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Sample records for supersolar ammonia deeper

  1. Coronae of Stars with Supersolar Elemental Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Uria; Behar, Ehud; Drake, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Coronal elemental abundances are known to deviate from the photospheric values of their parent star, with the degree of deviation depending on the first ionization potential (FIP). This study focuses on the coronal composition of stars with supersolar photospheric abundances. We present the coronal abundances of six such stars: 11 LMi, iota Hor, HR 7291, tau Boo, and alpha Cen A and B. These stars all have high-statistics X-ray spectra, three of which are presented for the first time. The abundances we measured were obtained using the line-resolved spectra of the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) in conjunction with the higher throughput EPIC-pn camera spectra onboard the XMM-Newton observatory. A collisionally ionized plasma model with two or three temperature components is found to represent the spectra well. All elements are found to be consistently depleted in the coronae compared to their respective photospheres. For 11 LMi and tau Boo no FIP effect is present, while iota Hor, HR 7291, and alpha Cen A and B show a clear FIP trend. These conclusions hold whether the comparison is made with solar abundances or the individual stellar abundances. Unlike the solar corona, where low-FIP elements are enriched, in these stars the FIP effect is consistently due to a depletion of high-FIP elements with respect to actual photospheric abundances. A comparison with solar (instead of stellar) abundances yields the same fractionation trend as on the Sun. In both cases, a similar FIP bias is inferred, but different fractionation mechanisms need to be invoked.

  2. Evolution of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars - III. Dust production at supersolar metallicities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Ambra; Bressan, Alessandro; Marigo, Paola; Girardi, Léo

    2014-03-01

    We extend the formalism presented in our recent calculations of dust ejecta from the Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch (TP-AGB) phase to the case of super-solar metallicity stars. The TP-AGB evolutionary models are computed with the COLIBRI code. We adopt our preferred scheme for dust growth. For M-giants, we neglect chemisputtering by H2 molecules and for C-stars we assume a homogeneous growth scheme which is primarily controlled by the carbon over oxygen excess. At super-solar metallicities, dust forms more efficiently and silicates tend to condense significantly closer to the photosphere (r ˜ 1.5R*) - and thus at higher temperatures and densities - than at solar and sub-solar metallicities (r ˜ 2-3R*). In such conditions, the hypothesis of thermal decoupling between gas and dust becomes questionable, while dust heating due to collisions plays an important role. The heating mechanism delays dust condensation to slightly outer regions in the circumstellar envelope. We find that the same mechanism is not significant at solar and sub-solar metallicities. The main dust products at super-solar metallicities are silicates. We calculate the total dust ejecta and dust-to-gas ejecta, for various values of the stellar initial masses and initial metallicities Z = 0.04, 0.06. Merging these new calculations with those for lower metallicities it turns out that, contrary to what is often assumed, the total dust-to-gas ejecta of intermediate-mass stars exhibit only a weak dependence on the initial metal content.

  3. Evolution of Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars III. Dust production at supersolar metallicities

    CERN Document Server

    Nanni, Ambra; Marigo, Paola; Girardi, Léo

    2013-01-01

    We extend the formalism presented in our recent calculations of dust ejecta from the Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch (TP-AGB) phase, to the case of super-solar metallicity stars. The TP-AGB evolutionary models are computed with the COLIBRI code. We adopt our preferred scheme for dust growth. For M-giants, we neglect chemisputtering by H$_2$ molecules and, for C-stars we assume a homogeneous growth scheme which is primarily controlled by the carbon over oxygen excess. At super-solar metallicities, dust forms more efficiently and silicates tend to condense significantly closer to the photosphere (r~1.5 R$_*$) - and thus at higher temperatures and densities - than at solar and sub-solar metallicities (r~2-3 R$_*$). In such conditions, the hypothesis of thermal decoupling between gas and dust becomes questionable, while dust heating due to collisions plays an important role. The heating mechanism delays dust condensation to slightly outer regions in the circumstellar envelope. We find that the same mech...

  4. Civic Education and Deeper Learning. Deeper Learning Research Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Peter; Kawashima-Ginsberg, Kei

    2015-01-01

    This report proposes that the turn toward deeper learning in education reform should go hand in hand with a renewed emphasis on high-quality civics education. Not only does deeper learning have great potential to promote civic outcomes and strengthen our democracy but, at the same time, civic education exemplifies deeper learning, in that it…

  5. A Super-Solar Metallicity For Stars With Hot Rocky Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Mulders, Gijs D; Apai, Daniel; Frasca, Antonio; Molenda-Zakowicz, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The host star metallicity provide a measure of the conditions in protoplanetary disks at the time of planet formation. Using a sample of over 20,000 Kepler stars with spectroscopic metallicities from the LAMOST survey, we explore how the exoplanet population depends on host star metallicity as a function of orbital period and planet size. We find that exoplanets with orbital periods less than 10 days are preferentially found around metal-rich stars ([Fe/H]~ 0.15 +- 0.05 dex). The occurrence rates of these hot exoplanets increases to ~30% for super-solar metallicity stars from ~10% for stars with a sub-solar metallicity. Cooler exoplanets, that resides at longer orbital periods and constitute the bulk of the exoplanet population with an occurrence rate of >~ 90%, have host-star metallicities consistent with solar. At short orbital periods, P<10 days, the difference in host star metallicity is largest for hot rocky planets (<1.7 R_Earth), where the metallicity difference is [Fe/H] =~ 0.25 +- 0.07 dex. The...

  6. Designing Deeper Learning Experiences for Online Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerkawski, Betul C.

    2014-01-01

    Deeper learning promotes students' active engagement in learning environments, so they can continuously explore, reflect and produce information to build complex knowledge structures. Consequently, deeper learning has become a major focus of scholarly investigation and debate. Multiple studies have been conducted to describe the…

  7. Comments on the manuscript: "The weak absorbing outflow in AGN Mrk 279: evidence of super-solar metal abundances" astro-ph/0611578 by Fields et al

    CERN Document Server

    Arav, N; Costantini, E; Arav, Nahum; Kaastra, Jelle; Costantini, Elisa

    2006-01-01

    A recent manuscript posted on astro-ph (astro-ph/0611578) by Fields et al. (hereafter F06) reports evidence of supersolar metal abundances in Mrk 279 by analyzing its Chandra LETGS X-ray spectrum. We point out that it is impossible in principle to obtain direct metal abundances from these X-ray data, since there is no handle on the amount of hydrogen column density. If F06 would have lowered their C, N, O and Fe abundance by a factor of ten and increased the hydrogen column density by a factor of ten, they would have obtained an almost identical fit with subsolar metalicity. F06 find support for their supersolar metal abundances from a cursory analysis of the UV data from the same Mrk 279 campaign. We point out that F06 included in that analysis portions of the UV trough that are known to arise from gas unrelated to the outflow, which weakens the support from the UV data. A detailed analysis of the Chandra LETGS X-ray spectrum was accepted for publication in A&A on Sept 14 2006 (Costantini et al 2006; her...

  8. Research of The Deeper Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao You Rong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural networks (NNs have powerful computational abilities and could be used in a variety of applications; however, training these networks is still a difficult problem. With different network structures, many neural models have been constructed. In this report, a deeper neural networks (DNNs architecture is proposed. The training algorithm of deeper neural network insides searching the global optimal point in the actual error surface. Before the training algorithm is designed, the error surface of the deeper neural network is analyzed from simple to complicated, and the features of the error surface is obtained. Based on these characters, the initialization method and training algorithm of DNNs is designed. For the initialization, a block-uniform design method is proposed which separates the error surface into some blocks and finds the optimal block using the uniform design method. For the training algorithm, the improved gradient-descent method is proposed which adds a penalty term into the cost function of the old gradient descent method. This algorithm makes the network have a great approximating ability and keeps the network state stable. All of these improve the practicality of the neural network.

  9. The Role of Digital Technologies in Deeper Learning. Students at the Center: Deeper Learning Research Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Chris

    2014-01-01

    To compete in today's global, knowledge-based, innovation-centered economy, young people must go beyond a high school diploma and acquire not just academic knowledge, but interpersonal and interpersonal capacities. That is, they must engage in deeper learning. As schools shift away from traditional education models in favor or providing deeper…

  10. Digging Deeper: Looking Beyond Behavior to Discover Meaning

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Digging Deeper: Looking Beyond Behavior to Discover Meaning A Unit of Four Online Lessons Digging Deeper: Looking Beyond Behavior to Discover Meaning is a unit of four lessons that explore and apply ...

  11. Ammonia toxicity in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, D J; Tsui, T K N

    2002-01-01

    Ammonia is present in the aquatic environment due to agricultural run-off and decomposition of biological waste. Ammonia is toxic to all vertebrates causing convulsions, coma and death, probably because elevated NH4+ displaces K+ and depolarizes neurons, causing activation of NMDA type glutamate receptor, which leads to an influx of excessive Ca2+ and subsequent cell death in the central nervous system. Present ammonia criteria for aquatic systems are based on toxicity tests carried out on, starved, resting, non-stressed fish. This is doubly inappropriate. During exhaustive exercise and stress, fish increase ammonia production and are more sensitive to external ammonia. Present criteria do not protect swimming fish. Fish have strategies to protect them from the ammonia pulse following feeding, and this also protects them from increases in external ammonia, as a result starved fish are more sensitive to external ammonia than fed fish. There are a number of fish species that can tolerate high environmental ammonia. Glutamine formation is an important ammonia detoxification strategy in the brain of fish, especially after feeding. Detoxification of ammonia to urea has also been observed in elasmobranches and some teleosts. Reduction in the rate of proteolysis and the rate of amino acid catabolism, which results in a decrease in ammonia production, may be another strategy to reduce ammonia toxicity. The weather loach volatilizes NH3, and the mudskipper, P. schlosseri, utilizes yet another unique strategy, it actively pumps NH4+ out of the body.

  12. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  13. Digging Deeper: Looking Beyond Behavior to Discover Meaning

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Behavior to Discover Meaning A Unit of Four Online Lessons Digging Deeper: Looking Beyond Behavior to Discover ... Behavior to Discover Meaning. A Unit of Four Online Lessons. HHS/ACF/OHS/EHSNRC. 2006. English. Last ...

  14. Indicators to Monitor Deeper Regional Trade Integration in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2015-01-01

    Stronger regional integration has been a policy priority in Africa for several decades. Countries in Africa have committed to a process of deeper integration, but have made little progress in implementing commitments and removing barriers. This report looks at the monitoring of regional integration in Africa and argues that more effective monitoring processes for existing integration arran...

  15. Ammonia emissions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    The NEC (National Emission Ceiling) directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries with the la......The NEC (National Emission Ceiling) directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries...

  16. Respiratory ammonia output and blood ammonia concentration during incremental exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ament, W; Huizenga, [No Value; Kort, E; van der Mark, TW; Grevink, RG; Verkerke, GJ

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the increase of ammonia concentration and lactate concentration in blood was accompanied by an increased expiration of ammonia during graded exercise. Eleven healthy subjects performed an incremental cycle ergometer test. Blood ammonia, blood lactate

  17. How School Districts Can Support Deeper Learning: The Need for Performance Alignment. Executive Summary. Deeper Learning Research Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Meredith I.; Rainey, Lydia R.

    2015-01-01

    School district leaders nationwide aspire to help their schools become vibrant places for learning--where students have meaningful academic opportunities "and" develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills, the ability to communicate effectively, and other deeper learning capacities that are essential to success in later life.…

  18. Hydroaminomethylation in supercritical ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Kant, M. [Leibniz-Institute for Catalysis, Berlin (Germany); Klein, H.; Jackstell, R.; Beller, M. [Leibniz-Institute for Catalysis, Rostock (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Thermodynamic measurements were carried in the reaction system of hydroaminomethylation of olefins. Mixtures of ammonia, olefins, co-solvents, syngas and products such as nonylamine used as model and water were studied. In dependence on the reaction conditions and the mixtures selected opalescence points in a region from 92-290 bar and 120-172 C were found. (orig.)

  19. Tritiated ammonia formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heung, L.K.

    1994-03-01

    A rate equation that closely simulates experimental data has been developed. this rate equation can be used to calculate the formation of tritiated ammonia from different concentrations of tritium and nitrogen. The reaction of T{sub 2} and N{sub 2} to form NT{sub 3} is a slow process, particularly when the tritium concentration is low. The reaction requires weeks or months to reach equilibrium dependent on the concentrations of the reactants.

  20. Combustion driven ammonia generation strategies for passive ammonia SCR system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, Joel G.; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Szekely, Jr., Gerald A.; Najt, Paul M.

    2016-12-06

    A method for controlling ammonia generation in an exhaust gas feedstream output from an internal combustion engine equipped with an exhaust aftertreatment system including a first aftertreatment device includes executing an ammonia generation cycle to generate ammonia on the first aftertreatment device. A desired air-fuel ratio output from the engine and entering the exhaust aftertreatment system conducive for generating ammonia on the first aftertreatment device is determined. Operation of a selected combination of a plurality of cylinders of the engine is selectively altered to achieve the desired air-fuel ratio entering the exhaust aftertreatment system.

  1. Pilot-scale field study for ammonia removal from lagoon biogas using an acid wet scrubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hongjian; Wu, Xiao; Miller, Curtis; Zhu, Jun; Hadlocon, Lara Jane; Manuzon, Roderick; Zhao, Lingying

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic activities in swine slurry storage and treatment generate biogas containing gaseous ammonia component which is a chemical agent that can cause adverse environmental impacts when released to the atmosphere. The aim of this pilot plant study was to remove ammonia from biogas generated in a covered lagoon, using a sulfuric acid wet scrubber. The data showed that, on average, the biogas contained 43.7 ppm of ammonia and its concentration was found to be exponentially related to the air temperature inside the lagoon. When the air temperature rose to 35°C and the biogas ammonia concentration reached 90 ppm, the mass transfer of ammonia/ammonium from the deeper liquid body to the interface between the air and liquid became a limiting factor. The biogas velocity was critical in affecting ammonia removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. A biogas flow velocity of 8 to 12 mm s(-1) was recommended to achieve a removal efficiency of greater than 60%. Stepwise regression revealed that the biogas velocity and air temperature, not the inlet ammonia concentration in biogas, affected the ammonia removal efficiency. Overall, when 73 g L(-1) (or 0.75 M) sulfuric acid solution was used as the scrubber solution, removal efficiencies varied from 0% to 100% with an average of 55% over a 40-d measurement period. Mass balance calculation based on ammonium-nitrogen concentration in final scrubber liquid showed that about 21.3 g of ammonia was collected from a total volume of 1169 m(3) of biogas, while the scrubber solution should still maintain its ammonia absorbing ability until its concentration reaches up to 1 M. These results showed promising use of sulfuric acid wet scrubber for ammonia removal in the digester biogas.

  2. Ammonia emissions from seabird colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackall, Trevor D.; Wilson, Linda J.; Theobald, Mark R.; Milford, Celia; Nemitz, Eiko; Bull, Jennifer; Bacon, Philip J.; Hamer, Keith C.; Wanless, Sarah; Sutton, Mark A.

    2007-05-01

    Ammonia emissions were measured from two entire seabird colonies with contrasting species assemblages, to ascertain the ammonia volatilisation potentials among seabird species in relation to their nesting behaviour. Emissions were calculated from downwind plume measurements of ammonia concentration using both inverse dispersion and tracer ratio methods. Measured colony emissions ranged 1-90 kg NH3 hour-1, and equated to 16 and 36% volatilization of excreted nitrogen for colonies dominated by ground/burrow nesting and bare rock nesting birds, respectively. The results were applied in a bioenergetics model with a global seabird database. Seabird colonies are found to represent the largest point sources of ammonia globally (up to ~6 Gg NH3 colony-1 year-1). Moreover the largest emissions occur mainly in remote environments with otherwise low NH3 emissions. These ammonia ``hot spots'' explain significant perturbations of the nitrogen cycle in these regions and add ~20% to oceanic ammonia emissions south of latitude 45°S.

  3. Ernst Mach a deeper look : documents and new perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    Ernst Mach -- A Deeper Look has been written to reveal to English-speaking readers the recent revival of interest in Ernst Mach in Europe and Japan. The book is a storehouse of new information on Mach as a philosopher, historian, scientist and person, containing a number of biographical and philosophical manuscripts publihsed for the first time, along with correspondence and other matters published for the first time in English. The book also provides English translations of Mach's controversies with leading physicists and psychologists, such as Max Planck and Carl Stumpf, and offers basic evidence for resolving Mach's position on atomism and Einstein's theory of relativity. Mach's scientific, philosophical and personal influence in a number of countries -- Austria, Germany, Bohemia and Yugoslavia among them -- has been carefully explored and many aspects detailed for the first time. All of the articles are eminently readable, especially those written by Mach's sister. They are deeply researched, new interpre...

  4. Going Deeper With Contextual CNN for Hyperspectral Image Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyungtae; Kwon, Heesung

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we describe a novel deep convolutional neural network (CNN) that is deeper and wider than other existing deep networks for hyperspectral image classification. Unlike current state-of-the-art approaches in CNN-based hyperspectral image classification, the proposed network, called contextual deep CNN, can optimally explore local contextual interactions by jointly exploiting local spatio-spectral relationships of neighboring individual pixel vectors. The joint exploitation of the spatio-spectral information is achieved by a multi-scale convolutional filter bank used as an initial component of the proposed CNN pipeline. The initial spatial and spectral feature maps obtained from the multi-scale filter bank are then combined together to form a joint spatio-spectral feature map. The joint feature map representing rich spectral and spatial properties of the hyperspectral image is then fed through a fully convolutional network that eventually predicts the corresponding label of each pixel vector. The proposed approach is tested on three benchmark data sets: the Indian Pines data set, the Salinas data set, and the University of Pavia data set. Performance comparison shows enhanced classification performance of the proposed approach over the current state-of-the-art on the three data sets.

  5. A deeper understanding of sequence in narrative visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullman, Jessica; Drucker, Steven; Henry Riche, Nathalie; Lee, Bongshin; Fisher, Danyel; Adar, Eytan

    2013-12-01

    Conveying a narrative with visualizations often requires choosing an order in which to present visualizations. While evidence exists that narrative sequencing in traditional stories can affect comprehension and memory, little is known about how sequencing choices affect narrative visualization. We consider the forms and reactions to sequencing in narrative visualization presentations to provide a deeper understanding with a focus on linear, 'slideshow-style' presentations. We conduct a qualitative analysis of 42 professional narrative visualizations to gain empirical knowledge on the forms that structure and sequence take. Based on the results of this study we propose a graph-driven approach for automatically identifying effective sequences in a set of visualizations to be presented linearly. Our approach identifies possible transitions in a visualization set and prioritizes local (visualization-to-visualization) transitions based on an objective function that minimizes the cost of transitions from the audience perspective. We conduct two studies to validate this function. We also expand the approach with additional knowledge of user preferences for different types of local transitions and the effects of global sequencing strategies on memory, preference, and comprehension. Our results include a relative ranking of types of visualization transitions by the audience perspective and support for memory and subjective rating benefits of visualization sequences that use parallelism as a structural device. We discuss how these insights can guide the design of narrative visualization and systems that support optimization of visualization sequence.

  6. A Deeper Look at the "Neural Correlate of Consciousness"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Benjamin Fink

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A main goal of the neuroscience of consciousness is: find the neural correlate to conscious experiences (NCC. When have we achieved this goal? The answer depends on our operationalisation of NCC. David Chalmers (2000 shaped the widely accepted operationalisation according to which an NCC is a neural system with a state which is minimally sufficient (but not necessary for an experience. A deeper look at this operationalisation reveals four ways how it might be unsatisfactory: (i it is not an operationalisation of a correlate of currently experiencing, but of the capacity to experience; (ii it is impractical and unhelpful for certain cases which are sometimes used to motivate a search for neural correlates of consciousness; (iii it does not mirror the usage of NCC by scientists who seek for unique correlates; (iv it hardly allows for a form of comparative testing of hypotheses, namely experimenta crucis. If problems (i–(iv are unsatisfactory enough, then we ought to amend or improve on Chalmers’s operationalisation. Here, I present an alternative which avoids these problems. This NCC2.0 also retains some benefits of Chalmers’s operationalisation, namely being compatible with contributions from extended, embedded, enacted, or embodied accounts (4E-accounts and allowing for the possibility of non-biological or artificial experiencers.

  7. Ammonia emissions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    measures might be cheaper in the Netherlands and Denmark than in the UK and the USA due to technology advances and stricter regulations in the past. The new Danish application procedure, when increasing the animal production, has tried to make the acceptance procedure quicker and dynamic ensuring that new......The NEC (National Emission Ceiling) directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries...... technology is adopted quicker and that the farm has the right location. It is concluded that the new application process so far has not lived up to the high expectations at the outset. Despite this, the paper concludes that Denmark is likely to reduce emission by 50% from 1990 to 2020 and reach the likely...

  8. Deeper Insights into the Circumgalactic Medium using Multivariate Analysis Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Kacprzak, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    Drawing from a database of galaxies whose surrounding gas has absorption from MgII, called the MgII-Absorbing Galaxy Catalog (MAGIICAT, Neilsen et al 2013), we studied the circumgalactic medium (CGM) for a sample of 47 galaxies. Using multivariate analysis, in particular the k-means clustering algorithm, we determined that simultaneously examining column density (N), rest-frame B-K color, virial mass, and azimuthal angle (the projected angle between the galaxy major axis and the quasar line of sight) yields two distinct populations: (1) bluer, lower mass galaxies with higher column density along the minor axis, and (2) redder, higher mass galaxies with lower column density along the major axis. We support this grouping by running (i) two-sample, two-dimensional Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) tests on each of the six bivariate planes and (ii) two-sample KS tests on each of the four variables to show that the galaxies significantly cluster into two independent populations. To account for the fact that 16 of our 47 galaxies have upper limits on N, we performed Monte-Carlo tests whereby we replaced upper limits with random deviates drawn from a Schechter distribution fit, f(N). These tests strengthen the results of the KS tests. We examined the behavior of the MgII λ2796 absorption line equivalent width and velocity width for each galaxy population. We find that equivalent width and velocity width do not show similar characteristic distinctions between the two galaxy populations. We discuss the k-means clustering algorithm for optimizing the analysis of populations within datasets as opposed to using arbitrary bivariate subsample cuts. We also discuss the power of the k-means clustering algorithm in extracting deeper physical insight into the CGM in relationship to host galaxies.

  9. Going deeper: metagenome of a hadopelagic microbial community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiley A Eloe

    attributes present in microbes residing in a deeper layer of the ocean far removed from the more productive sun-drenched zones above.

  10. Ammonia Synthesis at Low Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cussler, Edward; McCormick, Alon; Reese, Michael; Malmali, Mahdi

    2017-08-23

    Ammonia can be synthesized at low pressure by the use of an ammonia selective absorbent. The process can be driven with wind energy, available locally in areas requiring ammonia for synthetic fertilizer. Such wind energy is often called "stranded," because it is only available far from population centers where it can be directly used. In the proposed low pressure process, nitrogen is made from air using pressure swing absorption, and hydrogen is produced by electrolysis of water. While these gases can react at approximately 400 °C in the presence of a promoted conventional catalyst, the conversion is often limited by the reverse reaction, which makes this reaction only feasible at high pressures. This limitation can be removed by absorption on an ammine-like calcium or magnesium chloride. Such alkaline metal halides can effectively remove ammonia, thus suppressing the equilibrium constraints of the reaction. In the proposed absorption-enhanced ammonia synthesis process, the rate of reaction may then be controlled not by the chemical kinetics nor the absorption rates, but by the rate of the recycle of unreacted gases. The results compare favorably with ammonia made from a conventional small scale Haber-Bosch process.

  11. Global Seabird Ammonia Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddick, S. N.; Blackall, T. D.; Dragosits, U.; Daunt, F. H.; Braban, C. F.; Tang, Y. S.; Trathan, P.; Wanless, S.; Sutton, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Seabird colonies represent a major source of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) in remote coastal and marine systems in temperate, tropical and polar regions. Previous studies have shown that NH3 emissions from Scottish seabird colonies were substantial - of similar magnitude to the most intensive agricultural point source emissions. The UK data were used to model global seabird NH3 emissions and suggested that penguins are a major source of emissions on and around the Antarctic continent. The largest seabird colonies are in the order of millions of seabirds. Due to the isolation of these colonies from anthropogenic nitrogen sources, they may play a major role in the nitrogen cycle within these ecosystems. A global seabird database was constructed and used in conjunction with a species-specific seabird bioenergetics model to map the locations of NH3 emissions from seabird colonies. The accuracy of the modelled emissions was validated with field data of NH3 emissions measured at key seabird colonies in different climatic regions of the world: temperate (Isle of May, Scotland), tropical (Ascension Island) and polar (Signy Island, South Georgia). The field data indicated good agreement between modelled and measured NH3 emissions. The measured NH3 emissions also showed the variability of emission with climate. Climate dependence of seabird NH3 emissions may have further implications under a changing global climate. Seabird colonies represent NH3 emission ‘hotspots’, often far from anthropogenic sources, and are likely to be the major source of nitrogen input to these remote coastal ecosystems. The direct manuring by seabirds at colony locations may strongly influence species richness and biodiversity. The subsequent volatilisation and deposition of NH3 increases the spatial extent of seabird influence on nitrogen cycling in their local ecosystem. As many seabird populations are fluctuating due to changing food supply, climate change or anthropogenic pressures, these factors

  12. MEASUREMENT OF AMMONIA RELEASE FROM SALTSTONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamecnik, J; Alex Cozzi, A

    2009-01-15

    SRNL was requested by WSRC Waste Solidification Engineering to characterize the release of ammonia from saltstone curing at 95 C by performing experimental testing. These tests were performed with an MCU-type Tank 50H salt simulant containing 0, 50, and 200 mg/L ammonia. The testing program showed that above saltstone made from the 200 mg/L ammonia simulant, the vapor space ammonia concentration was about 2.7 mg/L vapor at 95 C. An upper 95% confidence value for this concentration was found to be 3.9 mg/L. Testing also showed that ammonia was chemically generated from curing saltstone at 95 C; the amount of ammonia generated was estimated to be equivalent to 121 mg/L additional ammonia in the salt solution feed. Even with chemical generation, the ammonia release from saltstone was found to be lower than its release from salt solution only with 200 mg/L ammonia.

  13. RESULTS OF INITIAL AMMONIA OXIDATION TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fowley, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-12-30

    This memo presents an experimental survey of aqueous phase chemical processes to remove aqueous ammonia from waste process streams. Ammonia is generated in both the current Hanford waste flowsheet and in future waste processing. Much ammonia will be generated in the Low Activity Waste (LAW) melters.i Testing with simulants in glass melters at Catholic University has demonstrated the significant ammonia production.ii The primary reaction there is the reducing action of sugar on nitrate in the melter cold cap. Ammonia has been found to be a problem in secondary waste stabilization. Ammonia vapors are noxious and destruction of ammonia could reduce hazards to waste treatment process personnel. It is easily evolved especially when ammonia-bearing solutions are adjusted to high pH.

  14. DETERMINATION OF AMMONIA IN EAR-LOBE CAPILLARY BLOOD IS AN ALTERNATIVE TO ARTERIAL BLOOD AMMONIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HUIZENGA, [No Value; GIPS, CH; CONN, HO; JANSEN, PLM

    1995-01-01

    Blood ammonia determination is a laboratory test to diagnose hepatic encephalopathy. Arterial blood is superior to peripheral venous blood ammonia because of ammonia metabolism in muscle. We have compared capillary with arterial whole blood ammonia as capillary sampling is an attractive alternative.

  15. Role of deeper sections in diagnostic oral histopathology: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikanth Manyam

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Diagnostic laboratories must balance the utility of deeper levels with the additional time required and expense incurred and the impact on patient care. Deeper sections are inevitable in certain situations and periodical auditing of laboratory work will reduce the need for additional sections and delay in the dispatch of biopsy report.

  16. Parameter Optimization on Experimental Study to Reduce Ammonia Escape in CO2 Absorption by Ammonia Scrubbing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Leng; Jianmin Gao; Mingyue He; Min Xie; Qian Du; Rui Sun; Shaohua Wu

    2016-01-01

    In order to research ammonia escape in CO2 absorption by ammonia scrubbing, ammonia escape was studied in CO2 absorption process using the bubbling reactor in different conditions as gas flow rate, CO2 ratio, absorbent temperature and ammonia concentration and quantity of escaped ammonia was measured by chemical titration. The results indicated that, the amount of ammonia escape can be around 20% of original amount in 90 min and the escaped amount will increase with the rise of gas flow rate, absorbent temperature, concentration of ammonia while decrease as CO2 ratio goes up. Through the analysis of the law of ammonia escape, at the same time, combined with ammonia escape and the influence of the relationship between the CO2 absorption efficiency, reducing ammonia escape working condition parameter optimization is given.

  17. Forthcoming Oversupply for Synthetic Ammonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhantong

    2007-01-01

    @@ Stable output increase The total capacity of synthetic ammonia in China is 52.0 million t/a today.There are around 540 producers mainly located in Shandong, Shanxi, Hebei,Henan, Jiangsu and Sichuan provinces.The cumulative capacity in Shandong province ranks the highest, accounting for 14.6% of the national total.

  18. Inhibiting Wet Oxidation of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, D. B. L.

    1985-01-01

    Simple modification of wet-oxidation process for treating organicwaste reduces loss of fixed nitrogen, potentially valuable byproduct of process. Addition of sufficient sulfuric acid to maintain reaction pH below 3 greatly reduces oxidation of ammonia to free nitrogen. No equipment modification required.

  19. Ceramic Membranes for Ammonia Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camus, O.; Perera, S.; Crittenden, B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Van Delft, Y.C.; Meyer, D.F.; Pex, P.P.A.C. [ECN Solar Energy, Westerduinweg 3, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Kumakiri, I.; Miachon, S.; Dalmon, J.A. [CNRS-Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse 2, av. A. Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne (France); Tennison, S. [MAST Carbon, Ltd., Henley Park, Guildford, Surrey, GU3 2AF (United Kingdom); Chanaud, P. [Pall-Exekia, BP1, Usine a Bazet (France); Groensmit, E. [Kemira GrowHow SA/NV, Avenue Einstein 11, B-1300 Wavre (Belgium); Nobel, W. [Continental Engineers BV, Rustenburg 114, 1506 AZ Zaandam (Netherlands)

    2008-12-15

    An extensive screening program has been performed to find a suitable membrane configuration and operating conditions for the effective recovery of ammonia from the syngas loop. All the experiments have been performed at steady state. MFI zeolite membranes in tubular and multi-channel fiber configurations have been tested along with tubular silica membranes. At 80C, a high ammonia permeance (2.1 x 10{sup -7} mol.m{sup -2}.s{sup -1}.Pa{sup -1}), and a selectivity of about 10 were found with the tubular zeolite membrane, whereas for the silica membrane an even higher ammonia permeance was measured (7.6 x 10{sup -7} mol.m{sup -2}.s{sup -1}.Pa{sup -1}) with a selectivity of about 7. For both silica and zeolite membranes, the selectivity was found to increase with increasing temperature up to 80C. This is a combined effect of weaker adsorption of ammonia and increased diffusion at higher temperature. The results have been modeled using both the well-mixed reactor and the log mean pressure difference approaches. To overcome their limitations in addressing changes in feed concentration along the membrane surface, a segmental model has been used to obtain suitable operating conditions and membrane areas required for an industrial application.

  20. Ammonia in power plant emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerich, Mads; Henningsen, J. O.; Olafsson, Ari

    1990-08-01

    Ammonia monitoring is needed in most schemes for denitrification of power plant emission. In the PALAMON system we use a 500 MHz tunable, single mode, single line, CO2 laser as light source for a low pressure, high temperature, photoacoustic cell. With this cell we can resolve the sR(5,O) line of the ammonia spectrum, and suppress the interfering C02(9R30) absorption line down to a lppm NH3 detection limit. The validity of the measured ammonia concentrations is strongly dependent on details of the sampling system and on the reliability of the calibration routines. In particular calibration with certified mixtures of NH3:N2 has proved insufficient due to the multiple and long time constants caused by adsorption of ammonia to different materials in the system. Presence of water vapor in the gas greatly reduces these time constants. Therefore a number of methods for simple production of moist calibration gases from macroscopic amounts of NH3 are applied. The calibrations are translated to response from an easily managable absorber in order to allow automated recalibration of the photoacoustic response. Data from a field test of the system, and calibration data will be presented.

  1. Transcriptional Response of the Archaeal Ammonia Oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus to Low and Environmentally Relevant Ammonia Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Stahl, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of chemoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea to compete for ammonia among marine microorganisms at low ambient concentrations has been in part attributed to their extremely high affinity for ammonia, but as yet there is no mechanistic understanding of supporting metabolism. We examined transcription of selected genes for anabolic functions (CO2 fixation, ammonia transport, and cell wall synthesis) and a central catabolic function (ammonia oxidation) in the thaumarchaeon Nitrosopu...

  2. Transcriptional response of the archaeal ammonia oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus to low and environmentally relevant ammonia concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Stahl, David A

    2013-11-01

    The ability of chemoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea to compete for ammonia among marine microorganisms at low ambient concentrations has been in part attributed to their extremely high affinity for ammonia, but as yet there is no mechanistic understanding of supporting metabolism. We examined transcription of selected genes for anabolic functions (CO2 fixation, ammonia transport, and cell wall synthesis) and a central catabolic function (ammonia oxidation) in the thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1 growing at two ammonia concentrations, as measured by combined ammonia and ammonium, one well above the Km for ammonia oxidation (∼500 μM) and the other well below the Km (ammonia-replete to ammonia-limiting conditions. Transcript levels for ammonia oxidation, CO2 fixation, and one of the ammonia transport genes were approximately the same at high and low ammonia availability. Transcripts for all analyzed genes decreased with time in the complete absence of ammonia, but with various rates of decay. The new steady-state mRNA levels established are presumably more reflective of the natural physiological state of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and offer a reference for interpreting message abundance patterns in the natural environment.

  3. Ammonia as efficient fuel for SOFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerte, A.; Valenzuela, R.X.; Escudero, M.J. [CIEMAT, Departamento de Energia, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Daza, L. [CIEMAT, Departamento de Energia, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    Ammonia is a possible candidate as the fuel for SOFCs. In this work, the influence on the performance of a tubular SOFC running on ammonia is studied. Analysis of open circuit voltages (OCVs) on the cell indicated the oxidation of ammonia within a SOFC is a two-stage process: decomposition of the inlet ammonia into nitrogen and hydrogen, followed by oxidation of hydrogen to water. For comparison, cell was also tested with hydrogen as the fuel and air as oxidant at different temperatures showing a similar behaviour. The performance of the cell tested under various conditions shows the high potential of ammonia as fuel for SOFCs. (author)

  4. Ammonia for hydrogen storage: challenges and opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klerke, Asbjørn; Christensen, Claus H.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of using ammonia as a hydrogen carrier is discussed. Compared to other hydrogen storage materials, ammonia has the advantages of a high hydrogen density, a well-developed technology for synthesis and distribution, and easy catalytic decomposition. Compared to hydrocarbons...... and alcohols, it has the advantage that there is no CO2 emission at the end user. The drawbacks are mainly the toxicity of liquid ammonia and the problems related to trace amounts of ammonia in the hydrogen after decomposition. Storage of ammonia in metal ammine salts is discussed, and it is shown...... that this maintains the high volumetric hydrogen density while alleviating the problems of handling the ammonia. Some of the remaining challenges for research in ammonia as a hydrogen carrier are outlined....

  5. Vertical segregation and phylogenetic characterization of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in the sediment of a freshwater aquaculture pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimin eLu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pond aquaculture is the major freshwater aquaculture method in China. Ammonia-oxidizing communities inhabiting pond sediments play an important role in controlling culture water quality. However, the distribution and activities of ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities along sediment profiles are poorly understood in this specific environment. Vertical variations in the abundance, transcription, potential ammonia oxidizing rate, and community composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA in sediment samples (0–50 cm depth collected from a freshwater aquaculture pond were investigated. The concentrations of the AOA amoA gene were higher than those of the AOB by an order of magnitude, which suggested that AOA, as opposed to AOB, were the numerically predominant ammonia-oxidizing organisms in the surface sediment. This could be attributed to the fact that AOA are more resistant to low levels of dissolved oxygen. However, the concentrations of the AOB amoA mRNA were higher than those of the AOA by 2.5–39.9-fold in surface sediments (0–10 cm depth, which suggests that the oxidation of ammonia was mainly performed by AOB in the surface sediments, and by AOA in the deeper sediments, where only AOA could be detected. Clone libraries of AOA and AOB amoA sequences indicated that the diversity of AOA and AOB decreased with increasing depth. The AOB community consisted of two groups: the Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas clusters, and Nitrosomonas were predominant in the freshwater pond sediment. All AOA amoA gene sequences in the 0–2 cm deep sediment were grouped into the Nitrososphaera cluster, while other AOA sequences in deeper sediments (10–15 and 20–25 cm depths were grouped into the Nitrosopumilus cluster.

  6. Digging deeper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Laura Mørch; Lund, Thomas Bøker

    segments. The estimations show that the development in general organic consumption varies between segments, and that their behaviour varies between sub markets. The positive half of the population has driven the overall growth in organic budget share at the Danish market over the period 2005 to 2007, while...... the other half have not changed their consumption significantly. The results indicate that for the most dedicated organic consumers, the organic budget share may be approaching a saturation point for some types of food, but also identifies other types of food which still have a growing organic budget share...

  7. Digging deeper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Rikke Vestergaard

    2011-01-01

    The paper suggests viewing managerial concepts as theories in use. Organizational transformation may thus be considered a process of adapting organizational practices to match these theories. The paper develops a framework that integrates findings based on industrial engineering perspectives on l...... on lean and writings from organizational theorists on Toyota management system. Based on translation theory, the paper argues that such framework should facilitate such communication driven change as well as the development of better research constructs of TPS....

  8. Digging deeper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Laura Mørch; Lund, Thomas Bøker

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how sub markets with different degrees of maturity develop during a period of general organic growth, and how different consumer segments behave on these sub markets. The paper uses actual purchasing behaviour of six consumer segments with different...... segments. The estimations show that the development in general organic consumption varies between segments, and that their behaviour varies between sub markets. The positive half of the population has driven the overall growth in organic budget share at the Danish market over the period 2005 to 2007, while......, even among the most dedicated consumers. The combination of attitudes and actual behaviour for a large number of consumers is new, and the results provide a valuable contribution to the ongoing investigation of organic consumers, and provide new nuances to the understanding of the latest organic growth....

  9. Ammonia Process by Pressure Swing Adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr Felix Jegede

    2010-12-27

    The overall objective of the project is to design, develop and demonstrate a technically feasible and commercially viable system to produce ammonia along with recovery of the products by adsorption separation methods and significantly decrease the energy requirement in ammonia production. This is achieved through a significantly more efficient ammonia psa recovery system. The new ammonia recovery system receives the reactor effluents and achieves complete ammonia recovery, (which completely eliminates the energy intensive refrigeration and condensation system currently used in ammonia production). It also recovers the unused reactants and recycles them back to the reactor, free of potential reactor contaminants, and without the need for re-compression and re-heat of recycle stream thereby further saving more energy. The result is a significantly lower energy consumption, along with capital cost savings.

  10. Enrichment of high ammonia tolerant methanogenic culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Proietti, Nicolas

    plants. The methods used today to counteract ammonia inhibition are slow and costexpensive. A new biological approach to avoid or counteract ammonia inhibition by using ammonia tolerant methanogens, could provide a sustainable solution for cost-effective digestion of abundant ammonia-rich wastes. The aim...... of the current study was to isolate and identify methanogenic cultures tolerant to high ammonia concentrations. A mixed methanogenic population was stepwise exposed to ammonia concentrations (1 to 9.26 g NH4+-N L-1) during an enrichment process with successive batch cultivations. The methanogenic population...... was derived from a full scale biogas reactor (Hashøj, Denmark), fed with 75% animal manure and 25% food industries organic waste. Basal anaerobic medium was used for the enrichment along with sodium acetate (1 g HAc L-1) as a carbon source. Fluorescence insitu hybridization (FISH) was used to determine...

  11. Ammonia emission from crop residues : quantification of ammonia volatilization based on crop residue properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, de F.J.; Huijsmans, J.F.M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of available literature data on ammonia volatilization from crop residues. From these data, a relation is derived for the ammonia emission depending on the N-content of crop residue.

  12. Tetraammineplatinum(II dichloride ammonia tetrasolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Grassl

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Pt(NH34]Cl2·4NH3, was crystallized in liquid ammonia from the salt PtCl2. The platinum cation is coordinated by four ammonia molecules, forming a square-planar complex. The chloride anions are surrounded by nine ammonia molecules, either bound within the platinum complex or solvent molecules. The solvent ammonia molecules are packed in such a way that an extended network of N—H...N and N—H...Cl hydrogen bonds is formed. The structure is isotypic with [Pd(NH34]Cl2·4NH3 [Grassl & Korber (2014. Acta Cryst. E70, i32].

  13. Ammonia synthesis at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Logadottir, Ashildur; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2000-01-01

    have been carried out to evaluate its feasibility. The calculations suggest that it might be possible to catalytically produce ammonia from molecular nitrogen at low temperatures and pressures, in particular if energy is fed into the process electrochemically. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics........ In contrast to the biological process, the industrial process requires high temperatures and pressures to proceed, and an explanation of this important difference is discussed. The possibility of a metal surface catalyzed process running at low temperatures and pressures is addressed, and DFT calculations...

  14. Reducing ammonia emissions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.

    2011-01-01

    The NEC directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries with the largest reductions since 1990...... to the high expectations at the outset. Despite this, the paper concludes that Denmark is likely to reduce emission by 50% from 1990 to 2020 and reach the likely 2020 NEC ceiling....

  15. Carbon fluxes in soil:long-term sequestration in deeper soil horizons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JohnF.MCCARTHY

    2005-01-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems represent the second largest carbon reservoir, and the C balance in terrestrial ecosystems can be directly impacted by human activities such as agricultural management practices and land-use changes. This paper focuses on the C-sequestration in soil. Although many studies showed that the concentration of SOC is much higher in the shallow soils (0-30 cm), the deeper horizons represent a much greater mass of soil and represent a huge C-storage pool. The process of preferential retention of more strongly adsorbing components, along with competitive displacement of weakly binding components are the key processes that enhance the movement of organic carbon to deeper soil horizons. DOC represents the most dynamic part of organic carbon in soils, and thus can be used as a timely indicator of the short-term change of C-sequestration.Long-term experiments have demonstrated that higher SOC levels in shallow soils would lead to increased fluxes of DOC to deeper horizons, but more data on a wider range of soils and treatment strategies are needed to fully evaluate the linkages between changes in SOC in shallow soil, vertical fluxes of DOC to deeper soil horizons, and enhanced C-inventories in deeper, slow-turnover SOC pools.

  16. Ammonia abatement by slurry acidification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren O.; Hutchings, Nicholas John; Hafner, Sasha

    2016-01-01

    Livestock production systems can be major sources of trace gases including ammonia (NH3), the greenhouse gases methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), and odorous compounds such as hydrogen sulphide (H2S). Short-term campaigns have indicated that acidification of livestock slurry during in......-house storage can reduce NH3 emissions, and also may influence other emissions. In this study, emissions of NH3 were quantified by measuring continuously during three complete finishing pig production periods of about 10 weeks each, and emissions of CH4 and H2S less frequently. Emissions were determined from...... sections with 30-32 pigs with or without daily adjustment of slurry pH to below 6. Ammonia losses from reference sections with untreated slurry were between 9.5 and 12.4% of N excreted, and from sections with acidified slurry between 3.1 and 6.2%. Acidification reduced total emissions of NH3 by 66 and 71...

  17. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide removal using biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reducing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from livestock facilities is an important issue for many communities and livestock producers. Ammonia has been regarded as odorous, precursor for particulate matter (PM), and contributed to livestock mortality. Hydrogen sulfide is highly toxic at elev...

  18. Chilled ammonia process for CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; van Well, Willy J. M

    2009-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2-10 degrees C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows...

  19. Ammonia Sensor Using Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Farooq, Aamir

    2015-09-01

    An ammonia sensor can include a laser detector configured to provide stable sample readings. The sensor can implement a method including processing the recorded intensity of the laser beam to determine a first harmonic component and a second harmonic component and the amount of ammonia in the sample.

  20. Oxidative and nitrosative stress in ammonia neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowrońska, Marta; Albrecht, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Increased ammonia accumulation in the brain due to liver dysfunction is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Fatal outcome of rapidly progressing (acute) HE is mainly related to cytotoxic brain edema associated with astrocytic swelling. An increase of brain ammonia in experimental animals or treatment of cultured astrocytes with ammonia generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the target tissues, leading to oxidative/nitrosative stress (ONS). In cultured astrocytes, ammonia-induced ONS is invariably associated with the increase of the astrocytic cell volume. Interrelated mechanisms underlying this response include increased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis which is partly coupled to the activation of NMDA receptors and increased generation of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase. ONS and astrocytic swelling are further augmented by excessive synthesis of glutamine (Gln) which impairs mitochondrial function following its accumulation in there and degradation back to ammonia ("the Trojan horse" hypothesis). Ammonia also induces ONS in other cell types of the CNS: neurons, microglia and the brain capillary endothelial cells (BCEC). ONS in microglia contributes to the central inflammatory response, while its metabolic and pathophysiological consequences in the BCEC evolve to the vasogenic brain edema associated with HE. Ammonia-induced ONS results in the oxidation of mRNA and nitration/nitrosylation of proteins which impact intracellular metabolism and potentiate the neurotoxic effects. Simultaneously, ammonia facilitates the antioxidant response of the brain, by activating astrocytic transport and export of glutathione, in this way increasing the availability of precursors of neuronal glutathione synthesis.

  1. Ammonia sensors and their applications - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, Björn; Olthuis, Wouter; Berg, van den Albert

    2005-01-01

    Many scientific papers have been written concerning gas sensors for different sensor applications using several sensing principles. This review focuses on sensors and sensor systems for gaseous ammonia. Apart from its natural origin, there are many sources of ammonia, like the chemical industry or i

  2. Ammonia tolerant enriched methanogenic cultures as bioaugmentation inocula to alleviate ammonia inhibition in continuous anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Wang, Han; Angelidaki, Irini

    Ammonia is the most common inhibitor of anaerobic digestion (AD) process, resulting in suboptimal exploitation of the biogas potential of the feedstocks, causing significant economic losses to the biogas plants. Ammonia is mainly inhibiting the aceticlastic methanogens, while the hydrogenotrophic...... of ammonia-rich organic waste in full-scale continuous reactors.......Ammonia is the most common inhibitor of anaerobic digestion (AD) process, resulting in suboptimal exploitation of the biogas potential of the feedstocks, causing significant economic losses to the biogas plants. Ammonia is mainly inhibiting the aceticlastic methanogens, while the hydrogenotrophic...... methanogens are more robust to ammonia toxicity effect. It has been shown that bioaugmentation of a pure strain of a hydrogenotrophic methanogen (i.e. Methanoculleus bourgensis) in an ammonia inhibited continuous anaerobic reactor can improve methane production more than 30%. Nevertheless, cultivation...

  3. Ammonia transformation in a biotrickling air filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Nielsen, Marie Louise; Andersen, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    A simple, tubular biotrickling filter was designed for optimal removal of ammonia and odour in ventilation air from a pig house. The removal and transformation of ammonia was studied in detail by analysis and modelling of chemical gradients through the filter. Good correspondence between...... measurements and model was obtained by using conventional substrate and inhibition kinetics of ammonium and nitrite oxidizing bacteria. Highest rates of ammonia removal were observed in the central section of the filter. Near the air outlet and water inlet the process was ammonia limited, while high nitrous...... acid concentrations almost excluded any biological activity near the air inlet and water outlet. Nitrous acid inhibition also stabilized pH at 6.5-7 all through the filter. Being sensitive to both ammonia and nitrous acid the nitrite oxidation process occurred mainly in the filter sections near the air...

  4. Final disposal in deep boreholes using multiple geological barriers. Digging deeper for safety. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracke, Guido; Hurst, Stephanie; Merkel, Broder; Mueller, Birgit; Schilling, Frank

    2016-03-15

    The proceedings of the workshop on final disposal in deep boreholes using multiple geological barriers - digging deeper for safety include contributions on the following topics: international status and safety requirements; geological and physical barriers; deep drilling - shaft building; technical barriers and emplacement technology for high P/T conditions; recovery (waste retrieval); geochemistry and monitoring.

  5. Promoting Effective Dialogue between Business and Education around the Need for Deeper Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Business-Higher Education Forum, 2013

    2013-01-01

    As employers scan the current workforce and anticipate future workforce needs, they frequently find that employees are not well-equipped with core content knowledge and 21st century workplace competencies, the combination of which the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation defines as "deeper learning." The cumulative effect of these…

  6. A Deeper Look at the Grammar and Some Implications of "Ser" and "Estar" + Locative in Spanish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Fabiola; Steinmetz, Donald

    1985-01-01

    Argues that the explanation of the use of "ser" and "estar" with locatives presented in the March 1984 issue of "Hispania" derives so directly from a theory of universal grammar because it is indicative of the explanatory adequacy of Case Grammar or of other, comparable theories of the deeper levels of linguistic structure. (SED)

  7. Low-cost anodes for ammonia electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selverston, Steven M.

    This research focused on the development of low-cost electrodes for the electrochemical oxidation of ammonia to nitrogen, a reaction that has possible applications in hydrogen generation, direct ammonia fuel cells, water treatment, and sensors. Statistical design of experiments was used to help develop an efficient and scalable process for electrodeposition of platinum with a specific electrochemical surface area of over 25 m2 /g. Catalyst surface area and activity were evaluated using cyclic voltammetry, and the material microstructure and morphology were investigated using x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The synthesized electrodes were found to be active toward the ammonia electrooxidation reaction, particularly when supporting electrolyte was added. However, supporting electrolyte was not required in order to oxidize the ammonia. As proof of concept, a homemade direct ammonia fuel cell employing a commercial anion exchange membrane was tested at room temperature with gravity-fed fuel and without supporting electrolyte. At room temperature, with passive reactant supply and using dissolved oxygen at the cathode, the cell produced about one quarter the power of a direct methanol fuel cell that used active transport of humidified oxygen and preheated (50 °C) methanol. With continued development of the membrane, cathode and membrane electrode assembly, the passive direct ammonia fuel cell using anion exchange membrane could have performance similar to the equivalent direct methanol fuel cell, and it could benefit from many advantages of ammonia over methanol such as lower cost, higher energy density, and reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

  8. Ammonia distribution and excretion in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, D J; Wright, P A

    1987-05-01

    This paper reviews the literature concerning ammonia production, storage and excretion in fish. Ammonia is the end product of protein catabolism and is stored in the body of fish in high concentrations relative to basal excretion rates. Ammonia, if allowed to accumulate, is toxic and is converted to less toxic compounds or excreted. Like other weak acids and bases, ammonia is distributed between tissue compartments in relation to transmembrane pH gradients. NH3 is generally equilibrated between compartments but NH4 (+) is distributed according to pH. Ammonia is eliminated from the blood upon passage through the gills. The mechanisms of branchial ammonia excretion vary between different species of fish and different environments, and primarily involves NH3 passive diffusion and NH4 (+)/Na(+) exchange. Water chemistry near the gill surface may also be important to ammonia excretion, but a more accurate measurement of the NH3 gradient across the gill epithelium is required before a more detailed analysis of NH3 and NH4 (+) excretion can be made.

  9. Resveratrol prevents ammonia toxicity in astroglial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Daniele Bobermin

    Full Text Available Ammonia is implicated as a neurotoxin in brain metabolic disorders associated with hyperammonemia. Acute ammonia toxicity can be mediated by an excitotoxic mechanism, oxidative stress and nitric oxide (NO production. Astrocytes interact with neurons, providing metabolic support and protecting against oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. Astrocytes also convert excess ammonia and glutamate into glutamine via glutamine synthetase (GS. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in grapes and red wines, exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and modulates glial functions, such as glutamate metabolism. We investigated the effect of resveratrol on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, GS activity, S100B secretion, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels in astroglial cells exposed to ammonia. Ammonia induced oxidative stress, decreased GS activity and increased cytokines release, probably by a mechanism dependent on protein kinase A (PKA and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK pathways. Resveratrol prevented ammonia toxicity by modulating oxidative stress, glial and inflammatory responses. The ERK and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB are involved in the protective effect of resveratrol on cytokines proinflammatory release. In contrast, other antioxidants (e.g., ascorbic acid and trolox were not effective against hyperammonemia. Thus, resveratrol could be used to protect against ammonia-induced neurotoxicity.

  10. Ammonia gas permeability of meat packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Faris; Hijaz, Faraj; Kastner, Curtis L; Smith, J Scott

    2011-03-01

    Meat products are packaged in polymer films designed to protect the product from exterior contaminants such as light, humidity, and harmful chemicals. Unfortunately, there is almost no data on ammonia permeability of packaging films. We investigated ammonia permeability of common meat packaging films: low-density polyethylene (LDPE; 2.2 mil), multilayer polyolefin (MLP; 3 mil), and vacuum (V-PA/PE; 3 mil, 0.6 mil polyamide/2.4 mil polyethylene). The films were fabricated into 10 × 5 cm pouches and filled with 50 mL deionized water. Pouches were placed in a plexiglass enclosure in a freezer and exposed to 50, 100, 250, or 500 ppm ammonia gas for 6, 12, 24, and 48 h at -17 ± 3 °C and 21 ± 3 °C. At freezing temperatures, no ammonia residues were detected and no differences in pH were found in the water. At room temperature, ammonia levels and pH of the water increased significantly (P packaging materials have low ammonia permeability and protect meat products exposed to ammonia leaks during frozen storage.

  11. Ammonia transformation in a biotrickling air filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Nielsen, Marie Louise; Andersen, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    A simple, tubular biotrickling filter was designed for optimal removal of ammonia and odour in ventilation air from a pig house. The removal and transformation of ammonia was studied in detail by analysis and modelling of chemical gradients through the filter. Good correspondence between measurem......A simple, tubular biotrickling filter was designed for optimal removal of ammonia and odour in ventilation air from a pig house. The removal and transformation of ammonia was studied in detail by analysis and modelling of chemical gradients through the filter. Good correspondence between...... measurements and model was obtained by using conventional substrate and inhibition kinetics of ammonium and nitrite oxidizing bacteria. Highest rates of ammonia removal were observed in the central section of the filter. Near the air outlet and water inlet the process was ammonia limited, while high nitrous...... acid concentrations almost excluded any biological activity near the air inlet and water outlet. Nitrous acid inhibition also stabilized pH at 6.5-7 all through the filter. Being sensitive to both ammonia and nitrous acid the nitrite oxidation process occurred mainly in the filter sections near the air...

  12. WOOD COLOR CHANGES BY AMMONIA FUMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Miklečić,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the influence of ammonia gas on wood color changes in response to an increasing demand for dark colored wood specimens. The darker wood color in ammonia fuming is accomplished through chemical reactions between ammonia gas and wood compounds. We exposed oak, maple, spruce, and larch wood samples to ammonia gas for 16 days. During fuming, the color changes were studied using CIE L*a*b* parameters. After fuming, the changes in extractives content, tannin, and nitrogen content were analyzed. The chemical changes of wood and residues of wood extractives after fuming were analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy. Oak wood reacted intensively with ammonia gas in a very short time, and the darkening was prominent for all the investigated wood species. It was established that tannin had no major influence on color changes of maple and larch wood in the ammonia-fuming process. The FTIR spectra of fumed wood indicated involvement of carbonyl groups, and the FTIR spectra of wood extractives indicated involvement of carbonyl, aromatic, and alcohol groups in reaction with ammonia gas.

  13. Electrochemical monitoring of ammonia during anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Nannan; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    Ammonia is known as key inhibitor to methanogens in anaerobic digestion (AD) process. It’s of importance to develop efficient tool for ammonia monitoring. In this study, an electrolysis cell (EC) coupled with a complete nitrification reactor was developed as sensor for real time and online......-rich digesters. It was observed that the initial transient currents (0 min) were linearly corresponding to the ammonia levels (from 0 to 95.75 mg/L NH4+-N, R2 = 0.9673). Finally, this new sensor was tested with real AD effluent and the results showed no significant difference with that measured by conventional...

  14. Transformation of ammonia i biological airfilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Sørensen, Karen; Andersen, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    nitrite oxidation only appeared in locations with minimal ammonia and nitrite levels. Nitrous oxide emission depended on anoxic microsites, and nitric oxide production was associated with nitrite accumulation. Water and biomass management appear to be the important tools for optimization of ammonia......Ammonia is a major compound in ventilation air from animal houses. In biological filters it is with varying efficiency transformed by physical, biological, and chemical processes and ends up as ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite dissolved in water and as dinitrogen, nitrous oxide and nitric oxide...... removal without too much energy consumption, waste water production, green house gas emission, or suppression of the filters odor removal efficiency....

  15. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea have more important role than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in ammonia oxidation of strongly acidic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Hu, Hang-Wei; Shen, Ju-Pei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2012-05-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrated the involvement of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in the global nitrogen cycle, but the relative contributions of AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to ammonia oxidation are still in debate. Previous studies suggest that AOA would be more adapted to ammonia-limited oligotrophic conditions, which seems to be favored by protonation of ammonia, turning into ammonium in low-pH environments. Here, we investigated the autotrophic nitrification activity of AOA and AOB in five strongly acidic soils (pHnitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD) completely inhibited the nitrification activity and CO(2) fixation by AOA, accompanied by decreasing thaumarchaeal amoA gene abundance. Bacterial amoA gene abundance decreased in all microcosms irrespective of DCD addition, and mostly showed no correlation with nitrate concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis of thaumarchaeal amoA gene and 16S rRNA gene revealed active (13)CO(2)-labeled AOA belonged to groups 1.1a-associated and 1.1b. Taken together, these results provided strong evidence that AOA have a more important role than AOB in autotrophic ammonia oxidation in strongly acidic soils.

  16. Ammonia as a Suitable Fuel for Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lan, Rong; Tao, Shanwen

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia, an important basic chemical, is produced at a scale of 150 million tons per year. Half of hydrogen produced in chemical industry is used for ammonia production. Ammonia containing 17.5 wt% hydrogen is an ideal carbon-free fuel for fuel cells. Compared to hydrogen, ammonia has many advantages. In this mini-review, the suitability of ammonia as fuel for fuel cells, the development of different types of fuel cells using ammonia as the fuel and the potential applications of ammonia fuel ...

  17. Ammonia as a suitable fuel for fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong eLan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia, an important basic chemical, is produced at a scale of 150 million tons per year. Half of hydrogen produced in chemical industry is used for ammonia production. Ammonia containing 17.5wt% hydrogen is an ideal carbon-free fuel for fuel cells. Compared to hydrogen, ammonia has many advantages. In this mini-review, the suitability of ammonia as fuel for fuel cells, the development of different types of fuel cells using ammonia as the fuel and the potential applications of ammonia fuel cells are briefly reviewed.

  18. Ammonia measurement with a pH electrode in the ammonia/urea-SCR process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröcher, Oliver; Elsener, Martin

    2007-03-01

    The selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides with ammonia (ammonia SCR) and urea (urea SCR), respectively, is a widespread process to clean flue and diesel exhaust gases due to its simplicity and efficiency. The main challenge of the process is to minimize the ammonia emissions downstream of the SCR catalyst. We found that ammonia emissions of >10 ppm can reliably be detected with a simple pH electrode in the presence of CO2, SOx, NOx, and moderately weak organic acids. 10-20 ppm of ammonia in the exhaust gas are sufficient to neutralize the acids and to increase the pH value from 3 to 6. On this basis a continuous measuring method for ammonia was developed, which was used to control the dosage of urea in the SCR process. While keeping the ammonia emissions after the SCR catalyst at 5-30 ppm an average NOx removal efficiency (DeNOx) of >95% were achieved at a diesel test rig. The method can also be applied for exhaust gases with higher acid contents, if a basic pre-filter is added adsorbing the acidic exhaust components. Compared to water as absorption solution, more precise ammonia measurements are possible, if a 0.1 M NH4Cl absorption solution is applied, whose pH value is changing as a Nernst function of the ammonia concentration.

  19. Aqueous Ammonia soaking of digested manure fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirtsou-Xanthopoulou, Chrysoula; Jurado, Esperanza; Skiadas, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    , their economical profitable operation relies on increasing the methane yield from manure, and especially of its solid fraction which is not so easily degradable. In the present study, Aqueous Ammonia Soaking was successfully applied on digested fibers separated from the effluent of a manure-fed, full......-scale anaerobic digester to enhance their methane productivity. Soaking in six different reagent concentrations in ammonia (5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, 32%) was applied for 3 days at 22°C. An overall methane yield increase from 85% to 110% was achieved compared to controls (digested manure fibers where AAS...... was not applied). The difference in reagent concentration at the range of 5-25% w/w in ammonia did not affect that much the overall methane yield resulting to an increase of 104-110% compared to the non AAS-treated fibers. Thus, an ammonia concentration as low as 5% is adequate for achieving the same increase...

  20. Ammonia and urea permeability of mammalian aquaporins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Søgaard, Rikke; Zeuthen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The human aquaporins,AQP3,AQP7, AQP8,AQP9, and possibly AQP10, are permeable to ammonia, and AQP7, AQP9, and possibly AQP3, are permeable to urea. In humans, these aquaporins supplement the ammonia transport of the Rhesus (Rh) proteins and the urea transporters (UTs). The mechanism by which...... ammonium is transported by aquaporins is not fully resolved. A comparison of transport equations, models, and experimental data shows that ammonia is transported in its neutral form, NH(3). In the presence of NH(3), the aquaporin stimulates H(+) transport. Consequently, this transport of H(+) is only...... significant at alkaline pH. It is debated whether the H(+) ion passes via the aquaporin or by some external route; the investigation of this problem requires the aquaporin-expressing cell to be voltage-clamped. The ammonia-permeable aquaporins differ from other aquaporins by having a less restrictive aromatic...

  1. 21 CFR 573.180 - Anhydrous ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... silage. (2)(i) The food additive anhydrous ammonia is applied directly to corn plant material for use in... to corn plant material containing 28 to 38 percent dry matter. (iv) The silage treated with...

  2. Ammonia Affects Astroglial Proliferation in Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Bodega

    Full Text Available Primary cultures of rat astroglial cells were exposed to 1, 3 and 5 mM NH4Cl for up to 10 days. Dose- and time-dependent reductions in cell numbers were seen, plus an increase in the proportion of cells in the S phase. The DNA content was reduced in the treated cells, and BrdU incorporation diminished. However, neither ammonia nor ammonia plus glutamine had any effect on DNA polymerase activity. iTRAQ analysis showed that exposure to ammonia induced a significant reduction in histone and heterochromatin protein 1 expression. A reduction in cell viability was also noted. The ammonia-induced reduction of proliferative activity in these cultured astroglial cells seems to be due to a delay in the completion of the S phase provoked by the inhibition of chromatin protein synthesis.

  3. Legal and economic aspects of deeper EU integration in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Krásnická

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The deeper economic integration in form of fiscal union, bank union, or increased macroeconomic surveillance is for the Czech Republic not only the question of whether and when to enter the euro zone, but also whether and when to join the other institutes. The aim of this paper is to analyse the legal background of these instruments and estimate their possible economic impact. These hypotheses would be a subject of author’s further search. The future impact on enterprises in the Czech Republic is evident in some areas of the EU enhanced cooperation. Adoption of the euro is an example. Other aspects of deeper economic integration as for example the bank union do not impact the microsphere so obviously; however can significantly change the business environment in the country.

  4. Nitrocarburizing in ammonia-hydrocarbon gas mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hanne; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present work investigates the possibility of nitrocarburising in ammonia-acetylene-hydrogen and ammonia-propene-hydrogen gas mixtures, where unsaturated hydrocarbon gas is the carbon source during nitrocarburising. Consequently, nitrocarburising is carried out in a reducing atmosphere...... microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that the use of unsaturated hydrocarbon gas in nitrocarburising processes is a viable alternative to traditional nitrocarburising methods....

  5. Trading shallow safety for deep sleep: Juvenile green turtles select deeper resting sites as they grow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Kristen M.; White, Connor F.; Iverson, Autumn R; Whitney, Nick

    2016-01-01

    To better protect endangered green sea turtles Chelonia mydas, a more thorough understanding of the behaviors of each life stage is needed. Although dive profile analyses obtained using time-depth loggers have provided some insights into habitat use, recent work has shown that more fine-scale monitoring of body movements is needed to elucidate physical activity patterns. We monitored 11 juvenile green sea turtles with tri-axial acceleration data loggers in their foraging grounds in Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida, USA, for periods ranging from 43 to 118 h (mean ± SD: 72.8 ± 27.3 h). Approximately half of the individuals (n = 5) remained in shallow (overall mean depth less than 2 m) water throughout the experiment, whereas the remaining individuals (n = 6) made excursions to deeper (4 to 27 m) waters, often at night. Despite these differences in depth use, acceleration data revealed a consistent pattern of diurnal activity and nocturnal resting in most individuals. Nocturnal depth differences thus do not appear to represent differences in behavior, but rather different strategies to achieve the same behavior: rest. We calculated overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA) to assess the relative energetic cost of each behavioral strategy in an attempt to explain the differences between them. Animals in deeper water experienced longer resting dives, more time resting per hour, and lower mean hourly ODBA. These results suggest that resting in deeper water provides energetic benefits that outweigh the costs of transiting to deep water and a potential increased risk of predation.

  6. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Whitlow, Eugene P.

    1998-09-22

    A method of inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425.degree. F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25.degree. C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425.degree. F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer.

  7. Reducing ammonia emissions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.

    2011-01-01

    Danish application procedure, when increasing the animal production, has tried to make the acceptance procedure quicker and dynamic ensuring that new technology is adopted quicker and that the farm is located in the right place. It is concluded that the new application process so far has not lived up......The NEC directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries with the largest reductions since 1990...... and the article looks at the measures and costs involved. The conclusion is that the costs have been under 3 €/kg NH3-N. The findings suggest that the same measures might be cheaper in the Netherlands and Denmark than in the UK and the USA due to technology advances and stricter regulations in the past. The new...

  8. Ammonia transformations and abundance of ammonia oxidizers in a clay soil underlying a manure pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Yonatan; Baram, Shahar; Dahan, Ofer; Ronen, Zeev; Nejidat, Ali

    2012-07-01

    Unlined manure ponds are constructed on clay soil worldwide to manage farm waste. Seepage of ammonia-rich liquor into underlying soil layers contributes to groundwater contamination by nitrate. To identify the possible processes that lead to the production of nitrate from ammonia in this oxygen-limited environment, we studied the diversity and abundance of ammonia-transforming microorganisms under an unlined manure pond. The numbers of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and anammox bacteria were most abundant in the top of the soil profile and decreased significantly with depth (0.5 m), correlating with soil pore-water ammonia concentrations and soil ammonia concentrations, respectively. On the other hand, the numbers of ammonia-oxidizing archaea were relatively constant throughout the soil profile (10(7) amoA copies per g(soil)). Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were detected mainly in the top 0.2 m. The results suggest that nitrate accumulation in the vadose zone under the manure pond could be the result of complete aerobic nitrification (ammonia oxidation to nitrate) and could exist as a byproduct of anammox activity. While the majority of the nitrogen was removed within the 0.5-m soil section, possibly by combined anammox and heterotrophic denitrification, a fraction of the produced nitrate leached into the groundwater.

  9. Measuring Deeper Learning through Cognitively Demanding Test Items: Results from the Analysis of Six National and International Exams. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kun; Le, Vi-Nhuan

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation's Education Program has established the Deeper Learning Initiative, which focuses on students' development of deeper learning skills (i.e., the mastery of core academic content, critical-thinking, problem-solving, collaboration, communication, and "learn-how-to-learn" skills). Two test…

  10. Aquaporin-8-facilitated mitochondrial ammonia transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Leandro R; Fanelli, Elena; Altamura, Nicola; Svelto, Maria; Marinelli, Raúl A; Calamita, Giuseppe

    2010-03-05

    Aquaporin-8 (AQP8) is a membrane channel permeable to water and ammonia. As AQP8 is expressed in the inner mitochondrial membrane of several mammalian tissues, we studied the effect of the AQP8 expression on the mitochondrial transport of ammonia. Recombinant rat AQP8 was expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The presence of AQP8 in the inner membrane of yeast mitochondria was demonstrated by subcellular fractionation and immunoblotting analysis. The ammonia transport was determined in isolated mitochondria by stopped flow light scattering using formamide as ammonia analog. We found that the presence of AQP8 increased by threefold mitochondrial formamide transport. AQP8-facilitated mitochondrial formamide transport in rat native tissue was confirmed in liver (a mitochondrial AQP8-expressing tissue) vs. brain (a mitochondrial AQP8 non-expressing tissue). Comparative studies indicated that the AQP8-mediated mitochondrial movement of formamide was markedly higher than that of water. Together, our data suggest that ammonia diffusional transport is a major function for mitochondrial AQP8. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Electron-induced ammonia adsorption on iron

    CERN Document Server

    Narkiewicz, U; Trybuchowicz, A; Arabczyk, W

    2003-01-01

    The adsorption of ammonia on an iron surface at ambient temperature has been investigated using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The effect of the electron beam on the process of the ammonia adsorption has been studied. The polycrystalline iron samples precovered with different amounts of oxygen (0.15-1 ML) or sulphur (1 ML) were used. The initial sticking coefficient of ammonia to oxygen precovered iron surface was estimated as s sub 0 approx 5x10 sup - sup 4 (independently on the oxygen coverage) for the adsorption experiments without the effect of the electron beam. The strong inhibiting effect of sulphur precoverage on the ammonia adsorption has been found (s sub 0 approx 6.5x10 sup - sup 6). The electron beam has favourable effect on the adsorption of ammonia, and this effect increases with the oxygen coverage (one monolayer of adsorbed nitrogen atoms at the saturation state and s sub 0 approx 1 for the iron surface precovered with one monolayer of oxygen). The proposed explanation is the favourable ef...

  12. The effect of outside conditions on anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Min; WANG Shu-bo

    2016-01-01

    Organic carbon, inorganic carbon, temperature, pH and ORP are all to have a certain influence on the anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction. We can draw some conclusions on the optimum conditions of anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction. The optimum temperature of the anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction is 30-35℃. And the optimum pH of the anaerobic ammonia reaction is 7.5-8.3. The presence of organic matters can affect the anaerobic ammonia reaction, and different organic matters have different influence on it. The concentration of the inorganic carbon also exist great influence on the reaction. High inorganic carbon concentration also can inhibit anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction.

  13. A personal ammonia monitor utilizing permeation sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedict, A.F. (Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Baton Rouge, LA); Reiszner, K.D.; West, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of the time-weighted-average personal exposure to ammonia. Sample collection was achieved by permeation through a silicone membrane into a boric acid solution. The trapped ammonia was then determined spectrophotometrically with Nessler's reagent or potentiometrically with an ion selective electrode. The device may be used for sampling periods as short as 5 minutes and was not affected by changes in the environmental parameters normally encountered at industrial locations. The detection limit is 0.4 ppm for an 8 hr sampling period and the monitor responds linearly to at least 150 ppm. The Nessler's method may be utilized in industrial environments containing monoethanol amine in conjunction with ammonia with no significant interference. Although some interference was observed from ethylenediamine with the Nessler's technique, little interference was found with the potentiometric determination.

  14. Ammonia emission time profiles based on manure transport data improve ammonia modelling across north western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, C.; Kranenburg, R.; Kuenen, J. J. P.; Van den Bril, B.; Verguts, V.; Schaap, M.

    2016-04-01

    Accurate modelling of mitigation measures for nitrogen deposition and secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) episodes requires a detailed representation of emission patterns from agriculture. In this study the meteorological influence on the temporal variability of ammonia emissions from livestock housing and application of manure and fertilizer are included in the chemistry transport model LOTOS-EUROS. For manure application, manure transport data from Flanders (Belgium) were used as a proxy to derive the emission variability. Using improved ammonia emission variability strongly improves model performance for ammonia, mainly by a better representation of the spring maximum. The impact on model performance for SIA was negligible as explained by the limited, ammonia rich region in which the emission variability was updated. The contribution of Flemish agriculture to modelled annual mean ammonia and SIA concentrations in Flanders were quantified at respectively 7-8 and 1-2 μg/m3. A scenario study was performed to investigate the effects of reducing ammonia emissions from manure application during PM episodes by 75%, yielding a maximum reduction in modelled SIA levels of 1-3 μg/m3 during episodes. Year-to-year emission variability and a soil module to explicitly model the emission process from manure and fertilizer application are needed to further improve the modelling of the ammonia budget.

  15. Structure of Ramie Treated by Liquid Ammonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The morphology and supermolecular structures of the scoured/bleached ramie and scoured/bleached/liquid ammonia treated ramie were studied by means of scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffractometer, reverse gel permeation chromatography, etc. The results indicate that liquid ammonia treatment of the scoured/bleached ramie leads to a smoother surface, a lower crystallinity, partial crystal transformation from cellulose Ⅰ to cellulose Ⅲ, a decrease in the volume and cumulative surface area of the larger micropores and an increase in those of the smaller ones in the fiber.

  16. Computational Search for Improved Ammonia Storage Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Bjerre; Lysgaard, Steen; Vegge, Tejs

    Metal halide ammines, e.g. Mg(NH3)6Cl2 and Sr(NH3)8Cl2, can reversibly store ammonia, with high volumetric hydrogen storage capacities. The storage in the halide ammines is very safe, and the salts are therefore highly relevant as a carbon-free energy carrier in future transportation infrastructure....... In this project we are searching for improved mixed materials with optimal desorption temperatures and kinetics, optimally releasing all ammonia in one step. We apply Density Functional Theory, DFT, calculations on mixed compounds selected by a Genetic Algorithm (GA), relying on biological principles of natural...

  17. Electrochemical ammonia production on molybdenum nitride nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howalt, Jakob Geelmuyden; Vegge, Tejs

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical investigations of electrochemical production of ammonia at ambient temperature and pressure on nitrogen covered molybdenum nanoparticles are presented. Density functional theory calculations are used in combination with the computational hydrogen electrode approach to calculate the free...... energy profile for electrochemical protonation of N2 and N adatoms on cuboctahedral Mo13 nanoparticles. Pathways for electrochemical ammonia production via direct protonation of N adatoms and N2 admolecules with an onset potential as low as -0.5 V and generally lower than -0.8 V on both a nitrogen...

  18. Chilled Ammonia Process for CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; Well, Willy J.M. van

    2010-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2–10°C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows good...... perspectives for decreasing the heat requirement. However, a scientific understanding of the processes is required. The thermodynamic properties of the NH3–CO2–H2O system were described using the extended UNIQUAC electrolyte model developed by Thomsen and Rasmussen in a temperature range from 0 to 110°C...

  19. Deammoniation and ammoniation processes with ammonia complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pim Donkers

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For selecting the most suitable ammoniate as a heat storage material we have reviewed all the available literature since 1860. This data reveal that we can order the dissociation temperature and the enthalpy of reaction of di erent ammoniates. We show that all data can be represented by a single master curve. This curve shows that ammoniates belonging to the alkali metal periodic group have the lowest energy pro ammonia molecule, whereas transition metals (3d have the highest energy pro ammonia molecule. These trends can be used to select the most suitable ammoniates under certain working conditions.

  20. Enantioselective, iridium-catalyzed monoallylation of ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouy, Mark J; Stanley, Levi M; Hartwig, John F

    2009-08-19

    Highly enantioselective, iridium-catalyzed monoallylations of ammonia are reported. These reactions occur with electron-neutral, -rich, and -poor cinnamyl carbonates, alkyl and trityloxy-substituted allylic carbonates, and dienyl carbonates in moderate to good yields and excellent enantioselectivities. This process is enabled by the use of an iridium catalyst that does not require a Lewis acid for activation and that is stable toward a large excess of ammonia. This selective formation of primary allylic amines allows for one-pot syntheses of heterodiallylamines and allylic amides that are not otherwise accessible via iridium-catalyzed allylic amination without the use of blocking groups and protective group manipulations.

  1. Study of Ammonia Emissions in a Ventilated Pig Pen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li

    Pig productions cause a wide emission of odors, such as ammonia (NH3), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and methane (CH4). Ammonia is one of the most important emissions for evaluating the air quality either in animal buildings or atmospheric environment. In studies of ammonia emission from animal buildings...... solution temperatures. The results show that the diffusive ceiling ventilation system can provide a relative low velocity in the pig pen and decrease ammonia emissions from the pig pen, but this ventilation system causes high ammonia concentration distribution in the animal occupied zone. Further, our...... reported in literature, little effort has been made to investigate the accuracy of current Henry’s law constant for modeling ammonia mass transfer process and study ammonia emissions in a full scale pig pen from fluid dynamics by CFD simulations. This will be the main objectives of this study. The ammonia...

  2. Ammonia effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens and syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Han; Fotidis, Ioannis; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia-rich substrates can cause inhibition on anaerobic digestion process. Syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria (SAOB) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens are important for the ammonia inhibitory mechanism on anaerobic digestion. The roles and interactions of SAOB and hydrogenotrophic methanogens...

  3. Ammonia production, excretion, toxicity, and defense in fish: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Y K Ip

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Many fishes are ammonotelic but some species can detoxify ammonia to glutamine or urea. Certain fish species can accumulate high levels of ammonia in the brain or defense against ammonia toxicity by enhancing the effectiveness of ammonia excretion through active NH4+ transport, manipulation of ambient pH, or reduction in ammonia permeability through the branchial and cutaneous epithelia. Recent reports on ammonia toxicity in mammalian brain reveal the importance of permeation of ammonia through the blood-brain barrier and passages of ammonia and water through transporters in the plasmalemma of brain cells. Additionally, brain ammonia toxicity could be related to the passage of glutamine through the mitochondrial membranes into the mitochondrial matrix. On the other hand, recent reports on ammonia excretion in fish confirm the involvement of Rhesus glycoproteins in the branchial and cutaneous epithelia. Therefore, this review focuses on both the earlier literature and the up-to-date information on the problems and mechanisms concerning the permeation of ammonia, as NH3, NH4+ or proton-neutral nitrogenous compounds, across mitochondrial membranes, the blood-brain barrier, the plasmalemma of neurons, and the branchial and cutaneous epithelia of fish. It also addresses how certain fishes with high ammonia tolerance defend against ammonia toxicity through the regulation of the permeation of ammonia and related nitrogenous compounds through various types of membranes. It is hoped that this review would revive the interests in investigations on the passage of ammonia through the mitochondrial membranes and the blood-brain barrier of ammonotelic fishes and fishes with high brain ammonia-tolerance, respectively.

  4. Detection of Ammonia in Liquids Using Millimeter Wave Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilmi Ozturk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of ammonia plays a vital role for counter-bioterrorism applications. Using millimeter wave absorption measurements, ammonia dissolved in water solution is analyzed and compared to water-only solution. The inversion of ammonia molecule results in split rotational spectral lines and transitions of these lines can be detected. Two-port measurements were carried out with vector network analyzer and measurements revealed that ammonia presence can be identified, especially between 30–35 GHz.

  5. Modelling of ammonia emissions from dairy cow houses

    OpenAIRE

    Monteny, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Dairy cow husbandry contributes to environmental acidification through the emission of ammonia. In-depth knowledge on the processes and variable factors that play a role in the emission of ammonia from dairy cow houses benefits the production of emission data, the development of low emission housing systems, and evaluation of emission levels in a farming system approach. A mechanistic simulation model for the ammonia emission from dairy cow houses was developed to facilitate this.An ammonia p...

  6. Cerebral ammonia uptake and accumulation during prolonged exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Dalsgaard, Mads K.; Steensberg, Adam

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated whether peripheral ammonia production during prolonged exercise enhances the uptake and subsequent accumulation of ammonia within the brain. Two studies determined the cerebral uptake of ammonia (arterial and jugular venous blood sampling combined with Kety-Schmidt-determined cerebra...

  7. Werkwijze voor het behandelen van ammonia-houdend afvalwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Jetten, M.S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Treatment of ammonia-comprising waste water comprises: (a) subjecting the waste water to a nitrification treatment using a nitrifying microorganism and adding oxygen, to give a solution comprising an oxidation product of ammonia, and (b) converting the oxidation product of ammonia into nitrogen usin

  8. The Ammonia Smoke Fountain: An Interesting Thermodynamic Adventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, M. Dale

    1999-01-01

    Describes a new demonstration that uses an apparatus like the ammonia-fountain apparatus but with modifications designed to produce ammonium-chloride smoke. This demonstration is easy to perform, interesting to observe, and allows demonstration of the solubility of ammonia in water, the basic nature of ammonia, the acidic nature of hydrogen…

  9. Comparison of ammonia emissions determined using different sampling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynamic, flow-through flux chambers are sometimes used to estimate ammonia emissions from livestock operations; however, ammonia emissions from the surfaces are affected by many factors which can be affected by the chamber. Ammonia emissions estimated using environmental flow-through chambers may be...

  10. Temperature dependence of feedyard ammonia emissions: The Arrhenius equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia emissions from beef cattle feedyards exhibit an annual pattern-like temperature. This suggests that ammonia emissions may obey the Arrhenius temperature relationship. Our objective was to determine the Arrhenius relationship between mean monthly ammonia emissions from cattle feedyards and me...

  11. Developing Physics Textbook Based on Cognitive Conflict for Deeper Conceptual Understanding and Better Characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linuwih, S.; Lurinda, N. W.; Fianti

    2017-04-01

    These study aims are to develop a textbook based on cognitive conflict approachment, to know theproperness of textbook, the legibility of textbook, and also the effect of using the textbook for increasing the conceptual understanding and improving the character of the students. This study was conducted by research and development method employing non-equivalent control group design to test the product. The subjects wereten-grade students of SMA N 1 Gubug in thesecond semester of 2015/2016. The properness test used properness-questionnaire, while the legibility test used themost closet. The data of conceptual understanding was taken from thepretest-postest result and the data of characters was taken from direct observation. By analysing the data, we concluded that the textbook based on cognitive conflict approachment was very proper to use with high legibility. By applied this textbook, students would be helped to get a deeper conceptual understanding and better characters.

  12. Comics – a Method that Allows Boys Deeper Experience of Children’s Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Kerneza

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the acquisition of reading skills girls are more successful than boys. As a method of interpretation comics could allow boys a deeper perception, understanding and evaluation of youth literary texts, and help them to express their literary perception experience. The main research method is case study with a number of linguistic motivations used. After getting acquainted with the comics, the students applied new knowledge to detect textual information embedded in stage directions, and expanded their literary worlds by converting texts into comic form. The research is based on qualitative research methods of literary didactic research. Boys’ deficits were successfully compensated – in some cases they were even more successful than girls, and the mehod of work also suited girls.

  13. Thermal and Trophic Stability of Deeper Maine Lakes in Granite Watersheds Impacted by Acid Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Robert E.; Wittchen, Bruce D.

    1990-09-01

    Acid deposition can lead to lake and watershed acidification, increases in lake transparency, and reductions in thermal stability and hypolimnetic oxygen deficits. On the basis of lake surveys during August-September 1985, we determined to what extent the deeper (maximum depth zm > 17 m) Maine lakes in acid-sensitive granitic watersheds have registered changes in temperature and oxygen stratification, as compared to 1938-1942, when G. P. Cooper performed the earliest scientific surveys of the state's lakes. After correcting for small but geographically consistent interannual differences in summer hypolimnetic temperatures related to spring turnover, and weather-dependent differences in mixed layer depth, there has been no significant change in thermal stratification in these Maine lakes over approximately 43 years. On the basis of specific historical contrasts in the late summer metalimnetic, hypolimnetic, and bathylimnetic oxygen concentrations there has been no significant change in lake trophic state or transparency.

  14. Thermal and trophic stability of deeper Maine lakes in granite waterhsheds implacted by acid deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, R.E.; Wittchen, B.D. (Univ. of Maine, Orono (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Acid deposition can lead to lake and watershed acidification, increases in lake transparency, and reduction in thermal stability and hypolimnetic oxygen deficits. On the basis of lake surveys during August-September 1985, we determined to what extent the deeper (maximum depth z{sub m}{gt}17 m) Maine lakes in acid-sensitive granitic watersheds have registered changes in temperature and oxygen stratification, as compared to 1938-1942, when G.P. Cooper performed the earliest scientific surveys of the state's lakes. After correcting for small but geographically consistent interannual differences in summer hypolimnetic temperatures related to spring turnover, and weather-dependent differences in mixed layer depth, there has been no significant change in thermal stratification in these Maine lakes over approximately 43 years. On the basis of specific historical contrasts in the late summer metalimnetic, hypolimnetic, and bathylimnetic oxygen concentrations there has been no significant change in lake trophic state or transparency.

  15. Particles and fundamental interactions supplements, problems and solutions : a deeper insight into particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Braibant, Sylvie; Spurio, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    This volume is an exercises and solutions manual that complements  the book "Particles and Fundamental Interactions" by Sylvie Braibant, Giorgio Giacomelli, and Maurizio Spurio.  It aims to give additional intellectual stimulation for students in experimental particle physics. It will be a helpful companion in the preparation of a written examination, but also it provides a means to gaining a deeper understanding of high energy physics. The problems proposed are sometimes true and important research questions, which are described and solved in a step-by-step manner. In addition to the problems and solutions, this book offers fifteen Supplements that give further insight into topical subjects related to particle accelerators, signal and data acquisition systems and computational methods to treat them.

  16. Quantum trajectories, real, surreal or an approximation to a deeper process?

    CERN Document Server

    Hiley, B J; Maroney, O

    2000-01-01

    The proposal that the one-parameter solutions of the real part of the Schrodinger equation (quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation) can be regarded as `quantum particle trajectories' has received considerable attention recently. Opinions as to their significance differ. Some argue that they do play a fundamental role as actual particle trajectories, others regard them as mere metaphysical appendages without any physical significance. Recent work has claimed that in some cases the Bohm approach gives results that disagree with those obtained from standard quantum mechanics and, in consequence, with experiment. Furthermore it is claimed that these trajectories have such unacceptable properties that they can only be considered as `surreal'. We re-examine these questions and show that the specific objections raised by Englert, Scully, Sussmann and Walther cannot be sustained. We also argue that contrary to their negative view, these trajectories can provide a deeper insight into quantum processes.

  17. Treatment of nickel-ammonia complex ion-containing ammonia nitrogen wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Xiao-bo; ZHOU Min; CHAI Li-yuan; WANG Yun-yan; SHU Yu-de

    2009-01-01

    Air stripping was adopted to treat nickel ammonia complex ion-containing wastewater in order to remove nickel and ammonia simultaneously in one technological process. The relationship among pH, the concentration of nickel ammonia complex ion and total ammonia concentration was analyzed theoretically. Influence of pH value, water temperature, airflow rate and time on air stripping was studied in detail by static experiment in laboratory. The results show that at pH 11, temperature of 60 ℃ and airflow rate of 0.12 m~3/h, NH_3 and Ni~(2+) concentrations remained in wastewater are less than 2 and 0.2 mg/L, respectively, after blowing for 75 min, which reaches the standard of the state discharge. When the tail gas is absorbed by 0.5 mol/L H_2SO_4 in order to avoid the secondary pollution, the absorption rate can achieve 70%.

  18. Ammonia tolerant enriched methanogenic cultures as bioaugmentation inocula to alleviate ammonia inhibition in continuous anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Wang, Han; Angelidaki, Irini

    tolerant methanogenic culture as potential bioaugmentation inoculum in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) operating under “inhibited steady-state”, triggered by high ammonia levels (5 g NH4+-N L-1). The results of the current study established for the first time that bioaugmentation of an enriched...... ammonia tolerant methanogen in a CSTR reactor could completely alleviate the ammonia inhibitory effect. Furthermore, it was found that bioaugmentation with the enriched culture resulted in 25% higher methane production compared to when the bioaugmentation was achieved with pure methanogenic strains....... The bioaugmentation was performed without pausing the continuous operation of the CSTR reactor and without excluding the ammonia-rich substrate from the feedstock. Thus, bioaugmentation with mixed methanogenic cultures could potentially support the development of an efficient and cost-effective biomethanation process...

  19. Diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, J.F.M.F.; van Bleijswijk, J.D.L.; Witte, H.; van Duyl, F.C.

    2013-01-01

    We analysed the diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) and Bacteria (AOB) in the shallow warm-water sponge Halisarca caerulea and the deep cold-water sponges Higginsia thielei and Nodastrella nodastrella. The abundance of AOA and AOB was analysed using catalyzed reporter

  20. Footprints on Ammonia Concentrations from Environmental Regulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Ellermann, Thomas; Hertel, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Releases of ammonia (NH3) to the atmosphere contribute significantly to the desposition of nitrogen to both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This is the background for the national NH3 emission ceilings in Europe. However, in some countries the national legislation aims not only to meet theese...

  1. Dehydrogenation of ammonia borane in fluoro alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalidindi, Suresh Babu; Nethaji, Munirathinam; Jagirdar, Balaji R. [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2010-10-15

    Dehydrogenation of ammonia borane was carried out in fluoro alcohol solvent in order to obtain compounds that are more likely candidates suitable for regeneration. Even though ammonia borane undergoes self-dissociation in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol to liberate H{sub 2}, decent hydrogen release rates were obtained by using Co-Co{sub 2}B, Ni-Ni{sub 3}B, and Co-Ni-B nanocomposites as catalysts. These catalysts are magnetic in nature and hence can be separated from the reaction mixture using a magnet for re-use. The final by-product NH{sub 4}{sup +} B(OCH{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup -} obtained after the catalytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane was thoroughly characterized using {sup 1}H, {sup 11}B, and {sup 13}C NMR and IR spectroscopies. The FTIR data showed that the B-O bond in NH{sub 4}{sup +} B(OCH{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup -} is slightly weaker compared to boric acid. Preliminary investigations on the regenerative routes for ammonia borane from the by-product NH{sub 4}{sup +} B(OCH{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup -} showed indications of the formation of BNH{sub x} species. (author)

  2. Ammonia synthesis from first principles calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honkala, Johanna Karoliina; Hellman, Anders; Remediakis, Ioannis

    2005-01-01

    The rate of ammonia synthesis over a nanoparticle ruthenium catalyst can be calculated directly on the basis of a quantum chemical treatment of the problem using density functional theory. We compared the results to measured rates over a ruthenium catalyst supported on magnesium aluminum spinet...

  3. Diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, J.F.M.F.; van Bleijswijk, J.D.L.; Witte, H.; van Duyl, F.C.

    2013-01-01

    We analysed the diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) and Bacteria (AOB) in the shallow warm-water sponge Halisarca caerulea and the deep cold-water sponges Higginsia thielei and Nodastrella nodastrella. The abundance of AOA and AOB was analysed using catalyzed reporter depositi

  4. Adsorption of Ammonia on Regenerable Carbon Sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Jesph E.; Serio, Michael A..; Wilburn, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide, moisture, and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), and more specifically in the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Data on sorption and desorption of ammonia, which is a major TC of concern, are presented in this paper. The current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is non-regenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. In this study, several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested for ammonia sorption. Ammonia-sorption capacity was related to carbon pore structure characteristics, and the temperature of oxidative carbon-surface treatment was optimized for enhanced ammonia-sorption performance.

  5. Radiation Chemistry in Ammonia-Water Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the effects of 100 keV proton irradiation on films of ammonia-water mixtures between 20 and 120 K. Irradiation destroys ammonia, leading to the formation and trapping of H2, N2 NO, and N2O, the formation of cavities containing radiolytic gases, and ejection of molecules by sputtering. Using infrared spectroscopy, we show that at all temperatures the destruction of ammonia is substantial, but at higher temperatures (120 K), it is nearly complete (approximately 97% destroyed) after a fluence of 10(exp 16) ions per square centimeter. Using mass spectroscopy and microbalance gravimetry, we measure the sputtering yield of our sample and the main components of the sputtered flux. We find that the sputtering yield depends on fluence. At low temperatures, the yield is very low initially and increases quadratically with fluence, while at 120 K the yield is constant and higher initially. The increase in the sputtering yield with fluence is explained by the formation and trapping of the ammonia decay products, N2 and H2 which are seen to be ejected from the ice at all temperatures.

  6. Diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, J.F.M.F.; van Bleijswijk, J.D.L.; Witte, H.; van Duyl, F.C.

    2013-01-01

    We analysed the diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) and Bacteria (AOB) in the shallow warm-water sponge Halisarca caerulea and the deep cold-water sponges Higginsia thielei and Nodastrella nodastrella. The abundance of AOA and AOB was analysed using catalyzed reporter depositi

  7. Fiber Optic Detection of Ammonia Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kalvoda

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Bathochromic shifts accompanying the formation of several bivalent metallic complexes containing 5-(4’-dimethylaminophenylimino quinolin-8-one (L1, and 7-chlore-5(4’-diethylamino-2-methylphenylimino quinolin-8-one (L2 ligands in ethanol solutions were evaluated by VIS-NIR spectroscopy. The [L1-Cu-L1] sulphide complex was selected as a reagent for further tests on optical fibres. Samples of multimode siloxane-clad fused-silica fibre were sensitized by diffusing an ethanol/chloroform solution of the dye into the cladding polymer, and tested by VIS-NIR optical spectroscopy (12 cm long fibre sections, and optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR; 20 ns laser pulses, wavelength 850 nm, 120 m long fibre sensitized within the interval 104–110 m. A well-resolved absorption band of the reagent could be identified in the absorption spectra of the fibres. After exposure to dry ammonia/nitrogen gas with increasing ammonia concentration (0–4000 ppm, the short fibre samples showed subsequent decay of NIR optical absorption; saturation was observed for higher ammonia levels. The concentration resolution r ? 50 ppm and forward response time t90 ? 30 sec were obtained within the interval 0–1000 ppm. The OTDR courses showed an enhancement of the back-scattered light intensity coming from the sensitized region after diffusion of the initial reagent, and decay after exposure to concentrated ammonia/nitrogen gas (10000 ppm.

  8. Designing for deeper learning in a blended computer science course for middle school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Shuchi; Pea, Roy; Cooper, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The focus of this research was to create and test an introductory computer science course for middle school. Titled "Foundations for Advancing Computational Thinking" (FACT), the course aims to prepare and motivate middle school learners for future engagement with algorithmic problem solving. FACT was also piloted as a seven-week course on Stanford's OpenEdX MOOC platform for blended in-class learning. Unique aspects of FACT include balanced pedagogical designs that address the cognitive, interpersonal, and intrapersonal aspects of "deeper learning"; a focus on pedagogical strategies for mediating and assessing for transfer from block-based to text-based programming; curricular materials for remedying misperceptions of computing; and "systems of assessments" (including formative and summative quizzes and tests, directed as well as open-ended programming assignments, and a transfer test) to get a comprehensive picture of students' deeper computational learning. Empirical investigations, accomplished over two iterations of a design-based research effort with students (aged 11-14 years) in a public school, sought to examine student understanding of algorithmic constructs, and how well students transferred this learning from Scratch to text-based languages. Changes in student perceptions of computing as a discipline were measured. Results and mixed-method analyses revealed that students in both studies (1) achieved substantial learning gains in algorithmic thinking skills, (2) were able to transfer their learning from Scratch to a text-based programming context, and (3) achieved significant growth toward a more mature understanding of computing as a discipline. Factor analyses of prior computing experience, multivariate regression analyses, and qualitative analyses of student projects and artifact-based interviews were conducted to better understand the factors affecting learning outcomes. Prior computing experiences (as measured by a pretest) and math ability were

  9. Orion Ammonia Boiler System Preflight Test Preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Julia L.

    2017-01-01

    The Environmental Controls and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) branch at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is currently undergoing preparations for ground testing of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) to prepare its subsystems for EM-1 (Exploration Mission-1). EM-1, Orions second unmanned flight, is a three-week long lunar mission during which the vehicle will complete a 6-day retrograde lunar orbit before returning to Earth. This paper focuses on the work done during the authors 16-week internship with the Mechanical Engineering Branch of KSCs Engineering Directorate. The authors project involved assisting with the preparations for testing the Orion MPCVs ammonia boiler system. The purpose of the ammonia boiler system is to keep the spacecraft sufficiently cool during the reentry portion of its mission, from service module (SM) separation to post-landing. This system is critical for keeping both the spacecraft (avionics and electronics) and crew alive during reentry, thus a successful test of the system is essential to the success of EM-1. XXXX The author was able to draft a detailed outline of the procedure for the ammonia system functional test. More work will need to be done on the vehicle power-up and power-down portions of the procedure, but the ammonia system testing portion of the procedure is thorough and includes vehicle test configurations, vehicle commands, and GSE. The author was able to compile a substantial list of questions regarding the ammonia system functional test with the help of her mentors. A significant number of these questions were answered in the teleconferences with Lockheed Martin.

  10. AMMONIA CONCENTRATION IN SALTSTONE HEADSPACE SUMMARY REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamecnik, J; Alex Cozzi, A

    2008-09-26

    The Saltstone Facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) is under revision to accommodate changes in the Composite Lower Flammability Limit (CLFL) from the introduction of Isopar into Tank 50. Saltstone samples were prepared with an 'MCU' type salt solution spiked with ammonia. The ammonia released from the saltstone was captured and analyzed. The ammonia concentration found in the headspace of samples maintained at 95 C and 1 atm was, to 95% confidence, less than or equal to 3.9 mg/L. Tank 50 is fed by several influent streams. The salt solution from Tank 50 is pumped to the salt feed tank (SFT) in the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). The premix materials cement, slag and fly ash are blended together prior to transfer to the grout mixer. The premix is fed to the grout mixer in the SPF and the salt solution is incorporated into the premix in the grout mixer, yielding saltstone slurry. The saltstone slurry drops into a hopper and then is pumped to the vault. The Saltstone Facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) is under revision to accommodate changes in the Composite Lower Flammability Limit (CLFL) from the introduction of Isopar{reg_sign} L into Tank 50. Waste Solidification-Engineering requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing to characterize the release of ammonia in curing saltstone at 95 C. The test temperature represents the maximum allowable temperature in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Ammonia may be present in the salt solution and premix materials, or may be produced by chemical reactions when the premix and salt solution are combined. A final report (SRNS-STI-2008-00120, Rev. 0) will be issued that will cover in more depth the information presented in this report.

  11. Ammonia downstream from HH 80 North

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girart, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Anglada, Guillem; Estalella, Robert; Torrelles, Jose, M.; Marti, Josep; Pena, Miriam; Ayala, Sandra; Curiel, Salvador; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto

    1994-01-01

    HH 80-81 are two optically visible Herbig-Haro (HH) objects located about 5 minutes south of their exciting source IRAS 18162-2048. Displaced symmetrically to the north of this luminous IRAS source, a possible HH counterpart was recently detected as a radio continuum source with the very large array (VLA). This radio source, HH 80 North, has been proposed to be a member of the Herbig-Haro class since its centimeter flux density, angular size, spectral index, and morphology are all similar to those of HH 80. However, no object has been detected at optical wavelengths at the position of HH 80 North, possibly because of high extinction, and the confirmation of the radio continuum source as an HH object has not been possible. In the prototypical Herbig-Haro objects HH 1 and 2, ammonia emission has been detected downstream of the flow in both objects. This detection has been intepreted as a result of an enhancement in the ammonia emission produced by the radiation field of the shock associated with the HH object. In this Letter we report the detection of the (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions of ammonia downstream HH 80 North. This detection gives strong suppport to the interpretation of HH 80 North as a heavily obscured HH object. In addition, we suggest that ammonia emission may be a tracer of embedded Herbig-Haro objects in other regions of star formation. A 60 micrometer IRAS source could be associated with HH 80 North and with the ammonia condensation. A tentative explanation for the far-infrared emission as arising in dust heated by their optical and UV radiation of the HH object is presented.

  12. Ammonia and ammonium hydroxide sensors for ammonia/water absorption machines: Literature review and data compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anheier, N. C., Jr.; McDonald, C. E.; Cuta, J. M.; Cuta, F. M.; Olsen, K. B.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes an evaluation of various sensing techniques for determining the ammonia concentration in the working fluid of ammonia/water absorption cycle systems. The purpose was to determine if any existing sensor technology or instrumentation could provide an accurate, reliable, and cost-effective continuous measure of ammonia concentration in water. The resulting information will be used for design optimization and cycle control in an ammonia-absorption heat pump. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) researchers evaluated each sensing technology against a set of general requirements characterizing the potential operating conditions within the absorption cycle. The criteria included the physical constraints for in situ operation, sensor characteristics, and sensor application. PNL performed an extensive literature search, which uncovered several promising sensing technologies that might be applicable to this problem. Sixty-two references were investigated, and 33 commercial vendors were identified as having ammonia sensors. The technologies for ammonia sensing are acoustic wave, refractive index, electrode, thermal, ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET), electrical conductivity, pH/colormetric, and optical absorption. Based on information acquired in the literature search, PNL recommends that follow-on activities focus on ISFET devices and a fiber optic evanescent sensor with a colormetric indicator. The ISFET and fiber optic evanescent sensor are inherently microminiature and capable of in situ measurements. Further, both techniques have been demonstrated selective to the ammonium ion (NH4(+)). The primary issue remaining is how to make the sensors sufficiently corrosion-resistant to be useful in practice.

  13. Ammonia and ammonium hydroxide sensors for ammonia/water absorption machines: Literature review and data compilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, N.C. Jr.; McDonald, C.E.; Cuta, J.M.; Cuta, F.M.; Olsen, K.B.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes an evaluation of various sensing techniques for determining the ammonia concentration in the working fluid of ammonia/water absorption cycle systems. The purpose of this work was to determine if any existing sensor technology or instrumentation could provide an accurate, reliable, and cost-effective continuous measure of ammonia concentration in water. The resulting information will be used for design optimization and cycle control in an ammonia-absorption heat pump. PNL researchers evaluated each sensing technology against a set of general requirements characterizing the potential operating conditions within the absorption cycle. The criteria included the physical constraints for in situ operation, sensor characteristics, and sensor application. PNL performed an extensive literature search, which uncovered several promising sensing technologies that might be applicable to this problem. Sixty-two references were investigated, and 33 commercial vendors were identified as having ammonia sensors. The technologies for ammonia sensing are acoustic wave, refractive index, electrode, thermal, ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET), electrical conductivity, pH/colormetric, and optical absorption. Based on information acquired in the literature search, PNL recommends that follow-on activities focus on ISFET devices and a fiber optic evanescent sensor with a colormetric indicator. The ISFET and fiber optic evanescent sensor are inherently microminiature and capable of in situ measurements. Further, both techniques have been demonstrated selective to the ammonium ion (NH{sub 4}{sup +}). The primary issue remaining is how to make the sensors sufficiently corrosion-resistant to be useful in practice.

  14. Establishing relative sensitivities of various toxicity testing organisms to ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karle, L.M.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, M.E.; Karls, R.K. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The toxicity of ammonia to various organisms was examined to develop a baseline for mortality in several commonly used testing species. This baseline data will assist in choosing the proper test species and in interpreting results as they pertain to ammonia. Responses for two juvenile fish species, three marine amphipods, and two species of mysid shrimp were compared for their sensitivity to levels of ammonia. All mortality caused by ammonia in the bottom-dwelling Citharichthys stigmaeus occurred within 24 h of exposure, whereas mortality in the silverside, Menidia beryllina, occurred over the entire 96-h test duration. Responses to ammonia varied among the amphipods Rhepoxynius abronius, Ampelisca abdita, and Eohaustorius estuarius. R. abronius and A. abdita showed similar sensitivity to ammonia at lower concentrations; A. abdita appeared more sensitive than R. abronius at levels above 40 mg/L. Concentrations of ammonia required to produce significant mortality in the amphipod E. estuarius were far higher than the other species examined (> 100 mg/L NH{sub 3}). A comparison of ammonia toxicity with two commonly used invertebrates, Holmesimysis sculpts and Mysidopsis bahia, suggest that these two species of mysid have similar sensitivities to ammonia. Further studies with ammonia that examine sensitivity of different organisms should be conducted to assist regulatory and environmental agencies in determining appropriate test species and in interpreting toxicological results as they may be affected by levels of ammonia.

  15. Study of Hydrogen Supply System with Ammonia Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saika, Takashi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Nohara, Tetsuo; Ishimatsu, Shinji

    Carbon-free fuel is effective in preventing global warming. Hydrogen has no carbon and can be made also from nuclear energy or reproducible energies other than fossil fuels. However, hydrogen lacks portability because of its difficulty in liquefying, but ammonia can easily be liquefied at a room temperature and dissociated into high-content hydrogen and nitrogen using a suitable catalyst. An ammonia dissociation system for fuel cells is proposed in this paper. The residual ammonia by 13ppm or more in the dissociated gas (H2+ N2) causes a decrease in the output of fuel cells. To separate residual ammonia, it should be sent to an ammonia separator and then to an ammonia distiller. In the experiment, the authors examine the concentrations of ammonia after dissociation at various temperatures, pressures and space velocities. The ammonia separator uses the fact that ammonia dissolves well in water. Then the ammonia water is distilled in the distiller. Thereby, the authors have proposed an ammonia circulation system that is a clean energy system.

  16. Pretreatment of Biomass by Aqueous Ammonia for Bioethanol Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Gupta, Rajesh; Lee, Y. Y.

    The methods of pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass using aqueous ammonia are described. The main effect of ammonia treatment of biomass is delignification without significantly affecting the carbohydrate contents. It is a very effective pretreatment method especially for substrates that have low lignin contents such as agricultural residues and herbaceous feedstock. The ammonia-based pretreatment is well suited for simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) because the treated biomass retains cellulose as well as hemicellulose. It has been demonstrated that overall ethanol yield above 75% of the theoretical maximum on the basis of total carbohydrate is achievable from corn stover pretreated with aqueous ammonia by way of SSCF. There are two different types of pretreatment methods based on aqueous ammonia: (1) high severity, low contact time process (ammonia recycle percolation; ARP), (2) low severity, high treatment time process (soaking in aqueous ammonia; SAA). Both of these methods are described and discussed for their features and effectiveness.

  17. Effect of catalyst on electrolysis of ammonia effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnin, Egilda P.; Biddinger, Elizabeth J.; Botte, Gerardine G. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 183 Stocker Center, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    The electrolysis of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) was studied as a remediation process for the removal of ammonia from wastewater, with the advantage of producing hydrogen while returning clean water to the environment. An electro-catalyst able to support the electro-oxidation of ammonia at low concentrations was designed. Two substrates were tested, Raney nickel and carbon fiber. Carbon fiber was found to be a better substrate for the electrolysis of ammonia at low concentrations. The performance of noble metals such as Rh, Pt and Ir, electroplated on the carbon fiber substrate was also evaluated. Rh-Pt-Ir and Pt-Ir on carbon fiber substrate were found to be the most promising electrodes for the electrolysis of ammonia at low concentrations. The maximum ammonia conversion was 91.49 {+-} 0.01% for a typical concentration of ammonia found in sewage water and the Faradaic efficiency was 91.81 {+-} 0.13% on the selected anode. (author)

  18. Exchange of Atmospheric Ammonia in a Mature Corn Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, L.; Heuer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Dry deposition of atmospheric ammonia increases nitrogen levels in terrestrial ecosystems, which contributes to nutrient imbalances and other environmental changes. The exchange of ammonia between the atmosphere and land is dynamic, and vegetative canopies can act as sources or sinks of ammonia under certain conditions. A field study was conducted during summer 2014 in a mature corn field at the University of Illinois using an automated exchange mechanism and a cavity ring-down spectrometer to sample atmospheric ammonia at eight levels between 0.2 m and 4.5 m above the surface. Ammonia concentrations, along with micrometeorological measurements, were evaluated to quantify and characterize ammonia flux profiles to improve understanding of the distribution of ammonia through vegetation.

  19. Spin-state chemistry of deuterated ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipilä, O.; Harju, J.; Caselli, P.; Schlemmer, S.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: We aim to develop a chemical model that contains a consistent description of spin-state chemistry in reactions involving chemical species with multiple deuterons. We apply the model to the specific case of deuterated ammonia, to derive values for the various spin-state ratios. Methods: We applied symmetry rules in the context of the complete scrambling assumption to calculate branching ratio tables for reactions between chemical species that include multiple protons and/or deuterons. New reaction sets for both gas-phase and grain-surface chemistry were generated using an automated routine that forms all possible spin-state variants of any given reaction with up to six H/D atoms, using the predetermined branching ratios. Both a single-point and a modified Bonnor-Ebert model were considered to study the density and temperature dependence of ammonia and its isotopologs, and the associated spin-state ratios. Results: We find that the spin-state ratios of the ammonia isotopologs are, at late times, very different from their statistical values. The ratios are rather insensitive to variations in the density, but present strong temperature dependence. We derive high peak values (~0.1) for the deuterium fraction in ammonia, in agreement with previous (gas-phase) models. The deuterium fractionation is strongest at high density, corresponding to a high degree of depletion, and also presents temperature dependence. We find that in the temperature range 5 K to 20 K, the deuterium fractionation peaks at ~15 K, while most of the ortho/para (and meta/para for ND3) ratios present a minimum at 10 K (ortho/para NH2D has instead a maximum at this temperature). Conclusions: Owing to the density and temperature dependence found in the abundances and spin-state ratios of ammonia and its isotopologs, it is evident that observations of ammonia and its deuterated forms can provide important constraints on the physical structure of molecular clouds. Appendix A is available in

  20. EFFECTS OF AMMONIA LOADING ON PORCELLIO SCABER: GLUTAMINE AND GLUTAMATE SYNTHESIS, AMMONIA EXCRETION AND TOXICITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright; Donnell; Reichert

    1994-03-01

    The effects of ammonia loading in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber were studied by exposing animals to atmospheres of high PNH3. Isopods show a remarkable tolerance of elevated ambient PNH3, with an LD50 of 89 Pa for a 7-day exposure. However, haemolymph total ammonia concentrations generally remained below 5 mmol l-1 (PNH3=0.37 Pa) over the range of ambient ammonia levels used (6.6­165 Pa). Following a 7-day loading period, whole-animal glutamine (Gln) and glutamate (Glu) levels increased in direct proportion to ambient PNH3, reaching values of 35 µmol g-1 fresh mass for glutamine and 12 µmol g-1 fresh mass for glutamate in 99 Pa PNH3; these correspond to control levels of 7.5 µmol g-1 fresh mass and 5.9 µmol g-1 fresh mass, respectively. Following transfer to ammonia-free chambers, NH3 excretion rates were augmented five- to sixfold relative to non-loaded controls. Ammonia volatilization subsequently declined, approaching control levels after 8­9 days. Levels of Gln and Glu showed a concomitant decline to 13.7 µmol g-1 fresh mass and 9.2 µmol g-1 fresh mass, respectively. The results suggest that these amino acids function in ammonia sequestration and, hence, detoxification. Calculations indicate that mobilization of amino groups by deamination of accumulated Gln and Glu could explain 35 % of the increased ammonia production. Implications of NH3 volatilization for acid­base balance are discussed.

  1. Operation summary of ammonia synthesis ammonia storage safety%合成氨氨库安全运行总结

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周荷珍; 张志翠

    2014-01-01

    介绍了氨对人体健康的危害及急救措施、氨罐的操作、汽车氨罐卸氨的原理及具体操作、氨吸收塔的操作,指出只有对氨库实行科学管理和精心操作,才能保证氨库的长期安全稳定运行。%The paper introduces damage from ammonia on human health and emergency measures, ammonia tank operation, the principle of car unloading ammonia ammonia tank and the specific operation, ammonia absorption tower operation, points out that only the ammonia base of scientific management and careful operation, in order to ensure the long-term safe and stable operation of ammonia storage.

  2. Near-peer teaching in anatomy: an approach for deeper learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Darrell J R; Cuffe, Tracy

    2009-10-01

    Peer teaching has been recognized as a valuable and effective approach for learning and has been incorporated into medical, dental, and healthcare courses using a variety of approaches. The success of peer teaching is thought to be related to the ability of peer tutors and tutees to communicate more effectively, thereby improving the learning environment. Near-peer teaching involves more experienced students acting as tutors who are ideally placed to pass on their knowledge and experience. The advantage of using near-peer teachers is the opportunity for the teacher to reinforce and expand their own learning and develop essential teaching skills. This study describes the design and implementation of a program for fourth year medical students to teach anatomy to first- and second-year medical students and evaluates the perceptions of the near-peer teachers on the usefulness of the program, particularly in relation to their own learning. Feedback from participants suggests that the program fulfills its aims of providing an effective environment for developing deeper learning in anatomy through teaching. Participants recognize that the program also equips them with more advanced teaching skills that will be required as they move nearer toward taking on supervisory and teaching duties. The program has also provided the school with an additional valuable and appropriate resource for teaching anatomy to first- and second-year students, who themselves view the inclusion of near-peer teachers as a positive element in their learning.

  3. Deep rooting conferred by DEEPER ROOTING 1 enhances rice yield in paddy fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai-Sanoh, Yumiko; Takai, Toshiyuki; Yoshinaga, Satoshi; Nakano, Hiroshi; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kondo, Motohiko; Uga, Yusaku

    2014-01-01

    To clarify the effect of deep rooting on grain yield in rice (Oryza sativa L.) in an irrigated paddy field with or without fertilizer, we used the shallow-rooting IR64 and the deep-rooting Dro1-NIL (a near-isogenic line homozygous for the Kinandang Patong allele of DEEPER ROOTING 1 (DRO1) in the IR64 genetic background). Although total root length was similar in both lines, more roots were distributed within the lower soil layer of the paddy field in Dro1-NIL than in IR64, irrespective of fertilizer treatment. At maturity, Dro1-NIL showed approximately 10% higher grain yield than IR64, irrespective of fertilizer treatment. Higher grain yield of Dro1-NIL was mainly due to the increased 1000-kernel weight and increased percentage of ripened grains, which resulted in a higher harvest index. After heading, the uptake of nitrogen from soil and leaf nitrogen concentration were higher in Dro1-NIL than in IR64. At the mid-grain-filling stage, Dro1-NIL maintained higher cytokinin fluxes from roots to shoots than IR64. These results suggest that deep rooting by DRO1 enhances nitrogen uptake and cytokinin fluxes at late stages, resulting in better grain filling in Dro1-NIL in a paddy field in this study. PMID:24988911

  4. Active Learning Approaches by Visualizing ICT Devices with Milliseconds Resolution for Deeper Understanding in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Akizo; Okiharu, Fumiko

    2010-07-01

    We are developing various modularized materials in physics education to overcome students' misconceptions by use of ICT, i.e. video analysis software and ultra-high-speed digital movies, motion detector, force sensors, current and voltage probes, temperature sensors etc. Furthermore, we also present some new modules of active learning approaches on electric circuit using high speed camera and voltage probes with milliseconds resolution. We are now especially trying to improve conceptual understanding by use of ICT devices with milliseconds resolution in various areas of physics education We give some modules of mass measurements by video analysis of collision phenomena by using high speed cameras—Casio EX-F1(1200 fps), EX-FH20(1000 fps) and EX-FC100/150(1000 fps). We present several new modules on collision phenomena to establish deeper understanding of conservation laws of momentum. We discuss some effective results of trial on a physics education training courses for science educators, and those for science teachers during the renewal years of teacher's license after every ten years in Japan. Finally, we discuss on some typical results of pre-test and post-test in our active learning approaches based on ICT, i.e. some evidence on improvements of physics education (increasing ratio of correct answer are 50%-level).

  5. Helping medical students to acquire a deeper understanding of truth-telling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Samia A; Baroffio, Anne; Ummel, Marinette; Burn, Carine Layat

    2015-01-01

    Truth-telling is an important component of respect for patients' self-determination, but in the context of breaking bad news, it is also a distressing and difficult task. We investigated the long-term influence of a simulated patient-based teaching intervention, integrating learning objectives in communication skills and ethics into students' attitudes and concerns regarding truth-telling. We followed two cohorts of medical students from the preclinical third year to their clinical rotations (fifth year). Open-ended responses were analysed to explore medical students' reported difficulties in breaking bad news. This intervention was implemented during the last preclinical year of a problem-based medical curriculum, in collaboration between the doctor-patient communication and ethics programs. Over time, concerns such as empathy and truthfulness shifted from a personal to a relational focus. Whereas 'truthfulness' was a concern for the content of the message, 'truth-telling' included concerns on how information was communicated and how realistically it was received. Truth-telling required empathy, adaptation to the patient, and appropriate management of emotions, both for the patient's welfare and for a realistic understanding of the situation. Our study confirms that an intervention confronting students with a realistic situation succeeds in making them more aware of the real issues of truth-telling. Medical students deepened their reflection over time, acquiring a deeper understanding of the relational dimension of values such as truth-telling, and honing their view of empathy.

  6. Acorns containing deeper plumule survive better: how white oaks counter embryo excision by rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingming; Dong, Zhong; Yi, Xianfeng; Bartlow, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    Several squirrel species excise the embryo of acorns of most white oak species to arrest germination for long-term storage. However, it is not clear how these acorns counter embryo excision and survive in the arms race of coevolution. In this study, we simulated the embryo excision behavior of squirrels by removing 4 mm of cotyledon from the apical end of white oak acorns differing in embryo depths to investigate the effects of embryo excision on acorn germination and seedling performance of white oak species. The embryo depth in the cotyledons was significantly different among white oak acorns, with Quercus mongolica containing the embryo most deeply in the acorns. We found that artificial embryo excision significantly decreased acorn germination rates of Quercus variabilis, Quercus acutissima, Quercus aliena, Quercus aliena var. acutiserrata, Quercus serrata. var. brevipetiolata but not Q. mongolica. Artificial embryo excision exerted significant negative impacts on seedling performance of all oak species except Quercus aliena. Our study demonstrates the role of embryo depth of acorns in countering embryo excision by squirrels and may explain the fact that squirrels do not perform embryo excision in acorns of Q. mongolica with deeper embryos. This apparent adaptation of acorns sheds light on the coevolutionary dynamics between oaks and their seed predators.

  7. Modelling of Ammonia Heat Pump Desuperheaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Stefan Wuust; Elmegaard, Brian; Markussen, Wiebke Brix

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of modelling desuperheating in ammonia heat pumps. Focus is on the temperature profile of the superheated refrigerant. Typically, the surface area of a heat exchanger is estimated using the Log Mean Temperature Difference (LMTD) method. The assumption of this method...... is that the specific heat is constant throughout the temperature glide of the refrigerant in the heat exchanger. However, considering ammonia as refrigerant, the LMTD method does not give accurate results due to significant variations of the specific heat. By comparing the actual temperature profiles from a one....... The area of the heat exchanger can be increased or the condensation temperature can be raised to achieve the same temperature difference for the discretized model as for the LMTD. This would affect the compressor work, hence the COP of the system. Furthermore, for higher condenser pressure, and thus higher...

  8. Aqueous Ammonia soaking of digested manure fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirtsou-Xanthopoulou, Chrysoula; Jurado, Esperanza; Skiadas, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    The continuously increasing demand for renewable energy sources renders anaerobic digestion to one of the most promising technologies for renewable energy production. Due to the animal production intensification, manure is being used as the primary feedstock for most of the biogas plants. Thus......-scale anaerobic digester to enhance their methane productivity. Soaking in six different reagent concentrations in ammonia (5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, 32%) was applied for 3 days at 22°C. An overall methane yield increase from 85% to 110% was achieved compared to controls (digested manure fibers where AAS...... in methane yield as the highest concentrations tested; it is anticipated that this will result to an even lower cost for recovery and recycling of ammonia in full-scale. Moreover, the effect of 1, 3, and 5 days AAS treatment on methane production from digested fibers was investigated with 5 and 25% w...

  9. Manufacture of Catalyst Systems for Ammonia Conversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAKH S.V.; SAVENKOV D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Platinum catalyst gauzes have been in use since the moment of development of the process of catalyst oxidation of ammonia for production of nitric acid or hydrocyanic acid.Catalyst gauzes are usually made of platinum or its alloys with rhodium and palladium.These precious metals have remarkable properties that make them ideal catalysts for acceleration of the ammonia/oxygen reaction.In 2008,OJSC "SIC ‘Supermetal’" and Umicore AG&Co.KG launched a production line for Pt-alloy-based catalyst systems to be used for ammonia oxidation in the production of weak nitric acid.Catalyst systems consist of a pack of catalyst gauzes and a pack of catchment gauzes,which are made using flat-bed knitting machines and wire-cloth looms.Today,up-to-date catalyst systems MKSpreciseTM are being manufactured,the basic advantages of which are an individual structure of gauzes and composition of the material,which allows to define precisely the position of each gauze in the catalyst pack,a high activity of the catalyst pack,direct catching of platinum and rhodium in the catalyst system,and a reasonable combination of single- and multilayer types of gauzes.This makes it possible to vary the configuration of the catalyst and select an optimum composition of the system to ensure the maximum efficiency of the ammonia oxidation process.We also produce the catchment systems that allow to find the best decision from the economic point view for each individual case.

  10. Nitrocarburising in ammonia-hydrocarbon gas mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hanne; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigates the possibility of nitrocarburising in ammonia-acetylene-hydrogen and ammoniapropene- hydrogen gas mixtures, where unsaturated hydrocarbon gas is the carbon source during nitrocarburising. Consequently, nitrocarburising is carried out in a reducing atmosphere...... microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that the use of unsaturated hydrocarbon gas in nitrocarburising processes is a viable alternative to traditional nitrocarburising methods....

  11. Fast and Accurate Exhaled Breath Ammonia Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Solga, Steven F; Mudalel, Matthew L; Spacek, Lisa A.; Risby, Terence H.

    2014-01-01

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Toge...

  12. Diverse microbial species survive high ammonia concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Laura C.; Cockell, Charles S.; Summers, Stephen

    2012-04-01

    Planetary protection regulations are in place to control the contamination of planets and moons with terrestrial micro-organisms in order to avoid jeopardizing future scientific investigations relating to the search for life. One environmental chemical factor of relevance in extraterrestrial environments, specifically in the moons of the outer solar system, is ammonia (NH3). Ammonia is known to be highly toxic to micro-organisms and may disrupt proton motive force, interfere with cellular redox reactions or cause an increase of cell pH. To test the survival potential of terrestrial micro-organisms exposed to such cold, ammonia-rich environments, and to judge whether current planetary protection regulations are sufficient, soil samples were exposed to concentrations of NH3 from 5 to 35% (v/v) at -80°C and room temperature for periods up to 11 months. Following exposure to 35% NH3, diverse spore-forming taxa survived, including representatives of the Firmicutes (Bacillus, Sporosarcina, Viridibacillus, Paenibacillus, Staphylococcus and Brevibacillus) and Actinobacteria (Streptomyces). Non-spore forming organisms also survived, including Proteobacteria (Pseudomonas) and Actinobacteria (Arthrobacter) that are known to have environmentally resistant resting states. Clostridium spp. were isolated from the exposed soil under anaerobic culture. High NH3 was shown to cause a reduction in viability of spores over time, but spore morphology was not visibly altered. In addition to its implications for planetary protection, these data show that a large number of bacteria, potentially including spore-forming pathogens, but also environmentally resistant non-spore-formers, can survive high ammonia concentrations.

  13. Ammonia volatilization from sows on grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S. G.; Søgaard, H. T.; Møller, H. B.; Morsing, S.

    According to regulations, sows with piglets on organic farms must graze on pastures. Volatilization of ammonia (NH 3) from urine patches may represent a significant source of nitrogen (N) loss from these farms. Inputs of N are low on organic farms and losses may reduce crop production. This study examined spatial variations in NH 3 volatilization using a movable dynamic chamber, and the pH and total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) content in the topsoil of pastures with grazing sows was measured during five periods between June 1998 and May 1999. Gross NH 3 volatilization from the pastures was also measured with an atmospheric mass balance technique during seven periods from September 1997 until June 1999. The dynamic chamber study showed a high variation in NH 3 volatilization because of the distribution of urine; losses were between 0 and 2.8 g NH 3-N m -2 day -1. Volatilization was highest near the feeding area and the huts, where the sows tended to urinate. Ammonia volatilization rate was linearly related to the product of NH 3 concentration in the boundary layer and wind speed. The NH 3 in the boundary layer was in equilibrium with NH 3 in soil solution. Gross NH 3 volatilization was in the range 0.07-2.1 kg NH 3-N ha -1 day -1 from a pasture with 24 sows ha -1. Ammonia volatilization was related to the amount of feed given to the sows, incident solar radiation and air temperature during measuring periods, and also to temperature, incident solar radiation and rain 1-2 days before measurements. Annual ammonia loss was 4.8 kg NH 3-N sow -1.

  14. Ammonia Optical Sensing by Microring Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Vittorio M. N.; Dell'Olio, Francesco; De Leonardis, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    A very compact (device area around 40 μm2) optical ammonia sensor based on a microring resonator is presented in this work. Silicon-on-insulator technology is used in sensor design and a dye doped polymer is adopted as sensing material. The sensor exhibits a very good linearity and a minimum detectable refractive index shift of sensing material as low as 8×10-5, with a detection limit around 4 ‰.

  15. Ammonia emissions in Europe, part II: How ammonia emission abatement strategies affect secondary aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Anna M.; Aulinger, Armin; Bieser, Johannes; Matthias, Volker; Quante, Markus

    2016-02-01

    In central Europe, ammonium sulphate and ammonium nitrate make up a large fraction of fine particles which pose a threat to human health. Most studies on air pollution through particulate matter investigate the influence of emission reductions of sulphur- and nitrogen oxides on aerosol concentration. Here, we focus on the influence of ammonia (NH3) emissions. Emission scenarios have been created on the basis of the improved ammonia emission parameterization implemented in the SMOKE for Europe and CMAQ model systems described in part I of this study. This includes emissions based on future European legislation (the National Emission Ceilings) as well as a dynamic evaluation of the influence of different agricultural sectors (e.g. animal husbandry) on particle formation. The study compares the concentrations of NH3, NH4+, NO3 -, sulphur compounds and the total concentration of particles in winter and summer for a political-, technical- and behavioural scenario. It was found that a reduction of ammonia emissions by 50% lead to a 24% reduction of the total PM2.5 concentrations in northwest Europe. The observed reduction was mainly driven by reduced formation of ammonium nitrate. Moreover, emission reductions during winter had a larger impact than during the rest of the year. This leads to the conclusion that a reduction of the ammonia emissions from the agricultural sector related to animal husbandry could be more efficient than the reduction from other sectors due to its larger share in winter ammonia emissions.

  16. Ammonia biofiltration and community analysis of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Yin; Wenfeng, Xu

    2009-09-01

    Biological removal of ammonia was investigated using compost and sludge as packing materials in laboratory-scale biofilters. The aim of this study is to characterize the composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in two biofilters designed to remove ammonia. Experimental tests and measurements included analysis of removal efficiency and metabolic products. The inlet concentration of ammonia applied was 20-100 mg m(-3). Removal efficiencies of BFC and BFS were in the range of 97-99% and 95-99%, respectively. Periodic analysis of the biofilter packing materials showed ammonia was removed from air stream by nitrification and by the improved absorption of NH(3) in the resultant acidity. Nitrate was the dominant product of NH(3) transformation. Changes in the composition of AOB were examined by using nested PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of DGGE bands. DGGE analysis of biofilter samples revealed that shifts in the community structure of AOB were observed in the experiment; however, the idle phase did not cause the structural shift of AOB. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the population of AOB showed Nitrosospira sp. remains the predominant population in BFC, while Nitrosomonas sp. is the predominant population in BFS.

  17. The use of anhydrous ammonia for bioventing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zytner, R.G.; Hallman, M.; Gimenez, B.F.; Jennings, R.; Leek, K. [Guelph Univ., ON (Canada). Faculty of Graduate Studies

    2002-07-01

    Soils contaminated with hydrocarbons can be effectively treated using bioventing remediation technology, an ideal method for removing residual contamination left by soil vapour extraction (SVE). Bioventing uses low or intermitted air flow rates to produce oxygen-rich conditions in the vadose zone, thereby promoting the formation of micro-organisms that can mineralize the hydrocarbons if enough nutrients are present. There is concern regarding the use of nutrients (the addition of nitrogen) to the subsurface because current applications methods cannot uniformly disperse nitrogen throughout the entire subsurface. Two research studies are being conducted using gasoline contaminated soil to address this concern. The first phase of the study focuses on how to best deliver nitrogen to the subsurface. Injecting anhydrous ammonia into the contaminated surface was one suggestion for stimulating the growth of hydrocarbon degraders. SVE extraction well models indicated this was an effective and safe way to disperse nitrogen. The second phase of the study involved the use of respirometers to compare total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) degradation with nitrogen additions in the form of NH{sub 4}Cl or anhydrous ammonia. The respirometers were run for about 1 month after which time it was determined that the use of anhydrous ammonia is an effective method to promote bioventing.

  18. Spin-state chemistry of deuterated ammonia

    CERN Document Server

    Sipilä, O; Caselli, P; Schlemmer, S

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We aim to develop a chemical model that contains a consistent description of spin-state chemistry in reactions involving chemical species with multiple deuterons. We apply the model to the specific case of deuterated ammonia, to derive values for the various spin-state ratios. Methods. We apply symmetry rules in the complete scrambling assumption to calculate branching ratio tables for reactions between chemical species that include multiple protons and/or deuterons. Reaction sets for both gas-phase and grain-surface chemistry are generated using an automated routine that forms all possible spin-state variants of any given reaction with up to six H/D atoms. Single-point and modified Bonnor-Ebert models are used to study the density and temperature dependence of ammonia and its isotopologs, and the associated spin-state ratios. Results. We find that the spin-state ratios of the ammonia isotopologs are, at late times, very different from their statistical values. The ratios are rather insensitive to varia...

  19. Spectral Indices of Stars at Super-solar Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Buzzoni, A; Malagnini, M L; Morossi, C

    2001-01-01

    We derived Lick narrow-band indices for 139 candidate super metal-rich stars of different luminosity class previously studied in Malagnini et al. (2000). Indices include Iron Fe50, Fe52, Fe53, and Magnesium Mgb and Mg2 features. By comparing observations with Kurucz' synthetic model atmospheres, no evidence is found for non-standard Mg vs. Fe relative abundance (i.e. [Mg/Fe]~ 0, on the average, for our sample). A comparison with the Worthey et al.(1994) and Buzzoni et al.(1992, 1994) fitting function predictions for [Fe/H] > 0 is performed and briefly discussed.

  20. Nitrate reduction functional genes and nitrate reduction potentials persist in deeper estuarine sediments. Why?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokratis Papaspyrou

    Full Text Available Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the

  1. Nitrate Reduction Functional Genes and Nitrate Reduction Potentials Persist in Deeper Estuarine Sediments. Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Smith, Cindy J.; Dong, Liang F.; Whitby, Corinne; Dumbrell, Alex J.; Nedwell, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the sediment column. This

  2. Helping medical students to acquire a deeper understanding of truth-telling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia A. Hurst

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Problem: Truth-telling is an important component of respect for patients’ self-determination, but in the context of breaking bad news, it is also a distressing and difficult task. Intervention: We investigated the long-term influence of a simulated patient-based teaching intervention, integrating learning objectives in communication skills and ethics into students’ attitudes and concerns regarding truth-telling. We followed two cohorts of medical students from the preclinical third year to their clinical rotations (fifth year. Open-ended responses were analysed to explore medical students’ reported difficulties in breaking bad news. Context: This intervention was implemented during the last preclinical year of a problem-based medical curriculum, in collaboration between the doctor–patient communication and ethics programs. Outcome: Over time, concerns such as empathy and truthfulness shifted from a personal to a relational focus. Whereas ‘truthfulness’ was a concern for the content of the message, ‘truth-telling’ included concerns on how information was communicated and how realistically it was received. Truth-telling required empathy, adaptation to the patient, and appropriate management of emotions, both for the patient's welfare and for a realistic understanding of the situation. Lessons learned: Our study confirms that an intervention confronting students with a realistic situation succeeds in making them more aware of the real issues of truth-telling. Medical students deepened their reflection over time, acquiring a deeper understanding of the relational dimension of values such as truth-telling, and honing their view of empathy.

  3. Green Infrastructure Research Promotes Students' Deeper Interest in Core Courses of a Water Resources Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerk, W.; Montalto, F. A.; Foti, R.

    2015-12-01

    As one of most innovative among low impact development technologies, Green Infrastructure (GI) is a new technology that presents a range of potential research opportunities. Inherently linked to sustainability, urban quality of life, resilience, and other such topics, GI also represents a unique opportunity to highlight the social relevance of practical STEM research to undergraduate students. The nature of research on urban GI, in fact, as well as the accessibility of the GI sites, allows students to combine hands-on experience with theoretical work. Furthermore, the range of scales of the projects is such that they can be managed within a single term, but does not preclude longer engagement. The Sustainable Water Resource Engineering lab at Drexel University is engaged in two types of GI research outside the classroom. One type is a research co-op research internship. The second is a selective university-wide faculty-mentored summer scholarship STAR (Students Tackling Advanced Research) specifically designed for freshmen. The research projects we developed for those curricula can be accomplished by undergraduate students, but also address a larger research need in this emerging field. The research tasks have included identifying and calibrating affordable instruments, designing and building experimental setups, and monitoring and evaluating performance of GI sites. The work also promoted deeper understanding of the hydrological processes and initiated learning beyond the students' current curricula. The practice of the Lab's research being embedded into the educational process receives positive feedback from the students and achieves meaningful and long-lasting learning objectives. The experience helps students to students acquire hands-on experience, improves their metacognition and evidence-based inquiring into real-world problems, and further advances decision-making and communication skills.

  4. Diving deeper into individual foraging specializations of a large marine predator, the southern sea lion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, A M M; Orben, R A; Arnould, J P Y; Peters, K; Knox, T; Costa, D P; Staniland, I J

    2015-12-01

    Despite global declines in the abundance of marine predators, knowledge of foraging ecology, necessary to predict the ecological consequences of large changes in marine predator abundance, remains enigmatic for many species. Given that populations suffering severe declines are of conservation concern, we examined the foraging ecology of southern sea lions (SSL) (Otaria flavescens)-one of the least studied otariids (fur seal and sea lions)-which have declined by over 90% at the Falkland Islands since the 1930s. Using a combination of biologging devices and stable isotope analysis of vibrissae, we redress major gaps in the knowledge of SSL ecology and quantify patterns of individual specialization. Specifically, we revealed two discrete foraging strategies, these being inshore (coastal) and offshore (outer Patagonian Shelf). The majority of adult female SSL (72% or n = 21 of 29 SSL) foraged offshore. Adult female SSL that foraged offshore travelled further (92 ± 20 vs. 10 ± 4 km) and dived deeper (75 ± 23 vs. 21 ± 8 m) when compared to those that foraged inshore. Stable isotope analysis revealed long-term fidelity (years) to these discrete foraging habitats. In addition, we found further specialization within the offshore group, with adult female SSL separated into two clusters on the basis of benthic or mixed (benthic and pelagic) dive behavior (benthic dive proportion was 76 ± 9 vs. 51 ± 8%, respectively). We suggest that foraging specialization in depleted populations such as SSL breeding at the Falkland Islands, are influenced by foraging site fidelity, and could be independent of intraspecific competition. Finally, the behavioral differences we describe are crucial to understanding population-level dynamics, impediments to population recovery, and threats to population persistence.

  5. Methods for reducing the ammonia in hybridoma cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capiaumont, J; Legrand, C; Carbonell, D; Dousset, B; Belleville, F; Nabet, P

    1995-02-21

    The factors which limit the proliferation of eukaryotic cells in vitro are still not well known. Ammonia is believed to be toxic for mammalian cell proliferation and secretion. We have tried two approaches to reducing the ammonia in the medium. We first limited the ammonia produced by the cells by replacing glutamine by glutamate. Then, we used two chemical engineering methods to eliminate accumulated ammonia. In one the used medium was passed through a natural cation exchanger: the clinoptilolite. In the other, the culture medium was passed through a hydrophobic microporous hollow fiber module. Replacing the glutamine by glutamate reduced the medium ammonia concentration. The physicochemical removal of ammonia induced a better cell growth, but not a better specific antibody secretion.

  6. Clinoptilolite as an ammonia binder in pig slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, G P; Debal, V; Hesta, M; Millet, S; De Wilde, R O

    2001-01-01

    Six gilts and six barrows are used in a 2 x 2 experiment with two phase feeding versus multiphase feeding and celite addition versus clinoptilolite addition. Nitrogen and ammonia concentration in the slurry on dry matter basis was reduced by 30% and 35% respectively by multiphase feeding, together with a decreased ratio of ammonia over nitrogen. Ammonia fixation in pig slurry by clinoptilolite increased from 21% after 14 days of supplementation upto 35% at 8 weeks after the supplementation period.

  7. Diversity, Physiology, and Niche Differentiation of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Hatzenpichler, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, has been suggested to have been a central part of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle since the oxygenation of Earth. The cultivation of several ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) as well as the discovery that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amo)-like gene sequences are nearly ubiquitously distributed in the environment and outnumber their bacterial counterparts in many habitats fundamentally revised our understanding o...

  8. The concentration of ammonia regulates nitrogen metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was grown in a continuous culture at a single dilution rate with input ammonia concentrations whose effects ranged from nitrogen limitation to nitrogen excess and glucose limitation. The rate of ammonia assimilation (in millimoles per gram of cells per hour) was approximately constant. Increased extracellular ammonia concentrations are correlated with increased intracellular glutamate and glutamine concentrations, increases in levels of NAD-dependent glutamate dehydro...

  9. Procedures for the synthesis of ethylenediamine bisborane and ammonia borane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramachandran, Padi Veeraraghavan; Gagare, Pravin D.; Mistry, Hitesh; Biswas, Bidyut

    2017-01-03

    A method for synthesizing ammonia borane includes (a) preparing a reaction mixture in one or more solvents, the reaction mixture containing sodium borohydride, at least one ammonium salt, and ammonia; and (b) incubating the reaction mixture at temperatures between about 0.degree. C. to about room temperature in an ambient air environment under conditions sufficient to form ammonia borane. Methods for synthesizing ethylenediamine bisborane, and methods for dehydrogenation of ethylenediamine bisborane are also described.

  10. Process model for ammonia volatilization from anaerobic swine lagoons incorporating varying wind speeds and biogas bubbling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia volatilization from treatment lagoons varies widely with the total ammonia concentration, pH, temperature, suspended solids, atmospheric ammonia concentration above the water surface, and wind speed. Ammonia emissions were estimated with a process-based mechanistic model integrating ammonia ...

  11. [Toxic effects of high concentrations of ammonia on Euglena gracilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Shi, Xiao-Rong; Cui, Yi-Bin; Li, Mei

    2013-11-01

    Ammonia is among the common contaminants in aquatic environments. The present study aimed at evaluation of the toxicity of ammonia at high concentration by detecting its effects on the growth, pigment contents, antioxidant enzyme activities, and DNA damage (comet assay) of a unicellular microalga, Euglena gracilis. Ammonia restrained the growth of E. gracilis, while at higher concentrations, ammonia showed notable inhibition effect, the growth at 2 000 mg x L(-1) was restrained to 55.7% compared with that of the control; The contents of photosynthetic pigments and protein went up with increasing ammonia dosage and decreased when the ammonia concentration was above 1000 mg x L(-1); In addition, there was an obvious increase in SOD and POD activities, at higher concentration (2 000 mg x L(-1)), activities of SOD and POD increased by 30.7% and 49.4% compared with those of the control, indicating that ammonia could promote activities of antioxidant enzymes in E. gracilis; The degree of DNA damage observed in the comet assay increased with increasing ammonia concentration, which suggested that high dose of ammonia may have potential mutagenicity on E. gracilis.

  12. Ammonia pollution characteristics of centralized drinking water sources in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Fu; Binghui Zheng; Xingru Zhao; Lijing Wang; Changming Liu

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of ammonia in drinking water sources in China were evaluated during 2005-2009.The spatial distribution and seasonal changes of ammonia in different types of drinking water sources of 22 provinces,5 autonomous regions and 4 municipalities were investigated.The levels of ammonia in drinking water sources follow the order of river > lake/reservoir > groundwater.The levels of ammonia concentration in river sources gradually decreased from 2005 t0 2008,while no obvious change was observed in the lakes/reservoirs and groundwater drinking water sources.The proportion of the type of drinking water sources is different in different regions.In river drinking water sources,the ammonia level was varied in different regions and changed seasonally.The highest value and wide range of annual ammonia was found in South East region,while the lowest value was found in Southwest region.In lake/reservoir drinking water sources,the ammonia levels were not varied obviously in different regions.In underground drinking water sources,the ammonia levels were varied obviously in different regions due to the geological permeability and the natural features of regions.In the drinking water sources with higher ammonia levels,there are enterprises and wastewater drainages in the protected areas of the drinking water sources.

  13. Ammonia pollution characteristics of centralized drinking water sources in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qing; Zheng, Binghui; Zhao, Xingru; Wang, Lijing; Liu, Changming

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of ammonia in drinking water sources in China were evaluated during 2005-2009. The spatial distribution and seasonal changes of ammonia in different types of drinking water sources of 22 provinces, 5 autonomous regions and 4 municipalities were investigated. The levels of ammonia in drinking water sources follow the order of river > lake/reservoir > groundwater. The levels of ammonia concentration in river sources gradually decreased from 2005 to 2008, while no obvious change was observed in the lakes/reservoirs and groundwater drinking water sources. The proportion of the type of drinking water sources is different in different regions. In river drinking water sources, the ammonia level was varied in different regions and changed seasonally. The highest value and wide range of annual ammonia was found in South East region, while the lowest value was found in Southwest region. In lake/reservoir drinking water sources, the ammonia levels were not varied obviously in different regions. In underground drinking water sources, the ammonia levels were varied obviously in different regions due to the geological permeability and the natural features of regions. In the drinking water sources with higher ammonia levels, there are enterprises and wastewater drainages in the protected areas of the drinking water sources.

  14. Sugar-driven prebiotic synthesis of ammonia from nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Arthur L

    2010-06-01

    Reaction of 3-5 carbon sugars, glycolaldehyde, and alpha-ketoaldehydes with nitrite under mild anaerobic aqueous conditions yielded ammonia, an essential substrate for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing molecules during abiogenesis. Under the same conditions, ammonia synthesis was not driven by formaldehyde, glyoxylate, 2-deoxyribose, and glucose, a result indicating that the reduction process requires an organic reductant containing either an accessible alpha-hydroxycarbonyl group or an alpha-dicarbonyl group. Small amounts of aqueous Fe(+3) catalyzed the sugar-driven synthesis of ammonia. The glyceraldehyde concentration dependence of ammonia synthesis, and control studies of ammonia's reaction with glyceraldehyde, indicated that ammonia formation is accompanied by incorporation of part of the synthesized ammonia into sugar-derived organic products. The ability of sugars to drive the synthesis of ammonia is considered important to abiogenesis because it provides a way to generate photochemically unstable ammonia at sites of sugar-based origin-of-life processes from nitrite, a plausible prebiotic nitrogen species.

  15. Ammonia sources, transport, and deposition in northern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, J. L., Jr.; Benedict, K. B.; Li, Y.; Shao, Y.; Wentworth, G.; Sullivan, A.; Evanoski-Cole, A. R.; Bangs, E.; Murphy, J. G.; Schichtel, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    Expanded measurements of ammonia in northern Colorado are providing new insight into ammonia sources in the region, their spatial variability, and their contributions to reactive nitrogen deposition in sensitive regions such as Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP). Regional ammonia concentrations have been examined through a combination of a passive ammonia monitoring network, through mobile measurements, and through an east-west transect of real-time ammonia monitors stretching from the agricultural source region of NE Colorado through the Rocky Mountain foothills west of the Front Range urban corridor, to Rocky Mountain National Park. Several years of ammonia observations in NE Colorado reveal considerable concentration variability, with the highest concentrations observed near animal feeding observations. Multi-year concentration increases have been observed at some locations and significant decreases at other locations, but most sites exhibit no significant long-term trends. Ammonia concentrations in RMNP are strongly influenced by episodic transport from ammonia-rich NE Colorado, but an imprtant influence is also observed from wildfire emissions. Local recylcing of boundary layer ammonia through formation and evaporation of dew also exerts a strong influence on local concentrations, a phenomenon that has received little prior attention.

  16. Oxydesulfurization of a Turkish hard lignite with ammonia solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Kuecuekbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    1996-09-01

    In this study the desulfurization of a high pyritic and high organic sulfur lignite taken from the Gediz area (western Turkey) was investigated by the oxydesulfurization method using ammonia solutions. The influence of such parameters as the concentration of ammonia solution, partial pressure of oxygen, temperature, and reaction time were studied. The ranges of these parameters were selected as 0--10 M concentration of ammonia solution, 0--1.5 MPa partial pressure of oxygen, 403--473 K temperature, and 10--60 min reaction time. It was concluded that the use of ammonia solution as an extraction solution increased the efficiency of the oxydesulfurization process.

  17. Removal of ammonia solutions used in catalytic wet oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang Mao; Lou, Jie Chung; Lin, Chia Hua

    2003-08-01

    Ammonia (NH(3)) is an important product used in the chemical industry, and is common place in industrial wastewater. Industrial wastewater containing ammonia is generally either toxic or has concentrations or temperatures such that direct biological treatment is unfeasible. This investigation used aqueous solutions containing more of ammonia for catalytic liquid-phase oxidation in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) based on Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts, prepared by co-precipitation of Cu(NO(3))(2), La(NO(3))(2), and Ce(NO(3))(3) at 7:2:1 molar concentrations. The experimental results indicated that the ammonia conversion of the wet oxidation in the presence of the Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts was determined by the Cu/La/Ce catalyst. Minimal ammonia was removed from the solution by the wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 91% ammonia removal was achieved by wet oxidation over the Cu/La/Ce catalyst at 230 degrees C with oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. Furthermore, the effluent streams were conducted at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes, and a reaction pathway was found linking the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen and water. The solution contained by-products, including nitrates and nitrites. Nitrite selectivity was minimized and ammonia removal maximized when the feed ammonia solution had a pH of around 12.0.

  18. Digging Deeper: controls and response of decomposition in the full soil profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torn, M. S.; Pries, C.; Zhu, B.; Castanha, C.; Curtis, J. B.; Brodie, E.; Jansson, J.; Nico, P. S.

    2013-12-01

    and deeper soils. We are using vertically installed heating cables to warm the soil profile to 4°C above ambient while maintaining its natural temperature gradient. Highly 13C-enriched root litter and DOC will be added to the soil at three depths in Fall 2013 in heated and unheated plots. A comprehensive suite of measurements will be used to quantify the effect of warming and carbon inputs on native soil C cycling in collaboration with development of depth-resolved models. This in situ experiment and concurrent model development will help us predict the response of the whole soil profile to a warming climate.

  19. Molecular Technique to Reduce PCR Bias for Deeper Understanding of Microbial Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.

    2012-01-01

    previously "shadowed" less abundant species available for PCR amplification. These PCR products obtained with and without PMA treatment will then be subjected to downstream diversity analyses such as sequencing and DNA microarray. It is expected that PMA-coupled PCR will amplify the "minority population" and help in understanding microbial diversity spectrum of an environmental sample at a much deeper level. This new protocol aims to overcome the major potential biases faced when analyzing microbial 16S rRNA gene diversity. This study will lead to a technological advancement and a commercial product that will aid microbial ecologists in understanding microbial diversity from various environmental niches. Implementation of this technique may lead to discoveries of novel microbes and their functions in sustenance of the ecosystem.

  20. Disentangling privacy from property: toward a deeper understanding of genetic privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Sonia M

    2004-04-01

    connoting commodification, disaggregation, and arms-length dealings, can negatively affect the self and harm these relationships. This Article concludes that a deeper understanding of genetic privacy calls for remedies for privacy violations that address dignitary harm and breach of trust, as opposed to market harms, as the property model suggests.

  1. Exposure of lambs to atmospheric ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, J.G.; Curtis, S.E.; Lewis, J.M.; Hinds, F.C.; Simon, J.

    1976-01-01

    Two trials were conducted to determine the effects of chronic exposure to atmospheric ammonia at a concentration of 75 ppm on weight gain and efficiency of feed conversion by lambs. Lambs were weighed and then randomly allotted to four dynamic air-pollutant exposure chambers. Initial weights (mean +/- SE) of lambs were 22.1 +/- .46 kg and 27.5 +/- 1.54 kg for trials 1 and 2, respectively (n=12 in both trials). Lambs in two chambers (controls) were maintained in an atmosphere of filtered room air. Lambs in the other two chambers (NH/sub 3/ -exposed) were exposed to an atmosphere of filtered air plus atmospheric ammonia at a concentration of 75 ppm. Exposure period was 28 days in both trials. Feed and water were available at all times. Lamb weight gain and feed disappearance were determined weekly. Upon termination of each trial, one lamb was randomly selected from each chamber, sacrificed, and gross and histopathologic structural changes noted. Weight gain and efficiency of feed conversion data for the two trials were combined for statistical analysis. Control lambs gained on the average .09 kg/day (.28 vs .19) more (P<.01) and consumed on the average .68 kg of feed (4.53 vs 5.21) less per kilogram of weight gain (P<.10) than did NH/sub 3/-exposed lambs. Ammonia-exposed lambs in both trials showed profuse lacrimation, severe coughing and sneezing, and profuse nasal discharge, which was bloody in some instances. Gross and histopathologic findings appeared to be qualitatively similar between treatments, but more pronounced in NH/sub 3/-exposed lambs.

  2. AMMONIA-FREE NOx CONTROL SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2006-06-01

    This report describes a novel NOx control system that has the potential to drastically reduce cost, and enhance performance, operation and safety of power plant NOx control. The new system optimizes the burner and the furnace to achieve very low NOx levels and to provide an adequate amount of CO, and uses the CO for reducing NO both in-furnace and over a downstream AFSCR (ammonia-free selective catalytic reduction) reactor. The AF-SCR combines the advantages of the highly successful SCR technology for power plants and the TWC (three-way catalytic converter) widely used on automobiles. Like the SCR, it works in oxidizing environment of combustion flue gas and uses only base metal catalysts. Like the TWC, the AF-SCR removes NO and excess CO simultaneously without using any external reagent, such as ammonia. This new process has been studied in a development program jointed funded by the US Department of Energy and Foster Wheeler. The report outlines the experimental catalyst work performed on a bench-scale reactor, including test procedure, operating conditions, and results of various catalyst formulations. Several candidate catalysts, prepared with readily available transition metal oxides and common substrate materials, have shown over 80-90% removal for both NO and CO in oxidizing gas mixtures and at elevated temperatures. A detailed combustion study of a 400 MWe coal-fired boiler, applying computational fluid dynamics techniques to model boiler and burner design, has been carried out to investigate ways to optimize the combustion process for the lowest NOx formation and optimum CO/NO ratios. Results of this boiler and burner optimization work are reported. The paper further discusses catalyst scale-up considerations and the conceptual design of a 400 MWe size AF-SCR reactor, as well as economics analysis indicating large cost savings of the ammonia-free NOx control process over the current SCR technology.

  3. Innovative bioelectrochemical-anaerobic-digestion integrated system for ammonia recovery and bioenergy production from ammonia-rich residues

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia (NH4+/NH3) inhibition during anaerobic digestion process is one of the most frequent problems existing in biogas plants, resulting in unstable process and reduced biogas production. In this study, we developed a novel hybrid system, consisted of a submersed microbial resource recovery cell (SMRC) and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), to prevent ammonia toxicity during anaerobic digestion by in-situ ammonia recovery and electricity production (Figure 1). In batch experiment, th...

  4. The Need for Deeper Roots: Making a Mission-Driven Case for Poverty-Related Issues in Business Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Michael; de la Cruz, Rachelle

    2016-01-01

    We begin with the argument that if universities are to form and educate future business leaders with a disciplined sensitivity to those who suffer from both material and spiritual poverty, they will be most successful when they draw upon a mission that has a deeper root system than generic values or instrumental rationality. Recognizing that…

  5. Evaluation of a new high power, wide separation laser Doppler probe : Potential measurement of deeper tissue blood flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clough, Geraldine; Chipperfield, Andrew; Byrne, Christopher; de Mul, Frits; Gush, Rodney

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To compare the output from a novel high power, wide separation laser Doppler flow probe (DP1-V2-HP, 4 mm, with IRLD20) with that of a standard flow probe (DP1-V2, 0.5 mm, with DRT4) (Moor UK) and to explore its potential for use in the noninvasive measurement of blood flow in deeper tissu

  6. TES ammonia retrieval strategy and global observations of the spatial and seasonal variability of ammonia (journal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presently only limited sets of tropospheric ammonia (NH3) measurements in the Earth's atmosphere have been reported from satellite and surface station measurements, despite the well-documented negative impact of NH3 on the environment and human health. Presented here is a detaile...

  7. The importance of the ammonia purification process in ammonia-water absorption systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Seara, Jose [Area de Maquinas y Motores Termicos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende No. 9, 36200 Vigo (Spain)]. E-mail: jseara@uvigo.es; Sieres, Jaime [Area de Maquinas y Motores Termicos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende No. 9, 36200 Vigo (Spain)

    2006-08-15

    Practical experience in working with ammonia-water absorption systems shows that the ammonia purification process is a crucial issue in order to obtain an efficient and reliable system. In this paper, the detrimental effects of the residual water content in the vapour refrigerant are described and quantified based on the system design variables that determine the effectiveness of the purification process. The study has been performed considering a single stage system with a distillation column with complete condensation. The ammonia purification effectiveness of the column is analysed in terms of the efficiencies in the stripping and rectifying sections and the reflux ratio. By varying the efficiencies from 0 to 1, systems with neither the rectifying nor stripping section, with either the rectifying or stripping section, or with both sections can be considered. The impact of the ammonia purification process on the absorption system performance is studied based on the column efficiencies and reflux ratio; and its effects on refrigerant concentration, system COP, system pressures and main system mass flow rates and concentrations are analysed. When the highest efficiency rectifying sections are used a combination of generation temperature and reflux ratio which leads to optimum COP values is found. The analysis covers different operating conditions with air and water cooled systems from refrigeration to air conditioning applications by changing the evaporation temperature. The importance of rectification in each kind of application is evaluated.

  8. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2005-03-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-FC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia.

  9. DIRECT AMMONIA-AIR FUEL CELL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    fuel cell was investigated. This cell is based on the use of a non-aqueous fused hydroxide electrolyte matrix, and operates in the intermediate temperature range of 180-300 C. Studies have been carried out to determine the nature of the ratecontrolling step in the kinetics of the anodic oxidation of ammonia. A new type of Ni/NiOOH reference electrode was developed for the measurement of single electrode potentials in experimental galvanic fuel cells employing this type of matrix electrolyte. In addition to various exploratory studies, two statistical analysis

  10. Transformation of ammonia i biological airfilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Sørensen, Karen; Andersen, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia is a major compound in ventilation air from animal houses. In biological filters it is with varying efficiency transformed by physical, biological, and chemical processes and ends up as ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite dissolved in water and as dinitrogen, nitrous oxide and nitric oxide...... emitted to the air. To identify the key regulators of these transformations we have combined data from studies of microbiology and performance in 10 experimental and full scale filters of varying design, loading, and management. Inhibition by nitrite controlled ammonium oxidation and pH, while biological...... removal without too much energy consumption, waste water production, green house gas emission, or suppression of the filters odor removal efficiency....

  11. Modeling and simulation of ammonia removal from purge gases of ammonia plants using a catalytic Pd-Ag membrane reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, M R; Asgari, A

    2008-05-01

    In this work, the removal of ammonia from synthesis purge gas of an ammonia plant has been investigated. Since the ammonia decomposition is thermodynamically limited, a membrane reactor is used for complete decomposition. A double pipe catalytic membrane reactor is used to remove ammonia from purge gas. The purge gas is flowing in the reaction side and is converted to hydrogen and nitrogen over nickel-alumina catalyst. The hydrogen is transferred through the Pd-Ag membrane of tube side to the shell side. A mathematical model including conservation of mass in the tube and shell side of reactor is proposed. The proposed model was solved numerically and the effects of different parameters on the rector performance were investigated. The effects of pressure, temperature, flow rate (sweep ratio), membrane thickness and reactor diameter have been investigated in the present study. Increasing ammonia conversion was observed by raising the temperature, sweep ratio and reducing membrane thickness. When the pressure increases, the decomposition is gone toward completion but, at low pressure the ammonia conversion in the outset of reactor is higher than other pressures, but complete destruction of the ammonia cannot be achieved. The proposed model can be used for design of an industrial catalytic membrane reactor for removal of ammonia from ammonia plant and reducing NO(x) emissions.

  12. Staging properties of potassium-ammonia ternary graphite intercalation compounds at high ammonia pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, X. W.; Solin, S. A.

    1989-04-01

    The pressure dependence of the (00l) x-ray diffraction patterns of the ternary graphite intercalation compound K(NH3)xC24 has been studied in the range 0.5-11 kbar (for which x~4.5) using a diamond anvil cell. A special apparatus for loading the cell with liquid ammonia at room temperature has been constructed and is briefly described. In these experiments, the pressure-transmitting fluid was also an intercalant, namely ammonia. Therefore, the chemical potential of this species was linearly coupled to the applied pressure in contrast to the usual case where the pressure-transmitting fluid is chemically passive. The pressure dependences of the basal spacings and of the relative intensities of key reflections have been measured, as have the compressibilities of the stage-1 and stage-2 components of the two-phase system. Basal-spacing anomalies and anomalies in the relative intensities occur at pressures of ~3.5 and 8.0 kbar and are tentatively attributed to in-plane coordination changes in the potassium-ammonia ratio. Using thermodynamic arguments and Le Chatelier's principle we show quantitatively that a staging phase transition from pure stage-1 phase to an admixture of stage-1 and stage-2 is expected with increased pressure above 10 bar in agreement with experiment. The saturation ammonia compositions (x values) of the admixed stages are found to be 4.5 and 5.4 for the stage-1 and -2 components, respectively. This result is interpreted as evidence that the composition is not sterically limited but is determined by the binding energy of ammonia for potassium and by the perturbation to this energy from the guest-host interaction.

  13. Improving The Efficiency Of Ammonia Electrolysis For Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Ramasamy

    Given the abundance of ammonia in domestic and industrial wastes, ammonia electrolysis is a promising technology for remediation and distributed power generation in a clean and safe manner. Efficiency has been identified as one of the key issues that require improvement in order for the technology to enter the market phase. Therefore, this research was performed with the aim of improving the efficiency of hydrogen production by finding alternative materials for the cathode and electrolyte. 1. In the presence of ammonia the activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) followed the trend Rh>Pt>Ru>Ni. The addition of ammonia resulted in lower rates for HER for Pt, Ru, and Ni, which have been attributed to competition from the ammonia adsorption reaction. 2. The addition of ammonia offers insight into the role of metal-hydrogen underpotential deposition (M-Hupd) on HER kinetics. In addition to offering competition via ammonia adsorption it resulted in fewer and weaker M-Hupd bonds for all metals. This finding substantiates the theory that M-Hupd bonds favor HER on Pt electrocatalyst. However, for Rh results suggest that M-Hupd bond may hinder the HER. In addition, the presence of unpaired valence shell electrons is suggested to provide higher activity for HER in the presence of ammonia. 3. Bimetals PtxM1-x (M = Ir, Ru, Rh, and Ni) offered lower overpotentials for HER compared to the unalloyed metals in the presence of ammonia. The activity of HER in the presence of ammonia follows the trend Pt-Ir>Pt-Rh>Pt-Ru>Pt-Ni. The higher activity of HER is attributed to the synergistic effect of the alloy, where ammonia adsorbs onto the more electropositive alloying metal leaving Pt available for Hupd formation and HER to take place. Additionally, this supports the theory that the presence of a higher number of unpaired electrons favors the HER in the presence of ammonia. 4. Potassium polyacrylate (PAA-K) was successfully used as a substitute for aqueous KOH for ammonia

  14. Emergency planning and the acute toxic potency of inhaled ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, R A

    1999-08-01

    Ammonia is present in agriculture and commerce in many if not most communities. This report evaluates the toxic potency of ammonia, based on three types of data: anecdotal data, in some cases predating World War 1, reconstructions of contemporary industrial accidents, and animal bioassays. Standards and guidelines for human exposure have been driven largely by the anecdotal data, suggesting that ammonia at 5,000-10,000 parts per million, volume/volume (ppm-v), might be lethal within 5-10 min. However, contemporary accident reconstructions suggest that ammonia lethality requires higher concentrations. For example, 33,737 ppm-v was a 5-min zero-mortality value in a major ammonia release in 1973 in South Africa. Comparisons of secondary reports of ammonia lethality with original sources revealed discrepancies in contemporary sources, apparently resulting from failure to examine old documents or accurately translate foreign documents. The present investigation revealed that contemporary accident reconstructions yield ammonia lethality levels comparable to those in dozens of reports of animal bioassays, after adjustment of concentrations to human equivalent concentrations via U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) procedures. Ammonia levels potentially causing irreversible injury or impairing the ability of exposed people to escape from further exposure or from coincident perils similarly have been biased downwardly in contemporary sources. The EPA has identified ammonia as one of 366 extremely hazardous substances subject to community right-to-know provisions of the Superfund Act and emergency planning provisions of the Clean Air Act. The Clean Air Act defines emergency planning zones (EPZs) around industrial facilities exceeding a threshold quantity of ammonia on-site. This study suggests that EPZ areas around ammonia facilities can be reduced, thereby also reducing emergency planning costs, which will vary roughly with the EPZ radius squared.

  15. Biofilter Treating Ammonia Gas Using Agricultural Residues Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaniya Kaosol

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Agricultural residues such as manure and sugarcane bagasse are wastes from agro-industry which has low value and requires some sustainable waste management method. In this research, a mixture of manure fertilizer and sugarcane bagasse is used as a biofilter media for an ammonia gas removal application. The aim of this research is to study the ammonia gas removal efficiency of such media. Approach: The experiments were conducted in laboratory-scale biofilters. Two inlet ammonia gas concentrations were used which are 500 and 1,000 ppm. Three ratios of manure fertilizer and sugarcane bagasse were studied including 1:3, 1:5 and 1:7 by volume. All experiments were conducted for a period of 40 days. Two Empty Bed Retention Time (EBRT of these experiments were used which is 39s and 78s. The moisture content of the biofilter media was maintained at 45-60% by adding water. Results: The maximum ammonia gas removal efficiency at 89.93% is observed from the following conditions: 500 ppm of the inlet ammonia gas concentration, the manure fertilizer and sugarcane bagasse mixture ratio of 1:5 and the EBRT of 78s. The important factors of the ammonia gas removal in biofiltration process are the inlet ammonia gas concentration and the EBRT. Conclusion: The experimental results showed that the mixture of manure fertilizer and sugarcane bagasse is an effective biofilter media for ammonia gas removal applications. However, the biofilter is more effective at low inlet ammonia gas concentration, while the ratio of manure fertilizer and sugarcane bagasse has no significant effect on the ammonia gas removal efficiency. Therefore, using both residues as biofilter media for ammonia gas removal application is an alternative sustainable way to such manage argo-industry waste.

  16. PRETREATMENT AND FRACTIONATION OF CORN STOVER BY AMMONIA RECYCLE PERCOLATION PROCESS. (R831645)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn stover was pretreated with aqueous ammonia in a flow-through column reactor,a process termed as Ammonia Recycle Percolation (ARP). The aqueous ammonia causesswelling and efficient delignification of biomass at high temperatures. The ARPprocess solubilizes abou...

  17. Apodization in high-contrast long-slit spectroscopy. Closer, deeper, fainter, cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigan, A.; N'Diaye, M.; Dohlen, K.

    2013-07-01

    The spectroscopy of faint planetary-mass companions to nearby stars is one of the main challenges that new-generation high-contrast spectro-imagers are going to face. However, the high contrast ratio between main-sequence stars and young planets makes it difficult to extract a companion spectrum that is not biased by the signal from the star. In a previous work we demonstrated that coupling long-slit spectroscopy (LSS) and classical Lyot coronagraphy (CLC) to form a long-slit coronagraph (LSC) allows low-mass companions to be properly characterized when combined with an innovative a posteriori data analysis methods based on the spectral deconvolution (SD). However, the presence of a slit in the coronagraphic focal plane induces a complex distribution of energy in the Lyot pupil plane that cannot be easily masked with a binary Lyot stop, creating strong diffraction residuals at close angular separation. To alleviate this concern, we propose to use a pupil apodization to suppress diffraction, creating an apodized long-slit coronagraph (ALSC). We show that this concept allows looking at a closer separation from the star, at deeper contrast, which enables the characterization of fainter substellar companions. After describing how the apodization was optimized, we demonstrate its advantages with respect to the CLC in the context of SPHERE/IRDIS LSS mode at low resolution with a 0.12'' slit and 0.18'' coronagraphic mask. We performed different sets of simulations with and without aberrations, and with and without a slit to demonstrate that the apodization is a more appropriate concept for LSS, at the expense of a significantly reduced throughput (37%) compared to the LSC. Then we performed detailed end-to-end simulations of the LSC and the ALSC that include realistic levels of aberrations to obtain several datasets representing 1 h of integration time on stars of spectral type A0 to M0 located at 10 pc. We inserted the spectra of planetary companions at different

  18. Energy retrofit study of an ammonia plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lababidi, H.M.S.; Alatiqi, I.M.; Nayfeh, L.J. [Kuwait University Safat (Kuwait). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2000-11-01

    Detailed energy integration study of the front-end of an existing ammonia plant has been performed, using recent advances in Pinch technology. Utility loads demanded by the existing process were found to be very close to the calculated minimum targets. This indicated that the selected ammonia plant is well integrated, and not much saving is expected through process-to-process energy integration. Alternatively, the retrofit study concentrated on better placement of available utilities. Two promising options have been investigated. The first one studied the flue gas temperature in the convection section of the primary reformer, and proposed new arrangements of the heating coils. Boiler feed water heating for high-pressure steam generation has been also considered as a possible source for reduction in energy consumption. Total benefit claimed amounted to 17.6% reduction in combustion fuel consumption. The overall results of this case study are promising. However, economical evaluation of the proposed modifications is essential. Additional possible reduction in energy consumption is also possible in energy and power integration of the back-end section. (author)

  19. Fast and accurate exhaled breath ammonia measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solga, Steven F; Mudalel, Matthew L; Spacek, Lisa A; Risby, Terence H

    2014-06-11

    This exhaled breath ammonia method uses a fast and highly sensitive spectroscopic method known as quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) that uses a quantum cascade based laser. The monitor is coupled to a sampler that measures mouth pressure and carbon dioxide. The system is temperature controlled and specifically designed to address the reactivity of this compound. The sampler provides immediate feedback to the subject and the technician on the quality of the breath effort. Together with the quick response time of the monitor, this system is capable of accurately measuring exhaled breath ammonia representative of deep lung systemic levels. Because the system is easy to use and produces real time results, it has enabled experiments to identify factors that influence measurements. For example, mouth rinse and oral pH reproducibly and significantly affect results and therefore must be controlled. Temperature and mode of breathing are other examples. As our understanding of these factors evolves, error is reduced, and clinical studies become more meaningful. This system is very reliable and individual measurements are inexpensive. The sampler is relatively inexpensive and quite portable, but the monitor is neither. This limits options for some clinical studies and provides rational for future innovations.

  20. Energy efficient ammonia heat pump. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, Claus; Pijnenburg, B.; Schumann Grindorf, H. [Danish Technological Institute, Aarhus (Denmark); Christensen, Rolf [Alfa Laval, Lund (Sweden); Rasmussen, Bjarne D. [Grundfos, Bjerringbro (Denmark); Gram, S.; Fredborg Jakobsen, D. [Svedan Industri Koeleanlaeg, Greve (Denmark)

    2013-09-15

    The report describes the development of a highly effective ammonia heat pump. Heat pumps play an increasingly important role in the search for more effective use of energy in our society. Highly efficient heat pumps can contribute to reduced energy consumption and improved economy of the systems which they are a part of. An ammonia heat pump with high pressure reciprocating compressor and a novel split condenser was developed to prove potential for efficiency optimization. The split of the condenser in two parts can be utilized to obtain smaller temperature approaches and, thereby, improved heat pump efficiency at an equal heat exchanger area, when compared to the traditional solution with separate condenser and de-superheater. The split condenser design can also be exploited for heating a significant share of the total heating capacity to a temperature far above the condensing temperature. Furthermore, the prototype heat pump was equipped with a plate type evaporator combined with a U-turn separator with a minimum liquid height and a liquid pump with the purpose of creating optimum liquid circulation ratio for the highest possible heat transfer coefficients at the lowest possible pressure drop. The test results successfully confirmed the highest possible efficiency; a COP of 4.3 was obtained when heating water from 40 deg. C to 80 deg. C while operating with evaporating/condensing temperatures of +20 deg C/+73 deg C. (Author)

  1. The Effects of Acute Copper and Ammonia Challenges on Ammonia and Urea Excretion by the Blue Crab Callinectes sapidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Alex M; Jorge, Marianna Basso; Wood, Chris M; Martins, Camila M G; Bianchini, Adalto

    2017-04-01

    Copper (Cu) is a persistent environmental contaminant that elicits several physiological disturbances in aquatic organisms, including a disruption in ammonia regulation. We hypothesized that exposure to Cu in a model crustacean (blue crab, Callinectes sapidus) acclimated to brackish water (2 ppt) would lead to hyperammonemia by stimulating an increase in ammonia production and/or by inhibiting ammonia excretion. We further hypothesized that urea production would represent an ammonia detoxification strategy in response to Cu. In a pilot experiment, exposure to 0, 100, and 200 µg/L Cu for 6 h caused significant concentration-dependent increases in ammonia excretion (J amm). Based on these results, an acute 24-h 100 µg/L Cu exposure was conducted and this similarly caused an overall stimulation of J amm during the 24-h period, indicative of an increase in ammonia production. Terminal haemolymph total ammonia content (T amm) was unchanged, suggesting that while ammonia production was increased, there was no inhibition of the excretion mechanism. In support of our second hypothesis, urea excretion (J urea) increased in response to Cu exposure; haemolymph [urea] was unaffected. This suggested that urea production also was increased. To further test the hypothesis that J urea increased to prevent hyperammonemia during Cu exposure, crabs were exposed to high environmental ammonia (HEA; 2.5 mmol/L NH4HCO3) for 12 h in a separate experiment. This led to a fourfold increase in haemolymph T amm, whereas J urea increased only transiently and haemolymph [urea] was unchanged, indicating that urea production likely does not contribute to the attenuation of hyperammonemia in blue crabs. Overall, Cu exposure in blue crabs led to increased ammonia and urea production, which were both eliminated by excretion. These results may have important implications in aquaculture systems where crabs may be exposed to elevated Cu and/or ammonia.

  2. Crystal Structure of an Ammonia-Permeable Aquaporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirscht, Andreas; Kaptan, Shreyas S; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Chaumont, François; Nissen, Poul; de Groot, Bert L; Kjellbom, Per; Gourdon, Pontus; Johanson, Urban

    2016-03-01

    Aquaporins of the TIP subfamily (Tonoplast Intrinsic Proteins) have been suggested to facilitate permeation of water and ammonia across the vacuolar membrane of plants, allowing the vacuole to efficiently sequester ammonium ions and counteract cytosolic fluctuations of ammonia. Here, we report the structure determined at 1.18 Å resolution from twinned crystals of Arabidopsis thaliana aquaporin AtTIP2;1 and confirm water and ammonia permeability of the purified protein reconstituted in proteoliposomes as further substantiated by molecular dynamics simulations. The structure of AtTIP2;1 reveals an extended selectivity filter with the conserved arginine of the filter adopting a unique unpredicted position. The relatively wide pore and the polar nature of the selectivity filter clarify the ammonia permeability. By mutational studies, we show that the identified determinants in the extended selectivity filter region are sufficient to convert a strictly water-specific human aquaporin into an AtTIP2;1-like ammonia channel. A flexible histidine and a novel water-filled side pore are speculated to deprotonate ammonium ions, thereby possibly increasing permeation of ammonia. The molecular understanding of how aquaporins facilitate ammonia flux across membranes could potentially be used to modulate ammonia losses over the plasma membrane to the atmosphere, e.g., during photorespiration, and thereby to modify the nitrogen use efficiency of plants.

  3. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit devices and methods for detecting ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Paulus, Michael J [Knoxville, TN; Sayler, Gary S [Blaine, TN; Applegate, Bruce M [West Lafayette, IN; Ripp, Steven A [Knoxville, TN

    2007-04-24

    Monolithic bioelectronic devices for the detection of ammonia includes a microorganism that metabolizes ammonia and which harbors a lux gene fused with a heterologous promoter gene stably incorporated into the chromosome of the microorganism and an Optical Application Specific Integrated Circuit (OASIC). The microorganism is generally a bacterium.

  4. Method of treating ammonia-comprising waste water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Jetten, M.S.M.

    1998-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of treating ammonia-comprising waste water in which the bicarbonate ion is the counter ion of the ammonium ion present in the waste water. According to the invention half the ammonium is converted into nitrite, yielding an ammonia- and nitrite-containing solution, a

  5. Dissociation and Mass Transfer Coefficients for Ammonia Volatilization Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Process-based models are being used to predict ammonia emissions from manure sources, but their accuracy has not been fully evaluated for cattle manure. Laboratory trials were conducted to measure the dissociation and mass transfer coefficients for ammonia volatilization from media of buffered ammon...

  6. Techniques for measuring ammonia in fly ash, mortar, and concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathbone, R.F. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Reseach; Majors, R.K. [Boral Material Technologies, Inc., San Antonio, TX (United States). Engineered Materials

    2003-12-01

    The presence of ammonia in fly ash that is to be used in mortar and concrete is of increasing concern in the U.S., mainly due to the installation of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) DeNOx systems. When the SCR catalyst is new, contamination of the fly ash with ammonia is generally not a concern. However, as the catalyst in the SCR ages and becomes less efficient, the ammonia slip increases and results in a greater amount of ammonium salt being precipitated on the fly ash. The increase in ammonia concentration is compounded by variability that can occur on a day-to-day basis. When marketing ammonia-laden fly ash for use in mortar and concrete it is imperative that the concentration of ammonia is known. However, there currently is no widely accepted or ''standard'' method for ammonia measurement in fly ash. This paper describes two methods that have been developed and used by the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and Boral Material Technologies, Inc. One of the methods uses gas detection tubes and can provide an accurate determination within five to ten minutes. Thus it is suitable as a rapid field technique. The other method employs a gas-sensing electrode and requires a longer period of time to complete the measurement. However, this second method can also be used to determine the quantity of ammonia in fresh mortar and concrete. (orig.)

  7. Lignin solubilisation and gentle fractionation in liquid ammonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strassberger, Z.; Prinsen, P.; Klis, van der F.; Es, van D.S.; Tanase, S.; Rothenberg, G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple method for solubilising lignin using liquid ammonia. Unlike water, which requires harsh conditions, ammonia can solubilise technical lignins, in particular kraft lignin. A commercial pine wood Kraft lignin (Indulin AT) was solubilized instantaneously at room temperature and 7–11

  8. Lignin solubilisation and gentle fractionation in liquid ammonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strassberger, Z.; Prinsen, P.; van der Klis, F.; van Es, D.S.; Tanase, S.; Rothenberg, G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple method for solubilizing lignin using liq. ammonia. Unlike water, which requires harsh conditions, ammonia can solubilize tech. lignins, in particular kraft lignin. A com. pine wood Kraft lignin (Indulin AT) was solubilized instantaneously at room temp. and 7-​11 bars autogenous

  9. Niche differentiation between ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in aquatic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coci, M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the studies presented in this thesis was the search for niche differentiation between the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in aquatic environments. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria are chemolitho-autotrophic microorganisms responsible for the first, mostly rate-limiting step of the nitrification

  10. Crystal Structure of an Ammonia-Permeable Aquaporin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kirscht

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins of the TIP subfamily (Tonoplast Intrinsic Proteins have been suggested to facilitate permeation of water and ammonia across the vacuolar membrane of plants, allowing the vacuole to efficiently sequester ammonium ions and counteract cytosolic fluctuations of ammonia. Here, we report the structure determined at 1.18 Å resolution from twinned crystals of Arabidopsis thaliana aquaporin AtTIP2;1 and confirm water and ammonia permeability of the purified protein reconstituted in proteoliposomes as further substantiated by molecular dynamics simulations. The structure of AtTIP2;1 reveals an extended selectivity filter with the conserved arginine of the filter adopting a unique unpredicted position. The relatively wide pore and the polar nature of the selectivity filter clarify the ammonia permeability. By mutational studies, we show that the identified determinants in the extended selectivity filter region are sufficient to convert a strictly water-specific human aquaporin into an AtTIP2;1-like ammonia channel. A flexible histidine and a novel water-filled side pore are speculated to deprotonate ammonium ions, thereby possibly increasing permeation of ammonia. The molecular understanding of how aquaporins facilitate ammonia flux across membranes could potentially be used to modulate ammonia losses over the plasma membrane to the atmosphere, e.g., during photorespiration, and thereby to modify the nitrogen use efficiency of plants.

  11. An infrared spectroscopy method to detect ammonia in gastric juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannozzi, Andrea M; Pennecchi, Francesca; Muller, Paul; Balma Tivola, Paolo; Roncari, Silvia; Rossi, Andrea M

    2015-11-01

    Ammonia in gastric juice is considered a potential biomarker for Helicobacter pylori infection and as a factor contributing to gastric mucosal injury. High ammonia concentrations are also found in patients with chronic renal failure, peptic ulcer disease, and chronic gastritis. Rapid and specific methods for ammonia detection are urgently required by the medical community. Here we present a method to detect ammonia directly in gastric juice based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The ammonia dissolved in biological liquid samples as ammonium ion was released in air as a gas by the shifting of the pH equilibrium of the ammonium/ammonia reaction and was detected in line by a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy system equipped with a gas cell for the quantification. The method developed provided high sensitivity and selectivity in ammonia detection both in pure standard solutions and in a simulated gastric juice matrix over the range of diagnostic concentrations tested. Preliminary analyses were also performed on real gastric juice samples from patients with gastric mucosal injury and with symptoms of H. pylori infection, and the results were in agreement with the clinicopathology information. The whole analysis, performed in less than 10 min, can be directly applied on the sample without extraction procedures and it ensures high specificity of detection because of the ammonia fingerprint absorption bands in the infrared spectrum. This method could be easily used with endoscopy instrumentation to provide information in real time and would enable the endoscopist to improve and integrate gastroscopic examinations.

  12. Scavenging of ammonia by raindrops in Saturn's great storm clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delitsky, M. L.; Baines, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    Observations of the great Saturn storms of 2010-2011 by Cassini instruments showed a very large depletion in atmospheric ammonia. While dynamics will play a role, the very high solubility of ammonia in water may be another important contributor to ammonia depletion in storms. Ammonia exists in Earth's atmosphere and rainstorms dissolve ammonia to a great degree, leaving almost no NH3 in the atmosphere. Studies by Elperin et al (2011, 2013) show that scavenging of ammonia is greatest as a rainstorm starts and lessens as raindrops fall, tapering off to almost zero by the time the rain reaches the ground (Elperin et al 2009). Ammonia is reaching saturation as it dissolves in the aqueous solution. As concentration increases, NH3 is then converted to aqueous species (NH3)x.(H2O)y (Max and Chapados 2013).Ammonia has the highest solubility in water compared to all other gases in the Saturn atmosphere. The Henry's Law constant for NH3 in water is 60 M/atm at 25 C. For H2S, it is 0.001 M/atm. In Saturn storms, it is "raining UP": As water-laden storm clouds convectively rise, ammonia gas will be scavenged and go into solution to a great degree, whilst all the other gases remain mostly in the gas phase. Aqueous ammonia acts as an antifreeze: if ammonia is dissolved in water cloud droplets to the limit of its solubility, as water droplets rise, they can stay liquid (and continue to scavenge NH3) to well below their normal freezing point of 0 Celsius (273 K). The freezing point for a 30 wt % water-ammonia solution is ~189 K. The pressure level where T = 189 K is at 2.8 bars. The normal freezing point of water occurs at the 9 bar pressure level in Saturn's atmosphere. 2.8 bars occurs at the -51 km altitude (below the 1 bar level). 9 bars is at the -130 km level: a difference of 79 km. A water droplet containing 30 wt% NH3 can move upwards from 9 bars to 2.8 bars (79 km) and still remain liquid, only freezing above that altitude. Calculations by the E-AIM model show that ammonia

  13. Hydrolyzabilities of different corn stover fractions after aqueous ammonia pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zongping; Ge, Xiaoyan; Xin, Donglin; Zhang, Junhua

    2014-02-01

    The effect of aqueous ammonia pretreatment on the hydrolysis of different corn stover fractions (rind, husk, leaf, and pith) by xylanase (XYL) with cellulases (CELs) was evaluated. The aqueous ammonia pretreatment had excellent delignification ability (above 66%) for different corn stover fractions. The corn rind exhibited the lowest susceptibility to aqueous ammonia pretreatment. The pretreated rind showed the lowest hydrolyzability by CEL and XYL, which was supported by a high content of crystalline cellulose in the hydrolyzed residues of rind, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). With the addition of 1 mg XYL/g dry matter, a high glucose yield (above 90%) could be obtained from the pretreated rind by CEL. The results revealed that a high hydrolyzate yield of corn rind after aqueous ammonia pretreatment could be obtained with 1 mg xylanase/g dry matter, showing that aqueous ammonia pretreatment and xylanase addition to cellulases have great potential for the efficient hydrolysis of corn stover without previous fractionation.

  14. Moisture insensitive adsorption of ammonia on resorcinol-formaldehyde resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seredych, Mykola; Ania, Conchi; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2016-03-15

    Phenolic-formaldehyde resins aged at 85, 90 and 95°C were used as ammonia adsorbents at dynamic conditions in dry and moist air. To avoid pressure drops 10% bentonite was added as a binder. The initial and hybrid materials (before and after ammonia adsorption) were extensively characterized from the point of view of their porosity and surface chemistry. The results showed that the addition of the binder had various effects on materials' properties depending on the chemistry of their surface groups. When the phenolic acidic groups were predominant, the largest increase in surface acidity upon the addition of the binder was found. It was linked to the exfoliation of bentonite by polar moieties of the resins, which made acidic groups from aluminosilicate layers available for ammonia adsorption. On this sample, a relatively high amount of ammonia was strongly adsorbed in dry conditions. Insensitivity to moisture is a significant asset of ammonia adsorbents.

  15. Alkaline Ammonia Electrolysis on Electrodeposited Platinum for Controllable Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Jieun; Choun, Myounghoon; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2016-02-19

    Ammonia is beginning to attract a great deal of attention as an alternative energy source carrier, because clean hydrogen can be produced through electrolytic processes without the emission of COx . In this study, we deposited various shapes of Pt catalysts under potentiostatic mode; the electrocatalytic oxidation behavior of ammonia using these catalysts was studied in alkaline media. The electrodeposited Pt was characterized by both qualitative and quantitative analysis. To discover the optimal structure and the effect of ammonia concentration, the bulk pH value, reaction temperature, and applied current of ammonia oxidation were investigated using potential sweep and galvanostatic methods. Finally, ammonia electrolysis was conducted using a zero-gap cell, producing highly pure hydrogen with an energy efficiency over 80 %. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Safety assessment of ammonia as a transport fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, N.J.; Markert, Frank; Paulsen, Jette Lundtang

    2005-01-01

    of transport of ammonia to the refuelling stations and safety of the activities at the refuelling station (unloading and refuelling). Comparisons are made between the safety of using ammonia and the safety of otherexisting or alternative fuels. The conclusion is that the hazards in relation to ammonia need......This report describes the safety study performed as part of the EU supported project “Ammonia Cracking for Clean Electric Power Technology” The study addresses the following activities: safety of operation of the ammonia-powered vehicle under normal andaccident (collision) conditions, safety...... to be controlled by a combination of technical and regulatory measures. The most important requirements are: - Advanced safety systems in the vehicle -Additional technical measures and regulations are required to avoid releases in maintenance workshops and unauthorised maintenance on the fuel system. - Road...

  17. Different cultivation methods to acclimatise ammonia-tolerant methanogenic consortia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Hailin; Fotidis, Ioannis; Mancini, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Bioaugmentation with ammonia tolerant-methanogenic consortia was proposed as a solution to overcome ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion process recently. However, appropriate technology to generate ammonia tolerant methanogenic consortia is still lacking. In this study, three basic...... reactors (i.e. batch, fed-batch and continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR)) operated at mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions were assessed, based on methane production efficiency, incubation time, TAN/FAN (total ammonium nitrogen/free ammonia nitrogen) levels and maximum methanogenic....... Meanwhile, CSTR reactors were inhibited at lower ammonia levels. Finally, specific methanogenic activity test showed that hydrogenotrophic methanogens were more active than aceticlastic methanogens in all FAN levels above 540 mg NH3-N L-1....

  18. Ammonia emissions in Europe, part I: Development of a dynamical ammonia emission inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Anna; Aulinger, Armin; Bieser, Johannes; Matthias, Volker; Quante, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen input from agricultural ammonia emissions into the environment causes numerous environmental and health problems. The purpose of this study is to present and evaluate an improved ammonia emission inventory based on a dynamical temporal parameterization suitable to compare and assess ammonia abatement strategies. The setup of the dynamical time profile (DTP) consists of individual temporal profiles for ammonia emissions, calculated for each model grid cell, depending on temperature, crop type, fertilizer and manure application, as well as on local legislation. It is based on the method of Skjøth et al., 2004 and Gyldenkærne et al., 2005. The method has been modified to cover the study area and to improve the performance of the emission model. To compare the results of the dynamical approach with the results of the static time profile (STP) the ammonia emission parameterizations have been implemented in the SMOKE for Europe emission model. Furthermore, the influence on secondary aerosol formation in the North Sea region and possible changes triggered through the use of a modified temporal distribution of ammonia emissions were analysed with the CMAQ chemistry transport model. The results were evaluated with observations of the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP). The correlation coefficient of NH3 improved significantly for 12 out of 16 EMEP measurement stations and an improvement in predicting the Normalized Mean Error can be seen for particulate NH4+ and NO3-. The prediction of the 95th percentile of the daily average concentrations has improved for NH3, NH4+ and NO3-. The NH3 concentration modelled with the STP is 157% higher in winter, and about 22% lower in early summer than the one modelled with the new DTP. Consequently, the influence of the DTP on the formation of secondary aerosols is particularly noticeable in winter, when the PM2.5 concentration is 25% lower in comparison to the use of STP for temporal disaggregation. Besides

  19. Quantifying the dry deposition of ammonia in ammonia-rich and ammonia-poor environments using a surrogate surface approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumen, Nadjoua; Yi, Seung-Muk; Raymond, Heather A.; Han, YoungJi; Holsen, Thomas M.

    In this study, dry deposition samples were collected with both an aerodynamically smooth water surface (WSS) and a knife-edge surrogate surface (KSS) in Potsdam, NY, Solomons, MD, and at a farm in upstate NY intermittently between March 2000 and August 2001. The WSS and the citric acid-coated paper filter on the KSS were used to measure total ammonium deposition (NH 3 and p-NH 4+), while a greased Mylar disk on the KSS was used to measure particulate NH 4+ (p-NH 4+) deposition. An annular denuder system (ADS) was used to measure NH 3 gas phase and particulate NH 4+ concentrations. In side-by-side experiments with two WSSs, no statistical difference was found between simultaneously measured total ammonium deposition at any of the sites. Average total NH 3 fluxes measured with the WSS in Potsdam, Solomons, and at the farm were 3.1, 2.1, and 310 mg NH 4+ m -2 day -1, respectively. Similarly gaseous NH 3 fluxes measured with the citric acid-coated paper on the KSS were 3.6, 2.1, and 500 mg NH 4+m -2 day -1, respectively. The p-NH 4+ fluxes to the KSS-greased strip were negligible at all three locations. Fluxes measured by the citric acid paper filters were slightly greater than those measured with the WSS suggesting that the acidic dry surfaces had a higher affinity for ammonia than the water in the WSS. The average gas-phase ammonia concentrations in Potsdam, Solomons, MD and at the farm were 0.60×10 -3, 2.1×10 -3, and 0.25 mg NH 4+ m -3, respectively. The average ammonium concentrations were 0.50×10 -3, 1.2×10 -3, and 14×10 -3 mg NH 4+ m -3, respectively.

  20. Arterial ammonia with Blood Ammonia Checker II and with indophenol reaction to assess presence of hepatic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizenga, [No Value; vanDam, GM; Gips, CH

    1996-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is associated with elevated arterial ammonia levels. The relationship is variable, in part due to ammonia methodology. One method, based on the indophenol reaction (IPh), is interfered with a number of amino acids including all aromatic amino acids. We have determined

  1. Ammonia emissions in agriculture: Proceedings of the First international ammonia conference 19-21 March 2007, Ede, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monteny, G.J.; Hartung, J.

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia emissions is an important topic in many countries with animal production, since it contributes to environmental and health problems. Strategies and measures to reduce ammonia emission are getting increasing attention in national and international legislation. The focus of this publication is

  2. Ammonia emissions in agriculture: Proceedings of the First international ammonia conference 19-21 March 2007, Ede, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monteny, G.J.; Hartung, J.

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia emissions is an important topic in many countries with animal production, since it contributes to environmental and health problems. Strategies and measures to reduce ammonia emission are getting increasing attention in national and international legislation. The focus of this publication is

  3. New lucinid bivalves from shallow and deeper water of the Indian and West Pacific Oceans (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Lucinidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Taylor

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Four new species and a new genus of lucinid bivalves are described from shallow and deeper waters in the Indian and West Pacific Oceans. The new genus Scabrilucina (subfamily Lucininae includes the little-known S. victorialis (Melvill, 1899 from the Arabian Sea and S. vitrea (Deshayes, 1844 from the Andaman Sea as well as a new species S. melvilli from the Torres Strait off northeastern Australia. Ferrocina brunei new species (Lucininae was recovered from 60 m near oil drilling activities off Borneo; its anatomy confirmed the presence of symbiotic bacteria. Two unusual deeper water species of Leucosphaerinae are described, both species included in on-going molecular analyses; Gonimyrtea ferruginea from 400–650 m in the southwest Pacific and Myrtina reflexa from 200–825 m off Zanzibar and Madagascar.

  4. Innovative bioelectrochemical-anaerobic-digestion integrated system for ammonia recovery and bioenergy production from ammonia-rich residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    (SMRC) and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), to prevent ammonia toxicity during anaerobic digestion by in-situ ammonia recovery and electricity production (Figure 1). In batch experiment, the ammonia concentration in the CSTR decreased from 6 to 0.7 g-N/L with an average recovery rate of 0.18 g......-N/L(CSTR)/d. Meanwhile, a maximum power density of 0.71±0.5 W/m2 was produced (10 Ω). Both current driven NH4+ migration and free NH3 diffusion were identified as the mechanisms responsible for the ammonia transportation. With an increase in initial ammonia concentration and a decrease in external resistance, the SMRC...

  5. Ammonia synthesis. Ammonia synthesis by N₂ and steam electrolysis in molten hydroxide suspensions of nanoscale Fe₂O₃.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Stuart; Cui, Baochen; Wang, Baohui; Li, Fang-Fang; Lau, Jason; Liu, Shuzhi

    2014-08-08

    The Haber-Bosch process to produce ammonia for fertilizer currently relies on carbon-intensive steam reforming of methane as a hydrogen source. We present an electrochemical pathway in which ammonia is produced by electrolysis of air and steam in a molten hydroxide suspension of nano-Fe2O3. At 200°C in an electrolyte with a molar ratio of 0.5 NaOH/0.5 KOH, ammonia is produced at 1.2 volts (V) under 2 milliamperes per centimeter squared (mA cm(-2)) of applied current at coulombic efficiency of 35% (35% of the applied current results in the six-electron conversion of N2 and water to ammonia, and excess H2 is cogenerated with the ammonia). At 250°C and 25 bar of steam pressure, the electrolysis voltage necessary for 2 mA cm(-2) current density decreased to 1.0 V.

  6. Characteristic of local boiling heat transfer of ammonia and ammonia / water binary mixture on the plate type evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Akio; Arima, Hirofumi; Ikegami, Yasuyuki

    2011-08-01

    Power generation using small temperature difference such as ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) and discharged thermal energy conversion (DTEC) is expected to be the countermeasures against global warming problem. As ammonia and ammonia/water are used in evaporators for OTEC and DTEC as working fluids, the research of their local boiling heat transfer is important for improvement of the power generation efficiency. Measurements of local boiling heat transfer coefficients were performed for ammonia /water mixture ( z = 0.9-1) on a vertical flat plate heat exchanger in a range of mass flux (7.5-15 kg/m2 s), heat flux (15-23 kW/m2), and pressure (0.7-0.9 MPa). The result shows that in the case of ammonia /water mixture, the local heat transfer coefficients increase with an increase of mass flux and composition of ammonia, and decrease with an increase of heat flux.

  7. Higher prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus DNA in deeper periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis in Japanese patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Kato

    Full Text Available Periodontitis, a complex chronic inflammatory disease caused by subgingival infection, is among the most prevalent microbial diseases in humans. Although traditional microbiological research on periodontitis has focused on putative bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, the herpes virus is proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis because bacterial etiology alone does not adequately explain various clinical aspects. In this study, we established for the first time, more Epstein-Barr virus (EBV DNA is found deeper in periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis in Japanese patients. Subgingival samples were collected from 85 patients with chronic periodontitis having two periodontal sites with probing depths (PD of ≤ 3 mm (shallow or ≥ 5 mm (deep and were subjected to a nested polymerase chain reaction. EBV DNA was more frequently detected in patients with deeper PD sites (66% than in those with shallow PD sites (48% or healthy controls (45%. Coexistence of EBV DNA and P. gingivalis was significantly higher in patients with deeper PD sites (40% than in those with shallow PD sites (14% or healthy controls (13%. Although no difference in clinical index for periodontitis, the odds ratio of EBV DNA in patients with deeper PD sites was 2.36, which was 2.07-fold higher than that in those with shallow PD sites. Interestingly, the odds of acquiring chronic periodontitis (PD ≥ 5 mm were higher in the presence of both EBV DNA and P. gingivalis compared with either EBV DNA or P. gingivalis only. In addition, we also observed that EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER in positive cells of human gingival tissues. These results would suggest that EBV DNA may serve as a pathogenic factor leading to chronic periodontitis among Japanese patients.

  8. Higher Prevalence of Epstein–Barr Virus DNA in Deeper Periodontal Pockets of Chronic Periodontitis in Japanese Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ayako; Imai, Kenichi; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis, a complex chronic inflammatory disease caused by subgingival infection, is among the most prevalent microbial diseases in humans. Although traditional microbiological research on periodontitis has focused on putative bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, the herpes virus is proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis because bacterial etiology alone does not adequately explain various clinical aspects. In this study, we established for the first time, more Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) DNA is found deeper in periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis in Japanese patients. Subgingival samples were collected from 85 patients with chronic periodontitis having two periodontal sites with probing depths (PD) of ≤3 mm (shallow) or ≥5 mm (deep) and were subjected to a nested polymerase chain reaction. EBV DNA was more frequently detected in patients with deeper PD sites (66%) than in those with shallow PD sites (48%) or healthy controls (45%). Coexistence of EBV DNA and P. gingivalis was significantly higher in patients with deeper PD sites (40%) than in those with shallow PD sites (14%) or healthy controls (13%). Although no difference in clinical index for periodontitis, the odds ratio of EBV DNA in patients with deeper PD sites was 2.36, which was 2.07-fold higher than that in those with shallow PD sites. Interestingly, the odds of acquiring chronic periodontitis (PD ≥5 mm) were higher in the presence of both EBV DNA and P. gingivalis compared with either EBV DNA or P. gingivalis only. In addition, we also observed that EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) in positive cells of human gingival tissues. These results would suggest that EBV DNA may serve as a pathogenic factor leading to chronic periodontitis among Japanese patients. PMID:23991022

  9. Higher prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus DNA in deeper periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis in Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ayako; Imai, Kenichi; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis, a complex chronic inflammatory disease caused by subgingival infection, is among the most prevalent microbial diseases in humans. Although traditional microbiological research on periodontitis has focused on putative bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, the herpes virus is proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis because bacterial etiology alone does not adequately explain various clinical aspects. In this study, we established for the first time, more Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA is found deeper in periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis in Japanese patients. Subgingival samples were collected from 85 patients with chronic periodontitis having two periodontal sites with probing depths (PD) of ≤ 3 mm (shallow) or ≥ 5 mm (deep) and were subjected to a nested polymerase chain reaction. EBV DNA was more frequently detected in patients with deeper PD sites (66%) than in those with shallow PD sites (48%) or healthy controls (45%). Coexistence of EBV DNA and P. gingivalis was significantly higher in patients with deeper PD sites (40%) than in those with shallow PD sites (14%) or healthy controls (13%). Although no difference in clinical index for periodontitis, the odds ratio of EBV DNA in patients with deeper PD sites was 2.36, which was 2.07-fold higher than that in those with shallow PD sites. Interestingly, the odds of acquiring chronic periodontitis (PD ≥ 5 mm) were higher in the presence of both EBV DNA and P. gingivalis compared with either EBV DNA or P. gingivalis only. In addition, we also observed that EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) in positive cells of human gingival tissues. These results would suggest that EBV DNA may serve as a pathogenic factor leading to chronic periodontitis among Japanese patients.

  10. CO2 production rate maxima in the deeper unsaturated zone of a semi-arid floodplain at Rifle, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, T. K.; Kim, Y.; Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Conrad, M. E.; Bill, M.; Hobson, C.; Williams, K. H.; Long, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    Fluxes of CO2 from soils are important to understand in order to predict subsurface feedbacks to the atmosphere and responses to climate change. Such fluxes are commonly monitored at the soil surface and generally assumed to largely originate within shallow depths. Relatively little is understood on the depth distribution of CO2 production below the rhizosphere. We monitored CO2 fluxes at the soil surface, and measured vertical profiles of vadose CO2 concentrations, matric potentials, and temperatures at the Rifle Site, a saline semi-arid floodplain along the Colorado River in order to determine the significance of deeper vadose zone respiration. Vadose zone CO2 profiles exhibit temperature-dependent seasonal variations, and are consistent with CO2 fluxes measured at the soil surface. The measured vadose zone CO2 concentration profiles combined with gas diffusion coefficients estimated from soil properties indicated that local maxima in rates of CO2 production persist in the deeper vadose zone, about 1 m below the rhizosphere, and above the water table (~3.5 m below the soil surface). We hypothesized that water and oxygen activities, nutrient levels, and temperatures remain favorable for microbial respiration throughout the year in the subrhizosphere, unlike overlying drier soils and the underlying poorly aerated aquifer. Using soils and sediments from the field site, the hypothesized existence of deeper subsurface maxima in CO2 production rate is currently being tested in the laboratory through sediment incubation experiments and in 2.0 m tall vadose zone columns. Initial results from the laboratory support the hypothesized persistence of a subrhizosphere "hot zone" for microbial respiration, partly sustained through seasonal pulses of dissolved and labile organic carbon originating from the rhizosphere. These findings suggest that similar sustained deeper local maxima in respiration rates may occur in many other regions where near-surface conditions are

  11. Towards an ammonia-mediated hydrogen economy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Johannessen, Tue; Sørensen, Rasmus Zink

    2006-01-01

    Materialization of a hydrogen economy could provide a solution to significant global challenges, In particular. the possibility of improving the efficiency and simultaneously minimizing the environmental impact of energy conversion processes, together with the opportunity to reduce the dependency...... of fossil fuels, are main drivers for the currently increasing research and development efforts. However. significant technological breakthroughs are necessary for making a hydrogen economy feasible. In particular, it is necessary to develop appropriate hydrogen storage and transportation technologies....... Recently, metal ammine salts were proposed as safe, reversible. high-density and low-cost hydrogen carriers. Here, we discuss how this development could provide a platform for using ammonia as a fuel for the hydrogen economy, We do that by comparing various possible hydrogen carriers with respect to energy...

  12. Radiation Damage in Polarized Ammonia Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Slifer, K

    2007-01-01

    Solid NH3 and ND3 provide a highly polarizable, radiation resistant source of polarized protons and deuterons and have been used extensively in high luminosity experiments investigating the spin structure of the nucleon. Over the past twenty years, the UVA polarized target group has been instrumental in producing and polarizing much of the material used in these studies, and many practical considerations have been learned in this time. In this discussion, we analyze the polarization performance of the solid ammonia targets used during the recent JLab Eg4 run. Topics include the rate of polarization decay with accumulated charge, the annealing procedure for radiation damaged targets to recover polarization, and the radiation induced change in optimum microwave frequency used to polarize the sample. We also discuss the success we have had in implementing frequency modulation of the polarizing microwave frequency.

  13. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Wu

    2003-12-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the October 1 to December 31, 2003 time period.

  14. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Wu; Z. Fan; R. Herman

    2004-03-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the January 1 to March 31, 2004 time period.

  15. Nitrogen-13-labeled ammonia for myocardial imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, W.F.; Fill, H.R.; Harper, P.V.

    1977-01-01

    Cyclotron-produced nitrogen-13 (half-life 10 min), as labeled ammonia (/sup 13/NH/sub 4//sup +/), has been evaluated as a myocardial perfusion imaging agent. The regional myocardial uptake of /sup 13/NH/sub 4//sup +/ has been shown to be proportional to regional tissue perfusion in animal studies. Intravenously administered /sup 13/NH/sub 4//sup +/ is rapidly cleared from the circulation, being extracted by the liver (15 percent), lungs, myocardium (2 percent--4 percent), brain, kidney, and bladder. Myocardial ammonia is metabolized mainly to glutamine via the glutamine synthetase pathway. Pulmonary uptake is substantial, but usually transient, except in smokers where clearance may be delayed. The positron annihilation irradiation (511 keV) of /sup 13/N may be imaged with a scintillation camera, using either a specially designed tungsten collimator or a pinhole collimator. After early technical problems with collimation and the production method of /sup 13/NH/sub 4//sup +/ were overcome, reproducible high quality myocardial images were consistently obtained. The normal myocardial image was established to be of a homogeneous ''doughnut'' configuration. Imaging studies performed in patients with varying manifestations of ischemic and valvular heart disease showed a high incidence of localized perfusion defects, especially in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Sequential studies at short intervals in patients with acute infarction showed correlation between alterations in regional perfusion and the clinical course of the patient. It is concluded that myocardial imaging with /sup 13/NH/sub 4//sup +/ and a scintillation camera provides a valid and noninvasive means of assessing regional myocardial perfusion. This method is especially suitable for sequential studies of acute cardiac patients at short intervals. Coincidence imaging of the 511 keV annihilation irradiation provides a tomographic and potentially quantitative assessment of the

  16. Albumin/asparaginase capsules prepared by ultrasound to retain ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinoco, Ana; Ribeiro, Artur; Oliveira, César; Parpot, Pier; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-11-01

    Asparaginase reduces the levels of asparagine in blood, which is an essential amino acid for the proliferation of lymphoblastic malign cells. Asparaginase converts asparagine into aspartic acid and ammonia. The accumulation of ammonia in the bloodstream leads to hyperammonemia, described as one of the most significant side effects of asparaginase therapy. Therefore, there is a need for asparaginase formulations with the potential to reduce hyperammonemia. We incorporated 2 % of therapeutic enzyme in albumin-based capsules. The presence of asparaginase in the interface of bovine serum albumin (BSA) capsules showed the ability to hydrolyze the asparagine and retain the forming ammonia at the surface of the capsules. The incorporation of Poloxamer 407 in the capsule formulation further increased the ratio aspartic acid/ammonia from 1.92 to 2.46 (and 1.10 from the free enzyme), decreasing the levels of free ammonia. This capacity to retain ammonia can be due to electrostatic interactions and retention of ammonia at the surface of the capsules. The developed BSA/asparaginase capsules did not cause significant cytotoxic effect on mouse leukemic macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. The new BSA/asparaginase capsules could potentially be used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia preventing hyperammonemia associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment with asparaginase.

  17. Arterial ammonia levels in the management of fulminant liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curry S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that an arterial ammonia level greater than 150 mmol/L is highly sensitive for predicting subsequent development of cerebral edema in patients with fulminant liver failure. We performed a prospective cohort study to confirm this relationship. We enrolled 22 consecutive patients who presented to our transplant hepatology service with grade 3-4 encephalopathy associated with fulminant liver failure. All patients underwent placement of an intraparenchymal ICP monitor, and every 12 hourly arterial ammonia levels. The prevalence of intracranial hypertension (IHTN in our population was 95% (21/22 patients, with 82 discrete episodes recorded. The sensitivity of arterial ammonia levels to predict the onset of IHTN was 62% (95% CI: 40.8 to 79.3 at a cut point of 150 mmol/L. Arterial ammonia levels preceding the first intracranial hypertension event were less than 150 mmol/L in 8 of 21 patients (39%. Fifty nine of 82 episodes of IHTN (73% occurred when arterial ammonia levels were less than 150 mmol/L. We conclude that the arterial ammonia level is not useful in making decisions regarding management related to cerebral edema in patients with fulminant liver failure. In fact, since almost all our study patients with grade III or IV encephalopathy secondary to fulminant liver failure went on to develop intracranial hypertension, our study supports the contention that all such patients might benefit from ICP monitoring regardless of arterial ammonia levels.

  18. Safety assessment of ammonia as a transport fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duijm, N.J.; Markert, F.; Lundtang paulsen, Jette

    2005-02-01

    This report describes the safety study performed as part of the EU supported project 'Ammonia Cracking for Clean Electric Power Technology' The study addresses the following activities: safety of operation of the ammonia-powered vehicle under normal and accident (collision) conditions, safety of transport of ammonia to the refuelling stations and safety of the activities at the refuelling station (unloading and refuelling). Comparisons are made between the safety of using ammonia and the safety of other existing or alternative fuels. The conclusion is that the hazards in relation to ammonia need to be controlled by a combination of technical and regulatory measures. The most important requirements are: - Advanced safety systems in the vehicle - Additional technical measures and regulations are required to avoid releases in maintenance workshops and unauthorised maintenance on the fuel system - Road transport of ammonia to refuelling stations in refrigerated form - Sufficient safety zones between refuelling stations and residential or otherwise public areas. When these measures are applied, the use of ammonia as a transport fuel wouldnt cause more risks than currently used fuels (using current practice). (au)

  19. Direct Measurements of the Surface-Atmosphere Exchange of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevlin, A.; Murphy, J. G.; Wentworth, G.; Gregoire, P.

    2012-12-01

    As the dominant atmospheric base, ammonia plays an important role in the formation and growth of inorganic aerosols. Surface-atmosphere exchange of ammonia has been observed to occur as a bidirectional flux governed by the relative magnitudes of atmospheric gas phase concentration and a temperature-dependent surface compensation point. In order to better characterise the links between gas-particle and surface-atmosphere exchanges, more direct measurements of these exchanges are necessary. Eddy Covariance (EC) can provide the most direct surface-atmosphere flux measurements, but its requirement for high frequency data combined with the reactive nature of ammonia have limited its application for this species. In order to address this lack, an investigation into the instrumental sensitivity and time response requirements for EC ammonia flux measurements was carried out using a Quantum Cascade-Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS) capable of measuring ammonia concentration at 10 Hz. Time response was additionally improved through the use of a heated sample line and custom glass inlet, and the system was deployed over a short grass field in rural Ontario. The ammonia measurements were used along with three dimensional sonic anemometer wind speed data to calculate EC ammonia fluxes. When combined with simultaneous measurements of the inorganic composition of gas and particle phases made by Ambient Ion Monitor - Ion Chromatography (AIM-IC), these flux measurements can provide insight into the links between gas-particle and surface-atmosphere exchange.

  20. Ice nucleation of ammonia gas exposed montmorillonite mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Salam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation characteristics of montmorillonite mineral dust aerosols with and without exposure to ammonia gas were measured at different atmospheric temperatures and relative humidities with a continuous flow diffusion chamber. The montmorillonite particles were exposed to pure (100% and diluted ammonia gas (25 ppm at room temperature in a stainless steel chamber. There was no significant change in the mineral dust particle size distribution due to the ammonia gas exposure. 100% pure ammonia gas exposure enhanced the ice nucleating fraction of montmorillonite mineral dust particles 3 to 8 times at 90% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw and 5 to 8 times at 100% RHw for 120 min exposure time within our experimental conditions. The percentages of active ice nuclei were 2 to 9 times higher at 90% RHw and 2 to 13 times higher at 100% RHw in 25 ppm ammonia exposed montmorillonite compared to unexposed montmorillonite. All montmorillonite particles are more efficient as ice nuclei with increasing relative humidities and decreasing temperatures. The activation temperature of montmorillonite exposed to 100% pure ammonia was 12°C higher than for unexposed montmorillonite particles at 90% RHw and 10°C higher at 100% RHw. In the 25 ppm ammonia exposed montmorillonite experiments, the activation temperature was 7°C warmer than unexposed montmorillonite at 100% RHw. Degassing does not reverse the ice nucleating ability of ammonia exposed montmorillonite mineral dust particles. This is the first experimental evidence that ammonia gas exposed montmorillonite mineral dust particles can enhance its activation as ice nuclei and that the activation can occur at temperatures warmer than –10°C where natural atmospheric ice nuclei are very scarce.

  1. SIRT5 regulation of ammonia-induced autophagy and mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polletta, Lucia; Vernucci, Enza; Carnevale, Ilaria; Arcangeli, Tania; Rotili, Dante; Palmerio, Silvia; Steegborn, Clemens; Nowak, Theresa; Schutkowski, Mike; Pellegrini, Laura; Sansone, Luigi; Villanova, Lidia; Runci, Alessandra; Pucci, Bruna; Morgante, Emanuela; Fini, Massimo; Mai, Antonello; Russo, Matteo A; Tafani, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In liver the mitochondrial sirtuin, SIRT5, controls ammonia detoxification by regulating CPS1, the first enzyme of the urea cycle. However, while SIRT5 is ubiquitously expressed, urea cycle and CPS1 are only present in the liver and, to a minor extent, in the kidney. To address the possibility that SIRT5 is involved in ammonia production also in nonliver cells, clones of human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and mouse myoblast C2C12, overexpressing or silenced for SIRT5 were produced. Our results show that ammonia production increased in SIRT5-silenced and decreased in SIRT5-overexpressing cells. We also obtained the same ammonia increase when using a new specific inhibitor of SIRT5 called MC3482. SIRT5 regulates ammonia production by controlling glutamine metabolism. In fact, in the mitochondria, glutamine is transformed in glutamate by the enzyme glutaminase, a reaction producing ammonia. We found that SIRT5 and glutaminase coimmunoprecipitated and that SIRT5 inhibition resulted in an increased succinylation of glutaminase. We next determined that autophagy and mitophagy were increased by ammonia by measuring autophagic proteolysis of long-lived proteins, increase of autophagy markers MAP1LC3B, GABARAP, and GABARAPL2, mitophagy markers BNIP3 and the PINK1-PARK2 system as well as mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. We observed that autophagy and mitophagy increased in SIRT5-silenced cells and in WT cells treated with MC3482 and decreased in SIRT5-overexpressing cells. Moreover, glutaminase inhibition or glutamine withdrawal completely prevented autophagy. In conclusion we propose that the role of SIRT5 in nonliver cells is to regulate ammonia production and ammonia-induced autophagy by regulating glutamine metabolism.

  2. Catalytic synthesis of ammonia using vibrationally excited nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Billing, Gert D.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study we have considered the catalytic synthesis of ammonia in the presence of vibrationally excited nitrogen. The distribution over vibrational states was assumed to be maintained during the reaction, and it was shown that the yield of ammonia increased considerably compared...... to that from conventional synthesis. In the present study the nitrogen molecules are only excited at the inlet of a plug flow reactor, and the importance of vibrational relaxation is investigated. We show that vibrational excitation can give an enhanced yield of ammonia also in the situation where vibrational...

  3. Protective effect of immobilized ammonia oxidizers and phenol-degrading bacteria on nitrification in ammonia- and phenol-containing wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, M.; Watanabe, A. [Environmental Science Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Chiba (Japan); Kudo, N.; Shinozaki, H. [Materials Science Engineering, Tokyo Denki University, Tokyo (Japan); Uemoto, H.

    2007-12-15

    Phenol present in wastewaters from various industries has an inhibitory effect on nitrification even at low concentrations. Hence, the biological treatment of wastewater containing both phenol and ammonia involves a series of treatment steps. It is difficult to achieve nitrification capability in an activated sludge system that contains phenol at concentrations above the inhibitory level. Batch treatment of wastewater containing various concentrations of phenol showed that the ammonia oxidation capability of suspended Nitrosomonas europaea cells, an ammonia oxidizer, was completely inhibited in the presence of more than 5.0 mg/L phenol. To protect the ammonia oxidizer from the inhibitory effect of phenol and to achieve ammonia oxidation capability in the wastewater containing phenol at concentrations above the inhibitory level, a simple bacterial consortium composed of an ammonia oxidizer (N. europaea) and a phenol-degrading bacterial strain (Acinetobacter sp.) was used. Ammonia oxidation did not occur in the presence of phenol at concentrations above the inhibitory level when suspended or immobilized N. europaea and Acinetobacter sp. cells were used in batch treatment. Following the acclimatization of the immobilized cells, accumulation of nitrite was observed, even when the wastewater contained phenol at concentrations above the inhibitory level. These results showed that immobilization was effective in protecting N. europaea cells from the inhibitory effect of phenol present in the wastewater. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Submersible microbial desalination cell for simultaneous ammonia recovery and electricity production from anaerobic reactors containing high levels of ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-02-01

    High ammonia concentration in anaerobic reactors can seriously inhibit the anaerobic digestion process. In this study, a submersible microbial desalination cell (SMDC) was developed as an innovative method to lower the ammonia level in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) by in situ ammonia recovery and electricity production. In batch experiment, the ammonia concentration in the CSTR decreased from 6 to 0.7 g-N/L during 30 days, resulting in an average recovery rate of 80 g-N/m(2)/d. Meanwhile, a maximum power density of 0.71±0.5 W/m(2) was generated at 2.85 A/m(2). Both current driven NH4(+) migration and free NH3 diffusion were identified as the mechanisms responsible for the ammonia transportation. With an increase in initial ammonia concentration and a decrease in external resistance, the SMDC performance was enhanced. In addition, the coexistence of other cations in CSTR or cathode had no negative effect on the ammonia transportation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ammonia removal from an aqueous solution and method for the production of a fertilizer material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelder, E.M.; Ursem, W.N.J.; Roos, R.A.; Marijnissen, J.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    The invention provides method for the removal of ammonia from air and converting the ammonia in a fertilizer material, comprising (a) contacting at least part of the air with an aqueous liquid, wherein the aqueous liquid is a solvent for ammonia, to provide an ammonia containing aqueous liquid,and(b

  6. New efficient catalyst for ammonia synthesis: barium-promoted cobalt on carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Stefan; Barfod, Rasmus; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    Barium-promoted cobalt catalysts supported on carbon exhibit higher ammonia activities at synthesis temperatures than the commercial, multipromoted iron catalyst and also a lower ammonia......Barium-promoted cobalt catalysts supported on carbon exhibit higher ammonia activities at synthesis temperatures than the commercial, multipromoted iron catalyst and also a lower ammonia...

  7. The production of ammonia by multiheme cytochromes C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jörg; Kroneck, Peter M H

    2014-01-01

    The global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle is essential for life on Earth. Many of the underlying biotic reactions are catalyzed by a multitude of prokaryotic and eukaryotic life forms whereas others are exclusively carried out by microorganisms. The last century has seen the rise of a dramatic imbalance in the global nitrogen cycle due to human behavior that was mainly caused by the invention of the Haber-Bosch process. Its main product, ammonia, is a chemically reactive and biotically favorable form of bound nitrogen. The anthropogenic supply of reduced nitrogen to the biosphere in the form of ammonia, for example during environmental fertilization, livestock farming, and industrial processes, is mandatory in feeding an increasing world population. In this chapter, environmental ammonia pollution is linked to the activity of microbial metalloenzymes involved in respiratory energy metabolism and bioenergetics. Ammonia-producing multiheme cytochromes c are discussed as paradigm enzymes.

  8. Optimization of biomethanation focusing on high ammonia loaded processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Han

    , could theoretically mitigate the ammonia inhibition problem (Angelidaki et al., 1999). Therefore, the effect of co-digestion of cattle manure with lipids (i.e. glycerol trioleate (GTO)) under high ammonia levels (5 g NH4+-N·L-1) in anaerobic continuous stirred tank (CSTR) reactors (RGTO) was assessed....... Additionally, for comparison purposes, a soluble carbohydrate (i.e. glucose) was also used as a co-substrate in an identical CSTR reactor (RGLU). At 5 g NH4+-N·L-1, relative methane production of RGTO and RGLU, was 10.5% and 41% compared to the expected uninhibited production, respectively. At the same time...... control reactor (RCTL), only fed with manure, reached 32.7% compared to the uninhibited basis production. Therefore, the hypothesis that the co-digestion of manure with lipids could alleviate the ammonia inhibition was not supported by the results. However, an “ammonia-LCFA synergetic inhibitory effect...

  9. Review of Options for Ammonia/Ammonium Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-06

    This report is a review of literature supporting practical ammonia/ammonium destruction processes. Melter research supporting Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass production has shown that significant amounts of ammonia will be in the melter offgas condensate. Further work with secondary waste forms indicates the potential need to remove the ammonia, perhaps by an oxidative process. This review finds likely practical chemical methods to oxidize ammonia in aqueous solution at moderate temperatures and atmospheric pressure, using easily obtained reagents. Leading candidates include nitrite oxidation to produce nitrogen gas, various peroxide oxidative processes, and air stripping. This work reviews many other processes and provides reasoning to not consider those processes further for this application.

  10. Role of ammonia in the pathogenesis of brain edema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujiwara,Masachika

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of hyperammonemia in the pathogenesis of cerebral edema was investigated using mongrel dogs to develop a treatment for cerebral edema in acute hepatic failure. Intravenous infusion of ammonium acetate alone into dogs did not induce brain edema, although blood ammonia reached unphysiologically high levels. However, ammonium acetate infusion during mannitol-induced reversible (osmotic opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB effectively induced cytotoxic brain edema. Pretreatment with a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA; valine, leucine and isoleucine solution prevented an increase in intracranial pressure (ICP and brain water content, and caused a decrease in brain ammonia content and an increase in brain BCAA and glutamic acid. The results suggest that ammonia plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cerebral edema during acute hepatic failure and that BCAAs accelerate ammonia detoxification in the brain.

  11. The concentration of ammonia regulates nitrogen metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    1995-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was grown in a continuous culture at a single dilution rate with input ammonia concentrations whose effects ranged from nitrogen limitation to nitrogen excess and glucose limitation. The rate of ammonia assimilation (in millimoles per gram of cells per hour) was approximately constant. Increased extracellular ammonia concentrations are correlated with increased intracellular glutamate and glutamine concentrations, increases in levels of NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity and its mRNA (gene GDH2), and decreases in levels of NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity and its mRNA (gene GDH1), as well as decreases in the levels of mRNA for the amino acid permease-encoding genes GAP1 and PUT4. The governing factor of nitrogen metabolism might be the concentration of ammonia rather than its flux.

  12. Quantitative comparison of ammonia and 3-indoleacetic acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantitative comparison of ammonia and 3-indoleacetic acid production in ... method and 3-indoleacetic acid as Salkowski method in halophilic, alkalophilic and ... in research due to their ease of implementation and relatively accurate results.

  13. Risk analysis and emergency management of ammonia installations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, J.M.; Gansevoort, J.

    1992-01-01

    The use of Quantitative Risk Assessment has been increasing for evaluating the risk of handling hazardous materials and land-use planning. This article reports on several studies carried out on the risk of handling, storage and transport of ammonia.

  14. Predicting catalysis: Understanding ammonia synthesis from first-principles calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmann, A.; Baerends, E.J.; Biczysko, M.

    2006-01-01

    . Furthermore, our studies provide new insight into several related fields, for instance, gas-phase and electrochemical ammonia synthesis. The success of predicting the outcome of a catalytic reaction from first-principles calculations supports our point of view that, in the future, theory will be a fully......Here, we give a full account of a large collaborative effort toward an atomic-scale understanding of modern industrial ammonia production over ruthenium catalysts. We show that overall rates of ammonia production can be determined by applying various levels of theory (including transition state...... for any given point along an industrial reactor, and the kinetic results can be integrated over the catalyst bed to determine the industrial reactor yield. We find that, given the present uncertainties, the rate of ammonia production is well-determined directly from our atomic-scale calculations...

  15. Computational Design of New Materials for Ammonia Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Bjerre; Quaade, Ulrich

    by using the available operators,which are based on a combination of chemical knowledge and random events.The initial experimental tests of the identified candidates showed promisingresults, but did also reveal that the materials can be challenging to synthesize,and might degrade during ammonia desorption......Many renewable energy technologies are currently being developed, but most have the major drawback, that the energy is not generated when needed, and storage of the energy is therefore essential. For transportation applications,an energy carrier offering a high energy density is needed. Ammonia...... is one possible energy carrier offering high gravimetric and volumetric capacities. A major drawback regarding ammonia is however its toxicity requiring careful handling and storage.Instead of handling the ammonia directly, it is possible to store it safely and completely reversibly in many different...

  16. Risk analysis and emergency management of ammonia installations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, J.M.; Gansevoort, J.

    1992-01-01

    The use of Quantitative Risk Assessment has been increasing for evaluating the risk of handling hazardous materials and land-use planning. This article reports on several studies carried out on the risk of handling, storage and transport of ammonia.

  17. Simultaneous Graphite Exfoliation and N Doping in Supercritical Ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikala, Suchithra Padmajan; Huang, Kai; Giroire, Baptiste; Prabhakaran, Prem; Henry, Lucile; Penicaud, Alain; Poulin, Philippe; Aymonier, Cyril

    2016-11-16

    We report the exfoliation of graphite and simultaneous N doping of graphene by two methods: supercritical ammonia treatment and liquid-phase exfoliation with NH4OH. While the supercritical ammonia allowed N doping at a level of 6.4 atom % in 2 h, the liquid-phase exfoliation with NH4OH allowed N doping at a level of 2.7 atom % in 6 h. The N doped graphene obtained via the supercritical ammonia route had few layers (supercritical ammonia as an exfoliation agent and N doping precursor for graphene. Notably, the N doped graphene showed electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction with high durability and good methanol tolerance compared to those of commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  18. [Inhibition of aromatics on ammonia-oxidizing activity of sediment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chun-hong; Hu, Hong-ying; Wei, Dong-bin; Huang, Xia; Qian, Yi

    2004-03-01

    The inhibition of 24 aromatics on ammonia-oxidizing activity of nitrifying bacteria in sediment was measured. The effects of the kind, number and position of substituted groups on ammonia-oxidizing activity of nitrifying bacteria were discussed. The inhibition of mono-substituted benzenes on ammonia-oxidizing activity of nitrifying bacteria were in order of -OH > -NO2 > -NH2 > -Cl > -CH3 > -H. The position of substituted groups of di-substituted benzenes also affected the inhibition, and the inhibitions of dimethylbenzenes(xylene) were in order of meta-> ortho-> para-. The increase in number of substituted group on benzene-ring enhanced the inhibition of aromatics studied in this study on nitrifying bacteria. There was a linear relationship between inhibition (IC50, mumol.L-1) of aromatics on ammonia-oxidizing activity and total electronegativity (sigma E) of aromatics: lgIC50 = 14.72 - 0.91 sigma E.

  19. Continuous ammonia monitor using a Stark microwave cavity resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, H; Ijuuin, Y; Morino, Y; Kamidate, T; Nakamura, A; Imai, H

    1980-03-01

    An ammonia monitor has been made by using a rectangular Stark microwave cavity tightly coupled through an iris to a Gunn oscillator. The Stark electrode installed inside the cavity is provided with a 100 kHz sinusoidal modulation voltage and a dc sweep voltage. The oscillation of the Gunn diode is tuned with the coupled Stark cavity to a frequency near a J,K=3,3 transition (23870.1 MHz) of ammonia. By fixing the Stark dc bias to a voltage which gives a peak intensity of the derivative output of the electric-resonance signal, ammonia is continuously monitored. An extremely good long-term stability is obtained. The noise level corresponds to 0.08 ppm of ammonia.

  20. Hydrogen Production from Ammonia Using a Plasma Membrane Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Kambara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an efficient method for using pulsed plasma to produce hydrogen from ammonia was developed. An original pulsed plasma reactor with a hydrogen separation membrane was developed for efficient hydrogen production, and its hydrogen production performance was investigated. Hydrogen production in the plasma was affected by the applied voltage and flow rate of ammonia gas. The maximum hydrogen production flow rate of a typical plasma reactor was 8.7 L/h, whereas that of the plasma membrane reactor was 21.0 L/h. We found that ammonia recombination reactions in the plasma controlled hydrogen production in the plasma reactor. In the plasma membrane reactor, a significant increase in hydrogen production was obtained because ammonia recombination reactions were inhibited by the permeation of hydrogen radicals generated in the plasma through a palladium alloy membrane. The energy efficiency was 4.42 mol-H2/kWh depending on the discharge power.

  1. N-Doping of Graphene through Electrothermal Reactions with Ammonia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xinran Wang; Xiaolin Li; Li Zhang; Youngki Yoon; Peter K. Weber; Hailiang Wang; Jing Guo; Hongjie Dai

    2009-01-01

    .... Individual graphene nanoribbons were covalently functionalized by nitrogen species through high-power electrical joule heating in ammonia gas, leading to n-type electronic doping consistent with theory...

  2. The ability on hydraulic-lift from deeper rooted plants with a phytoassay of rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Hydraulic lift(HL), the exudation of water from root system of deeper rooted plants under soil desiccated conditions is considered as a potential irrigation system in drought areas. The ability of HL in sorghum(Sorghum bicolor(L.)Moench)was evaluated by a split root experiment with mixed-cropped rice(Oryza sativa L.)as an indicator plant for phytoassay. Growth parameters of rice and soil water conditions are measured after withholding irrigation with or without sorghum root connection between...

  3. Ammonia nitrogen desorption from sanitary landfill leachate in filling towers

    OpenAIRE

    Leite,Valderi D.; Barros,Aldre J. M.; Lopes,Wilton S.; Sousa,José T. de

    2014-01-01

    Sanitary landfill leachates present high concentrations of carbonaceous and nitrogenous materials. The crucial point is that carbonaceous materials are of difficult biodegradation, what compromises the performance of biological treatment processes, while nitrogenous materials, such as ammonia nitrogen, probably preclude the use of biological treatments. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study the desorption process of ammonia nitrogen from sanitary landfill leachate in filling towers. De...

  4. Ammonia removal via microbial fuel cell (MFC) dynamic reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabiad, I.; Ali, U. F. M.; Zakarya, I. A.; Ibrahim, N.; Radzi, R. W.; Zulkurnai, N. Z.; Azmi, N. H.

    2017-06-01

    Landfill leachate is generally known as high-strength wastewater that is difficult to handle and contains dissolved extracts and suspended matter. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were designed to treat landfill leachate while continuously producing power (voltage output). Three different anodes were tested in MFC reactors: carbon black, activated carbon, and zinc electrodes. Movements in the MFC reactor during treatment were also a key factor for testing. Results showed a difference in ammonia levels in the three anodes used. The study compared the efficiency of static and dynamic modes of MFC in removing ammonia. Continual leachate movement in the reactor could increase the rate of removal of the ammonia components. The setup provided a viable condition for maximum removal because the reactor movement caused the sludge to disintegrate, which allowed ammonia to separate easily from the parent leachate. Ammonia removal also resulted from the transfer of ammonium through the membrane or from ammonia loss. Constant exchange of ionic content benefited the MFC performance by increasing power production and decreasing internal electrode material resistance. This paper presents the results of the analyses of leachate treatment from the solid waste landfill located in Padang Siding Landfill, Perlis. The performance of ammonia removal was enhanced using different types of electrodes. In both modes, activated carbon performed better than black carbon and zinc. The respective percentages of ammonia removal for activated carbon of dynamic over static were 96.6%, 66.6%, and 92.8% for activated carbon, zinc, and black carbon. The results provide further information on the possibility of using MFCs in landfill leachate treatment systems.

  5. Isotopic Discrimination of Some Solutes in Liquid Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube, H.; Viste, A.

    1966-01-01

    The nitrogen isotopic discrimination of some salts and metals, studies in liquid ammonia solution at -50�C, decreases in magnitude in the order Pb{sup ++}, Ca{sup ++}, Li{sup +}, AG{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Li, K{sup +}, Na, K. The isotopic discrimination appears to provide qualitative information about the strength of the cation-solvent interaction in liquid ammonia.

  6. Reduction of Ammonia and Tar in Pressurized Biomass Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Olofsson, G.

    2002-09-19

    The present paper intended to present the results of parametric study of the formation of ammonia and tar under pressurized gasification conditions. By the use of multivariate data analysis, the effects of operating parameters were determined and their influences could be quantified. In order to deal with cases in which high levels of ammonia and tar were produced, study of catalytic hot gas cleaning was performed, aiming to discuss the removal efficiency and test catalysts.

  7. Managing Ammonia Emissions From Screwworm Larval Rearing Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagel, Agustin; Phillips, Pamela; Chaudhury, Muhammad; Skoda, Steven

    2016-02-01

    Mass production, sterilization, and release of screwworms (Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel)) that were competitive in the field significantly contributed to the successful application of the sterile insect technique for eradication of screwworms from continental North America. Metabolic byproducts resulting from protein-rich diets required for larval screwworms lead to ammonia liberation, sometimes at high levels, within the mass rearing facility. Until recently a sodium polyacrylate gel bulking agent was used for the larval media and adsorbed much of the ammonia. A need to replace the gel with an environmentally "friendly" bulking agent, while not increasing ammonia levels in the rearing facility, led to a series of experiments with the objective of developing procedures to reduce ammonia emissions from the larval media bulked with cellulose fiber. Additives of ammonia-converting bacteria, potassium permanganate, and Yucca schidigera Roezl ex Otrgies powder extract, previously reported to reduce ammonia levels in organic environments, were evaluated. Ammonia-converting bacteria did not have a positive effect. Addition of Y. schidigera powder extract (∼1% of total volume), potassium permanganate (∼250 ppm), and a combination of these two additives (at these same concentrations) kept ammonia at equivalent levels as when larval media was bulked with gel. Potassium permanganate also had sufficient antimicrobial properties that the use of formaldehyde in the diet was not necessary. Further testing is needed, at a mass rearing level, before full implementation into the screwworm eradication program. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  8. Ammonia corrodes solar modules; Salmiakgeist greift Module an

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, Katrin

    2011-07-01

    Ammonia is an aggressive gas produced in animal shelters, which may cause corrosion of solar modules. Various institutions, e.g. DLG and TUeV Rheinland, therefore offer an ammonia test for solar modules. The TUeV Rheinland recently commissioned a walk-in test chamber and now issues an official seal of approval, while the DLG doubts the practical value of the test.

  9. On the photoionization and fragmentation of ammonia clusters using TPEPICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamke, W.; Herrmann, R.; Wang, Z.; Hertel, I.V.

    1988-12-01

    Measurements of the appearance potentials of ammonia cluster ions (NH/sub 3/)/sub n//sup +/ and (NH/sub 3/)/sub n-2/NH/sub 4//sup +/ using the threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) time-of-flight method are performed. The results agree well with other available data, however, solvation energies derived from these and from thermochemical data show significant discrepancies. The energetics for ammonia clusters are elucidated from various points of view.

  10. Accelerated DFT-Based Design of Materials for Ammonia Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Bjerre; Bialy, Agata; Blanchard, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Future energy carriers are needed in order to lower the CO2 emissions resulting from the burning of fossil fuels. One possible energy carrier is ammonia, which can be stored safely and reversibly in metal halide ammines; however, the release often occurs in multiple steps at too high temperatures...... materials is the first known high-capacity ternary metal halide ammine, which we have subsequently synthesized and confirmed the ammonia storage properties using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD)....

  11. Growth of organic microspherules in sugar-ammonia reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Arthur L

    2005-12-01

    Reaction of small sugars of less than four carbons with ammonia in water yielded organic microspherules generally less than ten microns in size. The time course of microspherule growth was examined for the D-erythrose-ammonia reaction that yielded microspherules attached to the glass walls of containers. Measurements were made of the elemental composition and infrared spectrum of the microspherule material. These viscose semi-solid microspherules are viewed as possible containers for prebiotic catalytic processes relevant to the origin of life.

  12. Impact Assessment and Environmental Evaluation of Various Ammonia Production Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicer, Yusuf; Dincer, Ibrahim; Vezina, Greg; Raso, Frank

    2017-05-01

    In the current study, conventional resources-based ammonia generation routes are comparatively studied through a comprehensive life cycle assessment. The selected ammonia generation options range from mostly used steam methane reforming to partial oxidation of heavy oil. The chosen ammonia synthesis process is the most common commercially available Haber-Bosch process. The essential energy input for the methods are used from various conventional resources such as coal, nuclear, natural gas and heavy oil. Using the life cycle assessment methodology, the environmental impacts of selected methods are identified and quantified from cradle to gate. The life cycle assessment outcomes of the conventional resources based ammonia production routes show that nuclear electrolysis-based ammonia generation method yields the lowest global warming and climate change impacts while the coal-based electrolysis options bring higher environmental problems. The calculated greenhouse gas emission from nuclear-based electrolysis is 0.48 kg CO2 equivalent while it is 13.6 kg CO2 per kg of ammonia for coal-based electrolysis method.

  13. The role of glutamate dehydrogenase in mammalian ammonia metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the reversible inter-conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia. High levels of GDH activity is found in mammalian liver, kidney, brain, and pancreas. In the liver, GDH reaction appears to be close-to-equilibrium, providing the appropriate ratio of ammonia and amino acids for urea synthesis in periportal hepatocytes. In addition, GDH produces glutamate for glutamine synthesis in a small rim of pericentral hepatocytes. Hence, hepatic GDH can be either a source for ammonia or an ammonia scavenger. In the kidney, GDH function produces ammonia from glutamate to control acidosis. In the human, the presence of two differentially regulated isoforms (hGDH1 and hGDH2) suggests a complex role for GDH in ammonia homeostasis. Whereas hGDH1 is sensitive to GTP inhibition, hGDH2 has dissociated its function from GTP control. Furthermore, hGDH2 shows a lower optimal pH than hGDH1. The hGDH2 enzyme is selectively expressed in human astrocytes and Sertoli cells, probably facilitating metabolic recycling processes essential for their supportive role. Here, we report that hGDH2 is also expressed in the epithelial cells lining the convoluted tubules of the renal cortex. As hGDH2 functions more efficiently under acidotic conditions without the operation of the GTP energy switch, its presence in the kidney may increase the efficacy of the organ to maintain acid base equilibrium.

  14. Optimality in the zonation of ammonia detoxification in rodent liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl, Martin; Pfaff, Michael; Ghallab, Ahmed; Driesch, Dominik; Henkel, Sebastian G; Hengstler, Jan G; Schuster, Stefan; Kaleta, Christoph; Gebhardt, Rolf; Zellmer, Sebastian; Li, Pu

    2015-11-01

    The rodent liver eliminates toxic ammonia. In mammals, three enzymes (or enzyme systems) are involved in this process: glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and the urea cycle enzymes, represented by carbamoyl phosphate synthetase. The distribution of these enzymes for optimal ammonia detoxification was determined by numerical optimization. This in silico approach predicted that the enzymes have to be zonated in order to achieve maximal removal of toxic ammonia and minimal changes in glutamine concentration. Using 13 compartments, representing hepatocytes, the following predictions were generated: glutamine synthetase is active only within a narrow pericentral zone. Glutaminase and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase are located in the periportal zone in a non-homogeneous distribution. This correlates well with the paradoxical observation that in a first step glutamine-bound ammonia is released (by glutaminase) although one of the functions of the liver is detoxification by ammonia fixation. The in silico approach correctly predicted the in vivo enzyme distributions also for non-physiological conditions (e.g. starvation) and during regeneration after tetrachloromethane (CCl4) intoxication. Metabolite concentrations of glutamine, ammonia and urea in each compartment, representing individual hepatocytes, were predicted. Finally, a sensitivity analysis showed a striking robustness of the results. These bioinformatics predictions were validated experimentally by immunohistochemistry and are supported by the literature. In summary, optimization approaches like the one applied can provide valuable explanations and high-quality predictions for in vivo enzyme and metabolite distributions in tissues and can reveal unknown metabolic functions.

  15. Ammonia at Blodgett Forest, Sierra Nevada, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Marc L.; Littlejohn, David

    2007-11-06

    Ammonia is a reactive trace gas that is emitted in large quantities by animal agriculture and other sources in California, which subsequently forms aerosol particulate matter, potentially affecting visibility, climate, and human health. We performed initial measurements of NH{sub 3} at the Blodgett Forest Research Station (BFRS) during a two week study in June, 2006. The site is used for ongoing air quality research and is a relatively low-background site in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Measured NH{sub 3} mixing ratios were quite low (< 1 to {approx} 2 ppb), contrasting with typical conditions in many parts of the Central Valley. Eddy covariance measurements showed NH{sub 3} fluxes that scaled with measured NH{sub 3} mixing ratio and calculated aerodynamic deposition velocity, suggesting dry deposition is a significant loss mechanism for atmospheric NH{sub 3} at BFRS. A simple model of NH{sub 3} transport to the site supports the hypothesis that NH{sub 3} is transported from the Valley to BFRS, but deposits on vegetation during the summer. Further work is necessary to determine whether the results obtained in this study can be generalized to other seasons.

  16. Measurements of Ammonia at Blodgett Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Marc L.; Littlejohn, David

    2007-04-01

    Ammonia is a reactive trace gas that is emitted in large quantities by animal agriculture and other sources in California, which subsequently forms aerosol particulate matter, potentially affecting visibility, climate, and human health. We performed initial measurements of NH{sub 3} at the Blodgett Forest Research Station (BFRS) during a 3 week study in June, 2006. The site is used for ongoing air quality research and is a relatively low-background site in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Measured NH{sub 3} mixing ratios were quite low (< 1 to {approx}2 ppb), contrasting with typical conditions in many parts of the Central Valley. Eddy covariance measurements showed NH{sub 3} fluxes that scaled with measured NH{sub 3} mixing ratio and calculated aerodynamic deposition velocity, suggesting dry deposition is a significant loss mechanism for atmospheric NH{sub 3} at BFRS. A simple model of NH{sub 3} transport to the site supports the hypothesis that NH{sub 3} is transported from the Valley to BFRS, but deposits on vegetation during the summer. Further work is necessary to determine whether the results obtained in this study can be generalized to other seasons.

  17. Nitridation of chromium powder in ammonia atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Li; Qiang Zhen; Rong Li

    2015-01-01

    CrN powder was synthesized by nitriding Cr metal in ammonia gas flow, and its chemical reaction mechanism and nitridation process were studied. Through thermodynamic calculations, the Cr−N−O predominance diagrams were constructed for different tempera-tures. Chromium nitride formed at 700−1200°C under relatively higher nitrogen and lower oxygen partial pressures. Phases in the products were then investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the Cr2N content varied with reaction temperature and holding time. The results indicate that the Cr metal powder nitridation process can be explained by a diffusion model. Further, Cr2N formed as an intermediate product because of an incomplete reaction, which was observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). After nitriding at 1000°C for 20 h, CrN powder with an average grain size of 63 nm was obtained, and the obtained sample was analyzed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  18. Submersible microbial desalination cell for simultaneous ammonia recovery and electricity production from anaerobic reactors containing high levels of ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    High ammonia concentration in anaerobic reactors can seriously inhibit the anaerobic digestion process. In this study, a submersible microbial desalination cell (SMDC) was developed as an innovative method to lower the ammonia level in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) by in situ ammonia...... recovery and electricity production. In batch experiment, the ammonia concentration in the CSTR decreased from 6 to 0.7g-N/L during 30days, resulting in an average recovery rate of 80g-N/m2/d. Meanwhile, a maximum power density of 0.71±0.5W/m2 was generated at 2.85A/m2. Both current driven NH4+ migration...

  19. Uptake of ammonia by Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying the plasmid pCYG4 related with ammonia assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Filho, J L; Ledingham, W M

    1992-08-01

    Batch culture experiments involving ammonia uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae BC55 pCYG4 have been carried out. This strain carries the plasmid pCYG4 that directs substantial overproduction of NADP-GDH, conferring an 11-fold increase in activity. The wild type cells had a specific growth rate greater than BC55 pCYG4. The ammonia uptake was practically the same until 15 h of growth. However, the amount of ammonia hydroxide added during growth (60 h) was two and half times greater in the BC55 pCYG4 than wild type cells. The results suggest that the presence of the plasmid pCYG4 can increase the amount of ammonia taken by the cells, but not the amount of biomass.

  20. Late Permian marine ecosystem collapse began in deeper waters: evidence from brachiopod diversity and body size changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, W-H; Shi, G R; Twitchett, R J; Zhang, Y; Zhang, K-X; Song, H-J; Yue, M-L; Wu, S-B; Wu, H-T; Yang, T-L; Xiao, Y-F

    2015-03-01

    Analysis of Permian-Triassic brachiopod diversity and body size changes from different water depths spanning the continental shelf to basinal facies in South China provides insights into the process of environmental deterioration. Comparison of the temporal changes of brachiopod diversity between deepwater and shallow-water facies demonstrates that deepwater brachiopods disappeared earlier than shallow-water brachiopods. This indicates that high environmental stress commenced first in deepwater settings and later extended to shallow waters. This environmental stress is attributed to major volcanic eruptions, which first led to formation of a stratified ocean and a chemocline in the outer shelf and deeper water environments, causing the disappearance of deep marine benthos including brachiopods. The chemocline then rapidly migrated upward and extended to shallow waters, causing widespread mass extinction of shallow marine benthos. We predict that the spatial and temporal patterns of earlier onset of disappearance/extinction and ecological crisis in deeper water ecosystems will be recorded during other episodes of rapid global warming.

  1. Tolerance response to in situ ammonia stress in a pilot-scale anaerobic digestion reactor for alleviating ammonia inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shumei; Zhao, Mingxing; Chen, Yang; Yu, Meijuan; Ruan, Wenquan

    2015-12-01

    The anaerobic digestion (AD) of protein-rich substrates is generally inhibited by ammonia. In this study, ammonia-tolerant acclimation was exposed to a stepwise in situ ammonia stress during the continuous AD of solid residual kitchen waste by using a continuous stirred tank reactor with a 50 L active volume. The reactor worked well during the acclimation process, with an average daily biogas production of 58 L/d, an effluent soluble chemical oxygen demand of 7238 mg/L, a volatile fatty acid (VFA) content of 578 mg/L, and a VFA/alkalinity ratio of less than 0.4. Moreover, ammonia stress enhanced the activity of Coenzyme F420. The results of high-throughput 16S rDNA sequencing showed that ammonia stress increased the relative abundance of Firmicutes bacteria and hydrogenotrophic methanogens but decreased the abundance of acetotrophic methanogens. This microbial community shift was proposed to be an in situ response strategy for ammonia stress adaptation.

  2. Effect of competing ions and causticization on the ammonia adsorption by a novel poly ligand exchanger (PLE) ammonia adsorption reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quanzhou; Zhou, Kanggen; Hu, Yuanjuan; Liu, Fang; Wang, Aihe

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a poly ligand exchanger, Cu(II)-loaded chelating resin named ammonia adsorption reagent (AMAR), bearing the functional group of weak iminodiacetate acid, was prepared to efficiently remove ammonia from solutions. Batch adsorption equilibrium experiments were conducted under a range of conditions. The effects of pH on the removal of ammonia by AMAR were investigated at 25 °C. The copper loaded on the resin forms a complex with NH3 in solution under alkaline condition. The effect of alkaline dosage (AD) on the ammonia adsorption was investigated. The maximum breakthrough bed volumes were obtained when the AD was set as 0.75 mmol OH(-)/mL. The higher AD did not guarantee the better ammonia removal efficiency due to the forming of Cu(OH)2 precipitate between OH(-) in solutions and Cu(II) on the resin. The effect of competing ions on the adsorption breakthrough curve of virgin AMAR and causticized AMAR was also investigated. The results demonstrated that the existence of competing ions had a negative impact on the adsorption capacity for both virgin AMAR and causticized AMAR. After causticization, the AMAR was more resistant to the competing ions comparing with virgin AMAR. The bivalent Ca(2+) affects the ammonia adsorption more than does the monovalent Na(+).

  3. Habitat-associated phylogenetic community patterns of microbial ammonia oxidizers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Fernàndez-Guerra

    Full Text Available Microorganisms mediating ammonia oxidation play a fundamental role in the connection between biological nitrogen fixation and anaerobic nitrogen losses. Bacteria and Archaea ammonia oxidizers (AOB and AOA, respectively have colonized similar habitats worldwide. Ammonia oxidation is the rate-limiting step in nitrification, and the ammonia monooxygenase (Amo is the key enzyme involved. The molecular ecology of this process has been extensively explored by surveying the gene of the subunit A of the Amo (amoA gene. In the present study, we explored the phylogenetic community ecology of AOB and AOA, analyzing 5776 amoA gene sequences from >300 isolation sources, and clustering habitats by environmental ontologies. As a whole, phylogenetic richness was larger in AOA than in AOB, and sediments contained the highest phylogenetic richness whereas marine plankton the lowest. We also observed that freshwater ammonia oxidizers were phylogenetically richer than their marine counterparts. AOA communities were more dissimilar to each other than those of AOB, and consistent monophyletic lineages were observed for sediments, soils, and marine plankton in AOA but not in AOB. The diversification patterns showed a more constant cladogenesis through time for AOB whereas AOA apparently experienced two fast diversification events separated by a long steady-state episode. The diversification rate (γ statistic for most of the habitats indicated γ(AOA > γ(AOB. Soil and sediment experienced earlier bursts of diversification whereas habitats usually eutrophic and rich in ammonium such as wastewater and sludge showed accelerated diversification rates towards the present. Overall, this work shows for the first time a global picture of the phylogenetic community structure of both AOB and AOA assemblages following the strictest analytical standards, and provides an ecological view on the differential evolutionary paths experienced by widespread ammonia

  4. Field intercomparison of ammonia passive samplers: results and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Amy; Leeson, Sarah; Jones, Matthew; van Dijk, Netty; Kentisbeer, John; Twigg, Marsailidh; Simmons, Ivan; Braban, Christine; Martin, Nick; Poskitt, Janet; Ferm, Martin; Seitler, Eva; Sacco, Paolo; Gates, Linda; Stolk, Ariën; Stoll, Jean-Marc; Tang, Sim

    2017-04-01

    Ammonia pollution contributes significantly to eutrophication and acidification of ecosystems with resultant losses of biodiversity and ecosystem changes. Monitoring of ambient ammonia over a wide spatial and long temporal scales is primarily done with low-cost diffusive samplers. Less frequently, surface flux measurements of ammonia can be made using passive samplers at plot scale. This paper will present a field intercomparison conducted within the MetNH3 project to assess the performance of passive samplers for ambient measurements of ammonia. Eight different designs of commercial passive samplers housed in shelters provided by the manufacturer/laboratory were exposed over an 8-week period at the Whim experimental field site in Scotland between August and October 2016. Whim Bog has a facility in place for controlled releases of ammonia (http://www.whimbog.ceh.ac.uk/). Automated conditional release from the line source occurs when the wind direction in the preceding minute is from the northeast (wind sector 180-215°) and wind speed is > 5 m s-1. The passive samplers were exposed at different distances from the release source (16, 32 and 60 m) and also at a background location. Most were exposed for 2 x 4-week long periods and some for 4 x 2-week long periods. At the 32 m position, an active denuder method, the CEH DELTA sampler and a continuous high temporal resolution wet chemistry ammonia instrument (AiRRmonia, Mechatronics, NL.) were also deployed alongside the passive samplers to provide reference measurements of ammonia. Results are presented within the context of the MetNH3 CATFAC controlled laboratory exposure assessments. The results are discussed in terms of typical deployments of passive samplers and quality control. Measurement for policy evidence for both local and regional studies using passive samplers are discussed.

  5. Seeing Deeper Into Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ZHIPING

    2010-01-01

    @@ Following the successful launch of the Chang'e-1 satellite in 2007, Chang'e-2 was lifted off by a Long March 3 carrier rocket on October 1, marking the beginning of the second phase of China's lunar probe project.

  6. Seeing Deeper Into Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Following the successful launch of the Chang ’e-1 satellite in 2007, Chang ’e-2 was lifted off by a Long March 3 carrier rocket on October 1, marking the beginning of the second phase of China’s lunar probe project.

  7. Effect of zeolite on toxicity of ammonia in freshwater sediments: Implications for toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G. [Geological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States); Leonard, E.N.; Mount, D.R. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Mid-Continent Ecology Div.

    1998-11-01

    Techniques for reducing ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments were investigated as part of a project to develop toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) procedures for whole sediments. Although ammonia is a natural constituent of freshwater sediments, pollution can lead to ammonia concentrations that are toxic to benthic invertebrates, and ammonia can also contribute to the toxicity of sediments that contain more persistent contaminants. The authors investigated the use of amendments of a natural zeolite mineral, clinoptilolite, to reduce concentrations of ammonia in sediment pore water. Zeolites have been widely used for removal of ammonia in water treatment and in aqueous TIE procedures. The addition of granulated zeolite to ammonia-spiked sediments reduced pore-water ammonia concentrations and reduced ammonia toxicity to invertebrates. Amendments of 20% zeolite (v/v) reduced ammonia concentrations in pore water by {ge}70% in spiked sediments with ammonia concentrations typical of contaminated freshwater sediments. Zeolite amendments reduced toxicity of ammonia-spiked sediments to three taxa of benthic invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Chironomus tentans), despite their widely differing sensitivity to ammonia toxicity. In contrast, zeolite amendments did not reduce acute toxicity of sediments containing high concentrations of cadmium or copper or reduce concentrations of these metals in pore waters. These studies suggest that zeolite amendments, used in conjunction with toxicity tests with sensitive taxa such as H. azteca, may be an effective technique for selective reduction of ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments.

  8. Effect of zeolite on toxicity of ammonia in freshwater sediments: Implications for toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Leonard, E.N.; Mount, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Techniques for reducing ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments were investigated as part of a project to develop toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) procedures for whole sediments. Although ammonia is a natural constituent of freshwater sediments, pollution can lead to ammonia concentrations that are toxic to benthic invertebrates, and ammonia can also contribute to the toxicity of sediments that contain more persistent contaminants. We investigated the use of amendments of a natural zeolite mineral, clinoptilolite, to reduce concentrations of ammonia in sediment pore water. Zeolites have been widely used for removal of ammonia in water treatment and in aqueous TIE procedures. The addition of granulated zeolite to ammonia-spiked sediments reduced pore-water ammonia concentrations and reduced ammonia toxicity to invertebrates. Amendments of 20% zeolite (v/v) reduced ammonia concentrations in pore water by ???70% in spiked sediments with ammonia concentrations typical of contaminated freshwater sediments. Zeolite amendments reduced toxicity of ammonia-spiked sediments to three taxa of benthic invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Chironomus tentans), despite their widely differing sensitivity to ammonia toxicity. In contrast, zeolite amendments did not reduce acute toxicity of sediments containing high concentrations of cadmium or copper or reduce concentrations of these metals in pore waters. These studies suggest that zeolite amendments, used in conjunction with toxicity tests with sensitive taxa such as H. azteca, may be an effective technique for selective reduction of ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments.

  9. ISS Ammonia Leak Detection Through X-Ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan; Barthelmy, Scott; Skinner, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia leaks are a significant concern for the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS has external transport lines that direct liquid ammonia to radiator panels where the ammonia is cooled and then brought back to thermal control units. These transport lines and radiator panels are subject to stress from micrometeorites and temperature variations, and have developed small leaks. The ISS can accommodate these leaks at their present rate, but if the rate increased by a factor of ten, it could potentially deplete the ammonia supply and impact the proper functioning of the ISS thermal control system, causing a serious safety risk. A proposed ISS astrophysics instrument, the Lobster X-Ray Monitor, can be used to detect and localize ISS ammonia leaks. Based on the optical design of the eye of its namesake crustacean, the Lobster detector gives simultaneously large field of view and good position resolution. The leak detection principle is that the nitrogen in the leaking ammonia will be ionized by X-rays from the Sun, and then emit its own characteristic Xray signal. The Lobster instrument, nominally facing zenith for its astrophysics observations, can be periodically pointed towards the ISS radiator panels and some sections of the transport lines to detect and localize the characteristic X-rays from the ammonia leaks. Another possibility is to use the ISS robot arm to grab the Lobster instrument and scan it across the transport lines and radiator panels. In this case the leak detection can be made more sensitive by including a focused 100-microampere electron beam to stimulate X-ray emission from the leaking nitrogen. Laboratory studies have shown that either approach can be used to locate ammonia leaks at the level of 0.1 kg/day, a threshold rate of concern for the ISS. The Lobster instrument uses two main components: (1) a microchannel plate optic (also known as a Lobster optic) that focuses the X-rays and directs them to the focal plane, and (2) a CCD (charge

  10. CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF PURE AMMONIA AND AMMONIA-WATER ICES INDUCED BY HEAVY IONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordalo, V.; Da Silveira, E. F. [Departamento de Fisica/Laboratorio do Acelerador Van de Graaff, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de S. Vicente 225, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lv, X. Y.; Domaracka, A.; Rothard, H.; Boduch, P. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Materiaux et la Photonique (CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie), CIMAP-CIRIL-GANIL, Boulevard Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Seperuelo Duarte, E., E-mail: vbordalo@fis.puc-rio.br [Grupo de Fisica e Astronomia, Instituto Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Lucio Tavares 1045, 26530-060 Nilopolis, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-09-10

    Cosmic rays are possibly the main agents to prevent the freeze-out of molecules onto grain surfaces in cold dense clouds. Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is one of the most abundant molecules present in dust ice mantles, with a concentration of up to 15% relative to water (H{sub 2}O). FTIR spectroscopy is used to monitor pure NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice samples as they are irradiated with Ni and Zn ion beams (500-600 MeV) at GANIL/France. New species, such as hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}), diazene (N{sub 2}H{sub 2} isomers), molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) were identified after irradiation of pure NH{sub 3} ices. Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), and hydroxylamine (NH{sub 2}OH) are some of the products of the NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice radiolysis. The spectral band at 6.85 {mu}m was observed after irradiation of both types of ice. Besides the likely contribution of ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) and amino (NH{sub 2}) radicals, data suggest a small contribution of NH{sub 2}OH to this band profile after high fluences of irradiation of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ices. The spectral shift of the NH{sub 3} ''umbrella'' mode (9.3 {mu}m) band is parameterized as a function of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O ratio in amorphous ices. Ammonia and water destruction cross-sections are obtained, as well as the rate of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O (1:10) ice compaction, measured by the OH dangling bond destruction cross-section. Ammonia destruction is enhanced in the presence of H{sub 2}O in the ice and a power law relationship between stopping power and NH{sub 3} destruction cross-section is verified. Such results may provide relevant information for the evolution of molecular species in dense molecular clouds.

  11. A possible explanation for deeper earthquakes under the Sacramento delta, California, in terms of its deep structure and thermal history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, V.; Parsons, T.; Simpson, R. W.; Timoshkina, E.; Williams, C.

    2003-04-01

    Hypocentral depth of earthquakes under the Sacramento River Delta region in Northern California extends to nearly 20 km, whereas in the Coast Ranges to the west it is less than 12-15 km. In order to better understand the origin of these deeper earthquakes and the potential earthquake hazard in the vicinity, we have used data from wells in the Sacramento Valley to construct and calibrate a model of tectonic subsidence and thermal evolution of this forearc basin. Our model assumes an oceanic basement with an initial thermal profile dependent on its age, subjected to a refrigeration effect caused by subducting slab, which age and rate could change in time. Subsidence obtained for the Sacramento Delta area is close to that expected for a forearc basin underlain by normal oceanic lithosphere of 150 My age. Observed subsidence at the eastern and northern borders of the Sacramento valley appears to be considerably less, corresponding to subsidence caused by the dynamics of the subduction zone alone. Thus, it appears that the lithosphere of the Sacramento Delta, being thinner and having undergone deeper long-term subsidence, differs from the lithosphere of other parts of the Sacramento valley. Strength diagrams based on the thermal model show that even under very slow deformation the upper part of the Sacramento Delta crystalline crust (at least down to 20-22 km) can fail in brittle fashion, which is in agreement with earthquake occurrence. Rheology of the mantle below the Moho also appears to be brittle. The greater width of the seismogenic zone in this area raises the possibility that for segments of comparable length, earthquakes of somewhat greater magnitude might occur than in the Coast Ranges to the west.

  12. Net summertime emission of ammonia from corn and triticale fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Undine; Smith, Jeremy; Brümmer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Recent advancements in laser spectrometry offer new opportunities to investigate ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of environmentally relevant trace gases. In this study, we used a quantum cascade laser (QCL) absorption spectrometer to continuously measure high-frequency concentrations of ammonia and the net exchange between an agricultural site and the atmosphere based on the eddy-covariance approach. The footprint was split into two main sectors, one planted with corn (Zea mays) and the other one with triticale. Ammonia concentrations were highly variable between 2 and almost 100 ppb with an average value of 8.1 ppb during the observation period from April to September 2015. While both deposition and emission of ammonia was observed, the total campaign exchange resulted in a loss of 3.3 kg NH3-N ha-1. Highest average emission fluxes of 65 ng N m-2 s-1 were recorded after fertilization at the beginning of the campaign in April and May. Afterwards the exchange of ammonia with the atmosphere decreased considerably, but the site remained on average a consistent source with sporadic lower peaks and an average flux of 13 ng N m-2 s-1. While management in the form of fertilization was the main driver for ammonia concentration and exchange at the site, biophysical controls from temperature, wind regime, and surface wetness are also presented.

  13. Mobility Spectrometer Studies on Hydrazine and Ammonia Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, William; Eiceman, Gary; Szumlas, Andrew; Lewis, John

    2011-01-01

    An airborne vapor analyzer for detecting sub- to low- parts-per-million (ppm) hydrazine in the presence of higher concentration levels of ammonia has been under development for the Orion program. The detector is based on ambient pressure ionization and ion mobility characterization. The detector encompasses: 1) a membrane inlet to exclude particulate and aerosols from the analyzer inlet; 2) a method to separate hydrazine from ammonia which would otherwise lead to loss of calibration and quantitative accuracy for the hydrazine determination; and 3) response and quantitative determinations for both hydrazine and ammonia. Laboratory studies were made to explore some of these features including mobility measurements mindful of power, size, and weight issues. The study recommended the use of a mobility spectrometer of traditional design with a reagent gas and equipped with an inlet transfer line of bonded phase fused silica tube. The inlet transfer line provided gas phase separation of neutrals of ammonia from hydrazine at 50 C simplifying significantly the ionization chemistry that underlies response in a mobility spectrometer. Performance of the analyzer was acceptable between ranges of 30 to 80 C for both the pre-fractionation column and the drift tube. An inlet comprised of a combined membrane with valve-less injector allowed high speed quantitative determination of ammonia and hydrazine without cross reactivity from common metabolites such as alcohols, esters, and aldehydes. Preliminary test results and some of the design features are discussed.

  14. Ammonia disinfection of corn grains intended for ethanol fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Broda

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bacterial contamination is an ongoing problem for commercial bioethanol plants. It concerns factories using grain and also other raw materials for ethanol fermentation. Bacteria compete with precious yeasts for sugar substrates and micronutrients, secrete lactic and acetic acids, which are toxic for yeast and this competition leads to significant decrease of bioethanol productivity. For this study, bacterial contamination of corn grain was examined. Then the grain was treated by ammonia solution to reduce microbial pollution and after that the microbiological purity of grain was tested one more time. Disinfected and non-disinfected corn grains were ground and fermentation process was performed. Microbiological purity of this process and ethanol yield was checked out. Material and methods. The grain was disinfected by ammonia solution for two weeks. Then the grain was milled and used as a raw material for the ethanol fermentation. The fermentation process was carried out in 500-ml Erlenmeyer flasks. Samples were withdrawn for analysis at 0, 24, 48, 72 hrs. The number of total viable bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, acetic acid bacteria, anaerobic bacteria and the quantity of yeasts and moulds were signified by plate method. Results. Ammonia solution effectively reduces bacterial contamination of corn grain. Mash from grain disinfected by ammonia contains less undesirable microorganisms than mash from crude grain. Moreover, ethanol yield from disinfected grain is at the highest level. Conclusions. The ammonia solution proved to be a good disinfection agent for grain used as a raw material for bioethanol fermentation process.

  15. Ammonia nitrogen removal from aqueous solution by local agricultural wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azreen, I.; Lija, Y.; Zahrim, A. Y.

    2017-06-01

    Excess ammonia nitrogen in the waterways causes serious distortion to environment such as eutrophication and toxicity to aquatic organisms. Ammonia nitrogen removal from synthetic solution was investigated by using 40 local agricultural wastes as potential low cost adsorbent. Some of the adsorbent were able to remove ammonia nitrogen with adsorption capacity ranging from 0.58 mg/g to 3.58 mg/g. The highest adsorption capacity was recorded by Langsat peels with 3.58 mg/g followed by Jackfruit seeds and Moringa peels with 3.37 mg/g and 2.64 mg/g respectively. This experimental results show that the agricultural wastes can be utilized as biosorbent for ammonia nitrogen removal. The effect of initial ammonia nitrogen concentration, pH and stirring rate on the adsorption process were studied in batch experiment. The adsorption capacity reached maximum value at pH 7 with initial concentration of 500 mg/L and the removal rate decreased as stirring rate was applied.

  16. Removal of Ammonia from Air, using Three Iranian Natural Zeolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Asilian

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia in air can be hazardous to human and animal life and should be removed from the environment. Recently the removal of environmental pollutants such as ammonia by means of natural and modified zeolites has attracted a lot of attention and interests. In this study the capability of three Iranian natural zeolites (Clinoptilolite in point of view of removal of ammonia from air was investigated. Through this research, different zeolites from various regions of Iran including Semnan, Meyaneh, and Firoozkooh resources were considered to be studied. These samples of zeolites were ground and granulized into 425 µm to 4 mm and were utilized in dynamic sorption experiments. Curves of sorption were plotted and breakthrough and saturated points of zeolite samples were obtained. The adsorption capacities at different ammonia concentrations, temperatures, and flow – rates were also calculated. Results obtained showed that, the natural Iranian zeolite (Clinoptilolite was identified to be more efficient adsorbent than the others to remove ammonia from the air. In the same conditions, the obtained breakthrough time for clinoptilolite sample of Meyaneh was longer than the others ( 135min , while, the adsorption capacity of Semnan clinoptilolite was higher than adsorbents ( 6.30 mg /g (P<0.0001.

  17. Amine substitution into sulfuric acid – ammonia clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vehkamäki

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The substitution of ammonia by dimethylamine in sulfuric acid – ammonia – dimethylamine clusters was studied using a collision and evaporation dynamics model. Quantum chemical formation free energies were computed using B3LYP/CBSB7 for geometries and frequencies and RI-CC2/aug-cc-pV(T+dZ for electronic energies. We first demonstrate the good performance of our method by a comparison with an experimental study investigating base substitution in positively charged clusters, and then continue by simulating base exchange in neutral clusters, which cannot be measured directly. Collisions of a dimethylamine molecule with an ammonia containing positively charged cluster result in the instantaneous evaporation of an ammonia molecule, while the dimethylamine molecule remains in the cluster. According to our simulations, a similar base exchange can take place in neutral clusters, although the overall process is more complicated. Neutral sulfuric acid – ammonia clusters are significantly less stable than their positively charged counterparts, resulting in a competition between cluster evaporation and base exchange.

  18. AMMONIA INHIBITION IN THERMOPHILIC ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF DAIRY CATTLE MANURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sutaryo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of five different concentrations of total ammonia nitrogen (TANand free ammonia (FA on the methane yield and digester performance under thermophilic conditions(50°C. Five identical continuously fed digesters were used. The experiment was run for four timeshydraulic retention time (HRT. Data were statitically analysed using the data Analysis Tool Packavailable with the Microsoft Excel program. Different ammonia levels were obtained by pulsing urea toobtain the target level of TAN and FA, and to subsequently maintaining the concentration of ammonialevels by daily urea additions. The result showed a strong negative correlation between both TAN andFA concentrations and methane yield. The methane yield was reduced by 24, 30, 52 and 66% indigesters that had TAN levels of 2.9, 3.6, 4.4 and 5.1 g/L, respectively, corresponding to 0.7, 1.1,1.5 and1.8 g/L FA. Total volatile fatty acid and especially isovaleric and isobutyric acid concentrations wereelevated during ammonia inhibition. Concentration of TAN in the biogas digester exceeding 3 g/Lindicating that very often the full biogas potential is not achieved due to ammonia inhibition and thatlonger HRT should be used to compensate or a lower process temperature should be chosen.

  19. Amine substitution into sulfuric acid – ammonia clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Kupiainen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The substitution of ammonia by dimethylamine in sulfuric acid – ammonia – dimethylamine clusters was studied using a collision and evaporation dynamics model. Quantum chemical formation free energies were computed using B3LYP/CBSB7 for geometries and frequencies and RI-CC2/aug-cc-pV(T+dZ for electronic energies. We first demonstrate the good performance of our method by a comparison with an experimental study investigating base substitution in positively charged clusters, and then continue by simulating base exchange in neutral clusters, which cannot be measured directly. Collisions of a dimethylamine molecule with an ammonia containing positively charged cluster result in the instantaneous evaporation of an ammonia molecule, while the dimethylamine molecule remains in the cluster. According to our simulations, a similar base exchange can take place in neutral clusters, although the overall process is more complicated. Neutral sulfuric acid – ammonia clusters are significantly less stable than their positively charged counterparts, resulting in a competition between cluster evaporation and base exchange.

  20. Ammonia modification of oxide-free Si(111) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Tatiana Peixoto; Longo, Roberto C.; Cho, Kyeongjae; Chabal, Yves J.

    2016-08-01

    Amination of surfaces is useful in a variety of fields, ranging from device manufacturing to biological applications. Previous studies of ammonia reaction on silicon surfaces have concentrated on vapor phase rather than wet chemical processes, and mostly on clean Si surfaces. In this work, the interaction of liquid and vapor-phase ammonia is examined on three types of oxide-free surfaces - passivated by hydrogen, fluorine (1/3 monolayer) or chlorine - combining infrared absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and first-principles calculations. The resulting chemical composition highly depends on the starting surface; there is a stronger reaction on both F- and Cl-terminated than on the H-terminated Si surfaces, as evidenced by the formation of Si-NH2. Side reactions can also occur, such as solvent reaction with surfaces, formation of ammonium salt by-products (in the case of 0.2 M ammonia in dioxane solution), and nitridation of silicon (in the case of neat and gas-phase ammonia reactions for instance). Unexpectedly, there is formation of Si-H bonds on hydrogen-free Cl-terminated Si(111) surfaces in all cases, whether vapor phase of neat liquid ammonia is used. The first-principles modeling of this complex system suggests that step-edge surface defects may play a key role in enabling the reaction under certain circumstances, despite the endothermic nature for Si-H bond formation.

  1. Stabilization of ammonia-rich hydrate inside icy planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naden Robinson, Victor; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming; Hermann, Andreas

    2017-08-22

    The interior structure of the giant ice planets Uranus and Neptune, but also of newly discovered exoplanets, is loosely constrained, because limited observational data can be satisfied with various interior models. Although it is known that their mantles comprise large amounts of water, ammonia, and methane ices, it is unclear how these organize themselves within the planets-as homogeneous mixtures, with continuous concentration gradients, or as well-separated layers of specific composition. While individual ices have been studied in great detail under pressure, the properties of their mixtures are much less explored. We show here, using first-principles calculations, that the 2:1 ammonia hydrate, (H2O)(NH3)2, is stabilized at icy planet mantle conditions due to a remarkable structural evolution. Above 65 GPa, we predict it will transform from a hydrogen-bonded molecular solid into a fully ionic phase O(2-)([Formula: see text])2, where all water molecules are completely deprotonated, an unexpected bonding phenomenon not seen before. Ammonia hemihydrate is stable in a sequence of ionic phases up to 500 GPa, pressures found deep within Neptune-like planets, and thus at higher pressures than any other ammonia-water mixture. This suggests it precipitates out of any ammonia-water mixture at sufficiently high pressures and thus forms an important component of icy planets.

  2. Development of Ammonia Gas Sensor Using Optimized Organometallic Reagent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Aubrecht

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable, continuous, and spatially distributed monitoring of dangerous or irritating chemical substances belongs to standard functions of contemporary industrial and public security systems. Fiber-optic-based detection provides feasible platform to fulfill such aims. This paper deals with characterization of ammonia sensing elements based on multimode polysiloxane-clad silica-core optical fibers sensitized with 5-(4′-dioctylamino phenylimino quinoline-8-1 cobalt bromide complex reagent immobilized into the cross-linked polymer matrix from a proper mixture of organic solvents and a radical scavenger contributing to the desired long-term stability of optical properties. The applied sensing mechanism combines optical detection principle with chemical reaction of the reagent and ammonia resulting in changes in the visible near-infrared optical absorption spectrum of the cladding layer, influencing via evanescent optical field interactions the spectral distribution of the guided light intensity. Reaction kinetics of short fiber sections exposed to ammonia/nitrogen mixture of various ammonia concentrations is tested and evaluated. The obtained sensitivity, limit of detection, and forward response time of the prepared sensors amount to 1.52⁎10-5 ppm−1, 31 ppm, and 25 s, respectively. The obtained results are promising for fabrication of distributed fiber-optic sensors applicable to detection and location of ammonia gas leaks in industrial as well as general public premises.

  3. Ammonia nanotubes and their interactions with coinage metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohajeri, Afshan, E-mail: amohajeri@shirazu.ac.ir; Bozorgizadeh, Tahereh

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • The possibility of building ammonia nanotubes (ANTs) is explored. • Six ANTs formed by the stacks of 4- and 5-membered ammonia rings have been studied. • The interactions between the ANTs and coinage metals are investigated. • The nature of nitrogen–metal bonds is unveiled by quantum chemical approaches. - Abstract: The hydrogen bond networks of finite ammonia molecules are considered to explore the possibility of building ammonia nanotubes (ANTs). Six ANTs formed by the stacks of 4- and 5-membered ammonia rings have been studied. The calculated stabilization energies indicate considerable stability for ANTs. In the second part, the interactions between the constructed ANTs and coinage metals (M = Cu, Ag, and Au) are investigated with a focus on the nature of nitrogen…metal bonds. The changes in binding energies from copper to gold reveal that the three metals have almost similar tendency for the interaction with ANTs and the interaction strength is governed by the structure of ANT. Furthermore, the electronic and structural properties of the resulting complexes have been unveiled by means of the quantum chemical analyses. The N…M bonds are found to have partially covalent and partially electrostatic nature.

  4. Different cultivation methods to acclimatise ammonia-tolerant methanogenic consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hailin; Fotidis, Ioannis A; Mancini, Enrico; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-05-01

    Bioaugmentation with ammonia tolerant-methanogenic consortia was proposed as a solution to overcome ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion process recently. However, appropriate technology to generate ammonia tolerant methanogenic consortia is still lacking. In this study, three basic reactors (i.e. batch, fed-batch and continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR)) operated at mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions were assessed, based on methane production efficiency, incubation time, TAN/FAN (total ammonium nitrogen/free ammonia nitrogen) levels and maximum methanogenic activity. Overall, fed-batch cultivation was clearly the most efficient method compared to batch and CSTR. Specifically, by saving incubation time up to 150%, fed-batch reactors were acclimatised to nearly 2-fold higher FAN levels with a 37%-153% methanogenic activity improvement, compared to batch method. Meanwhile, CSTR reactors were inhibited at lower ammonia levels. Finally, specific methanogenic activity test showed that hydrogenotrophic methanogens were more active than aceticlastic methanogens in all FAN levels above 540mgNH3-NL(-1). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of ammonia-generating diet on ovine serum and follicular fluid ammonia and urea levels, serum oestrogen and progesterone concentrations and granulosa cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, S; Mondal, S; Pal, D T; Gupta, P S P

    2016-04-01

    This study was undertaken to elucidate the effect of ammonia-generating diet on serum and follicular fluid ammonia and urea levels, serum oestrogen and progesterone concentrations and granulosa cell growth and secretion parameters in ewes (Ovis aries). Ewes were fed with 14% CP diet (control) or ammonia-generating diet or ammonia-generating diet plus soluble sugar. The serum and follicular fluid ammonia and urea level, serum oestrogen and progesterone levels and granulosa cell (obtained from ovaries of slaughtered ewes) growth parameters and secretory activities were estimated. Ammonia-generating diet (high-protein diet) increased the serum ammonia and urea concentration. Supplementation of soluble sugar significantly reduced the ammonia concentration in serum with comparable levels as in control group; however, the urea level in the same group was higher than that observed in control group. Supplementation of soluble sugar significantly reduced the follicular fluid ammonia concentration; however, the level was significantly higher compared to control group. Supplementation of soluble sugar brought down the follicular fluid urea level comparable to that observed in control group. Oestrogen and progesterone levels remained unchanged in ewes fed with different types of diet. Oestrogen and progesterone secretion were significantly lowered from granulosa cells recovered from ewes fed with high ammonia-generating diet. Low metabolic activity and high incidence of apoptosis were observed in granulosa cells obtained from ovaries of ewes fed with ammonia-generating diet.

  6. Branched-chain amino acids increase arterial blood ammonia in spite of enhanced intrinsic muscle ammonia metabolism in patients with cirrhosis and healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Gitte; Keiding, Susanne; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2011-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are used in attempts to reduce blood ammonia in patients with cirrhosis and intermittent hepatic encephalopathy based on the hypothesis that BCAA stimulate muscle ammonia detoxification. We studied the effects of an oral dose of BCAA on the skeletal muscle...... the metabolism of blood-supplied ammonia and the A-V measurements were used to measure the total ammonia metabolism across the thigh muscle. After intake of BCAA, blood ammonia increased more than 30% in both groups of subjects (both P ....05). BCAA intake led to a massive glutamine release from the muscle (cirrhotic patients, P BCAA enhanced the intrinsic muscle metabolism of ammonia but not the metabolism of blood-supplied ammonia in both the patients with cirrhosis and in the healthy...

  7. Dynamics of ammonia metabolism in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockwood, J.S.; McDonald, J.M.; Reiman, R.E.; Gelbard, A.S.; Laughlin, J.S.; Duffy, T.E.; Plum, F.

    1977-01-01

    The cyclotron-produced radionuclide /sup 13/N, T/sub 1/2/ 10 min, was used to label NH/sub 3/ and study its metabolism in 5 normal subjects and 17 with liver disease, including 5 with portacaval shunts, and 11 with encephalopathy (HE). The arterial NH/sub 3/ levels were 100 +- 8 ..mu..M in the non-HE subjects and 149 +- 18 ..mu..M in those with HE, (P < 0.01). After an iv pulse of 10 mCi of carrier-free /sup 13/NH/sub 4/Cl, the rate of NH/sub 3/ clearance from the vascular compartment was a function of its arterial concentration: ..mu..mol/min = 4.71 (NH/sub 3/)/sub a/ + 3.76 (r = +0.85, P < 0.005). In all subjects, brain activity increased rapidly when the specific activity of arterial NH/sub 3/ was maximal, and plateaued at levels 5.1 times those due to an equivalent amount of blood, indicating rapid passage of NH/sub 3/ across the blood-brain barrier, followed by metabolic trapping. Quantitative body scans showed that 7.4 +- 0.3% of observed activity was trapped by the brain. The brain NH/sub 3/ utilization rate (BAUR), calculated from brain and blood activities, was a function of (NH/sub 3/)/sub a/: ..mu..mol/min = 0.32 (NH/sub 3/)/sub a/ + 1.8 (r = +0.93, P < 0.005). The BAUR was 34 +- 3 ..mu..mol/min in the non-HE subjects and 49 +- 6 in those with HE (P < 0.05). Assuming a normal cerebral blood flow and brain weight, 51 +- 4% of arterial NH/sub 3/ was extracted from the blood during a single pass through normal brains. Utilization was greatest in grey matter. Calculations show that NH/sub 3/ metabolism occurs in a compartment, perhaps in astrocytes, that contains less than 20% of all brain ammonia. Liver uptake (3 to 24%) was a function of its projected size on the scan. Skeletal muscle metabolized about 50% of the arterial NH/sub 3/ in normals, less in those with cachexia.

  8. The Measuring Ammonia in Nature (MAN network in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Lolkema

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Since 2005 the Measuring Ammonia in Nature (MAN network monitors atmospheric ammonia concentrations in nature reserve areas in the Netherlands (man.rivm.nl. The main aim of the network is to monitor national trends, to assess regional deviations and to validate model calculations. Measurements are performed with commercial passive samplers, monthly calibrated against ammonia measurements of active sampling devices. The sampling is performed by an extensive group of local volunteers, which minimizes the cost and enables the use of local knowledge. We show the MAN network to be well capable of monitoring trends on national and local scale, as well as providing data for more detailed local analyses. The quality of the network is such that trends over time for individual MAN areas can be detected in the order of 3% per year for time series of six to nine years.

  9. Novel Ru - K/Carbon Nanotubes Catalyst for Ammonia Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A novel ammonia synthesis catalyst, potassium-promoted ruthenium supported on carbon nanotubes, was developed. It was found that the Ru-K/carbon nanotubes catalyst had higher activity for ammonia synthesis ( 20.85 ml NH 3 /h/g-cat ) than the Ru-K/fullerenes ( 13.3 ml NH 3 /h/g-cat ) at atmospheric ressure and 623 K. The catalyst had activity even at 473 K, and had the highest activity ( 23.46 ml NH 3 /h/g-cat ) at 643 K. It was suggested that the multi-walled structure favored the electron transfer, the hydrogen-storage and the hydrogen-spill which were favorable to ammonia synthesis.

  10. Design Ammonia Gas Detection System by Using Optical Fiber Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Bushra. R. Mhdi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Design study and construction of Ammonia gas detection using a fiber as a sensor to based on evanescent wave sensing technique was investigated. Multi-mode fiber type (PCS with core diameter (600μm and (50cm length used where plastic clad was removed by chemical etching for effective sensing area which coated with sol-gel film to enhance its absorption characteristics to evanescent wave around the optical spectrum emitted from halogen lamp measurements through different temperature rang (25-60oc with and without air using as a carrier to ammonia molecules are investigated. Finally sensing efficiency are monitored to ammonia gas it affected to different temperature and environmental condition are studied and our result are compatible to scientific publishes

  11. Ammonia nanotubes and their interactions with coinage metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Afshan; Bozorgizadeh, Tahereh

    2014-09-01

    The hydrogen bond networks of finite ammonia molecules are considered to explore the possibility of building ammonia nanotubes (ANTs). Six ANTs formed by the stacks of 4- and 5-membered ammonia rings have been studied. The calculated stabilization energies indicate considerable stability for ANTs. In the second part, the interactions between the constructed ANTs and coinage metals (M = Cu, Ag, and Au) are investigated with a focus on the nature of nitrogen…metal bonds. The changes in binding energies from copper to gold reveal that the three metals have almost similar tendency for the interaction with ANTs and the interaction strength is governed by the structure of ANT. Furthermore, the electronic and structural properties of the resulting complexes have been unveiled by means of the quantum chemical analyses. The N…M bonds are found to have partially covalent and partially electrostatic nature.

  12. AMMONOX-Ammonia for enhancing biogas yield & reducing NOx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Kristensen, P.G.; Paamand, K.

    2013-01-01

    The continuously increasing demand for renewable energy sources renders anaerobic digestion to one of the most promising technologies for renewable energy production. Due to the animal production intensification, manure is being used as the primary feedstock for most of the biogas plants. However...... to be emphasized that apart the increased methane yield, the ammonia used can be recovered and recycled from the liquid manure resulting in no consumption of chemicals and actually in production of excess ammonia. AMMONOX is an innovative concept focusing on an integrated approach for sustainable and cost......-efficient energy production in the form of methane from manure. The three pillars of AMMONOX are a) the optimisation and application of Aqueous Ammonia Soaking (AAS) as a moderate and sustainable chemical treatment for enhanced methane production from manure fibers and lignocellulosic biomasses, b) the application...

  13. Intensive Ammonia and Methane Oxidation in Organic Liquid Manure Crusts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Daniel Aagren; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    of the crusts. PCR targeting the unique methane and ammonia monooxygenases were applied together with FISH to detect the presence of the two bacterial groups. Potential activity was assessed by short term slurry incubations of crust samples while monitoring NO2- production or CH4 consumption. Crusts were......Intensive agricultural practice leads to periodic accumulation of enormous amounts of liquid manure (slurry) from animal husbandry, and large quantities of environmentally hazardous ammonia and methane are emitted from the manure storages. Floating surface crusts have been suggested to harbour...... methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and are known to accumulate nitrite and nitrate, indicating the presence of ammonia oxidizers (AOB). We have surveyed six manure tanks with organic covers to investigate the prevalence of MOB and AOB and to link the potential activity with physical and chemical aspects...

  14. Excretory nitrogen metabolism and defence against ammonia toxicity in air-breathing fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, S F; Ip, Y K

    2014-03-01

    With the development of air-breathing capabilities, some fishes can emerge from water, make excursions onto land or even burrow into mud during droughts. Air-breathing fishes have modified gill morphology and morphometry and accessory breathing organs, which would tend to reduce branchial ammonia excretion. As ammonia is toxic, air-breathing fishes, especially amphibious ones, are equipped with various strategies to ameliorate ammonia toxicity during emersion or ammonia exposure. These strategies can be categorized into (1) enhancement of ammonia excretion and reduction of ammonia entry, (2) conversion of ammonia to a less toxic product for accumulation and subsequent excretion, (3) reduction of ammonia production and avoidance of ammonia accumulation and (4) tolerance of ammonia at cellular and tissue levels. Active ammonia excretion, operating in conjunction with lowering of ambient pH and reduction in branchial and cutaneous NH₃ permeability, is theoretically the most effective strategy to maintain low internal ammonia concentrations. NH₃ volatilization involves the alkalization of certain epithelial surfaces and requires mechanisms to prevent NH₃ back flux. Urea synthesis is an energy-intensive process and hence uncommon among air-breathing teleosts. Aestivating African lungfishes detoxify ammonia to urea and the accumulated urea is excreted following arousal. Reduction in ammonia production is achieved in some air-breathing fishes through suppression of amino acid catabolism and proteolysis, or through partial amino acid catabolism leading to alanine formation. Others can slow down ammonia accumulation through increased glutamine synthesis in the liver and muscle. Yet, some others develop high tolerance of ammonia at cellular and tissue levels, including tissues in the brain. In summary, the responses of air-breathing fishes to ameliorate ammonia toxicity are many and varied, determined by the behaviour of the species and the nature of the environment in

  15. Diffusion equilibrium for ammonia in the kidney of the acidotic dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, W J; Balagura, S; Pitts, R F

    1967-10-01

    Inflow of preformed ammonia in arterial blood, renal production of ammonia, outflow of ammonia in renal venous blood, and urinary excretion of ammonia were measured during the infusion of (15)NH(4)Cl into one renal artery of dogs with chronic metabolic acidosis. Our results show that the specific activity of ammonia measured in the urine and that calculated in the renal pool agree within 95%. Pool specific activity is obtained by dividing the rate of infusion of isotope by the pool turnover rate, i.e., the sum of the rate of ammonia output in the urine and that in renal venous blood. An average of 35% of urinary ammonia is derived from arterial ammonia in these experiments. We conclude that ammonia is distributed evenly throughout all phases of the kidney within a period less than the transit time of blood through the kidney. Furthermore, from the proportion of urinary ammonia we found to be derived from preformed arterial ammonia (35%), and from our previous demonstration that 73% of urinary ammonia derives from deamidation and/or deamination of plasma glutamine, alanine, glycine, and glutamate, we can account for all of the ammonia that leaves the kidney in renal venous blood and in urine.

  16. Ammonia adsorption and its effects on framework stability of MOF-5 and MOF-177.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Dipendu; Deng, Shuguang

    2010-08-15

    Ammonia adsorption equilibrium and kinetics on MOF-5 and MOF-177 were measured volumetrically at 298 K and ammonia pressures up to 800 torr. This study allowed us to determine the ammonia adsorption properties and stability of both MOFs after exposure to ammonia. MOF-177 adsorbed more ammonia than MOF-5 at ammonia pressures below 150 torr and the ammonia adsorption capacity on both MOFs at 800 torr was about the same (12.2 mmol/g). It can be inferred from the adsorption results that physical adsorption of ammonia on both MOFs dominated at ammonia pressures below 150 torr after which chemical reactions between ammonia and MOF frameworks take place. After exposure to ammonia both MOFs lost majority of their pore textures as evidenced by a drastic decrease of specific surface area and pore volume. The X-ray diffraction study suggested a complete loss of crystallinity of both MOFs, and the FT-IR and Raman spectral analyses showed the generation of free organic ligands within both MOF-5 and MOF-177 after they were exposed to ammonia. Ammonia molecules are proposed to destroy the MOF frameworks by forming hydrogen bonds with Zn(4)O clusters of MOFs.

  17. First detection of ammonia (NH3) in the upper troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höpfner, Michael; Volkamer, Rainer; Grabowski, Udo; Grutter de la Mora, Michel; Orphal, Johannes; Stiller, Gabriele; von Clarmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is the major alkaline trace gas in the troposphere. Neutralization of atmospheric acids, like HNO3 and H2SO4, leads to formation of ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate aerosols. Further, there are indications that NH3 may enhance nucleation of sulfuric acid aerosols by stabilization of sulfuric acid clusters. By far the largest source of ammonia is agricultural food production. Major global emissions are located in S-E Asia as e.g. shown by satellite nadir observations. Besides its importance with respect to air quality issues, an increase of ammonia emissions in the 21st century might lead to a significant climate radiative impact through aerosol formation. In spite of its significance, there is a lack of observational information on the global distribution of NH3 in the mid- and upper troposphere. Observational evidence, however, would be important for testing e.g. model results on the fate of ammonia from its source regions on ground to altitudes up to the tropopause. In this contribution we will show, to our knowledge, the first unequivocal detection of ammonia in the upper troposphere. This result has been achieved through analysis of infrared limb-emission observations performed with the MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) instrument on board the Envisat satellite from 2002-2012. On a global scale, enhanced values of ammonia have been measured in the upper tropospheric region influenced by the Asian monsoon. We will present a quantitative analysis of the retrieved concentrations of NH3 including an error assessment and further retrieval diagnostics. The results will be discussed with respect to the variability of NH3 locally within the Asian monsoon region's upper troposphere and at different years. Further, we will show comparisons between global distributions of NH3 from published model simulations and our observational dataset from MIPAS.

  18. Investigating the Efficiency of Biological Filters for Ammonia Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Motesaddi Zarandi, MR Massoudinejad, A Mazaheri Tehrani, H Pouri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds and Aims: Ammonia removal from air to prevent severe damage to the environment and living organisms is very important. Biofiltration is an efficient, easy, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly process for degradation of ammonia from waste air. The aim of this study is to investigate the efficiency of biological filtration using a compost and scallop bed for ammonia removal. Materials and Methods: According to the ammonia removal method a column with 14cm inner diameter and 45cm height made from transparent Plexiglas was used. The column was filled up to 25 cm with compost and scallop (with a scallop: compost ratio of 1:4. In this study, performance of the biofilter was studied under 10 different flow rates (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 lit/min and 5 different concentrations (0-20, 20-40, 40-60, 60-80 and 80-100 ppm at a temperature of 25 degrees Celsius. Results: The results of this study showed that efficiency is decreased when the flow rate or concentration is increased because the microbial population is reduced. The efficiency was reduced by 84.6-98.2 percent. Maximum efficiency occurred at a 0.19g/(m3.h loading rate. Efficiency was in 0-20 concentration intervals at a flow rate of 1 lit/min and at an Empty Bed Residence Time (EBRT of 240 seconds. Conclusion: The results show that a biofilter with a compost and scallop bed is efficient for ammonia removal from air. Results can be optimized in the design and operation of biological systems to be used in the industrial control of ammonia gas.

  19. Synthesis of hydrides by interaction of intermetallic compounds with ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasov, Boris P., E-mail: tarasov@icp.ac.ru [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Fokin, Valentin N.; Fokina, Evelina E. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Yartys, Volodymyr A., E-mail: volodymyr.yartys@ife.no [Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller NO 2027 (Norway); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim NO 7491 (Norway)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Interaction of the intermetallics A{sub 2}B, AB, AB{sub 2}, AB{sub 5} and A{sub 2}B{sub 17} with NH{sub 3} was studied. • The mechanism of interaction of the alloys with ammonia is temperature-dependent. • Hydrides, hydridonitrides, disproportionation products or metal–N–H compounds are formed. • NH{sub 4}Cl was used as an activator of the reaction between ammonia and intermetallics. • Interaction with ammonia results in the synthesis of the nanopowders. - Abstract: Interaction of intermetallic compounds with ammonia was studied as a processing route to synthesize hydrides and hydridonitrides of intermetallic compounds having various stoichiometries and types of crystal structures, including A{sub 2}B, AB, AB{sub 2}, AB{sub 5} and A{sub 2}B{sub 17} (A = Mg, Ti, Zr, Sc, Nd, Sm; B = transition metals, including Fe, Co, Ni, Ti and nontransition elements, Al and B). In presence of NH{sub 4}Cl used as an activator of the reaction between ammonia and intermetallic alloys, their interaction proceeds at rather mild P–T conditions, at temperatures 100–200 °C and at pressures of 0.6–0.8 MPa. The mechanism of interaction of the alloys with ammonia appears to be temperature-dependent and, following a rise of the interaction temperature, it leads to the formation of interstitial hydrides; interstitial hydridonitrides; disproportionation products (binary hydride; new intermetallic hydrides and binary nitrides) or new metal–nitrogen–hydrogen compounds like magnesium amide Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}. The interaction results in the synthesis of the nanopowders where hydrogen and nitrogen atoms become incorporated into the crystal lattices of the intermetallic alloys. The nitrogenated materials have the smallest particle size, down to 40 nm, and a specific surface area close to 20 m{sup 2}/g.

  20. Crystal Structure of an Ammonia-Permeable Aquaporin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirscht, Andreas; Kaptan, Shreyas S; Bienert, Gerd Patrick;

    2016-01-01

    the structure determined at 1.18 Å resolution from twinned crystals of Arabidopsis thaliana aquaporin AtTIP2;1 and confirm water and ammonia permeability of the purified protein reconstituted in proteoliposomes as further substantiated by molecular dynamics simulations. The structure of AtTIP2;1 reveals...... an extended selectivity filter with the conserved arginine of the filter adopting a unique unpredicted position. The relatively wide pore and the polar nature of the selectivity filter clarify the ammonia permeability. By mutational studies, we show that the identified determinants in the extended selectivity...

  1. Power cycles with ammonia-water mixtures as working fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorin, Eva

    2000-05-01

    It is of great interest to improve the efficiency of power generating processes, i.e. to convert more of the energy in the heat source to power. This is favorable from an environmental point of view and can also be an economic advantage. To use an ammonia-water mixture instead of water as working fluid is a possible way to improve the efficiency of steam turbine processes. This thesis includes studies of power cycles with ammonia-water mixtures as working fluid utilizing different kinds of heat sources for power and heat generation. The thermophysical properties of the mixture are also studied. They play an important role in the calculations of the process performance and for the design of its components, such as heat exchangers. The studies concern thermodynamic simulations of processes in applications suitable for Swedish conditions. Available correlations for the thermophysical properties are compared and their influence on simulations and heat exchanger area predictions is investigated. Measurements of ammonia-water mixture viscosities using a vibrating wire viscometer are also described. The studies performed show that power cycles with ammonia-water mixtures as the working fluid are well suited for utilization of waste heat from industry and from gas engines. The ammonia-water power cycles can give up to 32 % more power in the industrial waste heat application and up to 54 % more power in the gas engine bottoming cycle application compared to a conventional Rankine steam cycle. However, ammonia-water power cycles in small direct-fired biomass-fueled cogeneration plants do not show better performance than a conventional Rankine steam cycle. When different correlations for the thermodynamic properties are used in simulations of a simple ammonia-water power cycle the difference in efficiency is not larger than 4 %, corresponding to about 1.3 percentage points. The differences in saturation properties between the correlations are, however, considerable at high

  2. Photoacoustic spectroscopy for fast and sensitive ammonia detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhang; Zhiying Wu; Qingxu Yu

    2007-01-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) spectrometer with H-type first longitudinal resonant cells for ammonia detection is developed. A new PA cell structure is designed to accelerate the drift velocity of the sample gas near the cell surface, so that the short response time at the flow rate of 100 sccm (standard cubic centimeter per minute) is achieved. The response time of 5 min and detection limit of 0.86 ppbv is reached for ammonia concentration measurement with a Teflon polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) cell. Further improvement could be expected when using a brass cell with a high quality Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) coating.

  3. Lanthanum-Promoted Ru/Sepiolite in Ammonia Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Le Zhiping; Lin Jianxin; Yu Xiujin; Huang Yueyu; Wei Kemei

    2005-01-01

    A new kind of Ru supported on sepiolite catalyst with La as promoter for ammonia synthesis was prepared. The effects of reaction conditions on catalytic activity were discussed. The result shows that La is an effective promoter for sepiolite-supported Ru based catalyst. When the load of Ru is 5% (mass fraction), and the molar ratio of La/Ru is 1.5, under the condition of 10 MPa 450 ℃ 20000 h-1, the ammonia synthesis rate is 38.5 mmol NH3·g-1·h-1.

  4. Ammonia-oxidising archaea--physiology, ecology and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleper, Christa; Nicol, Graeme W

    2010-01-01

    Nitrification is a microbially mediated process that plays a central role in the global cycling of nitrogen and is also of economic importance in agriculture and wastewater treatment. The first step in nitrification is performed by ammonia-oxidising microorganisms, which convert ammonia into nitrite ions. Ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB) have been known for more than 100 years. However, metagenomic studies and subsequent cultivation efforts have recently demonstrated that microorganisms of the domain archaea are also capable of performing this process. Astonishingly, members of this group of ammonia-oxidising archaea (AOA), which was overlooked for so long, are present in almost every environment on Earth and typically outnumber the known bacterial ammonia oxidisers by orders of magnitudes in common environments such as the marine plankton, soils, sediments and estuaries. Molecular studies indicate that AOA are amongst the most abundant organisms on this planet, adapted to the most common environments, but are also present in those considered extreme, such as hot springs. The ecological distribution and community dynamics of these archaea are currently the subject of intensive study by many research groups who are attempting to understand the physiological diversity and the ecosystem function of these organisms. The cultivation of a single marine isolate and two enrichments from hot terrestrial environments has demonstrated a chemolithoautotrophic mode of growth. Both pure culture-based and environmental studies indicate that at least some AOA have a high substrate affinity for ammonia and are able to grow under extremely oligotrophic conditions. Information from the first available genomes of AOA indicate that their metabolism is fundamentally different from that of their bacterial counterparts, involving a highly copper-dependent system for ammonia oxidation and electron transport, as well as a novel carbon fixation pathway that has recently been discovered in

  5. Test and Analysis for Spraying Ammonia in Diesel Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周华祥; 刘敬平; 贺力克; 陈方; 申奇志; 骆锐; 周正

    2011-01-01

    A certain amount of ammonia reducer were directly injected into the 4102BZLQ Diesel engine' s combustion chamber when the combustion temperature decreases to 1 573 - 1 073 K, NOx generated could be reduced to 1.11 g/( kW· h). Based on PRF combustion mechanism, NO was tested by using the heavy-duty diesel engine test cycle of ESC thirteen conditions , the ammonia spray angle and amount were tested and optimized in different conditions. The test results show that the thermal efficiency of Diesel engine does not decrease while NO exhaust decreases.

  6. Efficiency of deodorant materials for ammonia reduction in indoor air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bivolarova, Mariya Petrova; Mizutani, Chiyomi; Melikov, Arsen Krikor;

    2014-01-01

    A comparative study about the removability of ammonia gas in the air by activated carbon fiber (ACF) felt chemically treated with acid and a cotton fabric processed with iron phthalocyanine with copper (Cu) was performed in small-scale experiments. The test rig consisted of a heated plate and its...... proved activated carbon fiber felt with acid to be highly efficient in removing ammonia gas. Air temperature did not have profound effect on ACF performance. However, efficiency of the carbon fiber felt decreased when relative humidity was raised from 20 to 80%....

  7. MEASUREMENT OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM MECHANICALLY VENTILATED POULTRY HOUSES USING MULTIPATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia emissions from mechanically ventilated poultry operations are an important environmental concern. Open Path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy has emerged as a robust real-time method for gas phase measurement of ammonia concentrations in agricultural settings. ...

  8. A review of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in Chinese soils

    OpenAIRE

    Ji-Zheng eHe; Ju-Pei eShen; Li-Mei eZhang; Hong J eDi

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) oxidation, the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, is a key step in the global Nitrogen (N) cycle. Major advances have been made in recent years in our knowledge and understanding of the microbial communities involved in ammonia oxidation in a wide range of habitats, including Chinese agricultural soils. In this mini-review, we focus our attention on the distribution and community diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) in Chi...

  9. Mechanisms of the Effects of Acidosis and Hypokalemia on Renal Ammonia Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Ki-Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism is the predominant component of net acid excretion and new bicarbonate generation. Renal ammonia metabolism is regulated by acid-base balance. Both acute and chronic acid loads enhance ammonia production in the proximal tubule and secretion into the urine. In contrast, alkalosis reduces ammoniagenesis. Hypokalemia is a common electrolyte disorder that significantly increases renal ammonia production and excretion, despite causing metabolic alkalosis. Although the net ...

  10. Dynamic Model of an Ammonia Synthesis Reactor Based on Open Information

    OpenAIRE

    Jinasena, Asanthi; Lie, Bernt; Glemmestad, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia is a widely used chemical, hence the ammonia manufacturing process has become a standard case study in the scientific community. In the field of mathematical modeling of the dynamics of ammonia synthesis reactors, there is a lack of complete and well documented models. Therefore, the main aim of this work is to develop a complete and well documented mathematical model for observing the dynamic behavior of an industrial ammonia synthesis reactor system. The mode...

  11. Hydrogeological and geophysical study for deeper groundwater resource in quartzitic hard rock ridge region from 2D resistivity data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dewashish Kumar; V Ananda Rao; V S Sarma

    2014-04-01

    Electrical resistivity method is a versatile and economical technique for groundwater prospecting in different geological settings due to wide spectrum of resistivity compared to other geophysical parameters. Exploration and exploitation of groundwater, a vital and precious resource, is a challenging task in hard rock, which exhibits inherent heterogeneity. In the present study, two-dimensional Electrical Resistivity Tomography (2D-ERT) technique using two different arrays, viz., pole–dipole and pole–pole, were deployed to look into high signal strength data in a tectonically disturbed hard rock ridge region for groundwater. Four selected sites were investigated. 2D subsurface resistivity tomography data were collected using Syscal Pro Switch-10 channel system and covered a 2 km long profile in a tough terrain. The hydrogeological interpretation based on resistivity models reveal the water horizons trap within the clayey sand and weathered/fractured quartzite formations. Aquifer resistivity lies between ∼3–35 and 100–200 m. The results of the resistivity models decipher potential aquifer lying between 40 and 88 m depth, nevertheless, it corroborates with the static water level measurements in the area of study. The advantage of using pole–pole in conjunction with the pole–dipole array is well appreciated and proved worth which gives clear insight of the aquifer extent, variability and their dimension from shallow to deeper strata from the hydrogeological perspective in the present geological context.

  12. Warmer, deeper, and greener mixed layers in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre over the last 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Elodie; Raitsos, Dionysios E; Antoine, David

    2016-02-01

    Shifts in global climate resonate in plankton dynamics, biogeochemical cycles, and marine food webs. We studied these linkages in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre (NASG), which hosts extensive phytoplankton blooms. We show that phytoplankton abundance increased since the 1960s in parallel to a deepening of the mixed layer and a strengthening of winds and heat losses from the ocean, as driven by the low frequency of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). In parallel to these bottom-up processes, the top-down control of phytoplankton by copepods decreased over the same time period in the western NASG, following sea surface temperature changes typical of the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO). While previous studies have hypothesized that climate-driven warming would facilitate seasonal stratification of surface waters and long-term phytoplankton increase in subpolar regions, here we show that deeper mixed layers in the NASG can be warmer and host a higher phytoplankton biomass. These results emphasize that different modes of climate variability regulate bottom-up (NAO control) and top-down (AMO control) forcing on phytoplankton at decadal timescales. As a consequence, different relationships between phytoplankton, zooplankton, and their physical environment appear subject to the disparate temporal scale of the observations (seasonal, interannual, or decadal). The prediction of phytoplankton response to climate change should be built upon what is learnt from observations at the longest timescales.

  13. A Deeper Statistical Examination of Arrival Dates of Migratory Breeding Birds in Relation to Global Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Herbert Wilson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Using an 18-year dataset of arrival dates of 65 species of Maine migratory breeding birds, I take a deeper view of the data to ask questions about the shapes of the distribution. For each year, most species show a consistent right-skewed pattern of distribution, suggesting that selection is stronger against individuals that arrive too early compared to those that arrive later. Distributions are consistently leptokurtic, indicating a narrow window of optimal arrival dates. Species that arrive earlier in the spring show higher skewness and kurtosis values. Nectarivorous species showed more pronounced skewness. Wintering area did not explain patterns of skewness or kurtosis. Deviations from average temperatures and the North Atlantic Oscillation index explained little variation in skewness and kurtosis. When arrival date distributions are broken down into different medians (e.g., 5% median and 75% median, stronger correlations emerge for portions of the distribution that are adjacent, suggesting species fine-tune the progress of their migration. Interspecific correlations for birds arriving around the same time are stronger for earliest migrants (the 25% median compared to the true median and the 75% median.

  14. Lengthening of the Stargazin Cytoplasmic Tail Increases Synaptic Transmission by Promoting Interaction to Deeper Domains of PSD-95.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Anne-Sophie; Penn, Andrew C; Grillo-Bosch, Dolors; Retailleau, Natacha; Poujol, Christel; Philippat, Amandine; Coussen, Françoise; Sainlos, Matthieu; Opazo, Patricio; Choquet, Daniel

    2015-04-22

    PSD-95 is a prominent organizer of the postsynaptic density (PSD) that can present a filamentous orientation perpendicular to the plasma membrane. Interactions between PSD-95 and transmembrane proteins might be particularly sensitive to this orientation, as "long" cytoplasmic tails might be required to reach deeper PSD-95 domains. Extension/retraction of transmembrane protein C-tails offer a new way of regulating binding to PSD-95. Using stargazin as a model, we found that enhancing the apparent length of stargazin C-tail through phosphorylation or by an artificial linker was sufficient to potentiate binding to PSD-95, AMPAR anchoring, and synaptic transmission. A linear extension of stargazin C-tail facilitates binding to PSD-95 by preferentially engaging interaction with the farthest located PDZ domains regarding to the plasma membrane, which present a greater affinity for the stargazin PDZ-domain-binding motif. Our study reveals that the concerted orientation of the stargazin C-tail and PSD-95 is a major determinant of synaptic strength. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Gimme shelter: The importance of crevices to some fish species inhabiting a deeper-water rocky outcrop in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, M.S.; Schroeder, D.M.; Lenarz, B.; Cochrane, G.R.

    2006-01-01

    Federal law governing fisheries management recognizes the role habitat plays in structuring fish assemblages and achieving sustainable fisheries. However, in most instances it is not known which aspects of habitat are important to the lives of fish species. In 2004, we examined the importance of sheltering sites (crevices) to fishes living along low ledges in deeper waters off Anacapa Island, southern California. We found that patterns of fish-habitat relationships varied among the eight most abundant species. Three species, bocaccio (Sebastes paucispinis), vermilion (S. miniatus), and flag (S. rubrivinctus) rockfishes, had densities one to three orders of magnitude greater in the deep crevice habitat compared to low relief rock or shallow crevice habitats. Density and mean size of the two most abundant fishes, halfbanded (S. semicinctus) and squarespot (S. hopkinsi) rockfishes, generally increased as complexity of rock habitat increased. Not all species had the highest densities in deep crevice habitat. Greenspotted rockfish (S. chlorostictus) and blackeye goby (Rhinogobiops nicholsii) showed no significant difference in density among rock habitats. Pink seaperch (Zalembius rosaceus) were absent in the deep crevice habitat and abundant only in low relief rock habitats. Our study implies that it is not sufficient to distinguish only between soft and hard bottom types when using habitat to guide fisheries management strategies. Finer-scale investigations of fish-habitat relationships, paired with habitat mapping and groundtruthing, aid in the design and positioning of Marine Park Areas (MPAs) and are necessary to facilitate understanding of how a particular MPA may contribute to fisheries management.

  16. Effect of aerial ammonia on porcine infection of the respiratory tract with toxigenic Pasteurella multocida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Morten; Bækbo, P.; Nielsen, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the experimental study was to examine whether aerial ammonia alone could predispose the respiratory system of pigs to infection with toxigenic Pasteurella multocida type A. Two groups of 5 pigs each were continuously exposed to 50 ppm ammonia and less than 5 ppm ammonia, respecti...

  17. Effect of ammonia in cigarette tobacco on nicotine absorption in human smokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amsterdam, van J.; Sleijffers, A.; Spiegel, van P.; Blom, R.; Witte, M.; Kassteele, van de J.; Blokland, M.H.; Steerenberg, P.; Opperhuizen, A.

    2011-01-01

    The function of ammonia as tobacco additive is subject of scientific debate. It is argued that ammonia, by increasing the proportion of free nicotine, increases the absorption of nicotine in smokers. As a result of the addition of ammonia to cigarettes, smokers get exposed to higher internal

  18. Effect of ammonia on the anaerobic hydrolysis of cellulose and tributyrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasconcelos Fernandes, T.; Keesman, K.J.; Zeeman, G.; Lier, van J.B.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia nitrogen is one of the most common inhibitors in the anaerobic digestion of complex wastes containing high concentrations of ammonia like animal manures, blackwater and waste oil from gastronomy. The inhibiting effect of ammonia on methanogenesis has been well established. In contrast, the

  19. Gut does not contribute to systemic ammonia release in humans without portosystemic shunting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poll, Marcel C. G.; Ligthart-Melis, Gerdien C.; Damink, Steven W. M. Olde; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; Beets-Tan, Regina G. H.; Deutz, Nicolaas E. P.; Wigmore, Stephen J.; Soeters, Peter B.; Dejong, Cornelis H. C.

    2008-01-01

    The gut is classically seen as the main source of circulating ammonia. However, the contribution of the intestines to systemic ammonia production may be limited by hepatic extraction of portal-derived ammonia. Recent data suggest that the kidney may be more important than the gut for systemic ammoni

  20. Substrate and nutrient limitation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in temperate forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.S. Norman; J.E. Barrett

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing microbes control the rate-limiting step of nitrification, a critical ecosystem process, which affects retention and mobility of nitrogen in soil ecosystems. This study investigated substrate (NH4þ) and nutrient (K and P) limitation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in temperate forest soils at Coweeta Hydrologic...

  1. Proximal tubule-specific glutamine synthetase deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Lamers, Wouter H; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2016-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the recycling of NH4 (+) with glutamate to form glutamine. GS is highly expressed in the renal proximal tubule (PT), suggesting ammonia recycling via GS could decrease net ammoniagenesis and thereby limit ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of PT GS in ammonia metabolism under basal conditions and during metabolic acidosis. We generated mice with PT-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Under basal conditions, PT-GS-KO increased urinary ammonia excretion significantly. Increased ammonia excretion occurred despite decreased expression of key proteins involved in renal ammonia generation. After the induction of metabolic acidosis, the ability to increase ammonia excretion was impaired significantly by PT-GS-KO. The blunted increase in ammonia excretion occurred despite greater expression of multiple components of ammonia generation, including SN1 (Slc38a3), phosphate-dependent glutaminase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and Na(+)-coupled electrogenic bicarbonate cotransporter. We conclude that 1) GS-mediated ammonia recycling in the PT contributes to both basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism and 2) adaptive changes in other proteins involved in ammonia metabolism occur in response to PT-GS-KO and cause an underestimation of the role of PT GS expression.

  2. Identifying Potential Mechanisms Enabling Acidophily in the Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon “

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehtovirta-Morley, L.E.; Sayavedra-Soto, L.A.; Gallois, N.; Schouten, S.; Stein, L.Y.; Prosser, J.I.; Nicol, G.W.

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step in nitrification and is dominated by two distinct groups of microorganismsin soil: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). AOA are often more abundant than AOBand dominate activity in acid soils. The mechanism of amm

  3. Interorgan ammonia and amino acid metabolism in metabolically stable patients with cirrhosis and a TIPSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olde Damink, Steven W M; Jalan, Rajiv; Redhead, Doris N; Hayes, Peter C; Deutz, Nicolaas E P; Soeters, Peter B

    2002-11-01

    Ammonia is central to the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. This study was designed to determine the quantitative dynamics of ammonia metabolism in patients with cirrhosis and previous treatment with a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPSS). We studied 24 patients with cirrhosis who underwent TIPSS portography. Blood was sampled and blood flows were measured across portal drained viscera, leg, kidney, and liver, and arteriovenous differences across the spleen and the inferior and superior mesenteric veins. The highest amount of ammonia was produced by the portal drained viscera. The kidneys also produced ammonia in amounts that equaled total hepatosplanchnic area production. Skeletal muscle removed more ammonia than the cirrhotic liver. The amount of nitrogen that was taken up by muscle in the form of ammonia was less than the glutamine that was released. The portal drained viscera consumed glutamine and produced ammonia, alanine, and citrulline. Urea was released in the splenic and superior mesenteric vein, contributing to whole-body ureagenesis in these cirrhotic patients. In conclusion, hyperammonemia in metabolically stable, overnight-fasted patients with cirrhosis of the liver and a TIPSS results from portosystemic shunting and renal ammonia production. Skeletal muscle removes more ammonia from the circulation than the cirrhotic liver. Muscle releases excessive amounts of the nontoxic nitrogen carrier glutamine, which can lead to ammonia production in the portal drained viscera (PDV) and kidneys. Urinary ammonia excretion and urea synthesis appear to be the only way to remove ammonia from the body.

  4. Effect of ammonia on the anaerobic hydrolysis of cellulose and tributyrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasconcelos Fernandes, T.; Keesman, K.J.; Zeeman, G.; Lier, van J.B.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia nitrogen is one of the most common inhibitors in the anaerobic digestion of complex wastes containing high concentrations of ammonia like animal manures, blackwater and waste oil from gastronomy. The inhibiting effect of ammonia on methanogenesis has been well established. In contrast, the k

  5. Ammonia emission from excreta of growing-finishing pigs as affected by dietary composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canh, T.T.

    1998-01-01

    Ammonia, volatilised from pig slurry decreases manure's fertiliser value. Furthermore, the deposition of ammonia emitted into the atmosphere may cause undesirable changes in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. At present, there is increasing interest in nutritional means to reduce ammonia

  6. 78 FR 52192 - Final Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality Criteria For Ammonia-Freshwater 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ... AGENCY Final Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality Criteria For Ammonia-- Freshwater 2013 AGENCY... from effects of ammonia in freshwater (EPA 822-R-13-001). The final criteria incorporate the latest scientific knowledge on the toxicity of ammonia to freshwater aquatic life. On December 30, 2009,...

  7. Saccharification of newspaper waste after ammonia fiber expansion or extractive ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montella, Salvatore; Balan, Venkatesh; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Gunawan, Christa; Giacobbe, Simona; Pepe, Olimpia; Faraco, Vincenza

    2016-03-01

    The lignocellulosic fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW) can be used as renewable resources due to the widespread availability, predictable and low pricing and suitability for most conversion technologies. In particular, after the typical paper recycling loop, the newspaper waste (NW) could be further valorized as feedstock in biorefinering industry since it still contains up to 70 % polysaccharides. In this study, two different physicochemical methods-ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) and extractive ammonia (EA) were tested for the pretraetment of NW. Furthermore, based on the previously demonstrated ability of the recombinant enzymes endocellulase rCelStrep, α-L-arabinofuranosidase rPoAbf and its evolved variant rPoAbf F435Y/Y446F to improve the saccharification of different lignocellulosic pretreated biomasses (such as corn stover and Arundo donax), in this study these enzymes were tested for the hydrolysis of pretreated NW, with the aim of valorizing the lignocellulosic fractions of the MSW. In particular, a mixture of purified enzymes containing cellulases, xylanases and accessory hemicellulases, was chosen as reference mix and rCelStrep and rPoAbf or its variant were replaced to EGI and Larb. The results showed that these enzymatic mixes are not suitable for the hydrolysis of NW after AFEX or EA pretreatment. On the other hand, when the enzymes rCelStrep, rPoAbf and rPoAbf F435Y/Y446F were tested for their effect in hydrolysis of pretreated NW by addition to a commercial enzyme mixture, it was shown that the total polysaccharides conversion yield reached 37.32 % for AFEX pretreated NW by adding rPoAbf to the mix whilst the maximum sugars conversion yield for EA pretreated NW was achieved 40.80 % by adding rCelStrep. The maximum glucan conversion yield obtained (45.61 % for EA pretreated NW by adding rCelStrep to the commercial mix) is higher than or comparable to those reported in recent manuscripts adopting hydrolysis conditions similar to those used

  8. Low-liquid pretreatment of corn stover with aqueous ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2011-04-01

    A low-liquid pretreatment method of corn stover using aqueous ammonia was studied to reduce the severity and liquid throughput associated with the pretreatment step for ethanol production. Corn stover was treated at 0.5-50.0 wt.% of ammonia loading, 1:0.2-5.0 (w/w) of solid-to-liquid ratio, 30 °C for 4-12 weeks. The effects of these conditions on the composition and enzyme digestibility of pretreated corn stover were investigated. Pretreatment of corn stover at 30°C for four weeks using 50 wt.% of ammonia loading and 1:5 solid-to-liquid ratio resulted in 55% delignification and 86.5% glucan digestibility with 15 FPU cellulase+30 CBU β-glucosidase/g-glucan. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of corn stover treated at 30 °C for four weeks using 50 wt.% ammonia loading and 1:2 solid-to-liquid ratio gave an ethanol yield of 73% of the theoretical maximum based on total carbohydrates (glucan+xylan) present in the untreated material.

  9. Transition metal catalysed ammonia-borane dehydrogenation in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, William R H; Berkeley, Emily R; Alden, L R; Baker, R Tom; Sneddon, Larry G

    2011-03-21

    Significant advantages result from combining the disparate hydrogen release pathways for ammonia-borane (AB) dehydrogenation using ionic liquids (ILs) and transition metal catalysts. With the RuCl(2)(PMe(3))(4) catalyst precursor, AB dehydrogenation selectivity and extent are maximized in an IL with a moderately coordinating ethylsulfate anion.

  10. Ammonia emissions from cattle urine and dung excreted on pasture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laubach, J; Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo; Gibbs, S J;

    2013-01-01

    Twelve cattle were kept for three days in a circular area of 16 m radius on short pasture and fed with freshly-cut pasture. Ammonia (NH3) emissions from the urine and dung excreted by the cattle were measured with a micrometeorological mass-balance method, during the cattle presence and for 10 su...

  11. Formaldoxime hydrogen bonded complexes with ammonia and hydrogen chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golec, Barbara; Mucha, Małgorzata; Sałdyka, Magdalena; Barnes, Austin; Mielke, Zofia

    2015-02-01

    An infrared spectroscopic and MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) study of hydrogen bonded complexes of formaldoxime with ammonia and hydrogen chloride trapped in solid argon matrices is reported. Both 1:1 and 1:2 complexes between formaldoxime and ammonia, hydrogen chloride have been identified in the CH2NOH/NH3/Ar, CH2NOH/HCl/Ar matrices, respectively, their structures were determined by comparison of the spectra with the results of calculations. In the 1:1 complexes present in the argon matrices the OH group of formaldoxime acts as a proton donor for ammonia and the nitrogen atom acts as a proton acceptor for hydrogen chloride. In the 1:2 complexes ammonia or hydrogen chloride dimers interact both with the OH group and the nitrogen atom of CH2NOH to form seven membered cyclic structures stabilized by three hydrogen bonds. The theoretical spectra generally agree well with the experimental ones, but they seriously underestimate the shift of the OH stretch for the 1:1 CH2NOH⋯NH3 complex.

  12. Quantum simulations of the hydrogen molecule on ammonia clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mella, Massimo; Curotto, E.

    2013-09-01

    Mixed ammonia-hydrogen molecule clusters [H2-(NH3)n] have been studied with the aim of exploring the quantitative importance of the H2 quantum motion in defining their structure and energetics. Minimum energy structures have been obtained employing genetic algorithm-based optimization methods in conjunction with accurate pair potentials for NH3-NH3 and H2-NH3. These include both a full 5D potential and a spherically averaged reduced surface mimicking the presence of a para-H2. All the putative global minima for n ⩾ 7 are characterized by H2 being adsorbed onto a rhomboidal ammonia tetramer motif formed by two double donor and two double acceptor ammonia molecules. In a few cases, the choice of specific rhombus seems to be directed by the vicinity of an ammonia ad-molecule. Diffusion Monte Carlo simulations on a subset of the species obtained highlighted important quantum effects in defining the H2 surface distribution, often resulting in populating rhomboidal sites different from the global minimum one, and showing a compelling correlation between local geometrical features and the relative stability of surface H2. Clathrate-like species have also been studied and suggested to be metastable over a broad range of conditions if formed.

  13. concentrate ratio and rumen ammonia concentration on in situ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and the amount of starch that can be added without impairing fibre digestion. ... are, in turn, influenced by factors such as rumen pH, ammonia concentration, type ...... of glucose cn arnmonia accumulation in the rumen of sheep. Anst. J. Agric.

  14. A comparative kinetic study of SNCR process using ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javed, M. Tayyeb; Ahmed, Z.; Ibrahim, M. Asim; Irfan, N.

    2008-07-01

    The paper presents comparative kinetic modelling of nitrogen oxides (NOx) removal from flue gases by selective non-catalytic reduction process using ammonia as reducing agent. The computer code SENKIN is used in this study with the three published chemical kinetic mechanisms; Zanoelo, Kilpinen and Skreiberg. Kinetic modeling was performed for an isothermal plug flow reactor at atmospheric pressure so as to compare it with the experimental results. A 500 ppm NOx background in the flue gas is considered and kept constant throughout the investigation. The ammonia performance was modeled in the range of 750 to 1250{sup o}C using the molar ratios NH{sub 3}/NOx from 0.25 to 3.0 and residence times up to 1.5 seconds. The modeling using all the mechanisms exhibits and confirms a temperature window of NOx reduction with ammonia. It was observed that 80% of NOx reduction efficiency could be achieved if the flue gas is given 300 msec to react with ammonia, while it is passing through a section within a temperature range of 910 to 1060{sup o}C (Kilpinen mechanism) or within a temperature range of 925 to 1030{sup o}C (Zanoelo mechanism) or within a temperature range of 890 to 1090{sup o}C (Skreiberg mechanism). 20 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Ammonia removal from leachate solution using natural Chinese clinoptilolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuqiu; Liu, Shijun; Xu, Ze; Han, Tianwei; Chuan, Sun; Zhu, Tan

    2006-08-25

    This paper assesses the potential of natural Chinese clinoptilolite for ammonia removal from the leachate solution of sewage sludge. In batch study the effects of relevant parameters, such as contact time, initial ammonia concentration and particle size of clinoptilolite, were examined respectively. The results show that the data obtained from batch studies were fit to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and the Langmuir isotherms reflect more reasonable for ammonium ion uptake onto clinoptilolite; the clinoptilolite adsorption process has been proved effective, at laboratory scale, the maximum adsorption capacity of the clinoptilolite, for ammonium concentration ranging from 11.12 to 115.16 mg NH(4)-N L(-1) in leachate solution, was about 1.74 mg NH(4)-Ng(-1); the time to adsorption equilibrium was 2.5 h in leachate solution and 1.5 h more than for in NH(4)Cl synthetic solution; ammonium adsorption increased with decreasing clinoptilolite particle size; the ammonia removal capacity of clinoptilolite increased with increasing initial ammonia concentration. It is believed that as adsorption agent for NH(4)-N removal from sludge leachate, natural Chinese clinoptilolite can be feasible.

  16. Diversity, physiology, and niche differentiation of ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzenpichler, Roland

    2012-11-01

    Nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, has been suggested to have been a central part of the global biogeochemical nitrogen cycle since the oxygenation of Earth. The cultivation of several ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) as well as the discovery that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amo)-like gene sequences are nearly ubiquitously distributed in the environment and outnumber their bacterial counterparts in many habitats fundamentally revised our understanding of nitrification. Surprising insights into the physiological distinctiveness of AOA are mirrored by the recognition of the phylogenetic uniqueness of these microbes, which fall within a novel archaeal phylum now known as Thaumarchaeota. The relative importance of AOA in nitrification, compared to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), is still under debate. This minireview provides a synopsis of our current knowledge of the diversity and physiology of AOA, the factors controlling their ecology, and their role in carbon cycling as well as their potential involvement in the production of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide. It emphasizes the importance of activity-based analyses in AOA studies and formulates priorities for future research.

  17. Ammonia chemistry in oxy-fuel combustion of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendiara, Teresa; Glarborg, Peter

    2009-01-01

    concentrations and alteration in the amount and partitioning of O/H radicals, rather than direct reactions between N-radicals and CO2, are responsible for the effect of a high CO2 concentration on ammonia conversion. When CO2 is present as a bulk gas, formation of NO is facilitated by the increased OH/H ratio...

  18. Nitrate to ammonia ceramic (NAC) bench scale stabilization study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caime, W.J.; Hoeffner, S.L. [RUST - Clemson Technical Center, Anderson, SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) sites such as the Hanford site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have large quantities of sodium-nitrate based liquid wastes. A process to reduce the nitrates to ammonia has been developed at ORNL. This technology creates a sludge lower in nitrates. This report describes stabilization possibilities of the sludge.

  19. REGENERATION OF AMMONIA SOLUTION FOR CO2 CAPTURE IN POSTCOMBUSTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAROL TORO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated enthalpy of solutions and solubility for a NH3/CO2 system. Measurements were performed in a thermoregulated Lewis-type cell reactor, temperatures ranging from 278 to 303 K and mass concentrations from 2 wt% to 5 wt%. Enthalpies of solution of CO2 and solubility have been obtained as function of loading, α (moles CO2/mol NH3. Results show that ammonia solutions concentrations of 3 and 5 wt% promote the formation of ammonium bicarbonate. Beside, ammonia concentration of 2 wt% promotes the formation of ammonium carbonate. Therefore, to use ammonia concentrations of 3 and 5 wt% need less energy that a concentration of 2 wt% to reverse the reaction. Regeneration system was simulated using Aspen plus™ software for a pulverised coal fired power plant (CF in a post-combustion process. Model analysis established that NH3 heat duty is lower than MEA and MDEA ones. The energy consumption reaches 2.83 GJ•t-1 CO2. Regarding heat duty and ammonia losses, 3 wt% NH3 is the suitable concentration to capture CO2.

  20. Assessing the reliability of calculated catalytic ammonia synthesis rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medford, Andrew James; Wellendorff, Jess; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a general method for estimating the uncertainty in calculated materials properties based on density functional theory calculations. We illustrate the approach for a calculation of the catalytic rate of ammonia synthesis over a range of transition-metal catalysts. The correlation...

  1. Tritylamine as an Ammonia Surrogate in the Ugi Tetrazole Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Ting; Boltjes, Andre; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Doemling, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The role of tritylamine is introduced as a convenient ammonia substitute in the Ugi tetrazole synthesis. Fifteen examples and their mild cleavage products are described In satisfactory to good yields. N-Unsubstituted alpha-aminotetrazoles are important compounds with annotated biological activities,

  2. Catalytic synthesis of ammonia using vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Billing, Gert D.

    1992-01-01

    The dissociation of nitrogen is the rate-limiting step in the catalytic synthesis of ammonia. Theoretical calculations have shown that the dissociative sticking probability of molecular nitrogen on catalytic active metal surfaces is enhanced by orders of magnitude when the molecules...

  3. Insights into the ammonia synthesis from first-principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmann, A.; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina; Remediakis, Ioannis

    2006-01-01

    A new set of measurements is used to further test a recently published first-principles model for the ammonia (NH3) synthesis on an unpromoted Ru-based catalyst. A direct comparison shows an overall good agreement in NH3 productivity between the model and the experiment. In addition, macro...

  4. Priming ammonia lyases and aminomutases for industrial and therapeutic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heberling, Matthew M.; Wu, Bian; Bartsch, Sebastian; Janssen, Dick B.

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia lyases (AL) and aminomutases (AM) are emerging in green synthetic routes to chiral amines and an AL is being explored as an enzyme therapeutic for treating phenylketonuria and cancer. Although the restricted substrate range of the wild-type enzymes limits their widespread application, the no

  5. 46 CFR 151.50-32 - Ammonia, anhydrous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... copper bearing alloys shall not be used as materials of construction for tanks, pipelines, valves... have close at hand at all times a canister mask approved for ammonia or each person shall carry on his... provide respiratory protection for emergency escape from a contaminated area resulting from cargo...

  6. Shannon Entropy of Ammonia Volatilization from Fertilized Agricultural Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The economic loss of ammonia (NH3) volatilization from chemical N fertilizers applied to farmlands worldwide is 11.6 billion US dollars per year. The economic impact of negative environmental effects resulted from NH3 volatilization, i.e., formation of potent greenhouse gas (N2O) and PM2.5, is diffi...

  7. Predicting catalysis: understanding ammonia synthesis from first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, A; Baerends, E J; Biczysko, M; Bligaard, T; Christensen, C H; Clary, D C; Dahl, S; van Harrevelt, R; Honkala, K; Jonsson, H; Kroes, G J; Luppi, M; Manthe, U; Nørskov, J K; Olsen, R A; Rossmeisl, J; Skúlason, E; Tautermann, C S; Varandas, A J C; Vincent, J K

    2006-09-14

    Here, we give a full account of a large collaborative effort toward an atomic-scale understanding of modern industrial ammonia production over ruthenium catalysts. We show that overall rates of ammonia production can be determined by applying various levels of theory (including transition state theory with or without tunneling corrections, and quantum dynamics) to a range of relevant elementary reaction steps, such as N(2) dissociation, H(2) dissociation, and hydrogenation of the intermediate reactants. A complete kinetic model based on the most relevant elementary steps can be established for any given point along an industrial reactor, and the kinetic results can be integrated over the catalyst bed to determine the industrial reactor yield. We find that, given the present uncertainties, the rate of ammonia production is well-determined directly from our atomic-scale calculations. Furthermore, our studies provide new insight into several related fields, for instance, gas-phase and electrochemical ammonia synthesis. The success of predicting the outcome of a catalytic reaction from first-principles calculations supports our point of view that, in the future, theory will be a fully integrated tool in the search for the next generation of catalysts.

  8. A hydrophobic ammonia-oxidizing archaeon of the

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, M.Y.; Kim, J.G.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Madsen, E.L.; Kim, S.J.; Hong, H.; Si, O.-J.; Kerou, M.; Schleper, C.; Rhee, S.K.

    2016-01-01

    A wide diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA)within the phylum Thaumarchaeota exists and playsa key role in the N cycle in a variety of habitats. In thisstudy, we isolated and characterized an ammoniaoxidizingarchaeon, strain MY3, from a coal tarcontaminatedsediment. Phylogenetically, strain

  9. Equations of State and Phase Diagrams of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    We present equations of state relating the phases and a three-dimensional phase diagram for ammonia with its solid, liquid, and vapor phases, based on fitted authentic experimental data and including recent information on the high-pressure solid phases. This presentation follows similar articles on carbon dioxide and water published in this…

  10. Litter ammonia losses amplified by higher air flow rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT Broiler litter utilization has largely been associated with land application as fertilizer. Reducing ammonia (NH3) released from litter enhances its fertilizer value and negates detrimental impacts to the environment. A laboratory study was conducted to quantify the effect of air flow var...

  11. Engineering Tests of Experimental Ammonia Process Printer-Developer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1950-07-06

    up for an experimental am:tmoa process printer- developer to meet the military characteristics. Thlis machine was Krocurod under development contract ...over the top of the can. A small light on the front panel of the mucl -ine indicates when the level of the ammonia in the storage tank is such that

  12. Inhibition of bacterial ammonia oxidation by organohydrazines in soil microcosms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucheng eWu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxylamine oxidation by hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO is a key step for energy-yielding in support of the growth of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB. Organohydrazines have been shown to inactivate HAO from Nitrosomonas europaea, and may serve as selective inhibitors to differentiate bacterial from archaeal ammonia oxidation due to the absence of bacterial HAO gene homologue in known ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA. In this study, the effects of three organohydrazines on activity, abundance and composition of AOB and AOA were evaluated in soil microcosms. The results indicate that phenylhydrazine and methylhydrazine at the concentration of 100 mol per gram dry weight soil completely suppressed the activity of soil nitrification. DGGE fingerprinting and sequencing analysis of bacterial ammonia monooxygenase subunit A gene (amoA clearly demonstrated that nitrification activity change is well paralleled with the growth of Nitrosomonas europaea-like AOB in soil microcosms. No significant correlation between AOA community structure and nitrification activity was observed among all treatments during the incubation period, although incomplete inhibition of nitrification activity occurred in 2-hydroxyethylhydrazine-amended soil microcosms. These findings show that the HAO-targeted organohydrazines can effectively inhibit bacterial nitrification in soil, and the mechanism of organohydrazine affecting AOA remains unclear.

  13. Quantum simulations of the hydrogen molecule on ammonia clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mella, Massimo; Curotto, E

    2013-09-28

    Mixed ammonia-hydrogen molecule clusters [H2-(NH3)n] have been studied with the aim of exploring the quantitative importance of the H2 quantum motion in defining their structure and energetics. Minimum energy structures have been obtained employing genetic algorithm-based optimization methods in conjunction with accurate pair potentials for NH3-NH3 and H2-NH3. These include both a full 5D potential and a spherically averaged reduced surface mimicking the presence of a para-H2. All the putative global minima for n ≥ 7 are characterized by H2 being adsorbed onto a rhomboidal ammonia tetramer motif formed by two double donor and two double acceptor ammonia molecules. In a few cases, the choice of specific rhombus seems to be directed by the vicinity of an ammonia ad-molecule. Diffusion Monte Carlo simulations on a subset of the species obtained highlighted important quantum effects in defining the H2 surface distribution, often resulting in populating rhomboidal sites different from the global minimum one, and showing a compelling correlation between local geometrical features and the relative stability of surface H2. Clathrate-like species have also been studied and suggested to be metastable over a broad range of conditions if formed.

  14. Macroecological patterns of archaeal ammonia oxidizers in the Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sintes, E.; Ouillon, N.; Herndl, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Macroecological patterns are found in animals and plants, but also in micro-organisms.Macroecological and biogeographic distribution patterns in marine Archaea, however,have not been studied yet. Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) show a bipolar distribution(i.e. similar communities in the northernmost

  15. Redesign of a Phenylalanine Aminomutase into a Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartsch, S.; Wybenga, G.G.; Jansen, M.; Heberling, M.M.; Wu, B.; Dijkstra, B.W.; Janssen, D.B.

    2013-01-01

    An aminomutase, naturally catalyzing the interconversion of (S)--phenylalanine and (R)--phenylalanine, was converted into an ammonia lyase catalyzing the nonoxidative deamination of phenylalanine to cinnamic acid by a rational single-point mutation. It could be shown by crystal structures and kineti

  16. Assimilating Remote Ammonia Observations with a Refined Aerosol Thermodynamics Adjoint"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia emissions parameters in North America can be refined in order to improve the evaluation of modeled concentrations against observations. Here, we seek to do so by developing and applying the GEOS-Chem adjoint nested over North America to conductassimilation of observations...

  17. Effects of ammonia from livestock farming on lichen photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paoli, Luca [Department of Environmental Science ' G. Sarfatti' , University of Siena, via Mattioli 4, I-53100 Siena (Italy); Department of Biology, University of Crete, 71409 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Pirintsos, Stergios Arg.; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos [Department of Biology, University of Crete, 71409 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Pisani, Tommaso [Department of Environmental Science ' G. Sarfatti' , University of Siena, via Mattioli 4, I-53100 Siena (Italy); Navakoudis, Eleni [Department of Biology, University of Crete, 71409 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Loppi, Stefano, E-mail: loppi@unisi.i [Department of Environmental Science ' G. Sarfatti' , University of Siena, via Mattioli 4, I-53100 Siena (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    This study investigated if atmospheric ammonia (NH{sub 3}) pollution around a sheep farm influences the photosynthetic performance of the lichens Evernia prunastri and Pseudevernia furfuracea. Thalli of both species were transplanted for up to 30 days in a semi-arid region (Crete, Greece), at sites with concentrations of atmospheric ammonia of ca. 60 mug/m{sup 3} (at a sheep farm), ca. 15 mug/m{sup 3} (60 m from the sheep farm) and ca. 2 mug/m{sup 3} (a remote area 5 km away). Lichen photosynthesis was analysed by the chlorophyll a fluorescence emission to identify targets of ammonia pollution. The results indicated that the photosystem II of the two lichens exposed to NH{sub 3} is susceptible to this pollutant in the gas-phase. The parameter PI{sub ABS}, a global index of photosynthetic performance that combines in a single expression the three functional steps of the photosynthetic activity (light absorption, excitation energy trapping, and conversion of excitation energy to electron transport) was much more sensitive to NH{sub 3} than the F{sub V}/F{sub M} ratio, one of the most commonly used stress indicators. - Ammonia from livestock farming affects lichen photosynthesis.

  18. Anaerobic digestion of swine manure: Inhibition by ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kaare Hvid; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1998-01-01

    A stable anaerobic degradation of swine manure with ammonia concentration of 6 g-N/litre was obtained in continuously stirred tank reactors with a hydraulic retention time of 15 days, at Four different temperatures. Methane yields of 188, 141, 67 and 22 ml-CH4/g-VS were obtained at 37, 45, 55...

  19. Structure dependence of Pt surface activated ammonia oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santen, R A van; Offermans, W K [Schuit Institute of Catalysis, Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Ricart, J M; Novell-Leruth, G [Department of Chemical Physics and Inorganic Chemistry, University Rovira I Virgili, C/ Marcel.lI Domingo s/n, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Perez-RamIrez, J [Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ) and Catalan, Institution for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), Avinguda Paisos Catalans 16, 43007, Tarragona (Spain)], E-mail: r.a.v.santen@tue.nl

    2008-06-01

    Computational advances that enable the prediction of the structures and the energies of surface reaction intermediates are providing essential information to the formulation of theories of surface chemical reactivity. In this contribution this is illustrated for the activation of ammonia by coadsorbed oxygen and hydroxyl on the Pt(111), Pt(100), and Pt(211) surfaces.

  20. Does formate reduce alpha-ketoglutarate and ammonia to glutamate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Q.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The reported reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate and ammonia by formate is much slower than described (Morowitz et al., 1995). The formate reduction if any is small under these conditions. Glutamate is produced from a reduction by a second molecule of alpha-ketoglutarate involving an oxidative decarboxylation.

  1. 21 CFR 862.1065 - Ammonia test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonia test system. 862.1065 Section 862.1065 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  2. Corrosion protection of steel in ammonia/water heat pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfeld, Florian B.; Sun, Zhaoli

    2003-10-14

    Corrosion of steel surfaces in a heat pump is inhibited by adding a rare earth metal salt to the heat pump's ammonia/water working fluid. In preferred embodiments, the rare earth metal salt includes cerium, and the steel surfaces are cerated to enhance the corrosion-inhibiting effects.

  3. Mitigating Greenhouse Gas and Ammonia Emissions from Swine Manure Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Yue; Dong, Hongmin; Zhu, Zhiping; Gerber, Pierre J.; Xin, Hongwei; Smith, Pete; Opio, Carolyn; Steinfeld, Henning; Chadwick, Dave

    2017-01-01

    Gaseous emissions from animal manure are considerable contributor to global ammonia (NH3) and agriculture greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Given the demand to promote mitigation of GHGs while fostering sustainable development of the Paris Agreement, an improvement of management systems

  4. Ammonia sensor for closed-loop SCR control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, D.Y.; Yao, S.; Shost, M.; Yoo, J.H.; Cabush, D.; Racine, D.; Cloudt, R.P.M.; Willems, F.P.T.

    2009-01-01

    Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) is the dominant solution for meeting future NOx reduction regulations for heavy-duty diesel powertrains. SCR systems benefit from closed-loop control if an appropriate exhaust gas sensor were available. An ammonia sensor has recently been developed for use as a fe

  5. System Modeling for Ammonia Synthesis Energy Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bran Anleu, Gabriela; Kavehpour, Pirouz; Lavine, Adrienne; Ammonia thermochemical Energy Storage Team

    2015-11-01

    An ammonia thermochemical energy storage system is an alternative solution to the state-of-the-art molten salt TES system for concentrating solar power. Some of the advantages of this emerging technology include its high energy density, no heat losses during the storage duration, and the possibility of long storage periods. Solar energy powers an endothermic reaction to disassociate ammonia into hydrogen and nitrogen, which can be stored for future use. The reverse reaction is carried out in the energy recovery process; a hydrogen-nitrogen mixture flowing through a catalyst bed undergoes the exothermic ammonia synthesis reaction. The goal is to use the ammonia synthesis reaction to heat supercritical steam to temperatures on the order of 650°C as required for a supercritical steam Rankine cycle. The steam will flow through channels in a combined reactor-heat exchanger. A numerical model has been developed to determine the optimal design to heat supercritical steam while maintaining a stable exothermic reaction. The model consists of a transient one dimensional concentric tube counter-flow reactor-heat exchanger. The numerical model determines the inlet mixture conditions needed to achieve various steam outlet conditions.

  6. Ammonia removal from landfill leachate by air stripping and absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Fernanda M; Povinelli, Jurandyr; Vieira, Eny Maria

    2013-01-01

    An old landfill leachate was pre-treated in a pilot-scale aerated packed tower operated in batch mode for total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) removal. The stripped ammonia was recovered with a 0.4 mol L(-1) H2SO4 solution, deionized water and tap water. Ca(OH)2 (95% purity) or commercial hydrated lime was added to the raw leachate to adjust its pH to 11, causing removal of colour (82%) and heavy metals (70-90% for Zn, Fe and Mn). The 0.4 molL(-1) H2SO4 solution was able to neutralize 80% of the stripped ammonia removed from 12 L of leachate. The effectiveness of the neutralization of ammonia with deionized water was 75%. Treating 100 L of leachate, the air stripping tower removed 88% of TAN after 72 h of aeration, and 87% of the stripped ammonia was recovered in two 31 L pilot-scale absorption units filled with 20 L of tap water.

  7. 土壤碳通量--深土层的长期吸收%Carbon fluxes in soil:long-term sequestration in deeper soil horizons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John F.McCarthy

    2005-01-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems represent the second largest carbon reservoir, and the C balance in terrestrial ecosystems can be directly impacted by human activities such as agricultural management practices and land-use changes. This paper focuses on the C-sequestration in soil. Although many studies showed that the concentration of SOC is much higher in the shallow soils (0-30 cm), the deeper horizons represent a much greater mass of soil and represent a huge C-storage pool. The process of preferential retention of more strongly adsorbing components, along with competitive displacement of weakly binding components are the key processes that enhance the movement of organic carbon to deeper soil horizons. DOC represents the most dynamic part of organic carbon in soils, and thus can be used as a timely indicator of the short-term change of C-sequestration.Long-term experiments have demonstrated that higher SOC levels in shallow soils would lead to increased fluxes of DOC to deeper horizons, but more data on a wider range of soils and treatment strategies are needed to fully evaluate the linkages between changes in SOC in shallow soil, vertical fluxes of DOC to deeper soil horizons, and enhanced C-inventories in deeper, slow-turnover SOC pools.

  8. Study on adsorption and desorption of ammonia on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengwei; Zhang, Xinfang; Luo, Wei; Yang, Hang; He, Yanlan; Liu, Yixing; Zhang, Xueao; Peng, Gang

    2015-09-01

    The gas sensor based on pristine graphene with conductance type was studied theoretically and experimentally. The time response of conductance measurements showed a quickly and largely increased conductivity when the sensor was exposed to ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water. However, the desorption process in vacuum took more than 1 h which indicated that there was a larger number of transferred carriers and a strong adsorption force between ammonia and graphene. The desorption time could be greatly shortened down to about 2 min by adding the flow of water-vapor-enriched air at the beginning of the recovery stage which had been confirmed as a rapid and high-efficiency desorption process. Moreover, the optimum geometries, adsorption energies, and the charge transfer number of the composite systems were studied with first-principle calculations. However, the theoretical results showed that the adsorption energy between NH3 and graphene was too small to fit for the experimental phenomenon, and there were few charges transferred between graphene and NH3 molecules, which was completely different from the experiment measurement. The adsorption energy between NH4 and graphene increased stage by stage which showed NH4 was a strong donor. The calculation suggested that H2O molecule could help a quick desorption of NH4 from graphene by converting NH4 to NH3 or (NH3)n(H2O)m groups, which was consistent with the experimental results. This study demonstrates that the ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water is mainly ammonium groups of NH3 and NH4, and the NH4 moleculars are ideal candidates for the molecular doping of graphene while the interaction between graphene and the NH3 moleculars is weak.

  9. Studies on Ammonia Spectral Signatures Relevant to Jupiter's Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, A. U.; Marschall, J.; Wong, M. H.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2006-12-01

    Observational evidence and thermochemical models indicate an abundance of ammonia ice clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. However, spectrally identifiable ammonia ice clouds are found covering less than 1% of Jupiter's atmosphere, notably in turbulent areas [1,2]. Current literature suggests two possible explanations: coating by a hydrocarbon haze and/or photochemical processing ("tanning")[2,3]. We are pursuing a research program investigating the above hypotheses. In the experiments, thin films of ammonia ices are deposited in a cryogenic apparatus, coated with hydrocarbons, and characterized by infrared spectroscopy. The ice films can be irradiated by ultraviolet light to study their photochemistry. The spectroscopic measurements aim to identify the processes that control the optical properties of the ice mixtures and quantify their dependence on the identity of the coating, the temperature, and the ice composition. We have observed a consistent suppression of the ammonia absorption feature at 3 μm with coverage by thin layers of hydrocarbons. Modeling calculations of the multi-layer thin films assist in the interpretation of the experimental results and reveal the role of optical interference in masking the aforementioned ammonia spectral feature. The implications of these results for Jupiter's atmosphere will be discussed. Funding from the NSF Planetary Astronomy Program under grant AST-0206270 and from the NASA Outer Planets Research Program under grant NNG06GF37G is gratefully acknowledged. The participation of Anand Oza (Princeton University) was made possible by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program under grant PHY-0353745. 1. S. K. Atreya, A.-S. Wong, K. H. Baines, M. H. Wong, T. C. Owen, Planet. Space Science 53, 498 (2005). 2. K. H. Baines, R. W. Carlson, and L. W. Kamp, Icarus 159, 74 (2002). 3. A.-S. Wong, Y. L. Yung, and A. J. Friedson, Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, 1447 (2003).

  10. Glutamine versus ammonia utilization in the NAD synthetase family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica De Ingeniis

    Full Text Available NAD is a ubiquitous and essential metabolic redox cofactor which also functions as a substrate in certain regulatory pathways. The last step of NAD synthesis is the ATP-dependent amidation of deamido-NAD by NAD synthetase (NADS. Members of the NADS family are present in nearly all species across the three kingdoms of Life. In eukaryotic NADS, the core synthetase domain is fused with a nitrilase-like glutaminase domain supplying ammonia for the reaction. This two-domain NADS arrangement enabling the utilization of glutamine as nitrogen donor is also present in various bacterial lineages. However, many other bacterial members of NADS family do not contain a glutaminase domain, and they can utilize only ammonia (but not glutamine in vitro. A single-domain NADS is also characteristic for nearly all Archaea, and its dependence on ammonia was demonstrated here for the representative enzyme from Methanocaldococcus jannaschi. However, a question about the actual in vivo nitrogen donor for single-domain members of the NADS family remained open: Is it glutamine hydrolyzed by a committed (but yet unknown glutaminase subunit, as in most ATP-dependent amidotransferases, or free ammonia as in glutamine synthetase? Here we addressed this dilemma by combining evolutionary analysis of the NADS family with experimental characterization of two representative bacterial systems: a two-subunit NADS from Thermus thermophilus and a single-domain NADS from Salmonella typhimurium providing evidence that ammonia (and not glutamine is the physiological substrate of a typical single-domain NADS. The latter represents the most likely ancestral form of NADS. The ability to utilize glutamine appears to have evolved via recruitment of a glutaminase subunit followed by domain fusion in an early branch of Bacteria. Further evolution of the NADS family included lineage-specific loss of one of the two alternative forms and horizontal gene transfer events. Lastly, we identified NADS

  11. Study on adsorption and desorption of ammonia on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengwei; Zhang, Xinfang; Luo, Wei; Yang, Hang; He, Yanlan; Liu, Yixing; Zhang, Xueao; Peng, Gang

    2015-12-01

    The gas sensor based on pristine graphene with conductance type was studied theoretically and experimentally. The time response of conductance measurements showed a quickly and largely increased conductivity when the sensor was exposed to ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water. However, the desorption process in vacuum took more than 1 h which indicated that there was a larger number of transferred carriers and a strong adsorption force between ammonia and graphene. The desorption time could be greatly shortened down to about 2 min by adding the flow of water-vapor-enriched air at the beginning of the recovery stage which had been confirmed as a rapid and high-efficiency desorption process. Moreover, the optimum geometries, adsorption energies, and the charge transfer number of the composite systems were studied with first-principle calculations. However, the theoretical results showed that the adsorption energy between NH3 and graphene was too small to fit for the experimental phenomenon, and there were few charges transferred between graphene and NH3 molecules, which was completely different from the experiment measurement. The adsorption energy between NH4 and graphene increased stage by stage which showed NH4 was a strong donor. The calculation suggested that H2O molecule could help a quick desorption of NH4 from graphene by converting NH4 to NH3 or (NH3)n(H2O)m groups, which was consistent with the experimental results. This study demonstrates that the ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water is mainly ammonium groups of NH3 and NH4, and the NH4 moleculars are ideal candidates for the molecular doping of graphene while the interaction between graphene and the NH3 moleculars is weak.

  12. Ammonium recruitment and ammonia transport by E. coli ammonia channel AmtB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Thomas Pedersen; Rovira, C.; Peters, Günther H.j.

    2006-01-01

    To investigate substrate recruitment and transport across the Escherichia coli Ammonia transporter B (AmtB) protein, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the AmtB trimer. We have identified residues important in recruitment of ammonium and intraluminal binding sites selective of ammoniu...

  13. A study on ammonia removal properties using clinoptilolite Part 1 : characterization of clinoptilolite and ammonia removal properties in batch reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Jeong Min; Chung, Jong Shik [Dept. of Chemical Engineering/School of Environment Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea); Sun, De Shi [Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Techonology (China)

    2000-04-01

    A natural zeolite, deposit located at Guryongpo, Young-il bay, was found to be clinoptilolite containing impurities of heulandite and mordenite. Cation exchange capacity(CEC) for ammonia was about 1.41 meq/g from Na{sup +}-form of the zeolite. In batch experiment, removal efficiency of ammonia was increased as particle size of zeolite and initial concentration of Na{sup +} were decreased and SR(Stoichiometric Ratio), time, and initial concentration of ammonia increased. More than 70% aluminum ion could be removed from water having 3 ppm ammonia and 0.7 ppm Al{sup 3+} by the batch adsorption(ion exchange) experiment. Regeneration of used zeolite with NaCl solution of pH=12 has shown more than 95% of regeneration efficiency when SR'(ratio of the amount of NaCl solution employed actually to the amount in a stoichiometric quantity) was equal to 2.0. 19 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Sustainable Ammonia Synthesis – Exploring the scientific challenges associated with discovering alternative, sustainable processes for ammonia production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nørskov, Jens [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); ; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Chen, Jingguang [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Miranda, Raul [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science; Fitzsimmons, Tim [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science; Stack, Robert [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2016-02-18

    Ammonia (NH3) is essential to all life on our planet. Until about 100 years ago, NH3 produced by reduction of dinitrogen (N2) in air came almost exclusively from bacteria containing the enzyme nitrogenase.. DOE convened a roundtable of experts on February 18, 2016. Participants in the Roundtable discussions concluded that the scientific basis for sustainable processes for ammonia synthesis is currently lacking, and it needs to be enhanced substantially before it can form the foundation for alternative processes. The Roundtable Panel identified an overarching grand challenge and several additional scientific grand challenges and research opportunities: -Discovery of active, selective, scalable, long-lived catalysts for sustainable ammonia synthesis. -Development of relatively low pressure (<10 atm) and relatively low temperature (<200 C) thermal processes. -Integration of knowledge from nature (enzyme catalysis), molecular/homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. -Development of electrochemical and photochemical routes for N2 reduction based on proton and electron transfer -Development of biochemical routes to N2 reduction -Development of chemical looping (solar thermochemical) approaches -Identification of descriptors of catalytic activity using a combination of theory and experiments -Characterization of surface adsorbates and catalyst structures (chemical, physical and electronic) under conditions relevant to ammonia synthesis.

  15. Mass transfer characteristics of a structured packing for ammonia rectification in ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieres, Jaime; Fernandez-Seara, Jose [Area de Maquinas y Motores Termicos, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, University of Vigo, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende N9, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2007-01-15

    In ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems a purification process of the vapours produced in the generator is required. One type of equipment to carry out the purification process is a packed column. However, detailed experimental studies at the normal operating conditions found in ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems have not been found. An experimental facility has been designed and built to study the ammonia-water rectification in packed columns. Experimental tests have been performed at the normal operating conditions found in the high-pressure stage of a small power ammonia-water absorption refrigeration system. In this paper, the experimental set-up is described and experimental results of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) and the volumetric mass transfer coefficient of a rectifying section with the Sulzer BX packing are presented. The HETP values and the experimental mass transfer coefficients are compared with different data and correlations proposed in the literature; it has been found that the differences are appreciable. (author)

  16. Toward a deeper characterization of the social phenotype of Williams syndrome: The association between personality and social drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Rowena; Järvinen, Anna; Bellugi, Ursula

    2014-08-01

    Previous research has robustly established a Williams syndrome (WS) specific personality profile, predominantly characterized a gregarious, people-oriented, and tense predisposition. Extending this work, the aims of the current, cross-sectional study were two-fold: (1) to elucidate the stability of personality characteristics in individuals with WS and typically developing (TD) comparisons across development, and (2) to explore the personality attributes that may be related to the respective profiles of social functioning characterizing the two groups, which is currently poorly understood. The sample comprised of participants with WS and TD matched on chronological age. The test battery included the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ) and the Salk Institute Sociability Questionnaire (SISQ), an index of real-life social behavior. The main results showed that compared to the TD individuals, the WS group were consistently rated higher in Social Closeness, and this trait remained stable across development. Interpersonal behaviors were best predicted by Social Closeness in WS and by Social Potency in TD. Regression analysis highlighted that while a central motive underlying the increased drive toward social interaction in individuals with WS pertains to a desire to form affectionate relationships, TD individuals by contrast are motivated by a desire to exert social influence over others (leadership, social-dominance) and Well-Being (positive emotional disposition). In conclusion, these findings provide novel insight into social motivational factors underpinning the WS social behavior in real life, and contribute toward a deeper characterization of the WS affiliative drive. We suggest potential areas for behavioral intervention targeting improved social adjustment in individuals with WS.

  17. Digging deeper into the Southern skies: a compact Milky Way companion discovered in first-year Dark Energy Survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, E.; Queiroz, A.; Santiago, B.; Pieres, A.; Balbinot, E.; Bechtol, K.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Neto, A. Fausti; da Costa, L. N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Eifler, T. F.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A. R.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-05-01

    We use the first-year Dark Energy Survey (DES) data down to previously unprobed photometric depths to search for stellar systems in the Galactic halo, therefore complementing the previous analysis of the same data carried out by our group earlier this year. Our search is based on a matched filter algorithm that produces stellar density maps consistent with stellar population models of various ages, metallicities, and distances over the survey area. The most conspicuous density peaks in these maps have been identified automatically and ranked according to their significance and recurrence for different input models. We report the discovery of one additional stellar system besides those previously found by several authors using the same first-year DES data. The object is compact, and consistent with being dominated by an old and metal-poor population. DES 1 is found at high significance and appears in the DES images as a compact concentration of faint blue point sources. Assuming different spatial profile parameterizations, the best-fitting heliocentric distance and total absolute magnitude in the range of 77.6-87.1 kpc and -3.00 ≲ MV ≲ -2.21, respectively. The half-light radius of this object, rh ˜ 10 pc and total luminosity are consistent with it being a low-mass halo cluster. It is also found to have a very elongated shape (ɛ ˜ 0.57). In addition, our deeper probe of DES first-year data confirms the recently reported satellite galaxy candidate Horologium II as a significant stellar overdensity. We also infer its structural properties and compare them to those reported in the literature.

  18. Ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in the Rhizosphere of Freshwater Macrophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Martina; Schramm, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    AMMONIA-OXIDIZING ARCHAEA AND BACTERIA IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF FRESHWATER MACROPHYTES Martina Herrmann and Andreas Schramm Department of Biological Sciences, Microbiology, University of Aarhus, Denmark Aquatic macrophytes such as Littorella uniflora and Lobelia dortmanna release oxygen from...... measurements revealed clear differences in ammonia oxidation rates. The diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was assessed using the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene as functional marker. Both AOA and AOB could be detected in the rhizosphere of all three plant...

  19. Counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion by recovery using submersible microbial desalination cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia inhibition is one of the most frequent and serious problems in biogas plants. In this study, a novel hybrid system consisting of a submersible microbial desalination cell (SMDC) and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was developed for counteracting ammonia inhibition during anaerobic...... digestion (AD) with simultaneous in situ ammonia recovery and electricity production. The SMDC was powered by acetate in a buffer solution, while synthetic ammonia-rich wastewater was used as the feeding of the CSTR. Under continuous operation, ammonia recovery rate of 86 g-N/m2 /day and current density...

  20. Autotrophic ammonia oxidation at low pH through urea hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, S A; Prosser, J I

    2001-07-01

    Ammonia oxidation in laboratory liquid batch cultures of autotrophic ammonia oxidizers rarely occurs at pH values less than 7, due to ionization of ammonia and the requirement for ammonium transport rather than diffusion of ammonia. Nevertheless, there is strong evidence for autotrophic nitrification in acid soils, which may be carried out by ammonia oxidizers capable of using urea as a source of ammonia. To determine the mechanism of urea-linked ammonia oxidation, a ureolytic autotrophic ammonia oxidizer, Nitrosospira sp. strain NPAV, was grown in liquid batch culture at a range of pH values with either ammonium or urea as the sole nitrogen source. Growth and nitrite production from ammonium did not occur at pH values below 7. Growth on urea occurred at pH values in the range 4 to 7.5 but ceased when urea hydrolysis was complete, even though ammonia, released during urea hydrolysis, remained in the medium. The results support a mechanism whereby urea enters the cells by diffusion and intracellular urea hydrolysis and ammonia oxidation occur independently of extracellular pH in the range 4 to 7.5. A proportion of the ammonia produced during this process diffuses from the cell and is not subsequently available for growth if the extracellular pH is less than 7. Ureolysis therefore provides a mechanism for nitrification in acid soils, but a proportion of the ammonium produced is likely to be released from the cell and may be used by other soil organisms.

  1. Decreases in ammonia volatilization in response to greater plant diversity in microcosms of constructed wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bin; Ge, Ying; Han, Wenjuan; Fan, Xing; Ren, Yuan; Du, Yuanyuan; Shi, Mengmeng; Chang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Ammonia volatilization from wastewaters with a high concentration of ammonium is a serious environmental and health problem. Constructed wetlands (CWs) are widely used for treating wastewater, and plant diversity clearly improves some functions of ecosystem such as nitrogen removal. However, whether plant diversity can affect ammonia volatilization from wastewater is still unknown. In this study, we conducted a microcosm experiment with different plant diversity treatments using four plant species. Results showed that, (1) ammonia volatilization decreased with increasing plant species richness; (2) ammonia volatilization from systems containing Rumex japonicus was lower than other systems; and (3) ammonia volatilization was affected more by species composition than species richness. This paper is the first to report that ammonia volatilization is reduced by plant diversity, and that some plant species combinations are important to reduce ammonia volatilization from CWs when treating wastewater.

  2. Phylogenetic and functional marker genes to study ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms (AOM) in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junier, Pilar; Molina, Verónica; Dorador, Cristina; Hadas, Ora; Kim, Ok-Sun; Junier, Thomas; Witzel, Jean-Paul; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2010-01-01

    The oxidation of ammonia plays a significant role in the transformation of fixed nitrogen in the global nitrogen cycle. Autotrophic ammonia oxidation is known in three groups of microorganisms. Aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea convert ammonia into nitrite during nitrification. Anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (anammox) oxidize ammonia using nitrite as electron acceptor and producing atmospheric dinitrogen. The isolation and cultivation of all three groups in the laboratory are quite problematic due to their slow growth rates, poor growth yields, unpredictable lag phases, and sensitivity to certain organic compounds. Culture-independent approaches have contributed importantly to our understanding of the diversity and distribution of these microorganisms in the environment. In this review, we present an overview of approaches that have been used for the molecular study of ammonia oxidizers and discuss their application in different environments.

  3. Promoted Ru on high-surface area graphite for efficient miniaturized production of hydrogen from ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rasmus Zink; Klerke, Asbjørn; Quaade, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    Promoted Ru/C catalysts for decomposition of ammonia are incorporated into micro-fabricated reactors for the first time. With the reported preparation technique, the performance is increased more than two orders of magnitude compared to previously known micro-fabricated reactors for ammonia decom...... studies of both ammonia synthesis and decomposition, and it is shown how proper promotion can facilitate ammonia decomposition at temperatures below 500 K.......Promoted Ru/C catalysts for decomposition of ammonia are incorporated into micro-fabricated reactors for the first time. With the reported preparation technique, the performance is increased more than two orders of magnitude compared to previously known micro-fabricated reactors for ammonia...... decomposition. The catalytic activities for production of hydrogen from ammonia are determined for different promoters and promoter levels on graphite supported ruthenium catalysts. The reactivity trends of the Ru/C catalysts promoted with Cs and Ba are in excellent agreement with those known from earlier...

  4. Nitrogen removal and microbial characteristics in CANON biofilters fed with different ammonia levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuhai; Li, Dong; Zhang, Xiaojing; Zeng, Huiping; Yang, Zhuo; Cui, Shaoming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-11-01

    The nitrogen removal performance and microbial characteristics of four completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) biofilters were investigated. These four reactors were simultaneously seeded from a stable CANON biofilter with a seeding ratio of 1:1, which were fed with different ammonia levels. Results suggested that with the ammonia of 200-400 mg L(-1), aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AerAOB) and anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) could perform harmonious work. The bioactivity and population of the two groups of bacteria were both high, which then resulted in excellent nitrogen removal, while too low or too high ammonia would both lead to worse performance. When ammonia was too high, the bioactivity, biodiversity and population of AerAOB all decreased and then resulted in the lowest nitrogen removal. Nitrosomonas and Candidatus Brocadia were detected as predominant functional microbes in all the four reactors. Finally, strategies for treating sewage with different ammonia levels were proposed.

  5. An Assessment of Ammonia Emissions from Dairy Facilities in Pennsylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Ferguson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey of 715 Holstein dairy farms in Pennsylvania was used to construct demographics for the average Holstein dairy farm. The average Holstein dairy farm was composed of 69 lactating cows; 11 nonlactating, pregnant cows; 44 heifers; and 18 calves. Milk production averaged 27.3 kg (60.0 lb. Crop area averaged 73.6 ha. Milk production, crop area and type, average county yields, and herd animal groups were used to construct a typical feeding program for these farms. Typical rations were constructed for six feeding groups (three milk production groups, one nonlactating group, two heifer groups to meet milk production, pregnancy, and growth requirements. Rations were constructed based on three forage qualities (excellent, average, and poor typically observed on Pennsylvania dairy farms. Data for animal description (milk production, body weight, growth, and pregnancy status and ration components and amounts consumed for each animal group were input into the excretion model of the Dairy Nutrient Planner computer program (DNP. Excretion of fecal N and dry matter (DM, urinary N, and total P and K were produced for each animal group and used to assess potential volatile losses of N. Work at the Marshak Dairy, New Bolton Center, indicates the majority of urinary N is rapidly lost as ammonia from dairy facilities. Based on this observation, the losses of N as ammonia were estimated to be 4.63, 4.62, and 4.28�tonne/year for the farm with excellent, average, and poor quality forages, respectively. Volatile losses of N may be reduced most by controlling levels of urea in urine. Urinary N may be reduced through dietary manipulation of protein and carbohydrate sources. Conversion of urea to ammonia may be reduced by altering the pH of barn floors and gutters. Entrapment of ammonia may be accomplished by acidification of manure slurry. Atmospheric ammonia contributes to acid rain, eutrophication of estuaries and lakes, and particulate air pollution

  6. Improved process model for ammonia volatilization from anaerobic swine lagoons under varying wind speeds and gas bubbling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia volatilization from treatment lagoons varies widely with the lagoon water total ammonia concentration, pH, temperature, suspended solids, atmospheric ammonia concentration above the water surface, and wind speed. Ammonia emissions were estimated with a process-based mechanistic model using a...

  7. Construction of a fur null mutant and RNA-sequencing provide deeper global understanding of the Aliivibrio salmonicida Fur regulon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunniva Katharina Thode

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The ferric uptake regulator (Fur is a transcription factor and the main regulator of iron acquisition in prokaryotes. When bound to ferric iron, Fur recognizes its DNA binding site and generally executes its function by repressing transcription of its target genes. Due to its importance in virulence, the Fur regulon is well studied for several model bacteria. In our previous work, we used computational predictions and microarray to gain insights into Fur-regulation in Aliivibrio salmonicida, and have identified a number of genes and operons that appear to be under direct control of Fur. To provide a more accurate and deeper global understanding of the biological role of Fur we have now generated an A. salmonicida fur knock-out strain and used RNA-sequencing to compare gene expression between the wild-type and fur null mutant strains. Results An A. salmonicida fur null mutant strain was constructed. Biological assays demonstrate that deletion of fur results in loss of fitness, with reduced growth rates, and reduced abilities to withstand low-iron conditions, and oxidative stress. When comparing expression levels in the wild-type and the fur null mutant we retrieved 296 differentially expressed genes distributed among 18 of 21 functional classes of genes. A gene cluster encoding biosynthesis of the siderophore bisucaberin represented the highest up-regulated genes in the fur null mutant. Other highly up-regulated genes all encode proteins important for iron acquisition. Potential targets for the RyhB sRNA was predicted from the list of down-regulated genes, and significant complementarities were found between RyhB and mRNAs of the fur, sodB, cysN and VSAL_I0422 genes. Other sRNAs with potential functions in iron homeostasis were identified. Conclusion The present work provides by far the most comprehensive and deepest understanding of the Fur regulon in A. salmonicida to date. Our data also contribute to a better understanding of how

  8. Manufacture of a Polyaniline Nanofiber Ammonia Sensor Integrated with a Readout Circuit Using the CMOS-MEMS Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mao-Chen; Dai, Ching-Liang; Chan, Chih-Hua; Wu, Chyan-Chyi

    2009-01-01

    This study presents the fabrication of a polyaniline nanofiber ammonia sensor integrated with a readout circuit on a chip using the commercial 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process and a post-process. The micro ammonia sensor consists of a sensing resistor and an ammonia sensing film. Polyaniline prepared by a chemical polymerization method was adopted as the ammonia sensing film. The fabrication of the ammonia sensor needs a post-process to etch the sacrificial layers and to expose the sensing resistor, and then the ammonia sensing film is coated on the sensing resistor. The ammonia sensor, which is of resistive type, changes its resistance when the sensing film adsorbs or desorbs ammonia gas. A readout circuit is employed to convert the resistance of the ammonia sensor into the voltage output. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the ammonia sensor is about 0.88 mV/ppm at room temperature. PMID:22399944

  9. Manufacture of a Polyaniline Nanofiber Ammonia Sensor Integrated with a Readout Circuit Using the CMOS-MEMS Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chyan-Chyi Wu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the fabrication of a polyaniline nanofiber ammonia sensor integrated with a readout circuit on a chip using the commercial 0.35 mm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS process and a post-process. The micro ammonia sensor consists of a sensing resistor and an ammonia sensing film. Polyaniline prepared by a chemical polymerization method was adopted as the ammonia sensing film. The fabrication of the ammonia sensor needs a post-process to etch the sacrificial layers and to expose the sensing resistor, and then the ammonia sensing film is coated on the sensing resistor. The ammonia sensor, which is of resistive type, changes its resistance when the sensing film adsorbs or desorbs ammonia gas. A readout circuit is employed to convert the resistance of the ammonia sensor into the voltage output. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the ammonia sensor is about 0.88 mV/ppm at room temperature

  10. Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011: Cloud particles containing ammonia and water ices indicate a deep convective origin. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Baines, K. H.; Fry, P.

    2013-12-01

    Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011 was first detected by amateur astronomers in early December 2010 and later found in Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images taken on 5 December, when it took the form of a 1000 km wide bright spot. Within a week the head of the storm grew by a factor of ten in width and within a few months created a wake that encircled the planet. This is the sixth Great Saturn Storm in recorded history, all having appeared in the northern hemisphere, and most near northern summer solstice at intervals of roughly 30 years (Sanchez-Lavega et al. 1991, Nature 353, 397-401). That the most recent storm appeared 10 years early proved fortunate because Cassini was still operating in orbit around Saturn and was able to provide unique observations from which we could learn much more about these rare and enormous events. Besides the dramatic dynamical effects displayed at the visible cloud level by high-resolution imaging observations (Sayanagi et al. 2013, Icarus 223, 460-478), dramatic thermal changes also occurred in the stratosphere above the storm (Fletcher et al. 2011, Science 332, 1413), and radio measurements of lightning (Fischer et al., 2011, Nature 475, 75-77) indicated strong convective activity at deeper levels. Numerical models of Saturn's Giant storms (Hueso and Sanchez-Lavega 2004, Icarus 172, 255-271) suggest that they are fueled by water vapor condensation beginning at the 10-12 bar level, some 250 km below the visible cloud tops. That idea is also supported by our detection of water ice near the cloud tops (Sromovsky et al. 2013, Icarus 226, 402-418). From Cassini VIMS spectral imaging taken in February 2011, we learned that the storm's cloud particles are strong absorbers of sunlight at wavelengths from 2.8 to 3.1 microns. Such absorption is not seen on Saturn outside of storm regions, implying a different kind of cloud formation process as well as different cloud composition inside the storm region. We found compelling evidence

  11. AlN growth on sapphire substrate by ammonia MBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansurov, V. G.; Nikitin, A. Yu.; Galitsyn, Yu. G.; Svitasheva, S. N.; Zhuravlev, K. S.; Osvath, Z.; Dobos, L.; Horvath, Z. E.; Pecz, B.

    2007-03-01

    Kinetics of (0 0 0 1) Al 2O 3 surface nitridation and subsequent growth of AlN films on the sapphire substrate by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are investigated. Surface morphology evolution during AlN growth is studied in situ by reflection high energy electron diffraction and ex situ by atomic force microscopy. It is found that the surfaces of AlN layers thicker than 100 nm have two major features: a quite smooth background and noticeable amount of hillocks. The influence of growth conditions on the AlN surface morphology is studied in order to find a way for reducing of the hillocks density. A modification of nitridated sapphire surface by small amount of Al (1-2 monolayers) with subsequent treatment of the surface under ammonia flux is proposed. An improvement of AlN surface morphology of the layers grown on the modified surfaces is demonstrated.

  12. SWAG: Survey of Water and Ammonia in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Jürgen; Krieger, Nico; Rickert, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    SWAG ("Survey of Water and Ammonia in the Galactic Center") is a multi-line interferometric survey toward the Center of the Milky Way conducted with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The survey region spans the entire ~400pc Central Molecular Zone and comprises ~42 spectral lines at pc spatial and sub-km/s spectral resolution. In addition, we deeply map continuum intensity, spectral index, and polarization at the frequencies where synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust sources emit. The observed spectral lines include many transitions of ammonia, which we use to construct maps of molecular gas temperature, opacity and gas formation temperature (see poster by Nico Krieger et al., this volume). Water masers pinpoint the sites of active star formation and other lines are good tracers for density, radiation field, shocks, and ionization. This extremely rich survey forms a perfect basis to construct maps of the physical parameters of the gas in this extreme environment.

  13. The aerosols' fate in a putative ammonia ocean on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, S. I.; Coll, P.; Buch, A.; Brassé, C.; Poch, O.; Raulin, F.

    2010-04-01

    A laboratory study on the chemical transformation of Titan's aerosol analogues placed under putative surface conditions of the satellite was performed. The surface of Titan was one of the targets of the Cassini-Huygens mission and of several of the Cassini orbiter instruments, especially ISS, VIMS and Radar. The first images revealed an interesting solid surface with features that suggest aeolian, tectonic, fluvial processes and even an impact structure[1]. Since then, more detailed descriptions of dunes, channels, lakes, impact craters and cryovolcanic structures have been documented[2]. The existence of an internal liquid water ocean, containing a few percent ammonia has been proposed[2, 3]. It has also been proposed that ammonia-water mixtures can erupt from the putative subsurface ocean leading to cryovolcanism[4]. The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper obtained Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images during 2004 and 2005 that revealed a highly complex geology occurring at Titan's surface[5], among which cryovolcanic features play a central role. The composition of the cryomagma is mainly proposed to be a mixture of water ice and ammonia[6, 7, 8], although ammonia has not been directly detected on Titan, but suggested by recent Cassini-VIMS observations[9]. In order to understand the role that ammonia may play on the chemical transformation of atmospheric aerosols once they reach the surface, we designed the following protocol: laboratory analogues of Titan's aerosols were synthesized from a N2:CH4 (98:2) mixture irradiated under a continuous flow regime of 845 sccm inside which, a cold plasma of 180 W was established. The synthesized analogues were recovered and partitioned in several 10.0 mg samples that were placed in 4.0 mL-volume of aqueous ammonia solutions (25.00, 12.50, 6.25 and 3.125%) at different temperatures (298, 277, 253 and 93 K) for 10 weeks. After a derivatization process performed to the aerosols' refractory phase with N

  14. A low energy aqueous ammonia CO2 capture process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Waseem Arshad, Muhammad; Blaker, Eirik Ask

    2014-01-01

    The most pressing challenges regarding the use of ammonia for CO2 capture are the precipitation limitation and the energy penalty of solvent regeneration. Precipitation-free operation is a vital task since solids may cause the shutdown of the plant. Precipitation and slurry formation can be avoided...... by increasing temperature and L/G ratio but this leads to higher heat consumption, jeopardizing the economic feasibility. Here we developed, investigated, and optimized a novel CO2 capture process design using aqueous ammonia as solvent. The proposed configuration replaces the traditional stripper for solvent...... based CO2 capture with a thermal decomposition reactor. The overall energy penalty is reduced at the expense of introducing a solid handling section which consists of a saturation reactor, a crystallizer and a belt filter. The feasibility of the present approach is demonstrated by simulation. Flow...

  15. Mitigating ammonia nitrogen deficiency in dairy wastewaters for algae cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qian; Zhou, Wenguang; Min, Min; Ma, Xiaochen; Ma, Yiwei; Chen, Paul; Zheng, Hongli; Doan, Yen T T; Liu, Hui; Chen, Chi; Urriola, Pedro E; Shurson, Gerald C; Ruan, Roger

    2016-02-01

    This study demonstrated that the limiting factor to algae growth on dairy wastewater was the ammonia nitrogen deficiency. Dairy wastewaters were mixed with a slaughterhouse wastewater that has much higher ammonia nitrogen content. The results showed the mixing wastewaters improved the nutrient profiles and biomass yield at low cost. Algae grown on mixed wastewaters contained high protein (55.98-66.91%) and oil content (19.10-20.81%) and can be exploited to produce animal feed and biofuel. Furthermore, algae grown on mixed wastewater significantly reduced nutrient contents remained in the wastewater after treatment. By mitigating limiting factor to algae growth on dairy wastewaters, the key issue of low biomass yield of algae grown on dairy wastewaters was resolved and the wastewater nutrient removal efficiency was significantly improved by this study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of ammonia in sulfuric acid ion induced nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Ortega

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new multi-step strategy for quantum chemical calculations on atmospherically relevant cluster structures that makes calculation for large clusters affordable with a good accuracy-to-computational effort ratio. We have applied this strategy to evaluate the relevance of ternary ion induced nucleation; we have also performed calculations for neutral ternary nucleation for comparison. The results for neutral ternary nucleation agree with previous results, and confirm the important role of ammonia in enhancing the growth of sulfuric acid clusters. On the other hand, we have found that ammonia does not enhance the growth of ionic sulfuric acid clusters. The results also confirm that ion-induced nucleation is a barrierless process at high altitudes, but at ground level there exists a barrier due to the presence of a local minimum on the free energy surface.

  17. Study on Dynamic Characteristics of Ammonia Refrigerator System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Minoru; Ikegami, Yasuyuki; Hirao, Yasuhiro; Sudoh, Gaku; Shingoh, Masashi; Uehara, Haruo

    The dynamic characteristics of ammonia refrigerator system are observed when the expansion valve's opening is slightly changed. The refrigerator system is constructed with the reciprocal compressor, the plate type heat exchanger for the condenser and the evaporator, and the expansion valve. A simple simulation model for this refrigerator system is proposed to develop the computer-simulator of this ammonia refrigerator system and those simulation results are compared to above experimental results. For the development of the computer-simulator, simple but useful models, which can represent the dynamic characteristics of the refrigerator, are adopted for each components of the refrigerator system. The simulation shows the overall good agreement with experiment, without the time constant in the variation of the temperature at the evaporator outlet.

  18. Porous Materials for Hydrolytic Dehydrogenation of Ammonia Borane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Umegaki

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen storage is still one of the most significant issues hindering the development of a “hydrogen energy economy”. Ammonia borane is notable for its high hydrogen densities. For the material, one of the main challenges is to release efficiently the maximum amount of the stored hydrogen. Hydrolysis reaction is a promising process by which hydrogen can be easily generated from this compound. High purity hydrogen from this compound can be evolved in the presence of solid acid or metal based catalyst. The reaction performance depends on the morphology and/or structure of these materials. In this review, we survey the research on nanostructured materials, especially porous materials for hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of ammonia borane.

  19. Developing a Deeper Understanding of "Mathematics Teaching Expertise": An Examination of Three Chinese Mathematics Teachers' Resource Systems as Windows into Their Work and Expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Birgit; Xu, Binyan; Trouche, Luc; Wang, Chongyang

    2017-01-01

    In order to develop a deeper understanding of mathematics teaching expertise, in this study we use the Documentational Approach to Didactics to explore the resource systems of three Chinese mathematics "expert" teachers. Exploiting the Western and Eastern literature we examine the notion of "mathematics teaching expertise", as…

  20. A New Theological Culture in Order to Get a Deeper Understanding of the Richness of Religion and Religiosity in the Midst of Global Cultural Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharer, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    The author believes that the future of learning religion and religiously learning does not primary depend on new methods or medias transferring faith or religiosity to people's lives. It depends more on a change of theological awareness and of people's ways of theologizing in the midst of cultural flow in order to get a deeper understanding of the…

  1. Deep-sea fauna of European seas : an annotated species check-list of benthic invertebrates living deeper than 2000 m in the seas bordering Europe. Ophiuroidea

    OpenAIRE

    Smirnov, Igor S.; Piepenburg, Dieter; Ahearn, Cynthia; Juterzenka, Karen von

    2014-01-01

    An annotated check-list is given of Ophiuroidea species occurring deeper than 2000 m in the seas bordering Europe. The check-list is based on published data. The check-list includes 75 species. For each species synonymy, data on localities in European seas and general species distribution are provided. Station data are presented separately in the present thematic issue.

  2. Confirmation with the SALT telescope of a young Type Ia supernova at z=0.046 discovered during the "Deeper Wider Faster" program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoni, I.; Cooke, J.; Pritchard, T. A.; Kotze, M.; Miszalski, B.; Shara, M.; Mestric, U.; Tucker, B.; Plant, K.; Spiewak, R.; Ryder, S.; Abbott, T.; Allen, Rebecca; Anderson, G.; Asher, A.; Baglio, M. C.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M.; Bernard, S.; Bhandari, S.; Caleb, M.; Campana, S.; Coward, D.; Curtin, C.; D'Avanzo, P.; Deller, A.; Devlin, J. F.; Farah, W.; Fluke, C.; Flynn, C.; Foran, G.; Fugazza, D.; Gawin, B.; Hegarty, S.; Hodgson, R.; Hodgson, S.; Horst, J.; Howell, E.; Hussaini, I.; Jacobs, C.; Ko, M.; Lien, A.; Meade, B.; Melandri, A.; Moller, A.; Murphy, M. T.; Nanayakkara, T.; O'Neill, M.; Oslowski, S.; Peng, B.; Petroff, E.; Rest, A.; Robert, F.; Valdes, F.; Vohl, D.

    2017-02-01

    Further to ATel #10072, we report an additional discovery of a young Type Ia supernova from imaging on February 03.5, 2017 UT with the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) at CTIO during the recent & ldquo;Deeper, Wider, Faster & rdquo; program observations.

  3. Drivers of archaeal ammonia-oxidizing communities in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna eZhalnina

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA are highly abundant and play an important role in the nitrogen cycle. In addition, AOA have a significant impact on soil quality. AOA may cause nitrogen loss from soils, and the nitrate produced by AOA can lead to ground and surface water contamination, water eutrophication, and soil subsidence. The ammonia-oxidizing archaea discovered to date are classified in the phylum Thaumarchaeota. Only a few archaeal genomes are available in databases. As a result, AOA genes are not well annotated, and it is difficult to mine and identify archaeal genes within metagenomic libraries. Nevertheless, 16S rRNA and comparative analysis of ammonia monooxygenase sequences show that soils can vary greatly in the relative abundance of AOA. In some soils, AOA can comprise more than 10% of the total prokaryotic community. In other soils, AOA comprise less than 0.5% of the community. Many approaches have been used to measure the abundance and diversity of this group including DGGE, T-RFLP, q-PCR, and DNA sequencing. AOA have been studied across different soil types and various ecosystems from the Antarctic dry valleys to the tropical forests of South America to the soils near Mount Everest. Different studies have identified multiple soil factors that trigger the abundance of AOA. These factors include pH, concentration of available ammonia, organic matter content, moisture content, nitrogen content, clay content, as well as other triggers. Land use management appears to have a major effect on the abundance of AOA in soil, which may be the result of nitrogen fertilizer used in agricultural soils. This review summarizes the published results on this topic and suggests future work that will increase our understanding of how soil management and edaphoclimatic factors influence AOA.

  4. Ammonia emissions from deciduous forest after leaf fall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristina; Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Hertel, Ole

    2013-01-01

    leaf fall, the magnitude and temporal structure of the measured NH3 emission fluxes could be adequately reproduced with the bi-directional resistance model; it suggested the forest ground layer (soil and litter) to be the main contributing component to the NH3 emissions. The modelled concentration from...... anthropogenic NH3 sources. This suggests that an accurate description of ammonia fluxes over forest ecosystems requires a dynamic description of atmospheric and vegetation processes....

  5. Intensive Ammonia and Methane Oxidation in Organic Liquid Manure Crusts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Daniel Aagren; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Schramm, Andreas;

    of the crusts. PCR targeting the unique methane and ammonia monooxygenases were applied together with FISH to detect the presence of the two bacterial groups. Potential activity was assessed by short term slurry incubations of crust samples while monitoring NO2- production or CH4 consumption. Crusts were...... also CH4 emission mitigation, an organic surface crust can be effective if populations of MOB and AOB are allowed to build up....

  6. Fluxes of ammonia in the coastal marine boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, L.L.; Hertel, O.; Skjøth, C.A.;

    2003-01-01

    and that the calculated overall ammonia dry deposition may be overestimated by a factor two or more in the coastal region. A more detailed study is needed in order to quantify how this may influence overall deposition to given marine waters. In some cases the deposition may solely be redistributed whereas the total...... deposition is only marginally influenced. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  7. Pigment analysis and ammonia excretion in herbicide tolerant cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvakumar, G; Gopalaswamy, G; Kannaiyan, S

    2002-08-01

    Isolation of cyanobacteria was attempted from herbicide applied rice soils. The predominant genera were Westiellopsis followed by Anabaena, Nostoc and Oscillatoria. The herbicide tolerance was further tested by growing the cyanobacterial cultures in BG-11 medium supplemented with varying concentrations of the commonly used rice herbicide, viz butachlor under in vitro condition. The chlorophyll-a, phycobiliproteins and ammonia excretion were assessed at periodic intervals. Westiellopsis showed the maximum tolerance followed by Anabaena, Nostoc and Oscillatoria.

  8. A novel way to synthesize Pb nanotapes in liquid ammonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Sun; Meng Lei Zhang; Xiao Jun Tao; Yan Bao Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Lead nanotapes were synthesized in liquid ammonia solvent in the presence of sodium metal at low temperature. The process was template free. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations and X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterizations revealed that the as-prepared Pb nanotapes have average diameters in the range of 40-50 nm, and lengths up to several hundred nanometers, and exhibit cubic crystal structures.

  9. Electrochemistry in Near-Critical and Supercritical Fluids. I. Ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-18

    in a supercritical fluid containing an electrolyte. We show j here that electrocheical techniques, such as cyclic voltametry and .’ chronocoulametrY...8217,_- Electrochemistry, supercritical, ammonia S&. ASSTRACT. (CGWIU&UI VOWO *fo of Rea@ d 8~ US F &I-*I 81116 Cyclic voltanmetric and chronocoulometric studies of N...Bard 4 Department of Chemi stry, The University of Texas Austin, TX 78712 (Abstract) Cyclic voittuuntric and chronocoulometric studies of NH3

  10. Ammonia thermo-pumps; Les thermopompes a l`ammoniac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallin, G. [Societe Clauger (France)

    1997-12-31

    The main thermodynamic principles and performances of a compression refrigeration machine are first reviewed and its application to the simultaneous production of hot and cold in food industry is presented. Coefficients of performance and technical and environmental regulations of such systems using ammonia (NH{sub 3}) are presented. An application example is given with heat recovery on the low temperature (minus 10 C) glycol water NH{sub 3} production side

  11. Global evaluation of ammonia bi-directional exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, L; D. Henze; J. Bash; G.-R. Jeong; Cady-Pereira, K.; Shephard, M; Luo, M; F. Paulot; Capps, S.

    2015-01-01

    Bi-directional air–surface exchange of ammonia (NH3) has been neglected in many air quality models. In this study, we implement the bi-directional exchange of NH3 in the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. We also introduce an updated diurnal variability scheme for NH3 livestock emissions and evaluate the recently developed MASAGE_NH3 bottom up inventory. While updated diurnal variability improves comparison of modeled-to-hourly in situ measurements i...

  12. Strategies to Mitigate Ammonia Release on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macatangay, Ariel V.; Prokhorov, Kimberlee S.; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) is crucial to its continuous operation. Off-nominal situations can arise from virtually any aspect of ISS operations. One situation of particular concern is the inadvertent release of a chemical into the ISS atmosphere. In sufficient quantities, a chemical release can render the ISS uninhabitable regardless of the chemical s toxicity as a result of its effect on the hardware used to maintain the environment. This is certainly true with system chemicals which are integral components to the function and purpose of the system. Safeguards, such as design for minimum risk, multiple containment, hazard assessments, rigorous safety reviews, and others, are in place to minimize the probability of a chemical release to the ISS environment thereby allowing the benefits of system chemicals to outweigh the risks associated with them. The thermal control system is an example of such a system. Heat generated within the ISS is transferred from the internal thermal control system (ITCS) to the external thermal control system (ETCS) via two, single-barrier interface heat exchangers (IFHX). The ITCS and ETCS are closed-loop systems which utilize water and anhydrous ammonia, respectively, as heat-transfer fluids. There is approximately 1200 lbs. (208 gallons) of anhydrous ammonia in the ETCS circulating through the two heat exchangers, transferring heat from the ITCS water lines. At the amounts present in the ETCS, anhydrous ammonia is one system chemical that can easily overwhelm the station atmosphere scrubbing capabilities and render the ISS uninhabitable in the event of a catastrophic rupture. Although safeguards have certainly minimized the risk of an ammonia release into the Station atmosphere, credible release scenarios and controls to manage these scenarios are examined.

  13. Control of catalytic hydrotreating selectivity with ammonia. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satterfield, C.N.; Lee, C.; Gultekin, S.

    1993-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the possibility of control of product selectivity in the hydroprocessing of coal liquids and related substances by adding small amounts of ammonia. Quinoline was used in this study and in many others as representative of heterocyclic N compounds found in coal liquids. Coal liquids also contain hydroxy pyridines, but by studies with 8-OH quinoline, a representative compound (Part I), we demonstrated that the OH group was rapidly removed at the beginning of reaction to form quinoline, which reacted in the same manner as quinoline fed as such. In Part II we showed that in a mixture of naphthalene and quinoline, with the addition of ammonia there is an operating region in which complete HDN of quinoline can be achieved, but with greater conversion of naphthalene to tetralin instead of to decalin than was the case in the absence of added ammonia. This is of some significance to coal liquefaction since tetralin is a good hydrogen donor, but decalin is not. In Part III we showed that NH{sub 3} addition to a mixture of quinoline and phenanthrene provides an operating region where complete HDN of quinoline can be achieved with reduced formation of hydrogenated phenanthrenes and cracking to biphenyl. Part IV, a study of the hydrodeoxygenation (DHO) of dibenzofuran in the presence of naphthalene, showed that NH{sub 3} strongly inhibits HDO reactions and its effects on naphthalene here were much the same as in Part II. In Part V it was demonstrated that in the hydrotreating of propylbenzene, the addition of ammonia increased the selectivity towards ring hydrogenation (generally desired for reformulated motor fuels) and away from dealkylation (generally undesired), but the overall reaction rate at a fixed temperature drops substantially.

  14. Atmospheric ammonia exchange on a heathland in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Birgitte; Nørnberg, Per; Rasmussen, Keld Rømer

    Passive flux samplers were used to determine the ammonia exchange on an inland heath in Denmark over the last 2 years. The samplers measured the horizontal ammonia flux directly. Data were sampled continuously for periods of 1-4 weeks. The micro-meteorological gradient method was used with passive flux samplers and cup anemometers at different heights above the vegetation in order to calculate the vertical fluxes of ammonia. First a fixed sampler system was used with tubes mounted in four orthogonal horizontal directions. This system has been successfully applied to measure the emission from fertilized crops. Adapting this type of sampler to measure the deposition to heathlands did not prove to be straightforward. The precision of the calculated ammonia concentrations was too poor to give an acceptable accuracy for the concentration gradient. The problems were (a) driving rain which entered the tubes, (b) too few measuring points in each concentration profile, and (c) too long sampling periods to allow for the low-concentration levels above the heath area and the detection limits. Therefore, a passive flux sampler mounted on a wind vane and fitted with a rain shelter was developed. Results from the first 5 weekly periods are very promising, yielding accurate concentration gradients. The advantages of the passive flux samplers on the wind vane are (a) the minimum measuring period can be approximately halved compared to the fixed samplers, (b) some of the directional correction terms used with the fixed passive flux samplers are dispensed with, and (c) the field and laboratory work is minimized.

  15. Physiological and behavioral responses of sheep to gaseous ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C J C; Pines, M K; Latter, M; Muller, T; Petherick, J C; Norman, S T; Gaughan, J B

    2012-05-01

    Ammonia can accumulate in highly stocked sheep accommodation, for example during live export shipments, and could affect sheep health and welfare. Thus, the objective of this experiment was to test the effects of 4 NH(3) concentrations, 4 (control), 12, 21, and 34 mg/m(3), on the physiology and behavior of wether sheep. Sheep were held for 12 d under a micro-climate and stocking density similar to shipboard conditions recorded on voyages from Australia to the Middle East during the northern hemispheric summer. Ammonia increased macrophage activity in transtracheal aspirations, indicating active pulmonary inflammation; however, it had no effect (P > 0.05) on hematological variables. Feed intake decreased (P = 0.002) in proportion to ammonia concentration, and BW gain decreased (P sheep were less active, with less locomotion, pawing, and panting. Twenty-eight days after exposure to NH(3), the pulmonary macrophage activity and BW of the sheep returned to that of sheep exposed to only 4 mg/m(3). It was concluded that NH(3) induced a temporary inflammatory response of the respiratory system and reduced BW gain, which together indicated a transitory adverse effect on the welfare of sheep.

  16. A(a)LS: Ammonia-induced amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Bhavin

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a dreadful, devastating and incurable motor neuron disease. Aetiologically, it is a multigenic, multifactorial and multiorgan disease. Despite intense research, ALS pathology remains unexplained. Following extensive literature review, this paper posits a new integrative explanation. This framework proposes that ammonia neurotoxicity is a main player in ALS pathogenesis. According to this explanation, a combination of impaired ammonia removal— mainly because of impaired hepatic urea cycle dysfunction—and increased ammoniagenesis— mainly because of impaired glycolytic metabolism in fast twitch skeletal muscle—causes chronic hyperammonia in ALS. In the absence of neuroprotective calcium binding proteins (calbindin, calreticulin and parvalbumin), elevated ammonia—a neurotoxin—damages motor neurons. Ammonia-induced motor neuron damage occurs through multiple mechanisms such as macroautophagy-endolysosomal impairment, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, CDK5 activation, oxidative/nitrosative stress, neuronal hyperexcitability and neuroinflammation. Furthermore, the regional pattern of calcium binding proteins’ loss, owing to either ER stress and/or impaired oxidative metabolism, determines clinical variability of ALS. Most importantly, this new framework can be generalised to explain other neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington’s disease and Parkinsonism. PMID:27785351

  17. Ecogenomics of Zooplankton Community Reveals Ecological Threshold of Ammonia Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianghua; Zhang, Xiaowei; Xie, Yuwei; Song, Chao; Sun, Jingying; Zhang, Yong; Giesy, John P; Yu, Hongxia

    2017-02-23

    Communities of zooplankton can be adversely affected by contamination resulting from human activities. Yet understanding the influence of water quality on zooplankton under field-conditions is hindered by traditional labor-intensive approaches that are prone to incomplete or uncertain taxonomic determinations. Here, for the first time, an eco-genomic approach, based on genetic diversity in the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) region of DNA of zooplankton was used to develop a site-specific, water quality criterion (WQC) for ammonia (NH3). Ammonia has been recognized as a primary stressor in the catchment of the large, eutrophic Tai Lake, China. Nutrients, especially NH3 and nitrite (NO3(-)) had more significant effects on structure of the zooplankton community than did other environmental factors. Abundances of rotifers increased along a gradient of increasing concentrations of total ammonia nitrogen (TAN), while abundances of copepods and cladocera decreased. A novel, rapid, species sensitivity distribution (SSD) approach based on operational taxonomic units (OTUs) was established to develop a WQC for NH3. The WQC based on OTUs was consistent with the WQC based on the traditional morphology taxonomy approach. This genetics-based SSD approach could be a useful tool for monitoring for status and trends in species composition and deriving ecological criteria and an efficient biomonitoring tool to protect local aquatic ecosystems in virtually any aquatic ecosystem.

  18. Kinetics and thermodynamics of Si(111) surface nitridation in ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansurov, Vladimir G.; Malin, Timur V.; Galitsyn, Yurij G.; Shklyaev, Alexander A.; Zhuravlev, Konstantin S.

    2016-05-01

    Kinetics and thermodynamics of Si(111) surface nitridation under an ammonia flux at different substrate temperatures are investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. Two different stages of the nitridation process were revealed. The initial stage is the fast (within few seconds) formation of ordered two-dimensional SiN phase, occuring due to the topmost active surface Si atom (Sisurf) interaction with ammonia molecules. It is followed by the late stage consisting in the slow (within few minutes) amorphous Si3N4 phase formation as a result of the interaction of Si atoms in the lattice site (Siinc) with chemisorbed ammonia molecules. It was found that the ordered SiN phase formation rate decreases, as the temperature increases. The kinetic model of the initial stage was developed, in which the ordered SiN phase formation is the two-dimensional phase transition in the lattice gas with SiN cells. The enthalpy of the active surface Si atom generation on the clean Si(111) surface was estimated to be about 1.5 eV. In contrast, the amorphous Si3N4 phase formation is the normal (thermally activated) chemical process with the first-order kinetics, whose activation energy and pre-exponential factor are 2.4 eV and 108 1/s, respectively.

  19. Optical fiber waveguide sensor for the colorimetric detection of ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Katrin; Rist, Jonas; Peter, Carolin; Wöllenstein, Jürgen

    2011-06-01

    We present the development and characterization of a fiber-optic colorimetric gas sensor combined with the electronic circuitry for measurement control and RFID communication. The gas sensor detects ammonia using a 300 μm polyolefin fiber coated with a gas-sensitive polymer film. The spectral and time-dependent sensitivity of various polymer films was tested in transmission measurements. Light from a standard LED at λ = 590 nm was coupled into the polyolefin fiber through the front face. A prototype of the gas sensor with the direct coupling method was tested under realistic measurement conditions, i.e. battery-driven and in a completely autonomous mode. The sensor system showed good sensitivity to the ammonia concentrations and response times in the order of minutes. The achievable power consumption was below 100μW.The films contained the pH-sensitive dyes bromocresol purple or bromophenol blue embedded in either ethyl cellulose or polyvinyl butyral, and optionally tributyl phosphate as plasticizer. The bromophenol blue based films showed a strong reaction to ammonia, with saturation concentrations around 1000 ppm and response times of about 15 seconds to 100ppm. The colorimetric reaction was simulated using a simple kinetic model which was in good agreement with the experimental results.

  20. Formation of Hydroxylamine from Ammonia and Hydroxyl Radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Lahouari; Zins, Emilie-Laure

    2014-06-01

    In the interstellar medium, as well as in icy comets, ammonia may be a crucial species in the first step toward the formation of amino-acids and other prebiotic molecules such as hydroxylamine (NH2OH). It is worth to notice that the NH3/H2 ratio in the ISM is 3 10-5 compared the H2O/H2 one which is only 7 10-5. Using either electron-UV irradiations of water-ammonia ices or successive hydrogenation of solid nitric oxide, laboratory experiments have already shown the feasibility of reactions that may take place on the surface of ice grains in molecular clouds, and may lead to the formation of this precursor. Herein is proposed a new reaction pathway involving ammonia and hydroxyl radicals generated in a microwave discharge. Experimental studies, at 3 and 10 K, in solid phase as well as in neon matrix have shown that this reaction proceed via a hydrogen abstraction, leading to the formation of NH2 radical, that further recombine with hydroxyl radical to form hydroxylamine, under non-energetic conditions.

  1. Physiological responses of plant leaves to atmospheric ammonia and ammonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, J.; Soares, A.

    Misting of leaves of several plant species with 3 mM aqueous NH +4 at pH 5, or fumigation with 3000 μg m -3 gaseous NH 3 for 1 h, elicits similar biochemical and physiological changes in the species tested. The enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) was shown to increase its activity in all species, while that of nitrate reductase (NR) was inhibited, at least in those species which possessed the ability to induce foliar NR. At the same time there were marked changes in organic anion concentrations, with malate and citrate in particular being reduced in concentration, following either NH +4 or NH 3 application to leaves. The changes in organic anions are also discussed in the light of pH regulation by the cell. A stimulation of photosynthesis was also evident when leaves were treated with either NH 3 or NH +4. It is argued that, because of the differences in solution chemistry of the two ammonia forms, the aqueous form applied at pH 5 and the gaseous form being an alkali in solution, these changes can only have occurred through the ability of the leaves to readily assimilate both forms of the ammonia. The biochemical changes might have potential as markers for the onset of physiological perturbation by atmospheric ammonia pollution, particularly changes in organic acid concentration; their use in an index of pollution stress is briefly discussed.

  2. Equations of state of detonation products: ammonia and methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, John; Dattelbaum, Dana; Goodwin, Peter; Garcia, Daniel; Coe, Joshua; Leiding, Jeffery; Gibson, Lloyd; Bartram, Brian

    2015-06-01

    Ammonia (NH3) and methane (CH4) are two principal product gases resulting from explosives detonation, and the decomposition of other organic materials under shockwave loading (such as foams). Accurate thermodynamic descriptions of these gases are important for understanding the detonation performance of high explosives. However, shock compression data often do not exist for molecular species in the dense gas phase, and are limited in the fluid phase. Here, we present equation of state measurements of elevated initial density ammonia and methane gases dynamically compressed in gas-gun driven plate impact experiments. Pressure and density of the shocked gases on the principal Hugoniot were determined from direct particle velocity and shock wave velocity measurements recorded using optical velocimetry (Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and VISAR (velocity interferometer system for any reflector)). Streak spectroscopy and 5-color pyrometry were further used to measure the emission from the shocked gases, from which the temperatures of the shocked gases were estimated. Up to 0.07 GPa, ammonia was not observed to ionize, with temperature remaining below 7000 K. These results provide quantitative measurements of the Hugoniot locus for improving equations of state models of detonation products.

  3. Performance of plate type heat exchanger as ammonia condenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Andrew

    In this study, I experimentally analyzed the performance of a commercial semi-welded plate type heat exchanger (PHE) for use with ammonia systems. I determined performance parameters such as overall heat transfer coefficient, capacity, and pressure drop of the semi-welded PHE. This was analyzed by varying different parameters which demonstrated changes in overall heat transfer coefficient, capacity, and pressure drop. Both water and ammonia flow rates to the semi-welded PHE were varied independently, and analyzed in order to understand how changes in flow rates affected performance. Inlet water temperature was also varied, in order to understand how raising condenser water inlet temperature would affect performance. Finally, pressure drop was monitored to better understand the performance limitations of the semi-welded PHE. Testing of the semi-welded will give insight as to the performance of the semi-welded PHE in a potential ocean thermal energy conversion system, and whether the semi-welded PHE is a viable choice for use as an ammonia condenser.

  4. Effects of ammonia from livestock farming on lichen photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Luca; Pirintsos, Stergios Arg; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos; Pisani, Tommaso; Navakoudis, Eleni; Loppi, Stefano

    2010-06-01

    This study investigated if atmospheric ammonia (NH3) pollution around a sheep farm influences the photosynthetic performance of the lichens Evernia prunastri and Pseudevernia furfuracea. Thalli of both species were transplanted for up to 30 days in a semi-arid region (Crete, Greece), at sites with concentrations of atmospheric ammonia of ca. 60 microg/m3 (at a sheep farm), ca. 15 microg/m3 (60 m from the sheep farm) and ca. 2 microg/m3 (a remote area 5 km away). Lichen photosynthesis was analysed by the chlorophyll a fluorescence emission to identify targets of ammonia pollution. The results indicated that the photosystem II of the two lichens exposed to NH(3) is susceptible to this pollutant in the gas-phase. The parameter PI(ABS), a global index of photosynthetic performance that combines in a single expression the three functional steps of the photosynthetic activity (light absorption, excitation energy trapping, and conversion of excitation energy to electron transport) was much more sensitive to NH3 than the FV/FM ratio, one of the most commonly used stress indicators.

  5. Ammonia oxidation at high pressure and intermediate temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yu; Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation experiments were conducted at high pressure (30 bar and 100 bar) under oxidizing and stoichiometric conditions, respectively, and temperatures ranging from 450 to 925 K. The oxidation of ammonia was slow under stoichiometric conditions in the temperature range investigated. Under...... oxidizing conditions the onset temperature for reaction was 850–875 K at 30 bar, while at 100 bar it was about 800 K, with complete consumption of NH3 at 875 K. The products of reaction were N2 and N2O, while NO and NO2 concentrations were below the detection limit even under oxidizing conditions. The data...... was satisfactory. The main oxidation path for NH3 at high pressure under oxidizing conditions is NH3⟶+OH NH2⟶+HO2,NO2 H2NO⟶+O2 HNO⟶+O2 NO ⟶+NH2 N2. The modeling predictions are most sensitive to the reactions NH2 + NO = NNH + OH and NH2 + HO2 = H2NO + OH, which promote the ammonia consumption by forming OH...

  6. Ammonia-based feedforward and feedback aeration control in activated sludge processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Leiv; Jones, Richard M; Dold, Peter L; Bott, Charles B

    2014-01-01

    Aeration control at wastewater treatment plants based on ammonia as the controlled variable is applied for one of two reasons: (1) to reduce aeration costs, or (2) to reduce peaks in effluent ammonia. Aeration limitation has proven to result in significant energy savings, may reduce external carbon addition, and can improve denitrification and biological phosphorus (bio-P) performance. Ammonia control for limiting aeration has been based mainly on feedback control to constrain complete nitrification by maintaining approximately one to two milligrams of nitrogen per liter of ammonia in the effluent. Increased attention has been given to feedforward ammonia control, where aeration control is based on monitoring influent ammonia load. Typically, the intent is to anticipate the impact of sudden load changes, and thereby reduce effluent ammonia peaks. This paper evaluates the fundamentals of ammonia control with a primary focus on feedforward control concepts. A case study discussion is presented that reviews different ammonia-based control approaches. In most instances, feedback control meets the objectives for both aeration limitation and containment of effluent ammonia peaks. Feedforward control, applied specifically for switching aeration on or off in swing zones, can be beneficial when the plant encounters particularly unusual influent disturbances.

  7. Ammonia oxidation kinetics and temperature sensitivity of a natural marine community dominated by Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Rachel E A; Qin, Wei; Schauer, Andy J; Armbrust, E Virginia; Ingalls, Anitra E; Moffett, James W; Stahl, David A; Devol, Allan H

    2013-01-01

    Archaeal ammonia oxidizers (AOAs) are increasingly recognized as prominent members of natural microbial assemblages. Evidence that links the presence of AOA with in situ ammonia oxidation activity is limited, and the abiotic factors that regulate the distribution of AOA natural assemblages are not well defined. We used quantitative PCR to enumerate amoA (encodes α-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase) abundances; AOA amoA gene copies greatly outnumbered ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and amoA transcripts were derived primarily from AOA throughout the water column of Hood Canal, Puget Sound, WA, USA. We generated a Michaelis–Menten kinetics curve for ammonia oxidation by the natural community and found that the measured Km of 98±14 nmol l−1 was close to that for cultivated AOA representative Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1. Temperature did not have a significant effect on ammonia oxidation rates for incubation temperatures ranging from 8 to 20 °C, which is within the temperature range for depths of measurable ammonia oxidation at the site. This study provides substantial evidence, through both amoA gene copies and transcript abundances and the kinetics response, that AOA are the dominant active ammonia oxidizers in this marine environment. We propose that future ammonia oxidation experiments use a Km for the natural community to better constrain ammonia oxidation rates determined with the commonly used 15NH4+ dilution technique. PMID:23657360

  8. Measurement and reduction of porewater ammonia in 10-day sediment toxicity tests with marine amphipods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, N.P.; Karls, R.K.; Barrows, M.E. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Ammonia is recognized as a potential contributor to amphipod toxicity in sediment bioassays, such as those required for dredged material testing. Measurement of ammonia in sediment porewater prior to testing and monitoring of ammonia during testing have not been routinely performed. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) have recently provided guidance for reducing sediment porewater ammonia by aeration and by exchange of overlying water prior to introducing test animals. In this study, two amphipod species, Rhepoxynius abronius and Eohaustorius estuarius, were exposed to eight sediment treatments in 10-day solid-phase static bioassays. Ammonia in sediment porewater was measured prior to testing; treatments with > 70 mg/L total ammonia were manipulated to reduce porewater ammonia in the test chambers to {<=}30 mg/L, following procedures in a memorandum by EPA and USACE. Porewater ammonia was also measured {approximately}24 h after test set up (when animals would normally be added), each day of manipulation before animals were added, and also on Days 5 and 9 for the E. estuarius test. The treatment with the highest porewater ammonia concentration was tested with and without manipulation. Reduction of porewater ammonia required up to 2 days. Toxicity was reduced in the manipulated sediments, but was statistically significant relative to control and reference treatments.

  9. Ammonia removal from water: The comparison between using the wind speed and agitation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intamanee, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia removal from skim latex is an essential step in skim block production process. In general, skim latex contains about 0.4% ammonia by weight of skim latex and needs to be reduced in order to minimize acid usage during rubber coagulation step. The method used to remove ammonia from skim latex in many concentrated rubber latex plants is ammonia volatilization by agitating skim latex using a large agitator in a mixing pool. In this research, a new method to remove ammonia from water by blowing wind over the water surface was investigated. The effects of agitation speed and wind speed on overall mass transfer coefficient and removal rate of ammonia were investigated in a pilot scale experiment. The result has shown that the overall mass transfer coefficient and the ammonia removal rate increase linearly with increasing Reynolds number of air and liquid. However, the ammonia removal rate by using wind speed was much higher than that given by agitation method. The wind speed method proposed in this study is then recommended for ammonia removal from skim latex. Possible ways for applying the wind speed method for skim latex production plant are also suggested. The relationship between the wind speed or Reynolds number and the mass transfer coefficient can also be used to design the system for ammonia removal from water byusing wind speed.

  10. On the stability of the disordered molecular alloy phase of ammonia hemihydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C. W. [Diamond Light Source, Ltd., Harwell, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Bull, C. L. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Stinton, G. W.; Amos, D. M.; Donnelly, M.-E.; Loveday, J. S. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-07

    The disordered-molecular-alloy phase (DMA) of ammonia hydrates [J. S. Loveday and R. J. Nelmes, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4329 (1999)] is unique in that it has substitutional disorder of ammonia and water over the molecular sites of a body centred cubic lattice. Whilst this structure has been observed in ammonia di- and mono-hydrate compositions, it has not been conclusively observed in the ammonia hemihydrate system. This work presents investigations of the structural behaviour of ammonia hemihydrate as a function of P and T. The indications of earlier studies [Ma et al. RSC Adv. 2, 4290 (2012)] that the DMA structure could be produced by compression of ammonia hemihydrate above 20 GPa at ambient temperature are confirmed. In addition, the DMA structure was found to form reversibly both from the melt, and on warming of ammonia hemihydrate phase-II, in the pressure range between 4 and 8 GPa. The route used to make the DMA structure from ammonia mono- and di-hydrates—compression at 170 K to 6 GPa followed by warming to ambient temperature—was found not to produce the DMA structure for ammonia hemihydrate. These results provide the first strong evidence that DMA is a thermodynamically stable form. A high-pressure phase diagram for ammonia hemihydrate is proposed which has importance for planetary modelling.

  11. Growth of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in soil microcosms is inhibited by acetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offre, Pierre; Prosser, James I; Nicol, Graeme W

    2009-10-01

    Autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were considered to be responsible for the majority of ammonia oxidation in soil until the recent discovery of the autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea. To assess the relative contributions of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers to soil ammonia oxidation, their growth was analysed during active nitrification in soil microcosms incubated for 30 days at 30 degrees C, and the effect of an inhibitor of ammonia oxidation (acetylene) on their growth and soil nitrification kinetics was determined. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of bacterial ammonia oxidizer 16S rRNA genes did not detect any change in their community composition during incubation, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of bacterial amoA genes indicated a small decrease in abundance in control and acetylene-containing microcosms. DGGE fingerprints of archaeal amoA and 16S rRNA genes demonstrated changes in the relative abundance of specific crenarchaeal phylotypes during active nitrification. Growth was also indicated by increases in crenarchaeal amoA gene copy number, determined by qPCR. In microcosms containing acetylene, nitrification and growth of the crenarchaeal phylotypes were suppressed, suggesting that these crenarchaea are ammonia oxidizers. Growth of only archaeal but not bacterial ammonia oxidizers occurred in microcosms with active nitrification, indicating that ammonia oxidation was mostly due to archaea in the conditions of the present study.

  12. Production of oceanic nitrous oxide by ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Löscher

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding that microbial ammonia oxidation in the ocean is performed by archaea to a greater extent than by bacteria has drastically changed the view on oceanic nitrification. The numerical dominance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOA over their bacterial counterparts (AOB in large parts of the ocean leads to the hypothesis that AOA rather than AOB could be the key organisms for the oceanic production of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O that occurs as a by-product of nitrification. Very recently, enrichment cultures of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been reported to produce N2O.

    Here, we demonstrate that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA were detectable throughout the water column of the eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA and eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP Oceans. Particularly in the ETNA, comparable patterns of abundance and expression of archaeal amoA genes and N2O co-occurred in the oxygen minimum, whereas the abundances of bacterial amoA genes were negligible. Moreover, selective inhibition of archaea in seawater incubations from the ETNA decreased the N2O production significantly. In studies with the only cultivated marine archaeal ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, we provide the first direct evidence for N2O production in a pure culture of AOA, excluding the involvement of other microorganisms as possibly present in enrichments. N. maritimus showed high N2O production rates under low oxygen concentrations comparable to concentrations existing in the oxycline of the ETNA, whereas the N2O production from two AOB cultures was comparably low under similar conditions. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the production of N2O in tropical ocean areas results mainly from archaeal nitrification and will be affected by the predicted decrease in dissolved

  13. Production of oceanic nitrous oxide by ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Loescher

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding that microbial ammonia oxidation in the ocean is performed by archaea to a greater extent than by bacteria has drastically changed the view on oceanic nitrification. The numerical dominance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOA over their bacterial counterparts (AOB in large parts of the ocean leads to the hypothesis that AOA rather than AOB could be the key organisms for the oceanic production of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O which occurs as a by-product of nitrification. Very recently, enrichment cultures of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been described to produce N2O. Here, we demonstrate that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA were detectable throughout the water column of the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic (ETNA and Eastern Tropical South Pacific Oceans (ETSP. Particularly in the ETNA, maxima in abundance and expression of archaeal amoA genes correlated with the N2O maximum and the oxygen minimum, whereas the abundances of bacterial amoA genes were negligible. Moreover, selective inhibition of archaea in seawater incubations from the ETNA decreased the N2O production significantly. In studies with the only cultivated marine archaeal ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, we provide the first direct evidence for N2O production in a pure culture of AOA, excluding the involvement of other microorganisms as possibly present in enrichments. N. maritimus showed high N2O production rates under low oxygen concentrations comparable to concentrations existing in the oxycline of the ETNA, whereas the N2O production from two AOB cultures was comparably low under similar conditions. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the production of N2O in tropical ocean areas results mainly from archaeal nitrification and will be affected by the predicted decrease in dissolved oxygen

  14. Physiological and molecular analysis of the interactive effects of feeding and high environmental ammonia on branchial ammonia excretion and Na+ uptake in freshwater rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Alex M; Nawata, C Michele; Wood, Chris M

    2010-11-01

    Recently, a "Na(+)/NH(4)(+) exchange complex" model has been proposed for ammonia excretion in freshwater fish. The model suggests that ammonia transport occurs via Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins and is facilitated by gill boundary layer acidification attributable to the hydration of CO(2) and H(+) efflux by Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE-2) and H(+)-ATPase. The latter two mechanisms of boundary layer acidification would occur in conjunction with Na(+) influx (through a Na(+) channel energized by H(+)-ATPase and directly via NHE-2). Here, we show that natural ammonia loading via feeding increases branchial mRNA expression of Rh genes, NHE-2, and H(+)-ATPase, as well as H(+)-ATPase activity in juvenile trout, similar to previous findings with ammonium salt infusions and high environmental ammonia (HEA) exposure. The associated increase in ammonia excretion occurs in conjunction with a fourfold increase in Na(+) influx after a meal. When exposed to HEA (1.5 mmol/l NH(4)HCO(3) at pH 8.0), both unfed and fed trout showed differential increases in mRNA expression of Rhcg2, NHE-2, and H(+)-ATPase, but H(+)-ATPase activity remained at control levels. Unfed fish exposed to HEA displayed a characteristic reversal of ammonia excretion, initially uptaking ammonia, whereas fed fish (4 h after the meal) did not show this reversal, being able to immediately excrete ammonia against the gradient imposed by HEA. Exposure to HEA also led to a depression of Na(+) influx, demonstrating that ammonia excretion can be uncoupled from Na(+) influx. We suggest that the efflux of H(+), rather than Na(+) influx itself, is critical to the facilitation of ammonia excretion.

  15. Ammonia photolysis and the greenhouse effect in the primordial atmosphere of the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, W. R.; Atreya, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    Photochemical calculations indicate that in the prebiotic atmosphere of earth ammonia would have been irreversibly converted to N2 in less than 40 years if the ammonia surface mixing ratio were no more than 0.0001. However, if a continuous outgassing of ammonia were maintained, radiative-equilibrium calculations indicate that a surface mixing ratio of ammonia of 0.0001 or greater would provide a sufficient greenhouse effect to keep the surface temperature above freezing. With a 0.0001 mixing ratio of ammonia, 60% to 70% of the present-day solar luminosity would be adequate to maintain surface temperatures above freezing. A lower limit to the time constant for accumulation of an amount of nitrogen equivalent to the present day value is 10 my if the outgassing were such as to provide a continuous surface mixing ratio of ammonia of at least 0.00001.

  16. Synthesis of ammonia directly from air and water at ambient temperature and pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Rong; Irvine, John T S; Tao, Shanwen

    2013-01-01

    The N≡N bond (225 kcal mol⁻¹) in dinitrogen is one of the strongest bonds in chemistry therefore artificial synthesis of ammonia under mild conditions is a significant challenge. Based on current knowledge, only bacteria and some plants can synthesise ammonia from air and water at ambient temperature and pressure. Here, for the first time, we report artificial ammonia synthesis bypassing N₂ separation and H₂ production stages. A maximum ammonia production rate of 1.14 × 10⁻⁵ mol m⁻² s⁻¹ has been achieved when a voltage of 1.6 V was applied. Potentially this can provide an alternative route for the mass production of the basic chemical ammonia under mild conditions. Considering climate change and the depletion of fossil fuels used for synthesis of ammonia by conventional methods, this is a renewable and sustainable chemical synthesis process for future.

  17. Experimental study of separation of ammonia synthesis vent gas by hydrate formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Taibin; Wang Leiyan; Liu Aixian; Guo Xuqiang; Ma Qinglan; Li Guowen; Sun Qiang

    2009-01-01

    Termodynamic data on methane hydrate formation in the presence of ammonia are very important for upgrading of ammonia synthesis vent gas using hydrate formation.This paper is focused on the formation conditions of methane hydrate in the presence of ammonia and the effects of gas-liquid ratio and temperature on the separation of vent gas by hydrate formation.Equilibrium data for methane hydrate within an ammonia mole concentration range from 1% to 5 % were obtained.The experimental results indicated that ammonia has an inhibitive effect on hydrate formation.The higher the ammonia concentration, the higher is the pressure reguired for methane hydrate formation would be.The primary experimental results showed that when volume ratio of gas to liquid was 80:1 and temperature was 283.15 K, total mole fraction of (H2+N2) in gas phase could reach 96.9 %.

  18. Measurements of the horizontal gradient of ammonia over a conifer forest in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovmand, M.F.; Andersen, H.V.; Løfstrøm, P.;

    1998-01-01

    Horizontal gradients of ammonia have been measured in order to determine the spatial variation of the concentration above a forest as a function of distance from ammonia emitting areas. Measurements were carried out in June 1994 during conditions with winds from north and west. Concentration levels...... of ammonia were generally low, ranging from 0.04 to 0.7 mu g NH3-N m(-3). At northerly winds the concentration levels were about four times higher than at westerly winds, which relates well to more intensive and larger areas of ammonia emission towards north of the forest. The ammonia concentration decreases...... in the forest; in general the percentage decreases were lower during northerly winds (16%) than those obtained during westerly winds (67%). This is probably due to the larger extension of emitting areas towards north than towards the west. Model calculations are comparable with the measured ammonia...

  19. Yucca schidigera extract--a bioresource for the reduction of ammonia from mariculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacruz-Reyes, Roberto A; Chien, Yew-Hu

    2010-07-01

    Extract of a desert plant, Yuccaschidigera (YUPE) at 0 mg L(-1) (control), 18, 36 and 72 mg L(-1) was added to seawater containing 30, 50 and 100 Kuruma shrimp Marsupenaeusjaponicus postlarvae (PL) per liter with or without aeration for 24h to study its effects on reducing ammonia excreted from the PL. Even at the lowest YUPE addition level and the highest PL density, no ammonia accumulated in both aerated and no-aerated set-ups for up to 12h. Ammonia accumulated only in the controls. YUPE showed more effective in reducing ammonia in seawater from this biogenic source than ammonia from chemical source used in previous studies. Consequently, YUPE is identified as a natural, safe, and effective solution for ammonia reduction in seawater and mariculture. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Copper catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) in liquid ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Pengju; Atherton, John H; Page, Michael I

    2012-10-21

    Copper(I) catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reactions (CuAAC) occur smoothly in liquid ammonia (LNH(3)) at room temperature to give exclusively 1,4-substituted 1,2,3-triazoles with excellent yields (up to 99%). The CuAAC reactions in liquid ammonia require relatively small amounts of copper(I) catalyst (0.5 mole%) compared with that in conventional solvents. The product can be obtained conveniently by simply evaporation of ammonia, indicating its potential application in industry. The rate of the CuAAC reaction in liquid ammonia shows a second order dependence on the copper(I) concentration and the reaction occurs only with terminal alkynes. Deuterium exchange experiments with phenyl acetylene-d(1) show that the acidity of the alkyne is increased at least 1000-fold with catalytic amounts of copper(I) in liquid ammonia. The mechanism of the CuAAC reaction in liquid ammonia is discussed.

  1. Bioaugmentation as a solution to increase methane production from an ammonia-rich substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Wang, Han; Fiedel, Nicolai Russell

    2014-01-01

    production yield. To date there are not any reliable methods to alleviate the ammonia toxicity effect and/or to efficiently digest ammonia-rich waste. In the current study, bioaugmentation as a possible method to alleviate ammonia toxicity effect in a mesophilic continuously stirred-tank reactor (CSTR......Ammonia-rich substrates inhibit anaerobic digestion (AD) process and constitute the main reason of low energy recovery in full-scale reactors. It is estimated that many full-scale AD reactors are operating in ammonia induced “inhibited steady-state” with significant losses of the potential biogas......) operating under “inhibited steady state” was tested. A fast growing hydrogenotrophic methanogen (i.e. Methanoculleus bourgensis MS2T) was bioaugmented in the CSTR reactor at high ammonia levels (5 g NH4+-N L-1). A second CSTR reactor used as control with no bioaugmentation. The results derived from...

  2. Interannual variability of ammonia concentrations over the United States: sources and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiferl, Luke D.; Heald, Colette L.; Van Damme, Martin; Clarisse, Lieven; Clerbaux, Cathy; Coheur, Pierre-François; Nowak, John B.; Neuman, J. Andrew; Herndon, Scott C.; Roscioli, Joseph R.; Eilerman, Scott J.

    2016-09-01

    The variability of atmospheric ammonia (NH3), emitted largely from agricultural sources, is an important factor when considering how inorganic fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations and nitrogen cycling are changing over the United States. This study combines new observations of ammonia concentration from the surface, aboard aircraft, and retrieved by satellite to both evaluate the simulation of ammonia in a chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and identify which processes control the variability of these concentrations over a 5-year period (2008-2012). We find that the model generally underrepresents the ammonia concentration near large source regions (by 26 % at surface sites) and fails to reproduce the extent of interannual variability observed at the surface during the summer (JJA). Variability in the base simulation surface ammonia concentration is dominated by meteorology (64 %) as compared to reductions in SO2 and NOx emissions imposed by regulation (32 %) over this period. Introduction of year-to-year varying ammonia emissions based on animal population, fertilizer application, and meteorologically driven volatilization does not substantially improve the model comparison with observed ammonia concentrations, and these ammonia emissions changes have little effect on the simulated ammonia concentration variability compared to those caused by the variability of meteorology and acid-precursor emissions. There is also little effect on the PM2.5 concentration due to ammonia emissions variability in the summer when gas-phase changes are favored, but variability in wintertime emissions, as well as in early spring and late fall, will have a larger impact on PM2.5 formation. This work highlights the need for continued improvement in both satellite-based and in situ ammonia measurements to better constrain the magnitude and impacts of spatial and temporal variability in ammonia concentrations.

  3. A study on reduced chemical mechanisms of ammonia/methane combustion under gas turbine conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Hua; Howard, Michael; Valera Medina, Agustin; Dooley, Stephen; Bowen, Philip John

    2016-01-01

    As an alternative fuel and hydrogen carrier, ammonia is believed to have good potential for future power generation. To explore the feasibility of co-firing ammonia with methane, studies involving robust numerical analyses with detailed chemistry are required to progress towards industrial implementation. Therefore, the objective of this study is to determine a reduced mechanism for simulation studies of ammonia/methane combustion in practical gas turbine combustor conditions. Firstly, five d...

  4. In vivo synthesis of histidine by a cloned histidine ammonia-lyase in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, R L; Kane, J F

    1985-01-01

    Histidine ammonia-lyase catalyzes the first step in histidine catabolism, the deamination of histidine to urocanate and ammonia. In vitro experiments have shown that histidine ammonia-lyase also can catalyze the reverse (amination) reaction, histidine synthesis, relatively efficiently under extreme reaction conditions (4 M NH4OH, pH 10). An Escherichia coli hisB deletion strain was transformed with a pBR322 derivative plasmid (pCB101) containing the entire Klebsiella aerogenes histidine utili...

  5. Mobile measurements of ammonia: Sources and spatial variations in the Wallis region and Zurich (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elser, Miriam; El Haddad, Imad; Bruns, Emily; Pieber, Simone; Wolf, Robert; Krishna Kumar, Nivedita; Prévôt, André; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-05-01

    Ammonia (NH3) has negative impacts on human health, climate, ecosystems and materials. Moreover, it is also an important precursor for the formation of secondary aerosols in the form of ammonium salts (ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and ammonium chloride). Previous studies have shown that the vast majority of the ammonia emissions come from the agricultural sector (mostly from livestock farming and fertilizing activities). Other sources such as road transport, waste deposit, energy use and supply can also contribute to the ammonia levels in the urban areas. High concentrations of ammonia are commonly measured at the National Air Pollution Monitoring Network (NABEL) stations in Switzerland. Mobile measurements of ammonia and other pollutants (including BC, CO2, NOx and NR-PM) were conducted in the Wallis region and in Zurich in 2013 to study the spatial distribution of ammonia in Switzerland and identify its major emission sources in these regions. A new heated inlet setup was developed to improve the response time of the ammonia measurements, so that even very local sources could be identified. For both, the Wallis region and Zurich, it was observed that the background values of ammonia have a regional origin, as other pollutants affected by regional changes show similar background trends. These regional background values varied between 5 to 10 ppb during the different days of measurements. Moreover, no big differences were observed in the background values between the city center, the surrounding areas, the highway and the rural areas. The major local source of ammonia observed during these measurements was road transport, producing increases on the NH3 levels up to 4 times the background values. Based on emission factors estimated from tunnel measurements, the traffic was estimated to contribute between 20 -30% of the measured ammonia levels on a daily average in Zurich. Other sources of ammonia that can also contribute significantly to the levels of ammonia

  6. CLINICAL CO RELATION BETWEEN ARTERIAL VERSUS VENOUS AMMONIA LEVELS IN HEPATIC ENCEPHLOPATHY IN CIRRHOSIS OF LIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunath

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available : INTRODUCTION: Hepatic encephalopathy is a reversible neuropsychiatry state that complicates liver disease. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy in chronic liver is function is widely accepted to be due to failure of hepatic clearance of toxins products from gut exact toxin involved remains controversial but ammonia is thought to be an important factor. Ammonia levels help both in diagnosis and serve as a guide in treatment. Diagnosis of Hepatic Encephalopathy can be done based on clinical criteria and the severity of Hepatic Encephalopathy can be graded by West Haven Criteria. This criterion is the simplest grading of Hepatic Encephalopathy based on clinical findings. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To correlate between Ammonia levels and clinical severity of Hepatic Encephalopathy in Cirrhosis of liver and correlate between Arterial versus venous ammonia levels with severity of Hepatic Encephalopathy. RESULTS: Male patients had higher incidence than females. Severity of hepatic encephalopathy was graded by West Haven grading. Arterial total ammonia and venous ammonia was correlated with the clinical severity of HE. Of the 50 patients 3 had grade 1, 18 had grade 2, 22 had grade 3 and 7 had grade 4. Arterial and venous ammonia levels co related with severity of HE. The highest level of arterial ammonia was seen in grade 3 and grade 4.It was seen that other lab parameters also increased with severity of HE. But were not significant. Serum albumin was inversely co related with severity of HE. CONCLUSIONS: Arterial total ammonia correlated better with the severity of Hepatic Encephalopathy as compared to venous ammonia levels. Venous total ammonia did not correlate with severity of Hepatic Encephalopathy and with arterial ammonia levels.

  7. Impacts of an Ammonia Leak on the Cabin Atmosphere of the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, Stephanie M.; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.; Son, Chang H.; Perry Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    Toxic chemical release into the cabin atmosphere is one of the three major emergency scenarios identified on the International Space Station (ISS). The release of anhydrous ammonia, the coolant used in the U.S. On-orbit Segment (USOS) External Active Thermal Control Subsystem (EATCS), into the ISS cabin atmosphere is one of the most serious toxic chemical release cases identified on board ISS. The USOS Thermal Control System (TCS) includes an Internal Thermal Control Subsystem (ITCS) water loop and an EATCS ammonia loop that transfer heat at the interface heat exchanger (IFHX). Failure modes exist that could cause a breach within the IFHX. This breach would result in high pressure ammonia from the EATCS flowing into the lower pressure ITCS water loop. As the pressure builds in the ITCS loop, it is likely that the gas trap, which has the lowest maximum design pressure within the ITCS, would burst and cause ammonia to enter the ISS atmosphere. It is crucial to first characterize the release of ammonia into the ISS atmosphere in order to develop methods to properly mitigate the environmental risk. This paper will document the methods used to characterize an ammonia leak into the ISS cabin atmosphere. A mathematical model of the leak was first developed in order to define the flow of ammonia into the ISS cabin atmosphere based on a series of IFHX rupture cases. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods were then used to model the dispersion of the ammonia throughout the ISS cabin and determine localized effects and ventilation effects on the dispersion of ammonia. Lastly, the capabilities of the current on-orbit systems to remove ammonia were reviewed and scrubbing rates of the ISS systems were defined based on the ammonia release models. With this full characterization of the release of ammonia from the USOS TCS, an appropriate mitigation strategy that includes crew and system emergency response procedures, personal protection equipment use, and atmosphere monitoring

  8. Closing CO2 Loop in Biogas Production: Recycling Ammonia As Fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingyao; Yu, Ge; Tu, Te; Yan, Shuiping; Zhang, Yanlin; Zhao, Shuaifei

    2017-08-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel system for simultaneous ammonia recovery, carbon capture, biogas upgrading, and fertilizer production in biogas production. Biogas slurry pretreatment (adjusting the solution pH, turbidity, and chemical oxygen demand) plays an important role in the system as it significantly affects the performance of ammonia recovery. Vacuum membrane distillation is used to recover ammonia from biogas slurry at various conditions. The ammonia removal efficiency in vacuum membrane distillation is around 75% regardless of the ammonia concentration of the biogas slurry. The recovered ammonia is used for CO2 absorption to realize simultaneous biogas upgrading and fertilizer generation. CO2 absorption performance of the recovered ammonia (absorption capacity and rate) is compared with a conventional model absorbent. Theoretical results on biogas upgrading are also provided. After ammonia recovery, the treated biogas slurry has significantly reduced phytotoxicity, improving the applicability for agricultural irrigation. The novel concept demonstrated in this study shows great potential in closing the CO2 loop in biogas production by recycling ammonia as an absorbent for CO2 absorption associated with producing fertilizers.

  9. Emergency membrane contactor based absorption system for ammonia leaks in water treatment plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Jiahui; FANG Xuliang; HE Yiliang; JIN Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Because of the suspected health risks of trihalomethanes (THMs), more and more water treatment plants have replaced traditionalchlorine disinfection process with chloramines but often without the proper absorption system installed in the case of ammonia leaksin the storage room. A pilot plant membrane absorption system was developed and installed in a water treatment plant for this purpose.Experimentally determined contact angle, surface tension, and corrosion tests indicated that the sulfuric acid was the proper choice as the absorbent for leaking ammonia using polypropylene hollow fiber membrane contactor. Effects of several operating conditionson the mass transfer coefficient, ammonia absorption, and removal efficiency were examined, including the liquid concentration,liquid velocity, and feed gas concentration. Under the operation conditions investigated, the gas absorption efficiency over 99.9%was achieved. This indicated that the designed pilot plant membrane absorption system was effective to absorb the leaking ammonia in the model storage room. The removal rate of the ammonia in the model storage room was also experimentally and theoretically foundto be primarily determined by the ammonia suction flow rate from the ammonia storage room to the membrane contactor. The ammoniaremoval rate of 99.9% was expected to be achieved within 1.3 h at the ammonia gas flow rate of 500 m3/h. The success of the pilot plantmembrane absorption system developed in this study illustrated the potential of this technology for ammonia leaks in water treatmentplant, also paved the way towards a larger scale application.

  10. Inhibitory effect of ammonia nitrogen on specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A series of batch experiments were conducted in 125 mL serum bottles to assess the toxicity of different concentrations of ammonia nitrogen to the specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge from upflow anaerobic sludge bed(UASB) and expanded granular sludge bed(EGSB) reactors. The effects of pH value and temperature on toxicity of ammonia nitrogen to anaerobes were investigated. The results show that the specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge suffers inhibition from ammonia nitrogen, the concentrations of ammonia nitrogen that produce 50% inhibition of specific methanogenic activity for sludge from UASB and EGSB reactor are 2.35 and 2.75 g/L, respectively. Hydrogen utilizing methanogens suffers less inhibition from ammonia nitrogen than that of acetate utilizing methanogens. Hydrogen-producing acetogens that utilize propionate and butyrate as substrates suffer serious inhibition from ammonia nitrogen. The toxicity of ammonia nitrogen to anaerobic granular sludge enhances when pH value and temperature increase. Anaerobic granular sludge can bear higher concentrations of ammonia nitrogen after being acclimated by ammonia nitrogen for 7 d.

  11. System and method for determining an ammonia generation rate in a three-way catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Perry, Kevin L; Kim, Chang H

    2014-12-30

    A system according to the principles of the present disclosure includes a rate determination module, a storage level determination module, and an air/fuel ratio control module. The rate determination module determines an ammonia generation rate in a three-way catalyst based on a reaction efficiency and a reactant level. The storage level determination module determines an ammonia storage level in a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst positioned downstream from the three-way catalyst based on the ammonia generation rate. The air/fuel ratio control module controls an air/fuel ratio of an engine based on the ammonia storage level.

  12. Ammonia synthesis and decomposition on a Ru-based catalyst modeled by first-principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, A.; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina; Remediakis, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    A recently published first-principles model for the ammonia synthesis on an unpromoted Ru-based catalyst is extended to also describe ammonia decomposition. In addition, further analysis concerning trends in ammonia productivity, surface conditions during the reaction, and macro......-properties, such as apparent activation energies and reaction orders are provided. All observed trends in activity are captured by the model and the absolute value of ammonia synthesis/decomposition productivity is predicted to within a factor of 1-100 depending on the experimental conditions. Moreover it is shown: (i...

  13. Ammonia synthesis on Au modified Fe(111) and Ag and Cu modified Fe(100) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lytken, Ole; Waltenburg, Hanne Neergaard; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate any influence of steps and possible positive effects of making surface alloys the ammonia synthesis has been investigated over Au modified Fe(111) and Ag and Cu modified Fe(100) single crystals in the temperature range 603-773 K, using a system combining ultra-high vacuum...... and a high-pressure cell. Ammonia was synthesized from a stoichiometric (N-2:3H(2)) gas mixture at a pressure of 2 bar. By deposition of small amounts of An, the ammonia production activity of the Fe(1 1 1) surface can be enhanced. More important, for the gold modified surface, the reaction order in ammonia...

  14. Effects of sucrose amendment on ammonia assimilation during sewage sludge composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Liqiang; Li, Weiguang; Zhang, Shumei; Wu, Chuandong; Wang, Ke

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the laboratory-scale composting of sewage sludge and pumice mixtures that were amended with sucrose. The variation in temperature, pH, NH4(+)-N, ammonia emission, bacterial community, ammonia assimilating bacteria (AAB) populations and enzymatic activity related to ammonia assimilation were detected. The addition of sucrose increased the AAB population by 2.5-3.5 times, reduced ammonia emission by 24.7-31.1% compared with the control treatment, and promoted the growth of Bacillus and Wautersiella. The activities of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), glutamate synthase (GS) and glutamine synthetase (GOGAT), were enhanced by the addition of sucrose. GDH made a substantial contribution to ammonia assimilation when the ammonia concentration was high (⩾1.5g/kg) in the thermophilic phase. The GS/GOGAT cycle played an important role at low ammonia concentrations (⩽1.1g/kg) in the cooling phase. These results suggested that adding sucrose to sludge compost could promote ammonia assimilation and reduce ammonia emission.

  15. Method for the Determination of Ammonia in Mainstream Cigarette Smoke Using Ion Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Christina Vaughan; Feng, June; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Stanelle, Rayman; Watson, Clifford H.

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia in mainstream smoke is present in both the particulate and vapor phases. The presence of ammonia in the cigarette filler material and smoke is of significance because of the potential role ammonia could have in raising the “smoke pH.” An increased smoke pH could shift a fraction of total nicotine to free-base nicotine, which is reportedly more rapidly absorbed by the smoker. Methods measuring ammonia in smoke typically employ acid filled impingers to trap the smoke. We developed a fast, reliable method to measure ammonia in mainstream smoke without the use of costly and time consuming impingers to examine differences in ammonia delivery. The method uses both a Cambridge filter pad and a Tedlar bag to capture particulate and vapor phases of the smoke. We quantified ammonia levels in the mainstream smoke of 50 cigarette brands from 5 manufacturers. Ammonia levels ranged from approximately 1μg to 23μg per cigarette for ISO smoking conditions and 38μg to 67μg per cigarette for Canadian intense smoking conditions and statistically significance differences were observed between brands and manufacturers. Our findings suggest that ammonia levels vary by brand and are higher under Canadian intense smoking conditions. PMID:27415766

  16. Method for the Determination of Ammonia in Mainstream Cigarette Smoke Using Ion Chromatography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Vaughan Watson

    Full Text Available Ammonia in mainstream smoke is present in both the particulate and vapor phases. The presence of ammonia in the cigarette filler material and smoke is of significance because of the potential role ammonia could have in raising the "smoke pH." An increased smoke pH could shift a fraction of total nicotine to free-base nicotine, which is reportedly more rapidly absorbed by the smoker. Methods measuring ammonia in smoke typically employ acid filled impingers to trap the smoke. We developed a fast, reliable method to measure ammonia in mainstream smoke without the use of costly and time consuming impingers to examine differences in ammonia delivery. The method uses both a Cambridge filter pad and a Tedlar bag to capture particulate and vapor phases of the smoke. We quantified ammonia levels in the mainstream smoke of 50 cigarette brands from 5 manufacturers. Ammonia levels ranged from approximately 1μg to 23μg per cigarette for ISO smoking conditions and 38μg to 67μg per cigarette for Canadian intense smoking conditions and statistically significance differences were observed between brands and manufacturers. Our findings suggest that ammonia levels vary by brand and are higher under Canadian intense smoking conditions.

  17. Method for the Determination of Ammonia in Mainstream Cigarette Smoke Using Ion Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Christina Vaughan; Feng, June; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Stanelle, Rayman; Watson, Clifford H

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia in mainstream smoke is present in both the particulate and vapor phases. The presence of ammonia in the cigarette filler material and smoke is of significance because of the potential role ammonia could have in raising the "smoke pH." An increased smoke pH could shift a fraction of total nicotine to free-base nicotine, which is reportedly more rapidly absorbed by the smoker. Methods measuring ammonia in smoke typically employ acid filled impingers to trap the smoke. We developed a fast, reliable method to measure ammonia in mainstream smoke without the use of costly and time consuming impingers to examine differences in ammonia delivery. The method uses both a Cambridge filter pad and a Tedlar bag to capture particulate and vapor phases of the smoke. We quantified ammonia levels in the mainstream smoke of 50 cigarette brands from 5 manufacturers. Ammonia levels ranged from approximately 1μg to 23μg per cigarette for ISO smoking conditions and 38μg to 67μg per cigarette for Canadian intense smoking conditions and statistically significance differences were observed between brands and manufacturers. Our findings suggest that ammonia levels vary by brand and are higher under Canadian intense smoking conditions.

  18. Potential for Ammonia Recapture by Farm Woodlands: Design and Application of a New Experimental Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Theobald

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been increasing pressure on farmers in Europe to reduce the emissions of ammonia from their land. Due to the current financial climate in which farmers have to operate, it is important to identify ammonia control measures that can be adopted with minimum cost. The planting of trees around farmland and buildings has been identified as a potentially effective and low-cost measure to enhance ammonia recapture at a farm level and reduce long-range atmospheric transport. This work assesses experimentally what fraction of ammonia farm woodlands could potentially remove from the atmosphere. We constructed an experimental facility in southern Scotland to simulate a woodland shelterbelt planted in proximity to a small poultry unit. By measuring horizontal and vertical ammonia concentration profiles within the woodland, and comparing this to the concentration of an inert tracer (SF6 we estimate the depletion of ammonia due to dry deposition to the woodland canopy. Together with measurements of mean ammonia concentrations and throughfall fluxes of nitrogen, this information is used to provide a first estimate of the fraction of emitted ammonia that is recaptured by the woodland canopy. Analysis of these data give a lower limit of recapture of emitted ammonia, at the experimental facility, of 3%. By careful design of shelterbelt woodlands this figure could be significantly higher.

  19. Study on ammonia slip detection in the harsh combustion environments using diode laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Kun; Zhang, Yu-jun; Li, Hong-bin; He, Yin; Gao, Yan-wei; Wang, Li-ming; Liu, Wen-qing

    2016-10-01

    The emissions of NOX from Cement plant or Coal-fired power plant have serious pollution to the environment. In recent years, Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) is an effective means of reducing the emissions of NOX by injecting ammonia into the combustion flue gas, which ideally reacts with the NOX to produce harmless components (H2O and N2). The efficiency of SCR is determined by monitoring the ammonia slip of the flue exhaust outlet, excess ammonia injection can cause ammonia slip, which not only destroy the plant, but also increase the operating costs. In addition, ammonia is also pollution gases as NOX. The flue gas at the measurement point is high temperature, vibrate and high particle density processes in Cement plant primarily, such harsh conditions coupled with the highly reactive nature of ammonia, so it is difficult to reliable extractive low level analysis. The paper describes an in-situ Tunable Diode Laser analyzer for measuring ammonia slip in the combustion flue gas after SCR in Cement Plant or Coal-fired power plant. A correlation filtering algorithm is developed to select high-quality spectral absorption signal, which improve the accuracy of concentration inversion of analyzer. The paper also includes field test data on an actual Cement plant all day, and we compare the ammonia slip and NOX emissions of flue gas during actual production process, the results indicate that the measured values of the ammonia slip and NOX emissions present a good correlation and comply with the principle of SCR.

  20. Nitrification resilience and community dynamics of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with respect to ammonia loading shock in a nitrification reactor treating steel wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyungjin; Shin, Seung Gu; Lee, Joonyeob; Koo, Taewoan; Kim, Woong; Hwang, Seokhwan

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the nitrification resilience pattern and examine the key ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) with respect to ammonia loading shocks (ALSs) in a nitrification bioreactor treating steel wastewater. The perturbation experiments were conducted in a 4-L bioreactor operated in continuous mode with a hydraulic retention time of 10 d. Three sequential ALSs were given to the bioreactor (120, 180 and 180 mg total ammonia nitrogen (TAN)/L. When the first shock was given, the nitrification process completely recovered after 14 d of further operation. However, the resilience duration was significantly reduced to ∼1 d after the second and third ALSs. In the bioreactor, Nitrosomonas aestuarii dominated the other AOB species, Nitrosomonas europaea and N. nitrosa, throughout the process. In addition, the population of N. aestuarii increased with ammonia utilization following each ALS; i.e., this species responded to acute ammonia overloadings by contributing to ammonia oxidation. This finding suggests that N. aestuarii could be exploited to achieve stable nitrification in industrial wastewaters that contain high concentrations of ammonia.

  1. Hot Ammonia around Young O-type Stars. II. JVLA imaging of highly-excited metastable ammonia masers in W51-North

    CERN Document Server

    Goddi, Ciriaco; Zhang, Qizhou; Zapata, Luis; Wilson, Thomas L

    2014-01-01

    We have used the JVLA at the 1 cm band to map five highly-excited metastable inversion transitions of ammonia, (J,K)=(6,6), (7,7), (9,9), (10,10), and (13,13), in W51 IRS2 with ~0.2 angular resolution. We present detections of both thermal (extended) ammonia emission in the five inversion lines, with rotational states ranging in energy from about 400 to 1700 K, and point-like ammonia maser emission in the (6,6), (7,7), and (9,9) lines. The thermal ammonia emits around a velocity of 60 km/s, near the cloud's systemic velocity, is elongated in the east-west direction across 4" and is confined by the HII regions W51d, W51d1, and W51d2. The ammonia masers are observed in the eastern tip of the dense clump traced by thermal ammonia, offset by 0.65" to the East from its emission peak, and have a peak velocity at ~47.5 km/s. No maser components are detected near the systemic velocity. The ammonia masers are separated by 0.65" (3500 AU) from the (rare) vibrationally-excited SiO masers, excited by the deeply-embedded ...

  2. Synaptic organization of substance P, glutamate and GABA-immunoreactive boutons on functionally identified neurons in cat spinal deeper dorsal horn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏锋; 赵志奇

    1997-01-01

    In order to determine how nociceptive input conveyed by the C-fibers terminating in superficial lam-inae of the spinal cord reaches the wide dynamic range (WDR) cells in deeper dorsal horn, which functions as ascend-ing projection pathway, the morphological features of some WDR cells in the deeper dorsal horn of the cat lumbar spinal cord were studied by intracellular injection of horseradish peroxidase and physiological characterization. One of the fully stained neurons with somata in lamina V and dendrites that entered lamina Ⅱ were examined by electron mi-croscopy. Immunogold staining of ultrathin sections through the labeled proximal dendrites in lamina Ⅱ revealed that these dendrites received numerous synapses from substance P and glutamate immunoreactive (IR) axons, which were considered originating from C-fibers. In addition, many GABA-IR terminals were found presynaptic to the labeled dendrites. The results, therefore, suggest that the information carried by primary afferent can be sent from t

  3. Impact of TiO₂ and ZnO nanoparticles at predicted environmentally relevant concentrations on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria cultures under ammonia oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhuanxi; Qiu, Zhaozheng; Chen, Zheng; Du Laing, Gijs; Liu, Aifen; Yan, Changzhou

    2015-02-01

    Increased application of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2 and nano-ZnO) raises concerns related to their environmental impacts. The effects that such nanoparticles have on environmental processes and the bacteria that carry them out are largely unknown. In this study, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) enrichment cultures, grown from surface sediments taken from an estuary wetland in Fujian Province, China, were spiked with nano-TiO2 and nano-ZnO (with an average size of 32 and 43 nm, respectively) at predicted environmentally relevant concentrations (≤2 mg L(-1)) to determine their impacts on ammonia oxidation and the mechanisms involved. Results showed that higher nano-TiO2 concentrations significantly inhibited ammonia oxidation in enrichment cultures. It is noteworthy that the average ammonia oxidation rate was significantly correlated to the Shannon index, the Simpson's index, and AOB abundance. This suggested that ammonia oxidation inhibition primarily resulted from a reduction of AOB biodiversity and abundance. However, AOB biodiversity and abundance as well as the average ammonia oxidation rate were not inhibited by nano-ZnO at predicted environmentally relevant concentrations. Accordingly, an insignificant correlation was established between biodiversity and abundance of the AOB amoA gene and the average ammonia oxidation rate under nano-ZnO treatments. AOB present in samples belonged to the β-Proteobacteria class with an affinity close to Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas genera. This suggested that identified impacts of nano-TiO2 and nano-ZnO on ammonia oxidation processes can be extrapolated to some extent to natural aquatic environments. Complex impacts on AOB may result from different nanomaterials present in aquatic environments at various ambient conditions. Further investigation on how and to what extent different nanomaterials influence AOB diversity and abundance and their subsequent ammonia oxidation processes is therefore

  4. Diversity of Ammonia Oxidizing Archaea in Tropical Compost Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya eDe Gannes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Composting is widely used to transform waste materials into valuable agricultural products. In the tropics, large quantities of agricultural wastes could be potentially useful in agriculture after composting. However, while microbiological processes of composts in general are well established, relatively little is known about microbial communities that may be unique to these in tropical systems, particularly nitrifiers. The recent discovery of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA has changed the paradigm of nitrification being initiated solely by ammonia oxidizing bacteria. In the present study, AOA abundance and diversity was examined in composts produced from combinations of plant waste materials common in tropical agriculture (rice straw, sugar cane bagasse, coffee hulls, which were mixed with either cow- or sheep-manure. The objective was to determine how AOA abundance and diversity varied as a function of compost system and time, the latter being a contrast between the start of the compost process (mesophilic phase and the finished product (mature phase. The results showed that AOA were relatively abundant in composts of tropical agricultural wastes, and significantly more so than were the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Furthermore, while the AOA communities in the composts were predominatly group I.1b, the communities were diverse and exhibited structures that diverged between compost types and phases. These patterns could be taken as indicators of the ecophysiological diversity in the soil AOA (groub I.1b, in that significantly different AOA communties developed when exposed to varying physico-chemical environments. Nitrification patterns and levels differed in the composts which, for the mature material, could have signifcant effects on its performanc as a plant growth medium. Thus, it will also be important to determine the association of AOA (and diversity in their communities with nitrification in these systems.

  5. MANAGEMENT OF IRRIGATION AND NITROGEN FERTILIZERS TO REDUCE AMMONIA VOLATILIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Viero

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nitrogen losses by ammonia (NH3 volatilization can be reduced by appropriate irrigation management or by alternative N sources, replacing urea. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of irrigation management and N source combinations in decreasing NH3 volatilization from an Argissolo Vermelho Distrófico típico cultivated for 28 years with black oat (Avena strigosa and maize (Zea mays, under no-tillage in the region of Depressão Central, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design with split plots with three replications, where the main plots consisted of irrigation systems: no irrigation; irrigation immediately before and irrigation immediately after fertilization. The subplots were treated with different N sources: urea, urea with urease inhibitor and slow-release fertilizer, at an N rate of 180 kg ha-1, broadcast over maize, plus a control treatment without N fertilization. Ammonia volatilization was assessed using semi-open static collectors for 1, 2, 4, 6, and 10 days after N fertilization. In general, more than 90 % of total NH3-N losses occurred until three days after N fertilization, with peaks up to 15.4 kg ha-1 d-1. The irrigation was efficient to reduce NH3 losses only when applied after N fertilization. However, reductions varied according to the N fertilizer, and were higher for urea (67 % and slightly lower for urea with urease inhibitor (50 % and slow-release fertilizer (40 %, compared with the mean of the treatments without irrigation and irrigation before fertilization. The use of urea with urease inhibitor instead of urea was only promising under volatilization-favorable conditions (no irrigation or irrigation before N fertilization. Compared to urea, slow-release fertilizer did not reduce ammonia volatilization in any of the rainfed or irrigated treatments.

  6. Management strategy impacts on ammonia volatilization from swine manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, Diane M; Powers, Wendy J; Lorimor, Jeffery C

    2005-01-01

    Ammonia emitted from manure can have detrimental effects on health, environmental quality, and fertilizer value. The objective of this study was to measure the potential for reduction in ammonia volatilization from swine (Sus scrofa domestica) manure by temperature control, stirring, addition of nitrogen binder (Mohave yucca, Yucca schidigera Roezl ex Ortgies) or urease inhibitor [N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT)], segregation of urine from feces, and pH modification. Swine manure [total solids (TS) = 7.6-11.2%, total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) = 3.3-6.2 g/L, ammonium nitrogen NH(+)(4)-N = 1.0-3.3 g/L] was stored for 24, 48, 72, or 96 h in 2-L polyvinyl chloride vessels. The manure was analyzed to determine pre- and post-storage concentrations of TS and volatile solids (VS), TKN, and NH(+)(4)-N. The concentration of accumulated ammonia N in the vessel headspace (HSAN), post-storage, was measured using grab sample tubes. Headspace NH(3) concentrations were reduced 99.3% by segregation of urine from feces (P < 0.0001). Stirring and NBPT (152 microL/L) increased HSAN concentration (119 and 140%, respectively). Headspace NH(3) concentration increased by 2.7 mg/m(3) for every 1 degree C increase in temperature over 35 degrees C. Slurry NH(+)(4)-N concentrations were reduced by segregation (78.3%) and acidification to pH 5.3 (9.4%), and increased with stirring (4.8%) and increasing temperature (0.06 g/L per 1 degree C increase in temperature over 35 degrees C). Temperature control, urine-feces segregation, and acidification of swine manure are strategies with potential to reduce or slow NH(+)(4)-N formation and NH(3) volatilization.

  7. Ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems with flooded evaporators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Seara, Jose; Sieres, Jaime [Area de Maquinas y Motores Termicos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Vigo, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende No. 9, 36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2006-12-15

    The harmful effects of water accumulation in the evaporator in ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems (AARS) with flooded evaporators are a crucial issue. In this paper, the effects of the ammonia purification and the liquid entrainment and blow-down from the evaporator in AARS are analyzed. A mathematical model based on a single stage system with complete condensation has been developed. The ammonia purification is evaluated by means of the Murphree efficiencies of the stripping and rectifying sections of the distillation column. The entrainment and blow-down are taking into account considering the corresponding flow rates as a fraction of the dry vapour at the evaporator outlet. The influence of the distillation column components efficiency on the attainable distillate concentration and the effects of the distillate concentration and the liquid entrainment and blow-down on the system operating conditions and performance are analyzed and quantified. If no liquid entrainment or blow-down is considered, very high efficiencies in the distillation column are required. Small values of liquid entrainment or blow-down fractions increase significantly the operating range of the absorption system. If high values of the blow-down fraction are required, then a heat exchanger should be added to the system in order to recover the refrigeration capacity of the blow-down by additional subcooling of the liquid from the condenser. For a fixed value of the distillation column efficiency, an optimum value of the liquid blow-down fraction exists. Moreover, an optimum combination of generation temperature, reflux ratio and blow-down fraction can be found, which should be considered in designing and controlling an AARS. (author)

  8. Evidence of oil and gas hydrates within planet Mars: early biogenic or thermogenic sources from the Martian soils and deeper sediments near the deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Prasanta K.

    2012-10-01

    The presence of water (in liquid form) within the gullies of the Newton Crater from Mars (near the equator), oil-like hydrocarbons on the surface, gas hydrates in the deeper zones on Mars, and a list of publications on the geochemistry and astrobiology of carbonaceous chondrites have indicated that these petroleum hydrocarbons are closely related to the complex biological species similar to our terrestrial environment. Recent evidence of the possible presence of bacterial globule associated with carbonate minerals in the geological history of Mars may have indicated the link between possible bacterial growth and generation of petroleum hydrocarbons on Mars. Recent evidence of the possible presence of bacterially derived source rocks (organic rich black carbonaceous rocks) and heat flow distribution within Eberswalde and Holden areas of Mars during the earlier Martian geological time (possibly within the first 2 Ga) may have been originated from both biogeneic and thermogenic oil and gas hydrates. The thermal evolution of this biological geopolymer (source rock) could be observed in our earlier findings within the carbonaceous chondrites which show three distinct thermal events. Based on the current knowledge gained from carbonaceous chondrites, deltas, and hydrocarbons present within Mars, the methane on Mars may have been derived from the following sources: (1) deeper gas hydrates; (b) from the cracking of oil to gas within deeper oil or gas bearing reservoirs from a higher reservoir temperature; and (c) the high temperature conversion of current bacterial bodies within the upper surface of Mars.

  9. A process-based model for ammonia emission from urine patches, GAG (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing): description and sensitivity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Móring, Andrea; Vieno, Massimo; M. Doherty, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a new process-based, weather-driven model for ammonia (NH3) emission from a urine patch has been developed and its sensitivity to various factors assessed. The GAG model (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing) is capable of simulating the TAN (total ammoniacal nitrogen) and the water...... content of the soil under a urine patch and also soil pH dynamics. The model tests suggest that ammonia volatilization from a urine patch can be affected by the possible restart of urea hydrolysis after a rain event as well as CO2 emission from the soil. The vital role of temperature in NH3 exchange...

  10. Ammonia dynamics in magnesium ammine from DFT and neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tekin, Adem; Hummelshøj, Jens Strabo; Jacobsen, Hjalte Sylvest

    2010-01-01

    Energy storage in the form of ammonia bound in metal salts, so-called metal ammines, combines high energy density with the possibility of fast and reversible NH3 ab- and desorption kinetics. The mechanisms and processes involved in the NH3 kinetics are investigated by density functional theory (DFT......) and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The crystal structures of Mg(NH3)(n)Cl-2 with n = 6, 2, 1, which contains up to 9.19 wt % hydrogen and 0.115 kg hydrogen L-1, are first analyzed using an algorithm based on simulated annealing (SA), finding all the experimentally known structures and predicting the C2/m...

  11. [Element Sulfur Autotrophic Denitrification Combined Anaerobic Ammonia Oxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Huang, Yong; Liu, Xin; Yuan, Yi; Li Xiang; Wangyan, De-qing; Ding, Liang; Shao, Jing-wei; Zhao, Rong

    2016-03-15

    A novel element sulfur autotrophic denitrification combined anaerobic ammonia oxidation process, reacted in CSTR, was used to investigate the sulfate production and alkalinity consumption during the whole process. The element sulfur dosage was 50 g · L⁻¹. The inoculation volume of ANAMMOX granular sludge was 100 g · L⁻¹. The agitation rate and environment reaction temperature of the CSTR were set to 120 r · min⁻¹ and 35°C ± 0.5°C, respectively. The pH of influent was maintained in range of 8. 0-8. 4. During the start-up stage of sulfur based autotrophic denitrification, the nitrogen removal loading rate could reach 0.56-0.71 kg · (m³ · d) ⁻¹ in the condition of 5.3 h hydrogen retention time and 200 mg · L⁻¹ nitrate nitrogen. After the addition of 60 mg · L⁻¹ ammonia nitrogen, Δn(SO₄²⁻):Δn(NO₃⁻) decreased from 1.21 ± 0.06 to 1.01 ± 0.10, Δ(IC): Δ(NO₃⁻-N) decreased from 0.72 ± 0.1 to 0.51 ± 0.11, and the effluent pH increased from 6.5 to 7.2. During the combined stage, the ammonia concentration of effluent was 10.1-19.2 mg · L⁻¹, and the nitrate-nitrogen removal loading rate could be maintained in range of 0.66-0.88 kg · (m³ · d)⁻¹. The Δn (NH₄⁺): Δn (NO₃⁻) ratio reached 0.43, and the NO₃⁻ removal rate was increased by 60% in the simultaneous ammonia and nitrate removal reaction under the condition of G(T) = 22-64 s⁻¹ and pH = 8.08, while improper conditions reduced the efficiency of simultaneous reaction.

  12. Ammonia and Its Role in the Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Parth J; Balart, Luis A

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a commonly encountered sequela of chronic liver disease and cirrhosis with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Although ammonia is implicated in the pathogenesis of HE, the exact underlying mechanisms still remain poorly understood. Its role in the urea cycle, astrocyte swelling, and glutamine and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid systems suggests that the pathogenesis is multifaceted. Greater understanding in its underlying mechanism may offer more targeted therapeutic options in the future, and thus further research is necessary to fully understand the pathogenesis of HE.

  13. Nanostructured Polypyrrole-Based Ammonia and Volatile Organic Compound Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šetka, Milena; Drbohlavová, Jana; Hubálek, Jaromír

    2017-03-10

    The aim of this review is to summarize the recent progress in the fabrication of efficient nanostructured polymer-based sensors with special focus on polypyrrole. The correlation between physico-chemical parameters, mainly morphology of various polypyrrole nanostructures, and their sensitivity towards selected gas and volatile organic compounds (VOC) is provided. The different approaches of polypyrrole modification with other functional materials are also discussed. With respect to possible sensors application in medicine, namely in the diagnosis of diseases via the detection of volatile biomarkers from human breath, the sensor interaction with humidity is described as well. The major attention is paid to analytes such as ammonia and various alcohols.

  14. Ammonia emission inventory for the state of Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Maser, Colette R.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2003-12-17

    Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is the only significant gaseous base in the atmosphere and it has a variety of impacts as an atmospheric pollutant, including the formation of secondary aerosol particles: ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate. NH{sub 3} preferentially forms ammonium sulfate; consequently ammonium nitrate aerosol formation may be limited by the availability of NH{sub 3}. Understanding the impact of emissions of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen on visibility, therefore, requires accurately determined ammonia emission inventories for use in air quality models, upon which regulatory and policy decisions increasingly depend. This report presents an emission inventory of NH{sub 3} for the state of Wyoming. The inventory is temporally and spatially resolved at the monthly and county level, and is comprised of emissions from individual sources in ten categories: livestock, fertilizer, domestic animals, wild animals, wildfires, soil, industry, mobile sources, humans, and publicly owned treatment works. The Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory was developed using the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Ammonia Model as framework. Current Wyoming-specific activity data and emissions factors obtained from state agencies and published literature were assessed and used as inputs to the CMU Ammonia Model. Biogenic emissions from soils comprise about three-quarters of the Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory, though emission factors from soils are highly uncertain. Published emission factors are scarce and based on limited measurements. In Wyoming, agricultural land, rangeland, and forests comprise 96% of the land area and essentially all of the estimated emissions from soils. Future research on emission rates of NH{sub 3} for these land categories may lead to a substantial change in the magnitude of soil emissions, a different inventory composition, and reduced uncertainty in the inventory. While many NH{sub 3} inventories include annual emissions, air quality modeling studies require finer temporal

  15. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Ammonia Borane Dehydrogenation: Mechanism and Utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingyue; Kam, Lisa; Trerise, Ryan; Williams, Travis J

    2017-01-17

    One of the greatest challenges in using H2 as a fuel source is finding a safe, efficient, and inexpensive method for its storage. Ammonia borane (AB) is a solid hydrogen storage material that has garnered attention for its high hydrogen weight density (19.6 wt %) and ease of handling and transport. Hydrogen release from ammonia borane is mediated by either hydrolysis, thus giving borate products that are difficult to rereduce, or direct dehydrogenation. Catalytic AB dehydrogenation has thus been a popular topic in recent years, motivated both by applications in hydrogen storage and main group synthetic chemistry. This Account is a complete description of work from our laboratory in ruthenium-catalyzed ammonia borane dehydrogenation over the last 6 years, beginning with the Shvo catalyst and resulting ultimately in the development of optimized, leading catalysts for efficient hydrogen release. We have studied AB dehydrogenation with Shvo's catalyst extensively and generated a detailed understanding of the role that borazine, a dehydrogenation product, plays in the reaction: it is a poison for both Shvo's catalyst and PEM fuel cells. Through independent syntheses of Shvo derivatives, we found a protective mechanism wherein catalyst deactivation by borazine is prevented by coordination of a ligand that might otherwise be a catalytic poison. These studies showed how a bidentate N-N ligand can transform the Shvo into a more reactive species for AB dehydrogenation that minimizes accumulation of borazine. Simultaneously, we designed novel ruthenium catalysts that contain a Lewis acidic boron to replace the Shvo -OH proton, thus offering more flexibility to optimize hydrogen release and take on more general problems in hydride abstraction. Our scorpionate-ligated ruthenium species (12) is a best-of-class catalyst for homogeneous dehydrogenation of ammonia borane in terms of its extent of hydrogen release (4.6 wt %), air tolerance, and reusability. Moreover, a synthetically

  16. Accuracy of cuticular resistance parameterizations in ammonia dry deposition models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Frederik; Brümmer, Christian; Richter, Undine; Fléchard, Chris; Wichink Kruit, Roy; Erisman, Jan Willem

    2016-04-01

    Accurate representation of total reactive nitrogen (Nr) exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere is a crucial part of modern air quality models. However, bi-directional exchange of ammonia (NH3), the dominant Nr species in agricultural landscapes, still poses a major source of uncertainty in these models, where especially the treatment of non-stomatal pathways (e.g. exchange with wet leaf surfaces or the ground layer) can be challenging. While complex dynamic leaf surface chemistry models have been shown to successfully reproduce measured ammonia fluxes on the field scale, computational restraints and the lack of necessary input data have so far limited their application in larger scale simulations. A variety of different approaches to modelling dry deposition to leaf surfaces with simplified steady-state parameterizations have therefore arisen in the recent literature. We present a performance assessment of selected cuticular resistance parameterizations by comparing them with ammonia deposition measurements by means of eddy covariance (EC) and the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM) at a number of semi-natural and grassland sites in Europe. First results indicate that using a state-of-the-art uni-directional approach tends to overestimate and using a bi-directional cuticular compensation point approach tends to underestimate cuticular resistance in some cases, consequently leading to systematic errors in the resulting flux estimates. Using the uni-directional model, situations where low ratios of total atmospheric acids to NH3 concentration occur lead to fairly high minimum cuticular resistances, limiting predicted downward fluxes in conditions usually favouring deposition. On the other hand, the bi-directional model used here features a seasonal cycle of external leaf surface emission potentials that can lead to comparably low effective resistance estimates under warm and wet conditions, when in practice an expected increase in the compensation point due to

  17. Gas Turbine Combustion and Ammonia Removal Technology of Gasified Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeharu Hasegawa

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available From the viewpoints of securing a stable supply of energy and protecting our global environment in the future, the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC power generation of various gasifying methods has been introduced in the world. Gasified fuels are chiefly characterized by the gasifying agents and the synthetic gas cleanup methods and can be divided into four types. The calorific value of the gasified fuel varies according to the gasifying agents and feedstocks of various resources, and ammonia originating from nitrogenous compounds in the feedstocks depends on the synthetic gas clean-up methods. In particular, air-blown gasified fuels provide low calorific fuel of 4 MJ/m3 and it is necessary to stabilize combustion. In contrast, the flame temperature of oxygen-blown gasified fuel of medium calorie between approximately 9–13 MJ/m3 is much higher, so control of thermal-NOx emissions is necessary. Moreover, to improve the thermal efficiency of IGCC, hot/dry type synthetic gas clean-up is needed. However, ammonia in the fuel is not removed and is supplied into the gas turbine where fuel-NOx is formed in the combustor. For these reasons, suitable combustion technology for each gasified fuel is important. This paper outlines combustion technologies and combustor designs of the high temperature gas turbine for various IGCCs. Additionally, this paper confirms that further decreases in fuel-NOx emissions can be achieved by removing ammonia from gasified fuels through the application of selective, non-catalytic denitration. From these basic considerations, the performance of specifically designed combustors for each IGCC proved the proposed methods to be sufficiently effective. The combustors were able to achieve strong results, decreasing thermal-NOx emissions to 10 ppm (corrected at 16% oxygen or less, and fuel-NOx emissions by 60% or more, under conditions where ammonia concentration per fuel heating value in unit volume was 2.4 × 102 ppm

  18. Nanostructured Polypyrrole-Based Ammonia and Volatile Organic Compound Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Šetka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to summarize the recent progress in the fabrication of efficient nanostructured polymer-based sensors with special focus on polypyrrole. The correlation between physico-chemical parameters, mainly morphology of various polypyrrole nanostructures, and their sensitivity towards selected gas and volatile organic compounds (VOC is provided. The different approaches of polypyrrole modification with other functional materials are also discussed. With respect to possible sensors application in medicine, namely in the diagnosis of diseases via the detection of volatile biomarkers from human breath, the sensor interaction with humidity is described as well. The major attention is paid to analytes such as ammonia and various alcohols.

  19. Nanostructured Polypyrrole-Based Ammonia and Volatile Organic Compound Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šetka, Milena; Drbohlavová, Jana; Hubálek, Jaromír

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the recent progress in the fabrication of efficient nanostructured polymer-based sensors with special focus on polypyrrole. The correlation between physico-chemical parameters, mainly morphology of various polypyrrole nanostructures, and their sensitivity towards selected gas and volatile organic compounds (VOC) is provided. The different approaches of polypyrrole modification with other functional materials are also discussed. With respect to possible sensors application in medicine, namely in the diagnosis of diseases via the detection of volatile biomarkers from human breath, the sensor interaction with humidity is described as well. The major attention is paid to analytes such as ammonia and various alcohols. PMID:28287435

  20. Iron-Catalyzed Boron Removal from Molten Silicon in Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Morita, Kazuki

    2016-12-01

    A high-temperature process of refining metallurgical-grade silicon to solar-grade silicon was developed. In this gas purging treatment, boron impurity in silicon reacts with ammonia and the products are removed as volatiles at high temperature. 1 mass pct metallic iron was added to molten silicon as a catalyst, improving the boron removal ratio from 14 to 80 pct at 1723 K (1450 °C). At 1823 K (1550 °C), this reaction could reduce boron concentration from more than 120 ppmw to activation energy of 329 ± 129 kJ mol-1 was calculated from experimental data.