shock structure, Mach disk location and Mach disk diameter. The annular shock system is found depending the assistant and primary jet pressure ratios.

  17. Supersonically blown nylon-6 nanofibers entangled with graphene flakes for water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Gun; Kim, Do-Yeon; Mali, Mukund G.; Al-Deyab, Salem S.; Swihart, Mark T.; Yoon, Sam S.

    2015-11-01

    Water purification membranes, capable of purifying a few to tens of milliliters of aqueous methylene blue solution in a minute, were produced by supersonically blowing graphene flakes with a nylon-6 polymeric solution. The solution-blown nylon-6 nanofibers became entangled with graphene flakes thereby locking the graphene flakes within the frame of the bendable two-dimensional film structure. This method, which yielded a 5 × 7 cm2-sized membrane in less than 10 seconds, is commercially viable owing to fast fabrication and scalability. We show that our water purification device allows a flow rate range of 0.3-4 L h-1 with a membrane area of just 5 cm2, under a pressure difference of 0.5-3.5 bar. If the membrane were scaled up to 0.5 m2, it could provide 300-4000 L h-1 flow rate, an ample supply for home use.Water purification membranes, capable of purifying a few to tens of milliliters of aqueous methylene blue solution in a minute, were produced by supersonically blowing graphene flakes with a nylon-6 polymeric solution. The solution-blown nylon-6 nanofibers became entangled with graphene flakes thereby locking the graphene flakes within the frame of the bendable two-dimensional film structure. This method, which yielded a 5 × 7 cm2-sized membrane in less than 10 seconds, is commercially viable owing to fast fabrication and scalability. We show that our water purification device allows a flow rate range of 0.3-4 L h-1 with a membrane area of just 5 cm2, under a pressure difference of 0.5-3.5 bar. If the membrane were scaled up to 0.5 m2, it could provide 300-4000 L h-1 flow rate, an ample supply for home use. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06549f

  18. European Commission research on aircraft impacts in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amanatidis, G.T.; Angeletti, G. [European Commission (CEC), Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-12-31

    Aircraft engines release in the troposphere and lower stratosphere a number of chemical compounds (NO{sub x}, CO{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}O, hydrocarbons, sulphur, soot, etc.) which could potentially affect the ozone layer and the climate through chemical, dynamical and radiative changes. The global amount of gases and particles emitted by current subsonic and projected supersonic aircraft fleets can be estimated, but significant uncertainties remain about the fate of these emissions in the atmosphere. The European efforts concerning these potential atmospheric impacts of aircraft emissions are conducted by the Environment and Climate Research Programme of the European Commission (EC) as well as by national programmes of the Member States of the European Union (EU). The European research activities in this field, are described, divided for practical reasons in two periods. The first includes activities supported under the 3. Framework Programme for R and D activities which covered the period from 1992 up to 1996, while the second period has started in early 1996 and is supported under the 4. Framework Programme. (R.P.) 6 refs.

  19. Application of slender wing benefits to military aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polhamus, E. C.

    1983-01-01

    A review is provided of aerodynamic research conducted at the Langley Research Center with respect to the application of slender wing benefits in the design of high-speed military aircraft, taking into account the supersonic performance and leading-edge vortex flow associated with very highly sweptback wings. The beginning of the development of modern classical swept wing jet aircraft is related to the German Me 262 project during World War II. In the U.S., a theoretical study conducted by Jones (1945) pointed out the advantages of the sweptback wing concept. Developments with respect to variable sweep wings are discussed, taking into account early research in 1946, a joint program of the U.S. with the United Kingdom, the tactical aircraft concept, and the important part which the Langley variable-sweep research program played in the development of the F-111, F-14, and B-1. Attention is also given to hybrid wings, vortex flow theory development, and examples of flow design technology.

  20. Supersonic stall flutter of high-speed fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Stevans, W.; Jutras, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical model is proposed for predicting the onset of supersonic stall bending flutter in high-speed rotors. The analysis is based on a modified two-dimensional, compressible, unsteady actuator disk theory. The stability boundary predicted by the analysis is shown to be in good agreement with the measured boundary of a high speed fan. The prediction that the flutter mode would be a forward traveling wave sensitive to wheel speed and aerodynamic loading is confirmed by experimental measurements. In addition, the analysis shows that reduced frequency and dynamic head also play a significant role in establishing the supersonic stall bending flutter boundary of an unshrouded fan.

  1. Continuing Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics for Supersonic Retropropulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauerhamer, Daniel Guy; Trumble, Kerry A.; Kleb, Bil; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Edquist, Karl T.

    2011-01-01

    A large step in the validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for Supersonic Retropropulsion (SRP) is shown through the comparison of three Navier-Stokes solvers (DPLR, FUN3D, and OVERFLOW) and wind tunnel test results. The test was designed specifically for CFD validation and was conducted in the Langley supersonic 4 x4 Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel and includes variations in the number of nozzles, Mach and Reynolds numbers, thrust coefficient, and angles of orientation. Code-to-code and code-to-test comparisons are encouraging and possible error sources are discussed.

  2. Subsonic and Supersonic Jet Noise Calculations Using PSE and DNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, P.; Owis, Farouk

    1999-01-01

    Noise radiated from a supersonic jet is computed using the Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE) method. The evolution of the instability waves inside the jet is computed using the PSE method and the noise radiated to the far field from these waves is calculated by solving the wave equation using the Fourier transform method. We performed the computations for a cold supersonic jet of Mach number 2.1 which is excited by disturbances with Strouhal numbers St=.2 and .4 and the azimuthal wavenumber m=l. Good agreement in the sound pressure level are observed between the computed and the measured (Troutt and McLaughlin 1980) results.

  3. Situational awareness in the commercial aircraft cockpit - A cognitive perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Marilyn J.; Pew, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    A cognitive theory is presented that has relevance for the definition and assessment of situational awareness in the cockpit. The theory asserts that maintenance of situation awareness is a constructive process that demands mental resources in competition with ongoing task performance. Implications of this perspective for assessing and improving situational awareness are discussed. It is concluded that the goal of inserting advanced technology into any system is that it results in an increase in the effectiveness, timeliness, and safety with which the system's activities can be accomplished. The inherent difficulties of the multitask situation are very often compounded by the introduction of automation. To maximize situational awareness, the dynamics and capabilities of such technologies must be designed with thorough respect for the dynamics and capabilities of human information-processing.

  4. Commercial Aircraft Airframe Fuel Systems Survey and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    VALVE M~l’ ® FE(L FE06Cu~i 5u~jt~~ vat~FUEIL I.AL r(E PUE L FUEL f PUt GE VALVI AADTIV FWWV STAUIFBY Boa 7 HILL~E CAV 38 GAL U JILL ZAM StOOP VCA’r...to FAA. 3. Fiorentino, A., De Saro, R., and Franz , T., An Assessment of the Use Of Antimisting Fuel in Turbofan Engines, United Technologies

  5. Cabin Air Quality in Commercial Aircraft : Exposure, Symptoms and Signs

    OpenAIRE

    Lindgren, Torsten

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the dissertation was to study the cabin environment, and identify personal and environmental risk factors, associated with symptoms, and perception of cabin air quality. Another objective was to study if ban of smoking, and increased relative air humidity on intercontinental flights, could have a beneficial health effect. The studies were performed among Scandinavian cabin crew in one Airline Company. Office workers from the same company served as controls. Exposure differed ...

  6. Mission Planning for Unmanned Aircraft with Genetic Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karl Damkjær

    Unmanned aircraft invokes different feelings in people. Some see ruthless killing machines, other see a potential for fast and cheap distribution of goods, yet other see flexible and convenient emergency rescue drones. Regardless, advances and miniaturization in motors, sensors, and computer...... processing power have taken the unmanned aircraft from being a military application to the commercial sector and even into the hands of hobbyists. Still, the enthusiastic interest in the new technology and its prospective advantages overshadows the fact that it mainly sees application where the aircraft...... are mostly under human command, just like remote controlled planes have been for years. Actually the revolution of the drones is not so much a revolution of the unmanned aircraft as it is a digital control revolution. Only a few years ago, hopeful remote-control pilots had to invest countless hours...

  7. The Impacts of Rising Temperatures on Aircraft Takeoff Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffel, Ethan; Thompson, Terence R.; Horton, Radley M.

    2017-01-01

    Steadily rising mean and extreme temperatures as a result of climate change will likely impact the air transportation system over the coming decades. As air temperatures rise at constant pressure, air density declines, resulting in less lift generation by an aircraft wing at a given airspeed and potentially imposing a weight restriction on departing aircraft. This study presents a general model to project future weight restrictions across a fleet of aircraft with different takeoff weights operating at a variety of airports. We construct performance models for five common commercial aircraft and 19 major airports around the world and use projections of daily temperatures from the CMIP5 model suite under the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 emissions scenarios to calculate required hourly weight restriction. We find that on average, 10 - 30% of annual flights departing at the time of daily maximum temperature may require some weight restriction below their maximum takeoff weights, with mean restrictions ranging from 0.5 to 4% of total aircraft payload and fuel capacity by mid- to late century. Both mid-sized and large aircraft are affected, and airports with short runways and high temperatures, or those at high elevations, will see the largest impacts. Our results suggest that weight restriction may impose a non-trivial cost on airlines and impact aviation operations around the world and that adaptation may be required in aircraft design, airline schedules, and/or runway lengths.

  8. Review of evolving trends in blended wing body aircraft design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonkwo, Paul; Smith, Howard

    2016-04-01

    The desire to produce environmentally friendly aircraft that is aerodynamically efficient and capable of conveying large number of passengers over long ranges at reduced direct operating cost led aircraft designers to develop the Blended Wing Body (BWB) aircraft concept. The BWB aircraft represents a paradigm shift in the design of aircraft. The design provides aerodynamics and environmental benefits and is suitable for the integration of advanced systems and concepts like laminar flow technology, jet flaps and distributed propulsion. However, despite these benefits, the BWB is yet to be developed for commercial air transport due to several challenges. This paper reviews emerging trends in BWB aircraft design highlighting design challenges that have hindered the development of a BWB passenger transport aircraft. The study finds that in order to harness the advantages and reduce the deficiencies of a tightly coupled configuration like the BWB, a multidisciplinary design synthesis optimisation should be conducted with good handling and ride quality as objective functions within acceptable direct operating cost and noise bounds.

  9. Aerial imaging with manned aircraft for precision agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the last two decades, numerous commercial and custom-built airborne imaging systems have been developed and deployed for diverse remote sensing applications, including precision agriculture. More recently, unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) have emerged as a versatile and cost-effective platform f...

  10. Investigation of Practical Flight Control Systems for Small Aircraft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falkena, W.

    2012-01-01

    Personal air transportation utilizing small aircraft is a market that is expected to grow significantly in the near future. However, seventy times more accidents occur in this segment as compared with the commercial aviation sector. The majority of these accidents is related to handling and control

  11. Aircraft Operations Classification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Charles; Zhu, Weihong

    2001-01-01

    Accurate data is important in the aviation planning process. In this project we consider systems for measuring aircraft activity at airports. This would include determining the type of aircraft such as jet, helicopter, single engine, and multiengine propeller. Some of the issues involved in deploying technologies for monitoring aircraft operations are cost, reliability, and accuracy. In addition, the system must be field portable and acceptable at airports. A comparison of technologies was conducted and it was decided that an aircraft monitoring system should be based upon acoustic technology. A multimedia relational database was established for the study. The information contained in the database consists of airport information, runway information, acoustic records, photographic records, a description of the event (takeoff, landing), aircraft type, and environmental information. We extracted features from the time signal and the frequency content of the signal. A multi-layer feed-forward neural network was chosen as the classifier. Training and testing results were obtained. We were able to obtain classification results of over 90 percent for training and testing for takeoff events.

  12. A trade-off analysis design tool. Aircraft interior noise-motion/passenger satisfaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, I. D.

    1977-01-01

    A design tool was developed to enhance aircraft passenger satisfaction. The effect of aircraft interior motion and noise on passenger comfort and satisfaction was modelled. Effects of individual aircraft noise sources were accounted for, and the impact of noise on passenger activities and noise levels to safeguard passenger hearing were investigated. The motion noise effect models provide a means for tradeoff analyses between noise and motion variables, and also provide a framework for optimizing noise reduction among noise sources. Data for the models were collected onboard commercial aircraft flights and specially scheduled tests.

  13. Observations on the non-mixed length and unsteady shock motion in a two dimensional supersonic ejector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Srisha M. V.; Jagadeesh, Gopalan

    2014-03-01

    Key features that drive the operation of a supersonic ejector are the complex gasdynamic interactions of the primary and secondary flows within a variable area duct and the phenomenon of compressible turbulent mixing between them, which have to be understood at a fundamental level. An experimental study has been carried out on the mixing characteristics of a two dimensional supersonic ejector with a supersonic primary flow (air) of Mach number 2.48 and the secondary flow (subsonic) which is induced from the ambient. The non-mixed length, which is the length within the ejector for which the primary and secondary flow remain visually distinct is used to characterize the mixing in the ejector. The operating pressures, flow rates and wall static pressures along the ejector have been measured. Two flow visualization tools have been implemented—time resolved schlieren and laser scattering flow visualization. An important contribution has been the development of in-house image processing algorithms on the MATLAB platform to detect the non-mixed length from the schlieren and laser scattering images. The ratio of mass flow rates of the secondary flow to primary flow (entrainment ratio) has been varied in a range of 0.15-0.69 for two locations of the primary nozzle in the ejector duct. Representative cases have been computed using commercial CFD tool (Fluent) to supplement the experiments. Significant outcomes of the study are—the non-mixed length quantified from the flow visualization images is observed to lie within 4.5 to 5.2 times the height of the mixing duct which is confirmed by the wall static pressure profiles. The flow through the supersonic ejector in the mixed regime is explained using corroborative evidences from different diagnostic tools. A reduction of the non-mixed length by 46.7% is observed at operating conditions when the nozzle is sufficiently overexpanded. The disturbance caused to the mixing layer due to unsteady shock-boundary layer interactions

  14. 76 FR 45011 - Control of Air Pollution From Aircraft and Aircraft Engines; Proposed Emission Standards and Test...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ...-7742. DOI: 10.1021/es101325r. The formation of fine particulate matter, i.e., PM 2.5 , from emission of... to the Chicago Convention).\\10\\ \\10\\ ICAO, ``Aircraft Engine Emissions,'' International Standards and... docket EPA- HQ-OAR-2010-0687, May 10, 2011. Table 1--Current National NOX Emissions From Commercial...

  15. SIMULATION OF THE LASER DISCHARGE IN A SUPERSONIC GAS FLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tropina, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A heat model of the laser discharge in a supersonic turbulent gas flow has been developed. A numerical investigation of the error of the method of velocity measurements, which is based on the nitrogen molecules excitation, has been carried out. It is shown that fast gas heating by the discharge causes the velocity profiles deformation.

  16. Experimental study of mixing enhancement using pylon in supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Manmohan; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2016-01-01

    The Supersonic Combustion Ramjet (SCRAMJET) engine has been recognized as one of the most promising air breathing propulsion system for the supersonic/hypersonic flight mission requirements. Mixing and combustion of fuel inside scramjet engine is one of the major challenging tasks. In the current study the main focus has been to increase the penetration and mixing of the secondary jet inside the test chamber at supersonic speeds. In view of this, experiments are conducted to evaluate the effect of pylon on the mixing of secondary jet injection into supersonic mainstream flow at Mach 1.65. Two different pylons are investigated and the results are compared with those obtained by normal injection from a flat plate. The mixing studies are performed by varying the height of the pylon while keeping all other parameters the same. The study mainly focused on analyzing the area of spread and penetration depth achieved by different injection schemes based on the respective parameters. The measurements involved Mie scattering visualization and the flow features are analyzed using Schlieren images. The penetration height and spread area are the two parameters that are used for analyzing and comparing the performance of the pylons. It is observed that the secondary jet injection carried out from behind the big pylon resulted in maximum penetration and spread area of the jet as compared to the small pylon geometry. Moreover it is also evident that for obtaining maximum spreading and penetration of the jet, the same needs to be achieved at the injection location.

  17. NASA F-16XL supersonic laminar flow control program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of the NASA supersonic laminar flow control program are provided. Successful application of laminar flow control to a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) offers significant benefits in reductions of take-off gross weight, mission fuel burn, cruise drag, structural temperatures, engine size, emissions, and sonic boom. The ultimate economic success of the proposed HSCT may depend on the successful adaption of laminar flow control, which offers the single most significant potential improvements in lift drag ratio (L/D) of all the aerodynamic technologies under consideration. The F-16XL Supersonic Laminar Flow Control (SLFC) Experiment was conceived based on the encouraging results of in-house and NASA supported industry studies to determine if laminar flow control is feasible for the HSCT. The primary objective is to achieve extensive laminar flow (50-60 percent chord) on a highly swept supersonic wing. Data obtained from the flight test will be used to validate existing Euler and Navier Stokes aerodynamic codes and transition prediction boundary layer stability codes. These validated codes and developed design methodology will be delivered to industry for their use in designing supersonic laminar flow control wings. Results from this experiment will establish preliminary suction system design criteria enabling industry to better size the suction system and develop improved estimates of system weight, fuel volume loss due to wing ducting, turbocompressor power requirements, etc. so that benefits and penalties can be more accurately assessed.

  18. Multiresolution analysis of density fluctuation in supersonic mixing layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Due to the difficulties in measuring supersonic density field, the multiresolution analysis of supersonic mixing layer based on experimental images is still a formidable challenge. By utilizing the recently developed nanoparticle based planar laser scattering method, the density field of a supersonic mixing layer was measured at high spatiotemporal resolution. According to the dynamic behavior of coherent structures, the multiresolution characteristics of density fluctuation signals and density field images were studied based on Taylor’s hypothesis of space-time conversion and wavelet analysis. The wavelet coefficients reflect the characteristics of density fluctuation signals at different scales, and the detailed coefficients reflect the differences of approximation at adjacent levels. The density fluctuation signals of supersonic mixing layer differ from the periodic sine signal and exhibit similarity to the fractal Koch signal. The similarity at different scales reveals the fractal characteristic of mixing layer flowfield. The two-dimensional wavelet decomposition and reconstruction of density field images extract the approximate and detailed signals at different scales, which effectively resolve the characteristic structures of the flowfield at different scales.

  19. A flamelet model for turbulent diffusion combustion in supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE; ChunHian

    2010-01-01

    In order to develop a turbulent diffusion combustion model for supersonic flow, the physical argument of the extension of the flamelet model to supersonic flow was presented, and the flow field of a hydrogen/air diffusion combustion generated by axisymmetric supersonic jets was numerically simulated by employing the flamelet model. Using the experimental data, value of the model coefficient of scalar dissipation in the flamelet model was revised specifically for supersonic flow. The computational results of the modified flamelet model were compared with the experimental results, and it was indicated that the precision of the modified flamelet model was satisfying. Based on the numerical results and flamelet theory, the influence mechanisms of turbulence fluctuation on the average state equation and chemical reaction rate were studied for the first time. It was found that the fluctuation correlation of species mass fractions and temperature has little effect on the averaged gas state equation; the temperature fluctuation decreases the product of H2O, but its effect is small; the fluctuation of species mass fractions increases the product of H2O in the region close to oxidizer while decreases the product of H2O in other regions; the fluctuation correlation of species mass fractions and temperature largely decreases the product of H2O.

  20. Toward Active Control of Noise from Hot Supersonic Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    applied a double divergence directly to the incompressible Reynolds stress giving Ö U’UI dxgJ = -£ijk(sijUJk + ryWfc). (1) This neglected...SUPERSONIC JETS | QUARTERLY RPT. 6 ^ EXPERIMENTAL FACILITY j^i;r\\’ii Mo/ P I V • Page 6 • Prev • Wart • Last • Full Screen • Close

  1. Advanced Aircraft Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar Prince

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been long debate on “advanced aircraft material” from past decades & researchers too came out with lots of new advanced material like composites and different aluminum alloys. Now days a new advancement that is in great talk is third generation Aluminum-lithium alloy. Newest Aluminum-lithium alloys are found out to have low density, higher elastic modulus, greater stiffness, greater cryogenic toughness, high resistance to fatigue cracking and improved corrosion resistance properties over the earlier used aircraft material as mentioned in Table 3 [1-5]. Comparison had been made with nowadays used composite material and is found out to be more superior then that

  2. AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE HANGAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GEAMBASU Gabriel George

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the maintenance process that is done on an airplane, at a certain period of time, or after a number of flight hours or cycles and describes the checks performed behind each inspection. The first part of research describes the aircraft maintenance process that has to be done after an updated maintenance manual according with aircraft type, followed by a short introduction about maintenance hangar. The second part of the paper presents a hangar design with a foldable roof and walls, which can be folded or extended, over an airplane when a maintenance process is done, or depending on weather condition.

  3. The Impact of Structural Vibration on Flying Qualities of a Supersonic Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, David L.; Jackson, E. Bruce; Buttrill, Carey S.; Adams, William M.

    2001-01-01

    A piloted simulation experiment has been conducted in the NASA Langley Visual/Motion Simulator facility to address the impact of dynamic aeroelastic effects on flying qualities of a supersonic transport. The intent of this experiment was to determine the effectiveness of several measures that may be taken to reduce the impact of aircraft flexibility on piloting tasks. Potential solutions that were examined included structural stiffening, active vibration suppression, and elimination of visual cues associated with the elastic modes. A series of parametric configurations was evaluated by six test pilots for several types of maneuver tasks. During the investigation, several incidents were encountered in which cockpit vibrations due to elastic modes fed back into the control stick through involuntary motions of the pilot's upper body and arm. The phenomenon, referred to as biodynamic coupling, is evidenced by a resonant peak in the power spectrum of the pilot's stick inputs at a structural mode frequency. The results of the investigation indicate that structural stiffening and compensation of the visual display were of little benefit in alleviating the impact of elastic dynamics on the piloting tasks, while increased damping and elimination of control-effector excitation of the lowest frequency modes offered great improvements when applied in sufficient degree.

  4. Study of advanced composite structural design concepts for an arrow wing supersonic cruise configuration, task 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    A structural design study was conducted to assess the relative merits of structural concepts using advanced composite materials for an advanced supersonic aircraft cruising at Mach 2.7. The configuration and structural arrangement developed during Task I and II of the study, was used as the baseline configuration. Allowable stresses and strains were established for boron and advanced graphite fibers based on projected fiber properties available in the next decade. Structural concepts were designed and analyzed using graphite polyimide and boron polyimide, applied to stiffened panels and conventional sandwich panels. The conventional sandwich panels were selected as the structural concept to be used on the wing structure. The upper and lower surface panels of the Task I arrow wing were redesigned using high-strength graphite polyimide sandwich panels over the titanium spars and ribs. The ATLAS computer system was used as the basis for stress analysis and resizing the surface panels using the loads from the Task II study, without adjustment for change in aeroelastic deformation. The flutter analysis indicated a decrease in the flutter speed compared to the baseline titanium wing design. The flutter analysis indicated a decrease in the flutter speed compared to the baseline titanium wing design. The flutter speed was increased to that of the titanium wing, with a weight penalty less than that of the metallic airplane.

  5. Flight-measured lift and drag characteristics of a large, flexible, high supersonic cruise airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz, H. H.

    1977-01-01

    Flight measurements of lift, drag, and angle of attack were obtained for the XB-70 airplane, a large, flexible, high supersonic cruise airplane. This airplane had a length of over 57 meters, a takeoff gross mass of over 226,800 kilograms, and a design cruise speed of Mach 3 at an altitude of 21,340 meters. The performance measurements were made at Mach numbers from 0.72 to 3.07 and altitudes from approximately 7620 meters to 21,340 meters. The measurements were made to provide data for evaluating the techniques presently being used to design and predict the performance of aircraft in this category. Such performance characteristics as drag polars, lift-curve slopes, and maximum lift-to-drag ratios were derived from the flight data. The base drag of the airplane, changes in airplane drag with changes in engine power setting at transonic speeds, and the magnitude of the drag components of the propulsion system are also discussed.

  6. A Study of Vehicle Structural Layouts in Post-WWII Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensmeier, Mark D.; Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, results of a study of structural layouts of post-WWII aircraft are presented. This study was undertaken to provide the background information necessary to determine typical layouts, design practices, and industry trends in aircraft structural design. Design decisions are often predicated not on performance-related criteria, but rather on such factors as manufacturability, maintenance access, and of course cost. For this reason, a thorough understanding of current best practices in the industry is required as an input for the design optimization process. To determine these best practices and industry trends, a large number of aircraft structural cutaway illustrations were analyzed for five different aircraft categories (commercial transport jets, business jets, combat jet aircraft, single engine propeller aircraft, and twin-engine propeller aircraft). Several aspects of wing design and fuselage design characteristics are presented here for the commercial transport and combat aircraft categories. A great deal of commonality was observed for transport structure designs over a range of eras and manufacturers. A much higher degree of variability in structural designs was observed for the combat aircraft, though some discernable trends were observed as well.

  7. Multidisciplinary aircraft conceptual design optimization considering fidelity uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Daniel

    Aircraft conceptual design traditionally utilizes simplified analysis methods and empirical equations to establish the basic layout of new aircraft. Applying optimization methods to aircraft conceptual design may yield solutions that are found to violate constraints when more sophisticated analysis methods are introduced. The designer's confidence that proposed conceptual designs will meet their performance targets is limited when conventional optimization approaches are utilized. Therefore, there is a need for an optimization approach that takes into account the uncertainties that arise when traditional analysis methods are used in aircraft conceptual design optimization. This research introduces a new aircraft conceptual design optimization approach that utilizes the concept of Reliability Based Design Optimization (RBDO). RyeMDO, a framework for multi-objective, multidisciplinary RBDO was developed for this purpose. The performance and effectiveness of the RBDO-MDO approaches implemented in RyeMDO were evaluated to identify the most promising approaches for aircraft conceptual design optimization. Additionally, an approach for quantifying the errors introduced by approximate analysis methods was developed. The approach leverages available historical data to quantify the uncertainties introduced by approximate analysis methods in two engineering case studies: the conceptual design optimization of an aircraft wing box structure and the conceptual design optimization of a commercial aircraft. The case studies were solved with several of the most promising RBDO-MDO integrated approaches. The proposed approach yields more conservative solutions and estimates the risk associated with each solution, enabling designers to reduce the likelihood that conceptual aircraft designs will fail to meet objectives later in the design process.

  8. Aircraft Fuel Systems Career Ladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    type fittings remove and install fuel cells clean work areas inspect aircraft for safety pin installation purge tanks or cells using blow purge method...INSPECT AIRCRAFT FOR SAFETY PIN INSTALLATION 84 H254 PURGE TANKS OR CELLS USING BLOW PURGE METHOD 83 H227 CHECK AIRCRAFT FOR LIQUID OXYGEN (LOX...H243 INSPECT AIRCRAFT FOR SAFETY PIN INSTALLATION 52 M483 MIX SEALANTS BY HAND 48 K372 CONNECT OR DISCONNECT WIGGINS TYPE FITTINGS 48 H236 DISCONNECT

  9. Thermal Design and Analysis of the Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test Vehicle for the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropietro, A. J.; Pauken, Michael; Sunada, Eric; Gray, Sandria

    2013-01-01

    The thermal design and analysis of the experimental Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) vehicle is presented. The SFDT vehicle is currently being designed as a platform to help demonstrate key technologies for NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project. The LDSD project is charged by NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) with the task of advancing the state of the art in Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems by developing and testing three new technologies required for landing heavier payloads on Mars. The enabling technologies under development consist of a large 33.5 meter diameter Supersonic Ringsail (SSRS) parachute and two different types of Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) devices - a robotic class, SIAD-R, that inflates to a 6 meter diameter torus, and an exploration class, SIAD-E, that inflates to an 8 meter diameter isotensoid. As part of the technology development effort, the various elements of the new supersonic decelerator system must be tested in a Mars-like environment. This is currently planned to be accomplished by sending a series of SFDT vehicles into Earth's stratosphere. Each SFDT vehicle will be lifted to a stable float altitude by a large helium carrier balloon. Once at altitude, the SFDT vehicles will be released from their carrier balloon and spun up via spin motors to provide trajectory stability. An onboard third stage solid rocket motor will propel each test vehicle to supersonic flight in the upper atmosphere. After main engine burnout, each vehicle will be despun and testing of the deceleration system will begin: first an inflatable decelerator will be deployed around the aeroshell to increase the drag surface area, and then the large parachute will be deployed to continue the deceleration and return the vehicle back to the Earth's surface. The SFDT vehicle thermal system must passively protect the vehicle structure and its components from cold temperatures experienced during the

  10. Noise Generation by Fans with Supersonic Tip Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glegg, Stewart; Envia, Edmane (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Fan noise continues to be a significant issue for commercial aircraft engines and there still exists a requirement for improved understanding of the fundamental issues associated with fan noise source mechanisms. At the present time, most of the prediction methods identify the dominant acoustic sources to be associated with the stator vanes or blade trailing edges which are downstream of the fan face. However recent studies have shown that acoustic waves are significantly attenuated as they propagate upstream through a rotor, and if the appropriate corrections are applied, sound radiation from the engine inlet is significantly underpredicted. The prediction models can only be applied to fans with subsonic tip speeds. In contrast, most aircraft engines have fan tip speeds which are transonic and this implies an even higher attenuation for upstream propagating acoustic waves. Consequently understanding how sound propagates upstream through the fan is an important, and not well understood phenomena. The objective of this study is to provide improved insight into the upstream propagation effects through a rotor which are relevant to full scale engines. The focus of this study is on broadband fan noise generated by boundary layer turbulence interacting with the trailing edges of the fan blades. If this source mechanism is important upstream of the fan, the sound must propagate upstream through a transonic non uniform flow which includes large gradients and non linearities. Developing acoustic propagation models in this type of flow is challenging and currently limited to low frequency applications, where the frequency is of the same order as the blade passing frequency of the fan. For trailing edge noise, much higher frequencies are relevant and so a suitable approach needs to be developed, which is not limited by an unacceptably large computational effort. In this study we are in the process of developing a computational method which applies for the high frequencies of

  11. Aircraft Emissions Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    sample from each trap through a heated (1500C) six-port valve ’ Carle Instruments Model 5621) and onto the analytical column. The coLoponents in each...Environmental Protection, Vol. II. Aircraft Engine Emissions, Int. Civil Aviation Organ., 1981. 7. Nebel , G. J., "Benzene in Auto Exhaust," J. Air Poll

  12. Aircraft noise prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippone, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    This contribution addresses the state-of-the-art in the field of aircraft noise prediction, simulation and minimisation. The point of view taken in this context is that of comprehensive models that couple the various aircraft systems with the acoustic sources, the propagation and the flight trajectories. After an exhaustive review of the present predictive technologies in the relevant fields (airframe, propulsion, propagation, aircraft operations, trajectory optimisation), the paper addresses items for further research and development. Examples are shown for several airplanes, including the Airbus A319-100 (CFM engines), the Bombardier Dash8-Q400 (PW150 engines, Dowty R408 propellers) and the Boeing B737-800 (CFM engines). Predictions are done with the flight mechanics code FLIGHT. The transfer function between flight mechanics and the noise prediction is discussed in some details, along with the numerical procedures for validation and verification. Some code-to-code comparisons are shown. It is contended that the field of aircraft noise prediction has not yet reached a sufficient level of maturity. In particular, some parametric effects cannot be investigated, issues of accuracy are not currently addressed, and validation standards are still lacking.

  13. Aircraft Oxygen Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    aircraft use some form of on-board oxygen generation provided by one of two corporations that dominate this market . A review of safety incident data...manufacture of synthetic resins (e.g., Bakelite), and for 161 making dyestuffs, flavorings, perfumes , and other chemicals. Some are used as

  14. The impact of high altitude aircraft on the ozone layer in the stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Xue XI; Brasseur, Guy; Lin, Xing; Friedlingstein, P.; Granier, Claire; Rasch, Philip

    1994-01-01

    The paper discusses the potential effects on the ozone layer of gases released by the engines of proposed high altitude supersonic aircraft. The major problem arises from the emissions of nitrogen oxides which have the potential to destroy significant quantities of ozone in the stratosphere. The magnitude of the perturbation is highly dependent on the cruise altitude of the aircraft. Furthermore, the depletion of ozone is substantially reduced when heterogeneous conversion of nitrogen oxides into nitric acid on sulfate aerosol particles is taken into account in the calculation. The sensitivity of the aerosol load on stratospheric ozone is investigated. First, the model indicates that the aerosol load induced by the SO2 released by aircraft is increased by about 10-20% above the background aerosols at mid-high latitude of the Northern Hemisphere at 15 km for the NASA emission scenario A (the NASA emission scenarios are explained in Tables I to III). This increase in aerosol has small effects on stratospheric ozone. Second, when the aerosol load is increased following a volcanic eruption similar to the eruption of El Chichon (Mexico, April 1982), the ozone column in spring increases by as much as 9% in response to the injection of NOx from the aircraft with the NASA emission scenario A. Finally, the modeled suggests that significant ozone depletion could result from the formation of additional polar stratospheric clouds produced by the injection of H2O and HNO3 by the aircraft engines.

  15. Commercial Jet Transport Crashworthiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    simplification, obstructions are separated into three types; columna representing trees, poles, and towers that resist m..ion in the x and y direction and...aircraft type demonstrated that irious vertebral injuries were lower for light fixed-wing aircraft and cargo helicopters than the others. The rationale

  16. Braking performance of aircraft tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Satish K.

    This paper brings under one cover the subject of aircraft braking performance and a variety of related phenomena that lead to aircraft hydroplaning, overruns, and loss of directional control. Complex processes involving tire deformation, tire slipping, and fluid pressures in the tire-runway contact area develop the friction forces for retarding the aircraft; this paper describes the physics of these processes. The paper reviews the past and present research efforts and concludes that the most effective way to combat the hazards associated with aircraft landings and takeoffs on contaminated runways is by measuring and displaying in realtime the braking performance parameters in the aircraft cockpit.

  17. Corrosion Sensor Development for Condition-Based Maintenance of Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gino Rinaldi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft routinely operate in atmospheric environments that, over time, will impact their structural integrity. Material protection and selection schemes notwithstanding, recurrent exposure to chlorides, pollution, temperature gradients, and moisture provide the necessary electrochemical conditions for the development and profusion of corrosion in aircraft structures. For aircraft operators, this becomes an important safety matter as corrosion found in a given aircraft must be assumed to be present in all of that type of aircraft. This safety protocol and its associated unscheduled maintenance requirement drive up the operational costs of the fleet and limit the availability of the aircraft. Hence, there is an opportunity at present for developing novel sensing technologies and schemes to aid in shifting time-based maintenance schedules towards condition-based maintenance procedures. In this work, part of the ongoing development of a multiparameter integrated corrosion sensor is presented. It consists of carbon nanotube/polyaniline polymer sensors and commercial-off-the-shelf sensors. It is being developed primarily for monitoring environmental and material factors for the purpose of providing a means to more accurately assess the structural integrity of aerospace aluminium alloys through fusion of multiparameter sensor data. Preliminary experimental test results are presented for chloride ion concentration, hydrogen gas evolution, humidity variations, and material degradation.

  18. Aircraft-Assisted Pilot Suicides: Lessons to be Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorio, Alpo; Laukkala, Tanja; Navathe, Pooshan; Budowle, Bruce; Eyre, Anne; Sajantila, Antti

    2014-08-01

    Aircraft assisted suicides were studied in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, and Finland during 1956-2012 by means of literature search and accident case analysis. According to our study the frequency varied slightly between the studies. Overall, the new estimate of aircraft assisted suicides in the United States in a 20-yr period (1993-2012) is 0.33% (95% CI 0.21-0.49) (24/7244). In the detailed accident case analysis, it was found that in five out of the eight cases from the United States, someone knew of prior suicidal ideation before the aircraft assisted fatality. The caveats of standard medico-legal autopsy and accident investigation methods in investigation of suspected aircraft assisted suicides are discussed. It is suggested that a psychological autopsy should be performed in all such cases. Also the social context and possibilities of the prevention of aviation-related suicides were analyzed. In addition, some recent aircraft assisted suicides carried out using commercial aircraft during scheduled services and causing many casualties are discussed.

  19. Pressure variation by a magnetohydrodynamic method at the surface of a body placed in a supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapushkina, T. A.; Erofeev, A. V.; Ponyaev, S. A.

    2014-07-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the possibility of pressure variation near the surface of a body placed in a supersonic flow as a model of an aerofoil or the nose of an aircraft by organizing a surface gas discharge in a magnetic field transverse to the flow. The flow parameters and pressure are mainly affected by the ponderomotive Lorentz force acting on the gas in the direction orthogonal to the direction of the organized discharge current and leading to the removal or compression of the gas at the surface of the body and, hence, a variation of pressure. Experimental data on the visualization of the flow and on the pressure at the surface of the body are considered for various configurations of the current and intensities of the gas discharge and magnetic field; it is demonstrated that such configurations of the current and magnetic field near the surface of the body under investigation can be organized in such a way that the pressure at the front part as well as the upper and lower surfaces of the body under investigation can be increased or decreased, thus changing the aerodynamic drag and the aerofoil lift. Such a magnetohydrodynamic control over aerodynamic parameters of the aircraft can be used during takeoff and landing as well as during steady-state flight and also during the entrance into dense atmospheric layers. This will considerably reduce the thermal load on the surface of the body in the flow.

  20. Experimental investigation of the noise reduction of supersonic exhaust jets with fluidic inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Russell William Walter

    The noise produced by the supersonic, high temperature jets that exhaust from military aircraft is becoming a hazard to naval personnel and a disturbance to communities near military bases. Methods to reduce the noise produced from these jets in a practical full-scale environment are difficult. The development and analysis of distributed nozzle blowing for the reduction of radiated noise from supersonic jets is described. Model scale experiments of jets that simulate the exhaust jets from typical low-bypass ratio military jet aircraft engines during takeoff are performed. Fluidic inserts are created that use distributed blowing in the divergent section of the nozzle to simulate mechanical, hardwall corrugations, while having the advantage of being an active control method. This research focuses on model scale experiments to better understand the fluidic insert noise reduction method. Distributed blowing within the divergent section of the military-style convergent divergent nozzle alters the shock structure of the jet in addition to creating streamwise vorticity for the reduction of mixing noise. Enhancements to the fluidic insert design have been performed along with experiments over a large number of injection parameters and core jet conditions. Primarily military-style round nozzles have been used, with preliminary measurements of hardwall corrugations and fluidic inserts in rectangular nozzle geometries also performed. It has been shown that the noise reduction of the fluidic inserts is most heavily dependent upon the momentum flux ratio between the injector and core jet. Maximum reductions of approximately 5.5 dB OASPL have been observed with practical mass flow rates and injection pressures. The first measurements with fluidic inserts in the presence of a forward flight stream have been performed. Optimal noise reduction occurs at similar injector parameters in the presence of forward flight. Fluidic inserts in the presence of a forward flight stream were

  1. Bayesian Software Health Management for Aircraft Guidance, Navigation, and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Johann; Mbaya, Timmy; Menghoel, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Modern aircraft, both piloted fly-by-wire commercial aircraft as well as UAVs, more and more depend on highly complex safety critical software systems with many sensors and computer-controlled actuators. Despite careful design and V&V of the software, severe incidents have happened due to malfunctioning software. In this paper, we discuss the use of Bayesian networks (BNs) to monitor the health of the on-board software and sensor system, and to perform advanced on-board diagnostic reasoning. We will focus on the approach to develop reliable and robust health models for the combined software and sensor systems.

  2. Chemistry in plumes of high-flying aircraft with H2 combustion engines: a modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Weibring

    Full Text Available Recent discussions on high-speed civil transport (HSCT systems have renewed the interest in the chemistry of supersonic-aircraft plumes. The engines of these aircraft emit large concentrations of radicals like O, H, OH, and NO. In order to study the effect of these species on the composition of the atmosphere, the detailed chemistry of an expanding and cooling plume is examined for different expansion models.

    For a representative flight at 26 km the computed trace gas concentrations do not differ significantly for different models of the expansion behaviour. However, it is shown that the distributions predicted by all these models differ significantly from those adopted in conventional meso-scale and global models in which the plume chemistry is not treated in detail. This applies in particular to the reservoir species HONO and H2O2.

  3. Advanced technology payoffs for future rotorcraft, commuter aircraft, cruise missile, and APU propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, M. A.; Zeiner, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    In connection with the significant advances made regarding the performance of larger gas turbines, challenges arise concerning the improvement of small gas turbine engines in the 250 to 1000 horsepower range. In response to these challenges, the NASA/Army-sponsored Small Engine Component Technology (SECT) study was undertaken with the objective to identify the engine cycle, configuration, and component technology requirements for the substantial performance improvements desired in year-2000 small gas turbine engines. In the context of this objective, an American turbine engine company evaluated engines for four year-2000 applications, including a rotorcraft, a commuter aircraft, a supersonic cruise missile, and an auxiliary power unit (APU). Attention is given to reference missions, reference engines, reference aircraft, year-2000 technology projections, cycle studies, advanced engine selections, and a technology evaluation.

  4. Polymer, metal, and ceramic matrix composites for advanced aircraft engine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdanels, D. L.; Serafini, T. T.; Dicarlo, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Advanced aircraft engine research within NASA Lewis is being focused on propulsion systems for subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic aircraft. Each of these flight regimes requires different types of engines, but all require advanced materials to meet their goals of performance, thrust-to-weight ratio, and fuel efficiency. The high strength/weight and stiffness/weight properties of resin, metal, and ceramic matrix composites will play an increasingly key role in meeting these performance requirements. At NASA Lewis, research is ongoing to apply graphite/polyimide composites to engine components and to develop polymer matrices with higher operating temperature capabilities. Metal matrix composites, using magnesium, aluminum, titanium, and superalloy matrices, are being developed for application to static and rotating engine components, as well as for space applications, over a broad temperature range. Ceramic matrix composites are also being examined to increase the toughness and reliability of ceramics for application to high-temperature engine structures and components.

  5. PIV Measurements of Chevrons on F400 Tactical Aircraft Nozzle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James; Wernet, Mark; Frate, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Previous talks at this meeting have covered our collaborative work on high-energy jets such as present in tactical aircraft (those with supersonic plumes). The emphasis of this work is improving our understanding of flow physics and our prediction tools. In this presentation we will discuss recent flow diagnostics acquired using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) made on an underexpanded shocked jet plume from a tactical aircraft nozzle. In this presentation we show cross-sectional and streamwise cuts of both mean and turbulent velocities of an F404 engine nozzle with various chevron designs applied. The impact of chevron penetration, length, and width are documented. The impact of the parameters is generally nonlinear in measures considered here, a surprising result given the relatively smooth behavior of the noise to variations in these chevron parameters.

  6. SMACK - SMOOTHING FOR AIRCRAFT KINEMATICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, R.

    1994-01-01

    The computer program SMACK (SMoothing for AirCraft Kinematics) is designed to provide flightpath reconstruction of aircraft forces and motions from measurements that are noisy or incomplete. Additionally, SMACK provides a check on instrument accuracy and data consistency. The program can be used to analyze data from flight-test experiments prior to their use in performance, stability and control, or aerodynamic modeling calculations. It can also be used in the analysis of aircraft accidents, where the actual forces and motions may have to be determined from a very limited data set. Application of a state-estimation method for flightpath reconstruction is possible because aircraft forces and motions are related by well-known equations of motion. The task of postflight state estimation is known as a nonlinear, fixed-interval smoothing problem. SMACK utilizes a backward-filter, forward-smoother algorithm to solve the problem. The equations of motion are used to produce estimates that are compared with their corresponding measurement time histories. The procedure is iterative, providing improved state estimates until a minimum squared-error measure is achieved. In the SMACK program, the state and measurement models together represent a finite-difference approximation for the six-degree-of-freedom dynamics of a rigid body. The models are used to generate time histories which are likely to be found in a flight-test measurement set. These include onboard variables such as Euler angles, angular rates, and linear accelerations as well as tracking variables such as slant range, bearing, and elevation. Any bias or scale-factor errors associated with the state or measurement models are appended to the state vector and treated as constant but unknown parameters. The SMACK documentation covers the derivation of the solution algorithm, describes the state and measurement models, and presents several application examples that should help the analyst recognize the potential

  7. Supersonic flow past a flat lattice of cylindrical rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvernyuk, S. V.; Maksimov, F. A.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional supersonic laminar ideal gas flows past a regular flat lattice of identical circular cylinders lying in a plane perpendicular to the free-stream velocity are numerically simulated. The flows are computed by applying a multiblock numerical technique with local boundary-fitted curvilinear grids that have finite regions overlapping the global rectangular grid covering the entire computational domain. Viscous boundary layers are resolved on the local grids by applying the Navier-Stokes equations, while the aerodynamic interference of shock wave structures occurring between the lattice elements is described by the Euler equations. In the overlapping grid regions, the functions are interpolated to the grid interfaces. The regimes of supersonic lattice flow are classified. The parameter ranges in which the steady flow around the lattice is not unique are detected, and the mechanisms of hysteresis phenomena are examined.

  8. Passive Acoustic Radar for Detecting Supersonic Cruise Missile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; XIAO Hui

    2005-01-01

    A Passive Acoustic Radar is presented as a necessary complement to electromagnetic wave radar, which will be expected to be an effective means for detecting cruise missiles. Acoustic characteristics of supersonic flying projectiles with diverse shapes are expounded via experiment. It is pointed out that simulation experiment could be implemented using bullet or shell instead of cruise missile. Based on theoretical analysis and experiment, the "acoustic fingerprint" character of cruise missile is illustrated to identify it in a strong noise environment. After establishing a locating mathematical model,the technique of acoustic embattling is utilized to resolve a problem of confirming the time of early-warning, considering the fact that velocity of sound is much slower than that of light. Thereby, a whole system of passive acoustic radar for detecting supersonic cruise missile is formed.

  9. Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene nanofibers prepared by CO2 laser supersonic drawing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Suzuki

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE nanofibers were prepared by carbon dioxide (CO2 laser irradiation of asspun ETFE fibers with four different melt flow rates (MFRs in a supersonic jet that was generated by blowing air into a vacuum chamber through the fiber injection orifice. The drawability and superstructure of fibers produced by CO2 laser supersonic drawing depend on the laser power, the chamber pressure, the fiber injection speed, and the MFR. Nanofibers obtained using a laser power of 20 W, a chamber pressure of 20 kPa, and an MFR of 308 g•10 min–1 had an average diameter of 0.303 µm and a degree of crystallinity of 54%.

  10. Features of Ignition and Stable Combustion in Supersonic Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfeld, M.; Starov, A.; Timofeev, K.

    2009-01-01

    Present paper describes the results of experimental investigations of the supersonic combustor with entrance Mach numbers from 2 to 4 at static pressure from 0.8 to 2.5 bars, total temperature from 2000K to 3000K. Hydrogen and kerosene were used as fuel. The conditions, under which the self-ignition and intensive combustion of the fuel realized were found. Position of ignition area in the channel was determined and features of flame propagation in the channel presented. A possibility to ensure an efficient combustion of hydrogen and kerosene at a high supersonic flow velocity at the combustor entrance without special throttling and/or pseudo-shock introduction was shown. Analysis of applicability of existing methods of criterion descriptions of conditions of self-ignition and extinction of combustion is executed for generalization of experimental results on the basis of results obtained.

  11. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenou, M. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Harvey M. Kruger Family Center for Nano-science and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Additive Manufacturing Lab, Orbotech Ltd., P.O. Box 215, 81101 Yavne (Israel); Sa' ar, A. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Harvey M. Kruger Family Center for Nano-science and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Kotler, Z. [Additive Manufacturing Lab, Orbotech Ltd., P.O. Box 215, 81101 Yavne (Israel)

    2015-05-04

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10–100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets.

  12. Dynamical friction for supersonic motion in a homogeneous gaseous medium

    CERN Document Server

    Thun, Daniel; Schmidt, Franziska; Kley, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    The supersonic motion of gravitating objects through a gaseous medium constitutes a classical problem in theoretical astrophysics. Its application covers a broad range of objects and scales from planets up to galaxies. Especially the dynamical friction, caused by the forming wake behind the object, plays an important role for the dynamics of the system. To calculate the dynamical friction, standard formulae, based on linear theory are often used. It is our goal to check the general validity of these formulae and provide suitable expressions for the dynamical friction acting on the moving object, based on the basic physical parameters of the problem. We perform sequences of high resolution numerical studies of rigid bodies moving supersonically through a homogeneous medium, and calculate the total drag acting on the object, which is the sum of gravitational and hydro drag. We study cases without gravity with purely hydrodynamical drag, as well as gravitating objects. From the final equilibrium state of the sim...

  13. The effects of profiles on supersonic jet noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Bhat, T. R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of velocity profiles on supersonic jet noise are studied by using stability calculations made for a shock-free coannular jet, with both the inner and outer flows supersonic. The Mach wave emission process is modeled as the noise generated by the large scale turbulent structures or the instability waves in the mixing region. Both the vortex-sheet and the realistic finite thickness shear layer models are considered. The stability calculations were performed for both inverted and normal velocity profiles. Comparisons are made with the results for an equivalent single jet, based on equal thrust, mass flow rate and exit area to that of the coannular jet. The advantages and disadvantages of these velocity profiles as far as noise radiation is concerned are discussed. It is shown that the Rayleigh's model prediction of the merits and demerits of different velocity profiles are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  14. Effect of Microjet Injection on Supersonic Jet Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Podboy, G. G.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of microjet (jet) injection on the noise from supersonic jets is investigated. Three convergent-divergent (C-D) nozzles and one convergent nozzle, all having the same exit diameters, are used in the study. The jets are injected perpendicular to the primary jet close to the nozzle lip from six equally-spaced ports having a jet-to-primary-jet diameter ratio of 0.0054. Effects in the over-expanded, fully expanded as well as underexpanded flow regimes are explored. Relative to the effect on subsonic jets, larger reductions in the overall sound pressure level (OASPL) are achieved in most supersonic conditions. The largest reductions are typically associated with suppression of screech and transonic tones. For a shock-free, fully expanded case, the OASPL reductions achieved are comparable to that in the subsonic case; the same correlation, found for subsonic jet noise reduction at shallow observation angle, applies.

  15. Flight Research and Validation Formerly Experimental Capabilities Supersonic Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Experimental Capabilities Supersonic project, that is being reorganized into Flight Research and Validation. The work of Experimental Capabilities Project in FY '09 is reviewed, and the specific centers that is assigned to do the work is given. The portfolio of the newly formed Flight Research and Validation (FRV) group is also reviewed. The various projects for FY '10 for the FRV are detailed. These projects include: Eagle Probe, Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment (CCIE), Supersonic Boundary layer Transition test (SBLT), Aero-elastic Test Wing-2 (ATW-2), G-V External Vision Systems (G5 XVS), Air-to-Air Schlieren (A2A), In Flight Background Oriented Schlieren (BOS), Dynamic Inertia Measurement Technique (DIM), and Advanced In-Flight IR Thermography (AIR-T).

  16. Global Commercial Aviation Emissions Inventory for 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, J.; Balasubramanian, S.; Malwitz, A.; Wayson, R.; Fleming, G.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Naiman, A.; Lele, S.

    2008-12-01

    In 2004, the global commercial aircraft fleet included more than 13,000 aircraft flying over 30 billion km, burning more than 100 million tons of fuel. All this activity incurs substantial amounts of fossil-fuel combustion products at the cruise altitude within the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere that could potentially affect the atmospheric composition and climate. These emissions; such as CO, CO2, PM, NOx, SOx, are not distributed uniformly over the earth, so understanding the temporal and spatial distributions is an important component for modeling aviation climate impacts. Previous studies for specific years have shown that nearly all activity occurs in the northern hemisphere, and most is within mid-latitudes. Simply scaling older data by the annual global industry growth of 3-5 percent may provide emission trends which are not representative of geographically varying growth in aviation sector that has been noted over the past years. India, for example, increased its domestic aviation activity recently by 46 percent in one year. Therefore, it is important that aircraft emissions are best characterized and represented in the atmospheric models for impacts analysis. Data containing all global commercial flights for 2004 was computed using the Federal Aviation Administration's Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT) and provided by the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center. The following is a summary of this data which illustrates the global aviation footprint for 2004, and provides temporal and three-dimensional spatial distribution statistics of several emissions constituents.

  17. Handbook of Supersonic Aerodynamics. Section 18. Shock Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1959-12-01

    Supersonic Aerodynamics. The continued encouragement received from Dr. G. N. Patterson is sincerely acknowledged. Thanks are due to E. 0. Gadamer , K...the focal point. However, it is assumed that it is smoothed out very quickly (Ref. 1). This type of wave is difficult to generate in practice , as it...since in practice they quickly turn into a shock front. 2a1The piston velocity u 1--1 - (N - 1), and following the method of Eq. (6), the piston

  18. Supersonic Vortex Gerdien Arc with Magnetic Thermal Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, F.

    1988-02-01

    Temperatures up to ~ 5 x 104 oK have been obtained with water vortex Gerdien arcs, and temperatures of ~ 105oK have been reached in hydrogen plasma arcs with magnetic thermal insulation through an externally applied strong magnetic field. It is suggested that a further increase in arc temperatures up to 106oK can conceivably be attained by a combination of both techniques, using a Gerdien arc with a supersonic hydrogen gas vortex.

  19. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  20. Dynamical separation of spherical bodies in supersonic flow

    OpenAIRE

    Laurence, Stuart; Parziale, N. J.; Deiterding, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the unsteady separation behaviour of two spheres in a highly supersonic flow is carried out. The spherical bodies, initially touching, are released with negligible relative velocity, an arrangement representing the idealized binary fragmentation of a meteoritic body in the atmosphere. In experiments performed in a Mach-4 Ludwieg tube, nylon spheres are initially suspended in the test section by weak threads and, following detachment of ...

  1. Computational analysis of aircraft pressure relief doors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Tyler

    Modern trends in commercial aircraft design have sought to improve fuel efficiency while reducing emissions by operating at higher pressures and temperatures than ever before. Consequently, greater demands are placed on the auxiliary bleed air systems used for a multitude of aircraft operations. The increased role of bleed air systems poses significant challenges for the pressure relief system to ensure the safe and reliable operation of the aircraft. The core compartment pressure relief door (PRD) is an essential component of the pressure relief system which functions to relieve internal pressure in the core casing of a high-bypass turbofan engine during a burst duct over-pressurization event. The successful modeling and analysis of a burst duct event are imperative to the design and development of PRD's to ensure that they will meet the increased demands placed on the pressure relief system. Leveraging high-performance computing coupled with advances in computational analysis, this thesis focuses on a comprehensive computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study to characterize turbulent flow dynamics and quantify the performance of a core compartment PRD across a range of operating conditions and geometric configurations. The CFD analysis was based on a compressible, steady-state, three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach. Simulations were analyzed, and results show that variations in freestream conditions, plenum environment, and geometric configurations have a non-linear impact on the discharge, moment, thrust, and surface temperature characteristics. The CFD study revealed that the underlying physics for this behavior is explained by the interaction of vortices, jets, and shockwaves. This thesis research is innovative and provides a comprehensive and detailed analysis of existing and novel PRD geometries over a range of realistic operating conditions representative of a burst duct over-pressurization event. Further, the study provides aircraft

  2. Aircraft Data Acquisition

    OpenAIRE

    Elena BALMUS

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of digital systems instead of analog ones has created a major separation in the aviation technology. Although the digital equipment made possible that the increasingly faster controllers take over, we should say that the real world remains essentially analogue [4]. Fly-by-wire designers attempting to control and measure the real feedback of an aircraft were forced to find a way to connect the analogue environment to their digital equipment. In order to manage the implications...

  3. Airline and Aircraft Reliability

    OpenAIRE

    Hauka, Maris; Paramonovs, Jurijs

    2014-01-01

    Development of the inspection programme of fatigue-prone aircraft construction under limitation of airline fatigue failure rate. The highest economical effectiveness of airline under limitation of fatigue failure rate and failure probability is discussed. For computing is used exponential regression, Monte Carlo method, Log Normal distribution, Markov chains and semi-Markov process theory. The minimax approach is offered for processing the results of full-scale fatigue approval test of an air...

  4. Slotted Aircraft Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, James D. (Inventor); Witkowski, David P. (Inventor); Campbell, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A swept aircraft wing includes a leading airfoil element and a trailing airfoil element. At least one full-span slot is defined by the wing during at least one transonic condition of the wing. The full-span slot allows a portion of the air flowing along the lower surface of the leading airfoil element to split and flow over the upper surface of the trailing airfoil element so as to achieve a performance improvement in the transonic condition.

  5. Study on the Characteristics of Supersonic Coanda Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShigeruMatsuo; ShenYu; 等

    1998-01-01

    Techniques using coanda effect have been applied to the fluid control devices.In this field,experimental studies were so far performed for the spiral jet obtained by the Coanda jet issuing from a conical cylinder with an annular slit ,thrust vectoring of supersonic Coanda jets and so on,It is important from the viewpoints of effective applications to investigate the characteristics of the supersonic coanda jet in detail,In the present study,The effects of pressure rations and nozzle configurations on the characteristics of the supersonic COanda jet have been investigated.experimentally by a schlieren optical method and pressure measurements.Furthermore.Navier-Stokes equations were solved numerically using a 2nd-order TVD finite-volume scheme with a 3rd-order three stage Runge-Kutta method for time integration,κ-ε model was used in the computations.The effects of initial conditions on Coanda flow were investigated numerically.As a result,the simulated flow fields were compared with experimental data in good agreement qualitatively.

  6. Research on the mechanics of underwater supersonic gas jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Honghui; Wang, Boyi; Dai, Zhenqing

    2010-03-01

    An experimental research was carried out to study the fluid mechanics of underwater supersonic gas jets. High pressure air was injected into a water tank through converging-diverging nozzles (Laval nozzles). The jets were operated at different conditions of over-, full- and under-expansions. The jet sequences were visualized using a CCD camera. It was found that the injection of supersonic air jets into water is always accompanied by strong flow oscillation, which is related to the phenomenon of shock waves feedback in the gas phase. The shock wave feedback is different from the acoustic feedback when a supersonic gas jet discharges into open air, which causes screech tone. It is a process that the shock waves enclosed in the gas pocket induce a periodic pressure with large amplitude variation in the gas jet. Consequently, the periodic pressure causes the jet oscillation including the large amplitude expansion. Detailed pressure measurements were also conducted to verify the shock wave feedback phenomenon. Three kinds of measuring methods were used, i.e., pressure probe submerged in water, pressure measurements from the side and front walls of the nozzle devices respectively. The results measured by these methods are in a good agreement. They show that every oscillation of the jets causes a sudden increase of pressure and the average frequency of the shock wave feedback is about 5-10 Hz.

  7. Hydrogen tube vehicle for supersonic transport: 2. Speed and energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Arnold R. [Vehicle Projects Inc and Supersonic Tubevehicle LLC, 200 Violet St, Suite 100, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The central concept of a new idea in high-speed transport is that operation of a vehicle in a hydrogen atmosphere, because of the low density of hydrogen, would increase sonic speed by a factor of 3.8 and decrease drag by 15 relative to air. A hydrogen atmosphere requires that the vehicle operate within a hydrogen-filled tube or pipeline, which serves as a phase separator. The supersonic tube vehicle (STV) can be supersonic with respect to air outside the tube while remaining subsonic inside. It breathes hydrogen fuel for its propulsion fuel cells from the tube itself. This paper, second in a series on the scientific foundations of the supersonic tube vehicle, tests the hypothesis that the STV will be simultaneously fast and energy efficient by comparing its predicted speed and energy consumption with that of four long-haul passenger transport modes: road, rail, maglev, and air. The study establishes the speed ranking STV >> airplane > maglev > train > coach (intercity bus) and the normalized energy consumption ranking Airplane >> coach > maglev > train > STV. Consistent with the hypothesis, the concept vehicle is both the fastest and lowest energy consuming mode. In theory, the vehicle can cruise at Mach 2.8 while consuming less than half the energy per passenger of a Boeing 747 at a cruise speed of Mach 0.81. (author)

  8. Interaction of a swept shock wave and a supersonic wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, G.; Zhao, Y. X.; Zhou, J.

    2017-03-01

    The interaction of a swept shock wave and a supersonic wake has been studied. The swept shock wave is generated by a swept compression sidewall, and the supersonic wake is generated by a wake generator. The flow field is visualized with the nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering method, and a supplementary numerical simulation is conducted by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results show that the pressure rise induced by the swept shock wave can propagate upstream in the wake, which makes the location where vortices are generated move upstream, thickens the laminar section of the wake, and enlarges the generated vortices. The wake is swept away from the swept compression sidewall by the pressure gradient of the swept shock wave. This pressure gradient is not aligned with the density gradient of the supersonic wake, so the baroclinic torque generates streamwise vorticity and changes the distribution of the spanwise vorticity. The wake shock is curved, so the flow downstream of it is non-uniform, leaving the swept shock wave being distorted. A three-dimensional Mach disk structure is generated when the wake shock interacts with the swept shock wave.

  9. Research on the mechanics of underwater supersonic gas jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    An experimental research was carried out to study the fluid mechanics of underwater supersonic gas jets. High pressure air was injected into a water tank through converging-diverging nozzles (Laval nozzles). The jets were operated at different conditions of over-, full- and under-expansions. The jet sequences were visualized using a CCD camera. It was found that the injection of supersonic air jets into water is always accompanied by strong flow oscillation, which is related to the phenomenon of shock waves feedback in the gas phase. The shock wave feedback is different from the acoustic feedback when a supersonic gas jet discharges into open air, which causes screech tone. It is a process that the shock waves enclosed in the gas pocket induce a periodic pressure with large amplitude variation in the gas jet. Consequently, the periodic pressure causes the jet oscillation including the large amplitude expansion. Detailed pressure measurements were also conducted to verify the shock wave feedback phenomenon. Three kinds of measuring methods were used, i.e., pressure probe submerged in water, pressure measurements from the side and front walls of the nozzle devices respectively. The results measured by these methods are in a good agreement. They show that every oscillation of the jets causes a sudden increase of pressure and the average frequency of the shock wave feedback is about 5–10 Hz.

  10. Interaction of a swept shock wave and a supersonic wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, G.; Zhao, Y. X.; Zhou, J.

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of a swept shock wave and a supersonic wake has been studied. The swept shock wave is generated by a swept compression sidewall, and the supersonic wake is generated by a wake generator. The flow field is visualized with the nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering method, and a supplementary numerical simulation is conducted by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results show that the pressure rise induced by the swept shock wave can propagate upstream in the wake, which makes the location where vortices are generated move upstream, thickens the laminar section of the wake, and enlarges the generated vortices. The wake is swept away from the swept compression sidewall by the pressure gradient of the swept shock wave. This pressure gradient is not aligned with the density gradient of the supersonic wake, so the baroclinic torque generates streamwise vorticity and changes the distribution of the spanwise vorticity. The wake shock is curved, so the flow downstream of it is non-uniform, leaving the swept shock wave being distorted. A three-dimensional Mach disk structure is generated when the wake shock interacts with the swept shock wave.

  11. Manufacturing of A micro probe using supersonic aided electrolysis process

    CERN Document Server

    Shyu, R F; Ho, Chi-Ting

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a practical micromachining technology was applied for the fabrication of a micro probe using a complex nontraditional machining process. A series process was combined to machine tungsten carbide rods from original dimension. The original dimension of tungsten carbide rods was 3mm ; the rods were ground to a fixed-dimension of 50 micrometers using precision grinding machine in first step. And then, the rod could be machined to a middle-dimension of 20 micrometers by electrolysis. A final desired micro dimension can be achieved using supersonic aided electrolysis. High-aspect-ratio of micro tungsten carbide rod was easily obtained by this process. Surface roughness of the sample with supersonic aided agitation was compared with that with no agitation in electrolysis. The machined surface of the sample is very smooth due to ionized particles of anode could be removed by supersonic aided agitation during electrolysis. Deep micro holes can also be achieved by the machined high-aspect-rati tungsten c...

  12. THE TURBULENT DYNAMO IN HIGHLY COMPRESSIBLE SUPERSONIC PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federrath, Christoph [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Schober, Jennifer [Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R. G., E-mail: christoph.federrath@anu.edu.au [Institut für Astrophysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-12-20

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024{sup 3} cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = ν/η = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm ≥ 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm{sub crit}=129{sub −31}{sup +43}, showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present and early universe, we conclude that magnetic fields need to be taken into account during structure formation from the early to the present cosmic ages, because they suppress gas fragmentation and drive powerful jets and outflows, both greatly affecting the initial mass function of stars.

  13. Mixed exhaust flow supersonic jet engine and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klees, G.W.

    1993-06-08

    A method of operating a supersonic jet engine installation is described comprising (a) providing an engine having a variable area air inlet means and an outlet to discharge engine exhaust; (b) providing a secondary air passageway means; (c) receiving ambient air in the air inlet means and providing the ambient air as primary air to the engine inlet and secondary air to the secondary air passageway means; (d) providing a mixing section having an inlet portion and an exit portion, utilizing the mixing section in directing the exhaust from the engine to primary convergent/divergent exit passageway segments, where the exhaust is discharged at supersonic velocity as primary flow components, and directing secondary air flow from the secondary air passageway means to secondary exit passageway segments which are interspersed with the primary segments and from which the secondary air is discharged at subsonic velocity as secondary flow components; and (e) providing an exhaust section to receive the primary and secondary flow components in a mixing region and causing the primary and secondary flow components to mix to create a supersonic mixed flow, the exhaust section having a variable area final nozzle through which the mixed flow is discharged.

  14. Mass flow and its pulsation measurements in supersonic wing wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmakov, A. S.; Shevchenko, A. M.; Yatskikh, A. A.; Yermolaev, Yu. G.

    2016-10-01

    The results of experimental study of the flow in the wing wake are presented. Experiments were carried out in supersonic wind tunnel T-325 of ITAM SB RAS. Rectangle half-wing with sharp edges with a chord length of 30 mm and semispan of 95 mm was used to generate vortex wake. Experimental data were obtained in the cross section located 6 chord length downstream of the trailing edge at Mach numbers of 2.5 and 4 and at wing angles of attack of 4 and 10 degrees. Constant temperature hot-wire anemometer was used to measure disturbances in supersonic flow. Hot-wire was made of a tungsten wire with a diameter of 10 μm and length of 1.5 mm. Shlieren flow visualization were performed. As a result, the position and size of the vortex core in the wake of a rectangular wing were determined. For the first time experimental data on the mass flow distribution and its pulsations in the supersonic longitudinal vortex were obtained.

  15. Study of the flow characteristics of supersonic coaxial jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.H. [Andong National University, Andong (Korea); Koo, B.S. [Andong National University Graudate School, Andong (Korea)

    2001-12-01

    Supersonic coaxial jets are investigated numerically by using the axisymmetric, Navier-Stokes equations which are solved using a fully implicit finite volume method. Three different kinds of coaxial nozzles are employed to understand the flow physics involved in the supersonic coaxial jets. Two convergent-divergent supersonic nozzles are designed to have the same Mach number 2.0, and used to compare the coaxial jet flows with those discharging from one constant-area nozzle. The impingement angle of the annular jets are varied. The primary pressure ratio is changed in the range from 2.0 to 10.0 and the assistant jet ratio from 1.0 to 3.0. The results obtained show that the fluctuations of the total pressure and Mach number along the jet axis are much higher in the constant-area nozzle than those in the convergent-divergent nozzles, and the constant-area nozzle lead to higher total pressure losses, compared with the convergent-divergent nozzles. The assistant jets from the annular nozzle affect the coaxial jet flows within the distance less than about ten times the nozzle throat diameter, but beyond it the coaxial jet is conical with self-similar velocity profiles. Increasing both the primary jet pressure ratio and the assistant jet pressure ratio produces a longer coaxial jet core. (author). 14 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Flow and acoustic features of a supersonic tapered nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, E.; Bowman, H. L.; Schadow, K. C.

    1992-05-01

    The acoustic and flow characteristics of a supersonic tapered jet were measured for free and shrouded flow configurations. Measurements were performed for a full range of pressure ratios including over- and underexpanded and design conditions. The supersonic tapered jet is issued from a converging-diverging nozzle with a 3∶1 rectangular slotted throat and a conical diverging section leading to a circular exit. The jet was compared to circular and rectangular supersonic jets operating at identical conditions. The distinct feature of the jet is the absence of screech tones in the entire range of operation. Its near-field pressure fluctuations have a wide band spectrum in the entire range of measurements, for Mach numbers of 1 to 2.5, for over- and underexpanded conditions. The free jet's spreading rate is nearly constant and similar to the rectangular jet, and in a shroud, the pressure drop it is inducing is linearly proportional to the primary jet Mach number. This behavior persisted in high adverse pressure gradients at overexpanded conditions, and with nozzle divergence angles of up to 35°, no inside flow separation was observed.

  17. Experimental investigation of the structure of supersonic two-dimensional air microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, Ivan; Aniskin, Vladimir; Mironov, Sergey

    2016-10-01

    We have experimentally studied the structure of supersonic underexpanded room-temperature air jets escaping from micronozzles with characteristic heights from 47 to 175 µm and widths within 2410-3900 µm in a range of Reynolds numbers of 1280-9460. The dimensions of the first shock cell are established. The supersonic core length of supersonic underexpanded air jets has been determined for the first time. A flow regime with a large supersonic core length has observed for air jets escaping from a 47µm high nozzle.

  18. An experimental study of the structure of supersonic flat underexpanded microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniskin, V. M.; Maslov, A. A.; Mironov, S. G.; Tsyryulnikov, I. S.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2015-05-01

    We have experimentally studied the structure of supersonic flat underexpanded room-temperature air jets escaping from micro nozzles with characteristic heights from 47 to 175 μm and widths within 2410-3900 μm in a range of Reynolds numbers of 1280-9460. The dimensions of the first shock cell are established. The supersonic core length of supersonic flat underexpanded air jets has been determined for the first time. A flow regime with a large supersonic core length has been observed for air jets escaping from a 47-μm-high nozzle.

  19. Pressure distribution and aerodynamic coefficients associated with heat addition to supersonic air stream adjacent to two-dimensional supersonic wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkel, I Irving; Serafini, John S; Gregg, John L

    1952-01-01

    The modifications in the pressure distributions and the aerodynamic coefficients associated with additions of heat to the two-dimensional supersonic in viscid flow field adjacetnt to the lower surface of of a 5-percent-thickness symmetrical circular-arc wing are presented in this report. The pressure distributions are obtained by the use of graphical method which gives the two-dimensional supersonic inviscid flow field obtained with moderate heat addition. The variation is given of the lift-drag ratio and of the aerodynamic coefficients of lift, drag, and moment with free stream Mach number, angle of attack, and parameters defining extent and amount of heat addition. The six graphical solutions used in this study included Mach numbers of 3.0 and 5.0 and angles of attack of 0 degrees and 2 degrees.

  20. Interaction of Aircraft Wakes From Laterally Spaced Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Fred H.

    2009-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulations are used to examine wake interactions from aircraft on closely spaced parallel paths. Two sets of experiments are conducted, with the first set examining wake interactions out of ground effect (OGE) and the second set for in ground effect (IGE). The initial wake field for each aircraft represents a rolled-up wake vortex pair generated by a B-747. Parametric sets include wake interactions from aircraft pairs with lateral separations of 400, 500, 600, and 750 ft. The simulation of a wake from a single aircraft is used as baseline. The study shows that wake vortices from either a pair or a formation of B-747 s that fly with very close lateral spacing, last longer than those from an isolated B-747. For OGE, the inner vortices between the pair of aircraft, ascend, link and quickly dissipate, leaving the outer vortices to decay and descend slowly. For the IGE scenario, the inner vortices ascend and last longer, while the outer vortices decay from ground interaction at a rate similar to that expected from an isolated aircraft. Both OGE and IGE scenarios produce longer-lasting wakes for aircraft with separations less than 600 ft. The results are significant because concepts to increase airport capacity have been proposed that assume either aircraft formations and/or aircraft pairs landing on very closely spaced runways.

  1. Information note about the protection of nuclear facilities against aircraft crashes; Note d'information sur la protection des installations nucleaires contre les chutes d'avions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The protection of nuclear facilities against external risks (earthquakes, floods, fires etc..) is an aspect of safety taken into consideration by the French authority of nuclear safety (ASN). Concerning the aircraft crashes, the fundamental safety rules make three categories of aircraft: the small civil aircraft (weight < 5.7 t), the military aircraft, and the commercial aircraft (w > 5.7 t). Nuclear facilities are designed to resist against crashes of aircraft from the first category only, because the probability of the accidental crash of a big aircraft are extremely low. This document comprises an information note about the protection of nuclear facilities against aircraft crashes, a dossier about the safety of nuclear facilities with respect to external risks in general (natural disasters and aircraft crashes), and an article about the protection of nuclear power plants against aircraft crashes (design, safety measures, regulation, surveillance, experience feedback). (J.S.)

  2. Flight dynamics and control modelling of damaged asymmetric aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunwa, T. T.; Abdullah, E. J.

    2016-10-01

    This research investigates the use of a Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) controller to assist commercial Boeing 747-200 aircraft regains its stability in the event of damage. Damages cause an aircraft to become asymmetric and in the case of damage to a fraction (33%) of its left wing or complete loss of its vertical stabilizer, the loss of stability may lead to a fatal crash. In this study, aircraft models for the two damage scenarios previously mentioned are constructed using stability derivatives. LQR controller is used as a direct adaptive control design technique for the observable and controllable system. Dynamic stability analysis is conducted in the time domain for all systems in this study.

  3. An efficient navigation-control system for small unmanned aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girwar-Nath, Jonathan Alejandro

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles have been research in the past decade for a broad range of tasks and application domains such as search and rescue, reconnaissance, traffic control, pipe line inspections, surveillance, border patrol, and communication bridging. This work describes the design and implementation of a lightweight Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) semi-autonomous Fixed-Wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). Presented here is a methodology for System Identification utilizing the Box-Jenkins model estimator on recorded flight data to characterize the system and develop a mathematical model of the aircraft. Additionally, a novel microprocessor, the XMOS, is utilized to navigate and maneuver the aircraft utilizing a PD control system. In this thesis is a description of the aircraft and the sensor suite utilized, as well as the flight data and supporting videos for the benefit of the UAV research community.

  4. Commercialization and Pasisir Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Suryo, Djoko

    2013-01-01

    Commercialization process and the establishment of coastal culture in Javawas one united history process where one cannot be separated from the other. The commercialization process and the establishment of the coastal culture cannot be separated from the commercialization process and the establishment of Malay World in South East Asia. In other words, we can say that basically, commercialization process and the establishment of the coastal culture had been part of commercialization process an...

  5. On the Comparison of the Long Penetration Mode (LPM) Supersonic Counterflowing Jet to the Supersonic Screech Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Rebecca A.; Chang, Chau-Lyan.; Jones, Jess H.; Dougherty, N. Sam

    2015-01-01

    The authors provide a brief overview of the classic tonal screech noise problem created by underexpanded supersonic jets, briefly describing the fluid dynamic-acoustics feedback mechanism that has been long established as the basis for this well-known aeroacoustics problem. This is followed by a description of the Long Penetration Mode (LPM) supersonic underexpanded counterflowing jet phenomenon which has been demonstrated in several wind tunnel tests and modeled in several computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The authors provide evidence from test and CFD analysis of LPM that indicates that acoustics feedback and fluid interaction seen in LPM are analogous to the aeroacoustics interactions seen in screech jets. Finally, the authors propose applying certain methodologies to LPM which have been developed and successfully demonstrated in the study of screech jets and mechanically induced excitation in fluid oscillators for decades. The authors conclude that the large body of work done on jet screech, other aeroacoustic phenomena, and fluid oscillators can have direct application to the study and applications of LPM counterflowing supersonic cold flow jets.

  6. 19 CFR 122.64 - Other aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other aircraft. 122.64 Section 122.64 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Clearance of Aircraft and Permission To Depart § 122.64 Other aircraft. Clearance or permission to depart shall be requested by the aircraft commander or agent for aircraft covered...

  7. Three dimensional model calculations of the global dispersion of high speed aircraft exhaust and implications for stratospheric ozone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Anne R.; Rood, Richard B.; Jackman, Charles H.; Weaver, Clark J.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional (zonally averaged) photochemical models are commonly used for calculations of ozone changes due to various perturbations. These include calculating the ozone change expected as a result of change in the lower stratospheric composition due to the exhaust of a fleet of supersonic aircraft flying in the lower stratosphere. However, zonal asymmetries are anticipated to be important to this sort of calculation. The aircraft are expected to be restricted from flying over land at supersonic speed due to sonic booms, thus the pollutant source will not be zonally symmetric. There is loss of pollutant through stratosphere/troposphere exchange, but these processes are spatially and temporally inhomogeneous. Asymmetry in the pollutant distribution contributes to the uncertainty in the ozone changes calculated with two dimensional models. Pollutant distributions for integrations of at least 1 year of continuous pollutant emissions along flight corridors are calculated using a three dimensional chemistry and transport model. These distributions indicate the importance of asymmetry in the pollutant distributions to evaluation of the impact of stratospheric aircraft on ozone. The implications of such pollutant asymmetries to assessment calculations are discussed, considering both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions.

  8. Guidance Systems of Fighter Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.N. Rajanikanth

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Mission performance of a fighter aircraft is crucial for survival and strike capabilities in todays' aerial warfare scenario. The guidance functions of such an aircraft play a vital role inmeeting the requirements and accomplishing the mission success. This paper presents the requirements of precision guidance for various missions of a fighter aircraft. The concept ofguidance system as a pilot-in-loop system is pivotal in understanding and designing such a system. Methodologies of designing such a system are described.

  9. Guidance Systems of Fighter Aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    K.N. Rajanikanth; Rao, R S; P. S. Subramanyam; Ajai Vohra

    2005-01-01

    Mission performance of a fighter aircraft is crucial for survival and strike capabilities in todays' aerial warfare scenario. The guidance functions of such an aircraft play a vital role inmeeting the requirements and accomplishing the mission success. This paper presents the requirements of precision guidance for various missions of a fighter aircraft. The concept ofguidance system as a pilot-in-loop system is pivotal in understanding and designing such a system. Methodologies of designing s...

  10. Scheduling of an aircraft fleet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltrinieri, Massimo; Momigliano, Alberto; Torquati, Franco

    1992-01-01

    Scheduling is the task of assigning resources to operations. When the resources are mobile vehicles, they describe routes through the served stations. To emphasize such aspect, this problem is usually referred to as the routing problem. In particular, if vehicles are aircraft and stations are airports, the problem is known as aircraft routing. This paper describes the solution to such a problem developed in OMAR (Operative Management of Aircraft Routing), a system implemented by Bull HN for Alitalia. In our approach, aircraft routing is viewed as a Constraint Satisfaction Problem. The solving strategy combines network consistency and tree search techniques.

  11. Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-29

    Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

  12. Modeling Aircraft Emissions for Regional-scale Air Quality: Adapting a New Global Aircraft Emissions Database for the U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, S.; Baek, B. H.; Vennam, P. L.; Woody, M. C.; Omary, M.; Binkowski, F.; Fleming, G.

    2012-12-01

    Commercial aircraft emit substantial amounts of pollutants during their complete activity cycle that ranges from landing-and-takeoff (LTO) at airports to cruising in upper elevations of the atmosphere, and affect both air quality and climate. Since these emissions are not uniformly emitted over the earth, and have substantial temporal and spatial variability, it is vital to accurately evaluate and quantify the relative impacts of aviation emissions on ambient air quality. Regional-scale air quality modeling applications do not routinely include these aircraft emissions from all cycles. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has developed the Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT), a software system that dynamically models aircraft performance in space and time to calculate fuel burn and emissions from gate-to-gate for all commercial aviation activity from all airports globally. To process in-flight aircraft emissions and to provide a realistic representation of these for treatment in grid-based air quality models, we have developed an interface processor called AEDTproc that accurately distributes full-flight chorded emissions in time and space to create gridded, hourly model-ready emissions input data. Unlike the traditional emissions modeling approach of treating aviation emissions as ground-level sources or processing emissions only from the LTO cycles in regional-scale air quality studies, AEDTproc distributes chorded inventories of aircraft emissions during LTO cycles and cruise activities into a time-variant 3-D gridded structure. We will present results of processed 2006 global emissions from AEDT over a continental U.S. modeling domain to support a national-scale air quality assessment of the incremental impacts of aircraft emissions on surface air quality. This includes about 13.6 million flights within the U.S. out of 31.2 million flights globally. We will focus on assessing spatio-temporal variability of these commercial aircraft emissions, and

  13. Titanium Alloys and Processing for High Speed Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, William D.; Bird, R. Keith; Wallace, Terryl A.

    1996-01-01

    Commercially available titanium alloys as well as emerging titanium alloys with limited or no production experience are being considered for a variety of applications to high speed commercial aircraft structures. A number of government and industry programs are underway to improve the performance of promising alloys by chemistry and/or processing modifications and to identify appropriate alloys and processes for specific aircraft structural applications. This paper discusses some of the results on the effects of heat treatment, service temperatures from - 54 C to +177 C, and selected processing on the mechanical properties of several candidate beta and alpha-beta titanium alloys. Included are beta alloys Timetal 21S, LCB, Beta C, Beta CEZ, and Ti-10-2-3 and alpha-beta alloys Ti-62222, Ti-6242S, Timetal 550, Ti-62S, SP-700, and Corona-X. The emphasis is on properties of rolled sheet product form and on the superplastic properties and processing of the materials.

  14. Chemistry in aircraft plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraabol, A.G.; Stordal, F.; Knudsen, S. [Norwegian Inst. for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Konopka, P. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    An expanding plume model with chemistry has been used to study the chemical conversion of NO{sub x} to reservoir species in aircraft plumes. The heterogeneous conversion of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} to HNO{sub 3}(s) has been investigated when the emissions take place during night-time. The plume from an B747 has been simulated. During a ten-hour calculation the most important reservoir species was HNO{sub 3} for emissions at noon. The heterogeneous reactions had little impact on the chemical loss of NO{sub x} to reservoir species for emissions at night. (author) 4 refs.

  15. Aircraft propeller control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Stanley G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    In the invention, the speeds of both propellers in a counterrotating aircraft propeller pair are measured. Each speed is compared, using a feedback loop, with a demanded speed and, if actual speed does not equal demanded speed for either propeller, pitch of the proper propeller is changed in order to attain the demanded speed. A proportional/integral controller is used in the feedback loop. Further, phase of the propellers is measured and, if the phase does not equal a demanded phase, the speed of one propeller is changed, by changing pitch, until the proper phase is attained.

  16. Aircraft vulnerability analysis by modelling and simulation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Willers, CJ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available attributable to misuse of the weapon or to missile performance restrictions. This paper analyses some of the factors affecting aircraft vulnerability and demonstrates a structured analysis of the risk and aircraft vulnerability problem. The aircraft...

  17. Attitude and Heading Reference System for Small Unmanned Aircraft Collision Avoidance Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrant, Kevin

    This thesis describes the development of an Attitude and Heading Reference System (AHRS) to sense three-dimensional orientation for collision avoidance control in small unmanned aircraft. Unmanned aircraft are currently restricted to flight in designated airspace due to safety concerns of collision with manned aircraft. Therefore, collision avoidance is necessary to ensure the safety of both aircraft. Technical challenges, mainly in sensor limitations, restrict AHRS performance in attitude estimation during high-g maneuvers. Using sensor filtering techniques and a robust attitude representation, an AHRS suitable for collision avoidance is developed. Acceleration disturbances are reduced using estimates of non-gravitational accelerations including centripetal acceleration and model-based acceleration to improve gravity vector measurement during aircraft maneuvers. Simulation results with a variety of maneuvers deemed challenging for most AHRS are given showing accurate attitude estimates. Flight data from an existing commercial autopilot is compared with the results of the AHRS to demonstrate the validity of the solution with real flight data.

  18. D/B/F 98: Final Report Of the AIAA Student Aircraft Design, Build & Fly Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    December with the intention of molding a composite center section and attaching various wing panels, such as wings with winglets or anhedral, to solve...integrity needed to fulfill the mission. Initially, the use of composite materials was investigated for use in the fabrication of the aircraft, but...material currently being removed from many commercial aircraft. (Newer airline floorboards use a Kevlar/Nomex composite sandwich, with a much higher

  19. NASA Fixed Wing Project: Green Technologies for Future Aircraft Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosario, Ruben; Koudelka, John M.; Wahls, Rich; Madavan, Nateri

    2014-01-01

    Commercial aviation relies almost entirely on subsonic fixed wing aircraft to constantly move people and goods from one place to another across the globe. While air travel is an effective means of transportation providing an unmatched combination of speed and range, future subsonic aircraft must improve substantially to meet efficiency and environmental targets.The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Fixed Wing (FW) Project addresses the comprehensive challenge of enabling revolutionary energy efficiency improvements in subsonic transport aircraft combined with dramatic reductions in harmful emissions and perceived noise to facilitate sustained growth of the air transportation system. Advanced technologies and the development of unconventional aircraft systems offer the potential to achieve these improvements. Multidisciplinary advances are required in aerodynamic efficiency to reduce drag, structural efficiency to reduce aircraft empty weight, and propulsive and thermal efficiency to reduce thrust-specific energy consumption (TSEC) for overall system benefit. Additionally, advances are required to reduce perceived noise without adversely affecting drag, weight, or TSEC, and to reduce harmful emissions without adversely affecting energy efficiency or noise.The paper will highlight the Fixed Wing project vision of revolutionary systems and technologies needed to achieve these challenging goals. Specifically, the primary focus of the FW Project is on the N+3 generation; that is, vehicles that are three generations beyond the current state of the art, requiring mature technology solutions in the 2025-30 timeframe

  20. Investigation and design of a C-Wing passenger aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan BIKKANNAVAR

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel nonplanar wing concept called C-Wing is studied and implemented on a commercial aircraft to reduce induced drag which has a significant effect on fuel consumption. A preliminary sizing method which employs an optimization algorithm is utilized. The Airbus A320 aircraft is used as a reference aircraft to evaluate design parameters and to investigate the C-Wing design potential beyond current wing tip designs. An increase in aspect ratio due to wing area reduction at 36m span results in a reduction of required fuel mass by 16%. Also take-off mass savings were obtained for the aircraft with C-Wing configuration. The effect of a variations of height to span ratio (h/b of C-Wings on induced drag factor k, is formulated from a vortex lattice method and literature based equations. Finally the DOC costing methods used by the Association of European Airlines (AEA was applied to the existing A320 aircraft and to the C-Wing configuration obtaining a reduction of 6% in Direct Operating Costs (DOC for the novel concept resulted. From overall outcomes, the C-Wing concept suggests interesting aerodynamic efficiency and stability benefits.

  1. Capacity assessment of concrete containment vessels subjected to aircraft impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andonov, Anton, E-mail: anton.andonov@mottmac.com; Kostov, Marin; Iliev, Alexander

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • An approach to assess the containment capacity to aircraft impact via fragility curves is proposed. • Momentum over Area was defined as most suitable reference parameter to describe the aircraft load. • The effect of the impact induced damages on the containment pressure capacity has been studied. • The studied containment shows no reduction of the pressure capacity for the investigated scenarios. • The effectiveness of innovative protective structure against aircraft impact has been evaluated. - Abstract: The paper describes the procedure and the results from the assessment of the vulnerability of a generic pre-stressed containment structure subjected to a large commercial aircraft impact. Impacts of Boeing 737, Boeing 767 and Boeing 747 have been considered. The containment vulnerability is expressed by fragility curves based on the results of a number of nonlinear dynamic analyses. Three reference parameters have been considered as impact intensity measure in the fragility curve definition: peak impact force (PIF), peak impact pressure (PIP) and Momentum over Area (MoA). Conclusions on the most suitable reference parameter as well on the vulnerability of such containment vessels are drawn. The influence of the aircraft impact induced damages on the containment ultimate pressure capacity is also assessed and some preliminary conclusions on this are drawn. The paper also addresses a conceptual design of a protective structure able to decrease the containment vulnerability and provide a preliminary assessment of the applicability of such concept.

  2. A Collection of Nonlinear Aircraft Simulations in MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Frederico R.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear six degree-of-freedom simulations for a variety of aircraft were created using MATLAB. Data for aircraft geometry, aerodynamic characteristics, mass / inertia properties, and engine characteristics were obtained from open literature publications documenting wind tunnel experiments and flight tests. Each nonlinear simulation was implemented within a common framework in MATLAB, and includes an interface with another commercially-available program to read pilot inputs and produce a three-dimensional (3-D) display of the simulated airplane motion. Aircraft simulations include the General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon, Convair F-106B Delta Dart, Grumman F-14 Tomcat, McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom, NASA Langley Free-Flying Aircraft for Sub-scale Experimental Research (FASER), NASA HL-20 Lifting Body, NASA / DARPA X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Demonstrator, and the Vought A-7 Corsair II. All nonlinear simulations and 3-D displays run in real time in response to pilot inputs, using contemporary desktop personal computer hardware. The simulations can also be run in batch mode. Each nonlinear simulation includes the full nonlinear dynamics of the bare airframe, with a scaled direct connection from pilot inputs to control surface deflections to provide adequate pilot control. Since all the nonlinear simulations are implemented entirely in MATLAB, user-defined control laws can be added in a straightforward fashion, and the simulations are portable across various computing platforms. Routines for trim, linearization, and numerical integration are included. The general nonlinear simulation framework and the specifics for each particular aircraft are documented.

  3. Effect of emerging technology on a convertible, business/interceptor, supersonic-cruise jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beissner, F. L., Jr.; Lovell, W. A.; Robins, A. W.; Swanson, E. E.

    1986-01-01

    This study was initiated to assess the feasibility of an eight-passenger, supersonic-cruise long range business jet aircraft that could be converted into a military missile carrying interceptor. The baseline passenger version has a flight crew of two with cabin space for four rows of two passenger seats plus baggage and lavatory room in the aft cabin. The ramp weight is 61,600 pounds with an internal fuel capacity of 30,904 pounds. Utilizing an improved version of a current technology low-bypass ratio turbofan engine, range is 3,622 nautical miles at Mach 2.0 cruise and standard day operating conditions. Balanced field takeoff distance is 6,600 feet and landing distance is 5,170 feet at 44,737 pounds. The passenger section from aft of the flight crew station to the aft pressure bulkhead in the cabin was modified for the interceptor version. Bomb bay type doors were added and volume is sufficient for four advanced air-to-air missiles mounted on a rotary launcher. Missile volume was based on a Phoenix type missile with a weight of 910 pounds per missile for a total payload weight of 3,640 pounds. Structural and equipment weights were adjusted and result in a ramp weight of 63,246 pounds with a fuel load of 30,938 pounds. Based on a typical intercept mission flight profile, the resulting radius is 1,609 nautical miles at a cruise Mach number of 2.0.

  4. Dynamics of ultralight aircraft: Motion in vertical gusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    Gust load calculations are extended to the range of conditions encountered by ultralight aircraft such as hang gliders. Having wing loadings of the order of 5 kg/sq m, these gliders acquire a substantial fraction of the motion of a gust within a distance of 1 or 2 m. Comparative loads and displacements for a small powered airplane having a wing loading of 50 kg sq m and for a commercial jet with 500 kg sq m are shown.

  5. WRF simulation of the atmospheric conditions in some aircraft accidents

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano Sánchez, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Aviation, probably more than any other mode of transportation, is greatly affected by weather. Commercial aviation must deal with storms, fogs, windshears, ash from the volcanoes, intense rain, turbulences and other weather phenomena regularly. In this document are exposed in detail the effects of these phenomena on the aircraft's performance and on the airport facilities. Additionally, it is performed too, a study of the impact that these weather phenomena have had in aviation in the period ...

  6. The role of finite-difference methods in design and analysis for supersonic cruise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Finite-difference methods for analysis of steady, inviscid supersonic flows are described, and their present state of development is assessed with particular attention to their applicability to vehicles designed for efficient cruise flight. Current work is described which will allow greater geometric latitude, improve treatment of embedded shock waves, and relax the requirement that the axial velocity must be supersonic.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Jet Behavior and Impingement Characteristics of Preheating Shrouded Supersonic Jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-sheng WEI; Rong ZHU; Ting CHENG; Fei ZHAO

    2016-01-01

    As a novel supersonic j et technology,preheating shrouded supersonic j et was developed to deliver oxygen into molten bath efficiently and affordably.However,there has been limited research on the jet behavior and im-pingement characteristics of preheating shrouded supersonic j ets.Computational fluid dynamics (CFD)models were established to investigate the effects of main and shrouding gas temperatures on the characteristics of flow field and impingement of shrouded supersonic j et.The preheating shrouded supersonic j et behavior was simulated and meas-ured by numerical simulation and j et measurement experiment respectively.The influence of preheating shrouded su-personic j et on gas j et penetration and fluid flow in liquid bath was calculated by the CFD model which was validated against water model experiments.The results show that the uptrend of the potential core length of shrouded super-sonic j et would be accelerated with increasing the main and shrouding gas temperatures.Also,preheating supersonic j ets demonstrated significant advantages in penetrating and stirring the liquid bath.

  8. Effects of engine emissions from high-speed civil transport aircraft: A two-dimensional modeling study, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Sze, Nein Dak; Shia, Run-Lie; Rodriguez, Jose M.; Heisey, Curtis

    1991-01-01

    The AER two-dimensional chemistry-transport model is used to study the effect of supersonic and subsonic aircraft operation in the 2010 atmosphere on stratospheric ozone (O3). The results show that: (1) the calculated O3 response is smaller in the 2010 atmosphere compared to previous calculations performed in the 1980 atmosphere; (2) with the emissions provided, the calculated decrease in O3 column is less than 1 percent; and (3) the effect of model grid resolution on O3 response is small provided that the physics is not modified.

  9. H-infinity based integrated flight/propulsion control design for a STOVL aircraft in transition flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sanjay; Mattern, Duane L.; Bright, Michelle; Ouzts, Peter

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents results from an application of H(infinity) control design methodology to a centralized integrated flight/propulsion control (IFPC) system design for a supersonic STOVL fighter aircraft in transition flight. The overall design methodology consists of a centralized IFPC design with controller partitioning. Design and evaluation vehicle models are summarized, and insight is provided into formulating the H(infinity) control problem such that it reflects the IFPC design objective. The H(infinity) controller is shown to provide decoupled command tracking for the design model. The controller order could be significantly reduced by modal residualization of the fast controller modes without any deterioration in performance.

  10. Frequency Analysis of Aircraft hazards for License Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Ashley

    2006-10-24

    The preclosure safety analysis for the monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain must consider the hazard that aircraft may pose to surface structures. Relevant surface structures are located beneath the restricted airspace of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) on the eastern slope of Yucca Mountain, near the North Portal of the Exploratory Studies Facility Tunnel (Figure 1). The North Portal is located several miles from the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), which is used extensively by the U.S. Air Force (USAF) for training and test flights (Figure 1). The NTS airspace, which is controlled by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for NTS activities, is not part of the NTTR. Agreements with the DOE allow USAF aircraft specific use of the airspace above the NTS (Reference 2.1.1 [DIRS 103472], Section 3.1.1 and Appendix A, Section 2.1; and Reference 2.1.2 [DIRS 157987], Sections 1.26 through 1.29). Commercial, military, and general aviation aircraft fly within several miles to the southwest of the repository site in the Beatty Corridor, which is a broad air corridor that runs approximately parallel to U.S. Highway 95 and the Nevada-California border (Figure 2). These aircraft and other aircraft operations are identified and described in ''Identification of Aircraft Hazards'' (Reference 2.1.3, Sections 6 and 8). The purpose of this analysis is to estimate crash frequencies for aircraft hazards identified for detailed analysis in ''Identification of Aircraft Hazards'' (Reference 2.1.3, Section 8). Reference 2.1.3, Section 8, also identifies a potential hazard associated with electronic jamming, which will be addressed in this analysis. This analysis will address only the repository and not the transportation routes to the site. The analysis is intended to provide the basis for: (1) Categorizing event sequences related to aircraft hazards; (2) Identifying design or operational requirements related to aircraft hazards.

  11. 3 TUNNELS IN THE ENGINE RESEARCH BUILDING ERB - IN CELL CE-26 VARIABLE REYNOLDS NUMBER SUPERSONIC NO

    Science.gov (United States)

    1956-01-01

    3 TUNNELS IN THE ENGINE RESEARCH BUILDING ERB - IN CELL CE-26 VARIABLE REYNOLDS NUMBER SUPERSONIC NOZZLE - CELL CE-4 6X6 INCH MACH NUMBER 2.96 SUPERSONIC AIRPLANE - CELL 1-NW 1X1 FOOT MACH 3.12 SUPERSONIC TUNNEL

  12. Auralization of novel aircraft configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arntzen, M.; Bertsch, E.L.; Simons, D.G.

    2015-01-01

    A joint initiative of NLR, DLR, and TU Delft has been initiated to streamline the process of generating audible impressions of novel aircraft configurations. The integrated approach adds to the value of the individual tools and allows predicting the sound of future aircraft before they actually fly.

  13. MISSILES AND AIRCRAFT (PART1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Meyer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Many sources maintain that the role played by air power in the 1973 Yom Kippur War was important. Other interpretations state that control of air space over the battlefield areas, (either by aircraft or anti-aircraft defences, was vital.

  14. Resistance ability evaluation of safety-related structures for the simulated aircraft accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Sung Woon; Choi, Jang Kyu [Daewoo E and C Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2003-03-15

    Aircraft accidents on nuclear safety-related structures can cause severe damage to the safety of NPP(Nuclear Power Plant)s. To assess the safety of nuclear safety-related structures, the local damage and the dynamic response of global structures should be investigated together. This study have compared several local damage assessment formulas suggested for aircraft as an impactor, and have set the assessment system of local damage for impact-proof design of NPP containment buildings. And the local damage of nuclear safety-related structures in operation in Korea for commercial aircraft as impactor have been estimated. Impact load-time functions of the aircraft crash have been decided to assessment the safety of nuclear safety-related structures against the intentional colliding of commercial aircraft. Boeing 747 and Boeing 767 is selected as target aircraft based on the operation frequencies and weights. Comparison of the fire analysis methods showed that the method considering heat convection and radiation is adequate for the temperature analysis of the aircraft fuel fire. Finally, the study covered the analysis of the major structural drawings and design drawings with which three-dimensional finite element model analysis is expected to be performed.

  15. A plume capture technique for the remote characterization of aircraft engine emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G R; Mazaheri, M; Ristovski, Z D; Morawska, L

    2008-07-01

    A technique for capturing and analyzing plumes from unmodified aircraft or other combustion sources under real world conditions is described and applied to the task of characterizing plumes from commercial aircraft during the taxiing phase of the Landing/Take-Off (LTO) cycle. The method utilizes a Plume Capture and Analysis System (PCAS) mounted in a four-wheel drive vehicle which is positioned in the airfield 60 to 180 m downwind of aircraft operations. The approach offers low test turnaround times with the ability to complete careful measurements of particle and gaseous emission factors and sequentially scanned particle size distributions without distortion due to plume concentration fluctuations. These measurements can be performed for individual aircraft movements at five minute intervals. A Plume Capture Device (PCD) collected samples of the naturally diluted plume in a 200 L conductive membrane conforming to a defined shape. Samples from over 60 aircraft movements were collected and analyzed in situ for particulate and gaseous concentrations and for particle size distribution using a Scanning Particle Mobility Sizer (SMPS). Emission factors are derived for particle number, NO(x), and PM2.5 for a widely used commercial aircraft type, Boeing 737 airframes with predominantly CFM56 class engines, during taxiing. The practical advantages of the PCAS include the capacity to perform well targeted and controlled emission factor and size distribution measurements using instrumentation with varying response times within an airport facility, in close proximity to aircraft during their normal operations.

  16. Unsteady Flow in a Supersonic Turbine with Variable Specific Heats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Griffin, Lisa W.; Huber, Frank; Sondak, Douglas L.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Modern high-work turbines can be compact, transonic, supersonic, counter-rotating, or use a dense drive gas. The vast majority of modern rocket turbine designs fall into these Categories. These turbines usually have large temperature variations across a given stage, and are characterized by large amounts of flow unsteadiness. The flow unsteadiness can have a major impact on the turbine performance and durability. For example, the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) fuel turbine, a high work, transonic design, was found to have an unsteady inter-row shock which reduced efficiency by 2 points and increased dynamic loading by 24 percent. The Revolutionary Reusable Technology Turbopump (RRTT), which uses full flow oxygen for its drive gas, was found to shed vortices with such energy as to raise serious blade durability concerns. In both cases, the sources of the problems were uncovered (before turbopump testing) with the application of validated, unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to the designs. In the case of the RRTT and the Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) turbines, the unsteady CFD codes have been used not just to identify problems, but to guide designs which mitigate problems due to unsteadiness. Using unsteady flow analyses as a part of the design process has led to turbine designs with higher performance (which affects temperature and mass flow rate) and fewer dynamics problems. One of the many assumptions made during the design and analysis of supersonic turbine stages is that the values of the specific heats are constant. In some analyses the value is based on an average of the expected upstream and downstream temperatures. In stages where the temperature can vary by 300 to 500 K, however, the assumption of constant fluid properties may lead to erroneous performance and durability predictions. In this study the suitability of assuming constant specific heats has been investigated by performing three-dimensional unsteady Navier

  17. On commercial media bias

    OpenAIRE

    Germano, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    Within the spokes model of Chen and Riordan (2007) that allows for non-localized competition among arbitrary numbers of media outlets, we quantify the effect of concentration of ownership on quality and bias of media content. A main result shows that too few commercial outlets, or better, too few separate owners of commercial outlets can lead to substantial bias in equilibrium. Increasing the number of outlets (commercial and non-commercial) tends to bring down this bias; but the strongest ef...

  18. 超音速靶机的总体设计与研究%Conceptual Design and Reserch of Supersonic Target Drone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘靖; 刘志强

    2016-01-01

    According to the requirements of test and evaluation of weapon system, the general tech-nology requirements were put forward. The conceptual design of supersonic target drone on the aircraft design procedure was finished. The dynamic system, aerodynamic configuration and aerodynamic charac-teristics were designed in detail. The main flight performance was calculated. The foundation of engineer-ing implementation for the supersonic target drone has laid by the conceptual design.%根据武器系统试验需求,提出了超音速靶机的总体技术要求。按照飞行器设计的基本流程,完成了某型超音速靶机的总体设计,对该型靶机的动力系统、气动布局、气动特性等方面进行了详细设计,并对主要飞行性能进行了计算,为超音速靶机的工程实现打下了基础。

  19. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Combustion with Parallel Injection of Hydrogen Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S.R. Chandra Murty

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermochemical exploration of mixing and combustion of parallel hydrogen injection into supersonic vitiated air stream in a divergent duct is presented. Three-dimensional Navier Stokes equations along with twoequation turbulence models and Eddy dissipation concept (EDC-based combustion models are solved using commercial CFD software. Chemical reaction for H2-air system is modelled by two different simple chemical kinetic schemes namely; infinitely fast rate kinetics as well as the single-step finite rate kinetics. Grid convergence of the solution is demonstrated and a grid convergence index-based error estimate has been provided. Insight into the mixing and combustion of high-speed turbulent reacting flow is obtained through the analysis of various thermochemical variables. Very good comparisons are obtained for the exit profiles for various fluid dynamical and chemical variables for the mixing case. For reacting case, the comparison between the experimental and the numerical values are reasonable. Parametric studies were carried out to study the effect of different turbulence models and turbulent Schmidt numbers. It is seen that Wilcox k-w turbulence model performed better than the other two-equation turbulence models in its class. Strong dependence of flow behaviour on turbulent Schmidt number was observed. The results indicate that simple chemical kinetics is adequate to describe the H2-air reaction in the scramjet combustor.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(5, pp.465-475, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.57

  20. Development of air to air ejector for supersonic wind tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kracík Jan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the development of design of new conception of ejector with twelve primary annular nozzles arranged around the inlet part of the mixing chamber. The ejector is proposed to be used for propulsion of supersonic experimental wind tunnel with variable test section, which is now in development. The ejector is considered to be placed on outlet of this wind tunnel. The original design of the ejector has been modified to ensure its manufacturability. Software Ansys Fluent 14.0 was used for numerical verification of earlier work. The new design and dissimilarities of numerical results are presented in this work.