WorldWideScience

Sample records for superoptimizers sorav bansal

  1. Super-optimal CO2 reduces seed yield but not vegetative growth in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotenhuis, T. P.; Bugbee, B.

    1997-01-01

    Although terrestrial atmospheric CO2 levels will not reach 1000 micromoles mol-1 (0.1%) for decades, CO2 levels in growth chambers and greenhouses routinely exceed that concentration. CO2 levels in life support systems in space can exceed 10000 micromoles mol-1(1%). Numerous studies have examined CO2 effects up to 1000 micromoles mol-1, but biochemical measurements indicate that the beneficial effects of CO2 can continue beyond this concentration. We studied the effects of near-optimal (approximately 1200 micromoles mol-1) and super-optimal CO2 levels (2400 micromoles mol-1) on yield of two cultivars of hydroponically grown wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in 12 trials in growth chambers. Increasing CO2 from sub-optimal to near-optimal (350-1200 micromoles mol-1) increased vegetative growth by 25% and seed yield by 15% in both cultivars. Yield increases were primarily the result of an increased number of heads per square meter. Further elevation of CO2 to 2500 micromoles mol-1 reduced seed yield by 22% (P seeds per head by 10% and mass per seed by 11%. The toxic effect of CO2 was similar over a range of light levels from half to full sunlight. Subsequent trials revealed that super-optimal CO2 during the interval between 2 wk before and after anthesis mimicked the effect of constant super-optimal CO2. Furthermore, near-optimal CO2 during the same interval mimicked the effect of constant near-optimal CO2. Nutrient concentration of leaves and heads was not affected by CO2. These results suggest that super-optimal CO2 inhibits some process that occurs near the time of seed set resulting in decreased seed set, seed mass, and yield.

  2. 224-IJBCS-Article-Dr Ajay Bansal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RHUMSIKI

    1Department of Chemical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Jalandhar, ... Keywords: Orange G, UV/H2O2, photoreactor, degradation, process parameters. ... water during their synthesis and dyeing ..... composite design. ... analyses. Dyes and Pigment, 69: 210-223. Marechal AML, Slokar YM, Taufer T. 1997.

  3. Aridity induces super-optimal investment in leaf venation by Eucalyptus and Corymbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Paul L.; de Boer, Hugo J.; Price, Charles A.; Veneklaas, Erik J.

    2016-04-01

    The close relationship between leaf water status and stomatal conductance implies that the hydraulic architecture of leaves poses an important constraint on carbon uptake, specifically in arid environments with high evaporative demands. However, it remains uncertain how morphological, hydraulic and photosynthetic traits are coordinated to achieve optimal leaf functioning in arid environments. Zwieniecki and Boyce (2014) proposed a generic framework on the hydraulic architecture of leaves based on the argument that water is optimally distributed when the lateral distance between neighboring water transport veins (dx) is approximately equal to the distance from these veins to the epidermis (dy), expressed as dx:dy ≈1. Many derived angiosperms realize this optimal hydraulic architecture by closely coordinating leaf vein density with leaf thickness and the lateral position of veins inside the leaf. Zwieniecki and Boyce (2014) further suggested that over-investment in veins (dx:dy photosynthetic traits of 65 species (401 individuals) within the widely distributed and closely related genera Eucalyptus and Corymbia along a 2000-km-long aridity gradient in Western Australia (see Schulze et al., 2006). We inferred the potential functional benefit of reducing dx beyond dy using a semi-empirical model that links leaf morphology and hydraulics to photosynthesis. Our results reveal that Eucalyptus and Corymbia evolved extremely high vein densities in addition to thick amphistomatous leaf morphologies along the natural aridity gradient resulting in dx:dy ratios ranging between 0.8 and 0.08. We propose that as the thickness of amphistomatous leaves increases, the effect of reducing dx beyond dy is to offset the reduction in photosynthesis that would result from the theoretical optimal architecture of dx:dy ≈1. Our model quantified the resulting relative gain in photosynthesis at 10% to 15%, which could provide a crucial gas exchange advantage. We conclude that aridity confounds selection for leaf traits associated with a long leaf lifespan and thermal capacitance as well as those supporting higher rates of leaf water transport and photosynthesis. References Schulze, E.-D., Turner, N. C., Nicolle, D. and Schumacher, J.: Species differences in carbon isotope ratios, specific leaf area and nitrogen concentrations in leaves of Eucalyptus growing in a common garden compared with along an aridity gradient, Physiol. Plant., 127(3), 434-444, 2006. Zwieniecki, M. A. and Boyce, C. K.: Evolution of a unique anatomical precision in angiosperm leaf venation lifts constraints on vascular plant ecology, Proc. R. Soc. B Biol. Sci., 281(1779), 2014.

  4. [Temperature control of the crossing-over frequency in Drosophila melanogaster. Effect of infra- and super-optimal shock temperatures in early ontogenesis on the recombination frequency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grushko, T A; Korochkina, S E; Klimenko, V V

    1991-10-01

    Effect of temperature shock treatments (0 and 37 degrees C) in early ontogenesis on recombination frequency was studied in two strains of Drosophila X1 and X2. Recombination frequency under treatment with temperature of 0 degrees C and 37 degrees C (shock treatment), as well as at 14 degrees C and 29 degrees C nonshock treatment was found to be dependent on strain genotype, the chromosomal segments under consideration, developmental stage and the age of individuals analysed. Shock treatments usually increase recombination frequency, whereas nonshock treatments lead to unstable and variable recombination frequencies. A concept of ontogenic homeostasis of recombination has been introduced. It is assumed that the effect of temperature treatments on recombination frequency is indirect--i.e. physiologically mediated.

  5. Electron Attachment to Halomethanes at High Temperature: CH2CI2, CF2CI2, CH3CI, and CF3CI Attachment Rate Constants up to 1100 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    the one of Fessenden and Bansal"" for the slowest-attaching halomethane shown, CHF,, is in error because dissociative electron attach- ment is 2 eV... Fessenden and K. M. Bansal. J. Chem. Phys. 53, 3468 (1970). 26Y. Wang, L. G. Christophorou. J. K. Olthoff, and J. K. Verbrugge, Chem. Phys. Lett. 304

  6. Electron Affinity of trans-2-C4F8 from Electron Attachment-Detachment Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-04

    either isomer. This attachment rate constant agrees well with other values measured only at 300 K for “2-C4F8” by Bansal and Fessenden (4.9 × 10-8...Grajower, R. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. Ion Phys. 1973, 10, 11. (5) Bansal, K. M.; Fessenden , R. W. J. Chem. Phys. 1973, 59, 1760. (6) Sauers, I

  7. Arrhenius Behavior of Electron Attachment to CH3Br from 303 to 1100 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-21

    dissociating state grows. Among otable experimental results are early evidence by Wentworth t al. [2], Bansal and Fessenden [3], and Mothes [4] that...et al.) [7], 6.0×10−12 (293K, Levy et al.) [8], 7.0×10−12 (298K, Bansal and Fessenden ) [3], 3.6×10−12 (300K,Mothes et al.) [4], and1.0×10−11 (Schindler...1791–1801. [3] K.M. Bansal, R.W. Fessenden , Chem. Phys. Lett. 15 (1972) 21–23. [4] K.G. Mothes, E. Schultes, R.N. Schindler, J. Phys. Chem. 76 (1972

  8. Binary translation using peephole translation rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sorav; Aiken, Alex

    2010-05-04

    An efficient binary translator uses peephole translation rules to directly translate executable code from one instruction set to another. In a preferred embodiment, the translation rules are generated using superoptimization techniques that enable the translator to automatically learn translation rules for translating code from the source to target instruction set architecture.

  9. Deterministic Discrepancy Minimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bansal, N.; Spencer, J.

    2013-01-01

    We derandomize a recent algorithmic approach due to Bansal (Foundations of Computer Science, FOCS, pp. 3–10, 2010) to efficiently compute low discrepancy colorings for several problems, for which only existential results were previously known. In particular, we give an efficient deterministic algori

  10. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium (chromium (VI) ion from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    taye

    2015-04-01

    Apr 1, 2015 ... countries for industrial waste water varies from 0.05 to. 0.1 mg/l (Bansal et .... different methods of treatment by physically, chemically and organically .... hydrogen ion concentration is influenced by biological activities. Beside ...

  11. Doppler changes as the earliest parameter in fetal surveillance to detect fetal compromise in intrauterine growth-restricted fetuses: Erratum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article that appeared on pages 69-73 of the January-February 2016 issue of the Serbian Archives of Medicine (“Srpski arhiv za celokupno lekarstvo”; Srp Arh Celok Lek. 2016 Jan-Feb; 144(1-2:69-73; doi: 10.2298/SARH1602069B, there is an inaccuracy regarding the stated authors of the article (Saloni Bansal, Deepika Deka, Vatsla Dhadwal, Rajiv Mahendru; the authors should be in fact listed in the following manner: Saloni Bansal, Dipika Deka, Vatsla Dadhwal, Neeta Singh, Smriti Hari. The authors, as well as the publisher, regret this error. Link to the corrected article 10.2298/SARH1602069B

  12. Strategies to promote adherence to nutritional advice in patients with chronic kidney disease: a narrative review and commentary

    OpenAIRE

    Beto JA; Schury KA; Bansal VK

    2016-01-01

    Judith A Beto, Katherine A Schury, Vinod K Bansal Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Loyola University Healthcare System, Loyola University of Chicago, Maywood, IL, USA Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) requires extensive changes to food and lifestyle. Poor adherence to diet, medications, and treatments has been estimated to vary between 20% and 70%, which in turn can contribute to increased mortality and morbidity. Delivering effective nutritional advice in patients with CKD coor...

  13. Temporally Aware Reactive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    functional language. http://haskell.org, February 1999. 18. A. Rebón Portillo, K. Hammond, H.-W. Loidl, and P. Vasconcelos . Granularity analysis...Portillo, Kevin Hammond, Hans-Wolfgang Loidl, and Pedro Vasconcelos . Granularity analysis using automatic size and time cost inference. In Proceedings of IFL...SPIE/IS&T Multimedia Computing and Networking 1999, San Jose , California, January 1999. [2] N. Feamster, D. Bansal, and H. Balakrishnan. On the

  14. Severe Periodontal Disease Manifested in Chronic Disseminated Type of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in a 3-Year Old Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vinay Kumar; Bansal, Rajesh; Gupta, Vineeta; Bansal, Manish; Patne, Shashikant

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT% Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), previously known as histio-cytosis X, is a rare idiopathic disorder of reticulo-endothelial system with abnormal proliferation of bone marrow derived Langerhans cells along with a variable number of leukocytes, such as eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes and plasma cells. Three years old male child presented with multifocal osteolytic lesions and papulosquamous skin lesions. Clinical and radio-graphic features, such as severe alveolar bone loss, mobility of teeth, precocious eruption of teeth, foating appearance of teeth in orthopantomogram (OPG), osteolytic lesion in skull and cutaneous lesions were highly suggestive of LCH disease. Skin biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of LCH. Induction chemotherapy with oral prednisolone and intravenous vinblastine was started. Child responded well to chemotherapy. The clinical significance of the presented case is to diagnose the case of LCH on the basis of the manifestation of severe periodontal disease as this can be first or only manifestation of LCH. A dentist plays a major role in the multidisciplinary treatment of LCH through routine examination and periodic follow-up. How to cite this article: Bansal M, Srivastava VK, Bansal R, Gupta V, Bansal M, Patne S. Severe Periodontal Disease Manifested in Chronic Disseminated Type of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in a 3-Year Old Child. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):217-219. PMID:25709306

  15. Recent Developments in the Photophysics of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Their Use as Active and Passive Material Elements in Thin Film Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    given by the thermally averaged group velocity v = h| vb ,q|i calculated from the exciton dispersion in Fig. 7d and at room temperature we find v E 0.5 nm...158 A. D. Mohite, P. Gopinath, H. M. Shah and B. W. Alphenaar, Nano Lett., 2007, 8, 142–146. 159 M. Kasha, Radiat. Res., 1963, 20, 55–71. 160 C. Y...98, 13496–13500. 176 T. Bansal, A. D. Mohite, H. M. Shah , C. Galande, A. Srivastava, J. B. Jasinski, P. M. Ajayan and B. W. Alphenaar, Carbon, 2012

  16. Comparative bioequivalence studies of tramadol hydrochloride sustained-release 200 mg tablets

    OpenAIRE

    Suhas, Khandave; Satish ,Sawant; Santosh ,Joshi; Bansal,Yatish Kumar; Sonal Sushil Kadam,

    2010-01-01

    Suhas S Khandave1, Satish V Sawant1, Santosh S Joshi1, Yatish K Bansal2, Sonal S Kadam21Accutest Research Laboratories (I) Private Limited, Koparkhirne, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra, India; 2Ipca Laboratories Limited, Kandivli Mumbai, Maharashtra, IndiaBackground: Tramadol hydrochloride is available as 50 mg immediate-release (IR) and 100 mg, 200 mg, and 300 mg sustained-release (SR) tablets. The recommended dose of tramadol is 50–100 mg IR tablets every 4–6 hours. The tramado...

  17. Determination of surface areas and functional group in carbons by immersion microcalorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquero-Haeberlin, M.C.; Giraldo, L.; Moreno, J.C.; Gomez, A. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Santafe de Bogota (Colombia). Dept. de Quimica

    1997-12-31

    A batch-type heat conduction microcalorimeter is designed and constructed for the determination of immersion heats of microporous solids in polar and non polar solvents. The equipment was employed in the determination of surface areas of several activated carbons, ranging from 250 to 1500 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, with imprecision of 0.45%. The results are in concordance with the theoretical predictions of Stoeckli-Kraehnbuehl and Stoeckli-Bansal-Donnet equation. The immersion heats of activated carbons in 0.1 M NaOH and 0.1 M HCl were determinated and related to the number of acid and basic groups. (orig.)

  18. Thermodynamic substantiation of water-bridged collagen structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burjanadze, T V

    1992-08-01

    A solution of the problem of topology of a hydrogen bond net in a triple helix of collagen is suggested on the basis of an analysis of thermodynamic data on denaturation of phylogenetically different collagen [T. V. Burjanadze (1982), Vol. 21, pp. 1489-1501; T. V. Burjanadze, E. I. Tiktopulo, and P. L. Privalov (1987), Dokl. Akad. Nauk. USSR, Vol. 293, pp. 720-724] as well as on the earlier evaluation of the energy of the OH group of the 4-hydroxyproline bond [A. R. Ward and P. Mason (1973), Journal of Molecular Biology, Vol. 29, pp. 431-435]. It is shown that only the water-bridged collagen structure [G. N. Ramachandran and R. Chandrasekharan (1968), Biopolymers, Vol. 6, pp. 1649-1661; G. N. Ramachandran, M. Bansal, and R. S. Bhatnagar (1973), Biochimica Biophysica Acta, Vol. 322, pp. 166-171; M. Bansal, C. Ramakrishnan, and G. N. Ramachandran (1975), Proceedings of the Indian Academy of Sciences, Vol. 82, pp. 152-164] can explain both the change of thermostability upon proline hydroxylation [J. Rosenbloom, M. Harsch, and S. Jimenez (1973), Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Vol. 158, pp. 478-484] and its phylogenetic change [T. V. Burjanadze (1982)].

  19. Framework for adaptive multiscale analysis of nonhomogeneous point processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgason, Hannes; Bartroff, Jay; Abry, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    We develop the methodology for hypothesis testing and model selection in nonhomogeneous Poisson processes, with an eye toward the application of modeling and variability detection in heart beat data. Modeling the process' non-constant rate function using templates of simple basis functions, we develop the generalized likelihood ratio statistic for a given template and a multiple testing scheme to model-select from a family of templates. A dynamic programming algorithm inspired by network flows is used to compute the maximum likelihood template in a multiscale manner. In a numerical example, the proposed procedure is nearly as powerful as the super-optimal procedures that know the true template size and true partition, respectively. Extensions to general history-dependent point processes is discussed.

  20. High T-cell immune activation and immune exhaustion among individuals with suboptimal CD4 recovery after 4 years of antiretroviral therapy in an African cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colebunders Robert

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART partially corrects immune dysfunction associated with HIV infection. The levels of T-cell immune activation and exhaustion after long-term, suppressive ART and their correlation with CD4 T-cell count reconstitution among ART-treated patients in African cohorts have not been extensively evaluated. Methods T-cell activation (CD38+HLA-DR+ and immune exhaustion (PD-1+ were measured in a prospective cohort of patients initiated on ART; 128 patient samples were evaluated and subcategorized by CD4 reconstitution after long-term suppressive treatment: Suboptimal [median CD4 count increase 129 (-43-199 cells/μl], N = 34 ], optimal [282 (200-415 cells/μl, N = 64] and super-optimal [528 (416-878 cells/μl, N = 30]. Results Both CD4+ and CD8 T-cell activation was significantly higher among suboptimal CD4 T-cell responders compared to super-optimal responders. In a multivariate model, CD4+CD38+HLADR+ T-cells were associated with suboptimal CD4 reconstitution [AOR, 5.7 (95% CI, 1.4-23, P = 0.014]. T-cell exhaustion (CD4+PD1+ and CD8+PD1+ was higher among suboptimal relative to optimal (P P = 0.022]. Conclusion T-cell activation and exhaustion persist among HIV-infected patients despite long-term, sustained HIV-RNA viral suppression. These immune abnormalities were associated with suboptimal CD4 reconstitution and their regulation may modify immune recovery among suboptimal responders to ART.

  1. Data on diverse roles of helix perturbations in membrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Shelar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The various structural variations observed in TM helices of membrane proteins have been deconstructed into 9 distinct types of helix perturbations. These perturbations are defined by the deviation of TM helices from the predominantly observed linear α-helical conformation, to form 310- and π-helices, as well as adopting curved and kinked geometries. The data presented here supplements the article ‘Helix perturbations in Membrane Proteins Assist in Inter-helical Interactions and Optimal Helix Positioning in the Bilayer’ (A. Shelar, M. Bansal, 2016 [1]. This data provides strong evidence for the role of various helix perturbations in influencing backbone torsion angles of helices, mediating inter-helical interactions, oligomer formation and accommodation of hydrophobic residues within the bilayer. The methodology used for creation of various datasets of membrane protein families (Sodium/Calcium exchanger and Heme Copper Oxidase has also been mentioned.

  2. Improved Refrigerant Characteristics Flow Predictions in Adiabatic Capillary Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shodiya Sulaimon

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents improved refrigerant characteristics flow predictions using homogenous flow model in adiabatic capillary tube, used in small vapor compression refrigeration system. The model is based on fundamental equations of mass, momentum and energy. In order to improve the flow predictions, the inception of vaporization in the capillary tube is determined by evaluating initial vapor quality using enthalpy equation of refrigerant at saturation point and the inlet entrance effect of the capillary tube is also accounted for. Comparing this model with experimental data from open literature showed a reasonable agreement. Further comparison of this new model with earlier model of Bansal showed that the present model could be use to improve the performance predictions of refrigerant flow in adiabatic capillary tube.

  3. In situ observation of stomatal movements and gas exchange of Aegopodium podagraria L. in the understorey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, H; Kappen, L

    2000-10-01

    Observations of stomata in situ while simultaneously measuring CO(2) gas exchange and transpiration were made in field experiments with Aegopodium podagraria in a highly variable light climate in the understorey of trees. The low background photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) caused a slight opening of the stomata and no visible response to sporadic lightflecks. However, if lightflecks were frequent and brighter, slow opening movements were observed. Small apertures were sufficient to allow maximal photosynthetic rates. Therefore, the small apertures observed in low light usually only caused minor stomatal limitations of lightfleck photosynthesis. The response of stomata to step-wise changes in PPFD under different levels of leaf to air vapour pressure difference (Delta(W)) was observed under controlled conditions. High Delta(W) influenced the stomatal response only slightly by reducing stomatal aperture in low light and causing a slight reduction in the initial capacity to utilize high PPFD levels. Under continuous high PPFD, however, stomata opened to the same degree irrespective of Delta(W). Under high Delta(W), opening and closing responses to PPFD-changes were faster, which enabled a rapid removal of the small stomatal limitations of photosynthesis initially present in high Delta(W) after longer periods in low light. It is concluded that A. podagraria maintains a superoptimal aperture in low light which leads to a low instantaneous water use efficiency, but allows an efficient utilization of randomly occurring lightflecks.

  4. Modelling space-based integral-field spectrographs and their application to Type Ia supernova cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Hemant; Bonissent, Alain

    2017-04-01

    We present the parameterized simulation of an integral-field unit (IFU) slicer spectrograph and its applications in spectroscopic studies, namely, for probing dark energy with type Ia supernovae. The simulation suite is called the fast-slicer IFU simulator (FISim). The data flow of FISim realistically models the optics of the IFU along with the propagation effects, including cosmological, zodiacal, instrumentation and detector effects. FISim simulates the spectrum extraction by computing the error matrix on the extracted spectrum. The applications for Type Ia supernova spectroscopy are used to establish the efficacy of the simulator in exploring the wider parametric space, in order to optimize the science and mission requirements. The input spectral models utilize the observables such as the optical depth and velocity of the Si II absorption feature in the supernova spectrum as the measured parameters for various studies. Using FISim, we introduce a mechanism for preserving the complete state of a system, called the partial p/partial f matrix, which allows for compression, reconstruction and spectrum extraction, we introduce a novel and efficient method for spectrum extraction, called super-optimal spectrum extraction, and we conduct various studies such as the optimal point spread function, optimal resolution, parameter estimation, etc. We demonstrate that for space-based telescopes, the optimal resolution lies in the region near R ∼ 117 for read noise of 1 e- and 7 e- using a 400 km s-1 error threshold on the Si II velocity.

  5. Criminal thinking styles and emotional intelligence in Egyptian offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megreya, Ahmed M

    2013-02-01

    The Psychological Inventory of Criminal Thinking Styles (PICTS) has been applied extensively to the study of criminal behaviour and cognition. Increasingly growing evidence indicates that criminal thinking styles vary considerably among individuals, and these individual variations appear to be crucial for a full understanding of criminal behaviour. This study aimed to examine individual differences in criminal thinking as a function of emotional intelligence. A group of 56 Egyptian male prisoners completed the PICTS and Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i). The correlations between these assessments were examined using a series of Pearson correlations coefficients, with Bonferroni correction. General criminal thinking, reactive criminal thinking and five criminal thinking styles (mollification, cutoff, power orientation, cognitive indolence and discontinuity) negatively correlated with emotional intelligence. On the other hand, proactive criminal thinking and three criminal thinking styles (entitlement, superoptimism and sentimentality) did not associate with emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is an important correlate of individual differences in criminal thinking, especially its reactive aspects. Practical implications of this suggestion were discussed. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. REVIEWER LIST – 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available REVIEWER LIST – 2014 The Editorial Team would like to thank all those who gave generously of their time and expertise in reviewing the papers for the Indian Journal of Community Health in 2014.AAarti Kapil, New Delhi, IndiaAbhishek SinghAmandeep Kaur, Haldwani, IndiaAmit Kaushik, Safai, IndiaAnu Bhardwaj, Ambala, IndiaAnurag Chaudary, Ludhiana, IndiaA R BondArpan YagnikArvind Kumar Singh, Gorakhpur, IndiaAshish Yadav, Meerut, IndiaAthar Ansari, Aligarh, India BBaridalyne Nongkynrih, New Delhi, IndiaBhaskar Thakuria, Meerut, IndiaBhola Nath, Srinagar, IndiaBhupinder Kaur Anand, Lucknow, IndiaBiju Soman CC M Singh, Patna, India DDhiraj Kumar Srivastava, Safai, India GGarima Mittal, Dehradun, IndiaGeetu Singh, Agra, IndiaGita Negi, Dehradun, India HH Chopra, Meerut, IndiaHarsh Mahajan, Greater Noida, IndiaHem Chandra Sati, Dehradun, India KKhursheed Muzammil, Muzaffanagar, IndiaKrishna Prakash JoshiLLatika Nath Sinha, Jodhpur, India MMalik ItratManish Chaturvedi, Greater Noida, IndiaManoj BansalManu Batra, Moradabad, IndiaMegha Luthra, Dehradun, IndiaM R Talapalliwar NNaresh Pal Singh, Safai, IndiaNidhi Gupta, New Delhi, IndiaNirankar Singh OOm Prakash Kansal, Gurgaon, India PPankaj Kumar Jain, Safai, IndiaParul Sharma, Pune, IndiaPawan Kumar Goel, Mewat, IndiaPeeyush Kariwal, Bariely, IndiaPradeep Aggarwal, Dehradun, IndiaPragya SinhaPratima Gupta, AIIMS, India RRahul Bansal, Meerut, IndiaRakesh Kakkar, Dehradun, IndiaRanjana Singh, Hapur, IndiaRanjeeta Kumari, AIIMS, IndiaReema Kumari, Lucknow, IndiaRicha Sinha, Dehradun, IndiaRupali Roy, New Delhi, India SSonu Goel, Chandigarh, IndiaS D Kandpal, Dehradun, IndiaSadhana Awasthi, Haldwani, IndiaSamarjeet Kaur, Kanpur, IndiaSandul YasobantSanjay Kumar Jha, Haldwani, IndiaSanjay Kumar Gupta, New Delhi, IndiaSanjeev Davey, Muzaffarnagar, IndiaSaurabh Varshney, Rishikesh, IndiaSeema Jain, Meerut, IndiaSeema Diwan, Dehradun, IndiaShailendra Kumar, Muzaffarnagar, IndiaShaili Vyas, Dehradun

  7. Submodular Function Maximization via the Multilinear Relaxation and Contention Resolution Schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Chekuri, Chandra; Zenklusen, Rico

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of maximizing a non-negative submodular set function $f:2^N \\rightarrow \\mathbb{R}_+$ over a ground set $N$ subject to a variety of packing type constraints. In this paper we develop a general framework leading to a number of new results, in particular when $f$ may be a {\\em non-monotone} function. Our algorithms are based on (approximately) maximizing the multilinear extension $F$ of $f$ \\cite{CCPV07} over a polytope $P$ that represents the constraints, and then effectively rounding the fractional solution. Although this approach has been used quite successfully in some settings \\cite{CCPV09,KulikST09,LeeMNS09,CVZ10,BansalKNS10}, it has been limited in some important ways. We overcome these limitations as follows. First, we give constant factor approximation algorithms to maximize $F$ over any down-closed polytope $P$ that has an efficient separation oracle. Previously this was known only for monotone functions \\cite{Vondrak08}. For non-monotone functions, a constant factor was known ...

  8. A Constant Factor Approximation Algorithm for Unsplittable Flow on Paths

    CERN Document Server

    Bonsma, Paul; Wiese, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    We study the unsplittable flow problem on a path $P$. We are given a set of $n$ tasks. Each task is specified by a sub path of $P$, a demand, and a profit. Moreover, each edge of $P$ has a given capacity. The aim is to find a subset of the tasks with maximum profit, for which the given demands can be simultaneously routed along $P$, subject to the capacities. The best known polynomial time approximation algorithm for this problem achieves a performance ratio of $O(\\log n)$ and the best known hardness result is weak NP-hardness. In this paper, we firstly show that the problem is strongly NP-hard, even when the capacities are constant, and all demands are chosen from $\\{1,2,3\\}$. Secondly, we present the first polynomial time constant-factor approximation algorithm for this problem, achieving an approximation factor of $7+\\epsilon$ for any $\\epsilon>0$. This answers an open question from Bansal et al. (SODA'09). We employ a novel framework which reduces the problem to instances where the capacities of the edges...

  9. Thermodynamics of mixtures of patchy and spherical colloids of different sizes: A multi-body association theory with complete reference fluid information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Artee; Valiya Parambathu, Arjun; Asthagiri, D; Cox, Kenneth R; Chapman, Walter G

    2017-04-28

    We present a theory to predict the structure and thermodynamics of mixtures of colloids of different diameters, building on our earlier work [A. Bansal et al., J. Chem. Phys. 145, 074904 (2016)] that considered mixtures with all particles constrained to have the same size. The patchy, solvent particles have short-range directional interactions, while the solute particles have short-range isotropic interactions. The hard-sphere mixture without any association site forms the reference fluid. An important ingredient within the multi-body association theory is the description of clustering of the reference solvent around the reference solute. Here we account for the physical, multi-body clusters of the reference solvent around the reference solute in terms of occupancy statistics in a defined observation volume. These occupancy probabilities are obtained from enhanced sampling simulations, but we also present statistical mechanical models to estimate these probabilities with limited simulation data. Relative to an approach that describes only up to three-body correlations in the reference, incorporating the complete reference information better predicts the bonding state and thermodynamics of the physical solute for a wide range of system conditions. Importantly, analysis of the residual chemical potential of the infinitely dilute solute from molecular simulation and theory shows that whereas the chemical potential is somewhat insensitive to the description of the structure of the reference fluid, the energetic and entropic contributions are not, with the results from the complete reference approach being in better agreement with particle simulations.

  10. Strategies to promote adherence to nutritional advice in patients with chronic kidney disease: a narrative review and commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beto JA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Judith A Beto, Katherine A Schury, Vinod K Bansal Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Loyola University Healthcare System, Loyola University of Chicago, Maywood, IL, USA Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD requires extensive changes to food and lifestyle. Poor adherence to diet, medications, and treatments has been estimated to vary between 20% and 70%, which in turn can contribute to increased mortality and morbidity. Delivering effective nutritional advice in patients with CKD coordinates multiple diet components including calories, protein, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, and fluid. Dietary intake studies have shown difficulty in adhering to the scope and complexity of the CKD diet parameters. No single educational or clinical strategy has been shown to be consistently effective across CKD populations. Highest adherence has been observed when both diet and education efforts are individualized to each patient and adapted over time to changing lifestyle and CKD variables. This narrative review and commentary summarizes nutrition education literature and published strategies for providing nutritional advice in CKD. A cohort of practical and effective strategies for increasing dietary adherence to nutritional advice are provided that include communicating with "talking control" principles, integrating patient-owned technology, acknowledging the typical food pattern may be snacking rather than formal meals, focusing on a single goal rather than multiple goals, creating active learning and coping strategies (frozen sandwiches, visual hands-on activities, planting herb gardens, and involving the total patient food environment. Keywords: talking control, technology-enhanced learning, hemodialysis, nutrition education, education strategies

  11. Thermodynamics of mixtures of patchy and spherical colloids of different sizes: A multi-body association theory with complete reference fluid information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Artee; Valiya Parambathu, Arjun; Asthagiri, D.; Cox, Kenneth R.; Chapman, Walter G.

    2017-04-01

    We present a theory to predict the structure and thermodynamics of mixtures of colloids of different diameters, building on our earlier work [A. Bansal et al., J. Chem. Phys. 145, 074904 (2016)] that considered mixtures with all particles constrained to have the same size. The patchy, solvent particles have short-range directional interactions, while the solute particles have short-range isotropic interactions. The hard-sphere mixture without any association site forms the reference fluid. An important ingredient within the multi-body association theory is the description of clustering of the reference solvent around the reference solute. Here we account for the physical, multi-body clusters of the reference solvent around the reference solute in terms of occupancy statistics in a defined observation volume. These occupancy probabilities are obtained from enhanced sampling simulations, but we also present statistical mechanical models to estimate these probabilities with limited simulation data. Relative to an approach that describes only up to three-body correlations in the reference, incorporating the complete reference information better predicts the bonding state and thermodynamics of the physical solute for a wide range of system conditions. Importantly, analysis of the residual chemical potential of the infinitely dilute solute from molecular simulation and theory shows that whereas the chemical potential is somewhat insensitive to the description of the structure of the reference fluid, the energetic and entropic contributions are not, with the results from the complete reference approach being in better agreement with particle simulations.

  12. Constructive Discrepancy Minimization by Walking on The Edges

    CERN Document Server

    Lovett, Shachar

    2012-01-01

    Minimizing the discrepancy of a set system is a fundamental problem in combinatorics. One of the cornerstones in this area is the celebrated six standard deviations result of Spencer (AMS 1985): In any system of n sets in a universe of size n, there always exists a coloring which achieves discrepancy 6\\sqrt{n}. The original proof of Spencer was existential in nature, and did not give an efficient algorithm to find such a coloring. Recently, a breakthrough work of Bansal (FOCS 2010) gave an efficient algorithm which finds such a coloring. His algorithm was based on an SDP relaxation of the discrepancy problem and a clever rounding procedure. In this work we give a new randomized algorithm to find a coloring as in Spencer's result based on a restricted random walk we call "Edge-Walk". Our algorithm and its analysis use only basic linear algebra and is "truly" constructive in that it does not appeal to the existential arguments, giving a new proof of Spencer's theorem and the partial coloring lemma.

  13. Oil prices and long-run risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ready, Robert Clayton

    I show that relative levels of aggregate consumption and personal oil consumption provide an excellent proxy for oil prices, and that high oil prices predict low future aggregate consumption growth. Motivated by these facts, I add an oil consumption good to the long-run risk model of Bansal and Yaron [2004] to study the asset pricing implications of observed changes in the dynamic interaction of consumption and oil prices. Empirically I observe that, compared to the first half of my 1987--2010 sample, oil consumption growth in the last 10 years is unresponsive to levels of oil prices, creating an decrease in the mean-reversion of oil prices, and an increase in the persistence of oil price shocks. The model implies that the change in the dynamics of oil consumption generates increased systematic risk from oil price shocks due to their increased persistence. However, persistent oil prices also act as a counterweight for shocks to expected consumption growth, with high expected growth creating high expectations of future oil prices which in turn slow down growth. The combined effect is to reduce overall consumption risk and lower the equity premium. The model also predicts that these changes affect the riskiness of of oil futures contracts, and combine to create a hump shaped term structure of oil futures, consistent with recent data.

  14. Analysis of linear and nonlinear genotype × environment interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Cai eYang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The usual analysis of genotype × environment interaction (GxE is based on the linear regression of genotypic performance on environmental changes (e.g., classic stability analysis. This linear model may often lead to lumping together of the nonlinear responses to the whole range of environmental changes from suboptimal and superoptimal conditions, thereby lowering the power of detecting GxE variation. On the other hand, the GxE is present when the magnitude of the genetic effect differs across the range of environmental conditions regardless of whether the response to environmental changes is linear or nonlinear. The objectives of this study are: (i explore the use of four commonly used nonlinear functions (logistic, parabola, normal and Cauchy functions for modeling nonlinear genotypic responses to environmental changes and (ii to investigate the difference in the magnitude of estimated genetic effects under different environmental conditions. The use of nonlinear functions was illustrated through the analysis of one data set taken from barley cultivar trials in Alberta, Canada (Data A and the examination of change in effect sizes is through the analysis another data set taken from the North America Barley Genome Mapping Project (Data B. The analysis of Data A showed that the Cauchy function captured an average of >40% of total GxE variation whereas the logistic function captured less GxE variation than the linear function. The analysis of Data B showed that genotypic responses were largely linear and that strong QTL × environment interaction existed as the positions, sizes and directions of QTL detected differed in poor vs. good environments. We conclude that (i the nonlinear functions should be considered when analyzing multi-environmental trials with a wide range of environmental variation and (ii QTL × environment interaction can arise from the difference in effect sizes across environments.

  15. Original article Criminal thinking styles of minors. Social and personality correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Rode

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background This paper presents an attempt to determine the predictors of criminal thinking styles of minors, based on the theory of Glenn Walters. The construct which is the subject of this study, that is, criminal thinking, is treated as a factor that initiates and supports anti-social behaviour. It manifests itself in eight thinking styles (patterns: mollification, cut-off, entitlement, sentimentality, power orientation, cognitive indolence, discontinuity, and superoptimism. Participants and procedure The study involved 114 people: 65 boys and 49 girls. The research group consisted of minors – boys and girls who were referred, by order of the court, to Diagnostic and Consultation Family Centres to receive a psychological opinion, the purpose of which was to determine the degree of demoralisation of the minor. The study was also attended by the guardians of minors. A criterion for including a minor in this study was committing an offence. Results For each criminal thinking style, a forward stepwise regression analysis was conducted. Variables describing minors and mothers were included in the regression model. The aim of this approach is to identify the configuration of predictors of criminal thinking styles. In each of the models the coefficient of determination, R2, and  coefficients were calculated. Conclusions The predictors of criminal thinking styles identified by the regression analysis show the complexity and heterogeneity of factors contributing to the emergence of these cognitive distortions. Predictors include both properties conditioning the psychosocial functioning of mothers and factors determining the personality of a minor (sense of control, low empathy, low self-esteem. There is a noticeable influence of factors attributable to the mothers – variables derived from the environment (demanding, rejecting, inconsistent attitude.

  16. Grapevine phenology and climate change in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cola, G.; Failla, O.; Maghradze, D.; Megrelidze, L.; Mariani, L.

    2016-10-01

    While the climate of Western Europe has been deeply affected by the abrupt climate change that took place in the late `1980s of the twentieth century, a similar signal is detected only few years later, in 1994, in Georgia. Grapevine phenology is deeply influenced by climate and this paper aimed to analyze how phenological timing changed before and after the climatic change of 1994. Availability of thermal resources in the two climatic phases for the five altitudinal belts in the 0-1250-m range was analyzed. A phenological dataset gathered in two experimental sites during the period 2012-2014, and a suitable thermal dataset was used to calibrate a phenological model based on the normal approach and able to describe BBCH phenological stages 61 (beginning of flowering), 71 (fruit set), and 81 (veraison). Calibration was performed for four relevant Georgian varieties (Mtsvane Kakhuri, Rkatsiteli, Ojaleshi, and Saperavi). The model validation was performed on an independent 3-year dataset gathered in Gorizia (Italy). Furthermore, in the case of variety Rkatsiteli, the model was applied to the 1974-2013 thermal time series in order to obtain phenological maps of the Georgian territory. Results show that after the climate change of 1994, Rkatsiteli showed an advance, more relevant at higher altitudes where the whole increase of thermal resource was effectively translated in phenological advance. For instance the average advance of veraison was 5.9 days for 250-500 m asl belt and 18.1 days for 750-1000 m asl). On the other hand, at lower altitudes, phenological advance was depleted by superoptimal temperatures. As a final result, some suggestions for the adaptation of viticultural practices to the current climatic phase are provided.

  17. Average correlation clustering algorithm (ACCA) for grouping of co-regulated genes with similar pattern of variation in their expression values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Anindya; De, Rajat K

    2010-08-01

    Distance based clustering algorithms can group genes that show similar expression values under multiple experimental conditions. They are unable to identify a group of genes that have similar pattern of variation in their expression values. Previously we developed an algorithm called divisive correlation clustering algorithm (DCCA) to tackle this situation, which is based on the concept of correlation clustering. But this algorithm may also fail for certain cases. In order to overcome these situations, we propose a new clustering algorithm, called average correlation clustering algorithm (ACCA), which is able to produce better clustering solution than that produced by some others. ACCA is able to find groups of genes having more common transcription factors and similar pattern of variation in their expression values. Moreover, ACCA is more efficient than DCCA with respect to the time of execution. Like DCCA, we use the concept of correlation clustering concept introduced by Bansal et al. ACCA uses the correlation matrix in such a way that all genes in a cluster have the highest average correlation values with the genes in that cluster. We have applied ACCA and some well-known conventional methods including DCCA to two artificial and nine gene expression datasets, and compared the performance of the algorithms. The clustering results of ACCA are found to be more significantly relevant to the biological annotations than those of the other methods. Analysis of the results show the superiority of ACCA over some others in determining a group of genes having more common transcription factors and with similar pattern of variation in their expression profiles. Availability of the software: The software has been developed using C and Visual Basic languages, and can be executed on the Microsoft Windows platforms. The software may be downloaded as a zip file from http://www.isical.ac.in/~rajat. Then it needs to be installed. Two word files (included in the zip file) need to

  18. Psychosocial factors involved in memory and cognitive failures in people with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attree EA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth A Attree,1 Megan A Arroll,1 Christine P Dancey,1 Charlene Griffith,1 Amolak S Bansal1,2 1Chronic Illness Research Team, School of Psychology, University of East London, London, UK; 2Department of Immunology and the Sutton CFS Service, St Helier Hospital, Carshalton, UK Background: Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS is characterized by persistent emotional, mental, and physical fatigue accompanied by a range of neurological, autonomic, neuroendocrine, immune, and sleep problems. Research has shown that psychosocial factors such as anxiety and depression as well as the symptoms of the illness, have a significant impact on the quality of life of people with ME/CFS. In addition, individuals may suffer from deficits in memory and concentration. This study set out to explore the relationships between variables which have been found to contribute to cognitive performance, as measured by prospective and retrospective memory, and cognitive failures. Methods: Eighty-seven people with ME/CFS answered questionnaires measuring fatigue, depression, anxiety, social support, and general self-efficacy. These were used in a correlational design (multiple regression to predict cognitive function (self-ratings on prospective and retrospective memory, and cognitive failures. Results: Our study found that fatigue, depression, and general self-efficacy were directly associated with cognitive failures and retrospective (but not prospective memory. Conclusion: Although it was not possible in this study to determine the cause of the deficits, the literature in this area leads us to suggest that although the pathophysiological mechanisms of ME/CFS are unclear, abnormalities in the immune system, including proinflammatory cytokines, can lead to significant impairments in cognition. We suggest that fatigue and depression may be a result of the neurobiological effects of ME/CFS and in addition, that the neurobiological effects of the illness

  19. Investigation of Surface Treatments to Improve the Friction and Wear of Titanium Alloys for Diesel Engine Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cooley, Kevin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kirkham, Melanie J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bansal, Dinesh G. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States)

    2012-09-20

    This final report summarizes experimental and analytical work performed under an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, and UT-Battelle LLC. The project was directed by Jerry Gibbs, of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Propulsion Materials Program, with management by D. P. Stinton and J. A. Haynes of ORNL. Participants included Peter J. Blau (Principal Investigator), Kevin M. Cooley (senior technician), Melanie J. Kirkham (materials scientist) of the Materials Science and Technology Division or ORNL, and Dinesh G. Bansal, a post doctoral fellow employed by Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) and who, at the time of this writing, is an engineer with Cummins, Inc. This report covers a three-year effort that involved two stages. In the first stage, and after a review of the literature and discussions with surface treatment experts, a series of candidate alloys and surface treatments for titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) was selected for initial screening. After pre-screening using an ASTM standard test method, the more promising surface treatments were tested in Phase 2 using a variable loading apparatus that was designed and built to simulate the changing load patterns in a typical connecting rod bearing. Information on load profiles from the literature was supplemented with the help of T.C. Chen and Howard Savage of Cummins, Inc. Considering the dynamic and evolving nature of materials technology, this report presents a snapshot of commercial and experimental bearing surface technologies for titanium alloys that were available during the period of this work. Undoubtedly, further improvements in surface engineering methods for titanium will evolve.

  20. Hydrodynamic Studies on a Trickle Bed Reactor for Foaming Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Bansal

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic studies of trickle bed reactors (TBRs are essential for the design and prediction of their performance. The hydrodynamic characteristics involving pressure drop and dynamic liquid saturation are greatly affected by the physical properties of the liquids. In the present study experiments have been carried out in a concurrent downflow air - liquid trickle bed reactor to investigate the dynamic liquid saturation and pressure drop for the water (non-foaming and 3% polyethylene glycol and 4% polyethylene glycol foaming liquids in the gas continuous regime (GCF and foaming pulsing regime (FP. In the GCF regime the dynamic liquid saturation was found to increase with increase in liquid flow rate for non-foaming and foaming liquids. While for 3% and 4% polyethylene glycol solutions the severe foaming was observed in the high interaction regime and the regime is referred to as foaming pulsing (FP regime. The decrease in dynamic liquid saturation followed by a sharp rise in the pressure drop was observed during transition from gas GCF to FP regime. However in the FP regime, a dip in the dynamic liquid saturation was observed. The pressure drop for foaming liquids is observed to be manifolds higher compared to non-foaming liquid in the GCF regime. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 16th January 2010, Revised: 10th February 2010, Accepted: 21st Feberuary 2010[How to Cite: R. Gupta, A. Bansal. (2010. Hydrodynamic Studies on a Trickle Bed Reactor for Foaming Liquids. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 5 (1: 31-37. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.1.775.31-37][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.1.775.31-37 ][Cited by: Scopus 1 |

  1. Hydrodynamic Studies on a Trickle Bed Reactor for Foaming Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Gupta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic studies of trickle bed reactors (TBRs are essential for the design and prediction of their performance. The hydrodynamic characteristics involving pressure drop and dynamic liquid saturation are greatly affected by the physical properties of the liquids. In the present study experiments have been carried out in a concurrent downflow air - liquid trickle bed reactor to investigate the dynamic liquid saturation and pressure drop for the water (non-foaming and 3% polyethylene glycol and 4% polyethylene glycol foaming liquids in the gas continuous regime (GCF and foaming pulsing regime (FP. In the GCF regime the dynamic liquid saturation was found to increase with increase in liquid flow rate for non-foaming and foaming liquids. While for 3% and 4% polyethylene glycol solutions the severe foaming was observed in the high interaction regime and the regime is referred to as foaming pulsing (FP regime. The decrease in dynamic liquid saturation followed by a sharp rise in the pressure drop was observed during transition from gas GCF to FP regime. However in the FP regime, a dip in the dynamic liquid saturation was observed. The pressure drop for foaming liquids is observed to be manifolds higher compared to non-foaming liquid in the GCF regime. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 16th January 2010, Revised: 10th February 2010, Accepted: 21st Feberuary 2010[How to Cite: R. Gupta, A. Bansal. (2010. Hydrodynamic Studies on a Trickle Bed Reactor for Foaming Liquids. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 5 (1: 31-37. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.1.7127.31-37][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.1.7127.31-37 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/7127][Cited by: Scopus 1 | ] 

  2. Comparison of Clinical and Radiographic Success Rates of Pulpotomy in Primary Molars using Ferric Sulfate and Bioactive Tricalcium Silicate Cement: An in vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Kavita; Marwaha, Mohita; Gupta, Anil; Bansal, Kalpana; Srivastava, Ankit

    2017-01-01

    Formocresol has been a popular pulpotomy medicament for many years. It is considered the "gold standard" in pediatric dentistry. However, concerns have been raised over its use in children. It has been reported that formocresol has toxic and mutagenic effects in cell culture, dental crypts, and precancerous epithelial cells. Therefore, additional biocompatible treatment alternatives are required to replace formocresol pulpotomy. This study compared the clinical and radiographic success rates of ferric sulfate (FS) and bioactive tricalcium silicate cement (Biodentine, Septodont) as pulpotomy agents in primary molar teeth over a period of 9 months. Fifty primary molar teeth, symptom free, requiring pulpotomy in children aged 4 to 8 years were treated with conventional pulpotomy procedures. Ferric sulfate 15.5% solution (applied for 15 second for 25 teeth) and Biodentine (for 25 teeth) were used as pulpotomy agents. Permanent restorations were stainless steel crowns in most cases, in both groups. Patients were recalled for follow-up at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months intervals. The data were statistically analysed using chi-square test. At 9 months, 96% clinical success rate was observed in the FS and 100% in the Biodentine group. Radiographic success rate in the FS group was 84%, whereas 92% in the Biodentine group at 9 months. No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups. Biodentine can be used as a pulpotomy agent but further long-term studies are required. Sirohi K, Marwaha M, Gupta A, Bansal K, Srivastava A. Comparison of Clinical and Radiographic Success Rates of Pulpotomy in Primary Molars using Ferric Sulfate and Bioactive Tricalcium Silicate Cement: An in vivo Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(2):147-151.

  3. Awareness of Stem cells & Health Implications of SHED found in Pediatric Dentition among Indian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goomer, Pallvi; Sidhu, Arshpreet Kaur; Tuli, Preety; Kansal, Shinam; Bansal, Kanishka; Thakre, Gauri R

    2014-02-01

    Primary teeth may be an ideal source of postnatal stem cells to regenerate tooth structures and bone, and possibly to treat neural tissue injury or degenerative diseases. SHED (stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth) were identified to be a population of highly proliferative, clonogenic cells capable of differentiating into a variety of cell types including neural cells, adipocytes, and odontoblasts. The present study was carried out to assess the knowledge, awareness & attitude of parents visiting various dental clinics in tricity area of india regarding stem cells from primary teeth and their potential health benefits. A total of 250 parents of pediatric patients seeking dental treatment at various dental clinics in tricity area were included in the study. Parents were personally interviewed with a questionnaire and their responses were immediately computed. Among 250 parents only 95(62%) had knowledge regarding stem cells. While only 47(18.8) were informed regarding stem cells from baby teeth & their benefits. Maximum subjects were informed through internet 21(44.6%) followed by information through friends(23.4%) and dentist(21.2%). Very few were informed through magazines, newspaper and only one (2.1%) person was informed by television. It is important to create more awareness among the populace of our country about the potential health benefits of stem cells from primary teeth. Dentist should educate parents, caregivers and teachers regarding SHED & its benefits, ensuring good health for every Indian child and hence health of future citizens. How to cite the article: Goomer P, Sidhu AK, Tuli P, Kansal S, Bansal K, Thakre GR. Awareness of Stem cells & Health Implications of SHED found in Pediatric Dentition among Indian Population. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):44-7.

  4. Formulation of SrO-MBCUS Agglomerates for Esterification and Transesterification of High FFA Vegetable Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Musa Balbisiana Colla Underground Stem (MBCUS catalyst was treated thermally mixing with 5:1 w/w of Strontium Oxide (SrO and the dynamic sites were reformed. The MBCUS-SrO showed sharper crystalline phases as evidence from XRD and TEM analysis. The composition and morphology were characterized from BET, SEM, EDX thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA and XRF analysis. The optimization process for biodiesel production from Jatropha curcas L oil (JCO having high percentage of free fatty acids was carried out using orthogonal arrays adopting the Taguchi method. The linear equation was obtained from the analysis and subsequent biodiesel production (96% FAME was taken away from the JCO under optimal reaction conditions. The biodiesel so prepared had identical characteristics to that with MBCUS alone, but at a lower temperature (200˚C and internal vapour pressure. Metal leaching was much lower while reusability of the catalyst was enhanced. It was also confirmed that the particle size has little impact upon the conversion efficacy, but the basic active sites are more important. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 19th August 2015; Revised: 8th December 2015; Accepted: 1st January 2016 How to Cite: Kumar, P., Sarma, A.K., Bansal, A., Jha, M.K. (2016. Formulation of SrO-MBCUS Agglomerates for Esterification and Transesterification of High FFA Vegetable Oil. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (2: 140-150 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.2.540.140-150 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.2.540.140-150

  5. Comparison of Clinical and Radiographic Success Rates of Pulpotomy in Primary Molars using Ferric Sulfate and Bioactive Tricalcium Silicate Cement: An in vivo Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Kavita; Gupta, Anil; Bansal, Kalpana; Srivastava, Ankit

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Formocresol has been a popular pulpotomy medicament for many years. It is considered the “gold standard“ in pediatric dentistry. However, concerns have been raised over its use in children. It has been reported that formocresol has toxic and mutagenic effects in cell culture, dental crypts, and precancerous epithelial cells. Therefore, additional biocompatible treatment alternatives are required to replace formocresol pulpotomy. Aims This study compared the clinical and radiographic success rates of ferric sulfate (FS) and bioactive tricalcium silicate cement (Biodentine, Septodont) as pulpotomy agents in primary molar teeth over a period of 9 months. Materials and methods Fifty primary molar teeth, symptom free, requiring pulpotomy in children aged 4 to 8 years were treated with conventional pulpotomy procedures. Ferric sulfate 15.5% solution (applied for 15 second for 25 teeth) and Biodentine (for 25 teeth) were used as pulpotomy agents. Permanent restorations were stainless steel crowns in most cases, in both groups. Patients were recalled for follow-up at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months intervals. The data were statistically analysed using chi-square test. Results At 9 months, 96% clinical success rate was observed in the FS and 100% in the Biodentine group. Radiographic success rate in the FS group was 84%, whereas 92% in the Biodentine group at 9 months. No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups. Conclusion Biodentine can be used as a pulpotomy agent but further long-term studies are required. How to cite this article Sirohi K, Marwaha M, Gupta A, Bansal K, Srivastava A. Comparison of Clinical and Radiographic Success Rates of Pulpotomy in Primary Molars using Ferric Sulfate and Bioactive Tricalcium Silicate Cement: An in vivo Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(2):147-151. PMID:28890614

  6. Comparison of the Computational Efficiency of the Original Versus Reformulated High-Fidelity Generalized Method of Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Steven M; Bednarcyk, Brett; Aboydi, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    The High-Fidelity Generalized Method of Cells (HFGMC) micromechanics model has recently been reformulated by Bansal and Pindera (in the context of elastic phases with perfect bonding) to maximize its computational efficiency. This reformulated version of HFGMC has now been extended to include both inelastic phases and imperfect fiber-matrix bonding. The present paper presents an overview of the HFGMC theory in both its original and reformulated forms and a comparison of the results of the two implementations. The objective is to establish the correlation between the two HFGMC formulations and document the improved efficiency offered by the reformulation. The results compare the macro and micro scale predictions of the continuous reinforcement (doubly-periodic) and discontinuous reinforcement (triply-periodic) versions of both formulations into the inelastic regime, and, in the case of the discontinuous reinforcement version, with both perfect and weak interfacial bonding. The results demonstrate that identical predictions are obtained using either the original or reformulated implementations of HFGMC aside from small numerical differences in the inelastic regime due to the different implementation schemes used for the inelastic terms present in the two formulations. Finally, a direct comparison of execution times is presented for the original formulation and reformulation code implementations. It is shown that as the discretization employed in representing the composite repeating unit cell becomes increasingly refined (requiring a larger number of sub-volumes), the reformulated implementation becomes significantly (approximately an order of magnitude at best) more computationally efficient in both the continuous reinforcement (doubly-periodic) and discontinuous reinforcement (triply-periodic) cases.

  7. Sulfur Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  8. Using professional interpreters in undergraduate medical consultation skills teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansal A

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aarti Bansal,1 Jennifer Swann,1 William Henry Smithson2 1Academic Unit of Primary Medical Care, University of Sheffield, UK; 2Department of General Practice, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland Abstract: The ability to work with interpreters is a core skill for UK medical graduates. At the University of Sheffield Medical School, this teaching was identified as a gap in the curriculum. Teaching was developed to use professional interpreters in role-play, based on evidence that professional interpreters improve health outcomes for patients with limited English proficiency. Other principles guiding the development of the teaching were an experiential learning format, integration to the core consultation skills curriculum, and sustainable delivery. The session was aligned with existing consultation skills teaching to retain the small-group experiential format and general practitioner (GP tutor. Core curricular time was found through conversion of an existing consultation skills session. Language pairs of professional interpreters worked with each small group, with one playing patient and the other playing interpreter. These professional interpreters attended training in the scenarios so that they could learn to act as patient and family interpreter. GP tutors attended training sessions to help them facilitate the session. This enhanced the sustainability of the session by providing a cohort of tutors able to pass on their expertise to new staff through the existing shadowing process. Tutors felt that the involvement of professional interpreters improved student engagement. Student evaluation of the teaching suggests that the learning objectives were achieved. Faculty evaluation by GP tutors suggests that they perceived the teaching to be worthwhile and that the training they received had helped improve their own clinical practice in consulting through interpreters. We offer the following recommendations to others who may be interested in

  9. Comparative bioequivalence studies of tramadol hydrochloride sustained-release 200 mg tablets

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    Suhas S Khandave

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Suhas S Khandave1, Satish V Sawant1, Santosh S Joshi1, Yatish K Bansal2, Sonal S Kadam21Accutest Research Laboratories (I Private Limited, Koparkhirne, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra, India; 2Ipca Laboratories Limited, Kandivli Mumbai, Maharashtra, IndiaBackground: Tramadol hydrochloride is available as 50 mg immediate-release (IR and 100 mg, 200 mg, and 300 mg sustained-release (SR tablets. The recommended dose of tramadol is 50–100 mg IR tablets every 4–6 hours. The tramadol SR 200 mg tablet is a better therapeutic option, with a reduced frequency of dosing, and improved patient compliance and quality of life. The present study evaluated the bioequivalence of a generic tramadol SR 200 mg tablet.Methods: A comparative in vitro dissolution study was performed on the test and reference products, followed by two separate single-dose bioequivalence studies under fasting and fed conditions and one multiple-dose bioequivalence study under fasting conditions. These bioequivalence studies were conducted in healthy human subjects using an open-label, randomized, two-treatment, two-period, two-sequence, crossover design. The oral administration of the test and reference products was done on day 1 for both the single-dose studies and on days 1–5 for the multiple-dose study in each study period as per the randomization code. Serial blood samples were collected at predefined time points in all the studies. Analysis of plasma concentrations of tramadol and O-desmethyltramadol (the M1 metabolite was done by a validated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analytical method. The standard acceptance criterion of bioequivalence was applied on log-transformed pharmacokinetic parameters for tramadol and its M1 metabolite.Results: The ratios for geometric least-square means and 90% confidence intervals were within the acceptance range of 80%–125% for log-transformed primary pharmacokinetic parameters for tramadol and its M1 metabolite in all the three studies

  10. Surface Modification, Characterization and Photocatalytic Performance of Nano-Sized Titania Modified with Silver and Bentonite Clay

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    Neetu Divya

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In many textile industries dyes are used as coloring agents. Advanced oxidation processes are used for degrading or removing color from dye baths. Catalysts play a key role in these industries for the treatment of water. Solid catalysts are usually composed of metals that form supports onto the surface and create metal particles with high surface areas. TiO2 composites containing transition metal ions (silver and/or bentonite clay were prepared. Photocatalytic efficiencies have been investigated for the degradation of Orange G an azo dye. Various analytical techniques were used to characterize the surface properties of nano-sized titania modified using silver and/or bentonite clay. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and FTIR analyses showed that TiO2 (10 ± 2 nm and Ag (2 to 3 nm particles were supported on the surface of the bentonite clay and the size was in the range of 100 ± 2 nm. The modified catalysts P-25 TiO2/Bentonite/Ag and P-25 TiO2/Ag were found to be very active for the photocatalytic decomposition of Orange G. The percent decolorization in 60 min was 98% with both P-25 TiO2/Ag and P-25 TiO2/Bentonite/Ag modified catalysts. Whereas mineralization achieved in 9 hr were 68% and 71% with P-25 TiO2/Bentonite/Ag and P-25 TiO2/Ag catalyst respectively. © 2009 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved[Received: 30 October 2009, Revised: 20 November 2009, Accepted: 21 November 2009][How to Cite: N. Divya, A. Bansal, A. K. Jana. (2009. Surface Modification, Characterization and Photocatalytic Performance of Nano-Sized Titania Modified with Silver and Bentonite Clay. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 4(2: 43-53.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.4.2.1249.43-53][How to Link/ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.4.2.1249.43-53 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/1249

  11. Outcomes in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in the North Indian population

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    Sachan R

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Rekha Sachan,1 Munna Lal Patel,2 Pushpalata Sachan,3 Amrita Gaurav,1 Meenakshi Singh,1 Bhumika Bansal11Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2Department of Medicine, 3Department of Physiology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, IndiaIntroduction: Hypertensive disorders complicating pregnancy seriously endanger the safety of the mother and fetus during pregnancy. Very few studies have explored hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in India, even though this disease has been associated with adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes. This study aimed to analyze the disease pattern and risk factors associated with the disorder and assess the maternal and fetal outcomes in cases of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.Subjects and methods: This case-control study was carried out over 1 year from 2011 to 2012 at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India. A total of 149 patients were enrolled in the study. As seven were lost to follow-up, analysis was carried out on 142 cases. Patients were further classified according to the National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group (2000 as having mild preeclampsia (65 cases, severe preeclampsia (32 cases, or eclampsia (45 cases. Thirty-one healthy pregnant non-hypertensive women were enrolled into the study as controls.Results: The most common manifestation was edema, seen in 90% of cases. Proteinuria was also relatively common, 26.76% of patients with proteinuria of ≥300 mg/24 hours, 47.88% with proteinuria of ≥2 g/24 hours, and 25.35% with a urinary protein excretion of 3–5 g/24 hours. Central nervous system involvement was observed in 42.2% of cases, elevated bilirubin levels in 47.0%, visual symptoms in 6.4%, vaginal bleeding in 11.3%, and HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome was reported in 2.80%. Maternal deaths occurred in 2.8% of cases, all of which were from

  12. Species Tree Inference Using a Mixture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Ikram; Parviainen, Pekka; Lagergren, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Species tree reconstruction has been a subject of substantial research due to its central role across biology and medicine. A species tree is often reconstructed using a set of gene trees or by directly using sequence data. In either of these cases, one of the main confounding phenomena is the discordance between a species tree and a gene tree due to evolutionary events such as duplications and losses. Probabilistic methods can resolve the discordance by coestimating gene trees and the species tree but this approach poses a scalability problem for larger data sets. We present MixTreEM-DLRS: A two-phase approach for reconstructing a species tree in the presence of gene duplications and losses. In the first phase, MixTreEM, a novel structural expectation maximization algorithm based on a mixture model is used to reconstruct a set of candidate species trees, given sequence data for monocopy gene families from the genomes under study. In the second phase, PrIME-DLRS, a method based on the DLRS model (Åkerborg O, Sennblad B, Arvestad L, Lagergren J. 2009. Simultaneous Bayesian gene tree reconstruction and reconciliation analysis. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 106(14):5714-5719), is used for selecting the best species tree. PrIME-DLRS can handle multicopy gene families since DLRS, apart from modeling sequence evolution, models gene duplication and loss using a gene evolution model (Arvestad L, Lagergren J, Sennblad B. 2009. The gene evolution model and computing its associated probabilities. J ACM. 56(2):1-44). We evaluate MixTreEM-DLRS using synthetic and biological data, and compare its performance with a recent genome-scale species tree reconstruction method PHYLDOG (Boussau B, Szöllősi GJ, Duret L, Gouy M, Tannier E, Daubin V. 2013. Genome-scale coestimation of species and gene trees. Genome Res. 23(2):323-330) as well as with a fast parsimony-based algorithm Duptree (Wehe A, Bansal MS, Burleigh JG, Eulenstein O. 2008. Duptree: a program for large-scale phylogenetic

  13. Lay health educators within primary care practices to improve cancer screening uptake for South Asian patients: challenges in quality improvement

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    Lofters AK

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AK Lofters,1–4 M Vahabi,5 V Prakash,6 L Banerjee,7 P Bansal,8 S Goel,7,8 S Dunn1,2,9 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, 2Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 3Department of Family and Community Medicine, 4Centre for Urban Health Solutions, St Michael’s Hospital, 5Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, 6Screening Saves Lives Program, Canadian Cancer Society, Mississauga, 7Wise Elephant Family Health Team, Brampton, 8Mississauga Halton Central West Regional Cancer Program, Mississauga, 9Women’s College Research Institute, Women’s College Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada Background: Cancer screening uptake is known to be low among South Asian residents of Ontario. The objective of this pilot study was to determine if lay health educators embedded within the practices of primary care providers could improve willingness to screen and cancer screening uptake for South Asian patients taking a quality improvement approach.Materials and methods: Participating physicians selected quality improvement initiatives to use within their offices that they felt could increase willingness to screen and cancer screening uptake. They implemented initiatives, adapting as necessary, for six months.Results: Four primary care physicians participated in the study. All approximated that at least 60% of their patients were of South Asian ethnicity. All physicians chose to work with a preexisting lay health educator program geared toward South Asians. Health ambassadors spoke to patients in the office and telephoned patients. For all physicians, ~60% of South Asian patients who were overdue for cancer screening and who spoke directly to health ambassadors stated they were willing to be screened. One physician was able to track actual screening among contacted patients and found that screening uptake was relatively high: from 29.2% (colorectal cancer to 44.6% (breast cancer of patients came in for screening

  14. Secondary glaucoma in CAPN5-associated neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy

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    Cham A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abdourahman Cham,1,2 Mayank Bansal,3 Himanshu K Banda,4 Young Kwon,1 Paul S Tlucek,1 Alexander G Bassuk,5 Stephen H Tsang,6,7 Warren M Sobol,8 James C Folk,1 Steven Yeh,4 Vinit B Mahajan1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, 2Omics Laboratory, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 3Rajendra Prasad Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 5Department of Pediatrics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, 6Barbara and Donald Jonas Laboratory of Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine and Bernard and Shirlee Brown Glaucoma Laboratory, Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Institute of Human Nutrition, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 7Edward S Harkness Eye Institute, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY, 8Retina Physicians & Surgeons, Inc., Dayton, OH, USA Objective: The objective of this study was to review the treatment outcomes of patients with secondary glaucoma in cases of autosomal dominant neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy (ADNIV, a hereditary autoimmune uveitis due to mutations in CAPN5. Patients and methods: A retrospective, observational case series was assembled from ADNIV patients with secondary glaucoma. The main outcome measures were intraocular pressure (IOP, visual acuity, use of antiglaucoma medications, ocular surgeries, and adverse outcomes. Perimetry and optic disk optical coherence tomography (OCT were also analyzed. Results: Nine eyes of five ADNIV patients with secondary glaucoma were reviewed. Each received a fluocinolone acetonide (FA implant for the management of posterior uveitis. Following implantation, no eyes developed neovascular glaucoma. Five eyes (in patients 1, 2, and 5 required Ahmed glaucoma valve surgery for the management of steroid-responsive glaucoma. Patient 2 also developed angle closure with iris bombe and underwent laser

  15. Reviewer Database

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    Chief Editor

    2016-06-01

    Haranadha RajaH S JoshiHarsh MahajanHarshal SalveHem SatiHema GogiaHemang ShahHemant PawarHimalaya SinghHimanshu AgarwalH NegandhiJeetendra YadavIndrani GogoiI B SareenIpsa MohapatraIqbal M KhanJ NarainJ P MajraJ S ThakurJ V SinghJabanesh PalasJagannath BeheraJai K ShethJai SinghJaideep KumarVidanapathiranaJ DeshpandeyJayanta DasJayanti SemwalJitendera SinghJitendra BhawalkarJitendra KummarJoy ChakmaJugal KishoreJyoti TiwariK B S GuptaK MallikharjunaK RajasekharanK S NegiKallappa MasaliKamalakanta DasKapil AgrawalKapil YadavKarthik BalajeeKejal Joshi ReddyKhaja AhmedK MuzammilKimcheng ChounKishan K BhatiaKoskei AlfredKrishna JoshiKrishnaveni RKriti Bhat KKriti VaishK BrahmbhattKshitij ChoudharyL SatyanarayanaLakshmi PvmLalita SisodiaLatika Nath SinhaLavanya SelvarajLekshmy PillaiLilabi ShakirLivinus EgwudaLt Col R P SinghM RafiqM S A AhmedM SinghMadhavi BhargavaMahender SinghMaj JawaidMalik ItratMamta ChoudharyMandar SadawarteManeesh KumarManish ChaturvediManish GehaniManoj BansalManoj GuptaManu BatraManvi SagarMarie MajellaMary LeeMd Abu BasharMd AlamMd PialMd S BasandraMeenal ThakareMegha LuthraMigom DoleyM BhattacharyaMilind SomkuwarMisnaniartiH Mohammed MerzahMohin SakreMohini PhanseMonica AggarwalMonica KakkarMukhmohit SinghM TambeMuthu KumarN ArlapaNabil Al RabeeiNajam KhaliqueNandini SharmaNaresh SinghNavin AngadiNavneet SandhuNavuluri K ReddyNeerajNeha ChananaNidhi BhatnagarNidhi GuptaNidhi PrasadNikhil GovilN SardeshpandeNimila MathewsNiraj PanditNirankar SinghNitin DhupdaleNiveditha CO Prakash KansalOmair WaniPadmavati MajhiPallabi GuptaPallavi BoroPallavi PotdarPankaj BhardwajPankaj JainPankaj MishraParabjyot KaurParag KumarParnava DasParul SehgalParul SharmaParvathy PPavana BelagaviPawan GoelPawan KumarPawan ParasharPeeyush KariwalPoonam BPoorna C ReddyP AggarwalP ChoudharyPradeep KasarPragya SinhaPramod GuptaPrasad BogamPrasant SabothPrashant HowalPratima GuptaPraveen SaharyaPravin SPreeti PaddaPunit VarmaPunyatoya BejPurva JoshiR SharmaRabindra SinhaRachana A

  16. Relocation consequences on an ophthalmology consultation service from an inpatient to outpatient facility

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    Singh JS

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jorawer S Singh,1 Vincent M Imbrogno,2 Mary K Howard,3 Amandip S Cheema,3 Ausra D Selvadurai,4 Surbhi Bansal5 1Department of Ophthalmology, George Washington University, Washington, DC, 2Contemporary Ophthalmology of Erie, Erie, PA, 3Department of Ophthalmology, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 4OcuSight Eye Care Center, Rochester, NY, 5Department of Ophthalmology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Importance: This study shows that relocation of an academic ophthalmology residency program from an inpatient to an outpatient setting in western New York does not affect the consult volume but affects management patterns and follow-up rates.Objective: To investigate the effects on the ophthalmology consultation service of an academic program with relocation from a Regional Level-1 Trauma center to an outpatient facility.Design: Consultation notes from 3 years before and 3 years after the University at Buffalo’s (UB Department of Ophthalmology relocation from a Regional Level-1 Trauma center (Erie County Medical Center to an outpatient facility (Ross Eye Institute were obtained from hospital electronic medical records and analyzed.Setting: Hospitalized care and institutional practice.Participants: All inpatient or Emergency Room Ophthalmology consultation patients from the Department of Ophthalmology at UB from 2004 to 2010 (1,379 patients.Exposures: None, this was a retrospective chart review.Main outcome measures: Patient demographics, reason for consult, diagnoses, and ophthalmic procedures performed by the UB Department of Ophthalmology before and after its relocation.Results: Relocation to the outpatient facility did not affect consult volume (P=0.15. The number of consults focusing on ophthalmic conditions, as a percentage of the yearly total, rose 460% (P=0.0001, while systemic condition consults with ocular manifestations fell 83% (P=0.0001. Consults for ocular trauma decreased 65% (P=0.0034. Consults ending with a

  17. Simulate the Effect of Climate Change on Development, Irrigation Requirements and Soybean Yield in Gorgan

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    A.R. Nehbandani

    2016-10-01

    concentration. Conclusion: The effect of temperature and CO2 concentration were studied in soybean by SSM-iLegume-Soybeanmodel. The results indicated that yield reduction increase in CO2 concentration postpones the negative effect of higher temperature on soybean yield. On the other hand, super-optimal temperatures will decrease positive impact of increase in CO2 concentration. Therefore, with regard to the effect the following strategies proposed: improve in irrigation method, development of drought and high-temperature tolerant cultivars, increase in water use efficiency, early sowing and development of longer-duration cultivars.

  18. Main Parameters of Soil Quality and it's Management Under Changing Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    László Phd, M., ,, Dr.

    2009-04-01

    or undesirable, 2. soil renewability involves judgment of the extent to which soil characteristics can be controlled or managed, 3. rates of change in soil characteristics vary, and 4. there may be significant temporal or spatial variation in soil characteristics. Components of soil quality definitions may include desirable and undesirable characteristics. Desirable soil characteristics may either be the presence of a property that benefits soil productivity and/or other important soil functions, or the absence of a property that is detrimental to these functions. A soil characteristic may include a range of values that contributes positively to quality and a range that contributes negatively. Soil pH, for example, may be a positive or negative characteristic depending on its value. Larson and Pierce (1991) suggest that ranges of property values can be defined as optimal, suboptimal or superoptimal. A pH range of 6 to 7.5 is optimal for production of most crops. Outside of this range, pH is suboptimal and soil quality is lower than at the optimal pH range. The complexity of the soil quality concept is illustrated by the fact that the choice of optimal pH range is crop or use dependent. Letey (1985) suggested that identification of a range of water content that is nonlimiting to plant productivity might be a good way of assessing the collective effect of soil physical characteristics that contribute to crop productivity. For soils of decreasing quality, the width of the nonlimiting water range decreases. Undesirable soil characteristics may be either the presence of contaminants or a range of values of soil characteristics that contribute negatively to soil quality. The presence of chemicals that inhibit plant root growth or the absence of nutrients that result in low yields or poor crop quality are examples of undesirable soil characteristics that lower soil quality. The extent to which soil is viewed as a renewable resource shapes our approach to soil quality. "Soil