WorldWideScience

Sample records for superpressure balloon flights

  1. Sensor System for Super-Pressure Balloon Performance Modeling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long-duration balloon flights are an exciting new area of scientific ballooning, enabled by the development of large super-pressure balloons. As these balloons...

  2. Superpressure Tow Balloon for Extending Durations and Modifying Trajectories of High Altitude Balloon Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation involves the concept of using a Superpressure Tow Balloon (STB) with existing NASA high altitude balloon designs to form a tandem balloon...

  3. Superpressure Balloon Design Using Nonlinear Viscoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, James; Rand, James; Wakefield, David

    Stratospheric balloon platforms are used extensively by scientists for a variety of purposes. The typical balloon used today is the zero pressure natural shape fabricated from a thin film of linear low density polyethylene. This material has been found to possess a variety of desirable characteristics suitable to this environment. This film will remain ductile at very low temperatures which will permit it to develop large strains if necessary to satisfy equilibrium considerations. However, in order to achieve long duration flight without significant changes in altitude, the balloon should be pressurized to the extent necessary to maintain constant volume during typical variations in temperature. In the past, pressurized balloons were fabricated from other materials in order to achieve significant increases in strength. Thin films of polyester or polyimide have been used to make relatively small spheres capable of long duration flight. Unfortunately, these materials do not have the ductility of polyethylene at low temperature and are somewhat more fragile and subject to damage. In recent years various organizations have attempted to use the characteristic shape of a pumpkin to limit the stresses in a balloon envelope to that which can be accommodated by laminated fabric materials. While developing the design, analysis and construction techniques for this type of system, the use of polyethylene has been successfully demonstrated to provide a reliable envelope. This shape is achieved by using high strength members in the meridional direction to carry the very high loads generated by the pressure. These so called "tendons" have very low elongation and serve to limit the deformation of the film in that direction. However, earlier designs attempted to limit the stresses in the circumferential direction by using a lobe angle to control the stress. Unfortunately this has led to a number of stability problems with this type of balloon. In order to control the stability of

  4. Meshed-Pumpkin Super-Pressure Balloon Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack; Yavrouian, Andre

    2003-01-01

    An improved, lightweight design has been proposed for super-pressure balloons used to carry scientific instruments at high altitudes in the atmosphere of Earth for times as long as 100 days. [A super-pressure balloon is one in which the pressure of the buoyant gas (typically, helium) is kept somewhat above ambient pressure in order to maintain approximately constant density and thereby regulate the altitude.] The proposed design, called "meshed pumpkin," incorporates the basic concept of the pumpkin design, which is so named because of its appearance. The pumpkin design entails less weight than does a spherical design, and the meshed-pumpkin design would reduce weight further. The basic idea of the meshed-pumpkin design is to reinforce the membrane of a pumpkin balloon by attaching a strong, lightweight fabric mesh to its outer surface. The reinforcement would make it possible to reduce the membrane mass to one-third or less of that of the basic pumpkin design while retaining sufficient strength to enable the balloon to remain at approximately constant altitude for months.

  5. Experimental investigation of undesired stable equilibria in pumpkin shape super-pressure balloon designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schur, W. W.

    2004-01-01

    Excess in skin material of a pneumatic envelope beyond what is required for minimum enclosure of a gas bubble is a necessary but by no means sufficient condition for the existence of multiple equilibrium configurations for that pneumatic envelope. The very design of structurally efficient super-pressure balloons of the pumpkin shape type requires such excess. Undesired stable equilibria in pumpkin shape balloons have been observed on experimental pumpkin shape balloons. These configurations contain regions with stress levels far higher than those predicted for the cyclically symmetric design configuration under maximum pressurization. Successful designs of pumpkin shape super-pressure balloons do not allow such undesired stable equilibria under full pressurization. This work documents efforts made so far and describes efforts still underway by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Balloon Program Office to arrive on guidance on the design of pumpkin shape super-pressure balloons that guarantee full and proper deployment.

  6. The response of superpressure balloons to gravity wave motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R. A.; Hertzog, A.

    2014-04-01

    Superpressure balloons (SPB), which float on constant density (isopycnic) surfaces, provide a unique way of measuring the properties of atmospheric gravity waves (GW) as a function of wave intrinsic frequency. Here we devise a quasi-analytic method of investigating the SPB response to GW motions. It is shown that the results agree well with more rigorous numerical simulations of balloon motions and provide a better understanding of the response of SPB to GW, especially at high frequencies. The methodology is applied to ascertain the accuracy of GW studies using 12 m diameter SPB deployed in the 2010 Concordiasi campaign in the Antarctic. In comparison with the situation in earlier campaigns, the vertical displacements of the SPB were measured directly using GPS. It is shown using a large number of Monte Carlo-type simulations with realistic instrumental noise that important wave parameters, such as momentum flux, phase speed and wavelengths, can be retrieved with good accuracy from SPB observations for intrinsic wave periods greater than ca. 10 min. The noise floor for momentum flux is estimated to be ca. 10-4 mPa.

  7. Intercomparison of meteorological analyses and trajectories in the Antarctic lower stratosphere with Concordiasi superpressure balloon observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Lars; Hertzog, Albert; Rößler, Thomas; Stein, Olaf; Wu, Xue

    2017-07-01

    In this study we compared temperatures and horizontal winds of meteorological analyses in the Antarctic lower stratosphere, a region of the atmosphere that is of major interest regarding chemistry and dynamics of the polar vortex. The study covers the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) operational analysis, the ERA-Interim reanalysis, the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications version 1 and 2 (MERRA and MERRA-2), and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis. The comparison was performed with respect to long-duration observations from 19 superpressure balloon flights during the Concordiasi field campaign in September 2010 to January 2011. Most of the balloon measurements were conducted at altitudes of 17-18.5 km and latitudes of 60-85° S. We found that large-scale state temperatures of the analyses have a mean precision of 0.5-1.4 K and a warm bias of 0.4-2.1 K with respect to the balloon data. Zonal and meridional winds have a mean precision of 0.9-2.3 m s-1 and a bias below ±0.5 m s-1. Standard deviations related to small-scale fluctuations due to gravity waves are reproduced at levels of 15-60 % for temperature and 30-60 % for the horizontal winds. Considering the fact that the balloon observations have been assimilated into all analyses, except for NCEP/NCAR, notable differences found here indicate that other observations, the forecast models, and the data assimilation procedures have a significant impact on the analyses as well. We also used the balloon observations to evaluate trajectory calculations with our new Lagrangian transport model Massive-Parallel Trajectory Calculations (MPTRAC), where vertical motions of simulated trajectories were nudged to pressure measurements of the balloons. We found relative horizontal transport deviations of 4-12 % and error growth rates of 60-170 km day-1 for 15-day trajectories. Dispersion

  8. Intercomparison of meteorological analyses and trajectories in the Antarctic lower stratosphere with Concordiasi superpressure balloon observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Hoffmann

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study we compared temperatures and horizontal winds of meteorological analyses in the Antarctic lower stratosphere, a region of the atmosphere that is of major interest regarding chemistry and dynamics of the polar vortex. The study covers the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF operational analysis, the ERA-Interim reanalysis, the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications version 1 and 2 (MERRA and MERRA-2, and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. The comparison was performed with respect to long-duration observations from 19 superpressure balloon flights during the Concordiasi field campaign in September 2010 to January 2011. Most of the balloon measurements were conducted at altitudes of 17–18.5 km and latitudes of 60–85° S. We found that large-scale state temperatures of the analyses have a mean precision of 0.5–1.4 K and a warm bias of 0.4–2.1 K with respect to the balloon data. Zonal and meridional winds have a mean precision of 0.9–2.3 m s−1 and a bias below ±0.5 m s−1. Standard deviations related to small-scale fluctuations due to gravity waves are reproduced at levels of 15–60 % for temperature and 30–60 % for the horizontal winds. Considering the fact that the balloon observations have been assimilated into all analyses, except for NCEP/NCAR, notable differences found here indicate that other observations, the forecast models, and the data assimilation procedures have a significant impact on the analyses as well. We also used the balloon observations to evaluate trajectory calculations with our new Lagrangian transport model Massive-Parallel Trajectory Calculations (MPTRAC, where vertical motions of simulated trajectories were nudged to pressure measurements of the balloons. We found relative horizontal transport deviations of 4–12 % and error growth rates

  9. Development of a super-pressure balloon with a diamond-shaped net --- result of a ground inflation test of a 2,000 cubic-meter balloon ---

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshitaka; Nakashino, Kyoichi; Akita, Daisuke; Matsushima, Kiyoho; Shimadu, Shigeyuki; Goto, Ken; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Matsuo, Takuma

    2016-07-01

    A light super-pressure balloon has been developed using a method to cover a balloon with a diamond-shaped net of high-tensile fibers. The goal is to fly a payload of 900 kg to the altitude of 37 km with a 300,000 m^{3} balloon. Beginning from a demonstration test of the net-balloon with a 10 m^{3} balloon in 2010, we have been polished the net-balloon through ground inflation tests and flight tests, including a flight test of a 3,000 m ^{3} balloon in the tandem balloon configuration with a 15,000 m^{3} zero-pressure balloon in 2012, and a flight test of a 10 m^{3} balloon in the tandem balloon configuration with a 2 kg rubber balloon in 2013, as reported in the last COSPAR. In 2014, we developed a 5,000 m^{3} balloon and performed a ground inflation test to find that the balloon burst from a lip panel for termination with a differential pressure of 425 Pa. It was due to a stress concentration at the edge of a thick tape attached along the termination mechanism. In 2015, we modified the balloon by adding tapes on the lip panel to avoid the stress concentration, and also shorten the net length to leave some margin of the film and performed a ground inflation test again to find the balloon showed asymmetrical deployment and burst from the edge of the net with a differential pressure of 348 Pa. We consider it is due to the margin of the film along the circumferential direction, and proposed a gore shape which circumference length is kept as determined by the pumpkin shape of the balloon but setting meridian length longer than that. We developed a 10 m^{3} balloon with the gore design to find that the balloon deployed symmetrically and showed the burst pressure of 10,000 Pa. In 2016, we are going to develop a 2,000 m^{3} balloon with the gore design and perform its ground inflation test. In this paper, we are going to report its result with the sequence of the development.

  10. The Compton Spectrometer and Imager: Results from the 2016 Super-Pressure Balloon Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Alexander; Boggs, Steven; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Kierans, Carolyn; Sleator, Clio; Tomsick, John; Zoglauer, Andreas; Amman, Mark; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Tseng, Chao-Hsiung; Yang, Chien-Ying; Lin, Chih H.; Jean, Pierre; von Ballmoos, Peter

    2017-08-01

    The Compton Spectrometer and Imager is a 0.2-5 MeV Compton telescope capable of imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry of astrophysical sources. Such capabilities are made possible by COSI's twelve germanium cross-strip detectors, which provide for high efficiency, high resolution spectroscopy, and precise 3D positioning of photon interactions. In May 2016, COSI took flight from Wanaka, New Zealand on a NASA super-pressure balloon. For 46 days, COSI floated at a nominal altitude of 33.5 km, continually telemetering science data in real-time. The payload made a safe landing in Peru, and the hard drives containing the full raw data set were recovered. Analysis efforts have resulted in detections of various sources such as the Crab Nebula, Cyg X-1, Cen A, Galactic Center e+e- annihilation, and the long duration gamma-ray burst GRB 160530A. In this presentation, I will provide an overview of our main results, which include measuring the polarization of GRB 160530A, and our image of the Galactic Center at 511 keV. Additionally, I will summarize results pertaining to our detections of the Crab Nebula, Cyg X-1, and Cen A.

  11. Design Evolution and Methodology for Pumpkin Super-Pressure Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Rodger

    The NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) program has had many technical development issues discovered and solved along its road to success as a new vehicle. It has the promise of being a sub-satellite, a means to launch up to 2700 kg to 33.5 km altitude for 100 days from a comfortable mid-latitude launch point. Current high-lift long duration ballooning is accomplished out of Antarctica with zero-pressure balloons, which cannot cope with the rigors of diurnal cycles. The ULDB design is still evolving, the product of intense analytical effort, scaled testing, improved manufacturing, and engineering intuition. The past technical problems, in particular the s-cleft deformation, their solutions, future challenges, and the methodology of pumpkin balloon design will generally be described.

  12. Hyperspectral Polarimeter for Monitoring Balloon Strain Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's latest generation of superpressure, ultra long duration balloons (ULDB) extend the flight time for stratospheric experiments to levels previously unattainable...

  13. Spectral distribution of gravity wave momentum fluxes over the Antarctic Peninsula from Concordiasi superpressure balloon data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterscheid, R. L.; Gelinas, L. J.; Mechoso, C. R.; Schubert, G.

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves generated by flow over the steep topography of the Antarctic Peninsula transport significant amounts of zonal and meridional momentum into the stratosphere. Quantitative determination of this transport has been carried out for wave periods of 1 h or greater using data from a previous Antarctic superpressure balloon campaign in austral spring 2005 (VORCORE). The present study uses data from the later Concordiasi campaign (2010) to extend the momentum flux determination to shorter periods. Maps of the vertical fluxes of meridional and zonal momentum are presented for periods down to 12 min. We find that the momentum fluxes for periods below 1 h are comparable to those at longer periods, despite larger variances at longer periods. The momentum fluxes in the vicinity of the peninsula provide a significant zonal acceleration of the lower stratosphere, confirming a conclusion from the VORCORE data. The geographical distribution of fluxes around the peninsula has peaks both leeward and windward of the main terrain features. Numerical simulations suggest that the separate peaks may be related to wave transience caused by unsteady winds over the peninsula. Momentum fluxes comprise a main distribution maximizing at moderate flux values and a secondary distribution maximizing at high values exhibiting a high degree of intermittency. The high flux events account for the largest part of the average flux and suggest that drag parameterizations should take them into account. It is found that waves generated by the jet stream are also a significant source of momentum flux.

  14. Ballooning Spiders: The Case for Electrostatic Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Gorham, Peter W

    2013-01-01

    We consider general aspects of the physics underlying the flight of Gossamer spiders, also known as ballooning spiders. We show that existing observations and the physics of spider silk in the presence of the Earth's static atmospheric electric field indicate a potentially important role for electrostatic forces in the flight of Gossamer spiders. A compelling example is analyzed in detail, motivated by the observed "unaccountable rapidity" in the launching of such spiders from H.M.S. Beagle, recorded by Charles Darwin during his famous voyage.

  15. Cleft formation in pumpkin balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Frank E.; Brakke, Kenneth A.; Schur, Willi W.

    NASA’s development of a large payload, high altitude, long duration balloon, the Ultra Long Duration Balloon, centers on a pumpkin shape super-pressure design. Under certain circumstances, it has been observed that a pumpkin balloon may be unable to pressurize into the desired cyclically symmetric equilibrium configuration, settling into a distorted, undesired state instead. Success of the pumpkin balloon for NASA requires a thorough understanding of the phenomenon of multiple stable equilibria and developing of means for the quantitative assessment of design measures that prevent the occurrence of undesired equilibrium. In this paper, we will use the concept of stability to classify cyclically symmetric equilibrium states at full inflation and pressurization. Our mathematical model for a strained equilibrium balloon, when applied to a shape that mimics the Phase IV-A balloon of Flight 517, predicts instability at float. Launched in Spring 2003, this pumpkin balloon failed to deploy properly. Observations on pumpkin shape type super-pressure balloons that date back to the 1980s suggest that within a narrowly defined design class of pumpkin shape super-pressure balloons where individual designs are fully described by the number of gores ng and by a single measure of the bulging gore shape, the designs tend to become more vulnerable with the growing number of gores and with the diminishing size of the bulge radius rB Weight efficiency considerations favor a small bulge radius, while robust deployment into the desired cyclically symmetrical configuration becomes more likely with an increased bulge radius. In an effort to quantify this dependency, we will explore the stability of a family of balloon shapes parametrized by (ng, rB) which includes a design that is very similar, but not identical, to the balloon of Flight 517. In addition, we carry out a number of simulations that demonstrate other aspects related to multiple equilibria of pumpkin balloons.

  16. Breakthrough in Mars balloon technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzhanovich, V. V.; Cutts, J. A.; Cooper, H. W.; Hall, J. L.; McDonald, B. A.; Pauken, M. T.; White, C. V.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Castano, A.; Cathey, H. M.; Fairbrother, D. A.; Smith, I. S.; Shreves, C. M.; Lachenmeier, T.; Rainwater, E.; Smith, M.

    2004-01-01

    Two prototypes of Mars superpressure balloons were flight tested for aerial deployment and inflation in the Earth's stratosphere in June, 2002. One was an 11.3 m diameter by 6.8 m high pumpkin balloon constructed from polyethylene film and Zylon (PBO) tendons, the second was a 10 m diameter spherical balloon constructed from 12 μm thick Mylar film. Aerial deployment and inflation occurred under parachute descent at 34 km altitude, mimicing the dynamic pressure environment expected during an actual Mars balloon mission. Two on-board video cameras were used on each flight to provide real-time upward and downward views of the flight train. Atmospheric pressure and temperature were also recorded. Both prototypes successfully deployed from their storage container during parachute descent at approximately 40 m/s. The pumpkin balloon also successfully inflated with a 440 g charge of helium gas injected over a 1.5-min period. Since the helium inflation system was deliberately retained after inflation in this test, the pumpkin balloon continued to fall to the ocean where it was recovered for post-flight analysis. The less robust spherical balloon achieved only a partial (~70%) inflation before a structural failure occurred in the balloon film resulting in the loss of the vehicle. This structural failure was diagnosed to result from the vigorous oscillatory motion of the partially inflated balloon, possibly compounded by contact between the balloon film and an instrumentation box above it on the flight train. These two flights together represent significant progress in the development of Mars superpressure balloon technology and pave the way for future flight tests that will include post-deployment flight of the prototype balloons at a stable altitude.

  17. EUSO-Balloon: The first flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Valentina; Osteria, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    EUSO-Balloon is a pathfinder mission for JEM-EUSO, the near-UV telescope proposed to be installed on board the International Space Station (ISS). The main objective of this pathfinder mission is to perform a full scale end-to-end test of all the key technologies of JEM-EUSO detectors and to measure the UV background. The JEM-EUSO instrument consists of UV telescope designed to focus the signal of the UV tracks generated by Extreme Energy Cosmic Rays propagating in Earth's atmosphere, onto a finely pixelized UV camera. The EUSO-Balloon instrument, smaller than the one designed for the ISS, was launched on August 2014 from Timmins (Ontario, Canada). The flight lasted about five hours and the instrument reached a float altitude of about 40 km. From this altitude the telescope registered, at a rate of 400 000 frames/s, the nightglow background on forests, lakes and clouds, as well as city lights and artificial air showers tracks generated by means of a laser installed on an helicopter flying inside its field of view. In this contribution we will describe the instrument and its performance during the first flight.

  18. EUSO-Balloon: The first flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scotti, Valentina, E-mail: scottiv@na.infn.it; Osteria, Giuseppe

    2016-07-11

    EUSO-Balloon is a pathfinder mission for JEM-EUSO, the near-UV telescope proposed to be installed on board the International Space Station (ISS). The main objective of this pathfinder mission is to perform a full scale end-to-end test of all the key technologies of JEM-EUSO detectors and to measure the UV background. The JEM-EUSO instrument consists of UV telescope designed to focus the signal of the UV tracks generated by Extreme Energy Cosmic Rays propagating in Earth's atmosphere, onto a finely pixelized UV camera. The EUSO-Balloon instrument, smaller than the one designed for the ISS, was launched on August 2014 from Timmins (Ontario, Canada). The flight lasted about five hours and the instrument reached a float altitude of about 40 km. From this altitude the telescope registered, at a rate of 400 000 frames/s, the nightglow background on forests, lakes and clouds, as well as city lights and artificial air showers tracks generated by means of a laser installed on an helicopter flying inside its field of view. In this contribution we will describe the instrument and its performance during the first flight.

  19. Flight Qualification of the NASA's Super Pressure Balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathey, Henry; Said, Magdi; Fairbrother, Debora

    Designs of new balloons to support space science require a number of actual flights under various flight conditions to qualify them to as standard balloon flight offerings to the science community. Development of the new Super Pressure Balloon for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Balloon Program Office has entailed employing new design, analysis, and production techniques to advance the state of the art. Some of these advances have been evolutionary steps and some have been revolutionary steps requiring a maturing understanding of the materials, designs, and manufacturing approaches. The NASA Super Pressure Balloon development end goal is to produce a flight vehicle that is qualified to carry a ton of science instrumentation, at an altitude greater than 33 km while maintaining a near constant pressure altitude for extended periods of up to 100 days, and at any latitude on the globe. The NASA’s Balloon Program Office has pursued this development in a carefully executed incremental approach by gradually increasing payload carrying capability and increasing balloon volume to reach these end goal. A very successful test flight of a ~200,700 m3 balloon was launch in late 2008 from Antarctica. This balloon flew for over 54 days at a constant altitude and circled the Antarctic continent almost three times. A larger balloon was flown from Antarctica in early 2011. This ~422,400 m3 flew at a constant altitude for 22 days making one circuit around Antarctica. Although the performance was nominal, the flight was terminated via command to recover high valued assets from the payload. The balloon designed to reach the program goals is a ~532,200 m3 pumpkin shaped Super Pressure Balloon. A test flight of this balloon was launched from the Swedish Space Corporation’s Esrange Balloon Launch Facilities near Kiruna, Sweden on 14 August, 2012. This flight was another success for this development program. Valuable information was gained from this short test

  20. Measurements of gondola motion on a stratospheric balloon flight

    CERN Document Server

    Safonova, Margarita; Sreejith, A G; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Ambily, S; Prakash, Ajin; Mathew, Joice; Murthy, Jayant; Anand, Devarajan; Kapardhi, B V N; Kumar, B Suneel; Kulkarni, P M

    2016-01-01

    Balloon experiments are an economically feasible method of conducting observations in astronomy that are not possible from the ground. The astronomical payload may include a telescope, a detector, and a pointing/stabilization system. Determining the attitude of the payload is of primary importance in such applications, to accurately point the detector/telescope to the desired direction. This is especially important in generally unstable lightweight balloon flights. However, the conditions at float altitudes, which can be reached by zero pressure balloons, could be more stable, enabling accurate pointings. We have used the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), placed on a stratospheric zero pressure balloon, to observe 3-axis motion of a balloon payload over a fight time of 4.5 hours, from launch to the float altitude of 31.2 km. The balloon was launched under nominal atmospheric conditions on May 8th 2016, from a Tata Institute of Fundamental Research Balloon Facility, Hyderabad.

  1. Superpressure stratospheric vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chocol, C.; Robinson, W.; Epley, L.

    1990-09-15

    Our need for wide-band global communications, earth imaging and sensing, atmospheric measurements and military reconnaissance is extensive, but growing dependence on space-based systems raises concerns about vulnerability. Military commanders require space assets that are more accessible and under local control. As a result, a robust and low cost access to space-like capability has become a national priority. Free floating buoyant vehicles in the middle stratosphere can provide the kind of cost effective access to space-like capability needed for a variety of missions. These vehicles are inexpensive, invisible, and easily launched. Developments in payload electronics, atmospheric modeling, and materials combined with improving communications and navigation infrastructure are making balloon-borne concepts more attractive. The important milestone accomplished by this project was the planned test flight over the continental United States. This document is specifically intended to review the technology development and preparations leading up to the test flight. Although the test flight experienced a payload failure just before entering its assent altitude, significant data were gathered. The results of the test flight are presented here. Important factors included in this report include quality assurance testing of the balloon, payload definition and characteristics, systems integration, preflight testing procedures, range operations, data collection, and post-flight analysis. 41 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Retrieving Balloon Data in Flight Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration —   NASA has plans to fly stratospheric ULDBs for missions of 100 days or more in the next few years. As these balloons circumnavigate the globe multiple times,...

  3. Venus Altitude Cycling Balloon Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ISTAR Group ( IG) and team mate Thin Red Line Aerospace (TRLA) propose a Venus altitude cycling balloon (Venus ACB), an innovative superpressure balloon...

  4. Pumpkins and onions and balloon design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winker, J. A.

    The reach for a capability to make long flights (months) with heavy payloads (tonnes) has long been pursued. The closest we have come is with polar flights devoid of a significant diurnal cycle. Superpressure technology, with its ability to survive diurnal cycles, is an obvious choice, but materials limitations have been an obstacle to realizing these ambitious goals. Now comes an assortment of new synthetic materials, coupled with a special variety of superpressure balloon which, in combination, is poised to yield a solution for our enhanced duration/payload quest. In this paper we are looking not at materials, but only at a balloon concept. This concept is a "natural shape" oblate spheroid balloon whose shape is chosen to exploit properties of component materials, particularly newly available ones. The current variation of this concept is called a "pumpkin" balloon. The most visible work on this shape is that done by France's CNES, Japan's ISAS, and in the USA by NASA's Wallops Flight Facility. But the basic design idea is not new; it extends back at least a half century. This paper traces the origins of the shape, its evolution through various iterations, and it speculates on some of the recent thinking regarding construction details.

  5. Implementing Improved Security and Encryption for Balloon Flight Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, Andrew; Stilwell, Bryan D.

    The Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility uses a broad array of communication techniques be-tween its balloon-borne flight systems and ground command and control systems. These com-munication mediums vary from commercially available routing such as e-mail and IP based TCP/UDP protocols to military grade proprietary line-of-sight configurations; each with their own unique benefits and shortfalls. While each new advancement in technology improves secu-rity in some capacity, it does not always address the limitation of older, less advanced security or encryption capabilities. As the proliferation of newer, more commercially viable technologies become common place, safeguarding mission critical applications from unauthorized access and improve data integrity in the process becomes ever more necessary. Therefore, this paper will evaluate several security measures and methods of data encryption; including formalizing a standardized security philosophy that improves and addresses the mixture of established and emerging technologies.

  6. Development of a tiny tandem balloon system for atmospheric observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshitaka; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Fujiwara, Masatomo

    2016-07-01

    A tandem balloon system with a combination of a zero-pressure balloon on top and a super-pressure balloon on the bottom has a unique trajectory characteristic, with different flight altitudes between day and night and thus with ascending and descending motions at dawn and dusk, respectively. This characteristic provides a unique opportunity to explore the atmosphere, e.g., the upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric region with cross-tropopause measurements twice a day. We started development of a tiny tandem balloon system using a 10 m^{3} super-pressure balloon and a 100 m^{3} zero-pressure balloon, with a capability of carrying 3 kg of payload. One of the scientific targets is to measure water vapor, cloud particles, and temperature around the tropical tropopause which is the entry point of the stratospheric and mesospheric meridional circulation. For the data transfer, the iridium satellite communication module, SBD9603 is used. In this paper, the current status of the development will be reported.

  7. Initial Results from the ANITA 2006-2007 Balloon Flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorham, P.W.; /Hawaii U.; Allison, P.; /Hawaii U.; Barwick, S.W.; /UC, Irvine; Beatty, J.J.; /Ohio State U.; Besson, D.Z.; /Kansas U.; Binns, W.R.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Chen, C.; /SLAC; Chen, P.; /SLAC; Clem, J.M.; /Delaware U.; Connolly, A.; /University Coll. London; Dowkontt, P.F.; /Washington U., St. Louis; DuVernois, M.A.; /Minnesota U.; Field, R.C.; /SLAC; Goldstein, D.; /UC, Irvine; Goodhue, A.; /UCLA; Hast, C.; /SLAC; Hebert, C.L.; /Hawaii U.; Hoover, S.; /UCLA; Israel, M.H.; /Washington U., St. Louis; Kowalski, J.; /Hawaii U.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /UC, Irvine

    2011-11-16

    We report initial results of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of the flux of cosmogenic neutrinos. ANITA flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses that might be due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. In our initial high-threshold robust analysis, no neutrino candidates are seen, with no physics background. In a non-signal horizontal-polarization channel, we do detect 6 events consistent with radio impulses from extensive air showers, which helps to validate the effectiveness of our method. Upper limits derived from our analysis now begin to eliminate the highest cosmogenic neutrino models.

  8. Implementation of a Novel Flight Tracking and Recovery Package for High Altitude Ballooning Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Aqsa; Nekkanti, Sanjay; Mohan Suri, Ram; Shankar, Divya; Prasad Nagendra, Narayan

    High altitude ballooning is typically used for scientific missions including stratospheric observations, aerological observations, and near space environment technology demonstration. The usage of stratospheric balloons is a cost effective method to pursue several scientific and technological avenues against using satellites in the void of space. Based on the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA) ballooning program for studying Comet ISON using high altitude ballooning, a cost effective flight tracking and recovery package for ballooning missions has been developed using open source hardware. The flight tracking and recovery package is based on using Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS) and has a redundant Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) based Global Positioning System (GPS) tracker. The APRS based tracker uses AX.25 protocol for transmission of the GPS coordinates (latitude, longitude, altitude, time) alongside the heading and health parameters of the board (voltage, temperature). APRS uses amateur radio frequencies where data is transmitted in packet messaging format, modulated by radio signals. The receiver uses Very High Frequency (VHF) transceiver to demodulate the APRS signals. The data received will be decoded using MixW (open source software). A bridge will be established between the decoding software and the APRS software. The flight path will be predicted before the launch and the real time position co-ordinates will be used to obtain the real time flight path that will be uploaded online using the bridge connection. We also use open source APRS software to decode and Google Earth to display the real time flight path. Several ballooning campaigns do not employ payload data transmission in real time, which makes the flight tracking and package recovery vital for data collection and recovery of flight instruments. The flight tracking and recovery package implemented in our missions allow independent development of the payload package

  9. Comparative study of proliferation kinetics of paramecium tetraurelia aboard a satellite and a balloon flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tixador, R.; Richoilley, G.; Gasset, G.; Planel, H. (Faculte de Medecine, Toulouse-Purpan (France))

    1982-05-17

    A possible effect of cosmic rays on cell proliferation was investigated in cultures of Paramecium tetraurelia during a stratospheric balloon flight, with the techniques already used for the CYTOS experiments, performed aboard the orbital station Salyut 6. The results show that the stimulating effect of space on cell proliferation, reported in the CYTOS experiments, also occurs in the balloon flight. The respective roles of cosmic rays and weightlesness in the biological responses are discussed.

  10. Torsional balloon flight line oscillations: Comparison of modelling to flight data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, François; Bayman, Benjamin; Hanany, Shaul; Franco, Hugo; Marsh, Justin; Didier, Joy; Miller, Amber D.

    2017-08-01

    During the EBEX2013 long duration flight the payload was free to rotate in azimuth. The observed azimuth motion consisted of a superposition of full rotations with a period of 10-30 min and oscillatory motion with an amplitude of tens of degrees, average period of 79 s, and period dispersion of 12 s. We interpret the full rotations as induced by slow rotations of the balloon and the shorter period oscillatory motion as due to torsional oscillations of the flight line. We derive the torsional stiffness of the flight line using the bifilar pendulum model and apply it to the flight line of the EBEX2013 payload. We find a torsional spring constant of 36 kg m2/s2 corresponding to a period of 58 s. We conclude that the bifilar model, which accounts for the geometry of the flight line but neglects all material properties, predicts a stiffness and period that are 45% larger and 25% shorter than those observed. It is useful to have a simple, easy to use, coarse approximation for the torsional constant of the flight line.

  11. Thermal performance modeling of NASA s scientific balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, H.; Cathey, H.

    The flight performance of a scientific balloon is highly dependant on the interaction between the balloon and its environment. The balloon is a thermal vehicle. Modeling a scientific balloon's thermal performance has proven to be a difficult analytical task. Most previous thermal models have attempted these analyses by using either a bulk thermal model approach, or by simplified representations of the balloon. These approaches to date have provided reasonable, but not very accurate results. Improvements have been made in recent years using thermal analysis tools developed for the thermal modeling of spacecraft and other sophisticated heat transfer problems. These tools, which now allow for accurate modeling of highly transmissive materials, have been applied to the thermal analysis of NASA's scientific balloons. A research effort has been started that utilizes the "Thermal Desktop" addition to AUTO CAD. This paper will discuss the development of thermal models for both conventional and Ultra Long Duration super-pressure balloons. This research effort has focused on incremental analysis stages of development to assess the accuracy of the tool and the required model resolution to produce usable data. The first stage balloon thermal analyses started with simple spherical balloon models with a limited number of nodes, and expanded the number of nodes to determine required model resolution. These models were then modified to include additional details such as load tapes. The second stage analyses looked at natural shaped Zero Pressure balloons. Load tapes were then added to these shapes, again with the goal of determining the required modeling accuracy by varying the number of gores. The third stage, following the same steps as the Zero Pressure balloon efforts, was directed at modeling super-pressure pumpkin shaped balloons. The results were then used to develop analysis guidelines and an approach for modeling balloons for both simple first order estimates and detailed

  12. Universal stratospheric balloon gradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, Yury; Filippov, Sergey; Brekhov, Oleg; Nikolaev, Nikolay

    , which should be not less than 10 m. A brief description of this instrument is provided in the report. The SBMG is certified for the use in Russia for "zero-pressure" balloon "VAL 120" capable of drifting at about 30 km height. The obtained data are used in solving the problems of deep sounding of the Earth’s crust magnetic structure - an extraction of magnetic anomalies, determination of a depth of bedding of magnetoactive rocks and others. Examples of the experiments (data) obtained by SBMG (including along the 9000 km flight track), as a new opportunities in geomagnetism for researchers that could use this device, are shown here. To avoid magnetic noise the sensor of the upper magnetometer is located at 35 meters above the main suspension basket of the balloon (in the small magnetic noise place). As we know, people have a problem to find such places (with a relatively low level of magnetic noise) at other types of balloons. So, for the other types of balloons we have developed and investigated balloon gradiometer with sensors located at a distance of 50 m down from the main suspension basket of the balloon. This decision is optimal for the "superpressure" balloons. The developed launching technology, deployment in flight, assembly, data processing, transfer and landing the containers with the equipment can be used for other similar problems of monitoring and sounding an environment. Useful flight weights of each of three instrumental containers (uniformly placed along a vertical 6 km line) may be reaching 50 kg. More than ten testing flights (1986-2013) at stratospheric altitudes (20-30 km) have proven the reliability of this system.

  13. Results of the first EUSO-Balloon flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, H.; Bertaina, M.; JEM-EUSO Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    EUSO-Balloon, a balloon-borne diffractive fluorescence telescope, was launched by the French Space Agency ONES from the Timmins base in Ontario (Canada) on August 25th in 2014. After reaching the floating altitude of about 38 km, EUSO-Balloon imaged the UV background for more than 5 hours before descending to ground using the key technologies of JEM-EUSO. A detailed and precise measurement of the UV background in different atmospheric and ground conditions was achieved. The instrument proved the capability of detecting Extensive Air Showers (EAS) by observing laser tracks with similar characteristics. This contribution will summarise the first results obtained concerning all the topics described above.

  14. FIREBALL: the Faint Intergalactic medium Redshifted Emission Balloon: overview and first science flight results

    OpenAIRE

    Milliard, Bruno; Martin, D. Christopher; Schiminovich, David; Evrard, Jean; Matuszewski, Matt; Rahman, Shahinur; Tuttle, Sarah; McLean, Ryan; Deharveng, Jean-Michel; Mirc, Frederi; Grange, Robert; Chave, Robert

    2010-01-01

    FIREBALL (the Faint Intergalactic Redshifted Emission Balloon) is a balloon-borne 1m telescope coupled to an ultraviolet fiber-fed spectrograph. FIREBALL is designed to study the faint and diffuse emission of the intergalactic medium, until now detected primarily in absorption. FIREBALL is a path finding mission to test new technology and make new constraints on the temperature and density of this gas. We report on the first successful science flight of FIREBALL, in June 2009, which proved ev...

  15. Balloon Flight Tests of a Gas-Ionization-Chamber-Based Isotope Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Milliken, B.

    1995-01-01

    High resolution studies of the isotopic composition of heavy elements in the galactic cosmic radiation have been performed using satellites. The performance of the Tracking Heavy Isotope Spectrometer Telescopes for Low Energies (THISTLE) is investigated using data from a balloon flight carried out in 1993. The instrument design is discussed; and data, and additional analysis, is shown.

  16. Concept report: Experimental vector magnetograph (EXVM) operational configuration balloon flight assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The observational limitations of earth bound solar studies has prompted a great deal of interest in recent months in being able to gain new scientific perspectives through, what should prove to be, relatively low cost flight of the magnetograph system. The ground work done by TBE for the solar balloon missions (originally planned for SOUP and GRID) as well as the rather advanced state of assembly of the EXVM has allowed the quick formulation of a mission concept for the 30 cm system currently being assembled. The flight system operational configuration will be discussed as it is proposed for short duration flight (on the order of one day) over the continental United States. Balloon hardware design requirements used in formulation of the concept are those set by the National Science Balloon Facility (NSBF), the support agency under NASA contract for flight services. The concept assumes that the flight hardware assembly would come together from three development sources: the scientific investigator package, the integration contractor package, and the NSBF support system. The majority of these three separate packages can be independently developed; however, the computer control interfaces and telemetry links would require extensive preplanning and coordination. A special section of this study deals with definition of a dedicated telemetry link to be provided by the integration contractor for video image data for pointing system performance verification. In this study the approach has been to capitalize to the maximum extent possible on existing hardware and system design. This is the most prudent step that can be taken to reduce eventual program cost for long duration flights. By fielding the existing EXVM as quickly as possible, experience could be gained from several short duration flight tests before it became necessary to commit to major upgrades for long duration flights of this system or of the larger 60 cm version being considered for eventual development.

  17. Gamma ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Balloon Flight Engineering Model Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, D J; Williams, S; Grove, J E; Mizuno, T; Sadrozinski, H F W

    2002-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair-production high-energy (>20 MeV) gamma-ray telescope being built by an international partnership of astrophysicists and particle physicists for a satellite launch in 2006, designed to study a wide variety of high-energy astrophysical phenomena. As part of the development effort, the collaboration has built a Balloon Flight Engineering Model (BFEM) for flight on a high-altitude scientific balloon. The BFEM is approximately the size of one of the 16 GLAST-LAT towers and contains all the components of the full instrument: plastic scintillator anticoincidence system (ACD), high-Z foil/Si strip pair-conversion tracker (TKR), CsI hodoscopic calorimeter (CAL), triggering and data acquisition electronics (DAQ), commanding system, power distribution, telemetry, real-time data display, and ground data processing system. The principal goal of the balloon flight was to demonstrate the performance of this instrument configuration under c...

  18. Astronomy from the Upper Stratosphere: Key Discoveries and New Opportunities from High Altitude Scientific Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fissel, Laura M.

    2017-01-01

    Stratospheric balloons offer a near-space astronomy platform for a small fraction of the cost of an equivalent satellite. These balloons can lift scientific payloads of up to 6,000 lbs as high as 40 km above the Earth’s surface (above >99.5% of the atmosphere). In this presentation I will discuss the contribution that scientific balloon experiments have made to astronomy, from the early days when astronomers had to accompany their telescopes to the stratosphere, to the present era where automated payloads are in some cases able to achieve a pointing precision of better than an arcsecond. In particular, I will discuss the important contributions that balloon telescopes have made to our current understanding of the Universe through detailed measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background. I will also show how recent observations from sub-millimeter balloon telescopes such as BLAST and BLASTPol have been used to study both star formation and magnetic fields of nearby giant molecular clouds in unprecedented detail, and also to constrain models of interstellar dust composition. With improving ballooning technology, such as NASA’s new Super-Pressure Balloon program, we will soon have the capability for science flights of several months (rather than weeks) duration, thus beginning an exciting new era in balloon astronomy.

  19. Pre-flight integration and characterization of the SPIDER balloon-borne telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Rahlin, A S; Amiri, M; Benton, S J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Bryan, S A; Chiang, H C; Contaldi, C R; Crill, B P; Doré, O; Farhang, M; Filippini, J P; Fissel, L M; Fraisse, A A; Gambrel, A E; Gandilo, N N; Golwala, S; Gudmundsson, J E; Halpern, M; Hasselfield, M F; Hilton, G; Holmes, W A; Hristov, V V; Irwin, K D; Jones, W C; Kermish, Z D; Kuo, C L; MacTavish, C J; Mason, P V; Megerian, K; Moncelsi, L; Morford, T A; Nagy, J M; Netterfield, C B; O'Brient, R; Reintsema, C; Ruhl, J E; Runyan, M C; Shariff, J A; Soler, J D; Trangsrud, A; Tucker, C; Tucker, R S; Turner, A D; Weber, A C; Wiebe, D V; Young, E Y

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of integration and characterization of the SPIDER instrument after the 2013 pre-flight campaign. SPIDER is a balloon-borne polarimeter designed to probe the primordial gravitational wave signal in the degree-scale $B$-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background. With six independent telescopes housing over 2000 detectors in the 94 GHz and 150 GHz frequency bands, SPIDER will map 7.5% of the sky with a depth of 11 to 14 $\\mu$K$\\cdot$arcmin at each frequency, which is a factor of $\\sim$5 improvement over Planck. We discuss the integration of the pointing, cryogenic, electronics, and power sub-systems, as well as pre-flight characterization of the detectors and optical systems. SPIDER is well prepared for a December 2014 flight from Antarctica, and is expected to be limited by astrophysical foreground emission, and not instrumental sensitivity, over the survey region.

  20. Balloon Flight Test of a Compton Telescope Based on Scintillators with Silicon Photomultiplier Readouts

    CERN Document Server

    Bloser, P F; Bancroft, C M; Ryan, J M; McConnell, M L

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of the first high-altitude balloon flight test of a concept for an advanced Compton telescope making use of modern scintillator materials with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readouts. There is a need in the fields of high-energy astronomy and solar physics for new medium-energy gamma-ray (~0.4 - 10 MeV) detectors capable of making sensitive observations. A fast scintillator- based Compton telescope with SiPM readouts is a promising solution to this instrumentation challenge, since the fast response of the scintillators permits the rejection of background via time-of-flight (ToF) discrimination. The Solar Compton Telescope (SolCompT) prototype was designed to demonstrate stable performance of this technology under balloon-flight conditions. The SolCompT instrument was a simple two-element Compton telescope, consisting of an approximately one-inch cylindrical stilbene crystal for a scattering detector and a one-inch cubic LaBr3:Ce crystal for a calorimeter detector. Both scintillator dete...

  1. Crew Recovery and Contingency Planning for a Manned Stratospheric Balloon Flight - the StratEx Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Anil S; Jourdan, David; Nusbaum, Derek M; Garbino, Alejandro; Buckland, Daniel M; Norton, Sean; Clark, Johnathan B; Antonsen, Erik L

    2016-10-01

    The StratEx program used a self-contained space suit and balloon system to loft pilot Alan Eustace to a record-breaking altitude and skydive from 135,897 feet (41,422 m). After releasing from the balloon and a stabilized freefall, the pilot safely landed using a parachute system based on a modified tandem parachute rig. A custom spacesuit provided life support using a similar system to NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Washington, DC USA) Extravehicular Mobility Unit. It also provided tracking, communications, and connection to the parachute system. A recovery support team, including at least two medical personnel and two spacesuit technicians, was charged with reaching the pilot within five minutes of touchdown to extract him from the suit and provide treatment for any injuries. The team had to track the flight at all times, be prepared to respond in case of premature release, and to operate in any terrain. Crew recovery operations were planned and tailored to anticipate outcomes during this novel event in a systematic fashion, through scenario and risk analysis, in order to minimize the probability and impact of injury. This analysis, detailed here, helped the team configure recovery assets, refine navigation and tracking systems, develop procedures, and conduct training. An extensive period of testing and practice culminated in three manned flights leading to a successful mission and setting the record for exit altitude, distance of fall with stabilizing device, and vertical speed with a stabilizing device. During this mission, recovery teams reached the landing spot within one minute, extracted the pilot, and confirmed that he was not injured. This strategy is presented as an approach to prehospital planning and care for improved safety during crew recovery in novel, extreme events. Menon AS , Jourdan D , Nusbaum DM , Garbino A , Buckland DM , Norton S , Clark JB , Antonsen EL . Crew recovery and contingency planning for a manned

  2. Balloon Flight Background Measurement with Actively-Shielded Planar and Imaging CZT Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Bloser, P. F.; Narita, T; Jenkins, J. A.; Perrin, M.; Murray, R.; Grindlay, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    We present results from the flight of two prototype CZT detectors on a scientific balloon payload in September 2000. The first detector, referred to as ``CZT1,'' consisted of a 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm CZT crystal with a single gold planar electrode readout. This detector was shielded by a combination of a passive collimator surrounded by plastic scintillator and a thick BGO crystal in the rear. The second detector, ``CZT2,'' comprised two 10 mm x 10 mm x 5 mm CZT crystals, one made of eV Product...

  3. Balloon flight test of a Compton telescope based on scintillators with silicon photomultiplier readouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloser, P.F., E-mail: Peter.Bloser@unh.edu; Legere, J.S.; Bancroft, C.M.; Ryan, J.M.; McConnell, M.L.

    2016-03-11

    We present the results of the first high-altitude balloon flight test of a concept for an advanced Compton telescope making use of modern scintillator materials with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readouts. There is a need in the fields of high-energy astronomy and solar physics for new medium-energy gamma-ray (~0.4–10 MeV) detectors capable of making sensitive observations of both line and continuum sources over a wide dynamic range. A fast scintillator-based Compton telescope with SiPM readouts is a promising solution to this instrumentation challenge, since the fast response of the scintillators permits both the rejection of background via time-of-flight (ToF) discrimination and the ability to operate at high count rates. The Solar Compton Telescope (SolCompT) prototype presented here was designed to demonstrate stable performance of this technology under balloon-flight conditions. The SolCompT instrument was a simple two-element Compton telescope, consisting of an approximately one-inch cylindrical stilbene crystal for a scattering detector and a one-inch cubic LaBr{sub 3}:Ce crystal for a calorimeter detector. Both scintillator detectors were read out by 2×2 arrays of Hamamatsu S11828-3344 MPPC devices. Custom front-end electronics provided optimum signal rise time and linearity, and custom power supplies automatically adjusted the SiPM bias voltage to compensate for temperature-induced gain variations. A tagged calibration source, consisting of ~240 nCi of {sup 60}Co embedded in plastic scintillator, was placed in the field of view and provided a known source of gamma rays to measure in flight. The SolCompT balloon payload was launched on 24 August 2014 from Fort Sumner, NM, and spent ~3.75 h at a float altitude of ~123,000 ft. The instrument performed well throughout the flight. After correcting for small (~10%) residual gain variations, we measured an in-flight ToF resolution of ~760 ps (FWHM). Advanced scintillators with SiPM readouts continue to show

  4. Balloon Flight Background Measurement with Actively-Shielded Planar and Imaging CZT Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bloser, P F; Jenkins, J A; Perrin, M; Murray, R; Grindlay, J E

    2001-01-01

    We present results from the flight of two prototype CZT detectors on a scientific balloon payload in September 2000. The first detector, referred to as ``CZT1,'' consisted of a 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm CZT crystal with a single gold planar electrode readout. This detector was shielded by a combination of a passive collimator surrounded by plastic scintillator and a thick BGO crystal in the rear. The second detector, ``CZT2,'' comprised two 10 mm x 10 mm x 5 mm CZT crystals, one made of eV Products high pressure Bridgman material and the other of IMARAD horizontal Bridgman material, each fashioned with a 4 x 4 array of gold pixels on a 2.5 mm pitch. The pixellated detectors were flip-chip-mounted side by side and read out by a 32-channel ASIC. This detector was also shielded by a passive/plastic collimator in the front, but used only additional passive/plastic shielding in the rear. Both experiments were flown from Ft. Sumner, NM on September 19, 2000 on a 24 hour balloon flight. CZT1 recorded a non-vetoed backgro...

  5. Adapted ECC ozonesonde for long-duration flights aboard boundary-layer pressurised balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheusi, François; Durand, Pierre; Verdier, Nicolas; Dulac, François; Attié, Jean-Luc; Commun, Philippe; Barret, Brice; Basdevant, Claude; Clenet, Antoine; Derrien, Solène; Doerenbecher, Alexis; El Amraoui, Laaziz; Fontaine, Alain; Hache, Emeric; Jambert, Corinne; Jaumouillé, Elodie; Meyerfeld, Yves; Roblou, Laurent; Tocquer, Flore

    2016-12-01

    Since the 1970s, the French space agency CNES has developed boundary-layer pressurised balloons (BLPBs) with the capability to transport lightweight scientific payloads at isopycnic level and offer a quasi-Lagrangian sampling of the lower atmosphere over very long distances and durations (up to several weeks).Electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes are widely used under small sounding balloons. However, their autonomy is limited to a few hours owing to power consumption and electrolyte evaporation. An adaptation of the ECC sonde has been developed specifically for long-duration BLPB flights. Compared to conventional ECC sondes, the main feature is the possibility of programming periodic measurement sequences (with possible remote control during the flight). To increase the ozonesonde autonomy, the strategy has been adopted of short measurement sequences (2-3 min) regularly spaced in time (e.g. every 15 min). The rest of the time, the sonde pump is turned off. Results of preliminary ground-based tests are first presented. In particular, the sonde was able to provide correct ozone concentrations against a reference UV-absorption ozone analyser every 15 min for 4 days. Then we illustrate results from 16 BLBP flights launched over the western Mediterranean during three summer field campaigns of the ChArMEx project (http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr): TRAQA in 2012, and ADRIMED and SAFMED in 2013. BLPB drifting altitudes were in the range 0.25-3.2 km. The longest flight lasted more than 32 h and covered more than 1000 km. Satisfactory data were obtained when compared to independent ozone measurements close in space and time. The quasi-Lagrangian measurements allowed a first look at ozone diurnal evolution in the marine boundary layer as well as in the lower free troposphere. During some flight segments, there was indication of photochemical ozone production in the marine boundary layer or even in the free troposphere, at rates ranging from 1 to 2 ppbv h -1, which

  6. Precise Pointing and Stabilization Performance for the Balloon-borne Imaging Testbed (BIT): 2015 Test Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Romualdez, L J; Damaren, C J; Galloway, M N; Hartley, J W; Li, L; Massey, R J; Netterfield, C B

    2016-01-01

    Balloon-borne astronomy offers an attractive option for experiments that require precise pointing and attitude stabilization, due to a large reduction in the atmospheric interference observed by ground-based systems as well as the low-cost and short development time-scale compared to space-borne systems. The Balloon-borne Imaging Testbed (BIT) is an instrument designed to meet the technological requirements of high precision astronomical missions and is a precursor to the development of a facility class instrument with capabilities similar to the Hubble Space Telescope. The attitude determination and control systems (ADCS) for BIT, the design, implementation, and analysis of which are the focus of this paper, compensate for compound pendulation effects and other sub-orbital disturbances in the stratosphere to within 1-2$^{\\prime\\prime}$ (rms), while back-end optics provide further image stabilization down to 0.05$^{\\prime\\prime}$ (not discussed here). During the inaugural test flight from Timmins, Canada in S...

  7. The First Science Flight of the Faint Intergalactic medium Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBALL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher; Milliard, Bruno; Schiminovich, David; Tuttle, Sarah; Matuszewski, Matt; Rahman, Shahin; Evrard, Jean; Frank, Stephan; Deharveng, Jean-Michel; Peroux, Celine

    We have completed the second flight of the path-finding experiment, the Faint Intergalactic medium Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBALL), designed to discover and map faint emis-sion from the Intergalactic Medium (IGM). The second flight was fully successful, proving a fully functional fine pointing gondola with arcsec level capability, a 1 meter diameter (fixed) parabola primary telescope with planar sidereostat for pointing, a complete closed loop guide camera and control software, and a fiber fed UV integral field spectrograph feeding a spare GALEX Near UV detector. Three scientific targets were observed, and analysis of the data shows that the instrument performed as expected. The flux measurements obtained will be compared to models for IGM emission. We discuss future modifications to the payload that will achieve a 10-to 30-fold increase in sensitivity over science flight 1. We also discuss other instrument configurations that can utilize the 1-meter UV telescope and arcsecond pointing platform, and their corresponding science objectives. FIREBALL is a collaboration of NASA, Caltech, Columbia University, CNES, and Laboratorie Astrophysique Marseille, and is sup-ported by NASA, CNES, and CNRS.

  8. Clefting in pumpkin balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, F.; Schur, W.

    NASA's effort to develop a large payload, high altitude, long duration balloon, the Ultra Long Duration Balloon, focuses on a pumpkin shape super-pressure design. It has been observed that a pumpkin balloon may be unable to pressurize into the desired cyclically symmetric equilibrium configuration, settling into a distorted, undesired stable state instead. Hoop stress considerations in the pumpkin design leads to choosing the lowest possible bulge radius, while robust deployment is favored by a large bulge radius. Some qualitative understanding of design aspects on undesired equilibria in pumpkin balloons has been obtained via small-scale balloon testing. Poorly deploying balloons have clefts, but most gores away from the cleft deploy uniformly. In this paper, we present models for pumpkin balloons with clefts. Long term success of the pumpkin balloon for NASA requires a thorough understanding of the phenomenon of multiple stable equilibria and means for quantitative assessment of measures that prevent their occurrence. This paper attempts to determine numerical thresholds of design parameters that distinguish between properly deploying designs and improperly deploying designs by analytically investigating designs in the vicinity of criticality. Design elements which may trigger the onset undesired equilibria and remedial measures that ensure deployment are discussed.

  9. Modified ECC ozone sonde for long-duration flights aboard isopicnic drifting balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheusi, Francois; Durand, Pierre; Verdier, Nicolas; Dulac, François; Attié, Jean-Luc; Commun, Philippe; Barret, Brice; Basdevant, Claude; Clénet, Antoine; Fontaine, Alain; Jambert, Corinne; Meyerfeld, Yves; Roblou, Laurent; Tocquer, Flore

    2015-04-01

    Since few years, the French space agency CNES has developed boundary-layer pressurized balloons (BLPB) with the capability to transport scientific payloads at isopicnic level over very long distances and durations (up to several weeks in absence of navigation limits). However, the autonomy of conventional electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozone sondes, that are widely used for tropospheric and stratospheric soundings, is limited to few hours due to power consumption and electrolyte evaporation (owing to air bubbling in the cathode solution). In collaboration with the French research community, CNES has developed a new ozone payload suited for long duration flights aboard BLPB. The mechanical elements (Teflon pump and motor) and the electrochemical cell of conventional ECC sondes have been kept but the electronic implementation is entirely new. The main feature is the possibility of programming periodic measurement sequences -- with possible remote control during the flight. To increase the ozone sonde autonomy, a strategy has been adopted of short measurement sequences (typically 2-3 min) regularly spaced in time (e.g. every 15 min, which is usually sufficient for air quality studies). The rest of the time, the sonde is at rest (pump motor off). The response time of an ECC sonde to an ozone concentration step is below one minute. Consequently, the measurement sequence is typically composed of a one-minute spin-up period after the pump has been turned on, followed by a one- to two-minute acquisition period. All time intervals can be adjusted before and during the flight. Results of a preliminary ground-based test in spring 2012 are first presented. The sonde provided correct ozone concentrations against a reference UV analyzer every 15 minutes during 4 days. Then we illustrate results from 16 BLBP flights launched in the low troposphere over the Mediterranean during summer field campaings in 2012 and 2013 (TRAQA and ChArMEx programmes). BLPB drifting

  10. The ExaVolt Antenna: A Large-Aperture, Balloon-embedded Antenna for Ultra-high Energy Particle Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Gorham, P W; Allison, P; Liewer, K M; Miki, C; Hill, B; Varner, G S

    2011-01-01

    We describe the scientific motivation, experimental basis, design methodology, and simulated performance of the ExaVolt Antenna (EVA) mission, and planned ultra-high energy (UHE) particle observatory under development for NASA's suborbital super-pressure balloon program in Antarctica. EVA will improve over ANITA's integrated totals - the current state-of-the-art in UHE suborbital payloads - by 1-2 orders of magnitude in a single flight. The design is based on a novel application of toroidal reflector optics which utilizes a super-pressure balloon surface, along with a feed-array mounted on an inner membrane, to create an ultra-large radio antenna system with a synoptic view of the Antarctic ice sheet below it. Radio impulses arise via the Askaryan effect when UHE neutrinos interact within the ice, or via geosynchrotron emission when UHE cosmic rays interact in the atmosphere above the continent. EVA's instantaneous antenna aperture is estimated to be several hundred square meters for detection of these events...

  11. Solar Observations at THz Frequencies on Board of a Trans-Antartic Stratospheric Balloon Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Pierre; Abrantes, André; Bortolucci, Emilio; Caspi, Amir; Fernandes, Luis Olavo T.; Kropotov, Grigory; Kudaka, Amauri; Laurent, Glenn Thomas; Machado, Nelson; Marcon, Rogério; Marun, Adolfo; Nicolaev, Valery; Hidalgo Ramirez, Ray Fernando; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Shih, Albert; Silva, Claudemir; Timofeevsky, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Sub-THz and 30 THz solar burst observations revealed a new spectral component, with fluxes increasing towards THz frequencies, simultaneously with the well known component peaking at microwaves, bringing challenging constraints for interpretation. The THz flare spectra can be completed with measurements made from space. A new system of two photometers was built to observe the Sun at 3 and 7 THz named SOLAR-T. An innovative optical setup allows observations of the full solar disk and detect small burst with sub-second time resolution. The photometers use two Golay cell detectors at the foci of 7.6 cm Cassegrain telescopes. The incoming radiation undergoes low-pass filters made of rough surface primary mirrors and membranes, 3 and 7 THz band-pass filters, and choppers. The system has been integrated to redundant data acquisition system and Iridium short-burst data services telemetry for monitoring during the flight. SOLAR-T has been flown coupled to U.C. Berkeley solar hard X-ray and gamma-ray imaging spectro-polarimeter GRIPS experiment launched on a NASA CSBF stratospheric balloon from U.S. McMurdo base on January 19, 2016, on a trans-Antarctic flight. The mission ended on January 30. The SOLAR-T on-board computers were recovered from the payload that landed in the Argentina Mountain Range, nearly 2100 km from McMurdo. The SOLAR-T performance was successfully attained, with full space qualification instrumentation. Preliminary results provide the solar disk THz brightness temperatures and indicate a 7 THz burst enhancement time coincident to a sub-THz burst observed by SST during the 28 January GOES C9.6 class soft X-ray burst, the largest occurred during the flight.

  12. Balloon-Borne Infrasound Detection of Energetic Bolide Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eliot F.; Ballard, Courtney; Klein, Viliam; Bowman, Daniel; Boslough, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Infrasound is usually defined as sound waves below 20 Hz, the nominal limit of human hearing. Infrasound waves propagate over vast distances through the Earth's atmosphere: the CTBTO (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization) has 48 installed infrasound-sensing stations around the world to detect nuclear detonations and other disturbances. In February 2013, several CTBTO infrasound stations detected infrasound signals from a large bolide that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia. Some stations recorded signals that had circumnavigated the Earth, over a day after the original event. The goal of this project is to improve upon the sensitivity of the CTBTO network by putting microphones on small, long-duration super-pressure balloons, with the overarching goal of studying the small end of the NEO population by using the Earth's atmosphere as a witness plate.A balloon-borne infrasound sensor is expected to have two advantages over ground-based stations: a lack of wind noise and a concentration of infrasound energy in the "stratospheric duct" between roughly 5 - 50 km altitude. To test these advantages, we have built a small balloon payload with five calibrated microphones. We plan to fly this payload on a NASA high-altitude balloon from Ft Sumner, NM in August 2016. We have arranged for three large explosions to take place in Socorro, NM while the balloon is aloft to assess the sensitivity of balloon-borne vs. ground-based infrasound sensors. We will report on the results from this test flight and the prospects for detecting/characterizing small bolides in the stratosphere.

  13. High Energy Electrons and Gamma Rays from the ATIC-2 Balloon Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbert, J. B.; ATIC Collaboration

    2004-08-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment is primarily designed to measure the spectra of nuclear cosmic rays (protons to nickel). It is composed of a segmented BGO calorimeter (18 radiation lengths deep) following a carbon target (0.75 nuclear interaction lengths) interleaved with scintillator tracking layers. A Silicon matrix detector at the entrance identifies the incident particle charge. Utilizing simulations such as Fluka and Geant we have investigated the ability of this design to differentiate electron (gamma) initiated showers from hadronic showers. The differences in shower development between the two populations are sufficient to differentiate them for measurements of electron spectra into the TeV region, as confirmed by accelerator tests at CERN and by the ATIC-1 test flight in 2000-01. ATIC had a successful science flight in 2002-03 from McMurdo, Antarctica returning about 19 days of flight data. This exposure is sufficient to record electrons into the TeV region and measure gamma rays at 100's of GeV. The majority of gamma rays are of atmospheric origin and provide a test for this technique. The preliminary electron spectrum from the ATIC-2 flight is presented and compared to previous high energy measurements, principally from emulsion chambers. Possible astrophysical interpretations of the results are discussed. The ATIC Collaboration: J.H. Adams,2 H.S. Ahn,3 G.L. Bashindzhagyan,4 K.E. Batkov,4 J. Chang,6,7 M. Christl,2 A.R. Fazely,5, O. Ganel,3 R.M. Gunasingha,5 T.G. Guzik,1 J. Isbert,1 K.C. Kim,3 E.N. Kouznetsov,4 M.I. Panasyuk,4 A.D. Panov,4 W.K.H. Schmidt,6 E.S. Seo,3 N.V. Sokolskaya,4 J.Z. Wang,3 J.P. Wefel,1 J. Wu,3 V.I. Zatsepin,4 (1) Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA (2) Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, USA (3) University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA (4) Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia (5) Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA (6

  14. Balloon flight background measurement with actively-shielded planar and imaging CZT detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Narita, Tomohiko; Jenkins, Jonathan A.; Perrin, Marshall; Murray, Ruth; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    2002-01-01

    We present results from the flight of two prototype CZT detectors on a scientific balloon payload in September 2000. The first detector, referred to as CZT1, consisted of a 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm CZT crystal with a single gold planar electrode readout. This detector was shielded by a combination of a passive collimator in the front, giving a 40 degree field of view and surrounded by plastic scintillator, and a thick BGO crystal in the rear. The second detector, CZT2, comprised two 10 mm x 10 mm x 5 mm CZT crystals, one made of eV Products high pressure Bridgman material and the other of IMARAD horizontal Bridgman material, each fashioned with a 4 x 4 array of gold pixels on a 2.5 mm pitch. The pixellated detectors were flip-chip-mounted side by side and read out by a 32-channel ASIC. This detector was also shielded by a passive/plastic collimator in the front, but used only additional passive/plastic shielding in the rear. Both experiments were flown from Ft. Sumner, NM on September 19, 2000 on a 24 hour balloon flight. Both instruments performed well. CZT1 recorded a non-vetoed background level at 100 keV of approximately 1 x 10-3 cm-2s-1keV-1. Raising the BGO threshold from 50 keV to approximately 1 MeV produced only an 18% increase in this level. CZT2 recorded a background at 100 keV of approximately 4 times 10-3 cts cm-2s-1keV-1 in the eV Products detector and approximately 6 x 10-3 cts cm-2s-1keV-1 in the IMARAD detector, a difference possibly due to our internal background subtracting procedure. Both CZT1 and CZT2 spectra were in basic agreement with Monte Carlo simulations, though both recorded systematically higher count rates at high energy than predicted. No lines were observed, indicating that neutron capture reactions, at least those producing decay lines at a few 100 keV, are not significant components of the CZT background. Comparison of the CZT1 and CZT2 spectra indicates that passive/plastic shielding may provide adequately low background levels for

  15. Two lighter than air systems in opposing flight regimes: An unmanned short haul, heavy load transport balloon and a manned, light payload airship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Lighter Than Air vehicles are generally defined or categorized by the shape of the balloon, payload capacity and operational flight regime. Two balloon systems that are classed as being in opposite categories are described. One is a cable guided, helium filled, short haul, heavy load transport Lighter Than Air system with a natural shaped envelope. The other is a manned, aerodynamic shaped airship which utilizes hot air as the buoyancy medium and is in the light payload class. While the airship is in the design/fabrication phase with flight tests scheduled for the latter part of 1974, the transport balloon system has been operational for some eight years.

  16. Sicily 2002 Balloon Flight Campaign: A Test of the HASI Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettanini, C.

    A mock up of the probe descending in the Titan atmosphere for the Huygens Cassini Mission has been successfully launched with stratospheric balloon from Italian Space Agency Base "Luigi Broglio" in Sicily and recovered on May 30 th 2002. The probe has been lifted at 32 km altitude and then released to perform a 45 minutes descent decelerated by parachute, to simulate Huygens mission at Titan. Preliminary aerodynamics study of the probe has focused on the achievement of a descent velocity profile and a spin rate profile, satisfying the Huygens mission to Titan requirements. The descent velocity and spin rate have been calculated by solving a system of ODE describing the translational and rotational motion of the probe trough the earth atmosphere during parachute aided descent Results of these calculations have driven the choice of an appropriate angle of attack of the blades in the bottom of the probe and ballast weight during flight. The probe is hosting spares of HASI instruments, housekeeping sensors and other dedicated sensors, Beagle II UV Sensors and Huygens Tilt Sensor, for a total of 77 acquired sensor channels, sampled during ascent, drift and descent phase. Main goals are to verify sensor performance and perform a realistic functional test in dynamical and environmental conditions similar to those during the descent in Titan atmosphere and furthermore to investigate impact at ground to check the impact detection sequence of HASI accelerometer and HASI in the surface phase. An integrated data acquisition and instrument control system has been developed, based on PC architecture and soft -real-time application. Sensors channels have been sampled at the nominal HASI data rates, with a max rate of 1 kHz. Software has been developed for data acquisition, onboard storage and telemetry transmission satisfying all requests for real-time monitoring, diagnostic and redundancy.

  17. Observations of cosmic ray positrons during the 1993 flight of the NMSU/WiZard-TS93 balloon borne apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basini, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Circella, M.; De Cataldo, G.; De Marzo, C.N. [Bari Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Bari (Italy); Brunetti, M.T.; Codini, A. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); De Pascale, M.P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy)]|[INFN, Rome (Italy); Aversa, F. [Trieste Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    As a part of a series of experiments to search for antimatter in the primary cosmic ray, the NMSU balloon borne apparatus was configured for a flight dedicated to the search of positrons. Two completely new instruments were added to the magnetic spectrometer: a transition radiation detector (TRD) and a silicon-tungsten tracking calorimeter. The function of these two instruments complemented one another and the combined action provided a proton rejection factor better than 5x10{sup 5}. The paper shows the results from the analysis on the complete set of data. All the presented spectra are at the level of the spectrometer.

  18. Structure variations of pumpkin balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, N.; Izutsu, N.; Honda, H.

    2004-01-01

    A lobed pumpkin balloon by 3-D gore design concept is recognized as a basic form for a super-pressure balloon. This paper deals with extensions of this design concept for other large pressurized membrane structures, such as a stratospheric airship and a balloon of which volume is controllable. The structural modifications are performed by means of additional ropes, belts or a strut. When the original pumpkin shape is modified by these systems, the superior characteristics of the 3-D gore design, incorporating large bulges with a small local radius and unidirectional film tension, should be maintained. Improved design methods which are adequate for the above subjects will be discussed in detail. Application for ground structures are also mentioned.

  19. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry-BLASTPol: Performance and results from the 2012 Antarctic flight

    CERN Document Server

    Galitzki, N; Angilé, F E; Benton, S J; Devlin, M J; Dober, B; Fissel, L M; Fukui, Y; Gandilo, N N; Klein, J; Korotkov, A L; Matthews, T G; Moncelsi, L; Netterfield, C B; Novak, G; Nutter, D; Pascale, E; Poidevin, F; Savini, G; Scott, D; Shariff, J A; Soler, J D; Tucker, C E; Tucker, G S; Ward-Thompson, D

    2014-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) is a suborbital mapping experiment, designed to study the role played by magnetic fields in the star formation process. BLASTPol observes polarized light using a total power instrument, photolithographic polarizing grids, and an achromatic half-wave plate to modulate the polarization signal. During its second flight from Antarctica in December 2012, BLASTPol made degree scale maps of linearly polarized dust emission from molecular clouds in three wavebands, centered at 250, 350, and 500 microns. The instrumental performance was an improvement over the 2010 BLASTPol flight, with decreased systematics resulting in a higher number of confirmed polarization vectors. The resultant dataset allows BLASTPol to trace magnetic fields in star-forming regions at scales ranging from cores to entire molecular cloud complexes.

  20. "SP.ACE" 2013-2015: ASGARD Balloon and BIFROST Parabolic Flights: Latest Developments in Hands-On Space Education Projects for Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Schrijver, E.; Chameleva, H.; Degroote, C.; D'Haese, Z.; Paice, C.; Plas, H.; Van den Bossche, A.; Vander Donckt, L.; Vander Vost, J.

    2015-09-01

    Flight opportunities on high-altitude ASGARD balloons offered to secondary schools worldwide since 20 1 1 have led to an ever more rapidly increasing number of project proposals. The introduction of beginners' and ‘advanced classes of experiments is hoped to draw in even larger numbers of interested school teams. Furthermore, and in cooperation with ESERO (European Space Education Resources Office), workshops and documentation are being prepared to introduce teachers and students alike to the world of microcontrollers and sensors. A student parabolic flight programme called BIFROST (Brussels' Initiative to provide Flight Research Opportunities to STudents) was initiated to meet the rising demand for hands-on space education projects and the desire to cover the widest possible range of scientific and/or technical domains, which essentially calls for a variety of flight platforms: cansats, balloons and parabolic flight.

  1. Construction and testing of a pixellated CZT detector and shield for a hard x-ray astronomy balloon flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Narita, Tomohiko; Jenkins, Jonathan A.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    2000-12-01

    We report on the construction and laboratory testing of pixellated CZT detectors mounted in a flip-chip, tiled fashion and read out by an ASIC, as required for proposed hard X-ray astronomy missions. Two 10 mm X 10 mm X 5 mm detectors were fabricated, one out of standard eV Products high-pressure Bridgman CZT and one out of IMARAD horizontal Bridgman CZT. Each was fashioned with a 4 X 4 array of gold pixels on 2.5 mm pitch with a surrounding guard ring. The detectors were mounted side by side on a carrier card, such that the pixel pitch was preserved, and read out by a 32-channel VA-TA ASIC from IDE AS Corp. controlled by a PC/104 single-board computer. A passive shield/collimator surrounded by plastic scintillator encloses the detectors on five sides and provides an approximately 40 degree field of view. Thus this experiment tests key techniques required for future hard X-ray survey instruments. The experiment was taken to Ft. Sumner, NM in May 2000 in preparation for a scientific balloon flight aboard the joint Harvard-MSFC EXITE2/HERO payload. Although we did not receive a flight opportunity, and are currently scheduled to fly in September 2000, we present our calibration data in the flight configuration together with data analysis techniques and simulations of the expected flight background spectrum.

  2. The Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna ultra-high energy neutrino detector: Design, performance, and sensitivity for 2006-2007 balloon flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorham, P. W. [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Allison, P. [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Beatty, J. J. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Besson, D. Z. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Binns, W. R. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Chen, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Chen, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Clem, J. M. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Connolly, A. [Univ. College London, London (United Kingdom); Dowkontt, P. F. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); DuVernois, M. A. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Field, R. C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Goldstein, D. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Goodhue, A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hast, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hebert, C. L. [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Hoover, S. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Israel, M. H. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Learned, J. G. [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States). et al.

    2009-05-23

    In this article, we present a comprehensive report on the experimental details of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) long-duration balloon payload, including the design philosophy and realization, physics simulations, performance of the instrument during its first Antarctic flight completed in January of 2007, and expectations for the limiting neutrino detection sensitivity.

  3. Planetary Balloon-Based Science Platform Evaluation and Program Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John W.; Kremic, Tibor; Hibbitts, Karl; Young, Eliot F.; Landis, Rob

    2016-01-01

    gondola characteristics are assessed in this study and a concept is recommended, the Gondola for High-Altitude Planetary Science (GHAPS). This first generation platform is designed around a 1 m or larger aperture, narrow-field telescope with pointing accuracies better than one arc-second. A classical Cassegrain, or variant like Ritchey-Chretien, telescope is recommended for the primary telescope. The gondola should be designed for multiple flights so it must be robust and readily processed at recovery. It must be light-weighted to the extent possible to allow for long-duration flights on super-pressure balloons. Demonstration Flights: Recent demonstration flights achieved several significant accomplishments that can feed forward to a GHAPS gondola project. Science results included the first ever Earth-based measurements for CO2 in a comet, first measurements for CO2 and H2O in an Oort cloud comet, and the first measurement of 1 Ceres at 2.73 m to refine the shape of the infrared water absorption feature. The performance of the Fine Steering Mirror (FSM) was also demonstrated. The BOPPS platform can continue to be leveraged on future flights even as GHAPS is being developed. The study affirms the planetary decadal recommendations, and shows that a number of Top Priority science questions can be achieved. A combination GHAPS and BOPPS would provide the best value for PSD for realizing that science.

  4. Performance of the CAPRICE RICH detector during the 1994 balloon flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbiellini, G.; Basini, G.; Bellotti, R.; Bocciolini, M.; Boezio, M.; Massimo Brancaccio, F.; Bravar, U.; Cafagna, F.; Candusso, M.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellano, M.; De Cataldo, G.; Circella, M.; Codino, A.; Finetti, N.; Francke, T.; Giglietto, N.; Golden, R.L.; Grimani, C.; Hof, M.; Marangelli, B.; De Marzo, C.N.; Mitchell, J.W.; Morselli, A.; De Pascale, M.P.; Papini, P.; Perego, A.; Piccardi, S.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Schiavon, P.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, S.A.; Stochaj, S.J.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Suffert, M.; Vacchi, A.; Weber, N.; Zampa, N. [Particle Astrophysics Lab, New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)]|[Tata Institute of fundamental Research, Bombay (India)]|[Goddard Space Flight Center/NASA, Greenbelt, MD (United States)]|[Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)]|[Centre de Recherches Nucleaires, Strasbourg (France)]|[Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Univ. di Perugia and INFN-Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy)]|[INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Univ. di Firenze and INFN-Sezione di Firenze, Florence (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Univ. di Roma II ``Tor Vergata`` and INFN-Sezione di Roma II ``Tor Vergata``, Roma (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Univ. di Trieste and INFN-Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Fisica dell`Univ. di Bari and INFN-Sezione di Bari, Trieste (Italy)]|[University of Siegen, Siegen (Germany)

    1996-03-01

    A RICH detector capable of detecting unit charged particles, e.g. antiprotons and positrons, has been used successfully for the first time in a balloon-borne magnet spectrometer. The thin and compact CAPRICE RICH detector uses a NaF solid radiator, TMAE vapour as photoconverter and cathode pad readout in the photosensitive MWPC operated at low gain. 15 photoelectrons are detected per ring for {beta}=1, perpendicular incidence particles giving a resolution on the Cherenkov angle of 8 mrad, increasing to 14 mrad at 20 incidence angle. Besides particle identification on an event-by-event basis it efficiently rejects multiparticle events and albedo particles. (orig.).

  5. Initial Results from the Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) Balloon Flight Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) high-altitude balloon mission was successfully launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico USA on 25 September, 2015. Over 15 hours of science data were obtained from four dosimeters at altitudes above about 25 km. The four dosimeters flown on the RaD-X science payload are a Hawk version 3.0 Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) manufactured by Far West Technologies, a Liulin dosimeter-spectrometer produced by the Solar Research and Technology Institute, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, a total ionizing dose detector manufactured by Teledyne Microelectronic Technologies, and the RaySure detector provided by the University of Surrey.

  6. Improving uv resistance of high strength fibers used in large scientific balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, M.; Gupta, A.; Seyam, A.; Mock, G.; Theyson, T.

    For the last three decades, NASA has been involved in the development of giant balloons that are capable of lifting heavy payloads of equipment (such as large telescopes and scientific instruments) to the upper atmosphere. While the use of such balloons has led to scientific discoveries, the demand for competitive science payloads and observational programs continues to rise. The NASA Balloon Program Office has entered a new phase of research to develop an Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) that will lift payloads of up to 3,600 kg to altitudes of up to 40 km. The flight duration is targeted to ranges between 30 to 100 days. Attaining these target durations requires the development of a super-pressure balloon design. The use of textile structures have already been established in these missions in the form of high strength tendons essential for the super pressure pumpkin design. Unfortunately, high strength fibers lose significant strength upon exposure to Ultra Violet (UV) radiation. Such UV degradation poses a serious challenge for the development of the ULDB. To improve the mission performance of the ULDB, new methods for protecting the tendons from the environmental effects need to be developed. NASA and NC State University College of Textiles are undertaking a research program to address these issues. Four tracks have been identified to prepare finishes that are believed to enhance the resistance of high strength fibers to UV. These tracks are: (a) self-polymerizing, (b) diffusion application, (c) polymer-filled with 30-40% UV absorber, and (d) combination of dyeing plus surface application. Four high performance fibers have been selected for this research investigation. These are Vectran, Spectra, Kevlar and, PBO (Zylon). This work will address the current progress of evaluating the performance of the UV finishes. This will be accomplished by comparing the tensile properties (strenthg, breaking elongation, modulus, etc) of untreated, unexposed to UV fibers

  7. Lupus I Observations from the 2010 Flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Tristan G.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angilè, Francesco E.; Benton, Steven J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Devlin, Mark J.; Fissel, Laura M.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Novak, Giles; Nutter, David; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A.; Soler, Juan Diego; Tachihara, Kengo; Thomas, Nicholas E.; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Tucker, Carole E.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2014-04-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was created by adding polarimetric capability to the BLAST experiment that was flown in 2003, 2005, and 2006. BLASTPol inherited BLAST's 1.8 m primary and its Herschel/SPIRE heritage focal plane that allows simultaneous observation at 250, 350, and 500 μm. We flew BLASTPol in 2010 and again in 2012. Both were long duration Antarctic flights. Here we present polarimetry of the nearby filamentary dark cloud Lupus I obtained during the 2010 flight. Despite limitations imposed by the effects of a damaged optical component, we were able to clearly detect submillimeter polarization on degree scales. We compare the resulting BLASTPol magnetic field map with a similar map made via optical polarimetry. (The optical data were published in 1998 by J. Rizzo and collaborators.) The two maps partially overlap and are reasonably consistent with one another. We compare these magnetic field maps to the orientations of filaments in Lupus I, and we find that the dominant filament in the cloud is approximately perpendicular to the large-scale field, while secondary filaments appear to run parallel to the magnetic fields in their vicinities. This is similar to what is observed in Serpens South via near-IR polarimetry, and consistent with what is seen in MHD simulations by F. Nakamura and Z. Li.

  8. Lupus I Observations from the 2010 Flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Matthews, Tristan G; Angilè, Francesco E; Benton, Steven J; Chapin, Edward L; Chapman, Nicholas L; Devlin, Mark J; Fissel, Laura M; Fukui, Yasuo; Gandilo, Natalie N; Gundersen, Joshua O; Hargrave, Peter C; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K; Netterfield, Calvin B; Novak, Giles; Nutter, David; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A; Soler, Juan Diego; Tachihara, Kengo; Thomas, Nicholas E; Truch, Matthew D P; Tucker, Carole E; Tucker, Gregory S; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was created by adding polarimetric capability to the BLAST experiment that was flown in 2003, 2005, and 2006. BLASTPol inherited BLAST's 1.8 m primary and its Herschel/SPIRE heritage focal plane that allows simultaneous observation at 250, 350, and 500 {\\mu}m. We flew BLASTPol in 2010 and again in 2012. Both were long duration Antarctic flights. Here we present polarimetry of the nearby filamentary dark cloud Lupus I obtained during the 2010 flight. Despite limitations imposed by the effects of a damaged optical component, we were able to clearly detect submillimeter polarization on degree scales. We compare the resulting BLASTPol magnetic field map with a similar map made via optical polarimetry (The optical data were published in 1998 by J. Rizzo and collaborators.). The two maps partially overlap and are reasonably consistent with one another. We compare these magnetic field maps to the orientations of filaments in Lupus I,...

  9. LUPUS I observations from the 2010 flight of the Balloon-borne large aperture submillimeter telescope for polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Tristan G.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Novak, Giles [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Nutter, David [Cardiff University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Angilè, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeffrey [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Benton, Steven J.; Fissel, Laura M.; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Netterfield, Calvin B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Chapin, Edward L. [XMM SOC, ESAC, Apartado 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Fukui, Yasuo [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Gundersen, Joshua O. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Korotkov, Andrei L. [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Olmi, Luca [University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Physics Department, Box 23343, UPR station, San Juan (Puerto Rico); and others

    2014-04-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was created by adding polarimetric capability to the BLAST experiment that was flown in 2003, 2005, and 2006. BLASTPol inherited BLAST's 1.8 m primary and its Herschel/SPIRE heritage focal plane that allows simultaneous observation at 250, 350, and 500 μm. We flew BLASTPol in 2010 and again in 2012. Both were long duration Antarctic flights. Here we present polarimetry of the nearby filamentary dark cloud Lupus I obtained during the 2010 flight. Despite limitations imposed by the effects of a damaged optical component, we were able to clearly detect submillimeter polarization on degree scales. We compare the resulting BLASTPol magnetic field map with a similar map made via optical polarimetry. (The optical data were published in 1998 by J. Rizzo and collaborators.) The two maps partially overlap and are reasonably consistent with one another. We compare these magnetic field maps to the orientations of filaments in Lupus I, and we find that the dominant filament in the cloud is approximately perpendicular to the large-scale field, while secondary filaments appear to run parallel to the magnetic fields in their vicinities. This is similar to what is observed in Serpens South via near-IR polarimetry, and consistent with what is seen in MHD simulations by F. Nakamura and Z. Li.

  10. Nuclear Phosphatidylcholine and Sphingomyelin Metabolism of Thyroid Cells Changes during Stratospheric Balloon Flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Albi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine metabolism is involved in the response to ultraviolet radiation treatment in different ways related to the physiological state of cells. To evaluate the effects of low levels of radiation from the stratosphere on thyroid cells, proliferating and quiescent FRTL-5 cells were flown in a stratospheric balloon (BIRBA mission. After recovery, the activity of neutral sphingomyelinase, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C, sphingomyelin synthase, and reverse sphingomyelin synthase was assayed in purified nuclei and the nuclei-free fraction. In proliferating FRTL-5, space radiation stimulate nuclear neutral sphingomyelinase and reverse sphingomyelin synthase activity, whereas phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C and sphingomyelin synthase were inhibited, thus inducing sphingomyelin degradation and phosphatidylcholine synthesis. This effect was lower in quiescent cells. The possible role of nuclear lipid metabolism in the thyroid damage induced by space radiations is discussed.

  11. Measurements of atmospheric electrical parameters and ELF electromagnetic emissions during a meteorological balloon flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benda, Robert; Dujany, Matthieu; Berthomieu, Roland; Boissier, Mathilde; Bruneel, Pierre; Fischer, Lucie; Focillon, William; Gullo, Robin; Hubert, Valentin; Lafforgue, Gaétan; Loe-Mie, Marichka; Messager, Adrien; Roy, Felix; Auvray, Gérard; Bertrand, Fabrice; Coulomb, Romain; Deprez, Gregoire; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of electric field and atmospheric conductivity were performed onboard a small payload flown under a meteorological balloon during a fair weather period. This experiment is part of a project to study thunderstorms and TLE organized in the frame of the engineering cursus at Ecole Polytechnique. The payload is equipped with 4 electrodes to measure the 3 components of the DC and AC electric fields up to 3.2 kHz. Dedicated sequences of operation, when one electrode is operated in the relaxation mode, have been used to determine the positive and negative electrical conductivities. Altitude profiles of the DC vertical electric field and conductivities in agreement with expected fair weather parameters were obtained from ~ 3.5 to ~ 13 km before the failure of a battery. At an altitude of ~ 9 km slight disturbances in the electric field suggest the traversal of thin clouds with disturbed electrical characteristics. Schumann resonances were observed up to the fifth harmonics at levels that are typical of a quiet period over Europe with most thunderstorms located over remote longitudinal sectors. EM waves due the power lines at 50Hz are detected during the whole measuring period and their altitude and horizontal variations will be presented as a function of the position of the balloon over the ground power network. A surprising and interesting observation was made of a Russian transmitter at 82 Hz located in Murmansk region and used for sub-marine communications. We shall present an initial analysis of the amplitude and polarization of the corresponding signal.

  12. Formation Dynamics and Quantitative Prediction of Hydrocarbons of the Superpressure System in the Dongying Sag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUI Fenggui; HAO Xuefeng; LIU Qing; ZHUO Qingong; ZHANG Shouchun

    2008-01-01

    Based on the theory of formation dynamics of oil/gas pools, the Dongying sag can be divided into three dynamic systems regarding the accumulation of oil and gas: the superpressure closed system,the semi-closed system and the normal pressure open system. Based on the analysis of genesis of superpressure in the superpressure closed system and the rule of hydrocarbon expulsion,it is found that hydrocarbon generation is related to superpressure, which is the main driving factor of hydrocarbon migration. Micro fractures formed by superpressure are the main channels for hydrocarbon migration. There are three dynamic patterns for hydrocarbon expulsion: free water drainage, hydrocarbon accumulation and drainage through micro fissures. In the superpressure closed system, the oil-driving-water process and oil/gas accumulation were completed in lithologic traps by way of such two dynamic patterns as episodic evolution of superpressure systems and episodic pressure release of faults. The oil-bearing capacity of lithologic traps is intimately related to reservoir-forming dynamic force. Quantitative evaluation of dynamic conditions for pool formation can effectively predict the oil-bearing capability of traps.

  13. An analysis of the deployment of a pumpkin balloon at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, J. L.; Phillips, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    The design of large superpressure balloons has received significant attention in recent years due to the successful demonstration of various enabling technologies and materials. Of particular note is the "pumpkin" shaped balloon concept, which allows the stress in the envelope to be limited by the surface geometry. Unlike a sphere, where the radius used to determine the stress is determined by the volume of the balloon, the pumpkin utilizes a system of meridional tendons to react the loading in one direction, and form a number of lobes, which limit the stress in the circumferential direction. A suitable superpressure balloon has been designed using this technology which will carry 2 kg in the atmosphere of Mars. The deployment of this balloon is assumed to occur while falling on a decelerator suitably designed for the Mars atmosphere. The inflation is accomplished by a 10 kg system suspended at the nadir of the balloon. As the system falls toward the surface of the planet, helium gas is transferred into the balloon, forming a partially inflated system very similar to an ascending zero pressure balloon. This analysis incorporates the flow of the planetary gas around the inflating balloon which alters the pressure distribution and shape. As a result, stresses are seen to increase beyond the design values which will require the balloon to be redesigned to accommodate this type of dynamic deployment.

  14. Composite materials with uncured epoxy matrix exposed in stratosphere during NASA stratospheric balloon flight

    CERN Document Server

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Bilek, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    A cassette of uncured composite materials with an epoxy resin matrix was exposed in the stratosphere (40 km altitude) over 3 days. Temperature variations of -76...+32.50C and pressure up to 2.1 Torr were recorded during flight. An analysis of the chemical structure of the composites showed, that the polymer matrix exposed in the stratosphere becomes crosslinked, while the ground control materials react by way of polycondensation reaction of epoxy groups. The space irradiations are considered to be responsible for crosslinking of the uncured polymers exposed in the stratosphere. The composites were cured on Earth after landing. Analysis of the cured composites showed, that the polymer matrix remains active under stratospheric conditions. The results can be used for predicting curing processes of polymer composite in a free space environment during an orbital space flight.

  15. Composite Materials With Uncured Epoxy Matrix Exposed in Stratosphere During NASA Stratospheric Balloon Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Kondyurina, Irina; Bilek, Marcela; de Groh, Kim K.

    2013-01-01

    A cassette of uncured composite materials with epoxy resin matrixes was exposed in the stratosphere (40 km altitude) over three days. Temperature variations of -76 to 32.5C and pressure up to 2.1 torr were recorded during flight. An analysis of the chemical structure of the composites showed, that the polymer matrix exposed in the stratosphere becomes crosslinked, while the ground control materials react by way of polymerization reaction of epoxy groups. The space irradiations are considered to be responsible for crosslinking of the uncured polymers exposed in the stratosphere. The composites were cured on Earth after landing. Analysis of the cured composites showed that the polymer matrix remains active under stratospheric conditions. The results can be used for predicting curing processes of polymer composites in a free space environment during an orbital space flight.

  16. Cosmic ray nuclei detection in the balloon borne nuclear emulsion gamma ray telescope flight in Australia (GRAINE 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyono, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Saya; Aoki, Shigeki; Hara, Toshio; Kuretsubo, Kenji; Marushima, Toshitsugu; Matsumoto, Haruka; Mizutani, Fukashi; Ozaki, Keita; Shibayama, Emi; Suzuki, Atsumu; Takahashi, Satoru; Tateishi, Yurie; Yabu, Misato; Yamada, Kyohei; Kodama, Koichi; Hamada, Kaname; Kawahara, Hiroaki; Komatani, Ryosuke; Komatsu, Masahiro; Miyanishi, Motoaki; Morishita, Misaki; Morishima, Kunihiro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Naganawa, Naotaka; Nanano, Toshiyuki; Nishio, Akira; Niwa, Kimio; Otsuka, Naoto; Rokujo, Hiroki; Sato, Osamu; Yoshimoto, Masahiro

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear emulsion plates for studying elementary particle physics as well as cosmic ray physics are very powerful tracking tools with sub-micron spatial resolutions of charged particle trajectories. Even if gamma rays have to be detected, electron-positron pair tracks can provide precise information to reconstruct their direction and energy with high accuracy. Recent developments of emulsion analysis technology can digitally handle almost all tracks recorded in emulsion plates by using the Hyper Track Selector of the OPERA group at NAGOYA University. On the other hand, the potential of time resolutions have been equipped by emulsion multilayer shifter technology in the GRAINE (Gamma Ray Astro-Imager with Nuclear Emulsion) experiments, the aims of which are to detect cosmic gamma rays such as the Vela pulsar stellar object by precise emulsion tracking analysis and to study cosmic ray particle interactions and chemical compositions. In this paper, we focus on the subject of cosmic ray nuclei detection in the GRAINE balloon flight experiments launched at Alice Springs, Australia in May 2015.

  17. Construction and Testing of a Pixellated CZT Detector and Shield for a Hard X-ray Astronomy Balloon Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Bloser, P F; Jenkins, J A; Grindlay, J E

    2000-01-01

    We report on the construction and laboratory testing of pixellated CZT detectors mounted in a flip-chip, tiled fashion and read out by an ASIC, as required for proposed hard X-ray astronomy missions. Two 10 mm x 10 mm x 5 mm detectors were fabricated, one out of standard eV Products high-pressure Bridgman CZT and one out of IMARAD horizontal Bridgman CZT. Each was fashioned with a 4 x 4 array of gold pixels on a 2.5 mm pitch with a surrounding guard ring. The detectors were mounted side by side on a carrier card, such that the pixel pitch was preserved, and read out by a 32-channel VA-TA ASIC from IDE AS Corp. controlled by a PC/104 single-board computer. A passive shield/collimator surrounded by plastic scintillator encloses the detectors on five sides and provides a ~40deg field of view. Thus this experiment tests key techniques required for future hard X-ray survey instruments. The experiment was taken to Ft Sumner, NM in May 2000 in preparation for a scientific balloon flight aboard the joint Harvard-MSFC...

  18. Scientific ballooning in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, R.; Rinke, E.; Fernandes, J. O.; Villela, T.

    We present an overview of the scientific ballooning activities that took place in Brazil over the past 30 years as well as the current ongoing efforts in the area. We also briefly describe the balloon launching facility that exists at the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (National Institute for Space Research) — INPE. Up to now, over 100 scientific balloon experiments, related to Astrophysics, Aeronomy, and Geophysics were launched from Brazil taking advantage of the country's continental dimensions, a well-defined rain season, and a low population density, which offer excellent conditions for scientific ballooning activities. Balloons with volumes up to 500,000 cubic meters can be launched from INPE's balloon launching base (latitude S 22° 4' 2″; longitude W 044° 58' 41″). The availability of good roads and several inland airports in Brazil provides the necessary structure for safe payload retrieval and its rapid return to the balloon base. There are several airports throughout Brazil that can also be used as balloon launching bases, mainly in the country's Eastern region. Overflights of more than 1,000 kilometers are possible and easily attained. Balloon flights ranging from a few hours to long duration flights can be safely verified. The constant climate monitoring through the use of weather satellites information received at INPE provides the necessary data to determine the necessary conditions for a long duration flight. INPE's Center for Weather Forecast and Climate Studies (CPTEC) provides the necessary weather forecast support for launch and payload retrieval.

  19. Pumpkin Balloon

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, Jun; 西村, 純

    1992-01-01

    The Pumpkin shaped balloons, which are the extreme case of the heart-type balloons had been studied as one of the promising candidate of the super pressure balloons. Here, detailed studies for the features of the pumpkin balloons are described, particularly by comparing with those of the spherical shaped super pressure balloons.

  20. Viscoelastic behaviour of pumpkin balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerngross, T.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    2008-11-01

    The lobes of the NASA ULDB pumpkin-shaped super-pressure balloons are made of a thin polymeric film that shows considerable time-dependent behaviour. A nonlinear viscoelastic model based on experimental measurements has been recently established for this film. This paper presents a simulation of the viscoelastic behaviour of ULDB balloons with the finite element software ABAQUS. First, the standard viscoelastic modelling capabilities available in ABAQUS are examined, but are found of limited accuracy even for the case of simple uniaxial creep tests on ULDB films. Then, a nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model is implemented by means of a user-defined subroutine. This approach is verified by means of biaxial creep experiments on pressurized cylinders and is found to be accurate provided that the film anisotropy is also included in the model. A preliminary set of predictions for a single lobe of a ULDB is presented at the end of the paper. It indicates that time-dependent effects in a balloon structure can lead to significant stress redistribution and large increases in the transverse strains in the lobes.

  1. Use of neural network techniques to identify cosmic ray electrons and positrons during the 1993 balloon flight of the NMSU/Wizard-TS93 instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellotti, R.; Castellano, M. [Bari Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Bari (Italy); Candusso, M.; Casolino, M.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy)]|[INFN, Rome (Italy); Aversa, F.; Boezio, M. [Trieste Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy); Barbiellini, G. [Trieste Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy); Basini, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    The detectors used in the TS93 balloon flight produced a large volume of information for each cosmic ray trigger. Some of the data was visual in nature, other portions contained energy deposition and timing information. The data sets are amenable to conventional analysis techniques but there is no assurance that conventional techniques make full use of subtle correlations and relations amongst the detector responses. With the advent of neural network technologies, particularly adept at classification of complex phenomena, it would seem appropriate to explore the utility of neural network techniques to classify particles observed with the instruments. In this paper neural network based methodology for signal/background discrimination in a cosmic ray space experiment is discussed. Results are presented for electron and positron classification in the TS93 flight data set and will be compared to conventional analyses.

  2. Flight Performance of an advanced CZT Imaging Detector in a Balloon-borne Wide-Field Hard X-ray Telescope - ProtoEXIST1

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, J; Grindlay, J; Barthelemy, S; Baker, R; Garson, A; Krawczynski, H; Apple, J; Cleveland, W H

    2011-01-01

    We successfully carried out the first high-altitude balloon flight of a wide-field hard X-ray coded-aperture telescope ProtoEXIST1, which was launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility at Ft. Sumner, New Mexico on October 9, 2009. ProtoEXIST1 is the first implementation of an advanced CdZnTe (CZT) imaging detector in our ongoing program to establish the technology required for next generation wide-field hard X-ray telescopes. The CZT detector plane in ProtoEXIST1 consists of an 8 x 8 array of closely tiled 2 cm x 2 cm x 0.5 cm thick pixellated CZT crystals, each with 8 x 8 pixels, covering a 256 cm^2 active area with 2.5 mm pixels. A tungsten mask, mounted at 90 cm above the detector provides shadowgrams of X-ray sources in the 30 - 600 keV band for imaging, allowing a fully coded field of view of 9 Deg x 9 Deg with an angular resolution of 20 arcmin. To reduce the background radiation, the detector is surrounded by semi-graded (Pb/Sn/Cu) passive shields on the four sides all the way to the mask. ...

  3. Measurements of cosmic-ray secondary nuclei at high energies with the first flight of the CREAM balloon-borne experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, H S; Bagliesi, M G; Beatty, J J; Bigongiari, G; Boyle, P J; Brandt, T J; Childers, J T; Conklin, N B; Coutu, S; Duvernois, M A; Ganel, O; Han, J H; Hyun, H J; Jeon, J A; Kim, K C; Lee, J K; Lee, M H; Lutz, L; Maestro, P; Malinin, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Minnick, S A; Mognet, S I; Nam, S; Nutter, S L; Park, I H; Park, N H; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Swordy, S P; Wakely, S P; Wu, J; Yang, J; Yoon, Y S; Zei, R; Zinn, S Y

    2008-01-01

    We present new measurements of heavy cosmic-ray nuclei at high energies per- formed during the first flight of the balloon-borne cosmic-ray experiment CREAM (Cosmic-Ray Energetics And Mass). This instrument uses multiple charge detectors and a transition radiation detector to provide the first high accuracy measurements of the relative abundances of elements from boron to oxygen up to energies around 1 TeV/n. The data agree with previous measurements at lower energies and show a relatively steep decline (~E$^-0.6$ to E$^-0.5$) at high energies. They further show the source abundance of nitrogen relative to oxygen is ~10% in the TeV/n region.

  4. The design process for a pumpkin balloon: structural synthesis, structural analysis, and analytical assessment of some critical design issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schur, W. W.

    Effects of varying parameters in the design of super-pressure balloons of the "pumpkin" shape such as gore design, tendon stiffness, and structural lack-of-fit between tendons and gore seams are exhibited in analytical studies. The importance of an accurate representation of Poisson's effect for the film is demonstrated. Important design aspects that affect load paths and robustness of the design are discussed together with their resolution and quantification where applicable.

  5. NASA Super Pressure Balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Debbie

    2017-01-01

    NASA is in the process of qualifying the mid-size Super Pressure Balloon (SPB) to provide constant density altitude flight for science investigations at polar and mid-latitudes. The status of the development of the 18.8 million cubic foot SPB capable of carrying one-tone of science to 110,000 feet, will be given. In addition, the operating considerations such as launch sites, flight safety considerations, and recovery will be discussed.

  6. Preliminary results from the high resolution gamma-ray and hard x-ray spectrometer (HIREGS) '92-'93 long duration balloon flight in Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, R.P.; Feffer, P.T.; Slassi, S.; Whiteside, W.; Smith, D.M.; Hurley, K.C.; Kane, S.R.; McBride, S.; Primbsch, J.H.; Youssefi, K.; Zimmer, G. (Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)); Pelling, R.M. (Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)); Cotin, F.; Lavigne, J.M.; Rouaix, G.; Vedrenne, G.; Pehl, R.; Cork, C.; Luke, P.; Madden, N.; Malone, D.

    1993-01-01

    HIREGS consists of an array of twelve 6.7 cm diameter x 6.1 cm long liquid nitrogen-cooled segmented germanium detectors enclosed in a bismuth germanate (BGO) active anticoincidence shield. A CsI front collimator defines a 24 degree FWHM field-of-view. The energy resolution is one to several keV FWHM over the instrument energy range of 20 keV to 16 MeV. HIREGS was flown on a 10-day (31 Dec 92--10 Jan 93) circumpolar balloon flight from McMurdo Station, Antarctica. 30.5 hours of observation were obtained between 31 Dec 0400-2130 UT and 1 Jan 0600-1900 UT. Because the Sun was inactive during the flight, only one small flare was detected on 31 Dec 1933 UT. Excellent high resolution [open quotes]quiet[close quotes] Sun hard X-ray and gamma-ray spectra were obtained. These provide stringent upper limits for solar gamma-ray line and hard X-ray and gamma-ray continuum emission, which in turn can constrain the storage and/or continuous acceleration of ions and electrons by the Sun.

  7. Measurements of cosmic-ray proton and helium spectra from the BESS-Polar long-duration balloon flights over Antarctica

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Haino, S; Hams, T; Hasegawa, M; Horikoshi, A; Itazaki, A; Kim, K C; Kumazawa, T; Kusumoto, A; Lee, M H; Makida, Y; Matsuda, S; Matsukawa, Y; Matsumoto, K; Mitchell, J W; Myers, Z; Nishimura, J; Nozaki, M; Orito, R; Ormes, J F; Picot-Clemente, N; Sakai, K; Sasaki, M; Seo, E S; Shikaze, Y; Shinoda, R; Streitmatter, R E; Suzuki, J; Takasugi, Y; Takeuchi, K; Tanaka, K; Thakur, N; Yamagami, T; Yamamoto, A; Yoshida, T; Yoshimura, K

    2015-01-01

    The BESS-Polar Collaboration measured the energy spectra of cosmic-ray protons and helium during two long-duration balloon flights over Antarctica in December 2004 and December 2007, at substantially different levels of solar modulation. Proton and helium spectra probe the origin and propagation history of cosmic rays in the galaxy, and are essential to calculations of the expected spectra of cosmic-ray antiprotons, positrons, and electrons from interactions of primary cosmic-ray nuclei with the interstellar gas, and to calculations of atmospheric muons and neutrinos. We report absolute spectra at the top of the atmosphere for cosmic-ray protons in the kinetic energy range 0.2-160 GeV and helium nuclei 0.2-80 GeV/nucleon. The corresponding magnetic rigidity ranges are 0.6-160 GV for protons and 1.3-160 GV for helium. These spectra are compared to measurements from previous BESS flights and from AMS-01, ATIC-2, PAMELA, and AMS-02. We also report the ratio of the proton and helium fluxes from 1.3 GV to 160 GV a...

  8. Scientific ballooning in India: recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, M. N.; Damle, S. V.

    The National Scientific Balloon Facility (NBF) of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) has been conducting regular balloon flights for various experiments in the areas of Space Astronomy and Atmospheric Sciences. A continuous improvement in all aspects of Scientific Ballooning through a sustained R and D programme ensures uptodate services and a better handle on the design specifications for the balloon. Recent developments in balloon grade films, continuous improvements in design specifications, balloon manufacturing methods, flight operational procedures and improved balloon flight capabilities have resulted in a greatly improved flight performance in the last five years. A launch capability upgradation programme in terms of new launch spool and new launch vehicle has been initiated to be able to safely launch balloons with gross lifts upto 3500 kg, balloon volumes upto 450,000 m^3 and payloads upto 1400 kg. A series of steps have been initiated to improve long duration flight capabilities. In this paper, we present details on some of these aspects of Scientific Ballooning in India.

  9. Introduction (Special Issue on Scientific Balloon Capabilities and Instrumentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Smith, I. S.; Jones, W. V.

    2014-01-01

    In 1783, the Montgolfier brothers ushered in a new era of transportation and exploration when they used hot air to drive an un-tethered balloon to an altitude of 2 km. Made of sackcloth and held together with cords, this balloon challenged the way we thought about human travel, and it has since evolved into a robust platform for performing novel science and testing new technologies. Today, high-altitude balloons regularly reach altitudes of 40 km, and they can support payloads that weigh more than 3,000 kg. Long-duration balloons can currently support mission durations lasting 55 days, and developing balloon technologies (i.e. Super-Pressure Balloons) are expected to extend that duration to 100 days or longer; competing with satellite payloads. This relatively inexpensive platform supports a broad range of science payloads, spanning multiple disciplines (astrophysics, heliophysics, planetary and earth science.) Applications extending beyond traditional science include testing new technologies for eventual space-based application and stratospheric airships for planetary applications.

  10. Evaluation of ECMWF ERA-40 temperature and wind in the lower tropical stratosphere since 1988 from past long-duration balloon measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Christensen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The temperature and wind of the ECMWF ERA-40 reanalysis in the tropical lower stratosphere during the period 1988–2001 has been evaluated by comparison with independent in situ measurements of 21 IR Montgolfier and superpressure long-duration balloon flights performed by CNES from Pretoria (26° S in South Africa in 1988–1989, Latacunga (1° S in Ecuador in 1991–1998 and Bauru (22° S in Brazil in 2000–2001. The ERA-40 temperature displays a bias varying progressively from +1.16 K in 1988–1989, to +0.26 K in 1994–1996 and −0.46 K after 1998, the latter being fully consistent with recent evaluations of ECMWF operational analysis from radio occultation and in situ long-duration balloon observations. The amplitude of the bias and its evolution are very similar to the results of a previous evaluation from radiosondes in 1991–2003, suggesting that the origin of the drift of ERA-40 might be mainly due to errors in the series of satellite measurements of MSU, replaced by AMSU in 1998, assimilated in the model.

    The ERA-40 zonal wind speed in the lower stratosphere appears slightly overestimated by 0.7–1.0 m/s on average in both the tropics and equatorial region, that is by 5–10% compared to the average 10–20 m/s wind speed. This bias, fully consistent with a recent evaluation of ECMWF operational analysis in 2004, is found constant during the whole 1988–2001 period, suggesting a shortfall in the variabililty of ERA-40 horizontal winds in the lower stratosphere in the tropics and the equatorial region. Finally calculated trajectories using ERA-40, frequently used for analysing field observations, are found in error compared to that of the balloons by ±500 km after 5 days and ±1000 km after 10 days.

  11. Measurement of cosmic-ray antiproton spectrum at solar minimum with a long-duration balloon flight in Antarctica

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Haino, S; Hams, T; Hasegawa, M; Horikoshi, A; Kim, K C; Kusumoto, A; Lee, M H; Makida, Y; Matsuda, S; Matsukawa, Y; Mitchell, J W; Nishimura, J; Nozaki, M; Orito, R; Ormes, J F; Sakai, K; Sasaki, M; Seo, E S; Shinoda, R; Streitmatter, R E; Suzuki, J; Tanaka, K; Thakur, N; Yamagami, T; Yamamoto, A; Yoshida, T; Yoshimura, K

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons has been measured in the range 0.17 to 3.5 GeV, based on 7886 antiprotons collected by the BESS-Polar II instrument during a long-duration flight over Antarctica in the solar minimum period of December 2007 through January 2008. The antiproton spectrum measured by BESS-Polar II shows good consistency with secondary antiproton calculations. Cosmologically primary antiprotons have been searched for by comparing the observed and calculated antiproton spectra. The BESS-Polar II result shows no evidence of primary antiprotons originating from the evaporation of PBH.

  12. Measurement of the Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Spectrum at Solar Minimum with a Long-Duration Balloon Flight over Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Mitchell, J. W.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J. F.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E. S.; Shinoda, R.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, K.; Thakur, N.

    2012-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons (p-bar's) from 0.17 to 3.5 GeV has been measured using 7886 p-bar's detected by BESS-Polar II during a long-duration flight over Antarctica near solar minimum in December 2007 and January 2008. This shows good consistency with secondary p-bar calculations. Cosmologically primary p-bar's have been investigated by comparing measured and calculated p-bar spectra. BESS-Polar II data.show no evidence of primary p-bar's from the evaporation of primordial black holes.

  13. Measurement of Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Spectrum at Solar Minimum with a Long-Duration Balloon Flight in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Mitchell, J. W.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J. F.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E. S.; Shinoda, R.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, K.; Thakur, N.

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons (p(raised bar)'s) collected by the BESS-Polar II instrument during a long-duration flight over Antarctica in the solar minimum period of December 2007 through January 2008. The p(raised bar) spectrum measured by BESS-Polar II shows good consistency with secondary p(raised bar) calculations. Cosmologically primary p(raised bar)'s have been searched for by comparing the observed and calculated p(raised bar) spectra. The BESSPolar II result shows no evidence of primary p(raised bar)'s originating from the evaporation of PBH.

  14. Time-dependent strains and stresses in a pumpkin balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerngross, T.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    This paper presents a study of pumpkin-shaped superpressure balloons consisting of gores made from a thin polymeric film attached to high stiffness meridional tendons This type of design is being used for the NASA ULDB balloons The gore film shows considerable time-dependent stress relaxation whereas the behaviour of the tendons is essentially time-independent Upon inflation and pressurization the instantaneous i e linear-elastic strain and stress distributions in the film show significantly higher values in the meridional direction However over time and due to the biaxial visco-elastic stress relaxation of the the gore material the em hoop strains increase and the em meridional stresses decrease whereas the em remaining strain and stress components remain substantially unchanged These results are important for a correct assessment of the structural integrity of a pumpkin balloon in a long-duration mission both in terms of the material performance and the overall stability of the shape of the balloon An experimental investigation of the time dependence of the biaxial strain distribution in the film of a 4 m diameter 48 gore pumpkin balloon is presented The inflated shape of selected gores has been measured using photogrammetry and the time variation in strain components at some particular points of these gores has been measured under constant pressure and temperature The results show good correlation with a numerical study using the ABAQUS finite-element package that includes a widely used model of

  15. LOAC: a small aerosol optical counter/sizer for ground-based and balloon measurements of the size distribution and nature of atmospheric particles – Part 2: First results from balloon and unmanned aerial vehicle flights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-B. Renard

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the companion paper (Renard et al., 2015, we have described and evaluated a new versatile optical particle counter/sizer named LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter based on scattering measurements at angles of 12 and 60° that allows some topology identification of particles (droplets, carbonaceous, salts, and mineral dust in addition to size segregated counting in a large diameter range from 0.2 up to possibly more than 100 μm depending on sampling conditions. Its capabilities overpass those of preceding optical particle counters (OPCs allowing the characterization of all kind of aerosols from submicronic-sized absorbing carbonaceous particles in polluted air to very coarse particles (> 10–20 μm in diameter in desert dust plumes or fog and clouds. LOAC's light and compact design allows measurements under all kinds of balloons, on-board unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV and at ground level. We illustrate here the first LOAC airborne results obtained from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV and a variety of scientific balloons. The UAV was deployed in a peri-urban environment near Bordeaux in France. Balloon operations include (i tethered balloons deployed in urban environments in Vienna (Austria and Paris (France, (ii pressurized balloons drifting in the lower troposphere over the western Mediterranean (during the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment – ChArMEx campaigns, (iii meteorological sounding balloons launched in the western Mediterranean region (ChArMEx and from Aire-sur-l'Adour in south-western France (VOLTAIRE-LOAC campaign. More focus is put on measurements performed in the Mediterranean during (ChArMEx and especially during African dust transport events to illustrate the original capability of balloon-borne LOAC to monitor in situ coarse mineral dust particles. In particular, LOAC has detected unexpected large particles in desert sand plumes.

  16. LOAC: a small aerosol optical counter/sizer for ground-based and balloon measurements of the size distribution and nature of atmospheric particles - Part 2: First results from balloon and unmanned aerial vehicle flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Dulac, François; Berthet, Gwenaël; Lurton, Thibaut; Vignelles, Damien; Jégou, Fabrice; Tonnelier, Thierry; Jeannot, Matthieu; Couté, Benoit; Akiki, Rony; Verdier, Nicolas; Mallet, Marc; Gensdarmes, François; Charpentier, Patrick; Mesmin, Samuel; Duverger, Vincent; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Elias, Thierry; Crenn, Vincent; Sciare, Jean; Zieger, Paul; Salter, Matthew; Roberts, Tjarda; Giacomoni, Jérôme; Gobbi, Matthieu; Hamonou, Eric; Olafsson, Haraldur; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Camy-Peyret, Claude; Mazel, Christophe; Décamps, Thierry; Piringer, Martin; Surcin, Jérémy; Daugeron, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    In the companion (Part I) paper, we have described and evaluated a new versatile optical particle counter/sizer named LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter), based on scattering measurements at angles of 12 and 60°. That allows for some typology identification of particles (droplets, carbonaceous, salts, and mineral dust) in addition to size-segregated counting in a large diameter range from 0.2 µm up to possibly more than 100 µm depending on sampling conditions (Renard et al., 2016). Its capabilities overpass those of preceding optical particle counters (OPCs) allowing the characterization of all kind of aerosols from submicronic-sized absorbing carbonaceous particles in polluted air to very coarse particles (> 10-20 µm in diameter) in desert dust plumes or fog and clouds. LOAC's light and compact design allows measurements under all kinds of balloons, on-board unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and at ground level. We illustrate here the first LOAC airborne results obtained from a UAV and a variety of scientific balloons. The UAV was deployed in a peri-urban environment near Bordeaux in France. Balloon operations include (i) tethered balloons deployed in urban environments in Vienna (Austria) and Paris (France), (ii) pressurized balloons drifting in the lower troposphere over the western Mediterranean (during the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment - ChArMEx campaigns), (iii) meteorological sounding balloons launched in the western Mediterranean region (ChArMEx) and from Aire-sur-l'Adour in south-western France (VOLTAIRE-LOAC campaign). More focus is put on measurements performed in the Mediterranean during (ChArMEx) and especially during African dust transport events to illustrate the original capability of balloon-borne LOAC to monitor in situ coarse mineral dust particles. In particular, LOAC has detected unexpected large particles in desert sand plumes.

  17. Scientific Ballooning Activities and Recent Developments in Technology and Instrumentation of the TIFR Balloon Facility, Hyderabad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buduru, Suneel Kumar

    2016-07-01

    The Balloon Facility of Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR-BF) is a unique center of expertise working throughout the year to design, fabricate and launch scientific balloons mainly for space astronomy, atmospheric science and engineering experiments. Recently TIFR-BF extended its support to new user scientists for conducting balloon launches for biological and middle atmospheric sciences. For the first time two balloon launches conducted for sending live lab rats to upper stratosphere and provided launch support for different balloon campaigns such as Tropical Tropopause Dynamics (TTD) to study water vapour content in upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric regions over Hyderabad and the other balloon campaign to study the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (BATAL) during the Indian summer monsoon season. BATAL is the first campaign to conduct balloon launches during active (South-West) monsoon season using zero pressure balloons of different volumes. TIFR-BF also provided zero pressure and sounding balloon support to various research institutes and organizations in India and for several international space projects. In this paper, we present details on our increased capability of balloon fabrication for carrying heavier payloads, development of high strength balloon load tapes and recent developments of flight control and safety systems. A summary of the various flights conducted in two years will be presented along with the future ballooning plans.

  18. A challenge to the highest balloon altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Y.; Akita, D.; Fuke, H.; Iijima, I.; Izutsu, N.; Kato, Y.; Kawada, J.; Matsuzaka, Y.; Mizuta, E.; Namiki, M.; Nonaka, N.; Ohta, S.; Sato, T.; Seo, M.; Takada, A.; Tamura, K.; Toriumi, M.; Yamagami, T.; Yamada, K.; Yoshida, T.; Matsushima, K.; Tanaka, S.

    2012-02-01

    Development of a balloon to fly at higher altitudes is one of the most attractive challenges for scientific balloon technologies. After reaching the highest balloon altitude of 53.0 km using the 3.4 μm film in 2002, a thinner balloon film with a thickness of 2.8 μm was developed. A 5000 m3 balloon made with this film was launched successfully in 2004. However, three 60,000 m3 balloons with the same film launched in 2005, 2006, and 2007, failed during ascent. The mechanical properties of the 2.8 μm film were investigated intensively to look for degradation of the ultimate strength and its elongation as compared to the other thicker balloon films. The requirement of the balloon film was also studied using an empirical and a physical model assuming an axis-symmetrical balloon shape and the static pressure. It was found that the film was strong enough. A stress due to the dynamic pressure by the wind shear is considered as the possible reason for the unsuccessful flights. A 80,000 m3 balloon with cap films covering 9 m from the balloon top will be launch in 2011 to test the appropriateness of this reinforcement.

  19. Shielded Mars Balloon Launcher (SMBL) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences, along with its partner Vertigo Industries, proposes a novel approach to deployment of balloon-based payloads into the Martian atmosphere....

  20. Attitude determination for balloon-borne experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gandilo, N N; Amiri, M; Angile, F E; Benton, S J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Bryan, S A; Chiang, H C; Contaldi, C R; Crill, B P; Devlin, M J; Dober, B; Dore, O P; Farhang, M; Filippini, J P; Fissel, L M; Fraisse, A A; Fukui, Y; Galitzki, N; Gambrel, A E; Golwala, S; Gudmundsson, J E; Halpern, M; Hasselfield, M; Hilton, G C; Holmes, W A; Hristov, V V; Irwin, K D; Jones, W C; Kermish, Z D; Klein, J; Korotkov, A L; Kuo, C L; MacTavish, C J; Mason, P V; Matthews, T G; Megerian, K G; Moncelsi, L; Morford, T A; Mroczkowski, T K; Nagy, J M; Netterfield, C B; Novak, G; Nutter, D; O'Brient, R; Pascale, E; Poidevin, F; Rahlin, A S; Reintsema, C D; Ruhl, J E; Runyan, M C; Savini, G; Scott, D; Shariff, J A; Soler, J D; Thomas, N E; Trangsrud, A; Truch, M D; Tucker, C E; Tucker, G S; Tucker, R S; Turner, A D; Ward-Thompson, D; Weber, A C; Wiebe, D V; Young, E Y

    2014-01-01

    An attitude determination system for balloon-borne experiments is presented. The system provides pointing information in azimuth and elevation for instruments flying on stratospheric balloons over Antarctica. In-flight attitude is given by the real-time combination of readings from star cameras, a magnetometer, sun sensors, GPS, gyroscopes, tilt sensors and an elevation encoder. Post-flight attitude reconstruction is determined from star camera solutions, interpolated by the gyroscopes using an extended Kalman Filter. The multi-sensor system was employed by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol), an experiment that measures polarized thermal emission from interstellar dust clouds. A similar system was designed for the upcoming flight of SPIDER, a Cosmic Microwave Background polarization experiment. The pointing requirements for these experiments are discussed, as well as the challenges in designing attitude reconstruction systems for high altitude balloon flights. ...

  1. Trajectories of Rubber Balloons used in Balloon Releases: Theory and Application

    CERN Document Server

    Glaschke, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Balloon releases are one of the main attractions of many fairs. Helium filled rubber balloons are released to carry postcards over preferably long distances. Although such balloons have been considered in atmospheric sciences and air safety analysis, there is only scarce literature available on the subject. This work intends to close this gap by providing a comprehensive theoretical overview and a thorough analysis of real-life data. All relevant physical properties of a rubber balloon are carefully modelled and supplemented by weather observations to form a self-contained trajectory simulation tool. The analysis of diverse balloon releases provided detailed insight into the flight dynamics and potential optimisations. Helium balloons are found to reach routinely altitudes above 10 km. Under optimal conditions, they could stay more than 24 hours airborne while reaching flight distances close to 3000 km. However, external weather effects reduce the typical lifetime to 2-5 hours.

  2. The balloon and the airship technological heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, N. J.

    1981-01-01

    The balloon and the airship are discussed with emphasis on the identification of commonalities and distinctions. The aerostat technology behind the shape and structure of the vehicles is reviewed, including a discussion of structural weight, internal pressure, buckling, and the development of a stable tethered balloon system. Proper materials for the envelope are considered, taking elongation and stress into account, and flight operation and future developments are reviewed. Airships and tethered balloons which are designed to carry high operating pressure with low gas loss characteristics are found to share similar problems in low speed flight operations, while possessing interchangeable technologies.

  3. A balloon-borne integrating nephelometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.S.; Apple, M.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Weiss, R.E. (Radiance Research, Seattle, WA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    A balloon-borne integrating nephelometer has been successfully developed and flown by Sandia National Laboratories and Radiance Research. This report details instrument design, calibration and data conversion procedure. Free and tethered balloon transport and telemetry systems are described. Data taken during March 1989 South-Central New Mexico free flight ascents are presented as vertical profiles of atmospheric particle scattering coefficient, temperature and balloon heading. Data taken during December 1989 Albuquerque, New Mexico tethered flights are also presented as vertical profiles. Data analysis shows superior instrument performance. 5 refs., 22 figs.

  4. Cosmic-Ray Background Flux Model based on a Gamma-Ray Large-Area Space Telescope Balloon Flight Engineering Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, T

    2004-09-03

    Cosmic-ray background fluxes were modeled based on existing measurements and theories and are presented here. The model, originally developed for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Balloon Experiment, covers the entire solid angle (4{pi} sr), the sensitive energy range of the instrument ({approx} 10 MeV to 100 GeV) and abundant components (proton, alpha, e{sup -}, e{sup +}, {mu}{sup -}, {mu}{sup +} and gamma). It is expressed in analytic functions in which modulations due to the solar activity and the Earth geomagnetism are parameterized. Although the model is intended to be used primarily for the GLAST Balloon Experiment, model functions in low-Earth orbit are also presented and can be used for other high energy astrophysical missions. The model has been validated via comparison with the data of the GLAST Balloon Experiment.

  5. Simulating clefts in pumpkin balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Frank; Brakke, Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    The geometry of a large axisymmetric balloon with positive differential pressure, such as a sphere, leads to very high film stresses. These stresses can be significantly reduced by using a tendon re-enforced lobed pumpkin-like shape. A number of schemes have been proposed to achieve a cyclically symmetric pumpkin shape, including the constant bulge angle (CBA) design, the constant bulge radius (CBR) design, CBA/CBR hybrids, and NASA’s recent constant stress (CS) design. Utilizing a hybrid CBA/CBR pumpkin design, Flight 555-NT in June 2006 formed an S-cleft and was unable to fully deploy. In order to better understand the S-cleft phenomenon, a series of inflation tests involving four 27-m diameter 200-gore pumpkin balloons were conducted in 2007. One of the test vehicles was a 1/3-scale mockup of the Flight 555-NT balloon. Using an inflation procedure intended to mimic ascent, the 1/3-scale mockup developed an S-cleft feature strikingly similar to the one observed in Flight 555-NT. Our analysis of the 1/3-scale mockup found it to be unstable. We compute asymmetric equilibrium configurations of this balloon, including shapes with an S-cleft feature.

  6. The Design, Development and Test of Balloonborne and Groundbased Lidar Systems. Volume 2. Flight Test of Atmospheric Balloon Lidar Experiment, ABLE 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    Balloon Lidar E-xperiment) is part of Air Force Phillips Laboratory’s continuing interest in developing techniques for making remote measurements of...shaft is rotated until the two pointing mirrors are reflecting away from the payload. Using an autocollimator, the reticula pattern reflected from the...laser pointing mirror is made coincident with the reticula pattern reflected from the receiver pointing mirror by adjusting the mounting of the former

  7. Power Systems Design for Long Duration Ballooning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilwell, Bryan; Chuzel, Alain

    2016-01-01

    The Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility has been designing and building high-altitude balloon power systems for over 26 years. With that experience, we have found certain types of PV panels, batteries, and charge controllers that are reliable in stratospheric environments. The ultimate goal is to ensure that power systems will provide power reliably throughout the duration of an LDB flight. The purpose of this presentation is to provide some general guidelines and best practices for power system design.

  8. Heat Transfer Model for Hot Air Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llado-Gambin, Adriana

    A heat transfer model and analysis for hot air balloons is presented in this work, backed with a flow simulation using SolidWorks. The objective is to understand the major heat losses in the balloon and to identify the parameters that affect most its flight performance. Results show that more than 70% of the heat losses are due to the emitted radiation from the balloon envelope and that convection losses represent around 20% of the total. A simulated heating source is also included in the modeling based on typical thermal input from a balloon propane burner. The burner duty cycle to keep a constant altitude can vary from 10% to 28% depending on the atmospheric conditions, and the ambient temperature is the parameter that most affects the total thermal input needed. The simulation and analysis also predict that the gas temperature inside the balloon decreases at a rate of -0.25 K/s when there is no burner activity, and it increases at a rate of +1 K/s when the balloon pilot operates the burner. The results were compared to actual flight data and they show very good agreement indicating that the major physical processes responsible for balloon performance aloft are accurately captured in the simulation.

  9. Report on the Activities of National Balloon Facility, Hyderabad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Rajagopalan; Sreenivasan, S.; Suneel Kumar, B.; Kulkarni, P. M.

    2012-07-01

    More than five and half decades back, the Indian Balloon Group at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai started development of stratospheric zero pressure balloon technology and today it is one among the leading balloon groups in the world. For the past 40 years, the Institute has been operating a Scientific Balloon Facility at Hyderabad and carried out 478 balloon flights for various disciplines of space sciences like primary cosmic ray studies, X ray, Gamma Ray, Infra Red Astronomies and Atmospheric science maintaining 100% success rate during the past nine years. The Balloon Facility has the capability to build balloons of volume up to 750,000 Cu.M. as well as carrying out R & D in all aspects of scientific ballooning like balloon engineering, balloon material development, general and flight support instrumentation. A continued effort in R & D for ultra thin balloon material for High Altitude Sounding Flights has resulted in lowering the thickness of the proven indigenous Antrix film initially from 6 to 3.8 microns in the first phase and further reduction to 2.7 microns in the second phase. A test balloon of volume 5000 Cu.M. using the 2.7 micron film attained a record altitude of 45.0 Km. amsl with 1 Kg. GPS sonde payload. A 60,000 Cu.M. balloon fabricated out of 3.8 micron film capable of reaching 47 Km. Altitude with 10 Kg. Payload is awaiting trial. This report briefly describes our balloon activities during the past two years. In atmospheric sciences, aerosol studies were made with OPC,QCM,Aethelometer, Nephelometer,MWR, CIMEL Sun Photometer and Raman LIDAR.Measuments of vertical profile of Meteorological parameters and ozone upto stratosphere using GPS Radiosonde and Ozone sonde is made respectively.Study of Ionospheric tomography is done with CADI and CRABEX.

  10. Stability of the pumpkin balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Frank

    A large axisymmetric balloon with positive differential pressure, e.g., a sphere, leads to high film stresses. These can be significantly reduced by using a lobed pumpkin-like shape re-enforced with tendons. A number of schemes have been proposed to achieve a cyclically symmetric pumpkin-shape at full inflation, including the constant bulge angle (CBA) design and the constant bulge radius (CBR) design. The authors and others have carried out stability studies of CBA and CBR designs and found instabilities under various conditions. While stability seems to be a good indicator of deployment problems for large balloons under normal ascent conditions, one cannot conclude that a stable design will deploy reliably. Nevertheless, stability analysis allows one to quantify certain deployment characteristics. Ongoing research by NASA's Balloon Program Office utilizes a new design approach developed by Rodger Farley, NASA/GSFC, that takes into account film and tendon strain. We refer to such a balloon as a constant stress (CS) pumpkin design. In June 2006, the Flight 555-NT balloon (based on a hybrid CBR/CBA design) developed an S-cleft and did not deploy. In order to understand the S-cleft phenomena and study a number of aspects related to the CS-design, a series of inflation tests were conducted at TCOM, Elizabeth City, NC in 2007. The test vehicles were 27 meter diameter pumpkins distinguished by their respective equatorial bulge angles (BA). For example, BA98 indicates an equatorial bulge angle of 98° . BA90, BA55, and BA00 are similarly defined. BA98 was essentially a one-third scale version of of the Flight 555 balloon (i.e., 12 micron film instead of 38.1 micron, mini-tendons, etc.). BA90 and BA55 were Farley CS-designs. BA00 was derived from the BA55 design so that a flat chord spanned adjacent tendons. In this paper, we will carry out stability studies of BA98, BA90, BA55, and BA00. We discuss the deployment problem of pumpkin balloons in light of 2007 inflation

  11. An analysis of the deployment of a pumpkin balloon on mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, J.; Phillips, M.

    The design of large superpressure balloons has received significant attention in recent years due to the successful demonstration of various enabling technologies and materials. Of particular note is the "pumpkin" shaped balloon concept, which allows the stress in the envelope to be limited by the surface geometry. Unlike a sphere, which produces stress resultants determined by the volume of the system, the pumpkin utilizes a system of meridional tendons to react the loading in one direction, and form a number of lobes, which limit the stress in the circumferential direction. The application of this technology to very large systems is currently being demonstrated by NASA's Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) Program. However, this type of balloon has certain features that may be exploited to produce a system far more robust than a comparable sphere during deployment, inflation, and operation for long periods of time. When this concept is applied to a system designed to carry two kilograms in the atmosphere of Mars, the resulting balloon is small enough to alter the construction techniques and produce an envelope which is free of tucks and folds which may cause uncontrolled stress concentrations. A technique has been demonstrated where high strength tendons may be pretensioned prior to installation along the centerline of each gore. Since this position is the shortest distance between the apex and nadir of the balloon, the tendons will automatically resist the forces caused by deployment and inflation and thereby protect the thin film gas barrier from damage. A suitable balloon has been designed for this type of mission using five-micron Mylar Type C film for the gas barrier and P O braided cables for the meridionalB load carrying members. The deployment of this balloon is assumed to occur while falling on a decelerator suitably designed for the Mars atmosphere. The inflation is accomplished by a ten-kilogram system suspended at the nadir of the balloon. As the

  12. Nationwide Eclipse Ballooning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman Des Jardins, Angela; Berk Knighton, W.; Larimer, Randal; Mayer-Gawlik, Shane; Fowler, Jennifer; Harmon, Christina; Koehler, Christopher; Guzik, Gregory; Flaten, James; Nolby, Caitlin; Granger, Douglas; Stewart, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of the Nationwide Eclipse Ballooning Project is to make the most of the 2017 rare eclipse event in four main areas: public engagement, workforce development, partnership development, and science. The Project is focused on two efforts, both student-led: online live video of the eclipse from the edge of space and the study of the atmospheric response to the eclipse. These efforts, however, involving more than 60 teams across the US, are challenging in many ways. Therefore, the Project is leveraging the NASA Space Grant and NOAA atmospheric science communities to make it a success. The first and primary topic of this poster is the NASA Space Grant supported online live video effort. College and high school students on 48 teams from 31 states will conduct high altitude balloon flights from 15-20 locations across the 8/21/2017 total eclipse path, sending live video and images from near space to a national website. Video and images of a total solar eclipse from near space are fascinating and rare. It’s never been done live and certainly not in a network of coverage across a continent. In addition to the live video to the web, these teams are engaged in several other science experiments as secondary payloads. We also briefly highlight the eclipse atmospheric science effort, where about a dozen teams will launch over one hundred radiosondes from across the 2017 path, recording an unprecedented atmospheric data sample. Collected data will include temperature, density, wind, humidity, and ozone measurements.

  13. There is a Text in 'The Balloon'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elias, Camelia

    2009-01-01

    From the Introduction: Camelia Elias' "There is a Text in 'The Balloon': Donald Barthelme's Allegorical Flights" provides its reader with a much-need and useful distinction between fantasy and the fantastic: "whereas fantasy in critical discourse can be aligned with allegory, in which a supernatu......From the Introduction: Camelia Elias' "There is a Text in 'The Balloon': Donald Barthelme's Allegorical Flights" provides its reader with a much-need and useful distinction between fantasy and the fantastic: "whereas fantasy in critical discourse can be aligned with allegory, in which...

  14. Deployment Instabilities of Lobed-Pumpkin Balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashino, Kyoichi

    A lobed-pumpkin balloon, currently being developed in ISAS/JAXA as well as in NASA, is a promising vehicle for long duration scientific observations in the stratosphere. Recent ground and flight experiments, however, have revealed that the balloon has deployment instabilities under certain conditions. In order to overcome the instability problems, a next generation SPB called 'tawara' type balloon has been proposed, in which an additional cylindrical part is appended to the standard lobed-pumpkin balloon. The present study investigates the deployment stability of tawara type SPB in comparison to that of standard lobed-pumpkin SPB through eigenvalue analysis on the basis of finite element methods. Our numerical results show that tawara type SPB enjoys excellent deployment performance over the standard lobed-pumpkin SPBs.

  15. Japan-Indo collaboration on balloon observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Fumiyoshi

    Japan-Indo collaboration on balloon observations of cosmic X-ray sources was started in 1969 by the late S. Hayakawa of Nagoya Univ. and B. V. Sreekantan of TIFR. Cosmic background X-ray and soft gamma-ray spectra, simultaneous X-ray and optical flux variation, and size of X-ray emitting region of Crab Nebula were observed successfully by balloon flights at Hyderabad in 1969-1975. H. Shibai of Nagoya Univ. and T. N. Rengarajan of TIFR have organized collaboration on far infrared sky survey at wavlength of 150 micron emitted from CII. By employing improved detectors, CII distribution of Orion Nebula has been obtained in good accuracy by more than ten balloon flights in 1999-2008.

  16. An overview of instrumentation capabilities for Scientific ballooning in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarajan, Anand; Reddy Vizapur, Anmi; Rao Tanneeru, Venkateswara; Bangaru, Kapardhi; Trivedi, Dharmesh; Rodi, Ashish; Ojha, Devendra; Koli, Santosh

    2016-07-01

    The Balloon Facility of Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR-BF) in India, launches scientific balloons for research in the field of astronomy, astrobiology and atmospheric sciences. TIFR-BF not only has the capability to design, fabricate and launch zero-pressure balloons, but also provide operational and engineering support for launching them. The Control Instrumentation Group (CIG) at the balloon facility handles all electronics related to telemetry, telecommand, tracking, real-time data display, data storage, air-safety and payload recovery. In the recent past, it has designed and developed customized electronics and payload orientation mechanism to meet specific experimental objectives. Small, inexpensive and rugged industrial grade radio data modems were successfully deployed in balloon flights for low bit rate data and image telemetry. This paper will provide an overview and in-flight performance of some of the recent developments in instrumentation and electronics systems. Our plans for future upgradations will also be discussed.

  17. NASA test flights with increased flight stress indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, I. S., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the objectives, results, and conclusions stemming from a series of six test flights conducted for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) by the National Scientific Balloon Facility (NSBF). Results from the test flights indicate that: (1) the current two U.S. balloon films are capable of being flown at significantly increased flight stress index values; (2) payload weights less than the design minimum payload can be reliably flown without fear of structural failure due to increased circumferential stress; and (3) large and rapid decreases in payload weight can be tolerated by current balloons without structural failure.

  18. High altitude balloon experiments at IIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Akshata; Sreejith, A. G.; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    Recent advances in balloon experiments as well as in electronics have made it possible to fly scientific payloads at costs accessible to university departments. We have begun a program of high altitude ballooning at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bengaluru. The primary purpose of this activity is to test low-cost ultraviolet (UV) payloads for eventual space flight, but we will also try scientific exploration of the phenomena occurring in the upper atmosphere, including sprites and meteorite impacts. We present the results of the initial experiments carried out at the CREST campus of IIA, Hosakote, and describe our plans for the future.

  19. GHOST balloons around Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Charles R.

    1988-01-01

    The GHOST balloon position as a function of time data shows that the atmospheric circulation around the Antarctic Continent at the 100 mb and 200 mb levels is complex. The GHOST balloons supposedly follow the horizontal trajectory of the air at the balloon level. The position of GHOST balloon 98Q for a three month period in 1968 is shown. The balloon moved to within 2 deg of the South Pole on 1 October 1968 and then by 9 December 1968 was 35 deg from the South Pole and close to its position on 1 September 1968. The balloon generally moved from west to east but on two occasions moved in the opposite direction for a few days. The latitude of GHOST balloons 98Q and 149Z which was at 200 mb is given. Both balloons tended to get closer to the South Pole in September and October. Other GHOST balloons at the same pressure and time period may not indicate similar behavior.

  20. Stratospheric Balloon Platforms for Near Space Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, R. G.

    2012-12-01

    For over five decades, high altitude aerospace balloon platforms have provided a unique vantage point for space and geophysical research by exposing scientific instrument packages and experiments to space-like conditions above 99% of Earth's atmosphere. Reaching altitudes in excess of 30 km for durations ranging from hours to weeks, high altitude balloons offer longer flight durations than both traditional sounding rockets and emerging suborbital reusable launch vehicles. For instruments and experiments requiring access to high altitudes, engineered balloon systems provide a timely, responsive, flexible, and cost-effective vehicle for reaching near space conditions. Moreover, high altitude balloon platforms serve as an early means of testing and validating hardware bound for suborbital or orbital space without imposing space vehicle qualifications and certification requirements on hardware in development. From float altitudes above 30 km visible obscuration of the sky is greatly reduced and telescopes and other sensors function in an orbit-like environment, but in 1g. Down-facing sensors can take long-exposure atmospheric measurements and images of Earth's surface from oblique and nadir perspectives. Payload support subsystems such as telemetry equipment and command, control, and communication (C3) interfaces can also be tested and operationally verified in this space-analog environment. For scientific payloads requiring over-flight of specific areas of interests, such as an active volcano or forest region, advanced mission planning software allows flight trajectories to be accurately modeled. Using both line-of-sight and satellite-based communication systems, payloads can be tracked and controlled throughout the entire mission duration. Under NASA's Flight Opportunities Program, NSC can provide a range of high altitude flight options to support space and geophysical research: High Altitude Shuttle System (HASS) - A balloon-borne semi-autonomous glider carries

  1. To sail the skies of Mars - Scientific ballooning on the red planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidos, Eric J.; Burke, James D.

    1988-01-01

    Balloons represent a novel approach to exploring the surface of Mars. One promising aerostat system incorporates a solar-powered balloon as a means of generating diurnally varying lift and so can 'hop' across the surface, obtaining detailed information at a large number of sites. Two important areas of research and testing are underway on solar balloon technology and balloon payload design. The solar balloon concept has been demonstrated on earth, but more work is needed on a 'flyable' version for Mars. Particular attention must be paid to radiation heat transfer and aerodynamic effects. A special 'snake' payload concept has been demonstrated that allows for balloon system traverses of the surface and provides a usable instrument platform. A balloon system of this type could obtain unique surface imaging and physical and chemical data. The flight of the balloon also provides in situ atmospheric boundary-layer and circulation measurements.

  2. A New Paradigm in Space Based Experiments Using Rubber Balloons

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K; Palit, Sourav; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Mondal, Sushanta; Bhattacharyya, Arnab; Middya, Susanta; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2013-01-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics is engaged in long duration balloon borne experiments with typical payloads less than ~ 3kg. Low cost rubber balloons are used. In a double balloon system, the booster balloon lifts the orbiter balloon to its cruising altitude where data is taken for a long time. Here we present results of muon detections and recent solar activities, including the light curves and flare spectra in the 20-100keV range. We not only show that we have successfully obtained several flares and there spectra at different altitudes, we also found that the high energy X-ray flux of strong flares at altitudes of 10-13 km (the flight altitude of commercial planes) could be more than the contribution due to cosmic rays.

  3. Balloon observations of spatial coherence in the Global Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzworth, R. H.; Polar Patrol Balloon Team

    The first campaign of the Polar Patrol Balloon (PPB) experiment (1st-PPB) was carried out at Syowa Station in Antarctica during 1990-1991 and 1992-1993. Based on the results of the 1st-PPB experiment, the next campaign (2nd-PPB) was carried out in the austral summer of 2002-2003. This paper will present the global circuit results from the 2nd-PPB experiment. In that experiment, three balloons were launched for the purpose of upper atmosphere physics observation (3 balloons). Payloads of these 3 flights were identical with each other, and were launched as close together in time as allowed by weather conditions to constitute a cluster of balloons during their flights. Such a "Balloon Cluster" is suitable to observe temporal evolution and spatial distribution of phenomena in the ionospheric regions and boundaries that the balloons traversed during their circumpolar trajectory. More than 20 days of simultaneous fair weather 3-axis electric field and stratospheric conductivity data were obtained at geomagnetic latitudes ranging from sub-auroral to the polar cap. Balloon separation varied from ˜ 60 to ˜ 500 km. This paper will present the global circuit observations with emphasis on the times of apparent spatial variation in the vertical fair weather field.

  4. Thermodynamic model and numerical simulation of high altitude balloon ascending process%高空气球热力学模型与上升过程仿真分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕明云; 巫资春

    2011-01-01

    Based on the analysis of the high-altitude balloon thermodynamic environment, a coupling dynamic model was established to describe its thermodynamics and kinetics. The model was used to simulate the ascending and floating processes of a high altitude balloon. The results show that the inner helium temperature will present “supercool” during its ascending process, and “supercool” is more pronounced during the stratosphere region, with the inner helium temperature 19 K below the surrounding air temperature. Because of “supercool”, its ascending velocity profile take on double “V” shape. The inner helium temperature presents “superheat” during the daytime floating process due to strong sun radiation and weak convection with air, and the inner helium average temperature is 39 K higher than that of the surrounding air, with 648.8 Pa super-pressure. The ascending velocity profile and inner helium temperature profile of the numerical simulation good agreement with experimental flight data shows that the established model is accurate.%基于对高空气球热力学环境的分析,建立了热力学与动力学耦合的高空气球动力学模型;并采用该模型对某高空气球的上升与驻留过程进行仿真分析.结果表明:高空气球上升过程中内部氦气存在"超冷"现象,其中平流层区域"超冷"明显,氦气平均温差为-19 K;由于"超冷",其上升速度曲线呈双"V"形变化;强太阳辐射与弱对流环境使驻留过程中氦气呈现"超热"现象,平衡时氦气平均温度比环境温度高39 K,球内氦气超压648.8 Pa.数值仿真的速度、平均温度变化规律与相关飞行试验数据相吻合,说明该仿真模型是有效的.

  5. Long duration flights management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Sesma, Sergio; Letrenne, Gérard; Spel, Martin; Charbonnier, Jean-Marc

    Long duration flights (LDF) require a special management to take the best decisions in terms of ballast consumption and instant of separation. As a contrast to short duration flights, where meteorological conditions are relatively well known, for LDF we need to include the meteorological model accuracy in trajectory simulations. Dispersions on the fields of model (wind, temperature and IR fluxes) could make the mission incompatible with safety rules, authorized zones and others flight requirements. Last CNES developments for LDF act on three main axes: 1. Although ECMWF-NCEP forecast allows generating simulations from a 4D point (altitude, latitude, longitude and UT time), result is not statistical, it is determinist. To take into account model dispersion a meteorological NCEP data base was analyzed. A comparison between Analysis (AN) and Forecast (FC) for the same time frame had been done. Result obtained from this work allows implementing wind and temperature dispersions on balloon flight simulator. 2. For IR fluxes, NCEP does not provide ascending IR fluxes in AN mode but only in FC mode. To obtain the IR fluxes for each time frame, satellite images are used. A comparison between FC and satellites measurements had been done. Results obtained from this work allow implementing flux dispersions on balloon flight simulator. 3. An improved cartography containing a vast data base had been included in balloon flight simulator. Mixing these three points with balloon flight dynamics we have obtained two new tools for observing balloon evolution and risk, one of them is called ASTERISK (Statistic Tool for Evaluation of Risk) for calculations and the other one is called OBERISK (Observing Balloon Evolution and Risk) for visualization. Depending on the balloon type (super pressure, zero pressure or MIR) relevant information for the flight manager is different. The goal is to take the best decision according to the global situation to obtain the largest flight duration with

  6. Station-keeping of a high-altitude balloon with electric propulsion and wireless power transmission: A concept study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wynsberghe, Erinn; Turak, Ayse

    2016-11-01

    A stable, ultra long-duration high-altitude balloon (HAB) platform which can maintain stationary position would represent a new paradigm for telecommunications and high-altitude observation and transmission services, with greatly reduced cost and complexity compared to existing technologies including satellites, telecom towers, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). This contribution proposes a lightweight superpressure balloon platform for deployment to an altitude of 25 km. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) thrusters are presented to maintain position by overcoming stratospheric winds. Critical to maintaining position is a continual supply of electrical power to operate the on-board propulsion system. One viable solution is to deliver power wirelessly to a high-altitude craft from a ground-based transmitter. Microwave energy, not heavily attenuated by the atmosphere, can be provided remotely from a ground-based generator (magnetron, klystron, etc.) and steered electrically with an antenna array (phased array) at a designated frequency (such as 2.45 or 5.8 GHz). A rectifying antenna ("rectenna") on the bottom of the balloon converts waves into direct current for on-board use. Preliminary mission architecture, energy requirements, and safety concerns for a proposed system are presented along with recommended future work.

  7. Evolution of NASA Scientific Ballooning and Particle Astrophysics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William Vernon

    2017-01-01

    Particle astrophysics research has a history in ballooning that spans over 100 years, ever since Victor Hess discovered cosmic rays on a manned balloon in 1912. The NASA Particle Astrophysics Program currently covers the origin, acceleration and transport of Galactic cosmic rays, plus the Nature of Dark Matter and Ultrahigh Energy Neutrinos. Progress in each of these topics has come from sophisticated instrumentation flown on Long Duration Balloon (LDB) flights around Antarctica for more than two decades. Super Pressure Balloons (SPB) and International Space Station (ISS) platforms are emerging opportunities that promise major steps forward for these and other objectives. NASA has continued development and qualification flights leading to SPB flights capable of supporting 1000 kg science instruments to 33 km for upwards of hundred day missions, with plans for increasing the altitude to 38 km. This goal is even more important now, in view of the Astro2010 Decadal Study recommendation that NASA should support Ultra-Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) flight development for studies of particle astrophysics, cosmology and indirect detection of dark matter. The mid-latitude test flight of an 18.8 MCF SPB launched from Wanaka, NZ in 2015 achieved 32 days of nearly constant altitude exposure, and an identical SPB launched from Wanaka in 2016 with a science payload flew for 46 days. Scientific ballooning as a vital infrastructure component for cosmic ray and general astrophysics investigations, including training for young scientists, graduate and undergraduate students, leading up to the 2020 Decadal Study and beyond, will be presented and discussed.

  8. Long Duration Balloon Charge Controller Stack Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Kyle

    NASA and the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility are interested in updating the design of the charge controller on their long duration balloon (LDB) in order to enable the charge controllers to be directly interfaced via RS232 serial communication by a ground testing computers and the balloon's flight computer without the need to have an external electronics stack. The design involves creating a board that will interface with the existing boards in the charge controller in order to receive telemetry from and send commands to those boards, and interface with a computer through serial communication. The inputs to the board are digital status inputs indicating things like whether the photovoltaic panels are connected or disconnected; and analog inputs with information such as the battery voltage and temperature. The outputs of the board are 100ms duration command pulses that will switch relays that do things like connect the photovoltaic panels. The main component of this design is a PIC microcontroller which translates the outputs of the existing charge controller into serial data when interrogated by a ground testing or flight computer. Other components involved in the design are an AD7888 12-bit analog to digital converter, a MAX3232 serial transceiver, various other ICs, capacitors, resistors, and connectors.

  9. Report on the Brazilian Scientific Balloon Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Joao

    2016-07-01

    We report on the recent scientific ballooning activities in Brazil, and present the plans for the next few years. Recent technological developments, especially on telecommunications and gondola attitude control systems will be reported. We also present the recent progress achieved in the development of the protoMIRAX balloon experiment. protoMIRAX is a balloon-borne hard X-ray imaging telescope under development at INPE as a pathfinder for the MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de Raios X) satellite mission. The experiment consists essentially in a hard X-ray coded-aperture imager to operate in the 20-200 keV energy range. The detector plane is a square array of 196 10mm x 10mm x 2mm CdZnTe (CZT) planar detectors. A collimator defines a fully-coded field-of-view of 20 x 20 degrees, with 7 x 7 degrees of full sensitivity and an angular resolution of 1.7 degrees. We describe the final stages of development and testing of the front-end electronics, with charge preamplifiers, LNAs, shapers and Wilkinson-type ADCs customized for these detectors. We also show detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the flight background and the expected flight images of bright sources performed with the use of GEANT4.

  10. LISA: a java API for performing simulations of trajectories for all types of balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conessa, Huguette

    2016-07-01

    LISA (LIbrarie de Simulation pour les Aerostats) is a java API for performing simulations of trajectories for all types of balloons (Zero Pressure Balloons, Pressurized Balloons, Infrared Montgolfier), and for all phases of flight (ascent, ceiling, descent). This library has for goals to establish a reliable repository of Balloons flight physics models, to capitalize developments and control models used in different tools. It is already used for flight physics study software in CNES, to understand and reproduce the behavior of balloons, observed during real flights. It will be used operationally for the ground segment of the STRATEOLE2 mission. It was developed with quality rules of "critical software." It is based on fundamental generic concepts, linking the simulation state variables to interchangeable calculation models. Each LISA model defines how to calculate a consistent set of state variables combining validity checks. To perform a simulation for a type of balloon and a phase of flight, it is necessary to select or create a macro-model that is to say, a consistent set of models to choose from among those offered by LISA, defining the behavior of the environment and the balloon. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce the main concepts of LISA, and the new perspectives offered by this library.

  11. Development of a balloon volume sensor for pulsating balloon catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Timothy D C; Hattler, Brack G; Federspiel, William J

    2004-01-01

    Helium pulsed balloons are integral components of several cardiovascular devices, including intraaortic balloon pumps (IABP) and a novel intravenous respiratory support catheter. Effective use of these devices clinically requires full inflation and deflation of the balloon, and improper operating conditions that lead to balloon under-inflation can potentially reduce respiratory or cardiac support provided to the patient. The goal of the present study was to extend basic spirographic techniques to develop a system to dynamically measure balloon volumes suitable for use in rapidly pulsating balloon catheters. The dynamic balloon volume sensor system (DBVSS) developed here used hot wire anemometry to measure helium flow in the drive line from console to catheter and integrated the flow to determine the volume delivered in each balloon pulsation. An important component of the DBVSS was an algorithm to automatically detect and adjust flow signals and measured balloon volumes in the presence of gas composition changes that arise from helium leaks occurring in these systems. The DBVSS was capable of measuring balloon volumes within 5-10% of actual balloon volumes over a broad range of operating conditions relevant to IABP and the respiratory support catheter. This includes variations in helium concentration from 70-100%, pulsation frequencies from 120-480 beats per minute, and simulated clinical conditions of reduced balloon filling caused by constricted vessels, increased driveline, or catheter resistance.

  12. Sub-Scale Re-entry Capsule Drop via High Altitude Balloons Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High-altitude balloon flights are an inexpensive method used to lift payloads to high altitudes. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations permit payloads...

  13. Mars Solar Balloon Lander Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Mars Solar Balloon Lander (MSBL) is a novel concept which utilizes the capability of solar-heated hot air balloons to perform soft landings of scientific...

  14. The University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W.; Buttenschoen, A.; Farr, Q.; Hodgson, C.; Mann, I. R.; Mazzino, L.; Rae, J.; University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon Team

    2011-12-01

    The University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon (UA-HAB) program is a one and half year program sponsored by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) that offers hands on experience for undergraduate and graduate students in the design, build, test and flight of an experimental payload on a high altitude balloon platform. Utilising low cost weather balloon platforms, and through utilisation of the CSA David Florida Laboratory for thermal-vacuum tests , in advance of the final flight of the payload on a NASA high altitude balloon platform. Collectively the program provided unique opportunities for students to experience mission phases which parallel those of a space satellite mission. The program has facilitated several weather balloon missions, which additionally provide educational opportunities for university students and staff, as well as outreach opportunities among junior and senior high school students. Weather balloon missions provide a cheap and quick alternative to suborbital missions; they can be used to test components for more expensive missions, as well as to host student based projects from different disciplines such as Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (EAS), Physics, and Engineering. In addition to extensive skills development, the program aims to promote recruitment of graduate and undergraduate students into careers in space science and engineering. Results from the UA-HAB program and the flight of the UA-HAB shielded Gieger counter payload for cosmic ray and space radiation studies will be presented. Lessons learned from developing and maintaining a weather balloon program will also be discussed. This project is undertaken in partnership with the High Altitude Student Platform, organized by Louisiana State University and the Louisiana Space Consortium (LaSpace), and sponsored by NASA, with the financial support of the Canadian Space Agency.

  15. Balloon-borne gamma-ray polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The physical processes postulated to explain the high-energy emission mechanisms of compact astrophysical sources often yield polarised soft gamma rays (X-rays). PoGOLite is a balloon-borne polarimeter operating in the 25-80 keV energy band. The polarisation of incident photons is reconstructed using Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption in an array of phoswich detector cells comprising plastic and BGO scintillators, surrounded by a BGO side anticoincidence shield. The polarimeter is aligned to observation targets using a custom attitude control system. The maiden balloon flight is scheduled for summer 2011 from the Esrange Space Centre with the Crab and Cygnus X-1 as the primary observational targets.

  16. High-Altitude Ballooning Program at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, A; Safonova, M; Murthy, Jayant

    2013-01-01

    We have begun a program of high altitude ballooning at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore. Recent advances in balloons as well as in electronics have made possible scientific payloads at costs accessible to university departments. The primary purpose of this activity is to test low-cost ultraviolet (UV) payloads for eventual space flight, but to also explore phenomena occurring in the upper atmosphere, including sprites and meteorite impacts, using balloon-borne payloads. This paper discusses the results of three tethered balloon experiments carried out at the CREST campus of IIA, Hosakote and our plans for the future. We also describe the stages of payload development for these experiments.

  17. Material Properties Analysis of Structural Members in Pumpkin Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    The efficient design, service-life qualification, and reliability predictions for lightweight aerospace structures require careful mechanical properties analysis of candidate structural materials. The demand for high-quality laboratory data is particularly acute when the candidate material or the structural design has little history. The pumpkin-shaped super-pressure balloon presents both challenges. Its design utilizes load members (tendons) extending from apex to base around the gas envelope to achieve a lightweight structure. The candidate tendon material is highly weight-efficient braided HM cord. Previous mechanical properties studies of Zylon have focused on fiber and yarn, and industrial use of the material in tensile applications is limited. For high-performance polymers, a carefully plamed and executed properties analysis scheme is required to ensure the data are relevant to the desired application. Because no directly-applicable testing standard was available, a protocol was developed based on guidelines fiom professional and industry organizations. Due to the liquid-crystalline nature of the polymer, the cord is very stiff, creeps very little, and does not yield. Therefore, the key material property for this application is the breaking strength. The pretension load and gauge length were found to have negligible effect on the measured breaking strength over the ranges investigated. Strain rate was found to have no effect on breaking strength, within the range of rates suggested by the standards organizations. However, at the lower rate more similar to ULDB operations, the strength was reduced. The breaking strength increased when the experiment temperature was decreased from ambient to 183K which is the lowest temperature ULDB is expected to experience. The measured strength under all test conditions was well below that resulting from direct scale-up of fiber strength based on the manufacturers data. This expected result is due to the effects of the

  18. Near Space Lab-Rat Experimentation using Stratospheric Balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buduru, Suneel Kumar; Reddy Vizapur, Anmi; Rao Tanneeru, Venkateswara; Trivedi, Dharmesh; Devarajan, Anand; Pandit Manikrao Kulkarni, MR..; Ojha, Devendra; Korra, Sakram; Neerudu, Nagendra; Seng, Lim; Godi, Stalin Peter

    2016-07-01

    First ever balloon borne lab-rat experiment up to near space stratospheric altitude levels carried out at TIFR Balloon Facility, Hydeabad using zero pressure balloons for the purpose of validating the life support system. A series of two balloon experiments conducted under joint collaboration with IN.Genius, Singapore in the year 2015. In these experiments, three lab-rats sent to stratosphere in a pressurized capsule designed to reach an altitude of 30 km by keeping constant pressure, temperature and maintained at a precise rate of oxygen supply inside the capsule. The first experiment conducted on 1 ^{st} February, 2015 with a total suspended weight of 225 kg. During the balloon ascent stage at 18 km altitude, sensors inside the capsule reported drastic drop in internal pressure while oxygen and temperatures maintained at correct levels resulted in premature fligt termination at 20.1 km. All the three lab-rats recovered without life due to the collapse of their lungs caused by the depressurization inside the capsule. The second experiment conducted on 14th March, 2015 using a newly developed capsule with rectification of depressurization fault by using improved sealing gaskets and hermitically sealed connectors for sending lab-rats again to stratosphere comprising a total suspended load of 122.3 kg. The balloon flight was terminated after reaching 29.5 km in 110 minutes and succesfully recovered all the three lab-rats alive. This paper focuses on lessons learnt of the development of the life support system as an integral pressurized vessel, flight control instrumentation, flight simulation tests using thermo-vaccum chamber with pre-flight operations.

  19. Overview Of The Scientific Balloon Activity in Sweden 2014-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Mattias; Lockowandt, Christian; Andersson, Kent

    2016-07-01

    SSC, formerly known as Swedish Space Corporation, is a Swedish state-owned company working in several different space related fields, including scientific stratospheric balloon launches. Esrange Space Centre (Esrange in short) located in the north of Sweden is the launch facility of SSC, where both sounding rocket launches and stratospheric balloon launches are conducted. At Esrange there are also facilities for satellite communication, including one of the largest civilian satellite data reception stations in the world. Stratospheric balloons have been launched from Esrange since 1974, when the first flights were performed together with the French space agency CNES. These balloon flights have normally flown eastward either only over Sweden or into Finland. Some flights have also had permission to fly into Russia, as far as the Ural Mountains. Normal flight times are from 4 to 12 hours. These eastward flights are conducted during the winter months (September to May). Long duration flights have been flown from Esrange since 2005, when NASA flew the BLAST payload from Sweden to north Canada. The prevailing westerly wind pattern is very advantageous for trans-Atlantic flights during summer (late May to late July). The long flight times of 4-5 days are very beneficial for astronomical payloads, such as telescopes that need long observation times. Circumpolar flights of more than two weeks are possible if Russian overflight permission exists. Typical scientific balloon payload fields include atmospheric research, including research on ozone depletion, astronomical and cosmological research, and research in technical fields such as aerodynamics. Since last COSPAR a number of interesting balloon flights have been performed from Esrange. In late 2014 parachute tests for the ExoMars programme was performed by drop-test from balloons. This was followed up on in the summer of 2015 with full end-to-end dynamic stability tests of Earth re-entry capsule shapes. Several balloon

  20. Scientific study in solar and plasma physics relative to rocket and balloon projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    1993-01-01

    The goals of this research are to provide scientific and technical capabilities in the areas of solar and plasma physics contained in research programs and instrumentation development relative to current rocket and balloon projects; to develop flight instrumentation design, flight hardware, and flight program objectives and participate in peer reviews as appropriate; and to participate in solar-terrestrial physics modeling studies and analysis of flight data and provide theoretical investigations as required by these studies.

  1. Obesity and gastric balloon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed I Yasawy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The obesity epidemic, which is among the most common nutritional disorders, is rising rapidly worldwide. It leads to several health problems such as metabolic disorders, stroke, and even cancer. Efforts to control obesity with exercise and diet have a limited value in obese patients and different approaches to do this have been tried. In this paper, we share our experience with bioenteric intragastric balloon (BIB in treating obesity: Its safety, tolerability, and its efficacy in weight reduction. Materials and Methods: From January 2009 to September 2012, a total of 190 gastric balloons was inserted on patients at the endoscopy unit in King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar. This is an evaluation of the first 100 patients. All the patients had a body mass index of over 30 kg/m 2 and were within the age range of 17-55 with a mean age of 32 years. After consent, preballoon investigation tests and anesthesia evaluation, BIB was inserted under monitored anesthesia care sedation in the endoscopy suite. The balloon was filled with 500-700 mls of stained saline. All patients′ were given an analgesic and antiemetic for a week and antisecretory proton pump inhibitor′s for 6 months. Diet and the importance of the exercise were part of the preballoon insertion phase and protocol. The balloon was removed after 6-12 months. Results: The weight loss response to BIB in the 100 patients are classified into four groups: In the uncooperative, noncompliant patients - the maximum weight loss was 7 kg, while in the most compliant patients the weight loss reached up to 39 kg. In addition, there was significant improvement into diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and fatty liveras. Its safety and tolerability were extremely acceptable. Conclusion: Our data indicates that in well-selected patients, BIB is an effective device, which with minimum complications helps to achieve body weight loss and resolve many obesity related

  2. Space Weather Ballooning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Tony; Johnson, Sam; Koske-Phillips, Amelia; White, Michael; Yarborough, Amelia; Lamb, Aaron; Herbst, Anna; Molina, Ferris; Gilpin, Justin; Grah, Olivia; Perez, Ginger; Reid, Carson; Harvey, Joey; Schultz, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a "Space Weather Buoy" for measuring upper atmospheric radiation from cosmic rays and solar storms. The Buoy, which is carried to the stratosphere by helium balloons, is relatively inexpensive and uses off-the-shelf technology accessible to small colleges and high schools. Using this device, we have measured two Forbush Decreases and a small surge in atmospheric radiation during the St. Patrick's Day geomagnetic storm of March 2015.

  3. Cosmic ray abundance measurements with the CAKE balloon experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cecchini, S; Giacomelli, G; Manzoor, S; Medinaceli, E; Patrizii, L; Togo, V

    2005-01-01

    We present the results from the CAKE (Cosmic Abundance below Knee Energy) balloon experiment which uses nuclear track detectors. The final experiment goal is the determination of the charge spectrum of CR nuclei with Z $>$ 30 in the primary cosmic radiation. The detector, which has a geometric acceptance of $\\sim$ 1.7 m$^2$sr, was exposed in a trans-mediterranean stratospheric balloon flight. Calibrations of the detectors used (CR39 and Lexan), scanning strategies and algorithms for tracking particles in an automatic mode are presented. The present status of the results is discussed

  4. The Micro-Instrumentation Package: A Solution to Lightweight Ballooning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneau, Jill

    This paper discusses the design and testing of an over the horizon (OTH) light weight telemetry and termination system that can be used for small ballooning payloads. Currently, the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF) provides telemetry for the science payload by integrating one of two types of support packages. The type of support package integrated depends on whether the flight will stay in range of line of sight (LOS) or will exceed LOS requiring the use of over the horizon (OTH) telemetry. The weights of these systems range from 100 pounds to 350 pounds depending upon the use of redundant systems, equipment for high data rates, and batteries and/or solar panels for power requirements. These weight values are not as significant for larger payloads but can be crippling for smaller payloads. In addition, these support package systems are fairly expensive, placing a high importance on recovery. A lightweight and inexpensive telemetry system could be beneficial for various reasons. First, it would allow scientists to fly lightweight payloads on large balloons reaching even higher altitudes. Second, scientists could fly lightweight payloads on less expensive balloons such as meteorological balloons. Depending on the payload, these flights could be fairly inexpensive and even disposable. Third, a compact telemetry system on any balloon will free up more room for the science portion of the payload. In response, a compact telemetry/termination system called the Micro-Instrumentation Package (MIP) was developed. The MIP provides uplink and downlink communications, an interface to the science, housekeeping information including global positioning system (GPS) position, and relays. Instead of a power-hungry microprocessor, the MIP's central consists of a microcontroller. Microcontrollers are lower power, easily programmed, and can be purchased for less than ten dollars. For uplink and downlink telemetry, the MIP uses an LOS serial transceiver and an Iridium unit

  5. Titan Balloon Convection Model Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovative research effort is directed at determining, quantitatively, the convective heat transfer coefficients applicable to a Montgolfiere balloon operating...

  6. Iridium: Global OTH data communications for high altitude scientific ballooning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, A.

    While the scientific community is no stranger to embracing commercially available technologies, the growth and availability of truly affordable cutting edge technologies is opening the door to an entirely new means of global communications. For many years high altitude ballooning has provided science an alternative to costly satellite based experimental platforms. As with any project, evolution becomes an integral part of development. Specifically in the NSBF ballooning program, where flight durations have evolved from the earlier days of hours to several weeks and plans are underway to provide missions up to 100 days. Addressing increased flight durations, the harsh operational environment, along with cumbersome and outdated systems used on existing systems, such as the balloon vehicles Support Instrumentation Package (SIP) and ground-based systems, a new Over-The-Horizon (OTH) communications medium is sought. Current OTH equipment planning to be phased-out include: HF commanding systems, ARGOS PTT telemetry downlinks and INMARSAT data terminals. Other aspects up for review in addition to the SIP to utilize this communications medium include pathfinder balloon platforms - thereby, adding commanding abilities and increased data rates, plus providing a package for ultra-small experiments to ride aloft. Existing communication systems employed by the National Scientific Balloon Facility ballooning program have been limited not only by increased cost, slow data rates and "special government use only" services such as TDRSS (Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System), but have had to make special provisions to geographical flight location. Development of the Support Instrumentation Packages whether LDB (Long Duration Balloon), ULDB (Ultra Long Duration Balloon) or conventional ballooning have been plagued by non-standard systems configurations requiring additional support equipment for different regions and missions along with a myriad of backup for redundancy. Several

  7. Thermal design and performance of the balloon-borne large aperture submillimeter telescope for polarimetry BLASTPol

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, J D; Angilè, F E; Benton, S J; Devlin, M J; Dober, B; Fissel, L M; Fukui, Y; Galitzki, N; Gandilo, N N; Klein, J; Korotkov, A L; Matthews, T G; Moncelsi, L; Mroczkowski, A; Netterfield, C B; Novak, G; Nutter, D; Pascale, E; Poidevin, F; Savini, G; Scott, D; Shariff, J A; Thomas, N E; Truch, M D; Tucker, C E; Tucker, G S; Ward-Thompson, D

    2014-01-01

    We present the thermal model of the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol). This instrument was successfully flown in two circumpolar flights from McMurdo, Antarctica in 2010 and 2012. During these two flights, BLASTPol obtained unprecedented information about the magnetic field in molecular clouds through the measurement of the polarized thermal emission of interstellar dust grains. The thermal design of the experiment addresses the stability and control of the payload necessary for this kind of measurement. We describe the thermal modeling of the payload including the sun-shielding strategy. We present the in-flight thermal performance of the instrument and compare the predictions of the model with the temperatures registered during the flight. We describe the difficulties of modeling the thermal behavior of the balloon-borne platform and establish landmarks that can be used in the design of future balloon-borne instruments.

  8. Buddy balloon for TAVI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkin, Jonathan; Silberman, Shuli; Almagor, Yaron

    2013-11-15

    Percutaneous transfemoral aortic valve replacement is a new rapidly evolving technique that has made significant progress in recent years. The technology is however limitted and in some cases has resulted in failure to deliver the prosthetic valve. We describe a new technique using a buddy balloon, from the contralateral femoral artery, to assist in crossing the native aortic valve in those cases where extreme calcification and or tortuosity have caused the delivery system to hang up on the aortic wall. The technique is easily applied and facilitates the success of the procedure in cases which may otherwise have to be converted to open surgical aortic valve replacement.

  9. A Low Cost Weather Balloon Borne Solar Cell Calibration Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, David B.; Wolford, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Calibration of standard sets of solar cell sub-cells is an important step to laboratory verification of on-orbit performance of new solar cell technologies. This paper, looks at the potential capabilities of a lightweight weather balloon payload for solar cell calibration. A 1500 gr latex weather balloon can lift a 2.7 kg payload to over 100,000 ft altitude, above 99% of the atmosphere. Data taken between atmospheric pressures of about 30 to 15 mbar may be extrapolated via the Langley Plot method to 0 mbar, i.e. AMO. This extrapolation, in principle, can have better than 0.1 % error. The launch costs of such a payload arc significantly less than the much larger, higher altitude balloons, or the manned flight facility. The low cost enables a risk tolerant approach to payload development. Demonstration of 1% standard deviation flight-to-flight variation is the goal of this project. This paper describes the initial concept of solar cell calibration payload, and reports initial test flight results. .

  10. A Methane Balloon Inflation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Curtis J.; Cordes, Tanya J.; Franek, Joe

    2005-01-01

    The various equipments, procedure and hazards in constructing the device for inflating a methane balloon using a standard methane outlet in a laboratory are described. This device is fast, safe, inexpensive, and easy to use as compared to a hydrogen gas cylinder for inflating balloons.

  11. Stratospheric balloons from Esrange - current and future capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, O.

    Stratospheric balloon operations have been carried out at the Swedish Space Corporation's rocket, balloon and satellite operations base Esrange since 1974; approximately 550 stratospheric balloons have been launched during this period. The facility, located in northern Sweden at 68 degrees north, is fully equipped with a large launch pad, payload and flight train preparation hangars, telemetry stations, recovery helicopters, and supporting infrastructure. Many of the scientific balloons launched are CNES missions. This paper will present the possibilities for scientific and technical balloon missions at high latitudes and with a vast landing area in northern Sweden, Finland, and Russia. The proximity to the Arctic polar vortex makes Esrange an ideal base for studies of for example the ozone destruction process in the Arctic. A new option proposed by the Swedish Space Corporation and NASA is to perform week-long missions from the south of Sweden to western Canada. A newly developed line-of-sight telemetry system, E-LINK, for high bit-rates (> 2 Mbps both downlink and uplink) and based on the Ethernet communication standard is also described.

  12. Balloon-Borne, High-Energy Astrophysics: Experiences from the 1960s to the 1980s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2008-01-01

    Observational high-energy astrophysics in the hard-x-ray and gamma-ray regions owes its development and initial successes to the balloon-borne development of detector systems, as well as pioneering observations, primarily in the timeframe from the 1960s to the 1990s. I will describe some of the first observations made by the Rice University balloon group in the 1960s, including the impetus for these observations. The appearance of SN 1987a led to several balloon-flight campaigns, sponsored by NASA, from Alice Springs, Australia in 1987 and 1988. During the 1980s, prototypes of instruments for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory were flown on many balloon flights, which greatly enhanced the success of that mission.

  13. An automatic parachute release for high altitude scientific balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Chris

    NASA's Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility launches high altitude scientific research balloons at many locations around the world. Locations like Antarctica are flat for hundreds of miles and have nothing to snag a parachute consequently causing it to be more important to separate the parachute from the payload than in an area with vegetation and fences. Scientists are now building one of a kind payloads costing millions of dollars, taking five years or more to build, and are requesting multiple flights. In addition to that, the data gathering rate of many science payloads far exceeds the data downlink rate on over-the-horizon flights therefore making a recovery of at least the data hard drives a "minimum success requirement". The older mentality in ballooning; separating the parachute and payload from the balloon and getting it on the ground is more important than separating the parachute after the payload is on the ground has changed. It is now equally as important to separate the parachute from the gondola to prevent damage from dragging. Until now, commands had to be sent to separate the parachute from the gondola at approximately 60K ft, 30K ft, and 10K ft to use the Semi Automatic Parachute Release (SAPR), which is after the sometimes violent parachute opening shock. By using the Gondola controlled Automatic Parachute Release (GAPR) all commanding is done prior to termination, making the parachute release fully autonomous.

  14. Flight. Science Series Grades 4, 5, 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frensch, Helen

    The activities in this book are designed to reinforce the elementary concepts of flight. General background information, suggested activities, questions for discussion, and answers are provided. Twenty-eight reproducible worksheets are contained in this guide. Topics include: hot air balloons, the physics of flight, air resistance, airplane…

  15. Successful test flight of an airship

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Researchers with the Balloon Aircraft Research Center (BARC) of the Academy of Opto-electronics, CAS, succeeded in their first test flight of an aeroboat with a flight altitude up to 1,000 meters and an effective payload of 20 kilograms in Shandong on 25 December, 2007.

  16. Balloon Study of the Global Circuit: Spatial Coherence and Correlation with Lightning Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzworth, R. H.; Bering, E. A.; Kokorowski, M.; Reddell, B.; Kadokura, A.; Yamagishi, H.; Sato, N.; Ejiri, M.; Hirosawa, H.; Yamagami, T.; Torii, S.; Tohyama, F.; Nakagawa, M.; Okada, T.

    2004-12-01

    The second campaign of the Polar Patrol Balloon (PPB) experiment (2nd-PPB) was carried out at Syowa Station in Antarctica during 2002-2003. This paper will present the global circuit results from the 2nd-PPB experiment. In that experiment, three balloons were launched for the purpose of upper atmosphere physics observation (3 balloons). Payloads of these 3 flights were identical with each other, and were launched as close together in time as allowed by weather conditions to constitute a cluster of balloons during their flights. Such a ``Balloon Cluster'' is suitable to observe temporal evolution and spatial distribution of phenomena in the ionospheric regions and boundaries that the balloons traversed during their circumpolar trajectory. More than 20 days of simultaneous fair weather 3-axis electric field and stratospheric conductivity data were obtained at geomagnetic latitudes ranging from sub-auroral to the polar cap. Balloon separation varied from ˜60 to ˜500 km. This paper will present the global circuit observations with emphasis on the times of apparent spatial variation in the vertical fair weather field. This paper will also present stratospheric conductivity observations with emphasis on the temporal and spatial variations that were observed. Finally, the inferred current density will be compared with data from the WWLL (TOGA) lightning monitor experiment.

  17. Astronomical observations with the University College London balloon borne telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of a telescope system which was developed for high altitude balloon astronomy are discussed. A drawing of the optical system of the telescope is provided. A sample of the signals recorded during one of the flights is included. The correlation between the infrared flux and the radio continuum flux is analyzed. A far infrared map of the radio and infrared peaks of selected stars is developed. The spectrum of the planet Saturn is plotted to show intensity as compared with wavenumber.

  18. The Extreme Universe Space Observatory Super Pressure Balloon Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiencke, Lawrence; Olinto, Angela; Adams, Jim; JEM-EUSO Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Extreme Universe Space Observatory on a super pressure balloon (EUSO-SPB) mission will make the first fluorescence observations of high energy cosmic ray extensive air showers by looking down on the atmosphere from near space. A long duration flight of at least 50 nights launched from Wanaka NZ is planned for 2017. We describe completed instrument, and the planned mission. We acknowledge the support of NASA through grants NNX13AH53G and NNX13AH55G.

  19. The design and use of plastic balloons for stratospheric research in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Balasubramanian

    1958-04-01

    Full Text Available "Plastic balloon flying has been developed at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research as a research technique which has a number of important applications in India: (a cosmic ray studies; (b air sampling in the stratosphere for fall-out measurements; (c meteorological investigations; (d astronomical observations; (e defence research. Comparatively little work has been done till now in these fields at equatorial latitudes, particularly at stratospheric altitudes. Large plastic balloons with volumes of the order of half a million cubic feet, and more, have been constructed by heat welding polyethylene sheeting 0.0015"" thick. With these balloons, successful level flights at altitudes of 110,000 ft. have been achieved; in some cases, individual loads weighing a hundred pounds have been carried up. The most serious problem encountered is the extremely low temperature(about-85DegreeC, of the tropopause at the equatorial latitudes; all known plastics for balloon manufacture become brittle at these low temperatures. To overcome this, dark fabrics have been employed so that the material is heated by solar radiation. The plastic sheeting employed is extruded in India to balloon specifications from chosen polymers. The low temperatures and the turbulent conditions that prevail in the atmosphere at low latitudes present problems in balloon flying which are different from those encountered at high latitudes present in balloon flying which are different from those encountered at high latitudes. The techniques employed, the design of the balloons, and their performance under these conditions are discussed."

  20. The Rocket Balloon (Rocketball): Applications to Science, Technology, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Originally envisioned to study upper atmospheric phenomena, the Rocket Balloon system (or Rocketball for short) has utility in a range of applications, including sprite detection and in-situ measurements, near-space measurements and calibration correlation with orbital assets, hurricane observation and characterization, technology testing and validation, ground observation, and education. A salient feature includes the need to reach space and near-space within a critical time-frame and in adverse local meteorological conditions. It can also provide for the execution of technology validation and operational demonstrations at a fraction of the cost of a space flight. In particular, planetary entry probe proof-of-concepts can be examined. A typical Rocketball operational scenario consists of a sounding rocket launch and subsequent deployment of a balloon above a desired location. An obvious advantage of this combination is the additional mission 'hang-time' rendered by the balloon once the sounding rocket flight is completed. The system leverages current and emergent technologies at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and other organizations.

  1. The Advanced Scintillator Compton Telescope (ASCOT) balloon project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Sharma, Tejaswita; Legere, Jason S.; Bancroft, Christopher M.; McConnell, Mark L.; Ryan, James M.; Wright, Alex M.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a project to develop new medium-energy gamma-ray instrumentation by constructing and flying a balloon-borne Compton telescope using advanced scintillator materials combined with silicon photomultiplier readouts. There is a need in high-energy astronomy for a medium-energy gamma-ray mission covering the energy range from approximately 0.4 - 20 MeV to follow the success of the COMPTEL instrument on CGRO. We believe that directly building on the legacy of COMPTEL, using relatively robust, low-cost, off-the-shelf technologies, is the most promising path for such a mission. Fortunately, high-performance scintillators, such as Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), Cerium Bromide (CeBr3), and p-terphenyl, and compact readout devices, such as silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), are already commercially available and capable of meeting this need. We have conducted two balloon flights of prototype instruments to test these technologies. The first, in 2011, demonstrated that a Compton telescope consisting of an liquid organic scintillator scattering layer and a LaBr3 calorimeter effectively rejects background under balloon-flight conditions, using time-of-flight (ToF) discrimination. The second, in 2014, showed that a telescope using an organic stilbene crystal scattering element and a LaBr3 calorimeter with SiPM readouts can achieve similar ToF performance. We are now constructing a much larger balloon instrument, an Advanced Scintillator Compton Telescope (ASCOT) with SiPM readout, with the goal of imaging the Crab Nebula at MeV energies in a one-day flight. We expect a 4σ detection up to 1 MeV in a single transit. We present calibration results of the first detector modules, and updated simulations of the balloon instrument sensitivity. If successful, this project will demonstrate that the energy, timing, and position resolution of this technology are sufficient to achieve an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity in the mediumenergy gamma-ray band, were it to be

  2. A constitutive equation for stratospheric balloon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, J.; Sterling, J.

    The selection of a suitable material for use as a reliable stratospheric balloon gas barrier and structural component is based on a variety of desired properties. In order to achieve the required combination of weight per unit area, helium permeation, strength, flexibility and toughness at low temperatures, low density polyethylene has been used for the last half century. During the last decade, linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) has been found to have even better properties for this application. Thin films extruded from this type resin have been found to have time dependent properties which should be understood in order to make an intelligent analysis of the balloon. This paper describes the current effort to characterize a 38 micron coextrusion of LLDPE as a nonlinearly viscoelastic material. The resulting constitutive equation may be used to accurately describe the time dependent creep and/or relaxation of this film when subjected to a biaxial state of stress. Recent laboratory data have been used to modify an existing model of LLDPE to account for differences caused by the coextrusion process. The new model will facilitate structure design optimization and reliability assessment, and may further be utilized as a predictive tool to benefit in-flight operations. Unfortunately, current structural analysis techniques based on linear elastic properties will predict stresses in excess of those which actually exist. An example will be presented which demonstrates the magnitude of this error when nonlinear behavior is ignored.

  3. Balloon-borne observations of mid-latitude hydrofluoric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, B.; Toon, G. C.; Blavier, J.-F.; Szeto, J. T.; Fleming, E. L.; Jackman, C. H.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of stratospheric hydrofluoric acid (HF) have been made by the JPL MkIV interferometer during high-altitude balloon flights. Infrared solar absorption spectra were acquired near 35 deg N at altitudes between local tropopause and 38 km. Volume mixing ratio profiles of HF derived from 4 flights (1990-93), in conjunction with simultaneously observed N2O profiles, indicate an average rate of HF increase of (5.5 +/- 0.3)% per year, in agreement with time-dependent, two-dimensional model simulations (6% per year) and ATMOS measurements.

  4. US Monthly Pilot Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly winds aloft summary forms summarizing Pilot Balloon observational data for the United States. Generally labeled as Form 1114, and then transitioning to Form...

  5. US Daily Pilot Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pilot Balloon observational forms for the United States. Taken by Weather Bureau and U.S. Army observers. Period of record 1918-1960. Records scanned from the NCDC...

  6. US Air Force Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Worksheets containing pilot balloon data computed from releases at Air Force stations in the western United States. Elevation and azimuth angles are used to compute...

  7. Status of the Balloon-Borne X-ray Polarimetry Mission X-Calibur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczynski, Henric; Kislat, Fabian; Stuchlik, David; Okajima, Takashi; de Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2016-04-01

    We report on the status of the balloon borne hard X-ray polairmetry mission X-Calibur. The missions combines a focussing hard X-ray mirror from the InFOCuS collaboration with a scattering polarimeter and the WASP (Wallops Arc Second Pointer) pointing system. The mission is scheduled for a conventonal ~1 day balloon flight in Fall 2016 and a long duration (~30 day) balloon flight from McMurdo (Ross Island) in 2018/2019. X-Calibur will allow us to measure ~5% polarization fractions for strong sources with a Crab-like enegry spectra and fluxes. The science targets of the first balloon flights will include the stellar mass black holes GRS 1915+105 and Cyg X-1, Her X-1, Sco X-1, and the Crab nebula and pulsar. The long duration balloon flight will target several X-ray binaries and the extragalactic mass accreting supermassive black hole Cen A. In this contribution we give an update on the status of the mission, and the expected science return.

  8. High Altitude Infrasound Measurements using Balloon-Borne Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, D. C.; Johnson, C. S.; Gupta, R. A.; Anderson, J.; Lees, J. M.; Drob, D. P.; Phillips, D.

    2015-12-01

    For the last fifty years, almost all infrasound sensors have been located on the Earth's surface. A few experiments consisting of microphones on poles and tethered aerostats comprise the remainder. Such surface and near-surface arrays likely do not capture the full diversity of acoustic signals in the atmosphere. Here, we describe results from a balloon mounted infrasound array that reached altitudes of up to 38 km (the middle stratosphere). The balloon drifted at the ambient wind speed, resulting in a near total reduction in wind noise. Signals consistent with tropospheric turbulence were detected. A spectral peak in the ocean microbarom range (0.12 - 0.35 Hz) was present on balloon-mounted sensors but not on static infrasound stations near the flight path. A strong 18 Hz signal, possibly related to building ventilation systems, was observed in the stratosphere. A wide variety of other narrow band acoustic signals of uncertain provenance were present throughout the flight, but were absent in simultaneous recordings from nearby ground stations. Similar phenomena were present in spectrograms from the last balloon infrasound campaign in the 1960s. Our results suggest that the infrasonic wave field in the stratosphere is very different from that which is readily detectable on surface stations. This has implications for modeling acoustic energy transfer between the lower and upper atmosphere as well as the detection of novel acoustic signals that never reach the ground. Our work provides valuable constraints on a proposed mission to detect earthquakes on Venus using balloon-borne infrasound sensors.

  9. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope: BLAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truch, Matthew D. P.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Chapin, E. L.; Chung, J.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S.; Griffin, M.; Gundersen, J. O.; Halpern, M.; Hargrave, P. C.; Hughes, D. H.; Klein, J.; MacTavish, C. J.; Marsden, G.; Martin, P. G.; Martin, T. G.; Mauskopf, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Olmi, L.; Pascale, E.; Patanchon, G.; Rex, M.; Scott, D.; Semisch, C.; Thomas, N. E.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, G. S.; Viero, M. P.; Wiebe, D. V.

    2009-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) is a suborbital surveying experiment designed to study the evolutionary history and processes of star formation in local galaxies (including the Milky Way) and galaxies at cosmological distances. The BLAST continuum camera, which consists of 270 detectors distributed between three arrays, observes simultaneously in broadband (30%) spectral windows at 250, 350, and 500 microns. The optical design is based on a 2 m diameter telescope, providing a diffraction-limited resolution of 30" at 250 microns. The gondola pointing system enables raster mapping of arbitrary geometry, with a repeatable positional accuracy of 30"; postflight pointing reconstruction to manual override. On this poster, we describe the primary characteristics and measured in-flight performance of BLAST. BLAST performed a test flight in 2003 and has since made two scientifically productive long-duration balloon flights: a 100 hour flight from ESRANGE (Kiruna), Sweden to Victoria Island, northern Canada in 2005 June; and a 250 hour, circumpolar flight from McMurdo Station, Antarctica in 2006 December. The BLAST collaboration acknowledges the support of NASA through grants NAG5-12785, NAG5-13301, and NNGO-6GI11G, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Canada's Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Ontario Innovation Trust, the Puerto Rico Space Grant Consortium, the Fondo Institucional para la Investigacion of the University of Puerto Rico, and the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs.

  10. The design and development of a high-resolution visible-to-near-UV telescope for balloon-borne astronomy: SuperBIT

    CERN Document Server

    Romualdez, L Javier; Clark, Paul; Damaren, Christopher J; Eifler, Tim; Fraisse, Aurelien A; Galloway, Mathew N; Hartley, John W; Jones, William C; Li, Lun; Lipton, Leeav; Luu, Thuy Vy T; Massey, Richard J; Netterfield, C Barth; Padilla, Ivan; Rhodes, Jason D; Schmoll, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Balloon-borne astronomy is unique in that it allows for a level of image stability, resolution, and optical backgrounds that are comparable to space-borne systems due to greatly reduced atmospheric interference, but at a fraction of the cost and over a significantly reduced development time-scale. Instruments operating within visible-to-near-UV bands ($300$ - $900$ um) can achieve a theoretical diffraction limited resolution of $0.01"$ from the stratosphere ($35$ - $40$ km altitude) without the need for extensive adaptive optical systems required by ground-based systems. The {\\it Superpressure Balloon-borne Imaging Telescope} ("SuperBIT") is a wide-field imager designed to achieve 0.02$"$ stability over a 0.5$^\\circ$ field-of-view, for deep single exposures of up to 5 minutes. SuperBIT is thus well-suited for many astronomical observations, from solar or extrasolar planetary observations, to resolved stellar populations and distant galaxies (whether to study their morphology, evolution, or gravitational lensi...

  11. PoGOLino: a scintillator-based balloon-borne neutron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kole, Merlin; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kentaro; Ishizu, Sumito; Jackson, Miranda; Kamae, Tune; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Kawano, Takafumi; Kiss, Mozsi; Moretti, Elena; Pearce, Mark; Rydström, Stefan; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    PoGOLino is a balloon-borne scintillator-based experiment developed to study the largely unexplored high altitude neutron environment at high geomagnetic latitudes. The instrument comprises two detectors that make use of LiCAF, a novel neutron sensitive scintillator, sandwiched by BGO crystals for background reduction. The experiment was launched on March 20th 2013 from the Esrange Space Centre, Northern Sweden (geomagnetic latitude of $65^\\circ$), for a three hour flight during which the instrument took data up to an altitude of 30.9 km. The detector design and ground calibration results are presented together with the measurement results from the balloon flight.

  12. Low Cost Balloon programme of Indian Centre for Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics has launched 89 Missions to near space using single or multiple weather balloons or very light plastic balloons. Basic goal was to capitalize miniaturization of equipments in modern ages. Our typical payload of less than 4kg weight consists of GPS, video camera, cosmic ray detectors, Attitude measurement unit, sunsensor and most importantly a 50-100sqcm X-ray/Gamma-ray detector (usually a scintillator type). The main purpose of the latter is to study spectra of secondary cosmic ray spectra (till our ceiling altitude of 36-42km) over the years and their seasonal variation or variation with solar cycle. We also study solar X-ray spectra, especially of solar flares. We have detected a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) and pulsars. Our observation of black hole candidates did not yield satisfactory result yet mainly because of poor collimation (~ 10 deg x 10 deg) by lead collimator which introduces strong background also. Our effort with multiple balloon flights enabled us to have long duration flights. We believe that our procedure is very futuristic and yet at an affordable cost.

  13. Integrating BalloonSAT and Atmospheric Dynamic Concepts into the Secondary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, B. N.; Kennon, J. T.; Roberts, E.

    2016-05-01

    Arkansas BalloonSAT is an educational outreach and scientific research program that is part of Arkansas State University in Jonesboro, AR. The following is a unit of instruction to incorporate BalloonSAT measurements into secondary science classes. Students interpret graphs and identify several atmospheric trends and properties of a typical balloon flight. Students engage critical thinking skills in developing and answering their own questions relevant to the BalloonSAT program. Prerequisite concepts students should know are how to interpret graphs and unit conversions. Students should have a basic understanding of gravity, units of temperature and distance, and error in measurements. The unit is designed for one week after end-of-course exams and before the end of school. The unit may take two to five 50-minute periods, depending on how many activities are completed.

  14. EUSO-BALLOON a pathfinder for detecting UHECR's from the edge of space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scotti V.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available EUSO-Balloon has been conceived as a pathfinder mission for JEM-EUSO, to perform an end-to-end test of the subsystems and components, and to prove the global detection chain while improving our knowledge of the atmospheric and terrestrial UV background. Through a series of stratospheric balloon flights performed by the French Space Agency CNES, EUSO-BALLOON will serve as an evolutive test-bench for all the key technologies of JEM-EUSO. EUSO-Balloon also has the potential to detect Extensive Air Showers from above, marking a key milestone in the development of UHECR science, and paving the way for any future large scale, space-based UHECR observatory.

  15. Balloon Exoplanet Nulling Interferometer (BENI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Ford, Holland; Petro, Larry; Herman, Jay; Rinehart, Stephen; Carpenter, Kenneth; Marzouk, Joe

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of using a balloon-borne nulling interferometer to detect and characterize exosolar planets and debris disks. The existing instrument consists of a 3-telescope Fizeau imaging interferometer with 3 fast steering mirrors and 3 delay lines operating at 800 Hz for closed-loop control of wavefront errors and fine pointing. A compact visible nulling interferometer is under development which when coupled to the imaging interferometer would in-principle allow deep suppression of starlight. We have conducted atmospheric simulations of the environment above 100,000 feet and believe balloons are a feasible path forward towards detection and characterization of a limited set of exoplanets and their debris disks. Herein we will discuss the BENI instrument, the balloon environment and the feasibility of such as mission.

  16. Yellow Balloon in a Briar Patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Frank; Fitzmaurice, Robert W.

    1978-01-01

    As part of a meteorology unit, sixth grade science students launched helium balloons with attached return postcards. This article describes Weather Service monitoring of the balloons and postcard return results. (MA)

  17. BLAST: A balloon-borne, large-aperture, submillimetre telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Donald Victor

    BLAST is a balloon-borne large-aperture, submillimetre telescope, which makes large area (1--200 square degree) surveys of Galactic and extragalactic targets. Since BLAST observes in the stratosphere, it is able to make broad-band observations between 200 mum and 550 mum which are difficult or impossible to perform from the ground. BLAST has been designed to probe star formation both in the local Galaxy and in the high redshift (z = 1--4) universe. Because BLAST is flown on an unmanned stratospheric balloon platform, it has been designed to be able to operate autonomously, without needing operator intervention to perform its scientific goals. This thesis includes an overview of the design of the BLAST platform, with emphasis on the command and control systems used to operate the telescope. BLAST has been flown on two long-duration balloon flights. The first of these, from Esrange, Sweden in June of 2005, acquired ˜70 hours of primarily Galactic data. During the second flight, from Willy Field, Antarctica in December of 2006, BLAST acquired ˜225 hours of both Galactic and extragalactic data. Operational performance of the platform during these two flights is reviewed, with the goal of providing insight on how future flights can be improved. Reduction of the data acquired by these large-format bolometer arrays is a challenging procedure, and techniques developed for BLAST data reduction are reviewed. The ultimate goal of this reduction is the generation of high quality astronomical maps which can be used for subsequent portions of data analysis. This thesis treats, in detail, the iterative, maximum likelihood map maker developed for BLAST. Results of simulations performed on the map maker to characterise its ability to reconstruct astronomical signals are presented. Finally, astronomical maps produced by this map maker using real data acquired by BLAST are presented, with a discussion on non-physical map pathologies resulting from the data reduction pipeline and

  18. Ballonnen in zee = balloons as marine litter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franeker, van J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Releasing balloons seems harmless. However, remains of balloons, especially valves and ribbons are becoming a common and persistent type of marine litter found on beaches. Following Dutch Queens day 2007, large numbers of Dutch balloons were found in Normandy, France. Animals may become entangled in

  19. Complications of balloon packing in epistaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeeren, Lenka; Derks, Wynia; Fokkens, Wytske; Menger, Dirk Jan

    2015-01-01

    Although balloon packing appears to be efficient to control epistaxis, severe local complications can occur. We describe four patients with local lesions after balloon packing. Prolonged balloon packing can cause damage to nasal mucosa, septum and alar skin (nasal mucosa, the cartilaginous skeleton

  20. Ballonnen in zee = balloons as marine litter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franeker, van J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Releasing balloons seems harmless. However, remains of balloons, especially valves and ribbons are becoming a common and persistent type of marine litter found on beaches. Following Dutch Queens day 2007, large numbers of Dutch balloons were found in Normandy, France. Animals may become entangled in

  1. Qualitative comparison of concurrent vertical optical turbulence profiles from an aircraft and balloons over White Sands Missile Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowlin, Scott R.; Hahn, Ila L.; Hugo, Ronald J.; Bishop, Kenneth P.

    1999-08-01

    We report simultaneous balloon-borne thermosonde/airborne constant-current anemometer measurements made over a portion of White Sands Missile Range, NM. For the first time, vertical profiles of the refractive index structure parameter (Cn2) data generated from shallow slant aircraft flight paths are compared to the balloons vertical Cn2 distributions. We discuss possible adverse effects of meteorology and atmospheric velocity fluctuations. We present conclusions and make recommendations for future similar experimental efforts.

  2. Meteorological Support in Scientific Ballooning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwantes, Chris; Mullenax, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The weather affects every portion of a scientific balloon mission, from payload integration to launch, float, and impact and recovery. Forecasting for these missions is very specialized and unique in many aspects. CSBF Meteorology incorporates data from NWSNCEP, as well as several international meteorological organizations, and NCAR. This presentation will detail the tools used and specifics on how CSBF Meteorology produces its forecasts.

  3. Pseudoperforation during kissing balloon angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, Carmelo J; Fasseas, Panayotis; Raveendran, Ganesh; Garratt, Kirk N

    2004-11-01

    We describe a case of apparent perforation during kissing balloon angioplasty of a bifurcation lesion. There was no evidence of perforation on follow-up angiography or via intravascular ultrasound. Possible etiologies include minimal perforation that immediately sealed postdeflation or forced contrast into the microvascular bed via a proximal side branch.

  4. Pointing System for the Balloon-Borne Astronomical Payloads

    CERN Document Server

    Nirmal, K; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Suresh, Ambily; Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of a light-weight, fully autonomous 2-axis pointing and stabilization system designed for balloon-borne astronomical payloads. The system is developed using off-the-shelf components such as Arduino Uno controller, HMC 5883L magnetometer, MPU-9150 Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and iWave GPS receiver unit. It is a compact and rugged system which can also be used to take images/video in a moving vehicle, or in areal photography. The system performance is evaluated from the ground, as well as in conditions simulated to imitate the actual flight by using a tethered launch.

  5. Pointing system for the balloon-borne astronomical payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmal, Kaipacheri; Sreejith, Aickara Gopinathan; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Ambily, Suresh; Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-10-01

    We describe the development and implementation of a light-weight, fully autonomous 2-axis pointing and stabilization system designed for balloon-borne astronomical payloads. The system is developed using off-the-shelf components such as Arduino Uno controller, HMC 5883L magnetometer, MPU-9150 inertial measurement unit, and iWave GPS receiver unit. It is a compact and rugged system which can also be used to take images/video in a moving vehicle or in real photography. The system performance is evaluated from the ground, as well as in conditions simulated to imitate the actual flight by using a tethered launch.

  6. Non-linear analysis and the design of Pumpkin Balloons: stress, stability and viscoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, J. L.; Wakefield, D. S.

    Tensys have a long-established background in the shape generation and load analysis of architectural stressed membrane structures Founded upon their inTENS finite element analysis suite these activities have broadened to encompass lighter than air structures such as aerostats hybrid air-vehicles and stratospheric balloons Winzen Engineering couple many years of practical balloon design and fabrication experience with both academic and practical knowledge of the characterisation of the non-linear viscoelastic response of the polymeric films typically used for high-altitude scientific balloons Both companies have provided consulting services to the NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon ULDB Program Early implementations of pumpkin balloons have shown problems of geometric instability characterised by improper deployment and these difficulties have been reproduced numerically using inTENS The solution lies in both the shapes of the membrane lobes and also the need to generate a biaxial stress field in order to mobilise in-plane shear stiffness Balloons undergo significant temperature and pressure variations in flight The different thermal characteristics between tendons and film can lead to significant meridional stress Fabrication tolerances can lead to significant local hoop stress concentrations particularly adjacent to the base and apex end fittings The non-linear viscoelastic response of the envelope film acts positively to help dissipate stress concentrations However creep over time may produce lobe geometry variations that may

  7. Integrating Balloon and Satellite Operation Data Centers for Technology Readiness Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiello-Francisco, Fátima; Fernandes, Jose Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Stratospheric balloon-borne experiments have been one of the most effective ways to validate innovative space technology, taking the advantage of reduced development cycles and low cost in launching and operation. In Brazil, the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) has balloon and satellite ground infrastructures since the 1970´s and the 1990´s, respectively. In the recent past, a strategic approach was adopted on the modernization of balloon ground operation facilities for supporting the protoMIRAX experiment, an X-ray imaging telescope under development at INPE as a pathfinder for the MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de Raios X) satellite mission. The strategic target was to reuse the SATellite Control System (SATCS), a software framework developed to control and monitor INPÉs satellites, for balloon operation. This paper presents the results of that effort and the new ongoing project, a computer-based framework named I2Bso, which strategic target is to Integrate INPÉs Balloon and Satellite Operation data centers. The I2Bso major purpose is to support the continuous assessment of an innovative technology after different qualification flights either on board balloons or satellites in order to acquire growing evidence for the technology maturity.

  8. Technology Development for the ExaVolt Antenna (EVA) Suborbital Ultra-High Energy Particle Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Frank; Brakke, Kenneth; Gorham, Peter; Furer, Joshua; Miki, Christian

    We describe technology development for the ExaVolt Antenna (EVA), the next generation balloon-borne ultra-high energy (UHE) particle observatory under development for NASA's suborbital super-pressure balloon program in Antarctica. The design is based on a novel application of toroidal reflector optics, utilizing the super-pressure balloon surface to mount an RF reflector and an internal feed-array suspended inside of the balloon, to create an ultra-large radio antenna system with a synoptic view of the Antarctic ice sheet below it. A 1/20 scale model test with an actual inflated balloon is planned for late Spring 2014 at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. A 5.8~meter diameter super-pressure balloon will be pulsed at 3~GHz to test electronics and data acquisition systems. The 1/20 scale model will also be used to investigate deployment of the EVA system. Feed deployment is a semi-autonomous process that proceeds gradually as the volume of the ascending balloon increases. A mathematical model was developed to analyze deployment of the EVA system. Numerical solutions based on the model will be compared with measurements of ascent-like shapes assumed by the physical model during inflation.

  9. The balloon-borne electron telescope with scintillating fibers (BETS)

    CERN Document Server

    Torii, S; Tateyama, N; Yoshida, K; Ouchi, Y; Yamagami, T; Saitô, Y; Murakami, H; Kobayashi, T; Komori, Y; Kasahara, K; Yuda, T; Nishimura, J

    2000-01-01

    we describe a new detector system developed for high-altitude balloon flights to observe the cosmic-ray electrons above 10 GeV. The balloon borne electron telescope with Scintillating (BETS) fibers instrument is an imaging calorimeter which is capable of selecting electrons against the large background of protons. The calorimeter is composed of a sandwich of scintillating optical-fiber belts and lead plates with a combination of three plastic scintillators for the shower trigger. The total thickness of lead is 40 mm (~7.1 r.l.) and the number of fiber belts is nine. In each belt, alternating layers are oriented in orthogonal (x and y) directions. Two sets of an intensified CCD camera are adopted for read-out of the scintillating fibers in the x and y direction, respectively. The accelerator beam tests were carried out to study the performance of detector for electrons in 1996 and for protons in 1997 at CERN-SPS. The instrument was successfully flown aboard high-altitude balloon in 1997 and 1998. It is demonst...

  10. Modeling the ascent of sounding balloons: derivation of the vertical air motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gallice

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new model to describe the ascent of sounding balloons in the troposphere and lower stratosphere (up to ~30–35 km altitude is presented. Contrary to previous models, detailed account is taken of both the variation of the drag coefficient with altitude and the heat imbalance between the balloon and the atmosphere. To compensate for the lack of data on the drag coefficient of sounding balloons, a reference curve for the relationship between drag coefficient and Reynolds number is derived from a dataset of flights launched during the Lindenberg Upper Air Methods Intercomparisons (LUAMI campaign. The transfer of heat from the surrounding air into the balloon is accounted for by solving the radial heat diffusion equation inside the balloon. The potential applications of the model include the forecast of the trajectory of sounding balloons, which can be used to increase the accuracy of the match technique, and the derivation of the air vertical velocity. The latter is obtained by subtracting the ascent rate of the balloon in still air calculated by the model from the actual ascent rate. This technique is shown to provide an approximation for the vertical air motion with an uncertainty error of 0.5 m s−1 in the troposphere and 0.2 m s−1 in the stratosphere. An example of extraction of the air vertical velocity is provided in this paper. We show that the air vertical velocities derived from the balloon soundings in this paper are in general agreement with small-scale atmospheric velocity fluctuations related to gravity waves, mechanical turbulence, or other small-scale air motions measured during the SUCCESS campaign (Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study in the orographically unperturbed mid-latitude middle troposphere.

  11. Balloon borne arcsecond pointer feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Philip R.; Deweese, Keith D.

    2003-08-01

    A major hurdle in extending the range of experiments for which balloon vehicles are useful has been the imposition of the gondola dynamics on the accuracy with which an instrument can be kept pointed at a celestial target. In this paper, the foundation for a high fidelity controller simulation is presented and it is shown that sub-arcsecond pointing stability can be achieved for a large instrument pointing at an inertial target. The flexibility of the flight train is represented through generalized modal analysis. A multiple controller scheme is introduced with a coarse azimuth pointer and a pitch-yaw gimbal mount for fine pointing. An analysis and demonstration of the necessity in eliminating static friction are provided along with a solution to eliminate static friction from the system dynamics. A control scheme involving linear accelerometers for enhanced disturbance rejection is also presented. This paper establishes that the proposed control strategy can be made robustly stable with significant design margins. Also demonstrated is the efficacy of the proposed system in rejecting disturbances larger than those considered realistic.

  12. DLR HABLEG- High Altitude Balloon Launched Experimental Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlach, S.; Schwarzbauch, M.; Laiacker, M.

    2015-09-01

    The group Flying Robots at the DLR Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics in Oberpfaffenhofen conducts research on solar powered high altitude aircrafts. Due to the high altitude and the almost infinite mission duration, these platforms are also denoted as High Altitude Pseudo-Satellites (HAPS). This paper highlights some aspects of the design, building, integration and testing of a flying experimental platform for high altitudes. This unmanned aircraft, with a wingspan of 3 m and a mass of less than 10 kg, is meant to be launched as a glider from a high altitude balloon in 20 km altitude and shall investigate technologies for future large HAPS platforms. The aerodynamic requirements for high altitude flight included the development of a launch method allowing for a safe transition to horizontal flight from free-fall with low control authority. Due to the harsh environmental conditions in the stratosphere, the integration of electronic components in the airframe is a major effort. For regulatory reasons a reliable and situation dependent flight termination system had to be implemented. In May 2015 a flight campaign was conducted. The mission was a full success demonstrating that stratospheric research flights are feasible with rather small aircrafts.

  13. Demonstration of a Balloon Borne Arc-second Pointer Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deweese, K.; Ward, P.

    Many designs for utilizing stratospheric balloons as low-cost platforms on which to conduct space science experiments have been proposed throughout the years A major hurdle in extending the range of experiments for which these vehicles are useful has been the imposition of the gondola dynamics on the accuracy with which an instrument can be kept pointed at a celestial target A significant number of scientists have sought the ability to point their instruments with jitter in the arc-second range This paper presents the design and analysis of a stratospheric balloon borne pointing system that is able to meet this requirement The test results of a demonstration prototype of the design with similar ability are also presented Discussion of a high fidelity controller simulation for design analysis is presented The flexibility of the flight train is represented through generalized modal analysis A multiple controller scheme is utilized for coarse and fine pointing Coarse azimuth pointing is accomplished by an established pointing system with extensive flight history residing above the gondola structure A pitch-yaw gimbal mount is used for fine pointing providing orthogonal axes when nominally on target Fine pointing actuation is from direct drive dc motors eliminating backlash problems An analysis of friction nonlinearities and a demonstration of the necessity in eliminating static friction are provided A unique bearing hub design is introduced that eliminates static friction from the system dynamics A control scheme involving linear

  14. Background Measurements from Balloon-Borne CZT Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, J A; Grindlay, J E; Bloser, P F; Stahle, C K; Parker, B; Barthelmy, S D; Jenkins, Johnathan A; Narita, Tomohiko; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Bloser, Peter F.; Stahle, Carl; Parker, Brad; Barthelmy, Scott

    2002-01-01

    We report detector characteristics and background measurements from two prototype imaging CZT detectors flown on a scientific balloon payload in May 2001. The detectors are both platinum-contact 10mm x 10mm x 5mm CZT crystals, each with a 4 $\\times$ 4 array of pixels tiling the anode. One is made from IMARAD horizontal Bridgman CZT, the other from eV Products high-pressure Bridgman material. Both detectors were mounted side-by-side in a flip-chip configuration and read out by a 32-channel IDE VA/TA ASIC preamp/shaper. We enclosed the detectors in the same 40deg field-of-view collimator (comprisinga graded passive shield and plastic scintillator) used in our previously-reported September 2000 flight. I-V curves for the detectors are diode-like, and we find that the platinum contacts adhere significantly better to the CZT surfaces than gold to previous detectors. The detectors and instrumentation performed well in a 20-hour balloon flight on 23/24 May 2001. Although we discovered a significant instrumental back...

  15. Balloon-borne CALET prototype payload (bCALET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueyama, Yoshitaka; Torii, Shoji; Kasahara, Katsuaki; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Shunsuke; Akaike, Yosui; Nakai, Mikio; Aiba, Toshihide; Kai, Yuuichirou; Tamura, Tadahisa; Yoshida, Kenji; Katayose, Yusaku; Saito, Yoshitaka; Fuke, Hideyuki; Kawada, Jiro; Mizuta, Eiichi; Marrocchesi, Pier Simone; Kim, Meyoung; Bigongiari, Gabriele

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) payload will be installed in the Japanese Experiment Module Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) of the International Space Station (ISS). We have been developing a balloon borne payload to evaluate the performance of CALET by carring out precursor flights for the electron observation in 1-1000 GeV. The first flight of bCALET was done in 2006, and the enhanced version, bCALET-2, was successfully flown in 2009. In this paper, we describe the bCALET-3 payload which is composed of Imaging Calorimeter (IMC), Total Absorption Calorimeter (TASC) and Silicon pixel Array (SIA). IMC has an area of 320mm × 320mm, and is consisted 8 x-y layers of scintillating fiber belts inserted below tungsten plates for a fine imaging of shower particles. TASC is constructed by 6 layers of BGO scintillator blocks with an area of 300mm × 300mm, for measuring the total energy deposit of incoming shower particles. SIA owns to measure the charge number of incoming particle. Each component has very similar function with CALET with about half the area of CALET. We are planning to carry out the balloon experiment by bCALET-3 in November, 2010 for the test of the CALET capability of observing the electrons.

  16. A balloon-borne millimeter-wave telescope for cosmic microwave background anisotropy measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Fixsen, D J; Cottingham, D A; Folz, W C; Inman, C A; Kowitt, M S; Meyer, S; Page, L A; Puchalla, J L; Ruhl, J E; Silverberg, R F

    1995-01-01

    We report on the characteristics and design details of the Medium Scale Anisotropy Measurement (MSAM), a millimeter-wave, balloon-borne telescope that has been used to observe anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) on 0\\fdg5 angular scales. The gondola is capable of determining and maintaining absolute orientation to a few arcminutes during a one-night flight. Emphasis is placed on the optical and pointing performance as well as the weight and power budgets. We also discuss the total balloon/gondola mechanical system. The pendulation from this system is a ubiquitous perturbation on the pointing system. A detailed understanding in these areas is needed for developing the next generation of balloon-borne instruments.

  17. Balloon observations of Galactic cosmic ray helium before and during a Forbush decrease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, J. M.; Guzik, T. G.; Lijowski, M.; Wefel, J. P.; Beatty, J. J.; Ficenec, D. J.; Tobias, S.; Mitchell, J. W.; Mckee, S.; Nutter, S.

    1993-01-01

    The energy spectrum of Galactic cosmic ray helium was measured in two different balloon experiments launched four days apart from Canada: SMILI-I on Sept 1, 1989 and MASS on Sept 5, 1989. A slow Forbush decrease began on Sept 4, 1989 and had not reached its maximum at the time of the MASS flight. Comparison of the balloon measurements shows a fractional decrease of 0.37 to 0.15 in the Helium flux between 200 and 450 MeV/nucleon (1.2-2.0 GV). The rigidity dependence is analyzed in two models and found to be steeper than previous observations. Interplanetary particle data and ground-based Neutron Monitor results are consistent with the balloon observations. Probable sources for this Forbush decrease are discussed.

  18. Design and construction of a carbon fiber gondola for the SPIDER balloon-borne telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, J D; Amiri, M; Benton, S J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Bryan, S A; Chiang, C; Contaldi, C C; Crill, B P; Doré, O P; Farhang, M; Filippini, J P; Fissel, L M; Fraisse, A A; Gambrel, A E; Gandilo, N N; Golwala, S; Gudmundsson, J E; Halpern, M; Hasselfield, M; Hilton, G C; Holmes, W A; Hristov, V V; Irwin, K D; Jones, W C; Kermish, Z D; Kuo, C L; MacTavish, C J; Mason, P V; Megerian, K G; Moncelsi, L; Nagy, J M; Netterfield, C B; O'Brient, R; Rahlin, A S; Reintsema, C D; Ruhl, J E; Runyan, M C; Shariff, J A; Trangsrud, A; Tucker, C; Tucker, R S; Turner, A D; Weber, A C; Wiebe, D V; Young, E Y

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the light-weight carbon fiber and aluminum gondola designed for the SPIDER balloon-borne telescope. SPIDER is designed to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation with unprecedented sensitivity and control of systematics in search of the imprint of inflation: a period of exponential expansion in the early Universe. The requirements of this balloon-borne instrument put tight constrains on the mass budget of the payload. The SPIDER gondola is designed to house the experiment and guarantee its operational and structural integrity during its balloon-borne flight, while using less than 10% of the total mass of the payload. We present a construction method for the gondola based on carbon fiber reinforced polymer tubes with aluminum inserts and aluminum multi-tube joints. We describe the validation of the model through Finite Element Analysis and mechanical tests.

  19. Balloon observations of Galactic cosmic ray helium before and during a Forbush decrease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, J. M.; Guzik, T. G.; Lijowski, M.; Wefel, J. P.; Beatty, J. J.; Ficenec, D. J.; Tobias, S.; Mitchell, J. W.; Mckee, S.; Nutter, S.

    1993-01-01

    The energy spectrum of Galactic cosmic ray helium was measured in two different balloon experiments launched four days apart from Canada: SMILI-I on Sept 1, 1989 and MASS on Sept 5, 1989. A slow Forbush decrease began on Sept 4, 1989 and had not reached its maximum at the time of the MASS flight. Comparison of the balloon measurements shows a fractional decrease of 0.37 to 0.15 in the Helium flux between 200 and 450 MeV/nucleon (1.2-2.0 GV). The rigidity dependence is analyzed in two models and found to be steeper than previous observations. Interplanetary particle data and ground-based Neutron Monitor results are consistent with the balloon observations. Probable sources for this Forbush decrease are discussed.

  20. Intragastric balloon and multidisciplinary team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Mazure

    Full Text Available Background: The intragastric balloon is widely used for weight reduction in obese patients, but results are variable. We describe our results enhancing the importance of a Multidisciplinary Team (MT taking part in the treatment. Methods: A retrospective review was done concerning a total of 119 balloons , placed in 116 patients, under endoscopic control and conscious sedation, from May 2001 until August 2006. 49 patients were prepared and recommended to be followed by a MT in a physical unit, at least every 15 days during 6 months. 67 were indicated and followed by other colleagues, without MT. Removal was performed 6 months later. Results: Concerning our 49 patients, mean age was 38, 1 years, 31 female and 18 males, with BMI ranged between 32 and 63, average of 42. The average decrease of weight excess was 31, 85% (-4, 45-80, 4%, and the BMI diminished 5,3 points (from 13,6 to gain of 0,9. The treatment failed in 34,6 % of our patients -including 4 patients lost of follow-up (8, 16%-, compared with 53, 8% of patients without structured MT for selection and follow-up. Physical exercise enhanced markedly the results with 45, 8% of excess of weight loss in women and 39, 7% in males, compared with 14, 6 and 15, 6% in patients who didn't follow the program. The weight loss was mostly fat mass, 89,9% in men and 75,6% in women.- The results maintenance was obtained in 40% of patients one year later. There were no major complications; one balloon had to be removed at 3 weeks because of intolerance, another at 5 months because of gastroesophageal reflux. Conclusions: BIB is an effective help to achieve a short term weight loss in obese patients; nevertheless, good and long lasting results will depend on the modification of life style obtained by a multidisciplinary approach.

  1. Coriolis Mass-Flowmeter for aerostatic gas amount determination in zero pressure stratosperic balloons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-07-01

    The CNES ballooning community regularly operates zero pressure balloons in many countries around the world (recently in France, Sweden, Canada and soon, Australia in 2017). An important operational flight parameter is the aerostatic gas mass injected into the balloon (currently helium and hydrogen in the study). Besides the lifting force, it determines mainly the ascent rate from which the adiabatic expansion depends directly. A too high ascent velocity in very cold air temperature profiles could result in a gas temperature drop which if too great, might induce brittleness of the envelope. A precise gas mass determination is therefore critical for performance as well as for mission safety. The various gas supply tanks in various countries all have different characteristics with possible uncertainties with regard to their volumes. This makes the currently used gas mass determination method based on supply tank pressure measurements unreliable. This method also relies on tank temperature, another source of inaccuracy in the gas amount determination. CNES has therefore prospected for alternative methods to reduce inaccuracies and perhaps also ease the operational procedures during balloon inflation. Coriolis mass-flowmeters which have reached industrial maturity, offer the great advantage over other flowmeters to be able to directly measure the mass of the transferred fluid, and not deducing it from other parameters as other types of flowmeters would do. An industrial contractor has been therefore assigned to integrate this solution into the CNES operational setup. This new system is to be tested in February 2016. The presentation will briefly explain the Coriolis flowmeter's principle and display the February 2016 performance tests' results. The expected incidence on zero pressure balloons' trajectories will also be discussed based on simulations ran on a balloon flight simulator software.

  2. Paraplegia following intraaortic balloon circulatory assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benício Anderson

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraaortic balloon counterpulsation is frequently used in patients experiencing severe ventricular dysfunction following maximal drug therapy. However, even with the improvement of percutaneous insertion techniques, the procedure has always been followed by vascular, infectious, and neurological complications. This article describes a case of paraplegia due to intraaortic balloon counterpulsation in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery.

  3. Approaching the knee -- balloon-borne observations of cosmic ray composition

    CERN Document Server

    Cherry, M L

    2005-01-01

    Below the knee in the cosmic ray spectrum, balloon and spacecraft experiments offer the capability of direct composition and energy measurements on the primary particles. A major difficulty is obtaining enough exposure to extend the range of direct measurements sufficiently high in energy to permit overlap with ground-based observations. Presently, balloon and space measurements extend only up to ~100 TeV, well below the range of ground-based experiments. The prospect of Ultra-Long Duration Balloon missions offers the promise of multiple long flights that can build up exposure. The status of balloon measurements to measure the high energy proton and nuclear composition and spectrum is reviewed, and the statistical considerations involved in searching for a steepening in the spectrum are discussed. Given the very steeply falling spectrum, it appears unlikely that balloon experiments will be able to extend the range of direct measurements beyond 1000 TeV any time in the near future. Especially given the recent ...

  4. Proliferation kinetics of paramecium tetraurelia in balloon-borne experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croute, F.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Vidal, S.; Rousseille, R.; Planel, H.

    1982-06-01

    Experiments were carried out to demonstrate the effect of cosmic radiation, at a balloon-flight ceiling of about 36,500 m (120,000 ft) on single-cell organism proliferation. Paramecium tetraurelia were placed in air-tight containers and maintained at 25 degrees +/- 0.1 degrees C. Cellular growth was determined by cell count, either after recovery or during the flight, by means of an automatic fixation device. Dosimetry was performed by a tissue equivalent proportional counter and was of about 0.5 mrad/h. Flight ceiling duration ranged from 48 min - 22 h. A secondary stimulating effect of growth rate, preceded by a temporary decrease, was observed after recovery. Because of the high bacterial concentration in the trans-Mediterranean flight culture medium, the temporary drop of the growth rate, due to the radiolysis products, disappears. Researchers consider that the stimulating effect can be the result of enzymatic intracellular scavenging of radiolysis products generated in the cell.

  5. Balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimetry with PoGOLite

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    PoGOLite is a hard X-ray polarimeter operating in the 25-100 keV energy band. The instrument design is optimised for the observation of compact astrophysical sources. Observations are conducted from a stabilised stratospheric balloon platform at an altitude of approximately 40 km. The primary targets for first balloon flights of a reduced effective area instrument are the Crab and Cygnus-X1. The polarisation of incoming photons is determined using coincident Compton scattering and photo-absorption events reconstructed in an array of plastic scintillator detector cells surrounded by a bismuth germanate oxide (BGO) side anticoincidence shield and a polyethylene neutron shield. A custom attitude control system keeps the polarimeter field-of-view aligned to targets of interest, compensating for sidereal motion and perturbations such as torsional forces in the balloon rigging. An overview of the PoGOLite project is presented and the outcome of the ill-fated maiden balloon flight is discussed.

  6. Design and Implementation of an experiment-specific Payload Orientation Platform for balloon-borne Experiment .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarajan, Anand; Rodi, Ashish; Ojha, Devendra

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the mesospheric dynamics and its coupling to the upper atmospheric regions above, a Balloon-borne optical Investigation of Regional-atmospheric Dynamics (BIRD) experiment was jointly conducted by Physical Research Laboratory Ahmedabad and Boston University, on 08 March 2010 from TIFR Balloon Facility, Hyderabad. Along with the BIRD payload, a nano payload of University of York, Canada was also flown for aerosol studies during sunset. The balloon carrying a 335kg BIRD payload was launched at 1052 hrs, reached a float altitude of 34.8km amsl at 1245 hrs and was allowed to float till 1825 hrs before it was parachuted down. To achieve the experimental objectives, it was essential that the payload Gandola, comprising of two optical spectrographs, is programmed to rotate azimuthally in 3 steps of 30 degrees each from East-West (E-W) to North-South (N-S) direction, stop at each step for 5 minutes for data acquisition, return to the original E-W position and keep repeating the sequence continuously with a provision to start or stop the orientation from Ground station through telecommand. To meet these unique requirements, we designed developed and implemented a Payload Orientation Platform (POP), using flux-gate magnetometer for direction-finding, which worked satisfactorily in the BIRD flight. This paper presents an overview of the POP implemented, focuses on the design considerations of the associated electronics and finally presents the results of the performance during the entire balloon flight.

  7. Background measurements from balloon-born imaging CZT detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jonathan A.; Narita, Tomohiko; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Bloser, Peter F.; Stahle, Carl M.; Parker, Bradford H.; Barthelmy, Scott D.

    2003-03-01

    We report detector characteristics and background measurements from two prototype imaging CdZnTe (CZT) detectors flown on a scientific balloon payload in May 2001. The detectors are both platinum-contact 10 mm × 10 mm × 5 mm CZT crystals, each with a 4 × 4 array of pixels tiling the anode. One is made from IMARAD horizontal Bridgman CZT, the other from eV Products high-pressure Bridgman CZT. Both detectors were mounted side-by-side in a flip-chip configuration and read out by a 32-channel IDE VA/TA ASIC preamp/shaper. We enclosed the detectors in the same 40o field-of-view collimator used in our previously-reported September 2000 flight. I-V curves for the detectors are diode-like, and we find that the platinum contacts adhere significantly better to the CZT surfaces than gold to previosu detectors. The detectors and instrumentation performed well in a 20-hour balloon flight on 23/24 May 2001. Although we discovered a significant instrumental background component in flight, it was possible to measure and subtract this component from the spectra. The resulting IMARAD detector background spectrum reaches ~5×10-3 counts cm-2s-1keV-1 at 100 keV and has a power-law index of ~2 at hgih energies. The eV Products detector has a similar spectrum, although there is more uncertainty in the enregy scale because of calibration complications.

  8. SPIDER: a balloon-borne CMB polarimeter for large angular scales

    CERN Document Server

    Filippini, J P; Amiri, M; Benton, S J; Bihary, R; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Bonetti, J A; Bryan, S A; Burger, B; Chiang, H C; Contaldi, C R; Crill, B P; Doré, O; Farhang, M; Fissel, L M; Gandilo, N N; Golwala, S R; Gudmundsson, J E; Halpern, M; Hasselfield, M; Hilton, G; Holmes, W; Hristov, V V; Irwin, K D; Jones, W C; Kuo, C L; MacTavish, C J; Mason, P V; Montroy, T E; Morford, T A; Netterfield, C B; O'Dea, D T; Rahlin, A S; Reintsema, C D; Ruhl, J E; Runyan, M C; Schenker, M A; Shariff, J A; Soler, J D; Trangsrud, A; Tucker, C; Tucker, R S; Turner, A D

    2011-01-01

    We describe SPIDER, a balloon-borne instrument to map the polarization of the millimeter-wave sky with degree angular resolution. Spider consists of six monochromatic refracting telescopes, each illuminating a focal plane of large-format antenna-coupled bolometer arrays. A total of 2,624 superconducting transition-edge sensors are distributed among three observing bands centered at 90, 150, and 280 GHz. A cold half-wave plate at the aperture of each telescope modulates the polarization of incoming light to control systematics. Spider's first flight will be a 20-30-day Antarctic balloon campaign in December 2011. This flight will map \\sim8% of the sky to achieve unprecedented sensitivity to the polarization signature of the gravitational wave background predicted by inflationary cosmology. The Spider mission will also serve as a proving ground for these detector technologies in preparation for a future satellite mission.

  9. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimetre Telescope (BLAST) and BLASTPol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Enzo; Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Balloon observations from Antarctica have proven an effective and efficient way to address open Cosmological questions as well as problems in Galactic astronomy. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimetre Telescope (BLAST) is a sub-orbital mapping experiment which uses 270 bolometric detectors to image the sky in three wavebands centred at 250, 350 and 500 μm with a 1.8 m telescope. In the years before Herschel launched, BLAST provided data of unprecedented angular and spectral coverage in frequency bands close to the peak of dust emission in star forming regions in our Galaxy, and in galaxies at cosmological distances. More recently, BLASTPol was obtained by reconfiguring the BLAST focal plane as a submillimetric polarimeter to study the role that Galactic magnetic fields have in regulating the processes of star-formation. The first and successful BLASTPol flight from Antarctica in 2010 is followed by a second flight, currently scheduled for the end of 2012.

  10. Data Retrieved by ARCADE-R2 Experiment On Board the BEXUS-17 Balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbetta, M.; Branz, F.; Carron, A.; Olivieri, L.; Prendin, J.; Sansone, F.; Savioli, L.; Spinello, F.; Francesconi, A.

    2015-09-01

    The Autonomous Rendezvous, Control And Docking Experiment — Reflight 2 (ARCADE-R2) is a technology demonstrator aiming to prove automatic attitude determination and control, rendezvous and docking capabilities for small scale spacecraft and aircraft. The development of such capabilities could be fundamental to create, in the near future, fleets of cooperative, autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles for mapping, surveillance, inspection and remote observation of hazardous environments; small-class satellites could also benefit from the employment of docking systems to extend and reconfigure their mission profiles. ARCADE-R2 is designed to test these technologies on a stratospheric flight on board the BEXUS-17 balloon, allowing to demonstrate them in a harsh environment subjected to gusty winds and high pressure and temperature variations. In this paper, ARCADE-R2 architecture is introduced and the main results obtained from a stratospheric balloon flight are presented.

  11. Low energy gamma ray observations with the MPI-Compton telescope. [balloon-borne detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graml, F.; Penningsfeld, F. P.; Schoenfelder, V.

    1978-01-01

    Although the evaluation of data from the first balloon-flight of a large area Compton telescope is incomplete, two preliminary results are discussed. From the measured background spectrum at float altitude, the sensitivity of the telescope for the detection of cosmic gamma ray lines is estimated. The energy spectra is determined for an enhanced gamma ray flux observed from the direction of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151. A schematic drawing of the telescope is presented and discussed.

  12. Airborne Internet Providing Tethered Balloon System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvriti Dhawan1

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we shall introduce a new system for providing wireless network communication over a specified area using ’lighter than air’ balloons. This technology will replace the existing fiber optic network system. This will be done by using a tethered balloon along with the payload (containing a receiver, a transmitter and a radio communication device.This payload will be suspended from the ground at an altitude (depending on the area of coverage required. Users under this area will be able to access this system directly for internet connectivity. This system can be used over large areas like universities, companies and societies to provide internet facility to their users through Wi-Fi or over an area where the user is specified (commercial purposes. Currently Google is working on similar idea called the ’Google Loon’ in which they use high altitude balloons which float at an altitude twice as high as air planes and the weather. They recently tested this system over New-Zealand by providing internet to their pilot testers on ground. Their balloons not being stationary, move with directional winds and have to be replaced one after the other to maintain consistency. This can be a huge problem over the areas where upper atmospheric winds are not in favorable direction. We can resolve this problem by using our stationary tethered balloon system which can communicate with the loon balloons to provide internet facility over a desired area. Moreover when our balloon will communicate with the loon balloon it will increase the coverage area as the loon balloon has to communicate to a point which is above the ground. Our system will not only replace the existing fiber optic system but it will also be selfsustaining i.e. It will generate its own power using solar panels.

  13. Collection of Stratospheric Samples using Balloon-Borne Payload System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant; Sreejith, A. G.; Kumble, Sheshashayi; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Kj, Nirmal; Suresh, Ambily; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-07-01

    Earth's atmosphere at stratospheric altitudes contains dust particles from soil lifted by weather, volcanic dust, man-made aerosols, IDP (Interplanetary Dust Particles) - remnants of comets and asteroids, and even interstellar dust. Satellite observations suggest that approximately 100--300 tons of cosmic dust enter Earth's atmosphere every day. However, very little is known about the microbial life in the upper atmosphere, where conditions are very much similar to that on Mars and possibly on some exoplanets. Stratosphere provides a good opportunity to study the existence or survival of biological life in these conditions. Despite the importance of this topic to astrobiology, stratospheric microbial diversity/survival remains largely unexplored, probably due to significant difficulties in the access and ensuring the absence of contamination of the samples. To conduct a detailed study into this, we are developing the balloon-borne payload system SAMPLE (Stratospheric Altitude Microbiology Probe for Life Existence) to collect dust samples from stratosphere and bring them in an hygienic and uncontaminated manner to a suitable laboratory environment, where further study will be conducted to establish the possibility of microbial life in the upper atmosphere. This balloon-borne payload system will rise through the atmosphere till it reaches an altitude of about 25-30 km above sea level. The payload consists of detachable pre-sterilized sampling chambers designed to collect and contain the dust samples and get them back to the surface without contamination during the flight, a microprocessor and a controller which will determine the altitude of the payload system to actively monitor the opening and closing of the sample collection chambers. For contamination control, we will have two extra chambers, one of which will fly but not open, and one will remain closed on the ground. Other onboard devices include environmental sensors, GPS tracking devices, cameras to monitor

  14. Modular and Reusable Power System Design for the BRRISON Balloon Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truesdale, Nicholas A.

    High altitude balloons are emerging as low-cost alternatives to orbital satellites in the field of telescopic observation. The near-space environment of balloons allows optics to perform near their diffraction limit. In practice, this implies that a telescope similar to the Hubble Space Telescope could be flown for a cost of tens of millions as opposed to billions. While highly feasible, the design of a balloon telescope to rival Hubble is limited by funding. Until a prototype is proven and more support for balloon science is gained, projects remain limited in both hardware costs and man hours. Thus, to effectively create and support balloon payloads, engineering designs must be efficient, modular, and if possible reusable. This thesis focuses specifically on a modular power system design for the BRRISON comet-observing balloon telescope. Time- and cost-saving techniques are developed that can be used for future missions. A modular design process is achieved through the development of individual circuit elements that span a wide range of capabilities. Circuits for power conversion, switching and sensing are designed to be combined in any configuration. These include DC-DC regulators, MOSFET drivers for switching, isolated switches, current sensors and voltage sensing ADCs. Emphasis is also given to commercially available hardware. Pre-fabricated DC-DC converters and an Arduino microcontroller simplify the design process and offer proven, cost-effective performance. The design of the BRRISON power system is developed from these low-level circuits elements. A board for main power distribution supports the majority of flight electronics, and is extensible to additional hardware in future applications. An ATX computer power supply is developed, allowing the use of a commercial ATX motherboard as the flight computer. The addition of new capabilities is explored in the form of a heater control board. Finally, the power system as a whole is described, and its overall

  15. Stratospheric electric field measurements with transmediterranean balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Morena, B. A.; Alberca, L. F.; Curto, J. J.; Holzworth, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    The horizontal component of the stratospheric electric field was measured using a balloon in the ODISEA Campaign of Transmediterranean Balloon Program. The balloon flew between Trapani (Sicily) and El Arenosillo (Huelva, Spain) along the 39 deg N parallel at a height between 34 and 24 km. The high values found for the field on fair-weather and its quasi-turbulent variation, both in amplitude and direction, are difficult to explain with the classical electric field source. A new source, first described by Holzworth (1989), is considered as possibly causing them.

  16. Looners: Inside the world of balloon fetishism

    OpenAIRE

    McIntyre, Karen E

    2011-01-01

    In the spring of 1997, Shaun had just broken up with a boyfriend, and his roommate had moved out. Living alone for the first time and relieved of the fear that someone might walk in the door, he was finally able to indulge his fantasy. The young man sat on his couch and started blowing up balloons. Shaun had loved playing with balloons since he was a child. When he hit puberty, he felt his first orgasm rubbing against a balloon. It was then that his relationship with the object took ...

  17. Looners: Inside the world of balloon fetishism

    OpenAIRE

    McIntyre, Karen E

    2011-01-01

    In the spring of 1997, Shaun had just broken up with a boyfriend, and his roommate had moved out. Living alone for the first time and relieved of the fear that someone might walk in the door, he was finally able to indulge his fantasy. The young man sat on his couch and started blowing up balloons. Shaun had loved playing with balloons since he was a child. When he hit puberty, he felt his first orgasm rubbing against a balloon. It was then that his relationship with the object took ...

  18. A new stratospheric sounding platform based on unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) droppable from meteorological balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, Denis; Khaykin, Sergey; Lykov, Alexey; Berezhko, Yaroslav; Lunin, Aleksey

    High-resolution measurements of climate-relevant trace gases and aerosols in the upper troposphere and stratosphere (UTS) have been and remain technically challenging. The high cost of measurements onboard airborne platforms or heavy stratospheric balloons results in a lack of accurate information on vertical distribution of atmospheric constituents. Whereas light-weight instruments carried by meteorological balloons are becoming progressively available, their usage is constrained by the cost of the equipment or the recovery operations. The evolving need in cost-efficient observations for UTS process studies has led to development of small airborne platforms - unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), capable of carrying small sensors for in-situ measurements. We present a new UAV-based stratospheric sounding platform capable of carrying scientific payload of up to 2 kg. The airborne platform comprises of a latex meteorological balloon and detachable flying wing type UAV with internal measurement controller. The UAV is launched on a balloon to stratospheric altitudes up to 20 km, where it can be automatically released by autopilot or by a remote command sent from the ground control. Having been released from the balloon the UAV glides down and returns to the launch position. Autopilot using 3-axis gyro, accelerometer, barometer, compas and GPS navigation provides flight stabilization and optimal way back trajectory. Backup manual control is provided for emergencies. During the flight the onboard measurement controller stores the data into internal memory and transmits current flight parameters to the ground station via telemetry. Precise operation of the flight control systems ensures safe landing at the launch point. A series of field tests of the detachable stratospheric UAV has been conducted. The scientific payload included the following instruments involved in different flights: a) stratospheric Lyman-alpha hygrometer (FLASH); b) backscatter sonde; c) electrochemical

  19. Modeling the ascent of sounding balloons: derivation of the vertical air motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gallice

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A new model to describe the ascent of sounding balloons in the troposphere and lower stratosphere (up to ∼30–35 km altitude is presented. Contrary to previous models, detailed account is taken of both the variation of the drag coefficient with altitude and the heat imbalance between the balloon and the atmosphere. To compensate for the lack of data on the drag coefficient of sounding balloons, a reference curve for the relationship between drag coefficient and Reynolds number is derived from a dataset of flights launched during the Lindenberg Upper Air Methods Intercomparisons (LUAMI campaign. The transfer of heat from the surrounding air into the balloon is accounted for by solving the radial heat diffusion equation inside the balloon. In its present state, the model does not account for solar radiation, i.e. it is only able to describe the ascent of balloons during the night. It could however be adapted to also represent daytime soundings, with solar radiation modeled as a diffusive process. The potential applications of the model include the forecast of the trajectory of sounding balloons, which can be used to increase the accuracy of the match technique, and the derivation of the air vertical velocity. The latter is obtained by subtracting the ascent rate of the balloon in still air calculated by the model from the actual ascent rate. This technique is shown to provide an approximation for the vertical air motion with an uncertainty error of 0.5 m s−1 in the troposphere and 0.2 m s−1 in the stratosphere. An example of extraction of the air vertical velocity is provided in this paper. We show that the air vertical velocities derived from the balloon soundings in this paper are in general agreement with small-scale atmospheric velocity fluctuations related to gravity waves, mechanical turbulence, or other small-scale air motions measured during the SUCCESS campaign (Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects

  20. Beam tests of the balloon-borne ATIC experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ganel, O; Ahn, H S; Ampe, J; Bashindzhagian, G L; Case, G; Chang, H; Ellison, S; Fazely, A; Gould, R; Granger, D; Gunasingha, R M; Guzik, T G; Han, Y J; Isbert, J; Kim, H J; Kim, K C; Kim, S K; Kwon, Y; Panasyuk, M Y; Panov, A; Price, B; Samsonov, G; Schmidt, W K H; Sen, M; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Sokolskaya, N; Stewart, M; Voronin, A; Wagner, D; Wang, J Z; Wefel, J P; Wu, J; Zatsepin, V

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon-borne experiment is designed to perform cosmic-ray elemental spectra measurements from 50 GeV to 100 TeV for nuclei from hydrogen to iron. These measurements are expected to provide information about some of the most fundamental questions in astroparticle physics today. ATIC's design centers on an 18 radiation length (X0) deep bismuth germanate (BGO) calorimeter, preceded by a 0.75λint graphite target. In September 1999, the ATIC detector was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN's SPS accelerator within the framework of the development program for the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). In December 2000–January 2001 and again in December 2002–January 2003, ATIC flew on the first two of a series of long-duration balloon (LDB) flights from McMurdo Station, Antarctica. We present here results from the 1999 beam tests, including energy resolutions for electrons and protons at several beam energies from 100 to 375 G...

  1. Beam test calibration of the balloon-borne imaging calorimeter for the CREAM experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Marrocchesi, P S; Bagliesi, M G; Basti, A; Bigongiari, G; Castellina, A; Ciocci, M A; Di Virgilio, A; Lomtatze, T; Ganel, O; Kim, K C; Lee, M H; Ligabue, F; Lutz, L; Maestro, P; Malinine, A; Meucci, M; Millucci, V; Morsani, F; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Wu, J; Wu, J; Yoon, Y S; Zei, R; Zinn, S Y

    2010-01-01

    CREAM (Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass) is a multi-flight balloon mission designed to collect direct data on the elemental composition and individual energy spectra of cosmic rays. Two instrument suites have been built to be flown alternately on a yearly base. The tungsten/Sci-Fi imaging calorimeter for the second flight, scheduled for December 2005, was calibrated with electron and proton beams at CERN. A calibration procedure based on the study of the longitudinal shower profile is described and preliminary results of the beam test are presented.

  2. Magnetometer for Balloons and UAVs Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR project will investigate a new, low-cost approach to atomic magnetometry that is suited for operation from UAVs and research balloons. Atomic...

  3. MRI temperature mapping during thermal balloon angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmatukha, Andriy V; Bakker, Chris J G

    2006-04-21

    Knowledge on the thermal dose delivered during thermal balloon angioplasty (TBA) is desirable to understand why TBA's outcome varies widely among patients and why it is subject to high restenosis rates. In its conventional implementation, TBA involves injection of a heated medium into a balloon positioned within a stenotic blood vessel. The medium injection causes flow, motion and susceptibility-redistribution artefacts that are devastating to the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) technique of MRI temperature mapping. Here, we propose to separate in time medium injection and heating by first inflating a balloon with a medium at an initial temperature, and then by heating the medium up using laser light. The separation is shown to eliminate all the mentioned artefacts and to enable real-time MRI temperature mapping using the PRFS technique. Accurate and reliable temperature maps were acquired in a TBA balloon itself and in the surrounding phantom tissue during heat application.

  4. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope: BLAST

    CERN Document Server

    Pascale, E; Bock, J J; Chapin, E L; Chung, J; Devlin, M J; Dicker, S; Griffin, M; Gundersen, J O; Halpern, M; Hargrave, P C; Hughes, D H; Klein, J; MacTavish, C J; Marsden, G; Martin, P G; Martin, T G; Mauskopf, P; Netterfield, C B; Olmi, L; Patanchon, G; Rex, M; Scott, D; Semisch, C; Thomas, N; Truch, M D P; Tucker, C; Tucker, G S; Viero, M P; Wiebe, D V

    2007-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) is a sub-orbital survey-experiment designed to study the evolutionary history and processes of star formation in local galaxies (including the Milky Way) and galaxies at cosmological distances. The BLAST continuum camera, which consists of 270 detectors distributed between 3 arrays, observes simultaneously in broad-band (30%) spectral-windows at 250, 350, and 500 micron. The optical design is based on a 2m diameter Cassegrain telescope, providing a diffraction-limited resolution of 30" at 250 micron. The gondola pointing system enables raster-like maps of arbitrary geometry, with a repeatable positional accuracy of ~30" post-flight pointing reconstruction to ~<5" rms is also achieved. The on-board telescope control software permits autonomous execution of a pre-selected set of maps, with the option of manual intervention. In this paper we describe the primary characteristics and measured in-flight performance of BLAST. Since a test-flight in ...

  5. CNES super pressure balloons assessment and new developments to prepare Strateole-2 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venel, Stephanie; Spel, Martin; Cocquerez, Philippe; Meyer, Jean-Renaud; Nicot, Jean-Marc.; Parot, Gael; Perraud, Sophie

    The French Space Agency, CNES, has developed, since about twelve years ago, super pressure balloons (SPB) that float on constant density (isopycnic) surfaces in the lowermost stratosphere, carrying 40 to 50 kg payloads, during typically three months. These SPB have been successfully deployed in flotilla of about 20 balloons for different scientific campaigns all over the world in different configuration sizes from 8,5 to 12 m diameter, mainly to document the chemistry and dynamics of the atmosphere, to study gravity waves, and to provide in-situ atmospheric profiles thanks to the NCAR driftsonde payloada. This paper will describe the main results and lessons achieved during the last CONCORDIASI campaign in 2010 over the Antarctic region. Thus, anomalies on the on-board system were investigated and explained by the effect of atmospheric particles fluxes. Also related to these flights, an accurate thermal model was built to evaluate the temperature distribution in the balloon, and several ageing tests have been made to better understand the effect of solar exposure on the different balloon materials. This paper will also present the new developments in progress for the future STRATEOLE-2 campaign dedicated to advance the knowledge of coupling processes between the troposphere and the stratosphere in the deep tropics, and foreseen in 2018-2019. In particular, a new command-control system will be developed to be in conformity with the CNES safety rules, and in continuation with the new zero pressure balloons system named NOSYCA. New solar panels are under investigation. Finally, two new balloon sizes will grow the SPB family to respond to the scientist demand of two special altitude densities.

  6. NASA balloon: Aircraft ranging, data and voice experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishna, S.; Hamby, C.; Reed, D.

    1972-01-01

    A series of tests to evaluate, at L-band, the ranging, voice, and data communications concepts proposed for the air traffic control experiment of the Applications Technology Satellite-F are described. The ground station facilities, balloon platforms and the aircraft were supplied by the European Space Research Organization. One ground simulation and two aircraft flights at low elevation angles were conducted. Even under high interference conditions good performance was obtained for both voice communications and side tone ranging. High bit errors occurred in the data channels resulting in false commands. As a result of the experience gained in operating the equipment in an aircraft environment several recommendations were made for improving the equipment performance.

  7. SPIDER: A Balloon-borne Large-scale CMB Polarimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Crill, B P; Battistelli, E S; Benton, S; Bihary, R; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Brevik, J; Bryan, S; Contaldi, C R; Dore, O; Farhang, M; Fissel, L; Golwala, S R; Halpern, M; Hilton, G; Holmes, W; Hristov, V V; Irwin, K; Jones, W C; Kuo, C L; Lange, A E; Lawrie, C; MacTavish, C J; Martin, T G; Mason, P; Montroy, T E; Netterfield, C B; Pascale, E; Riley, D; Ruhl, J E; Runyan, M C; Trangsrud, A; Tucker, C; Turner, A; Viero, M; Wiebe, D

    2008-01-01

    Spider is a balloon-borne experiment that will measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background over a large fraction of a sky at 1 degree resolution. Six monochromatic refracting millimeter-wave telescopes with large arrays of antenna-coupled transition-edge superconducting bolometers will provide system sensitivities of 4.2 and 3.1 micro K_cmb rt s at 100 and 150 GHz, respectively. A rotating half-wave plate will modulate the polarization sensitivity of each telescope, controlling systematics. Bolometer arrays operating at 225 GHz and 275 GHz will allow removal of polarized galactic foregrounds. In a 2-6 day first flight from Alice Springs, Australia in 2010, Spider will map 50% of the sky to a depth necessary to improve our knowledge of the reionization optical depth by a large factor.

  8. Results from the First Flight of BAM

    CERN Document Server

    Tucker, G S; Halpern, M; Towlson, W

    1996-01-01

    A new instrument, BAM (Balloon-borne Anisotropy Measurement), designed to measure cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy at medium angular scales was flown for the first time in July of 1995. BAM is unique in that it uses a cryogenic differential Fourier transform spectrometer coupled to a lightweight off-axis telescope. The very successful first flight of BAM demonstrates the potential of the instrument for obtaining high quality CMB anisotropy data.

  9. CNES super pressure balloons upgrade for Strateole-2 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venel, Stephanie; Cocquerez, Philippe; Hertzog, Albert

    2016-07-01

    The French Space Agency, CNES, has developed, since about twelve years ago, super pressure balloons (SPB) that float on constant density (isopycnic) surfaces in the lowermost stratosphere, carrying 40 to 50 kg payloads, during typically three months. These SPB have been successfully deployed in flotilla of about 20 balloons for different scientific campaigns all over the world in different configuration sizes from 8,5 to 12 m diameter, mainly to document the chemistry and dynamics of the atmosphere, to study gravity waves, and to provide in-situ atmospheric profiles thanks to the NCAR driftsonde payload. The SPB housekeeping gondola used from 2005 to 2011 now needs to be upgraded in order to increase the flights' safety and to improve its performance with up to date equipment's. The control center will also be redesigned. These modifications take into account the experience acquired during the last SPB campaigns, mainly during CONCORDIASI, with 19 flights over Antarctica from September 2010 to January 2011. After a successful preliminary design review, the project is now conducting the detailed conception phase. This new system is developed for STRATEOLE-2, a project dedicated to the coupling processes between the troposphere and the stratosphere in the deep tropics, using several types of instruments, both for in situ and remote measurements in the atmosphere. STRATEOLE -2 includes two measurement campaigns, three years spaced to study the quasi biennial oscillation. Since the scientific payloads are fully self-standing, some technical solutions will be common with the CNES housekeeping gondola, such as the renewable power system. This paper will describe the STRATEOLE-2 project and the developments in progress for the SPB system upgrade.

  10. Balloon Borne Arc-Second Pointer Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Philip R.; DeWeese, Keith D.

    2003-01-01

    For many years scientists have been utilizing stratospheric balloons as low-cost platforms on which to conduct space science experiments. A major hurdle in extending the range of experiments for which these vehicles are useful has been the imposition of the gondola dynamics on the accuracy with which an instrument can be kept pointed at a celestial target. A significant number of scientists have sought the ability to point their instruments with jitter in the arc-second range. This paper presents the design and analysis of a stratospheric balloon borne pointing system that is able to meet this requirement. The foundation for a high fidelity controller simulation is presented. The flexibility of the flight train is represented through generalized modal analysis. A multiple controller scheme is introduced for coarse and fine pointing. Coarse azimuth pointing is accomplished by an established pointing system, with extensive flight history, residing above the gondola structure. A pitch-yaw gimbal mount is used for fine pointing, providing orthogonal axes when nominally on target. Fine pointing actuation is from direct drive dc motors, eliminating backlash problems. An analysis of friction nonlinearities and a demonstration of the necessity in eliminating static fiction are provided. A unique bearing hub design is introduced that eliminates static fiction from the system dynamics. A control scheme involving linear accelerometers for enhanced disturbance rejection is also presented. Results from a linear analysis of the total system and the high fidelity simulation are given. This paper establishes that the proposed control strategy can be made robustly stable with significant design margins. Also demonstrated is the efficacy of the proposed system in rejecting disturbances larger than those considered realistic. Finally, we see that sub arc-second pointing stability can be achieved for a large instrument pointing at an inertial target.

  11. The atmospheric nightglow in the 300-400 nm wavelength Results by the balloon-borne experiment 'BABY'

    CERN Document Server

    Catalano, O; Biondo, B; Celi, F; Di Raffaele, R; Giarrusso, S; Linsley, J; Lo Bue, A; Mangano, A; Russo, F

    2002-01-01

    The balloon-borne experiment, named BAckground BYpass (BABY) belongs to a wider program that has as its final goal the detection and study of high-energy cosmic rays from space (satellite, Space Station). An information of fundamental importance for this class of projects concerns the nighttime background light. The instrument designed to detect fluorescence photons is basically composed of two collimated photomultipliers: a single photon-counting PMT and a charge integration PMT. We briefly report the details of the design, operation and performance of the detector, which was designed and completely built at the IFCAI-CNR Institute in Palermo. Preliminary analysis and results of the nocturnal background in the range of 300-400 nm are presented for the whole duration of the flight during the 1998 Mediterranean balloon flight campaign. A substantial part of the flight was at night over the sea.

  12. Cosmic radiation dose measurements from the RaD-X flight campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Gronoff, Guillaume P.; Norman, Ryan B.; Hayes, Bryan M.; Lusby, Terry C.; Straume, Tore; Tobiska, W. Kent; Hands, Alex; Ryden, Keith; Benton, Eric; Wiley, Scott; Gersey, Brad; Wilkins, Richard; Xu, Xiaojing

    2016-10-01

    The NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) stratospheric balloon flight mission obtained measurements for improving the understanding of cosmic radiation transport in the atmosphere and human exposure to this ionizing radiation field in the aircraft environment. The value of dosimetric measurements from the balloon platform is that they can be used to characterize cosmic ray primaries, the ultimate source of aviation radiation exposure. In addition, radiation detectors were flown to assess their potential application to long-term, continuous monitoring of the aircraft radiation environment. The RaD-X balloon was successfully launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico (34.5°N, 104.2°W) on 25 September 2015. Over 18 h of flight data were obtained from each of the four different science instruments at altitudes above 20 km. The RaD-X balloon flight was supplemented by contemporaneous aircraft measurements. Flight-averaged dosimetric quantities are reported at seven altitudes to provide benchmark measurements for improving aviation radiation models. The altitude range of the flight data extends from commercial aircraft altitudes to above the Pfotzer maximum where the dosimetric quantities are influenced by cosmic ray primaries. The RaD-X balloon flight observed an absence of the Pfotzer maximum in the measurements of dose equivalent rate.

  13. Low-cost Citizen Science Balloon Platform for Measuring Air Pollutants to Improve Satellite Retrieval Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potosnak, M. J.; Beck-Winchatz, B.; Ritter, P.

    2016-12-01

    High-altitude balloons (HABs) are an engaging platform for citizen science and formal and informal STEM education. However, the logistics of launching, chasing and recovering a payload on a 1200 g or 1500 g balloon can be daunting for many novice school groups and citizen scientists, and the cost can be prohibitive. In addition, there are many interesting scientific applications that do not require reaching the stratosphere, including measuring atmospheric pollutants in the planetary boundary layer. With a large number of citizen scientist flights, these data can be used to constrain satellite retrieval algorithms. In this poster presentation, we discuss a novel approach based on small (30 g) balloons that are cheap and easy to handle, and low-cost tracking devices (SPOT trackers for hikers) that do not require a radio license. Our scientific goal is to measure air quality in the lower troposphere. For example, particulate matter (PM) is an air pollutant that varies on small spatial scales and has sources in rural areas like biomass burning and farming practices such as tilling. Our HAB platform test flight incorporates an optical PM sensor, an integrated single board computer that records the PM sensor signal in addition to flight parameters (pressure, location and altitude), and a low-cost tracking system. Our goal is for the entire platform to cost less than $500. While the datasets generated by these flights are typically small, integrating a network of flight data from citizen scientists into a form usable for comparison to satellite data will require big data techniques.

  14. High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun Balloon-Borne Telescope: Astrophysical Pointing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Ramsey, Brian; Apple, Jeff; Kurt, Dietz; Tennant, Allyn; Swartz, Douglas; Christe, Steven D.; Shih, Albert

    2014-01-01

    On September 21, 2013, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun, or HEROES, balloon-borne x-ray telescope launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility's site in Ft. Summer, NM. The flight lasted for approximately 27 hours and the observational targets included the Sun and astrophysical sources GRS 1915+105 and the Crab Nebula. Over the past year, the HEROES team upgraded the existing High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES Project is a multi-NASA Center effort with team members at both Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), and is led by Co-PIs (one at each Center). The HEROES payload consists of the hard X-ray telescope HERO, developed at MSFC, combined with several new systems. To allow the HEROES telescope to make observations of the Sun, a new solar aspect system was added to supplement the existing star camera for fine pointing during both the day and night. A mechanical shutter was added to the star camera to protect it during solar observations and two alignment monitoring systems were added for improved pointing and post-flight data reconstruction. This mission was funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands-On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist.

  15. Imaging Sunlit Aurora from Balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lummerzheim, D.; Zhou, X.

    2012-12-01

    Since 1892 when aurora was first imaged by Martin Brendel, useful auroral images have been obtained only when the aurora is in darkness. While UV imagers onboard satellite provide global auroral dynamics, the sunlit aurora in the UV band is overwhelmed by the UV airglow that has the same wavelengths with the UV auroral emissions. The visible band imaging is feasible only when the aurora is in darkness to avoid the sunlight contamination. However, sunlit aurora (such as dayside aurora) is closely related to the solar wind - magnetosphere - ionosphere coupling. In addition, limited land area has badly restricted the capability of imaging dayside aurora from the northern hemisphere and nightside aurora from the southern hemisphere. We have confirmed that sunlit aurora can be imaged using a near-infrared (NIR) camera on board the balloon platform flying in Antarctica or Arctic. This method provides a unique capability for dayside and conjugate auroral investigations. Scientific questions that can be addressed by such observations include how does the dayside aurora respond to solar wind transient variations? Are auroras hemispherically symmetric? Are auroral forms and their variations under sunlight the same as those in darkness? etc. The new method is also cost effective comparing to space-borne imagers, and offers capabilities not obtainable from space and the ground. With the accomplishment of identifying auroral dynamics in sunlight and darkness, in the south and north simultaneously, our knowledge and understanding of auroral phenomenon and its causes will be expanded.

  16. An implementation of Software Defined Radios for federated aerospace networks: Informing satellite implementations using an inter-balloon communications experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtyamov, Rustam; Cruz, Ignasi Lluch i.; Matevosyan, Hripsime; Knoll, Dominik; Pica, Udrivolf; Lisi, Marco; Golkar, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Novel space mission concepts such as Federated Satellite Systems promise to enhance sustainability, robustness, and reliability of current missions by means of in-orbit sharing of space assets. This new paradigm requires the utilization of several technologies in order to confer flexibility and re-configurability to communications systems among heterogeneous spacecrafts. This paper illustrates the results of the experimental demonstration of the value proposition of federated satellites through two stratospheric balloons interoperating with a tracking ground station through Commercial Off-The-Shelf Software Defined Radios (SDRs). The paper reports telemetry analysis and characterizes the communications network that was realized in-flight. Furthermore, it provides details on an in-flight anomaly experienced by one of the balloons, which was recovered through the use of the federated technology that has been developed. The anomaly experienced led to the early loss of the directional link from the ground station to the affected stratospheric balloon node after 15 min in flight. Nevertheless, thanks to the federated approach among the systems, the ground station was still able to retrieve the balloon's data in real time through the network system, for which the other balloon operated as a federated relay for 45 min in flight, uninterrupted. In other words, the federated approach to the system allowed triplicating the useful lifetime of the defective system, which would have not been possible to realize otherwise. Such anomaly coincidentally demonstrated the value of the federated approach to space systems design. The paper paves the way for future tests on space assets.

  17. Performance of the transition radiation detector flown on the NMSU/WIZARD TS93 balloon-borne instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aversa, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Boezio, M. [Trieste Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy); Basini, G.; Brancaccio, F.M. [INFN, Laboratori nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Bellotti, R. [Bari Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Bari (Italy); Bidoli, V. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Sezione Univ. `Tor Vergata` Rome (Italy); Bocciolini, M. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Bronzini, F. [Rome Univ. `La Sapienza` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Sezione Univ. `La Sapienza` Rome (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    It is built and tested a transition radiation detector (TRD) to discriminate positrons from protons in the balloon flight TS 93 experiment. It is presented the TRD performance using flight data obtaining a proton-positron rejection factor of the order of 10{sup -3}. During the 24 hour flight, the data in the momentum range 4-50 GeV/c are collected. Using the TRD together with the Silicon calorimeter, it is achieved an overall rejection factor of about 10{sup -5} of positron against the proton background over the entire momentum range.

  18. BALLOON-BASED HIGH-TIME RESOLUTION MEASUREMENTS OF X-RAY EMISSIONS FROM LIGHTNING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. EACK; D. SUSZCYNSKY; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project consisted of a series of balloon flights to collect high-time-resolution x-ray and electric-field-change measurements in thunderstorms in order to validate the existence of the runaway air-breakdown mechanism during lightning and/or sprite production. The runaway air-breakdown mechanism is currently the leading theory to account for unexplained balloon and aircraft-based measurements of x-ray enhancements associated with sprites. Balloon-borne gamma-ray and electric-field-change instruments were launched into a daytime summer thunderstorm. A greater than three-fold increase in the gamma-ray flux was observed as the balloon descended through a thunderstorm anvil where a strong electric field was present. These observations suggest that gamma-ray production in thunderstorms may not be as uncommon as previously believed.

  19. An Overview of High-Altitude Balloon Experiments at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Safonova, Margarita; Sreejith, A G; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Ambily, S; Nirmal, K; Talnikar, Sameer; Hadigal, Shripathy; Prakash, Ajin; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    The High-Altitude Ballooning programme began at Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, in the year 2011 with the primary purpose of developing and flying low-cost scientific payloads on a balloon-borne platform. Some of the science goals are studies of the phenomena occurring in the upper atmosphere, of airglow and zodiacal light, and observations of extended astronomical objects such as, for example, comets, from near space (20 to 30 km). A brief summary and results of the tethered flights carried out at CREST campus are given in Ref.~1. Here we present a complete overview of the 9 free-flying balloon experiments conducted from March 2013 to November 2014. We describe the launch procedures, payloads, methods of tracking and recovery of the payloads. Since we fall in the light/medium balloon category, the weight of the payload is limited to less than 5 kg --- we use a 3-D printer to fabricate lightweight boxes and structures for our experiments. We are also developing in-house lightweight sensors and co...

  20. Telescopes in Near Space: Balloon Exoplanet Nulling Interferometer (BigBENI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Mallik, Udayan; Mauk, Robin

    2012-01-01

    A significant and often overlooked path to advancing both science and technology for direct imaging and spectroscopic characterization of exosolar planets is to fly "near space" missions, i.e. balloon borne exosolar missions. A near space balloon mission with two or more telescopes, coherently combined, is capable of achieving a subset of the mission science goals of a single large space telescope at a small fraction of the cost. Additionally such an approach advances technologies toward flight readiness for space flight. Herein we discuss the feasibility of flying two 1.2 meter telescopes, with a baseline separation of 3.6 meters, operating in visible light, on a composite boom structure coupled to a modified visible nulling coronagraph operating to achieve an inner working angle of 60 milli-arcseconds. We discuss the potential science return, atmospheric residuals at 135,000 feet, pointing control and visible nulling and evaluate the state-or-art of these technologies with regards to balloon missions.

  1. The Debris Disk Explorer: a balloon-borne coronagraph for observing debris disks

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Lewis C; Traub, Wesley; Unwin, Stephen; Trauger, John; Krist, John; Aldrich, Jack; Brugarolas, Paul; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Wyatt, Mark; Stuchlik, David; Lanzi, James

    2013-01-01

    The Debris Disk Explorer (DDX) is a proposed balloon-borne investigation of debris disks around nearby stars. Debris disks are analogs of the Asteroid Belt (mainly rocky) and Kuiper Belt (mainly icy) in our Solar System. DDX will measure the size, shape, brightness, and color of tens of disks. These measurements will enable us to place the Solar System in context. By imaging debris disks around nearby stars, DDX will reveal the presence of perturbing planets via their influence on disk structure, and explore the physics and history of debris disks by characterizing the size and composition of disk dust. The DDX instrument is a 0.75-m diameter off-axis telescope and a coronagraph carried by a stratospheric balloon. DDX will take high-resolution, multi-wavelength images of the debris disks around tens of nearby stars. Two flights are planned; an overnight test flight within the United States followed by a month-long science flight launched from New Zealand. The long flight will fully explore the set of known de...

  2. Near ultraviolet spectrograph for balloon platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, A. G.; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2015-06-01

    Small and compact scientific payloads may be easily designed constructed and own on high altitude balloons. Despite the fact that large orbital observatories provide accurate observations and statistical studies of remote and/or faint space sources, small telescopes on board balloons or rockets are still attractive because of their low cost and rapid response time. We describe here a near ultraviolet (NUV) spectrograph designed to be own on a high{altitude balloon platform. Our basic optical design is a modified Czerny-Turner system using off the shelf optics. We compare different methods of aberration corrections in such a system. We intend the system to be portable and scalable to different telescopes. The use of reflecting optics reduces the transmission loss in UV. We plan on using an image intensified CMOS sensor operating in photon counting mode as the detector of choice.

  3. Residual stenosis after conventional balloon angioplasty for hemodialysis shunt failure: treatment with metallic stent placement and post-balloon dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariya, Shuji; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Komemushi, Atsushi; Shiraishi, Tomokuni; Kawanaka, Toshiaki; Sawada, Satoshi

    2005-02-01

    The usefulness of metallic stent placement and post-balloon dilatation was investigated for patients with residual stenosis after conventional percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty (balloon PTA) of dialysis shunt vessels. Among 92 patients who had received balloon PTA for dialysis shunt vessels, seven patients who showed a residual waist on the balloon even under maximum inflation were enrolled in this study. In these patients with residual stenosis after balloon PTA, we inserted a stent in the residual stenosis, and post-balloon dilatation was immediately applied using the same balloon catheter. After balloon PTA, the average percent diameter stenosis declined to 45.5 +/- 7.30%, and the stenosis was further improved to an average of 19.3 +/- 7.09% after the placement of a stent and the additional balloon PTA. The average percent diameter dilatation of the balloon before the placement of a stent was 65.8 +/- 12.7%, while the average dilatation increased to 84.1 +/- 8.96% after the placement of a stent. Dialysis became possible immediately after the procedure in all cases. Metallic stent placement and post-balloon dilatation was effective for patients with residual stenosis after conventional balloon PTA of dialysis shunt vessels.

  4. 75 FR 33838 - National Environmental Policy Act; Scientific Balloon Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION National Environmental Policy Act; Scientific Balloon Program AGENCY: National... Draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA) and Draft Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for NASA's Scientific Balloon Program. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of...

  5. Angry Birds realized: water balloon launcher for teaching projectile motion with drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Boyd F.; Sam, David D.; Christiansen, Michael A.; Booth, William A.; Jessup, Leslie O.

    2014-05-01

    A simple, collapsible design for a large water balloon slingshot launcher features a fully adjustable initial velocity vector and a balanced launch platform. The design facilitates quantitative explorations of the dependence of the balloon range and time of flight on the initial speed, launch angle, and projectile mass, in an environment where quadratic air drag is important. Presented are theory and experiments that characterize this drag, and theory and experiments that characterize the nonlinear elastic energy and hysteresis of the latex tubing used in the slingshot. The experiments can be carried out with inexpensive and readily available tools and materials. The launcher provides an engaging way to teach projectile motion and elastic energy to students of a wide variety of ages.

  6. A comparision of temperature detection with the small rotorcraft and the balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, X.

    2016-12-01

    To observe the upper atmosphere, we can use balloons, aircrafts, and rockets etc. With the popularity of UAV applications in various fields, the use of small rotorcraft as a meteorological observation carrier has gained more and more attention. Small rotorcrafts have the following advantages, such as easy portability, high controllability, and reusable. They have a good prospect in the atmospheric boundary layer detection. In this paper, we detect the vertical temperature profile using the small rotorcraft carrying the temperature sensor and also the radiosonde at the same time. We conduct flight tests in Baoshan District Meteorological Bureau of Shanghai in China as is shown in Fig. 1, and mainly focus on the comparision of their differences. The preliminary results showed that the absolute error is less than 0.07 ° comparing with the balloon-borne sensors as is shown in Fig. 2. Our tests showed that using small rotorcraft as a platform to observe the atmosphere is feasible means.

  7. A large area telescope for balloon-borne hard X-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R. E.; Barbaglia, G.; Bazzano, A.; Boccaccini, L.; Bussini, A.; Carzaniga, A.; Court, A.; Dean, A. J.; Dipper, N. A.; Ferrandi, G.; Haskell, N.; La Padula, C.; Lewis, R. A.; Maccagni, D.; Mastropietro, M.; Patriarca, R.; Perotti, F.; Polcaro, V. F.; Quadrini, E.; Ramsden, D.; Sembay, S.; Spicer, R.; Ubertini, P.; Villa, G.; Whatley, D.

    1984-12-01

    A balloon-borne hard X-ray telescope is described that has been designed to make highly sensitive observations of cosmic sources in the energy range 15 to 300 keV. The payload is characterized by a combination of NaI(Tl) based detector of a novel design and spectroscopic proportional counters, providing a total sensitive area of 5000 cm2 and a 1 standard deviation sensitivity at the level of about 4 × 10-6 photons cm-2 s-1 keV-1. All of the telescope sub-systems are described including the micro-processor based orientation platform that provides a pointing stability of better than 10 arc min. The physical characteristics of the detectors are included along with a summary of the telescope performance during a balloon flight in 1982.

  8. Science Results From The ARCADE Open-Aperture Cryogenic Balloon Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Alan; Fixsen, D. J.; Levin, S. M.; Limon; Lubin, P. M.; Mirel, P.; Seiffert; Villela, Thyrso; Wollack, E.; Wuensche, C. A.

    The Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE) is a balloon-borne instrument to measure the frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave back-ground and diffuse Galactic foregrounds at centimeter wavelengths. ARCADE greatly reduces measurement uncertainties compared to previous balloon-borne or ground-based instrument using a double-nulled design that features fully cryogenic optics with no windows between the atmosphere and the 2.7 K instrument. A four-hour flight in 2006 achieved sensitivity com-parable to the COBE/FIRAS satellite measurement while providing new insights for emission ranging from spinning dust in the interstellar medium to an unexpectedly bright extragalactic radio background. I will discuss scientific results from the ARCADE program and implications of the ARCADE cold optics for millimeter and sub-mm astronomy.

  9. Cutting balloon angioplasty for intrastent restenosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Orávio de Freitas Jr

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe here two patients with angiographic diagnosis of intrastent restenosis and regional myocardial ischemia. One stent restenosis was located in a native coronary artery and the other in a vein graft. Both were treated with cutting balloon angioplasty (CBA, inflated at low pressures. Angiographic success was obtained and both patients were discharged in the day after the procedure. Cutting balloon angioplasty using low inflation pressures achieved important luminal gains, in these two cases of intrastent restenosis. Further studies are necessary before the effectiveness of this procedure can be precisely defined.

  10. On the inflation of a rubber balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermarlière, Julien

    2016-12-01

    It is a well-known fact that it is difficult to start a balloon inflating. But after a pressure peak that occurs initially, it becomes far easier to do it! The purpose of this article is to establish the experimental pressure-radius chart for a rubber balloon and to compare it to the theoretical one. We will demonstrate that the barometer of a smartphone is a very suitable tool to reach this goal. We hope that this phenomenon will help students realize that sometimes very simple questions can lead to very interesting and counterintuitive science.

  11. Ballooning behavior in the golden orbweb spider Nephilapilipes (Araneae: Nephilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa M.J. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ballooning, a mode of aerial dispersal in spiders, is an innate behavior that requires appropriate physiological and meteorological conditions. Although only rarely reported in the golden orbweb spiders, family Nephilidae, the large geographic distributions of most nephilids—in particular of Nephila species—would imply that these spiders likely routinely disperse by ballooning in spite of giant female sizes. Here we study ballooning behavior in the golden orbweb spider Nephila pilipes (Fabricius, 1793. Specifically, we test for the propensity of spiderlings to deploy ballooning as a dispersal mechanism. We subjected a total of 59 first-instar spiderlings to a wind experiment at two wind speeds (2.17 ± 0.02 m s-1 and 3.17 ± 0.02 m s-1 under laboratory conditions. Under an average wind speed of 3.17 m s-1, none of the spiderlings exhibited pre-ballooning or ballooning behavior. However, at an average wind speed of 2.17 m s-1, 53 (89.8% spiderlings showed pre-ballooning behavior, and 17 (32.1% of the pre-ballooners ultimately ballooned. Our results concur with prior reports on spiderlings of other families that pre-ballooning behavior is a requirement for ballooning to occur. Furthermore, although we cannot rule out other dispersal mechanisms such as synanthropic spread, our findings suggest that the widespread N. pilipes uses ballooning to colonize remote oceanic islands.

  12. Auditory Risk of Exploding Hydrogen-Oxygen Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Kent L.; Vernon, Julia A.; Macedone, Jeffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    Although hydrogen-oxygen balloon explosions are popular demonstrations, the acoustic impulse created poses a hearing damage risk if the peak level exceeds 140 dB at the listener's ear. The results of acoustical measurements of hydrogen-oxygen balloons of varying volume and oxygen content are described. It is shown that hydrogen balloons may be…

  13. 21 CFR 884.5050 - Metreurynter-balloon abortion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Metreurynter-balloon abortion system. 884.5050... Devices § 884.5050 Metreurynter-balloon abortion system. (a) Identification. A metreurynter-balloon abortion system is a device used to induce abortion. The device is inserted into the uterine...

  14. GPS-aided gravimetry at 30 km altitude from a balloon-borne platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarewicz, Andrew R.; Evans, Alan G.

    1989-01-01

    A balloon-borne experiment, flown at 30 km altitude over New Mexico, was used to test dynamic differential Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking in support of gravimetry at high-altitudes. The experiment package contained a gravimeter (Vibrating String Accelerometer), a full complement of inertial instruments, a TI-4100 GPS receiver and a radar transponder. The flight was supported by two GPS receivers on the ground near the flight path. From the 8 hour flight, about a forty minute period was selected for analysis. Differential GPS phase measurements were used to estimate changes in position over the sample time interval, or average velocity. In addition to average velocity, differential positions and numerical averages of acceleration were obtained in three components. Gravitational acceleration was estimated by correcting for accelerations due to translational motion, ignoring all rotational effects.

  15. Analysis of actinic flux profiles measured from an ozonesonde balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Allaart, M.; Knap, W. H.; Stammes, P.

    2015-04-01

    A green light sensor has been developed at KNMI to measure actinic flux profiles using an ozonesonde balloon. In total, 63 launches with ascending and descending profiles were performed between 2006 and 2010. The measured uncalibrated actinic flux profiles are analysed using the Doubling-Adding KNMI (DAK) radiative transfer model. Values of the cloud optical thickness (COT) along the flight track were taken from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) Cloud Physical Properties (CPP) product. The impact of clouds on the actinic flux profile is evaluated on the basis of the cloud modification factor (CMF) at the cloud top and cloud base, which is the ratio between the actinic fluxes for cloudy and clear-sky scenes. The impact of clouds on the actinic flux is clearly detected: the largest enhancement occurs at the cloud top due to multiple scattering. The actinic flux decreases almost linearly from cloud top to cloud base. Above the cloud top the actinic flux also increases compared to clear-sky scenes. We find that clouds can increase the actinic flux to 2.3 times the clear-sky value at cloud top and decrease it to about 0.05 at cloud base. The relationship between CMF and COT agrees well with DAK simulations, except for a few outliers. Good agreement is found between the DAK-simulated actinic flux profiles and the observations for single-layer clouds in fully overcast scenes. The instrument is suitable for operational balloon measurements because of its simplicity and low cost. It is worth further developing the instrument and launching it together with atmospheric chemistry composition sensors.

  16. How to perform combined cutting balloon and high pressure balloon valvuloplasty for dogs with subaortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleman, Mandi E; Estrada, Amara H; Maisenbacher, Herbert W; Prošek, Robert; Pogue, Brandon; Shih, Andre; Paolillo, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Subvalvular aortic stenosis (SAS) is one of the most common congenital cardiac malformations in dogs. Unfortunately, the long term success rate and survival data following either open heart surgery or catheter based intervention has been disappointing in dogs with severe subaortic stenosis. Medical therapy is currently the only standard recommended treatment option. A cutting balloon dilation catheter has been used successfully for resistant coronary artery and peripheral pulmonary arterial stenoses in humans. This catheter is unique in that it has the ability to cut, or score, the stenotic region prior to balloon dilatation of the stenosis. The use of cutting balloon valvuloplasty combined with high pressure valvuloplasty for dogs with severe subaortic stenosis has recently been reported to be a safe and feasible alternative therapeutic option. The following report describes this technique, outlines the materials required, and provides some 'tips' for successful percutaneous subaortic balloon valvuloplasty. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Single-balloon versus double-balloon bipedicular kyphoplasty for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heng; Sun, Zhenzhong; Wang, Zhiwen; Jiang, Weimin

    2015-04-01

    Twenty-eight patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCF) were treated with single-balloon bipedicular kyphoplasty (Group A), and 40 patients were treated with double-balloon bipedicular kyphoplasty (Group B). Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score, vertebral height, and kyphotic angle (KA) were evaluated pre-operatively, post-operatively (3 days after surgery) and at final follow-up. Operative time, X-ray exposure frequency and costs were recorded. The mean operative time and X-ray exposure frequency in Group A were greater than in Group B (pkyphoplasty is a safe and cost-effective surgical method for the treatment of OVCF. It can achieve pain relief comparable with double-balloon bipedicular kyphoplasty. However, double-balloon bipedicular kyphoplasty is more efficacious in terms of the restoration of vertebral height and reduction of KA, and the operative time and X-ray exposure frequency are lower.

  18. An overview of the SCOUT-AMMA stratospheric aircraft, balloons and sondes campaign in West Africa, August 2006: rationale, roadmap and highlights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cairo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A multi-platform field measurement campaign involving aircraft and balloons took place over West Africa between 26 July and 25 August 2006, in the frame of the concomitant AMMA Special Observing Period and SCOUT-O3 African tropical activities.

    Specifically aiming at sampling the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, the high-altitude research aircraft M55 Geophysica was deployed in Ouagadougou (12.3° N, 1.7° W, Burkina Faso, in conjunction with the German D-20 Falcon, while a series of stratospheric balloon and sonde flights were conducted from Niamey (13.5° N, 2.0° E, Niger.

    The stratospheric aircraft and balloon flights intended to gather experimental evidence for a better understanding of large scale transport, assessing the effect of lightning on NOx production, and studying the impact of intense mesoscale convective systems on water, aerosol, dust and chemical species in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The M55 Geophysica carried out five local and four transfer flights between southern Europe and the Sahel and back, while eight stratospheric balloons and twenty-nine sondes were flown from Niamey.

    These experiments allowed a characterization of the tropopause and lower stratosphere of the region. We provide here an overview of the campaign activities together with a description of the general meteorological situation during the flights and a summary of the observations accomplished.

  19. An overview of the SCOUT-AMMA stratospheric aircraft, balloons and sondes campaign in West Africa, August 2006: rationale, roadmap and highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, F.; Pommereau, J. P.; Law, K. S.; Schlager, H.; Garnier, A.; Fierli, F.; Ern, M.; Streibel, M.; Arabas, S.; Borrmann, S.; Berthelier, J. J.; Blom, C.; Christensen, T.; D'Amato, F.; di Donfrancesco, G.; Deshler, T.; Diedhiou, A.; Durry, G.; Engelsen, O.; Goutail, F.; Harris, N. R. P.; Kerstel, E. R. T.; Khaykin, S.; Konopka, P.; Kylling, A.; Larsen, N.; Lebel, T.; Liu, X.; MacKenzie, A. R.; Nielsen, J.; Oulanowski, A.; Parker, D. J.; Pelon, J.; Polcher, J.; Pyle, J. A.; Ravegnani, F.; Rivière, E. D.; Robinson, A. D.; Röckmann, T.; Schiller, C.; Simões, F.; Stefanutti, L.; Stroh, F.; Some, L.; Siegmund, P.; Sitnikov, N.; Vernier, J. P.; Volk, C. M.; Voigt, C.; von Hobe, M.; Viciani, S.; Yushkov, V.

    2009-09-01

    A multi-platform field measurement campaign involving aircraft and balloons took place over West Africa between 26 July and 25 August 2006, in the frame of the concomitant AMMA Special Observing Period and SCOUT-O3 African tropical activities. Specifically aiming at sampling the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, the high-altitude research aircraft M55 Geophysica was deployed in Ouagadougou (12.3° N, 1.7° W), Burkina Faso, in conjunction with the German D-20 Falcon, while a series of stratospheric balloon and sonde flights were conducted from Niamey (13.5° N, 2.0° E), Niger. The stratospheric aircraft and balloon flights intended to gather experimental evidence for a better understanding of large scale transport, assessing the effect of lightning on NOx production, and studying the impact of intense mesoscale convective systems on water, aerosol, dust and chemical species in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The M55 Geophysica carried out five local and four transfer flights between southern Europe and the Sahel and back, while eight stratospheric balloons and twenty-nine sondes were flown from Niamey. These experiments allowed a characterization of the tropopause and lower stratosphere of the region. We provide here an overview of the campaign activities together with a description of the general meteorological situation during the flights and a summary of the observations accomplished.

  20. Spatial distribution of meteorological parameters around 900 hPa level over the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean regions during the IFP-99 of the INDOEX programme as revealed from the constant altitude balloon experiments conducted from Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Appu, K.S.; Nair, S.M.; Kunhikrishnan, P.K.; Moorthy, K.K.; Sarode, P.R.; Rao, L.V.G.; Bajpai, S.R.; Prakash, L.H.; Viswanathan, G.; Mitra, A.P.; Sadourny, R.; Basdevant, C.; Ethe, C.; Ovarlez, H.; Chapuis, R.; Dartiguelongue, B.; Vianeys, P.

    . Data and method of analysis Balloon positions were precisely obtained in all the flights from the GPS system but vertical positions were not accu- rate. Altitude informations were thus missed. But the height information was available from the pressure... Turbulence, Wiley, New York, 1984, p. 160. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. The Balloon Campaign could be successfully conducted only due to the whole hearted support received from Goa University; National Institute of Oceanography, Goa; IMD Office at Goa, and NCMRWF...

  1. Experiments with Helium-Filled Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zable, Anthony C.

    2010-12-01

    The concepts of Newtonian mechanics, fluids, and ideal gas law physics are often treated as separate and isolated topics in the typical introductory college-level physics course, especially in the laboratory setting. To bridge these subjects, a simple experiment was developed that utilizes computer-based data acquisition sensors and a digital gram scale to estimate the molar mass of the gas in an inflated balloon. In this experiment, the comparable density of an inflated balloon to that of atmospheric air introduces a significant role for buoyancy that must be accounted for. The ideal gas law approximation is assumed for both the isolated gas mixture within the balloon and the surrounding air, which defines the relationship between the gas pressure, volume, temperature, and molar quantity. Analysis of the forces associated with the inflated balloon with the incorporation of Archimedes' principle and the ideal gas law into Newton's second law results in an experimental method for the measurement of the molar mass and mole fraction of a gas that is easy to implement yet academically challenging for students. The following narrative describes the basic setup of this experiment, along with a sample set of data as acquired and analyzed by a typical physics student from one of my classes.

  2. Demonstration of free-space optical communication for long-range data links between balloons on Project Loon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moision, Bruce; Erkmen, Baris; Keyes, Edward; Belt, Todd; Bowen, Oliver; Brinkley, Devin; Csonka, Paul; Eglington, Michael; Kazmierski, Andrei; Kim, Nam-hyong; Moody, John; Tu, Thanh; Vermeer, William

    2017-02-01

    Internet connectivity is limited and in some cases non-existent for a significant part of the world's population. Project Loon aims to address this with a network of high-altitude balloons traveling in the stratosphere, at an altitude of approximately 20 km. The balloons navigate by using the stratified wind layers at different altitudes, adjusting the balloon's altitude to catch winds in a desired direction. Data transfer is achieved by 1) uplinking a signal from an Internet-connected ground station to a balloon terminal, 2) crosslinking the signal through the balloon network to reach the geographic area of the users, and 3) downlinking the signal directly to the end-users' phones or other LTE-enabled devices. We describe Loon's progress on utilizing free-space optical communications (FSOC) for the inter-balloon crosslinks. FSOC, offering high data rates and long communication ranges, is well-suited for communication between high-altitude platforms. A stratospheric link is sufficiently high to be above weather events (clouds, fog, rain, etc.), and the impact of atmospheric turbulence is significantly weaker than at ground level. In addition, being in the stratosphere as opposed to space helps avoid the typical challenges faced by space-based systems, namely operation in a vacuum environment with significant radiation. Finally, the angular pointing disturbances introduced by a floating balloon-based platform are notably less than any propelled platform, which simplifies the disturbance rejection requirements on the FSOC system. We summarize results from Project Loon's early-phase experimental inter-balloon links at 20 km altitude, demonstrating full duplex 130 Mbps throughput at distances in excess of 100 km over the course of several-day flights. The terminals utilize a monostatic design, with dual wavelengths for communication and a dedicated wide-angle beacon for pointing, acquisition, and tracking. We summarize the constraints on the terminal design, and the

  3. Under Pressure: Intraluminal Filling Pressures of Postpartum Hemorrhage Tamponade Balloons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Kathleen M; Racusin, Diana A; Belfort, Michael A; Dildy, Gary A

    2017-04-01

    Objective Uterine tamponade by fluid-filled balloons is now an accepted method of controlling postpartum hemorrhage. Available tamponade balloons vary in design and material, which affects the filling attributes and volume at which they rupture. We aimed to characterize the filling capacity and pressure-volume relationship of various tamponade balloons. Study Design Balloons were filled with water ex vivo. Intraluminal pressure was measured incrementally (every 10 mL for the Foley balloons and every 50 mL for all other balloons). Balloons were filled until they ruptured or until 5,000 mL was reached. Results The Foley balloons had higher intraluminal pressures than the larger-volume balloons. The intraluminal pressure of the Sengstaken-Blakemore tube (gastric balloon) was initially high, but it decreased until shortly before rupture occurred. The Bakri intraluminal pressure steadily increased until rupture occurred at 2,850 mL. The condom catheter, BT-Cath, and ebb all had low intraluminal pressures. Both the BT-Cath and the ebb remained unruptured at 5,000 mL. Conclusion In the setting of acute hemorrhage, expeditious management is critical. Balloons that have a low intraluminal pressure-volume ratio may fill more rapidly, more easily, and to greater volumes. We found that the BT-Cath, the ebb, and the condom catheter all had low intraluminal pressures throughout filling.

  4. The TRACER instrument: A balloon-borne cosmic-ray detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ave, M.; Boyle, P. J.; Brannon, E.; Gahbauer, F.; Hermann, G.; Höppner, C.; Hörandel, J. R.; Ichimura, M.; Müller, D.; Obermeier, A.; Romero-Wolf, A.

    2011-10-01

    We describe a large-area detector for measurements of the intensity of cosmic-ray nuclei in balloon-borne exposures. In order to observe individual nuclei at very high energies, the instrument employs transition radiation detectors (TRD) whose energy response extends well beyond 10 4 GeV amu -1. The TR measurement is performed with arrays of single-wire proportional tubes interleaved with plastic-fiber radiators. An additional energy determination comes from the specific ionization in gas and its relativistic rise which is also measured with proportional tubes. The tubes also determine the trajectory of each cosmic-ray nucleus with mm-resolution. In total, nearly 1600 tubes are used. The instrument is triggered by large-area plastic scintillators. The scintillators, together with acrylic Cherenkov counters, also determine the nuclear charge Z of each cosmic-ray particle, measure the energy in the GeV amu -1 region, and discriminate against low-energy background. We describe the details of this detector system, and discuss its performance in three high-altitude balloon flights, including two long-duration flights in 2003 and 2006 at Antarctic and Arctic latitudes, respectively. Scientific results from these flights are summarized, and possible future developments are reviewed.

  5. Ozone loss derived from balloon-borne tracer measurements and the SLIMCAT CTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Robinson

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Balloon-borne measurements of CFC-11 (on flights of the DIRAC in situ gas chromatograph and the DESCARTES grab sampler, ClO and O3 were made during the 1999/2000 winter as part of the SOLVE-THESEO 2000 campaign. Here we present the CFC-11 data from nine flights and compare them first with data from other instruments which flew during the campaign and then with the vertical distributions calculated by the SLIMCAT 3-D CTM. We calculate ozone loss inside the Arctic vortex between late January and early March using the relation between CFC-11 and O3 measured on the flights, the peak ozone loss (1200 ppbv occurs in the 440–470 K region in early March in reasonable agreement with other published empirical estimates. There is also a good agreement between ozone losses derived from three independent balloon tracer data sets used here. The magnitude and vertical distribution of the loss derived from the measurements is in good agreement with the loss calculated from SLIMCAT over Kiruna for the same days.

  6. Miracle Flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... her future. Donate Now Make your donation today Saving Lives One Flight At A ... “To improve access to health care by providing financial assistance to low income children for commercial air ...

  7. Search for Signatures of Inflation with the EBEX Balloon-Borne Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanany, Shaul

    EBEX (E and B EXperiment) is a balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation. It is a long-duration payload equipped with an array of 1564 bolometric transition edge sensors. The unique combination of sensitivity, resolution and sky coverage enables unprecedented power to constrain inflationary models and to determine the amplitude of the matter power spectrum through measurement of the gravitational lensing of CMB photons. The experiment is optimized to take full advantage of the balloon-borne environment in its frequency coverage, and to measure the yet unknown properties of Galactic dust polarization. EBEX completed a test flight in June of 2009 from Ft. Sumner, NM, and a second end- to-end integration campaign in the summer of 2011. Important milestones have been achieved including the first operation of any transition edge sensor (TES) bolometer in a balloon-borne environment, the first demonstration of any multiplexed readout of TES bolometers in space-like conditions, the first operation of a polarimeter based on continuous rotation of a half-wave plate by means of a superconducting magnetic bearing, and validation of the EBEX optical system and end-to-end polarimetry. The EBEX instrument is now being readied for its first long duration flight, which is scheduled to take place in December 2012, just before the start of this proposed grant period. In this proposal we are requesting funding to analyze and publish the science data generated during the first EBEX science flight. In addition to its science goals EBEX is a technology pathfinder for other experiments and for a future NASA satellite mission. It continues to provide excellent training grounds for student and post-docs. Already 6 Ph.D. theses have been produced based on the project and 7 more are anticipated.

  8. Dosimetry of charged and neutral particles onboard a stratospheric balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dönsdorf, Esther Miriam; Burmeister, Soenke; Heber, Bernd; Benton, Eric; Berger, Thomas

    The interaction of the primary galactic cosmic rays with constituents of the atmosphere leads to a complex secondary radiation field at high altitudes. Of special interest for aviation and thereby also for radiation protection is the height up to 30 km where the radiation field consists of charged and neutral particles. For the determination of the dose rates up to this altitude in the Earth's atmosphere a stratopheric balloon flight will be performed in central Oklahoma which has a cutoff rigidity of about 4 GV. Onboard there will be two different active radiation detector systems to measure the dose of charged and neutral particles in the stratosphere. The first one is a silicon telescope which consists of two 2 cm2 silicon PIN-photodiodes used as semiconductor detectors. This instrument will mainly be used to measure the charged component of the radiation field due to the fact that the silicon detectors have a rather low efficiency for the detection of neutrons and gammas with energies higher than 60 keV. The second instrument is a so called phoswich detector. It is composed of two dissimilar scintillators optically coupled to each other and to a common photomultiplier tube. For this experimental setup a combination of a fast plastic scintillator BC412 and a slow inorganic scintillator CsI(Na) is used. The pulses from the two scintillators will be separated by applying pulse shape analysis. These two different scintillator materials have been chosen because BC412 is hydrogen rich and thus the cross section for fast neutrons is relatively high and CsI(Na) has a high cross section for gamma radiation. The objective of the phoswich detector is to distinguish between gammas and neutrons but it is also possible to measure charged particles with this setup. The aim of the balloon flight is to determine the dose measured with these two different instruments and in particular to differentiate between the dose induced by charged particles and by the different neutral

  9. A 1.2 meter balloon-borne telescope for a submillimeter wave sky survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, R. F.; Hauser, M. G.; Mather, J. C.; Gezari, D. Y.; Kelsall, T.; Cheung, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    A balloon-borne, 1.2 meter Cassegrain telescope designed for diffraction-limited imagery at 100 microns is being developed for a survey of the Galactic plane at submillimeter wavelengths. The telescope pointing system is servocontrolled using a gyroscope for the primary stabilization reference. Extensive use is made of microprocessors for flight sequencing, pointing control and stabilization, and telemetry formatting. A description of the telescope, helium-cooled detectors, and the orientation subsystems are presented together with a brief discussion of the proposed astronomical observations.

  10. Efficient coordination of swarms of sensor-laden balloons for persistent, in situ, real-time measurement of hurricane development*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, Thomas; Meneghello, Gianluca

    2016-10-01

    Accurate long-term forecasts of the path and intensity of severe hurricanes are imperative to protect property and save lives. Extensive real-time measurements within hurricanes, especially near their core, are essential for supplementing the limited relevant information accessible by satellites in order to improve such forecasts. Current operational methods for obtaining in situ information, such as dropsondes and repeated manned and unmanned aircraft flights over and within hurricanes, are both expensive and limited in duration. In the present work it is demonstrated by numerical experiments how a swarm of robust, inexpensive, buoyancy-controlled, sensor-laden balloons might be deployed and controlled in an energetically efficient, coordinated fashion, for days at a time, to continuously monitor relevant properties (pressure, humidity, temperature, and wind speed) of a hurricane as it develops. Rather than fighting its gale-force winds, the strong and predictable stratification of these winds is leveraged to efficiently disperse the balloons into a favorable time-evolving distribution. An iterative bootstrap approach is envisioned in which (a) sensor balloons are used to help improve the available computational estimate of the uncertain and underresolved flow field of the hurricane and (b) this (imprecise) estimate of the hurricane flow field is leveraged to improve the distribution of the sensor balloons, which then better facilitates (a), etc. The control approach envisioned in this ambitious effort is a combination of (centrally computed) model predictive control for coordination at the largest scales, which is the focus of the present paper, coupled with a feedback control strategy (decentrally computed, on the balloons themselves), for smaller-scale corrections. Our work indicates that, following such an approach, certain target orbits of interest within the hurricane can be continuously sampled by some balloons, while others make repeated sweeps between the

  11. The protoMIRAX Hard X-ray Imaging Balloon Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Braga, João; Avila, Manuel A C; Penacchioni, Ana V; Sacahui, J Rodrigo; Santiago, Valdivino A de; Mattiello-Francisco, Fátima; Strauss, Cesar; Fialho, Márcio A A

    2015-01-01

    The protoMIRAX hard X-ray imaging telescope is a balloon-borne experiment developed as a pathfinder for the MIRAX satellite mission. The experiment consists essentially in a coded-aperture hard X-ray (30-200 keV) imager with a square array (13$\\times$13) of 2mm-thick planar CZT detectors with a total area of 169 cm$^2$. The total, fully-coded field-of-view is $21^{\\circ}\\times 21^{\\circ}$ and the angular resolution is 1$^{\\circ}$43'. In this paper we describe the protoMIRAX instrument and all the subsystems of its balloon gondola, and we show simulated results of the instrument performance. The main objective of protoMIRAX is to carry out imaging spectroscopy of selected bright sources to demonstrate the performance of a prototype of the MIRAX hard X-ray imager. Detailed background and imaging simulations have been performed for protoMIRAX balloon flights. The 3$\\sigma$ sensitivity for the 30-200 keV range is ~1.9 $\\times$ 10$^{-5}$ photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ for an integration time of 8 hs at an atmospheric ...

  12. SAMPEX relativistic micorbursts: PET spectra and comparison to DREP and balloon microbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, X.; Comess, M.; Smith, D. M.; Selesnick, R. S.; Sample, J. G.; Millan, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Relativistic(> 1 MeV) electron microbursts may account for significant relativistic electron losses from the outer belt. We will present the spectral characteristics of relativistic microbursts observed with the Proton/Electron telescope (PET) on board the Solar Anomalous Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) satellite from 1992 to 2004. We find that these events, concentrated in the morning sector, are well fitted by an exponential spectrum with e-folding energies of 100-375 keV in the 0.5-4 MeV range. We have compared the time-averaged precipitation rate from relativistic microbursts with the time-avearged rate from duskside Relativistic Electron Precipitation (DREP), and find that microbursts appear more important 100 keV microburst e-folding energies contrast with 16 hours of microburst data from the MeV Auroral X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy (MAXIS) balloon campaign, which show exponential microburst spectra with folding energies ranging from 50-105 keV. We used the Monte Carlo simulation package GEANT3 calculate the count-rate spectra that would have been expected from MAXIS from the SAMPEX microburst spectra. We use these simulations to address the apparent contradictions between the satellite and balloon pictures of microbursts in anticipation of the upcoming flights of the Balloon Array for RBSP Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL).

  13. A technical strategy for carotid artery stenting: suboptimal prestent balloon angioplasty without poststenting balloon dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sung-Chul; Kwon, O-Ki; Oh, Chang Wan; Jung, Cheolkyu; Han, Moon Gu; Bae, Hee-Joon; Lee, Sang Hyung; Jung, Young Sub; Han, Moon Hee; Kang, Hyun-Seung

    2010-11-01

    Traditional carotid artery stenting (CAS) consists of predilatation, optional deployment of embolic protection devices, stenting, and poststent angioplasty. Each step carries a risk of thromboembolism. To design a new and simplified procedural protocol, suboptimal balloon angioplasty without routine poststenting balloon dilatation, and to describe the efficacy this protocol in terms of procedural risks and angiographic and clinical outcomes. Over a period of 6 years, 161 carotid artery stenoses in 156 consecutive patients were treated by CAS with embolic protection devices. Among them, 110 lesions in 107 patients (68.3%) were treated by our simplified method (symptomatic, > 50% stenosis; asymptomatic, > 70% stenosis). Overall, 98 lesions (88.3%) had severe stenosis (> 70%). The mean stenosis was reduced from 77% to 10% after CAS. A persistent neurological deficit developed in 2 patients from thromboembolism. Hemodynamic insufficiency developed in 14 lesions during CAS (12.7%). The ipsilateral stroke and mortality rate was 4.5% within 1 month after CAS (asymptomatic, 3.6%; symptomatic, 4.8%). Over a mean of 19 months of follow-up, additive angioplasty was performed in 2 patients as a result of progressive restenosis (≥ 50%). A comparison of the balloon sizes of the prestent angioplasty for group 1 (balloon, ≤ 4 mm) and group 2 (balloon, ≥ 5 mm) showed no difference in restenosis between the groups at 15 months of follow-up after CAS. Our CAS technique with suboptimal prestenting angioplasty without routine use of poststenting dilatation is safe, simple, and efficient with acceptable risks.

  14. Double balloon enteroscopy examinations in general anesthesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laszlo; Zubek; Lena; Szabo; Peter; Laszlo; Lakatos; Janos; Papp; Janos; Gal; Gabor; Elo

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To demonstrate that the double balloon enteroscopy(DBE) can be safely performed in general anesthesia with intubation.METHODS:We performed a retrospective examination between August 2005 and November 2008 amongpatients receiving intubation narcosis due to DBE examination.The patients were grouped based on sex,age and physical status.Anesthesia records includedduration of anesthesia,quantity of medication usedand anesthesia-related complications.We determinedthe frequency of complications in the differen...

  15. Burn Injury Arise From Flying Balloon Toys

    OpenAIRE

    Yalcin Kulahci; Fatih Zor; Mehmet Bozkurt; Serdar Ozturk; Mustafa Sengezer

    2007-01-01

    Many of peoples are faced minor or major burn injuries in their life. Even the most widespread burn cause is flame injuries, too different burn cause pointed out in literature like Acetylen burns. The cases which imply in literature, mostly causes from explosion of high pressure acetylene tube, metal oxygene patch flame or carbide lamp using from cave explorers. An interesting acetylene burn cause in Turkey was publised by the authors. This cases was to come into being from flying toy balloon...

  16. Numerical Modelling Of Pumpkin Balloon Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, D.

    Tensys have been involved in the numerical formfinding and load analysis of architectural stressed membrane structures for 15 years. They have recently broadened this range of activities into the `lighter than air' field with significant involvement in aerostat and heavy-lift hybrid airship design. Since early 2004 they have been investigating pumpkin balloon instability on behalf of the NASA ULDB programme. These studies are undertaken using inTENS, an in-house finite element program suite based upon the Dynamic Relaxation solution method and developed especially for the non-linear analysis and patterning of membrane structures. The paper describes the current state of an investigation that started with a numerical simulation of the lobed cylinder problem first studied by Calladine. The influence of material properties and local geometric deformation on stability is demonstrated. A number of models of complete pumpkin balloons have then been established, including a 64-gore balloon with geometry based upon Julian Nott's Endeavour. This latter clefted dramatically upon initial inflation, a phenomenon that has been reproduced in the numerical model. Ongoing investigations include the introduction of membrane contact modelling into inTENS and correlation studies with the series of large-scale ULDB models currently in preparation.

  17. MAXIS Balloon Observations of Electron Microburst Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, R. M.; Hunter, A. E.; McCarthy, M. P.; Lin, R. P.; Smith, D. M.

    2003-12-01

    Quantifying and understanding losses is an integral part of understanding relativistic electron variability in the radiation belts. SAMPEX observations indicate that electron microburst precipitation is a major loss mechanism during active periods; the loss of relativistic electrons during a six hour period due to microburst precipitation was recently estimated to be comparable to the total number of trapped electrons in the outer zone (Lorentzen et al., 2001). Microburst precipitation was first observed from a balloon (Anderson and Milton, 1964), but these early measurements were only sensitive to MAXIS 2000 long duration balloon campaign. MAXIS was launched from McMurdo Station in Antarctica carrying a germanium spectrometer, a BGO scintillator and two X-ray imagers designed to measure the bremsstrahlung produced by precipitating electrons. The balloon circumnavigated the south pole in 18 days covering magnetic latitudes ranging from 58o-90o South. During the week following a moderate geomagnetic storm (with Dst reaching -91 nT), MAXIS detected a total of over 16 hours of microburst precipitation. We present high resolution spectra obtained with the MAXIS germanium spectrometer which allow us to determine the precipitating electron energy distribution. The precipitating distribution will then be compared to the trapped distribution measured by the GPS and LANL satellites. We also examine the spatial distribution of the precipitation.

  18. Pointing control for the SPIDER balloon-borne telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Shariff, Jamil A; Amiri, Mandana; Benton, Steven J; Bock, Jamie J; Bond, J Richard; Bryan, Sean A; Chiang, H Cynthia; Contaldi, Carlo R; Crill, Brendan P; Doré, Olivier P; Farhang, Marzieh; Filippini, Jeffrey P; Fissel, Laura M; Fraisse, Aurelien A; Gambrel, Anne E; Gandilo, Natalie N; Golwala, Sunil R; Gudmundsson, Jon E; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hilton, Gene C; Holmes, Warren A; Hristov, Viktor V; Irwin, Kent D; Jones, William C; Kermish, Zigmund D; Kuo, Chao-Lin; MacTavish, Carolyn J; Mason, Peter V; Megerian, Krikor G; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Morford, Tracy A; Nagy, Johanna M; Netterfield, C Barth; O'Brient, Roger; Rahlin, Alexandra S; Reintsema, Carl D; Ruhl, John E; Runyan, Marcus C; Soler, Juan D; Trangsrud, Amy; Tucker, Carole E; Tucker, Rebecca S; Turner, Anthony D; Weber, Alexis C; Wiebe, Donald V; Young, Edward Y

    2014-01-01

    We present the technology and control methods developed for the pointing system of the SPIDER experiment. SPIDER is a balloon-borne polarimeter designed to detect the imprint of primordial gravitational waves in the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation. We describe the two main components of the telescope's azimuth drive: the reaction wheel and the motorized pivot. A 13 kHz PI control loop runs on a digital signal processor, with feedback from fibre optic rate gyroscopes. This system can control azimuthal speed with < 0.02 deg/s RMS error. To control elevation, SPIDER uses stepper-motor-driven linear actuators to rotate the cryostat, which houses the optical instruments, relative to the outer frame. With the velocity in each axis controlled in this way, higher-level control loops on the onboard flight computers can implement the pointing and scanning observation modes required for the experiment. We have accomplished the non-trivial task of scanning a 5000 lb payload sinusoidally in az...

  19. CdZnTe Background Measurement at Balloon Altitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Bloser, P F; Narita, T; Harrison, F

    1998-01-01

    We report results of an experiment conducted in May 1997 to measure CdZnTe background and background reduction schemes in space flight conditions similar to those of proposed hard X-ray astrophysics missions. A 1 cm^2 CdZnTe detector was placed adjacent to a thick BGO anticoincidence shield and flown piggybacked onto the EXITE2 scientific balloon payload. The planar shield was designed to veto background countsproduced by local gamma-ray production in passive material and neutron interactions in the detector. The CdZnTe and BGO were partially surrounded by a Pb-Sn-Cu shield to approximate the grammage of an X-ray collimator, although the field of view was still ~2 pi sr. At an altitude of 127000 feet we find a reduction in background by a factor of 6 at 100 keV. The non-vetoed background is 9 X 10^{-4} cts /cm^2-sec-keV at 100 keV, about a factor of 2 higher than that of the collimated (4.5 deg FWHM) EXITE2 phoswich detector. We compare our recorded spectrum with that expected from simulations using GEANT and...

  20. Intra-Aortic Balloon Pump Rupture and Entrapment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artan Jahollari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra-aortic balloon pump is used frequently to support a failing myocardium in cardiac patients. Due to the invasive nature of this device, usage is accompanied by consistent risk of complications. Balloon rupture, although it occurs rarely, may lead to entrapment if diagnosis delays. A 78-year male who underwent cardiac surgery experienced balloon rupture and entrapment in the right femoral artery during the postoperative follow-up. Surgical extraction under local anesthesia was performed and the patient had an uneventful course. Fast and gentle solution of the problem is necessary to prevent further morbidity or mortality related to a retained balloon catheter in these delicate patients.

  1. Balloon observations of ultra-low-frequency waves in the electric field above the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, B.; Benbrrook, J.R.; Bering E.A. III; Byrne, G.J.; Theall, J.R. (Univ. of Houston, TX (USA))

    1988-01-01

    The physics of ultra-low-frequency waves in the magnetosphere, near the cusp and in the polar cap, is important because this region is one where ultra-low-frequency wave energy from the magnetopause can most easily enter the magnetosphere. During the 1985-1986 South Pole balloon campaign, eight stratospheric balloon payloads were launched from Amundsen-Scott Station, South Geographic Pole, Antarctica, to record data on ultra-low-frequency waves. The payloads were instrumented with three-axis double-probe electric field detectors and X-ray scintillation counters. This paper concentrates on the third flight of this series, which was launched at 2205 universal time on 21 December 1985. Good data were received from the payload until the transmitter failed at 0342 universal time on 22 December. During most of the four hours that the balloon was afloat, an intense ultra-low-frequency wave event was in progress. The electric-field data from this period have been examined in detail and compared with magnetic field data, obtained with ground-based fluxgate and induction magnetometers to determine the characteristics of the waves. After float was reached, the electric-field data in figure 1 show large-amplitude, quasi-periodic fluctuations suggesting the presence of intense ultra-low-frequency wave activity. In conclusion, the electric-field signature observed from flight 3 appears to have been essentially an electrostatic event or possibly a short-wavelength hydromagnetic wave with a varying and interesting polarization character. The authors are continuing the analysis of the data to determine the source of the observed ultra-low-frequency waves.

  2. NRL tethered balloon measurements at San Nicolas Island during FIRE IFO 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Hermann; Gathman, Stuart; James, Jeffrey; Smith, Mike; Consterdine, Ian; Brandeki, Scott

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of the tethered balloon measurements made during the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) marine stratocumulus intensive field observations (IFO) at San Nicolas Island in 1987. The instrument utilized on the balloon flights, the 17 flights over a 10 day period, the state of the data analysis, and some preliminary results are described. A goal of the measurements with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) balloon was to give a unique and greatly improved look at the microphysics of the clear and cloud-topped boundary layer. For this goal, collocated measurements were made of turbulence, aerosol, cloud particles, and meteorology. Two new instruments which were expected to make significant contributions to this effort were the saturation hygrometer, capable of measuring 95 percent less than RH 105 percent (with an accuracy of 0.05 percent near 100 percent) and used for the first time in clouds; and the forward scatter meter which gives in situ LWC measurements at more than 10 Hz. The data set, while unfortunately only partially simultaneous with the bulk of the FIRE stratocumulus observations, is unique and worthwhile in its own right. For the first time accurate RH measurements near 100 percent have been made in-cloud; although, the use of the saturation hygrometer reflected a learning experience which will result is substantially better performance the next time. These measurements were made in conjunction with other microphysical measurements such as aerosol and cloud droplet spectra, and perhaps most important of all, they were all collocated with bivane turbulence measurements thus permitting flux calculations. Thus the analysis of this data set, which consisted of about 50 percent stratocumulus cases including increasing and decreasing partial cloud cover, should lead to new insights on the physical mechanisms which drive the boundary-layer/cloud/turbulence system.

  3. Tethered Balloon Operations at ARM AMF3 Site at Oliktok Point, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexheimer, D.; Lucero, D. A.; Helsel, F.; Hardesty, J.; Ivey, M.

    2015-12-01

    Oliktok Point has been the home of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (ARM) third ARM Mobile Facility, or AMF3, since October 2013. The AMF3 is operated through Sandia National Laboratories and hosts instrumentation collecting continuous measurements of clouds, aerosols, precipitation, energy, and other meteorological variables. The Arctic region is warming more quickly than any other region due to climate change and Arctic sea ice is declining to record lows. Sparsity of atmospheric data from the Arctic leads to uncertainty in process comprehension, and atmospheric general circulation models (AGCM) are understood to underestimate low cloud presence in the Arctic. Increased vertical resolution of meteorological properties and cloud measurements will improve process understanding and help AGCMs better characterize Arctic clouds. SNL is developing a tethered balloon system capable of regular operation at AMF3 in order to provide increased vertical resolution atmospheric data. The tethered balloon can be operated within clouds at altitudes up to 7,000' AGL within DOE's R-2204 restricted area. Pressure, relative humidity, temperature, wind speed, and wind direction are recorded at multiple altitudes along the tether. These data were validated against stationary met tower data in Albuquerque, NM. The altitudes of the sensors were determined by GPS and calculated using a line counter and clinometer and compared. Wireless wetness sensors and supercooled liquid water content sensors have also been deployed and their data has been compared with other sensors. This presentation will provide an overview of the balloons, sensors, and test flights flown, and will provide a preliminary look at data from sensor validation campaigns and test flights.

  4. Elemental Spectra from the CREAM-I Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, H S; Bagliesi, M G; Beatty, J J; Bigongiari, G; Boyle, P; Childers, J T; Conklin, N B; Coutu, S; Duvernois, M A; Ganel, O; Han, J H; Jeon, J A; Kim, K C; Lee, J K; Lee, M H; Lutz, L; Maestro, P; Malinine, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Minnick, S; Mognet, S I; Nam, S; Nutter, S; Park, I H; Park, N H; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Swordy, S; Wakely, S; Wu, J; Yang, J; Yoon, Y S; Zei, R; Zinn, S Y

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) is a balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the composition and energy spectra of cosmic rays of charge Z = 1 to 26 up to an energy of ~ 10^15 eV. CREAM had two successful flights on long-duration balloons (LDB) launched from Mc- Murdo Station, Antarctica, in December 2004 and December 2005. CREAM-I achieves a substantial measurement redundancy by employing multiple detector systems, namely a Timing Charge Detector and a Silicon Charge Detector (SCD) for particle identification, and a Transition Radiation Detector and a sampling tungsten/scintillating-fiber ionization calorimeter (CAL) for energy measurement. In this paper, preliminary energy spectra of various elements measured with CAL/SCD during the first 42-day flight are presented.

  5. BESS and its future prospect for polar long duration flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, A.; Abe, K.; Anraku, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Fujikawa, M.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Imori, M.; Izumi, K.; Maeno, T.; Makida, Y.; Matsui, N.; Matsumoto, H.; Matsunaga, H.; McDonald, F. B.; Mitchell, J.; Mitsui, T.; Moiseev, A.; Motoki, M.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, S.; Ormes, J. F.; Righter, D.; Saeki, T.; Sanuki, T.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E. S.; Shikaze, Y.; Sonoda, T.; Streitmatter, R.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, K.; Tanizaki, K.; Ueda, I.; Wang, J. Z.; Yajima, N.; Yamagami, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamato, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yoshimura, K.; BESS Collaboration

    The Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer, BESS, aims to study elementary particle/antiparticle phenomena in the early history of the Universe. The instrument has a unique feature of a thin superconducting solenoid magnet enabling a large geometrical acceptance with a horizontally cylindrical configuration. Seven balloon flights have been successfully carried out since 1993. More than 10 3 comic-ray antiproton have been unambiguously detected, and the energy spectrum has been measured with the characteristic peak at 2 GeV. The search for cosmic-ray antihelium brought the upper-limit of the antihelium/helium ratio down to < 10 -6. To extend the highly sensitive measurements, we are planning polar long duration flights in Antarctica focusing on the very low energy antiproton spectrum towards the solar-minimum in the next decade.

  6. Space-quality data from balloon-borne telescopes: the High Altitude Lensing Observatory (HALO)

    CERN Document Server

    Rhodes, Jason; Booth, Jeffrey; Massey, Richard; Liewer, Kurt; Smith, Roger; Amara, Adam; Aldrich, Jack; Berge, Joel; Bezawada, Naidu; Brugarolas, Paul; Clark, Paul; Dubbeldam, Cornelis M; Ellis, Richard; Frenk, Carlos; Gallie, Angus; Heavens, Alan; Henry, David; Jullo, Eric; Kitching, Thomas; Lanzi, James; Lilly, Simon; Lunney, David; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morris, David; Paine, Christopher; Peacock, John; Pellegrino, Sergio; Pittock, Roger; Pool, Peter; Refregier, Alexandre; Seiffert, Michael; Sharples, Ray; Smith, Alexandra; Stuchlik, David; Taylor, Andy; Teplitz, Harry; Vanderveld, R Ali; Wu, James

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for attaining sub-arcsecond pointing stability during sub- orbital balloon flights, as designed for in the High Altitude Lensing Observatory (HALO) concept. The pointing method presented here has the potential to perform near-space quality optical astronomical imaging at 1-2% of the cost of space-based missions. We also discuss an architecture that can achieve sufficient thermomechanical stability to match the pointing stability. This concept is motivated by advances in the development and testing of Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) flights which promise to allow observation campaigns lasting more than three months. The design incorporates a multi-stage pointing architecture comprising: a gondola coarse azimuth control system, a multi-axis nested gimbal frame structure with arcsecond stability, a telescope de-rotator to eliminate field rotation, and a fine guidance stage consisting of both a telescope mounted angular rate sensor and guide CCDs in the focal plane to drive a fast-steering ...

  7. Ozone loss derived from balloon-borne tracer measurements in the 1999/2000 Arctic winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Robinson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Balloon-borne measurements of CFC11 (from the DIRAC in situ gas chromatograph and the DESCARTES grab sampler, ClO and O3 were made during the 1999/2000 Arctic winter as part of the SOLVE-THESEO 2000 campaign, based in Kiruna (Sweden. Here we present the CFC11 data from nine flights and compare them first with data from other instruments which flew during the campaign and then with the vertical distributions calculated by the SLIMCAT 3D CTM. We calculate ozone loss inside the Arctic vortex between late January and early March using the relation between CFC11 and O3 measured on the flights. The peak ozone loss (~1200ppbv occurs in the 440-470K region in early March in reasonable agreement with other published empirical estimates. There is also a good agreement between ozone losses derived from three balloon tracer data sets used here. The magnitude and vertical distribution of the loss derived from the measurements is in good agreement with the loss calculated from SLIMCAT over Kiruna for the same days.

  8. AUTOPERFUSION BALLOON CATHETER FOR COMPLICATED CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY - A PROSPECTIVE-STUDY WITH RETROSPECTIVE CONTROLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMUINCK, ED; VANDIJK, RB; DENHEIJER, P; MEEDER, JG; LIE, KI

    1992-01-01

    Prolonged angioplasty balloon inflation with an autoperfusion balloon for failed conventional coronary angioplasty, was compared with emergency surgery for this condition. Restenosis was assessed 6 weeks after successful intervention with the autoperfusion balloon. Forty consecutive patients with pe

  9. AUTOPERFUSION BALLOON CATHETER FOR COMPLICATED CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY - A PROSPECTIVE-STUDY WITH RETROSPECTIVE CONTROLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMUINCK, ED; VANDIJK, RB; DENHEIJER, P; MEEDER, JG; LIE, KI

    1992-01-01

    Prolonged angioplasty balloon inflation with an autoperfusion balloon for failed conventional coronary angioplasty, was compared with emergency surgery for this condition. Restenosis was assessed 6 weeks after successful intervention with the autoperfusion balloon. Forty consecutive patients with

  10. FLIGHT INFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Check in With Singapore Airlines, Check out With Paypal Singapore Airlines customers in the United States, Singapore and five other Asia Pacific countries and territories can now pay for their flights with PayPal on singaporeair.com. This facility will progressively be made available to the airline’s customers in up to 17 countries, making this the largest collaboration between PayPal and an Asian carrier to date.

  11. Thrombus aspiration catheter is a Dottering balloon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshagiri Rao, D; Barik, Ramachandra; Prasad, Akula Siva

    2016-01-01

    Coronary angiogram in a young man with history of STEMI with delayed presentation revealed subtotal occlusion of left anterior descending artery (LAD) with large thrombotic filling defect distal to the critical lesion. PCI was preferred without delay because of ongoing chest pain. Several runs of thrombus aspiration failed to detect any visible thrombus. However, the immediate angiogram after thrombus aspiration showed complete distal embolization of the thrombus which could have been achieved by Dottering or balloon dilatation. In contrary to the general perception, does thrombus aspiration push more thrombus than it can aspirate?

  12. Pneumothorax, music and balloons: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiferaw Dejene

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe two cases of spontaneous pneumothorax in young healthy adults with no underlying structural lung disease. The onset of pneumothorax was following physical activity including playing musical instruments and blowing of balloons. There is sparse data evaluating the pathophysiology of primary spontaneous pneumothorax in relation to increased mouth pressures. These cases highlight the possible physical effect of valsalva manoeuvre on transpulmonary pressures, and the potential risk of developing pneumothorax in otherwise healthy individuals. This aspect of pneumothorax development is worthy of further exploration, to better elucidate the mechanism and enhance our understanding of this common respiratory presentation.

  13. Double-balloon endoscopy: Who needs it?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendel, J.W.; Vilmann, P.; Jensen, T.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) made the small bowel accessible to inspection and therapy in its entirety. However, DBE is a time-consuming procedure that requires a highly skilled endoscopist, several nurses and - more often than not - anesthesiological support. This makes the selectio...... within the next 12 months. Conclusions. CE can be applied as a screening procedure for DBE and allows for an approximately two-thirds reduction in the need for DBE as well as enabling a choice to be made between the oral and anal route Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  14. Stratospheric composition from balloon based measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mencaraglia, F.; Carli, B. [Ist. per le Ricerche sulle Onde Elettromagnetiche, Firenze (Italy); Bonetti, A.; Ciarpallini, P. [Univ. di Firenze (Italy); Carlotti, M.; Lepri, G. [Univ. di Bologna (Italy); Alboni, F.; Cortesi, U.; Ridolfi, M. [Fondazione per la Metereologia Applicata, Firenze (Italy)

    1995-12-31

    Measurements of the composition of the earth`s atmosphere is of fundamental importance for the study of atmospheric chemistry and for developing models that can predict the evolution of the atmosphere itself. Here, the chemical composition of the lower stratosphere has been measured using a polarizing interferometer operating in the far infrared and submillimetric spectral region. The instrument was flown three times (in 1992, 1993 and 1994) from the NSBF balloon base (Fort Sumner, New Mexico) in coincidence with overpasses of the UARS satellite, for a total of about 50 hours of measurements. In this paper the authors report some of the results obtained from the data analysis made up to now.

  15. Reversible transient apical ballooning syndrome with coronary lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunshan Cao; Min Zhang; Xiang Li; Ping Xie; Lynn Cronin

    2009-01-01

    Transient apical ballooning syndrome(Tako-Tsubo syndrome or ampulla cardiomyopathy) occurs predominantly in women over 60 years of age with a history of recent physical or psychological stress. We present a case of a male patient with reversible transient apical ballooning syndrome with significant coronary lesions and other ECG changes that did not explain the clinical symptoms.

  16. 21 CFR 870.1350 - Catheter balloon repair kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter balloon repair kit. 870.1350 Section 870... repair kit. (a) Identification. A catheter balloon repair kit is a device used to repair or replace the... effect the repair or replacement. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA...

  17. 14 CFR 61.115 - Balloon rating: Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Balloon rating: Limitations. 61.115 Section 61.115 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... takes a practical test in a balloon with an airborne heater: (1) The pilot certificate will contain a...

  18. Apical Ballooning Syndrome: A Complication of Dual Chamber Pacemaker Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Sham'a, Raed A. H; Asher, Elad; Luria, David; Berger, Michael; Glikson, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Apical ballooning is a cardiac syndrome (Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy) described as a typical form of acute transient left ventricular dysfunction. While its onset has often been associated with emotionally or physically stressful situations, it has an overall favorable prognosis. We describe here a case of transient apical ballooning following permanent pacemaker implantation. PMID:19652736

  19. The 1991 research and technology report, Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Ottenstein, Howard (Editor); Montgomery, Harry (Editor); Truszkowski, Walter (Editor); Frost, Kenneth (Editor); Sullivan, Walter (Editor); Boyle, Charles (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The 1991 Research and Technology Report for Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. Research covered areas such as (1) earth sciences including upper atmosphere, lower atmosphere, oceans, hydrology, and global studies; (2) space sciences including solar studies, planetary studies, Astro-1, gamma ray investigations, and astrophysics; (3) flight projects; (4) engineering including robotics, mechanical engineering, electronics, imaging and optics, thermal and cryogenic studies, and balloons; and (5) ground systems, networks, and communications including data and networks, TDRSS, mission planning and scheduling, and software development and test.

  20. The IMaX polarimeter for the solar telescope SUNRISE of the NASA long duration balloon program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Herrero, A.; Martínez-Pillet, V.; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Domingo, V.

    2010-06-01

    On June 8th 2009 the SUNRISE mission was successfully launched. This mission consisted of a 1m aperture solar telescope on board of a stratospheric balloon within the Long Duration Balloon NASA program. The flight followed the foreseen circumpolar trajectory over the Artic and the duration was 5 days and 17 hours. One of the two postfocal instruments onboard was IMaX, the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment. This instrument is a solar magnetograph which is a diffraction limited imager capable to resolve 100 km on the solar surface, and simultaneously a high sensitivity polarimeter (Aeroespacial field and it is an important precedent for future space missions such as Solar Orbiter from ESA. Among these novel technologies the utilization of Liquid Crystal Variable Retarders (LCVRs) as polarization modulators and a LiNbO3 etalon as tunable spectral filter are remarkable. Currently the data obtained is being analyzed and the preliminary results show unprecedented information about the solar dynamics.

  1. Low cost multi-purpose balloon-borne platform for wide-field imaging and video observation

    CERN Document Server

    Ocaña, Francisco; Conde, Aitor

    2016-01-01

    Atmosphere layers, especially the troposphere, hinder the astronomical observation. For more than 100 years astronomers have tried observing from balloons to avoid turbulence and extinction. New developments in cardsize computers, RF equipment and satellite navigation have democratised the access to the stratosphere. As a result of a ProAm collaboration with the Daedalus Team we have developed a low-cost multi-purpose platform with stratospheric balloons carrying up to 3 kg of scientific payload. The Daedalus Team is an amateur group that has been launching sounding probes since 2010. Since then the first two authors have provided scienti fic payloads for nighttime flights with the purpose of technology demonstration for astronomical observation. We have successfully observed meteor showers (Geminids 2012, Camelopardalis 2014, Quadrantids 2016 and Lyrids 2016) and city light pollution emission with image and video sensors covering the 400-1000nm range.

  2. Use of a Fourier transform spectrometer on a balloon-borne telescope and at the multiple mirror telescope (MMT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traub, W. A.; Chance, K. V.; Brasunas, J. C.; Vrtilek, J. M.; Carleton, N. P.

    1982-01-01

    The design and use of an infrared Fourier transform spectrometer which has been used for observations of laboratory, stratospheric, and astronomical spectra are described. The spectrometer has a spectral resolution of 0.032/cm and has operated in the mid-infrared (12 to 13 microns) as well as the far-infrared (40 to 140 microns), using both bolometer and photoconductor cryogenic detectors. The spectrometer is optically sized to accept an f/9 beam from the multi-mirror telescope (MMT). The optical and electronic design are discussed, including remote operation of the spectrometer on a balloon-borne 102-cm telescope. The performance of the laser-controlled, screw-driven moving cat's-eye mirror is discussed. Segments of typical far-infrared balloon flight spectra, lab spectra, and mid-infrared MMT spectra are presented. Data reduction, interferogram processing, artifact removal, wavelength calibration, and intensity calibration methods are discussed. Future use of the spectrometer is outlined.

  3. A Rare and Serious Unforeseen Complication of Cutting Balloon Angioplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Vemula

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutting balloon angioplasty (CBA is one of the adept ways of treating “in-stent restenosis.” Various complications related to cutting balloon angioplasty have been reported including arterial rupture, delayed perforation and fracture of microsurgical blades. Here we report a very unusual and inadvertent extraction of a stent previously deployed in the ramus intermedius coronary branch by a cutting balloon catheter. This required repeat stenting of the same site for an underlying dissection. Even though stent extraction is a rare complication it can be serious due to dissection, perforation, and closure of the artery. Physicians performing coronary artery interventions would need to be aware of this rare and serious complication especially if any difficulty is encountered while withdrawing the cutting balloon. Therefore, after removal, cutting balloon should be examined thoroughly for possible stent dislodgment or extraction when used for “in-stent restenosis.”

  4. Global kinetic ballooning mode simulations in BOUT++

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C. H.; Xu, X. Q.

    2017-01-01

    We report on simulation results of a 3+1 gyro-Landau-fluid (GLF) model in BOUT++ framework, which contributes to increasing the physics understanding of the edge turbulence. We find that there is no second stability region of kinetic ballooning modes (KBM) in the concentric circular geometry. The first unstable β of KBM decreases below the ideal ballooning mode threshold with increasing {ηi} . In order to study the KBM in the real tokamak equilibrium, we find that the approximation of shifted circular geometry (β \\ll {{\\varepsilon}2} ) is not valid for a high β global equilibrium near the second stability region of KBM. Thus we generate a series of real equilibria from a global equilibrium solver CORSICA, including both Shafranov shift and elongation effects, but not including bootstrap current. In these real equilibria, the second stability region of KBM are observed in our global linear simulations. The most unstable mode for different β are the same while the mode number spectrum near the second stability region is wider than the case near the first stability region. The nonlinear simulations show that the energy loss of an ELM keeps increasing with β, because the linear drive of the turbulence remains strong for the case near the second stability region during profile evolution.

  5. The Thermal Design, Characterization, and Performance of the SPIDER Long-Duration Balloon Cryostat

    CERN Document Server

    Gudmundsson, J E; Amiri, M; Benton, S J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Bryan, S A; Chiang, H C; Contaldi, C R; Crill, B P; Doré, O; Filippini, J P; Fraisse, A A; Gambrel, A; Gandilo, N N; Hasselfield, M; Halpern, M; Hilton, G C; Holmes, W; Hristov, V V; Irwin, K D; Jones, W C; Kermish, Z; MacTavish, C J; Mason, P V; Megerian, K; Moncelsi, L; Montroy, T E; Morford, T A; Nagy, J M; Netterfield, C B; Rahlin, A S; Reintsema, C D; Ruhl, J E; Runyan, M C; Shariff, J A; Soler, J D; Trangsrud, A; Tucker, C; Tucker, R S; Turner, A D; Wiebe, D V; Young, E

    2015-01-01

    We describe the SPIDER flight cryostat, which is designed to cool six millimeter-wavelength telescopes during an Antarctic long-duration balloon flight. The cryostat, one of the largest to have flown on a stratospheric payload, uses liquid helium-4 to deliver cooling power to stages at 4.2 and 1.6 K. Stainless steel capillaries facilitate a high flow impedance connection between the main liquid helium tank and a smaller superfluid tank, allowing the latter to operate at 1.6 K as long as there is liquid in the 4.2 K main tank. Each telescope houses a closed cycle helium-3 adsorption refrigerator that further cools the focal planes down to 300 mK. Liquid helium vapor from the main tank is routed through heat exchangers that cool radiation shields, providing negative thermal feedback. The system performed successfully during a 17 day flight in the 2014-2015 Antarctic summer. The cryostat had a total hold time of 16.8 days, with 15.9 days occurring during flight.

  6. The thermal design, characterization, and performance of the SPIDER long-duration balloon cryostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, J. E.; Ade, P. A. R.; Amiri, M.; Benton, S. J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Bryan, S. A.; Chiang, H. C.; Contaldi, C. R.; Crill, B. P.; Dore, O.; Filippini, J. P.; Fraisse, A. A.; Gambrel, A.; Gandilo, N. N.; Hasselfield, M.; Halpern, M.; Hilton, G.; Holmes, W.; Hristov, V. V.; Irwin, K. D.; Jones, W. C.; Kermish, Z.; MacTavish, C. J.; Mason, P. V.; Megerian, K.; Moncelsi, L.; Montroy, T. E.; Morford, T. A.; Nagy, J. M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Rahlin, A. S.; Reintsema, C. D.; Ruhl, J. E.; Runyan, M. C.; Shariff, J. A.; Soler, J. D.; Trangsrud, A.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, R. S.; Turner, A. D.; Wiebe, D. V.; Young, E.

    2015-12-01

    We describe the SPIDER flight cryostat, which is designed to cool six millimeter-wavelength telescopes during an Antarctic long-duration balloon flight. The cryostat, one of the largest to have flown on a stratospheric payload, uses liquid 4 He to deliver cooling power to stages at 4.2 and 1.6 K. Stainless steel capillaries facilitate a high flow impedance connection between the main liquid helium tank and a smaller superfluid tank, allowing the latter to operate at 1.6 K as long as there is liquid in the 4.2 K main tank. Each telescope houses a closed cycle 3 He adsorption refrigerator that further cools the focal planes down to 300 mK. Liquid helium vapor from the main tank is routed through heat exchangers that cool radiation shields, providing negative thermal feedback. The system performed successfully during a 17 day flight in the 2014-2015 Antarctic summer. The cryostat had a total hold time of 16.8 days, with 15.9 days occurring during flight.

  7. HERO: Program Status and Fist Images from a Balloon-Borne Focusing Hard-X-ray Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, B. D.; Alexander, C. D.; Apple, J. A.; Benson, C. M.; Dietz, K. L.; Elsner, R. F.; Engelhaupt. D. E.; Ghosh, K. K.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; ODell, S. L.; hide

    2001-01-01

    HERO is a balloon payload featuring shallow-graze angle replicated optics for hard-x-ray imaging. When completed, the instrument will offer unprecedented sensitivity in the hard-x-ray region, giving thousands of sources to choose from for detailed study on long flights. A recent proof-of-concept flight captured the first hard-x-ray focused images of the Crab Nebula, Cygnus X-1 and GRS 1915+105. Full details of the HERO program are presented, including the design and performance of the optics, the detectors and the gondola. Results from the recent proving flight are discussed together with expected future performance when the full science payload is completed.

  8. Are drug-coated balloons cost effective for femoropopliteal occlusive disease? A comparison of bare metal stents and uncoated balloons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Thomas G; Fisette, Jean-François

    2016-07-01

    To perform a cost-effectiveness analysis to help hospital decision-makers with regard to the use of drug-coated balloons compared with bare metal stents and uncoated balloons for femoropopliteal occlusive disease. Clinical outcomes were extracted from the results of meta-analyses already published, and cost units are those used in the Quebec healthcare network. The literature review was limited to the last four years to obtain the most recent data. The cost-effectiveness analysis was based on a 2-year perspective, and risk factors of reintervention were considered. The cost-effectiveness analysis indicated that drug-coated balloons were generally more efficient than bare metal stents, particularly for patients with higher risk of reintervention (up to CAD$1686 per patient TASC II C or D). Compared with uncoated balloons, results indicated that drug-coated balloons were more efficient if the reintervention rate associated with uncoated balloons is very high and for patients with higher risk of reintervention (up to CAD$3301 per patient). The higher a patient's risk of reintervention, the higher the savings associated with the use of a drug-coated balloon will be. For patients at lower risk, the uncoated balloon strategy is still recommended as a first choice for endovascular intervention.

  9. THE KISSING BALLOON TECHNIQUE WITH 2 OVER-THE-WIRE BALLOON CATHETERS THROUGH A SINGLE 8-FRENCH GUIDING CATHETER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENHEIJER, P; BERNINK, PJLM; VANDIJK, RB; TWISK, SPM; LIE, KI

    1991-01-01

    Some of the newer over-the-wire coronary angioplasty catheters have shaft sizes of 3.0 French (F) or less. The inner diameter of modern 8-F guiding catheters is large enough to accommodate two of such balloon catheters. We report a kissing balloon procedure with two over-the-wire catheters through a

  10. THE KISSING BALLOON TECHNIQUE WITH 2 OVER-THE-WIRE BALLOON CATHETERS THROUGH A SINGLE 8-FRENCH GUIDING CATHETER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENHEIJER, P; BERNINK, PJLM; VANDIJK, RB; TWISK, SPM; LIE, KI

    Some of the newer over-the-wire coronary angioplasty catheters have shaft sizes of 3.0 French (F) or less. The inner diameter of modern 8-F guiding catheters is large enough to accommodate two of such balloon catheters. We report a kissing balloon procedure with two over-the-wire catheters through a

  11. Overview of the Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) flight mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Christopher J.

    2016-11-01

    The NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) stratospheric balloon flight mission addresses the need to reduce the uncertainty in predicting human exposure to cosmic radiation in the aircraft environment. Measurements were taken that characterize the dosimetric properties of cosmic ray primaries, the ultimate source of aviation radiation exposure, and the cosmic ray secondary radiations that are produced and transported to aviation altitudes. In addition, radiation detectors were flown to assess their potential application to long-term, continuous monitoring of the aircraft radiation environment. RaD-X was successfully launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico (34.5°N, 104.2°W), on 25 September 2015. Over 18 h of science data were obtained from a total of four different type dosimeters at altitudes above 20 km. The RaD-X flight mission was supported by laboratory radiation exposure testing of the balloon flight dosimeters and also by coordinated radiation measurements taken on ER-2 and commercial aircraft. This paper provides the science background and motivation for the RaD-X flight mission, a brief description of the balloon flight profile and the supporting aircraft flights, and a summary of the articles included in the RaD-X special collection and their contributions to the science goals of the RaD-X mission.

  12. Effect of intra-aortic balloon pump on coronary blood flow during different balloon cycles support: A computer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Thin Pa Pa; Htet, Zwe Lin; Singhavilai, Thamvarit; Naiyanetr, Phornphop

    2015-01-01

    Intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) has been used in clinical treatment as a mechanical circulatory support device for patients with heart failure. A computer model is used to study the effect on coronary blood flow (CBF) with different balloon cycles under both normal and pathological conditions. The model of cardiovascular and IABP is developed by using MATLAB SIMULINK. The effect on coronary blood flow has been studied under both normal and pathological conditions using different balloon cycles (balloon off; 1:4; 1:2; 1:1). A pathological heart is implemented by reducing the left ventricular contractility. The result of this study shows that the rate of balloon cycles is related to the level of coronary blood flow.

  13. Design and Calibrations of the Protomirax Balloon Telescope and the Brazilian Scientific Balloon Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Joao; D'Amico, Flavio; Avila, Manuel

    2012-07-01

    In this presentation we report on the recent scientific ballooning activities in Brazil, including important international collaborations, and present our plan for the next few years. We also present the recent progress achieved in the design of the detector system of the protoMIRAX balloon experiment and report on the scientific balloon activities in Brazil. protoMIRAX is a balloon-borne X-ray imaging telescope under development at INPE as a pathfinder for the MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de Raios X) satellite mission. The experiment consists essentially in an X-ray (30-200 keV) coded-aperture imager which employs a square array of 196 10mm x 10mm x 2mm CdZnTe (CZT) planar detectors made by eV Products in the USA. A collimator defines a fully-coded field-of-view of 20o x 20o, with 4o x 4o of full sensitivity. The final angular resolution will depend on the mask pattern used. In this paper we describe the design and development of the detector plane, including the front-end electronics. Preamplifiers and shaping amplifiers, customized for these detectors, were designed and built at INPE. Laboratory spectral measurements show an energy resolution of 12.0% at 60 keV, of which 10.6% is due to intrinsic electronics noise measured with a pulser at similar pulse height levels. We present spectral results obtained in the laboratory as well as initial calibration results of the acquisition system designed to get positions and energies in the detector plane. We show simulations of the coded-aperture images with different mask designs and iterative reconstruction methods.

  14. Microbiological sampling of the atmosphere using a latex sounding balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, W. P.; Bryan, N.; Christner, B. C.; Guzik, T. G.; Stewart, M. F.; Giammanco, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    The occurrence of microbes in the atmosphere has been the subject of scientific inquiry since Louis Pasteur’s time; however, data on the nature and diversity of microbial life in the upper troposphere and stratosphere is very limited. To experimentally address this, we have designed, constructed, and field-tested a lightweight, autonomous system that can sample at high altitudes using a latex sounding balloon. An important aspect of our sampling protocol is the ability to decontaminate and assess the level of background contamination during laboratory and field handling. Our approach involves the parallel decontamination and monitoring of 3 identical payloads: (i) one that remains in the laboratory, (ii) a control on the flight string, and (iii) a payload that opens and samples airborne particles in the atmosphere. Comparative analysis of various sterilization methods indicated that ethylene oxide was most effective at decreasing the concentration of DNA-containing cells, decreasing background cellular contamination by 94%. In conjunction, germicidal ultraviolet light, sodium hypochlorite, and 70% ethanol were used to decrease the concentration of microbes associated with payload surfaces. Bioaerosol collection is achieved by impact sampling on a 3.5 mm^2 retention surface covered with a thin layer of sterile silicone grease as the payload travels through the atmosphere. Initial flights have been successful in recovering viable microorganisms present in parcels of air at altitudes of 3 km to 9 km. Microscopic analysis on the collected cell assemblages implied that ~70% of the cells were potentially viable, and aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were cultured and isolated from liquid and agar-solidified culture media. Future plans include increasing the sampling altitude up to ~30 km in a series of discrete steps, maintaining our background controls and connection to lower altitude measurements. The pressure, temperature, and radiation levels in Earth’s stratosphere

  15. Sicily 2002 balloon campaign: a test of the HASI instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettanini, C.; Fulchignoni, M.; Angrilli, F.; Lion Stoppato, P. F.; Antonello, M.; Bastianello, S.; Bianchini, G.; Colombatti, G.; Ferri, F.; Flamini, E.; Gaborit, V.; Aboudan, A.

    2004-01-01

    A mock-up of the probe descending in the Titan atmosphere as part of the Huygens Cassini Mission was successfully launched and recovered on 30th May 2002 after a stratospheric balloon launch from the Italian Space Agency Base "Luigi Broglio" in Trapani, Sicily. To simulate the Huygens mission at Titan, the probe was lifted to an altitude of 32 km and then released to perform a 45 min parachute decelerated descent. The probe was hosting spares of HASI instruments, housekeeping sensors and other dedicated sensors, Beagle II UV Sensors and Huygens Tilt Sensor, for a total of 76 acquired sensor channels and sampled during the ascent, drift and descent phase. An integrated data acquisition and instrument control system was developed, based on PC architecture and soft-real-time application. Sensors channels were sampled at the nominal HASI data rates, with a max rate of 1 kHz. Software was developed for data acquisition, onboard storage and telemetry transmission satisfying all requests for real-time monitoring, diagnostic and redundancy. The main goal of this flight was to verify sensor performance and perform a realistic functional test for HASI hardware in dynamical and environmental conditions similar to those of the Titan atmosphere as well as the impact detection sequence of HASI accelerometer and HASI during ground landing. Aerodynamic study of the probe has contributed in achieving descent velocity and spin rate profiles close to the ones envisioned for the Huygens Titan descent. Profiles have been calculated by solving a system of ODE describing the translational and rotational motion of the probe through the Earth's atmosphere during parachute aided descent. Results of these calculations have driven the choice of an appropriate angle of attack of the blades in the bottom of the probe and ballast weight during flight. Passive thermal control of the probe has also been designed and implemented in order to guarantee proper temperature ranges on critical components

  16. Geodesic Acoustic Propagation and Ballooning Mode Formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M. B.; Diamond, P. H.; Young, G. G.; Arakawa, M.

    2005-10-01

    Relevance of ballooning formalism (BMF) in nonlinear interaction of toroidal electromagnetic drift waves in the presence of zonal flows and Geodesic Acoustic Oscillation (GAO) is critically examined from a physical argument of radial propagation of wave packets. To achieve the quasi-translational invariance of poloidal harmonics which is necessary for the BMF, the geodesic curvature induced transfer [1] of fluctuation energy in radial direction should occur faster than the time scale of physical interest. Of course, this does not happen necessarily in drift-Alfven (DALF) turbulence simulations [2]. This observation casts considerable doubts on the applicability of various codes based on the BMF concept to nonlinear electromagnetic problems. [1] B. Scott, Phys. Letters A 320 (2003) 53. [2] B. Scott, New J. Phys 7 (2005) 92.

  17. The Norwegian Sounding Rocket and Balloon Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skatteboe, Rolf

    2001-08-01

    The status and recent developments of the Norwegian Sounding Rocket and Balloon Program are presented with focus on national activities and recent achievements. The main part of the Norwegian program is sounding rocket launches conducted by Andøya Rocket Range from the launch facilities on Andøya and at Svalbard. For the majority of the programs, the scientific goal is investigation of processes in the middle and upper atmosphere. The in situ measurements are supplemented by a large number of ground-based support instruments located at the ALOMAR Observatory. The ongoing and planned projects are described and the highlights of the latest completed projects are given. The scientific program for the period 2001-2003 will be reviewed. Several new programs have been started to improve the services available to the international science comunity. The Hotel Payload project and MiniDusty are important examples that will be introduced in the paper. Available space related infrastructure is summarized.

  18. Intragastric balloon: ethics, medical need and cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzampassi, Katerina; Shrewsbury, Anne D

    2008-01-01

    The development of the intragastic balloon as a safe, noninvasive, alternative method to weight reduction raises all the ethical questions routinely faced by practitioners of other forms of cosmetic surgery. In the case of the morbidly, severely or merely obese, the surgeon is faced with a medical decision in a situation defined by medical parameters. The case of the overweight or normal may, however, create an ethical dilemma in which the doctor is forced to make decisions of a nonmedical nature, for which his training has not prepared him, and relating essentially to his personal attitudes and moral beliefs, culture and the recognition that 'if I don't, somebody else--possibly less competent--will'.

  19. CTO revascularization: Obstacles and options in balloon nonpenetrable lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaz, On

    2017-07-01

    CTO lesions resisting balloon crossing are located in moderate/severe tortuous coronary arteries contain more moderate/severe calcification burden and carry a higher J-CTO score as compared with balloon crossable CTO lesions. CTO lesions resisting balloon crossing do not constitute a homogenous group. In 25% of the patients, the resisting CTO was caused by stent restenosis and thrombus is an integral component of CTO in addition to calcium and fibrosis. The excimer laser and rotational/orbital atherectomy are among useful debulking technologies capable of creating a "pilot recanalization channel" in the CTO that enables completion of the revasularization. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. An investigation of electrostatically deposited radionuclides on latex balloons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, T.; Caly, A., E-mail: Terry.Price@gmail.com [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Use of Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS) education material for a community science education event to promote science awareness, science culture and literacy (Science Rendezvous 2011) lead to investigation of observed phenomena. Experiments are done on balloons that are electrostatically charged then left to collect particulate. Alpha spectroscopy was performed to identify alpha emitting radioisotopes present on the balloons. The time dependent behaviour of the activity was investigated. Additionally, the Alpha activity of the balloon was compared to Beta activity. The grounds for further investigations are proposed. (author)

  1. Balloon dilation of congenital supravalvular pulmonic stenosis in a dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treseder, Julia R.

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty is considered the standard of care for treatment of valvular pulmonic stenosis, a common congenital defect in dogs. Supravalvular pulmonic stenosis is a rare form of pulmonic stenosis in dogs and standard treatment has not been established. Although, there have been reports of successful treatment of supravalvular pulmonic stenosis with surgical and stenting techniques, there have been no reports of balloon dilation to treat dogs with this condition. Here, a case of supravalvular pulmonic stenosis diagnosed echocardiographically and angiographically in which a significant reduction in pressure gradient was achieved with balloon dilation alone is presented. PMID:27297421

  2. Intragastric balloon for morbid obesity causing chronic gastric dilatation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretolesi, F.; Derchi, L.E. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Genoa (Italy); Redaelli, G.; Papagni, L. [IRCCS, Ist. Auxologico Italiano, Milan (Italy)

    2001-04-01

    We describe the radiographic findings observed in a morbidly obese and diabetic patient with an intragastric air-filled balloon introduced as a therapeutic measure to reduce food intake. The balloon was associated with chronic gastric dilatation and had to be removed 3 months after insertion. However, together with diet and behavioural therapy, it proved effective in reducing body weight and ameliorating glycaemic control. Although rarely used, intragastric balloons for the treatment of morbid obesity are still encountered in radiological practice. Radiologists must be able to recognize them and to understand their complications. (orig.)

  3. Exploring Venus with high-altitude balloons: Science objectives and mission architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, Kevin; Limaye, Sanjay; Zahnle, Kevin; Atreya, Sushil K.

    Following the trailblazing flights of the 1985 twin Soviet VEGA balloons, missions to fly in the high atmosphere of Venus near 55 km altitude have been proposed to both NASA's Discovery Program and ESA's Cosmic Vision. Such missions would address a variety of fundamental science issues highlighted in a variety of high-level NASA-authorized science documents in recent years, including the Decadal Study, various NASA roadmaps, and recommendations coming out of the Venus Exploration Analysis Group (VEXAG). Such missions would in particular address key questions of Venus's origin, evolution, and current state, including detailed measurements of (1) trace gases associated with Venus's active photoand thermo-chemistry and (2) measurements of vertical motions and local temperature which characterize convective and wave processes. As an example of what can be done with a small mission (less than 500M US dollars), the Venus Aerostatic-Lift Observatories for in-situ Research (VALOR) Discovery mission will be discussed. This mission would fly twin balloon-borne aerostats over temperate and polar latitudes, sampling rare gases, chemicals and dynamics in two distinct latitude regions for several days. A variety of scenarios for the origin, formation, and evolution of Venus would be tested by sampling all the noble gases and their isotopes, especially the heaviest elements never reliably measured previously: xenon and krypton. Riding the gravity and planetary waves of Venus, the VALOR balloons would sample the chemistry, meteorology and dynamics of Venus's sulfur-cloud region. Tracked by an array of Earth-based telescopes, zonal, meridional, and vertical winds would be measured with unprecedented precision. Such measurements would help to develop a fundamental understanding of (1) the circulation of Venus, especially its enigmatic super-rotation, (2) the nature of Venus's sulfur cycle, key to Venus's current climate, and (3) how Venus formed and evolved over the aeons.

  4. The isotopic composition of methane in the stratosphere: high-altitude balloon sample measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Röckmann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The isotopic composition of stratospheric methane has been determined on a large suite of air samples from stratospheric balloon flights covering subtropical to polar latitudes and a time period of 16 yr. 154 samples were analyzed for δ13C and 119 samples for δD, increasing the previously published dataset for balloon borne samples by an order of magnitude, and more than doubling the total available stratospheric data (including aircraft samples published to date. The samples also cover a large range in mixing ratio from tropospheric values near 1800 ppb down to only 250 ppb, and the strong isotope fractionation processes accordingly increase the isotopic composition up to δ13C = −14‰ and δD = +190‰, the largest enrichments observed for atmospheric CH4 so far. When analyzing and comparing kinetic isotope effects (KIEs derived from single balloon profiles, it is necessary to take into account the residence time in the stratosphere in combination with the observed mixing ratio and isotope trends in the troposphere, and the range of isotope values covered by the individual profile. The isotopic composition of CH4 in the stratosphere is affected by both chemical and dynamical processes. This severely hampers interpretation of the data in terms of the relative fractions of the three important sink mechanisms (reaction with OH, O(1D and Cl. It is shown that a formal sink partitioning using the measured data severely underestimates the fraction removed by OH, which is likely due to the insensitivity of the measurements to the kinetic fractionation in the lower stratosphere. Full quantitative interpretation of the CH4 isotope data in terms of the three sink reactions requires a global model.

  5. An introduction to the SCOUT-AMMA stratospheric aircraft, balloons and sondes campaign in West Africa, August 2006: rationale and roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, F.; Pommereau, J. P.; Law, K. S.; Schlager, H.; Garnier, A.; Fierli, F.; Ern, M.; Streibel, M.; Arabas, S.; Borrmann, S.; Berthelier, J. J.; Blom, C.; Christensen, T.; D'Amato, F.; di Donfrancesco, G.; Deshler, T.; Diedhiou, A.; Durry, G.; Engelsen, O.; Goutail, F.; Harris, N. R. P.; Kerstel, E. R. T.; Khaykin, S.; Konopka, P.; Kylling, A.; Larsen, N.; Lebel, T.; Liu, X.; MacKenzie, A. R.; Nielsen, J.; Oulanowski, A.; Parker, D. J.; Pelon, J.; Polcher, J.; Pyle, J. A.; Ravegnani, F.; Rivière, E. D.; Robinson, A. D.; Röckmann, T.; Schiller, C.; Simões, F.; Stefanutti, L.; Stroh, F.; Some, L.; Siegmund, P.; Sitnikov, N.; Vernier, J. P.; Volk, C. M.; Voigt, C.; von Hobe, M.; Viciani, S.; Yushkov, V.

    2010-03-01

    A multi-platform field measurement campaign involving aircraft and balloons took place over West Africa between 26 July and 25 August 2006, in the frame of the concomitant AMMA Special Observing Period and SCOUT-O3 African tropical activities. Specifically aiming at sampling the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, the high-altitude research aircraft M55 Geophysica was deployed in Ouagadougou (12.3° N, 1.7° W), Burkina Faso, in conjunction with the German D-20 Falcon, while a series of stratospheric balloons and sonde flights were conducted from Niamey (13.5° N, 2.0° E), Niger. Altogether, these measurements were intended to provide experimental evidence for a better understanding of large scale transport, assessing the effect of lightning on NOx production, and studying the impact of intense mesoscale convective systems on water, aerosol, dust and chemical species in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The M55 Geophysica carried out five local and four transfer flights between southern Europe and the Sahel and back, while eight stratospheric balloons and twenty-nine sondes were flown from Niamey. These experiments allowed a characterization of the tropopause and lower stratosphere of the region. The paper provides an overview of SCOUT-AMMA campaign activities together with a description of the meteorology of the African monsoon and the situation prevailing during the flights and a brief summary of the observations accomplished.

  6. Immediate Outcome of Balloon Mitral Valvuloplasty with JOMIVA Balloon during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Ramona; Kaliappan, Tamilarasu; Gopalan, Rajendiran; Palanimuthu, Ramasmy; Anandhan, Premkrishna

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatic mitral stenosis is the most common Valvular Heart Disease encountered during pregnancy. Balloon Mitral Valvuloplasty (BMV) is one of the treatment option available if the symptoms are refractory to the medical management and the valve anatomy is suitable for balloon dilatation. BMV with Inoue balloon is the most common technique being followed worldwide. Over the wire BMV is a modified technique using Joseph Mitral Valvuloplasty (JOMIVA) balloon catheter which is being followed in certain centres. Aim To assess the immediate post procedure outcome of over the wire BMV with JOMIVA balloon. Materials and Methods Clinical and echocardiographic parameters of pregnant women with significant mitral stenosis who underwent elective BMV with JOMIVA balloon in our institute from 2005 to 2015 were analysed retrospectively. Severity of breathlessness (New York Heart Association Functional Class), and duration of pregnancy was included in the analysis. Pre procedural echocardiographic parameters which included severity of mitral stenosis and Wilkin’s scoring were analysed. Clinical, haemodynamic and echocardiographic outcomes immediately after the procedure were analysed. Results Among the patients who underwent BMV in our Institute 38 were pregnant women. Twenty four patients (63%) were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class III. All of them were in sinus rhythm except two (5%) who had atrial fibrillation. Thirty four patients (89.5%) were in second trimester of pregnancy at the time of presentation and four (10.5%) were in third trimester. Echocardiographic analysis of the mitral valve showed that the mean Wilkin’s score was 7.3. Mean mitral valve area pre procedure was 0.8 cm2. Mean gradient across the valve was 18 mmHg. Ten patients (26.5%) had mild mitral regurgitation and none had more than mild mitral regurgitation. Thirty six patients had pulmonary hypertension as assessed by tricuspid regurgitation jet velocity. All of them underwent BMV

  7. Development of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) based high altitude balloon (HAB) platform for active aerosol sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateran, S.; Sedan, M. F.; Harithuddin, A. S. M.; Azrad, S.

    2016-10-01

    The knowledge on the abundance and diversity of the minute particles or aerosols in the earth's stratosphere is still in its infancy as aerosol sampling at high-altitude still possess a lot of challenges. Thus far, high-altitude aerosol sampling has been conducted mostly using manned flights, which requires enormous financial and logistical resources. There had been researches for the utilisation of high altitude balloon (HAB) for active and passive aerosol samplings within the stratosphere. However, the gathered samples in the payload were either brought down by controlling the balloon air pressure or were just dropped with a parachute to slow the descend speed in order to reduce the impact upon landing. In most cases, the drop location of the sample are unfavorable such as in the middle of the sea, dense foliage, etc. Hence a system that can actively sample aerosols at high-altitude and improve the delivery method in terms of quality and reliability using unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is designed and tested in this study.

  8. ARCADE-R2 experiment on board BEXUS 17 stratospheric balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbetta, Marco; Boesso, Alessandro; Branz, Francesco; Carron, Andrea; Olivieri, Lorenzo; Prendin, Jacopo; Rodeghiero, Gabriele; Sansone, Francesco; Savioli, Livia; Spinello, Fabio; Francesconi, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of the ARCADE-R2 experiment, a technology demonstrator that aimed to prove the feasibility of small-scale satellite and/or aircraft systems with automatic (a) attitude determination, (b) control and (c) docking capabilities. The experiment embodies a simplified scenario in which an unmanned vehicle mock-up performs rendezvous and docking operations with a fixed complementary unit. The experiment is composed by a supporting structure, which holds a small vehicle with one translational and one rotational degree of freedom, and its fixed target. The dual system features three main custom subsystems: a relative infrared navigation sensor, an attitude control system based on a reaction wheel and a small-scale docking mechanism. The experiment bus is equipped with pressure and temperature sensors, and wind probes to monitor the external environmental conditions. The experiment flew on board the BEXUS 17 stratospheric balloon on October 10, 2013, where several navigation-control-docking sequences were executed and data on the external pressure, temperature, wind speed and direction were collected, characterizing the atmospheric loads applied to the vehicle. This paper describes the critical components of ARCADE-R2 as well as the main results obtained from the balloon flight.

  9. Special considerations for qualifying thin films for super pressure pumpkin ultra long duration balloon missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Magdi A.

    2004-01-01

    The assessment of creep and dynamic response behaviors on materials intended for ultra long duration balloon (ULDB) applications is essential. The first provides needed information for design and fabrication. The second ensures that the film is sufficiently tough to survive the dynamic events during launch and ascent. Characterization and assessment of these two important parameters are discussed in this paper. Visco-elastic behavior of materials in a loaded structure, such as the ULDB film change their geometry significantly over time under load causing possible changes in the load path and the stress distribution. These changes must be held in check to satisfy the functional requirements of the structure over its service life. Typically, the balloon experiences during its service life various environmental conditions each with a different creep response. These are characterized by a simplified load temperature history for the purpose of lifetime response assessment. At mid-latitudes a significant portion of the service life is spent at night, i.e., at low temperature and low load; for the ULDB film this night-time contribution to creep is negligible. By contrast, flight exposure in an Antarctic summer is at an almost constant high temperature and corresponding high pressure. This paper presents the creep behavior of the ULDB film as a function of load, temperature, and time along with an overview of its implementation in the design. In addition, it presents a quantitative assessment on the toughness of the material under dynamic "Snatch" loading.

  10. Microorganisms in the Stratosphere (MIST): In-flight Sterilization with UVC Leds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Gregory Michael; Smith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The stratosphere (10 km to 50 km above sea level) is a unique place on Earth for astrobiological studies of microbes in extreme environments due to the combination of harsh conditions (high ultraviolet radiation, low pressure, desiccation, and low temperatures). Microorganisms in the Stratosphere (MIST) will attempt to characterize the diversity of microbes at these altitudes using a balloon collection device on a meteorological weather balloon. A major challenge of such an aerobiology study is the potential for ground contamination that makes it difficult to distinguish between collected microbes and contaminants. One solution is to use germicidal ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) to sterilize the collection strip. To use this solution, an optimal spatial arrangement of the lights had to be determined to ensure the greatest chance of complete sterilization within the 30 to 60 minute time of balloon ascent. A novel, 3D-printed test stand was developed to experimentally determine viable Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 spore reduction after exposure to ultraviolet radiation at various times, angles, and distances. Taken together, the experimental simulations suggested that the UV LEDs on the MIST flight hardware should be active for at least 15 minutes and mounted within 4 cm of the illuminated surface at any angle to achieve optimal sterilization. These findings will aid in the production of the balloon collection device to ensure pristine stratospheric microbial samples are collected. Flight hardware capable of in-flight self-sterilization will enable future life detection missions to minimize both forward contamination and false positives.

  11. Overview of balloon-borne aerosol measurements with the aerosol counter LOAC, with focus on the ChArMEx 2013 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulac, François; Renard, Jean-Baptiste

    LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter) is a new small optical particle counter/sizer of 250 grams designed to fly under all kinds of balloons. The measurements are conducted at two scattering angles: the first one, at 12°, is used to determine the aerosol particle concentrations in 19 size classes within a diameter range of 0.2-100 mm; the second angle, at 60°, is used to discriminate between different types of particles dominating different size classes. The sensor particularly discriminates wet or liquid particles, mineral dust, soot carbon particles and salts. Comparisons with measurements from other sensors at the surface are shown. We shall give a quick review of balloon-borne experiences since 2011 with LOAC under all kinds of balloons including tethered, sounding, open stratospheric, and new boundary-layer pressurized drifting balloons (BLBP) from CNES. Observation domains include the atmospheric surface layer, the boundary layer, the free troposphere and the lower stratosphere up to more than 35 km in altitude. Operations encompass a variety of environments including the Arctic (Reykjavik, Island, and Kiruna, Sweden), Brazil (Sao Paolo), the western Mediterranean Basin, southwestern France, peri-urban (Ile de France) and urban areas (Paris and Vienna). Results from the various campaigns will be illustrated including the study of fog events, urban aerosols, Saharan dust transport over France, stratospheric soot... Emphasis will be put on the ChArMEx campaign (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment) performed in summer 2013 in the Mediterranean basin: 19 LOAC flights have been performed under meteorological balloons and 12 under low altitude drifting balloons, most of them from Minorca Island (Spain) in June and early July and others from Levant Island (south of France) in late July and early August. Most of the flights were coupled with ozone concentration measurements (see presentation by F. Gheusi et al.). LOAC balloons were especially, but not

  12. Balloon Pump with Floating Valves for Portable Liquid Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Morimoto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a balloon pump with floating valves to control the discharge flow rates of sample solutions. Because the floating valves were made from a photoreactive resin, the shapes of the floating valves could be controlled by employing different exposure patterns without any change in the pump configurations. Owing to the simple preparation process of the pump, we succeeded in changing the discharge flow rates in accordance with the number and length of the floating valves. Because our methods could be used to easily prepare balloon pumps with arbitrary discharge properties, we achieved several microfluidic operations by the integration of the balloon pumps with microfluidic devices. Therefore, we believe that the balloon pump with floating valves will be a useful driving component for portable microfluidic systems.

  13. Low Cost Variable Conductance Heat Pipe for Balloon Payload Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — While continuously increasing in complexity, the payloads of terrestrial high altitude balloons need a thermal management system to reject their waste heat and to...

  14. 10 meter Sub-Orbital Large Balloon Reflector (LBR) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Besides serving as a launch vehicle, the carrier balloon provides a stable mount for the enclosed telescope. Looking up, the LBR will serve as a telescope. Looking...

  15. Absence of Bacteria on Coronary Angioplasty Balloons from Unselected Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gorm Mørk; Nilsson, Martin; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2015-01-01

    if bacterial DNA from primarily oral bacteria could be detected on coronary angioplasty balloons by use of an optimized sampling process combined with an internally validated sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Coronary angioplasty balloons and control samples from a total of 45 unselected...... angioplasty balloons are unlikely to be useful for detection of bacteria with current PCR techniques in unselected patients with coronary artery disease, more studies are warranted to determine the extent to which bacteria contribute to atherosclerosis and its clinical manifestations and whether the presence......, and translocation of bacteria from the oral cavity to the coronary arteries may play a role in the development of coronary artery disease. Very few studies have used angioplasty balloons for in vivo sampling from diseased coronary arteries, and with varying results. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess...

  16. Ohmic scaling based on current diffusive ballooning mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Masatoshi; Itoh, Sanae [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Itoh, Kimitaka

    1996-01-01

    Based on the anomalous transport model due to current diffusive ballooning mode turbulence, the global energy confinement time in a tokamak with Ohmic heating is theoretically studied. Relations to empirical scaling laws are also discussed. (author)

  17. Optimising a balloon-borne polarimeter in the hard X-ray domain: From the PoGOLite Pathfinder to PoGO+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, M.; Jackson, M.; Kawano, T.; Kiss, M.; Kole, M.; Mikhalev, V.; Moretti, E.; Takahashi, H.; Pearce, M.

    2016-09-01

    PoGOLite is a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter dedicated to the study of point sources. Compton scattered events are registered using an array of plastic scintillator units to determine the polarisation of incident X-rays in the energy range 20-240 keV. In 2013, a near circumpolar balloon flight of 14 days duration was completed after launch from Esrange, Sweden, resulting in a measurement of the linear polarisation of the Crab emission. Building on the experience gained from this Pathfinder flight, the polarimeter is being modified to improve performance for a second flight in 2016. Such optimisations, based on Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations, take into account the source characteristics, the instrument response and the background environment which is dominated by atmospheric neutrons. This paper describes the optimisation of the polarimeter and details the associated increase in performance. The resulting design, PoGO+, is expected to improve the Minimum Detectable Polarisation (MDP) for the Crab from 19.8% to 11.1% for a 5 day flight. Assuming the same Crab polarisation fraction as measured during the 2013 flight, this improvement in MDP will allow a 5σ constrained result. It will also allow the study of the nebula emission only (Crab off-pulse) and Cygnus X-1 if in the hard state.

  18. High Altitude Ballooning as a Mechanism for Teaching NGSS-Related Geoscience Content and Classroom Activities for Pre- and In-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, M. A.; Kroeger, T.

    2014-12-01

    Training in-service and pre-service K-12 science teachers to understand and structure appropriate instructional opportunities for addressing cross-cutting concepts and engineering design with students in their classrooms is critical given the emphases in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). One mechanism for doing so involves utilizing high altitude ballooning as a tool for providing authentic investigation opportunities in the geosciences. As individual states review and make decisions about what role the NGSS will play in their standards, it is important for college and university science teacher preparation programs to prepare current and future teachers to become more comfortable with designing research investigations, controlling variables, anticipating cross-disciplinary connections, refining and analyzing data, and communicating the findings of real and contrived scientific investigation. Many undergraduate and professional development research possibilities exist through high altitude ballooning, including: microbiological experimentation at high altitudes, microcontroller use for context-specific data collection, near-space system development and design, balloon flight-track modeling, and more. Example projects and findings will be shared. Equally important to creating appropriate learning activities to address NGSS expectations is understanding the context-specific needs and available resources existing in K-12 science classrooms. Findings from semi-structured interviews with a focus group of pre-service and practicing teachers will be presented -- from both participants and non-participants in high altitude ballooning activities -- related to how high altitude ballooning could be (or already is) being used to meet NGSS and state science standards. The two primary outcomes of the presentation are to: 1) inform science teacher preparation programs for purposes of structuring useful and appropriate science methods activities; 2) frame the K-12

  19. An improved balloon snake for HIFU image-guided system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Bing; Xu, Xian-Ze; Le, Yi; Xu, Feng-Qiu

    2014-07-01

    Target segmentation in ultrasound images is a key step in the definition of the intro-operative planning of high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy. This paper presents an improvement for the balloon snake in segmentation. A sign function, designed by the edge map and the moving snake, is added to give the direction of the balloon force on the moving snake separately. Segmentation results are demonstrated on ultrasound images and the effectiveness and convenience shown in applications.

  20. Intrauterine tamponade balloon use in the treatment of uterine inversion

    OpenAIRE

    Haeri, Sina; Rais, Sheliza; Monks, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Uterine inversion is a rare but life-threatening obstetrical emergency that occurs when the fundus of the uterus prolapses through the cervix, hence turning the uterus inside out. In this case report, we present our experience using an intrauterine tamponade balloon for management of uterine inversion, and a review of the literature. The utility of an intrauterine tamponade balloon in cases of uterine inversion, especially when maternal medical conditions preclude the use of uterotonics, or r...

  1. The Hubble party balloon and the expanding universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendri, G.; Rosi, T.; Oss, S.

    2016-09-01

    We show that the metaphor of the inflated balloon used to describe expanding space-time according to the Hubble law can be transformed into a simple laboratory experiment. We obtain, in terms of measured recession speeds and distances of ink dots drawn on a party balloon, easy renditions of various cosmological models, such as the static one and the Einstein-De Sitter universe.

  2. Analysis of current diffusive ballooning mode in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Morihisa [Faculty of Engineering, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan); Fukuyama, Atsushi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    2000-07-01

    The effect of finite gyroradius on the current diffusive ballooning mode is examined. Starting from the reduced MHD equations including turbulent transports, coupling with drift motion and finite gyroradius effect of ions, we derive a ballooning mode equation with complex transport coefficients. The eigenfrequency, saturation level and thermal diffusivity are evaluated numerically from the marginal stability condition. Preliminary results of their parameter dependence are presented. (author)

  3. Isotopic abundances of stratospheric ozone from balloon-borne high-resolution infrared solar spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Kosters, J. J.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    IR solar absorption spectra at 0.002-0.0003/cm resolution in the 10-micron region obtained during two balloon flights near 32 deg N latitude are examined to determine the isotopic ratios of (O-16)(O-16)(O-18) and (O-16)(O-18)(O-16) relative to normal ozone in the stratosphere. For November 18, 1987, the results show column-averaged isotopic enhancement ratios of 1.20 + or - 0.14 and 1.40 + or - 0.18 for (O-16)(O-18)(O-16)/(O-16)(O-16)(O-16) and (O-16)(O-16)(O-18)/(O-16)(O-16)(O-16), respectively. The corresponding values for June 6, 1988, show ratios of 1.16 + or - 0.08 and 1.25 + or - 0.12. The results are compared with heavy-to-normal O3 ratios obtained using other techniques.

  4. B-MINE, the balloon-borne microcalorimeter nuclear line explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silver, E; Schnopper, H; Jones, C

    2001-01-01

    introduces the concept of focusing optics and microcalorimeter spectroscopy to nuclear line emission astrophysics. B-MINE has a thin, plastic foil telescope multilayered to maximize the reflectivity in a 20 keV band centered at 68 keV and a microcalorimeter array optimized for the same energy band....... This combination provides a reduced background, an energy resolution of 50 eV and a 3sigma sensitivity in 10(6) s of 3.3 x 10(-7) ph cm(-2) s(-1) at 68 keV. During the course of a long duration balloon flight, B-MINE could carry out a detailed study of the Ti-44 emission line centroid and width in CAS A....

  5. Joint US-USSR Long duration Antarctic Mars calibration Balloon (LAMB) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, S. R.; Trombka, J. I.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R.; Squyres, S. W.; Surkov, Iu. A.; Moskaleva, L. P.; Shcheglov, O.; Mitugov, A. G.; Rester, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Long duration Antarctic Mars calibration Balloon (LAMB) project has been established at Goddard Space Flight Center for the evaluation and cross calibration of U.S. and USSR remote sensing gamma-ray and neutron detectors. These detectors are analogs of those flown on the Soviet Phobos mission around Mars and those to be flown on the upcoming U.S. Mars Observer mission. Cosmic rays, which are normally filtered out by the atmosphere, and the earth's magnetic field, will induce gamma-ray and neutron emissions from about a half ton of simulated Mars soil aboard the gondola. The cross calibration of these instruments should greatly facilitate the data analysis from both missions and play a role in U.S.-USSR cooperation in space.

  6. Preliminary Results from the GPS-Reflections Mediterranean Balloon Experiment (GPSR MEBEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, James L.; Ruffini, Giulio; Rius, Antonio; Cardellach, Estelle; Masters, Dallas; Armathys, Michael; Zavorotny, Valery

    2000-01-01

    An experiment to collect bistatically scattered GPS signals from a balloon at 37 km altitude has been conducted. This experiment represented the highest altitude to date that such signals were successfully recorded. The flight took place in August 1999 over the Mediterranean sea, between a launch in Sicily and recovery near Nerpio, a town in the Sierra de Segura, Albacete province of Huelva, Spain. Results from this experiment are presented, showing the waveform shape as compared to theoretical calculations. These results will be used to validate analytical models which form the basis of wind vector retrieval algorithms. These algorithms are already being validated from aircraft altitudes, but may be applied to data from future spaceborne GPS receivers. Surface wind data from radiosondes were used for comparison. This experiment was a cooperative project between NASA, the IEEC in Barcelona, and the University of Colorado at Boulder.

  7. Preliminary Results from the GPS-Reflections Mediterranean Balloon Experiment (GPSR-MEBEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, James L.; Ruffini, Giulio; Rius, Antonio; Cardellach, Estelle; Masters, Dallas; Armatys, Michael; Zavorotny, Valery; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An experiment to collect bistatically scattered GPS signals from a balloon at 37 km altitude has been conducted. This experiment represented the highest altitude to date that such signals were successfully recorded. The flight took place in August 1999 over the Mediterranean sea, between a launch in Sicily and recovery near Nerpio, a town in the Sierra de Segura, Albacete province of Huelva, Spain. Results from this experiment are presented, showing the waveform shape as compared to theoretical calculations. These results will be used to validate analytical models which form the basis of wind vector retrieval algorithms. These algorithms are already being validated from aircraft altitudes, but may be applied to data from future spacebourne GPS receivers. Surface wind data from radiosondes were used for comparison. This experiment was a cooperative project between NASA, the IEEC in Barcelona, and the University of Colorado at Boulder.

  8. Avionics and Power Management for Low-Cost High-Altitude Balloon Science Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jeffrey; Roberts, Anthony; McNatt, Jeremiah

    2016-01-01

    High-altitude balloons (HABs) have become popular as educational and scientific platforms for planetary research. This document outlines key components for missions where low cost and rapid development are desired. As an alternative to ground-based vacuum and thermal testing, these systems can be flight tested at comparable costs. Communication, solar, space, and atmospheric sensing experiments often require environments where ground level testing can be challenging or impossible in certain cases. When performing HAB research the ability to monitor the status of the platform and gather data is key for both scientific and recoverability aspects of the mission. A few turnkey platform solutions are outlined that leverage rapidly evolving open-source engineering ecosystems. Rather than building custom components from scratch, these recommendations attempt to maximize simplicity and cost of HAB platforms to make launches more accessible to everyone.

  9. Reaching High Altitudes on Mars with an Inflatable Hypersonic Drag Balloon (Ballute)

    CERN Document Server

    Griebel, Hannes

    2010-01-01

    The concept of probing the atmosphere of planet Mars by means of a hypersonic drag balloon, a device known as a “ballute”, is a novel approach to planetary science. In this concept, the probe deploys an inflatable drag body out in space and may then enter the atmosphere either once or several times until it slowly descends towards the ground, taking continuous atmospheric and other readings across a large altitude and ground range. Hannes Griebel discusses the theory behind such a mission along with experience gained during its practical implementation, such as mission design, manufacturing, packing and deployment techniques as well as ground and flight tests. The author also studies other ballute applications, specifically emergency low Earth orbit recovery and delivering payloads to high altitude landing sites on Mars.

  10. B-MINE, the balloon-borne microcalorimeter nuclear line explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silver, E.; Schnopper, H.; Jones, C.

    2002-01-01

    introduces the concept of focusing optics and microcalorimeter spectroscopy to nuclear line emission astrophysics. B-MINE has a thin, plastic foil telescope multilayered to maximize the reflectivity in a 20 keV band centered at 68 keV and a microcalorimeter array optimized for the same energy band....... This combination provides a reduced background, an energy resolution of 50 eV and a 3σ sensitivity in 106 s of 3.3 × 10-7 ph cm-2 s-1 at 68 keV. During the course of a long duration balloon flight. B-MINE could carry out a detailed study of the 44Ti emission line centroid and width in CASA....

  11. B-MINE, the balloon-borne microcalorimeter nuclear line explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silver, E; Schnopper, H; Jones, C

    2001-01-01

    introduces the concept of focusing optics and microcalorimeter spectroscopy to nuclear line emission astrophysics. B-MINE has a thin, plastic foil telescope multilayered to maximize the reflectivity in a 20 keV band centered at 68 keV and a microcalorimeter array optimized for the same energy band....... This combination provides a reduced background, an energy resolution of 50 eV and a 3sigma sensitivity in 10(6) s of 3.3 x 10(-7) ph cm(-2) s(-1) at 68 keV. During the course of a long duration balloon flight, B-MINE could carry out a detailed study of the Ti-44 emission line centroid and width in CAS A....

  12. Cutting balloons for the treatment of vascular stenoses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsetis, Dimitrios [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Radiology, Medical School of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria [St George' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    The aim of this article is to review the mechanism, technical characteristics, biological response and clinical applications of cutting balloon angioplasty in peripheral vessels. The cutting balloon is a non-compliant, balloon catheter equipped with three-to-four microtome-sharp atherotomes. When used appropriately, it is safe and easy to use, with a high immediate success rate and few complications, provided oversizing is avoided. There is some evidence that pre-dilation with a standard or high-pressure balloon may also predispose to vascular rupture. The cutting balloon has proved to be beneficial in treating difficult complex lesions in the coronary arteries. Early experience in non-coronary vessels shows that cutting balloon angioplasty can be used to treat peripheral bypass anastomotic and haemodialysis fistula stenoses that are resistant to conventional high-inflation pressures. Its application in de novo peripheral arterial lesions and non-coronary in-stent restenosis is still under discussion. Theoretically, this device induces a smaller degree of vessel wall injury localised to the area of incisions and sparing the interincisional segments; however, this postulated reduction in restenosis rates has not been confirmed in clinical practice. (orig.)

  13. Catching Comet's Particles in the Earth's Atmosphere by Using Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potashko, Oleksandr; Viso, Michel

    The project is intended to catch cometary particles in the atmosphere by using balloons. The investigation is based upon knowledge that the Earth crosses the comet’s tails during the year. One can catch these particles at different altitudes in the atmosphere. So, we will be able to gradually advance in the ability to launch balloons from low to high altitudes and try to catch particles from different comet tails. The maximum altitude that we have to reach is 40 km. Both methods - distance observation and cometary samples from mission Stardust testify to the presence of organic components in comet’s particles. It would be useful to know more details about this organic matter for astrobiology; besides, the factor poses danger to the Earth. Moreover, it is important to prove that it is possible to get fundamental scientific results at low cost. In the last 5 years launching balloons has become popular and this movement looks like hackers’ one - as most of them occur without launch permission to airspace. The popularity of ballooning is connected with low cost of balloon, GPS unit, video recording unit. If you use iPhone, you have a light solution with GPS, video, picture and control function in one unit. The price of balloon itself begins from $50; it depends on maximum altitude, payload weight and material. Many university teams realized balloon launching and reached even stratosphere at an altitude of 33 km. But most of them take only video and picture. Meanwhile, it is possible to carry out scientific experiments by ballooning, for example to collect comet particles. There is rich experience at the moment of the use of mineral, chemical and isotopic analysis techniques and data of the comet’s dust after successful landing of StarDust capsule with samples in 2006. Besides, we may use absolutely perfect material to catch particles in the atmosphere, which was used by cosmic missions such as Stardust and Japanese Hayabusa. As to balloon launches, we could use

  14. A comparison of balloon-expandable-stent implantation with balloon angioplasty in patients with coronary artery disease. Benestent Study Group.

    OpenAIRE

    Serruys, P.W.; de Jaegere, P; Kiemeneij, F.; Macaya, C; Rutsch, W; Heyndrickx, G.; Emanuelsson, H.; Marco, J.; Legrand, Victor; Materne, P.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Balloon-expandable coronary-artery stents were developed to prevent coronary restenosis after coronary angioplasty. These devices hold coronary vessels open at sites that have been dilated. However, it is unknown whether stenting improves long-term angiographic and clinical outcomes as compared with standard balloon angioplasty. METHODS: A total of 520 patients with stable angina and a single coronary-artery lesion were randomly assigned to either stent implantation (262 patients)...

  15. Optical coherence tomography monitoring of angioplasty balloon inflation in a deployment tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarnoush, Hamed; Vergnole, Sébastien; Bourezak, Rafik; Boulet, Benoit; Lamouche, Guy

    2010-08-01

    We present an innovative integration of an intravascular optical coherence tomography probe into a computerized balloon deployment system to monitor the balloon inflation process. The high-resolution intraluminal imaging of the balloon provides a detailed assessment of the balloon quality and, consequently, a technique to improve the balloon manufacturing process. A custom-built swept-source optical coherence tomography system is used for real-time imaging. A semicompliant balloon with a nominal diameter of 4 mm is fabricated for the experiments. Imaging results correspond to balloon deployment in air and inside an artery phantom. A characterization of the balloon diameter, wall thickness, compliance, and elastic modulus is provided, based on image segmentation. Using the images obtained from the probe pullback, a three-dimensional visualization of the inflated balloon is presented.

  16. Ballooning mode spectrum in general toroidal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewar, R.L.; Glasser, A.H.

    1982-04-01

    A WKB formalism for constructing normal modes of short-wavelength ideal hydromagnetic, pressure-driven instabilities (ballooning modes) in general toroidal magnetic containment devices with sheared magnetic fields is developed. No incompressibility approximation is made. A dispersion relation is obtained from the eigenvalues of a fourth order system of ordinary differential equations to be solved by integrating along a line of force. Higher order calculations are performed to find the amplitude equation and the phase change at a caustic. These conform to typical WKB results. In axisymmetric systems, the ray equations are integrable, and semiclassical quantization leads to a growth rate spectrum consisting of an infinity of discrete eigenvalues, bounded above by an accumulation point. However, each eigenvalue is infinitely degenerate. In the nonaxisymmetric case, the rays are unbounded in a four dimensional phase space, and semiclassical quantization breaks down, leading to broadening of the discrete eigenvalues and accumulation point of the axisymmetric case into continuum bands. Analysis of a model problem indicates that the broadening of the discrete eigenvalues is numerically very small, the dominant effect being broadening of the accumulation point.

  17. Percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty in mitral stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Oh, Byung Hee; Park, Kyung Ju; Kim, Seung Hyup; Lee, Young Woo; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-02-15

    Percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty(PBV) was successfully performed in 8 mitral stenosis patients for recent 3 months. Five patients have aortic insufficiencies also and two patients have mitral regurgitations below grade II/IV. All patients showed sinus rhythm on EKG, and had no mitral valvular calcification on echocardiography and fluoroscopy. PBV resulted in an increase in mitral valve area from 1.22{+-}0.22 to 2.57{+-}0.86 cm{sup 2}, a decrease in mean left atrial pressure from 23.4{+-}9.6 to 7.5{+-}3.4 mmHg and a decrease in mean mitral pressure gradient from 21.3{+-}9.4 to 6.8{+-}3.1 mmHg. There were no significant complications except 2 cases of newly appeared and mildly aggravated mitral regurgitation. We believe that PBV will become a treatment modality of choice replacing surgical commissurotomy or valve replacement in a group of mitral stenosis patients, because of its effectiveness and safety.

  18. Kissing balloon inflation in percutaneous coronary interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgueglia, Gregory A; Chevalier, Bernard

    2012-08-01

    Bifurcation lesions are the most frequently approached complex coronary lesions in everyday interventional practice. Bifurcations complexity relies essentially on their very specific anatomy that is imperfectly handled by current coronary devices and, despite dedicated techniques and drug-eluting stents, percutaneous coronary interventions directed toward the treatment of bifurcations are technically demanding and require proper execution. Kissing balloon (KB) inflation was the first specific bifurcation technique to have been developed for percutaneous bifurcation interventions and continues to currently play an important role. Indeed, KB has been proposed to optimize stent apposition, improve side branch access while correcting stent deformation or distortion. Over the years, the KB technique has been deeply investigated by many different methods, from bench testing and computer simulations to in vivo intravascular imaging and clinical studies, producing a large amount of data pointing out the benefits and limitations of the technique. We sought to provide here a comprehensive overview of all those aspects. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Burn Injury Arise From Flying Balloon Toys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalcin Kulahci

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Many of peoples are faced minor or major burn injuries in their life. Even the most widespread burn cause is flame injuries, too different burn cause pointed out in literature like Acetylen burns. The cases which imply in literature, mostly causes from explosion of high pressure acetylene tube, metal oxygene patch flame or carbide lamp using from cave explorers. An interesting acetylene burn cause in Turkey was publised by the authors. This cases was to come into being from flying toy balloons flame. 80 person was injured from flying toy ballons flame in a meeting in 2002. Although this potential risks of acetylene, helium have not any of some risk. But helium was provided from other countries and have more price. The injuries which caused from acetylene burns like 1st -2nd degree burns. Consequently that was known helium is more avaliable for using in toy sector, and never cause burn injuries like this. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(4.000: 291-296

  20. Burn Injury Arise From Flying Balloon Toys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalcin Kulahci

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Many of peoples are faced minor or major burn injuries in their life. Even the most widespread burn cause is flame injuries, too different burn cause pointed out in literature like Acetylen burns. The cases which imply in literature, mostly causes from explosion of high pressure acetylene tube, metal oxygene patch flame or carbide lamp using from cave explorers. An interesting acetylene burn cause in Turkey was publised by the authors. This cases was to come into being from flying toy balloons flame. 80 person was injured from flying toy ballons flame in a meeting in 2002. Although this potential risks of acetylene, helium have not any of some risk. But helium was provided from other countries and have more price. The injuries which caused from acetylene burns like 1st -2nd degree burns. Consequently that was known helium is more avaliable for using in toy sector, and never cause burn injuries like this. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(4: 291-296

  1. Special Considerations for Qualifying Thin Films for Supper Pressure Pumpkin Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, M.

    Pumpkin type super pressure balloons require much less stringent mechanical requirements on the envelope film material when compared to spherical super pressure type balloons. However, since suitable thin films are typically viscoelastic in nature, their creep characteristics must be fully characterized and must not exceed specific and predetermined design limits. Proper assessment of materials limits to meet these design limits requires creep-load-temperature data that characterizes the performance of the material over a time that exceeds the duration of the design service life by some specified margin. Contrary to the behavior of materials with purely elastic response, visco-elastic materials such as these considered for the ULDB design, change their geometry under sustained loading over time. This change is usually reflected by exhibiting a significant visco-elastic component over the service life of the mission. For that regime of large visco-elastic response, where the material is highly nonlinear, a certain load-temperature threshold can be reached where the creep is limited by an asymptote that depends on both the temperature and load level. Such creep is recoverable, although the recovery period may be much longer than the 100 day design service life of the ULDB structure plus the factor of safety required for the design. For a typical flight, the most significant creep occurs at the highest temperature, which also produces the highest internal pressure. At mid- latitudes a significant portion of the service life is spent at night, i.e. at low temperature and low load; for the ULDB film, this nighttime contribution to creep is insignificant in comparison to any daytime contribution. By contrast, flight exposure in an Antarctic summer is at an almost constant high temperature and corresponding high pressure. This response behavior must be sufficiently characterized to serve the needs of the structural design and performance predictions of the vehicle in

  2. New Heights with High-Altitude Balloon Launches for Effective Student Learning and Environmental Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, H. D.; Dailey, J. F.; Takehara, D.; Krueger, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Over a seven-year period Taylor University, an undergraduate liberal art school, has successfully launched and recovered over 200 sophisticated student payloads to altitudes between 20-33 km (100% success with rapid recovery) with flight times between 2 to 6 hrs. All of the payloads included two GPS tracking systems, cameras and monitors, a 110 kbit down link, an uplink command capability for educational experiments (K-12 and undergrad). Launches were conducted during the day and night, with multiple balloons, with up to 10 payloads for experiments, and under varying weather and upper atmospheric conditions. The many launches in a short period of time allowed the payload bus design to evolve toward increased performance, reliability, standardization, simplicity, and modularity for low-cost launch services. Through NSF and NASA grants, the program has expanded leading to over 50 universities trained at workshops to implement high altitude balloon launches in the classroom. A spin-off company (StraoStar Systems LLC) now sells the high-altitude balloon system and facilitates networking between schools. This high-altitude balloon program helps to advance knowledge and understanding across disciplines by giving students and faculty rapid and low-cost access to earth/ecology remote sensing from high altitude, insitu and limb atmospheric measurements, near-space stratosphere measurements, and IR/UV/cosmic ray access to the heavens. This new capability is possible by exposing students to recent advances in MEMS technology, nanotechnology, wireless telecommunication systems, GPS, DSPs and other microchip miniaturizations to build < 4 kg payloads. The high-altitude balloon program provides an engaging laboratory, gives challenging field experiences, reaches students from diverse backgrounds, encourages collaboration among science faculty, and provides quantitative assessment of the learning outcomes. Furthermore this program has generated many front page news reports along

  3. Intragastric balloon followed by diet vs intragastric balloon followed by another balloon: a prospective study on 100 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genco, Alfredo; Cipriano, Massimiliano; Bacci, Vincenzo; Maselli, Roberta; Paone, Emanuela; Lorenzo, Michele; Basso, Nicola

    2010-11-01

    Aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of BioEnterics Intragastric Balloon (BIB®) followed by diet with BIB followed by another BIB. A prospective study was designed: a homogeneous group of 100 obese patients (age range 25-35, BMI range 40.0-44.9, M/F ratio 1/4) was allocated into two groups according to procedure: BIB (6 months) followed by diet therapy (7 months; group A = 50 pts), BIB positioning followed by another BIB after 1 month (group B = 50 pts). Baseline demographics were similar in both groups (Group A 10M/40F; mean age 31.4 ± 2.6; range 25-35; mean weight 106.3 ± 12.5 Kg; range 88-150; mean BMI 42.6±2.7 Kg/m(2); range 40.2-43.8; Group B 10M/40F; mean age 32.1 ± 2.1; range 25-35; mean weight 107.1 ± 11.9 Kg; range 90-150; mean BMI 42.9 ± 2.3; range 40.2-43.9). In both groups, weight loss parameters (Kg, BMI, and % EBL) were considered. Statistics were by Fisher's exact test (p < 0.05 was considered significant). At the time of 1st BIB removal, weight loss parameters in both groups were not significantly different: Group A: mean weight was 83.7±19.1 (range 52-151); mean BMI 34.2 ± 3.9 (range 32.4-43.8); and mean %EBL 43.5 ± 21.1 (range 0-68). Group B: mean weight was 84.9 ± 18.3 (range 50-148); mean BMI 34.8 ± 3.3 (range 32.4-43.8); and mean % EBL 45.2 ± 22.5% (range 0-68). At the study end, weight loss parameters were significantly lower in patients who underwent consecutive BIB (p < 0.05): mean BMI was 30.9 ± 7.2 Kg/m(2) (range 24-40), and 35.9 ± 9.7 Kg/m(2) (range 34-42); mean % EBL was 51.9 ± 24.6% (range 0-100) and 25.1 ± 26.2% (range 0-100) in group B and A, respectively. As compared with diet, a second intragastric balloon can be positioned without difficulties, achieving good results with continuous weight loss.

  4. Validation of GOMOS vertical profiles using the stratospheric balloon-borne AMON and SALOMON UV-visible spetrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, J.-B.; Chartier, M.; Berthet, G.; Robert, C.; Lemaire, T.; Pepe, F.; George, M.; Pirre, M.

    2003-08-01

    The stratospheric balloon-borne UV-visible spectrometers AMON and SALOMON, which use stars and Moon as light source, respectively, are involved in the validation of the UV-visible spectrometer GOMOS onboard ENVISAT, which uses also stars as light source. A low spectral resolution UV-visible spectrometer, AMON-RA, is also implanted in the AMON gondola, for the analysis of the chromatic scintillation effect. A flight of SALOMON occurred in September 19, 2002, at mid latitude from Aire sur l'Adour, France. An AMON (and AMON-RA) flight occurred at high latitude from Kiruna (northern Sweden) on March 1, 2003. The vertical profiles are compared to those obtained by GOMOS. Taking into account the effect of the chromatic scintillation on the transmission spectra, recommendations will be proposed in order to improve the GOMOS retrievals.

  5. Thermal architecture for the SPIDER flight cryostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, J. E.; Ade, P. A. R.; Amiri, M.; Benton, S. J.; Bihary, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Bonetti, J. A.; Bryan, S. A.; Burger, B.; Chiang, H. C.; Contaldi, C. R.; Crill, B. P.; Doré, O.; Farhang, M.; Filippini, J.; Fissel, L. M.; Gandilo, N. N.; Golwala, S. R.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G.; Holmes, W.; Hristov, V. V.; Irwin, K. D.; Jones, W. C.; Kuo, C. L.; MacTavish, C. J.; Mason, P. V.; Montroy, T. E.; Morford, T. A.; Netterfield, C. B.; O'Dea, D. T.; Rahlin, A. S.; Reintsema, C. D.; Ruhl, J. E.; Runyan, M. C.; Schenker, M. A.; Shariff, J. A.; Soler, J. D.; Trangsrud, A.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, R. S.; Turner, A. D.

    2010-07-01

    We describe the cryogenic system for SPIDER, a balloon-borne microwave polarimeter that will map 8% of the sky with degree-scale angular resolution. The system consists of a 1284 L liquid helium cryostat and a 16 L capillary-filled superfluid helium tank, which provide base operating temperatures of 4 K and 1.5 K, respectively. Closed-cycle 3He adsorption refrigerators supply sub-Kelvin cooling power to multiple focal planes, which are housed in monochromatic telescope inserts. The main helium tank is suspended inside the vacuum vessel with thermally insulating fiberglass flexures, and shielded from thermal radiation by a combination of two vapor cooled shields and multi-layer insulation. This system allows for an extremely low instrumental background and a hold time in excess of 25 days. The total mass of the cryogenic system, including cryogens, is approximately 1000 kg. This enables conventional long duration balloon flights. We will discuss the design, thermal analysis, and qualification of the cryogenic system.

  6. Thermal architecture for the SPIDER flight cryostat

    CERN Document Server

    Gudmundsson, J E; Amiri, M; Benton, S J; Bihary, R; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Bonetti, J A; Bryan, S A; Chiang, H C; Contaldi, C R; Crill, B P; O'Dea, D; Farhang, M; Filippini, J P; Fissel, L M; Gandilo, N N; Golwala, S R; Halpern, M; Hasselfield, M; Helson, K R; Hilton, G; Holmes, W; Hristov, V V; Irwin, K D; Jones, W C; Kuo, C L; MacTavish, C J; Mason, P V; Montroy, T E; Morford, T A; Netterfield, C B; Rahlin, A S; Reintsema, C D; Ruhl, J E; Runyan, M C; Schenker, M A; Shariff, J A; Soler, J D; Trangsrud, A; Tucker, C; Tucker, R S; Turner, A D; 10.1117/12.857925

    2011-01-01

    We describe the cryogenic system for SPIDER, a balloon-borne microwave polarimeter that will map 8% of the sky with degree-scale angular resolution. The system consists of a 1284 L liquid helium cryostat and a 16 L capillary-filled superfluid helium tank, which provide base operating temperatures of 4 K and 1.5 K, respectively. Closed-cycle helium-3 adsorption refrigerators supply sub-Kelvin cooling power to multiple focal planes, which are housed in monochromatic telescope inserts. The main helium tank is suspended inside the vacuum vessel with thermally insulating fiberglass flexures, and shielded from thermal radiation by a combination of two vapor cooled shields and multi-layer insulation. This system allows for an extremely low instrumental background and a hold time in excess of 25 days. The total mass of the cryogenic system, including cryogens, is approximately 1000 kg. This enables conventional long duration balloon flights. We will discuss the design, thermal analysis, and qualification of the cryog...

  7. Extradural balloon obliteration of the empty sella report of three cases (intrasellar balloon obliteration).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazioğlu, N; Akar, Z; Ak, H; Işlak, C; Koçer, N; Seçkin, M S; Kuday, C

    1999-01-01

    Empty sella syndrome is an anatomical and clinical entity composed of intrasellar reposition of the CSF and compression of the pituitary tissue, resulting in a clinical picture of headache, visual field defect, CSF rhinorrhea and some mild endocrinological disturbances. While some cases are primary with no appreciable aetiology, secondary cases are associated with prior operation or radiotherapy of the region. In our series, 3 patients with primary empty sella syndrome were treated by the current approach of extradural filling of the sellar cavity. This technique was first described by Guiot and widely accepted thereafter. We used a detachable silicon balloon filled with HEMA or liquid silicone for obliteration of the sellar cavity and obtained clinically satisfactory results without complications. Visual symptoms regressed and headache disappeared. But at long term follow-up all the balloons were found to be deflated. Despite the facility and efficacy of the technique we do not recommend it in the treatment of the empty sella because the filling of the sella is only transient and relapses may occur.

  8. Coolability of ballooned VVER bundles with pellet relocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hozer, Z.; Nagy, I.; Windberg, P.; Vimi, A. [AEKI, P.O.box 49, Budapest, H-1525 (Hungary)

    2009-06-15

    During a LOCA incident the high pressure in the fuel rods can lead to clad ballooning and the debris of fuel pellets can fill the enlarged volume. The evaluation of the role of these two effects on the coolability of VVER type fuel bundles was the main objective of the experimental series. The tests were carried out in the modified configuration of the CODEX facility. 19-rod electrically heated VVER type bundle was used. The test section was heated up to 600 deg. C in steam atmosphere and the bundle was quenched from the bottom by cold water. Three series of tests were performed: 1. Reference bundle with fuel rods without ballooning, with uniform power profile. 2. Bundle with 86% blockage rate and with uniform power profile. The blockage rate was reached by superimposing hollow sleeves on all 19 fuel rods. 3. Bundle with 86% blockage rate and with local power peak in the ballooned area. The local power peak was produced by the local reduction the cross section of the internal heater bar inside of the fuel rods. In all three bundle configurations three different cooling water flow-rates were applied. The experimental results confirmed that a VVER bundle with even 86% blockage rate remains coolable after a LOCA event. The ballooned section creates some obstacles for the cooling water during reflood of the bundle, but this effect causes only a short delay in the cooling down of the hot fuel rods. Earlier tests on the coolability of ballooned bundles were performed only with Western type bundles with square fuel lattice. The present test series was the first confirmation of the coolability of VVER type bundles with triangular lattice. The accumulation of fuel pellet debris in the ballooned volume results in a local power peak, which leads to further slowing down of quench front. The first tests indicated that the effect of local power peak was less significant on the delay of cooling down than the effect of ballooning. (authors)

  9. Balloon dacryocystoplasty: Incomplete versus complete obstruction of the nasolacrimal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Sang Hoon; Han, Young Min; Chung, Gyung Ho; Kim, Chong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul [Chung Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ho Young [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    Balloon dilatation of nasolacrimal drainage apparatus was attempted for the treatment of stenoses or obstructures of the nasolacrimal system in 49 eyes of 41 consecutive patients with complete obstructions and 16 eyes of 14 patients with incomplete obstructions. These two groups were compared with regards to the effectiveness of balloon dacryocystoplasty. All patients suffered from severe epiphora had already undergone multiple probings. A 0.018 inch hair or ball guide wire was introduced through the superior punctum into the inferior meatus of the nasal cavity and pulled out through the nasal aperture using a hemostat under nasal endoscopy. A deflated angiography balloon catheter was then introduced in a retrograde direction and dilated under fluoroscopic control. No major complications occurred in any of the patients. At 7 days after balloon dilatation, 25 of 49 eyes with complete obstruction demonstrated improvement in epiphora (initial success rate: 51.0%) and among them 17 eyes showed complete resolution of symptoms. Reocclusion occurred in 12 of the 25 eyes with initial improvement at the 2 months follow up. For the 16 eyes with incomplete obstruction, and improvement of epiphora was attained in 11 eyes (initial success rate 68.8%): 5 of these eyes showed complete resolution of epiphora, and 3 was failed to maintain initial improvement at the 2 month follow up. Although this study demonstrate that results of balloon dacryocystoplasty are not encouraging because of the high failure and recurrence rate, balloon dacryocystoplasty is a simple and safe nonsurgical technique that can be used to treat for obstructions of the nasolacrimal system. In addition, balloon dacryocystoplasty shows better results in incomplete obstruction than in complete obstruction than complete obstruction of the nasolacrimal system.

  10. EBEX: A Balloon-Borne Telescope for Measuring Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    EBEX is a long-duration balloon-borne (LDB) telescope designed to probe polarization signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It is designed to measure or place an upper limit on the inflationary B-mode signal, a signal predicted by inflationary theories to be imprinted on the CMB by gravitational waves, to detect the effects of gravitational lensing on the polarization of the CMB, and to characterize polarized Galactic foreground emission. The payload consists of a pointed gondola that houses the optics, polarimetry, detectors and detector readout systems, as well as the pointing sensors, control motors, telemetry sytems, and data acquisition and flight control computers. Polarimetry is achieved with a rotating half-wave plate and wire grid polarizer. The detectors are sensitive to frequency bands centered on 150, 250, and 410 GHz. EBEX was flown in 2009 from New Mexico as a full system test, and then flown again in December 2012 / January 2013 over Antarctica in a long-duration flight to collect scientific data. In the instrumentation part of this thesis we discuss the pointing sensors and attitude determination algorithms. We also describe the real-time map making software, "QuickLook", that was custom-designed for EBEX. We devote special attention to the design and construction of the primary pointing sensors, the star cameras, and their custom-designed flight software package, "STARS" (the Star Tracking Attitude Reconstruction Software). In the analysis part of this thesis we describe the current status of the post-flight analysis procedure. We discuss the data structures used in analysis and the pipeline stages related to attitude determination and map making. We also discuss a custom-designed software framework called "LEAP" (the LDB EBEX Analysis Pipeline) that supports most of the analysis pipeline stages.

  11. High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun: Hard X-Ray Balloon-Borne Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Apple, Jeff; StevensonChavis, Katherine; Dietz, Kurt; Holt, Marlon; Koehler, Heather; Lis, Tomasz; O'Connor, Brian; RodriquezOtero, Miguel; Pryor, Jonathan; Ramsey, Brian; Rinehart-Dawson, Maegan; Smith, Leigh; Sobey, Alexander; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Christe, Steven; Cramer, Alexander; Edgerton, Melissa; Rodriquez, Marcello; Shih, Albert; Gregory, Don; Jasper, John; Bohon, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Set to fly in the Fall of 2013 from Ft. Sumner, NM, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) mission is a collaborative effort between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Goddard Space Flight Center to upgrade an existing payload, the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope, to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES science payload consists of 8 mirror modules, housing a total of 109 grazing-incidence optics. These modules are mounted on a carbon-fiber - and Aluminum optical bench 6 m from a matching array of high pressure xenon gas scintillation proportional counters, which serve as the focal-plane detectors. The HERO gondola utilizes a differential GPS system (backed by a magnetometer) for coarse pointing in the azimuth and a shaft angle encoder plus inclinometer provides the coarse elevation. The HEROES payload will incorporate a new solar aspect system to supplement the existing star camera, for fine pointing during both the day and night. A mechanical shutter will be added to the star camera to protect it during solar observations. HEROES will also implement two novel alignment monitoring system that will measure the alignment between the optical bench and the star camera and between the optics and detectors for improved pointing and post-flight data reconstruction. The overall payload will also be discussed. This mission is funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist

  12. High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun: Hard X-ray balloon-borne telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, J.; Apple, J.; Chavis, K. S.; Dietz, K.; Holt, M.; Koehler, H.; Lis, T.; O'Connor, B.; Otero, M. R.; Pryor, J.; Ramsey, B.; Rinehart-Dawson, M.; Smith, L.; Sobey, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Christe, S.; Cramer, A.; Edgerton, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Shih, A.; Gregory, D.; Jasper, J.; Bohon, S.

    Set to fly in the Fall of 2013 from Ft. Sumner, NM, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) mission is a collaborative effort between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Goddard Space Flight Center to upgrade an existing payload, the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope, to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES science payload consists of 8 mirror modules, housing a total of 109 grazing-incidence optics. These modules are mounted on a carbon-fiber - and Aluminum optical bench 6 m from a matching array of high pressure xenon gas scintillation proportional counters, which serve as the focal-plane detectors. The HERO gondola utilizes a differential GPS system (backed by a magnetometer) for coarse pointing in the azimuth and a shaft angle encoder plus inclinometer provides the coarse elevation. The HEROES payload will incorporate a new solar aspect system to supplement the existing star camera, for fine pointing during both the day and night. A mechanical shutter will be added to the star camera to protect it during solar observations. HEROES will also implement two novel alignment monitoring system that will measure the alignment between the optical bench and the star camera and between the optics and detectors for improved pointing and post-flight data reconstruction. The overall payload will also be discussed. This mission is funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist.

  13. Ballooning osteolysis in 71 failed total ankle arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpal; Reichard, Theresa; Hameister, Rita; Awiszus, Friedemann; Schenk, Katja; Feuerstein, Bernd; Roessner, Albert; Lohmann, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Aseptic loosening is a major cause of failure in total ankle arthroplasty (TAA). In contrast to other total joint replacements, large periarticular cysts (ballooning osteolysis) have frequently been observed in this context. We investigated periprosthetic tissue responses in failed TAA, and performed an element analysis of retrieved tissues in failed TAA. Patients and methods - The study cohort consisted of 71 patients undergoing revision surgery for failed TAA, all with hydroxyapatite-coated implants. In addition, 5 patients undergoing primary TAA served as a control group. Radiologically, patients were classified into those with ballooning osteolysis and those without, according to defined criteria. Histomorphometric, immunohistochemical, and elemental analysis of tissues was performed. Von Kossa staining and digital microscopy was performed on all tissue samples. Results - Patients without ballooning osteolysis showed a generally higher expression of lymphocytes, and CD3+, CD11c+, CD20+, and CD68+ cells in a perivascular distribution, compared to diffuse expression. The odds of having ballooning osteolysis was 300 times higher in patients with calcium content >0.5 mg/g in periprosthetic tissue than in patients with calcium content ≤0.5 mg/g (p < 0.001). Interpretation - There have been very few studies investigating the pathomechanisms of failed TAA and the cause-effect nature of ballooning osteolysis in this context. Our data suggest that the hydroxyapatite coating of the implant may be a contributory factor.

  14. Restenosis following balloon dilation of benign esophageal stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Sheng Cheng; Ming-Hua Li; Ren-Jie Yang; Hui-Zhen Zhang; Zai-Xian Ding; Qi-Xin Zhuang; Zhi-Ming Jiang; Ke-Zhong Shang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the mechanism of restenosis following balloon dilation of benign esophageal stenosis.METHODS: A total of 49 rats with esophageal stenosis were induced in 70 rats using 5 ml of 50 % sodium hydroxide solution and the double-balloon method, and an esophageal restenosis (RS) model was developed by esophageal stenosis using dilation of a percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) balloon catheter. These 49 rats were divided into two groups: rats with benign esophageal stricture caused by chemical burn only (control group, n=21) and rats with their esophageal stricture treated with balloon catheter dilation (experimental group, n=28). Imaging analysis and immunohistochemistry were used for both quantitative and qualitative analyses of esophageal stenosis and RS formation in the rats, respectively.RESULTS: Cross-sectional areas and perimeters of the esophageal mucosa layer, muscle layer, and the entire esophageal layers increased significantly in the experimental group compared with the control group. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was expressed on the 5th day after dilation, and was still present at 1 month. Fibronectin (FN)was expressed on the 1st day after dilation, and was still present at 1 month.CONCLUSION: Expression of PCNA and FN plays an important role in RS after balloon dilation of benign esophageal stenosis.

  15. Complexity Analysis of Balloon Drawing for Rooted Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Chun-Cheng; Poon, Sheung-Hung; Fan, Jia-Hao

    2010-01-01

    In a balloon drawing of a tree, all the children under the same parent are placed on the circumference of the circle centered at their parent, and the radius of the circle centered at each node along any path from the root reflects the number of descendants associated with the node. Among various styles of tree drawings reported in the literature, the balloon drawing enjoys a desirable feature of displaying tree structures in a rather balanced fashion. For each internal node in a balloon drawing, the ray from the node to each of its children divides the wedge accommodating the subtree rooted at the child into two sub-wedges. Depending on whether the two sub-wedge angles are required to be identical or not, a balloon drawing can further be divided into two types: even sub-wedge and uneven sub-wedge types. In the most general case, for any internal node in the tree there are two dimensions of freedom that affect the quality of a balloon drawing: (1) altering the order in which the children of the node appear in...

  16. Maternal outcomes after uterine balloon tamponade for postpartum hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Emmanuelle; Legendre, Guillaume; Bouet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Cheve, Marie-Therese; Multon, Olivier; Sentilhes, Loïc

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate maternal outcomes following uterine balloon tamponade in the management of postpartum hemorrhage. Retrospective case-series. Two French hospitals, a level 3 university referral center and a level 2 private hospital. All women who underwent balloon tamponade treatment for primary postpartum hemorrhage. Uterine tamponade was used after standard treatment of postpartum hemorrhage had failed. The study population was divided into two groups, successful cases where the bleeding stopped after the balloon tamponade, and failures requiring subsequent surgery or embolization. Success rates. Uterine tamponade was used in 49 women: 30 (61%) after vaginal delivery and 19 (39%) after cesarean section. Uterine atony was the main cause of hemorrhage (86%). The overall success rate was 65%. Of 17 failures, surgery was required in 16 cases, including hysterectomy in 11, and uterine artery embolization in one case. Demographic and obstetric characteristics did not differ significantly between the success and failure groups. No complications were directly attributed to the balloon tamponade in the postpartum period. Two women had a subsequent full-term pregnancy without recurrence of postpartum hemorrhage. Balloon tamponade is an effective, safe and readily available method for treating primary postpartum hemorrhage and could reduce the need for invasive procedures. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  17. Feasibility and mortality of airway balloon dilation in a live rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visaya, Jiovani M; Ward, Robert F; Modi, Vikash K

    2014-03-01

    Endoscopic balloon dilation is commonly performed in children with airway stenosis, but guidelines are needed for selecting safe and effective balloon inflation parameters. To determine the feasibility and safety of airway balloon dilation in live rabbits using a range of balloon diameters and pressures. Prospective animal study using 32 adult New Zealand white rabbits with 1-week follow-up performed at an academic animal research facility. Rabbits underwent endoscopic laryngeal balloon dilation with diameters ranging from 6 to 10 mm and pressures of 5 to 15 atm. Rabbits were observed for intraoperative complications and postoperative morbidity. All rabbit airways were sized to a 4-0 endotracheal tube (5.4-mm outer diameter). Balloon dilation was performed safely with no intraoperative complications in 25 of 30 cases. One rabbit developed transient cyanosis during balloon inflation. Three rabbits died while undergoing dilation with 10-mm balloons, and another rabbit developed respiratory failure shortly after the procedure. All rabbits that died perioperatively lacked endoscopic evidence of airway obstruction or gross trauma. Four rabbits developed postoperative feeding difficulties that did not correlate with balloon diameter or inflation pressure. Endoscopic balloon dilation is generally well tolerated in New Zealand white rabbits. Intraoperative mortality from cardiopulmonary arrest reaches 50% when the balloon diameter exceeds the airway diameter by 4.6 mm. Postoperative feeding difficulties may occur with any balloon diameter or inflation pressure. Additional animal studies are necessary to determine the short- and long-term histologic effects of balloon dilation on the airway.

  18. Solar radiation measurements from coordinated radiosonde flights during the 20th March 2015 solar eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. Giles; Marlton, Graeme; Williams, Paul; Nicoll, Keri

    2016-04-01

    Solar radiation sensors can be carried on standard weather balloon packages and provide additional information about the atmosphere's vertical structure beyond the traditional thermodynamic measurements [1]. An interesting set of circumstances for such sensors occurs during a solar eclipse, which provides a rapidly changing solar radiation environment within the duration of a typical free balloon flight. Coordinating several launches of solar radiation measuring radiosondes brings a good likelihood of at least one being above any cloud during the maximum eclipse, allowing solar eclipse radiation measurements for comparison with theory. For the 20th March 2015 solar eclipse, a coordinated campaign of balloon-carried solar radiation measurements was undertaken from Reading (51.44N, 0.94W), Lerwick (60.15N, 1.13W) and Reykjavik (64.13N, 21.90W), straddling the path of the eclipse. All three balloons reached sufficient altitude at the eclipse time for eclipse-induced variations in solar radiation and solar limb darkening to be measured above cloud. Because the sensor platforms were free to swing, techniques have been evaluated to correct the measurements for their changing orientation. These approaches, which are essentially independent, give values that agree with theoretical expectations for the eclipse-induced radiation changes. [1] K.A. Nicoll and R.G. Harrison, Balloon-borne disposable radiometer Rev Sci Instrum 83, 025111 (2012) doi: 10.1063/1.3685252

  19. Tokamak resistive magnetohydrodynamic ballooning instability in the negative shear regime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Bing-Ren; Lin Jian-Long; Li Ji-Quan

    2007-01-01

    Improved confinement of tokamak plasma with central negative shear is checked against the resistive ballooning mode. In the negative shear regime, the plasma is always unstable for purely growing resistive ballooning mode. For a simplest tokamak equilibrium model, the s-α model, characteristics of this kind of instability are fully clarified by numerically solving the high n resistive magnetohydrodynamic ballooning eigen-equation. Dependences of the growth rate on the resistivity, the absolute shear value, the pressure gradient are scanned in detail. It is found that the growth rate is a monotonically increasing function of a while it is not sensitive to the changes of the shear s, the initial phase θ0 and the resistivity parameter εR.

  20. Ideal MHD Ballooning modes, shear flow and the stable continuum

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, J B

    2012-01-01

    There is a well established theory of Ballooning modes in a toroidal plasma. The cornerstone of this is a local eigenvalue lambda on each magnetic surface - which also depends on the ballooning phase angle k. In stationary plasmas lambda(k) is required only near its maximum, but in rotating plasmas its average over k is required. Unfortunately in many case lambda(k) does not exist for some range of k, because the spectrum there contains only a stable continuum. This limits the application of the theory, and raises the important question of whether this "stable interval" gives rise to significant damping. This question is re-examined using a new, simplified, model - which leads to the conclusion that there is no appreciable damping at small shear flow. In particular, therefore, a small shear flow should not affect Ballooning mode stability boundaries.

  1. Ideal ballooning modes, shear flow and the stable continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. B.

    2012-11-01

    There is a well-established theory of ballooning modes in a toroidal plasma. The cornerstone of this is a local eigenvalue λ on each magnetic surface—which also depends on the ballooning phase angle k. In stationary plasmas, λ(k) is required only near its maximum, but in rotating plasmas its average over k is required. Unfortunately in many cases λ(k) does not exist for some range of k, because the spectrum there contains only a stable continuum. This limits the application of the theory, and raises the important question of whether this ‘stable interval’ gives rise to significant damping. This question is re-examined using a new, simplified, model—which leads to the conclusion that there is no appreciable damping at small shear flow. In particular, therefore, a small shear flow should not affect ballooning mode stability boundaries.

  2. Balloon vetebroplasty with calcium phosphate cement augmentation for direct restoration of traumatic thoracolumbar vertebral fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, JJ; van Helden, WH; Oner, FC; Verbout, AJ; Dhert, WJA

    2002-01-01

    Study Design. A human cadaveric model was used to evaluate balloon vertebroplasty in traumatic vertebral fractures. Objectives. To assess the feasibility and safety of balloon vertebroplasty followed by calcium phosphate cement augmentation to prevent recurrent kyphosis. Summary of Background Data.

  3. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition reduces adventitial thickening and collagen accumulation following balloon dilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierevogel, MJ; Velema, E; van der Meer, FJ; Nijhuis, MO; de Kleijn, DPV; Borst, C; Pasterkamp, G

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Constrictive arterial remodeling following balloon angioplasty has been related to adventitial collagen accumulation and subsequent thickening and can be prevented by matrix ructalloprotemase (MMP) inhibition. Following balloon dilation, we examined the effect of MMP inhibition on colla-e

  4. Balloon vetebroplasty with calcium phosphate cement augmentation for direct restoration of traumatic thoracolumbar vertebral fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, JJ; van Helden, WH; Oner, FC; Verbout, AJ; Dhert, WJA

    2002-01-01

    Study Design. A human cadaveric model was used to evaluate balloon vertebroplasty in traumatic vertebral fractures. Objectives. To assess the feasibility and safety of balloon vertebroplasty followed by calcium phosphate cement augmentation to prevent recurrent kyphosis. Summary of Background Data.

  5. 78 FR 17429 - Certain Balloon Dissection Devices and Products Containing Same; Commission Determination Not To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Balloon Dissection Devices and Products Containing Same; Commission Determination Not To..., the importation, or sale in the United States after importation of certain balloon dissection devices...

  6. The PILOT optical alignment for its first flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mot, B.; Longval, Y.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Ade, P.; André, Y.; Aumont, J.; Bautista, L.; Bray, N.; deBernardis, P.; Boulade, O.; Bousquet, F.; Bouzit, M.; Buttice, V.; Caillat, A.; Chaigneau, M.; Coudournac, C.; Crane, B.; Douchin, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubois, J.-P.; Engel, C.; Etcheto, P.; Gélot, P.; Griffin, M.; Foenard, G.; Grabarnik, S.; Hargrave, P.; Hughes, A.; Laureijs, R.; Lepennec, Y.; Leriche, B.; Maestre, S.; Maffei, B.; Mangilli, A.; Martignac, J.; Marty, C.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mirc, F.; Misawa, R.; Montel, J.; Montier, L.; Narbonne, J.; Nicot, J.-M.; Pajot, F.; Parot, G.; Pérot, E.; Pimentao, J.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rodriguez, L.; Roudil, G.; Saccoccio, M.; Salatino, M.; Savini, G.; Stever, S.; Simonella, O.; Tapie, P.; Tauber, J.; Tibbs, C.; Torre, J.-P.; Tucker, C.

    2017-06-01

    PILOT is a balloon-borne astronomy experiment designed to study the polarization of dust emission in the diffuse interstellar medium in our Galaxy at wavelengths 240 and 550 µm with an angular resolution of about two arc-min. PILOT optics is composed of an off-axis Gregorian telescope and a refractive re-imager system. All these optical elements, except the primary mirror, are in a cryostat cooled to 3K. We used optical and 3D measurements combined with thermo-elastic modeling to perform the optical alignment. This paper describes the system analysis, the alignment procedure, and finally the performances obtained during the first flight in September 2015

  7. ProtoEXIST: balloon-borne technology development for wide-field hard X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindlay, Jonathan

    We report on the development of the ProtoEXIST balloon-borne experiment for development of wide-field coded aperture imaging with high spatial resolution imaging Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) arrays in close-tiled, large area configurations. ProtoEXIST1 will incorporate two coded aperture telescopes, each with 16 x 16cm close-tiled imaging CZT with 2.5mm pixels that maintain registration across the full detector. The detector plane incorporates new-technology low powered ASIC readout on each 20 x 20 x 5mm CZT crystal. A 2 x 4 array of such crystals are closetiled on a single board (DCA) with vertical integration to a controlling and readout-enabling FPGA. Detector readout modes can be commanded through the FPGA and selected in flight: from simple peak pixel, to peak plus neighbor pixels to larger pixel-selected modes, which will improve spatial/spectral resolution as well as allow for future tests of Compton imaging. The full readout consists of a 2 x 4 array of DCAs for each of the two telescopes. The detector plane is shielded from below by an active shield (2cm CsI) on one telescope vs. an equivalent graded-passive shield on the other to enable direct imaging comparisons of background rejection in a balloon environment. Both telescopes incorporate otherwise identical graded-passive side shields and laminated coded aperture masks (5mm pixels, laser-cut in W sheet). The telescopes each have 20o x 20o fields of view (FWHM), with 21arcmin resolution across the field. The ProtoEXIST gondola is derived from the old Harvard EXITE gondola but now with new pointing system and daytime star camera as developed at MSFC for the HERO balloon payload. A first flight is planned for September/October, 2008. Tests will include not only the first tests of this multipixel, controllable ASIC-readout system but also tests of the scanning coded aperture imaging as planned for the proposed EXIST mission. Followup flight(s) will test the higher-spatial resolution CZT imager (0.6mm pixels) now planned

  8. Paclitaxel-coated balloons - Survey of preclinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnorr, B; Kelsch, B; Cremers, B; Clever, Y P; Speck, U; Scheller, B

    2010-10-01

    Restenosis following interventions in the coronary or peripheral arteries develops over weeks to months. In coronary arteries the restenosis rate has been markedly reduced since the advent of drug-eluting stents. Non-stent-based methods for local drug delivery enable restenosis inhibition without the need for stent implantation, does not permanently change the structure of the vessel, are repeatable, and seems to be applicable where drug-eluting stents provide insufficient protection. Preclinical data indicate that short exposure of the vessel wall to a lipophilic inhibitor of cell proliferation is sufficient for preventing restenosis. Initial evidence to this effect emerged from an investigation of paclitaxel embedded in a matrix that enhances the solubility and release of the agent from the balloon coating as well as its transfer to the vessel wall. Further corroborating data from preclinical and clinical studies demonstrating a reduction in late lumen loss and lower restenosis rates led to the market introduction of a variety of paclitaxel-coated angioplasty balloons. The effectiveness of restenosis inhibition is not determined by the active agent alone. Other factors that are crucial for the effectiveness and safety of drug-coated angioplasty balloons are the formulation containing the agent and the coating technique. In this review we first outline the development of paclitaxel-coated balloons to then provide an overview of the preclinical results obtained with different paclitaxel-coated balloons and finally compare these with the outcome in patients. The article concludes with a short outlook on initial results with a zotarolimus-coated angioplasty balloon.

  9. Second-generation endometrial ablation technologies: the hot liquid balloons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilos, George A; Edris, Fawaz

    2007-12-01

    Hysteroscopic endometrial ablation (HEA) was introduced in the 1980s to treat menorrhagia. Its use required additional training, surgical expertise and specialized equipment to minimize emergent complications such as uterine perforations, thermal injuries and excessive fluid absorption. To overcome these difficulties and concerns, thermal balloon endometrial ablation (TBEA) was introduced in the 1990s. Four hot liquid balloons have been introduced into clinical practice. All systems consist of a catheter (4-10mm diameter), a silicone balloon and a control unit. Liquids used to inflate the balloons include internally heated dextrose in water (ThermaChoice, 87 degrees C), and externally heated glycine (Cavaterm, 78 degrees C), saline (Menotreat, 85 degrees ) and glycerine (Thermablate, 173 degrees C). All balloons require pressurization from 160 to 240 mmHg for treatment cycles of 2 to 10 minutes. Prior to TBEA, preoperative endometrial thinning, including suction curettage, is optional. Several RCTs and cohort studies indicate that the advantages of TBEA include portability, ease of use and short learning curve. In addition, small diameter catheters requiring minimal cervical dilatation (5-7 mm) and short duration of treatment cycles (2-8 min) allow treatment under minimal analgesia/anesthesia requirements in a clinic setting. Following TBEA serious adverse events, including thermal injuries to viscera have been experienced. To minimize such injuries some surgeons advocate the use of routine post-dilatation hysteroscopy and/or ultrasonography to confirm correct intrauterine placement of the balloon prior to initiating the treatment cycle. After 10 years of clinical practice, TBEA is thought to be the preferred first-line surgical treatment of menorrhagia in appropriately selected candidates. Economic modeling also suggested that TBEA may be more cost-effective than HEA.

  10. The Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarization: BLAST-pol

    CERN Document Server

    Marsden, G; Bock, J J; Chapin, E L; Chung, J; Devlin, M J; Dicker, S; Griffin, M; Gundersen, J O; Halpern, M; Hargrave, P C; Hughes, D H; Klein, J; MacTavish, C J; Martin, P G; Martin, T G; Matthews, T G; Mauskopf, P; Moncelsi, L; Netterfield, C B; Novak, G; Pascale, E; Olmi, L; Patanchon, G; Rex, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Semisch, C; Thomas, N; Truch, M D P; Tucker, C; Tucker, G S; Viero, M P; Ward-Thompson, D; Wiebe, D V

    2008-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) is a sub-orbital experiment designed to study the process of star formation in local galaxies (including the Milky Way) and in galaxies at cosmological distances. Using a 2-m Cassegrain telescope, BLAST images the sky onto a focal plane, which consists of 270 bolometric detectors split between three arrays, observing simultaneously in 30% wide bands, centered at 250, 350, and 500 microns. The diffraction-limited optical system provides a resolution of 30" at 250 microns. The pointing system enables raster-like scans with a positional accuracy of ~30", reconstructed to better than 5" rms in post-flight analysis. BLAST had two successful flights, from the Arctic in 2005, and from Antarctica in 2006, which provided the first high-resolution and large-area (~0.8-200 deg^2) submillimeter surveys at these wavelengths. As a pathfinder for the SPIRE instrument on Herschel, BLAST shares with the ESA satellite similar focal plane technology and scientific...

  11. Properties of nylon 12 balloons after thermal and liquid carbon dioxide treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Andrew J; Davé, Vipul

    2013-03-01

    Critical design attributes of angioplasty balloons include the following: tear resistance, high burst pressures, controlled compliance, and high fatigue. Balloons must have tear resistance and high burst pressures because a calcified stenosis can be hard and nominal pressures of up to 16 atm can be used to expand the balloon. The inflated balloon diameter must be a function of the inflation pressure, thus compliance is predictable and controlled. Reliable compliance is necessary to prevent damage to vessel walls, which may be caused by over-inflation. Balloons are often inflated multiple times in a clinical setting and they must be highly resistant to fatigue. These design attributes are dependent on the mechanical properties and polymer morphology of the balloon. The effects of residual stresses on shrinkage, crystallite orientation, balloon compliance, and mechanical properties were studied for angioplasty nylon 12 balloons. Residual stresses of these balloons were relieved by oven heat treatment and liquid CO2 exposure. Residual stresses were measured by quantifying shrinkage at 80 °C of excised balloon samples using a dynamic mechanical analyzer. Shrinkage was lower after oven heat treatment and liquid CO2 exposure compared to the as-received balloons, in the axial and radial directions. As-received, oven heat treated, and liquid CO2-exposed balloon samples exhibited similar thermal properties (T(g), T(m), X(t)). Crystallite orientation was not observed in the balloon cylindrical body using X-ray scattering and polarized light microscopy, which may be due to balloon fabrication conditions. Significant differences were not observed between the stress-strain curves, balloon compliance, and average burst pressures of the as-received, oven heat treated, and liquid CO2-exposed balloons.

  12. Simultaneous electric-field measurements on nearby balloons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozer, F. S.

    1972-01-01

    Electric-field payloads were flown simultaneously on two balloons from Great Whale River, Canada, on September 21, 1971, to provide data at two points in the upper atmosphere that differed in altitude by more than one atmospheric density scale height and in horizontal position by 30-140 km. The altitude dependences in the two sets of data prove conclusively that the vertical electric field at balloon altitudes stems from fair-weather atmospheric electricity sources and that the horizontal fields are mapped down ionospheric fields, since the weather-associated horizontal fields were smaller than 2 mV/m.

  13. Balloon-expandable Metallic Stents for Airway Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohki, Takashi; Sugimoto, Seiichiro; Kurosaki, Takeshi; Otani, Shinji; Miyoshi, Kentaroh; Yamane, Masaomi; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Oto, Takahiro

    2016-10-01

    Stent placement is an essential treatment for airway diseases. Although self-expandable metallic stents and silicone stents are commonly applied for the treatment of airway diseases, these stents are unsuitable for the treatment of small airway diseases encountered in pediatric patients and lung transplant recipients with airway complications. Currently, only vascular balloon-expandable metallic stents are available for the treatment of small airway diseases; however, little research has been conducted on the use of these stents in this field. We have launched a prospective feasibility study to clarify the safety and efficacy of balloon-expandable metallic stents for the treatment of airway diseases.

  14. Intrauterine tamponade balloon use in the treatment of uterine inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeri, Sina; Rais, Sheliza; Monks, Brian

    2015-01-06

    Uterine inversion is a rare but life-threatening obstetrical emergency that occurs when the fundus of the uterus prolapses through the cervix, hence turning the uterus inside out. In this case report, we present our experience using an intrauterine tamponade balloon for management of uterine inversion, and a review of the literature. The utility of an intrauterine tamponade balloon in cases of uterine inversion, especially when maternal medical conditions preclude the use of uterotonics, or reinversion is observed should be kept in mind.

  15. Pulmonary Talco-silicosis in a Balloon Making Industry Worker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Waghmare

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a thirty eight year old lady, working in balloon making industry. She was referred to us in view of incidental chest X-ray changes found during preoperative pulmonary evaluation. She was asymptomatic from respiratory point of view. Chest Xray was suggestive of bilateral reticulonodular opacities. HRCT thorax revealed interstitial lung disease. Spirometry was suggestive of restrictive abnormality. Subsequently the powder which patient used to instill in balloon before inflating was brought for analysis which revealed 32.73% silica. Hence diagnosis of talco-silicosis was made, in the absence of any other cause for lung involvement.

  16. Balloon-Borne System Would Aim Instrument Toward Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polites, M. E.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed system including digital control computer, control sensors, and control actuators aims telescope or other balloon-borne instrument toward Sun. Pointing system and instrument flown on gondola, suspended from balloon. System includes reaction wheel, which applies azimuthal control torques to gondola, and torque motor to apply low-frequency azimuthal torques between gondola and cable. Three single-axis rate gyroscopes measure yaw, pitch, and roll. Inclinometer measures roll angle. Two-axis Sun sensor measures deviation, in yaw and pitch, of attitude of instrument from line to apparent center of Sun. System provides initial coarse pointing, then maintains fine pointing.

  17. Identification of the shape of the yarn balloon using MATHEMATICA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, J; Yu, W-d [College of Textiles, Donghua University, 2999 North Renmin Road, Songjiang District, Shanghai, 201620 (China); Chen, R-h [School of Textiles, Tianjin Polytechnic University, 63 Chenglinzhuang Road, Tianjin 300160 (China)], E-mail: wdyu@dhu.edu.cn

    2008-02-15

    The balloon of yarn in parallel spinning process is studied in this work. In parallel spinning process, a filament yarn was unwound from a package at high rotating speed and twisted on a staple core yarn to form the wrapped yarn. The forces acting on the unwinding yarn made the yarn move as a 3-D curve, which has a great influence on the quality of the final yarn. A nonlinear mathematical model is employed, and a computer software, MATHEMATICA, is applied to identification of the balloon shape and the distribution of the yarn tension.

  18. AIAA Educator Academy: The Space Weather Balloon Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmier, B.; Henriquez, E.; Bering, E. A.; Slagle, E.

    2013-12-01

    Educator Academy is a K-12 STEM curriculum developed by the STEM K-12 Outreach Committee of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). Consisting of three independent curriculum modules, K-12 students participate in inquiry-based science and engineering challenges to improve critical thinking skills and enhance problem solving skills. The Space Weather Balloon Curriculum Module is designed for students in grades 9-12. Throughout this module, students learn and refine physics concepts as well as experimental research skills. Students participate in project-based learning that is experimental in nature. Students are engaged with the world around them as they collaborate to launch a high altitude balloon equipped with HD cameras.The program leaders launch high altitude weather balloons in collaboration with schools and students to teach physics concepts, experimental research skills, and to make space exploration accessible to students. A weather balloon lifts a specially designed payload package that is composed of HD cameras, GPS tracking devices, and other science equipment. The payload is constructed and attached to the balloon by the students with low-cost materials. The balloon and payload are launched with FAA clearance from a site chosen based on wind patterns and predicted landing locations. The balloon ascends over 2 hours to a maximum altitude of 100,000 feet where it bursts and allows the payload to slowly descend using a built-in parachute. The payload is located using the GPS device. In April 2012, the Space Weather Balloon team conducted a prototype field campaign near Fairbanks Alaska, sending several student-built experiments to an altitude of 30km, underneath several strong auroral displays. To better assist teachers in implementing one or more of these Curriculum Modules, teacher workshops are held to give teachers a hands-on look at how this curriculum is used in the classroom. And, to provide further support, teachers are each

  19. Emerging Stent and Balloon Technologies in the Femoropopliteal Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Pastromas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular procedures for the management of the superficial femoral (SFA and popliteal artery disease are increasingly common. Over the past decade, several stent technologies have been established which may offer new options for improved clinical outcomes. This paper reviews the current evidence for SFA and popliteal artery angioplasty and stenting, with a focus on randomized trials and registries of nitinol self-expanding stents, drug-eluting stents, dug-coated balloons, and covered stent-grafts. We also highlight the limitations of the currently available data and the future routes in peripheral arterial disease (PAD stent and balloon technology.

  20. Conquering the Arctic and Conquering the Sky: Views on Technical Progress and Superman in Saint-Exupéry’s Night Flight and P. O. Sundman’s The Flight of the Eagle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Bourguignon

    2008-02-01

          Per Olof Sundman's The Flight of the Eagle is an historical novel about the Swedish engineer Andrée's attempt to reach the North Pole in a balloon in 1897. The balloon trip starts from Danes Island, one of the Spitsbergen islands, and flies for about three days, but it has to be given up by the men on the expedition at a point far away from the Pole. They try to make their way on the ice-pack back to Spitsbergen but die at the beginning of the winter.

  1. BioEnterics Intragastric Balloon (BIB) versus Spatz Adjustable Balloon System (ABS): Our experience in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Teresa; Aprea, Giovanni; Formisano, Cesare; Ruggiero, Simona; Quarto, Gennaro; Serra, Raffaele; Massa, Guido; Sivero, Luigi

    2017-02-01

    The BioEnterics Intragastric Balloon (BIB) and the Spatz Adjustable Balloon System (ABS) are in fact recommended for weight reduction as a bridge to bariatric surgery. We retrospected studied patients with body mass index (BMI) and age ranges of 37-46 and 70-80 years, respectively, who had undergone BIB from January 2010 to July 2012 and prospected studied patients who had undergone Spatz balloon from July 2012 to August 2014. The aim of this study is to compare BIB and Spatz in terms of weight loss, complications, and maintenance of weight after removal. For both procedures, the median weight loss was 20 ± 3 kg, median BMI at the end of the therapy was 32 ± 2, and no severe complication occurred.

  2. Manned Flight Simulator (MFS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Aircraft Simulation Division, home to the Manned Flight Simulator (MFS), provides real-time, high fidelity, hardware-in-the-loop flight simulation capabilities...

  3. 21 CFR 870.3535 - Intra-aortic balloon and control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intra-aortic balloon and control system 870.3535... balloon and control system (a) Identification. A intra-aortic balloon and control system is a device that... during certain life-threatening emergencies, and a control system for regulating the inflation and...

  4. Wave power absorption by a submerged balloon fixed to the sea bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurniawan, Adi; Greaves, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of absorbing wave energy using a submerged balloon fixed to the sea bed is investigated. The balloon is in the form of a fabric encased within an array of meridional tendons which terminate at a point at the top of the balloon and at some radius at the bottom. The expansion...

  5. Large bowel impaction by the BioEnterics Intragastric Balloon (BIB) necessitating surgical intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W Y; Kirkpatrick, U J; Moody, A P; Wake, P N

    2000-05-01

    A case of large bowel impaction caused by migration of a BioEnterics Intragastric Balloon (BIB) is presented. The literature is reviewed regarding both the use and the complications inherent in such balloon devices. This is the first reported case of an intragastric balloon impacted in the colon 9 months after insertion.

  6. 14 CFR 91.109 - Flight instruction; Simulated instrument flight and certain flight tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight instruction; Simulated instrument flight and certain flight tests. 91.109 Section 91.109 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Flight Rules General § 91.109 Flight instruction; Simulated instrument flight...

  7. Hybrid Global Communication Architecture with Balloons and Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignolet, G.; Celeste, A.; Erb, B.

    2002-01-01

    Global space communication systems have been developed now for more than three decades, based mainly on geostationary satellites or almost equivalent systems such as the Molnya orbit concepts. The last decade of the twentieth century has seen the emergence of satellite constellations in low or medium Earth orbit, in order to improve accessibility in terms of visibility at higher latitudes and limited size or power requirement for ground equipment. However such systems are complex to operate, there are still many situations where connection may remain difficult to achieve, and commercial benefits are still to be proven. A new concept, using a network combination of geostationary relay satellites and high altitude stratospheric platforms may well overcome the inconveniences of both geostationary systems and satellite constellations to improve greatly global communication in the future. The emergence of enabling technologies developed in Japan and in several other countries will soon make it possible to fly helium balloons in the upper layers of the atmosphere, at altitudes of 20 km or more. At such an altitude, well above the meteorological disturbances and the jet-streams, the stratosphere enjoys a regular wind at moderate speeds ranging between 10 m/s and 30 m/s, depending on latitude and also on season. It is possible for balloons powered by electric engines to fly non- stop upstream of the wind in order to remain stationary above a particular location. Large balloons, with sizes up to 300 m in length, would be able to carry sub-satellite communication payloads, as well as observation apparatus and scientific equipment. The range of visibility for easy both-way communication between the balloon and operators or customers on the ground could be as large as 200 km in radius. Most current studies consider a combination of solar cells and storage batteries to power the balloons, but microwave beam wireless power transportation from the ground could be a very

  8. Ornithopter flight stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietl, John M.; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2007-04-01

    The quasi-steady aerodynamics model and the vehicle dynamics model of ornithopter flight are explained, and numerical methods are described to capture limit cycle behavior in ornithopter flight. The Floquet method is used to determine stability in forward flight, and a linear discrete-time state-space model is developed. This is used to calculate stabilizing and disturbance-rejecting controllers.

  9. White flight or flight from poverty?

    CERN Document Server

    Jego, C; Jego, Charles; Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon of White flight is often illustrated by the case of Detroit whose population dropped from 1.80 million to 0.95 million between 1950 and 2000 while at the same time its Black and Hispanic component grew from 30 percent to 85 percent. But is this case really representative? The present paper shows that the phenomenon of White flight is in fact essentially a flight from poverty. As a confirmation, we show that the changes in White or Black populations are highly correlated which means that White flight is always paralleled by Black flight (and Hispanic flight as well). This broader interpretation of White flight accounts not only for the case of northern cities such as Cincinnati, Cleveland or Detroit, but for all population changes at county level, provided the population density is higher than a threshold of about 50 per square-kilometer which corresponds to moderately urbanized areas (as can be found in states like Indiana or Virginia for instance).

  10. Measurements of cosmic-ray energy spectra with the 2nd CREAM flight

    CERN Document Server

    Maestro, P; Allison, P; Bagliesi, M G; Barbier, L; Beatty, J J; Bigongiari, G; Brandt, T J; Childers, J T; Conklin, N B; Coutu, S; DuVernois, M A; Ganel, O; Han, J H; Jeon, J A; Kim, K C; Lee, M H; Malinine, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Minnick, S; Mognet, S I; Nam, S W; Nutter, S; Park, I H; Park, N H; Seo, E S; Sina, R; Walpole, P; Wu, J; Yang, J; Yoon, Y S; Zei, R; Zinn, S Y; 10.1016/j.nuclphysbps.2009.09.045

    2010-01-01

    During its second Antarctic flight, the CREAM (Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass) balloon experiment collected data for 28 days, measuring the charge and the energy of cosmic rays (CR) with a redundant system of particle identification and an imaging thin ionization calorimeter. Preliminary direct measurements of the absolute intensities of individual CR nuclei are reported in the elemental range from carbon to iron at very high energy.

  11. Gamma Ray and Very Low Frequency Radio Observations from a Balloon-Borne Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, C.; Sheldon, A.; Cully, C. M.; Davalos, A.; Osakwe, C.; Galts, D.; Delfin, J.; Duffin, C.; Mansell, J.; Russel, M.; Bootsma, M.; Williams, R.; Patrick, M.; Mazzino, M. L.; Knudsen, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The University of Calgary's Student Organization for Aerospace Research (SOAR) built an instrument to participate in the High Altitude Student Platform (HASP) initiative organized by Louisiana State University and supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office (BPO) and the Louisiana Space Consortium (LaSPACE). The HASP platform will be launched in early September 2015 from Fort Sumner, New Mexico and will reach heights of 36 kilometers with a flight duration of 15 to 20 hours. The instrument, Atmospheric Phenomenon Observer Gamma/VLF Emissions Experiment (APOGEE), measures Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGF) and sferics from lightning strikes with the use of Geiger tubes and a VLF detector. TGFs, which are quick bursts of high energy radiation that can occur alongside lightning, are believed to be the result of Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA). RREA occurs when a large number of relativistic electrons overcome atmospheric frictional forces and accelerate to relativistic velocities which excite secondary electrons that collide with the atmosphere causing bremsstrahlung radiation. Lightning strikes also produce sferics within the Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) bands which can be detected and used to locate the strikes. The goal of APOGEE is to further investigate the link between TGFs and RREA. These phenomena are very difficult to measure together as Bremsstrahlung radiation is easily detected from space but ionospheric reflection facilitates surface detection of sferics. A high altitude balloon provides a unique opportunity to study both phenomena using one instrument because both phenomena can easily be detected from its altitude. APOGEE has been designed and built by undergraduate students at the University of Calgary with faculty assistance and funding, and is equipped with three devices for data collection: a camera to have visual conformation of events, a series of Geiger Tubes to obtain directional gamma readings, and

  12. Development of a balloon-borne stabilized platform for measuring radiative flux profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, C. D.; Alzheimer, J. M.; Anderson, G. A.; Shaw, W. J.

    1993-03-01

    A stabilized platform has been developed to carry broadband short-wave and long-wave radiometric sensors on the tetherline of a small tethered balloon that ascends through atmospheric depths of up to 1.5 km to obtain vertical profiles of radiative flux and flux divergence for evaluating atmospheric radiative transfer models. The Sky Platform was designed to keep the radiometers level despite unpredictable movements of the balloon and tetherline occasioned by turbulence and wind shear. The automatic control loop drives motors, gears, and pulleys located on two of the vertices of the triangular frame to climb the harness lines to keep the platform level. Radiometric sensors, an electronic compass, and an on-board data acquisition system make up the remainder of the Sky Platform. Because knowledge of the dynamic response of the tether line-platform system is essential to properly close the automatic control loop on the Sky Platform, a Motion Sensing Platform (MSP) was developed to fly in place of the Sky Platform on the tetherline to characterize the Sky Platform's operating environment. This unstabilized platform uses an array of nine solid-state linear accelerometers to measure the lateral and angular accelerations, velocities, and displacements that the Sky Platform will experience. This paper presents field performance tests of the Sky and Motion Sensing Platforms, as conducted at Richland, Washington, on February 17, 1993. The tests were performed primarily to characterize the stabilization system on the Sky Platform. Test flights were performed on this cold winter day from 1400 to 1800 Pacific Standard Time (PST). During this period, temperature profiles were near the dry adiabatic lapse rate. Flights were made through a jet wind speed profile having peak wind speeds of 7 m/s at a height of 100 m AGL. Wind directions were from the northwest. All flights were performed as continuous ascents, rather than ascending in discrete steps with halts at set altitudes.

  13. Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument (HASI) test by a stratospheric balloon experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulchignoni, M.; Gaborit, V.; Aboudam, A.; Angrilli, F.; Antonello, M.; Bastianello, S.; Bettanini, C.; Bianchini, G.; Colombatti, G.; Ferri, F.; Lion Stoppato, P.

    2002-09-01

    We developped a series of balloon experiments parachuting a 1:1 scale mock up of the Huygens probe from an altitude larger than 30 km in order to simulate at planetary scale the final part of the descent of the probe in the Titan atmosphere. The Earth atmosphere represents a natural laboratory where most of the physical parameters meet quite well the bulk condition of Titan's environment, with the exception of temperature. A first balloon experiment has been carried out in June 2001 and the results have been reported at the last DPS (V. Gaborit et al., BAAS 33, 38.03) The mock up of the probe descending in the Titan atmosphere for the Huygens Cassini Mission has been successfully launched with stratospheric balloon from Italian Space Agency Base "Luigi Broglio" in Sicily and recovered on May 30th 2002. The probe has been lifted at 32 km altitude and then released to perform a 45 minutes descent decelerated by parachute, to simulate Huygens mission at Titan. Preliminary aerodynamics study of the probe has focused on the achievement of a descent velocity profile and a spin rate profile, satisfying the Huygens mission to Titan requirements. The descent velocity and spin rate have been calculated by solving a system of ODE describing the translational and rotational motion of the probe trough the earth atmosphere during parachute aided descent Results of these calculations have driven the choice of an appropriate angle of attack of the blades in the bottom of the probe and ballast weight during flight. The probe is hosting spares of HASI sensors, housekeeping sensors and other dedicated sensors, Beagle II UV Sensors and Huygens SSP Tilt Sensor, for a total of 77 acquired sensor channels, sampled during ascent, drift and descent phase. Main goals are i) to verify sensor performance and perform a realistic functional test in dynamical and environmental conditions similar to those during the descent in Titan atmosphere; ii) to investigate impact at ground to check the

  14. The High Altitude Balloon Experiment demonstration of acquisition, tracking, and pointing technologies (HABE-ATP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimiduk, D.; Caylor, M.; Williamson, D.; Larson, L.

    1995-01-01

    rocket body. The track and fire control performance must be developed to the point that an aimpoint can be selected, maintained, and then track performance scored with a low-power 'surrogate' weapon beam. Extensive instrumentation monitors not only the optical sensors and the video data, but all aspects of each of the experiment subsystems such as the control system, the experiment flight vehicle, and the tracker. Because the system is balloon-borne and recoverable, it is expected to fly many times during its development program.

  15. Complications of flow-directed balloon-tipped catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, F W; Husserl, F E

    1990-01-01

    Acute or short-term complications following the use of flow-directed balloon-tipped catheters are well recognized. Long-term sequelae are rarely reported. We report herein an early complication of pulmonary arterial rupture with infarction followed by the delayed development of a pulmonary arterial aneurysm.

  16. Balloon dacryocystoplasty study in the management of adult epiphora.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fenton, S

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: To determine the efficacy of dacryocystoplasty with balloon dilation in the treatment of acquired obstruction of the nasolacrimal system in adults. METHODS: Balloon dacryocystoplasty was performed in 52 eyes of 42 patients under general anaesthetic. A Teflon-coated guidewire was introduced through the canaliculus and manipulated through the nasolacrimal system and out of the nasal aperture. A 4 mm wide 3 cm coronary angioplasty balloon catheter was threaded over the guidewire in a retrograde fashion and dilated at the site of obstruction. RESULTS: There was complete obstruction in 30% of cases and partial obstruction in 70%. The most common site of obstruction was the nasolacrimal duct. The procedure was technically successful in 94% of cases. The overall re-obstruction rate was 29% within 1 year of the procedure. There was an anatomical failure rate of 17% for partial obstruction and 69% for complete obstruction within 1 year. CONCLUSIONS: Balloon dacryocystoplasty has a high recurrence rate. There may be a limited role for this procedure in partial obstructions. Further refinements of the procedure are necessary before it can be offered as a comparable alternative to a standard surgical dacryocystorhinostomy.

  17. Balloon Angioplasty for Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease: A Multicenter Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanam, Lakshmi Sudha Prasanna; Sharma, Mukesh; Alurkar, Anand; Baddam, Sridhar Reddy; Pamidimukkala, Vijaya; Polavarapu, Raghavasarma

    2017-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the role and efficacy of the balloon angioplasty in intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) in patients who presented with acute stroke due to vessel occlusion and in patients with symptomatic disease despite optimum medical management. Methods From 2013 to 2016, a total of 39 patients (24 males and 15 females with a mean age of 64.5 years) underwent balloon angioplasty over a period of 2 years and 8 months in three different institutions in India. Maverick balloon catheter (Boston scientific) is used in all the patients. MRI brain with MR angiogram was done in all the patients prior to intervention. Twenty-three patients who had underlying severe ICAD presented with acute stroke due to vessel occlusion. Sixteen patients presented with symptomatic ICAD with recurrent ischemic attack due to the progressing underlying disease despite optimum medical management. Technical success, peri-procedural events, and clinical outcomes were documented for all the patients. Results Technical success (residual stenosis 90% of the patients. MR angiogram on follow-up of nine months was done in 26 patients, and none of them had restenosis. Conclusion Balloon angioplasty is a safe option and can be effectively used in patients of ICAD with acceptable risks and promising outcomes. PMID:28702117

  18. Latex Micro-balloon Pumping in Centrifugal Microfluidic Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeinehvand, Mohammad Mahdi; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Al-Faqheri, Wisam; Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Kazemzadeh, Amin; Wadi harun, Sulaiman; Madou, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Centrifugal microfluidic platforms have emerged as point-of-care diagnostic tools. However, the unidirectional nature of the centrifugal force limits the available space for multi-stepped processes on a single microfluidics disc. To overcome this limitation, a passive pneumatic pumping method actuated at high rotational speeds has been previously proposed to pump liquid against the centrifugal force. In this paper, a novel micro-balloon pumping method that relies on elastic energy stored in a latex membrane is introduced. It operates at low rotational speeds and pumps a larger volume of liquid towards the centre of the disc. Two different micro-balloon pumping designs have been developed to study the pump performance and capacity at a range of rotational frequencies from 0 to 1500 rpm. The behaviour of the micro-balloon pump on the centrifugal microfluidic platforms has been theoretically analysed and compared with the experimental data. The experimental data shows that, the developed pumping method dramatically decreases the required rotational speed to pump liquid compared to the previously developed pneumatic pumping methods. It also shows that within a range of rotational speed, desirable volume of liquid can be stored and pumped by adjusting the size of the micro-balloon. PMID:24441792

  19. 28. Critical pulmonary valve stenosis: Medical management beyond balloon dilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Arif Khan

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Phentolamine and/or Captopril have a therapeutic role in neonates with critical PVS who remain oxygen dependent after balloon dilation. Both medicationslead to vasodilatation of pulmonary and systemic vascularity. They facilitate inflowto the right ventricle. Right to left shunt across a PFO or/ ASD minimizesand saturation improves leading to a significantreduction in length of hospitalization.

  20. Scientific Ballooning Technologies Workshop STO-2 Thermal Design and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Doug

    2016-01-01

    The heritage thermal model for the full STO-2 (Stratospheric Terahertz Observatory II), vehicle has been updated to model the CSBF (Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility) SIP-14 (Scientific Instrument Package) in detail. Analysis of this model has been performed for the Antarctica FY2017 launch season. Model temperature predictions are compared to previous results from STO-2 review documents.

  1. Investigating obscure gastrointestinal bleeding : capsule endoscopy or double balloon enteroscopy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, J.; Weersma, R. K.; Koornstra, J. J.

    2009-01-01

    The possibility to visualise the small bowel has dramatically improved with the introduction of capsule endoscopy (CE) and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE). CE and DBE have become standard practice in investigating suspected diseases of the small bowel. An important reason to perform small bowel inv

  2. Investigating obscure gastrointestinal bleeding : capsule endoscopy or double balloon enteroscopy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, J.; Weersma, R. K.; Koornstra, J. J.

    2009-01-01

    The possibility to visualise the small bowel has dramatically improved with the introduction of capsule endoscopy (CE) and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE). CE and DBE have become standard practice in investigating suspected diseases of the small bowel. An important reason to perform small bowel

  3. 75 FR 77673 - National Environmental Policy Act: Scientific Balloon Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION National Environmental Policy Act: Scientific Balloon Program AGENCY: National... the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321, et seq.); the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40...

  4. Latex micro-balloon pumping in centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeinehvand, Mohammad Mahdi; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Al-Faqheri, Wisam; Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Kazemzadeh, Amin; Madou, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Centrifugal microfluidic platforms have emerged as point-of-care diagnostic tools. However, the unidirectional nature of the centrifugal force limits the available space for multi-step processes on a single microfluidic disc. To overcome this limitation, a passive pneumatic pumping method actuated at high rotational speeds has been previously proposed to pump liquid against the centrifugal force. In this paper, a novel micro-balloon pumping method that relies on elastic energy stored in a latex membrane is introduced. It operates at low rotational speeds and pumps a larger volume of liquid towards the centre of the disc. Two different micro-balloon pumping mechanisms have been designed to study the pump performance at a range of rotational frequencies from 0 to 1500 rpm. The behaviour of the micro-balloon pump on the centrifugal microfluidic platforms has been theoretically analysed and compared with the experimental data. The experimental data show that the developed pumping method dramatically decreases the required rotational speed to pump liquid compared to the previously developed pneumatic pumping methods. It also shows that within a range of rotational speed, a desirable volume of liquid can be stored and pumped by adjusting the size of the micro-balloon.

  5. Intrauterine balloon tamponade for the control of postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohano, Rajni; Haq, Gulfishan; Kazi, Sarah; Sheikh, Saima

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of balloon temponade in the management of postpartum haemorrhage. The study was conducted at the Dow University of Health Sciences and Civil Hospital Karachi from January to July 18, 2012, and comprised women aged 18-35 years, parity 1-6 and gestational age 31-41 weeks, who developed or were admitted with primary postpartum haemorrhage due to uterine atony in whom medical treatment had failed. SPSS 10 was used to analyse the data. The mean age, parity, gestational age of 139 women was 26.4±4.2 years, 3.4±1.3, 37.81±1.67 respectively. Mean estimated blood loss was 1155.8±350.6 ml, mean systolic blood pressure 90.96±18.1 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure 55±7.5 mmHg and mean pulse was 108.3±10.89 bpm. Balloon tamponade was effective in 126(90.4%) cases. Condom catheter balloon tamponade was an effective means of controlling postpartum haemorrhage. There should be a low threshold for use of balloon tamponade as it is effective, easy to use, easily available, has low complication rate, and an inexpensive modality to manage non-traumatic postpartum haemorrhage, especially in resource-limited settings, and still maintain reproductive ability.

  6. Using Hydrogen Balloons to Display Metal Ion Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, James H.

    2008-01-01

    We have optimized a procedure for igniting hydrogen-filled balloons containing metal salts to obtain the brightest possible flash while minimizing the quantity of airborne combustion products. We report air quality measurements in a lecture hall immediately after the demonstration. While we recommend that this demonstration be done outdoors or in…

  7. Balloon atrial septostomy under echocardiographic guide: case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Meraji

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Balloon atrial septostomy is an emergent procedure in pediatric cardiology. Nowadays, most patients in need of the procedure have acceptable outcomes after surgical repair. Thus, it is important to perform this procedure as safe as possible. By performing early arterial switch operation and prostaglandin infusion, the rate of balloon atrial septostomy has markedly decreased. However, not all centers performing early arterial switch repairs have abandoned atrial septostomy, even in patients who respond favorably to prostaglandin infusion.Case presentation: In total, eight 1- to 15-day old term neonates admitted in Shahid Rajaee Heart Center in Tehran, Iran from October 2009 to February 2011, with congenital heart diseases were scheduled for balloon atrial septostomy. In six cases the procedure was done exclusively under echocardiographic guidance and in two cases with the help of fluoroscopy. Success was defined as the creation of an atrial septal defect with a diameter equal to or more than 5 mm and ample mobility of its margins.Results: Male sex was predominant (87% and the mean age of the neonates was six days. The diagnosis in all cases was simple transposition of great arteries. The procedure was successful in all patients with any cardiovascular complication.Conclusion: Balloon atrial septostomy is an emergent procedure that can be done safely and effectively under echocardiographic guidance. According to the feasibility of this technique it could be performed fast, safe and effective at bedside, avoiding patient transportation to hemodynamic laboratory or referral center.

  8. An improved time of flight gamma-ray telescope to monitor diffuse gamma-ray in the energy range 5 MeV - 50 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacostafereiraneri, A.; Bui-Van, A.; Lavigne, J. M.; Sabaud, C.; Vedrenne, G.; Agrinier, B.; Gouiffes, C.

    1985-01-01

    A time of flight measuring device is the basic triggering system of most of medium and high energy gamma-ray telescopes. A simple gamma-ray telescope has been built in order to check in flight conditions the functioning of an advanced time of flight system. The technical ratings of the system are described. This telescope has been flown twice with stratospheric balloons, its axis being oriented at various Zenital directions. Flight results are presented for diffuse gamma-rays, atmospheric secondaries, and various causes of noise in the 5 MeV-50 MeV energy range.

  9. X-Ray Astronomy Research at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    For at least twenty years, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has played a major role in the development of X-ray astronomy in the United States. MSFC scientists and engineers are currently involved in a wide range of programs which will contribute to the growth of X-ray astronomy well into the next century. Areas of activity include calibration of X-ray astronomy instrumentation using Marshall's world-class X-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF), development of high-throughput, replicated X-ray optics, X-ray detector development, balloon-based X-ray astronomy, and analysis of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) and clusters of galaxies. Recent milestones include the successful calibration of NASA's premier X-ray Astronomy Satellite - AXAF (recently renamed Chandra), a balloon flight of a large area (1000 sq cm) micro-strip proportional counter, and work on a hard X-ray (30-100 keV) telescope called HERO, capable of high quality spectroscopy and imaging through the use of grazing incidence optics and an Imaging Gas Scintillation Proportional Counter (IGSPC). In my presentation, I will provide a general overview of our research and facilities. I will conclude with a more detailed discussion of our High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) program and plans for long duration (>100 days) balloon flights which will take place in the near future.

  10. Angioplasty with drug coated balloons for the treatment of infrainguinal peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Restenosis or re-occlusion after femoropopliteal angioplasty or stent implantation is the main limitation of endovascular treatment strategies for peripheral artery disease. Within the last years, balloon catheters with anti-proliferative drug coating on the balloon surface have shown to be associated with higher patency rates compared to plain balloon angioplasty. Thus, drug-coated balloons were gradually adopted in many interventional centres for the treatment of femoropopliteal obstructions. The current review summarises the existing evidence for drug-coated balloons in the infrainguinal vessels and their indication in special lesion cohorts.

  11. Balloon contribution to the HyMeX (Hydrological in the Mediterranean Experiment) project: results and lessons of the deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthou, Ségolène; Verdier, Nicolas; Drobinski, Philippe; Basdevant, Claude; Doerenbecher, Alexis; Fesquet, Clement; Durand, Pierre; Cocquerez, Philippe

    HyMeX is an international project that aims at improving our understanding of the water cycle and its variability over the Mediterranean Basin, with emphases on extreme events by means of monitoring and modelling the Mediterranean coupled system. In this frame, Boundary Layer Pressurized Balloons (BLPB) were part of the numerous instruments deployed during two special observation periods (SOPs) in autumn 2012 and winter 2013. Scientific instrumentation on board includes pressure, humidity, temperature sensors and a 3D GPS from which the balloon velocity can be deduced. Whether assimilated in models or directly used as observed data, balloons measurements allow to better understand the moisture transport contribution to Mediterranean heavy precipitation and the effect of air/sea interactions at mesoscale during Mistral/Tramontana events on ocean convection. Different stages were necessary for the deployment of the BLPB. First, the determination of the BLPB flight specifications (launch sites, flight altitude,...) was done using trajectory analysis based on ECMWF (I)FS and Météo-France (ARPEGE, AROME) Numerical Weather Forecast models for meteorological situations corresponding to the HyMeX ``target event'' (heavy precipitation in fall; Mistral/Tramontana in winter). BLPBs were calibrated to fly near or below the top of the boundary layer. An assimilation system was also developed to assimilate in real time the BLPB’s data into the Météo-France Numerical Weather Forecast prediction system. The BLPB were successfully deployed during the two HyMeX special observation periods (SOP) in fall 2012 (5 September - 6 November) and winter 2013 (1 February - 15 March): begin{enumerate} The BAMED SOP1 balloon campaign, dedicated to the study of heavy precipitation events (HPE), took place in Minorca (Baleares). The CNES team with the help and support of the scientists launched 19 BLPBs from San Luis airport. Trajectories sampled a large sector of the Mediterranean Sea

  12. Optimising a balloon-borne polarimeter in the hard X-ray domain: from the PoGOLite Pathfinder to PoGO+

    CERN Document Server

    Chauvin, Maxime; Kawano, Takafumi; Kiss, Mózsi; Kole, Merlin; Mikhalev, Victor; Moretti, Elena; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Pearce, Mark

    2016-01-01

    PoGOLite is a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter dedicated to the study of point sources. Compton scattered events are registered using an array of plastic scintillator units to determine the polarisation of incident X-rays in the energy range 20 - 240 keV. In 2013, a near circumpolar balloon flight of 14 days duration was completed after launch from Esrange, Sweden, resulting in a measurement of the linear polarisation of the Crab emission. Building on the experience gained from this Pathfinder flight, the polarimeter is being modified to improve performance for a second flight in 2016. Such optimisations, based on Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations, take into account the source characteristics, the instrument response and the background environment which is dominated by atmospheric neutrons. This paper describes the optimisation of the polarimeter and details the associated increase in performance. The resulting design, PoGO+, is expected to improve the Minimum Detectable Polarisation (MDP) for the Crab from ...

  13. Cutting balloon angioplasty vs. conventional balloon angioplasty in patients receiving intracoronary brachytherapy for the treatment of in-stent restenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasseas, Panayotis; Orford, James L; Lennon, Ryan; O'Neill, Jessica; Denktas, Ali E; Panetta, Carmelo J; Berger, Peter B; Holmes, David R

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of cutting balloon angioplasty (CBA) for the treatment of in-stent restenosis prior to intracoronary brachytherapy (ICB). Cutting balloon angioplasty may reduce the incidence of uncontrolled dissection requiring adjunctive stenting and may limit "melon seeding" and geographic miss in patients with in-stent restenosis who are subsequently treated with ICB. We performed a retrospective case-control analysis of 134 consecutive patients with in-stent restenosis who were treated with ICB preceded by either CBA or conventional balloon angioplasty. We identified 44 patients who underwent CBA and ICB, and 90 control patients who underwent conventional percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and ICB for the treatment of in-stent restenosis. Adjunctive coronary stenting was performed in 13 patients (29.5%) in the CBA/ICB group and 41 patients (45.6%; P 0.05). Despite sound theoretical reasons why CBA may be better than conventional balloon angioplasty for treatment of in-stent restenosis with ICB, and despite a reduction in the need for adjunctive coronary stenting, we were unable to identify differences in clinical outcome.

  14. A comparison of balloon-expandable-stent implantation with balloon angioplasty in patients with coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); P.P.T. de Jaegere (Peter); F. Kiemeneij (Ferdinand); C.M. Miguel (Carlos); W.R. Rutsch (Wolfgang); G.R. Heyndrickx (Guy); H.U. Emanuelsson (Hakan); J. Marco (Jean); V.M.G. Legrand (Victor); P.H. Materne (Phillipe); J.A. Belardi (Jorge); U. Sigwart (Ulrich); A. Colombo (Antonio); J-J. Goy (Jean-Jacques); P.A. van den Heuvel (Paul); J. Delcan; M-A.M. Morel (Marie-Angèle)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractBalloon-expandable coronary-artery stents were developed to prevent coronary restenosis after coronary angioplasty. These devices hold coronary vessels open at sites that have been dilated. However, it is unknown whether stenting improves long-term angiographic and clinical outcomes as c

  15. A comparison of balloon-expandable-stent implantation with balloon angioplasty in patients with coronary artery disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); P.P.T. de Jaegere (Peter); F. Kiemeneij (Ferdinand); C.M. Miguel (Carlos); W.R. Rutsch (Wolfgang); G.R. Heyndrickx (Guy); H.U. Emanuelsson (Hakan); J. Marco (Jean); V.M.G. Legrand (Victor); P.H. Materne (Phillipe); J.A. Belardi (Jorge); U. Sigwart (Ulrich); A. Colombo (Antonio); J-J. Goy (Jean-Jacques); P. van den Heuvel; J. Delcan; M-A.M. Morel (Marie-Angèle)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND. Balloon-expandable coronary-artery stents were developed to prevent coronary restenosis after coronary angioplasty. These devices hold coronary vessels open at sites that have been dilated. However, it is unknown whether stenting improves long-term angiographic and clinical o

  16. An introduction to the SCOUT-AMMA stratospheric aircraft, balloons and sondes campaign in West Africa, August 2006: rationale and roadmap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cairo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A multi-platform field measurement campaign involving aircraft and balloons took place over West Africa between 26 July and 25 August 2006, in the frame of the concomitant AMMA Special Observing Period and SCOUT-O3 African tropical activities.

    Specifically aiming at sampling the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, the high-altitude research aircraft M55 Geophysica was deployed in Ouagadougou (12.3° N, 1.7° W, Burkina Faso, in conjunction with the German D-20 Falcon, while a series of stratospheric balloons and sonde flights were conducted from Niamey (13.5° N, 2.0° E, Niger.

    Altogether, these measurements were intended to provide experimental evidence for a better understanding of large scale transport, assessing the effect of lightning on NOx production, and studying the impact of intense mesoscale convective systems on water, aerosol, dust and chemical species in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The M55 Geophysica carried out five local and four transfer flights between southern Europe and the Sahel and back, while eight stratospheric balloons and twenty-nine sondes were flown from Niamey.

    These experiments allowed a characterization of the tropopause and lower stratosphere of the region. The paper provides an overview of SCOUT-AMMA campaign activities together with a description of the meteorology of the African monsoon and the situation prevailing during the flights and a brief summary of the observations accomplished.

  17. Impact of intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation with different balloon volumes on cardiac performance in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marc; Fasseas, Panayotis; Singh, Varinder P; McBride, Ruth; Orford, James L; Kussmaul, William G

    2002-10-01

    Intra-aortic balloon (IAB) counterpulsation can augment the cardiac output. However, the effect of different IAB volumes on cardiac performance has not been adequately evaluated in humans. Eighty-two patients (52 males [63%]; mean age, 65 +/- 12 years; mean body surface area [BSA], 1.8 +/- 0.2 m(2)) had IAB counterpulsation for cardiogenic shock, refractory angina, and preoperatively for high-risk cardiac surgery. Cardiac hemodynamics were prospectively studied during IAB with inflation volumes of 32 vs. 40 cc. Hemodynamic data collected included aortic pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, systemic and mixed venous oxygen saturations, and cardiac output (by Fick). Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) was used to obtain both velocity time integrals (VTIs) and the area of the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT). Left ventricular stroke volume was then calculated as LVOT area x VTI. Cardiac output (CO) determined by the Fick method and VTI did not differ significantly (P = NS) between the two inflation volumes (y = 0.002 + 0.97x). In a subgroup of 33 patients with BSA

  18. A miniature particle counter LOAC under meteorological balloon for the survey of stratospheric aerosols - comparison with other datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignelles, Damien; Berthet, Bwenael; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Rieger, Landon; Bourassa, Adam; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Taha, Ghassan; Khaykin, Sergey; Lurton, Thibaut; Jegou, Fabrice; Couté, Benoît; Duverger, Vincent

    2017-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosols contribute to the terrestrial radiative budget during large eruptive events but also during volcanic quiescent periods (Kremser et al. 2016). The survey of background stratospheric aerosols, especially in the middle stratosphere, is challenging due to extreme experimental conditions and low particle concentration. Furthermore, during periods of low volcanic activity, origins and optical properties of aerosols in the middle and high stratosphere are not well defined yet (Neely et al. 2011). We propose to study the capabilities of a new miniature particle counter called LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter), light enough to be carried under meteorological balloons, whichensure a very good frequency of flights and designed to be able to measure and discriminate between several main aerosol types. The LOAC miniature particle counter has been initially designed for balloon-borne tropospheric studies (Renard et al. 2016).Metrological performances of the LOAC instrument have been determined in the laboratory and during balloon flights. Principal limitations of the use of LOAC in the stratosphere areinduced by the temperature variations and the influence of cosmic rays. A detection threshold has been determined in the laboratory to be of 0.8 particule.cm-3 in terms of concentration which also limits the use of LOAC in the stratosphere where aerosol concentrations during volcanic quiescent periods may be lower than this limit. Since June 2013, more than 100 hundred LOAC instruments have been launched under meteorological balloons during the ChArMEx and Voltaire-LOAC field campaigns. This dataset has been studied and compared to satellite records such as OSIRIS, OMPS, and CALIOPbut also to ground-based lidar data (NDACC lidar OHP) and outputs from the WACCM/CARMA model. Results show that large variations in stratospheric aerosols are well defined by satellite but less visible in LOAC records. Instrumental LOAC limitations in the stratosphere can explain

  19. An Open Source, FPGA-based LeKID readout for BLAST-TNG: Pre-flight Results

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, Samuel; Sinclair, Adrian; Rowe, Samuel; Bryan, Sean; Mauskopf, Philip; Austermann, Jason; Devlin, Mark; Dicker, Simon; Gao, Jiansong; Hilton, Gene C; Hubmayr, Johannes; Jones, Glenn; Klein, Jeffrey; Lourie, Nathan P; McKenney, Christopher; Nati, Federico; Soler, Juan D; Strader, Matthew; Vissers, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We present a highly frequency multiplexed readout for large-format superconducting detector arrays intended for use in the next generation of balloon-borne and space-based sub-millimeter and far-infrared missions. We will demonstrate this technology on the upcoming NASA Next Generation Balloon-borne Large Aperture Sub-millimeter Telescope (BLAST-TNG) to measure the polarized emission of Galactic dust at wavelengths of 250, 350 and 500 microns. The BLAST-TNG receiver incorporates the first arrays of Lumped Element Kinetic Inductance Detectors (LeKID) along with the first microwave multiplexing readout electronics to fly in a space-like environment and will significantly advance the TRL for these technologies. After the flight of BLAST-TNG, we will continue to improve the performance of the detectors and readout electronics for the next generation of balloon-borne instruments and for use in a future FIR Surveyor.

  20. Using High Resolution Balloon Photography to Provide Topographic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, K.; Bauer, T.

    2009-12-01

    For site-scale projects, the Bureau of Reclamation has used low altitude balloon photogrammetry to obtain high-resolution photographs and detailed topographic information. These data are collected in a fraction of the time and effort it would take to obtain a similar level of detail using traditional methods. This is accomplished at a significantly reduced cost compared to flying LiDAR or aerial photography, which can be prohibitively expensive for small or medium scale projects. Low altitude balloon photogrammetry is a process where overlapping photographs and ground survey control points are input into a photogrammetry software program (AdamTechnology 3DM Analyst Mine Mapping Suite) to produce orthophotographs and digital terrain model (DTM) elevation points. To acquire the photos a digital camera is attached to an 8-foot diameter helium balloon. The balloon is tethered and flown above the location of interest. The camera is controlled remotely while a live image is transmitted to a receiver on the ground. Ground survey control is established by using GPS equipment to survey ground targets placed within the area to be photographed. There are limitations to the process. Data collection is very weather dependent; too much wind causes the balloon to be unstable. Site conditions also determine the feasibility: power lines, trees, and steep embankments can cause difficulties maneuvering the balloon. Although some of the photographs show the underwater portion of the channel; there is little agreement between GPS points and the processed DTM elevations in the channel. The balloon has been used to survey large woody debris (LWD) structures and channel morphology in the Middle Fork John Day River (central Oregon) and monitoring debris after the removal of Chiloquin Dam (Sprague River, southern Oregon). Seventeen LWD structures were installed on the Middle Fork John Day River near John Day, OR in 2007 and 2008 to provide aquatic habitat. Balloon photos were obtained in

  1. Assessment of the influence of the RaD-X balloon payload on the onboard radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronoff, Guillaume; Mertens, Christopher J.; Norman, Ryan B.; Straume, Tore; Lusby, Terry C.

    2016-10-01

    The NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) stratospheric balloon flight mission, launched on 25 September 2015, provided dosimetric measurements above the Pfotzer maximum. The goal of taking these measurements is to improve aviation radiation models by providing a characterization of cosmic ray primaries, which are the source of radiation exposure at aviation altitudes. The RaD-X science payload consists of four instruments. The main science instrument is a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). The other instruments consisted of three solid state silicon dosimeters: Liulin, Teledyne total ionizing dose (TID) and RaySure detectors. The instruments were housed in an aluminum structure protected by a foam cover. The structure partially shielded the detectors from cosmic rays but also created secondary particles, modifying the ambient radiation environment observed by the instruments. Therefore, it is necessary to account for the influence of the payload structure on the measured doses. In this paper, we present the results of modeling the effect of the balloon payload on the radiation detector measurements using a Geant-4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) application. Payload structure correction factors derived for the TEPC, Liulin, and TID instruments are provided as a function of altitude. Overall, the payload corrections are no more than a 7% effect on the radiation environment measurements.

  2. Telescope performance and image simulations of the balloon-borne coded-mask protoMIRAX experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penacchioni, A. V., E-mail: ana.penacchioni@inpe.br; Braga, J., E-mail: joao.braga@inpe.br; Castro, M. A., E-mail: manuel.castro@inpe.br; Sacahui, J. R., E-mail: rodrigo.sacahui@inpe.br; D’Amico, F., E-mail: flavio.damico@inpe.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) São José dos Campos (Brazil)

    2015-12-17

    In this work we present the results of imaging simulations performed with the help of the GEANT4 package for the protoMIRAX hard X-ray balloon experiment. The instrumental background was simulated taking into account the various radiation components and their angular dependence, as well as a detailed mass model of the experiment. We modelled the meridian transits of the Crab Nebula and the Galactic Centre (CG) region during balloon flights in Brazil (∼ −23° of latitude and an altitude of ∼40 km) and introduced the correspondent spectra as inputs to the imaging simulations. We present images of the Crab and of three sources in the GC: 1E 1740.7-2942, GRS 1758-258 and GX 1+4. The results show that the protoMIRAX experiment is capable of making spectral and timing observations of bright hard X-ray sources as well as important imaging demonstrations that will contribute to the design of the MIRAX satellite mission.

  3. Telescope performance and image simulations of the balloon-borne coded-mask protoMIRAX experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Penacchioni, A V; Castro, M A; D'Amico, F

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present the results of imaging simulations performed with the help of the GEANT4 package for the protoMIRAX hard X-ray balloon experiment. The instrumental background was simulated taking into account the various radiation components and their angular dependence, as well as a detailed mass model of the experiment. We modeled the meridian transits of the Crab Nebula and the Galatic Centre region during balloon flights in Brazil ($\\sim -23^{\\circ}$ of latitude and an altitude of $\\sim 40 \\thinspace$ km) and introduced the correspondent spectra as inputs to the imaging simulations. We present images of the Crab and of three sources in the Galactic Centre region: 1E 1740.7-2942, GRS 1758-258 and GX 1+4. The results show that the protoMIRAX experiment is capable of making spectral and timing observations of bright hard X-ray sources as well as important imaging demonstrations that will contribute to the design of the MIRAX satellite mission.

  4. The IMaX polarimeter for the solar telescope SUNRISE of the NASA long duration balloon program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo V.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available On June 8th 2009 the SUNRISE mission was successfully launched. This mission consisted of a 1m aperture solar telescope on board of a stratospheric balloon within the Long Duration Balloon NASA program. The flight followed the foreseen circumpolar trajectory over the Artic and the duration was 5 days and 17 hours. One of the two postfocal instruments onboard was IMaX, the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment. This instrument is a solar magnetograph which is a diffraction limited imager capable to resolve 100 km on the solar surface, and simultaneously a high sensitivity polarimeter (<10-3 and a high resolution spectrograph (bandwidth <70mÅ. The magnetic vectorial map can be extracted thanks to the well-know Zeeman effect, which takes place in the solar atoms, allowing to relate polarization and spectral measurements to magnetic fields. The technological challenge of the IMaX development has a special relevance due to the utilization of innovative technologies in the Aeroespacial field and it is an important precedent for future space missions such as Solar Orbiter from ESA. Among these novel technologies the utilization of Liquid Crystal Variable Retarders (LCVRs as polarization modulators and a LiNbO3 etalon as tunable spectral filter are remarkable. Currently the data obtained is being analyzed and the preliminary results show unprecedented information about the solar dynamics.

  5. A Spreadsheet Simulation Tool for Terrestrial and Planetary Balloon Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raquea, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    During the early stages of new balloon design and development, it is necessary to conduct many trade studies. These trade studies are required to determine the design space, and aid significantly in determining overall feasibility. Numerous point designs then need to be generated as details of payloads, materials, mission, and manufacturing are determined. To accomplish these numerous designs, transient models are both unnecessary and time intensive. A steady state model that uses appropriate design inputs to generate system-level descriptive parameters can be very flexible and fast. Just such a steady state model has been developed and has been used during both the MABS 2001 Mars balloon study and the Ultra Long Duration Balloon Project. Using Microsoft Excel's built-in iteration routine, a model was built. Separate sheets were used for performance, structural design, materials, and thermal analysis as well as input and output sheets. As can be seen from figure 1, the model takes basic performance requirements, weight estimates, design parameters, and environmental conditions and generates a system level balloon design. Figure 2 shows a sample output of the model. By changing the inputs and a few of the equations in the model, balloons on earth or other planets can be modeled. There are currently several variations of the model for terrestrial and Mars balloons, as well there are versions of the model that perform crude material design based on strength and weight requirements. To perform trade studies, the Visual Basic language built into Excel was used to create an automated matrix of designs. This trade study module allows a three dimensional trade surface to be generated by using a series of values for any two design variables. Once the fixed and variable inputs are defined, the model automatically steps through the input matrix and fills a spreadsheet with the resulting point designs. The proposed paper will describe the model in detail, including current

  6. Bat flight: aerodynamics, kinematics and flight morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenström, Anders; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2015-03-01

    Bats evolved the ability of powered flight more than 50 million years ago. The modern bat is an efficient flyer and recent research on bat flight has revealed many intriguing facts. By using particle image velocimetry to visualize wake vortices, both the magnitude and time-history of aerodynamic forces can be estimated. At most speeds the downstroke generates both lift and thrust, whereas the function of the upstroke changes with forward flight speed. At hovering and slow speed bats use a leading edge vortex to enhance the lift beyond that allowed by steady aerodynamics and an inverted wing during the upstroke to further aid weight support. The bat wing and its skeleton exhibit many features and control mechanisms that are presumed to improve flight performance. Whereas bats appear aerodynamically less efficient than birds when it comes to cruising flight, they have the edge over birds when it comes to manoeuvring. There is a direct relationship between kinematics and the aerodynamic performance, but there is still a lack of knowledge about how (and if) the bat controls the movements and shape (planform and camber) of the wing. Considering the relatively few bat species whose aerodynamic tracks have been characterized, there is scope for new discoveries and a need to study species representing more extreme positions in the bat morphospace.

  7. Digital flight control research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, J. E.; Stern, R. G.; Smith, T. B.; Sinha, P.

    1974-01-01

    The results of studies which were undertaken to contribute to the design of digital flight control systems, particularly for transport aircraft are presented. In addition to the overall design considerations for a digital flight control system, the following topics are discussed in detail: (1) aircraft attitude reference system design, (2) the digital computer configuration, (3) the design of a typical digital autopilot for transport aircraft, and (4) a hybrid flight simulator.

  8. Flight Standards Automation System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — FAVSIS supports Flight Standards Service (AFS) by maintaining their information on entities such as air carriers, air agencies, designated airmen, and check airmen....

  9. PILOT: a balloon-borne experiment to measure the polarized FIR emission of dust grains in the interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Misawa, R; Ade, P; Andre, Y; deBernardis, P; Bouzit, M; Charra, M; Crane, B; Dubois, J P; Engel, C; Griffin, M; Hargrave, P; Leriche, B; Longval, Y; Maes, S; Marty, C; Marty, W; Masi, S; Mot, B; Narbonne, J; Pajot, F; Pisano, G; Ponthieu, N; Ristorcelli, I; Rodriguez, L; Roudil, G; Salatino, M; Savini, G; Tucker, C

    2014-01-01

    Future cosmology space missions will concentrate on measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background, which potentially carries invaluable information about the earliest phases of the evolution of our universe. Such ambitious projects will ultimately be limited by the sensitivity of the instrument and by the accuracy at which polarized foreground emission from our own Galaxy can be subtracted out. We present the PILOT balloon project which will aim at characterizing one of these foreground sources, the polarization of the dust continuum emission in the diffuse interstellar medium. The PILOT experiment will also constitute a test-bed for using multiplexed bolometer arrays for polarization measurements. We present the results of ground tests obtained just before the first flight of the instrument.

  10. PILOT: a balloon-borne experiment to measure the polarized FIR emission of dust grains in the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, J.-Ph.; Ade, P.; André, Y.; Aumont, J.; Bautista, L.; Bray, N.; Bernardis, P. de; Boulade, O.; Bousquet, F.; Bouzit, M.; Buttice, V.; Caillat, A.; Charra, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Crussaire, J.-P.; Douchin, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubois, J.-P.; Engel, C.; Etcheto, P.; Gélot, P.; Griffin, M.; Foenard, G.; Grabarnik, S.; Hargrave, P.; Hughes, A.; Laureijs, R.; Lepennec, Y.; Leriche, B.; Longval, Y.; Maestre, S.; Maffei, B.; Martignac, J.; Marty, C.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mirc, F.; Misawa, R.; Montel, J.; Montier, L.; Mot, B.; Narbonne, J.; Nicot, J.-M.; Pajot, F.; Parot, G.; Pérot, E.; Pimentao, J.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rodriguez, L.; Roudil, G.; Salatino, M.; Savini, G.; Simonella, O.; Saccoccio, M.; Tapie, P.; Tauber, J.; Torre, J.-P.; Tucker, C.

    2016-08-01

    Future cosmology space missions will concentrate on measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background, which potentially carries invaluable information about the earliest phases of the evolution of our universe. Such ambitious projects will ultimately be limited by the sensitivity of the instrument and by the accuracy at which polarized foreground emission from our own Galaxy can be subtracted out. We present the PILOT balloon project, which aims at characterizing one of these foreground sources, the polarized continuum emission by dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. The PILOT experiment also constitutes a test-bed for using multiplexed bolometer arrays for polarization measurements. This paper presents the instrument and its expected performances. Performance measured during ground calibrations of the instrument and in flight will be described in a forthcoming paper.

  11. Developing International Standards for Meteorological Balloon to Facilitate Industrial Progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Yizhi

    2011-01-01

    Meteorological balloon is made of natural rubber latex with a special process.On natural conditions,it carries the air sounding instrument into the high air to detect the meteorological elements in the air.As a means of delivery used in the aerological sounding,it is widely used in the meteorological,sailing,aeronautical,aerospace and other fields,and plays an extremely important role in the weather report,disaster prevention,disaster relief,guaranteeing ships and aircrafts to leave ports safely,and scientific research in relevant spaces,etc.Especially,the role of meteorological balloons is not ignorable in the forecast of extremely adverse weather frequently occurring around the world in recent years.

  12. MIPAS Ozone Validation by Stratospheric Balloon and Aircraft Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, U.; Blom, C. E.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Chance, K.; Davies, J.; Goutail, F.; Kuttippurath, J.; McElroy, C. T.; Mencaraglia, F.; Oelhaf, H.; Petritoli, A.; Pirre, M.; Pommereau, J. P.; Ravegnani, F.; Renard, J. B.; Strong, K.

    2004-08-01

    A number of in situ and remote sensing techniques for the measurement of upper tropospheric and stratospheric O3 content was employed during dedicated experiments of the ESABC programme, aiming at the validation of the ENVISAT chemistry payload. In this paper, we will be focusing on the validation of MIPAS off-line products, by presenting the results of the intercomparison between MIPAS O3 vertical profiles and aircraft and balloon correlative measurements. First priority is given to the validation of processor v4.61 data, but individual results of 2002 and 2003 balloon observations are also compared with MIPAS O3 non operational data. Some general remarks are finally expressed, along with specific recommendation to fully exploit the available ESABC validation dataset

  13. Apical ballooning-like syndrome: Hypocalcemia? What else!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Accadia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Apical ballooning syndrome (ABS, also known as Takotsubo or stress cardiomyopathy, is characterised by acute, transient and severe LV dysfunction, mimicking myocardial infarction; it occurs, in most cases, in the absence of obstructive coronary disease and is precipitated by severe emotional or physical stress, but many other potential triggers has been identi ed in the last years. Although the pathogenesis of ABS remains unclear, the most common mechanisms suggested are coronary vasospam and an exaggerated sympathetic activation associated to high levels of plasma cathecolamine leading to cardiotoxicity.We describe two cases of Apical Ballooning like Syndrome that were triggered by severe, acute hypocalcemia, without evidence of coronary vasospasm and with normal hematic level of cathecolamines.

  14. NEW APPROACHES: A hot air balloon from dustbin liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Nicholas

    1998-07-01

    This article describes how a simple hot air balloon, inflated by a hair dryer, can be made out of household bin liners and Sellotape. It can be used at sixth-form level as an application of the ideal gas equation, = constant, and is rather more exciting than heated pistons. It gives a taste of a simple engineering design process, although the students do have to be reasonably adept at geometry and algebra.

  15. Prime time for drug eluting balloons in SFA interventions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodmann, M

    2014-08-01

    Peripheral arterial disease most commonly affects the femoropopliteal segment. Despite enormous improvements in device and treatment technology the long-term patency rate and clinical benefit of endovascular treatment in the respective vascular bed is not satisfying. Drug coated balloon technology as a treatment option in femoropopliteal disease has shown encouraging results in first-in-man trials, which have now been proven in large randomized controlled trials.

  16. Balloon Kyphoplasty: An Effective Treatment for Kummell Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pius

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of balloon kyphoplasty for treating Kummel disease accompanying severe osteoporosis. Methods Twelve patients with single-level Kummell disease accompanied by severe osteoporosis were enrolled in this investigation. After postural reduction for 1 or 2 days, balloon kyphoplasty was performed on the collapsed vertebrae. Clinical results, radiological parameters, and related complications were assessed at 7 days, 1 month and 6 months after the procedure. Results Prior to kyphoplasty, the mean pain score (according to the visual analogue scale) was 8.0. Seven days after the procedure, this score improved to 2.5. Despite the significant improvement compared to preoperative value, the score increased to 4.0 at 6 months after the procedure. The mean preoperative vertebral height loss was 55.4%. Kyphoplasty reduced this loss to 31.6%, but it increased to 38.7% at 6 months after the procedure. The kyphotic angle improved significantly from 22.4°±4.9° (before the procedure) to 10.1°±3.8° after surgery, However, the improved angle was not maintained 6 months after the procedure. The mean correction loss for the kyphotic deformity was 7.2° at 6 months after the procedure. Three out of 12 patients sustained adjacent fractures after balloon kyphoplasty within 6 months. Conclusion Although balloon kyphoplasty for treating Kummell disease is known to provide stabilization and pain relief, it may be associated with the development of adjacent fractures and aggravated kyphosis. PMID:27799987

  17. Double-balloon enteroscopy in detecting small intestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Fa-chao; PAN De-shou; ZHOU Dian-yuan; XIAO Bing; JIANG Bo; WAN Tian-mo; GUO Yu; ZHOU Dan; WANG Li-hui; CHEN Jin-feng; XIE Lu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Digestive tract hemorrhage is a common disease of the digestive system, but about 0.4%-5% intestinal bleeding can not be detected with gastroscope or colonscope.1 Since the intestine is long, tortuous, far away from both ends of the digestive tract and unfixed in position, clinical diagnosis of the bleeding is relatively difficult. Yamamoto and Sugano2 reported the clinical application of double-balloon enteroscope at American DDW in 2003.

  18. Apical ballooning-like syndrome: Hypocalcemia? What else!

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Accadia; Marianna Abitabile; Salvatore Rumolo; Scotto di Uccio Fortunato; Luigi Irace; Andrea Tuccillo; Giuseppe Mercogliano; Bernardino Tuccillo

    2016-01-01

    Apical ballooning syndrome (ABS), also known as Takotsubo or stress cardiomyopathy, is characterised by acute, transient and severe LV dysfunction, mimicking myocardial infarction; it occurs, in most cases, in the absence of obstructive coronary disease and is precipitated by severe emotional or physical stress, but many other potential triggers has been identi ed in the last years. Although the pathogenesis of ABS remains unclear, the most common mechanisms suggested are coronary vasospam an...

  19. Real-time in situ measurements of volcanic plume physico-chemical properties using Controlled METeorological balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Adam; Voss, Paul; Watson, Matthew; Roberts, Tjarda; Thomas, Helen; Prata, Fred; Sutton, Jeff; Mather, Tamsin; Witt, Melanie; Patrick, Matthew

    2010-05-01

    While the climatic effects of volcanogenic sulphate aerosol in the stratosphere are well characterised, the nature and global impact of sustained tropospheric volcanic degassing is less well understood. In situ measurement of volcanic emissions can be used to understand plume processes (e.g., microphysics and chemistry), and used to validate and improve remote sensing techniques. New developments in sensor and communication technologies have led to the production of miniaturized lightweight unmanned atmospheric measurement platforms. Controlled METeorological (CMET) balloons collect real-time observations of atmospheric physico-chemical properties at altitudes of up to 5 km for hours or even days at a time. Standard measurements include pressure (± 10 mb), aspirated temperature (± 0.3 C), relative humidity (± 5 %) and location (GPS position ± 5 m horizontal, ± 50 m vertical). Balloon platform-based measurements of volcanic plume properties were made for the first time using CMET balloons equipped with miniature electrochemical sensors during the eruption of Halema'uma'u crater (Kilauea) in Hawai'i in 2008. In addition, multiple measurement platforms were simultaneously deployed that included (1) ground-based remote measurements (mini-DOAS and UV camera); (2) satellite-based sensors (MODIS and OMI); and (3) in situ sampling at the emission source using ground-based electrochemical sensor instrumentation. During the 25 July 2008 flight, a single CMET balloon remained in the plume and collected data for several hours. Ratios of [H2O] and [SO2] correlate in proximal regions of the plume, though were found to anti-correlate further downwind. Correlation is explained through co-emission of SO2 and H2O at source, as has been frequently previously observed e.g. by FTIR. Anti-correlation of [H2O] and [SO2] ratios has not previously been reported and may reflect dehydration of the aged plume through condensation of water vapour on volcanogenic sulphate aerosol. The

  20. High-Altitude Balloon Launches and Hands-On Sensors for Effective Student Learning in Astronomy and STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, H. D.; Dailey, J.; Snyder, S. J.

    2011-09-01

    Students creating and flying experiments into near-space using a low-cost balloon High-Altitude Research Platform (HARP) greatly advance understanding in introductory astronomy and advanced classes across several disciplines. Remote sensing above 98% of the atmosphere using cameras, image intensifiers, IR, and UV sensors provides access to the heavens and large regions of the earth below. In situ and limb atmospheric gas measurements, near-space stratosphere measurements, and cosmic rays engage students in areas from planetary atmospheres to supernova acceleration. This new capability is possible by exposing students to recent advances in MEMS technology, nanotechnology, wireless telecommunication systems, GPS, DSPs and other microchip miniaturizations to build less than 4 kg payloads. The HARP program provides an engaging laboratory, gives challenging science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) field experiences, reaches students from diverse backgrounds, encourages collaboration among science faculty, and provides quantitative assessment of the learning outcomes. Over a seven-year period, Taylor University, an undergraduate liberal arts school, has successfully launched over 230 HARP systems to altitudes over 30 km (100% retrieval success with rapid recovery) with flight times between two and six hours. The HARP payloads included two GPS tracking systems, cameras and monitors, a 110 kbit down link, an uplink command capability for educational experiments (K-12 and undergraduate). Launches were conducted during the day and night, with multiple balloons, with up to 10 payloads for experiments, and under varying weather and upper atmospheric conditions. The many launches in a short period of time allowed the payload bus design to evolve toward increased performance, reliability, standardization, simplicity, and modularity for low-cost launch services. Through NSF and NASA grants, the program has expanded, leading to representatives from more than 52

  1. Balloon Demonstrator Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer for the Measurement of Methane and Carbon Dioxide over the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri Z., Zahra; McElroy, Charles T.; Feng, Keh-Harng; Moeini, Omid; Walker, Kaley A.; Martin, Randall; Grandmont, Frederic J.

    2015-04-01

    Arctic climate is changing more rapidly than expected. Multi-year ice is melting and opening the way for shipping and exploration activity for natural resources which in turn increases air pollution. Observing greenhouse gases on a global scale is essential to monitor climate change, especially in the Arctic. Several space missions monitor trace gasses but are in low-earth, sun synchronous orbits and do not have a 24/7 view of northern latitudes. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA), along with other Canadian government departments, is proposing the Polar Communications and Weather (PCW) satellite to provide weather, communication and atmospheric composition information over the Arctic. The use of two satellites in out-of-phase highly elliptical three-apogee orbits with an apogee at ~40,000 km over the Arctic, will provide continuous quasi-geostationary viewing of the northern latitudes. The planned meteorological instrument for the PCW mission is a 21-channel spectral imager with UV, visible, NIR and MIR channels, similar to MODIS and ABI, capable of measuring several different trace gasses. This paper will focus on the development of an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) to be flown on a high-altitude balloon to demonstrate the capacity to monitor methane and carbon dioxide in the Arctic as part of the PHEOS-WCA (Polar Highly Elliptical Orbit Science - Weather, Climate and Air quality) instrument suit; a science complement to the PCW mission. Funding through the CSA Flights for the Advancement of Science and Technology (FAST) program is in place to develop the demonstrator IFTS to show that measurements of methane and carbon dioxide can be collected from space in the 1.6 µm band. The characteristics of the instrument and plans for the balloon flight will be discussed and details of the PCW mission and PHEOS-WCA component will be presented. The authors acknowledge support of the PHEOS-WCA science team.

  2. Precision Attitude Control for the BETTII Balloon-Borne Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Rinehart. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) is an 8-meter baseline far-infrared interferometer to fly on a high altitude balloon. Operating at wavelengths of 30-90 microns, BETTII will obtain spatial and spectral information on science targets at angular resolutions down to less than half an arcsecond, a capability unmatched by other far-infrared facilities. This requires attitude control at a level ofless than a tenth of an arcsecond, a great challenge for a lightweight balloon-borne system. We have designed a precision attitude determination system to provide gondola attitude knowledge at a level of 2 milliarcseconds at rates up to 100Hz, with accurate absolute attitude determination at the half arcsecond level at rates of up to 10Hz. A mUlti-stage control system involving rigid body motion and tip-tilt-piston correction provides precision pointing stability to the level required for the far-infrared instrument to perform its spatial/spectral interferometry in an open-loop control. We present key aspects of the design of the attitude determination and control and its development status.

  3. A Sensitivity Analysis of fMRI Balloon Model

    KAUST Repository

    Zayane, Chadia

    2015-04-22

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows the mapping of the brain activation through measurements of the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast. The characterization of the pathway from the input stimulus to the output BOLD signal requires the selection of an adequate hemodynamic model and the satisfaction of some specific conditions while conducting the experiment and calibrating the model. This paper, focuses on the identifiability of the Balloon hemodynamic model. By identifiability, we mean the ability to estimate accurately the model parameters given the input and the output measurement. Previous studies of the Balloon model have somehow added knowledge either by choosing prior distributions for the parameters, freezing some of them, or looking for the solution as a projection on a natural basis of some vector space. In these studies, the identification was generally assessed using event-related paradigms. This paper justifies the reasons behind the need of adding knowledge, choosing certain paradigms, and completing the few existing identifiability studies through a global sensitivity analysis of the Balloon model in the case of blocked design experiment.

  4. Balloon Cell Urethral Melanoma: Differential Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. McComiskey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Primary malignant melanoma of the urethra is a rare tumour (0.2% of all melanomas that most commonly affects the meatus and distal urethra and is three times more common in women than men. Case. A 76-year-old lady presented with vaginal pain and discharge. On examination, a 4 cm mass was noted in the vagina and biopsy confirmed melanoma of a balloon type. Preoperative CT showed no distant metastases and an MRI scan of the pelvis demonstrated no associated lymphadenopathy. She underwent anterior exenterative surgery and vaginectomy also. Histology confirmed a urethral nodular malignant melanoma. Discussion. First-line treatment of melanoma is often surgical. Adjuvant treatment including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or immunotherapy has also been reported. Even with aggressive management, malignant melanoma of the urogenital tract generally has a poor prognosis. Recurrence rates are high and the mean period between diagnosis and recurrence is 12.5 months. A 5-year survival rate of less than 20% has been reported in balloon cell melanomas along with nearly 20% developing local recurrence. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this case is the first report of balloon cell melanoma arising in the urethra. The presentation and surgical management has been described and a literature review provided.

  5. Balloon-Assisted Fistula Sealing Procedure for Symptomatic Tarlov Cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuesheng; Li, Shiting; Sheng, Hansong; Feng, Baohui; Zhang, Nu; Xie, Chaoran

    2016-04-01

    Tarlov cyst is an abnormal expansion of the spinal nerve sleeve, and it communicates with the subarachnoid cavity via a perineural fistula. This study presents our experience of a balloon-assisted fistula sealing procedure in treating Tarlov cyst. Twenty-two patients with symptomatic Tarlov cysts were surgically treated. An emulsion balloon was placed into the lumbar subarachnoid cistern through a trocar, so as to temporarily block cerebrospinal fluid flow, then the thecal sac was opened and the inlet of the fistula was sealed by suture of a muscular patch and reinforced by fibrin glue. Finally, the cyst wall was imbricated and the bony cavity was filled with pedicled muscle flaps. Comparing the preoperative and postoperative pain scores according to visual analog scale, 2 patients were slightly improved and 18 patients were substantially improved, including 3 completely pain-free cases. Only 2 patients were unchanged in pain, and both of them had multiple cysts. As a whole, the postoperative pain score was much better than the preoperative score (2.4 vs. 7.5; P cyst recurrence was found in 1 patient. The balloon-assisted fistula sealing procedure is safe and effective for Tarlov cyst, especially for the single cyst. It is a good complement to the cyst wall imbricating procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Electromechanical flight control actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of using an electromechanical actuator (EMA) as the primary flight control equipment in aerospace flight is examined. The EMA motor design is presented utilizing improved permanent magnet materials. The necessary equipment to complete a single channel EMA using the single channel power electronics breadboard is reported. The design and development of an improved rotor position sensor/tachometer is investigated.

  7. Java for flight software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, E.; Niessner, A.

    2003-01-01

    This work involves developing representative mission-critical spacecraft software using the Real-Time Specification for Java (RTSJ). This work currently leverages actual flight software used in the design of actual flight software in the NASA's Deep Space 1 (DSI), which flew in 1998.

  8. BLAST-TNG: A Next Generation Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fissel, Laura M.; Ade, Peter; Angilè, Francesco E.; Campbell Ashton, Peter; Austermann, Jason Edward; Billings, Tashalee; Che, George; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Cunningham, Maria R.; Davis, Kristina; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon; Dober, Bradley; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; gao, jiansong; Gordon, Sam; Groppi, Christopher E.; Hillbrand, Seth; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Hannes; Irwin, Kent; Jones, Paul; Klein, Jeffrey; li, dale; Li, Zhi-Yun; lourie, nathan; Lowe, Ian; Mani, Hamdi; Martin, Peter G.; Mauskopf, Philip; McKenney, Christopher; Nati, Federico; Novak, Giles; Pascale, Enzo; pisano, giampaolo; Pereira Santos, Fábio; Scott, Douglas; Sinclair, Adrian; Diego Diego Soler, Juan; tucker, carole; Underhill, Matthew; Vissers, Michael; Williams, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of polarized thermal dust emission can be used to map magnetic fields in the interstellar medium. Recently, BLASTPol, the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry, has published the most detailed map ever made of a giant molecular cloud forming high-mass stars. I will present an overview of The Next Generation BLAST polarimeter (BLAST-TNG), the successor telescope to BLASTPol, which maps linearly polarized dust emission at 250, 350 and 500 μm. BLAST-TNG utilizes a 2.5-meter carbon-fiber primary mirror that illuminates focal plane arrays containing over 3,000 microwave kinetic inductance detectors. This new polarimeter has an order of magnitude increase in mapping speed and resolution compared to BLASTPol and we expect to make over 500,000 measurements of magnetic field orientation per flight. BLAST-TNG will have the sensitivity to map entire molecular cloud complexes as well as regions of diffuse high Galactic latitude dust. It also has the resolution (FWHM = 25’’ at 250 μm) necessary to trace magnetic fields in prestellar cores and dense filaments. BLAST-TNG will thus provide a crucial link between the low resolution Planck all-sky maps and the detailed but narrow field of view polarimetry capabilities of ALMA. For our first Antarctic flight in December 2017 we are putting out a call for shared-risk proposals to fill 25% of the available science time. In addition, BLAST-TNG data will be publicly released within a year of the publication of our first look papers, leaving a large legacy data set for the study of the role played by magnetic fields in the star formation process and the properties of interstellar dust.

  9. The Liege-balloon program. [balloon-borne instruments for high-spectral resolution observations of the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, R.

    1974-01-01

    The Liege-balloon program is intended to make high-spectral resolution observations of the sun in the near- and intermediate infrared regions not accessible from the ground. A description of the equipment, followed by a summary of the data obtained till now is presented. Except for ozone whose maximum of concentration lies near 25 Km altitude, the residual mass distribution of the other mentioned molecules decreases with altitude. This is a self-explanatory argument for carrying out spectroscopic observations from platforms transcending the densest layers of the earth's atmosphere. The Liege balloon equipment is primarily intended for very high-resolution solar observations from about 27-30 Km altitude, in all spectral regions between 1.5 and 15.0 microns, not accessible from the ground.

  10. Search for Cosmic-Ray Antiparticles with Balloon-borne and Space-borne Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    von Doetinchem, Ph

    2009-01-01

    This thesis discusses two different approaches for the measurement of cosmic-ray antiparticles in the GeV to TeV energy range. The first part of this thesis discusses the prospects of antiparticle flux measurements with the proposed PEBS detector. The project allots long duration balloon flights at one of Earth's poles at an altitude of 40 km. GEANT4 simulations were carried out which determine the atmospheric background and attenuation especially for antiparticles. The second part covers the AMS-02 experiment which will be installed in 2010 on the International Space Station at an altitude of about 400 km for about three years to measure cosmic rays without the influence of Earth's atmosphere. The present work focuses on the anticoincidence counter system (ACC). The ACC is needed to reduce the trigger rate during periods of high fluxes and to reject external particles crossing the tracker from the side or particles resulting from interactions within the detector which would otherwise disturb the clean charge...

  11. Differential flux measurement of atmospheric pion, muon, electron and positron energy spectra at balloon altitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimani, C.; Brunetti, M.T.; Codino, A. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); Papini, P.; Massimo Brancaccio, F.; Finetti, N. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Stephens, S.A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Researc, Bombay (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements); Basini, G.; Bongiorno, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ. Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.

    1995-09-01

    The fluxes of atmospheric electrons, positrons, positive and negative muons and negative pions have been determined using the NMSU Wizard-MASS2 balloons-borne instrument. The instrument was launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico, (geomagnetic cut-off about 4.5 GV/c) on september 23, 1991. The flight lasted 9.8 hours and remained above 100.000 ft. Muons and negative pions were observed and their momenta were determined. Since these particles are not a part of the primary component, the measurement of their fluxes provides information regarding production and propagation of secondary particles in the atmosphere. Similarly, observations of electrons and positrons well below the geomagnetic cut-off provides insight into electromagnetic cascade processes in the upper atmosphere. In addition, the determination of the energy spectra of rare particles such as positrons can be used for background subtraction for cosmic ray experiments gathering data below a few g/cm{sup 2} of overlying atmosphere.

  12. PoGOLite - A High Sensitivity Balloon-Borne Soft Gamma-ray Polarimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Arimoto, Makoto; Axelsson, Magnus; Bettolo, Cecilia Marini; Björnsson, Claes-Ingvar; Bogaert, Gilles; Carlson, Per; Craig, William; Ekeberg, Tomas; Engdegård, Olle; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Gunji, Shuichi; Hjalmarsdotter, Linnea; Iwan, Bianca; Kanai, Yoshikazu; Kataoka, Jun; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kazejev, Jaroslav; Kiss, Mózsi; Klamra, Wlodzimierz; Larsson, Stefan; Madejski, Grzegorz; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Ng, Johnny; Pearce, Mark; Ryde, Felix; Suhonen, Markus; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tanaka, Takuya; Thurston, Timothy; Ueno, Masaru; Varner, Gary; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Yamashita, Yuichiro; Ylinen, Tomi; Yoshida, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    We describe a new balloon-borne instrument (PoGOLite) capable of detecting 10% polarisation from 200mCrab point-like sources between 25 and 80keV in one 6 hour flight. Polarisation measurements in the soft gamma-ray band are expected to provide a powerful probe into high-energy emission mechanisms as well as the distribution of magnetic fields, radiation fields and interstellar matter. At present, only exploratory polarisation measurements have been carried out in the soft gamma-ray band. Reduction of the large background produced by cosmic-ray particles has been the biggest challenge. PoGOLite uses Compton scattering and photo-absorption in an array of 217 well-type phoswich detector cells made of plastic and BGO scintillators surrounded by a BGO anticoincidence shield and a thick polyethylene neutron shield. The narrow FOV (1.25msr) obtained with well-type phoswich detector technology and the use of thick background shields enhance the detected S/N ratio. Event selections based on recorded phototube wavefor...

  13. A burst of energetic gamma rays. [measured by balloon-borne instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, R.; Simnett, G.; White, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    A burst of gamma rays with energies greater than 1 MeV occurring on May 14, 1972, at 201247 UT (151247 local time) was detected during a balloon flight from Palestine, Texas, at a float altitude of 4g/sq cm residual atmosphere. The detector was a tank of liquid scintillator 1m x 0.5 m x 15 cm surrounded by a 0.6 cm plastic scintillator in anticoincidence. The signal was 60 standard deviations above a steady background of 600 counts/sec. The flux was 0.12 (+0.07 or -0.04) gamma/sq cm, and the time integrated flux 20(+11 or -7) gamma/sq cm. Only one such event was seen during the 8 hours of observation in the daytime on May 14 and 15. Two sub-flares in H alpha occurred during the burst, but not coincident with the start time. A detector on the Solrad satellite observed X-rays on all channels 2 minutes after the gamma ray start time. This event is similar to three earlier reported events.

  14. Effect of routine rapid insertion of Bakri balloon tamponade on reducing hemorrhage from placenta previa during and after cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyama, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Morikazu; Sasa, Hidenori; Ishibashi, Hiroki; Yoshida, Masashi; Nakatsuka, Masaya; Takano, Masashi; Furuya, Kenichi

    2017-06-24

    To evaluate the effectiveness of routine rapid insertion of a Bakri balloon during cesarean section for placenta previa based on a retrospective control study. Women with singleton pregnancies who underwent cesarean section for placenta previa at our institution between 2003 and 2016 were enrolled. Between 2015 and 2016, women who routinely underwent balloon tamponade during cesarean section were defined as the balloon group. Between 2003 and 2014, women who underwent no hemostatic procedures except balloon tamponade were defined as the non-balloon group. The clinical outcomes of the two groups were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 266 women with placenta previa, 50 were in the balloon group and 216 were in the non-balloon group. The bleeding amounts were significantly smaller in the balloon group than in the non-balloon group: intraoperative bleeding (991 vs. 1250 g, p placenta previa.

  15. Vessel wall temperature estimation for novel short term thermal balloon angioplasty: study of thermal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kenji; Nakatani, Eriko; Futami, Hikaru; Ogawa, Yoshifumi; Arai, Tsunenori; Fukui, Masaru; Shimamura, Satoshi; Kawabata, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    We have been proposing novel thermal balloon angioplasty, photo-thermo dynamic balloon angioplasty (PT-DBA). PTDBA realized thermal injury and low pressure dilatation that can prevent restenosis in chronic phase. We aim to determine the most efficient heating condition suit to individual symptom with pre-operation thermal simulation. We analyzed the flow dynamics and heat convection inside the balloon, and investigated heat conduction of balloon film to establish the temperature estimation method among vessel wall. Compared with ex vivo temperature measurement experiment, we concluded that the factors need to be considered for the establishment would be the heat conduction of the flow inside PTDB, heat conduction at the balloon film, and contact thermal resistance between the balloon film and vessel wall.

  16. Double Balloon Cervical Ripening Catheter for Control of Massive Hemorrhage in a Cervical Ectopic Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Nabila; Reilly, James; Moretti, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cervical pregnancy can be complicated by perfuse vaginal bleeding. Mechanical compression directed at tamponing the cervical vessels can control hemostasis. There are several types of balloon catheters that have been described for cervical compression. However use of a double balloon catheter is a novel approach for cervical tamponade, as one balloon is positioned below the external cervical os and the second balloon is situated above in the internal cervical os. This compresses the cervix from internal os to external os between the two balloons, forming a “cervical sandwich.” We describe this method of cervical tamponade using a silicone double balloon cervical ripening catheter that rapidly controlled hemorrhage in a patient that failed conservative management with methotrexate. PMID:28261511

  17. Early clinical outcome and complications related to balloon kyphoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Bergmann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures using transpedicular cement augmentation has grown significantly over the last two decades. The benefits of balloon kyphoplasty compared to conservative treatment remain controversial and are discussed in the literature. The complication rates of vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty are considered to be low. The focus of this study was the analysis of acute and clinically relevant complications related to this procedure. In our department, all patients treated between February 2002 and February 2011 with percutaneous cement augmentation (372 patients, 522 augmented vertebral bodies were prospectively recorded. Demographic data, comorbidities, fracture types, intraoperative data and all complications were documented. The pre- and postoperative pain-level and neurological status (Frankel-Score were evaluated. All patients underwent a standardized surgical procedure. Two hundred and ninety-seven patients were treated solely by balloon kyphoplasty; 216 females (72.7% and 81 males (27.3%. Average patient age was 76.21 years (±10.71, range 35-98 years. Average American Society Anestesiologists score was 3.02. According to the Orthopedic Trauma Association classification, there were 69 A 1.1 fractures, 177 A 1.2 fractures, 178 A 3.1.1 fractures and 3 A 3.1.3 fractures. Complications were divided into preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative events. There were 4 pre-operative complications: 3 patients experienced persistent pain after the procedure. In one case, the pedicles could not be visualized during the procedure and the surgery was terminated. One hundred and twenty-nine (40.06% of the patients showed intraoperative cement leaking outside the vertebras, one severe hypotension and tachycardia as reaction to the inflation of the balloons, and there was one cardiac arrest during surgery. Postoperative subcutaneous hematomas were observed in 3 cases, 13 patients developed a

  18. Five-millimeter balloon trocar site herniation: report of two cases and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanis, Margaux J; Momeni, Mazdak; Zakashansky, Konstantin; Chuang, Linus; Hayes, Monica Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Trocar site herniation is a well-known potential complication of minimally invasive surgery. We present the cases of two herniations after use of 5-mm non-bladed balloon trocars. In both patients, surgical management was required, with no subsequent sequelae to date. The hernias were attributed to excessive fascial stretching and compression by the balloon. We recommend full-thickness closure of 5-mm ports if a balloon is used or if there was extensive intraoperative manipulation.

  19. Sinus Balloon Dilation as Treatment for Acute Sphenoid Sinusitis with Impaired Vision for a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about sinus balloon dilatation in treatment of acute left sphenoid sinusitis with left impaired vision in a child. Balloon catheter dilatation (BCD of the sinus ostia is a new technique. It has been shown to be a minimally invasive technique to manage chronic sinusitis. However, this method is rarely used in the treatment of acute sinusitis. So far, we know of no reported cases of sinus balloon dilatation in treatment of this case, especially for children.

  20. High-energy electron observations by PPB-BETS flight in Antarctica

    CERN Document Server

    Torii, S; Tamura, T; Yoshida, K; Kitamura, H; Anraku, K; Chang, J; Ejiri, M; Iijima, I; Kadokura, A; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kobayashi, T; Komori, Y; Matsuzaka, Y; Mizutani, K; Murakami, H; Namiki, M; Nishimura, J; Ohta, S; Saitô, Y; Shibata, M; Tateyama, N; Yamagishi, H; Yamashita, T; Yuda, T

    2008-01-01

    We have observed cosmic-ray electrons from 10 GeV to 800 GeV by a long duration balloon flight using Polar Patrol Balloon (PPB) in Antarctica. The observation was carried out for 13 days at an average altitude of 35 km in January 2004. The detector is an imaging calorimeter composed of scintillating-fiber belts and plastic scintillators inserted between lead plates with 9 radiation lengths. The performance of the detector has been confirmed by the CERN-SPS beam test and also investigated by Monte-Carlo simulations. New telemetry system using a commercial satellite of Iridium, power supply by solar batteries, and automatic level control using CPU have successfully been developed and operated during the flight. From the long duration balloon observations, we derived the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons in the energy range from 100 GeV to 800 GeV. In addition, for the first time we derived the electron arrival directions above 100 GeV, which is consistent with the isotropic distribution.

  1. Cutting balloon angioplasty for undilatable venous stenoses causing dialysis graft failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittl, John A; Feldman, Robert L

    2003-04-01

    Dialysis fistulas and bridge grafts frequently develop outflow stenoses in the venous limb, leading to graft failure. The venous stenoses are fibrotic and require percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with high-pressure balloons. We have encountered venous stenoses in 3 out of 219 hemodialysis patients with graft failure that were undilatable with 6-8 mm high-pressure balloons inflated to more than 24 atm. In each of these cases, treatment with a 4 mm cutting balloon successfully facilitated subsequent balloon dilation at lower pressures. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Development of ultra-thin polyethylene balloons for high altitude research upto mesosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, B Suneel; Ojha, D K; Peter, G Stalin; Vasudevan, R; Anand, D; Kulkarni, P M; Reddy, V Anmi; Rao, T V; Sreenivasan, S

    2014-01-01

    Ever since its inception four decades back, Balloon Facility of Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Hyderabad has been functioning with the needs of its user scientists at its focus. During the early nineties, when the X-ray astronomy group at TIFR expressed the need for balloons capable of carrying the X-ray telescopes to altitudes up to 42 km, the balloon group initiated research and development work on indigenous balloon grade films in various thickness not only for the main experiment but also in parallel, took up the development of thin films in thickness range 5 to 6 microns for fabrication of sounding balloons required for probing the stratosphere up to 42 km as the regular 2000 grams rubber balloon ascents could not reach altitudes higher than 38 km. By the year 1999, total indigenisation of sounding balloon manufacture was accomplished. The work on balloon grade ultra-thin polyethylene film in thickness range 2.8 to 3.8 microns for fabrication of balloons capable of penetrating mesosphere ...

  3. Magnesium and Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium is an essential nutrient for muscle, cardiovascular, and bone health on Earth, and during space flight. We sought to evaluate magnesium status in astronauts before, during, and after space missions, in 43 astronauts (34 male, 9 female) on 4-6 month space flight missions. We also studied individuals participating in a ground analog of space flight, (head-down tilt bed rest, n=27, 35 +/- 7 y). We evaluated serum concentration and 24-hour urinary excretion of magnesium along with estimates of tissue magnesium status from sublingual cells. Serum magnesium increased late in flight, while urinary magnesium excretion was higher over the course of 180-d space missions. Urinary magnesium increased during flight but decreased significantly at landing. Neither serum nor urinary magnesium changed during bed rest. For flight and bed rest, significant correlations existed between the area under the curve of serum and urinary magnesium and the change in total body bone mineral content. Tissue magnesium concentration was unchanged after flight and bed rest. Increased excretion of magnesium is likely partially from bone and partially from diet, but importantly, it does not come at the expense of muscle tissue stores. While further study is needed to better understand the implications of these findings for longer space exploration missions, magnesium homeostasis and tissue status seem well maintained during 4- to 6-month space missions.

  4. A balloon-borne instrument for high-resolution astrophysical spectroscopy in the 20-8000 keV energy range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciesas, W. S.; Baker, R.; Boclet, D.; Brown, S.; Cline, T.; Costlow, H.; Durouchoux, P.; Ehrmann, C.; Gehrels, N.; Hameury, J. M.

    1983-04-01

    The Low Energy Gamma ray Spectrometer (LEGS) is designed to perform fine energy resolution measurements of astrophysical sources. The instrument is configured for a particular balloon flight with either of two sets of high purity germanium detectors. In one configuration, the instrument uses an array of three coaxial detectors (effective volume equal to or approximately 230 cubic cm) inside an NaI (T1) shield and collimator (field of view equal to or approximately 16 deg FWHM) and operates in the 80 to 8000 keV energy range. In the other configuration, three planar detectors (effective area equal to or approximately square cm) surrounded by a combination of passive Fe and active NaI for shielding and collimation (field of view equal to or approximately 5 deg x 10 deg FWHM) are optimized for the 20 to 200 keV energy range. In a typical one day balloon flight, LEGS sensitivity limit (3 sigma) for narrow line features is less than or approximately .0008 ph/cm/s square (coaxial array: 80 to 2000 keV) and less than or approximately .0003 ph/square cm/s (planar array: 50 to 150 keV).

  5. Thromboembolic events associated with single balloon-, double balloon-, and stent-assisted coil embolization of asymptomatic unruptured cerebral aneurysms: evaluation with diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takigawa, Tomoji; Suzuki, Kensuke; Sugiura, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryotaro; Takano, Issei; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Hyodo, Akio [Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Koshigaya, Saitama (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    The introduction of the balloon remodeling and stent-assisted technique has revolutionized the approach to coil embolization for wide-neck aneurysms. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of thromboembolic events associated with single balloon-assisted, double balloon-assisted, and stent-assisted coil embolization for asymptomatic unruptured aneurysms. A retrospective review was undertaken by 119 patients undergoing coiling with an adjunctive technique for unruptured saccular aneurysms (64 single balloon, 12 double balloon, 43 stent assisted). All underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) within 24 h after the procedure. DWI showed hyperintense lesions in 48 (40 %) patients, and ten (21 %) of these patients incurred neurological deterioration (permanent, two; transient, eight). Hyperintense lesions were detected significantly more often in procedures with the double balloon-assisted technique (7/12, 58 %) than with the single balloon-assisted technique (16/64, 25 %, p = 0.05). Occurrence of new lesions was significantly higher with the use of stent-assisted technique (25/43, 58 %) than with the single balloon-assisted technique (p = 0.001). Symptomatic ischemic rates were similar between the three groups. The increased number of microcatheters was significantly related to the DWI abnormalities (two microcatheters, 15/63 (23.8 %); three microcatheters, 20/41 (48.8 %) (p = 0.008); four microcatheters, 12/15 (80 %) (p = 0.001)). Thromboembolic events detected on DWI related to coil embolization for unruptured aneurysms are relatively common, especially in association with the double balloon-assisted and stent-assisted techniques. Furthermore, the number of microcatheters is highly correlated with DWI abnormalities. The high rate of thromboembolic events suggests the need for evaluation of platelet reactivity and the addition or change of antiplatelet agents. (orig.)

  6. Lagrangian temperature and vertical velocity fluctuations due to gravity waves in the lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podglajen, Aurélien; Hertzog, Albert; Plougonven, Riwal; Legras, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Wave-induced Lagrangian fluctuations of temperature and vertical velocity in the lower stratosphere are quantified using measurements from superpressure balloons (SPBs). Observations recorded every minute along SPB flights allow the whole gravity wave spectrum to be described and provide unprecedented information on both the intrinsic frequency spectrum and the probability distribution function of wave fluctuations. The data set has been collected during two campaigns coordinated by the French Space Agency in 2010, involving 19 balloons over Antarctica and 3 in the deep tropics. In both regions, the vertical velocity distributions depart significantly from a Gaussian behavior. Knowledge on such wave fluctuations is essential for modeling microphysical processes along Lagrangian trajectories. We propose a new simple parameterization that reproduces both the non-Gaussian distribution of vertical velocities (or heating/cooling rates) and their observed intrinsic frequency spectrum.

  7. Initial Flight Test of the Production Support Flight Control Computers at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John; Stephenson, Mark

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has completed the initial flight test of a modified set of F/A-18 flight control computers that gives the aircraft a research control law capability. The production support flight control computers (PSFCC) provide an increased capability for flight research in the control law, handling qualities, and flight systems areas. The PSFCC feature a research flight control processor that is "piggybacked" onto the baseline F/A-18 flight control system. This research processor allows for pilot selection of research control law operation in flight. To validate flight operation, a replication of a standard F/A-18 control law was programmed into the research processor and flight-tested over a limited envelope. This paper provides a brief description of the system, summarizes the initial flight test of the PSFCC, and describes future experiments for the PSFCC.

  8. Validation of GOMOS vertical profiles using the stratospheric balloon-borne AMON and SALOMON UV-Visible spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, J. B.; Chartier, M.; Berthet, G.; Robert, C.; Lemaire, T.; Pepe, F.; George, M.; Pirre, M.

    2003-04-01

    The stratospheric balloon-borne UV-visible spectrometers AMON and SALOMON, which uses stars and Moon as light source, respectively, were involved in the validation of the UV-visible spectrometer GOMOS onboard ENVISAT, which uses also stars as light source. A low spectral resolution UV-visible spectrometer, AMON-RA, is also implanted in the AMON gondola, for the validation of the GOMOS algorithm dedicated to the correction of the chromatic scintillation effect. A flight of SALOMON occurred in September 19, 2002, at mid latitude from Aire sur l’Adour, France. The night-time SALOMON and GOMOS measurements were conducted at the same time (around 21h30 TU) and with a spatial coincidence less than 250 km. Comparison of vertical profiles was done for an altitude in the 15-40 km range. While the global shape of the GOMOS and SALOMON ozone profiles are quite in agreement, the GOMOS NO2 and NO3 profiles are unrealistic when compared to SALOMON profiles. A reanalysis of the GOMOS transmission using algorithms already developed for SALOMON shows that accurate NO2 and NO3 profiles can be retrieved if DOAS technique and dedicated spectral windows are used. An AMON (and AMON-RA) flight and a new SALOMON flight should occurred at high latitude from Kiruna (northern Sweden) in January and March 2003, respectively. The same analyses as for the September 2002 flight will be conducted, including this time the OClO and aerosols extinction coefficient retrievals. Taking into account the effect of the chromatic scintillation on the transmission spectra, recommendations will be proposed in order to improve the GOMOS retrievals.

  9. Influence of inflation pressure and balloon size on the development of intimal hyperplasia after balloon angioplasty. A study in the atherosclerotic rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarembock, I J; LaVeau, P J; Sigal, S L; Timms, I; Sussman, J; Haudenschild, C; Ezekowitz, M D

    1989-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of balloon size and inflation pressure on acute and subsequent outcome following balloon angioplasty (BA), 70 New Zealand White rabbits with bilateral femoral atherosclerosis were assigned to four groups: group 1, oversized balloon, low inflation pressure (n = 35 vessels; balloon size, 3.0 mm/inflation pressure, 5 atm); group 2, oversized balloon, high inflation pressure (n = 36; 3.0 mm/10 atm); group 3, appropriate size, low inflation pressure (n = 17; 2.5 mm/5 atm); and group 4, appropriate size balloon, high inflation pressure (n = 19; 2.5 mm/10 atm). Angiograms were obtained before, 10 minutes after, and 28 days after BA and read by two blinded observers using electronic calipers. The in vivo balloon-to-vessel ratio was measured for each group. There were eight non-BA controls. Rabbits were sacrificed either immediately (n = 34) or at 28 days after BA (n = 36), with the femoral vessels pressure perfused for histologic and morphometric analysis. The latter was performed at 28 days only. Absolute angiographic diameters increased in all groups immediately after BA (p less than 0.01). Acute angiographic success, defined as greater than 20% increase in luminal diameter, was higher using high inflation pressure (group 2, 32/36 [89%] and group 4, 16/19 [84%] vs. group 1, 23/35 [66%] and group 3, 9/17 [53%]; p less than 0.05). A 3.0-mm balloon resulted in significant oversizing irrespective of inflation pressure (balloon-to-vessel ratio, 1.5 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.1 +/- 0.1 to 1, for the 2.5-mm balloon). Vessels exposed to high inflation pressure had a significantly higher incidence of mural thrombus, dissection (p less than 0.01), and medial necrosis versus low pressure (p less than 0.05). At 28 days, the rates of restenosis (defined as greater than 50% loss of initial gain) were 14/20 (70%), 11/16 (69%), 5/10 (50%), and 5/10 (50%) for groups 1 through 4 (p = NS; a trend in favor of the groups using an oversized balloon). There was an increase in the

  10. NuMED CHEATHAM-PLATINUM STENT AND BALLOON IN BALLOON DELIVERY CATHETER FOR TREATMENT OF NATIVE COARCTATION OF THE AORTA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ COARCTATION of the aorta (CoA) is a congenital heart defect involving a narrowing of the aorta. The narrowed segment called coarctation is most likely to happen in the segment just after the aortic arch. The narrowing can be removed by surgery or sometimes by a nonsurgical balloon dilation. However, aortic coarctation may recur even after successful surgery or balloon dilation. Fortunately, coarctation can now be treated with nonsurgical balloon dilation associated with implanting a stent using cardiac catheterization. Herein we reported our experience in a 19-year-old boy with CoA who underwent successful covered Cheatham-Platinum (CP) stent implantation for the coarctation.

  11. A millisecond-risetime sub-millimeter light source for lab and in flight bolometer calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbon, Ph. [DAPNIA CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Delbart, A. [DAPNIA CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Fesquet, M. [DAPNIA CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Magneville, C. [DAPNIA CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France)]. E-mail: cmv@hep.saclay.cea.fr; Mazeau, B. [DAPNIA CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Pansart, J.-P. [DAPNIA CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Yvon, D. [DAPNIA CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France)]. E-mail: dyvon@cea.fr; Dumoulin, L. [IN2P3/CSNSM, Orsay (France); Marnieros, S. [IN2P3/CSNSM, Orsay (France); Camus, Ph. [CEA/CRTBT, Grenoble (France); Durand, T. [CEA/CRTBT, Grenoble (France); Hoffmann, Ch. [CEA/CRTBT, Grenoble (France)

    2007-06-01

    The Olimpo balloon project will use a 120 bolometer camera to observe the sky at four frequencies (143, 217, 385 and 600GHz) with a resolution of 3 to 2 arc-minute. This paper presents the sub-millimeter calibration 'lamp' developed for ground testing and in-flight secondary calibration of bolometric detectors. By design, main features of the device are reproducibility and stability of light flux and millisecond rise time. The radiative device will be placed inside the bolometer camera and will illuminate the bolometer array through a hole in the last 2K mirror. Operation, readout, and monitoring of the device is ensured by warm electronics. Light output flux and duration is programmable, triggered and monitored from a simple computer RS232 interface. It was tested to be reliable in ballooning temperature conditions from -80 to 50 deg. C. Design and test's results are explained.

  12. A millisecond-risetime sub-millimeter light source for lab and in flight bolometer calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbon, Ph.; Delbart, A.; Fesquet, M.; Magneville, C.; Mazeau, B.; Pansart, J.-P.; Yvon, D.; Dumoulin, L.; Marnieros, S.; Camus, Ph.; Durand, T.; Hoffmann, Ch.

    2007-06-01

    The Olimpo balloon project will use a 120 bolometer camera to observe the sky at four frequencies (143, 217, 385 and 600 GHz) with a resolution of 3 to 2 arc-minute. This paper presents the sub-millimeter calibration "lamp" developed for ground testing and in-flight secondary calibration of bolometric detectors. By design, main features of the device are reproducibility and stability of light flux and millisecond rise time. The radiative device will be placed inside the bolometer camera and will illuminate the bolometer array through a hole in the last 2 K mirror. Operation, readout, and monitoring of the device is ensured by warm electronics. Light output flux and duration is programmable, triggered and monitored from a simple computer RS232 interface. It was tested to be reliable in ballooning temperature conditions from -80 to 50C. Design and test's results are explained.

  13. Anisotropy in the Microwave Sky Results from the First Flight of BAM

    CERN Document Server

    Tucker, G S; Halpern, M; Shinkoda, I; Towlson, W

    1996-01-01

    Results are reported from the first flight of a new balloon-borne instrument, BAM (Balloon-borne Anisotropy Measurement), designed to search for cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy. The instrument uses a cryogenic differential Fourier transform spectrometer to obtain data in five spectral channels whose central frequencies lie in the range 3.7 cm^{-1} to 8.5 cm^{-1}. The spectrometer is coupled to an off-axis prime focus telescope; the combination yields difference spectra of two regions on the sky defined by positions show statistically significant fluctuations. Assuming Gaussian correlated anisotropy, for the band average 3.1 cm^{-1} to 9.2 cm^{-1}, one finds $\\Delta T/T = 3.1^{+3.1}_{1.1}\\times 10^{-5}$ (90% confidence interval) for a correlation angle of 1\\fdg 2. This corresponds to $Q_{flat} = 35.9^{17.7}_{6.3} \\mu K$ (1\\sigma).

  14. Stratospheric Flight of Three Mars Surface Instrument Prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, T. L.; Neidholdt, E.; Banfield, D. J.; Kokorowski, M.; Kobie, B.; Diaz, E.; Gordon, S.; Doan, D.; Salami, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Analog Site Testbed for Readiness Advancement (ASTRA) is a high-altitude balloon platform for the testing of Mars surface instrument systems. In September 2012 three prototype instruments, a mass spectrometer and two anemometers, were taken to the 6 mbar pressure level of Earth's stratosphere (~34.5 km) above New Mexico to demonstrate their current capabilities and identify the critical path-to-flight steps for future advancement. Each of the instrument systems deployed on ASTRA were rated at TRL 4 at the start of the project. Through laboratory development, environmental testing, and the ASTRA balloon flight, each has advanced to an overall system TRL of 5, with specific subsystems reaching TRL 6. The results from the Rapid Acquisition Mass Spectrometer (RAMS), the Hot-Wire Anemometer (HWA), and the Single-Axis Sonic Anemometer (SASA) from the mid-September flight are presented, with focus given to both scientific results of the terrestrial atmospheric investigations, and the engineering and technical performance of the individual instrument systems and the balloon platform. The RAMS instrument has unique ion-imaging optics which permit the acquisition of a complete mass spectrum in a single CCD frame (~50 ms minimum). This allows RAMS to see rapid fluctuations in atmospheric constituents (necessary for the study of, for instance, vapor fluxes to and from the Mars surface) and has potential applications for laser ablation mass spectroscopy. The HWA is the latest generation of hot-wire anemometer, with heritage from the Mars Pathfinder MET instrument, and the ATMIS sensors developed for the Mars Polar Lander and the NetLander project. In addition to wind speed, a thermocouple cage around the hot filament detects heat plume direction, thus permitting 2-D wind vectors to be established. The SASA is a proof-of-capability device for an eventual three-axis sonic anemometer design. Developed under PIDDP funding by Dr. Don Banfield of Cornell (thus a contributed

  15. Flight Research Building (Hangar)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NASA Glenn Flight Research Building is located at the NASA Glenn Research Center with aircraft access to Cleveland Hopkins International Airport. The facility is...

  16. Hypersonic flight testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, W.

    1987-01-01

    This presentation is developed for people attending the University of Texas week-long short course in hypersonics. The presentation will be late in the program after the audience has been exposed to computational tehniques and ground test methods. It will attempt to show why we flight test, flight test options, what we learn from flight tests and how we use this information to improve our knowledge of hypersonics. It presupposes that our primary interest is in developing vehicles which will fly in the hypersonic flight region and not in simply developing technology for technology's sake. The material is presented in annotated vugraph form so that the author's comments on each vugraph are on the back of the preceding page. It is hoped that the comments will help reinforce the message on the vugraph.

  17. Flight Systems Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project will develop the Flight System Monitor which will use non-intrusive electrical monitoring (NEMO). The electronic system health of...

  18. Complex Coronary Interventions with the Novel Mozec™ CTO Balloon: The MOZART Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Alessandro; Rognoni, Andrea; Schaffer, Alon; Secco, Gioel G; Bongo, Angelo S

    2015-01-01

    Mozec™ CTO is a novel semicompliant rapid-exchange PTCA balloon catheter with specific features dedicated to treat complex coronary lesions like chronic total occlusions (CTOs). However, no data have been reported about the performance of this device in an all-comers population with complex coronary lesions. We evaluated the safety and success rate of Mozec™ CTO balloon in 41 consecutive patients with chronic stable angina and complex coronary lesions (15 severe calcified coronary stenoses, 15 bifurcation lesions with planned two-stent intervention, and 11 CTOs). Safety was assessed reporting the balloon burst rate after inflation exceeding the rated burst pressure (RBP) according to the manufacturer's reference table. Success was defined as the possibility to advance the device further the target lesion. The Mozec™ CTO balloon showed an excellent performance with a 93.3% success in crossing tight and severely calcified lesions (14/15 pts), a 93.3% success in engaging jailed side branches after stent deployment across bifurcations (14/15 pts), and a 90.9% success in crossing CTO lesions (10/11 pts). The burst rate at RBP of the Mozec™ CTO balloon was 6.7% (1/15 balloons) in the tight and severely calcified lesions, 6.7% (1/15 balloons) when dilating jailed vessels, and 9.1% (1/11 balloons) in CTOs. The novel Mozec™ CTO balloon dilatation catheter showed promising results when employed to treat complex lesions in an all-comers population. Further studies should clarify if this kind of balloon might reduce the need of more costly devices like over-the-wire balloons and microcatheters for complex lesions treatment.

  19. 1999 Flight Mechanics Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, John P. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This conference publication includes papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics Symposium held on May 18-20, 1999. Sponsored by the Guidance, Navigation and Control Center of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  20. Adaptive structures flight experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maurice

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: adaptive structures flight experiments; enhanced resolution using active vibration suppression; Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX); ACTEX program status; ACTEX-2; ACTEX-2 program status; modular control patch; STRV-1b Cryocooler Vibration Suppression Experiment; STRV-1b program status; Precision Optical Bench Experiment (PROBE); Clementine Spacecraft Configuration; TECHSAT all-composite spacecraft; Inexpensive Structures and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX); and INFLEX program status.