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Sample records for supernovae sne iin

  1. Carnegie Supernova Project: Observations of Type IIn Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Taddia, F; Sollerman, J; Phillips, M M; Anderson, J P; Boldt, L; Campillay, A; Castellón, S; Contreras, C; Folatelli, G; Hamuy, M; Heinrich-Josties, E; Krzeminski, W; Morrell, N; Burns, C R; Freedman, W L; Madore, B F; Persson, S E; Suntzeff, N B

    2013-01-01

    The observational diversity displayed by various Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) is explored and quantified. In doing so a more coherent picture ascribing the variety of observed SNe IIn types to particular progenitor scenarios is sought. Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) optical and near-infrared light curves and visual-wavelength spectroscopy of the Type IIn SNe 2005kj, 2006aa, 2006bo, 2006qq and 2008fq are presented. Combined with previously published observations of the Type IIn SNe 2005ip and 2006jd (Stritzinger et al. 2012), the full CSP sample is used to derive physical parameters which describe the nature of the interaction between the expanding SN ejecta and the circum-stellar material (CSM). For each SN of our sample we find counterparts, identifying objects similar to SNe 1994W (SN 2006bo), 1998S (SN 2008fq) and 1988Z (SN 2006qq). We present the unprecedented initial u-band plateau of SN 2006aa, and its peculiar late-time luminosity and temperature evolution. For each SN, assuming the CSM was formed b...

  2. Modeling Type-IIn Interacting Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Austin; Duffell, Paul; Kasen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Spectra of Type-IIn Supernovae (SNe) have shown evidence of interaction between SN ejecta and a surrounding circumstellar medium (CSM). Namely, narrow Hydrogen lines indicate that the fast moving ejecta slows after it collides with the slow moving CSM. However, observations of eta-Carinae and spectropolarimetry of SN2009ip during its 2012 explosion have shown that the CSM may often be asymmetric. In this study, we investigate the ability of an asymmetric CSM to disguise the characteristic narrow H lines expected from Type-IIn SNe. We perform two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the interaction between supernova ejecta and CSM. The simulations are run using the moving-mesh hydrodynamics code JET. Previous studies have ignored possible asymmetries by limiting their calculations to one-dimension or assuming a spherically symmetric CSM. We calculate shock propagation within the disk and CSM heating rate to produce mock-bolometric light curves. We also track unshocked CSM mass and speculate on its effects on the observation of H lines.

  3. Constraints on Type IIn Supernova Progenitor Outbursts from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search

    CERN Document Server

    Bilinski, Christopher; Li, Weidong; Williams, G Grant; Zheng, WeiKang; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2015-01-01

    We searched through roughly 12 years of archival survey data acquired by the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) as part of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) in order to detect or place limits on possible progenitor outbursts of Type IIn supernovae (SNe~IIn). The KAIT database contains multiple pre-SN images for 5 SNe~IIn (plus one ambiguous case of a SN IIn/imposter) within 50 Mpc. No progenitor outbursts are found using the false discovery rate (FDR) statistical method in any of our targets. Instead, we derive limiting magnitudes (LMs) at the locations of the SNe. These limiting magnitudes (typically reaching $m_R \\approx 19.5\\,\\mathrm{mag}$) are compared to outbursts of SN 2009ip and $\\eta$ Car, plus additional simulated outbursts. We find that the data for SN 1999el and SN 2003dv are of sufficient quality to rule out events $\\sim40$ days before the main peak caused by initially faint SNe from blue supergiant (BSG) precursor stars, as in the cases of SN 2009ip and SN 2010mc. These SNe~IIn...

  4. Multi-wavelength Observations of the Enduring Type IIn Supernovae 2005ip and 2006jd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stritzinger, Maximilian; Taddia, Francesco; Fransson, Claes;

    2012-01-01

    We present an observational study of the Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) 2005ip and 2006jd. Broadband UV, optical, and near-IR photometry, and visual-wavelength spectroscopy of SN 2005ip complement and extend upon published observations to 6.5 years past discovery. Our observations of SN 2006jd ext...

  5. Point-source and diffuse high-energy neutrino emission from Type IIn supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulou, M.; Coenders, S.; Vasilopoulos, G.; Kamble, A.; Sironi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Type IIn supernovae (SNe), a rare subclass of core collapse SNe, explode in dense circumstellar media that have been modified by the SNe progenitors at their last evolutionary stages. The interaction of the freely expanding SN ejecta with the circumstellar medium gives rise to a shock wave propagating in the dense SN environment, which may accelerate protons to multi-PeV energies. Inelastic proton-proton collisions between the shock-accelerated protons and those of the circumstellar medium lead to multimessenger signatures. Here, we evaluate the possible neutrino signal of Type IIn SNe and compare with IceCube observations. We employ a Monte Carlo method for the calculation of the diffuse neutrino emission from the SN IIn class to account for the spread in their properties. The cumulative neutrino emission is found to be ∼10 per cent of the observed IceCube neutrino flux above 60 TeV. Type IIn SNe would be the dominant component of the diffuse astrophysical flux, only if 4 per cent of all core collapse SNe were of this type and 20-30 per cent of the shock energy was channeled to accelerated protons. Lower values of the acceleration efficiency are accessible by the observation of a single Type IIn SN as a neutrino point source with IceCube using up-going muon neutrinos. Such an identification is possible in the first year following the SN shock breakout for sources within 20 Mpc.

  6. Discovery of the Ultraluminous Type IIn Supernova PS1-11vo

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Ryan; Soderberg, A. M.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.; Czekala, I.; Milisavljevic, D.; Margutti, R.; Drout, M.; Challis, P.; Gezari, S.; Huber, M.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Grav, T.; Heasley, J. N.; Hodapp, K. W.; Jedicke, R.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.; Luppino, G.; Lupton, R.; Magnier, E. A.; Monet, D. G.; Morgan, J. S.; Onaka, P.; Price, P. A.; Stubbs, C.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery by the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS1 or PS1) of PS1-11vo, a Type IIn supernova (SN) at z = 0.116 with a peak r-band absolute magnitude of M = -20.4. We also present optical spectroscopic observations from the Apache Point Observatory Echelle Spectrograph, the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph, and the MMT Blue Channel Spectrograph over a period of roughly 1 year after detection. PS1-11vo is one of the longest lived, most luminous supernovae (SNe) ever discovered and the highest quality SN IIn documented by Pan-STARRS1. The Pan-STARRS1 photometric observations indicate maximum was reached roughly 50 days after the time of explosion, during which the SN rose by approximately 5 mag. Spectra of PS1-11vo display a prominent hydrogen alpha emission line and P Cygni profile, typical of SNe IIn. We compare the photometric and spectroscopic observations of PS1-11vo to those of other SNe II, including several recent ultraluminous SNe IIn. Finally, we examine its spectral energy distribution to model various parameters of the SN and its host environment at 5 days past maximum, estimating a peak luminosity of L = 4.5E43 erg/s and an initial Nickel-56 mass of 4.5 solar masses. This work is supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 0754568 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  7. Twin Supernova Studies with SNe Ia from SNfactory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhouri, Hannah; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Hsiao, E.; Loken, S.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Runge, K.; Thomas, R. C.; Antilogous, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Pain, R.; Wu, C.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E.; Pereira, R.; Smadja, G.; Pecontal, E.; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Scalzo, R.; Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M.; Paech, K.; Tao, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of twin supernovae with spectrophotometric timeseries of nearby Type Ia supernova from the Nearby Supernova Factory (Aldering, et al. 2002). One advantage of "twins” is they offer the best opportunity for having objects with the same intrinsic luminosities and colors, ostensibly leaving only extrinsic factors such as dust to explain any observed differences in brightness and color. Using well-sampled timeseries data for over 100 nearby Hubble-flow SNe Ia, we study the impact of dust on the brightness differences of SN Ia twins in order to improve the standardization of these standardizable candles that have been and will continue to be a primary tool in the determination of cosmological parameters. Specifically we are able to solve for the relative extinction and RV needed to bring the twins into near-perfect agreement. We will present a study of the resulting distribution of RV. In searching for twin supernovae we have found groups of SNe, again differing only by a dust law that accounts for the brightness differences. These groups allow us to look for similarities in subsets of SNe and explore spectrophotometric differences from group to group.

  8. On the progenitor of SN 2005gl and the nature of Type IIn supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gal-Yam, A; Fox, D B; Cenko, S B; Soderberg, A M; Moon, D S; Sand, D J; Li, W; Filippenko, A V; Aldering, G; Copin, Y; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the type IIn supernova (SN) 2005gl, in the relatively nearby (d~66 Mpc) galaxy NGC 266. Photometry and spectroscopy of the SN indicate it is a typical member of its class. Pre-explosion Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of the location of the SN, along with a precise localization of this event using the Laser-Guide-Star assisted Adaptive Optics (LGS-AO) system at Keck Observatory, are combined to identify a luminous (M_V=-10.3) point source as the possible progenitor of SN 2005gl. If the source is indeed a single star, it was likely a member of the class of luminous blue variable stars (LBVs). This finding leads us to consider the possible general association of SNe IIn with LBV progenitors. We find this is indeed supported by observations of other SNe, and the known properties of LBV stars. For example, we argue that should the prototypical Galactic LBV eta Carina explode in a phase similar to its current state, it will likely produce a type IIn SN. We discuss our findings in the con...

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Palomar Transient Factory SNe IIn photometry (Ofek+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, E. O.; Arcavi, I.; Tal, D.; Sullivan, M.; Gal-Yam, A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Ben-Ami, S.; Bersier, D.; Cao, Y.; Cenko, S. B.; De Cia, A.; Filippenko, A. V.; Fransson, C.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Laher, R.; Surace, J.; Quimby, R.; Yaron, O.

    2017-07-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF; Law et al. 2009PASP..121.1395L; Rau et al. 2009PASP..121.1334R) and its extension the intermediate PTF (iPTF) found over 2200 spectroscopically confirmed SNe. We selected 19 SNe IIn for which PTF/iPTF has good coverage of the light-curve rise and peak; they are listed in Table 1. Optical spectra were obtained with a variety of telescopes and instruments, including the Double Spectrograph (Oke & Gunn 1982PASP...94..586O) at the Palomar 5 m Hale telescope, the Kast spectrograph (Miller & Stone 1993, Lick Observatory Technical Report 66 (Santa Cruz, CA: Lick Observatory)) at the Lick 3 m Shane telescope, the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (Oke et al. 1995PASP..107..375O) on the Keck-1 10 m telescope, and the Deep Extragalactic Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (Faber et al. 2003SPIE.4841.1657F) on the Keck-2 10 m telescope. (2 data files).

  10. Properties of Newly Formed Dust Grains in The Luminous Type IIn Supernova 2010jl

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, K; Sahu, D K; Minowa, Y; Motohara, K; Ueno, I; Folatelli, G; Pyo, T -S; Kitagawa, Y; Kawabata, K S; Anupama, G C; Kozasa, T; Moriya, T J; Yamanaka, M; Nomoto, K; Bersten, M; Quimby, R; Iye, M

    2013-01-01

    Supernovae (SNe) have been proposed to be the main production sites of dust grains in the Universe. Our knowledge on their importance to dust production is, however, limited by observationally poor constraints on the nature and amount of dust particles produced by individual SNe. In this paper, we present a spectrum covering optical through near-Infrared (NIR) light of the luminous Type IIn supernova (SN IIn) 2010jl around one and half years after the explosion. This unique data set reveals multiple signatures of newly formed dust particles. The NIR portion of the spectrum provides a rare example where thermal emission from newly formed hot dust grains is clearly detected. We determine the main population of the dust species to be carbon grains at a temperature of ~1,350 - 1,450K at this epoch. The mass of the dust grains is derived to be ~(7.5 - 8.5) x 10^{-4} Msun. Hydrogen emission lines show wavelength-dependent absorption, which provides a good estimate on the typical size of the newly formed dust grains...

  11. The Unusual Temporal and Spectral Evolution of the Type IIn Supernova 2011ht

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roming, P. W. A.; Pritchard, T. A.; Prieto, J. L.; Kochanek, C. S.; Fryer, C. L.; Davidson, K.; Humphreys, R. M.; Bayless, A. J.; Beacom, J. F.; Brown, P. J.; Holland, S. T.; Immler, S.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Oates, S. R.; Pogge, R. W.; Pojmanski, G.; Stoll, R.; Shappee, B. J.; Stanek, K. Z.; Szczygiel, D. M.

    2012-06-01

    We present very early UV to optical photometric and spectroscopic observations of the peculiar Type IIn supernova (SN) 2011ht in UGC 5460. The UV observations of the rise to peak are only the second ever recorded for a Type IIn SN and are by far the most complete. The SN, first classified as an SN impostor, slowly rose to a peak of MV ~ -17 in ~55 days. In contrast to the ~2 mag increase in the v-band light curve from the first observation until peak, the UV flux increased by >7 mag. The optical spectra are dominated by strong, Balmer emission with narrow peaks (FWHM ~ 600 km s-1), very broad asymmetric wings (FWHM ~ 4200 km s-1), and blueshifted absorption (~300 km s-1) superposed on a strong blue continuum. The UV spectra are dominated by Fe II, Mg II, Si II, and Si III absorption lines broadened by ~1500 km s-1. Merged X-ray observations reveal a L 0.2-10 = (1.0 ± 0.2) × 1039 erg s-1. Some properties of SN 2011ht are similar to SN impostors, while others are comparable to Type IIn SNe. Early spectra showed features typical of luminous blue variables at maximum and during giant eruptions. However, the broad emission profiles coupled with the strong UV flux have not been observed in previous SN impostors. The absolute magnitude and energetics (~2.5 × 1049 erg in the first 112 days) are reminiscent of normal Type IIn SN, but the spectra are of a dense wind. We suggest that the mechanism for creating this unusual profile could be a shock interacting with a shell of material that was ejected a year before the discovery of the SN. This paper is dedicated to our colleague, Weidong Li, who died on 2011 December 12. His contribution to the study of all types of SNe was tremendous.

  12. PROPERTIES OF NEWLY FORMED DUST GRAINS IN THE LUMINOUS TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA 2010jl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, K.; Nozawa, T.; Folatelli, G.; Moriya, T. J.; Nomoto, K.; Bersten, M.; Quimby, R. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sahu, D. K.; Anupama, G. C. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Minowa, Y.; Pyo, T.-S. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Motohara, K.; Kitagawa, Y. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Ueno, I.; Kawabata, K. S.; Yamanaka, M. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Kozasa, T. [Department of Cosmosciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Iye, M., E-mail: keiichi.maeda@ipmu.jp [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-10-10

    Supernovae (SNe) have been proposed to be the main production sites of dust grains in the universe. However, our knowledge of their importance to dust production is limited by observationally poor constraints on the nature and amount of dust particles produced by individual SNe. In this paper, we present a spectrum covering optical through near-Infrared (NIR) light of the luminous Type IIn supernova 2010jl around one and a half years after the explosion. This unique data set reveals multiple signatures of newly formed dust particles. The NIR portion of the spectrum provides a rare example where thermal emission from newly formed hot dust grains is clearly detected. We determine the main population of the dust species to be carbon grains at a temperature of ∼1350-1450 K at this epoch. The mass of the dust grains is derived to be ∼(7.5-8.5) × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉}. Hydrogen emission lines show wavelength-dependent absorption, which provides a good estimate of the typical size of the newly formed dust grains (∼< 0.1 μm, and most likely ∼< 0.01 μm). We believe the dust grains were formed in a dense cooling shell as a result of a strong SN-circumstellar media (CSM) interaction. The dust grains occupy ∼10% of the emitting volume, suggesting an inhomogeneous, clumpy structure. The average CSM density must be ∼> 3 × 10{sup 7} cm{sup –3}, corresponding to a mass loss rate of ∼> 0.02 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1} (for a mass loss wind velocity of ∼100 km s{sup –1}). This strongly supports a scenario in which SN 2010jl and probably other luminous SNe IIn are powered by strong interactions within very dense CSM, perhaps created by Luminous-Blue-Variable-like eruptions within the last century before the explosion.

  13. The Unusual Temporal and Spectral Evolution of the Type IIn Supernova 2011ht

    CERN Document Server

    Roming, P W A; Prieto, J L; Kochanek, C S; Fryer, C L; Davidson, K; Humphreys, R M; Bayless, A J; Beacom, J F; Brown, P J; Holland, S T; Immler, S; Kuin, N P M; Oates, S R; Pogge, R W; Pojmanski, G; Stoll, R; Shappee, B J; Stanek, K Z; Szczygiel, D M

    2012-01-01

    We present very early UV to optical photometric and spectroscopic observations of the peculiar Type IIn supernova (SN) 2011ht in UGC 5460. The UV observations of the rise to peak are only the second ever recorded for a Type IIn SN and are by far the most complete. The SN, first classified as a SN impostor, slowly rose to a peak of M_V \\sim -17 in \\sim55 days. In contrast to the \\sim2 magnitude increase in the v-band light curve from the first observation until peak, the UV flux increased by >7 magnitudes. The optical spectra are dominated by strong, Balmer emission with narrow peaks (FWHM\\sim600 km/s), very broad asymmetric wings (FWHM\\sim4200 km/s), and blue shifted absorption (\\sim300 km/s) superposed on a strong blue continuum. The UV spectra are dominated by FeII, MgII, SiII, and SiIII absorption lines broadened by \\sim1500 km/s. Merged X-ray observations reveal a L_(0.2-10)=(1.0+/-0.2)x10^(39) erg/s. Some properties of SN 2011ht are similar to SN impostors, while others are comparable to Type IIn SNe. Ea...

  14. Environments of interacting transients: Impostors and type IIn supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Habergham, Stacey; James, Phil; Lyman, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents one of the first environmental analyses of the locations of the class of `interacting transients', namely type IIn supernovae and supernova Impostors. We discuss the association of these transients with star formation, host galaxy type, metallicity, and the locations of each event within the respective host. Given the frequent assumption of very high mass progenitors for these explosions from various studies, most notably a direct progenitor detection, it is interesting to note the weak association of these subtypes with star formation as traced by H{\\alpha} emission, particularly in comparison with type Ic supernovae, which trace the H{\\alpha} emission and are thought to arise from high mass progenitors. The radial distributions of these transients compared to type Ic supernovae are also very different. This provides evidence for the growing hypothesis that these `interacting transients' are in fact comprised of a variety of progenitor systems. The events contained within this sample are ...

  15. THE UNUSUAL TEMPORAL AND SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF THE TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA 2011ht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roming, P. W. A.; Bayless, A. J. [Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute, P.O. Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228-0510 (United States); Pritchard, T. A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Penn State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Prieto, J. L. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Kochanek, C. S.; Beacom, J. F.; Pogge, R. W.; Stoll, R.; Shappee, B. J.; Stanek, K. Z.; Szczygiel, D. M. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Fryer, C. L. [CCS-2, MS D409, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 87544 (United States); Davidson, K.; Humphreys, R. M. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Brown, P. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 201 James Fletcher Bldg., 115 S. 1400 E. 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0830 (United States); Holland, S. T. [Space Telescope Science Center, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Immler, S. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kuin, N. P. M.; Oates, S. R. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Pojmanski, G., E-mail: proming@swri.edu [Warsaw University Astronomical Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-06-01

    We present very early UV to optical photometric and spectroscopic observations of the peculiar Type IIn supernova (SN) 2011ht in UGC 5460. The UV observations of the rise to peak are only the second ever recorded for a Type IIn SN and are by far the most complete. The SN, first classified as an SN impostor, slowly rose to a peak of M{sub V} {approx} -17 in {approx}55 days. In contrast to the {approx}2 mag increase in the v-band light curve from the first observation until peak, the UV flux increased by >7 mag. The optical spectra are dominated by strong, Balmer emission with narrow peaks (FWHM {approx} 600 km s{sup -1}), very broad asymmetric wings (FWHM {approx} 4200 km s{sup -1}), and blueshifted absorption ({approx}300 km s{sup -1}) superposed on a strong blue continuum. The UV spectra are dominated by Fe II, Mg II, Si II, and Si III absorption lines broadened by {approx}1500 km s{sup -1}. Merged X-ray observations reveal a L{sub 0.2-10} = (1.0 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}. Some properties of SN 2011ht are similar to SN impostors, while others are comparable to Type IIn SNe. Early spectra showed features typical of luminous blue variables at maximum and during giant eruptions. However, the broad emission profiles coupled with the strong UV flux have not been observed in previous SN impostors. The absolute magnitude and energetics ({approx}2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 49} erg in the first 112 days) are reminiscent of normal Type IIn SN, but the spectra are of a dense wind. We suggest that the mechanism for creating this unusual profile could be a shock interacting with a shell of material that was ejected a year before the discovery of the SN.

  16. Direct Determination of Hubble Parameter Using Type IIn Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Blinnikov, Sergei; Baklanov, Petr; Dolgov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach, a Dense Shell Method (DSM), for measuring distances for cosmology. It is based on original Baade idea to relate absolute difference of photospheric radii with photospheric velocity. We demonstrate that this idea works: the new method does not rely on the Cosmic Distance Ladder and gives satisfactory results for the most luminous Type IIn Supernovae. This allows one to make them good primary distance indicators for cosmology. Fixing correction factors for illustration, we obtain with this method the median distance of 68^{+19}_{-15} (68%CL) Mpc to SN 2006gy and median Hubble parameter 79^{+23}_{-17} (68%CL) km/s/Mpc.

  17. A Massive Progenitor of the Luminous Type IIn Supernova 2010jl

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Nathan; Miller, Adam A; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Filippenko, Alexei V; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Cooper, Michael C; Matheson, Thomas; Van Dyk, Schuyler D

    2010-01-01

    The bright, nearby, recently discovered supernova SN2010jl is a member of the rare class of relatively luminous Type~IIn events. Here we report archival HST observations of its host galaxy UGC5189A taken roughly 10yr prior to explosion, as well as early-time optical spectra of the SN. The HST images reveal a bright, blue point source at the position of the SN, with an absolute magnitude of -12.0 in the F300W filter. If it is not just a chance alignment, the source at the SN position could be (1) a massive young (less than 6 Myr) star cluster in which the SN resided, (2) a quiescent, luminous blue star with an apparent temperature around 14,000K, (3) a star caught during a bright outburst akin to those of LBVs, or (4) a combination of option 1 and options 2 or 3. Although we cannot confidently choose between these possibilities with the present data, any of them imply that the progenitor of SN2010jl had an initial mass above 30Msun. This reinforces mounting evidence that many SNe IIn result from very massive s...

  18. On type IIn/Ia-CSM supernovae as exemplified by SN 2012ca

    CERN Document Server

    Inserra, C; Smartt, S J; Benetti, S; Chen, T -W; Childress, M; Gal-Yam, A; Howell, D A; Kangas, T; Pignata, G; Polshaw, J; Sullivan, M; Smith, K W; Valenti, S; Young, D R; Parker, S; Seccull, T; McCrum, M

    2015-01-01

    We present the complete set of ultra-violet, optical and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy for SN 2012ca, covering the period from 6 days prior to maximum light, until 531 days after maximum. The spectroscopic time series for SN 2012ca is essentially unchanged over 1.5 years, and appear to be dominated at all epochs by signatures of interaction with a dense circumstellar medium rather than the underlying supernova (SN). SN 2012ca is a member of the class of type Ia-CSM/IIn SNe, the nature of which have been debated extensively in the literature. The two leading scenarios are either a type Ia SN exploding within a dense CSM from a non-degenerate, evolved companion, or a core-collapse SN from a massive star. While some members of the class have been unequivocally associated with type Ia SNe, in other cases the association is less certain. While it is possible that Sn 2012ca does arise from a thermonuclear SN, this would require a relatively high (between 20 and 70 per cent) efficiency in converting kine...

  19. The Crab nebula and the class of Type IIn-P supernovae caused by sub-energetic electron-capture explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan

    2013-09-01

    What sort of supernova (SN) gave rise to the Crab nebula? While there are several indications that the Crab arose from a sub-energetic explosion of an 8-10 M⊙ progenitor star, this would appear to conflict with the high luminosity indicated by historical observations. This paper shows that several well-known observed properties of the Crab and SN 1054 are well matched by a particular breed of Type IIn SN. The Crab's properties are best suited to the Type IIn-P subclass (Type IIn spectra with plateau light curves), exemplified by SNe 1994W, 2009kn and 2011ht. These events probably arise from relatively low energy (1050 erg) explosions with low 56Ni yield that may result from electron-capture SN (ecSN) explosions, but their high visual-wavelength luminosity and Type IIn spectra are dominated by shock interaction with dense circumstellar material (CSM) rather than the usual recombination photosphere. In this interaction, a large fraction of the 1050 erg of the total kinetic energy can be converted to visual-wavelength luminosity. After about 120 d, nearly all of the mass outside the neutron star in the CSM and ejecta ends up in a slowly expanding (1000-1500 km s-1) thin dense shell, which is then accelerated and fragmented by the growing pulsar wind nebula in the subsequent 1000 yr, producing the complex network of filaments seen today. There is no need to invoke the extended, invisible fast SN envelope hypothesized to reside outside the Crab. As differentiated from a normal SN II-P, SNe IIn-P provide a much better explanation for several observed features of the Crab: (1) no blast wave outside the Crab nebula filaments, (2) no rapidly expanding SN envelope outside the filaments, (3) a total mass of ˜5 M⊙ swept up in a thin slow shell, (4) a low kinetic energy of the Crab at least an order of magnitude below a normal core-collapse SN, (5) a high peak luminosity (-18 mag) despite the low kinetic energy, (6) chemical abundances consistent with an 8-10 M⊙ star and

  20. Two Distinct-Absorption X-Ray Components from Type IIn Supernovae: Evidence for Asphericity in the Circumstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Katsuda, Satoru; Bamba, Aya; Terada, Yukikatsu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Kawabata, Koji; Ohno, Masanori; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Tsuboi, Yohko; Immler, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We present multi-epoch X-ray spectral observations of three Type IIn supernovae (SNe) 2005kd, 2006jd, and 2010jl, acquired with Chandra, XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and Swift. Previous extensive X-ray studies of SN 2010jl have revealed that X-ray spectra are dominated by thermal emission, which likely arises from a hot plasma heated by a forward shock propagating into a massive circumstellar medium (CSM). Interestingly, an additional soft X-ray component was required to reproduce the spectra at a period of ~1-2 yr after the SN explosion. Although this component is likely associated with the SN, its origin remained an open question. We find a similar, additional soft X-ray component from the other two SNe IIn as well. Given this finding, we present a new interpretation for the origin of this component; it is thermal emission from a forward shock essentially identical to the hard X-ray component, but directly reaches us from a void of the dense CSM. Namely, the hard and soft components are responsible for the heavily- ...

  1. The bumpy light curve of Type IIn supernova iPTF13z over 3 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyholm, A.; Sollerman, J.; Taddia, F.; Fremling, C.; Moriya, T. J.; Ofek, E. O.; Gal-Yam, A.; De Cia, A.; Roy, R.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cao, Y.; Nugent, P. E.; Masci, F. J.

    2017-08-01

    A core-collapse (CC) supernova (SN) of Type IIn is dominated by the interaction of SN ejecta with the circumstellar medium (CSM). Some SNe IIn (e.g. SN 2006jd) have episodes of re-brightening ("bumps") in their light curves. We present iPTF13z, a Type IIn SN discovered on 2013 February 1 by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). This SN showed at least five bumps in its declining light curve between 130 and 750 days after discovery. We analyse this peculiar behaviour and try to infer the properties of the CSM, of the SN explosion, and the nature of the progenitor star. We obtained multi-band optical photometry for over 1000 days after discovery with the P48 and P60 telescopes at Palomar Observatory. We obtained low-resolution optical spectra during the same period. We did an archival search for progenitor outbursts. We analyse the photometry and the spectra, and compare iPTF13z to other SNe IIn. In particular we derive absolute magnitudes, colours, a pseudo-bolometric light curve, and the velocities of the different components of the spectral lines. A simple analytical model is used to estimate the properties of the CSM. iPTF13z had a light curve peaking at Mr ≲ - 18.3 mag. The five bumps during its decline phase had amplitudes ranging from 0.4 to 0.9 mag and durations between 20 and 120 days. The most prominent bumps appeared in all the different optical bands, when covered. The spectra of this SN showed typical SN IIn characteristics, with emission lines of Hα (with broad component FWHM 103 - 104 km s-1 and narrow component FWHM 102 km s-1) and He i, but also with Fe ii, Ca ii, Na i D and Hβ P Cygni profiles (with velocities of 103km s-1). A pre-explosion outburst was identified lasting ≳ 50 days, with Mr ≈ - 15 mag around 210 days before discovery. Large, variable progenitor mass-loss rates (≳0.01M⊙ yr-1) and CSM densities (≳10-16 g cm-3) are derived. The SN was hosted by a metal-poor dwarf galaxy at redshift z = 0.0328. We suggest that

  2. SN 2010jl in UGC 5189: Yet another luminous type IIn supernova in a metal-poor galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Stoll, R; Stanek, K Z; Pogge, R W; Szczygiel, D M; Pojmanski, G; Antognini, J; Yan, H

    2010-01-01

    We present ASAS data starting 25 days before the discovery of the recent type IIn SN 2010jl, and we compare its light curve to other luminous IIn SNe, showing that it is a luminous (M_I ~ -20.5) event. Its host galaxy, UGC 5189, has a low gas-phase oxygen abundance (12 + log(O/H) = 8.2), which reinforces the emerging trend that over-luminous core-collapse supernovae are found in the low-metallicity tail of the galaxy distribution, similar to the known trend for the hosts of long GRBs. We compile oxygen abundances from the literature and from our own observations of UGC 5189, and we present an unpublished spectrum of the luminous type Ic SN 2010gx that we use to estimate its host metallicity. We discuss these in the context of host metallicity trends for different classes of core-collapse objects. The earliest generations of stars are known to be enhanced in [O/Fe] relative to the Solar mixture; it is therefore likely that the stellar progenitors of these overluminous supernovae are even more iron-poor than th...

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SNe IIn observations and properties (Ofek+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, E. O.; Sullivan, M.; Shaviv, N. J.; Steinbok, A.; Arcavi, I.; Gal-Yam, A.; Tal, D.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Ben-Ami, S.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cenko, S. B.; Laher, R.; Surace, J.; Bloom, J. S.; Filippenko, A. V.; Silverman, J. M.; Yaron, O.

    2017-03-01

    We used PTF observations of the SNe in our sample. The PTF data reduction is described by Laher et al. (2014PASP..126..674L), and the photometric calibration is discussed by Ofek et al. (2012PASP..124...62O, 2012PASP..124..854O). Our search is based on image subtraction, and the flux residuals in the individual image subtractions for all the SNe in our sample are listed in Table 2. In order to calculate the rate of SN precursors, we need to estimate the "control time"-that is, for how long each SN location was observed (prior to its explosion) to a given limiting magnitude. Table 5 lists, for each SN, the time bin windows (of 15 days) prior to the SN explosion and the 5σ sensitivity depth at each window for bins with more than five measurements (second channel), or the median 6σ limiting magnitudes at windows with fewer than six measurements (first channel). (4 data files).

  4. Mass-loss histories of Type IIn supernova progenitors within decades before their explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Moriya, Takashi J; Taddia, Francesco; Sollerman, Jesper; Blinnikov, Sergei I; Sorokina, Elena I

    2014-01-01

    We present results of a systematic study of the mass-loss properties of Type IIn supernova progenitors within decades before their explosion. We apply an analytic light curve model to 11 Type IIn supernova bolometric light curves to derive the circumstellar medium properties. We reconstruct the mass-loss histories based on the estimated circumstellar medium properties. The estimated mass-loss rates are mostly higher than 1e-3 Msun/yr and they are consistent with those obtained by other methods. The mass-loss rates are often found to be constantly high within decades before their explosion. This indicates that there exists some mechanism to sustain the high mass-loss rates of Type IIn supernova progenitors for at least decades before their explosion. Thus, the shorter eruptive mass loss events observed in some Type IIn supernova progenitors are not always responsible for creating their dense circumstellar media. In addition, we find that Type IIn supernova progenitors may tend to increase their mass-loss rates...

  5. Texas Supernova Search: A Wide Field Search for Nearby SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, R. M.; Castro, F.; Gerardy, C. L.; Hoeflich, P.; Kannappan, S. J.; Mondol, P.; Sellers, M.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2005-12-01

    ROTSE-IIIb is one four robotic telescopes built by the University of Michigan to observe the prompt optical afterglows associated with gamma-ray bursts. At just 0.45m in diameter, it is the smallest research telescope at McDonald, but its 1.85 x 1.85 deg field of view and autonomous operation make it an excellent survey instrument for rare transient phenomena. We have been using ROTSE-IIIb for the past year to search for supernovae in nearby galaxy clusters such as the Virgo, Coma, and Ursa Major clusters. ROTSE-IIIb's wide field of view allows us to search the thousands of galaxies in these clusters, which cover hundreds of square degrees on the sky, in just a few tens of exposures. We can therefore observe all of these fields in a single night, and repeat the search every night. When we identify a new supernova candidate, we invoke our target of opportunity time on the neighboring 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) the following night to obtain a spectrum. Because of the rolling search and the quick spectral turn-around possible with the HET, we are able to capture spectra of the earliest phases of the explosion. By combining this information with spectra taken at later epochs, we can construct a complete description of the explosion. Through this work we aim to better understand the physical conditions of supernova explosions, identify any systematic effects that may affect how Type Ia supernovae are calibrated as standard candles and used to probe cosmology, and also to better calibrate Type II supernovae as standard candles.

  6. Two Distinct-absorption X-Ray Components from Type IIn Supernovae: Evidence for Asphericity in the Circumstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Maeda, Keiichi; Bamba, Aya; Terada, Yukikatsu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Kawabata, Koji; Ohno, Masanori; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Tsuboi, Yohko; Immler, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    We present multi-epoch X-ray spectral observations of three Type IIn supernovae (SNe), SN 2005kd, SN 2006jd, and SN 2010jl, acquired with Chandra, XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and Swift. Previous extensive X-ray studies of SN 2010jl have revealed that X-ray spectra are dominated by thermal emission, which likely arises from a hot plasma heated by a forward shock propagating into a massive circumstellar medium (CSM). Interestingly, an additional soft X-ray component was required to reproduce the spectra at a period of ˜1-2 years after the SN explosion. Although this component is likely associated with the SN, its origin remained an open question. We find a similar, additional soft X-ray component from the other two SNe IIn as well. Given this finding, we present a new interpretation for the origin of this component; it is thermal emission from a forward shock essentially identical to the hard X-ray component, but directly reaches us from a void of the dense CSM. Namely, the hard and soft components are responsible for the heavily and moderately absorbed components, respectively. The co-existence of the two components with distinct absorptions as well as the delayed emergence of the moderately absorbed X-ray component could be evidence for asphericity of the CSM. We show that the X-ray spectral evolution can be qualitatively explained by considering a torus-like geometry for the dense CSM. Based on our X-ray spectral analyses, we estimate the radius of the torus-like CSM to be on the order of ˜5 × 1016 cm.

  7. Late-time Light Curves of Type II Supernovae: Physical Properties of SNe and Their Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Panagia, Nino; Fabbri, Joanna; Barlow, Michael J; Clayton, Geoffrey C; Gallagher, Joseph S; Sugerman, Ben E K; Wesson, Roger; Andrews, Jennifer E; Ercolano, Barbara; Welch, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    We present BVRIJHK band photometry of 6 core-collapse supernovae, SNe 1999bw, 2002hh, 2003gd, 2004et, 2005cs, and 2006bc measured at late epochs (>2 yrs) based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Gemini north, and WIYN telescopes. We also show the JHK lightcurves of a supernova impostor SN 2008S up to day 575. Of our 43 HST observations in total, 36 observations are successful in detecting the light from the SNe alone and measuring magnitudes of all the targets. HST observations show a resolved scattered light echo around SN 2003gd at day 1520 and around SN 2002hh at day 1717. Our Gemini and WIYN observations detected SNe 2002hh and 2004et, as well. Combining our data with previously published data, we show VRIJHK-band lightcurves and estimate decline magnitude rates at each band in 4 different phases. Our prior work on these lightcurves and other data indicate that dust is forming in our targets from day ~300-400, supporting SN dust formation theory. In this paper we focus on other physical properties derived f...

  8. Swift and LT UV and optical observations of type IIn superluminous supernova 2017gir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Zach; Kuin, Paul; Chandra, Poonam; Ashall, Chris; Malesani, Daniele; Pastorello, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    We observed the field of the type IIn superluminous supernova 2017gir (ATLAS17jsb, Tonry et al. 2017; Lyman et al. 2017, ATel 10674) with Swift via a target-of-opportunity for three epochs (6th, 16th and 19th of September, 2017) in the three UVOT UV filters (w1, m1, w2). The SN is clearly detected in all three filters, and it is seen that its brightness fades over this timescale.

  9. The Type IIn Supernova 2002kg: The Outburst of a Luminous Blue Variable Star in NGC 2403

    CERN Document Server

    Van Dyk, S D; Chornock, R; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R; Humphreys, R M; Li, W; Challis, Peter M.; Chornock, Ryan; Dyk, Schuyler D. Van; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Foley, Ryan; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Li, Weidong

    2006-01-01

    We show that Supernova (SN) 2002kg in NGC 2403, initially classified as Type II-narrow (IIn), has photometric and spectroscopic properties unlike those of normal SNe. Its behavior, instead, is more typical of highly massive stars which experience the short-lived luminous blue variable (LBV) phase toward the end of their lives. The star, in fact, most resembles the LBV S Doradus in outburst. The precursor of SN 2002kg is the irregular, bright blue variable star 37 (V37), catalogued by Tammann & Sandage in 1968. Using high-quality ground-based, multi-band images we can constrain the initial mass of V37 to be M_ini >~ 40 M_sun. We find that, although the spectra indicate a nitrogen enhancement, possibly revealing the products of CNO processing by V37 in the ejecta, the star lacks a substantial LBV nebula. The outburst from SN 2002kg/V37 is not nearly as energetic as the giant eruptions of the eta Carinae-like variables, such as SN 1954J/V12, also in NGC 2403. SN 2002kg/V37, however, is among a growing number...

  10. Type Ia SNe along redshift: the R(Si II) ratio and the expansion velocities in intermediate z supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Altavilla, G; Balastegui, A; Méndez, J; Irwin, M; Espana-Bonet, C; Schamaneche, K; Balland, C; Ellis, Richard S; Fabbro, S; Folatelli, G; Goobar, A; Hillebrandt, W; McMahon, R M; Mouchet, M; Mourao, A; Nobili, S; Pain, R; Stanishev, V; Walton, N A

    2006-01-01

    We study intermediate--z SNe Ia using the empirical physical diagrams which enable to learn about those SNe explosions. This information can be very useful to reduce systematic uncertainties of the Hubble diagram of SNe Ia up to high z. The study of the expansion velocities and the measurement of the ratio $\\mathcal{R}$(\\SiII) allow to subtype those SNe Ia as done for nearby samples. The evolution of this ratio as seen in the diagram $\\mathcal{R}$(\\SiII)--(t) together with $\\mathcal{R}$(\\SiII)$_{max}$ versus (B-V)$_{0}$ indicate consistency of the properties at intermediate z compared with local SNe. At intermediate--z, the expansion velocities of Ca II and Si II are similar to the nearby counterparts. This is found in a sample of 6 SNe Ia in the range 0.033$\\leq z \\leq$0.329 discovered within the {\\it International Time Programme} (ITP) of {\\it Cosmology and Physics with SNe Ia} during the spring of 2002. Those supernovae were identified using the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. Two SNe Ia at intermediate z...

  11. Type IIn Supernova SN 2010jl: Optical Observations for Over 500 Days After Explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Tianmeng; Wu, Chao; Chen, Juncheng; Chen, Jia; Liu, Qin; Huang, Fang; Liang, Jide; Zhao, Xulin; Li, Lin; Wang, Min; Dennefeld, Michel; Zhang, Jujia; Zhai, Meng; Wu, Hong; Fan, Zhou; Zou, Hu; Zhou, Xu; Ma, Jun

    2012-01-01

    We present extensive optical observations of a Type IIn supernova (SN) 2010jl for the first 1.5 years after the discovery. The UBVRI light curves demonstrated an interesting two-stage evolution during the nebular phase, which almost flatten out after about 90 days from the optical maximum. SN 2010jl has one of the highest intrinsic H_alpha luminosity ever recorded for a SN IIn, especially at late phase, suggesting a strong interaction of SN ejecta with the dense circumstellar material (CSM) ejected by the progenitor. This is also indicated by the remarkably strong Balmer lines persisting in the optical spectra. One interesting spectral evolution about SN 2010jl is the appearance of asymmetry of the Balmer lines. These lines can be well decomposed into a narrow component and an intermediate-width component. The intermediate-width component showed a steady increase in both strength and blueshift with time until t ~ 400 days after maximum, but it became less blueshifted at t ~ 500 days when the line profile appe...

  12. TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA SN 2010jl: OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS FOR OVER 500 DAYS AFTER EXPLOSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Tianmeng; Wu Chao; Zhai Meng; Wu Hong; Fan Zhou; Zou Hu; Zhou Xu; Ma Jun [National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Wang Xiaofeng; Chen Juncheng; Chen Jia; Liu Qin; Huang Fang; Liang Jide; Zhao Xulin [Physics Department and Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lin Lin [Center for Astrophysics, University of Science and Technology of China, No. 96, JinZhai Road Baohe District, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Wang Min [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, 210008 (China); Dennefeld, Michel [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, and University Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6) (France); Zhang Jujia, E-mail: armengjade@gmail.com, E-mail: wang_xf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2012-11-01

    We present extensive optical observations of a Type IIn supernova (SN IIn) 2010jl for the first 1.5 years after its discovery. The UBVRI light curves demonstrated an interesting two-stage evolution during the nebular phase, which almost flatten out after about 90 days from the optical maximum. SN 2010jl has one of the highest intrinsic H{alpha} luminosities ever recorded for an SN IIn, especially at late phase, suggesting a strong interaction of SN ejecta with the dense circumstellar material (CSM) ejected by the progenitor. This is also indicated by the remarkably strong Balmer lines persisting in the optical spectra. One interesting spectral evolution about SN 2010jl is the appearance of asymmetry of the Balmer lines. These lines can be well decomposed into a narrow component and an intermediate-width component. The intermediate-width component showed a steady increase in both strength and blueshift with time until t {approx} 400 days after maximum, but it became less blueshifted at t {approx} 500 days, when the line profile appeared relatively symmetric again. Owing to the fact that a pure reddening effect will lead to a sudden decline of the light curves and a progressive blueshift of the spectral lines, we therefore propose that the asymmetric profiles of H lines seen in SN 2010jl are unlikely due to the extinction by newly formed dust inside the ejecta, contrary to the explanation by some early studies. Based on a simple CSM-interaction model, we speculate that the progenitor of SN 2010jl may suffer a gigantic mass loss ({approx}30-50 M{sub Sun }) a few decades before explosion. Considering a slow-moving stellar wind (e.g., {approx}28 km s{sup -1}) inferred for the preexisting, dense CSM shell and the extremely high mass-loss rate (1-2 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}), we suggest that the progenitor of SN 2010jl might have experienced a red supergiant stage and may explode finally as a post-red supergiant star with an initial mass above 30-40 M{sub Sun }.

  13. Explosions inside Ejecta and Most Luminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Blinnikov, S I

    2008-01-01

    The extremely luminous supernova SN2006gy is explained in the same way as other SNIIn events: light is produced by a radiative shock propagating in a dense circumstellar envelope formed by a previous weak explosion. The problems in the theory and observations of multiple-explosion SNe IIn are briefly reviewed.

  14. Detection of a Type IIn Supernova in Optical Follow-up Observations of IceCube Neutrino Events

    OpenAIRE

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J. A.(Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire, Université de Genève, 1211, Geneva, Switzerland); Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D; Anderson, T.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.

    2015-01-01

    The IceCube neutrino observatory pursues a follow-up program selecting interesting neutrino events in real-time and issuing alerts for electromagnetic follow-up observations. In March 2012, the most significant neutrino alert during the first three years of operation was issued by IceCube. In the follow-up observations performed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), a Type IIn supernova (SN) PTF12csy was found $0.2^\\circ$ away from the neutrino alert direction, with an error radius of $0.54...

  15. Radio and X-Ray Observations of SN 2006jd: Another Strongly Interacting Type IIn Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Poonam; Chevalier, Roger A.; Chugai, Nikolai; Fransson, Claes; Irwin, Christopher M.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Chakraborti, Sayan; Immler, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We report four years of radio and X-ray monitoring of the Type IIn supernova SN 2006jd at radio wavelengths with the Very Large Array, Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Expanded Very Large Array at X-ray wavelengths with Chandra, XMM-Newton and Swift-XRT. We assume that the radio and X-ray emitting particles are produced by shock interaction with a dense circumstellar medium. The radio emission shows an initial rise that can be attributed to free-free absorption by cool gas mixed into the nonthermal emitting region external free-free absorption is disfavored because of the shape of the rising light curves and the low gas column density inferred along the line of sight to the emission region. The X-ray luminosity implies a preshock circumstellar density approximately 10(exp 6) per cubic meter at a radius r approximately 2 x 10(exp 16) centimeter, but the column density inferred from the photoabsorption of X-rays along the line of sight suggests a significantly lower density. The implication may be an asymmetry in the interaction. The X-ray spectrum shows Fe line emission at 6.9 keV that is stronger than is expected for the conditions in the X-ray emitting gas. We suggest that cool gas mixed into the hot gas plays a role in the line emission. Our radio and X-ray data both suggest the density profile is flatter than r2 because of the slow evolution of the unabsorbed emission.

  16. Systematic Blueshift of Line Profiles in the Type IIn Supernova 2010jl: Evidence for Post-Shock Dust Formation?

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Nathan; Filippenko, Alexei V; Cooper, Michael C; Matheson, Thomas; Bian, Fuyan; Weiner, Benjamin J; Comerford, Julia M

    2011-01-01

    Type IIn SNe show spectral evidence for strong interaction between their blast wave and dense circumstellar material (CSM) around the progenitor star. SN2010jl was the brightest core-collapse SN in 2010, and it was a Type IIn explosion with strong CSM interaction. Andrews et al. recently reported evidence for an IR excess in SN2010jl, indicating either new dust formation or the heating of CSM dust in an IR echo. Here we report multi-epoch spectra of SN2010jl that reveal the tell-tale signature of new dust formation: emission-line profiles becoming systematically more blueshifted as the red side of the line is blocked by increasing extinction. The effect is seen clearly in the intermediate-width (400--4000 km/s) component of H$\\alpha$ beginning roughly 30d after explosion. Moreover, we present near-IR spectra demonstrating that the asymmetry in the hydrogen-line profiles is wavelength dependent, appearing more pronounced at shorter wavelengths. This evidence suggests that new dust grains had formed quickly in ...

  17. The Detection of a Type IIn Supernova in Optical Follow-up Observations of IceCube Neutrino Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Beiser, E.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Fuchs, T.; Glagla, M.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Gretskov, P.; Groh, J. C.; Gross, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hellwig, D.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfe, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jurkovic, M.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Koob, A.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Middlemas, E.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Pütz, J.; Quinnan, M.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stanisha, N. A.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stössl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Santen, J.; Vanheule, S.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wichary, C.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration; Ofek, Eran O.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Nugent, Peter E.; Arcavi, Iair; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Perley, Daniel A.; Barlow, Tom; Horesh, Assaf; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Howell, D. A.; Dilday, Ben; PTF Collaboration; Evans, Phil A.; Kennea, Jamie A.; Swift Collaboration; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Kaiser, N.; Waters, C.; Flewelling, H.; Tonry, J. L.; Rest, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Pan-STARRS1 Science Consortium

    2015-09-01

    The IceCube neutrino observatory pursues a follow-up program selecting interesting neutrino events in real-time and issuing alerts for electromagnetic follow-up observations. In 2012 March, the most significant neutrino alert during the first three years of operation was issued by IceCube. In the follow-up observations performed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), a Type IIn supernova (SN IIn) PTF12csy was found 0.°2 away from the neutrino alert direction, with an error radius of 0.°54. It has a redshift of z = 0.0684, corresponding to a luminosity distance of about 300 Mpc and the Pan-STARRS1 survey shows that its explosion time was at least 158 days (in host galaxy rest frame) before the neutrino alert, so that a causal connection is unlikely. The a posteriori significance of the chance detection of both the neutrinos and the SN at any epoch is 2.2σ within IceCube's 2011/12 data acquisition season. Also, a complementary neutrino analysis reveals no long-term signal over the course of one year. Therefore, we consider the SN detection coincidental and the neutrinos uncorrelated to the SN. However, the SN is unusual and interesting by itself: it is luminous and energetic, bearing strong resemblance to the SN IIn 2010jl, and shows signs of interaction of the SN ejecta with a dense circumstellar medium. High-energy neutrino emission is expected in models of diffusive shock acceleration, but at a low, non-detectable level for this specific SN. In this paper, we describe the SN PTF12csy and present both the neutrino and electromagnetic data, as well as their analysis.

  18. Abundance stratification in Type Ia supernovae - V. SN 1986G bridging the gap between normal and subluminous SNe Ia

    CERN Document Server

    Ashall, C; Pian, E; James, P A

    2016-01-01

    A detailed spectroscopic analysis of SN 1986G has been performed. SN 1986G `bridges the gap' between normal and sub luminous type Ia supernova (SNe Ia). The abundance tomography technique is used to determine the abundance distribution of the elements in the ejecta. SN 1986G was found to be a low energy Chandrasekhar mass explosion. Its kinetic energy was 70% of the standard W7 model (0.9x10$^{51}$erg). Oxygen dominates the ejecta from the outermost layers down to $\\sim$9000kms$^{-1}$ , intermediate mass elements (IME) dominate from $\\sim$ 9000kms$^{-1}$ to $\\sim$ 3500kms$^{-1}$ with Ni and Fe dominating the inner layers $<\\sim$ 3500kms$^{-1}$. The final masses of the main elements in the ejecta were found to be, O=0.33M, IME=0.69M, stable NSE=0.21M, $^{56}$Ni=0.14M. An upper limit of the carbon mass is set at C=0.02M. The spectra of SN1986G consist of almost exclusively singly ionised species. SN1986G can be thought of as a low luminosity extension of the main population of SN Ia, with a large deflagratio...

  19. Coronal lines and dust formation in SN 2005ip: Not the brightest, but the hottest Type IIn supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Nathan; Chornock, Ryan; Filippenko, Alexei V; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Weidong; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Foley, Ryan J; Rex, Jacob; Steele, Thea N

    2008-01-01

    We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of SN2005ip for the first 3yr after discovery, showing an underlying Type II-L SN interacting with a steady wind to yield an unusual Type IIn spectrum. For the first 160d, it had a fast linear decline from a modest peak absolute magnitude of about -17.4 (unfiltered), followed by a plateau at roughly -14.8 mag for more than 2yr. Initially having a normal broad-lined spectrum superposed with sparse narrow lines from the photoionized circumstellar medium (CSM), it quickly developed signs of strong CSM interaction with a spectrum similar to that of SN1988Z. As the underlying SN II-L faded, SN2005ip exhibited a rich high-ionization spectrum with a dense forest of narrow coronal lines, unprecedented among SNe but reminiscent of some active galactic nuclei. The line-profile evolution of SN 2005ip confirms that dust formation caused its recently reported infrared excess, but these lines reveal that it is the first SN to show clear evidence for dust in both the fast SN ej...

  20. Detection of a Type IIn Supernova in Optical Follow-up Observations of IceCube Neutrino Events

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Archinger, M; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Beiser, E; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Börner, M; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Buzinsky, N; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; Dembinski, H; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de Wasseige, G; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Ehrhardt, T; Eichmann, B; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fahey, S; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Fuchs, T; Glagla, M; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Ghorbani, K; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hansmann, B; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hignight, J; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Holzapfe, K; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huber, M; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; In, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kemp, J; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Kohnen, G; Koirala, R; Kolanoski, H; Konietz, R; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leuner, J; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Mahn, K B M; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Menne, T; Merino, G; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Pandya, H; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Richter, S; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sabbatini, L; Sander, H -G; Sandrock, A; Sandroos, J; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schimp, M; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Seckel, D; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stahlberg, M; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Sutherland, M; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Turcati, A; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vanheule, S; Veenkamp, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Wandkowsky, N; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Wille, L; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Xu, Y; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Zoll, M; Ofek, Eran O; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Nugent, Peter E; Arcavi, Iair; Bloom, Joshua S; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Perley, Daniel A; Barlow, Tom; Horesh, Assaf; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Howell, D A; Evans, Phil A; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Kaiser, N; Waters, C; Flewelling, H; Tonry, J L; Rest, A

    2015-01-01

    The IceCube neutrino observatory pursues a follow-up program selecting interesting neutrino events in real-time and issuing alerts for electromagnetic follow-up observations. In March 2012, the most significant neutrino alert during the first three years of operation was issued by IceCube. In the follow-up observations performed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), a Type IIn supernova (SN) PTF12csy was found $0.2^\\circ$ away from the neutrino alert direction, with an error radius of $0.54^\\circ$. It has a redshift of $z=0.0684$, corresponding to a luminosity distance of about $300 \\, \\mathrm{Mpc}$ and the Pan-STARRS1 survey shows that its explosion time was at least 158 days (in host galaxy rest frame) before the neutrino alert, so that a causal connection is unlikely. The a posteriori significance of the chance detection of both the neutrinos and the SN at any epoch is $2.2 \\, \\sigma$ within IceCube's 2011/12 data acquisition season. Also, a complementary neutrino analysis reveals no long-term signal ove...

  1. The Extended HST Supernova Survey: The Rate of SNe Ia at z>1.4 Remains Low

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlen, Tomas; Riess, Adam G

    2008-01-01

    We use the HST ACS imaging of the two GOODS fields during Cycles 11, 12, and 13 to derive the Type Ia supernova rate in four redshift intervals in the range 0.21.4 supports our previous result that there is a drop in the Type Ia supernova rate at high redshift, suggesting a long time delay between the formation of the progenitor star and the explosion of the supernova. If described by a simple one-parameter model, we find a characteristic delay time of 2-3 Gyr. However, a number of recent results based on e.g., low redshift supernova samples and supernova host galaxy properties suggest that the supernova delay time distribution is bimodal. In this model, a major fraction of the Type Ia supernova rate is 'prompt' and follows the star formation rate, while a smaller fraction of the rate has a long delay time, making this channel proportional to mass. While our results are fully consistent with the bimodal model at low redshifts, the low rate we find at z>1.4 appears to contradict these results. Models that corr...

  2. A Hubble Space Telescope Snapshot Survey of Nearby Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Li, W; Van Dyk, S D; Hu, J; Qiu, Y; Modjaz, M; Leonard, D C; Li, Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Dyk, Schuyler D. Van; Hu, Jingyao; Qiu, Yulei; Modjaz, Maryam; Leonard, Douglas C.

    2002-01-01

    We present photometry of 12 recent supernovae (SNe) recovered in a {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} Snapshot program, and tie the measurements to earlier ground-based observations, in order to study the late-time evolution of the SNe. Many of the ground-based measurements are previously unpublished, and were made primarily with a robotic telescope, the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope. Evidence for circumstellar interaction is common among the core-collapse SNe. Late-time decline rates for Type IIn SNe are found to span a wide range, perhaps due to differences in circumstellar interaction. An extreme case, SN IIn 1995N, declined by only 1.2 mag in $V$ over about 4 years following discovery. Template images of some SNe must therefore be obtained many years after the explosion, if contamination from the SN itself is to be minimized. Evidence is found against a previous hypothesis that the Type IIn SN 1997bs was actually a superoutburst of a luminous blue variable star. The peculiar SN Ic 1997ef, a "hypernova," d...

  3. SN 2009ip and SN 2010mc: Early and late-time behavior consistent with core-collapse Type IIn supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Nathan; Prieto, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The recent supernova (SN) 2009ip had pre-SN eruptions followed by a final explosion in 2012. Its pre-SN observations make 2009ip the best observed SN progenitor in history, but the unprecedented data on the pre-SN activity has fueled debate about the nature of the 2012 explosion, whether it was a true SN or some extreme non-terminal event. In principle, both types of events could power shock interaction with circumstellar material (CSM), but here we argue that only a core-collapse SN provides a self-consistent explanation. Previously, we demonstrated that the light curves of SN 2009ip and another Type IIn, SN 2010mc, were nearly identical. Here we expand that comparison to their spectra as well, demonstrating that they are both consistent with known Type IIn events. The late-time spectra of SN 2009ip resemble those of the super-luminous SN 2006tf, and the underlying broad component in SN 2009ip's spectra resembles Type II-P events. The recent claim that the late-time spectrum of SN 2009ip is returning to its ...

  4. Interaction-powered supernovae: rise-time versus peak-luminosity correlation and the shock-breakout velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Tal, David; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; De Cia, Annalisa; Yaron, Ofer [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Cao, Yi [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Nugent, Peter E. [Computational Cosmology Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bersier, David [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Fransson, Claes [Department of Astronomy, The Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kasliwal, Mansi M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason [Spitzer Science Center, MS 314-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Quimby, Robert [Kavli IPMU (WPI), The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2014-06-20

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock-breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a specific relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limits on the shock-breakout velocity. The lower limits on the shock velocity we find are consistent with what is expected for SNe (i.e., ∼10{sup 4} km s{sup –1}). This supports the suggestion that the early-time light curves of SNe IIn are caused by shock breakout in a dense CSM. We note that such a correlation can arise from other physical mechanisms. Performing such a test on other classes of SNe (e.g., superluminous SNe) can be used to rule out the interaction model for a class of events.

  5. Ultraviolet observations of core-collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Tyler Anthony

    Ultraviolet observations of Core Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe) have traditionally lagged behind observations in the optical and near-infrared. With the launch of Swift in 2004 this began to change. The systematic study of UV emission from these objects provides information about supernovae temperature, radius, metallicity and luminosity that may be difficult to obtain from the ground - especially at early times where upwards of 80% of the SNe bolometric flux may come from the UV region. We begin with the examination of an extraordinary Type IIn supernova SN 2007pk, which was at the time the earliest observed Type IIn SNe in the UV, and characterize the explosion properties while examining how the early observed UV emission compares with other observed CCSNe at early times. Building upon this we assemble the largest sample of CCSNe in the UV and examine the UV and bolometric characteristics of CCSNe by subtype. Using these bolometric light curves we go on to calculate empirically based bolometric corrections and UV- ux corrections for use by observers when observing filters are limited or UV observations are unable to be obtained. We improve upon this by identifying a small subsample of Type II Plateau SNe which have simultaneous ground based optical - near infrared data, and improve our bolometric light curve calculation method to more accurately determine bolometric light curve, corrections and UV corrections. Finally, we use recent hydrodynamical models to examine the accuracy of current modeling techniques to reproduce Type IIP SNe, the implications of progenitor properties on the light curves of the SNe, and possibility of future diagnostics for progenitor metalicity, radius, and explosion energies from Type IIP light curves and models.

  6. Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Marisa

    2014-03-01

    We live in a Universe that is getting bigger faster. This astonishing discovery of Universal acceleration was made in the late 1990s by two teams who made observations of a special type of exploded star known as a `Supernova Type Ia'. (SNeIa) Since the discovery of the accelerating Universe, one of the biggest questions in modern cosmology has been to determine the cause of that acceleration - the answer to this question will have far reaching implications for our theories of cosmology and fundamental physics more broadly. The two main competing explanations for this apparent late time acceleration of the Universe are modified gravity and dark energy. The Dark Energy Survey (DES) has been designed and commissioned to find to find answers to these questions about the nature of dark energy and modified gravity. The new 570 megapixel Dark Energy Camera is currently operating with the Cerro-Tololo Inter American Observatory's 4m Blanco teleccope, carrying out a systematic search for SNeIa, and mapping out the large scale structure of the Universe by making observations of galaxies. The DES science program program which saw first light in September 2013 will run for five years in total. DES SNeIa data in combination with the other DES observations of large scale structure will enable us to put increasingly accurate constraints on the expansion history of the Universe and will help us distinguish between competing theories of dark energy and modified gravity. As we draw to the close of the first observing season of DES in March 2014, we will report on the current status of the DES supernova survey, presenting first year supernovae data, preliminary results, survey strategy, discovery pipeline, spectroscopic target selection and data quality. This talk will give the first glimpse of the DES SN first year data and initial results as we begin our five year survey in search of dark energy. On behalf of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration.

  7. Interaction-powered supernovae: Rise-time vs. peak-luminosity correlation and the shock-breakout velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Ofek, E O; Tal, D; Sullivan, M; Gal-Yam, A; Kulkarni, S R; Nugent, P E; Ben-Ami, S; Bersier, D; Cao, Y; Cenko, S B; De Cia, A; Filippenko, A V; Fransson, C; Kasliwal, M M; Laher, R; Surace, J; Quimby, R; Yaron, O

    2014-01-01

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limit...

  8. PTF11iqb: Cool supergiant mass loss that bridges the gap between Type IIn and normal supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Nathan; Cenko, S Bradley; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Filippenko, Alexei V; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Clubb, Kelsey I; Graham, Melissa L; Leonard, Douglas C; Horst, J Chuck; Williams, G Grant; Andrews, Jennifer E; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Nugent, Peter; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Xu, Dong; Ben-Ami, Sagi

    2015-01-01

    PTF11iqb was initially classified as a TypeIIn event caught very early after explosion. It showed narrow Wolf-Rayet (WR) spectral features on day 2, but the narrow emission weakened quickly and the spectrum morphed to resemble those of Types II-L and II-P. At late times, Halpha emission exhibited a complex, multipeaked profile reminiscent of SN1998S. In terms of spectroscopic evolution, we find that PTF11iqb was a near twin of SN~1998S, although with weaker interaction with circumstellar material (CSM) at early times, and stronger CSM interaction at late times. We interpret the spectral changes as caused by early interaction with asymmetric CSM that is quickly (by day 20) enveloped by the expanding SN ejecta photosphere, but then revealed again after the end of the plateau when the photosphere recedes. The light curve can be matched with a simple model for weak CSM interaction added to the light curve of a normal SN~II-P. This plateau requires that the progenitor had an extended H envelope like a red supergia...

  9. Terrestrial impact of the galactic historical SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyudin, A. F.

    2002-03-01

    Galactic supernovae (SNe) of the last millennium have left their signatures in many energy domains, with the optical being the best known due to the absence of astronomical instruments before the 17th century being more sophisticated than the human eye. Alongside with these records found in the scriptes of the ancient eastern and western astronomers, quite recently other signatures were recognised as valuable tracers of historical SNe, for example, different ionic and/or molecular depositions in the polar ice, radioactive isotopes depositions, and the /γ-ray emission from the radioactive 44Ti produced in the SN explosion. While the ice depositions are expected to be the result of the supernova flash in the UV and soft X-rays, the 60Fe radioactive isotope deposition into the deep-ocean ferromanganese crust is the result of direct isotope transfer by cosmic rays dust grains originating in the SN blast wave. These and other impacts of the galactic SNe are important from the point of view of their possible influence on the terrestrial environment. In this paper we consider known tracers of historical SNe and compare them to the proposed new tracer based on the atmospheric response to the galactic supernova emission in the UV and X-rays. In addition to using the 44Ti radioactive decay line photons for uncovering hidden galactic supernova remnants by imaging /γ-ray telescopes, all such tracers form an important complement to the historical SNe record.

  10. Supernova PTF 09UJ: A Possible Shock Breakout from a Dense Circumstellar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, E. O.; Rabinak, I.; Neill, J. D.; Arcavi, I.; Cenko, S. B.; Waxman, E.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P. E.; Bildsten, L.; Bloom, J. S.; Filippenko, A. V.; Forster, K.; Howell, D. A.; Jacobsen, J.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Law, N.; Martin, C.; Poznanski, D.; Quimby, R. M.; Shen, K. J.; Sullivan, M.; Dekany, R.; Rahmer, G.; Hale, D.; Smith, R.; Zolkower, J.; Velur, V.; Walters, R.; Henning, J.; Bui, K.; McKenna, D.

    2010-12-01

    Type-IIn supernovae (SNe IIn), which are characterized by strong interaction of their ejecta with the surrounding circumstellar matter (CSM), provide a unique opportunity to study the mass-loss history of massive stars shortly before their explosive death. We present the discovery and follow-up observations of an SN IIn, PTF 09uj, detected by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). Serendipitous observations by Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths detected the rise of the SN light curve prior to the PTF discovery. The UV light curve of the SN rose fast, with a timescale of a few days, to a UV absolute AB magnitude of about -19.5. Modeling our observations, we suggest that the fast rise of the UV light curve is due to the breakout of the SN shock through the dense CSM (n ≈ 1010 cm-3). Furthermore, we find that prior to the explosion the progenitor went through a phase of high mass-loss rate (~0.1 M sun yr-1) that lasted for a few years. The decay rate of this SN was fast relative to that of other SNe IIn.

  11. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

    2001-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the

  12. SNe Ia as a cosmological probe

    CERN Document Server

    Meng, Xiangcun; Han, Zhanwen

    2015-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae luminosities can be corrected to render them useful as standard candles able to probe the expansion history of the universe. This technique was successful applied to discover the present acceleration of the universe. As the number of SNe Ia observed at high redshift increases and analysis techniques are perfected, people aim to use this technique to probe the equation of state of the dark energy. Nevertheless, the nature of SNe Ia progenitors remains controversial and concerns persist about possible evolution effects that may be larger and harder to characterize than the more obvious statistical uncertainties.

  13. SN Refsdal: Classification as a Luminous and Blue SN 1987A-like Type II Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, P L; Selsing, J; Foley, R J; Hjorth, J; Rodney, S A; Christensen, L; Strolger, L -G; Filippenko, A V; Treu, T; Steidel, C C; Strom, A; Riess, A G; Zitrin, A; Schmidt, K B; Bradac, M; Jha, S W; Graham, M L; McCully, C; Graur, O; Weiner, B J; Silverman, J M

    2015-01-01

    We have acquired Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Very Large Telescope near-infrared spectra and images of supernova (SN) Refsdal after its discovery as an Einstein cross in Fall 2014. The HST light curve of SN Refsdal matches the distinctive, slowly rising light curves of SN 1987A-like supernovae (SNe), and we find strong evidence for a broad H-alpha P-Cygni profile in the HST grism spectrum at the redshift (z = 1.49) of the spiral host galaxy. SNe IIn, powered by circumstellar interaction, could provide a good match to the light curve of SN Refsdal, but the spectrum of a SN IIn would not show broad and strong H-alpha absorption. From the grism spectrum, we measure an H-alpha expansion velocity consistent with those of SN 1987A-like SNe at a similar phase. The luminosity, evolution, and Gaussian profile of the H-alpha emission of the WFC3 and X-shooter spectra, separated by ~2.5 months in the rest frame, provide additional evidence that supports the SN 1987A-like classification. In comparison with other exam...

  14. Using Quantitative Spectroscopic Analysis to Determine the Properties and Distances of Type II-Plateau Supernovae: SNe 2005cs and 2006bp

    CERN Document Server

    Dessart, Luc; Brown, Peter J; Hicken, Malcolm; Hillier, D John; Holland, Stephen T; Immler, Stefan; Kirshner, Robert P; Milne, Peter; Modjaz, Maryam; Roming, Peter W A

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the Type II Plateau supernovae (SN II-P) 2005cs and 2006bp with the non-LTE model atmosphere code CMFGEN. We fit 13 spectra in the first month for SN 2005cs and 18 for SN 2006bp. {\\sl Swift} ultraviolet photometry and ground-based optical photometry calibrate each spectrum. Our analysis shows both objects were discovered less than 3 days after they exploded, making these the earliest SN II-P spectra ever studied. They reveal broad and very weak lines from highly-ionized fast ejecta with an extremely steep density profile. We identify He{\\sc ii} 4686\\AA emission in the SN 2006bp ejecta. Days later, the spectra resemble the prototypical Type II-P SN 1999em, which had a supergiant-like photospheric composition. Despite the association of SN 2005cs with possible X-ray emission, the emergent UV and optical light comes from the photosphere, not from circumstellar emission. We surmise that the very steep density fall-off we infer at early times may be a fossil of the combined actions of the shock wave pas...

  15. SNe Ia: Can Chandrasekhar Mass Explosions Reproduce the Observed Zoo?

    CERN Document Server

    Baron, E

    2014-01-01

    The question of the nature of the progenitor of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is important both for our detailed understanding of stellar evolution and for their use as cosmological probes of the dark energy. Much of the basic features of SNe Ia can be understood directly from the nuclear physics, a fact which Gerry would have appreciated. We present an overview of the current observational and theoretical situation and show that it not incompatible with most SNe Ia being the results of thermonuclear explosions near the Chandrasekhar mass.

  16. Supernova rates from the SUDARE VST-Omegacam search. I

    CERN Document Server

    Cappellaro, E; Pignata, G; Grado, L; Greggio, L; Limatola, L; Vaccari, M; Baruffolo, A; Benetti, S; Bufano, F; Capaccioli, M; Cascone, E; Covone, G; De Cicco, D; Falocco, S; Della Valle, M; Jarvis, M; Marchetti, L; Napolitano, N R; Paolillo, M; Pastorello, A; Radovich, M; Schipani, P; Spiro, S; Tomasella, L; Turatto, M

    2015-01-01

    We describe the observing strategy, data reduction tools and early results of a supernova (SN) search project, named SUDARE, conducted with the ESO VST telescope aimed at measuring the rate of the different types of SNe in the redshift range 0.2SNe, most of which are SNIa (57%) and the remaining core collapse events of which 44% type II, 22% type IIn and 34% type Ib/c. In order to link the transients, we built a catalog of ~1.3x10^5 galaxies in the redshift range 0SNe in different bin of redshifts. The values are consistent with other measurements from the literature. The dispersion of the rate measurements for SNe Ia is comparable with the scatter of the t...

  17. What are Published X-ray lightcurves telling us about Young Supernova Expansion?

    CERN Document Server

    Dwarkadas, Vikram V

    2011-01-01

    Massive stars lose mass in the form of stellar winds and outbursts. This material accumulates around the star. When the star explodes as a supernova (SN) the resulting shock wave expands within this circumstellar medium. The X-ray emission resulting from the interaction depends, among other parameters, on the density of this medium, and therefore the variation in the X-ray luminosity can be used to study the variation in the density structure of the medium. In this paper we explore the X-ray emission and lightcurves of all known SNe, in order to study the nature of the medium into which they are expanding. In particular we wish to investigate whether young SNe are expanding into a steady wind medium, as is most often assumed in the literature. We find that in the context of the theoretical arguments that have been generally used in the literature, many young SNe, and especially those of Type IIn, which are the brightest X-ray luminosity class, do not appear to be expanding into steady winds. Some IIns appear ...

  18. Pre-supernova outbursts via wave heating in massive stars - I. Red supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jim

    2017-09-01

    Early observations of supernovae (SNe) indicate that enhanced mass-loss and pre-SN outbursts may occur in progenitors of many types of SNe. We investigate the role of energy transport via waves driven by vigorous convection during late-stage nuclear burning of otherwise typical 15 M⊙ red supergiant SN progenitors. Using mesa stellar evolution models including 1D hydrodynamics, we find that waves carry ∼107 L⊙ of power from the core to the envelope during core neon/oxygen burning in the final years before core collapse. The waves damp via shocks and radiative diffusion at the base of the hydrogen envelope, which heats up fast enough to launch a pressure wave into the overlying envelope that steepens into a weak shock near the stellar surface, causing a mild stellar outburst and ejecting a small (≲1 M⊙) amount of mass at low speed (≲50 km s-1) roughly one year before the SN. The wave heating inflates the stellar envelope but does not completely unbind it, producing a non-hydrostatic pre-SN envelope density structure different from prior expectations. In our models, wave heating is unlikely to lead to luminous Type IIn SNe, but it may contribute to flash-ionized SNe and some of the diversity seen in II-P/II-L SNe.

  19. New approaches to SNe Ia progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Although Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are a major tool in cosmology and play a key role in the chemical evolution of galaxies, the nature of their progenitor systems (apart from the fact that they must be close binaries containing at least one white dwarf) remains largely unknown. In the last decade, considerable efforts have been made, both observationally and theoretically, to solve this problem. Observations have, however, revealed a previously unsuspected variety of events, ranging from very underluminous outbursts to clearly overluminous ones, and spanning a range well outside the peak luminosity--decline rate of the light curve relationship, used to make calibrated candles of the SNe Ia. On the theoretical side, new explosion scenarios, such as violent mergings of pairs of white dwarfs, have been explored. We review those recent developments, emphasizing the new observational findings, but also trying to tie them to the different scenarios and explosion mechanisms proposed thus far.

  20. SNE Industrial Fieldbus Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Angel; Raines, Matthew; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Mata, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) have very limited diagnostic and no prognostic capabilities, while current smart sensor designs do not have the capability to communicate over Fieldbus networks. The aim is to interface smart sensors with PLCs so that health and status information, such as failure mode identification and measurement tolerance, can be communicated via an industrial Fieldbus such as ControlNet. The SNE Industrial Fieldbus Interface (SIFI) is an embedded device that acts as a communication module in a networked smart sensor. The purpose is to enable a smart sensor to communicate health and status information to other devices, such as PLCs, via an industrial Fieldbus networking protocol. The SNE (Smart Network Element) is attached to a commercial off-the-shelf Any bus-S interface module through the SIFI. Numerous Anybus-S modules are available, each one designed to interface with a specific Fieldbus. Development of the SIFI focused on communications using the ControlNet protocol, but any of the Anybus-S modules can be used. The SIFI communicates with the Any-bus module via a data buffer and mailbox system on the Anybus module, and supplies power to the module. The Anybus module transmits and receives data on the Fieldbus using the proper protocol. The SIFI is intended to be connected to other existing SNE modules in order to monitor the health and status of a transducer. The SIFI can also monitor aspects of its own health using an onboard watchdog timer and voltage monitors. The SIFI also has the hardware to drive a touchscreen LCD (liquid crystal display) unit for manual configuration and status monitoring.

  1. Exploring the Environments of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habergham, Stacey; Anderson, Joe; James, Phil; Lyman, Joe

    2015-06-01

    Despite years of intense research on the exact nature of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), much uncertainty still surrounds the progenitor systems of these explosions. Only the most common subtype (SNIIP) has a known origin, thanks to numerous direct observations of the progenitor stars. However, direct detections are limited by the frequency of nearby events. This led to the analysis of the host galaxies, in the assumption that trends in large samples of events could give indications of the progenitor systems of SNe. Indeed it was these investigations which concluded that CCSNe must originate from young, massive stars, due to their sole presence in star-forming galaxies. Over the past 20 years a new field of research has aimed to straddle these two techniques, looking at the local environment of the progenitor within the host galaxy. This technique is effective out to a larger distance than direct detections ( 80 Mpc), but is limited by the requirement to be able to resolve the regions at the location of, or close to the SN coordinates. These regions are significantly smaller than the entire galaxy but may still contain thousands of stars, if not more. The compromise here is between gathering large enough samples for meaningful statistical analysis, and gathering information on the environment local to the SN. This technique allows statistical constraints to be made on progenitor properties such as mass and metallicity, and this review talk will highlight the progress that has been made in this field, including; differences in the explosion sites of SNe types II and Ibc, the fact that SNe Ic are significantly more associated with host star formation than SNe Ib, and that the interacting SNe IIn do not explode in regions containing the most massive stars.

  2. On the Nature of Type Ia-CSM Supernovae: Optical and Near-Infrared Spectra of SN 2012ca and SN 2013dn

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Ori D; Filippenko, Alexei V; Mauerhan, Jon; Becker, Juliette; Borish, H Jacob; Cenko, S Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I; Graham, Melissa; Hsiao, Eric; Kelly, Patrick L; Lee, William H; Marion, G H; Milisavljevic, Dan; Parrent, Jerod; Shivvers, Isaac; Skrutskie, Michael; Smith, Nathan; Wilson, John; Zheng, Weikang

    2014-01-01

    A growing subset of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) show evidence for unexpected interaction with a dense circumstellar medium (SNe Ia-CSM). The precise nature of the progenitor, however, remains debated owing to spectral ambiguities arising from a strong contribution from the CSM interaction. Late-time spectra offer potential insight if the post-shock cold, dense shell becomes sufficiently thin and/or the ejecta begin to cross the reverse shock. To date, few high-quality spectra of this kind exist. Here we report on the late-time optical and infrared spectra of the SNe~Ia-CSM 2012ca and 2013dn. These SNe Ia-CSM spectra exhibit low [Fe III]/[Fe II] ratios and strong [Ca II] at late epochs. Such characteristics are reminiscent of the super-Chandrasekhar-mass (SC) candidate SN 2009dc, for which these features suggested a low-ionisation state due to high densities, although the broad Fe features admittedly show similarities to the blue "quasi-continuum" observed in some core-collapse SNe Ibn and IIn. Neither SN 2012...

  3. Supernova PTF 09uj: A possible shock breakout from a dense circumstellar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Ofek, E O; Neill, J D; Arcavi, I; Cenko, S B; Waxman, E; Kulkarni, S R; Yam, A Gal; Nugent, P E; Bildsten, L; Bloom, J S; Filippenko, A V; Forster, K; Howell, D A; Jacobsen, J; Kasliwal, M M; Law, N; Martin, C; Poznanski, D; Quimby, R M; Shen, K J; Sullivan, M; Dekany, R; Rahmer, G; Hale, D; Smith, R; Zolkower, J; Velur, V; Walters, R; Henning, J; Bui, K; McKenna, D

    2010-01-01

    Type-IIn supernovae (SNe), which are characterized by strong interaction of their ejecta with the surrounding circumstellar matter (CSM), provide a unique opportunity to study the mass-loss history of massive stars shortly before their explosive death. We present the discovery and follow-up observations of a Type IIn SN, PTF 09uj, detected by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). Serendipitous observations by GALEX at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths detected the rise of the SN light curve prior to the PTF discovery. The UV light curve of the SN rose fast, with a time scale of a few days, to a UV absolute AB magnitude of about -19.5. Modeling our observations, we suggest that the fast rise of the UV light curve is due to the breakout of the SN shock through the dense CSM (n~10^10 cm^-3). Furthermore, we find that prior to the explosion the progenitor went through a phase of high mass-loss rate (~0.1 solar mass per year) that lasted for a few years. The decay rate of this SN was fast relative to that of other SNe I...

  4. New observational insight on shock interactions toward supernovae and supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Charles Donald

    Supernovae (SNe) are energetic explosions that signal the end of a star's life. These events and the supernova remnants (SNRs) they leave behind play a central role in stellar feedback by adding energy and momentum and metals to the interstellar medium (ISM). Emission associated with these feedback processes, especially atomic and molecular line emission as well as thermal and nonthermal continuum emission is known to be enhanced in regions of high density, such as dense circumstellar matter (CSM) around SNe and molecular clouds (MCs). In this thesis, I begin with a brief overview of the physics of SN shocks in Chapter 1, focusing on a foundation for studying pan-chromatic signatures of interactions between SNe and dense environments. In Chapter 2, I examine an unusual SN with signatures of CSM interaction in the form of narrow lines of hydrogen (Type IIn) and thermal continuum emission. This SN appears to belong to a class of Type Ia SNe that shares spectroscopic features with Type IIn SNe. I discuss the difficulties of decomposing spectra in a regime where interaction occurs between SN ejecta and CSM, potentially confusing the underlying SN type. This is followed by a discussion of rebrightening that occurred at late-time in B and V band photometry of this SN, possibly associated with clumpy or dense CSM at large distances from the progenitor. In Chapter 3, I examine synchrotron emission from Cassiopeia A, observed in the Ks band over multiple epochs. The synchrotron emission is generally diffuse over the remnant, but there is one location in the southwest portion of the remnant where it appears to be enhanced and entrained as knots of emission in the SNR ejecta. I evaluate whether the Ks band knots are dominated by synchrotron emission by comparing them to other infrared and radio imaging that is known to be dominated by synchrotron emission. Concluding that they are likely synchrotron-emitting knots, I measure the magnetic field strength and electron density

  5. The luminosity calibration of SNe Ia: present status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammann, G. A.; Reindl, B.

    Blue supernovae of type Ia (SNe Ia) have become the most important objects in cosmology being of exceptionally uniform luminosity. Used as relative distance indicators they map deviations from pure Hubble flow and determine the cosmological constant Λ. Once their absolute magnitude is determined they provide the best estimate of the large-scale value of the Hubble constant H0. An HST project is reviewed where Cepheid distances are used for the luminosity calibration of SNe Ia. The mean luminosity of 8 SNe Ia is MB(max) = -19.47±0.07, MV(max) = -19.48±0.07, corresponding - after small corrections for second parameters - to H0(cosmic) = 59±5.

  6. Spectral modeling of Type II SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessart, Luc

    2015-08-01

    The red supergiant phase represents the final stage of evolution in the life of moderate mass (8-25Msun) massive stars. Hidden from view, the core changes considerably its structure, progressing through the advanced stages of nuclear burning, and eventually becomes degenerate. Upon reaching the Chandrasekhar mass, this Fe or ONeMg core collapses, leading to the formation of a proto neutron star. A type II supernova results if the shock that forms at core bounce, eventually wins over the envelope accretion and reaches the progenitor surface.The electromagnetic display of such core-collapse SNe starts with this shock breakout, and persists for months as the ejecta releases the energy deposited initially by the shock or continuously through radioactive decay. Over a timescale of weeks to months, the originally optically-thick ejecta thins out and turns nebular. SN radiation contains a wealth of information about the explosion physics (energy, explosive nucleosynthesis), the progenitor properties (structure and composition). Polarised radiation also offers signatures that can help constrain the morphology of the ejecta.In this talk, I will review the current status of type II SN spectral modelling, and emphasise that a proper solution requires a time dependent treatment of the radiative transfer problem. I will discuss the wealth of information that can be gleaned from spectra as well as light curves, from both the early times (photospheric phase) and late times (nebular phase). I will discuss the diversity of Type SNe properties and how they are related to the diversity of red supergiant stars from which they originate.SN radiation offers an alternate means of constraining the properties of red-supergiant stars. To wrap up, I will illustrate how SNe II-P can also be used as probes, for example to constrain the metallicity of their environment.

  7. X-Ray Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Immler, S; Immler, Stefan; Lewin, Walter H.G.

    2002-01-01

    We present a review of X-ray observations of supernovae (SNe). By observing the (~0.1--100 keV) X-ray emission from young SNe, physical key parameters such as the circumstellar matter (CSM) density, mass-loss rate of the progenitor and temperature of the outgoing and reverse shock can be derived as a function of time. Despite intensive search over the last ~25 years, only 15 SNe have been detected in X-rays. We review the individual X-ray observations of these SNe and discuss their implications as to our understanding of the physical processes giving rise to the X-ray emission.

  8. Optical Spectra and Light Curves of Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Filippenko, A V

    2003-01-01

    I review recent optical observations of supernovae (SNe) conducted by my group. The Lick Observatory Supernova Search with the 0.76-m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope is currently the world's most successful search for nearby SNe. We also use this telescope to obtain multicolor light curves of SNe. One of the more interesting SNe we discovered is SN 2000cx, which differs from all previously observed SNe Ia. Another very strange SN Ia that we studied is SN 2002cx, many of whose properties are opposite those of SN 2000cx. Extensive data on SNe II-P 1999em and 1999gi were used to derive distances with the expanding photosphere method. Results from spectropolarimetry suggest that the deeper we peer into the ejecta of core-collapse SNe, the greater the asphericity. We are using Hubble Space Telescope data to identify, or set limits on, the progenitors of core-collapse SNe.

  9. Statistical studies of supernova environments

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Joseph P; Habergham, Stacey M; Galbany, Lluís; Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo

    2015-01-01

    Investigations of the environments of SNe allow statistical constraints to be made on progenitor properties. We review progress that has been made in this field. Pixel statistics using tracers of e.g. star formation within galaxies show differences in the explosion sites of, in particular SNe types II and Ibc (SNe II and SNe Ibc), suggesting differences in population ages. Of particular interest is that SNe Ic are significantly more associated with H-alpha emission than SNe Ib, implying shorter lifetimes for the former. In addition, such studies have shown that the interacting SNe IIn do not explode in regions containing the most massive stars, which suggests that at least a significant fraction of their progenitors arise from the lower end of the core-collapse SN mass range. Host HII region spectroscopy has been obtained for a significant number of core-collapse events, however definitive conclusions have to-date been elusive. Single stellar evolution models predict that the fraction of SNe Ibc to SNe II sho...

  10. The Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey: V. Improving the Dark Energy Constraints Above z>1 and Building an Early-Type-Hosted Supernova Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, N; Lidman, C; Aldering, G; Amanullah, R; Barbary, K; Barrientos, L F; Botyanszki, J; Brodwin, M; Connolly, N; Dawson, K S; Dey, A; Doi, M; Donahue, M; Deustua, S; Eisenhardt, P; Ellingson, E; Faccioli, L; Fadeyev, V; Fakhouri, H K; Fruchter, A S; Gilbank, D G; Gladders, M D; Goldhaber, G; Gonzalez, A H; Goobar, A; Gude, A; Hattori, T; Hoekstra, H; Hsiao, E; Huang, X; Ihara, Y; Jee, M J; Johnston, D; Kashikawa, N; Koester, B; Konishi, K; Kowalski, M; Linder, E V; Lubin, L; Melbourne, J; Meyers, J; Morokuma, T; Munshi, F; Mullis, C; Oda, T; Panagia, N; Perlmutter, S; Postman, M; Pritchard, T; Rhodes, J; Ripoche, P; Rosati, P; Schlegel, D J; Spadafora, A; Stanford, S A; Stanishev, V; Stern, D; Strovink, M; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; Wagner, M; Wang, L; Yasuda, N; Yee, H K C

    2011-01-01

    We present ACS, NICMOS, and Keck AO-assisted photometry of 20 Type Ia supernovae SNe Ia from the HST Cluster Supernova Survey. The SNe Ia were discovered over the redshift interval 0.623 1 SNe Ia. We describe how such a sample could be efficiently obtained by targeting cluster fields with WFC3 on HST.

  11. The Unprecedented Third Outburst of SN 2009ip: A Luminous Blue Variable Becomes a Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Mauerhan, Jon C; Filippenko, Alexei; Blanchard, Kyle; Blanchard, Peter; Casper, Chadwick F E; Cenko, S Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I; Cohen, Daniel; Li, Gary; Silverman, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Some reports of supernova (SN) discoveries turn out not to be true core-collapse explosions. One such case was SN 2009ip, which was recognized to be a luminous blue variable (LBV) eruption. This source had a massive (50-80 Msun) hot progenitor star identified in pre-explosion data, it had documented evidence of pre-outburst variability, and it was subsequently discovered to have a 2nd outburst in 2010. This same source rebrightened again in 2012, and early spectra showed the same narrow-line profiles as before, suggesting another LBV-like eruption. We present new photometry and spectroscopy of SN 2009ip, indicating that its 3rd observed outburst in under 4 years appears to have transitioned into a genuine SN. The most striking discovery in these data is that unlike previous reports, the spectrum exhibited Balmer lines with very broad P-Cygni profiles characteristic of normal Type II supernovae (SNe II), in addition to narrow emission lines seen in SNe IIn and LBVs. Emission components have FWHM 8000 km/s, whi...

  12. Search for Early Gamma-ray Production in Supernovae Located in a Dense Circumstellar Medium with the Fermi LAT

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    Supernovae (SNe) exploding in a dense circumstellar medium (CSM) are hypothesized to accelerate cosmic rays in collisionless shocks and emit GeV gamma rays and TeV neutrinos on a time scale of several months. We perform the first systematic search for gamma-ray emission in Fermi LAT data in the energy range from 100 MeV to 300 GeV from the ensemble of 147 SNe Type IIn exploding in dense CSM. We search for a gamma-ray excess at each SNe location in a one year time window. In order to enhance a possible weak signal, we simultaneously study the closest and optically brightest sources of our sample in a joint-likelihood analysis in three different time windows (1 year, 6 months and 3 months). For the most promising source of the sample, SN 2010jl (PTF10aaxf), we repeat the analysis with an extended time window lasting 4.5 years. We do not find a significant excess in gamma rays for any individual source nor for the combined sources and provide model-independent flux upper limits for both cases. In addition, we de...

  13. Supernovae anisotropy power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Ghodsi, Hoda; Habibi, Farhang

    2016-01-01

    We contribute another anisotropy study to this field of research using Supernovae Type Ia (SNe Ia). In this work, we utilise the power spectrum calculation method and apply it to both the current SNe Ia data and simulation. Our simulations are constructed with the characteristics of the upcoming survey of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which shall bring us the largest SNe Ia collection to date. We make predictions for the amplitude of a possible dipole anisotropy or anisotropy in higher multipole moments that would be detectable by the LSST.

  14. The Nearby Supernova Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Wood-Vasey, W M; Lee Byung Cheol; Loken, S; Nugent, P; Perlmutter, S; Siegrist, J L; Wang, L; Antilogus, P; Astier, Pierre; Hardin, D; Pain, R; Copin, Y; Smadja, G; Gangler, E; Castera, A; Adam, G; Bacon, R; Lemonnier, J P; Pecontal, A; Pécontal, E; Kessler, R

    2004-01-01

    The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an ambitious project to find and study in detail approximately 300 nearby Type Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) at redshifts 0.03SNe in the nearby smooth Hubble flow that can be used as calibration for the current and future programs designed to use SNe to measure the cosmological parameters. The first key ingredient for this program is a reliable supply of Hubble-flow SNe systematically discovered in unprecedented numbers using the same techniques as those used in distant SNe searches. In 2002, 35 SNe were found using our test-bed pipeline for automated SN search and discovery. The pipeline uses images from the asteroid search conducted by the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking group at JPL. Improvements in our subtraction techniques and analysis have allowed us to increase our effective SN discovery rate to ~12 SNe/month in 2003.

  15. A new method for estimating the bolometric properties of Ibc SNe

    CERN Document Server

    Cano, Zach

    2013-01-01

    The bolometric properties (nickel mass, ejecta mass and kinetic energies) of 61 Ibc supernovae (SNe), including 20 Gamma-Ray Burst and X-Ray Flash (GRB/XRF), 19 Ib, 13 Ic and 9 Ic-BL (broad-lined) SNe are presented. All of the available $BVRI$ photometry in the literature have been collected and used in a new method that utilizes a template supernova (SN 1998bw) and an analytical model based on Arnett (1982) to accurately estimate the bolometric properties of each SN. A statistical analysis of the bolometric properties is then performed, where it is found that GRB/XRF SNe are the most energetic, and eject more mass (including nickel content) than Ib, Ic and Ic-BL SNe. The results are then compared to the existing progenitor models of Ibc SNe, where it is concluded that it is highly likely that at least two progenitor channels exist for producing a Ibc SN: most Ibc SNe arise via binary interactions, where the mass of the stellar progenitor is less than what is attributed to a Wolf Rayet star. Conversely, the p...

  16. The initial and final state of SNe Ia from the single degenerate model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Although type Ia supernovae(SNe Ia) show their importance in many astrophysical fields,the nature of the progenitors of SNe Ia is still unclear.At present,the single degenerate(SD) model is presented to be a very likely progenitor model.Following the comprehensive SD model developed by Meng & Yang(2010),we show the initial and final state of the progenitor systems of SNe Ia in an orbital period—the secondary mass(log Pi,M2i) plane.Our results may explain the location of some supersoft X-ray sources and recurrent novae in the(log Pi,M2i) plane,and be helpful to judge whether an SD system is the potential progenitor system of SNe Ia,as well as to simulate the interaction between SN ejecta and its companion.

  17. Core-collapse supernova progenitor constraints using the spatial distributions of massive stars in local galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, T.; Portinari, L.; Mattila, S.; Fraser, M.; Kankare, E.; Izzard, R. G.; James, P.; González-Fernández, C.; Maund, J. R.; Thompson, A.

    2017-01-01

    We studied the spatial correlations between the Hα emission and different types of massive stars in two local galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Messier 33. We compared these to correlations derived for core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) in the literature to connect CCSNe of different types with the initial masses of their progenitors and to test the validity of progenitor mass estimates which use the pixel statistics method. We obtained samples of evolved massive stars in both galaxies from catalogues with good spatial coverage and/or completeness, and combined them with coordinates of main-sequence stars in the LMC from the SIMBAD database. We calculated the spatial correlation of stars of different classes and spectral types with Hα emission. We also investigated the effects of distance, noise and positional errors on the pixel statistics method. A higher correlation with Hα emission is found to correspond to a shorter stellar lifespan, and we conclude that the method can be used as an indicator of the ages, and therefore initial masses, of SN progenitors. We find that the spatial distributions of type II-P SNe and red supergiants of appropriate initial mass (≳9 M⊙) are consistent with each other. We also find the distributions of type Ic SNe and WN stars with initial masses ≳20 M⊙ consistent, while supergiants with initial masses around 15 M⊙ are a better match for type IIb and II-L SNe. The type Ib distribution corresponds to the same stellar types as type II-P, which suggests an origin in interacting binaries. On the other hand, we find that luminous blue variable stars show a much stronger correlation with Hα emission than do type IIn SNe.

  18. Type Ibn Supernovae Show Photometric Homogeneity and Spectral Diversity at Maximum Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Arcavi, Iair; Valenti, Stefano; McCully, Curtis; Howell, D. Andrew; Johansson, Joel; Sollerman, Jesper; Pastorello, Andrea; Benetti, Stefano; Cao, Yi; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Corsi, Alessandra; Duggan, Gina; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fox, Ori D.; Fremling, Christoffer; Horesh, Assaf; Karamehmetoglu, Emir; Kasliwal, Mansi; Marion, G. H.; Ofek, Eran; Sand, David; Taddia, Francesco; Zheng, WeiKang; Fraser, Morgan; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Inserra, Cosimo; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank; Rebbapragada, Umaa; Smartt, Stephen; Smith, Ken W.; Sullivan, Mark; Surace, Jason; Woźniak, Przemek

    2017-02-01

    Type Ibn supernovae (SNe) are a small yet intriguing class of explosions whose spectra are characterized by low-velocity helium emission lines with little to no evidence for hydrogen. The prevailing theory has been that these are the core-collapse explosions of very massive stars embedded in helium-rich circumstellar material (CSM). We report optical observations of six new SNe Ibn: PTF11rfh, PTF12ldy, iPTF14aki, iPTF15ul, SN 2015G, and iPTF15akq. This brings the sample size of such objects in the literature to 22. We also report new data, including a near-infrared spectrum, on the Type Ibn SN 2015U. In order to characterize the class as a whole, we analyze the photometric and spectroscopic properties of the full Type Ibn sample. We find that, despite the expectation that CSM interaction would generate a heterogeneous set of light curves, as seen in SNe IIn, most Type Ibn light curves are quite similar in shape, declining at rates around 0.1 mag day‑1 during the first month after maximum light, with a few significant exceptions. Early spectra of SNe Ibn come in at least two varieties, one that shows narrow P Cygni lines and another dominated by broader emission lines, both around maximum light, which may be an indication of differences in the state of the progenitor system at the time of explosion. Alternatively, the spectral diversity could arise from viewing-angle effects or merely from a lack of early spectroscopic coverage. Together, the relative light curve homogeneity and narrow spectral features suggest that the CSM consists of a spatially confined shell of helium surrounded by a less dense extended wind.

  19. X-ray Emission from Supernovae in Dense Circumstellar Matter Environments: a Search for Collisionless Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, E. O.; Fox, D.; Cenko, Stephen B.; Sullivan, M; Gnat, O.; Frail, D. A.; Horesh, A.; Corsi, A.; Quimby, R. M.; Gehrels, N.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P. E.; Yaron, O.; Fillippenko, A. V; Kasliwal, M. M.; Bildsten, L.; Bloom, J. S.; Poznanski, D.; Arcavi, I.; Laher, R. R.; Levitan, D.; Sesar, B.; Surace, J..

    2013-01-01

    The optical light curve of some supernovae (SNe) may be powered by the outward diffusion of the energy deposited by the explosion shock (the so-called shock breakout) in optically thick (Tau approx > 30) circumstellar matter (CSM). Recently, it was shown that the radiation-mediated and radiation-dominated shock in an optically thick wind must transform into a collisionless shock and can produce hard X-rays. The X-rays are expected to peak at late times, relative to maximum visible light. Here we report on a search, using Swift/XRT and Chandra, for X-ray emission from 28 SNe that belong to classes whose progenitors are suspected to be embedded in dense CSM. Our sample includes 19 Type IIn SNe, one Type Ibn SN, and eight hydrogen-poor superluminous SNe (SLSN-I such as SN 2005ap). Two SNe (SN 2006jc and SN 2010jl) have X-ray properties that are roughly consistent with the expectation for X-rays from a collisionless shock in optically thick CSM. However, the X-ray emission from SN 2006jc can also be explained as originating in an optically thin region. Thus, we propose that the optical light curve of SN 2010jl is powered by shock breakout in CSM. We suggest that two other events (SN 2010al and SN 2011ht) were too X-ray bright during the SN maximum optical light to be explained by the shock-breakout model.We conclude that the light curves of some, but not all, SNe IIn/Ibn are powered by shock breakout in CSM. For the rest of the SNe in our sample, including all of the SLSN-I events, our X-ray limits are not deep enough and were typically obtained too early (i.e., near the SN maximum light) for definitive conclusions about their nature. Late-time X-ray observations are required in order to further test whether these SNe are indeed embedded in dense CSM. We review the conditions required for a shock breakout in a wind profile. We argue that the timescale, relative to maximum light, for the SN to peak in X-rays is a probe of the column density and the density profile above

  20. The sloan digital sky survey-II supernova survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5° wide...... spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during...

  1. Photometric Identification of Young Stripped-Core Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Poznanski, Dovi; Maoz, Dan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Foley, Ryan J.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method designed to identify the spectral type of young (less than ~30 days after explosion) and nearby (z < ~0.05) supernovae (SNe) using their broad-band colors. In particular, we show that stripped-core SNe (i.e., hydrogen deficient core-collapse events, spectroscopically defined as SNe Ib and SNe Ic, including broad-lined SN 1998bw-like events) can be clearly distinguished from other types of SNe. Using the full census of nearby SNe discovered during the year 2002, we estimate...

  2. Supernova 2013by

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valenti, S.; Sand, D.; Stritzinger, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present multiband ultraviolet and optical light curves, as well as visual-wavelength and near-infrared spectroscopy of the Type II linear (IIL) supernova (SN) 2013by. We show that SN 2013by and other SNe IIL in the literature, after their linear decline phase that start after maximum, have...

  3. Ultraviolet diversity of Type Ia Supernovae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Pan, Yen-Chen; Brown, P.;

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) observations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) probe the outermost layers of the explosion, and UV spectra of SNe Ia are expected to be extremely sensitive to differences in progenitor composition and the details of the explosion. Here, we present the first study of a sample of high...

  4. Constraining dust and color variations of high-z SNe using NICMOS on Hubble Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Nobili, S; Aldering, G; Amanullah, R; Barbary, K; Burns, M S; Dawson, K S; Deustua, S E; Faccioli, L; Fruchter, A S; Goldhaber, G; Goobar, A; Hook, I; Howell, D A; Kim, A G; Knop, R A; Lidman, C; Meyers, J; Nugent, P E; Pain, R; Panagia, N; Perlmutter, S; Rubin, D; Spadafora, A L; Strovink, M; Suzuki, N; Swift, H

    2009-01-01

    We present data from the Supernova Cosmology Project for five high redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that were obtained using the NICMOS infrared camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. We add two SNe from this sample to a rest-frame I-band Hubble diagram, doubling the number of high redshift supernovae on this diagram. This I-band Hubble diagram is consistent with a flat universe (Omega_Matter, Omega_Lambda= 0.29, 0.71). A homogeneous distribution of large grain dust in the intergalactic medium (replenishing dust) is incompatible with the data and is excluded at the 5 sigma confidence level, if the SN host galaxy reddening is corrected assuming R_V=1.75. We use both optical and infrared observations to compare photometric properties of distant SNe Ia with those of nearby objects. We find generally good agreement with the expected color evolution for all SNe except the highest redshift SN in our sample (SN 1997ek at z=0.863) which shows a peculiar color behavior. We also present spectra obtained from ground ...

  5. BVRI Photometry of Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Wynn C. G.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Peng, Chien Y.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Leonard, Douglas C.; Matheson, Thomas; Treffers, Richard R.; Richmond, Michael W.

    2001-01-01

    We present optical photometry of one Type IIn supernova (1994Y) and nine Type Ia supernovae (1993Y, 1993Z, 1993ae, 1994B, 1994C, 1994M, 1994Q, 1994ae, and 1995D). SN 1993Y and SN 1993Z appear to be normal SN Ia events with similar rates of decline, but we do not have data near maximum brightness. The colors of SN 1994C suggest that it suffers from significant reddening or is intrinsically red. The light curves of SN 1994Y are complicated; they show a slow rise and gradual decline near maximum...

  6. Cosmology with Superluminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Scovacricchi, Dario; Bacon, David; Sullivan, Mark; Prajs, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    We predict cosmological constraints for forthcoming surveys using Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe) as standardisable candles. Due to their high peak luminosity, these events can be observed to high redshift (z~3), opening up new possibilities to probe the Universe in the deceleration epoch. We describe our methodology for creating mock Hubble diagrams for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), the "Search Using DECam for Superluminous Supernovae" (SUDSS) and a sample of SLSNe possible from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), exploring a range of standardisation values for SLSNe. We include uncertainties due to gravitational lensing and marginalise over possible uncertainties in the magnitude scale of the observations (e.g. uncertain absolute peak magnitude, calibration errors). We find that the addition of only ~100 SLSNe from SUDSS to 3800 Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from DES can improve the constraints on w and Omega_m by at least 20% (assuming a flat wCDM universe). Moreover, the combination of DES SNe Ia a...

  7. The radial distribution of SNe in nuclear starbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Illana, R.; Pérez-Torres, M. Á.; Alberdi, A.

    2012-10-01

    We have probed the radial distribution of supernovae and supernova remnants in the nuclear regions of the starburst galaxies M82, Arp 299-A, and Arp 220, by using high-angular resolution (≤ 0."1) radio observations. We derived scale-length values for the putative nuclear disks, which range from ~20-30 pc for Arp 299-A and Arp 220, up to ~140 pc for M82. The radial distribution of SNe for the nuclear disks in Arp 299-A and Arp 220 is also consistent with a power-law surface density profile of exponent γ = 1, as expected from detailed hydrodynamical simulations of nuclear disks. Our results give thus support to scenarios where a nuclear disk of size ~100 pc is formed in (U)LIRGs, and is sustained by gas pressure, in which case the accretion onto the black hole could be lowered due to supernova feedback. This study is detailed in Herrero-Illana et al. (2012). Database: ast

  8. Standardization of type Ia supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Coelho, Rodrigo C V; Reis, Ribamar R R; Siffert, Beatriz B

    2014-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been intensively investigated due to its great homogeneity and high luminosity, which make it possible to use them as standardizable candles for the determination of cosmological parameters. In 2011, the physics Nobel prize was awarded for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae. This is a pedagogical article, aimed at those starting their study of that subject, in which we dwell on some topics related to the analysis of SNe Ia and their use in luminosity distance estimators. Here we investigate their spectral properties and light curve standardization, paying careful attention to the fundamental quantities directly related to the SNe Ia observables. Finally, we describe our own step-by-step implementation of a classical light curve fi?tter, the stretch, applying it to real data from the Carnegie Supernova Project.

  9. Type Ia supernova rate studies from the SDSS-II Supernova Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilday, Benjamin [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The author presents new measurements of the type Ia SN rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. The SDSS-II Supernova Survey was carried out during the Fall months (Sept.-Nov.) of 2005-2007 and discovered ~ 500 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia with densely sampled (once every ~ 4 days), multi-color light curves. Additionally, the SDSS-II Supernova Survey has discovered several hundred SNe Ia candidates with well-measured light curves, but without spectroscopic confirmation of type. This total, achieved in 9 months of observing, represents ~ 15-20% of the total SNe Ia discovered worldwide since 1885. The author describes some technical details of the SN Survey observations and SN search algorithms that contributed to the extremely high-yield of discovered SNe and that are important as context for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey SN Ia rate measurements.

  10. The ultraviolet properties of supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peter J.

    2009-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) observations of supernovae (SNe) probe an important wavelength region where hot temperatures, extinction, and metallicity have strong effects. In addition, they provide a comparison set against which to compare and better understand rest frame UV observations of high redshift SNe observed in the optical. UV observations, however, are rare due to the need for telescopes above the atmosphere and the difficulty in observing transient objects with space based observatories. Limited observations with space based observatories, primarily the International Ultraviolet Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope, are reviewed, after which the Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on the Swift spacecraft is introduced. With Swift we have observed more SNe than all previous UV missions combined. Case studies of two individual SNe are first presented: SNe 2005am and 2005cs. SN 2005am is the first young SN observed with Swift, and the near-UV (uvw1: central wavelength ~ 2600 λ) light curve is consistent with the previous "template" derived from IUE and HST observations of SNe 1990N and 1992A. SN 2005cs is the first plateau-type II (IIP) with a well observed UV light curve. UVOT observations show a dramatic drop in the UV brightness and shift in the spectral energy distribution from blue to red caused by the dropping temperature and resulting line blanketing in the UV. These case studies demonstrate the information available from the UV data for individual SNe. A photometry method for proper accounting of coincidence loss, aperture corrections, and subtraction of the underlying galaxy is detailed. This method is then applied to a large sample of SNe observed with UVOT. We present 25 light curves and compare SNe by type and across types. The SNe Ia, with a few exceptions, are shown to have very similar light curves in the near UV, whereas, the three SNe Ib/c we have observed are very different. The SNe IIP all have rapidly fading UV light curves, though with

  11. THE LOW-REDSHIFT CARNEGIE SUPERNOVA PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Folatelli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the low-redshift Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP, an undergoing program to follow up about 250 nearby supernovae (SNe of all types. We brie y describe the observations which yield well-sampled, highly precise optical and near-infrared light curves in a well-understood photometric system, complemented with optical spectroscopy. As one of the main goals of the CSP, we preliminarily present the rst Hubble diagram using a sample of 30 Type-Ia SNe (SNe Ia.

  12. Type Iax Supernovae: A New Class of Stellar Explosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Challis, P. J.; Chornock, R.

    2013-01-01

    We describe observed properties of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe Iax), consisting of SNe observationally similar to its prototypical member, SN 2002cx. The class currently has 25 members, and we present optical photometry and/or optical spectroscopy for most of them. SNe Iax are spectrosc......We describe observed properties of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe Iax), consisting of SNe observationally similar to its prototypical member, SN 2002cx. The class currently has 25 members, and we present optical photometry and/or optical spectroscopy for most of them. SNe Iax...... are spectroscopically similar to SNe Ia, but have lower maximum-light velocities (2000 M_V,peak > -18.9 mag), and most have hot photospheres. Relative to SNe Ia, SNe Iax have low luminosities for their light-curve shape. There is a correlation between...... luminosity and light-curve shape, similar to that of SNe Ia, but offset from that of SNe Ia and with larger scatter. Despite a host-galaxy morphology distribution that is highly skewed to late-type galaxies without any SNe Iax discovered in elliptical galaxies, there are several indications...

  13. Models of interacting supernovae and their spectral diversity

    CERN Document Server

    Dessart, Luc; Audit, Edouard; Livne, Eli; Waldman, Roni

    2016-01-01

    Using radiation-hydrodynamics and radiative-transfer simulations, we explore the origin of the spectral diversity of interacting supernovae (SNe) of type IIn. We revisit SN1994W and investigate the dynamical configurations that can give rise to spectra with narrow lines at all times. We find that a standard ~10Msun 10^51erg SN ejecta ramming into a 0.4Msun dense CSM is inadequate for SN1994W, as it leads to the appearance of broad lines at late times. This structure, however, generates spectra that exhibit the key morphological changes seen in SN1998S. For SN1994W, we consider a completely different configuration, which involves the interaction at a large radius of a low mass inner shell with a high mass outer shell. Such a structure may arise in an 8-12Msun star from a nuclear flash (e.g., of Ne) followed within a few years by core collapse. Our simulations show that the large mass of the outer shell leads to the complete braking of the inner shell material, the formation of a slow dense shell, and the power...

  14. Massive stars exploding in a He-rich circumstellar medium - IV. Transitional Type Ibn supernovae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Brown, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    We present ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared data of the Type Ibn supernovae (SNe) 2010al and 2011hw. SN 2010al reaches an absolute magnitude at peak of M-R = -18.86 +/- 0.21. Its early light curve shows similarities with normal SNe Ib, with a rise to maximum slower than most SNe Ibn. The sp...

  15. The death of massive stars - I. Observational constraints on the progenitors of type II-P supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Smartt, S J; Crockett, R M; Maund, J R

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of a 10.5 yr, volume limited (28 Mpc) search for supernova (SN) progenitor stars. We compile all SNe discovered within this volume (132, of which 27% are type Ia) and determine the relative rates of each sub-type from literature studies : II-P (59%), Ib/c (29%), IIb (5%), IIn (4%) and II-L (3%). Twenty II-P SNe have high quality optical or near-IR pre-explosion images that allow a meaningful search for the progenitor stars. In four cases they are clearly red supergiants, one case is unconstrained, two fall on compact coeval star clusters and the other 13 have no progenitor detected. We review and update all the available data for the host galaxies (distance, metallicity and extinction) and determine masses and upper mass estimates using the STARS stellar evolutionary code and a single consistent homogeneous method. A maximum likelihood calculation suggests that the minimum stellar mass for a type II-P to form is m(min)=8.5 +1/-1.5 Msol and the maximum mass for II-P progenitors is m(max)...

  16. Galaxy Zoo Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, A M; Sullivan, M; Lintott, C J; Nugent, P E; Botyanszki, J; Kasliwal, M; Quimby, R; Bamford, S P; Fortson, L F; Schawinski, K; Hook, I; Blake, S; Podsiadlowski, P; Joensson, J; Gal-Yam, A; Arcavi, I; Howell, D A; Bloom, J S; Jacobsen, J; Kulkarni, S R; Law, N M; Ofek, E O; Walters, R

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the first results from a new citizen science project: Galaxy Zoo Supernovae. This proof of concept project uses members of the public to identify supernova candidates from the latest generation of wide-field imaging transient surveys. We describe the Galaxy Zoo Supernovae operations and scoring model, and demonstrate the effectiveness of this novel method using imaging data and transients from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We examine the results collected over the period April-July 2010, during which nearly 14,000 supernova candidates from PTF were classified by more than 2,500 individuals within a few hours of data collection. We compare the transients selected by the citizen scientists to those identified by experienced PTF scanners, and find the agreement to be remarkable - Galaxy Zoo Supernovae performs comparably to the PTF scanners, and identified as transients 93% of the ~130 spectroscopically confirmed SNe that PTF located during the trial period (with no false positive iden...

  17. Status on bidimensional dark energy parameterizations using SNe Ia JLA and BAO datasets

    CERN Document Server

    Escamilla-Rivera, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Using current observations forecast type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) Joint Lightcurve Analysis (JLA) binned and baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), in this paper we investigate six bidimensional dark energy parameterizations in order to explore which has more constraining power. Our results indicate that for Taylor series-like parameterizations at second order in redshift $z$, the tension ($\\sigma$-distance) between these data sets seems to be reduced and their behaviour are $<$1$\\sigma$ compatible with $\\Lambda$CDM.

  18. THE BIRTH RATE OF SNe Ia FROM HYBRID CONe WHITE DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xiangcun [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Podsiadlowski, Philipp, E-mail: xiangcunmeng@ynao.ac.cn [Department of Astronomy, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-10

    Considering the uncertainties of the C-burning rate (CBR) and the treatment of convective boundaries, Chen et al. found that there is a regime where it is possible to form hybrid CONe white dwarfs (WDs), i.e., ONe WDs with carbon-rich cores. As these hybrid WDs can be as massive as 1.30 M {sub ☉}, not much mass needs to be accreted for these objects to reach the Chandrasekhar limit and to explode as Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We have investigated their contribution to the overall SN Ia birth rate and found that such SNe Ia tend to be relatively young with typical time delays between 0.1 and 1 Gyr, where some may be as young as 30 Myr. SNe Ia from hybrid CONe WDs may contribute several percent to all SNe Ia, depending on the common-envelope ejection efficiency and the CBR. We suggest that these SNe Ia may produce part of the 2002cx-like SN Ia class.

  19. SNe Ia host galaxy properties from Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, Jonas; Pforr, Janine; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C; Smith, Mathew; Lampeitl, Hubert; Beifiori, Alessandra; Gupta, Ravi R; Schneider, Donald P

    2012-01-01

    We study the stellar populations of SNe Ia host galaxies using SDSS-II spectroscopy. We focus on the relationships of SNe Ia properties with stellar velocity dispersion and the stellar population parameters age, metallicity and element abundance ratios derived by fitting absorption line indices to stellar population models. We concentrate on a sub-sample of 84 SNe Ia from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. In agreement with previous findings, we find that SALT2 stretch factor values show the strongest dependence on stellar population age. Hence, SNe Ia peak-luminosity is closely related to the age of the stellar progenitor systems, where more luminous SNe Ia appear in younger stellar populations. We find no statistically significant trends in the Hubble residual with any of the stellar population parameters studied, including age and metallicity contrary to the literature, as well as with stellar velocity dispersion. Moreover, we find that the method of stellar mass derivation is affecting the Hubble residual-mass...

  20. The birth rate of SNe Ia from hybrid CONe white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Meng, Xiangcun

    2014-01-01

    Considering the uncertainties of the C-burning rate (CBR) and the treatment of convective boundaries, Chen et al. (2014) found that there is a regime where it is possible to form hybrid CONe white dwarfs (WDs), i.e. ONe WDs with carbon-rich cores. As these hybrid WDs can be as massive as 1.30 $M_{\\odot}$, not much mass needs to be accreted for these objects to reach the Chandrasekhar limit and to explode as Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We have investigated their contribution to the overall SN Ia birth rate and found that such SNe Ia tend to be relatively young with typical time delays between 0.1 and 1 Gyr, where some may be as young as 30 Myr. SNe Ia from hybrid CONe WDs may contribute several percent to all SNe Ia, depending on the common-envelope ejection efficiency and the CBR. We suggest that these SNe Ia may produce part of the 2002cx-like SN Ia class.

  1. Defining Photometric Peculiar Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Gaitan, S; Pignata, G; Forster, F; Gutierrez, C P; Bufano, F; Galbany, L; Folatelli, G; Phillips, M M; Hamuy, M; Anderson, J P; de Jaeger, T

    2014-01-01

    We present a new photometric identification technique for SN 1991bg-like type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), i.e. objects with light-curve characteristics such as later primary maxima and absence of secondary peak in redder filters. This method is capable of selecting out this sub-group from the normal type Ia population. Furthermore, we find that recently identified peculiar sub-types such as SNe Iax and super-Chandrasekhar SNe Ia have similar photometric characteristics as 91bg-like SNe Ia, namely the absence of secondary maxima and shoulders at longer wavelengths, and can also be classified with our technique. The similarity of these different SN Ia sub-groups perhaps suggests common physical conditions. This typing methodology permits the photometric identification of peculiar SNe Ia in large up-coming wide field surveys either to study them further or to obtain a pure sample of normal SNe Ia for cosmological studies.

  2. Defining photometric peculiar type Ia supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Gaitán, S.; Pignata, G.; Förster, F.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Bufano, F.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; De Jaeger, T. [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M. M. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Folatelli, G. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Kavli IPMU, WPI) (Japan); Anderson, J. P., E-mail: sgonzale@das.uchile.cl [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Casilla 19, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-11-10

    We present a new photometric identification technique for SN 1991bg-like type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), i.e., objects with light curve characteristics such as later primary maxima and the absence of a secondary peak in redder filters. This method is capable of selecting this sub-group from the normal type Ia population. Furthermore, we find that recently identified peculiar sub-types such as SNe Iax and super-Chandrasekhar SNe Ia have photometric characteristics similar to 91bg-like SNe Ia, namely, the absence of secondary maxima and shoulders at longer wavelengths, and can also be classified with our technique. The similarity of these different SN Ia sub-groups perhaps suggests common physical conditions. This typing methodology permits the photometric identification of peculiar SNe Ia in large upcoming wide-field surveys either to study them further or to obtain a pure sample of normal SNe Ia for cosmological studies.

  3. The Detection of a SN IIn in Optical Follow-Up Observations of IceCube Neutrino Events

    OpenAIRE

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K; Arguelles, C.; Grant, D.; Gretskov, P.; Groh, J. C.; Gross, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansmann, B.; Arlen, T. C.; Hanson, K.

    2015-01-01

    The IceCube neutrino observatory pursues a follow-up program selecting interesting neutrino events in real-time and issuing alerts for electromagnetic follow-up observations. In 2012 March, the most significant neutrino alert during the first three years of operation was issued by IceCube. In the follow-up observations performed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), a Type IIn supernova (SN IIn) PTF12csy was found 0.degrees 2 away from the neutrino alert direction, with an error radius of 0...

  4. Galaxy Zoo Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. M.; Lynn, S.; Sullivan, M.; Lintott, C. J.; Nugent, P. E.; Botyanszki, J.; Kasliwal, M.; Quimby, R.; Bamford, S. P.; Fortson, L. F.; Schawinski, K.; Hook, I.; Blake, S.; Podsiadlowski, P.; Jönsson, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Arcavi, I.; Howell, D. A.; Bloom, J. S.; Jacobsen, J.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Law, N. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Walters, R.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the first results from a new citizen science project: Galaxy Zoo Supernovae. This proof-of-concept project uses members of the public to identify supernova candidates from the latest generation of wide-field imaging transient surveys. We describe the Galaxy Zoo Supernovae operations and scoring model, and demonstrate the effectiveness of this novel method using imaging data and transients from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We examine the results collected over the period 2010 April-July, during which nearly 14 000 supernova candidates from the PTF were classified by more than 2500 individuals within a few hours of data collection. We compare the transients selected by the citizen scientists to those identified by experienced PTF scanners and find the agreement to be remarkable - Galaxy Zoo Supernovae performs comparably to the PTF scanners and identified as transients 93 per cent of the ˜130 spectroscopically confirmed supernovae (SNe) that the PTF located during the trial period (with no false positive identifications). Further analysis shows that only a small fraction of the lowest signal-to-noise ratio detections (r > 19.5) are given low scores: Galaxy Zoo Supernovae correctly identifies all SNe with ≥8σ detections in the PTF imaging data. The Galaxy Zoo Supernovae project has direct applicability to future transient searches, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, by both rapidly identifying candidate transient events and via the training and improvement of existing machine classifier algorithms. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 10 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo Supernovae project ().

  5. How supernovae launch galactic winds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Drummond; Quataert, Eliot; Martizzi, Davide; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2017-09-01

    We use idealized three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of global galactic discs to study the launching of galactic winds by supernovae (SNe). The simulations resolve the cooling radii of the majority of supernova remnants (SNRs) and thus self-consistently capture how SNe drive galactic winds. We find that SNe launch highly supersonic winds with properties that agree reasonably well with expectations from analytic models. The energy loading (η _E= \\dot{E}_wind/ \\dot{E}_SN) of the winds in our simulations are well converged with spatial resolution while the wind mass loading (η _M= \\dot{M}_wind/\\dot{M}_\\star) decreases with resolution at the resolutions we achieve. We present a simple analytic model based on the concept that SNRs with cooling radii greater than the local scaleheight break out of the disc and power the wind. This model successfully explains the dependence (or lack thereof) of ηE (and by extension ηM) on the gas surface density, star formation efficiency, disc radius and the clustering of SNe. The winds our simulations are weaker than expected in reality, likely due to the fact that we seed SNe preferentially at density peaks. Clustering SNe in time and space substantially increases the wind power.

  6. Supernovae and Gamma Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Della Valle

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Se revisa el estatus observacional de la conexi on Supernova (SN/Estallido de Rayos-Gamma (GRB. Recientes (y no tan recientes observaciones de GRBs largos sugieren que una fracci on signi cativa de ellos (pero no todos est an asociados con supernovas brillantes del tipo Ib/c. Estimaciones actuales de las tasas de producci on de GRBs y SNs dan una raz on para GRB/SNe-Ibc en el rango 0:4%

  7. Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Richard; Jha, Saurabh; Kuhlmann, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    We have publicly released a blinded mix of simulated SNe, with types (Ia, Ib, Ic, II) selected in proportion to their expected rate. The simulation is realized in the griz filters of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) with realistic observing conditions (sky noise, point spread function and atmospheric transparency) based on years of recorded conditions at the DES site. Simulations of non-Ia type SNe are based on spectroscopically confirmed light curves that include unpublished non-Ia samples donated from the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP), the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS), and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II). We challenge scientists to run their classification algorithms and report a type for each SN. A spectroscopically confirmed subset is provided for training. The goals of this challenge are to (1) learn the relative strengths and weaknesses of the different classification algorithms, (2) use the results to improve classification algorithms, and (3) understand what spectroscopically confirmed sub-...

  8. Nurseries of Supernovae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Teddy

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe) have long been the gold standard for precision cosmology and after several decades of intense research the supernova (SN) community was in 2011 honored by giving the Nobel Prize in physics for the discovery of Dark Energy to the leaders of the two big SN collaborations...... the gasphase metallicity, stellar mass and stellar age for this z = 1.55 host galaxy. I am also able to rule out the presence of any AGN though emission-line ratios. The host is classified as a highly star forming, low mass, low metallicity galaxy. It is a clear outlier in star formation and stellar mass...... compared to most low redshift (z 1) redshift SNe. This is mainly due to the change in specific star-formation rate as a function of redshift. This can potentially impact the use of high redshift SN Ia as standard candels...

  9. Progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Natures of progenitors of type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) have not yet been clarified. There has been long and intensive discussion on whether the so-called single degenerate (SD) scenario or the double degenerate (DD) scenario, or anything else, could explain a major population of SNe Ia, but the conclusion has not yet been reached. With rapidly increasing observational data and new theoretical ideas, the field of studying the SN Ia progenitors has been quickly developing, and various new insights have been obtained in recent years. This article aims at providing a summary of the current situation regarding the SN Ia progenitors, both in theory and observations. It seems difficult to explain the emerging diversity seen in observations of SNe Ia by a single population, and we emphasize that it is important to clarify links between different progenitor scenarios and different sub-classes of SNe Ia.

  10. Pre-supernova mass loss predictions for massive stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S. Vink; A. de Koter; R. Kotak

    2006-01-01

    Massive stars and supernovae (SNe) have a huge impact on their environment. Despite their importance, a comprehensive knowledge of which massive stars produce which SNe is hitherto lacking. We use a Monte Carlo method to predict the mass-loss rates of massive stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram

  11. Luminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2012-01-01

    Supernovae (SNe), the luminous explosions of stars, were observed since antiquity, with typical peak luminosity not exceeding 1.2x10^{43} erg/s (absolute magnitude >-19.5 mag). It is only in the last dozen years that numerous examples of SNe that are substantially super-luminous (>7x10^{43} erg/s; <-21 mag absolute) were well-documented. Reviewing the accumulated evidence, we define three broad classes of super-luminous SN events (SLSNe). Hydrogen-rich events (SLSN-II) radiate photons diffusing out from thick hydrogen layers where they have been deposited by strong shocks, and often show signs of interaction with circumstellar material. SLSN-R, a rare class of hydrogen-poor events, are powered by very large amounts of radioactive 56Ni and arguably result from explosions of very massive stars due to the pair instability. A third, distinct group of hydrogen-poor events emits photons from rapidly-expanding hydrogen-poor material distributed over large radii, and are not powered by radioactivity (SLSN-I). Thes...

  12. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA CARBON FOOTPRINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, R. C.; Nugent, P. [Computational Cosmology Center, Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 50B-4206, Berkeley, CA 94611 (United States); Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Childress, M.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Loken, S. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universite Paris Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M.; Paech, K. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); and others

    2011-12-10

    We present convincing evidence of unburned carbon at photospheric velocities in new observations of five Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained by the Nearby Supernova Factory. These SNe are identified by examining 346 spectra from 124 SNe obtained before +2.5 days relative to maximum. Detections are based on the presence of relatively strong C II {lambda}6580 absorption 'notches' in multiple spectra of each SN, aided by automated fitting with the SYNAPPS code. Four of the five SNe in question are otherwise spectroscopically unremarkable, with ions and ejection velocities typical of SNe Ia, but spectra of the fifth exhibit high-velocity (v > 20, 000 km s{sup -1}) Si II and Ca II features. On the other hand, the light curve properties are preferentially grouped, strongly suggesting a connection between carbon-positivity and broadband light curve/color behavior: three of the five have relatively narrow light curves but also blue colors and a fourth may be a dust-reddened member of this family. Accounting for signal to noise and phase, we estimate that 22{sup +10}{sub -6%} of SNe Ia exhibit spectroscopic C II signatures as late as -5 days with respect to maximum. We place these new objects in the context of previously recognized carbon-positive SNe Ia and consider reasonable scenarios seeking to explain a physical connection between light curve properties and the presence of photospheric carbon. We also examine the detailed evolution of the detected carbon signatures and the surrounding wavelength regions to shed light on the distribution of carbon in the ejecta. Our ability to reconstruct the C II {lambda}6580 feature in detail under the assumption of purely spherical symmetry casts doubt on a 'carbon blobs' hypothesis, but does not rule out all asymmetric models. A low volume filling factor for carbon, combined with line-of-sight effects, seems unlikely to explain the scarcity of detected carbon in SNe Ia by itself.

  13. Stripped-envelope supernova rates and host-galaxy properties

    CERN Document Server

    Graur, Or; Modjaz, Maryam; Maoz, Dan; Shivvers, Isaac; Filippenko, Alexei V; Li, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    The progenitors of stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe Ibc) remain to be conclsuively identified, but correlations between SN rates and host-galaxy properties can constrain progenitor models. Here, we present one result from a re-analysis of the rates from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search. Galaxies with stellar masses less than $\\sim 10^{10}~{\\rm M_\\odot}$ are less efficient at producing SNe Ibc than more massive galaxies. Any progenitor scenario must seek to explain this new observation.

  14. THE ENGINES BEHIND SUPERNOVAE AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRYER, CHRISTOPHER LEE [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-23

    The authors review the different engines behind supernova (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), focusing on those engines driving explosions in massive stars: core-collapse SNe and long-duration GRBs. Convection and rotation play important roles in the engines of both these explosions. They outline the basic physics and discuss the wide variety of ways scientists have proposed that this physics can affect the supernova explosion mechanism, concluding with a review of the current status in these fields.

  15. Discovery of the Dust-Enshrouded Progenitor of the Type IIn SN 2008S with Spitzer

    CERN Document Server

    Prieto, J L; Thompson, T A; Yuksel, H; Kochanek, C S; Stanek, K Z; Beacom, J F; Martini, P; Pasquali, A; Bechtold, J

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of the progenitor of the recent type IIn supernova 2008S in the nearby galaxy NGC 6946. Surprisingly, the progenitor was not found in deep, pre-supernova optical images of its host galaxy taken with the Large Binocular Telescope, but only through examination of archival Spitzer mid-IR data. A source coincident with the supernova position is clearly detected in the 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 micron IRAC bands, showing no evident variability in a three-year light curve leading up to the explosion, yet undetected at 3.6 and 24 micron. The distinct presence of ~440 K dust, along with stringent LBT limits on the optical fluxes, suggests that the progenitor of SN 2008S died in a shroud of its own dust. The inferred luminosity of 3.5x10^4 Lsun implies a modest progenitor mass of ~10 Msun. We conclude that type IIn supernovae need not always result from the death of very massive eta Carinae-like objects.

  16. A unified explanation for the supernova rate-galaxy mass dependency based on supernovae discovered in Sloan galaxy spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Graur, Or; Modjaz, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Using a method to discover and classify supernovae (SNe) in galaxy spectra, we detect 91 Type Ia SNe (SNe Ia) and 16 Type II SNe (SNe II) among ~740,000 galaxies of all types and ~215,000 star-forming galaxies without active galactic nuclei, respectively, in Data Release 9 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Of these SNe, 22 SNe Ia and 8 SNe II are new discoveries reported here for the first time. We use our SN samples to measure SN rates per unit mass as a function of galaxy stellar mass, star-formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (sSFR), as derived by the MPA-JHU Galspec pipeline. We confirm the rate-mass correlations, first discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search, for both SNe Ia and SNe II at median redshifts of ~0.1 and ~0.075, respectively. The mass-normalized SN Ia and SN II rates, averaged over all masses and redshifts in their respective galaxy samples, are 0.10 +/- 0.01 (stat) +/- 0.01 (sys) X 10^-12 Msol^-1 yr^-1 and 0.52 +0.16 -0.13 (stat) +0.02 -0.05 (sys) X 10^-12 Msol^-1 yr^-1, respec...

  17. Nearby Supernova Rates from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search. I. The Methods and Database

    CERN Document Server

    Leaman, Jesse; Chornock, Ryan; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2010-01-01

    This is the first paper of a series in which we present new measurements of the observed rates of supernovae (SNe) in the local Universe, determined from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS). We have obtained 2.3 million observations of 14,882 sample galaxies over an interval of 11 years (March 1998 through Dec. 2008). We considered 1036 SNe detected in our sample and used an optimal subsample of 726 SNe (274 SNe~Ia, 116 SNe~Ibc, 324 SNe~II) to determine our SN rates. This is the largest and most homogeneous set of nearby SNe ever assembled for this purpose, and ours is the first local SN rate analysis based on CCD imaging and modern image-subtraction techniques. In this paper, we lay the foundation of the study. We derive the recipe for the control-time calculation for SNe with a known luminosity function, and provide details on the construction of the galaxy and SN samples used in the calculations. Compared with a complete volume-limited galaxy sample, our sample has a deficit of low-luminosity gala...

  18. Spectroscopy of Type Ia Supernovae by the Carnegie Supernova Project

    CERN Document Server

    Folatelli, Gastón; Phillips, Mark M; Hsiao, Eric; Campillay, Abdo; Contreras, Carlos; Castellón, Sergio; Hamuy, Mario; Krzeminski, Wojtek; Roth, Miguel; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Burns, Christopher R; Freedman, Wendy L; Madore, Barry F; Murphy, David; Persson, S E; Prieto, José L; Suntzeff, Nicholas B; Krisciunas, Kevin; Anderson, Joseph P; Förster, Francisco; Maza, José; Pignata, Giuliano; Rojas, P Andrea; Boldt, Luis; Salgado, Francisco; Wyatt, Pamela; E., Felipe Olivares; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Sako, Masao

    2013-01-01

    This is the first release of optical spectroscopic data of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project including 604 previously unpublished spectra of 93 SNe Ia. The observations cover a range of phases from 12 days before to over 150 days after the time of B-band maximum light. With the addition of 228 near-maximum spectra from the literature we study the diversity among SNe Ia in a quantitative manner. For that purpose, spectroscopic parameters are employed such as expansion velocities from spectral line blueshifts, and pseudo-equivalent widths (pW). The values of those parameters at maximum light are obtained for 78 objects, thus providing a characterization of SNe Ia that may help to improve our understanding of the properties of the exploding systems and the thermonuclear flame propagation. Two objects, namely SNe 2005M and 2006is, stand out from the sample by showing peculiar Si II and S II velocities but otherwise standard velocities for the rest of the ions. We further s...

  19. Multi-layered Spectral Formation in SNe Ia Around Maximum Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongard, Sebastien; Baron, E.; Smadja, G.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2008-09-02

    We use the radiative transfer code \\phx\\ to study the line formation of the wavelength region 5000-7000 Angstrom. This is the region where the SNe Ia defining Si II feature occurs. This region is important since the ratio of the two nearby silicon lines has been shown to correlate with the absolute blue magnitude. We use a grid of LTE synthetic spectral models to investigate the formation of line features in the spectra of SNe Ia. By isolating the main contributors to the spectral formation we show that the ions that drive the spectral ratio are FeIII, FeII, SiII and SII. While the first two strongly dominate the flux transfer, the latter two form in the same physical region inside of the supernova. We also show that the naive blackbody that one would derive from a fit to the observed spectrum is far different than the true underlying continuum.

  20. The Nature of Gamma Ray Burst Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Cano, Zach

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are among the brightest and most energetic physical processes in the universe. It is known that core-collapse SNe arise from the gravitational collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars (the progen- itors of nearby core-collapse SNe have been imaged and unambiguously identified). It is also believed that the progenitors of long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs) are massive stars, mainly due to the occurrence and detection of very energetic core-collap...

  1. Type Ia Supernova Carbon Footprints

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, R C; Aragon, C; Antilogus, P; Bailey, S; Baltay, C; Bongard, S; Buton, C; Canto, A; Childress, M; Chotard, N; Copin, Y; Fakhouri, H K; Gangler, E; Hsiao, E Y; Kerschhaggl, M; Kowalski, M; Loken, S; Nugent, P; Paech, K; Pain, R; Pecontal, E; Pereira, R; Perlmutter, S; Rabinowitz, D; Rigault, M; Rubin, D; Runge, K; Scalzo, R; Smadja, G; Tao, C; Weaver, B A; Wu, C; Brown, P J; Milne, P A

    2011-01-01

    We present convincing evidence of unburned carbon at photospheric velocities in new observations of 5 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained by the Nearby Supernova Factory. These SNe are identified by examining 346 spectra from 124 SNe obtained before +2.5 d relative to maximum. Detections are based on the presence of relatively strong C II 6580 absorption "notches" in multiple spectra of each SN, aided by automated fitting with the SYNAPPS code. Four of the 5 SNe in question are otherwise spectroscopically unremarkable, with ions and ejection velocities typical of SNe Ia, but spectra of the fifth exhibits high-velocity (v > 20,000 km/s) Si II and Ca II features. On the other hand, the light curve properties are preferentially grouped, strongly suggesting a connection between carbon-positivity and broad band light curve/color behavior: Three of the 5 have relatively narrow light curves but also blue colors, and a fourth may be a dust-reddened member of this family. Accounting for signal-to-noise and phase, we ...

  2. Endurance of SN 2005ip after a decade: X-rays, radio and Hα like SN 1988Z require long-lived pre-supernova mass-loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan; Kilpatrick, Charles D.; Mauerhan, Jon C.; Andrews, Jennifer E.; Margutti, Raffaella; Fong, Wen-Fai; Graham, Melissa L.; Zheng, WeiKang; Kelly, Patrick L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fox, Ori D.

    2017-04-01

    Supernova (SN) 2005ip was a Type IIn event notable for its sustained strong interaction with circumstellar material (CSM), coronal emission lines and infrared (IR) excess, interpreted as shock interaction with the very dense and clumpy wind of an extreme red supergiant. We present a series of late-time spectra of SN 2005ip and a first radio detection of this SN, plus late-time X-rays, all of which indicate that its CSM interaction is still strong a decade post-explosion. We also present and discuss new spectra of geriatric SNe with continued CSM interaction: SN 1988Z, SN 1993J and SN 1998S. From 3 to 10 yr post-explosion, SN 2005ip's Hα luminosity and other observed characteristics were nearly identical to those of the radio-luminous SN 1988Z, and much more luminous than SNe 1993J and 1998S. At 10 yr after explosion, SN 2005ip showed a drop in Hα luminosity, followed by a quick resurgence over several months. We interpret this Hα variability as ejecta crashing into a dense shell located ≲ 0.05 pc from the star, which may be the same shell that caused the IR echo at earlier epochs. The extreme Hα luminosities in SN 2005ip and SN 1988Z are still dominated by the forward shock at 10 yr post-explosion, whereas SN 1993J and SN 1998S are dominated by the reverse shock at a similar age. Continuous strong CSM interaction in SNe 2005ip and 1988Z is indicative of enhanced mass-loss for ∼103 yr before core collapse, longer than Ne, O or Si burning phases. Instead, the episodic mass-loss must extend back through C burning and perhaps even part of He burning.

  3. Testing SNe Ia distance measurement methods with SN 2011fe

    CERN Document Server

    Vinko, J; Takats, K; Marion, G H; Hegedus, T; Biro, I B; Borkovits, T; Szegedi-Elek, E; Farkas, A; Klagyivik, P; Kiss, L L; Kovacs, T; Pal, A; Szakats, R; Szalai, N; Szalai, T; Szatmary, K; Szing, A; Vida, K; Wheeler, J C

    2012-01-01

    The nearby, bright, almost completely unreddened Type Ia supernova 2011fe in M101 provides a unique opportunity to test both the precision and the accuracy of the extragalactic distances derived from SNe Ia light curve fitters. We apply the current, public versions of the independent light curve fitting codes MLCS2k2 and SALT2 to compute the true distance modulus of SN 2011fe from high-precision, multi-color (BVRI) light curves. The results from the two fitting codes confirm that 2011fe is a "normal" (not peculiar) and only slightly reddened SN Ia. New unreddened distance moduli are derived as 29.21 +/- 0.07 mag (D \\sim 6.95 +/- 0.23 Mpc, MLCS2k2), and 29.05 +/- 0.07 mag (6.46 +/- 0.21 Mpc, SALT2). Despite the very good fitting quality achieved with both light curve fitters, the resulting distance moduli are inconsistent by 2 sigma. However, both are marginally consistent (at \\sim 1 sigma) with the HST Key Project distance modulus for M101. The SALT2 distance is in good agreement with the recently revised Cep...

  4. Continuous Dust Formation in SNe 2010jl and 2011ja

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafton, Kelsie; Clayton, Geoffrey; Andrews, Jennifer; Barlow, Michael; De Looze, Ilse

    2016-08-01

    Studies in the last 10 years of dust formation in core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) have found only small amounts, ~0.001 solar masses. This is far less than the amount needed to account for the large masses of dust seen in some high redshift galaxies. However, the recent discovery of ~1 solar mass of cold dust in the ejecta of SN 1987A has has caused a complete re-evaluation of dust formation in CCSNe. It has been suggested that the CCSNe are continuously forming dust so that by the time they are about 25 years old they will have dust masses similar to SN 1987A. However, there is a wide time gap between the CCSNe that have been studied recently and SN 1987A. We plan to use the sensitivity of Spitzer to detect dust emission from CCSNe 5 or more years after explosion. Radiative transfer models will be used to estimate the dust masses. This proposal is to continue our study of two interesting SNe 2010jl and 2011ja. These observations are part of a long term study requiring multiple epochs of Spitzer observations to look for evidence of continuous dust formation. These observations will help shed light on the mystery of dust in SN 1987A.

  5. Photometric selection of high-redshift type Ia supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, M; Perrett, K; Nugent, P; Astier, Pierre; Aubourg, E; Balam, D; Basa, S; Carlberg, R; Conley, A; Fabbro, S; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hook, I; Lafoux, H; Neill, J D; Pain, R; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pritchet, C; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Taillet, R; Aldering, G; Baumont, S; Bronder, J; Filiol, M; Knop, R; Perlmutter, S; Tao, C

    2005-01-01

    We present a method for selecting high-redshift type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) located via rolling SN searches. The technique, using both color and magnitude information of events from only 2-3 epochs of multi-band real-time photometry, is able to discriminate between SNe Ia and core collapse SNe. Furthermore, for the SNe Ia, the method accurately predicts the redshift, phase and light-curve parameterization of these events based only on pre-maximum-light data. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique on a simulated survey of SNe Ia and core-collapse SNe, where the selection method effectively rejects most core-collapse SNe while retaining SNe Ia. We also apply the selection code to real-time data acquired as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). During the period May 2004 to January 2005 in the SNLS, 440 SN candidates were discovered of which 70 were confirmed spectroscopically as SNe Ia and 15 as core-collapse events. For this test dataset, the selection technique ...

  6. Supernovae and their host galaxies - IV. The distribution of supernovae relative to spiral arms

    CERN Document Server

    Aramyan, L S; Petrosian, A R; de Lapparent, V; Bertin, E; Mamon, G A; Kunth, D; Nazaryan, T A; Adibekyan, V; Turatto, M

    2016-01-01

    Using a sample of 215 supernovae (SNe), we analyze their positions relative to the spiral arms of their host galaxies, distinguishing grand-design (GD) spirals from non-GD (NGD) galaxies. We find that: (1) in GD galaxies, an offset exists between the positions of Ia and core-collapse (CC) SNe relative to the peaks of arms, while in NGD galaxies the positions show no such shifts; (2) in GD galaxies, the positions of CC SNe relative to the peaks of arms are correlated with the radial distance from the galaxy nucleus. Inside (outside) the corotation radius, CC SNe are found closer to the inner (outer) edge. No such correlation is observed for SNe in NGD galaxies nor for SNe Ia in either galaxy class; (3) in GD galaxies, SNe Ibc occur closer to the leading edges of the arms than do SNe II, while in NGD galaxies they are more concentrated towards the peaks of arms. In both samples of hosts, the distributions of SNe Ia relative to the arms have broader wings. These observations suggest that shocks in spiral arms of...

  7. Bright but slow - Type II supernovae from OGLE-IV - Implications for magnitude limited surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Poznanski, Dovi; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Zuzanna; Wyrzykowski, Lukasz; Blagorodnova, Nadejda

    2015-01-01

    We study a sample of 11 Type II supernovae (SNe) discovered by the OGLE-IV survey. All objects have well sampled I-band light curves, and at least one spectrum. We find that 2 or 3 of the 11 SNe have a declining light curve, and spectra consistent with other SNe II-L, while the rest have plateaus that can be as short as 70d, unlike the 100d typically found in nearby galaxies. The OGLE SNe are also brighter, and show that magnitude limited surveys find SNe that are different than usually found...

  8. Search for VHE Gamma-Ray Emission from Young SNe with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Lennarz, D

    2013-01-01

    Supernova (SN) remnants are a well motivated candidate for the acceleration sites of cosmic rays with energies up to the knee (10^15 eV). It has been suggested that also young SNe (~10 GeV) gamma-ray radiation. The H.E.S.S. imaging air Cherenkov telescope array is an instrument sensitive to such radiation. In this contribution, the pointing directions of the H.E.S.S. telescopes are compared to a recently published, extragalactic SN catalogue to identify coincidental observations. The results of the data analysis are discussed.

  9. Enhanced momentum feedback from clustered supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Eric S.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Dekel, Avishai; Madau, Piero

    2017-02-01

    Young stars typically form in star clusters, so the supernovae (SNe) they produce are clustered in space and time. This clustering of SNe may alter the momentum per SN deposited in the interstellar medium (ISM) by affecting the local ISM density, which in turn affects the cooling rate. We study the effect of multiple SNe using idealized 1D hydrodynamic simulations which explore a large parameter space of the number of SNe, and the background gas density and metallicity. The results are provided as a table and an analytic fitting formula. We find that for clusters with up to ˜100 SNe, the asymptotic momentum scales superlinearly with the number of SNe, resulting in a momentum per SN which can be an order of magnitude larger than for a single SN, with a maximum efficiency for clusters with 10-100 SNe. We argue that additional physical processes not included in our simulations - self-gravity, breakout from a galactic disc, and galactic shear - can slightly reduce the momentum enhancement from clustering, but the average momentum per SN still remains a factor of 4 larger than the isolated SN value when averaged over a realistic cluster mass function for a star-forming galaxy. We conclude with a discussion of the possible role of mixing between hot and cold gas, induced by multidimensional instabilities or pre-existing density variations, as a limiting factor in the build-up of momentum by clustered SNe, and suggest future numerical experiments to explore these effects.

  10. Asphericity in supernova explosions from late-time spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Keiichi; Kawabata, Koji; Mazzali, Paolo A; Tanaka, Masaomi; Valenti, Stefano; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Hattori, Takashi; Deng, Jinsong; Pian, Elena; Taubenberger, Stefan; Iye, Masanori; Matheson, Thomas; Filippenko, Alexei V; Aoki, Kentaro; Kosugi, George; Ohyama, Youichi; Sasaki, Toshiyuki; Takata, Tadafumi

    2008-02-29

    Core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) are the explosions that announce the death of massive stars. Some CC-SNe are linked to long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and are highly aspherical. One important question is to what extent asphericity is common to all CC-SNe. Here we present late-time spectra for a number of CC-SNe from stripped-envelope stars and use them to explore any asphericity generated in the inner part of the exploding star, near the site of collapse. A range of oxygen emission-line profiles is observed, including a high incidence of double-peaked profiles, a distinct signature of an aspherical explosion. Our results suggest that all CC-SNe from stripped-envelope stars are aspherical explosions and that SNe accompanied by GRBs exhibit the highest degree of asphericity.

  11. TWO SNe Ia AT REDSHIFT ∼2: IMPROVED CLASSIFICATION AND REDSHIFT DETERMINATION WITH MEDIUM-BAND INFRARED IMAGING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodney, Steven A.; Riess, Adam G.; Jones, David O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Scolnic, Daniel M. [Department of Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Molino, Alberto [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), E-18080 Granada (Spain); McCully, Curtis [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Casertano, Stefano [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Graur, Or [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Hayden, Brian, E-mail: srodney@sc.edu [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    We present two supernovae (SNe) discovered with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey, an HST multi-cycle treasury program. We classify both objects as SNe Ia and find redshifts of z = 1.80 ± 0.02 and 2.26{sup +0.02}{sub −0.10}, the latter of which is the highest redshift SN Ia yet seen. Using light curve fitting we determine luminosity distances and find that both objects are consistent with a standard ΛCDM cosmological model. These SNe were observed using the HST Wide Field Camera 3 infrared detector, with imaging in both wide- and medium-band filters. We demonstrate that the classification and redshift estimates are significantly improved by the inclusion of single-epoch medium-band observations. This medium-band imaging approximates a very low resolution spectrum (λ/Δλ ≲ 100) which can isolate broad spectral absorption features that differentiate SNe Ia from their most common core collapse cousins. This medium-band method is also insensitive to dust extinction and (unlike grism spectroscopy) it is not affected by contamination from the SN host galaxy or other nearby sources. As such, it can provide a more efficient—though less precise—alternative to IR spectroscopy for high-z SNe.

  12. Asiago spectroscopic classification of two SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; OAPd, M. Turatto (INAF

    2016-09-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of two transients. The targets are supplied by the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNOvae (ASAS-SN) and the TNS (https://wis-tns.weizmann.ac.il).

  13. Asiago spectroscopic classification of 2 SNe candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Tomasella, L.; Turatto, M.; Terreran, G.

    2017-01-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of SN 2017lf and SN 2017ms. The targets were supplied by the Tsinghua-NAOC Transient Survey (TNTS) and the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS).

  14. ON THE DEPENDENCE OF TYPE Ia SNe LUMINOSITIES ON THE METALLICITY OF THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Raya, Manuel E.; Mollá, Mercedes [Dpto.de Investigación Básica, C.I.E.M.A.T., Avda. Complutense 40, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); López-Sánchez, Ángel R. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Galbany, Lluís [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics MAS, Nuncio Monseñor Sótero Sanz 100, Providencia, 7500011 Santiago (Chile); Vílchez, José Manuel [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Apdo. 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Rosell, Aurelio Carnero [Observatório Nacional, and LIneA Laboratório Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia, Rua Gal. José Cristino 77 Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20921-400 (Brazil); Domínguez, Inmaculada, E-mail: manuelemilio.moreno@ciemat.es [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2016-02-10

    The metallicity of the progenitor system producing a type Ia supernova (SN Ia) could play a role in its maximum luminosity, as suggested by theoretical predictions. We present an observational study to investigate if such a relationship exists. Using the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) we have obtained intermediate-resolution spectroscopy data of a sample of 28 local galaxies hosting SNe Ia, for which distances have been derived using methods independent of those based on SN Ia parameters. From the emission lines observed in their optical spectra, we derived the gas-phase oxygen abundance in the region where each SN Ia exploded. Our data show a trend, with an 80% of chance not being due to random fluctuation, between SNe Ia absolute magnitudes and the oxygen abundances of the host galaxies, in the sense that luminosities tend to be higher for galaxies with lower metallicities. This result seems likely to be in agreement with both the theoretically expected behavior and with other observational results. This dependence M{sub B}–Z might induce systematic errors when it is not considered when deriving SNe Ia luminosities and then using them to derive cosmological distances.

  15. Rapidly Rising Transients in the Supernova - Superluminous Supernova Gap

    CERN Document Server

    Arcavi, Iair; Howell, D Andrew; Bildsten, Lars; Leloudas, Giorgos; Hardin, Delphine; Prajs, Szymon; Perley, Daniel A; Svirski, Gilad; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Katz, Boaz; McCully, Curtis; Cenko, S Bradley; Lidman, Chris; Sullivan, Mark; Valenti, Stefano; Astier, Pierre; Balland, Cristophe; Carlberg, Ray G; Conley, Alex; Fouchez, Dominique; Guy, Julien; Pain, Reynald; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris J; Regnault, Nicolas; Rich, James; Ruhlmann-Kleider, Vanina

    2015-01-01

    We present observations of four rapidly rising (t_{rise}~10d) transients with peak luminosities between those of supernovae (SNe) and superluminous SNe (M_{peak}~-20) - one discovered and followed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and three by the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). The light curves resemble those of SN 2011kl, recently shown to be associated with an ultra-long-duration gamma ray burst (GRB), though no GRB was seen to accompany our SNe. The rapid rise to a luminous peak places these events in a unique part of SN phase space, challenging standard SN emission mechanisms. Spectra of the PTF event formally classify it as a Type II SN due to broad Halpha emission, but an unusual absorption feature, which can be interpreted as either high velocity Halpha (though deeper than in previously known cases) or Si II (as seen in Type Ia SNe), is also observed. We find that existing models of white dwarf detonations, CSM interaction, shock breakout in a wind (or steeper CSM) and magnetar spindown can not r...

  16. TYPE Iax SUPERNOVAE: A NEW CLASS OF STELLAR EXPLOSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Challis, P. J.; Chornock, R.; Marion, G. H.; Kirshner, R. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ganeshalingam, M.; Li, W.; Silverman, J. M.; Filippenko, A. V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Morrell, N. I.; Phillips, M. M. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, La Serena (Chile); Pignata, G. [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Stritzinger, M. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Wang, X. [Physics Department and Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Anderson, J. P.; Hamuy, M. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Freedman, W. L.; Persson, S. E. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Jha, S. W.; McCully, C., E-mail: rfoley@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); and others

    2013-04-10

    We describe observed properties of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe Iax), consisting of SNe observationally similar to its prototypical member, SN 2002cx. The class currently has 25 members, and we present optical photometry and/or optical spectroscopy for most of them. SNe Iax are spectroscopically similar to SNe Ia, but have lower maximum-light velocities (2000 {approx}< |v| {approx}< 8000 km s{sup -1}), typically lower peak magnitudes (-14.2 {>=} M{sub V,{sub peak}} {approx}> -18.9 mag), and most have hot photospheres. Relative to SNe Ia, SNe Iax have low luminosities for their light-curve shape. There is a correlation between luminosity and light-curve shape, similar to that of SNe Ia, but offset from that of SNe Ia and with larger scatter. Despite a host-galaxy morphology distribution that is highly skewed to late-type galaxies without any SNe Iax discovered in elliptical galaxies, there are several indications that the progenitor stars are white dwarfs (WDs): evidence of C/O burning in their maximum-light spectra, low (typically {approx}0.5 M{sub Sun }) ejecta masses, strong Fe lines in their late-time spectra, a lack of X-ray detections, and deep limits on massive stars and star formation at the SN sites. However, two SNe Iax show strong He lines in their spectra. The progenitor system and explosion model that best fits all of the data is a binary system of a C/O WD that accretes matter from a He star and has a deflagration. At least some of the time, this explosion will not disrupt the WD. The small number of SNe in this class prohibit a detailed analysis of the homogeneity and heterogeneity of the entire class. We estimate that in a given volume there are 31{sup +17}{sub -13} SNe Iax for every 100 SNe Ia, and for every 1 M{sub Sun} of iron generated by SNe Ia at z = 0, SNe Iax generate {approx}0.036 M{sub Sun }. Being the largest class of peculiar SNe, thousands of SNe Iax will be discovered by LSST. Future detailed observations of SNe Iax should

  17. Subaru FOCAS Spectroscopic Observations of High-Redshift Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Lidman, Christopher; Doi, Mamoru; Yasuda, Naoki; Aldering, Greg; Amanullah, Rahman; Barbary, Kyle; Dawson, Kyle; Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Fakhouri, Hannah K; Goldhaber, Gerson; Goobar, Ariel; Hattori, Takashi; Hayano, Junji; Hook, Isobel M; Howell, D Andrew; Furusawa, Hisanori; Ihara, Yutaka; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Knop, Rob A; Konishi, Kohki; Meyers, Joshua; Oda, Takeshi; Pain, Reynald; Perlmutter, Saul; Rubin, David; Spadafora, Anthony L; Suzuki, Nao; Takanashi, Naohiro; Totani, Tomonori; Utsunomiya, Hiroyuki; Wang, Lifan

    2009-01-01

    We present spectra of high-redshift supernovae (SNe) that were taken with the Subaru low resolution optical spectrograph, FOCAS. These SNe were found in SN surveys with Suprime-Cam on Subaru, the CFH12k camera on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These SN surveys specifically targeted z>1 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). From the spectra of 39 candidates, we obtain redshifts for 32 candidates and spectroscopically identify 7 active candidates as probable SNe Ia, including one at z=1.35, which is the most distant SN Ia to be spectroscopically confirmed with a ground-based telescope. An additional 4 candidates are identified as likely SNe Ia from the spectrophotometric properties of their host galaxies. Seven candidates are not SNe Ia, either being SNe of another type or active galactic nuclei. When SNe Ia are observed within a week of maximum light, we find that we can spectroscopically identify most of them up to z=1.1. Beyond...

  18. Cosmology with superluminous supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scovacricchi, D.; Nichol, R. C.; Bacon, D.; Sullivan, M.; Prajs, S.

    2016-02-01

    We predict cosmological constraints for forthcoming surveys using superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) as standardizable candles. Due to their high peak luminosity, these events can be observed to high redshift (z ˜ 3), opening up new possibilities to probe the Universe in the deceleration epoch. We describe our methodology for creating mock Hubble diagrams for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), the `Search Using DECam for Superluminous Supernovae' (SUDSS) and a sample of SLSNe possible from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), exploring a range of standardization values for SLSNe. We include uncertainties due to gravitational lensing and marginalize over possible uncertainties in the magnitude scale of the observations (e.g. uncertain absolute peak magnitude, calibration errors). We find that the addition of only ≃100 SLSNe from SUDSS to 3800 Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from DES can improve the constraints on w and Ωm by at least 20 per cent (assuming a flat wCDM universe). Moreover, the combination of DES SNe Ia and 10 000 LSST-like SLSNe can measure Ωm and w to 2 and 4 per cent, respectively. The real power of SLSNe becomes evident when we consider possible temporal variations in w(a), giving possible uncertainties of only 2, 5 and 14 per cent on Ωm, w0 and wa, respectively, from the combination of DES SNe Ia, LSST-like SLSNe and Planck. These errors are competitive with predicted Euclid constraints, indicating a future role for SLSNe for probing the high-redshift Universe.

  19. Supernova Acceleration Probe: Studying Dark Energy with Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J; Allam, S; Althouse, W E; Amanullah, R; Annis, J; Astier, Pierre; Aumeunier, M; Bailey, S; Baltay, C; Barrelet, E; Basa, S; Bebek, C; Bergström, L; Bernstein, G; Bester, M; Besuner, B; Bigelow, B; Blandford, R; Bohlin, R; Bonissent, A; Bower, C; Brown, M; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Cole, D; Commins, Eugene D; Craig, W; Davis, T; Dawson, K; Day, C; De Harveng, M; De Jongh, F; Deustua, S; Diehl, H; Dobson, T; Dodelson, S; Ealet, A; Ellis, R; Emmet, W; Figer, D; Fouchez, D; Frerking, M; Frieman, J A; Fruchter, A; Gerdes, D; Gladney, L; Goldhaber, G; Goobar, A; Groom, D; Heetderks, H; Hoff, M; Holland, S; Huffer, M; Hui, L; Huterer, D; Jain, B; Jelinsky, P; Juramy, C; Karcher, A; Kent, S; Kahn, S; Kim, A; Kolbe, W; Krieger, B; Kushner, G; Kuznetsova, N; Lafever, R; Lamoureux, J; Lampton, M; Lefèvre, O; Lebrun, V; Levi, M; Limon, P; Lin, H; Linder, E; Loken, S; Lorenzon, W; Malina, R; Marian, L; Marriner, J P; Marshall, P; Massey, R; Mazure, A; McGinnis, B; McKay, T; McKee, S; Miquel, R; Mobasher, B; Morgan, N; Mortsell, E; Mostek, N; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Nakajima, R; Nugent, P; Olus, H; Pain, R; Palaio, N; Pankow, D; Peoples, John; Perlmutter, S; Peterson, D; Prieto, E; Rabinowitz, D; Réfrégier, A; Rhodes, J; Roe, N; Rusin, D; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Seiffert, M; Sholl, M; Shukla, H; Smadja, G; Smith, R M; Smoot, George F; Snyder, J; Spadafora, A; Stabenau, F; Stebbins, A; Stoughton, C; Szymkowiak, A; Tarle, G; Taylor, K; Tilquin, A; Tomasch, A; Tucker, D; Vincent, D; Von der Lippe, H; Walder, J P; Wang, G; Weinstein, A; Wester, W; White, M

    2005-01-01

    The Supernova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will use Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as distance indicators to measure the effect of dark energy on the expansion history of the Universe. (SNAP's weak-lensing program is described in a companion White Paper.) The experiment exploits supernova distance measurements up to their fundamental systematic limit; strict requirements on the monitoring of each supernova's properties lead to the need for a space-based mission. Results from pre-SNAP experiments, which characterize fundamental SN Ia properties, will be used to optimize the SNAP observing strategy to yield data, which minimize both systematic and statistical uncertainties. SNAP has achieved technological readiness and the collaboration is poised to begin construction.

  20. Type Ia Supernova Progenitors, Environmental Effects and Cosmic Supernova Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Nomoto, K; Hachisu, I; Kato, M; Kobayashi, C; Tsujimoto, T; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Umeda, Hideyuki; Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Tsujimoto, Takuji

    1999-01-01

    Relatively uniform light curves and spectral evolution of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have led to the use of SNe Ia as a ``standard candle'' to determine cosmological parameters, such as the Hubble constant, the density parameter, and the cosmological constant. Whether a statistically significant value of the cosmological constant can be obtained depends on whether the peak luminosities of SNe Ia are sufficiently free from the effects of cosmic and galactic evolutions. Here we first review the single degenerate scenario for the Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf (WD) models of SNe Ia. We identify the progenitor's evolution and population with two channels: (1) the WD+RG (red-giant) and (2) the WD+MS (near main-sequence He-rich star) channels. In these channels, the strong wind from accreting white dwarfs plays a key role, which yields important age and metallicity effects on the evolution. We then address the questions whether the nature of SNe Ia depends systematically on environmental properties such as metalli...

  1. Supernovae under microscope: how supernovae overlap to form superbubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Yadav, Naveen; Sharma, Prateek; Nath, Biman B

    2016-01-01

    We explore the formation of superbubbles through energy deposition by multiple supernovae (SNe) in a uniform medium. We use total energy conserving, 3-D hydrodynamic simulations to study how SNe correlated in space and time create superbubbles. While isolated SNe fizzle out completely by $\\sim 1$ Myr due to radiative losses, for a realistic cluster size it is likely that subsequent SNe go off within the hot/dilute bubble and sustain the shock till the cluster lifetime. We scan the parameter space of ISM density ($n_{g0}$), number of SNe ($N_{\\rm OB}$), and star cluster radius ($r_{\\rm cl}$) to study the conditions for the formation of an overpressured (super)bubble. For realistic cluster sizes, we find that the bubble remains overpressured only if, for a given $n_{g0}$, $N_{\\rm OB}$ is sufficiently large. While most of the input energy is still lost radiatively, superbubbles can retain up to $\\sim 5-10\\%$ of the input energy in form of kinetic+thermal energy till 10 Myr for ISM density $n_{g0} \\approx 1$ cm$^...

  2. Supernova 2013fc in a circumnuclear ring of a luminous infrared galaxy: the big brother of SN 1998S

    CERN Document Server

    Kangas, T; Kankare, E; Lundqvist, P; Väisänen, P; Childress, M; Pignata, G; McCully, C; Valenti, S; Vinko, J; Pastorello, A; Elias-Rosa, N; Fraser, M; Gal-Yam, A; Kotak, R; Kotilainen, J; Smartt, S J; Galbany, L; Harmanen, J; Howell, D A; Inserra, C; Marion, G H; Quimby, R M; Silverman, J M; Szalai, T; Wheeler, C J; Ashall, C; Benetti, S; Romero-Cañizales, C; Smith, K W; Sullivan, M; Takáts, K; Young, D R

    2015-01-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN 2013fc, a bright type II supernova (SN) in a circumnuclear star-forming ring in the luminous infrared galaxy ESO 154-G010, observed as part of the Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey of Transient Objects (PESSTO). SN 2013fc is both photometrically and spectroscopically similar to the well-studied type IIn SN 1998S and to the bright type II-L SN 1979C. It exhibits an initial linear decline after maximum, followed by a short plateau phase and a tail phase with a decline too fast for $^{56}$Co decay with full gamma-ray trapping. Initially the spectrum was blue and featureless. Later on, a strong broad ($\\sim 8000$ km s$^{-1}$) H$\\alpha$ emission profile became prominent. We apply a Starlight stellar population model fit to the SN location (observed when the SN had faded) to estimate both a high extinction of $A_V = 2.9 \\pm 0.2$ mag and an age of $10_{-2}^{+3}$ Myr for the underlying cluster. We compare the SN to SNe 1998S and 1979C and discuss its possible ...

  3. The multi-faceted Type II-L supernova 2014G from pre-maximum to nebular phase

    CERN Document Server

    Terreran, G; Benetti, S; Smartt, S J; Ochner, P; Tomasella, L; Howell, D A; Morales-Garoffolo, A; Harutyunyan, A; Kankare, E; Arcavi, I; Cappellaro, E; Elias-Rosa, N; Hosseinzadeh, G; Kangas, T; Pastorello, A; Tartaglia, L; Turatto, M; Valenti, S; Wiggins, P; Yuan, F

    2016-01-01

    We present multi-band ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry, along with visual-wavelength spectroscopy, of supernova (SN) 2014G in the nearby galaxy NGC 3448 (25 Mpc). The early-phase spectra show strong emission lines of the high ionisation species He II/N IV/C IV during the first 2-3 d after explosion, traces of a metal-rich CSM probably due to pre-explosion mass loss events. These disappear by day 9 and the spectral evolution then continues matching that of normal Type II SNe. The post-maximum light curve declines at a rate typical of Type II-L class. The extensive photometric coverage tracks the drop from the photospheric stage and constrains the radioactive tail, with a steeper decline rate than that expected from the $^{56}$Co decay if $\\gamma$-rays are fully trapped by the ejecta. We report the appearance of an unusual feature on the blue-side of H$\\alpha$ after 100 d, which evolves to appear as a flat spectral feature linking H$\\alpha$ and the O I doublet. This may be due to interaction o...

  4. Type II Supernovae as Probes of Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Poznanski, Dovi; Blondin, Stephane; Bloom, Joshua S; D'Andrea, Christopher B; Della Valle, Massimo; Dessart, Luc; Ellis, Richard S; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Goobar, Ariel; Hamuy, Mario; Hicken, Malcolm; Kasen, Daniel N; Krisciunas, Kevin L; Leonard, Douglas C; Li, Weidong; Livio, Mario; Marion, Howie; Matheson, Thomas; Neill, James D; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Nugent, Peter E; Quimby, Robert; Sako, Masao; Sullivan, Mark; Thomas, Rollin C; Turatto, Massimo; Van Dyk, Schuyler D; Wood-Vasey, W Michael

    2009-01-01

    - Constraining the cosmological parameters and understanding Dark Energy have tremendous implications for the nature of the Universe and its physical laws. - The pervasive limit of systematic uncertainties reached by cosmography based on Cepheids and Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) warrants a search for complementary approaches. - Type II SNe have been shown to offer such a path. Their distances can be well constrained by luminosity-based or geometric methods. Competing, complementary, and concerted efforts are underway, to explore and exploit those objects that are extremely well matched to next generation facilities. Spectroscopic follow-up will be enabled by space- based and 20-40 meter class telescopes. - Some systematic uncertainties of Type II SNe, such as reddening by dust and metallicity effects, are bound to be different from those of SNe Ia. Their stellar progenitors are known, promising better leverage on cosmic evolution. In addition, their rate - which closely tracks the ongoing star formation rate -...

  5. The circumstellar material around SN IIn 1997eg Another detection of Very Narrow P Cygni profile

    CERN Document Server

    Salamanca, I M; Tenorio-Tagle, G

    2002-01-01

    We report the detection of a very narrow P Cygni profile on top of the broad emission Ha and Hb lines of the Type IIn Supernova 1997eg. A similar feature has been detected in SN 1997ab (Salamanca et al. 1998), SN 1998S (Meikle & Geballe 1998, Fassia et al. 2001) and SN 1995G (Filippenko & Schlegel 1995). The detection of the narrow P Cygni profile indicates the existence of a dense circumstellar material (CSM) into which the ejecta of the supernova is expanding. From the analysis of the spectra of SN 1997eg we deduce (a) that such CSM is very dense (n ~ 5x10^7 cm^-3), (b) that has a low expanding velocity of about 160 \\kms. The origin of such dense CSM can be either a very dense progenitor wind (dotM ~ 10^-2 solar masses per year) or a circumstellar shell product of the progenitor wind expanding into a high pressure environment.

  6. Dust around Type Ia supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lifan

    2005-10-20

    An explanation is given of the low value of R lambda triple bond A lambda/E(B - V), the ratio of absolute to selective extinction deduced from Type Ia supernova observations. The idea involves scattering by dust clouds located in the circumstellar environment, or at the highest velocity shells of the supernova ejecta. The scattered light tends to reduce the effective R lambda in the optical, but has an opposite effect in the ultraviolet. The presence of circumstellar dust can be tested by ultraviolet to near infrared observations and by multi-epoch spectropolarimetry of SNe Ia.

  7. Enhanced Momentum Feedback from Clustered Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gentry, Eric S; Dekel, Avishai; Madau, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Massive stars are typically in star clusters and live short lives, so the supernovae (SNe) they produce are clustered in space and time. Since the amount of momentum that SNe can deliver to the interstellar medium depends on how their outflowing remnants make the transition from adiabatic to radiative, this clustering may alter the momentum budget per SN, an effect we systematically explore over a large parameter space. We perform a parameter study of 1D hydrodynamic simulations, varying the number of SNe, and the background gas metallicity and density. For a few SNe, we find that the asymptotic momentum scales superlinearly with the number of SNe. As a result, the asymptotic momentum per SN can be an order of magnitude greater than that delivered by isolated SNe, with a maximum efficiency occurring for clusters that produce ~10-100 SNe. Adequately capturing this effect in simulations requires very high resolution to avoid over-cooling (a typical resolution for our simulations is 0.3 pc). We show that inadequ...

  8. The impact of bulges on the radial distribution of supernovae in disc galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hakobyan, A A; Barkhudaryan, L V; Mamon, G A; Kunth, D; Petrosian, A R; Adibekyan, V; Aramyan, L S; Turatto, M

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the impact of bulges on the radial distributions of the different types of supernovae (SNe) in the stellar discs of host galaxies with various morphologies. We find that in Sa-Sm galaxies, all core-collapse (CC) and vast majority of SNe Ia belong to the disc, rather than the bulge component. The radial distribution of SNe Ia in S0-S0/a galaxies is inconsistent with their distribution in Sa-Sm hosts, which is probably due to the contribution of the outer bulge SNe Ia in S0-S0/a galaxies. The radial distributions of both types of SNe are similar in all the subsamples of Sa-Sbc and Sc-Sm galaxies. These results confirm that the old bulges of Sa-Sm galaxies are not significant producers of Type Ia SNe, while the bulge populations are significant for SNe Ia only in S0-S0/a galaxies.

  9. SNE's methodological basis - web-based software in entrepreneurial surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning

    This overhead based paper gives an introduction to the research methodology applied in the surveys carried out in the SNE-project.......This overhead based paper gives an introduction to the research methodology applied in the surveys carried out in the SNE-project....

  10. Optical and Infrared photometry of the type IIn SN 1998S Days 11-146

    CERN Document Server

    Fassia, A; Vacca, W D; Kemp, S N; Walton, N A; Pollacco, D L; Smartt, S J; Oscoz, A; Aragón-Salamanca, A; Bennett, S; Hawarden, T G; Alonso, A; Alcalde, D; Pedrosa, A; Telting, J H; Arevalo, M J; Deeg, H J; Garzón, F; Gómez-Roldán, A; Gómez, G; Gutíerrez, C; López, S; Rozas, M; Serra-Ricart, M; Zapatero-Osorio, M R

    2000-01-01

    We present contemporaneous optical and infrared photometric observations of the type IIn SN 1998S covering the period between 11 and 146 days after discovery. The infrared data constitute the first ever infrared light curves of a type IIn supernova. We use blackbody and spline fits to the photometry to examine the luminosity evolution. During the first 2--3 months, the luminosity is dominated by the release of shock-deposited energy in the ejecta. After $\\sim$100 days the luminosity is powered mostly by the deposition of radioactive decay energy from 0.15$\\pm$0.05 M$_{\\odot}$ of $^{56}$Ni which was produced in the explosion. We also report the discovery of an astonishingly high infrared (IR) excess, $K-L'=2.5$, that was present at day 130. We interpret this as being due to thermal emission from dust grains in the vicinity of the supernova. We argue that to produce such a high IR luminosity so soon after the explosion, the dust must be {\\it pre-existing} and so is located in the circumstellar medium of the pro...

  11. The Candidate Progenitor of the Type IIn SN 2010jl is Not an Optically Luminous Star

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Ori D; Dwek, Eli; Smith, Nathan; Filippenko, Alexei V; Andrews, Jennifer; Arendt, Richard G; Foley, Ryan J; Kelly, Patrick L; Miller, Adam A; Shivvers, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    The nature of the progenitor star (or system) for the Type IIn supernova (SN) subclass remains uncertain. While there are direct imaging constraints on the progenitors of at least four Type IIn supernovae, one of them being SN 2010jl, ambiguities remain in the interpretation of the unstable progenitors and the explosive events themselves. A blue source in pre-explosion HST/WFPC2 images falls within the 5 sigma astrometric error circle derived from post-explosion ground-based imaging of SN 2010jl. At the time the ground-based astrometry was published, however, the SN had not faded sufficiently for post-explosion HST follow-up observations to determine a more precise astrometric solution and/or confirm if the pre-explosion source had disappeared, both of which are necessary to ultimately disentangle the possible progenitor scenarios. Here we present HST/WFC3 imaging of the SN 2010jl field obtained in 2014 and 2015, when the SN had faded sufficiently to allow for new constraints on the progenitor. The SN, which ...

  12. SALT2: using distant supernovae to improve the use of Type Ia supernovae as distance indicators

    CERN Document Server

    Guy, J; Baumont, S; Hardin, D; Pain, R; Regnault, N; Basa, S; Carlberg, R G; Conley, A; Fabbro, S; Fouchez, D; Hook, I M; Howell, D A; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C J; Rich, J; Sullivan, M; Antilogus, P; Aubourg, E; Bazin, G; Bronder, J; Filiol, M; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Ripoche, P; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V

    2007-01-01

    We present an empirical model of Type Ia supernovae spectro-photometric evolution with time. The model is built using a large data set including light-curves and spectra of both nearby and distant supernovae, the latter being observed by the SNLS collaboration. We derive the average spectral sequence of Type Ia supernovae and their main variability components including a color variation law. The model allows us to measure distance moduli in the spectral range 2500-8000 A with calculable uncertainties, including those arising from variability of spectral features. Thanks to the use of high-redshift SNe to model the rest-frame UV spectral energy distribution, we are able to derive improved distance estimates for SNe Ia in the redshift range 0.8supernovae.

  13. ON THE RATES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IN DWARF AND GIANT HOSTS WITH ROTSE-IIIb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quimby, Robert M. [Kavli IPMU, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Yuan Fang [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Akerlof, Carl [Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wheeler, J. Craig [Department of Astronomy, McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Warren, Michael S. [Theoretical Division, Mail Stop B227, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    We present a sample of 23 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that were discovered in the background of galaxy clusters targeted by ROTSE-IIIb and use up to 18 of these to determine the local (z-bar 0.05) volumetric rate. Since our survey is flux limited and thus biased against fainter objects, the pseudo-absolute magnitude distribution (pAMD) of SNe Ia in a given volume is an important concern, especially the relative frequency of high- to low-luminosity SNe Ia. We find that the pAMD derived from the volume-limited Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) sample is incompatible with the distribution of SNe Ia in a volume-limited (z < 0.12) sub-sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II). The LOSS sample requires far more low-luminosity SNe Ia than the SDSS-II can accommodate. Even though LOSS and SDSS-II have sampled different SNe Ia populations, their volumetric rates are surprisingly similar. Using the same model pAMD adopted in the SDSS-II SNe Ia rate calculation and excluding two high-luminosity SNe Ia from our sample, we derive a rate that is marginally higher than previous low-redshift determinations. With our full sample and the LOSS pAMD, our rate is more than double the canonical value. We also find that 5 of our 18 SNe Ia are hosted by very low luminosity (M{sub B} > -16) galaxies, whereas only 1 out of 79 nearby SDSS-II SNe Ia have such faint hosts. It is possible that previous works have undercounted either low-luminosity SNe Ia, SNe Ia in low-luminosity hosts, or peculiar SNe Ia (sometimes explicitly), and the total SNe Ia rate may be higher than the canonical value.

  14. Nearby Supernova Rates from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search. II. The Observed Luminosity Functions and Fractions of Supernovae in a Complete Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Weidong; Chornock, Ryan; Filippenko, Alexei V; Poznanski, Dovi; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Modjaz, Maryam; Jha, Saurabh; Foley, Ryan J; Smith, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    This is the second paper of a series in which we present new measurements of the observed rates of supernovae (SNe) in the local Universe, determined from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS). In this paper, a complete SN sample is constructed, and the observed (uncorrected for host-galaxy extinction) luminosity functions (LFs) of SNe are derived. These LFs solve two issues that have plagued previous rate calculations for nearby SNe: the luminosity distribution of SNe and the host-galaxy extinction. We select a volume-limited sample of 175 SNe, collect photometry for every object, and fit a family of light curves to constrain the peak magnitudes and light-curve shapes. The volume-limited LFs show that they are not well represented by a Gaussian distribution. There are notable differences in the LFs for galaxies of different Hubble types (especially for SNe Ia). We derive the observed fractions for the different subclasses in a complete SN sample, and find significant fractions of SNe II-L (10%), IIb (...

  15. The diversity of Type Ia Supernovae: evidence for systematics?

    CERN Document Server

    Benetti, S; Mazzali, P A; Turatto, M; Altavilla, G; Bufano, F; Elias-Rosa, N; Kotak, R; Pignata, G; Salvo, M; Stanishev, V

    2004-01-01

    The photometric and spectroscopic properties of 26 well observed Type Ia Supernovae (SNeIa) were analyzed with the aim to explore SNIa diversity. The sample includes (Branch-)normal SNe as well as extreme events like SNe 1991T and 1991bg, while the truly peculiar SNIa, SN2000cx and SN2002cx are not included in our sample . A statistical treatment reveals the existence of three different groups. The first group (FAINT) consists of faint SNeIa similar to SN1991bg, with low expansion velocities and rapid evolution of SiII velocity. A second group consists of ``normal'' SNeIa, also with high temporal velocity gradient (HVG), but with brighter mean absolute magnitude =-19.3 and higher expansion velocities than the FAINT SNe. The third group includes both ``normal'' and SN1991T-like SNeIa: these SNe populate a narrow strip in the SiII velocity evolution plot, with a small velocity gradient (SVG), but have absolute magnitudes similar to HVGs. While the FAINT and HVG SNeIa together seem to define a relation between R...

  16. Type Iax Supernovae: A New Class of Stellar Explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, Ryan J; Chornock, R; Ganeshalingam, M; Li, W; Marion, G H; Morrell, N I; Pignata, G; Stritzinger, M D; Silverman, J M; Wang, X; Anderson, J P; Filippenko, A V; Freedman, W L; Hamuy, M; Jha, S W; Kirshner, R P; McCully, C; Persson, S E; Phillips, M M; Reichart, D E; Soderberg, A M

    2012-01-01

    We describe observed properties of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe Iax), consisting of SNe observationally similar to its prototypical member, SN 2002cx. The class currently has 25 members, and we present optical photometry and/or optical spectroscopy for most of them. SNe Iax are spectroscopically similar to SNe Ia, but have lower maximum-light velocities (2000 M_V,peak > -18.9 mag), and most have hot photospheres. Relative to SNe Ia, SNe Iax have low luminosities for their light-curve shape. There is a correlation between luminosity and light-curve shape, similar to that of SNe Ia, but offset from that of SNe Ia and with larger scatter. Despite a host-galaxy morphology distribution that is highly skewed to late-type galaxies without any SNe Iax discovered in elliptical galaxies, there are several indications that the progenitor stars are white dwarfs (WDs): evidence of C/O burning in their maximum-light spectra, low ejecta masses, strong Fe lines in their late-time spectra, a lack of X-ray detections...

  17. Ultraviolet Light Curves of Supernovae with Swift Uvot

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Peter J; Immler, Stefan; Milne, Peter; Roming, Peter W A; Gehrels, Neil; Nousek, John; Panagia, Nino; Still, Martin; Berk, Daniel Vanden

    2008-01-01

    We present ultravioliet (UV) observations of supernovae (SNe) obtained with the UltraViolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift spacecraft. This is the largest sample of UV light curves from any single instrument and covers all major SN types and most subtypes. The UV light curves of SNe Ia are fairly homogenous while SNe Ib/c and IIP show more variety in their light curve shapes. The UV-optical colors clearly differentiate SNe Ia and IIP, particularly at early times. The color evolution of SNe IIP, however, makes their colors similar to SNe Ia at about 20 days after explosion. SNe Ib/c are shown to have varied UV-optical colors. The use of UV colors to help type SNe will be important for high redshift SNe discovered in optical observations. These data can be added to ground based optical and near infrared data to create bolometric light curves of individual objects and as checks on generic bolometric corrections used in the absence of UV data. This sample can also be compared with rest-frame UV obser...

  18. Collective supernova neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirizzi, Alessandro [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Neutrinos emitted by core-collapse supernovae (SNe) represent an important laboratory for both particle physics and astrophysics. While propagating in the dense SN environment, they can feel not only the presence of background matter (via ordinary Mikheev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects) but also of the gas of neutrinos and antineutrinos (via neutrino-neutrino interaction effects). The neutrino-neutrino interactions appear to modify the flavor evolution of SN neutrinos in a collective way, completely different from the ordinary matter effects. In these conditions, the flavor evolution equations become highly nonlinear, sometimes resulting in surprising phenomena when the entire neutrino system oscillates coherently as a single collective mode. In this talk, I present the recent results on collective supernova neutrino flavor conversions and I discuss about the sensitivity of these effects to the ordering of the neutrino mass spectrum.

  19. Measurements of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift z < ~0.3 from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Dilday, Benjamin; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Filippenko, Alexei V; Frieman, Joshua A; Galbany, Lluis; Garnavich, Peter M; Goobar, Ariel; Hopp, Ulrich; Ihara, Yutaka; Jha, Saurabh W; Kessler, Richard; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Molla, Mercedes; Nichol, Robert C; Nordin, Jakob; Riess, Adam G; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Wheeler, J Craig; Ostman, Linda; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Dan; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The adopted sample of supernovae (SNe) includes 516 SNe Ia at redshift z \\lesssim 0.3, of which 270 (52%) are spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The remaining 246 SNe Ia were identified through their light curves; 113 of these objects have spectroscopic redshifts from spectra of their host galaxy, and 133 have photometric redshifts estimated from the SN light curves. Based on consideration of 87 spectroscopically confirmed non-Ia SNe discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey, we estimate that 2.04+1.61-0.95 % of the photometric SNe Ia may be misidentified. The sample of SNe Ia used in this measurement represents an order of magnitude increase in the statistics for SN Ia rate measurements in the redshift range covered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. If we assume a SN Ia rate that is constant at low redshift (z < 0.15), then the SN observations can be used t...

  20. Spectroscopic confirmation of high-redshift supernovae with the ESO VLT

    CERN Document Server

    Lidman, C E; Folatelli, G; Garavini, G; Nobili, S; Aldering, G; Amanullah, R; Antilogus, P; Astier, Pierre; Blanc, G; Burns, M S; Conley, A; Deustua, S E; Doi, M; Ellis, R; Fabbro, S; Fadeev, V; Gibbons, R; Goldhaber, G; Goobar, A; Groom, D E; Hook, I; Kashikawa, N; Kim, A G; Knop, R A; Lee Byung Cheol; Méndez, J; Morokuma, T; Motohara, K; Nugent, P; Pain, R; Perlmutter, S; Prasad, V; Quimby, R; Raux, J; Regnault, N; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Sainton, G; Schaefer, B E; Schahmaneche, K; Smith, E; Spadafora, A L; Stanishev, V; Walton, N A; Wang, L; Wood-Vasey, W M; Yasuda, N

    2004-01-01

    We present VLT FORS1 and FORS2 spectra of 39 candidate high-redshift supernovae that were discovered as part of a cosmological study using Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) over a wide range of redshifts. From the spectra alone, 20 candidates are spectrally classified as SNe Ia with redshifts ranging from z=0.212 to z=1.181. Of the remaining 19 candidates, 1 might be a Type II supernova and 11 exhibit broad supernova-like spectral features and/or have supernova-like light curves. The candidates were discovered in 8 separate ground-based searches. In those searches in which SNe Ia at z ~ 0.5 were targeted, over 80% of the observed candidates were spectrally classified as SNe Ia. In those searches in which SNe Ia with z > 1 were targeted, 4 candidates with z > 1 were spectrally classified as SNe Ia and later followed with ground and space based observatories. We present the spectra of all candidates, including those that could not be spectrally classified as supernova.

  1. The Beijing Astronomical Observatory supernova survey (Ⅱ)——Results in 1996

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李卫东; 裘予雷; 乔琪源; 胡景耀; 李启斌

    1999-01-01

    Six supernovae (SNe) discovered in 1996 by the Beijing Astronomical Observatory Supernova (SN) Survey (BAOSS) are reported. SN 1996W, the first supernova discovered by the survey, has been monitored photometrically and spectroscopically for a long time. The spectra and photometry showed that it was a typical type Ⅱ-P supernova. SN 1996cb, the sixth SN discovered in 1996 and a peculiar one like SN 1993J, has also been observed intensively for a long time.

  2. The Effect of AGN and SNe Feedback on Star Formation,Reionization and the Near Infrared Background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Feedback from supernovae (SNe) and from active galactic nuclei (AGN) accom-panies the history of star formation and galaxy evolution. We present an analytic model to explain how and when the SNe and AGN exert their feedback effects on the star formation and galaxy evolution processes. By using SNe and AGN kinetic feedback mechanisms based on the Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) model, we explore how these feedback mecha-nisms affect the star formation history (SFH), the Near-Infrared Background (NIRB) flux and the cosmological reionization. We find the values of the feedback strengths, ∈AGN =1.0+0.50.3and ∈SN=0.04+0.02-0.02, can provide a reasonable explanation of most of the observational re-suits, and that the AGN feedback effect on star formation history is quite different from the SNe feedback at high redshifts. Our conclusions manifest quantitatively that these feedback effects decrease star formation rate density (SFRD) and the NIRB flux (in 1.4 - 4.0μm), and postpone the time of completion of the cosmological reionization.

  3. Radiation-hydrodynamical modelling of underluminous Type II plateau supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Spiro, S.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Manicò, G.; Turatto, M.

    2017-01-01

    With the aim of improving our knowledge about the nature of the progenitors of low-luminosity Type II plateau supernovae (LL SNe IIP), we made radiation-hydrodynamical models of the well-sampled LL SNe IIP 2003Z, 2008bk and 2009md. For these three SNe, we infer explosion energies of 0.16-0.18 foe, radii at explosion of 1.8-3.5 × 1013 cm and ejected masses of 10-11.3 M⊙. The estimated progenitor mass on the main sequence is in the range ˜13.2-15.1 M⊙ for SN 2003Z and ˜11.4-12.9 M⊙ for SNe 2008bk and 2009md, in agreement with estimates from observations of the progenitors. These results together with those for other LL SNe IIP modelled in the same way enable us also to conduct a comparative study on this SN sub-group. The results suggest that (a) the progenitors of faint SNe IIP are slightly less massive and have less energetic explosions than those of intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP; (b) both faint and intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP originate from low-energy explosions of red (or yellow) supergiant stars of low to intermediate mass; (c) some faint objects may also be explained as electron-capture SNe from massive super-asymptotic giant branch stars; and (d) LL SNe IIP form the underluminous tail of the SNe IIP family, where the main parameter `guiding' the distribution seems to be the ratio of the total explosion energy to the ejected mass. Further hydrodynamical studies should be performed and compared to a more extended sample of LL SNe IIP before drawing any conclusion on the relevance of fall-back to this class of events.

  4. Quantitative comparison between Type Ia supernova spectra at low and high redshifts: A case study

    CERN Document Server

    Garavini, G; Nobili, S; Aldering, G; Amanullah, R; Antilogus, P; Astier, Pierre; Blanc, G; Bronder, J; Burns, M S; Conley, A; Deustua, S E; Doi, M; Fabbro, S; Fadeev, V; Gibbons, R; Goldhaber, G; Goobar, A; Groom, D E; Hook, I; Howell, D A; Kashikawa, N; Kim, A G; Kowalski, M; Kuznetsova, N; Lee, B C; Lidman, C; Méndez, J; Morokuma, T; Motohara, K; Nugent, P; Pain, R; Perlmutter, S; Quimby, R; Raux, J; Regnault, N; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Sainton, G; Schahmaneche, K; Smith, E; Spadafora, A L; Stanishev, V; Thomas, R C; Walton, N A; Wang, L; Wood-Vasey, W M; Project, N Y T S C

    2007-01-01

    We develop a method to measure the strength of the absorption features in Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) spectra and use it to make a quantitative comparison between the spectra of Type Ia supernovae at low and high redshifts. In this case study, we apply the method to 12 high-redshift (0.212 < z < 0.912) SNe Ia observed by the Supernova Cosmology Project . Through measurements of the strengths of these features and of the blueshift of the absorption minimum in Ca II H&K, we show that the spectra of the high-redshift SNe Ia are quantitatively similar to spectra of nearby SNe Ia (z < 0.15). One supernova in our high redshift sample, SN 2002fd at z=0.279, is found to have spectral characteristics that are associated with peculiar SN 1991T/SN 1999aa-like supernovae.

  5. Quantitative comparison between Type Ia supernova spectra at low and high redshifts: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supernova Cosmology Project; Nugent, Peter E; Garavini, G.; Folatelli, G.; Nobili, S.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Antilogus, P.; Astier, P.; Blanc, G.; Bronder, J.; Burns, M.S.; Conley, A.; Deustua, S. E.; Doi, M.; Fabbro, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D. E.; Hook, I.; Howell, D. A.; Kashikawa, N.; Kim, A. G.; Kowalski, M.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lee, B. C.; Lidman, C.; Mendez, J.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Nugent, P. E.; Pain, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Quimby, R.; Raux, J.; Regnault, N.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Sainton, G.; Schahmaneche, K.; Smith, E.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stanishev, V.; Thomas, R. C.; Walton, N. A.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yasuda, N.

    2008-03-24

    We develop a method to measure the strength of the absorption features in type Ia supernova (SN Ia) spectra and use it to make a quantitative comparisons between the spectra of type Ia supernovae at low and high redshifts. In this case study, we apply the method to 12 high-redshift (0.212 = z = 0.912) SNe Ia observed by the Supernova Cosmology Project. Through measurements of the strengths of these features and of the blueshift of theabsorption minimum in Ca ii H&K, we show that the spectra of the high-redshift SNe Ia are quantitatively similar to spectra of nearby SNe Ia (z< 0.15). One supernova in our high redshift sample, SN 2002fd at z = 0.279, is found to have spectral characteristics that are associated with peculiar SN 1991T/SN 1999aa-like supernovae.

  6. Near-Infrared Properties of Type Ia Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M. M.

    2012-02-01

    The photometric properties of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the near-infrared as garnered from observations made over the last 30 years are reviewed. During this period, light curves for more than 120 nearby SNe Ia have been published, revealing considerable homogeneity but also some fascinating differences. These data have confirmed that, for all but the fastest declining objects, SNe Ia are essentially perfect standard candles in the near-infrared, displaying only a slight dependence of peak luminosity on decline rate and color.

  7. Analytical Expressions For Light-curves of Supernovae Type Ia

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo

    2013-01-01

    A simple analytical model is used to derive the main properties of supernovae type Ia (SNe Ia), which are produced by the thermonuclear explosion of accreting C-O white dwarfs that cross the Chandrasekhar mass limit. The few underlying physical assumptions of the model yield analytical expressions that reproduce quite well the observed bolometric light-curves of SNe Ia and the empirical brighter-slower and brighter-bluer relationships that were used to standardize SNe Ia for their use as distance indicators, which led to the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe.

  8. IMPROVING COSMOLOGICAL DISTANCE MEASUREMENTS USING TWIN TYPE IA SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhouri, H. K.; Boone, K.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Fagrelius, P. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Fleury, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucléaire et des Hautes Énergies, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Université Paris Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Barbary, K. [Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, 366 LeConte Hall MC 7300, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Baugh, D.; Chen, J. [Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Buton, C.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y. [Université de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Childress, M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Feindt, U. [Institut fur Physik, Humboldt-Universitat zu Berlin, Newtonstrasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Fouchez, D. [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3, 163 avenue de Luminy—Case 902—F-13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Gangler, E. [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Collaboration: Nearby Supernova Factory; and others

    2015-12-10

    We introduce a method for identifying “twin” Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and using them to improve distance measurements. This novel approach to SN Ia standardization is made possible by spectrophotometric time series observations from the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory). We begin with a well-measured set of SNe, find pairs whose spectra match well across the entire optical window, and then test whether this leads to a smaller dispersion in their absolute brightnesses. This analysis is completed in a blinded fashion, ensuring that decisions made in implementing the method do not inadvertently bias the result. We find that pairs of SNe with more closely matched spectra indeed have reduced brightness dispersion. We are able to standardize this initial set of SNfactory SNe to 0.083 ± 0.012 mag, implying a dispersion of 0.072 ± 0.010 mag in the absence of peculiar velocities. We estimate that with larger numbers of comparison SNe, e.g., using the final SNfactory spectrophotometric data set as a reference, this method will be capable of standardizing high-redshift SNe to within 0.06–0.07 mag. These results imply that at least 3/4 of the variance in Hubble residuals in current SN cosmology analyses is due to previously unaccounted-for astrophysical differences among the SNe.

  9. Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood-Vasey, William Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The remarkable uniformity of Type Ia supernovae has allowed astronomers to use them as distance indicators to measure the properties and expansion history of the Universe. However, Type Ia supernovae exhibit intrinsic variation in both their spectra and observed brightness. The brightness variations have been approximately corrected by various methods, but there remain intrinsic variations that limit the statistical power of current and future observations of distant supernovae for cosmological purposes. There may be systematic effects in this residual variation that evolve with redshift and thus limit the cosmological power of SN Ia luminosity-distance experiments. To reduce these systematic uncertainties, we need a deeper understanding of the observed variations in Type Ia supernovae. Toward this end, the Nearby Supernova Factory has been designed to discover hundreds of Type Ia supernovae in a systematic and automated fashion and study them in detail. This project will observe these supernovae spectrophotometrically to provide the homogeneous high-quality data set necessary to improve the understanding and calibration of these vital cosmological yardsticks. From 1998 to 2003, in collaboration with the Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a systematic and automated searching program was conceived and executed using the computing facilities at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the National Energy Research Supercomputing Center. An automated search had never been attempted on this scale. A number of planned future large supernovae projects are predicated on the ability to find supernovae quickly, reliably, and efficiently in large datasets. A prototype run of the SNfactory search pipeline conducted from 2002 to 2003 discovered 83 SNe at a final rate of 12 SNe/month. A large, homogeneous search of this scale offers an excellent opportunity to measure the rate of Type Ia supernovae. This thesis presents a new method for

  10. Type II-P Supernovae from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey and the Standardized Candle Method

    CERN Document Server

    D'Andrea, Chris B; Dilday, Benjamin; Frieman, Joshua A; Holtzman, Jon; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Wheeler, J C; Yasuda, Naoki; Cinabro, David; Jha, Saurabh; Nichol, Robert C; Lampeitl, Hubert; Smith, Mathew; Atlee, David W; Basset, Bruce; Castander, Francisco J; Goobar, Ariel; Miquel, Ramon; Nordin, Jakob; Östman, Linda; Prieto, Jose Luis; Quimby, Robert; Riess, Adam G; Stritzinger, Maximilian

    2009-01-01

    We apply the Standardized Candle Method (SCM) for Type II Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P), which relates the velocity of the ejecta of a SN to its luminosity during the plateau, to 15 SNe II-P discovered over the three season run of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - II Supernova Survey. The redshifts of these SNe - 0.027 0.01) as all of the current literature on the SCM combined. We find that the SDSS SNe have a very small intrinsic I-band dispersion (0.22 mag), which can be attributed to selection effects. When the SCM is applied to the combined SDSS-plus-literature set of SNe II-P, the dispersion increases to 0.29 mag, larger than the scatter for either set of SNe separately. We show that the standardization cannot be further improved by eliminating SNe with positive plateau decline rates, as proposed in Poznanski et al. (2009). We thoroughly examine all potential systematic effects and conclude that for the SCM to be useful for cosmology, the methods currently used to determine the Fe II velocity at day 50 mus...

  11. Search for Type Ia supernova NUV-optical subclasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinabro, David; Scolnic, Daniel; Kessler, Richard; Li, Ashley; Miller, Jake

    2017-04-01

    In response to a recently reported observation of evidence for two classes of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) distinguished by their brightness in the rest-frame near-ultraviolet (NUV), we search for the phenomenon in publicly available light-curve data. We use the SNANA supernova analysis package to simulate SN Ia light curves in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Supernova Search and the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) with a model of two distinct ultraviolet classes of SNe Ia and a conventional model with a single broad distribution of SN-Ia ultraviolet brightnesses. We compare simulated distributions of rest-frame colours with these two models to those observed in 158 SNe Ia in the SDSS and SNLS data. The SNLS sample of 99 SNe Ia is in clearly better agreement with a model with one class of SN Ia light curves and shows no evidence for distinct NUV sub-classes. The SDSS sample of 59 SNe Ia with poorer colour resolution does not distinguish between the two models.

  12. Search For Type Ia Supernova NUV-Optical Subclasses

    CERN Document Server

    Cinabro, David; Kessler, Richard; Li, Ashley; Miller, Jake

    2016-01-01

    In response to a recently reported observation of evidence for two classes of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) distinguished by their brightness in the rest-frame near ultraviolet (NUV), we search for the phenomenon in publicly available light-curve data. We use the SNANA supernova analysis package to simulate SN Ia-light curves in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Supernova Search (SDSS) and the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) with a model of two distinct ultraviolet classes of SNe Ia and a conventional model with a single broad distribution of SN-Ia ultraviolet brightnesses. We compare simulated distributions of rest-frame colors with these two models to those observed in 158 SNe Ia in the SDSS and SNLS data. The SNLS sample of 99 SNe Ia is in clearly better agreement with a model with one class of SN Ia light curves and shows no evidence for distinct NUV sub-classes. The SDSS sample of 59 SNe Ia with poorer color resolution does not distinguish between the two models.

  13. The Role of Variations of Central Density Of White Dwarf Progenitors Upon Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, R; Jordan, G; Lamb, D

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of the accelerated expansion of the universe using Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) has stimulated a tremendous amount of interest in the use of SNe Type Ia events as standard cosmological candles, and as a probe of the fundamental physics of dark energy. Recent observations of SNe Ia have indicated a significant population difference depending on the host galaxy. These observational findings are consistent with SNe Ia Ni-56 production in star-forming spiral galaxies some 0.1 solar masses higher - and therefore more luminous than in elliptical galaxies. We present recent full-star, 3D simulations of Type Ia supernovae which may help explain the nature of this systematic variation in SNe Ia luminosities, as well as the nature of the Ia explosion mechanism. These insights may in turn eventually shed light on the mystery of dark energy itself.

  14. The progenitors of supernovae Type Ia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonen, Silvia

    2014-09-01

    Despite the significance of Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) in many fields in astrophysics, SNeIa lack a theoretical explanation. SNeIa are generally thought to be thermonuclear explosions of carbon/oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs). The canonical scenarios involve white dwarfs reaching the Chandrasekhar mass, either by accretion from a non-degenerate companion (single-degenerate channel, SD) or by a merger of two CO WDs (double-degenerate channel, DD). The study of SNeIa progenitors is a very active field of research for binary population synthesis (BPS) studies. The strength of the BPS approach is to study the effect of uncertainties in binary evolution on the macroscopic properties of a binary population, in order to constrain binary evolutionary processes. I will discuss the expected SNeIa rate from the BPS approach and the uncertainties in their progenitor evolution, and compare with current observations. I will also discuss the results of the POPCORN project in which four BPS codes were compared to better understand the differences in the predicted SNeIa rate of the SD channel. The goal of this project is to investigate whether differences in the simulated populations are due to numerical effects or whether they can be explained by differences in the input physics. I will show which assumptions in BPS codes affect the results most and hence should be studied in more detail.

  15. Luminosity distributions of Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Ashall, Chris; Sasdelli, Michele; Prentice, Simon

    2016-01-01

    We have assembled a dataset of 165 low redshift, $z<$0.06, publicly available type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We produce maximum light magnitude ($M_{B}$ and $M_{V}$) distributions of SNe Ia to explore the diversity of parameter space that they can fill. Before correction for host galaxy extinction we find that the mean $M_{B}$ and $M_{V}$ of SNe Ia are $-18.58\\pm0.07$mag and $-18.72\\pm0.05$mag respectively. Host galaxy extinction is corrected using a new method based on the SN spectrum. After correction, the mean values of $M_{B}$ and $M_{V}$ of SNe Ia are $-19.10\\pm0.06$ and $-19.10\\pm0.05$mag respectively. After correction for host galaxy extinction, `normal' SNeIa ($\\Delta m_{15}(B)<1.6$mag) fill a larger parameter space in the Width-Luminosity Relation (WLR) than previously suggested, and there is evidence for luminous SNe Ia with large $\\Delta m_{15}(B)$. We find a bimodal distribution in $\\Delta m_{15}(B)$, with a pronounced lack of transitional events at $\\Delta m_{15}(B)$=1.6 mag. We confirm that ...

  16. The Spectral SN-GRB Connection: Systematic Spectral Comparisons between Type Ic Supernovae, broad-lined Type Ic Supernovae with and without Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Modjaz, Maryam; Bianco, Federica B; Graur, Or

    2015-01-01

    We present the first systematic investigation of spectral properties of 17 Type Ic Supernovae (SNe Ic), 10 broad-lined SNe Ic (SNe Ic-bl) without observed Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and 10 SNe Ic-bl with GRBs (SN-GRBs) as a function of time in order to probe their explosion conditions and progenitors. We analyze a total of 396 spectra, which were drawn from published spectra of individual SNe as well as from the densely time-sampled spectra data of Modjaz et al. (2014). In order to quantify the diversity of the SN spectra as a function of SN subtype, we construct average spectra of SNe Ic, SNe Ic-bl without GRBs and SNe Ic-bl with GRBs, along with standard deviation and maximum deviation contours. We find that SN~1994I is not a typical SN Ic, in contrast to common belief, while the spectra of SN 1998bw/GRB 980425 are representative of mean spectra of SNe Ic-bl. We measure the ejecta absorption and width velocities (as traced by FeII 5169) and find that SNe Ic-bl with GRBs, on average, have quantifiably higher ab...

  17. Snapping Supernovae at z>1.7

    CERN Document Server

    Aldering, G; Kowalski, M; Linder, E V; Perlmutter, S; Aldering, Greg; Kim, Alex G.; Kowalski, Marek; Linder, Eric V.; Perlmutter, Saul

    2006-01-01

    We examine the utility of very high redshift Type Ia supernovae for cosmology and systematic uncertainty control. Next generation space surveys such as the Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will obtain thousands of supernovae at z>1.7, beyond the design redshift for which the supernovae will be exquisitely characterized. We find that any z\\gtrsim2 standard candles' use for cosmological parameter estimation is quite modest and subject to pitfalls; we examine gravitational lensing, redshift calibration, and contamination effects in some detail. The very high redshift supernovae - both thermonuclear and core collapse - will provide copious interesting information on star formation, environment, and evolution. However, the new observational systematics that must be faced, as well as the limited expansion of SN-parameter space afforded, does not point to high value for 1.7SNe Ia in controlling evolutionary systematics relative to what SNAP can already achieve at z<1.7. Synergy with observations fro...

  18. SNe Ia Tests of Quintessence Tracker Cosmology in an Anisotropic Background

    CERN Document Server

    Miranda, W; Pigozzo, C

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the observational effects of a quintessence model in an anisotropic spacetime. The anisotropic metric is a non-rotating particular case of a generalized Godel's metric and is classified as Bianchi III. This metric is an exact solution of the Einstein-Klein-Gordon field equations with an anisotropic scalar field, which is responsible for the anisotropy of the spacetime geometry. We test the model against observations of type Ia supernovae, analyzing the SDSS dataset calibrated with the MLCS2k2 fitter, and the results are compared to standard quintessence models with Ratra-Peebles potentials. We obtain a good agreement with observations, with best values for the matter and curvature density parameters $\\Omega_M = 0.29$ and $\\Omega_k= 0.01$ respectively. We conclude that present SNe Ia observations cannot, alone, distinguish a possible anisotropic axis in the cosmos.

  19. Are Galaxy Clusters Suggesting an Accelerating Universe Independent of SNe Ia and Gravity Metric Theory?

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, J A S; Cunha, J V

    2009-01-01

    A kinematic method to access cosmic acceleration based exclusively on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) and X-ray surface brightness data from galaxy clusters is proposed. By using the SZE/X-ray data from 38 galaxy clusters [Bonament et al., Astrop. J. 647, 25 (2006)], we find that the present Universe is accelerating and that the transition from an earlier decelerating to a late time accelerating regime occurred relatively recent. Such results are fully independent on the validity of any metric gravity theory, the possible matter-energy contents filling the Universe, as well as on the SNe type Ia Hubble diagram from which the present acceleration was inferred. The ability of the ongoing Planck satellite mission to obtain tighter constraints on the expansion history through SZE/X-ray angular diameters is also discussed. Two simple simulations of future Planck data suggest that such technique will be competitive with supernova data besides being complementary to it.

  20. Reconstruction of the interaction term between dark matter and dark energy using SNe Ia

    CERN Document Server

    Solano, Freddy Cueva

    2011-01-01

    We apply a parametric reconstruction method to a homogeneous, isotropic and spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model filled of a fluid of dark energy (DE) with constant equation of state (EOS) parameter interacting with dark matter (DM). The reconstruction method is based on expansions of the general interaction term and the relevant cosmological variables in terms of Chebyshev polynomials which form a complete set orthonormal functions. This interaction term describes an exchange of energy flow between the DE and DM within dark sector. To show how the method works we do the reconstruction of the interaction function expanding it in terms of only the first six Chebyshev polynomials and obtain the best estimation for the coefficients of the expansion assuming two models: (a) a DE equation of the state parameter w =-1 (an interacting cosmological constant), (b) a DE equation of the state parameter w = constant, and using the Union2 SNe Ia data set from "The Supernova Cosmology Project"...

  1. SNe Ia tests of quintessence tracker cosmology in an anisotropic background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, W.; Carneiro, S.; Pigozzo, C.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the observational effects of a quintessence model in an anisotropic spacetime. The anisotropic metric is a non-rotating particular case of a generalized Gödel's metric and is classified as Bianchi III. This metric is an exact solution of the Einstein-Klein-Gordon field equations with an anisotropic scalar field ψ, which is responsible for the anisotropy of the spacetime geometry. We test the model against observations of type Ia supernovae, analyzing the SDSS dataset calibrated with the MLCS2k2 fitter, and the results are compared to standard quintessence models with Ratra-Peebles potentials. We obtain a good agreement with observations, with best values for the matter and curvature density parameters ΩM = 0.29 and Ωk= 0.01 respectively. We conclude that present SNe Ia observations cannot, alone, distinguish a possible anisotropic axis in the cosmos.

  2. Observational constraints from SNe Ia and Gamma-Ray Bursts on a clumpy universe

    CERN Document Server

    Bretón, Nora

    2013-01-01

    The luminosity distance describing the effect of local inhomogeneities in the propagation of light proposed by Zeldovich-Kantowski-Dyer-Roeder (ZKDR) is tested with two probes for two distinct ranges of redshifts: supernovae Ia (SNe Ia) in 0.015 < z < 1.414 and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in 1.547 < z < 3.57. Our analysis is performed by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) code that allows us to constrain the matter density parameter \\Omega_m as well as the smoothness parameter $\\alpha$ that measures the inhomogeneous-homogeneous rate of the cosmic fluid in a flat \\LambdaCDM model. The obtained best fits are (\\Omega_m=0.285^{+0.019}_{-0.018}, \\alpha= 0.856^{+0.106}_{-0.176}) from SNe Ia and (\\Omega_m=0.259^{+0.028}_{-0.028}, \\alpha=0.587^{+0.201}_{-0.202}) from GRBs, while from the joint analysis the best fits are (\\Omega_m=0.284^{+0.021}_{-0.020}, \\alpha= 0.685^{+0.164}_{-0.171}) with a \\chi^2_{\\rm red}=0.975. The value of the smoothness parameter $\\alpha$ indicates a clumped universe however it does n...

  3. On the dependence of the type Ia SNe luminosities on the metallicity of their host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno-Raya, Manuel E; López-Sánchez, Ángel R; Galbany, Lluís; Vílchez, José; Carnero, Aurelio; Domínguez, Inma

    2015-01-01

    The metallicity of the progenitor system producing a type Ia supernova (SN Ia) could play a role in its maximum luminosity, as suggested by theoretical predictions. We present an observational study to investigate if such a relationship there exists. Using the 4.2m WHT we have obtained intermediate-resolution spectroscopy data of a sample of 28 local galaxies hosting SNe Ia, for which distances have been derived using methods independent to those based on the own SN Ia parameters. From the emission lines observed in their optical spectrum, we derived the gas-phase oxygen abundance in the region where each SN Ia exploded. Our data show a trend, with a 80% of chance not to be due to random fluctuation, between SNe Ia absolute magnitudes and the oxygen abundances of the host galaxies, in the sense that luminosities tend to be higher for galaxies with lower metallicities. This result seems like to be in agreement with both the theoretically expected behavior, and with other observational results. This dependence ...

  4. Pre-explosion companion stars in Type Iax supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Zheng-Wei; Abate, Carlo; Wang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Type Iax supernovae (SNe Iax) are proposed as one new sub-class of SNe Ia since they present sufficiently distinct observational properties from the bulk of SNe Ia. SNe Iax are the most common of all types of peculiar SNe by both number and rate, with an estimated rate of occurrence of about 5-30% of the total SN Ia rate. However, the progenitor systems of SNe Iax are still uncertain. Analyzing pre-explosion images at SN Iax positions provides a direct way to place strong constraints on the nature of progenitor systems of SNe Iax. In this work, we predict pre-explosion properties of binary companion stars in a variety of potential progenitor systems by performing detailed binary evolution calculations with the one-dimensional stellar evolution code STARS. This will be helpful for constraining progenitor systems of SNe Iax from their pre-explosion observations. With our binary evolution calculations, it is found that the non-degenerate helium (He) companion star to both a massive C/O WD (> 1.1 solar mass) and ...

  5. Radiation-hydrodynamical modelling of underluminous type II plateau Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Pumo, M L; Spiro, S; Pastorello, A; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Manicò, G; Turatto, M

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of improving our knowledge about the nature of the progenitors of low-luminosity Type II plateau supernovae (LL SNe IIP), we made radiation-hydrodynamical models of the well-sampled LL SNe IIP 2003Z, 2008bk and 2009md. For these three SNe we infer explosion energies of $0.16$-$0.18$ foe, radii at explosion of $1.8$-$3.5 \\times 10^{13}$ cm, and ejected masses of $10$-$11.3$\\Msun. The estimated progenitor mass on the main sequence is in the range $\\sim 13.2$-$15.1$\\Msun\\, for SN 2003Z and $\\sim 11.4$-$12.9$\\Msun\\, for SNe 2008bk and 2009md, in agreement with estimates from observations of the progenitors. These results together with those for other LL SNe IIP modelled in the same way, enable us also to conduct a comparative study on this SN sub-group. The results suggest that: a) the progenitors of faint SNe IIP are slightly less massive and have less energetic explosions than those of intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP, b) both faint and intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP originate from low-energy explo...

  6. Determination of the Hubble constant, the intrinsic scatter of luminosities of Type Ia SNe, and evidence for non-standard dust in other galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, X; Pain, R; Wang, L; Zhou, X; Li, Zongwei; Pain, Reynald; Wang, Lifan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Xu

    2006-01-01

    A sample of 109 type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with recession velocity < 30,000 km s^{-1}, is compiled from published SNe Ia light curves to explore the expansion rate of the local Universe. Based on the color parameter \\Delta C_{12}, we found that the average absorption to reddening ratio for SN Ia host galaxies to be R_{UBVI} = 4.37+/-0.25, 3.33+/-0.11, 2.30+/-0.11, 1.18+/-0.11, which are systematically lower than the standard values in the Milky Way. We investigated the correlations of the intrinsic luminosity with light curve decline rate, color index, and supernova environmental parameters. In particular, we found SNe Ia in E/S0 galaxies to be brighter close to the central region than those in the outer region, which may suggest a possible metallicity effect on SN luminosity. The dependence of SN luminosity on galactic environment disappears after corrections for the extinction and \\Delta C_{12}. The Hubble diagrams constructed using 73 Hubble flow SNe Ia yield a 1-$\\sigma$ scatter of <0.12 mag in BVI...

  7. Could there be a hole in type Ia supernovae?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasen, Daniel; Nugent, Peter; Thomas, R.C.; Wang, Lifan

    2004-04-23

    In the favored progenitor scenario, Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) arise from a white dwarf accreting material from a non-degenerate companion star. Soon after the white dwarf explodes, the ejected supernova material engulfs the companion star; two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations by Marietta et al. (2001) show that, in the interaction, the companion star carves out a conical hole of opening angle 30-40 degrees in the supernova ejecta. In this paper we use multi-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations to explore the observable consequences of an ejecta-hole asymmetry. We calculate the variation of the spectrum, luminosity, and polarization with viewing angle for the aspherical supernova near maximum light. We find that the supernova looks normal from almost all viewing angles except when one looks almost directly down the hole. In the latter case, one sees into the deeper, hotter layers of ejecta. The supernova is relatively brighter and has a peculiar spectrum characterized by more highly ionized species, weaker absorption features, and lower absorption velocities. The spectrum viewed down the hole is comparable to the class of SN 1991T-like supernovae. We consider how the ejecta-hole asymmetry may explain the current spectropolarimetric observations of SNe Ia, and suggest a few observational signatures of the geometry. Finally, we discuss the variety currently seen in observed SNe Ia and how an ejecta-hole asymmetry may fit in as one of several possible sources of diversity.

  8. Bright but slow - Type II supernovae from OGLE-IV & magnitude limited surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Poznanski, Dovi; Wyrzykowski, Lukasz; Blagorodnova, Nadejda

    2015-01-01

    We study a sample of 11 Type II supernovae (SNe) discovered by the OGLE-IV survey. All objects have well sampled I-band light curves, and at least one spectrum. We find that 3 or 4 of the 11 SNe have a declining light curve, making them SNe II-L, while the rest have plateaus that can be as short as 70d, unlike the 100d typically found in nearby galaxies. These SNe are also brighter than found in the local Universe, and show that magnitude limited surveys find SNe that are different than found in nearby galaxies. We discuss this sample in the context of understanding Type II SNe as a class and their suggested use as standard candles.

  9. DISCOVERY OF TWO SUPERNOVAE IN THE NUCLEAR REGIONS OF THE LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY IC 883

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kankare, E.; Mattila, S.; Takalo, A. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Ryder, S. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 296, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Vaeisaenen, P. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa); Alberdi, A.; Perez-Torres, M.-A.; Romero-Canizales, C. [Instituto de Astrofsica de Andalucia, IAA-CSIC, Apartado 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Alonso-Herrero, A.; Colina, L. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Centro de Astrobiologia, CSIC/INTA, Carretera de Torrejon a Ajalvir, km 4, 28850, Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Efstathiou, A. [School of Sciences, European University Cyprus, Diogenes Street, Engomi, 1516 Nicosia (Cyprus); Kotilainen, J. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Melinder, J., E-mail: erkki.kankare@utu.fi [Department of Astronomy, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-01-10

    We report the discovery of two consecutive supernovae (SNe), 2010cu and 2011hi, located at 0.''37 (180 pc) and 0.''79 (380 pc) projected distance, respectively, from the center of the K-band nucleus of the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) IC 883. The SNe were discovered in an ongoing near-infrared K-band search for core-collapse SNe in such galaxies using the ALTAIR/NIRI adaptive optics system with laser guide star at the Gemini-North Telescope. These are thus the closest SNe yet discovered to an LIRG nucleus in optical or near-infrared wavelengths. The near-infrared light curves and colors of both SNe are consistent with core-collapse events. Both SNe seem to suffer from relatively low host galaxy extinction suggesting that regardless of their low projected galactocentric distances, they are not deeply buried in the nuclear regions of the host galaxy.

  10. Discovery of Two Supernovae in the Nuclear Regions of the Luminous Infrared Galaxy IC 883

    CERN Document Server

    Kankare, E; Ryder, S; Vaisanen, P; Alberdi, A; Alonso-Herrero, A; Colina, L; Efstathiou, A; Kotilainen, J; Melinder, J; Perez-Torres, M -A; Romero-Canizales, C; Takalo, A

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of two consecutive supernovae (SNe), 2010cu and 2011hi, located at 0.37" (180 pc) and 0.79" (380 pc) projected distance respectively from the centre of the K-band nucleus of the luminous infrared galaxy IC 883. The SNe were discovered in an ongoing near-infrared K-band search for core-collapse SNe in such galaxies using the ALTAIR/NIRI adaptive optics system with laser guide star at the Gemini-North Telescope. These are thus the closest SNe yet discovered to a LIRG nucleus in optical or near-infrared wavelengths. The near-infrared light curves and colours of both SNe are consistent with core-collapse events. Both SNe seem to suffer from relatively low host galaxy extinction suggesting that regardless of their low projected galactocentric distances, they are not deeply buried in the nuclear regions of the host galaxy.

  11. Radio emission from supernovae and gamma-ray bursters and the need for the SKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Sramek, Richard A.; Panagia, Nino

    2004-12-01

    Study of radio supernovae (SNe) over the past 25 years includes two dozen detected objects and more than 100 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the stellar system, and to show clumpiness of the circumstellar material. Since 1997 the afterglow of γ-ray bursting sources (GRBs) has occasionally been detected in the radio, as well in other wavelength bands. In particular, the interesting and unusual γ-ray burst GRB 980425, almost certainly related to the radio supernova SN 1998bw, and the more recent SN 2003dh/GRB 030329 are links between the two classes of objects. Analyzing the extensive radio emission data available for SN 1998bw, one can describe its time evolution within the well established framework available for the analysis of radio emission from supernovae. This then allows relatively detailed description of a number of physical properties of the object. The radio emission can best be explained as the interaction of a mildly relativistic ( Γ ˜ 1.6) shock with a dense pre-explosion stellar wind-established circumstellar medium that is highly structured both azimuthally, in clumps or filaments, and radially, with observed density enhancements. From this we can support the conclusion that at least some members of the slow-soft class of GRBs are related to type Ib/c SNe and can be attributed to the explosion of a massive star in a dense, highly structured CSM that was presumably established by the pre-explosion stellar system. However, due to the lack of sensitivity of current radio telescopes, most supernovae cannot be studied if they are more

  12. Photometric classification of type Ia supernovae in the SuperNova Legacy Survey with supervised learning

    CERN Document Server

    Möller, A; Leloup, C; Neveu, J; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Rich, J; Carlberg, R; Lidman, C; Pritchet, C

    2016-01-01

    In the era of large astronomical surveys, photometric classification of supernovae (SNe) has become an important research field due to limited spectroscopic resources for candidate follow-up and classification. In this work, we present a method to photometrically classify type Ia supernovae based on machine learning with redshifts that are derived from the SN light-curves. This method is implemented on real data from the SNLS deferred pipeline, a purely photometric pipeline that identifies SNe Ia at high-redshifts ($0.2Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS), which contains large spectroscopically and photometrically classified type Ia sa...

  13. First stars, hypernovae, and superluminous supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Ken'Ichi

    2016-07-01

    After the big bang, production of heavy elements in the early universe takes place starting from the formation of the first (Pop III) stars, their evolution, and explosion. The Pop III supernova (SN) explosions have strong dynamical, thermal, and chemical feedback on the formation of subsequent stars and evolution of galaxies. However, the nature of Pop III stars/supernovae (SNe) have not been well-understood. The signature of nucleosynthesis yields of the first SN can be seen in the elemental abundance patterns observed in extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars. We show that the abundance patterns of EMP stars, e.g. the excess of C, Co, Zn relative to Fe, are in better agreement with the yields of hyper-energetic explosions (Hypernovae, (HNe)) rather than normal supernovae. We note the large variation of the abundance patterns of EMP stars propose that such a variation is related to the diversity of the GRB-SNe and posssibly superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). For example, the carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars may be related to the faint SNe (or dark HNe), which could be the explosions induced by relativistic jets. Finally, we examine the various mechanisms of SLSNe.

  14. Supernova 2009kf: An Ultraviolet Bright Type IIP Supernova Discovered With Pan-Starrs 1 and Galex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. SUPERNOVA 2009kf: AN ULTRAVIOLET BRIGHT TYPE IIP SUPERNOVA DISCOVERED WITH PAN-STARRS 1 AND GALEX M. T. Botticella1, C...January 29; accepted 2010 May 12; published 2010 June 16 ABSTRACT We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of a luminous Type IIP Supernova ...magnitude MNUV = −21.5 ± 0.5 mag suggests such SNe could be discovered out to z ∼ 2.5 in the PS1 survey. Key words: stars: evolution – supernovae

  15. The Type II supernovae 2006V and 2006au: two SN 1987A-like events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taddia, F.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Sollerman, J.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Supernova 1987A revealed that a blue supergiant (BSG) star can end its life as a core-collapse supernova (SN). SN 1987A and other similar objects exhibit properties that distinguish them from ordinary Type II Plateau (IIP) SNe, whose progenitors are believed to be red supergiants (RSGs)....

  16. The Effect of Host Galaxies on Type Ia Supernovae in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Lampeitl, Hubert; Nichol, Robert C; Bassett, Bruce; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Benjamin; Foley, Ryan J; Frieman, Joshua A; Garnavich, Peter M; Goobar, Ariel; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh W; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Nordin, Jakob; Östman, Linda; Riess, Adam G; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Stritzinger, Maximilian

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the host galaxy dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the full three year sample of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. We rediscover, to high significance, the strong correlation between host galaxy typeand the width of the observed SN light curve, i.e., fainter, quickly declining SNe Ia favor passive host galaxies, while brighter, slowly declining Ia's favor star-forming galaxies. We also find evidence (at between 2 to 3 sigma) that SNe Ia are ~0.1 magnitudes brighter in passive host galaxies, than in star-forming hosts, after the SN Ia light curves have been standardized using the light curve shape and color variations: This difference in brightness is present in both the SALT2 and MCLS2k2 light curve fitting methodologies. We see evidence for differences in the SN Ia color relationship between passive and star-forming host galaxies, e.g., for the MLCS2k2 technique, we see that SNe Ia in passive hosts favor a dust law of R_V ~1, while SNe Ia in star-forming hosts require R_V ...

  17. A Radio Survey of Type Ib and Ic Supernovae: Searching for Engine Driven Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, E; Frail, D A; Soderberg, A M

    2003-01-01

    The association of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and core-collapse supernovae (SNe) of Type Ib and Ic was motivated by the detection of SN 1998bw in the error box of GRB 980425 and the now-secure identification of a SN 1998bw-like event in the cosmological GRB 030329. The bright radio emission from SN 1998bw indicated that it possessed some of the unique attributes expected of GRBs, namely a large reservoir of energy in (mildly) relativistic ejecta and variable energy input. The two popular scenarios for the origin of SN 1998bw are a typical cosmological burst observed off-axis or a member of a new distinct class of supernova explosions (gSNe). In the former, about 0.5% of local Type Ib/c SNe are expected to be similar to SN1998bw; for the latter no such constraint exists. Motivated thus, we began a systematic program of radio observations of most reported Type Ib/c SNe accessible to the Very Large Array. Of the 33 SNe observed from late 1999 to the end of 2002 at most one is as bright as SN 1998bw. From this we co...

  18. First-Year Spectroscopy for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Chen; Sako, Masao; Marriner, John; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Frieman, Joshua A; Garnavich, Peter M; Hogan, Craig J; Holtzman, Jon; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marshall, Jennifer L; McGinnis, David; Miknaitis, Gajus; Nichol, Robert C; Prieto, Jose Luis; Riess, Adam G; Richmond, Michael W; Schneider, Donald P; Smith, Mathew; Takanashi, Naohiro; Tokita, Kouichi; van der Heyden, Kurt; Yasuda, Naoki; Assef, Roberto J; Barentine, John; Bender, Ralf; Blandford, Roger D; Bremer, Malcolm; Brewington, Howard; Collins, Chris A; Crotts, Arlin; Dembicky, Jack; Eastman, Jason; Edge, Alastair; Elson, Ed; Eyler, Michael E; Filippenko, Alexei V; Foley, Ryan J; Frank, Stephan; Goobar, Ariel; Harvanek, Michael; Hopp, Ulrich; Ihara, Yutaka; Kahn, Steven; Ketzeback, William; Kleinman, Scott J; Kollatschny, Wolfram; Krzesiński, Jurek; Leloudas, Giorgos; Long, Daniel C; Lucey, John; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; McMillan, Russet J; Morgan, Christopher W; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nitta, Atsuko; Ostman, Linda; Pan, Kaike; Romer, A Kathy; Saurage, Gabrelle; Schlesinger, Katie; Snedden, Stephanie A; Sollerman, Jesper; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Watson, Linda C; Watters, Shannon; Wheeler, J Craig; York, Donald

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05 - 0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existi...

  19. First-Year Spectroscopy for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Chen; Romani, Roger W.; Sako, Masao; Marriner, John; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L.; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Holtzman, Jon; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert

    2008-03-25

    This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05-0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existing in the majority of our SN spectra.

  20. Progenitors of Supernovae Type Ia

    CERN Document Server

    Toonen, S; Bours, M; Zwart, S Portegies; Claeys, J; Mennekens, N; Ruiter, A

    2013-01-01

    Despite the significance of Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) in many fields in astrophysics, SNeIa lack a theoretical explanation. The standard scenarios involve thermonuclear explosions of carbon/oxygen white dwarfs approaching the Chandrasekhar mass; either by accretion from a companion or by a merger of two white dwarfs. We investigate the contribution from both channels to the SNIa rate with the binary population synthesis (BPS) code SeBa in order to constrain binary processes such as the mass retention efficiency of WD accretion and common envelope evolution. We determine the theoretical rates and delay time distribution of SNIa progenitors and in particular study how assumptions affect the predicted rates.

  1. Mass extinctions and supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Korschinek, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    A nearby supernova (SN) explosion could have negatively influenced life on Earth, maybe even been responsible for mass extinctions. Mass extinction poses a significant extinction of numerous species on Earth, as recorded in the paleontologic, paleoclimatic, and geological record of our planet. Depending on the distance between the Sun and the SN, different types of threats have to be considered, such as ozone depletion on Earth, causing increased exposure to the Sun's ultraviolet radiation, or the direct exposure of lethal x-rays. Another indirect effect is cloud formation, induced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere which result in a drop in the Earth's temperature, causing major glaciations of the Earth. The discovery of highly intensive gamma ray bursts (GRBs), which could be connected to SNe, initiated further discussions on possible life-threatening events in Earth's history. The probability that GRBs hit the Earth is very low. Nevertheless, a past interaction of Earth with GRBs and/or SNe cannot be exclude...

  2. The multifaceted Type II-L supernova 2014G from pre-maximum to nebular phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terreran, G.; Jerkstrand, A.; Benetti, S.; Smartt, S. J.; Ochner, P.; Tomasella, L.; Howell, D. A.; Morales-Garoffolo, A.; Harutyunyan, A.; Kankare, E.; Arcavi, I.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Kangas, T.; Pastorello, A.; Tartaglia, L.; Turatto, M.; Valenti, S.; Wiggins, P.; Yuan, F.

    2016-10-01

    We present multiband ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry, along with visual-wavelength spectroscopy, of supernova (SN) 2014G in the nearby galaxy NGC 3448 (25 Mpc). The early-phase spectra show strong emission lines of the high ionization species He II/N IV/C IV during the first 2-3 d after explosion, traces of a metal-rich circumstellar material (CSM) probably due to pre-explosion mass-loss events. These disappear by day 9 and the spectral evolution then continues matching that of normal Type II SNe. The post-maximum light curve declines at a rate typical of Type II-L class. The extensive photometric coverage tracks the drop from the photospheric stage and constrains the radioactive tail, with a steeper decline rate than that expected from the 56Co decay if γ-rays are fully trapped by the ejecta. We report the appearance of an unusual feature on the blue side of H α after 100 d, which evolves to appear as a flat spectral feature linking H α and the [O I] doublet. This may be due to interaction of the ejecta with a strongly asymmetric, and possibly bipolar CSM. Finally, we report two deep spectra at ˜190 and 340 d after explosion, the latter being arguably one of the latest spectra for a Type II-L SN. By modelling the spectral region around the [Ca II], we find a supersolar Ni/Fe production. The strength of the [O I] λλ6300,6363 doublet, compared with synthetic nebular spectra, suggests a progenitor with a zero-age main-sequence mass between 15 and 19 M⊙.

  3. Are Type la Supernovae Reliable Distance Indicators?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Recent applications of type la supernovae (SNe la) in cosmology have successfully revealed the accelerating expansion of the universe. However, as distance indicators used in measuring the expansion history of the universe and probing the nature of dark energy, these objects must pass more strict tests. We propose a K-S test to investigate if there exists any systematic bias when deriving the luminosity distances under the standard candle assumption. Two samples, one comprising 71 high-redshift SNe la and the other, 44 nearby ones, are used in our investigation. We find that it is likely there exists a bias in the adopted samples, which is probably caused by a systematic error, e.g. in the color parameter used in the luminosity calibration and a bias may be caused by the SN evolution or by varying properties of the dust surrounding the SNe Ia.

  4. Type Ia supernova science 2010-2020

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, D A; Della Valle, M; Nugent, P E; Perlmutter, S; Marion, G H; Krisciunas, K; Badenes, C; Mazzali, P; Aldering, G; Antilogus, P; Baron, E; Becker, A; Baltay, C; Benetti, S; Blondin, S; Branch, D; Brown, E F; Deustua, S; Ealet, A; Ellis, Richard S; Fouchez, D; Freedman, W; Gal-Yam, A; Jha, S; Kasen, D; Kessler, R; Kim, A G; Leonard, D C; Li, W; Livio, M; Maoz, D; Mannucci, F; Matheson, T; Neill, J D; Nomoto, K; Panagia, N; Perrett, K; Phillips, M; Poznanski, D; Quimby, R; Rest, A; Riess, A; Sako, M; Soderberg, A M; Strolger, L; Thomas, R; Turatto, M; van Dyk, S; Wood-Vasey, W M

    2009-01-01

    In the next decade Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) will be used to test theories predicting changes in the Dark Energy equation of state with time. Ultimately this requires a dedicated space mission like JDEM. SNe Ia are mature cosmological probes --- their limitations are well characterized, and a path to improvement is clear. Dominant systematic errors include photometric calibration, selection effects, reddening, and population-dependent differences. Building on past lessons, well-controlled new surveys are poised to make strides in these areas: the Palomar Transient Factory, Skymapper, La Silla QUEST, Pan-STARRS, the Dark Energy Survey, LSST, and JDEM. They will obviate historical calibrations and selection biases, and allow comparisons via large subsamples. Some systematics follow from our ignorance of SN Ia progenitors, which there is hope of determining with SN Ia rate studies from 0SNe Ia regulate galactic and cluster chemical evolution, inform stellar evolution, and are ...

  5. Electron Acceleration in Supernovae and Millimeter Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi Maeda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Supernovae launch a strong shock wave by the interaction of the expanding ejecta and surrounding circumstellar matter (CSM. At the shock, electrons are accelerated to relativistic speed, creating observed synchrotron emissions in radio wavelengths. In this paper, I suggest that SNe (i.e., < 1 year since the explosion provide a unique site to study the electron acceleration mechanism. I argue that the eciency of the acceleration at the young SN shock is much lower than conventionally assumed, and that the electrons emitting in the cm wavelengths are not fully in the Diffusive Shock Acceleration (DSA regime. Thus radio emissions from young SNe record information on the yet-unresolved 'injection' mechanism. I also present perspectives of millimeter (mm observations of SNe - this will provide opportunities to uniquely determine the shock physics and the acceleration efficiency, to test the non-linear DSA mechanism and provide a characteristic electron energy scale with which the DSA start dominating the electron acceleration.

  6. Near infrared spectroscopy of the type IIn SN 2010jl: evidence for high velocity ejecta

    CERN Document Server

    Borish, H Jacob; Chevalier, Roger A; Breslauer, Benjamin M; Kingery, Aaron M; Privon, George C

    2014-01-01

    The Type IIn supernova SN 2010jl was relatively nearby and luminous, allowing detailed studies of the near-infrared (NIR) emission. We present 1-2.4 micron spectroscopy over the age range of 36 to 565 days from the earliest detection of the supernova. On day 36, the Paschen H lines show an unresolved emission component along with a symmetric broad component that can be modeled as the result of electron scattering by a thermal distribution of electrons. Over the next hundreds of days, the broad components of the H lines shift to the blue by 700 km/s, as is also observed in optical lines. The narrow lines do not show a shift, indicating they originate in a different region. He I 10830 and 20587 lines both show an asymmetric broad emission component, with a shoulder on the blue side that varies in prominence and velocity from -5500 km/s on day 108 to -4000 km/s on day 219. This component may be associated with the higher velocity flow indicated by X-ray observations of the supernova. The absence of the feature i...

  7. Supernova detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahata, Masayuki [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray research, University of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka-cho, Hida-shi, Gifu, Japan, 506-1205 (Japan)], E-mail: nakahata@suketto.icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2008-11-01

    The detection of supernova neutrinos is reviewed, focusing on the current status of experiments to detect supernova burst neutrinos and supernova relic neutrinos. The capabilities of each detector currently operating and in development are assessed and the likely neutrino yield for a future supernova is estimated. It is expected that much more information will be obtained if a supernova burst were to occur in our Galaxy than was obtained for supernova SN1987A. The detection of supernova relic neutrinos is considered and it is concluded that a large volume detector with a neutron tagging technique is necessary.

  8. Three Gravitationally Lensed Supernovae Behind CLASH Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Brandon; Jha, Saurabh W; Rodney, Steven A; Jones, David O; Graur, Or; Merten, Julian; Zitrin, Adi; Riess, Adam G; Matheson, Thomas; Sako, Masao; Holoien, Thomas W -S; Postman, Marc; Coe, Dan; Bartelmann, Matthias; Balestra, Italo; Benitez, Narciso; Bouwens, Rychard; Bradley, Larry; Broadhurst, Tom; Cenko, S Bradley; Donahue, Megan; Filippenko, Alexei V; Ford, Holland; Garnavich, Peter; Grillo, Claudio; Infante, Leopoldo; Jouvel, Stephanie; Kelson, Daniel; Koekemoer, Anton; Lahav, Ofer; Lemze, Doron; Maoz, Dan; Medezinski, Elinor; Melchior, Peter; Meneghetti, Massimo; Molino, Alberto; Moustakas, John; Moustakas, Leonidas A; Nonino, Mario; Rosati, Piero; Seitz, Stella; Strolger, Louis G; Umetsu, Keiichi; Zheng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We report observations of three gravitationally lensed supernovae (SNe) in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program. These objects, SN CLO12Car (z = 1.28), SN CLN12Did (z = 0.85), and SN CLA11Tib (z = 1.14), are located behind three different clusters, MACSJ1720.2+3536 (z = 0.391), RXJ1532.9+3021 (z = 0.345), and Abell 383 (z = 0.187), respectively. Each SN was detected in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical and infrared images. Based on photometric classification, we find that SNe CLO12Car and CLN12Did are likely to be Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), while SN CLA11Tib is probably a core-collapse SN. Using multi-color light-curve fits to determine a standardized SN Ia luminosity distance, we infer that SN CLO12Car was approximately 1.0 +/- 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia at a similar redshift and ascribe this to gravitational lens magnification. Similarly, SN CLN12Did is approximately 0.2 +/- 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia. We derive independent estimates ...

  9. Using the local gas-phase oxygen abundances to explore a metallicity-dependence in SNe Ia luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno-Raya, M E; Molla, M; Galbany, L; Vilchez, J M; Carnero, A

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the gas-phase oxygen abundances of a sample of 28 galaxies in the local Universe (z < 0.02) hosting Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia). The data were obtained with the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope (WHT). We derive local oxygen abundances for the regions where the SNe Ia exploded by calculating oxygen gradients through each galaxy (when possible) or assuming the oxygen abundance of the closest HII region. The sample selection only considered galaxies for which distances not based on the the SN Ia method are available. Then, we use a principal component analysis to study the dependence of the absolute magnitudes on the color of the SN Ia, the oxygen abundances of the region where they exploded, and the stretch of the SN light curve. We demonstrate that our previous result suggesting a metallicity-dependence on the SN Ia luminosity for not-reddened SNe Ia (Moreno-Raya et al. 2016) can be extended to our whole sample. These results reinforce the need of including a metallicity proxy, such...

  10. Revisiting the Lick Observatory Supernova Search Volume-Limited Sample: Updated Classifications and Revised Stripped-envelope Supernova Fractions

    CERN Document Server

    Shivvers, Isaac; Zheng, Weikang; Filippenko, Alexei V; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Liu, Yuqian; Matheson, Thomas; Pastorello, Andrea; Graur, Or; Foley, Ryan J; Chornock, Ryan; Smith, Nathan; Leaman, Jesse; Benetti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We re-examine the classifications of supernovae (SNe) presented in the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) volume-limited sample with a focus on the stripped-envelope SNe. The LOSS volumetric sample, presented by Leaman et al. (2011) and Li et al. (2011b), was calibrated to provide meaningful measurements of SN rates in the local universe; the results presented therein continue to be used for comparisons to theoretical and modeling efforts. Many of the objects from the LOSS sample were originally classified based upon only a small subset of the data now available, and recent studies have both updated some subtype distinctions and improved our ability to perform robust classifications, especially for stripped-envelope SNe. We re-examine the spectroscopic classifications of all events in the LOSS volumetric sample (180 SNe and SN impostors) and update them if necessary. We discuss the populations of rare objects in our sample including broad-lined Type Ic SNe, Ca-rich SNe, SN 1987A-like events (we identify...

  11. Evidence of Environmental Dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae from the Nearby Supernova Factory indicated by Local H{\\alpha}

    CERN Document Server

    Rigault, M; Aldering, G; Antilogus, P; Aragon, C; Bailey, S; Baltay, C; Bongard, S; Buton, C; Canto, A; Cellier-Holzem, F; Childress, M; Chotard, N; Fakhouri, H K; Feindt, U; Fleury, M; Gangler, E; Greskovic, P; Guy, J; Kim, A G; Kowalski, M; Lombardo, S; Nordin, J; Nugent, P; Pain, R; Pécontal, E; Pereira, R; Perlmutter, S; Rabinowitz, D; Runge, K; Saunders, C; Scalzo, R; Smadja, G; Tao, C; Thomas, R C; Weaver, B A

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged) We study the host galaxy regions in close proximity to Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) to analyze relations between the properties of SN Ia events and environments most similar to where their progenitors formed. We focus on local H\\alpha\\ emission as an indicator of young environments. The Nearby Supernova Factory has obtained flux-calibrated spectral timeseries for SNe Ia using integral field spectroscopy, allowing the simultaneous measurement of the SN and its immediate vicinity. For 89 SNe Ia we measure H\\alpha\\ emission tracing ongoing star formation within a 1 kpc radius around each SN. This constitutes the first direct study of the local environment for a large sample of SNe Ia also having accurate luminosity, color and stretch measurements. We find that SNe Ia with local H\\alpha\\ emission are redder by 0.036+/-0.017 mag, and that the previously-noted correlation between stretch and host mass is entirely driven by the SNe Ia coming from passive regions. Most importantly, the mean standardized bri...

  12. Tycho Brahe's supernova: light from centuries past

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz-Lapuente, P

    2003-01-01

    The light curve of SN 1572 is described in the terms used nowadays to characterize SNeIa. By assembling the records of the observations done in 1572--74 and evaluating their uncertainties, it is possible to recover the light curve and the color evolution of this supernova. It is found that, within the SNe Ia family, the event should have been a SNIa with a normal rate of decline, its stretch factor being {\\it s} $\\sim$ 0.9. Visual light curve near maximum, late--time decline and the color evolution sustain this conclusion. After correcting for extinction, the luminosity of this supernova is found to be M$_{V}$ $=$ --19.58 --5 log (D/3.5 kpc) $\\pm$ 0.42.

  13. Nucleosynthesis Basics and Applications to Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Thielemann, F K; Freiburghaus, C; Nomoto, K; Hashimoto, M; Pfeiffer, B; Kratz, K L

    1998-01-01

    This review concentrates on nucleosynthesis processes in general and their applications to massive stars and supernovae. A brief initial introduction is given to the physics in astrophysical plasmas which governs composition changes. We present the basic equations for thermonuclear reaction rates and nuclear reaction networks. The required nuclear physics input for reaction rates is discussed, i.e. cross sections for nuclear reactions, photodisintegrations, electron and positron captures, neutrino captures, inelastic neutrino scattering, and beta-decay half-lives. We examine especially the present state of uncertainties in predicting thermonuclear reaction rates, while the status of experiments is discussed by others in this volume (see M. Wiescher). It follows a brief review of hydrostatic burning stages in stellar evolution before discussing the fate of massive stars, i.e. the nucleosynthesis in type II supernova explosions (SNe II). Except for SNe Ia, which are explained by exploding white dwarfs in binary...

  14. Supernova Feedback in an Inhomogeneous Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Martizzi, Davide; Quataert, Eliot

    2014-01-01

    Supernova (SN) feedback is one of the key processes shaping the interstellar medium (ISM) of galaxies. SNe contribute to (and in some cases may dominate) driving turbulence in the ISM and accelerating galactic winds. Modern cosmological simulations have sufficient resolution to capture the main structures in the ISM of galaxies, but are typically still not capable of explicitly resolving all of the small-scale stellar feedback processes, including the expansion of supernova remnants (SNRs). We perform a series of controlled three-dimensional hydrodynamic (adaptive mesh refinement, AMR) simulations of single SNRs expanding in an inhomogeneous density field with statistics motivated by those of the turbulent ISM. We use these to quantify the momentum and thermal energy injection from SNe as a function of spatial scale and the density, metallicity, and structure of the ambient medium. Using these results, we develop an analytic sub-resolution model for SN feedback for use in galaxy formation simulations. We then...

  15. The Nature of Gamma Ray Burst Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Cano, Zach

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are among the brightest and most energetic physical processes in the universe. It is known that core-collapse SNe arise from the gravitational collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars (the progen- itors of nearby core-collapse SNe have been imaged and unambiguously identified). It is also believed that the progenitors of long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs) are massive stars, mainly due to the occurrence and detection of very energetic core-collapse su- pernovae that happen both temporally and spatially coincident with most L-GRBs. However many outstanding questions regarding the nature of these events exist: How massive are the progenitors? What evolutionary stage are they at when they explode? Do they exist as single stars or in binary systems (or both, and to what fractions)? The work presented in this thesis attempts to further our understanding at the types of progenitors that give rise to long-duration GRB supernovae (GRB-SNe). This work is based on optical ...

  16. A physically motivated classification of stripped-envelope supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, S. J.; Mazzali, P. A.

    2017-08-01

    The classification of stripped-envelope supernovae (SE-SNe) is revisited using modern data sets. Spectra are analysed using an empirical method to 'blindly' categorize SNe according to spectral feature strength and appearance. This method makes a clear distinction between SNe that are He-rich (IIb/Ib) and He-poor (Ic), and further analysis is performed on each subgroup. For He-rich SNe, the presence of H becomes the focus. The strength, velocity, and ratio between absorption and emission of H α are measured, along with additional analysis of He I lines, in order to categorize the SNe. The He-poor SNe are ordered according to the number of absorption features N present in the spectra, which is a measure of the degree of line blending. The kinetic energy per unit mass Ek/Mej is strongly affected by mass at high velocity, and such situations principally occur when the outer density profile of the ejecta is shallow, leading to the blending of lines. Using the results, the existing SE-SN taxonomic scheme is adapted. He-rich SNe are split into four groups, IIb, IIb(I), Ib(II) and Ib, which represent H-rich to H-poor SNe. The SNe Ic category of broad-lined Ic (Ic-BL) is abandoned in favour of quantifying the line blending via 〈N〉 before peak. To better reflect the physical parameters of the explosions, the velocity of Si Uii at peak and the half-luminosity decay time t+1/2 are included to give SNe Ic a designation of Ic-〈N〉(vp, SiII/t+1/2).

  17. The ESSENCE Supernova Survey: Survey Optimization, Observations, and Supernova Photometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miknaitis, Gajus; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Smith, R.C.; Stubbs, C.W.; Suntzeff, N.B.; Foley, R.J.; Matheson, T.; Tonry, J.L.; Aguilera, C.; Blackman, J.W.; Becker, A.C.; Clocchiatti, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Filippenko, A.V.; Garg, A.; Garnavich, P.M.; /Fermilab /Chile U., Catolica /Cerro-Tololo

    2007-01-08

    We describe the implementation and optimization of the ESSENCE supernova survey, which we have undertaken to measure the equation of state parameter of the dark energy. We present a method for optimizing the survey exposure times and cadence to maximize our sensitivity to the dark energy equation of state parameter w = P/{rho}c{sup 2} for a given fixed amount of telescope time. For our survey on the CTIO 4m telescope, measuring the luminosity distances and redshifts for supernovae at modest redshifts (z {approx} 0.5 {+-} 0.2) is optimal for determining w. We describe the data analysis pipeline based on using reliable and robust image subtraction to find supernovae automatically and in near real-time. Since making cosmological inferences with supernovae relies crucially on accurate measurement of their brightnesses, we describe our efforts to establish a thorough calibration of the CTIO 4m natural photometric system. In its first four years, ESSENCE has discovered and spectroscopically confirmed 102 type Ia SNe, at redshifts from 0.10 to 0.78, identified through an impartial, effective methodology for spectroscopic classification and redshift determination. We present the resulting light curves for the all type Ia supernovae found by ESSENCE and used in our measurement of w, presented in Wood-Vasey et al. (2007).

  18. Spectropolarimetry of stripped-envelope supernovae: observations and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masaomi

    2017-09-01

    Spectropolarimetry is one of the most powerful methods to study the multi-dimensional geometry of supernovae (SNe). We present a brief summary of the spectropolarimetric observations of stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe. Observations indicate that stripped-envelope SNe generally have a non-axisymmetric ion distribution in the ejecta. Three-dimensional clumpy geometry nicely explains the observed properties. A typical size of the clumps deduced from observations is relatively large: http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xlink:href="RSTA20160273IM1"/>25% of the photosphere. Such a large-scale clumpy structure is similar to that observed in Cassiopeia A, and suggests that large-scale convection or standing accretion shock instability takes place at the onset of the explosion. This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'.

  19. Birthrates and delay times of Type Ia supernovae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) play an important role in diverse areas of astrophysics, from the chemical evolution of galaxies to observational cosmology. However, the nature of the progenitors of SNe Ia is still unclear. In this paper, according to a detailed binary population synthesis study, we obtained SN Ia birthrates and delay times from different progenitor models, and compared them with observations. We find that the Galactic SN Ia birthrate from the double-degenerate (DD) model is close to those inferred from observations, while the birthrate from the single-degenerate (SD) model accounts for only about 1/2-2/3 of the observations. If a single starburst is assumed, the distribution of the delay times of SNe Ia from the SD model is a weak bimodality, where the WD + He channel contributes to the SNe Ia with delay times shorter than 100 Myr, and the WD + MS and WD + RG channels to those with age longer than 1 Gyr.

  20. Circumstellar Shells in Absorption in Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, K J; Reynolds, S P

    2009-01-01

    Progenitors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe) have been predicted to modify their ambient circumstellar (CSM) and interstellar environments through the action of their powerful winds. While there is X-ray and optical evidence for circumstellar interaction in several remnants of Type Ia SNe, widespread evidence for such interaction in Type Ia SNe themselves has been lacking. We consider prospects for detection of CSM shells that have been predicted to be common around Type Ia SNe. Such shells are most easily detected in Na I absorption lines. Variable (declining) absorption is expected to occur soon after the explosion, primarily during the SN rise time, for shells located within 1 - 10 pc of a SN. The distance of the shell from the SN can be determined by measuring the time scale for line variability.

  1. UBVRI Light Curves of 44 Type Ia Supernovae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jha, Saurabh; Groot, Paul J.

    2006-01-01

    We present UBVRI photometry of 44 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed from 1997 to 2001 as part of a continuing monitoring campaign at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The data set comprises 2190 observations and is the largest homogeneously

  2. Multiwavelength observations of the Type IIb supernova 2009mg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oates, S. R.; Bayless, A. J.; Stritzinger, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    We present Swift Ultra-Violet Optical Telescope and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) observations, and visual wavelength spectroscopy of the Type IIb supernova (SN) 2009mg, discovered in the Sb galaxy ESO 121-G26. The observational properties of SN 2009mg are compared to the prototype Type IIb SNe 1993J...

  3. HYDRODYNAMICAL MODELS OF TYPE II-P SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Bersten

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present progress in light curve models of type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P obtained using a newly devel- oped, one-dimensional hydrodynamic code. Using simple initial models (polytropes, we reproduced the global behavior of the observed light curves and we analyzed the sensitivity of the light curves to the variation of free parameters.

  4. Improved Cosmological Constraints from New, Old and Combined Supernova Datasets

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, M; Aldering, G; Agostinho, R J; Amadon, A; Amanullah, R; Balland, C; Barbary, K; Blanc, G; Challis, P J; Conley, A; Connolly, N V; Covarrubias, R; Dawson, K S; Deustua, S E; Ellis, R; Fabbro, S; Fadeev, V; Fan, X; Farris, B; Folatelli, G; Frye, B L; Garavini, G; Gates, E L; Germany, L; Goldhaber, G; Goldman, B; Goobar, A; Groom, D E; Haïssinski, J; Hardin, D; Hook, I; Kent, S; Kim, A G; Knop, R A; Lidman, C; Linder, E V; Méndez, J; Meyers, J; Miller, G J; Moniez, M; Mourão, A M; Newberg, H; Nobili, S; Nugent, P E; Pain, R; Perdereau, O; Perlmutter, S; Phillips, M M; Prasad, V; Quimby, R; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Rubenstein, E P; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Santos, F D; Schaefer, B E; Schommer, R A; Smith, R C; Soderberg, A M; Spadafora, A L; Strolger, L -G; Strovink, M; Suntzeff, N B; Suzuki, N; Thomas, R C; Walton, N A; Wang, L; Wood-Vasey, W M; Yun, J L

    2008-01-01

    We present a new compilation of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), a new dataset of low-redshift nearby-Hubble-flow SNe and new analysis procedures to work with these heterogeneous compilations. This ``Union'' compilation of 414 SN Ia, which reduces to 307 SNe after selection cuts, includes the recent large samples of SNe Ia from the Supernova Legacy Survey and ESSENCE Survey, the older datasets, as well as the recently extended dataset of distant supernovae observed with HST. A single, consistent and blind analysis procedure is used for all the various SN Ia subsamples, and a new procedure is implemented that consistently weights the heterogeneous data sets and rejects outliers. We present the latest results from this Union compilation and discuss the cosmological constraints from this new compilation and its combination with other cosmological measurements (CMB and BAO). The constraint we obtain from supernovae on the dark energy density is $\\Omega_\\Lambda= 0.713^{+0.027}_{-0.029} (stat)}^{+0.036}_{-0.039} (sys)}...

  5. Cosmological Inference from Host-Selected Type Ia Supernova Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Syed A.; Mould, Jeremy; Lidman, Chris; Ruhlmann-Kleider, Vanina; Hardin, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    We compare two Type Ia supernova samples that are drawn from a spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernova sample: a host-selected sample in which SNe Ia are restricted to those that have a spectroscopic redshift from the host; and a broader, more traditional sample in which the redshift could come from either the SN or the host. The host-selected sample is representative of SN samples that will use the redshift of the host to infer the SN redshift, long after the SN has faded from view. We find that SNe Ia that are selected on the availability of a redshift from the host differ from SNe Ia that are from the broader sample. The former tend to be redder, have narrower light curves, live in more massive hosts, and tend to be at lower redshifts. We find that constraints on the equation of state of dark energy, w, and the matter density, ΩM, remain consistent between these two types of samples. Our results are important for ongoing and future supernova surveys, which unlike previous supernova surveys, will have limited real-time follow-up to spectroscopically classify the SNe they discover. Most of the redshifts in these surveys will come from the hosts.

  6. Multiwavelength observations of the Type IIb supernova 2009mg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oates, S. R.; Bayless, A. J.; Stritzinger, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    We present Swift Ultra-Violet Optical Telescope and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) observations, and visual wavelength spectroscopy of the Type IIb supernova (SN) 2009mg, discovered in the Sb galaxy ESO 121-G26. The observational properties of SN 2009mg are compared to the prototype Type IIb SNe 1993J...

  7. An Unusually Fast-Evolving Supernova

    OpenAIRE

    Poznanski, Dovi; Chornock, Ryan; Nugent, Peter E.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Leonard, Douglas C.; Li, Weidong; Thomas, Rollin C.

    2009-01-01

    Analyses of supernovae (SNe) have revealed two main types of progenitors: exploding white dwarfs and collapsing massive stars. We present SN2002bj, which stands out as different from any SN reported to date. Its light curve rises and declines very rapidly, yet reaches a peak intrinsic brightness greater than -18 mag. A spectrum obtained 7 days after discovery shows the presence of helium and intermediate-mass elements, yet no clear hydrogen or iron-peak elements. The spectrum only barely rese...

  8. The core-degenerate scenario for the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Zhou, W.-H.; Zuo, Z.-Y.; Li, Y.-B.; Luo, X.; Zhang, J.-J.; Liu, D.-D.; Wu, C.-Y.

    2017-02-01

    The origin of the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is still uncertain. The core-degenerate (CD) scenario has been proposed as an alternative way for the production of SNe Ia. In this scenario, SNe Ia are formed at the final stage of common-envelope evolution from a merger of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf (CO WD) with the CO core of an asymptotic giant branch companion. However, the birthrates of SNe Ia from this scenario are still not well determined. In this work, we performed a detailed investigation on the CD scenario based on a binary population synthesis approach. The SN Ia delay times from this scenario are basically in the range of 90-2500 Myr, mainly contributing to the observed SNe Ia with short and intermediate delay times, although this scenario can also produce some old SNe Ia. Meanwhile, our work indicates that the Galactic birthrates of SNe Ia from this scenario are not more than 20 per cent of total SNe Ia due to more careful treatment of mass transfer. Although the SN Ia birthrates in this work are lower than those in Ilkov & Soker, the CD scenario cannot be ruled out as a viable mechanism for the formation of SNe Ia. Especially, SNe Ia with circumstellar material from this scenario contribute to 0.7-10 per cent of total SNe Ia, which means that the CD scenario can reproduce the observed birthrates of SNe Ia like PTF 11kx. We also found that SNe Ia happen systemically earlier for a high value of metallicity and their birthrates increase with metallicity.

  9. Type Ia supernovae: Progenitors and evolution with redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Umeda, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Hachisu, Izumi; Kato, Mariko; Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2000-06-01

    Relatively uniform light curves and spectral evolution of Type Ia supernovae(SNe Ia) have led to the use of SNe Ia as a ``standard candle'' to determine cosmological parameters. Whether a statistically significant value of the cosmological constant can be obtained depends on whether the peak luminosities of SNe Ia are sufficiently free from the effects of cosmic and galactic evolutions. Here we first review the single degenerate scenario for the Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf (WD) models of SNe Ia. We identify the progenitor's evolution and population with two channels: (1) the WD+RG (red-giant) and (2) the WD+MS (near main-sequence He-rich star) channels. In these channels, the strong wind from accreting WDs plays a key role, which yields important age and metallicity effects on the evolution. We then address the questions whether the nature of SNe Ia depends systematically on environmental properties such as metallicity and age of the progenitor system and whether significant evolutionary effects exist. We suggest that the variation of the carbon mass fraction X(C) in the C+O WD (or the variation of the initial WD mass) causes the diversity of the brightness of SNe Ia. This model can explain the observed dependences of SNe Ia brightness on the galaxy types and the distance from the galactic center. Finally, applying the metallicity effect on the evolution of SN Ia progenitors, we make a prediction of the cosmic supernova rate history as a composite of the supernova rates in different types of galaxies. .

  10. Three Gravitationally Lensed Supernovae Behind Clash Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Brandon; McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurbh W.; Rodney, Steven A.; Jones, David O.; Graur, Or; Merten, Julian; Zitrin, Adi; Riess, Adam G.; Matheson, Thomas; Sako, Masao; Holoien, Thomas W. -S.; Postman, Marc; Coe, Dan; Bartelmann, Matthias; Balestra, Italo; Benitez, Narciso; Bouwens, Rychard; Bradley, Larry; Broadhurst, Tom; Cenko, Stephen Bradley; Donahue, Megan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ford, Holland; Garnavich, Peter; Grillo, Claudio; Infante, Leopoldo; Jouvel, Stephanie; Kelson, Daniel; Koekemoer, Anton; Lahav, Ofer; Lemze, Doron; Maoz, Dan; Medezinski, Elinor; Melchior, Peter; Meneghetti, Massimo; Molino, Alberto; Moustakas, John; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Nonino, Mario; Rosati, Piero; Seitz, Stella; Strolger, Louis G.; Umetsu, Keiichi; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We report observations of three gravitationally lensed supernovae (SNe) in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program. These objects, SN CLO12Car (z = 1.28), SN CLN12Did (z = 0.85), and SN CLA11Tib (z = 1.14), are located behind three different clusters, MACSJ1720.2+3536 (z = 0.391), RXJ1532.9+3021 (z = 0.345), and A383 (z = 0.187), respectively. Each SN was detected in Hubble Space Telescope optical and infrared images. Based on photometric classification, we find that SNe CLO12Car and CLN12Did are likely to be Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), while the classification of SN CLA11Tib is inconclusive. Using multi-color light-curve fits to determine a standardized SN Ia luminosity distance, we infer that SN CLO12Car was approx. 1.0 +/- 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia at a similar redshift and ascribe this to gravitational lens magnification. Similarly, SN CLN12Did is approx. 0.2 +/- 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia. We derive independent estimates of the predicted magnification from CLASH strong+weak-lensing maps of the clusters (in magnitude units, 2.5 log10 µ): 0.83 +/- 0.16 mag for SN CLO12Car, 0.28 +/- 0.08 mag for SN CLN12Did, and 0.43 +/- 0.11 mag for SN CLA11Tib. The two SNe Ia provide a new test of the cluster lens model predictions: we find that the magnifications based on the SN Ia brightness and those predicted by the lens maps are consistent. Our results herald the promise of future observations of samples of cluster-lensed SNe Ia (from the ground or space) to help illuminate the dark-matter distribution in clusters of galaxies, through the direct determination of absolute magnifications.

  11. Host Galaxy Identification for Supernova Surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Ravi R.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kovacs, Eve; Spinka, Harold; Kessler, Richard; Goldstein, Daniel A.; Liotine, Camille; Pomian, Katarzyna; D’Andrea, Chris B.; Sullivan, Mark; Carretero, Jorge; Castander, Francisco J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Finley, David A.; Fischer, John A.; Foley, Ryan J.; Kim, Alex G.; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Sako, Masao; Scolnic, Daniel M.; Smith, Mathew; Tucker, Brad E.; Uddin, Syed; Wolf, Rachel C.; Yuan, Fang; Abbott, Tim M. C.; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Kind, Matias Carrasco; Cunha, Carlos E.; Costa, Luiz N. da; Desai, Shantanu; Doel, Peter; Eifler, Tim F.; Evrard, August E.; Flaugher, Brenna; Fosalba, Pablo; Gaztañaga, Enrique; Gruen, Daniel; Gruendl, Robert; James, David J.; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Miquel, Ramon; Plazas, Andrés A.; Romer, A. Kathy; Sánchez, Eusebio; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Sobreira, Flávia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tarle, Gregory; Walker, Alistair R.; Wester, William

    2016-11-08

    Host galaxy identification is a crucial step for modern supernova (SN) surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will discover SNe by the thousands. Spectroscopic resources are limited, so in the absence of real-time SN spectra these surveys must rely on host galaxy spectra to obtain accurate redshifts for the Hubble diagram and to improve photometric classification of SNe. In addition, SN luminosities are known to correlate with host-galaxy properties. Therefore, reliable identification of host galaxies is essential for cosmology and SN science. We simulate SN events and their locations within their host galaxies to develop and test methods for matching SNe to their hosts. We use both real and simulated galaxy catalog data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog and MICECATv2.0, respectively. We also incorporate "hostless" SNe residing in undetected faint hosts into our analysis, with an assumed hostless rate of 5%. Our fully automated algorithm is run on catalog data and matches SNe to their hosts with 91% accuracy. We find that including a machine learning component, run after the initial matching algorithm, improves the accuracy (purity) of the matching to 97% with a 2% cost in efficiency (true positive rate). Although the exact results are dependent on the details of the survey and the galaxy catalogs used, the method of identifying host galaxies we outline here can be applied to any transient survey.

  12. Ultraviolet Diversity of Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, Ryan J; Brown, P; Filippenko, A V; Fox, O D; Hillebrandt, W; Kirshner, R P; Marion, G H; Milne, P A; Parrent, J T; Pignata, G; Stritzinger, M D

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) observations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) probe the outermost layers of the explosion, and UV spectra of SNe Ia are expected to be extremely sensitive to differences in progenitor composition and the details of the explosion. Here we present the first study of a sample of high signal-to-noise ratio SN Ia spectra that extend blueward of 2900 A. We focus on spectra taken within 5 days of maximum brightness. Our sample of ten SNe Ia spans the majority of the parameter space of SN Ia optical diversity. We find that SNe Ia have significantly more diversity in the UV than in the optical, with the spectral variance continuing to increase with decreasing wavelengths until at least 1800 A (the limit of our data). The majority of the UV variance correlates with optical light-curve shape, while there are no obvious and unique correlations between spectral shape and either ejecta velocity or host-galaxy morphology. Using light-curve shape as the primary variable, we create a UV spectral model for SNe I...

  13. Quantifying Supernovae-driven Multiphase Galactic Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miao; Bryan, Greg L.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2017-06-01

    Galactic outflows are observed everywhere in star-forming disk galaxies and are critical for galaxy formation. Supernovae (SNe) play the key role in driving the outflows, but there is no consensus as to how much energy, mass, and metal they can launch out of the disk. We perform 3D, high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations to study SNe-driven outflows from stratified media. Assuming the SN rate scales with gas surface density Σgas as in the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, we find that the mass loading factor, η m, defined as the mass outflow flux divided by the star formation surface density, decreases with increasing Σgas as {η }{{m}}\\propto {{{Σ }}}{gas}-0.61. Approximately Σgas ≲ 50 M ⊙ pc-2 marks when η m ≳ 1. About 10%-50% of the energy and 40%-80% of the metals produced by SNe end up in the outflows. The tenuous hot phase (T > 3 × 105 K), which fills 60%-80% of the volume at the midplane, carries the majority of the energy and metals in the outflows. We discuss how various physical processes, including the vertical distribution of SNe, photoelectric heating, external gravitational field, and SN rate, affect the loading efficiencies. The relative scale height of gas and SNe is a very important factor in determining the loading efficiencies.

  14. Host Galaxy Identification for Supernova Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi R.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kovacs, Eve; Spinka, Harold; Kessler, Richard; Goldstein, Daniel A.; Liotine, Camille; Pomian, Katarzyna; D'Andrea, Chris B.; Sullivan, Mark; Carretero, Jorge; Castander, Francisco J.; Nichol, Robert C.; Finley, David A.; Fischer, John A.; Foley, Ryan J.; Kim, Alex G.; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Sako, Masao; Scolnic, Daniel M.; Smith, Mathew; Tucker, Brad E.; Uddin, Syed; Wolf, Rachel C.; Yuan, Fang; Abbott, Tim M. C.; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Carnero Rosell, Aurelio; Carrasco Kind, Matias; Cunha, Carlos E.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Desai, Shantanu; Doel, Peter; Eifler, Tim F.; Evrard, August E.; Flaugher, Brenna; Fosalba, Pablo; Gaztañaga, Enrique; Gruen, Daniel; Gruendl, Robert; James, David J.; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Miquel, Ramon; Plazas, Andrés A.; Romer, A. Kathy; Sánchez, Eusebio; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Sobreira, Flávia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tarle, Gregory; Walker, Alistair R.; Wester, William

    2016-12-01

    Host galaxy identification is a crucial step for modern supernova (SN) surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, which will discover SNe by the thousands. Spectroscopic resources are limited, and so in the absence of real-time SN spectra these surveys must rely on host galaxy spectra to obtain accurate redshifts for the Hubble diagram and to improve photometric classification of SNe. In addition, SN luminosities are known to correlate with host-galaxy properties. Therefore, reliable identification of host galaxies is essential for cosmology and SN science. We simulate SN events and their locations within their host galaxies to develop and test methods for matching SNe to their hosts. We use both real and simulated galaxy catalog data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog and MICECATv2.0, respectively. We also incorporate “hostless” SNe residing in undetected faint hosts into our analysis, with an assumed hostless rate of 5%. Our fully automated algorithm is run on catalog data and matches SNe to their hosts with 91% accuracy. We find that including a machine learning component, run after the initial matching algorithm, improves the accuracy (purity) of the matching to 97% with a 2% cost in efficiency (true positive rate). Although the exact results are dependent on the details of the survey and the galaxy catalogs used, the method of identifying host galaxies we outline here can be applied to any transient survey.

  15. Host Galaxy Identification for Supernova Surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Ravi R.; et al.

    2016-04-20

    Host galaxy identification is a crucial step for modern supernova (SN) surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will discover SNe by the thousands. Spectroscopic resources are limited, so in the absence of real-time SN spectra these surveys must rely on host galaxy spectra to obtain accurate redshifts for the Hubble diagram and to improve photometric classification of SNe. In addition, SN luminosities are known to correlate with host-galaxy properties. Therefore, reliable identification of host galaxies is essential for cosmology and SN science. We simulate SN events and their locations within their host galaxies to develop and test methods for matching SNe to their hosts. We use both real and simulated galaxy catalog data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog and MICECATv2.0, respectively. We also incorporate "hostless" SNe residing in undetected faint hosts into our analysis, with an assumed hostless rate of 5%. Our fully automated algorithm is run on catalog data and matches SNe to their hosts with 91% accuracy. We find that including a machine learning component, run after the initial matching algorithm, improves the accuracy (purity) of the matching to 97% with a 2% cost in efficiency (true positive rate). Although the exact results are dependent on the details of the survey and the galaxy catalogs used, the method of identifying host galaxies we outline here can be applied to any transient survey.

  16. The Local Hosts of Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Neill, James D; Howell, D Andy; Conley, Alex; Seibert, Mark; Martin, D Christopher; Barlow, Tom A; Foster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G; Schiminovich, David; Wyder, Ted K; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, José; Heckman, Timothy M; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F; Milliard, Bruno; Rich, R Michael; Szalay, A S

    2009-01-01

    We use multi-wavelength, matched aperture, integrated photometry from GALEX, SDSS and the RC3 to estimate the physical properties of 166 nearby galaxies hosting 168 well-observed Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Our data corroborate well-known features that have been seen in other SN Ia samples. Specifically, hosts with active star formation produce brighter and slower SNe Ia on average, and hosts with luminosity-weighted ages older than 1 Gyr produce on average more faint, fast and fewer bright, slow SNe Ia than younger hosts. New results include that in our sample, the faintest and fastest SNe Ia occur only in galaxies exceeding a stellar mass threshhold of ~10^10 M_sun, indicating that their progenitors must arise in populations that are older and/or more metal rich than the general SN Ia population. A low host extinction sub-sample hints at a residual trend in peak luminosity with host age, after correcting for light-curve shape, giving the appearance that older hosts produce less-extincted SNe Ia on average....

  17. Merging white dwarfs and Type Ia supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yungelson, L. R.; Kuranov, A. G.

    2017-01-01

    Using population synthesis, we study a double-degenerate (DD) scenario for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), aiming to estimate the maximum possible contribution to the rate of SNe from this scenario and the dependence of the delay-time distribution (DTD) on it. We make an extreme assumption that all mergers of super-Chandrasekhar pairs of CO white dwarfs (WDs) and mergers of CO WDs more massive than 0.47 M⊙ with hybrid or helium WDs more massive than 0.37 M⊙ produce SNe Ia. The models are parametrized by the product of the common envelope efficiency and the parameter of binding energy of stellar envelopes, αce λ, which we vary between 0.25 and 2. The best agreement with observations is obtained for αce λ = 2. A substantial contribution to the rate of SNe Ia is provided by the pairs with a hybrid WD. The estimated Galactic rate of SNe Ia is 6.5 × 10-3 yr-1 (for the mass of the bulge and thin disc equal to 7.2 × 1010 M⊙), which is comparable to the observational estimate (5.4 ± 0.12) × 10-3 yr-1. The model DTD for 1 ≤ t ≤ 8 Gyr satisfactorily fits the DTD for SNe Ia in the field galaxies (Maoz, Mannucci & Brandt). For this epoch, the model DTD is ∝t-1.64. At earlier and later epochs, our DTD has a deficit of events, as in other studies. Marginal agreement with the observational DTD is achieved even if only CO+CO WDs with M1 ≥ 0.8 M⊙ and M2 ≥ 0.6 M⊙ produce SNe Ia. A better agreement of observed and modelled DTD may be obtained if tidal effects are weaker than assumed and/or the metallicity of the population is much lower than solar.

  18. Paired galaxies with different activity levels and their supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Nazaryan, T A; Hakobyan, A A; Adibekyan, V Zh; Kunth, D; Mamon, G A; Turatto, M; Aramyan, L S

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the influence of close neighbor galaxies on the properties of supernovae (SNe) and their host galaxies using 56 SNe located in pairs of galaxies with different levels of star formation (SF) and nuclear activity. The statistical study of SN hosts shows that there is no significant difference between morphologies of hosts in our sample and the larger general sample of SN hosts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8). The mean distance of type II SNe from nuclei of hosts is greater by about a factor of 2 than that of type Ibc SNe. The distributions and mean distances of SNe are consistent with previous results compiled with the larger sample. For the first time it is shown that SNe Ibc are located in pairs with significantly smaller difference of radial velocities between components than pairs containing SNe Ia and II. We consider this as a result of higher star formation rate (SFR) of these closer systems of galaxies. SN types are not correlated with the luminosity ratio of ho...

  19. Type Ia Supernovae Strongly Interacting with Their Circumstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, Jeffrey M; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Sullivan, Mark; Howell, D Andrew; Filippenko, Alexei V; Arcavi, Iair; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Bloom, Joshua S; Cenko, S Bradley; Cao, Yi; Chornock, Ryan; Clubb, Kelsey I; Coil, Alison L; Foley, Ryan J; Graham, Melissa L; Griffith, Christopher V; Horesh, Assaf; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Leonard, Douglas C; Li, Weidong; Matheson, Thomas; Miller, Adam A; Modjaz, Maryam; Ofek, Eran O; Pan, Yen-Chen; Perley, Daniel A; Poznanski, Dovi; Quimby, Robert M; Steele, Thea N; Sternberg, Assaf; Xu, Dong; Yaron, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    Owing to their utility for measurements of cosmic acceleration, Type Ia supernovae (SNe) are perhaps the best-studied class of SNe, yet the progenitor systems of these explosions largely remain a mystery. A rare subclass of SNe Ia show evidence of strong interaction with their circumstellar medium (CSM), and in particular, a hydrogen-rich CSM; we refer to them as SNe Ia-CSM. In the first systematic search for such systems, we have identified 16 SNe Ia-CSM, and here we present new spectra of 13 of them. Six SNe Ia-CSM have been well-studied previously, three were previously known but are analyzed in-depth for the first time here, and seven are new discoveries from the Palomar Transient Factory. The spectra of all SNe Ia-CSM are dominated by H{\\alpha} emission (with widths of ~2000 km/s) and exhibit large H{\\alpha}/H{\\beta} intensity ratios (perhaps due to collisional excitation of hydrogen via the SN ejecta overtaking slower-moving CSM shells); moreover, they have an almost complete lack of He I emission. They...

  20. Can Dust Injected by SNe Explain the NIR-MIR Excess in Young Massive Stellar Clusters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, Sergio; Wünsch, Richard; Palouš, Jan

    2017-07-01

    We present a physically motivated model involving the different processes affecting supernova dust grains as they are incorporated into the thermalized medium within young massive star clusters. The model is used to explain the near- to mid-infrared (NIR-MIR) excess found in such clusters and usually modeled as a blackbody with temperature ˜ (400{--}1000) K. In our approach, dust grains are efficiently produced in the clumpy ejecta of core-collapse supernovae, shattered into small pieces (≲ 0.05 μm) as they are incorporated into the hot and dense ISM, heated via frequent collisions with electrons and the absorption of energetic photons. Grains with small sizes can more easily acquire the high temperatures (˜1000 K) required to produce an NIR-MIR excess with respect to the emission of foreground PAHs and starlight. However, the extreme conditions inside young massive clusters make it difficult for these small grains to have a persistent manifestation at NIR-MIR wavelengths as they are destroyed by efficient thermal sputtering. Nevertheless, the chances for a persistent manifestation are increased by taking into account that small grains become increasingly transparent to their impinging ions as their sizes decrease. For an individual SN event, we find that the NIR-MIR excess lasts longer if the time required to incorporate all the grains into the thermalized medium is also longer, and, in some cases, comparable to the characteristic interval between supernova explosions. Our models can successfully explain the near-infrared excesses found in the star clusters observed in M33 assuming a low heating efficiency and mass loading. In this scenario, the presence of the NIR-MIR excess is an indication of efficient dust production in SNe and its subsequent destruction.

  1. Measurements of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift z < ~0.3 from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Smith, Mathew; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /Portsmouth U.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Bender, Ralf; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ.; Castander, Francisco; /Barcelona, IEEC; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; /UC, Berkeley; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Galbany, Lluis; /Barcelona, IFAE; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.

    2010-01-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The adopted sample of supernovae (SNe) includes 516 SNe Ia at redshift z {approx}< 0.3, of which 270 (52%) are spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The remaining 246 SNe Ia were identified through their light curves; 113 of these objects have spectroscopic redshifts from spectra of their host galaxy, and 133 have photometric redshifts estimated from the SN light curves. Based on consideration of 87 spectroscopically confirmed non-Ia SNe discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey, we estimate that 2.04{sub -0.95}{sup +1.61}% of the photometric SNe Ia may be misidentified. The sample of SNe Ia used in this measurement represents an order of magnitude increase in the statistics for SN Ia rate measurements in the redshift range covered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. If we assume a SN Ia rate that is constant at low redshift (z < 0.15), then the SN observations can be used to infer a value of the SN rate of r{sub V} = (2.69{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.34+0.21}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} at a mean redshift of {approx} 0.12, based on 79 SNe Ia of which 72 are spectroscopically confirmed. However, the large sample of SNe Ia included in this study allows us to place constraints on the redshift dependence of the SN Ia rate based on the SDSS-II Supernova Survey data alone. Fitting a power-law model of the SN rate evolution, r{sub V} (z) = A{sub p} x ((1+z)/(1+z{sub 0})){sup {nu}}, over the redshift range 0.0 < z < 0.3 with z{sub 0} = 0.21, results in A{sub p} = (3.43{sub -0.15}{sup +0.15}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} and {nu} = 2.04{sub -0.89}{sup +0.90}.

  2. Evidence for Pre-Existing Dust in the Bright Type IIn SN 2010jl

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, J E; Wesson, R; Sugerman, B E K; Barlow, M J; Clem, J; Ercolano, B; Fabbri, J; Gallagher, J S; Landolt, A; Meixner, M; Otsuka, M; Riebel, D; Welch, D L

    2011-01-01

    SN 2010jl was an extremely bright, Type IIn SNe which showed a significant IR excess no later than 90 days after explosion. We have obtained Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 \\mum and JHK observations of SN 2010jl \\sim90 days post explosion. Little to no reddening in the host galaxy indicated that the circumstellar material lost from the progenitor must lie in a torus inclined out of the plane of the sky. The likely cause of the high mid-IR flux is the reprocessing of the initial flash of the SN by pre-existing circumstellar dust. Using a 3D Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer code, we have estimated that between 0.03-0.35 Msun of dust exists in a circumstellar torus around the SN located 6 \\times 10 ^17 cm away from the SN and inclined between 60-80\\cdot to the plane of the sky. On day 90, we are only seeing the illumination of approximately 5% of this torus, and expect to see an elevated IR flux from this material up until day \\sim 450. It is likely this dust was created in an LBV-like mass loss event of more than 3 Msun, whi...

  3. The Diversity of Type II Supernova vs. The Similarity in Their Progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Valenti, S; Stritzinger, M D; Graham, M L; Hosseinzadeh, G; Arcavi, I; Bildsten, L; Jerkstrand, A; McCully, C; Pastorello, A; Piro, A L; Sand, D; Smartt, S J; Terreran, G; Baltay, C; Benetti, S; Brown, P; Filippenko, A V; Fraser, M; Rabinowitz, D; Sullivan, M; Yuan, F

    2016-01-01

    High-quality collections of Type II supernova (SN) light curves are scarce because they evolve for hundreds of days, making follow-up observations time consuming and often extending over multiple observing seasons. In light of these difficulties, the diversity of SNe II is not fully understood. Here we present ultraviolet and optical photometry of 12 SNe II monitored by the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) during 2013-2014, and compare them with previously studied SNe having well-sampled light curves. We explore SN II diversity by searching for correlations between the slope of the linear light-curve decay after maximum light (historically used to divide SNe II into IIL and IIP) and other measured physical properties. While SNe IIL are found to be on average more luminous than SNe IIP, SNe IIL do not appear to synthesize more 56Ni than SNe IIP. Finally, optical nebular spectra obtained for several SNe in our sample are found to be consistent with models of red supergiant progenitors in...

  4. Environmental impact of Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Dubner, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    The explosion of a supernovae (SN) represents the sudden injection of about 10^51 ergs of thermal and mechanical energy in a small region of space, causing the formation of powerful shock waves that propagate through the interstellar medium at speeds of several thousands of km/s. These waves sweep, compress and heat the interstellar material that they encounter, forming the supernova remnants. Their evolution over thousands of years change forever, irreversibly, not only the physical but also the chemical properties of a vast region of space that can span hundreds of parsecs. This contribution briefly analyzes the impact of these explosions, discussing the relevance of some phenomena usually associated with SNe and their remnants in the light of recent theoretical and observational results.

  5. An Update on Radio Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Sramek, Richard A.; Weiler, Kurt W.; Montes, Marcos J.; Panagia, Nino

    The radio emission from supernovae (SNe) is nonthermal synchrotron radiation of high brightness temperature, with a ``turn-on'' delay at longer wavelengths, power-law decline after maximum with index beta, and spectral index alpha asymptotically decreasing with time to a final, optically thin value. Radio supernovae (RSNe) are best described by the Chevalier (1982) ``mini-shell'' model, with modifications by Weiler \\etal\\ (1990). RSNe observations provide a valuable probe of the SN circumstellar environment and constraints on progenitor masses. We present a progress report on a number of recent RSNe, as well as on new behavior from RSNe 1979C and 1980K, and on RSNe as potential distance indicators. In particular, we present updated radio light curves for SN 1993J in M81.

  6. Evidence for Nearby Supernova Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Benítez, N; Canelles, M; Benitez, Narciso; Maiz-Apellaniz, Jesus; Canelles, Matilde

    2002-01-01

    Supernova explosions are one of the most energetic--and potentially lethal--phenomena in the Universe. Scientists have speculated for decades about the possible consequences for life on Earth of a nearby supernova, but plausible candidates for such an event were lacking. Here we show that the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, a group of young stars currently located at~130 parsecs from the Sun, has generated 20 SN explosions during the last 11 Myr, some of them probably as close as 40 pc to our planet. We find that the deposition on Earth of 60Fe atoms produced by these explosions can explain the recent measurements of an excess of this isotope in deep ocean crust samples. We propose that ~2 Myr ago, one of the SNe exploded close enough to Earth to seriously damage the ozone layer, provoking or contributing to the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary marine extinction.

  7. Type IA supernova spectroscopy analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey II - Supernova Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chen

    2009-06-01

    Supernovae (SNe) have played an important role in the recent dramatic development of observational cosmology. They possess homogeneous observable properties, and thus approximate "standard candles", allowing them to be precise, luminosity distance indicators. Over the last decade, the observed sample of supernovae (SNe) has increased by more than an order of magnitude. Further advances will no longer be limited by statistical errors, but rather by the control of systematic uncertainties, associated with source diversity and evolution. Over 500 SNe Ia have been discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) -- II SN Survey during the three fall seasons from 2005 to 2007. We combine spectroscopic and photometric data to explore reducing these systematic errors. One challenge is to remove accurately the host galaxy light from the observed spectra. We have developed an effective host-subtraction tool using a composite color-constrained PCA+template-fitting program. We have applied this technique to more than 700 spectra from SNe with redshifts up to 0.4 obtained from the SDSS-II SN Survey and more than 200 spectra from low-z SNe at redshifts less than 0.01 obtained from the Center for Astrophysics (CfA) SN archive. We have also developed an automatic method to quantify spectral features of SNe Ia and applied it to the CfA and SDSS-II samples. By comparing the time series of the spectral features between these two samples, we have found no sign of cosmological evolution. We have, however, found evidence for luminosity-dependent differences in the Mg II 4300, Si II 4000, Si II 5800, and Si II 6150 lines. This should be useful for cosmological studies.

  8. An Intensive HST Survey for z>1 Supernovae by Targeting Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, K S; Amanullah, R; Barbary, K; Barrientos, L F; Brodwin, M; Connolly, N; Dey, A; Doi, M; Donahue, M; Eisenhardt, P; Ellingson, E; Faccioli, L; Fadeev, V; Fakhouri, H K; Fruchter, A S; Gilbank, D G; Gladders, M D; Goldhaber, G; González, A H; Goobar, A; Gude, A; Hattori, T; Hoekstra, H; Huang, X; Ihara, Y; Jannuzi, B T; Johnston, D; Kashikawa, K; Koester, B; Konishi, K; Kowalski, M; Lidman, C; Linder, E V; Lubin, L; Meyers, J; Morokuma, T; Munshi, F; Mullis, C; Oda, T; Panagia, N; Perlmutter, S; Postman, M; Pritchard, T; Rhodes, J; Rosati, P; Rubin, D; Schlegel, D J; Spadafora, A; Stanford, S A; Stanishev, V; Stern, D; Strovink, M; Suzuki, N; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; Wagner, M; Wang, L; Yasuda, N; Yee, H K C

    2009-01-01

    We present a new survey strategy to discover and study high redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). By targeting massive galaxy clusters at 0.90.95, nine of which were in galaxy clusters. This strategy provides a SN sample that can be used to decouple the effects of host galaxy extinction and intrinsic color in high redshift SNe, thereby reducing one of the largest systematic uncertainties in SN cosmology.

  9. Thermonuclear supernova explosions and their remnants: the case of Tycho

    CERN Document Server

    Badenes, C; Borkowski, K J; Badenes, Carles; Bravo, Eduardo; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.

    2003-01-01

    We propose to use the thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants (SNRs) originated in Type Ia supernovae (SNe) to extract relevant information concerning the explosion mechanism. We will focus on the differences between numerical 1D and 3D explosion calculations, and the impact that these differences could have on young SNRs. We use the remnant of the Tycho supernova (SN 1572) as a test case to compare with our predictions, discussing the observational features that allow to accept or discard a given model.

  10. A Trio of GRB-SNe: GRB 120729A, GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez and GRB 130831A / SN 2013fu

    CERN Document Server

    Cano, Z; Pozanenko, A; Butler, N; Thone, C C; Guidorzi, C; Kruhler, T; Gorosabel, J; Jakobsson, P; Leloudas, G; Malesani, D; Hjorth, J; Melandri, A; Mundell, C; Wiersema, K; D'Avanzo, P; Schulze, S; Gomboc, A; Johansson, A; Zheng, W; Kann, D A; Knust, F; Varela, K; Akerlof, C W; Bloom, J; Burkhonov, O; Cooke, E; de Diego, J A; Dhungana, G; Farina, C; Ferrante, F V; Flewelling, H A; Fox, O D; Fynbo, J; Gehrels, N; Georgiev, L; Gonzalez, J J; Greiner, J; Guver, T; Hartoog, O; Hatch, N; Jelinek, M; Kehoe, R; Klose, S; Klunko, E; Kopac, D; Kutyrev, A; Krugl, Y; Lee, W H; Levan, A; Linkov, V; Matkin, A; Minikulov, N; Molotov, I; Prochaska, J Xavier; Richer, M G; Roman-Zuniga, C G; Rumyantsev, V; Sanchez-Ramirez, R; Steele, I; Tanvir, N R; Volnova, A; Watson, A M; Xu, D; Yuan, F

    2014-01-01

    We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry for three gamma-ray burst supernovae (GRB-SNe): GRB 120729A, GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez and GRB 130831A / SN 2013fu. In the case of GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez, we also present optical spectroscopy at t-t0=16.1 d, which covers rest-frame 3000-6250 Angstroms. Based on Fe II (5169) and Si (II) (6355), our spectrum indicates an unusually low expansion velocity of 4000-6350 km/s, the lowest ever measured for a GRB-SN. Additionally, we determined the brightness and shape of each accompanying SN relative to a template supernova (SN 1998bw), which were used to estimate the amount of nickel produced via nucleosynthesis during each explosion. We find that our derived nickel masses are typical of other GRB-SNe, and greater than those of SNe Ibc that are not associated with GRBs. For GRB 130831A / SN 2013fu, we use our well-sampled R-band light curve (LC) to estimate the amount of ejecta mass and the kinetic energy of the SN, finding that these too are similar to other GRB-...

  11. Type Ia Supernovae Rates and Galaxy Clustering from the CFHT Supernova Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, M L; Sullivan, M; Gwyn, S D J; Neill, J D; Hsiao, E Y; Astier, Pierre; Balam, D; Balland, C; Basa, S; Carlberg, R G; Conley, A; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Howell, D A; Pain, R; Perrett, K; Regnault, N; Baumont, S; Du, J Le; Lidman, C; Perlmutter, S; Ripoche, P; Suzuki, N; Walker, E S; Zhang, T

    2008-01-01

    The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) has created a large homogeneous database of intermediate redshift (0.2 < z < 1.0) type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The SNLS team has shown that correlations exist between SN Ia rates, properties, and host galaxy star formation rates. The SNLS SN Ia database has now been combined with a photometric redshift galaxy catalog and an optical galaxy cluster catalog to investigate the possible influence of galaxy clustering on the SN Ia rate, over and above the expected effect due to the dependence of SFR on clustering through the morphology-density relation. We identify three cluster SNe Ia, plus three additional possible cluster SNe Ia, and find the SN Ia rate per unit mass in clusters at intermediate redshifts is consistent with the rate per unit mass in field early-type galaxies and the SN Ia cluster rate from low redshift cluster targeted surveys. We also find the number of SNe Ia in cluster environments to be within a factor of two of expectati...

  12. Discovery of a Supernova Explosion at Half the Age of the Universe and its Cosmological Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Perlmutter, S; Valle, M D; Deustua, S; Ellis, Richard S; Fabbro, S; Fruchter, A S; Goldhaber, Gerson; Goobar, A; Groom, D E; Hook, I M; Kim, A G; Kim, M Y; Knop, R A; Lidman, C E; McMahon, R G; Nugent, P; Pain, R; Panagia, N; Pennypacker, C R; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Schaefer, B; Walton, N A; Nugent, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The ultimate fate of the universe, infinite expansion or a big crunch, can be determined by measuring the redshifts, apparent brightnesses, and intrinsic luminosities of very distant supernovae. Recent developments have provided tools that make such a program practicable: (1) Studies of relatively nearby Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have shown that their intrinsic luminosities can be accurately determined; (2) New research techniques have made it possible to schedule the discovery and follow-up observations of distant supernovae, producing well over 50 very distant (z = 0.3 -- 0.7) SNe Ia to date. These distant supernovae provide a record of changes in the expansion rate over the past several billion years. By making precise measurements of supernovae at still greater distances, and thus extending this expansion history back far enough in time, we can distinguish the slowing caused by the gravitational attraction of the universe's mass density Omega_M from the effect of a possibly inflationary pressure caused ...

  13. A metric space for type Ia supernova spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Sasdelli, Michele; Aldering, G; Antilogus, P; Aragon, C; Bailey, S; Baltay, C; Benitez-Herrera, S; Bongard, S; Buton, C; Canto, A; Cellier-Holzem, F; Chen, J; Childress, M; Chotard, N; Copin, Y; Fakhouri, H K; Feindt, U; Fink, M; Fleury, M; Fouchez, D; Gangler, E; Guy, J; Ishida, E E O; Kim, A G; Kowalski, M; Kromer, M; Lombardo, S; Mazzali, P A; Nordin, J; Pain, R; Pécontal, E; Pereira, R; Perlmutter, S; Rabinowitz, D; Rigault, M; Runge, K; Saunders, C; Scalzo, R; Smadja, G; Suzuki, N; Tao, C; Taubenberger, S; Thomas, R C; Tilquin, A; Weaver, B A

    2014-01-01

    We develop a new framework for use in exploring Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) spectra. Combining Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square analysis (PLS) we are able to establish correlations between the Principal Components (PCs) and spectroscopic/photometric SNe Ia features. The technique was applied to ~120 supernova and ~800 spectra from the Nearby Supernova Factory. The ability of PCA to group together SNe Ia with similar spectral features, already explored in previous studies, is greatly enhanced by two important modifications: (1) the initial data matrix is built using derivatives of spectra over the wavelength, which increases the weight of weak lines and discards extinction, and (2) we extract time evolution information through the use of entire spectral sequences concatenated in each line of the input data matrix. These allow us to define a stable PC parameter space which can be used to characterize synthetic SN Ia spectra by means of real SN features. Using PLS, we demonstrate that th...

  14. A Comprehensive Investigation Into Modeling Supernovae Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Desmond

    Supernovae are a rich source of information. By studying their light curves and spectra we gain insights into stellar evolution, the nature of the progenitor star, surface abundances at the time of the explosion, whether previous mass-loss episodes have occurred, the physics of the explosion including the amount and type of elements synthesized, and whether the explosion has produced significant mixing between shells of different chemical composition. To maximize the information that can be gleaned from observations of supernovae it is essential that we have the necessary spectroscopic tools. To this end, we are developing a code, CMFGEN, capable of modeling supernova light curves and spectra. The code is currently being used, to study core-collapse supernovae as well as those arising from the nuclear detonation of a White Dwarf star. We wish to extend CMFGEN's capabilities by developing a procedure to handle non-monotonic velocity flows so that we can treat shock breakout and the interaction of supernova ejecta with circumstellar material. We will also investigate magnetar-powered SNe, and explore the connection between Type Ib and Type Ic supernovae and those supernovae associated with long-duration gamma-ray bursters. Through detailed studies of individual supernova, and through the construction of model grids, we are able to infer deficiencies in our modeling, in our atomic data, and in the progenitor models, and hence make refinements so that we can improve our understanding of all SNe classes. Previous (IUE), current (HST, Chandra, GALEX), and future NASA missions (James Webb Telescope) do/will provide a wealth of data on supernovae. The proposed research is related to strategic subgoal 3D: "Discover the origin, structure, evolution, and destiny of the universe, and search for Earth-like planets." Supernovae are inherently coupled to the evolution of the universe and life: They can trigger star formation and they provide the raw materials (e.g., oxygen

  15. Classifying supernovae using only galaxy data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Ryan J. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Mandel, Kaisey [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We present a new method for probabilistically classifying supernovae (SNe) without using SN spectral or photometric data. Unlike all previous studies to classify SNe without spectra, this technique does not use any SN photometry. Instead, the method relies on host-galaxy data. We build upon the well-known correlations between SN classes and host-galaxy properties, specifically that core-collapse SNe rarely occur in red, luminous, or early-type galaxies. Using the nearly spectroscopically complete Lick Observatory Supernova Search sample of SNe, we determine SN fractions as a function of host-galaxy properties. Using these data as inputs, we construct a Bayesian method for determining the probability that an SN is of a particular class. This method improves a common classification figure of merit by a factor of >2, comparable to the best light-curve classification techniques. Of the galaxy properties examined, morphology provides the most discriminating information. We further validate this method using SN samples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Palomar Transient Factory. We demonstrate that this method has wide-ranging applications, including separating different subclasses of SNe and determining the probability that an SN is of a particular class before photometry or even spectra can. Since this method uses completely independent data from light-curve techniques, there is potential to further improve the overall purity and completeness of SN samples and to test systematic biases of the light-curve techniques. Further enhancements to the host-galaxy method, including additional host-galaxy properties, combination with light-curve methods, and hybrid methods, should further improve the quality of SN samples from past, current, and future transient surveys.

  16. The ESO/VLT 3rd year Type Ia supernova data set from the Supernova Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Balland, C; Basa, S; Mouchet, M; Howell, D A; Astier, P; Carlberg, R G; Conley, A; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Pain, R; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Sullivan, M; Antilogus, P; Arsenijevic, V; Du, J Le; Fabbro, S; Lidman, C; Mourao, A; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pécontal, E; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V

    2009-01-01

    We present 139 spectra of 124 Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) that were observed at the ESO/VLT during the first three years of the Canada-France-Hawai Telescope (CFHT) Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). This homogeneous data set is used to test for redshift evolution of SNeIa spectra, and will be used in the SNLS 3rd year cosmological analyses. Spectra have been reduced and extracted with a dedicated pipeline that uses photometric information from deep CFHT Legacy Survey (CFHT-LS) reference images to trace, at sub-pixel accuracy, the position of the supernova on the spectrogram as a function of wavelength. It also separates the supernova and its host light in 60% of cases. The identification of the supernova candidates is performed using a spectrophotometric SNIa model. A total of 124 SNeIa, roughly 50% of the overall SNLS spectroscopic sample, have been identified using the ESO/VLT during the first three years of the survey. Their redshifts range from z=0.149 to z=1.031. The average redshift of the sample is z=0.63...

  17. Near-Infrared Photometry of the Type IIn SN 2005ip: The Case for Dust Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Ori; Chevalier, Roger A; Kanneganti, Srikrishna; Park, Chan; Wilson, John; Nelson, Matthew; Amirhadji, Jason; Crump, Danielle; Hoeft, Alexi; Provence, Sydney; Sargeant, Benjamin; Sop, Joel; Tea, Matthew; Thomas, Steven; Woolard, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    Near-infrared photometric observations of the Type IIn SN 2005ip in NGC 2906 reveal large fluxes (>1.3 mJy) in the K_s-band over more than 900 days. While warm dust can explain the late-time K_s-band emission of SN 2005ip, the nature of the dust heating source is ambiguous. Shock heating of pre-existing dust by post-shocked gas is unlikely because the forward shock is moving too slowly to have traversed the expected dust-free cavity by the time observations first reveal the K_s emission. While an infrared light echo correctly predicts a near-infrared luminosity plateau, heating dust to the observed temperatures of ~1400-1600 K at a relatively large distance from the supernova (\\ga 10^{18} cm) requires an extraordinarily high early supernova luminosity (~1 X 10^{11} L_sun). The evidence instead favors condensing dust in the cool, dense shell between the forward and reverse shocks. Both the initial dust temperature and the evolutionary trend towards lower temperatures are consistent with this scenario. We infer...

  18. A semi-analytical light curve model and its application to type IIP supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Nagy, Andrea P; Vinko, Jozsef; Wheeler, J Craig

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present a semi-analytical light curve modeling code which can be used for estimating physical properties of core collapse supernovae (SNe) in a quick and efficient way. To verify our code we fit light curves of Type II SNe and compare our best parameter estimates to those from hydrodynamical calculations. For this analysis we use the quasi-bolometric light curves of five different Type IIP supernovae. In each case we get appropriate results for the initial pre-supernova parameters. We conclude that this semi-analytical light curve model is useful to get approximate physical properties of Type II SNe without using time-consuming numerical hydrodynamic simulations.

  19. Time-Varying Sodium Absorption in the Type Ia Supernova 2013gh

    CERN Document Server

    Ferretti, R; Goobar, A; Johansson, J; Vreeswijk, P M; Butler, R P; Cao, Y; Cenko, S B; Doran, G; Filippenko, A V; Freeland, E; Hosseinzadeh, G; Howell, D A; Lundqvist, P; Mattila, S; Nordin, J; Nugent, P E; Petrushevska, T; Valenti, S; Vogt, S; Wozniak, P

    2016-01-01

    Temporal variability of narrow absorption lines in high-resolution spectra of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is studied to search for circumstellar matter. Time series which resolve the profiles of absorption lines such as Na I D or Ca II H&K are expected to reveal variations due to photoionisation and subsequent recombination of the gases. The presence, composition, and geometry of circumstellar matter may hint at the elusive progenitor system of SNe Ia and could also affect the observed reddening law. To date, there are few known cases of time-varying Na I D absorption in SNe Ia, all of which occurred during relatively late phases of the supernova evolution. Photoionisation, however, is predicted to occur during the early phases of SNe Ia, when the supernova peaks in the ultraviolet. We therefore attempt to observe early-time absorption-line variations by obtaining high-resolution spectra of SNe before maximum light. We have obtained photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy of SNe Ia 2013gh and iPTF 13d...

  20. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington; Choi, Changsu; /Seoul Natl. U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, Darren L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hogan, Craig J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Marshall, Jennifer L.; /Ohio State U.; McGinnis,; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Pennsylvania U.

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

  1. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington; Choi, Changsu; /Seoul Natl. U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, Darren L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hogan, Craig J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Marshall, Jennifer L.; /Ohio State U.; McGinnis,; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Pennsylvania U.

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

  2. Supernovae and their host galaxies - III. The impact of bars and bulges on the radial distribution of supernovae in disc galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hakobyan, A A; Barkhudaryan, L V; Mamon, G A; Kunth, D; Petrosian, A R; Adibekyan, V; Aramyan, L S; Turatto, M

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the impact of bars and bulges on the radial distributions of the different types of supernovae (SNe) in the stellar discs of host galaxies with various morphologies. We use a well-defined sample of 500 nearby (< 100 Mpc) SNe and their low-inclined (i < 60 deg) and morphologically non-disturbed S0-Sm host galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that in Sa-Sm galaxies, all core-collapse (CC) and vast majority of SNe Ia belong to the disc, rather than the bulge component. The radial distribution of SNe Ia in S0-S0/a galaxies is inconsistent with their distribution in Sa-Sm hosts, which is probably due to the contribution of the outer bulge SNe Ia in S0-S0/a galaxies. In Sa-Sbc galaxies, the radial distribution of CC SNe in barred hosts is inconsistent with that in unbarred ones, while the distributions of SNe Ia are not significantly different. At the same time, the radial distributions of both types of SNe in Sc-Sm galaxies are not affected by bars. We propose that th...

  3. Type II-P Supernovae as Standard Candles: The SDSS-II Sample Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Poznanski, Dovi; Nugent, Peter E.; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2010-01-01

    We revisit the observed correlation between Hbeta and FeII velocities for Type II-P supernovae (SNe~II-P) using 28 optical spectra of 13 SNe II-P and demonstrate that it is well modeled by a linear relation with a dispersion of about 300 km/s. Using this correlation, we reanalyze the publicly available sample of SNe II-P compiled by D'Andrea et al. and find a Hubble diagram with an intrinsic scatter of 11% in distance, which is nearly as tight as that measured before their sample is added to ...

  4. Very low energy supernovae and their resulting transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth

    Core-collapse supernovae play a key role in many of astrophysical processes, but the details of how these explosive events work remain elusive. Many questions about the CCSN explosion mechanism and progenitor stars could be answered by either detecting very-low-energy supernovae (VLE SNe) or alternately placing a tight upper bound on their fraction of the CCSN population. However, VLE SNe are by definition dim events. Many VLE SNe result from the failure of the standard CCSN explosion mechanism, meaning that any observable signature must be created by secondary processes either before or during the collapse. In this dissertation I examine alternate means of producing transients in otherwise-failed CCSNe and consider the use of shock breakout flashes to both detect VLE SNe and retrieve progenitor star information. I begin by simulating neutrino-mediated mass loss in CCSNe progenitors to show that a dim, unusual, but still observable transient can be produced. I then simulate shock breakout flashes in VLE SNe for both the purposes of detection as well as extracting information about the exploding star. I discuss particular challenges of modeling shock breakout at low energies and behaviors unique to this regime, in particular the behavior of the spectral temperature. All simulations in this dissertation were done with the CASTRO radiation-hydrodynamic code.

  5. Long-rising Type II supernovae from PTF and CCCP

    CERN Document Server

    Taddia, F; Fremling, C; Migotto, K; Gal-Yam, A; Armen, S; Duggan, G; Ergon, M; Filippenko, A V; Fransson, C; Hosseinzadeh, G; Kasliwal, M M; Laher, R R; Leloudas, G; Leonard, D C; Lunnan, R; Masci, F J; Moon, D -S; Silverman, J M; Wozniak, P R

    2016-01-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A was a peculiar H-rich event with a long-rising (LR) light curve (LC), stemming from a compact blue supergiant star (BSG). Only a few similar events have been presented in the literature. We present new data for a sample of 6 LR Type II SNe (SNe II), 3 of which were discovered and observed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and 3 observed by the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). Our aim is to enlarge the family of LR SNe II, characterizing their properties. Spectra, LCs, and host-galaxies (HG) of these SNe are presented. Comparisons with known SN 1987A-like events are shown, with emphasis on the absolute magnitudes, colors, expansion velocities, and HG metallicities. Bolometric properties are derived from the multiband LC. By modeling the early-time LCs with scaling relations derived from the SuperNova Explosion Code (SNEC) models of MESA progenitor stars, we estimate the progenitor radii of these SNe and other progenitor parameters. We present PTF12kso, a LR SN II with the largest...

  6. An Open Catalog for Supernova Data

    CERN Document Server

    Guillochon, James; Margutti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    We present the Open Supernova Catalog, an online collection of observations and metadata for presently 20,000+ supernovae and related candidates. The catalog is freely available on the web (https://sne.space), with its main interface having been designed to be a user-friendly, rapidly-searchable table accessible on desktop and mobile devices. In addition to the primary catalog table containing supernova metadata, an individual page is generated for each supernova which displays its available metadata, light curves, and spectra spanning X-ray to radio frequencies. The data presented in the catalog is automatically rebuilt on a daily basis and is constructed by parsing several dozen sources, including the data presented in the supernova literature and from secondary sources such as other web-based catalogs. Individual supernova data is stored in the hierarchical, human- and machine-readable JSON format, with the entirety of each supernova's data being contained within a single JSON file bearing its name. The se...

  7. Photometric classification of type Ia supernovae in the SuperNova Legacy Survey with supervised learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, A.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Leloup, C.; Neveu, J.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Rich, J.; Carlberg, R.; Lidman, C.; Pritchet, C.

    2016-12-01

    In the era of large astronomical surveys, photometric classification of supernovae (SNe) has become an important research field due to limited spectroscopic resources for candidate follow-up and classification. In this work, we present a method to photometrically classify type Ia supernovae based on machine learning with redshifts that are derived from the SN light-curves. This method is implemented on real data from the SNLS deferred pipeline, a purely photometric pipeline that identifies SNe Ia at high-redshifts (0.2 Random Forest and Boosted Decision Trees. We evaluate the performance using SN simulations and real data from the first 3 years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS), which contains large spectroscopically and photometrically classified type Ia samples. Using the Area Under the Curve (AUC) metric, where perfect classification is given by 1, we find that our best-performing classifier (Extreme Gradient Boosting Decision Tree) has an AUC of 0.98.We show that it is possible to obtain a large photometrically selected type Ia SN sample with an estimated contamination of less than 5%. When applied to data from the first three years of SNLS, we obtain 529 events. We investigate the differences between classifying simulated SNe, and real SN survey data. In particular, we find that applying a thorough set of selection cuts to the SN sample is essential for good classification. This work demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of machine learning classification in a high-z SN survey with application to real SN data.

  8. Subluminous Type Ia Supernovae at High Redshift from the Supernova Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Gaitan, S; Sullivan, M; Conley, A; Howell, D A; Carlberg, R G; Astier, P; Balam, D; Balland, C; Basa, S; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Pain, R; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N; Rich, J

    2010-01-01

    The rate evolution of subluminous Type Ia Supernovae is presented using data from the Supernova Legacy Survey. This sub-sample represents the faint and rapidly-declining light-curves of the observed supernova Ia (SN Ia) population here defined by low stretch values (s<0.8). Up to redshift z=0.6, we find 18 photometrically-identified subluminous SNe Ia, of which six have spectroscopic redshift (and three are spectroscopically-confirmed SNe Ia). The evolution of the subluminous volumetric rate is constant or slightly decreasing with redshift, in contrast to the increasing SN Ia rate found for the normal stretch population, although a rising behaviour is not conclusively ruled out. The subluminous sample is mainly found in early-type galaxies with little or no star formation, so that the rate evolution is consistent with a galactic mass dependent behavior: $r(z)=A\\times M_g$, with $A=(1.1\\pm0.3)\\times10^{-14}$ SNe per year and solar mass.

  9. Bayesian Single-Epoch Photometric Classification of Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Poznanski, D; Gal-Yam, A; Poznanski, Dovi; Maoz, Dan; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2006-01-01

    (abridged) Ongoing supernova (SN) surveys find hundreds of candidates, that require confirmation for their use. Traditional classification based on followup spectroscopy of all candidates is virtually impossible for these large samples. We present an automatic Bayesian classifying algorithm for supernovae, the SN-ABC. We rely solely on single-epoch multiband photometry and host-galaxy (photometric) redshift information to sort SN candidates into the two major types, Ia and core-collapse supernovae. We test the SN-ABC performance on published samples of SNe from the SNLS and GOODS projects that have both broad-band photometry and spectroscopic classification (so the true type is known). The SN-ABC correctly classifies up to 97% (85%) of the type Ia (II-P) SNe in SNLS, and similar fractions of the GOODS SNe, depending on photometric redshift quality. We further test our method on large artificial samples to explore possible biases, and find that, in deep surveys, SNe Ia are best classified at redshifts z >~ 0.6...

  10. X-ray and optical plateaus following the main bursts in GRBs and SNe Ⅱ-P: a hint about similar late injection behaviors?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hong Cui; Ren-Xin Xu

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the emission plateaus in the X-ray afterglow light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and those in the optical light curves of type Ⅱ plateau supernovae (SNe Ⅱ-P) in order to study whether they have similar late energy injection behaviors.We show that correlations of bolometric energies (or luminosities) between the prompt explosions and the plateaus for the two phenomena are similar.The energy emitted by SNe Ⅱ-P are at the lower end of the range of possible energies for GRBs.The bolometric energies (or luminosities) in the prompt phase Eexpl (or Lexpl) and in the plateau phase Eplateau (or Lplateau) share relations of Eexpl ∝ E0.73±0.14plateau and Lexpl ∝ L~0.70plateau These results may indicate a similar late energy injection behavior that produces the observed plateaus in these two phenomena.

  11. Supernova VLBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, N.

    2009-08-01

    We review VLBI observations of supernovae over the last quarter century and discuss the prospect of imaging future supernovae with space VLBI in the context of VSOP-2. From thousands of discovered supernovae, most of them at cosmological distances, ˜50 have been detected at radio wavelengths, most of them in relatively nearby galaxies. All of the radio supernovae are Type II or Ib/c, which originate from the explosion of massive progenitor stars. Of these, 12 were observed with VLBI and four of them, SN 1979C, SN 1986J, SN 1993J, and SN 1987A, could be imaged in detail, the former three with VLBI. In addition, supernovae or young supernova remnants were discovered at radio wavelengths in highly dust-obscured galaxies, such as M82, Arp 299, and Arp 220, and some of them could also be imaged in detail. Four of the supernovae so far observed were sufficiently bright to be detectable with VSOP-2. With VSOP-2 the expansion of supernovae can be monitored and investigated with unsurpassed angular resolution, starting as early as the time of the supernova's transition from its opaque to transparent stage. Such studies can reveal, in a movie, the aftermath of a supernova explosion shortly after shock break out.

  12. Supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Branch, David

    2017-01-01

    Targeting advanced students of astronomy and physics, as well as astronomers and physicists contemplating research on supernovae or related fields, David Branch and J. Craig Wheeler offer a modern account of the nature, causes and consequences of supernovae, as well as of issues that remain to be resolved. Owing especially to (1) the appearance of supernova 1987A in the nearby Large Magellanic Cloud, (2) the spectacularly successful use of supernovae as distance indicators for cosmology, (3) the association of some supernovae with the enigmatic cosmic gamma-ray bursts, and (4) the discovery of a class of superluminous supernovae, the pace of supernova research has been increasing sharply. This monograph serves as a broad survey of modern supernova research and a guide to the current literature. The book’s emphasis is on the explosive phases of supernovae. Part 1 is devoted to a survey of the kinds of observations that inform us about supernovae, some basic interpreta tions of such data, and an overview of t...

  13. Nuclear pasta and supernova neutrinos at late times

    CERN Document Server

    Horowitz, C J; Caplan, M E; Fischer, T; Lin, Zidu; Newton, W G; O'Connor, E; Roberts, L F

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear pasta, with nucleons arranged into tubes, sheets, or other complex shapes, is expected in core collapse supernovae (SNe) at just below nuclear density. We calculate the additional opacity from neutrino-pasta coherent scattering using molecular dynamics simulations. We approximately include this opacity in simulations of SNe. We find that pasta slows neutrino diffusion and greatly increases the neutrino signal at late times of 10 or more seconds after stellar core collapse. This signal, for a galactic SN, should be clearly visible in large detectors such as Super-Kamiokande.

  14. Photometric and Spectroscopic Properties of Type II-P Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Faran, Tamar; Poznanski, Dovi; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan J.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Leonard, Douglas C.; Li, Weidong; Modjaz, Maryam; Nakar, Ehud; Serduke, Frank J. D.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    We study a sample of 23 Type II Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P), all observed with the same set of instruments. Analysis of their photometric evolution confirms that their typical plateau duration is 100 days with little scatter, showing a tendency to get shorter for more energetic SNe. The rise time from explosion to plateau does not seem to correlate with luminosity. We analyze their spectra, measuring typical ejecta velocities, and confirm that they follow a well behaved power-law decline. W...

  15. Photometric Identification of Young Stripped-Core Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gal-Yam, A; Maoz, D; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Poznanski, Dovi; Maoz, Dan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Foley, Ryan J.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method designed to identify the spectral type of young (less than ~30 days after explosion) and nearby (z < ~0.05) supernovae (SNe) using their broad-band colors. In particular, we show that stripped-core SNe (i.e., hydrogen deficient core-collapse events, spectroscopically defined as SNe Ib and SNe Ic, including broad-lined SN 1998bw-like events) can be clearly distinguished from other types of SNe. Using the full census of nearby SNe discovered during the year 2002, we estimate the impact that prompt multi-band photometry, obtained by 1m class telescopes, would have on the early identification of stripped-core events. Combining this new approach with ongoing spectroscopic follow-up programs, one can expect ~20 nearby, stripped-core events to be identified, each year, around, or before, maximum light. Follow-up studies, including prompt, multi-epoch optical spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry, as well as radio and X-ray observations, could greatly increase our understanding of these events, a...

  16. A Sample of Type II-L Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Faran, T; Filippenko, A V; Chornock, R; Foley, R J; Ganeshalingam, M; Leonard, D C; Li, W; Modjaz, M; Serduke, F J D; Silverman, J M

    2014-01-01

    What are Type II-Linear supernovae (SNe II-L)? This class, which has been ill defined for decades, now receives significant attention -- both theoretically, in order to understand what happens to stars in the ~15-25Mo range, and observationally, with two independent studies suggesting that they cannot be cleanly separated photometrically from the regular hydrogen-rich SNe II-P characterised by a marked plateau in their light curve. Here, we analyze the multi-band light curves and extensive spectroscopic coverage of a sample of 35 SNe II and find that 11 of them could be SNe II-L. The spectra of these SNe are hydrogen deficient, typically have shallow Halpha absorption, may show indirect signs of helium via strong OI 7774 absorption, and have faster line velocities consistent with a thin hydrogen shell. The light curves can be mostly differentiated from those of the regular, hydrogen-rich SNe II-P by their steeper decline rates and higher luminosity, and we propose as a defining photometric characteristic the ...

  17. Reconstruction of the interaction term between dark matter and dark energy using SNe Ia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solano, Freddy Cueva; Nucamendi, Ulises, E-mail: freddy@ifm.umich.mx, E-mail: ulises@ifm.umich.mx [Instituto de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Edificio C-3, Ciudad Universitaria, CP. 58040, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2012-04-01

    We apply a parametric reconstruction method to a homogeneous, isotropic and spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model filled of a fluid of dark energy (DE) with constant equation of state (EOS) parameter interacting with dark matter (DM)\\@. The reconstruction method is based on expansions of the general interaction term and the relevant cosmological variables in terms of Chebyshev polynomials which form a complete set orthonormal functions. This interaction term describes an exchange of energy flow between the DE and DM within dark sector. To show how the method works we do the reconstruction of the interaction function expanding it in terms of only the first six Chebyshev polynomials and obtain the best estimation for the coefficients of the expansion assuming three models: (a) a DE equation of the state parameter w = −1 (an interacting cosmological Λ), (b) a DE equation of the state parameter w = constant with a dark matter density parameter fixed, (c) a DE equation of the state parameter w = constant with a free constant dark matter density parameter to be estimated, and using the Union2 SNe Ia data set from ''The Supernova Cosmology Project'' (SCP) composed by 557 type Ia supernovae. In both cases, the preliminary reconstruction shows that in the best scenario there exist the possibility of a crossing of the noninteracting line Q = 0 in the recent past within the 1σ and 2σ errors from positive values at early times to negative values at late times. This means that, in this reconstruction, there is an energy transfer from DE to DM at early times and an energy transfer from DM to DE at late times. We conclude that this fact is an indication of the possible existence of a crossing behavior in a general interaction coupling between dark components.

  18. Early-time light curves of Type Ib/c supernovae from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Taddia, F; Leloudas, G; Stritzinger, M D; Valenti, S; Galbany, L; Kessler, R; Schneider, D P; Wheeler, J C

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the early-time optical light curves (LCs) of 20 Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe Ib/c) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) SN survey II, aiming to study their properties as well as to derive their progenitor parameters. High-cadence, multi-band LCs are fitted with a functional model and the best-fit parameters are compared among the SN types. Bolometric LCs (BLCs) are constructed for the entire sample. We computed the black-body (BB) temperature (T_BB) and photospheric radius (R_ph) evolution for each SN via BB fits on the spectral energy distributions. In addition, the BLC properties are compared to model expectations. Complementing our sample with literature data, we find that SNe Ic and Ic-BL (broad-line) have shorter rise times than those of SNe Ib and IIb. \\Delta m_15 is similar among the different sub-types. SNe Ic appear brighter and bluer than SNe Ib, but this difference vanishes if we consider host galaxy extinction corrections based on colors. Our SNe have typical T_BB ~ 10000 K at peak, an...

  19. Dust grains from the heart of supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchio, Marco; Marassi, Stefania; Schneider, Raffaella; Bianchi, Simone; Limongi, Marco; Chieffi, A.

    2016-06-01

    Dust grains are classically thought to form in the winds of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. However, there is increasing evidence today for dust formation in supernovae (SNe). To establish the relative importance of these two classes of stellar sources of dust, it is important to know the fraction of freshly formed dust in SN ejecta that is able to survive the passage of the reverse shock and be injected in the interstellar medium. We have developed a new code (GRASH_Rev) which follows the newly-formed dust evolution throughout the supernova explosion until the merging of the forward shock with the circumstellar ISM. We have considered four well studied SNe in the Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud: SN1987A, CasA, the Crab Nebula, and N49. For all the simulated models, we find good agreement with observations and estimate that between 1 and 8% of the observed mass will survive, leading to a SN dust production rate of (3.9± 3.7)×10^(-4) MM_{⊙})/yr in the Milky Way. This value is one order of magnitude larger than the dust production rate by AGB stars but insufficient to counterbalance the dust destruction by SNe, therefore requiring dust accretion in the gas phase.

  20. Bayesian Statistics and Parameter Constraints on the Generalized Chaplygin Gas Model using SNe Ia Data

    CERN Document Server

    Colistete, R C; Goncalves, S V B

    2004-01-01

    The type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observational data are used to estimate the parameters of a cosmological model with cold dark matter and the generalized Chaplygin gas model (GCGM). The GCGM depends essentially on five parameters: the Hubble constant, the parameter $\\bar{A}$ related to the velocity of the sound, the equation of state parameter $\\alpha$, the curvature of the Universe and the fraction density of the generalized Chaplygin gas (or the cold dark matter). The parameter $\\alpha$ is allowed to take negative values and to be greater than 1. The Bayesian parameter estimation yields $\\alpha = - 0.86^{+6.01}_{-0.15}$, $H_0 = 62.0^{+1.32}_{-1.42} km/Mpc.s$, $\\Omega _{k0}=-1.26_{-1.42}^{+1.32}$, $\\Omega_{m0} = 0.00^{+0.86}_{-0.00}$, $\\Omega_{c0} = 1.39^{+1.21}_{-1.25}$, $\\bar A =1.00^{+0.00}_{-0.39}$, $t_0 = 15.3^{+4.2}_{-3.2}$ and $q_0 = -0.80^{+0.86}_{-0.62}$, where $t_0$ is the age of the Universe and $q_0$ is the value of the deceleration parameter today. Our results indicate that a Universe completely ...

  1. Cosmic expansion history from SNe Ia data via information field theory: the charm code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porqueres, Natàlia; Enßlin, Torsten A.; Greiner, Maksim; Böhm, Vanessa; Dorn, Sebastian; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Manrique, Alberto

    2017-03-01

    We present charm (cosmic history agnostic reconstruction method), a novel inference algorithm that reconstructs the cosmic expansion history as encoded in the Hubble parameter H(z) from SNe Ia data. The novelty of the approach lies in the usage of information field theory, a statistical field theory that is very well suited for the construction of optimal signal recovery algorithms. The charm algorithm infers non-parametrically s(a) = ln(ρ(a) /ρcrit0), the density evolution which determines H(z), without assuming an analytical form of ρ(a) but only its smoothness with the scale factor a = (1 + z)-1. The inference problem of recovering the signal s(a) from the data is formulated in a fully Bayesian way. In detail, we have rewritten the signal as the sum of a background cosmology and a perturbation. This allows us to determine the maximum a posteriory estimate of the signal by an iterative Wiener filter method. Applying charm to the Union2.1 supernova compilation, we have recovered a cosmic expansion history that is fully compatible with the standard ΛCDM cosmological expansion history with parameter values consistent with the results of the Planck mission.

  2. SiFTO: An Empirical Method for Fitting SNe Ia Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Conley, A; Hsiao, E Y; Guy, J; Astier, Pierre; Balam, D; Balland, C; Basa, S; Carlberg, R G; Fouchez, D; Hardin, D; Howell, D A; Hook, I M; Pain, R; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N

    2008-01-01

    We present SiFTO, a new empirical method for modeling type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) light curves by manipulating a spectral template. We make use of high-redshift SN observations when training the model, allowing us to extend it bluer than rest frame U. This increases the utility of our high-redshift SN observations by allowing us to use more of the available data. We find that when the shape of the light curve is described using a stretch prescription, applying the same stretch at all wavelengths is not an adequate description. SiFTO therefore uses a generalization of stretch which applies different stretch factors as a function of both the wavelength of the observed filter and the stretch in the rest-frame B band. We compare SiFTO to other published light-curve models by applying them to the same set of SN photometry, and demonstrate that SiFTO and SALT2 perform better than the alternatives when judged by the scatter around the best fit luminosity distance relationship. We further demonstrate that when SiFTO ...

  3. Host Galaxy Identification for Supernova Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ravi R; Kovacs, Eve; Spinka, Harold; Kessler, Richard; Goldstein, Daniel A; Liotine, Camille; Pomian, Katarzyna; D'Andrea, Chris B; Sullivan, Mark; Carretero, Jorge; Castander, Francisco J; Nichol, Robert C; Finley, David A; Fischer, John A; Foley, Ryan J; Kim, Alex G; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Sako, Masao; Scolnic, Daniel M; Smith, Mathew; Tucker, Brad E; Uddin, Syed; Wolf, Rachel C; Yuan, Fang; Abbott, Tim M C; Abdalla, Filipe B; Benoit-Levy, Aurelien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Kind, Matias Carrasco; Cunha, Carlos E; da Costa, Luiz N; Desai, Shantanu; Doel, Peter; Eifler, Tim F; Evrard, August E; Flaugher, Brenna; Fosalba, Pablo; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Gruen, Daniel; Gruendl, Robert; James, David J; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Maia, Marcio A G; Marshall, Jennifer L; Miquel, Ramon; Plazas, Andres A; Romer, A Kathy; Sanchez, Eusebio; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Sobreira, Flavia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly E C; Tarle, Gregory; Walker, Alistair R; Wester, William

    2016-01-01

    Host galaxy identification is a crucial step for modern supernova (SN) surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will discover SNe by the thousands. Spectroscopic resources are limited, so in the absence of real-time SN spectra these surveys must rely on host galaxy spectra to obtain accurate redshifts for the Hubble diagram and to improve photometric classification of SNe. In addition, SN luminosities are known to correlate with host-galaxy properties. Therefore, reliable identification of host galaxies is essential for cosmology and SN science. We simulate SN events and their locations within their host galaxies to develop and test methods for matching SNe to their hosts. We use both real and simulated galaxy catalog data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog and MICECATv2.0, respectively. We also incorporate "hostless" SNe residing in undetected faint hosts into our analysis, with an assumed hostless rate of 5%. Our fully automated alg...

  4. Kinematics and Host-Galaxy Properties Suggest a Nuclear Origin for Calcium-Rich Supernova Progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, Ryan J

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-rich supernovae (Ca-rich SNe) are peculiar low-luminosity SNe Ib with relatively strong Ca spectral lines at ~2 months after peak brightness. This class also has an extended projected offset distribution, with several members of the class offset from their host galaxies by 30 - 150 kpc. There is no indication of any stellar population at the SN positions. Using a sample of 13 Ca-rich SNe, we present kinematic evidence that the progenitors of Ca-rich SNe originate near the centers of their host galaxies and are kicked to the locations of the SN explosions. Specifically, SNe with small projected offsets have large line-of-sight velocity shifts as determined by nebular lines, while those with large projected offsets have no significant velocity shifts. Therefore, the velocity shifts must not be primarily the result of the SN explosion. There is an excess of SNe with blueshifted velocity shifts within two isophotal radii (5/6 SNe), indicating that the SNe are moving away from their host galaxies and redsh...

  5. The core-degenerate scenario for the progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Bo; Zuo, Zhaoyu; Li, Yinbi; Luo, Xia; Zhang, Jujia; Liu, Dongdong; Wu, Chengyuan

    2016-01-01

    The origin of the progenitors of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is still uncertain. The core-degenerate (CD) scenario has been proposed as an alternative way for the production of SNe Ia. In this scenario, SNe Ia are formed at the final stage of common-envelope evolution from a merger of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf (CO WD) with the CO core of an asymptotic giant branch companion. However, the birthrates of SNe Ia from this scenario are still not well determined. In this work, we performed a detailed investigation on the CD scenario based on a binary population synthesis approach. The SN Ia delay times from this scenario are basically in the range of 90Myr-2500Myr, mainly contributing to the observed SNe Ia with short and intermediate delay times although this scenario can also produce some old SNe Ia. Meanwhile, our work indicates that the Galactic birthrates of SNe Ia from this scenario are no more than 20% of total SNe Ia due to more careful treatment of mass transfer. Although the SN Ia birthrates in the pres...

  6. The bolometric light curves and physical parameters of stripped-envelope supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Prentice, S J; Pian, E; Gal-Yam, A; Kulkarni, S R; Rubin, A; Corsi, A; Fremling, C; Sollerman, J; Yaron, O; Arcavi, I; Zheng, W; Kasliwal, M M; Filippenko, V V; Cenko, S B; Cao, Y; Nugent, P

    2016-01-01

    The optical and optical/near-infrared pseudobolometric light curves of 84 stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe) are constructed using a consistent method and a standard cosmology. The light curves are analysed to derive temporal characteristics and peak luminosity $L_{\\mathrm{p}}$, enabling the construction of a luminosity function. Subsequently, the mass of $^{56}$Ni synthesised in the explosion, along with the ratio of ejecta mass to ejecta kinetic energy, are found. Analysis shows that host-galaxy extinction is an important factor in accurately determining luminosity values as it is significantly greater than Galactic extinction in most cases. It is found that broad-lined SNe Ic (SNe Ic-BL) and gamma-ray burst SNe are the most luminous subtypes with a combined median $L_{\\mathrm{p}}$, in erg s$^{-1}$, of log($L_{\\mathrm{p}})=42.99$ compared to $42.51$ for SNe Ic, $42.50$ for SNe Ib, and $42.36$ for SNe IIb. It is also found that SNe Ic-BL synthesise approximately twice the amount of $^{56}$Ni compared with SN...

  7. Aspherical supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasen, Daniel Nathan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Although we know that many supernovae are aspherical, the exact nature of their geometry is undetermined. Because all the supernovae we observe are too distant to be resolved, the ejecta structure can't be directly imaged, and asymmetry must be inferred from signatures in the spectral features and polarization of the supernova light. The empirical interpretation of this data, however, is rather limited--to learn more about the detailed supernova geometry, theoretical modeling must been undertaken. One expects the geometry to be closely tied to the explosion mechanism and the progenitor star system, both of which are still under debate. Studying the 3-dimensional structure of supernovae should therefore provide new break throughs in our understanding. The goal of this thesis is to advance new techniques for calculating radiative transfer in 3-dimensional expanding atmospheres, and use them to study the flux and polarization signatures of aspherical supernovae. We develop a 3-D Monte Carlo transfer code and use it to directly fit recent spectropolarimetric observations, as well as calculate the observable properties of detailed multi-dimensional hydrodynamical explosion simulations. While previous theoretical efforts have been restricted to ellipsoidal models, we study several more complicated configurations that are tied to specific physical scenarios. We explore clumpy and toroidal geometries in fitting the spectropolarimetry of the Type Ia supernova SN 2001el. We then calculate the observable consequences of a supernova that has been rendered asymmetric by crashing into a nearby companion star. Finally, we fit the spectrum of a peculiar and extraordinarily luminous Type Ic supernova. The results are brought to bear on three broader astrophysical questions: (1) What are the progenitors and the explosion processes of Type Ia supernovae? (2) What effect does asymmetry have on the observational diversity of Type Ia supernovae, and hence their use in cosmology? (3

  8. Aspherical supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasen, Daniel Nathan

    2004-05-21

    Although we know that many supernovae are aspherical, the exact nature of their geometry is undetermined. Because all the supernovae we observe are too distant to be resolved, the ejecta structure can't be directly imaged, and asymmetry must be inferred from signatures in the spectral features and polarization of the supernova light. The empirical interpretation of this data, however, is rather limited--to learn more about the detailed supernova geometry, theoretical modeling must been undertaken. One expects the geometry to be closely tied to the explosion mechanism and the progenitor star system, both of which are still under debate. Studying the 3-dimensional structure of supernovae should therefore provide new break throughs in our understanding. The goal of this thesis is to advance new techniques for calculating radiative transfer in 3-dimensional expanding atmospheres, and use them to study the flux and polarization signatures of aspherical supernovae. We develop a 3-D Monte Carlo transfer code and use it to directly fit recent spectropolarimetric observations, as well as calculate the observable properties of detailed multi-dimensional hydrodynamical explosion simulations. While previous theoretical efforts have been restricted to ellipsoidal models, we study several more complicated configurations that are tied to specific physical scenarios. We explore clumpy and toroidal geometries in fitting the spectropolarimetry of the Type Ia supernova SN 2001el. We then calculate the observable consequences of a supernova that has been rendered asymmetric by crashing into a nearby companion star. Finally, we fit the spectrum of a peculiar and extraordinarily luminous Type Ic supernova. The results are brought to bear on three broader astrophysical questions: (1) What are the progenitors and the explosion processes of Type Ia supernovae? (2) What effect does asymmetry have on the observational diversity of Type Ia supernovae, and hence their use in cosmology? (3

  9. Understanding Supernovae With A Swift Ultraviolet Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peter

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are one of the primary tools to study the expansion history of the universe. Their usefulness as precision standard candles is limited by several systematic uncertainties and the possibility that the progenitor systems and explosion details have changed over the history of the universe. Optical observations of high- redshift SNe probe rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, requiring space based observations of nearby SNe against which to compare. The Swift satellite has already observed more supernovae than all other UV observatories combined. We propose to create and make publicly available a value-added archive of the images and photometry of the 200+ SNe observed in the UV by Swift's Ultra- Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT). We will use this data to study the effects of environment and extinction on the SN Ia light curves. We will also compare this local sample of UV light curves with high redshift SNe observed in the optical. The Swift SN Archive will include final photometry as well as the final images appropriate for others to use to produce their own photometry of the SNe, other transient objects in the fields, or the host galaxies. For each epoch of photometry we will also compute the spectrum-dependent corrections for extinction and redshift. These data will be used to measure the UV contribution to the bolometric light curve and look for any time dependence to the extinction. With the larger sample available we will look for correlations with host galaxy properties. We will also create absolute magnitude light curves of SNe of all types for comparison with existing high redshift observations. These will also be used to make predictions for the detectability and classification of high redshift SNe in the rest-frame UV by future ground and space-based telescopes. The Swift UV observations fill a critical niche in our understanding of SNe Ia, and this program will enhance the scientific use of this important dataset. The work done

  10. The Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey: III. Correlated Properties of Type Ia Supernovae and Their Hosts at 0.9 < z < 1.46

    CERN Document Server

    Meyers, J; Barbary, K; Barrientos, L F; Brodwin, M; Dawson, K S; Deustua, S; Doi, M; Eisenhardt, P; Faccioli, L; Fakhouri, H K; Fruchter, A S; Gilbank, D G; Gladders, M D; Goldhaber, G; Gonzalez, A H; Hattori, T; Hsiao, E; Ihara, Y; Kashikawa, N; Koester, B; Konishi, K; Lidman, C; Lubin, L; Morokuma, T; Oda, T; Perlmutter, S; Postman, M; Ripoche, P; Rosati, P; Rubin, D; Rykoff, E; Spadafora, A; Stanford, S A; Suzuki, N; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; Yasuda, N

    2012-01-01

    Using the sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey and augmented with HST-observed SNe Ia in the GOODS fields, we search for correlations between the properties of SNe and their host galaxies at high redshift. We use galaxy color and quantitative morphology to determine the red sequence in 25 clusters and develop a model to distinguish passively evolving early-type galaxies from star-forming galaxies in both clusters and the field. With this approach, we identify six SN Ia hosts that are early-type cluster members and eleven SN Ia hosts that are early-type field galaxies. We confirm for the first time at z>0.9 that SNe Ia hosted by early-type galaxies brighten and fade more quickly than SNe Ia hosted by late-type galaxies. We also show that the two samples of hosts produce SNe Ia with similar color distributions. The relatively simple spectral energy distributions (SEDs) expected for passive galaxies enable us to measure stellar masses of ea...

  11. Nearby Supernova Rates from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search. III. The Rate-Size Relation, and the Rates as a Function of Galaxy Hubble Type and Colour

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Weidong; Leaman, Jesse; Filippenko, Alexei V; Poznanski, Dovi; Wang, Xiaofeng; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Mannucci, Filippo

    2010-01-01

    This is the third paper of a series in which we present new measurements of the observed rates of supernovae (SNe) in the local Universe, determined from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS). We have considered a sample of about 1000 SNe and used an optimal subsample of 726 SNe (274 SNe Ia, 116 SNe Ibc, and 324 SNe II) to determine our rates. We study the trend of the rates as a function of a few quantities available for our galaxy sample, such as luminosity in the B and K bands, stellar mass, and morphological class. We discuss different choices (SN samples, input SN luminosity functions, inclination correction factors) and their effect on the rates and their uncertainties. A comparison between our SN rates and the published measurements shows that they are consistent with each other to within uncertainties when the rate calculations are done in the same manner. Nevertheless, our data demonstrate that the rates cannot be adequately described by a single parameter using either galaxy Hubble types or B...

  12. The X-ray/radio and UV luminosity expected from the symbiotic systems as the progenitor of SNe Ia

    CERN Document Server

    Meng, Xiangcun

    2016-01-01

    We carried out a series of binary stellar evolution calculations, in which the effect of tidally enhanced wind on the evolution of WD + RG systems is incorporated. The WDs increase their mass to the Chandrasekhar mass limit, and then explode as SNe Ia. Based on the binary evolution results, we estimated the X-ray/radio (the excess UV) luminosity from the interactions between supernova ejecta and the CSM (the secondary) via some published standard models. We found that the X-ray flux may be high enough to be detected for a nearby SN Ia from a symbiotic system, while the radio flux is more likely to de detected when the companion is an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star, and for a first giant branch (FGB) companion, the radio flux is generally lower than the detection limit. For two well observed SNe Ia, 2011fe and 2014J, almost all symbiotic systems are excluded by X-ray observations, but WD + FGB systems may not be ruled out by radio observations. The excess UV luminosity resulting from the collision of super...

  13. Neutrino event counts from Type Ia supernova models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Gautam; Scholberg, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae (SNe) are widely known to be among the universe's primary neutrino factories, releasing ˜99% of their energy, or ˜1053 ergs, in the form of the tiny leptons. On the other hand, less than 4% of the energy of Type Ia SNe is released via neutrinos, hence making Ia SNe impossible to detect (through neutrino observations) at typical supernova distances. For this reason, neutrino signatures from these explosions have very rarely been modeled. We ran time-sliced fluences from non-oscillation pure deflagration and delayed detonation (DDT) Ia models by Odrzywolek and Plewa (2011) through SNOwGLoBES, a software that calculates event rates and other observed quantities of supernova neutrinos in various detectors. We determined Ia neutrino event rates in Hyper-K, a proposed water Cherenkov detector, JUNO, a scintillator detector under construction, and DUNE, a proposed argon detector, and identified criteria to distinguish between the two models (pure deflagration and DDT) based on data from a real supernova (statistically represented by a Poisson distribution around the expected result). We found that up to distances of 8.00, 1.54, and 2.37 kpc (subject to change based on oscillation effects and modified detector efficiencies), we can discern the explosion mechanism with ≥90% confidence in Hyper-K, JUNO, and DUNE, respectively, thus learning more about Ia progenitors.

  14. THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE CLUSTER SUPERNOVA SURVEY. V. IMPROVING THE DARK-ENERGY CONSTRAINTS ABOVE z > 1 AND BUILDING AN EARLY-TYPE-HOSTED SUPERNOVA SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, N.; Rubin, D.; Aldering, G.; Barbary, K.; Faccioli, L.; Fakhouri, H. K. [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lidman, C. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Amanullah, R.; Botyanszki, J. [Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Barrientos, L. F. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Brodwin, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Connolly, N. [Department of Physics, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY 13323 (United States); Dawson, K. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Dey, A. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Doi, M. [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Donahue, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Deustua, S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Eisenhardt, P. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Ellingson, E. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Fadeyev, V., E-mail: nsuzuki@lbl.gov, E-mail: rubind@berkeley.edu, E-mail: clidman@aao.gov.au [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 94064 (United States); Collaboration: Supernova Cosmology Project; and others

    2012-02-10

    We present Advanced Camera for Surveys, NICMOS, and Keck adaptive-optics-assisted photometry of 20 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey. The SNe Ia were discovered over the redshift interval 0.623 < z < 1.415. Of these SNe Ia, 14 pass our strict selection cuts and are used in combination with the world's sample of SNe Ia to derive the best current constraints on dark energy. Of our new SNe Ia, 10 are beyond redshift z = 1, thereby nearly doubling the statistical weight of HST-discovered SNe Ia beyond this redshift. Our detailed analysis corrects for the recently identified correlation between SN Ia luminosity and host galaxy mass and corrects the NICMOS zero point at the count rates appropriate for very distant SNe Ia. Adding these SNe improves the best combined constraint on dark-energy density, {rho}{sub DE}(z), at redshifts 1.0 < z < 1.6 by 18% (including systematic errors). For a flat {Lambda}CDM universe, we find {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.729 {+-} 0.014 (68% confidence level (CL) including systematic errors). For a flat wCDM model, we measure a constant dark-energy equation-of-state parameter w = -1.013{sup +0.068}{sub -0.073} (68% CL). Curvature is constrained to {approx}0.7% in the owCDM model and to {approx}2% in a model in which dark energy is allowed to vary with parameters w{sub 0} and w{sub a} . Further tightening the constraints on the time evolution of dark energy will require several improvements, including high-quality multi-passband photometry of a sample of several dozen z > 1 SNe Ia. We describe how such a sample could be efficiently obtained by targeting cluster fields with WFC3 on board HST. The updated supernova Union2.1 compilation of 580 SNe is available at http://supernova.lbl.gov/Union.

  15. An Open Catalog for Supernova Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillochon, James; Parrent, Jerod; Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Margutti, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    We present the Open Supernova Catalog, an online collection of observations and metadata for presently 36,000+ supernovae and related candidates. The catalog is freely available on the web (https://sne.space), with its main interface having been designed to be a user-friendly, rapidly searchable table accessible on desktop and mobile devices. In addition to the primary catalog table containing supernova metadata, an individual page is generated for each supernova, which displays its available metadata, light curves, and spectra spanning X-ray to radio frequencies. The data presented in the catalog is automatically rebuilt on a daily basis and is constructed by parsing several dozen sources, including the data presented in the supernova literature and from secondary sources such as other web-based catalogs. Individual supernova data is stored in the hierarchical, human- and machine-readable JSON format, with the entirety of each supernova’s data being contained within a single JSON file bearing its name. The setup we present here, which is based on open-source software maintained via git repositories hosted on github, enables anyone to download the entirety of the supernova data set to their home computer in minutes, and to make contributions of their own data back to the catalog via git. As the supernova data set continues to grow, especially in the upcoming era of all-sky synoptic telescopes, which will increase the total number of events by orders of magnitude, we hope that the catalog we have designed will be a valuable tool for the community to analyze both historical and contemporary supernovae.

  16. Observational and Physical Classification of Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the current classification scheme of supernovae (SNe). This scheme has evolved over many decades and now includes numerous SN Types and sub-types. Many of these are universally recognized, while there are controversies regarding the definitions, membership and even the names of some sub-classes; we will try to review here the commonly-used nomenclature, noting the main variants when possible. SN Types are defined according to observational properties; mostly visible-light spectra near maximum light, as well as according to their photometric properties. However, a long-term goal of SN classification is to associate observationally-defined classes with specific physical explosive phenomena. We show here that this aspiration is now finally coming to fruition, and we establish the SN classification scheme upon direct observational evidence connecting SN groups with specific progenitor stars. Observationally, the broad class of Type II SNe contains objects showing strong spectroscopic signat...

  17. Type Ia and II supernovae contributions to the metal enrichment in intra-cluster medium observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Kosuke; Matsushita, Kyoko; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y; Ishida, Manabu; Ohashi, Takaya

    2007-01-01

    We studied the properties of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) in two clusters of galaxies (AWM 7 and Abell 1060) and two groups (HCG 62 and NGC 507) with the X-ray Observatory Suzaku. Based on spatially resolved energy spectra, we measured for the first time precise cumulative ICM metal masses within 0.1 and ~0.3 r_{180}. Comparing our results with supernova nucleosynthesis models, the number ratio of type II (SNe II) to type Ia (SNe Ia) is estimated to be ~3.5, assuming the metal mass in the ICM is represented by the sum of products synthesized in SNe Ia and SNe II. Normalized by the K-band luminosities of present galaxies, and including the metals in stars, the integrated number of past SNe II explosions is estimated to be close to or somewhat higher than the star formation rate determined from Hubble Deep Field observations.

  18. Finding the First Cosmic Explosions. III. Pair-Pulsational Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Whalen, Daniel J; Even, Wesley; Woosley, S E; Heger, Alexander; Stiavelli, Massimo; Fryer, Chris L

    2013-01-01

    Population III supernovae have been the focus of growing attention because of their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that can be seen at the edge of the observable universe. But until now pair-pulsation supernovae, in which explosive thermonuclear burning in massive stars fails to unbind them but can eject their outer layers into space, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the earliest redshifts. These shells can later collide and, like Type IIn supernovae, produce superluminous events in the UV at high redshifts that could be detected in the near infrared today. We present numerical simulations of a 110 M$_{\\odot}$ pair-pulsation explosion done with the Los Alamos radiation hydrodynamics code RAGE. We find that collisions between consecutive pair pulsations are visible in the near infrared out to z $\\sim$ 15 - 20 and can probe the earliest stellar populations at cosmic dawn.

  19. Photometric and Spectroscopic Properties of Type II-P Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Faran, Tamar; Filippenko, Alexei V; Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan J; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Leonard, Douglas C; Li, Weidong; Modjaz, Maryam; Nakar, Ehud; Serduke, Frank J D; Silverman, Jeffrey M

    2014-01-01

    We study a sample of 23 Type II Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P), all observed with the same set of instruments. Analysis of their photometric evolution confirms that their typical plateau duration is 100 days with little scatter, showing a tendency to get shorter for more energetic SNe. The rise time from explosion to plateau does not seem to correlate with luminosity. We analyze their spectra, measuring typical ejecta velocities, and confirm that they follow a well behaved power-law decline. We find indications of high-velocity material in the spectra of six of our SNe. We test different dust extinction correction methods by asking the following - does the uniformity of the sample increase after the application of a given method? A reasonably behaved underlying distribution should become tighter after correction. No method we tested made a significant improvement.

  20. Type Ia supernova explosion mechanism and implications for cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, K.

    Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) are believed to be thermonuclear explosions of a white dwarf, and are one of the most mature cosmological standardized candles. However, the explosion mechanism has not yet been fully clarified. Furthermore, they show observational diversities which may be a consequence of either the diversity in the explosion physics and/or surrounding environments, an issue yet to be clarified. In this paper, it is argued that an asymmetry in the explosion is likely a generic feature, and that the diversity arising from various viewing angles can be an origin of observational diversities of SNe Ia seen in their spectral features (suspected possible biases in cosmology) and colors (related to the extinction estimate in cosmology). These findings indicate that at least a part of observational diversities are intrinsic, rather than caused by environment effects, and open up a possibility of using SNe Ia as more precise distance indicators than currently employed.

  1. Constraining dark matter halo properties using lensed SNLS supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Jonsson, J; Hook, I; Basa, S; Carlberg, R; Conley, A; Fouchez, D; Howell, D A; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C

    2010-01-01

    This paper exploits the gravitational magnification of SNe Ia to measure properties of dark matter haloes. The magnification of individual SNe Ia can be computed using observed properties of foreground galaxies and dark matter halo models. We model the dark matter haloes of the galaxies as truncated singular isothermal spheres with velocity dispersion and truncation radius obeying luminosity dependent scaling laws. A homogeneously selected sample of 175 SNe Ia from the first 3-years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 1 is used to constrain models of the dark matter haloes associated with foreground galaxies. The best-fitting velocity dispersion scaling law agrees well with galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements. We further find that the normalisation of the velocity dispersion of passive and star forming galaxies are consistent with empirical Faber-Jackson and Tully-Fisher relations, respectively. If we make no assumption on the normalisation of these relations, we find th...

  2. A study of gamma ray bursts with afterglow plateau phases associated with supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainotti, M. G.; Nagataki, S.; Maeda, K.; Postnikov, S.; Pian, E.

    2017-04-01

    Context. The analysis of 176 gamma ray burst (GRB) afterglow plateaus observed by Swift from GRBs with known redshifts revealed that the subsample of long GRBs associated with supernovae (LONG-SNe), comprising 19 events, presents a very high correlation coefficient between the luminosity at the end of the plateau phase LX(Ta) = La and the end time of the plateau . Furthermore, these SNe Ib/c associated with GRBs also obey the peak-magnitude stretch relation, which is similar to that used to standardize the SNe Ia. Aims: Our aim is to investigate a category of GRBs with plateau and associated with SNe to compare our correlation for this sample with the correlation for long GRBs for which no associated SN has been observed (hereafter LONG-NO-SNe, 128 GRBs) and to check whether there is a difference among these subsamples. Methods: We first adopted a nonparametric statistical method to take redshift evolution into account and to check if and how this effect may steepen the slope for the LONG-NO-SNe sample. This procedure is necessary because this sample is observed at much higher redshift than the GRB-SNe sample. Therefore, removing selection bias is the first step before any comparison among samples observed at different redshifts could be properly performed. Then, we applied the T-student test to evaluate a statistical difference between the slopes of the two samples. Results: We demonstrate that there is no evolution for the slope of the LONG-NO-SNe sample and no evolution is expected for GRBs observed at small redshifts such as those present in the LONG-SNe sample. The difference between the slope of the LONG-NO-SNe and the slope of LONG-SNe, i.e., those with firm spectral detection of SN components, is statistically significant (P = 0.005). Conclusions: This possibly suggests that, unlike LONG-NO-SNe, LONG-SNe with firm spectroscopic features of the associated SNe might not require a standard energy reservoir in the plateau phase. Therefore, this analysis may

  3. Dark Energy and Termonuclear Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domíngez, I.; Bravo, E.; Piersanti, L.; Tornambé, A.; Straniero, O.; Höflich, P.

    2008-12-01

    Nowadays it is widely accepted that the current Universe is dominated by dark energy and exotic matter, the so called StandardModel of Cosmoloy or CDM model. All the available data (Thermonuclear Supernovae, Cosmic Microwave Background, Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, Large Scale Structure, etc.) are compatible with a flat Universe made by ~70% of dark energy. Up to now observations agree that dark energy may be the vacuum energy (or cosmological constant) although improvements are needed to constrain further its equation of state. In this context, the cosmic destiny of the Universe is no longer linked to its geometry but to the nature of dark energy; it may be flat and expand forever or collapse. To understand the nature of dark energy is probably the most fundamental problem in physics today; it may open new roads of knowledge and led to unify gravity with the other fundamental interactions in nature. It is expected that astronomical data will continue to provide directions to theorists and experimental physicists. Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have played a fundamental role, showing the acceleration of the expansion rate of the Universe a decade ago, and up to now they are the only astronomical observations that provide a direct evidence of the acceleration. However, in order to determine the source of the dark energy term it is mandatory to improve the precision of supernovae as distance indicators on cosmological scale.

  4. Results from the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Richard; Belov, Pavel; Bhatnagar, Vasudha; Campbell, Heather; Conley, Alex; Frieman, Joshua A; Glazov, Alexandre; Hlozek, Santiago Gonzalez-Gaitan Renee; Jha, Saurabh; Kuhlmann, Stephen; Kunz, Martin; Lampeitl, Hubert; Mahabal, Ashish; Newling, James; Nichol, Robert C; Parkinson, David; Philip, Ninan Sajeeth; Poznanski, Dovi; Richards, Joseph W; Rodney, Steven A; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P; Smith, Mathew; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Varughese, Melvin

    2010-01-01

    We report results from the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge (SNPCC), a publicly released mix of simulated SNe, with types (Ia, Ibc, II) selected in proportion to their expected rate. The simulation was realized in the griz filters of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) with realistic observing conditions (sky noise, point spread function and atmospheric transparency) based on years of recorded conditions at the DES site. Simulations of non-Ia type SNe are based on spectroscopically confirmed light curves that include unpublished non-Ia samples donated from the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP), the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS), and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II). A spectroscopically confirmed subset was provided for training. We challenged scientists to run their classification algorithms and report a type and photo-z for each SN. Participants from 10 groups contributed 13 entries for the sample that included a host galaxy photo-z for each SN, and 9 entries for the sample that had no redshi...

  5. Type Ia Supernovae: Colors, Rates, and Progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Heringer, Epson; Kezwer, Jason; Graham, Melissa L; Sand, David; Bildfell, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The rate of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in a galaxy depends not only on stellar mass, but also on star formation history. Here we show that two simple observational quantities ($g-r$ or $u-r$ host galaxy color, and $r$-band luminosity), coupled with an assumed delay time distribution (the rate of SNe Ia as a function of time for an instantaneous burst of star formation), are sufficient to accurately determine a galaxy's SN Ia rate, with very little sensitivity to the precise details of the star formation history. Using this result, we compare observed and predicted color distributions of SN Ia hosts for the MENeaCS cluster supernova survey, and for the SDSS Stripe 82 supernova survey. The observations are consistent with a continuous delay time distribution (DTD), without any cutoff. For old progenitor systems the power-law slope for the DTD is found to be $-1.50 ^{+0.19} _{-0.15}$. This result favours the double degenerate scenario for SN Ia, though other interpretations are possible. We find that the late-t...

  6. The Fall 2004 SDSS Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Sako, M; Frieman, J A; Adelman-McCarthy, J; Becker, A; De Jongh, F; Dilday, B; Estrada, J; Hendry, J; Holtzman, J; Kaplan, J; Kessler, R; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J P; Miknaitis, G; Riess, A; Tucker, D; Barentine, J; Blandford, R D; Brewington, H; Dembicky, J; Harvanek, M; Hawley, S; Hogan, C; Johnston, D; Kahn, S; Ketzeback, B; Kleinman, S; Krzesínski, J; Lamenti, D; Long, D; McMillan, R; Newman, P; Nitta, A; Nichol, R; Scranton, R; Sheldon, E S; Snedden, S A; Stoughton, C; York, D; Sako, Masao; Romani, Roger; Frieman, Josh; Carthy, Jen Adelman-Mc; Becker, Andrew; Jongh, Fritz De; Dilday, Ben; Estrada, Juan; Hendry, John; Holtzman, Jon; Kaplan, Jared; Kessler, Rick; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Miknaitis, Gajus; Riess, Adam; Tucker, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    In preparation for the Supernova Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II, a proposed 3-year extension to the SDSS, we have conducted an early engineering and science run during the fall of 2004, which consisted of approximately 20 scheduled nights of repeated imaging of half of the southern equatorial stripe. Transient supernova-like events were detected in near real-time and photometric measurements were made in the five SDSS filter bandpasses with a cadence of ~2 days. Candidate type Ia supernovae (SNe) were pre-selected based on their colors, light curve shape, and the properties of the host galaxy. Follow-up spectroscopic observations were performed with the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5m telescope and the 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope to confirm their types and measure the redshifts. The 2004 campaign resulted in 22 spectroscopically confirmed SNe, which includes 16 type Ia, 5 type II, and 1 type Ib/c. These SN Ia will help fill in the sparsely sampled redshift interval of z = 0.05 - 0.35,...

  7. The sloan digital sky Survey-II supernova survey: search algorithm and follow-up observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Masao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bassett, Bruce [Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Becker, Andrew; Hogan, Craig J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cinabro, David [Department of Physics, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); DeJongh, Fritz; Frieman, Joshua A.; Marriner, John; Miknaitis, Gajus [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Depoy, D. L.; Prieto, Jose Luis [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1173 (United States); Dilday, Ben; Kessler, Richard [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Doi, Mamoru [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Garnavich, Peter M. [University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, MSC 4500, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Jha, Saurabh [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, P.O. Box 20450, MS29, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States); Konishi, Kohki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8582 (Japan); Lampeitl, Hubert [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Nichol, Robert C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Mercantile House, Hampshire Terrace, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2EG (United Kingdom); and others

    2008-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg{sup 2} region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the type Ia SNe, the main driver for the survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  8. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary

    CERN Document Server

    Frieman, Joshua A; Becker, A; Choi, C; Cinabro, D; De Jongh, F; Depoy, D L; Dilday, B; Doi, M; Garnavich, P M; Hogan, C J; Holtzman, J; Im, M; Jha, S; Kessler, R; Konishi, K; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J; Marshall, J L; McGinnis, D; Miknaitis, G; Nichol, R C; Prieto, J L; Riess, A G; Richmond, M W; Romani, R; Sako, M; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; van der Heyden, K; Yasuda, N; Zheng, C; Adelman-McCarthy, J; Annis, J; Assef, R J; Barentine, J; Bender, R; Blandford, R D; Boroski, W N; Bremer, M; Brewington, H; Collins, C A; Crotts, A; Dembicky, J; Eastman, J; Edge, A; Edmondson, E; Elson, E; Eyler, M E; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Frank, S; Goobar, A; Gueth, T; Gunn, J E; Harvanek, M; Hopp, U; Ihara, Y; Ivezić, Ž; Kahn, S; Kaplan, J; Kent, S; Ketzeback, W; Kleinman, S J; Kollatschny, W; Kron, R G; Krzesiński, J; Lamenti, D; Leloudas, G; Lin, H; Long, D C; Lucey, J; Lupton, R H; Malanushenko, E; Malanushenko, V; McMillan, R J; Méndez, J; Morgan, C W; Morokuma, T; Nitta, A; Ostman, L; Pan, K; Rockosi, C M; Romer, A K; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Saurage, G; Schlesinger, K; Snedden, S A; Sollerman, J; Stoughton, C; Stritzinger, M; Subba-Rao, M; Tucker, D; Väisänen, P; Watson, L C; Watters, S; Wheeler, J C; Yanny, B; York, D

    2007-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large ...

  9. LOSS Revisited. II. The Relative Rates of Different Types of Supernovae Vary between Low- and High-mass Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graur, Or; Bianco, Federica B.; Modjaz, Maryam; Shivvers, Isaac; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong; Smith, Nathan

    2017-03-01

    In Paper I of this series, we showed that the ratio between stripped-envelope (SE) supernova (SN) and Type II SN rates reveals a significant SE SN deficiency in galaxies with stellar masses ≲ {10}10 {M}ȯ . Here, we test this result by splitting the volume-limited subsample of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) SN sample into low- and high-mass galaxies and comparing the relative rates of various SN types found in them. The LOSS volume-limited sample contains 180 SNe and SN impostors and is complete for SNe Ia out to 80 Mpc and core-collapse SNe out to 60 Mpc. All of these transients were recently reclassified by us in Shivvers et al. We find that the relative rates of some types of SNe differ between low- and high-mass galaxies: SNe Ib and Ic are underrepresented by a factor of ∼3 in low-mass galaxies. These galaxies also contain the only examples of SN 1987A-like SNe in the sample and host about nine times as many SN impostors. Normal SNe Ia seem to be ∼30% more common in low-mass galaxies, making these galaxies better sources for homogeneous SN Ia cosmology samples. The relative rates of SNe IIb are consistent in both low- and high-mass galaxies. The same is true for broad-line SNe Ic, although our sample includes only two such objects. The results presented here are in tension with a similar analysis from the Palomar Transient Factory, especially as regards SNe IIb.

  10. Late-time spectroscopy of Type Iax Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Jha, Saurabh W.; Pan, Yen-Chen; Zheng, Wei Kang; Bildsten, Lars; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Kasen, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    We examine the late-time (t ≳ 200 d after peak brightness) spectra of Type Iax supernovae (SNe Iax), a low-luminosity, low-energy class of thermonuclear stellar explosions observationally similar to, but distinct from, Type Ia supernovae. We present new spectra of SN 2014dt, resulting in the most complete late-time spectral sequence of an SN Iax. At late times, SNe Iax have generally similar spectra, all with a similar continuum shape and strong forbidden-line emission. However, there is also significant diversity where some SN Iax spectra display narrow P-Cygni features from permitted lines and a continuum indicative of a photosphere at late times in addition to strong narrow (FWHM 6000 km s-1) forbidden lines, and weak narrow forbidden lines, and some SNe Iax have spectra intermediate to these two varieties. We find that SNe Iax with strong broad forbidden lines are more luminous and have higher velocity ejecta at peak brightness. We estimate blackbody and kinematic radii of the late-time photosphere, finding the latter significantly larger than the former. We propose a two-component model that solves this discrepancy and explains the diversity of the late-time spectra of SNe Iax. In this model, the broad forbidden lines originate from the SN ejecta, while the photosphere, P-Cygni lines, and narrow forbidden lines originate from a wind launched from the remnant of the progenitor white dwarf and is driven by the radioactive decay of newly synthesized material left in the remnant. The relative strength of the two components accounts for the diversity of late-time SN Iax spectra. This model also solves the puzzle of a long-lived photosphere and the slow late-time decline of SNe Iax.

  11. LOSS Revisited - II: The relative rates of different types of supernovae vary between low- and high-mass galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Graur, Or; Modjaz, Maryam; Shivvers, Isaac; Filippenko, Alexei V; Li, Weidong; Smith, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    In Paper I of this series, we showed that the ratio between stripped-envelope supernova (SE SN) and Type II SN rates reveals a significant SE SN deficiency in galaxies with stellar masses $\\lesssim 10^{10}~{\\rm M}_\\odot$. Here, we test this result by splitting the volume-limited subsample of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) SN sample into low- and high-mass galaxies and comparing the relative rates of various SN types found in them. The LOSS volume-limited sample contains 180 SNe and SN impostors and is complete for SNe Ia out to 80 Mpc and core-collapse SNe out to 60 Mpc. All of these transients were recently reclassified by us in Shivvers et al. (in prep.) We find that the relative rates of some types of SNe differ between low- and high-mass galaxies: SNe Ib and Ic are underrepresented by a factor of ~3 in low-mass galaxies. These galaxies also contain the only examples of SN 1987A-like SNe in the sample and host ~9 times as many SN impostors. Normal SNe Ia are ~30% more common in low-mass galax...

  12. How to Find Gravitationally Lensed Type Ia Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Daniel A.; Nugent, Peter E.

    2017-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that are multiply imaged by gravitational lensing can extend the SN Ia Hubble diagram to very high redshifts (z ≳ 2), probe potential SN Ia evolution, and deliver high-precision constraints on H0, w, and Ωm via time delays. However, only one, iPTF16geu, has been found to date, and many more are needed to achieve these goals. To increase the multiply imaged SN Ia discovery rate, we present a simple algorithm for identifying gravitationally lensed SN Ia candidates in cadenced, wide-field optical imaging surveys. The technique is to look for supernovae that appear to be hosted by elliptical galaxies, but that have absolute magnitudes implied by the apparent hosts’ photometric redshifts that are far brighter than the absolute magnitudes of normal SNe Ia (the brightest type of supernovae found in elliptical galaxies). Importantly, this purely photometric method does not require the ability to resolve the lensed images for discovery. Active galactic nuclei, the primary sources of contamination that affect the method, can be controlled using catalog cross-matches and color cuts. Highly magnified core-collapse SNe will also be discovered as a byproduct of the method. Using a Monte Carlo simulation, we forecast that the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope can discover up to 500 multiply imaged SNe Ia using this technique in a 10 year z-band search, more than an order of magnitude improvement over previous estimates. We also predict that the Zwicky Transient Facility should find up to 10 multiply imaged SNe Ia using this technique in a 3 year R-band search—despite the fact that this survey will not resolve a single system.

  13. Two superluminous supernovae from the early universe discovered by the supernova legacy survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, D. A. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Kasen, D. [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Lidman, C. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Sullivan, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-389 (United States); Astier, P.; Balland, C.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N. [LPNHE, CNRS-IN2P3 and University of Paris VI and VII, F-75005 Paris (France); Carlberg, R. G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Fouchez, D. [CPPM, CNRS-IN2P3 and University Aix Marseille II, Case 907, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Rich, J.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V. [DSM/IRFU/SPP, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Perrett, K. [DRDC Ottawa, 3701 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON K1A 0Z4 (Canada); Pritchet, C. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2013-12-20

    We present spectra and light curves of SNLS 06D4eu and SNLS 07D2bv, two hydrogen-free superluminous supernovae (SNe) discovered by the Supernova Legacy Survey. At z = 1.588, SNLS 06D4eu is the highest redshift superluminous SN with a spectrum, at M{sub U} = –22.7 it is one of the most luminous SNe ever observed, and it gives a rare glimpse into the rest-frame ultraviolet where these SNe put out their peak energy. SNLS 07D2bv does not have a host galaxy redshift, but on the basis of the SN spectrum, we estimate it to be at z ∼ 1.5. Both SNe have similar observer-frame griz light curves, which map to rest-frame light curves in the U band and UV, rising in ∼20 rest-frame days or longer and declining over a similar timescale. The light curves peak in the shortest wavelengths first, consistent with an expanding blackbody starting near 15,000 K and steadily declining in temperature. We compare the spectra with theoretical models, and we identify lines of C II, C III, Fe III, and Mg II in the spectra of SNLS 06D4eu and SCP 06F6 and find that they are consistent with an expanding explosion of only a few solar masses of carbon, oxygen, and other trace metals. Thus, the progenitors appear to be related to those suspected for SNe Ic. A high kinetic energy, 10{sup 52} erg, is also favored. Normal mechanisms of powering core-collapse or thermonuclear SNe do not seem to work for these SNe. We consider models powered by {sup 56}Ni decay and interaction with circumstellar material, but we find that the creation and spin-down of a magnetar with a period of 2 ms, a magnetic field of 2 × 10{sup 14} G, and a 3 M {sub ☉} progenitor provides the best fit to the data.

  14. How multiple supernovae overlap to form superbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Naveen; Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Sharma, Prateek; Nath, Biman B.

    2017-02-01

    We explore the formation of superbubbles through energy deposition by multiple supernovae (SNe) in a uniform medium. We use the total energy conserving, 3D hydrodynamic simulations to study how SNe correlated in space and time create superbubbles. While isolated SNe fizzle out completely by ∼1 Myr due to radiative losses, for a realistic cluster size it is likely that subsequent SNe go off within the hot/dilute bubble and sustain the shock till the cluster lifetime. For realistic cluster sizes, we find that the bubble remains overpressured only if, for a given ng0, NOB is sufficiently large. While most of the input energy is still lost radiatively, superbubbles can retain up to ∼5-10 per cent of the input energy in the form of kinetic+thermal energy till 10 Myr for interstellar medium density ng0 ≈ 1 cm-3. We find that the mechanical efficiency decreases for higher densities (η _mech ∝ n_{g0}^{-2/3}). We compare the radii and velocities of simulated supershells with observations and the classical adiabatic model. Our simulations show that the superbubbles retain only ≲ 10 per cent of the injected energy, thereby explaining the observed smaller size and slower expansion of supershells. We also confirm that a sufficiently large (≳ 104) number of SNe are required to go off in order to create a steady wind with a stable termination shock within the superbubble. We show that the mechanical efficiency increases with increasing resolution, and that explicit diffusion is required to obtain converged results.

  15. The Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey: VI. The Volumetric Type Ia Supernova Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Barbary, K; Amanullah, R; Brodwin, M; Connolly, N; Dawson, K S; Doi, M; Eisenhardt, P; Faccioli, L; Fadeyev, V; Fakhouri, H K; Fruchter, A S; Gilbank, D G; Gladders, M D; Goldhaber, G; Goobar, A; Hattori, T; Hsiao, E; Huang, X; Ihara, Y; Kashikawa, N; Koester, B; Konishi, K; Kowalski, M; Lidman, C; Lubin, L; Meyers, J; Morokuma, T; Oda, T; Panagia, N; Perlmutter, S; Postman, M; Ripoche, P; Rosati, P; Rubin, D; Schlegel, D J; Spadafora, A L; Stanford, S A; Strovink, M; Suzuki, N; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; Yasuda, N

    2011-01-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate out to z ~ 1.6 from the Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey. In observations spanning 189 orbits with the Advanced Camera for Surveys we discovered 29 SNe, of which approximately 20 are SNe Ia. Twelve of these SNe Ia are located in the foregrounds and backgrounds of the clusters targeted in the survey. Using these new data, we derive the volumetric SN Ia rate in four broad redshift bins, finding results consistent with previous measurements at z > 1 and strengthening the case for a SN Ia rate that is equal to or greater than ~0.6 x 10^-4/yr/Mpc^3 at z ~ 1 and flattening out at higher redshift. We provide SN candidates and efficiency calculations in a form that makes it easy to rebin and combine these results with other measurements for increased statistics. Finally, we compare the assumptions about host-galaxy dust extinction used in different high-redshift rate measurements, finding that different assumptions may induce sig...

  16. Supernova 2013by: A Type IIL Supernova with a IIP-like light curve drop

    CERN Document Server

    Valenti, S; Stritzinger, M; Howell, D A; Arcavi, I; McCully, C; Childress, M J; Hsiao, E Y; Contreras, C; Morrell, N; Phillips, M M; Gromadzki, M; Kirshner, R P; Marion, G H

    2015-01-01

    We present multi-band ultraviolet and optical light curves, as well as visual-wavelength and near-infrared spectroscopy of the Type II linear (IIL) supernova (SN) 2013by. We show that SN 2013by and other SNe IIL in the literature, after their linear decline phase that start after maximum, have a sharp light curve decline similar to that seen in Type II plateau (IIP) supernovae. This light curve feature has rarely been observed in other SNe IIL due to their relative rarity and the intrinsic faintness of this particular phase of the light curve. We suggest that the presence of this drop could be used as a physical parameter to distinguish between subclasses of SNe II, rather than their light curve decline rate shortly after peak. Close inspection of the spectra of SN 2013by indicate asymmetric line profiles and signatures of high-velocity hydrogen. Late (less than 90 days after explosion) near-infrared spectra of SN 2013by exhibit oxygen lines, indicating significant mixing within the ejecta. From the late-time...

  17. Supernova Legacy Survey: Using Spectral Signatures To Improve Type Ia Supernovae As Distance Indicators

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, E S; Sullivan, M; Howell, D A; Astier, P; Balland, C; Basa, S; Bronder, T J; Carlberg, R; Conley, A; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Pain, R; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Aldering, G; Fakhouri, H K; Kronborg, T; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Perlmutter, S; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Zhang, T

    2010-01-01

    GMOS optical long-slit spectroscopy at the Gemini-North telescope was used to classify targets from the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) from July 2005 and May 2006 - May 2008. During this time, 95 objects were observed. Where possible the objects' redshifts (z) were measured from narrow emission or absorption features in the host galaxy spectrum, otherwise they were measured from the broader supernova features. We present spectra of 68 confirmed or probable SNe Ia from SNLS with redshifts in the range 0.17 \\leq z \\leq 1.02. In combination with earlier SNLS Gemini and VLT spectra, we used these new observations to measure pseudo-equivalent widths (EWs) of three spectral features - CaII H&K, SiII and MgII - in 144 objects and compared them to the EWs of low-redshift SNe Ia from a sample drawn from the literature. No signs of changes with z are seen for the CaII H&K and MgII features. Systematically lower EW SiII is seen at high redshift, but this can be explained by a change in demographics of the SNe Ia...

  18. SweetSpot Data Release 1: 70 Type Ia Supernovae in the Near Infrared in the Nearby Hubble Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Weyant, Anja; Allen, Lori; Trevino Barton, Nathan; Garnavich, Peter M.; Farhin Jahan, Nabila; Jha, Saurabh; Kroboth, Jessica Rose; Ponder, Kara Ann; Joyce, Richard R.; Matheson, Thomas; Rest, Armin

    2015-01-01

    SweetSpot is an NOAO Survey program from 2012B-2015A that is observing 150 Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) in the Hubble flow to obtain reliable NIR luminosities free from peculiar-velocity confusion and the uncertainties of dust.Our full SweetSpot program will (1) extend the NIR Hubble diagram past currently available samples; (2) quantitatively demonstrate the degree to which SNeIa are robust standard candles in the NIR; (3) provide key insights about the color evolution and intrinsic properties of SNeIa and their host galaxies; and (4) establish a well-calibrated low-redshift anchor for future NIR supernova surveys from JWST, Euclid, and WFIRST/NEW. By the end of the survey we will have measured the relative distance to a redshift of z~0.05 to 1%. Nearby Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) observations such as these will test the standard nature of SNeIa in the restframe NIR, allow insight into the nature of dust, and provide a critical anchor for future cosmological SN Ia surveys at higher redshift.We here present our Data Release 1 which includes 70 supernovae observed from 2011B-2013B. Along with an updated NIR Hubble diagram combining these SNeIa with those from the literature, we explore the relationships between SNIa NIR luminosity and properties of the host galaxy.

  19. Constraints on intragroup stellar mass from hostless Type Ia supernova

    CERN Document Server

    McGee, Sean L

    2009-01-01

    We probe the diffuse stellar mass in a sample of 1401 low redshift galaxy groups (10E13 - 10E14 Msun/h) by examining the rate of hostless Type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) within the groups. We correlate the sample of confirmed SNe Ia from the SDSS supernova survey with the positions of our galaxy groups, as well as with the resolved galaxies within them. We find that 19 of the 59 SNe Ia within the group sample have no detectable host galaxy, with another three ambiguous instances. This gives a robust upper limit that a maximum of 2.69% +1.58%/-1.34% of the group's total mass arises from diffuse stars in the intragroup medium. After correcting for a contribution from ``prompt'' SNe occurring within galaxies, and including a contribution from those which arise in dwarf galaxies below our photometric limit, we find that only 1.32% +0.78%/-0.70% of the group's total mass is likely in the form of diffuse stellar mass. Combining this result with the galaxy stellar mass functions of Yang et al., we find that 47% +16%/-15%...

  20. RAPIDLY RISING TRANSIENTS IN THE SUPERNOVA—SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA GAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcavi, Iair; Howell, D. Andrew [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93111 (United States); Wolf, William M. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Bildsten, Lars; McCully, Curtis; Valenti, Stefano [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Leloudas, Giorgos; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Katz, Boaz [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, 76100 (Israel); Hardin, Delphine; Astier, Pierre; Balland, Cristophe [LPNHE, CNRS-IN2P3 and University of Paris VI and VII, F-75005 Paris (France); Prajs, Szymon; Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Perley, Daniel A. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Svirski, Gilad [Racah Institute for Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lidman, Chris [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Carlberg, Ray G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Conley, Alex, E-mail: iarcavi@lcogt.net [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-389 (United States); and others

    2016-03-01

    We present observations of four rapidly rising (t{sub rise} ≈ 10 days) transients with peak luminosities between those of supernovae (SNe) and superluminous SNe (M{sub peak} ≈ −20)—one discovered and followed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and three by the Supernova Legacy Survey. The light curves resemble those of SN 2011kl, recently shown to be associated with an ultra-long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB), though no GRB was seen to accompany our SNe. The rapid rise to a luminous peak places these events in a unique part of SN phase space, challenging standard SN emission mechanisms. Spectra of the PTF event formally classify it as an SN II due to broad Hα emission, but an unusual absorption feature, which can be interpreted as either high velocity Hα (though deeper than in previously known cases) or Si ii (as seen in SNe Ia), is also observed. We find that existing models of white dwarf detonations, CSM interaction, shock breakout in a wind (or steeper CSM), and magnetar spin down cannot readily explain the observations. We consider the possibility that a “Type 1.5 SN” scenario could be the origin of our events. More detailed models for these kinds of transients and more constraining observations of future such events should help to better determine their nature.

  1. Late-time Spectroscopy of Type Iax Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, Ryan J; Pan, Yen-Chen; Zheng, WeiKang; Bildsten, Lars; Filippenko, Alexei V; Kasen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We examine the late-time (t > 200 days after peak brightness) spectra of Type Iax supernovae (SNe Iax), a low-luminosity, low-energy class of thermonuclear stellar explosions observationally similar to, but distinct from, Type Ia supernovae. We present new spectra of SN 2014dt, resulting in the most complete published late-time spectral sequence of a SN Iax. At late times, SNe Iax have generally similar spectra, all with a similar continuum shape and strong forbidden-line emission. However, there is also significant diversity where some late-time SN Iax spectra display narrow P-Cygni features and a continuum indicative of a photosphere in addition to strong narrow forbidden lines, while others have no obvious P-Cygni features, strong broad forbidden lines, and weak narrow forbidden lines. Finally, some SNe Iax have spectra intermediate to these two varieties with weak P-Cygni features and broad/narrow forbidden lines of similar strength. We find that SNe Iax with strong broad forbidden lines also tend to be m...

  2. The Carnegie Supernova Project: Intrinsic Colors of Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, Christopher R; Phillips, M M; Hsiao, E Y; Contreras, Carlos; Persson, S E; Folatelli, Gaston; Boldt, Luis; Campillay, Abdo; Catellón, Sergio; Freedman, Wendy L; Madore, Barry F; Morrell, Nidia; Salgado, Francisco; Suntzeff, Nicholas B

    2014-01-01

    We present an updated analysis of the intrinsic colors of SNe Ia using the latest data release of the Carnegie Supernova Project. We introduce a new light-curve parameter very similar to stretch that is better suited for fast-declining events, and find that these peculiar types can be seen as extensions to the population of "normal" SNe Ia. With a larger number of objects, an updated fit to the Lira relation is presented along with evidence for a dependence on the late-time slope of the B-V color-curves with stretch and color. Using the full wavelength range from u to H band, we place constraints on the reddening law for the sample as a whole and also for individual events/hosts based solely on the observed colors. The photometric data continue to favor low values of Rv, though with large variations from event to event, indicating an intrinsic distribution. We confirm the findings of other groups that there appears to be a correlation between the derived reddening law, Rv, and the color excess, E(B-V), such t...

  3. Decontaminating Cosmology: Towards Measuring Dark Energy with Photometrically Classified Pan-STARRS Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David; Riess, Adam G.; Scolnic, Daniel; Kessler, Richard; Rest, Armin; Kirshner, Robert P.; Berger, Edo; Ortega, Carolyn; Foley, Ryan; Chornock, Ryan; Challis, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The Pan-STARRS (PS1) Medium Deep Survey discovered over 5,000 likely supernovae (SNe) but obtained spectral classifications for just 10% of its SN candidates. We measured spectroscopic host galaxy redshifts for 2,979 of these likely SNe and estimate that ˜1,100 are Type Ia SNe (SNe Ia) with light-curve quality sufficient for a cosmological analysis. We then use these data with simulations to determine the impact of core-collapse SN (CC SN) contamination on measurements of the dark energy equation of state, w. With the method of Bayesian Estimation Applied to Multiple Species (BEAMS), we can simultaneously determine distances to SNe Ia and the contaminating CC SN distribution as a function of redshift. We use light-curve based SN classification priors for BEAMS as well as a new classification method based on host galaxy spectra and the association of SN type with host type. From simulations of 1,000 PS1 SNe, we find that w is biased by just -0.005 due to CC SN contamination, 10% of its statistical uncertainty. By applying several independent SN classification methods and CC SN parameterizations, we estimate w can be measured with a systematic error of 0.014, 30% of the statistical uncertainty on w. We find that BEAMS determines the SALT2 color and shape coefficients, α and β, and the SNIa dispersion with ~1σ bias. We also draw Monte Carlo samples from real PS1 SNe without spectroscopic classifications and find measurements of w from these SNe are fully consistent with the PS1 spectroscopic sample. Finally, the abundance of bright CC SNe in our sample implies that the luminosity functions of Ia-like CC SNe may be ~1 mag brighter than expected from previous measurements.

  4. The Observer's Guide to the Gamma-Ray Burst-Supernova Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Z.; Wang, S.-Q.; Dai, Z.-G.; Wu, X.-F.

    2016-10-01

    In this review we present a progress report of the connection between long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their accompanying supernovae (SNe). The analysis is from the point of view of an observer, with much of the emphasis placed on how observations, and the modelling of observations, have constrained what we known about GRB-SNe. We discuss their photometric and spectroscopic properties, their role as cosmological probes, including their measured luminosity-decline relationships, and how they can be used to measure the Hubble constant. We present a statistical analysis of their bolometric properties, and use this to determine the properties of the "average" GRB-SNe: which has a kinetic energy of EK≈2.5×10^52 erg, an ejecta mass of Mej≈6 M⊙, a nickel mass of MNi≈0.4 M⊙, a peak photospheric velocity of vph≈21,000 km s-1, a peak bolometric luminosity of Lp≈1×10^43 erg s-1, and it reaches peak bolometric light in tp≈13 days. We discuss their geometry, consider the various physical processes that are thought to power the luminosity of GRB-SNe, and whether differences exist between GRB-SNe and the SNe associated with ultra-long duration GRBs. We discuss how observations of the environments of GRB-SNe further constrain the physical properties of their progenitor stars, and give an overview of the current theoretical paradigms of their suspected central engines. We also present an overview of the radioactively powered transients that have been photometrically associated with short-duration GRBs. We conclude the review by discussing what additional research is needed to further our understanding of GRB-SNe, in particular the role of binary-formation channels and the connection of GRB-SNe with superluminous SNe (abridged).

  5. Multi-Dimensional Simulations of Radiative Transfer in Aspherical Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Mazzali, Paolo A; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2008-01-01

    We study optical radiation of aspherical supernovae (SNe) and present an approach to verify the asphericity of SNe with optical observations of extragalactic SNe. For this purpose, we have developed a multi-dimensional Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code, SAMURAI (SupernovA MUlti-dimensional RAdIative transfer code). The code can compute the optical light curve and spectra both at early phases (<~ 40 days after the explosion) and late phases (~ 1 year after the explosion), based on hydrodynamic and nucleosynthetic models. We show that all the optical observations of SN 1998bw (associated with GRB 980425) are consistent with polar-viewed radiation of the aspherical explosion model with kinetic energy 20 x 10^{51} ergs. Properties of off-axis hypernovae are also discussed briefly.

  6. Massive stars exploding in a He-rich circumstellar medium - IX. SN 2014av, and characterization of Type Ibn SNe

    CERN Document Server

    Pastorello, A; Ciabattari, F; Bersier, D; Mazzali, P A; Gao, X; Xu, Z; Zhang, J -J; Tokuoka, S; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Elias-Rosa, N; Harutyunyan, A; Huang, F; Miluzio, M; Mo, J; Ochner, P; Tartaglia, L; Terreran, G; Tomasella, L; Turatto, M

    2015-01-01

    We present spectroscopic and photometric data of the Type Ibn supernova (SN) 2014av, discovered by the Xingming Observatory Sky Survey. A stringent pre-discovery detection limit indicates that the object was discovered soon after core-collapse. A prompt follow-up campaign arranged by amateur astronomers allows us to monitor the rising phase (lasting 10.6 days) and to accurately estimate the epoch of the maximum light, on 2014 April 23 (JD = 2456771.1 +- 1.2). The absolute magnitude of the SN at the maximum light is M(R) = -19.76 +- 0.16. The post-peak light curve shows an initial fast decline lasting about 3 weeks, and is followed by a slower decline in all bands until the end of the monitoring campaign. The spectra are initially characterized by a hot continuum. Later on, the temperature declines and a number of lines become prominent mostly in emission. In particular, later spectra are dominated by strong and narrow emission features of He I typical of Type Ibn supernovae (SNe), although there is clear evid...

  7. Type-Ia Supernova Rates to Redshift 2.4 from CLASH: the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble

    CERN Document Server

    Graur, O; Maoz, D; Riess, A G; Jha, S W; Postman, M; Dahlen, T; Holoien, T W -S; McCully, C; Patel, B; Strolger, L -G; Benitez, N; Coe, D; Jouvel, S; Medezinski, E; Molino, A; Nonino, M; Bradley, L; Koekemoer, A; Balestra, I; Blondin, S; Cenko, S B; Clubb, K I; Dickinson, M E; Filippenko, A V; Frederiksen, T F; Garnavich, P; Hjorth, J; Jones, D O; Leibundgut, B; Matheson, T; Mobasher, B; Rosati, P; Silverman, J M; U, V; Jedruszczuk, K; Li, C; Lin, K; Mirmelstein, M; Neustadt, J; Ovadia, A; Rogers, E H

    2013-01-01

    We present the supernova (SN) sample and Type-Ia SN (SN Ia) rates from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have imaged 25 galaxy-cluster fields and parallel fields of non-cluster galaxies. We report a sample of 27 SNe discovered in the parallel fields. Of these SNe, ~11 are classified as SN Ia candidates, including four SN Ia candidates at redshifts z > 1.2. We measure volumetric SN Ia rates to redshift 1.8 and add the first upper limit on the SN Ia rate in the range 1.8 99% significance level.

  8. Supernova 2010as: the Lowest-Velocity Member of a Family of Flat-Velocity Type IIb Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Folatelli, Gastón; Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Estay, Felipe Olivares; Anderson, Joseph P; Holmbo, Simon; Maeda, Keiichi; Morrell, Nidia; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Pignata, Giuliano; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Contreras, Carlos; Förster, Francisco; Hamuy, Mario; Phillips, Mark M; Prieto, José Luis; Valenti, Stefano; Afonso, Paulo; Altenmüller, Konrad; Elliott, Jonny; Greiner, Jochen; Updike, Adria; Haislip, Joshua B; LaCluyze, Aaron P; Moore, Justin P; Reichart, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    We present extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of the stripped-envelope (SE) supernova SN 2010as. Spectroscopic peculiarities, such as initially weak helium features and low expansion velocities with a nearly flat evolution, place this object in the small family of events previously identified as transitional Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe). There is ubiquitous evidence of hydrogen, albeit weak, in this family of SNe, indicating that they are in fact a peculiar kind of Type IIb SNe that we name "flat-velocity Type IIb". The flat velocity evolution---which occurs at different levels between 6000 and 8000 km/s for different SNe---suggests the presence of a dense shell in the ejecta. Despite the spectroscopic similarities, these objects show surprisingly diverse luminosities. We discuss the possible physical or geometrical unification picture for such diversity. Using archival HST images we associate SN 2010as with a massive cluster and derive a progenitor age of ~6 Myr, ass...

  9. Gravitational Wave Emission from the Single-Degenerate Channel of Type Ia Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falta, David; Fisher, Robert; Khanna, Gaurav

    2011-05-01

    The thermonuclear explosion of a C/O white dwarf as a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) generates a kinetic energy comparable to that released by a massive star during a SN II event. Current observations and theoretical models have established that SNe Ia are asymmetric, and therefore—like SNe II—potential sources of gravitational wave (GW) radiation. We perform the first detailed calculations of the GW emission for a SN Ia of any type within the single-degenerate channel. The gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) mechanism predicts a strongly polarized GW burst in the frequency band around 1 Hz. Third-generation spaceborne GW observatories currently in planning may be able to detect this predicted signal from SNe Ia at distances up to 1 Mpc. If observable, GWs may offer a direct probe into the first few seconds of the SNe Ia detonation.

  10. SN 2009kn - The Twin of the Type IIn SN 1994W

    CERN Document Server

    Kankare, E; Bufano, F; Spyromilio, J; Mattila, S; Chugai, N N; Lundqvist, P; Pastorello, A; Kotak, R; Benetti, S; Botticella, M-T; Cumming, R J; Fransson, C; Fraser, M; Leloudas, G; Miluzio, M; Sollerman, J; Stritzinger, M; Turatto, M; Valenti, S

    2012-01-01

    We present an optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic study of supernova (SN) 2009kn spanning ~1.5 yr from the discovery. The optical spectra are dominated by the narrow (FWHM ~1000 km s^-1) Balmer lines distinctive of a Type IIn SN with P-Cygni profiles. Contrarily the photometric evolution resembles more that of a Type IIP SN with a large drop in luminosity at the end of the plateau phase. These characteristics are similar to those of SN 1994W, whose nature has been explained with two different models with different approaches. The well-sampled dataset on SN 2009kn offers the possibility to test these models, both in the case of SN 2009kn and SN 1994W. We associate the narrow P-Cygni lines with a swept-up shell composed of circumstellar matter and SN ejecta. The broad emission line wings, seen during the plateau phase arise from internal electron scattering in this shell. The slope of the light curve after the post-plateau drop is fairly consistent with that expected from the radioactive dec...

  11. Supernova 2008J: early time observations of a heavily reddened SN 2002ic-like transient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taddia, F.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Phillips, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We provide additional observational evidence that some Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) show signatures of circumstellar interaction (CSI) with hydrogen-rich material. Methods: Early phase optical and near-infrared (NIR) light curves and spectroscopy of SN 2008J obtained by the Carnegie Supernov...

  12. Supernova 2008J: early time observations of a heavily reddened SN 2002ic-like transient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taddia, F.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Phillips, M. M.;

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We provide additional observational evidence that some Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) show signatures of circumstellar interaction (CSI) with hydrogen-rich material. Methods: Early phase optical and near-infrared (NIR) light curves and spectroscopy of SN 2008J obtained by the Carnegie Supernov...

  13. The supernova rate: a critical ingredient and an important tool

    CERN Document Server

    Mannucci, F

    2009-01-01

    In this review I summarize the role of supernova rate as a critical ingredient of modern astrophysics, and as an important tool to understand SN explosions. Many years of active observations and theoretical modeling have produced several important results. In particular, linking SN rates with parent stellar populations has proved to be an important strategy. Despite these advances, the situation is far from clear, in particular for the SNe Ia.

  14. A trio of gamma-ray burst supernovae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cano, Z.; Ugarte Postigo, Antonio de; Pozanenko, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry for three gamma-ray burst supernovae (GRB-SNe): GRB 120729A, GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez and GRB 130831A / SN 2013fu. In the case of GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez, we also present optical spectroscopy at t-t0=16.1 d, which covers rest-frame 3000-6250 An...

  15. Core-Collapse supernovae and its progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Subhash; Misra, Kuntal

    2016-01-01

    Massive stars unable to sustain gravitational collapse, at the end of nuclear burning stage, turns out into core-collapse supernovae, leaving behind compact objects like neutron stars or black holes. The progenitor properties like mass and metallicity primarily governs the explosion parameters and type of compact remnant. In this contribution we summarize observational study of three Core Collapse type IIP SNe 2012aw, 2013ab and 2013ej, which are rigorously observed from ARIES and other Indian observatories and discuss their progenitor and explosion properties.

  16. Typing Supernova Remnants Using X-ray Line Emission Morphologies

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Laura A; Badenes, Carles; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Jeltema, Tesla E; Pooley, David A

    2009-01-01

    We present a new observational method to type the explosions of young supernova remnants (SNRs). By measuring the morphology of the Chandra X-ray line emission in seventeen Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud SNRs with a multipole expansion analysis (using power ratios), we find that the core-collapse SNRs are statistically more asymmetric than the Type Ia SNRs. We show that the two classes of supernovae can be separated naturally using this technique because X-ray line morphologies reflect the distinct explosion mechanisms and structure of the circumstellar material. These findings are consistent with recent spectropolarimetry results showing that core-collapse SNe are intrinsically more asymmetric.

  17. Dependence on supernovae light-curve processing in void models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengochea, Gabriel R., E-mail: gabriel@iafe.uba.ar [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), UBA-CONICET, CC 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); De Rossi, Maria E., E-mail: derossi@iafe.uba.ar [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), UBA-CONICET, CC 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-06-02

    In this work, we show that when supernova Ia (SN Ia) data sets are used to put constraints on the free parameters of inhomogeneous models, certain extra information regarding the light-curve fitter used in the supernovae Ia luminosity fluxes processing should be taken into account. We found that the size of the void as well as other parameters of these models might be suffering extra degenerations or additional systematic errors due to the fitter. A recent proposal to relieve the tension between the results from Planck satellite and SNe Ia is re-analyzed in the framework of these subjects.

  18. Cosmic flows in the nearby universe from Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Turnbull, Stephen J; Feldman, Hume A; Hicken, Malcolm; Kirshner, Robert P; Watkin, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Peculiar velocities are one of the only probes of very large-scale mass density fluctuations in the nearby Universe. We present new "minimal variance" bulk flow measurements based upon the "First Amendment" compilation of 245 Type Ia supernovae (SNe) peculiar velocities and find a bulk flow of 249 +/- 76 km/s in the direction l= 319 +/- 18 deg, b = 7 +/- 14 deg. The SNe bulk flow is consistent with the expectations of \\Lambda CDM. However, it is also marginally consistent with the bulk flow of a larger compilation of non-SNe peculiar velocities (Watkins, Feldman, & Hudson 2009). By comparing the SNe peculiar velocities to predictions of the IRAS Point Source Catalog Redshift survey (PSCz) galaxy density field, we find \\Omega_{m}^{0.55} \\sigma_{8,lin} = 0.40 +/- 0.07, which is in agreement with \\Lambda CDM. However, we also show that the PSCz density field fails to account for 150 +/- 43 km/s of the SNe bulk motion.

  19. Estimating Type Ia Supernova Metallicities Using Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, V. Ashley

    2017-01-01

    Normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe) can be used as standardizable candles because their progenitors, white dwarfs, are a fairly homogenous class of objects. However, intrinsic variability in these events arise from a number of factors, including metallicity. Recent studies have investigated the effects of metallicity on Type Ia SNe observables from both a theoretical approach, by tuning model metallicity to analyze spectral features, and an observational approach, by studying the effect of host metallicity on light curves. In this work, we take a new, data-driven approach to the problem. Inspired by the success of neural networks in the field of image processing, we aim to estimate the metallicities of Type Ia SNe progenitors from their near-maximum spectra using feed-forward neural networks. We first collect a sample of near-maximum Type Ia SNe spectra from the literature to be smoothed and down-sampled. We then estimate the metallicities of the SNe hosts using the B-band magnitudes. We build a multilayer perceptron to generate a model that takes as input the down-sampled spectra and returns a scalar metallicity. Finally, we discuss basic considerations to be taken when working with spectral (as opposed to image) data using neural networks.

  20. Not Color Blind Using Multiband Photometry to Classify Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Poznanski, D; Maoz, D; Filippenko, A V; Leonard, D C; Matheson, T; Poznanski, Dovi; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Maoz, Dan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Leonard, Douglas C.; Matheson, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Large numbers of supernovae (SNe) have been discovered in recent years, and many more will be found in the near future. Once discovered, further study of a SN and its possible use as an astronomical tool (e.g., a distance estimator) require knowledge of the SN type. Current classification methods rely almost solely on the analysis of SN spectra to determine their type. However, spectroscopy may not be possible or practical when SNe are faint, very numerous, or discovered in archival studies. We present a classification method for SNe based on the comparison of their observed colors with synthetic ones, calculated from a large database of multi-epoch optical spectra of nearby events. We discuss the capabilities and limitations of this method. For example, type Ia SNe at redshifts z 100 days) stages. Broad-band photometry through standard Johnson-Cousins UBVRI filters can be useful to classify SNe up to z ~ 0.6. The use of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) u'g'r'i'z' filters allows extending our classification m...

  1. Metallicity from Type II Supernovae from the (i)PTF

    CERN Document Server

    Taddia, F; Sollerman, J; Rubin, A; Leloudas, G; Gal-Yam, A; Arcavi, I; Cao, Y; Filippenko, A V; Graham, M L; Mazzali, P A; Nugent, P E; Pan, Y -C; Silverman, J M; Xu, D; Yaron, O

    2016-01-01

    Type IIP supernovae (SNe IIP) have recently been proposed as metallicity ($Z$) probes. The spectral models of Dessart et al. (2014) showed that the pseudo-equivalent width of Fe II $\\lambda$5018 (pEW$_{5018}$) during the plateau phase depends on the primordial $Z$, but there was a paucity of SNe IIP exhibiting pEW$_{5018}$ compatible with $Z < 0.4 {\\rm Z}_{\\odot}$. This lack might be due to some physical property of the SN II population, or to the fact that those SNe were discovered in luminous, metal-rich targeted galaxies. Here we use SN II observations from the untargeted (intermediate) Palomar Transient Factory [(i)PTF] survey, aiming to investigate the pEW$_{5018}$ distribution of this SN population and in particular to look for the presence of SNe II at lower $Z$. We perform pEW$_{5018}$ measurements on the spectra of a sample of 39 (i)PTF SNe II, selected to have well-constrained explosion epochs and light-curve properties (Rubin et al. 2015). Based on the comparison with the pEW$_{5018}$ spectral m...

  2. Improved Standardization of Type II-P Supernovae: Application to an Expanded Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Poznanski, Dovi; Filippenko, Alexei V; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Li, Weidong; Bloom, Joshua S; Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan J; Nugent, Peter E; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Cenko, S Bradley; Gates, Elinor L; Leonard, Douglas C; Miller, Adam A; Modjaz, Maryam; Serduke, Frank J D; Smith, Nathan; Swift, Brandon J; Wong, Diane S

    2008-01-01

    In the epoch of precise and accurate cosmology, cross-confirmation using a variety of cosmographic methods is paramount to circumvent systematic uncertainties. Owing to progenitor histories and explosion physics differing from those of Type Ia SNe (SNe Ia), Type II-plateau supernovae (SNe II-P) are unlikely to be affected by evolution in the same way. Based on a new analysis of 17 SNe II-P, and on an improved methodology, we find that SNe II-P are good standardizable candles, almost comparable to SNe Ia. We derive a tight Hubble diagram with dispersion of 10% in distance, using the simple correlation between luminosity and photospheric velocity introduced by Hamuy & Pinto 2002. We show that the descendent method of Nugent et al. 2006 can be further simplified and that the correction for dust extinction has low statistical impact. We find that our SN sample favors, on average, a very steep dust law with total to selective extinction R_V<2. Such an extinction law has been recently inferred for many SNe I...

  3. The impact of bars on the radial distribution of supernovae in disc galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakobyan, A. A.; Karapetyan, A. G.; Barkhudaryan, L. V.; Mamon, G. A.; Kunth, D.; Petrosian, A. R.; Adibekyan, V.; Aramyan, L. S.; Turatto, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present an analysis of the impact of bars on the radial distributions of the different types of supernovae (SNe) in the stellar discs of host galaxies with various morphologies. We find that in Sa-Sbc galaxies, the radial distribution of core-collapse (CC) SNe in barred hosts is inconsistent with that in unbarred ones, while the distributions of SNe Ia are not significantly different. At the same time, the radial distributions of both types of SNe in Sc-Sm galaxies are not affected by bars. We propose that the additional mechanism shaping the distributions of Type Ia and CC SNe can be explained within the framework of substantial suppression of massive star formation in the radial range swept by strong bars, particularly in early-type spirals. The radial distribution of CC SNe in unbarred Sa-Sbc galaxies is more centrally peaked and inconsistent with that in unbarred Sc-Sm hosts, while the distribution of SNe Ia in unbarred galaxies is not affected by host morphology. These results can be explained by the distinct distributions of massive stars in the discs of early-and late-type spirals.

  4. The impact of bars on the radial distribution of supernovae in disc galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hakobyan, A A; Barkhudaryan, L V; Mamon, G A; Kunth, D; Petrosian, A R; Adibekyan, V; Aramyan, L S; Turatto, M

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the impact of bars on the radial distributions of the different types of supernovae (SNe) in the stellar discs of host galaxies with various morphologies. We find that in Sa-Sbc galaxies, the radial distribution of core-collapse (CC) SNe in barred hosts is inconsistent with that in unbarred ones, while the distributions of SNe Ia are not significantly different. At the same time, the radial distributions of both types of SNe in Sc-Sm galaxies are not affected by bars. We propose that the additional mechanism shaping the distributions of Type Ia and CC SNe can be explained within the framework of substantial suppression of massive star formation in the radial range swept by strong bars, particularly in early-type spirals. The radial distribution of CC SNe in unbarred Sa-Sbc galaxies is more centrally peaked and inconsistent with that in unbarred Sc-Sm hosts, while the distribution of SNe Ia in unbarred galaxies is not affected by host morphology. These results can be explained by the ...

  5. Type Ib/c Supernovae with and without Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Modjaz, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    While the connection between Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Type Ib/c Supernovae (SNe Ib/c) from stripped stars has been well-established, one key outstanding question is what conditions and factors lead to each kind of explosion in massive stripped stars. One promising line of attack is to investigate what sets apart SNe Ib/c with GRBs from those without GRBs. Here, I briefly present two observational studies that probe the SN properties and the environmental metallicities of SNe Ib/c (specifically broad-lined SNe Ic) with and without GRBs. I present an analysis of expansion velocities based on published spectra and on the homogeneous spectroscopic CfA data set of over 70 SNe of Types IIb, Ib, Ic and Ic-bl, which triples the world supply of well-observed Stripped SNe. Moreover, I demonstrate that a meta-analysis of the three published SN Ib/c metallicity data sets, when including only values at the SN positions to probe natal oxygen abundances, indicates at very high significance that indeed SNe Ic erupt f...

  6. A Systematic Study of Mid-Infrared Emission from Core-Collapse Supernovae with SPIRITS

    CERN Document Server

    Tinyanont, Samaporn; Fox, Ori D; Lau, Ryan; Smith, Nathan; Williams, Robert; Jencson, Jacob; Perley, Daniel; Dykhoff, Devin; Gehrz, Robert; Johansson, Joel; Masci, Frank; Cody, Ann Marie; Prince, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic study of mid-infrared (mid-IR) emission from 141 nearby supernovae (SNe) observed with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) on Spitzer.These SNe reside in one of the 190 galaxies within 20 Mpc drawn from the ongoing SPIRITS program. We detect 8 Type Ia SNe and 36 core-collapse SNe. All Type I SNe become undetectable within 3 years of explosion. About 22$\\pm$11% of Type II SNe continue to be detected at late-times. Dust luminosity, temperature, and a lower liit on mass are obtained by fitting the SED using photometry with IRAC bands 1 and 2. The mass estimate does not distinguish between pre-existing and newly produced dust. We observe warm dust masses between $10^{-2}$ and $10^{-6}$ $\\rm M_{\\odot}$ and dust temperatures from 200 K to 1280 K.We present detailed case studies of two extreme Type II-P SNe: SN 2011ja and 2014bi. SN 2011ja was over-luminous ([4.5] = -15.6 mag) at 900 days post-explosion accompanied by the growing dust mass. This suggests either an episode of dust formation or an...

  7. Snapping Supernovae at z>1.7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldering, Greg; Kim, Alex G.; Kowalski, Marek; Linder, Eric V.; Perlmutter, Saul

    2006-07-03

    We examine the utility of very high redshift Type Ia supernovae for cosmology and systematic uncertainty control. Next generation space surveys such as the Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will obtain thousands of supernovae at z>1.7, beyond the design redshift for which the supernovae will be exquisitely characterized. We find that any z gtrsim 2 standard candles' use for cosmological parameter estimation is quite modest and subject to pitfalls; we examine gravitational lensing, redshift calibration, and contamination effects in some detail. The very high redshift supernovae - both thermonuclear and core collapse - will provide copious interesting information on star formation, environment, and evolution. However, the new observational systematics that must be faced, as well as the limited expansion of SN-parameter space afforded, does not point to high value for 1.7SNe Ia in controlling evolutionary systematics relative to what SNAP can already achieve at z<1.7. Synergy with observations from JWST and thirty meter class telescopes afford rich opportunities for advances throughout astrophysics.

  8. Grouping normal type Ia supernovae by UV to optical color differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milne, Peter A. [University of Arizona, Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Brown, Peter J. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A. and M. University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Roming, Peter W. A. [Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Corporation, P.O. Drawer 28510, San Antonio, TX 78228-0510 (United States); Bufano, Filomena [Universidad Andres Bello, Departmento de Cincias Fisicas, Avda. Republica 220, Santiago (Chile); Gehrels, Neil, E-mail: pbrown@physics.tamu.edu [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrophysics Science Division, Codes 660.1 and 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    Observations of many Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) for multiple epochs per object with the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope instrument have revealed that there exists order to the differences in the UV-optical colors of optically normal supernovae (SNe). We examine UV-optical color curves for 23 SNe Ia, dividing the SNe into four groups, and find that roughly one-third of 'NUV-blue' SNe Ia have bluer UV-optical colors than the larger 'NUV-red' group. Two minor groups are recognized, 'MUV-blue' and 'irregular' SNe Ia. While we conclude that the latter group is a subset of the NUV-red group, containing the SNe with the broadest optical peaks, we conclude that the 'MUV-blue' group is a distinct group. Separating into the groups and accounting for the time evolution of the UV-optical colors lowers the scatter in two NUV-optical colors (e.g., u – v and uvw1 – v) to the level of the scatter in b – v. This finding is promising for extending the cosmological utilization of SNe Ia into the NUV. We generate spectrophotometry of 33 SNe Ia and determine the correct grouping for each. We argue that there is a fundamental spectral difference in the 2900-3500 Å wavelength range, a region suggested to be dominated by absorption from iron-peak elements. The NUV-blue SNe Ia feature less absorption than the NUV-red SNe Ia. We show that all NUV-blue SNe Ia in this sample also show evidence of unburned carbon in optical spectra, whereas only one NUV-red SN Ia features that absorption line. Every NUV-blue event also exhibits a low gradient of the Si II λ6355 absorption feature. Many NUV-red events also exhibit a low gradient, perhaps suggestive that NUV-blue events are a subset of the larger low-velocity gradient group.

  9. Light Echoes and the Environments of SNe 2014J and 2016adj

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugerman, Ben; Benge, A.; Bryan, G.; Joung, M.; Lawrence, S.; Mac Low, M.; Ostriker, J.; Peek, J.

    2016-08-01

    Light echoes are one of the most powerful and efficient probes of the structure and composition of dust in circumstellar and interstellar environments. Observations of light echoes provide exact three-dimensional (3-D) positions of dust while constraining its density, grain-size and chemical make-up. These can be used to study the evolutionary history of supernova (SN) progenitors, produce high-resolution maps of the structure and composition of interstellar media (ISM), and geometrically measure extragalactic distances. However, echoes pass through a given point only once, and only illuminate a thin slice of a complete structure at any given time, thus accomplishing meaningful science requires carefully-planned, repeated observations. The Type Ia SN 2014J in M82, and the core-collapse SN 2016adj in Cen A are both nearby (~3.5 Mpc), highly reddened (A_V=2-4 mags), and were reported within the last year to have produced resolved light echoes. With 12 orbits of HST and 2.4 hours of Spitzer follow-up observations proposed here, we will map out much more of the 3-D geometry and measure the dust properties of numerous independent structures within the ISM of the host galaxies, and map out or constrain the presence of circumstellar material around each SN. These results can be further used to investigate why the extinction toward SN 2014J (R_V=1.4) differs from Galactic values; measure the geometric distances to both host galaxies; constrain the progenitor properties; test competing models of Type Ib/IIb SNe; and benchmark whether echoes can help us understand galactic feedback, by comparing the actual structures they reveal to ISM simulations.

  10. Cepheid Calibration of the Peak Brightness of SNe Ia. V. SN 1981B in NGC 4536

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, A.; Sandage, Allan; Labhardt, Lukas; Tammann, G. A.; Macchetto, F. D.; Panagia, N.

    1996-07-01

    Observations have been made with the Hubble Space Telescope between 1994 June and August over a 67 day interval, comprising 17 epochs in the F555W band and 5 epochs in the F814W band. The target was a region of an outlying spiral arm of NGC 4536 [Sbc(s)I-II), a galaxy that was parent to the type Ia supernova SN 1981B. Seventy-three Cepheids were found with periods ranging between 5.4 and 65 days. The apparent distance modulus of NGC 4536 is (m - M)_AV_ = 31.23 +/- 0.05 and (m - M)_AB_ = 31.27 +/- 0.05. There is no statistically significant differential absorption between the Cepheids inside and outside the spiral arm, or between the Cepheids and the position of the supernova (SN). The resulting absolute magnitudes of SN 1981B are M_V_(max) = - 19.32 +/- 0.12 and M_B_(max) = - 19.29 +/- 0.13 using the apparent modulus of NGC 4536 and the apparent magnitudes of SN 1981B as if there is no differential extinction between them. If we correct the SN for reddening, determined independently of the Cepheids, and then use the true modulus of NGC 4536 of (m - M)_0_ = 31.10 +/- 0.13, the SN values are M_B_(max) = - 19.46 +/- 0.24 and M_V_(max) = - 19.44 +/- 0.21. Combining these calibrations With the three calibrations previously available for the SNe 1895B, 1937C, and 1972E, determined in the first four papers of this series, gives the interim calibrations of = - 19.48 +/- 0.12 and = - 19.47 +/- 0.10. These require interim Hubble constants of H_0_(B) = 55 +/- 3(internal) km s^-1^ Mpc^-1^, and H_0_(V) = 58 +/- 3(internal) km s^-1^ Mpc^-1^. Improvement is expected when the fifth and sixth calibrators, SN 1960F in NGC 4496A and SN 1990N in NGC 4639, are added to the four available here. When these data are available, any putative decay rate-absolute magnitude correlation can also begin to be studied directly from the Cepheid calibrations themselves.

  11. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE STRONGLY INTERACTING WITH THEIR CIRCUMSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Nugent, Peter E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, Iair; Ben-Ami, Sagi [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Howell, D. Andrew; Graham, Melissa L. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Cao, Yi; Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Chornock, Ryan; Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Coil, Alison L. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Griffith, Christopher V. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kasliwal, Mansi M., E-mail: jsilverman@astro.as.utexas.edu [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); and others

    2013-07-01

    Owing to their utility for measurements of cosmic acceleration, Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are perhaps the best-studied class of SNe, yet the progenitor systems of these explosions largely remain a mystery. A rare subclass of SNe Ia shows evidence of strong interaction with their circumstellar medium (CSM), and in particular, a hydrogen-rich CSM; we refer to them as SNe Ia-CSM. In the first systematic search for such systems, we have identified 16 SNe Ia-CSM, and here we present new spectra of 13 of them. Six SNe Ia-CSM have been well studied previously, three were previously known but are analyzed in depth for the first time here, and seven are new discoveries from the Palomar Transient Factory. The spectra of all SNe Ia-CSM are dominated by H{alpha} emission (with widths of {approx}2000 km s{sup -1}) and exhibit large H{alpha}/H{beta} intensity ratios (perhaps due to collisional excitation of hydrogen via the SN ejecta overtaking slower-moving CSM shells); moreover, they have an almost complete lack of He I emission. They also show possible evidence of dust formation through a decrease in the red wing of H{alpha} 75-100 days past maximum brightness, and nearly all SNe Ia-CSM exhibit strong Na I D absorption from the host galaxy. The absolute magnitudes (uncorrected for host-galaxy extinction) of SNe Ia-CSM are found to be -21.3 mag {<=} M{sub R} {<=} -19 mag, and they also seem to show ultraviolet emission at early times and strong infrared emission at late times (but no detected radio or X-ray emission). Finally, the host galaxies of SNe Ia-CSM are all late-type spirals similar to the Milky Way, or dwarf irregulars like the Large Magellanic Cloud, which implies that these objects come from a relatively young stellar population. This work represents the most detailed analysis of the SN Ia-CSM class to date.

  12. LOSS Revisited - I: Unraveling correlations between supernova rates and galaxy properties, as measured in a re-analysis of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search

    CERN Document Server

    Graur, Or; Huang, Shan; Modjaz, Maryam; Shivvers, Isaac; Filippenko, Alexei V; Li, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Most types of supernovae (SNe) have yet to be connected with their progenitor stellar systems. Here, we re-analyze the ten-year 1998-2008 SN sample collected by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) in order to constrain the progenitors of SNe Ia and stripped-envelope SNe (SE SNe; i.e., SNe IIb, Ib, Ic, and broad-lined Ic). We matched the LOSS galaxy sample with spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and measured SN rates as a function of galaxy stellar mass, specific star-formation rate (sSFR), and oxygen abundance (metallicity). We find significant correlations between the SN rates and all three galaxy properties. The SN Ia correlations are consistent with other measurements, as well as with our previous explanation of these measurements in the form of a combination of the SN Ia delay-time distribution and the correlation between galaxy mass and age. Intriguingly, we measure a deficiency in the SE SN rates, relative to the SN II rates, in galaxies with low stellar masses, high sSFR values, an...

  13. Three gravitationally lensed supernovae behind clash galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Brandon; McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W.; Holoien, Thomas W.-S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Rodney, Steven A.; Jones, David O.; Graur, Or; Riess, Adam G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Merten, Julian [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 169-327, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zitrin, Adi [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Matheson, Thomas [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Sako, Masao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Postman, Marc; Coe, Dan; Bradley, Larry [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21208 (United States); Bartelmann, Matthias [Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Balestra, Italo [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); Benítez, Narciso [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Camino Bajo de Huétor 24, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Bouwens, Rychard [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Broadhurst, Tom, E-mail: bpatel02@physics.rutgers.edu [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country, P.O. Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); and others

    2014-05-01

    We report observations of three gravitationally lensed supernovae (SNe) in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program. These objects, SN CLO12Car (z = 1.28), SN CLN12Did (z = 0.85), and SN CLA11Tib (z = 1.14), are located behind three different clusters, MACSJ1720.2+3536 (z = 0.391), RXJ1532.9+3021 (z = 0.345), and A383 (z = 0.187), respectively. Each SN was detected in Hubble Space Telescope optical and infrared images. Based on photometric classification, we find that SNe CLO12Car and CLN12Did are likely to be Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), while the classification of SN CLA11Tib is inconclusive. Using multi-color light-curve fits to determine a standardized SN Ia luminosity distance, we infer that SN CLO12Car was ∼1.0 ± 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia at a similar redshift and ascribe this to gravitational lens magnification. Similarly, SN CLN12Did is ∼0.2 ± 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia. We derive independent estimates of the predicted magnification from CLASH strong+weak-lensing maps of the clusters (in magnitude units, 2.5 log{sub 10}μ): 0.83 ± 0.16 mag for SN CLO12Car, 0.28 ± 0.08 mag for SN CLN12Did, and 0.43 ± 0.11 mag for SN CLA11Tib. The two SNe Ia provide a new test of the cluster lens model predictions: we find that the magnifications based on the SN Ia brightness and those predicted by the lens maps are consistent. Our results herald the promise of future observations of samples of cluster-lensed SNe Ia (from the ground or space) to help illuminate the dark-matter distribution in clusters of galaxies, through the direct determination of absolute magnifications.

  14. Impacto ambiental de los remanentes de supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubner, G. M.

    2015-08-01

    The explosion of a supernovae (SN) represents the sudden injection of about ergs of thermal and mechanical energy in a small region of space, causing the formation of powerful shock waves that propagate through the interstellar medium at speeds of several thousands of km/s. These waves sweep, compress and heat the interstellar material that they encounter, forming the supernova remnants. Their evolution over thousands of years change forever, irreversibly, not only the physical but also the chemical properties of a vast region of space that can span hundreds of parsecs. This contribution briefly analyzes the impact of these explosions, discussing the relevance of some phenomena usually associated with SNe and their remnants in the light of recent theoretical and observational results.

  15. An Unusually Fast-Evolving Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Poznanski, Dovi; Nugent, Peter E; Bloom, Joshua S; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Leonard, Douglas C; Li, Weidong; Thomas, Rollin C

    2009-01-01

    Analyses of supernovae (SNe) have revealed two main types of progenitors: exploding white dwarfs and collapsing massive stars. We present SN2002bj, which stands out as different from any SN reported to date. Its light curve rises and declines very rapidly, yet reaches a peak intrinsic brightness greater than -18 mag. A spectrum obtained 7 days after discovery shows the presence of helium and intermediate-mass elements, yet no clear hydrogen or iron-peak elements. The spectrum only barely resembles that of a Type Ia supernova, with added carbon and helium. Its properties suggest that SN2002bj may be representative of a class of progenitors that previously has been only hypothesized: a helium detonation on a white dwarf, ejecting a small envelope of material. New surveys should find many such objects, despite their scarcity.

  16. Supernova Constraints and Systematic Uncertainties from the First 3 Years of the Supernova Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Conley, A; Sullivan, M; Regnault, N; Astier, P; Balland, C; Basa, S; Carlberg, R G; Fouchez, D; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Howell, D A; Pain, R; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Perrett, K M; Pritchet, C J; Rich, J; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Balam, D; Baumont, S; Ellis, R S; Fabbro, S; Fakhouri, H K; Fourmanoit, N; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S; Graham, M L; Hudson, M J; Hsiao, E; Kronborg, T; Lidman, C; Mourao, A M; Neill, J D; Perlmutter, S; Ripoche, P; Suzuki, N; Walker, E S; 10.1088/0067-0049/192/1/1

    2011-01-01

    We combine high redshift Type Ia supernovae from the first 3 years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) with other supernova (SN) samples, primarily at lower redshifts, to form a high-quality joint sample of 472 SNe (123 low-$z$, 93 SDSS, 242 SNLS, and 14 {\\it Hubble Space Telescope}). SN data alone require cosmic acceleration at >99.9% confidence, including systematic effects. For the dark energy equation of state parameter (assumed constant out to at least $z=1.4$) in a flat universe, we find $w = -0.91^{+0.16}_{-0.20}(\\mathrm{stat}) ^{+0.07}_{-0.14} (\\mathrm{sys})$ from SNe only, consistent with a cosmological constant. Our fits include a correction for the recently discovered relationship between host-galaxy mass and SN absolute brightness. We pay particular attention to systematic uncertainties, characterizing them using a systematics covariance matrix that incorporates the redshift dependence of these effects, as well as the shape-luminosity and color-luminosity relationships. Unlike previous work, we ...

  17. Measuring cosmic bulk flows with Type Ia Supernovae from the Nearby Supernova Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Feindt, U; Kowalski, M; Aldering, G; Antilogus, P; Aragon, C; Bailey, S; Baltay, C; Bongard, S; Buton, C; Canto, A; Cellier-Holzem, F; Childress, M; Chotard, N; Copin, Y; Fakhouri, H K; Gangler, E; Guy, J; Kim, A; Nugent, P; Nordin, J; Paech, K; Pain, R; Pecontal, E; Pereira, R; Perlmutter, S; Rabinowitz, D; Rigault, M; Runge, K; Saunders, C; Scalzo, R; Smadja, G; Tao, C; Thomas, R C; Weaver, B A; Wu, C

    2013-01-01

    Context. Our Local Group of galaxies appears to be moving relative to the Cosmic Microwave Background with the source of the peculiar motion still uncertain. While in the past this has been studied mostly using galaxies as distance indicators, the weight of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) has increased recently with the continuously improving statistics of available low-redshift supernovae. Aims. We measured the bulk flow in the nearby universe (0.015 < z < 0.1) using 117 SNe Ia observed by the Nearby Supernova Factory, as well as the Union2 compilation of SN Ia data already in the literature. Methods. The bulk flow velocity was determined from SN data binned in redshift shells by including a coherent motion (dipole) in a cosmological fit. Additionally, a method of spatially smoothing the Hubble residuals was used to verify the results of the dipole fit. To constrain the location and mass of a potential mass concentration (e.g. the Shapley Supercluster) responsible for the peculiar motion, we fit a Hubble l...

  18. See Change: the Supernova Sample from the Supernova Cosmology Project High Redshift Cluster Supernova Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Brian; Perlmutter, Saul; Boone, Kyle; Nordin, Jakob; Rubin, David; Lidman, Chris; Deustua, Susana E.; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Aldering, Greg Scott; Brodwin, Mark; Cunha, Carlos E.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jee, James; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hoekstra, Henk; Santos, Joana; Stanford, S. Adam; Stern, Daniel; Fassbender, Rene; Richard, Johan; Rosati, Piero; Wechsler, Risa H.; Muzzin, Adam; Willis, Jon; Boehringer, Hans; Gladders, Michael; Goobar, Ariel; Amanullah, Rahman; Hook, Isobel; Huterer, Dragan; Huang, Xiaosheng; Kim, Alex G.; Kowalski, Marek; Linder, Eric; Pain, Reynald; Saunders, Clare; Suzuki, Nao; Barbary, Kyle H.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Meyers, Joshua; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Sofiatti, Caroline; Wilson, Gillian; Rozo, Eduardo; Hilton, Matt; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Luther, Kyle; Yen, Mike; Fagrelius, Parker; Dixon, Samantha; Williams, Steven

    2017-01-01

    The Supernova Cosmology Project has finished executing a large (174 orbits, cycles 22-23) Hubble Space Telescope program, which has measured ~30 type Ia Supernovae above z~1 in the highest-redshift, most massive galaxy clusters known to date. Our SN Ia sample closely matches our pre-survey predictions; this sample will improve the constraint by a factor of 3 on the Dark Energy equation of state above z~1, allowing an unprecedented probe of Dark Energy time variation. When combined with the improved cluster mass calibration from gravitational lensing provided by the deep WFC3-IR observations of the clusters, See Change will triple the Dark Energy Task Force Figure of Merit. With the primary observing campaign completed, we present the preliminary supernova sample and our path forward to the supernova cosmology results. We also compare the number of SNe Ia discovered in each cluster with our pre-survey expectations based on cluster mass and SFR estimates. Our extensive HST and ground-based campaign has already produced unique results; we have confirmed several of the highest redshift cluster members known to date, confirmed the redshift of one of the most massive galaxy clusters at z~1.2 expected across the entire sky, and characterized one of the most extreme starburst environments yet known in a z~1.7 cluster. We have also discovered a lensed SN Ia at z=2.22 magnified by a factor of ~2.7, which is the highest spectroscopic redshift SN Ia currently known.

  19. Smoking Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez, H L; Dunne, L

    2007-01-01

    The question "Are supernovae important sources of dust?" is a contentious one. Observations with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) and the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) only detected very small amounts of hot dust in supernova remnants. Here, we review observations of two young Galactic remnants with the Submillimetre Common User Bolometer Array (SCUBA), which imply that large quantities of dust are produced by supernovae. The association of dust with the Cassiopeia A remnant is in question due to the contamination of foreground material. In this article, we compare the emission from cold dust with CO emission towards Kepler's supernova remnant. We detect very little CO at the location of the submillimetre peaks. A comparison of masses from the CO and the dust clouds are made, and we estimate the 3 sigma upper limit on the gas-to-dust ratios to range from 25 - 65 suggesting that we cannot yet rule out freshly-formed or swept up circumstellar dust in Kepler's supernova remnant.

  20. Type Ia Supernovae and the Hubble Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Branch, D

    1998-01-01

    The focus of this review is the work that has been done during the 1990s on using Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) to measure the Hubble constant ($H_0$). SNe Ia are well suited for measuring $H_0$. A straightforward maximum-light color criterion can weed out the minority of observed events that are either intrinsically subluminous or substantially extinguished by dust, leaving a majority subsample that has observational absolute-magnitude dispersions of less than $\\sigma_{obs}(M_B) \\simeq \\sigma_{obs}(M_V) \\simeq 0.3$ mag. Correlations between absolute magnitude and one or more distance-independent SN Ia or parent-galaxy observables can be used to further standardize the absolute magnitudes to better than 0.2 mag. The absolute magnitudes can be calibrated in two independent ways --- empirically, using Cepheid-based distances to parent galaxies of SNe Ia, and physically, by light curve and spectrum fitting. At present the empirical and physical calibrations are in agreement at $M_B \\simeq M_V \\simeq -19.4$ or -19....

  1. Peculiar Type II Supernovae from Blue Supergiants

    CERN Document Server

    Kleiser, Io K W; Kasen, Daniel; Young, Timothy R; Chornock, Ryan; Filippenko, Alexei V; Challis, Peter; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Kirshner, Robert P; Li, Weidong; Matheson, Thomas; Nugent, Peter E; Silverman, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of Type II supernovae (SNe) are produced by red supergiants (RSGs), but SN 1987A revealed that blue supergiants (BSGs) can produce members of this class as well, albeit with some peculiar properties. This best studied event revolutionized our understanding of SNe, and linking it to the bulk of Type II events is essential. We present here optical photometry and spectroscopy gathered for SN 2000cb, which is clearly not a standard Type II SN and yet is not a SN 1987A analog. The light curve of SN 2000cb is reminiscent of that of SN 1987A in shape, with a slow rise to a late optical peak, but on substantially different time scales. Spectroscopically, SN 2000cb resembles a normal SN II but with ejecta velocities that far exceed those measured for SN 1987A or normal SNe II, above 18000 km/s for H-alpha at early times. The red colours, high velocities, late photometric peak, and our modeling of this object all point toward a scenario involving the high-energy explosion of a small-radius star, most ...

  2. Quantifying Supernovae-Driven Multiphase Galactic Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Miao; Ostriker, Jeremiah P

    2016-01-01

    Galactic outflows are ubiquitously observed in star-forming disk galaxies and are critical for galaxy formation. Supernovae (SNe) play the key role in driving the outflows, but there is no consensus as to how much energy, mass and metal they can launch out of the disk. We perform 3D, high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations to study SNe-driven outflows from stratified media. Assuming SN rate scales with gas surface density $\\Sigma_{\\rm{gas}}$ as in the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation, we find the mass loading factor, defined as the mass outflow flux divided by the star formation surface density, decreases with increasing $\\Sigma_{\\rm{gas}}$ as $\\propto \\Sigma^{-0.61}_{\\rm{gas}}$. Approximately $\\Sigma_{\\rm{gas}} \\lesssim$ 50 $M_\\odot/pc^2$ marks when the mass loading factor $\\gtrsim$1. About 10-50\\% of the energy and 40-80\\% of the metals produced by SNe end up in the outflows. The tenuous hot phase ($T>3\\times 10^5$ K) carries the majority of the energy and metals in outflows. We discuss how various physical...

  3. Probing Cosmological Isotropy With Type IA Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Bengaly, C A P; Alcaniz, J S

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the validity of the Cosmological Principle by mapping the cosmological parameters $H_0$ and $q_0$ through the celestial sphere. In our analysis, performed in a low-redshift regime to follow a model-independent approach, we use two compilations of type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia), namely the Union2.1 and the JLA datasets. Firstly, we show that the angular distributions for both SNe Ia datasets are statistically anisotropic at high confidence level ($p$-value $<$ 0.0001), in particular the JLA sample. Then we find that the cosmic expansion and acceleration are mainly of dipolar type, with maximal anisotropic expansion [acceleration] pointing towards $(l,b) \\simeq (326^{\\circ},12^{\\circ})$ [$(l,b) \\simeq (174^{\\circ},27^{\\circ})$], and $(l,b) \\simeq (58^{\\circ},-60^{\\circ})$ [$(l,b) \\simeq (225^{\\circ},51^{\\circ})$] for the Union2.1 and JLA data, respectively. Secondly, we use a geometrical method to test the hypothesis that the non-uniformly distributed SNe Ia events could introduce anisotropic imp...

  4. Evidence for Type Ia Supernova Diversity from Ultraviolet Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    reserved. Printed in the U.S.A. EVIDENCE FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA DIVERSITY FROM ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Xiaofeng Wang1,2,3...DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evidence for Type Ia Supernova Diversity from Ultraviolet Observations with the...spectroscopy and photometry of four Type Ia supernovae (SNe 2004dt, 2004ef, 2005M and 2005cf) obtained with the UV prism of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on

  5. The Search for the Companion Star of Tycho Brahe's 1572 Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, J.

    2005-03-01

    In recent years, type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been used successfully as cosmological probes of the Universe. However, the nature of their progenitors has remained somewhat of a mystery. It is widely accepted that they represent the disruption of a degenerate object, but there are also numerous progenitor models, but most of these have serious theoretical/observational problems or do not appear to produce sufficient numbers to explain the observed frequency of SNe Ia in our Galaxy. Tycho Brahe's supernova (SN 1572) is one of the only two supernovae observed in our Galaxy that are thought to have been of type Ia as revealed by the light curve, radio emission and X-ray spectra. We have conducted a search for the surviving companion star of SN 1572.

  6. PTF discovers a young type IIn SN in NGC 151

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrent, J.; Levitan, D.; Howell, A.; Thomas, R. C.; Nugent, P.; Sullivan, M.; Kasliwal, M.; Ofek, E. O.; Quimby, R.; Ben-Ami, S.; Xu, D.; Arcavi, I.; Gal-Yam, A.; Cenko, C. B.; Li, W.; Filippenko, A. V.

    2011-07-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of a new supernova in NGC 151. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  7. Kiso Supernova Survey (KISS): Survey Strategy

    CERN Document Server

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Tanaka, Masaomi; Mori, Kensho; Matsumoto, Emiko; Kikuchi, Yuki; Shibata, Takumi; Sako, Shigeyuki; Aoki, Tsutomu; Doi, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Naoto; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Mito, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Takashi; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Soyano, Takao; Tarusawa, Ken'ichi; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nakata, Fumiaki; Okada, Norio; Sarugaku, Yuki; Richmond, Michael W; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Aldering, Greg; Arimatsu, Ko; Contreras, Carlos; Horiuchi, Takashi; Hsiao, Eric Y; Itoh, Ryosuke; Iwata, Ikuru; Koji,; Kawabata, S; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kitagawa, Yutaro; Kokubo, Mitsuru; Kuroda, Daisuke; Paolo,; Mazzali,; Misawa, Toru; Moritani, Yuki; Morrell, Nidia; Okamoto, Rina; Pavlyuk, Nikolay; Phillips, Mark M; Pian, Elena; Sahu, Devendra; Saito, Yoshihiko; Sano, Kei; Stritzinger, Maximilian D; Tachibana, Yutaro; Taddia, Francesco; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Tateuchi, Ken; Tomita, Akihiko; Tsvetkov, Dmitry; Ui, Takahiro; Ukita, Nobuharu; Urata, Yuji; Walker, Emma S; Yoshii, Taketoshi

    2014-01-01

    The Kiso Supernova Survey (KISS) is a high-cadence optical wide-field supernova (SN) survey. The primary goal of the survey is to catch the very early light of a SN, during the shock breakout phase. Detection of SN shock breakouts combined with multi-band photometry obtained with other facilities would provide detailed physical information on the progenitor stars of SNe. The survey is performed using a 2.2x2.2 deg field-of-view instrument on the 1.05-m Kiso Schmidt telescope, the Kiso Wide Field Camera (KWFC). We take a three-minute exposure in g-band once every hour in our survey, reaching magnitude g~20-21. About 100 nights of telescope time per year have been spent on the survey since April 2012. The number of the shock breakout detections is estimated to be of order of 1 during our 3-year project. This paper summarizes the KISS project including the KWFC observing setup, the survey strategy, the data reduction system, and CBET-reported SNe discovered so far by KISS.

  8. Dust grains from the heart of supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Bocchio, M; Schneider, R; Bianchi, S; Limongi, M; Chieffi, A

    2016-01-01

    Dust grains are classically thought to form in the winds of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. However, there is increasing evidence today for dust formation in supernovae (SNe). To establish the relative importance of these two classes of stellar sources of dust, it is important to know the fraction of freshly formed dust in SN ejecta that is able to survive the passage of the reverse shock and be injected in the interstellar medium. We have developed a new code (GRASH\\_Rev) which follows the newly-formed dust evolution throughout the supernova explosion until the merging of the forward shock with the circumstellar ISM. We have considered four well studied SNe in the Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud: SN1987A, CasA, the Crab Nebula, and N49. For all the simulated models, we find good agreement with observations and estimate that between 1 and 8$\\%$ of the observed mass will survive, leading to a SN dust production rate of $(3.9 \\pm 3.7) \\times 10^{-4}$ M$_{\\odot}$yr$^{-1}$ in the Milky Way. This value i...

  9. Kiso Supernova Survey (KISS): Survey strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Tominaga, Nozomu; Tanaka, Masaomi; Mori, Kensho; Matsumoto, Emiko; Kikuchi, Yuki; Shibata, Takumi; Sako, Shigeyuki; Aoki, Tsutomu; Doi, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Naoto; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Mito, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Takashi; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Soyano, Takao; Tarusawa, Ken'ichi; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nakata, Fumiaki; Okada, Norio; Sarugaku, Yuki; Richmond, Michael W.; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Aldering, Greg; Arimatsu, Ko; Contreras, Carlos; Horiuchi, Takashi; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Itoh, Ryosuke; Iwata, Ikuru; Kawabata, Koji S.; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kitagawa, Yutaro; Kokubo, Mitsuru; Kuroda, Daisuke; Mazzali, Paolo; Misawa, Toru; Moritani, Yuki; Morrell, Nidia; Okamoto, Rina; Pavlyuk, Nikolay; Phillips, Mark M.; Pian, Elena; Sahu, Devendra; Saito, Yoshihiko; Sano, Kei; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Tachibana, Yutaro; Taddia, Francesco; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Tateuchi, Ken; Tomita, Akihiko; Tsvetkov, Dmitry; Ui, Takahiro; Ukita, Nobuharu; Urata, Yuji; Walker, Emma S.; Yoshii, Taketoshi

    2014-12-01

    The Kiso Supernova Survey (KISS) is a high-cadence optical wide-field supernova (SN) survey. The primary goal of the survey is to catch the very early light of a SN, during the shock breakout phase. Detection of SN shock breakouts combined with multi-band photometry obtained with other facilities would provide detailed physical information on the progenitor stars of SNe. The survey is performed using a 2.2° × 2.2° field-of-view instrument on the 1.05-m Kiso Schmidt telescope, the Kiso Wide Field Camera (KWFC). We take a 3-min exposure in g-band once every hour in our survey, reaching magnitude g ˜ 20-21. About 100 nights of telescope time per year have been spent on the survey since 2012 April. The number of the shock breakout detections is estimated to be of the order of 1 during our three-year project. This paper summarizes the KISS project including the KWFC observing setup, the survey strategy, the data reduction system, and CBET-reported SNe discovered so far by KISS.

  10. Supernovae in the Subaru Deep Field: An Initial Sample, and Type Ia Rate, out to Redshift 1.6

    CERN Document Server

    Poznanski, Dovi; Yasuda, Naoki; Foley, Ryan J; Doi, Mamoru; Filippenko, Alexei V; Fukugita, Masataka; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Jannuzi, Buell T; Morokuma, Tomoki; Oda, Takeshi; Schweiker, Heidi; Sharon, Keren; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Totani, Tomonori

    2007-01-01

    Large samples of high-redshift supernovae (SNe) are potentially powerful probes of cosmic star formation, metal enrichment, and SN physics. We present initial results from a new deep SN survey, based on re-imaging in the R, i', z' bands, of the 0.25 deg2 Subaru Deep Field (SDF), with the 8.2-m Subaru telescope and Suprime-Cam. In a single new epoch consisting of two nights of observations, we have discovered 33 SNe, down to a z'-band magnitude of 26.3 (AB). We have measured the photometric redshifts of the SN host galaxies, obtained Keck spectroscopic redshifts for 17 of the host galaxies, and classified the SNe using the Bayesian photometric algorithm of Poznanski et al. (2007) that relies on template matching. After correcting for biases in the classification, 55% of our sample consists of Type Ia supernovae and 45% of core-collapse SNe. The redshift distribution of the SNe Ia reaches z ~ 1.6, with a median of z ~ 1.2. The core-collapse SNe reach z ~ 1.0, with a median of z ~ 0.5. Our SN sample is comparabl...

  11. Selecting superluminous supernovae in faint galaxies from the first year of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey

    CERN Document Server

    McCrum, M; Rest, A; Smith, K; Kotak, R; Rodney, S A; Young, D R; Chornock, R; Berger, E; Foley, R J; Fraser, M; Wright, D; Scolnic, D; Tonry, J L; Urata, Y; Huang, K; Pastorello, A; Botticella, M T; Valenti, S; Mattila, S; Kankare, E; Farrow, D J; Huber, M E; Stubbs, C W; Kirshner, R P; Bresolin, F; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Draper, P W; Flewelling, H; Jedicke, R; Kaiser, N; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Morgan, J S; Price, P A; Sweeney, W; Wainscoat, R J; Waters, C

    2014-01-01

    The Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) survey has obtained imaging in 5 bands (grizy_P1) over 10 Medium Deep Survey (MDS) fields covering a total of 70 square degrees. This paper describes the search for apparently hostless supernovae (SNe) within the first year of PS1 MDS data with an aim of discovering new superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). A total of 249 hostless transients were discovered down to a limiting magnitude of M_AB ~ 23.5, of which 75 were classified as Type Ia SNe. There were 58 SNe with complete light curves that are likely core-collapse SNe (CCSNe) or SLSNe and 13 of these have had spectra taken. Of these 13 hostless, non-Type Ia SNe, 9 were SLSNe of Type I at redshifts between 0.5-1.4. Thus one can maximise the discovery rate of Type I SLSNe by concentrating on hostless transients and removing normal SNe Ia. We present data for three new possible SLSNe; PS1-10pm (z = 1.206), PS1-10ahf (z = 1.16) and PS1-11acn (z ~ 0.61), and estimate the rate of SLSNe-I to be between 0.6pm0.3 * 10^-4 and 1.0pm0.3 * 10^-4 of t...

  12. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey:Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Masao; /Pennsylvania U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, D.L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Craig, Hogan, J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U.; Richmond, Michael W.; /Rochester Inst.; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Smith, Mathew; /Portsmouth U.; SubbaRao, Mark; /Chicago U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg2 region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  13. Restframe I-band Hubble diagram for type Ia supernovae up to redshift z ~0.5

    CERN Document Server

    Project, T S C; Amanullah, R; Garavini, G; Goobar, A; Lidman, C; Stanishev, V; Aldering, G; Antilogus, P; Astier, Pierre; Burns, M S; Conley, A; Deustua, S E; Ellis, R; Fabbro, S; Fadeev, V; Folatelli, G; Gibbons, R; Goldhaber, G; Groom, D E; Hook, I; Howell, D A; Kim, A G; Knop, R A; Nugent, P; Pain, R; Perlmutter, S; Quimby, R; Raux, J; Regnault, N; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Sainton, G; Schahmaneche, K; Smith, E; Spadafora, A L; Thomas, R C; Wang, L; Project, The Supernova Cosmology

    2005-01-01

    We present a novel technique for fitting restframe I-band light curves on a data set of 42 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Using the result of the fit, we construct a Hubble diagram with 26 SNe from the subset at 0.01< z<0.1. Adding two SNe at z~0.5 yields results consistent with a flat Lambda-dominated``concordance universe'' ($\\Omega_M,\\Omega_\\Lambda$)=(0.25,0.75). For one of these, SN 2000fr, new near infrared data are presented. The high redshift supernova NIR data are also used to test for systematic effects in the use of SNe Ia as distance estimators. A flat, Lambda=0, universe where the faintness of supernovae at z~0.5 is due to grey dust homogeneously distributed in the intergalactic medium is disfavoured based on the high-z Hubble diagram using this small data-set. However, the uncertainties are large and no firm conclusion may be drawn. We explore the possibility of setting limits on intergalactic dust based on B-I and B-V colour measurements, and conclude that about 20 well measured SNe are need...

  14. Probing bulk flow with nearby SNe Ia data

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, Stephen; Johnson, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    We test the isotropy of the local Universe using low redshift Supernova data from various catalogs and the non-parametric method of smoothed residuals. Using a recently developed catalog which combines Supernova data from various surveys, we show that the isotropic hypothesis of a Universe with zero velocity perturbation can be rejected with moderate significance, with $p$-value $\\sim 0.07$ out to redshift $z < 0.045$. We estimate the direction of maximal anisotropy on the sky for various pre-existing catalogs and show that it remains relatively unaffected by the light curve fitting procedure. However the recovered direction is biased by the underlying distribution of data points on the sky. We estimate both the uncertainty and bias in the direction by creating mock data containing a randomly oriented bulk flow and using our method to reconstruct its direction. We conclude that the inhomogeneous nature of the data introduces a directional bias in galactic latitude of approximately $|\\Delta b_{\\rm max}| \\si...

  15. The Discovery of the Most Distant Known Type Ia Supernova at Redshift 1.914

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, David O; Riess, Adam G; Mobasher, Bahram; Dahlen, Tomas; McCully, Curtis; Frederiksen, Teddy F; Casertano, Stefano; Hjorth, Jens; Keeton, Charles R; Koekemoer, Anton; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Wiklind, Tommy G; Challis, Peter; Graur, Or; Hayden, Brian; Patel, Brandon; Weiner, Benjamin J; Filippenko, Alexei V; Garnavich, Peter; Jha, Saurabh W; Kirshner, Robert P; Ferguson, Henry C; Grogin, Norman A; Kocevski, Dale

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of a Type Ia supernova (SN) at redshift $z = 1.914$ from the CANDELS multi-cycle treasury program on the \\textit{Hubble Space Telescope (HST)}. This SN was discovered in the infrared using the Wide-Field Camera 3, and it is the highest-redshift Type Ia SN yet observed. We classify this object as a SN\\,Ia by comparing its light curve and spectrum with those of a large sample of Type Ia and core-collapse supernovae (SNe). Its apparent magnitude is consistent with that expected from the $\\Lambda$CDM concordance cosmology. We discuss the use of spectral evidence for classification of $z > 1.5$ SNe\\,Ia using {\\it HST} grism simulations, finding that spectral data alone can frequently rule out SNe\\,II, but distinguishing between SNe\\,Ia and SNe\\,Ib/c can require prohibitively long exposures. In such cases, a quantitative analysis of the light curve may be necessary for classification. Our photometric and spectroscopic classification methods can aid the determination of SN rates and cosmolog...

  16. A More General Model for the Intrinsic Scatter in Type Ia Supernova Distance Moduli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriner, John; Bernstein, J. P.; Kessler, Richard; Lampeitl, Hubert; Miquel, Ramon; Mosher, Jennifer; Nichol, Robert C.; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, Mathew

    2011-10-01

    We describe a new formalism to fit the parameters α and β that are used in the SALT2 model to determine the standard magnitudes of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The new formalism describes the intrinsic scatter in SNe Ia by a covariance matrix in place of the single parameter normally used. We have applied this formalism to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Supernova Survey (SDSS-II) data and conclude that the data are best described by α = 0.135+.033 -.017 and β = 3.19+0.14 - 0.24, where the error is dominated by the uncertainty in the form of the intrinsic scatter matrix. Our result depends on the introduction of a more general form for the intrinsic scatter of the distance moduli of SNe Ia than is conventional, resulting in a larger value of β and a larger uncertainty than the conventional approach. Although this analysis results in a larger value of β and a larger error, the SDSS data differ (at a 98% confidence level) from β = 4.1, the value expected for extinction by the type of dust found in the Milky Way. We have modeled the distribution of SNe Ia in terms of their color and conclude that there is strong evidence that variation in color is a significant contributor to the scatter of SNe Ia around their standard candle magnitude.

  17. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Supernovae: The First Two Years of Swift Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Bufano, F; Turatto, M; Landsman, W; Brown, P; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Holland, S T; Mazzali, P; Milne, P; Panagia, N; Pian, E; Roming, P; Zampieri, L; Breeveld, A A; Gehrels, N

    2009-01-01

    We present the entire sample of ultraviolet (UV) spectra of supernovae (SNe) obtained with the Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift satellite during the first 2 years of observations (2005/2006). A total of 29 UV-grism and 22 V-grism spectra of 9 supernovae (SNe) have been collected, of which 6 are thermonuclear (type Ia) and 3 core collapse (type Ibc/II) SNe. All the spectra have been obtained during the photospheric phase. After a comparison of the spectra of our sample with those in the literature (SNe 1992A, 1990N and 1999em), we confirm some degree of diversity in the UV emission of Type Ia SNe and a greater homogeneity in the Type II Plateau SN sample. Signatures of interaction between the ejecta and the circumstellar environment have been found in the UV spectrum of SN 2006jc, the only SN Type Ib/c for which UVOT grism data are available. Currently, Swift UVOT is the best suited instrument for early SN studies in the UV due to its fast response and flexible scheduling capabilities. H...

  18. The Hubble Diagram of Type Ia Supernovae as a Function of Host Galaxy Morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, M; Aldering, G; Amanullah, R; Astier, Pierre; Blanc, G; Burns, M S; Conley, A; Deustua, S E; Doi, M; Fabbro, S; Folatelli, G; Fruchter, A S; Garavini, G; Gibbons, R; Goldhaber, Gerson; Goobar, A; Groom, D E; Hardin, D; Hook, I; Howell, D A; Irwin, M; Kim, A G; Knop, R A; Lidman, C E; McMahon, R; Méndez, J; Nobili, S; Nugent, P; Pain, R; Panagia, N; Pennypacker, C R; Perlmutter, S; Quimby, R; Raux, J; Regnault, N; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Schaefer, B; Schahmaneche, K; Spadafora, A L; Walton, N A; Wang, L; Wood-Vasey, W M; Yasuda, N

    2003-01-01

    (Abridged) We present new results on the Hubble diagram of distant type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) segregated according to the type of host galaxy. This makes it possible to check earlier evidence for a cosmological constant by explicitly comparing SNe residing in galaxies likely to contain negligible dust with the larger sample. The cosmological parameters derived from these SNe Ia hosted by presumed dust-free early-type galaxies supports earlier claims for a cosmological constant, which we demonstrate at 5 sigma significance, and the internal extinction implied is small even for late-type systems (A_B<0.2). Thus, our data demonstrate that host galaxy extinction is unlikely to systematically dim distant SNe Ia in a manner that would produce a spurious cosmological constant. We classify the host galaxies of 39 distant SNe discovered by the Supernova Cosmology Project (SCP) using the combination of HST STIS imaging, Keck ESI spectroscopy and ground-based broad-band photometry. We compare with a low-redshift sam...

  19. The Oxygen Features in Type Ia Supernovae and the Implications for the Nature of Thermonuclear Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xulin; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Lifan; Sai, Hanna; Zhang, Jujia; Zhang, Tianmeng; Huang, Fang; Rui, Liming

    2016-01-01

    The absorption feature O I 7773 is an important spectral indicator for type Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) that can be used to trace the unburned material at outer layers of the exploding white dwarf. In this work, we use a large sample of SNe~Ia to examine this absorption at early phases (i.e., -13 days SNe with normal photospheric velocities (i.e., v_si < 12,500 km s^{-1} at optical maximum), the line strength of high velocity feature (HVF) of O~I is inversely correlated with that of Si~II (or Ca~II), and this feature also shows a negative correlation with the luminosity of SNe Ia. This finding, together with other features we find for the O~I HVF, reveal that for this subgroup of SNe~Ia explosive oxygen burning occurs at the outermost layer of supernova and difference in burning there could lead to the observed diversity, which are in ...

  20. Photometric selection of Type Ia supernovae in the Supernova Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bazin, G; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Rich, J; Aubourg, E; Astier, P; Balland, C; Basa, S; Carlberg, R G; Conley, A; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Howell, D A; Pain, R; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N; Sullivan, M; Fourmanoit, N; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S; Lidman, C; Perlmutter, S; Ripoche, P; Walker, E S

    2011-01-01

    We present a sample of 485 photometrically identified Type Ia supernova candidates mined from the first three years of data of the CFHT SuperNova Legacy Survey (SNLS). The images were submitted to a deferred processing independent of the SNLS real-time detection pipeline. Light curves of all transient events were reconstructed in the g_M, r_M, i_M and z_M filters and submitted to automated sequential cuts in order to identify possible supernovae. Pure noise and long-term variable events were rejected by light curve shape criteria. Type Ia supernova identification relied on event characteristics fitted to their light curves assuming the events to be normal SNe Ia. The light curve fitter SALT2 was used for this purpose, assigning host galaxy photometric redshifts to the tested events. The selected sample of 485 candidates is one magnitude deeper than that allowed by the SNLS spectroscopic identification. The contamination by supernovae of other types is estimated to be 4%. Testing Hubble diagram residuals with ...

  1. Two superluminous supernovae from the early universe discovered by the Supernova Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, D A; Lidman, C; Sullivan, M; Conley, A; Astier, P; Carlberg, C Balland R G; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Pain, R; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V

    2013-01-01

    We present spectra and lightcurves of SNLS 06D4eu and SNLS 07D2bv, two hydrogen-free superluminous supernovae discovered by the Supernova Legacy Survey. At z = 1.588, SNLS 06D4eu is the highest redshift superluminous SN with a spectrum, at M_U = -22.7 is one of the most luminous SNe ever observed, and gives a rare glimpse into the restframe ultraviolet where these supernovae put out their peak energy. SNLS 07D2bv does not have a host galaxy redshift, but based on the supernova spectrum, we estimate it to be at z ~ 1.5. Both supernovae have similar observer-frame griz lightcurves, which map to restframe lightcurves in the U-band and UV, rising in ~ 20 restframe days or longer, and declining over a similar timescale. The lightcurves peak in the shortest wavelengths first, consistent with an expanding blackbody starting near 15,000 K and steadily declining in temperature. We compare the spectra to theoretical models, and identify lines of C II, C III, Fe III, and Mg II in the spectrum of SNLS 06D4eu and SCP 06F6...

  2. Constraining Cosmic Evolution of Type Ia Supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Aguilera, C.; Becker, A.C.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Clocchiatti, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Garnavich, P.M.; Jha, S.; Kirshner, R.P.; Krisciunas, K.; Leibundgut, B.; Li, W.; Matheson, T.; Miceli, A.; Miknaitis, G.; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Riess, A.G.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Chile U., Catolica /Bohr Inst. /Notre Dame U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Texas A-M /European Southern Observ. /NOAO, Tucson /Fermilab /Chile U., Santiago /Harvard U., Phys. Dept. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Res. Sch. Astron. Astrophys., Weston Creek /Stockholm U. /Hawaii U. /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept.

    2008-02-13

    We present the first large-scale effort of creating composite spectra of high-redshift type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and comparing them to low-redshift counterparts. Through the ESSENCE project, we have obtained 107 spectra of 88 high-redshift SNe Ia with excellent light-curve information. In addition, we have obtained 397 spectra of low-redshift SNe through a multiple-decade effort at Lick and Keck Observatories, and we have used 45 ultraviolet spectra obtained by HST/IUE. The low-redshift spectra act as a control sample when comparing to the ESSENCE spectra. In all instances, the ESSENCE and Lick composite spectra appear very similar. The addition of galaxy light to the Lick composite spectra allows a nearly perfect match of the overall spectral-energy distribution with the ESSENCE composite spectra, indicating that the high-redshift SNe are more contaminated with host-galaxy light than their low-redshift counterparts. This is caused by observing objects at all redshifts with similar slit widths, which corresponds to different projected distances. After correcting for the galaxy-light contamination, subtle differences in the spectra remain. We have estimated the systematic errors when using current spectral templates for K-corrections to be {approx}0.02 mag. The variance in the composite spectra give an estimate of the intrinsic variance in low-redshift maximum-light SN spectra of {approx}3% in the optical and growing toward the ultraviolet. The difference between the maximum-light low and high-redshift spectra constrain SN evolution between our samples to be < 10% in the rest-frame optical.

  3. Discovery of a Supernova Explosion at Half the Age of the Universe and its Cosmological Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlmutter, S.; Aldering, G.; Della Valle, M.; Deustua, S.; Ellis, R. S.; Fabbro, S.; Fruchter, A.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D. E.; Hook, I. M.; Kim, A. G.; Kim, M. Y.; Knop, R. A.; Lidman, C.; McMahon, R. G.; Nugent, P.; Pain, R.; Panagia, N.; Pennypacker, C. R.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schaefer, B.; Walton, N.

    1997-12-16

    The ultimate fate of the universe, infinite expansion or a big crunch, can be determined by measuring the redshifts, apparent brightnesses, and intrinsic luminosities of very distant supernovae. Recent developments have provided tools that make such a program practicable: (1) Studies of relatively nearby Type la supernovae (SNe la) have shown that their intrinsic luminosities can be accurately determined; (2) New research techniques have made it possible to schedule the discovery and follow-up observations of distant supernovae, producing well over 50 very distant (z = 0.3-0.7) SNe Ia to date. These distant supernovae provide a record of changes in the expansion rate over the past several billion years. By making precise measurements of supernovae at still greater distances, and thus extending this expansion history back far enough in time, we can even distinguish the slowing caused by the gravitational attraction of the universe's mass density {Omega}{sub M} from the effect of a possibly inflationary pressure caused by a cosmological constant {Lambda}. We report here the first such measurements, with our discovery of a Type Ia supernova (SN 1997ap) at z = 0.83. Measurements at the Keck II 10-m telescope make this the most distant spectroscopically confirmed supernova. Over two months of photometry of SN 1997ap with the Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based telescopes, when combined with previous measurements of nearer SNe la, suggests that we may live in a low mass-density universe. Further supernovae at comparable distances are currently scheduled for ground and space-based observations.

  4. Type Ia supernovae: explosions and progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzendorf, Wolfgang Eitel

    2011-08-01

    Supernovae are the brightest explosions in the universe. Supernovae in our Galaxy, rare and happening only every few centuries, have probably been observed since the beginnings of mankind. At first they were interpreted as religious omens but in the last half millennium they have increasingly been used to study the cosmos and our place in it. Tycho Brahe deduced from his observations of the famous supernova in 1572, that the stars, in contrast to the widely believe Aristotelian doctrine, were not immutable. More than 400 years after Tycho made his paradigm changing discovery using SN 1572, and some 60 years after supernovae had been identified as distant dying stars, two teams changed the view of the world again using supernovae. The found that the Universe was accelerating in its expansion, a conclusion that could most easily be explained if more than 70% of the Universe was some previously un-identified form of matter now often referred to as `Dark Energy'. Beyond their prominent role as tools to gauge our place in the Universe, supernovae themselves have been studied well over the past 75 years. We now know that there are two main physical causes of these cataclysmic events. One of these channels is the collapse of the core of a massive star. The observationally motivated classes Type II, Type Ib and Type Ic have been attributed to these events. This thesis, however is dedicated to the second group of supernovae, the thermonuclear explosions of degenerate carbon and oxygen rich material and lacking hydrogen - called Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). White dwarf stars are formed at the end of a typical star's life when nuclear burning ceases in the core, the outer envelope is ejected, with the degenerate core typically cooling for eternity. Theory predicts that such stars will self ignite when close to 1.38 Msun (called the Chandrasekhar Mass). Most stars however leave white dwarfs with 0.6 Msun, and no star leaves a remnant as heavy as 1.38 M! sun, which suggests

  5. The absolute infrared magnitudes of type Ia supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Meikle, W P S

    2000-01-01

    The absolute luminosities and homogeneity of early-time infrared (IR) light curves of type Ia supernovae are examined. Eight supernovae are considered. These are selected to have accurately known epochs of maximum blue light as well as having reliable distance estimates and/or good light curve coverage. Two approaches to extinction correction are considered. Owing to the low extinction in the IR, the differences in the corrections via the two methods are small. Absolute magnitude light curves in the J, H and K-bands are derived. Six of the events, including five established ``Branch-normal'' supernovae show similar coeval magnitudes. Two of these, SNe 1989B and 1998bu, were observed near maximum infrared light. This occurs about 5 days {\\it before} maximum blue light. Absolute peak magnitudes of about -19.0, -18.7 and -18.8 in J, H & K respectively were obtained. The two spectroscopically peculiar supernovae in the sample, SNe 1986G and 1991T, also show atypical IR behaviour. The light curves of the six s...

  6. SOUSA's Swift Supernova Siblings

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Swift has observed over three hundred supernovae in its first ten years. Photometry from the Ultra-Violet Optical Telescope (UVOT) is being compiled in the Swift Optical/Ultraviolet Supernovae Archive (SOUSA). The diversity of supernovae leads to a wide dynamic range of intrinsic properties. The intrinsic UV brightness of supernovae as a function of type and epoch allows one to understand the distance ranges at which Swift can reliably detect supernovae. The large Swift sample also includes supernovae from the same galaxy as other Swift supernovae. Through the first ten years, these families include 34 supernovae from 16 host galaxies (two galaxies have each hosted three Swift supernovae).

  7. Core-collapse Supernovae from the Palomar Transient Factory: Indications for a Different Population in Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Quimby, Robert M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Nugent, Peter E.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Bloom, Joshua S.; Sullivan, Mark; Howell, D. Andrew; Poznanski, Dovi; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Law, Nicholas; Hook, Isobel; Jönsson, Jakob; Blake, Sarah; Cooke, Jeff; Dekany, Richard; Rahmer, Gustavo; Hale, David; Smith, Roger; Zolkower, Jeff; Velur, Viswa; Walters, Richard; Henning, John; Bui, Kahnh; McKenna, Dan; Jacobsen, Janet

    2010-09-01

    We use the first compilation of 72 core-collapse supernovae (SNe) from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) to study their observed subtype distribution in dwarf galaxies compared to giant galaxies. Our sample is the largest single-survey, untargeted, spectroscopically classified, homogeneous collection of core-collapse events ever assembled, spanning a wide host-galaxy luminosity range (down to Mr ≈ -14 mag) and including a substantial fraction (>20%) of dwarf (Mr >= -18 mag) hosts. We find more core-collapse SNe in dwarf galaxies than expected and several interesting trends emerge. We use detailed subclassifications of stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe and find that all Type I core-collapse events occurring in dwarf galaxies are either SNe Ib or broad-lined SNe Ic (SNe Ic-BL), while "normal" SNe Ic dominate in giant galaxies. We also see a significant excess of SNe IIb in dwarf hosts. We hypothesize that in lower metallicity hosts, metallicity-driven mass loss is reduced, allowing massive stars that would have appeared as "normal" SNe Ic in metal-rich galaxies to retain some He and H, exploding as Ib/IIb events. At the same time, another mechanism allows some stars to undergo extensive stripping and explode as SNe Ic-BL (and presumably also as long-duration gamma-ray bursts). Our results are still limited by small-number statistics, and our measurements of the observed N(Ib/c)/N(II) number ratio in dwarf and giant hosts (0.25+0.3 -0.15 and 0.23+0.11 -0.08, respectively; 1σ uncertainties) are consistent with previous studies and theoretical predictions. As additional PTF data accumulate, more robust statistical analyses will be possible, allowing the evolution of massive stars to be probed via the dwarf-galaxy SN population.

  8. Discovering the Nature of Dark Energy: Towards Better Distances from Type Ia Supernovae -- Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippenko, Alexei Vladimir [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia; exploding white-dwarf stars) were the key to the Nobel-worthy 1998 discovery and subsequent verification that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, driven by the effects of dark energy. Understanding the nature of this mysterious, yet dominant, component of the Universe is at the forefront of research in cosmology and fundamental physics. SNe Ia will continue to play a leading role in this enterprise, providing precise cosmological distances that improve constraints on the nature of dark energy. However, for this effort to succeed, we need to more thoroughly understand relatively nearby SNe Ia, because our conclusions come only from comparisons between them and distant (high-redshift) SNe Ia. Thus, detailed studies of relatively nearby SNe Ia are the focus of this research program. Many interesting results were obtained during the course of this project; these were published in 32 refereed research papers that acknowledged the grant. A major accomplishment was the publication of supernova (SN) rates derived from about a decade of operation of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) with the 0.76-meter Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT). We have determined the most accurate rates for SNe of different types in large, nearby galaxies in the present-day Universe, and these can be compared with SN rates far away (and hence long ago in the past) to set constraints on the types of stars that explode. Another major accomplishment was the publication of the light curves (brightness vs. time) of 165 SNe Ia, along with optical spectroscopy of many of these SNe as well as other SNe Ia, providing an extensive, homogeneous database for detailed studies. We have conducted intensive investigations of a number of individual SNe Ia, including quite unusual examples that allow us to probe the entire range of SN explosions and provide unique insights into these objects and the stars before they explode. My team's studies have also

  9. Simulating Supernova Light Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Even, Wesley Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dolence, Joshua C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-05

    This report discusses supernova light simulations. A brief review of supernovae, basics of supernova light curves, simulation tools used at LANL, and supernova results are included. Further, it happens that many of the same methods used to generate simulated supernova light curves can also be used to model the emission from fireballs generated by explosions in the earth’s atmosphere.

  10. [O I] λλ6300, 6364 IN THE NEBULAR SPECTRUM OF A SUBLUMINOUS TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubenberger, S.; Kromer, M.; Hillebrandt, W. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Pakmor, R. [Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Pignata, G. [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Maeda, K. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Hachinger, S. [Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Emil-Fischer-Str. 31, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Leibundgut, B. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    In this Letter, a late-phase spectrum of SN 2010lp, a subluminous Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), is presented and analyzed. As in 1991bg-like SNe Ia at comparable epochs, the spectrum is characterized by relatively broad [Fe II] and [Ca II] emission lines. However, instead of narrow [Fe III] and [Co III] lines that dominate the emission from the innermost regions of 1991bg-like supernovae (SNe), SN 2010lp shows [O I] λλ6300, 6364 emission, usually associated with core-collapse SNe and never previously observed in a subluminous thermonuclear explosion. The [O I] feature has a complex profile with two strong, narrow emission peaks. This suggests that oxygen is distributed in a non-spherical region close to the center of the ejecta, severely challenging most thermonuclear explosion models discussed in the literature. We conclude that, given these constraints, violent mergers are presently the most promising scenario to explain SN 2010lp.

  11. Hot Dust! Late-Time Infrared Emission From Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ori; Skrutskie, M. F.; Chevalier, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    Supernovae light curves typically peak and fade in the course of several months. Some supernovae , however, exhibit late-time infrared emission that in some cases can last for several years. These supernovae tend to be of the Type IIn subclass, which is defined by narrow hydrogen and helium emission lines arising from a dense, pre-existing circumstellar medium excited by the supernova radiation. Such a late-time ``IR excess'' with respect to the optical blackbody counterpart typically indicates the presence of warm dust. The origin and heating mechanism of the dust is not, however, always well constrained. In this talk, I will explore several scenarios that explain the observed late-time emission. In particular, I will discuss the case of the Type IIn SN 2005ip, which has displayed an ``IR excess'' for over 3 years. The results allow us to interpret the progenitor system and better understand the late stages of stellar evolution. Much of the data used for this analysis were obtained with TripleSpec, a medium-resolution near-infrared spectrograph located at Apache Point Observatory, NM, and FanCam, a JHK imager located at Fan Mountain Observatory, just outside of Charlottesville, VA. These two instruments were designed, fabricated, built, and commissioned by our instrumentation group at the University of Virginia. I will also spend some time discussing these instruments. I would like to thank the following for financial support of this work throughout my graduate career: NASA GSRP, NSF AAG-0607737, Spitzer PID 50256, Achievement Reward for College Scientists (ARCS), and the Virginia Space Grant Consortium.

  12. Constraints from Type Ia supernovae on the Λ-CDM model in Randers-Finsler space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Zhe; LI Ming-Hua; LI Xin

    2012-01-01

    Gravitational field equations in Randers-Finsler space of approximate Berwald type are investigated.A modified Friedmann equation and a new luminosity distance-redshift relation is proposed.A best-fit to the Type Ia supernovae (SNe) observations yields that the ΩΛ in the Λ-CDM model is suppressed to almost zero.This fact indicates that the astronomical observations on the Type Ia SNe can be described well without invoking any form of dark energy.The best-fit age of the universe is given.It is in agreement with the age of our galaxy.

  13. Type Ibn Supernovae Show Photometric Homogeneity and Spectral Diversity at Maximum Light

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Arcavi, Iair; Valenti, Stefano; McCully, Curtis; Howell, D. Andrew; Johansson, Joel; Sollerman, Jesper; Pastorello, Andrea; Benetti, Stefano; Cao, Yi; Cenko, S Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey; Corsi, Alessandra; Duggan, Gina; Elias-Rosa, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Type Ibn supernovae (SNe) are a small yet intriguing class of explosions whose spectra are characterized by low-velocity helium emission lines with little to no evidence for hydrogen. The prevailing theory has been that these are the core-collapse explosions of very massive stars embedded in helium-rich circumstellar material (CSM). We report optical observations of six new SNe Ibn: PTF11rfh, PTF12ldy, iPTF14aki, iPTF15ul, SN 2015G, and iPTF15akq. This brings the sample size of such objects i...

  14. Abundance Profiling of Extremely Metal-Poor Stars and Supernova Properties in the Early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Tominaga, Nozomu; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2013-01-01

    The first metal enrichment in the universe was made by a supernova (SN) explosion of a population (Pop) III star and chemical evolution of the universe is recorded in abundance patterns of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars. Increasing number of the EMP stars are now being discovered. This allows us to statistically constrain properties of SNe of Pop III stars (Pop III SNe). We investigate the properties of Pop III SNe by comparing their nucleosynthetic yields with the abundance patterns of the EMP stars. We focus on the most metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] $\\lsim-3.5$ and present Pop III SN models that reproduce well their individual abundance patterns. From these models we derive relations between abundance ratios and properties of Pop III SNe: [(C+N)/Fe] vs. an ejected Fe mass, and [(C+N)/Mg] vs. a remnant mass. Using fitting formulae, distribution of the abundance ratios of EMP stars is converted to those of the properties of Pop III SNe, which can be compared with SNe in the present day. Large samples of EMP ...

  15. Spectroscopy of High-Redshift Supernovae from the ESSENCE Project: The First Four Years

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, R J; Blondin, S; Chornock, R; Silverman, J M; Challis, P; Clocchiatti, A; Filippenko, A V; Kirshner, R P; Leibundgut, B; Sollerman, J; Spyromilio, J; Tonry, J L; Davis, T M; Garnavich, P M; Jha, S W; Krisciunas, K; Li, W; Pignata, G; Rest, A; Riess, A G; Schmidt, B P; Smith, R C; Stubbs, C W; Tucker, B E; Wood-Vasey, W M

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of spectroscopic observations from the ESSENCE high-redshift supernova (SN) survey during its first four years of operation. This sample includes spectra of all SNe Ia whose light curves were presented by Miknaitis et al. (2007) and used in the cosmological analyses of Davis et al. (2007) and Wood-Vasey et al. (2007). The sample represents 273 hours of spectroscopic observations with 6.5 - 10-m-class telescopes of objects detected and selected for spectroscopy by the ESSENCE team. We present 174 spectra of 156 objects. Combining this sample with that of Matheson et al. (2005), we have a total sample of 329 spectra of 274 objects. From this, we are able to spectroscopically classify 118 Type Ia SNe. As the survey has matured, the efficiency of classifying SNe Ia has remained constant while we have observed both higher-redshift SNe Ia and SNe Ia farther from maximum brightness. Examining the subsample of SNe Ia with host-galaxy redshifts shows that redshifts derived from only the SN Ia sp...

  16. The Changing Fractions of Type Ia Supernova NUV-Optical Subclasses with Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Milne, Peter A; Brown, Peter J; Narayan, Gautham

    2014-01-01

    UV and optical photometry of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) at low redshift have revealed the existence of two distinct color groups, NUV-red and NUV-blue events. The color curves differ primarily by an offset, with the NUV-blue u- color curves bluer than the NUV-red curves by 0.4 mag. For a sample of 23 low-z SNe~Ia observed with Swift, the NUV-red group dominates by a ratio of 2:1. We compare rest-frame UV/optical spectrophotometry of intermediate and high-z SNe Ia with UVOT photometry and HST spectrophotometry of low-z SNe Ia, finding that the same two color groups exist at higher-z, but with the NUV-blue events as the dominant group. Within each red/blue group, we do not detect any offset in color for different redshifts, providing insight into how SN~Ia UV emission evolves with redshift. Through spectral comparisons of SNe~Ia with similar peak widths and phase, we explore the wavelength range that produces the UV/OPT color differences. We show that the ejecta velocity of NUV-red SNe is larger than that of N...

  17. Solving the 56Ni puzzle of magnetar-powered broad-lined type Ic supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ling-Jun; Xu, Dong; Wang, Shan-Qin; Dai, Zi-Gao; Wu, Xue-Feng; Wei, Jian-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Broad-lined type Ic supernovae (SNe Ic-BL) are of great importance because their association with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) holds the key to deciphering the central engine of LGRBs, which refrains from being unveiled despite decades of investigation. Among the two popularly hypothesized types of central engine, i.e., black holes and strongly magnetized neutron stars (magnetars), there is mounting evidence that the central engine of GRB-associated SNe (GRB-SNe) is rapidly rotating magnetars. Theoretical analysis also suggests that magnetars could be the central engine of SNe Ic-BL. What puzzled the researchers is the fact that light curve modeling indicates that as much as 0.2-0.5 solar mass of 56Ni was synthesized during the explosion of the SNe Ic-BL, which is unfortunately in direct conflict with current state-of-the-art understanding of magnetar-powered 56Ni synthesis. Here we propose a dynamic model of magnetar-powered SNe to take into account the acceleration of the ejecta by the magnetar, a...

  18. Type Ia supernova bolometric light curves and ejected mass estimates from the Nearby Supernova Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Scalzo, R; Antilogus, P; Aragon, C; Bailey, S; Baltay, C; Bongard, S; Buton, C; Cellier-Holzem, F; Childress, M; Chotard, N; Copin, Y; Fakhouri, H K; Gangler, E; Guy, J; Kim, A; Kowalski, M; Kromer, M; Nordin, J; Nugent, P; Paech, K; Pain, R; Pecontal, E; Pereira, R; Perlmutter, S; Rabinowitz, D; Rigault, M; Runge, K; Saunders, C; Sim, S A; Smadja, G; Tao, C; Taubenberger, S; Thomas, R C; Weaver, B A

    2014-01-01

    We present a sample of normal type Ia supernovae from the Nearby Supernova Factory dataset with spectrophotometry at sufficiently late phases to estimate the ejected mass using the bolometric light curve. We measure $^{56}$Ni masses from the peak bolometric luminosity, then compare the luminosity in the $^{56}$Co-decay tail to the expected rate of radioactive energy re- lease from ejecta of a given mass. We infer the ejected mass in a Bayesian context using a semi-analytic model of the ejecta, incorporating constraints from contemporary numerical models as priors on the density structure and distribution of $^{56}$Ni throughout the ejecta. We find a strong correlation between ejected mass and light curve decline rate, and consequently $^{56}$Ni mass, with ejected masses in our data ranging from 0.9-1.4 $M_\\odot$. Most fast-declining (SALT2 $x_1 < -1$) normal SNe Ia have significantly sub-Chandrasekhar ejected masses in our fiducial analysis.

  19. Core-Collapse Supernovae from the Palomar Transient Factory: Indications for a Different Population in Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Arcavi, Iair; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Quimby, Robert M; Ofek, Eran O; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Nugent, Peter E; Cenko, S Bradley; Bloom, Joshua S; Sullivan, Mark; Howell, D Andrew; Poznanski, Dovi; Filippenko, Alexei V; Law, Nicholas; Hook, Isobel; Jonsson, Jakob; Blake, Sarah; Cooke, Jeff; Dekany, Richard; Rahmer, Gustavo; Hale, David; Smith, Roger; Zolkower, Jeff; Velur, Viswa; Walters, Richard; Henning, John; Bui, Kahn; McKenna, Dan; Jacobsen, Janet

    2010-01-01

    We use the first compilation of 72 core-collapse supernovae (SNe) from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) to study their observed subtype distribution in dwarf galaxies compared to giant galaxies. The nature of the PTF survey provides a minimally biased sample, rich in SNe from dwarf hosts, with spectroscopic classifications. With 15 events detected in dwarf galaxies, our results are still limited by small-number statistics. However, several interesting trends emerge. We find more core-collapse SNe in dwarf galaxies than expected, with a similar N(Ib/c)/N(II) ratio in dwarf and giant hosts (0.25_{-0.15}^{+0.3} and 0.23_{-0.08}^{+0.11}, respectively), although our uncertainties (1 sigma) are still too large to distinguish between these results and those of previous studies and theoretical predictions. We use detailed subclassifications of stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe and find that all Type I core-collapse events occurring in dwarf galaxies are either SNe Ib or broad-lined SNe Ic (SNe Ic-BL), while "nor...

  20. The sloan digital sky survey-II supernova survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5° wide...... centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for the discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between September 1 and November 30 of 2005-7. During...... the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327...

  1. Observation and interpretation of type IIb supernova explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Garoffolo, Antonia

    2016-03-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) explosions represent the final demise of massive stars. Among the various types, there is a group of relatively infrequent CC-SNe termed type IIb, which appear to be hybrids between normal type II SNe (those characterised by H emission) and type Ib (those that lack H features in their spectra but exhibit prominent HeI lines). The nature of the stellar progenitors leading to type IIb SNe is currently unknown, although two channels are contemplated: single massive stars that have lost part of their outer envelope as a consequence of stellar winds, and massive stars that shed mass by Roche-Lobe overflow to a companion. The latter is in fact the favoured scenario for most of the objects observed up to now. In the majority of cases, when there are no direct progenitor detections, some hints about type IIb SN progenitors (e.g., initial mass) can be derived indirectly from the objects' light curves (LCs) and spectra. Motivated by the relatively few well-sampled observational datasets that exist up to date for type IIb SNe and the unknowns on their progenitors, we carried out extensive observations (mainly in the optical domain) for the young type IIb SNe 2011fu and 2013df. Both these SNe are particularly interesting because they show a first LC peak caused by shock breakout, followed by a secondary 56Ni-decay-powered maximum. The analysis of the data for SNe 2011fu and 2013df points to precursors that seem to have been stars with large radii (of the order of 100 RSun), with low mass hydrogen envelopes (tenths of MSun), and relatively low initial masses (12-18 MSun), which could have formed part of interacting binary systems. The nature of a third SN IIb candidate, OGLE-2013-SN-100, proved to be enigmatic. OGLE-2013-SN-100, shows a first peak in the LC, and other characteristics somewhat similar to those of type IIb SNe. However, after a deeper analysis, we conclude OGLE-2013-SN-100 is likely not a SN of type IIb. We provide an alternative

  2. Lensed Type Ia Supernovae as Probes of Cluster Mass Models

    CERN Document Server

    Nordin, J; Richard, J; Rykoff, E; Aldering, G; Amanullah, R; Atek, H; Barbary, K; Deustua, S; Fakhouri, H K; Fruchter, A S; Goobar, A; Hook, I; Hsiao, E Y; Huang, X; Kneib, J -P; Lidman, C; Meyers, J; Perlmutter, S; Saunders, C; Spadafora, A L; Suzuki, N

    2013-01-01

    Using three magnified Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) detected behind massive CLASH clusters (Abell~383, MACSJ1532 and MACSJ1720) observed using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we perform a first pilot study to see whether standardizable candles can be used to calibrate cluster mass maps created from strong lensing observations. Such calibrations will be crucial when next generation HST cluster surveys (e.g. FRONTIER) provide magnification maps that will, in turn, form the basis for the exploration of the high redshift universe. We demonstrate that supernovae can be used as "test beams" for this purpose. We use a combination of spectroscopic and photometric methods to classify the SNe and then determine the SN amplification factors using the SALT2/Union2.1 framework. We find SNe with significant amplification, up to a factor of 1.7 at $\\sim5\\sigma$ significance for SN-L2 behind MACSJ1720. We initially conducted this as a blind study to avoid fine tuning of parameters, and there we found a mean amplification dif...

  3. Tests of Environmental Effects on Type Ia Supernova Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Suzanna M.; Strolger, L.; Wolff, S.

    2011-01-01

    The host galaxy environments of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) provide our best opportunity for constraining the mechanism(s) of the SN Ia progenitor system, i.e., the stars involved, the incubation times, and the sensitivity of SNe Ia to changes in the local gas-phase metallicity. The latter can affect the luminosity of the resultant event, and possibly the success in ultimately yielding a SN Ia. We seek to solidify possible environmental trends in SN Ia rates from direct measures of host galaxy properties, using the sample collected by the Nearby Galaxies Supernova Search project. This study will uncover which has the greatest influence on SN Ia production efficiency: parent population age, rate of star-formation, or metallicity. Here, we will show some preliminary results from SSP model fitting (of age and [Fe/H]) to a selection of hosts obtained thus far from this study. The complete sample will provide a validity test of the mostly indirect trends being established for SNe Ia from the LOSS, SDSS, SNfactory and other surveys, and may ultimately steer future investigations towards more precise SN Ia cosmology.

  4. NTT and NOT spectroscopy of SDSS-II supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Ostman, L; Goobar, A; Amanullah, R; Smith, M; Sollerman, J; Stanishev, V; Stritzinger, M D; Bassett, B A; Davis, T M; Edmondson, E; Frieman, J A; Garnavich, P M; Lampeitl, H; Leloudas, G; Marriner, J; Nichol, R C; Romer, K; Sako, M; Schneider, D P; Zheng, C

    2010-01-01

    Context. The SDSS-II Supernova Survey, conducted between 2005 and 2007, was designed to detect a large number of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) around z~0.2, the redshift “gap” between low-z and high-z SN searches. The survey has provided multi-band photometric lightcurves for variable targets, and SN candidates were scheduled for spectroscopic observations, primarily to provide SN classification and accurate redshifts. We present SN spectra obtained in 2006 and 2007 using the NTT and the NOT. Aims. We provide an atlas of SN spectra in the range z =0.03-0.32 that complements the well-sampled lightcurves from SDSS-II in the forthcoming three-year SDSS SN cosmology analysis. The sample can, for example, be used for spectral studies of SNe Ia, which are critical for understanding potential systematic effects when SNe are used to determine cosmological distances. Methods. The spectra were reduced in a uniform manner, and special care was taken in estimating the uncertainties for the different processing st...

  5. The Type Ia Supernova Rate in Radio and Infrared Galaxies from the CFHT Supernova Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, M L; Sullivan, M; Howell, D A; Gwyn, S D J; Astier, P; Balland, C; Basa, S; Carlberg, R G; Conley, A; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Pain, R; Perrett, K; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Balam, D; Fabbro, S; Hsiao, E Y; Mourao, A; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Perlmutter, S; Ruhlman-Kleider, V; Suzuki, N; Fakhouri, H K; Walker, E S

    2009-01-01

    We have combined the large SN Ia database of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey and catalogs of galaxies with photometric redshifts, VLA 1.4 GHz radio sources, and Spitzer infrared sources. We present eight SNe Ia in early-type host galaxies which have counterparts in the radio and infrared source catalogs. We find the SN Ia rate in subsets of radio and infrared early-type galaxies is ~1-5 times the rate in all early-type galaxies, and that any enhancement is always <~ 2 sigma. Rates in these subsets are consistent with predictions of the two component "A+B" SN Ia rate model. Since infrared properties of radio SN Ia hosts indicate dust obscured star formation, we incorporate infrared star formation rates into the "A+B" model. We also show the properties of SNe Ia in radio and infrared galaxies suggest the hosts contain dust and support a continuum of delay time distributions for SNe Ia, although other delay time distributions cannot be ruled out based on our data.

  6. Type Ia Supernovae from Merging White Dwarfs I. Prompt Detonations

    CERN Document Server

    Moll, Rainer; Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, Stan

    2013-01-01

    Merging white dwarfs are a possible progenitor of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). While it is not entirely clear if and when an explosion is triggered in such systems, numerical models suggest that a detonation might be initiated before the stars have coalesced to form a single compact object. Here we study such "peri-merger" detonations by means of numerical simulations, modeling the disruption and nucleosynthesis of the stars until the ejecta reach the coasting phase. Synthetic light curves and spectra are generated for comparison with observations. Three models are considered with primary masses 0.96 Msun, 1.06 Msun, and 1.20 Msun. Of these, the 0.96 Msun dwarf merging with an 0.81 Msun companion, with a Ni56 yield of 0.58 Msun, is the most promising candidate for reproducing common SNe Ia. The more massive mergers produce unusually luminous SNe Ia with peak luminosities approaching those attributed to "super-Chandrasekhar" mass SNe Ia. While the synthetic light curves and spectra of some of the models resemb...

  7. Formation of Dust in the Ejecta of Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Nozawa, Takaya; Kozasa, Takashi; Tanaka, Masaomi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Umeda, Hideyuki

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the formation of dust grains in the ejecta of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), adopting the carbon-deflagration W7 model. In the calculations of dust formation, we apply the nucleation and grain growth theory and consider the two cases with and without formation of CO and SiO molecules. The results of the calculations show that for the sticking probability of alpha_j=1, C, silicate, Si, and FeS grains can condense at early times of ~100--300 days after the explosion, whereas Fe and SiC grains cannot form substantially. Due to the low gas density in SNe Ia with no H-envelope, the average radii of the newly formed grains are generally below 0.01 micron, being much smaller than those in Type II-P SNe. This supports our previous conclusion that the radius of dust formed in the ejecta is smaller in SNe with less massive envelopes. The total dust mass ranges from 3x10^{-4} M_sun to 0.2 M_sun for alpha_j=0.1--1, depending on whether or not CO and SiO molecules are formed. We also estimate the optical dept...

  8. FINDING THE FIRST COSMIC EXPLOSIONS. II. CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whalen, Daniel J. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Joggerst, Candace C. [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Stiavelli, Massimo [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Heger, Alexander [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Holz, Daniel E. [Enrico Fermi Institute, Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the properties of Population III (Pop III) stars is prerequisite to elucidating the nature of primeval galaxies, the chemical enrichment and reionization of the early intergalactic medium, and the origin of supermassive black holes. While the primordial initial mass function (IMF) remains unknown, recent evidence from numerical simulations and stellar archaeology suggests that some Pop III stars may have had lower masses than previously thought, 15-50 M{sub Sun} in addition to 50-500 M{sub Sun }. The detection of Pop III supernovae (SNe) by JWST, WFIRST, or the TMT could directly probe the primordial IMF for the first time. We present numerical simulations of 15-40 M{sub Sun} Pop III core-collapse SNe performed with the Los Alamos radiation hydrodynamics code RAGE. We find that they will be visible in the earliest galaxies out to z {approx} 10-15, tracing their star formation rates and in some cases revealing their positions on the sky. Since the central engines of Pop III and solar-metallicity core-collapse SNe are quite similar, future detection of any Type II SNe by next-generation NIR instruments will in general be limited to this epoch.

  9. Type Ia Supernova Color Curves: Disentangling Intrinsic Variations from Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Samia; McCully, C.; Jha, S.

    2012-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are important cosmological tools based on their use as "standard candles": as objects of similar intrinsic luminosity, their variations in apparent brightness are a reliable indication of relative distance. The more accurately we can measure and correct for variations in SN Ia brightness, the more precisely we can determine cosmological distances and place constraints on cosmological parameters including the Hubble constant and the nature of dark energy. Corrections for dust along the line of sight to the SN are usually based on its reddening effect; however, recent studies have shown that the relationship between extinction and reddening of SN light curves does not match canonical values for standard, Milky Way-like dust. It is likely that color variations intrinsic to the SNe themselves are confounding our ability to independently determine the dust extinction and reddening. Using ground-based photometry of several hundred SNe from the published literature, we present an analysis that attempts to disentangle the effects of dust and intrinsic color variations by looking at the time dependence of SNe Ia colors, controlling for light curve shape properties by empirically matching similar objects.

  10. Cosmological constraints from supernova data set with corrected redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Feoli, A; Rillo, V; Grasso, M; 10.1088/1742-6596/354/1/012005

    2012-01-01

    Observations of distant type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), used as standard candles, support the notion that the Cosmos is filled with a mysterious form of energy, the dark energy. The constraints on cosmological parameters derived from data of SNe Ia and the measurements of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies indicate that the dark energy amounts to roughly 70% of all the energy contained in the Universe. In the hypothesis of a flat Universe, we investigate if the dark energy is really required in order to explain the SNe Ia experimental data, and, in this case, how much of such unknown energy is actually deduced from the analysis of these data and must be introduced in the LambdaCDM model of cosmology. In particular we are interested in verifying if the Einstein-de Sitter model of the expanding Universe is really to be ruled out. By using a fitting procedure based on the Newton method search for a minimum, we reanalyzed the "Union compilation" reported by Kowalski et al. (2008) formed by 307 SNe, obtaini...

  11. Probing Efficient Cosmic-Ray Acceleration in Young Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Dwarkadas, Vikram V; Marcowith, A; Tatischeff, V

    2015-01-01

    The formation of a core collapse supernovae (SNe) results in a fast (but non- or mildly-relativistic) shock wave expanding outwards into the surrounding medium. The medium itself is likely modified due to the stellar mass-loss from the massive star progenitor, which may be Wolf-Rayet stars (for Type Ib/c SNe), red supergiant stars (for type IIP and perhaps IIb and IIL SNe), or some other stellar type. The wind mass-loss parameters determine the density structure of the surrounding medium. Combined with the velocity of the SN shock wave, this regulates the shock acceleration process. In this article we discuss the essential parameters that control the particle acceleration and gamma-ray emission in SNe, with particular reference to the Type IIb SN 1993J. The shock wave expanding into the high density medium leads to fast particle acceleration, giving rise to rapidly-growing plasma instabilities driven by the acceleration process itself. The instabilities grow over intraday timescales. This growth, combined wit...

  12. Breaking the color-reddening degeneracy in type Ia supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Sasdelli, M; Hillebrandt, W; Ashall, C; Mazzali, P A; Prentice, S

    2016-01-01

    A new method to study the intrinsic color and luminosity of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is presented. A metric space built using principal component analysis (PCA) on spectral series SNe Ia between -12.5 and +17.5 days from B maximum is used as a set of predictors. This metric space is built to be insensitive to reddening. Hence, it does not predict the part of color excess due to dust-extinction. At the same time, the rich variability of SN Ia spectra is a good predictor of a large fraction of the intrinsic color variability. Such metric space is a good predictor of the epoch when the maximum in the B-V color curve is reached. Multivariate Partial Least Square (PLS) regression predicts the intrinsic B band light-curve and the intrinsic B-V color curve up to a month after maximum. This allows to study the relation between the light curves of SNe Ia and their spectra. The total-to-selective extinction ratio RV in the host-galaxy of SNe Ia is found, on average, to be consistent with typical Milky-Way values. Th...

  13. Observational Constraints on the Nature of the Dark Energy: First Cosmological Results From the ESSENCE Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood-Vasey, W.Michael; Miknaitis, G.; Stubbs, C.W.; Jha, S.; Riess, A.G.; Garnavich, P.M.; Kirshner, R.P.; Aguilera, C.; Becker, A.C.; Blackman, J.W.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Clocchiatti, A.; Conley, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Filippenko, A.V.; Foley, R.J.; Garg, A.; Hicken, M.; Krisciunas, K.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2007-01-05

    We present constraints on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter, w = P/({rho}c{sup 2}), using 60 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the ESSENCE supernova survey. We derive a set of constraints on the nature of the dark energy assuming a flat Universe. By including constraints on ({Omega}{sub M}, w) from baryon acoustic oscillations, we obtain a value for a static equation-of-state parameter w = -1.05{sub -0.12}{sup +0.13} (stat 1{sigma}) {+-} 0.13 (sys) and {Omega}{sub M} = 0.274{sub -0.020}{sup +0.033} (stat 1{sigma}) with a best-fit {chi}{sup 2}/DoF of 0.96. These results are consistent with those reported by the Super-Nova Legacy Survey in a similar program measuring supernova distances and redshifts. We evaluate sources of systematic error that afflict supernova observations and present Monte Carlo simulations that explore these effects. Currently, the largest systematic currently with the potential to affect our measurements is the treatment of extinction due to dust in the supernova host galaxies. Combining our set of ESSENCE SNe Ia with the SuperNova Legacy Survey SNe Ia, we obtain a joint constraint of w = -1.07{sub -0.09}{sup +0.09} (stat 1{sigma}) {+-} 0.13 (sys), {Omega}{sub M} = 0.267{sub -0.018}{sup +0.028} (stat 1{sigma}) with a best-fit {chi}{sup 2}/DoF of 0.91. The current SNe Ia data are fully consistent with a cosmological constant.

  14. The influence of host galaxy morphology on the properties of Type Ia supernovae from the JLA compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henne, V.; Pruzhinskaya, M. V.; Rosnet, P.; Léget, P.-F.; Ishida, E. E. O.; Ciulli, A.; Gris, P.; Says, L.-P.; Gangler, E.

    2017-02-01

    The observational cosmology with distant Type Ia supernovae (SNe) as standard candles claims that the Universe is in accelerated expansion, caused by a large fraction of dark energy. In this paper we investigate the SN Ia environment, studying the impact of the nature of their host galaxies on the Hubble diagram fitting. The supernovae (192 SNe) used in the analysis were extracted from Joint-Light-curves-Analysis (JLA) compilation of high-redshift and nearby supernovae which is the best one to date. The analysis is based on the empirical fact that SN Ia luminosities depend on their light curve shapes and colors. We confirm that the stretch parameter of Type Ia supernovae is correlated with the host galaxy type. The supernovae with lower stretch are hosted mainly in elliptical and lenticular galaxies. No significant correlation between SN Ia colour and host morphology was found.   We also examine how the luminosities of SNe Ia change depending on host galaxy morphology after stretch and colour corrections. Our results show that in old stellar populations and low dust environments, the supernovae are slightly fainter. SNe Ia in elliptical and lenticular galaxies have a higher α (slope in luminosity-stretch) and β (slope in luminosity-colour) parameter than in spirals. However, the observed shift is at the 1-σ uncertainty level and, therefore, can not be considered as significant.   We confirm that the supernova properties depend on their environment and that the incorporation of a host galaxy term into the Hubble diagram fit is expected to be crucial for future cosmological analyses.

  15. Explosion of red-supergiant stars: Influence of the atmospheric structure on shock breakout and early-time supernova radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessart, Luc; John Hillier, D.; Audit, Edouard

    2017-09-01

    Early-time observations of Type II supernovae (SNe) 2013cu and 2013fs have revealed an interaction of ejecta with material near the star surface. Unlike Type IIn SN 2010jl, which interacts with a dense wind for 1 yr, the interaction ebbs after 2-3 d, suggesting a dense and compact circumstellar envelope. Here, we use multi-group radiation hydrodynamics and non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium radiative transfer to explore the properties of red-supergiant (RSG) star explosions embedded in a variety of dense envelopes. We consider the cases of an extended static atmosphere or a steady-state wind, adopting a range of mass loss rates. The shock breakout signal, luminosity and color evolution up to 10 d, and ejecta dynamics are strongly influenced by the properties of this nearby environment. This compromises the use of early-time observations to constrain R⋆. For dense circumstellar envelopes, the time-integrated luminosity over the first 10-15 d can be boosted by a factor of a few. The presence of narrow lines for 2-3 d in 2013fs and 2013cu require a cocoon of material of 0.01 M⊙ out to 5-10 R⋆. Spectral lines evolve from electron scattering to Doppler broadened with a growing blueshift of their emission peaks. Recent studies propose a super-wind phase with a mass loss rate from 0.001 up to 1 M⊙ yr-1 in the last months or years of the life of a RSG, although there is no observational constraint that this external material is a steady-state outflow. Alternatively, observations may be explained by the explosion of a RSG star inside its complex atmosphere. Indeed, spatially resolved observations reveal that RSG stars have extended atmospheres, with the presence of downflows and upflows out to several R⋆, even in a standard RSG such as Betelgeuse. Mass loading in the region intermediate between star and wind can accommodate the 0.01 M⊙ needed to explain the observations of 2013fs. Signatures of interaction in early-time spectra of RSG star explosions may

  16. SN 2009kn - the twin of the Type IIn supernova 1994W

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kankare, E.; Ergon, M.; Bufano, F.;

    2012-01-01

    . Contrarily, the photometric evolution resembles more that of a Type IIP SN with a large drop in luminosity at the end of the plateau phase. These characteristics are similar to those of SN 1994W, whose nature has been explained with two different models with different approaches. The well-sampled data set...

  17. Supernova 2010as: the lowest-velocity member of a family of flat-velocity type IIb supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folatelli, Gastón; Bersten, Melina C.; Nomoto, Ken' ichi [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Hamuy, Mario [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Olivares Estay, Felipe; Pignata, Giuliano [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Anderson, Joseph P. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Holmbo, Simon; Stritzinger, Maximilian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Maeda, Keiichi [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Morrell, Nidia; Contreras, Carlos; Phillips, Mark M. [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Förster, Francisco [Center for Mathematical Modelling, Universidad de Chile, Avenida Blanco Encalada 2120 Piso 7, Santiago (Chile); Prieto, José Luis [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Valenti, Stefano [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Afonso, Paulo; Altenmüller, Konrad; Elliott, Jonny, E-mail: gaston.folatelli@ipmu.jp [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstraße 1, D-85740 Garching (Germany); and others

    2014-09-01

    We present extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of the stripped-envelope supernova SN 2010as. Spectroscopic peculiarities such as initially weak helium features and low expansion velocities with a nearly flat evolution place this object in the small family of events previously identified as transitional Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe). There is ubiquitous evidence of hydrogen, albeit weak, in this family of SNe, indicating that they are in fact a peculiar kind of Type IIb SNe that we name 'flat-velocity' Type IIb. The flat-velocity evolution—which occurs at different levels between 6000 and 8000 km s{sup –1} for different SNe—suggests the presence of a dense shell in the ejecta. Despite the spectroscopic similarities, these objects show surprisingly diverse luminosities. We discuss the possible physical or geometrical unification picture for such diversity. Using archival Hubble Space Telescope images, we associate SN 2010as with a massive cluster and derive a progenitor age of ≈6 Myr, assuming a single star-formation burst, which is compatible with a Wolf-Rayet progenitor. Our hydrodynamical modeling, on the contrary, indicates that the pre-explosion mass was relatively low, ≈4 M {sub ☉}. The seeming contradiction between a young age and low pre-SN mass may be solved by a massive interacting binary progenitor.

  18. Supernova Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, Alicia M.

    2014-01-01

    For decades, the study of stellar explosions -- supernovae -- have focused almost exclusively on the strong optical emission that dominates the bolometric luminosity in the days following the ultimate demise of the star. Yet many of the leading breakthroughs in our understanding of stellar death have been enabled by obtaining data at other wavelengths. For example, I have shown that 1% of all supernovae give rise to powerful relativistic jets, representing the biggest bangs in the Universe since the Big Bang. My recent serendipitous X-ray discovery of a supernova in the act of exploding (“in flagrante delicto”) revealed a novel technique to discover new events and provide clues on the shock physics at the heart of the explosion. With the advent of sensitive new radio telescopes, my research group combines clues from across the electromagnetic spectrum (radio to gamma-ray), leading us to a holistic study of stellar death, the physics of the explosions, and their role in fertilizing the Universe with new elements, by providing the community with cosmic autopsy reports.

  19. The Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey: The Type Ia Supernova Rate in High-Redshift Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Barbary, K; Amanullah, R; Brodwin, M; Connolly, N; Dawson, K S; Doi, M; Eisenhardt, P; Faccioli, L; Fadeyev, V; Fakhouri, H K; Fruchter, A S; Gilbank, D G; Gladders, M D; Goldhaber, G; Goobar, A; Hattori, T; Hsiao, E; Huang, X; Ihara, Y; Kashikawa, N; Koester, B; Konishi, K; Kowalski, M; Lidman, C; Lubin, L; Meyers, J; Morokuma, T; Oda, T; Panagia, N; Perlmutter, S; Postman, M; Ripoche, P; Rosati, P; Rubin, D; Schlegel, D J; Spadafora, A L; Stanford, S A; Strovink, M; Suzuki, N; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; Yasuda, N

    2010-01-01

    We report a measurement of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate in galaxy clusters at 0.9 0.9 SNe. Finding 8 +/- 1 cluster SNe Ia, we determine a SN Ia rate of 0.50 +0.23-0.19 (stat) +0.10-0.09 (sys) SNuB (SNuB = 10^-12 SNe L_{sun,B}^-1 yr^-1). In units of stellar mass, this translates to 0.36 +0.16-0.13 (stat) +0.07-0.06 (sys) SNuM (SNuM = 10^-12 SNe M_sun^-1 yr^-1). This represents a factor of approximately 5 +/- 2 increase over measurements of the cluster rate at z < 0.2. We parameterize the late-time SN Ia delay time distribution with a power law (proportional to t^s). Under the assumption of a cluster formation redshift of z_f = 3, our rate measurement in combination with lower-redshift cluster SN Ia rates constrains s = -1.31 +0.55-0.40, consistent with measurements of the delay time distribution in the field. This measurement is also consistent with the value of s ~ -1 typically expected for the "double degenerate" SN Ia progenitor scenario, and inconsistent with some models for the "single degenerat...

  20. Distribution of 56Ni Yields of Type Ia Supernovae and its Implication for Progenitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Wang; Xiang-Cun Meng; Xiao-Feng Wang; Zhan-Wen Han

    2008-01-01

    The amount of 56Ni produced in Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosion is probably the most important physical parameter underlying the observed correlation of SN Ia lumi-nosities with their light curves. Based on an empirical relation between the 56Ni mass and the light curve parameter △m15, we obtained rough estimates of the 56Ni mass for a large sample of nearby SNe Ia with the aim of exploring the diversity in SN Ia. We found that the derived 56Ni masses for different SNe Ia could vary by a factor of ten (e.g., MNi = 0.1 - 1.3 M⊙),which cannot be explained in terms of the standard Chandraseldaar-mass model (with a 56Ni mass production of 0.4 - 0.8 M⊙). Different explosion and/or progenitor models are clearly required for various SNe Ia, in particular, for those extremely nickel-poor and nickel-rich producers. The nickel-rich (with MNi 0.8 M⊙) SNe Ia are very luminous and may have massive progenitors exceeding the Chandrasekhar-mass limit since extra progenitor fuel is required to produce more 56Ni to power the light curve. This is also consistent with the find-ing that the intrinsically bright SNe Ia prefer to occur in stellar environments of young and massive stars. For example, 75% SNe Ia in spirals have △m15 < 1.2 while this ratio is only 18% in E/S0 galaxies. The nickel-poor SNe Ia (with MNi < 0.2 M⊙) may invoke the sub-Chandrasekhar model, as most of them were found in early-type E/S0 galaxies dominated by the older and low-mass stellar populations. This indicates that SNe Ia in spiral and E/S0 galaxies have progenitors of different properties.

  1. Extending the supernova Hubble diagram to z~1.5 with the Euclid space mission

    CERN Document Server

    Astier, P; Brescia, M; Cappellaro, E; Carlberg, R G; Cavuoti, S; Della Valle, M; Gangler, E; Goobar, A; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Kessler, R; Kim, A; Linder, E; Longo, G; Maguire, K; Mannucci, F; Mattila, S; Nichol, R; Pain, R; Regnault, N; Spiro, S; Sullivan, M; Tao, C; Turatto, M; Wang, X F; Wood-Vasey, W M

    2014-01-01

    We forecast dark energy constraints that could be obtained from a new large sample of Type Ia supernovae where those at high redshift are acquired with the Euclid space mission. We simulate a three-prong SN survey: a z<0.35 nearby sample (8000 SNe), a 0.2SNe), and a 0.75SNe). The nearby and intermediate surveys are assumed to be conducted from the ground, while the high-z is a joint ground- and space-based survey. This latter survey, the "Dark Energy Supernova Infra-Red Experiment" (DESIRE), is designed to fit within 6 months of Euclid observing time, with a dedicated observing program. We simulate the SN events as they would be observed in rolling-search mode by the various instruments, and derive the quality of expected cosmological constraints. We account for known systematic uncertainties, in particular calibration uncertainties including their contribution through the training of the supernova model used to fit the supernovae li...

  2. Cosmology with Photometrically-Classified Type Ia Supernovae from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Heather; Nichol, Robert C; Sako, Masao; Smith, Mathew; Lampeitl, Hubert; Olmstead, Matthew D; Bassett, Bruce; Biswas, Rahul; Brown, Peter; Cinabro, David; Dawson, Kyle S; Dilday, Ben; Foley, Ryan J; Frieman, Joshua A; Garnavich, Peter; Hlozek, Renee; Jha, Saurabh W; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kunz, Martin; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Richmond, Michael; Riess, Adam; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Taylor, Matt; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2012-01-01

    We present the cosmological analysis of 752 photometrically-classified Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey, supplemented with host-galaxy spectroscopy from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Our photometric-classification method is based on the SN typing technique of Sako et al. (2011), aided by host galaxy redshifts (0.05SNe. We demonstrate that this level of contamination has no effect on our cosmological constraints. We quantify and correct for our selection effects (e.g., Malmquist bias) using simulations. When fitting to a flat LambdaCDM cosmological model, we find that our photometric sample alone gives omega_m=0.24+0.07-0.05 (statistical errors only). If we relax the constraint on flatness, then our sample provides competitive joint stati...

  3. SDSS-II Supernova survey. An analysis of the largest sample of type IA supernovae and correlations with host-galaxy spectral properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Rachel C.; D’Andrea, Chris B.; Gupta, Ravi R.; Sako, Masao; Fischer, John A.; Kessler, Rick; Jha, Saurabh W.; March, Marisa C.; Scolnic, Daniel M.; Fischer, Johanna-Laina; Campbell, Heather; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Richmond, Michael; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, Mathew

    2016-04-20

    Using the largest single-survey sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) to date, we study the relationship between properties of SNe Ia and those of their host galaxies, focusing primarily on correlations with Hubble residuals (HR). Our sample consists of 345 photometrically-classified or spectroscopicallyconfirmed SNe Ia discovered as part of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey (SDSS-SNS). This analysis utilizes host-galaxy spectroscopy obtained during the SDSS-I/II spectroscopic survey and from an ancillary program on the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) that obtained spectra for nearly all host galaxies of SDSS-II SN candidates. In addition, we use photometric hostgalaxy properties from the SDSS-SNS data release (Sako et al. 2014) such as host stellar mass and star-formation rate. We confirm the well-known relation between HR and host-galaxy mass and find a 3.6σ significance of a non-zero linear slope. We also recover correlations between HR and hostgalaxy gas-phase metallicity and specific star-formation rate as they are reported in the literature. With our large dataset, we examine correlations between HR and multiple host-galaxy properties simultaneously and find no evidence of a significant correlation. We also independently analyze our spectroscopically-confirmed and photometrically-classified SNe Ia and comment on the significance of similar combined datasets for future surveys.

  4. Improving Cosmological Distance Measurements Using Twin Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Fakhouri, H K; Aldering, G; Antilogus, P; Aragon, C; Bailey, S; Baltay, C; Barbary, K; Baugh, D; Bongard, S; Buton, C; Chen, J; Childress, M; Chotard, N; Copin, Y; Fagrelius, P; Feindt, U; Fleury, M; Fouchez, D; Gangler, E; Hayden, B; Kim, A G; Kowalski, M; Leget, P -F; Lombardo, S; Nordin, J; Pain, R; Pecontal, E; Pereira, R; Perlmutter, S; Rabinowitz, D; Ren, J; Rigault, M; Rubin, D; Runge, K; Saunders, C; Scalzo, R; Smadja, G; Sofiatti, C; Strovink, M; Suzuki, N; Tao, C; Thomas, R C; Weaver, B A

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a method for identifying "twin" Type Ia supernovae, and using them to improve distance measurements. This novel approach to Type Ia supernova standardization is made possible by spectrophotometric time series observations from the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory). We begin with a well-measured set of supernovae, find pairs whose spectra match well across the entire optical window, and then test whether this leads to a smaller dispersion in their absolute brightnesses. This analysis is completed in a blinded fashion, ensuring that decisions made in implementing the method do not inadvertently bias the result. We find that pairs of supernovae with more closely matched spectra indeed have reduced brightness dispersion. We are able to standardize this initial set of SNfactory supernovae to 0.083 +/- 0.012 magnitudes, implying a dispersion of 0.072 +/- 0.010 magnitudes in the absence of peculiar velocities. We estimate that with larger numbers of comparison SNe, e.g, using the final SNfactory spec...

  5. An Efficient Approach to Obtaining Large Numbers of Distant Supernova Host Galaxy Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Lidman, C; Sullivan, M; Myzska, J; Dobbie, P; Glazebrook, K; Mould, J; Astier, P; Balland, C; Betoule, M; Carlberg, R; Conley, A; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Hook, I; Howell, D A; Pain, R; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C; Regnault, N; Rich, J

    2012-01-01

    We use the wide-field capabilities of the 2dF fibre positioner and the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) to obtain redshifts of galaxies that hosted supernovae during the first three years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). With exposure times ranging from 10 to 60 ksec per galaxy, we were able to obtain redshifts for 400 host galaxies in two SNLS fields, thereby substantially increasing the total number of SNLS supernovae with host galaxy redshifts. The median redshift of the galaxies in our sample that hosted photometrically classified Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is 0.77, which is 25% higher than the median redshift of spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia in the three-year sample of the SNLS. Our results demonstrate that one can use wide-field fibre-fed multi-object spectrographs on 4m telescopes to efficiently obtain redshifts for large numbers of supernova host galaxies over the large areas of sky that will be covered by future high-redshift supernova surveys, such as the Dark...

  6. Supernova interaction with dense mass loss

    CERN Document Server

    Chevalier, Roger A

    2013-01-01

    Supernovae of Type IIn (narrow line) appear to be explosions that had strong mass loss before the event, so that the optical luminosity is powered by the circumstellar interaction. If the mass loss region has an optical depth $>c/v_s$, where $v_s$ is the shock velocity, the shock breakout occurs in the mass loss region and a significant fraction of the explosion energy can be radiated. The emission from the superluminous SN 2006gy and the normal luminosity SN 2011ht can plausibly be attributed to shock breakout in a wind, with SN 2011ht being a low energy event. Superluminous supernovae of Type I may derive their luminosity from interaction with a mass loss region of limited extent. However, the distinctive temperature increase to maximum luminosity has not been clearly observed in Type I events. Suggested mechanisms for the strong mass loss include pulsational pair instability, gravity-waves generated by instabilities in late burning phases, and binary effects.

  7. Signatures of A Companion Star in Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, Keiichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    While type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) have been used as precise cosmological distance indicators, their progenitor systems remain unresolved. One of the key questions is if there is a non-degenerate companion star at the time of a thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf (WD). In this paper, we investigate if an interaction between the SN ejecta and the companion star may result in observable footprints around the maximum brightness and thereafter, by performing multi-dimensional radiation transfer simulations based on hydrodynamic simulations of the interaction. We find that such systems result in variations in various observational characteristics due to different viewing directions, while the predicted behaviors (redder and fainter for the companion direction) are opposite to what were suggested by the previous study. The variations are generally modest and within observed scatters. However, the model predicts trends between some observables different from observationally derived, thus a large sample of SNe Ia...

  8. Observational clues to the progenitors of Type-Ia supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Maoz, Dan; Nelemans, Gijs

    2013-01-01

    Type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are important distance indicators, element factories, cosmic-ray accelerators, kinetic-energy sources in galaxy evolution, and endpoints of stellar binary evolution. It has long been clear that a SN Ia must be the runaway thermonuclear explosion of a degenerate carbon-oxygen stellar core, most likely a white dwarf (WD). However, the specific progenitor systems of SNe Ia, and the processes that lead to their ignition, have not been identified. Two broad classes of progenitor binary systems have long been considered: single-degenerate (SD), in which a WD gains mass from a non-degenerate star; and double-degenerate (DD), involving the merger of two WDs. New theoretical work has enriched these possibilities with some interesting updates and variants. We review the significant recent observational progress in addressing the progenitor problem. We consider clues that have emerged from the observed properties of the various proposed progenitor populations, from studies of their sites, pre...

  9. A supernova distance to the anchor galaxy NGC 4258

    CERN Document Server

    Polshaw, J; Chambers, K C; Smartt, S J; Taubenberger, S; Kromer, M; Gall, E E E; Hillebrandt, W; Huber, M; Smith, K W; Wainscoat, R J

    2015-01-01

    The fortuitous occurrence of a type II-Plateau (IIP) supernova, SN~2014bc, in a galaxy for which distance estimates from a number of primary distance indicators are available provides a means with which to cross-calibrate the standardised candle method (SCM) for type IIP SNe. By applying calibrations from the literature we find distance estimates in line with the most precise measurement to NGC~4258 based on the Keplerian motion of masers (7.6$\\pm$0.23\\,Mpc), albeit with significant scatter. We provide an alternative local SCM calibration by only considering type IIP SNe that have occurred in galaxies for which a Cepheid distance estimate is available. We find a considerable reduction in scatter ($\\sigma_I = 0.16$\\, mag.), but note that the current sample size is limited. Applying this calibration, we estimate a distance to NGC~4258 of $7.08\\pm0.86$ Mpc.

  10. The interaction between feedback from active galactic nuclei and supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, C M

    2012-01-01

    Energetic feedback from supernovae (SNe) and from active galactic nuclei (AGN) are both important processes that are thought to control how much gas is able to condense into galaxies and form stars. We show that although both AGN and SNe suppress star formation, they mutually weaken one another's effect by up to an order of magnitude in haloes in the mass range for which both feedback processes are efficient (10^11.25 M_sun < m_200 < 10^12.5 M_sun). These results demonstrate the importance of the simultaneous, non-independent inclusion of these two processes in models of galaxy formation to estimate the total feedback strength. These results are of particular relevance to semi-analytic models, which implicitly assume the effects of the two feedback processes to be independent, and also to hydrodynamical simulations that model only one of the feedback processes.

  11. Time Lapse Spectropolarimetry: Constraining the Nature and Progenitors of Interacting CCSNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huk, Leah N.; SNSPOL

    2017-01-01

    SNe Type IIn are among the brightest supernova explosions due to strong circumstellar interaction, but the category is not well defined. The heterogeneous nature of the class implies that any number of different progenitors can give rise to a IIn event so long as there is appreciable mass loss prior to explosion. Examining the geometric and optical properties of the circumstellar material (CSM) can help to identify the progenitors of individual IIn SNe. Polarimetry is the optimal method for constraining CSM characteristics as polarimetric signals depend on and preserve geometric information from unresolved sources.I present results of an ensemble of three-dimensional simulations of the polarized H alpha emission-line profiles of interacting SNe using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code called SLIP. A novel feature of these simulations is their ability to emit photons from a distributed shock region as well as from a central source. This allows us to investigate two different illumination scenarios as well as CSM properties. We present results for how these different models best match multi-epoch observed polarized spectra of the IIn SNe 1997eg, and all IIn from the the SNSPOL collaboration database. I will use the results to investigate relationships among SNe IIn based on viewing angle and consider whether the IIn category should be subdivided based on physical properties of the CSM and/or progenitor.

  12. The influence of host galaxy morphology on the properties of Type Ia supernovae from the JLA compilation

    CERN Document Server

    Henne, Vincent; Rosnet, Philippe; Leget, Pierre-Francois; Ishida, Emille; Ciulli, Alexandre; Gris, Philippe; Says, Louis-Pierre; Gangler, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    The observational cosmology with distant Type Ia supernovae (SNe) as standard candles claims that the Universe is in accelerated expansion, caused by a large fraction of dark energy. In this paper we investigate the SN Ia environment, studying the impact of the nature of their host galaxies on the Hubble diagram fitting. The supernovae (192 SNe) used in the analysis were extracted from Joint-Light-curves-Analysis (JLA) compilation of high-redshift and nearby supernovae which is the best one to date. The analysis is based on the empirical fact that SN Ia luminosities depend on their light curve shapes and colors. We confirm that the stretch parameter of Type Ia supernovae is correlated with the host galaxy type. The supernovae with lower stretch are hosted mainly in elliptical and lenticular galaxies. No significant correlation between SN Ia colour and host morphology was found. We also examine how the luminosities of SNe Ia change depending on host galaxy morphology after stretch and colour corrections. Our r...

  13. Constructing a cosmological model-independent Hubble diagram of type Ia supernovae with cosmic chronometers

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhengxiang; Yu, Hongwei; Zhu, Zong-Hong; Alcaniz, J S

    2015-01-01

    We apply two methods to reconstruct the Hubble parameter $H(z)$ as a function of redshift from 15 measurements of the expansion rate obtained from age estimates of passively evolving galaxies. These reconstructions enable us to derive the luminosity distance to a certain redshift $z$, calibrate the light-curve fitting parameters accounting for the (unknown) intrinsic magnitude of type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) and construct cosmological model-independent Hubble diagrams of SNe Ia. In order to test the compatibility between the reconstructed functions of $H(z)$, we perform a statistical analysis considering the latest SNe Ia sample, the so-called JLA compilation. We find that, while one of the reconstructed functions leads to a value of the local Hubble parameter $H_0$ in excellent agreement with the one reported by the Planck collaboration, the other requires a higher value of $H_0$, which is consistent with recent measurements of this quantity from Cepheids and other local distance indicators.

  14. Swift X-Ray Upper Limits on Type Ia Supernova Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, B. R.; Immler, S.

    2012-01-01

    We have considered 53 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed by the Swift X-Ray Telescope. None of the SNe Ia are individually detected at any time or in stacked images. Using these data and assuming that the SNe Ia are a homogeneous class of objects, we have calculated upper limits to the X-ray luminosity (0.2-10 keV) and mass-loss rate of L(sub 0.2-10) < 1.7 X 10(exp 38) erg/s and M(dot) < l.l X 10(exp -6) solar M/ yr x (V(sub w))/(10 km/s), respectively. The results exclude massive or evolved stars as the companion objects in SN Ia progenitor systems, but allow the possibility of main sequence or small stars, along with double degenerate systems consisting of two white dwarfs, consistent with results obtained at other wavelengths (e.g., UV, radio) in other studies.

  15. SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR EXPANDING BLAST WAVES DURING THE EARLY EVOLUTION OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Silich, Sergiy [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica Óptica y Electrónica, AP 51, 72000 Puebla, México (Mexico); Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (Spain); Cassisi, Santi, E-mail: gtt@inaoep.mx, E-mail: cmt@iac.es, E-mail: cassisi@oa-teramo.inaf.it [INAF—Astronomical Observatory of Collurania, via M. Maggini, I-64100 Teramo (Italy)

    2015-11-20

    Our arguments deal with the early evolution of Galactic globular clusters and show why only a few of the supernovae (SNe) products were retained within globular clusters and only in the most massive cases (M ≥ 10{sup 6} M{sub ⊙}), while less massive clusters were not contaminated at all by SNe. Here, we show that SN blast waves evolving in a steep density gradient undergo blowout and end up discharging their energy and metals into the medium surrounding the clusters. This inhibits the dispersal and the contamination of the gas left over from a first stellar generation. Only the ejecta from well-centered SNe that evolve into a high-density medium available for a second stellar generation (2SG) in the most massive clusters would be retained. These are likely to mix their products with the remaining gas, eventually leading in these cases to an Fe-contaminated 2SG.

  16. Incorporating Astrophysical Systematics into a Generalized Likelihood for Cosmology with Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Ponder, Kara A; Zentner, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    Traditional cosmological inference using Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) have used stretch- and color-corrected fits of SN Ia light curves and assumed a resulting fiducial mean and symmetric intrinsic dispersion to the resulting relative luminosity. However, the recent literature has presented mounting evidence that SNeIa have different width-color-corrected luminosities, depending on the environment in which they are found. Such correlations suggest the existence of multiple populations of SNeIa and a non-Gaussian distribution of relative luminosity. We introduce a framework that provides a generalized full-likelihood approach to accommodate multiple populations with unknown population parameters. To illustrate this framework we use a simple model of two populations with a relative shift, independent intrinsic dispersions, and linear redshift evolution of the relative fraction of each population. We generate mock SN Ia data sets from an underlying two-population model and use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm ...

  17. Sub-luminous `1991bg-Like' Thermonuclear Supernovae Account for Most Diffuse Antimatter in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Crocker, Roland M; Seitenzahl, Ivo R; Panther, Fiona H; Baumgardt, Holger; Moller, Anais; Nataf, David M; Ferrario, Lilia; Eldridge, J J; White, Martin; Sim, Stuart; Tucker, Brad E; Aharonian, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Observations by the INTEGRAL satellite reveal that the Galaxy glows with the radiation from the annihilation of $(5.0_{-1.5}^{+1.0}) \\times 10^{43}$ electron-positron pairs every second. Constrained to be injected into the interstellar medium (ISM) at only mildly relativistic energies, it is highly plausible most positrons originate from the $\\beta^+$ decay of radionuclides synthesised in stars or supernovae. However, none of the initially most likely candidates -- massive stars, core-collapse (CC) supernovae (SNe) or ordinary thermonuclear supernovae (SNe Ia) -- have Galactic distributions that match the spatial distribution of positron injection across the Milky Way. Here we show that a class of transient positron source occurring in stars of age >5 Gyr can explain the global distribution of positron annihilation in the Galaxy. Such sources, occurring at a present Galactic rate $\\sim$ 0.002 year$^{-1}$ and typically synthesising $\\sim$ 0.03 solar masses of the $\\beta^+$-unstable radionuclide $^{44}$Ti, can ...

  18. Solar abundance of manganese: a case for the existence of near Chandrasekhar-mass Type Ia supernova progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Seitenzahl, Ivo R; Roepke, Friedrich K; Ruiter, Ashley J

    2013-01-01

    Context: Manganese is predominantly synthesised in Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions. Owing to the entropy dependence of the Mn yield in explosive thermonuclear burning, SNe Ia involving near Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs (WDs) are predicted to produce Mn to Fe ratios significantly exceeding those of SN Ia explosions involving sub-Chandrasekhar mass primary WDs. Of all current supernova explosion models, only SN Ia models involving near-Chandrasekhar mass WDs produce [Mn/Fe] > 0.0. Aims: Using the specific yields for competing SN Ia scenarios, we aim to constrain the relative fractions of exploding near-Chandrasekhar mass to sub-Chandrasekhar mass primary WDs in the Galaxy. Methods: We extract the Mn yields from three-dimensional thermonuclear supernova simulations referring to different initial setups and progenitor channels. We then compute the chemical evolution of Mn in the Solar neighborhood, assuming SNe Ia are made up of different relative fractions of the considered explosion models. Results: We ...

  19. Resolving Supernovae, H0, and the Equation of State with HST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Rohde, A. C.; Gorski, M. J.; Riess, A. G.; Lampeitl, H.; Ferguson, H. C.; Martel, A. R.

    2006-12-01

    There is little understood about the nature of the dark energy component of the universe. Presently, inconsistency in the value of the Hubble constant and the limited sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) at z>1 provide the largest sources of uncertainty in the evolutionary nature of dark energy. There is also growing suspicion that SNeIa may be the result of at least two physical mechanisms, which may produce unnoticed effects in cosmological parameters. The preferred bulk mechanism for SN Ia progenitors, and more importantly the accuracy of the same empirical corrections over all redshifts, can be ascertained by studying the rate of SNeIa in the early universe. The notably few SNeIa found at z>1.4 in the deep HST surveys have suggested that most SNeIa take 3-4 Gyr to develop from a single burst of star formation. Simple tests of this conclusion would be to gather a more statistically significant sample of SNeIa in the desired redshift range, or just a few events at z>2. We present our new investigations with HST into these critical issues. Our Cycle 15 program, SHOES, continues the search for SNeIa at z>1 with ACS, but has an added component of simultaneous observations with NICMOS of Cepheids in galaxies that have hosted well studied SNeIa. These observations are expected to greatly reduce the uncertainty in H_0 (likewise reducing uncertainty in Omega_M), which along with the increased overall z>1 sample, will likely reduce dark energy constraints by approximately 40%. With the addition of the SHOES sample to those from PANS and GOODS, we will have nearly 4 times as many z>1 SNeIa to test the bulk delay of SNeIa from the cosmic star formation rate history. And by performing creative combinations of the data, we will ultimately produce an ultra deep survey for possible z>2 SNeIa.

  20. COSMOLOGY WITH PHOTOMETRICALLY CLASSIFIED TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM THE SDSS-II SUPERNOVA SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Heather; D' Andrea, Chris B; Nichol, Robert C.; Smith, Mathew; Lampeitl, Hubert [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Sako, Masao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brown, Peter; Dawson, Kyle S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Bassett, Bruce [Mathematics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town (South Africa); Biswas, Rahul; Kuhlmann, Steve [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Cinabro, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48126 (United States); Dilday, Ben [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Frieman, Joshua A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Hlozek, Renee [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Jha, Saurabh W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Kunz, Martin, E-mail: Heather.Campbell@port.ac.uk [African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Muizenberg, 7945, Cape Town (South Africa); and others

    2013-02-15

    We present the cosmological analysis of 752 photometrically classified Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey, supplemented with host-galaxy spectroscopy from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Our photometric-classification method is based on the SN classification technique of Sako et al., aided by host-galaxy redshifts (0.05 < z < 0.55). SuperNova ANAlysis simulations of our methodology estimate that we have an SN Ia classification efficiency of 70.8%, with only 3.9% contamination from core-collapse (non-Ia) SNe. We demonstrate that this level of contamination has no effect on our cosmological constraints. We quantify and correct for our selection effects (e.g., Malmquist bias) using simulations. When fitting to a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmological model, we find that our photometric sample alone gives {Omega} {sub m} = 0.24{sup +0.07} {sub -0.05} (statistical errors only). If we relax the constraint on flatness, then our sample provides competitive joint statistical constraints on {Omega} {sub m} and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}}, comparable to those derived from the spectroscopically confirmed Three-year Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS3). Using only our data, the statistics-only result favors an accelerating universe at 99.96% confidence. Assuming a constant wCDM cosmological model, and combining with H {sub 0}, cosmic microwave background, and luminous red galaxy data, we obtain w = -0.96{sup +0.10} {sub -0.10}, {Omega} {sub m} = 0.29{sup +0.02} {sub -0.02}, and {Omega} {sub k} = 0.00{sup +0.03} {sub -0.02} (statistical errors only), which is competitive with similar spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia analyses. Overall this comparison is reassuring, considering the lower redshift leverage of the SDSS-II SN sample (z < 0.55) and the lack of spectroscopic confirmation used herein. These results demonstrate the potential of photometrically classified SN Ia samples in improving

  1. Tycho Brahe's Supernova: Light from Centuries Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar

    2004-09-01

    The light curve of SN 1572 is described in the terms used nowadays to characterize Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). By assembling the records of the observations done in 1572-1574 and evaluating their uncertainties, it is possible to recover the light curve and the color evolution of this supernova. It is found that within the SN Ia family, the event should have been an SN Ia with a normal rate of decline, its stretch factor being s~0.9. The visual light curve near maximum, late-time decline, and color evolution sustain this conclusion. After correcting for extinction, the luminosity of this supernova as observed at maximum is found to be MV=-19.24-5log(D/3.0kpc)+/-0.42. From stretch fitting of the overall light curve, the maximum in V would imply a luminosity difference of +0.17+/-0.1 mag, with the maximum brightness of an s=1 SN Ia. The quantity MV is consistent with a distance of 2.8+/-0.4 kpc for the scale of H0=65 km s-1 Mpc-1.

  2. Type II Supernovae: Model Light Curves and Standard Candle Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.

    2009-10-01

    A survey of Type II supernovae explosion models has been carried out to determine how their light curves and spectra vary with their mass, metallicity, and explosion energy. The presupernova models are taken from a recent survey of massive stellar evolution at solar metallicity supplemented by new calculations at subsolar metallicity. Explosions are simulated by the motion of a piston near the edge of the iron core and the resulting light curves and spectra are calculated using full multi-wavelength radiation transport. Formulae are developed that describe approximately how the model observables (light curve luminosity and duration) scale with the progenitor mass, explosion energy, and radioactive nucleosynthesis. Comparison with observational data shows that the explosion energy of typical supernovae (as measured by kinetic energy at infinity) varies by nearly an order of magnitude—from 0.5 to 4.0 × 1051 ergs, with a typical value of ~0.9 × 1051 ergs. Despite the large variation, the models exhibit a tight relationship between luminosity and expansion velocity, similar to that previously employed empirically to make SNe IIP standardized candles. This relation is explained by the simple behavior of hydrogen recombination in the supernova envelope, but we find a sensitivity to progenitor metallicity and mass that could lead to systematic errors. Additional correlations between light curve luminosity, duration, and color might enable the use of SNe IIP to obtain distances accurate to ~20% using only photometric data.

  3. Observational properties of low redshift pair instability supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kozyreva, A; Langer, N; Yoon, S -C

    2014-01-01

    So called superluminous supernovae have been recently discovered in the local Universe. It appears possible that some of them originate from stellar explosions induced by the pair instability mechanism. Recent stellar evolution models also predict pair instability supernovae (PISNe) from very massive stars at fairly high metallicities (i.e. Z~0.004). We provide supernova (SN) models and synthetic light curves for two progenitor models, a 150 Msun red-supergiant and a 250 Msun yellow-supergiant at a metallicity of Z=0.001, for which the evolution from the main sequence to collapse, and the initiation of the PISN itself, has been previously computed in a realistic and self-consistent way. We are using the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA to describe the SN evolution of both models over a time frame of about 500 days. We describe the shock-breakout phases of both SNe which are characterized by a higher luminosity, a longer duration and a lower effective temperature than those of ordinary SNeIIP. We derive the...

  4. The radio spectra of the compact sources in Arp 220: A mixed population of supernovae and supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Parra, R; Diamond, P J; Thrall, H; Lonsdale, C J; Smith, H E; Parra, Rodrigo; Conway, John E.; Diamond, Philip J.; Thrall, Hannah; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Smith, Harding E.

    2006-01-01

    We report the first detection at multiple radio wavelengths (13, 6 and 3.6 cm) of the compact sources within both nuclei of the Ultra Luminous Infra-Red Galaxy Arp 220. We present the radio spectra of the 18 detected sources. In just over half of the sources we find that these spectra and other properties are consistent with the standard model of powerful Type IIn supernovae interacting with their pre-explosion stellar wind. The rate of appearance of new radio sources identified with these supernova events suggests that an unusually large fraction of core collapse supernovae in Arp 220 are highly luminous; possibly implying a radically different stellar initial mass function or stellar evolution compared to galactic disks. Another possible explanation invokes very short (~3 x 10^5 year) intense (~10^3 M_Sol year^-1) star formation episodes with a duty cycle of ~10%. A second group of our detected sources, consisting of the brightest and longest monitored sources at 18 cm do not easily fit the radio supernova ...

  5. The type Ia supernova SNLS-03D3bb from a super-Chandrasekhar-masswhite dwarf star

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, D.Andrew; Sullivan, Mark; Nugent, Peter E.; Ellis,Richard S.; Conley, Alexander J.; Le Borgne, Damien; Carlberg, RaymondG.; Guy, Julien; Balam, David; Basa, Stephane; Fouchez, Dominique; Hook,Isobel M.; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Neill, James D.; Pain, Reynald; Perrett,Kathryn M.; Pritchet, Christopher J.

    2006-02-01

    The acceleration of the expansion of the universe, and theneed for Dark Energy, were inferred from the observations of Type Iasupernovae (SNe Ia) 1;2. There is consensus that SNeIa are thermonuclearexplosions that destroy carbon-oxygen white dwarf stars that accretematter from a companion star3, although the nature of this companionremains uncertain. SNe Ia are thought to be reliable distance indicatorsbecause they have a standard amount of fuel and a uniform trigger theyare predicted to explode when the mass of the white dwarf nears theChandrasekhar mass 4 - 1.4 solar masses. Here we show that the highredshift supernova SNLS-03D3bb has an exceptionally high luminosity andlow kinetic energy that both imply a super-Chandrasekhar mass progenitor.Super-Chandrasekhar mass SNeIa shouldpreferentially occur in a youngstellar population, so this may provide an explanation for the observedtrend that overluminous SNe Ia only occur in young environments5;6. Sincethis supernova does not obey the relations that allow them to becalibrated as standard candles, and since no counterparts have been foundat low redshift, future cosmology studies will have to considercontamination from such events.

  6. Verifying the Cosmological Utility of Type Ia Supernovae: Implications of a Dispersion in the Ultraviolet Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, Peter E; Ellis, R.S.; Sullivan, M.; Nugent, P.E.; Howell, D.A.; Gal-Yam, A.; Astier, P.; Balam, D.; Balland, C.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R.; Conley, A.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.; Pain, R.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C.J.; Regnault, N.

    2008-02-28

    We analyze the mean rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectrum of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe) and its dispersion using high signal-to-noise ratio Keck-I/LRIS-B spectroscopy for a sample of 36 events at intermediate redshift (z=0.5) discovered by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). We introduce a new method for removing host galaxy contamination in our spectra, exploiting the comprehensive photometric coverage of the SNLS SNe and their host galaxies, thereby providing the first quantitative view of the UV spectral properties of a large sample of distant SNe Ia. Although the mean SN Ia spectrum has not evolved significantly over the past 40percent of cosmic history, precise evolutionary constraints are limited by the absence of a comparable sample of high-quality local spectra. The mean UV spectrum of our z~;;=0.5 SNe Ia and its dispersion is tabulated for use in future applications. Within the high-redshift sample, we discover significant UV spectral variations and exclude dust extinction as the primary cause by examining trends with the optical SN color. Although progenitor metallicity may drive some of these trends, the variations we see are much larger than predicted in recent models and do not follow expected patterns. An interesting new result is a variation seen in the wavelength of selected UV features with phase. We also demonstrate systematic differences in the SN Ia spectral features with SN light curve width in both the UV and the optical. We show that these intrinsic variations could represent a statistical limitation in the future use of high-redshift SNe Ia for precision cosmology. We conclude that further detailed studies are needed, both locally and at moderate redshift where the rest-frame UV can be studied precisely, in order that future missions can confidently be planned to fully exploit SNe Ia as cosmological probes.

  7. A Search for New Candidate Super-Chandrasekhar-Mass Type Ia Supernovae in the Nearby Supernova Factory Dataset

    CERN Document Server

    Scalzo, The Nearby Supernova Factory: R; Antilogus, P; Aragon, C; Bailey, S; Baltay, C; Bongard, S; Buton, C; Canto, A; Cellier-Holzem, F; Childress, M; Chotard, N; Copin, Y; Fakhouri, H K; Gangler, E; Guy, J; Hsiao, E Y; Kerschhaggl, M; Kowalski, M; Nugent, P; Paech, K; Pain, R; Pecontal, E; Pereira, R; Perlmutter, S; Rabinowitz, D; Rigault, M; Runge, K; Smadja, G; Tao, C; Thomas, R C; Weaver, B A; Wu, C

    2012-01-01

    We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of five type Ia supernovae discovered by the Nearby Supernova Factory selected to be spectroscopic analogues of the candidate super-Chandrasekhar-mass events SN 2003fg and SN 2007if. Their spectra are characterized by hot, highly ionized photospheres near maximum light, for which SN 1991T supplies the best phase coverage among available close spectral templates. Like SN 2007if, these supernovae are overluminous (-19.5 < M_V < -20) and the velocity of the Si II 6355 absorption minimum is consistent with being constant in time from phases as early as a week before, and up to two weeks after, $B$-band maximum light. We interpret the velocity plateaus as evidence for a reverse-shock shell in the ejecta formed by interaction at early times with a compact envelope of surrounding material, as might be expected for SNe resulting from the mergers of two white dwarfs. We use the bolometric light curves and line velocity evolution of these SNe to estimate important pa...

  8. Tension between SNeIa and BAO: current status and future forecasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escamilla-Rivera, Celia [Astrophysics, University of Oxford, DWD, Kebble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Lazkoz, Ruth; Salzano, Vincenzo; Sendra, Irene, E-mail: celia_escamilla@ehu.es, E-mail: ruth.lazkoz@ehu.es, E-mail: vincenzo.salzano@ehu.es, E-mail: irene.sendra@ehu.es [Fisika Teorikoaren eta Zientziaren Historia Saila, Zientzia eta Teknologia Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, 644 Posta Kutxatila, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-09-01

    Using real and synthetic Type Ia SNe (SNeIa) and baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) data representing current observations forecasts, this paper investigates the tension between those probes in the dark energy equation of state (EoS) reconstruction considering the well known CPL model and Wang's low correlation reformulation. In particular, here we present simulations of BAO data from both the the radial and transverse directions. We also explore the influence of priors on Ω{sub m} and Ω{sub b} on the tension issue, by considering 1σ deviations in either one or both of them. Our results indicate that for some priors there is no tension between a single dataset (either SNeIa or BAO) and their combination (SNeIa+BAO). Our criterion to discern the existence of tension (σ-distance) is also useful to establish which is the dataset with most constraining power; in this respect SNeIa and BAO data switch roles when current and future data are considered, as forecasts predict and spectacular quality improvement on BAO data. We also find that the results on the tension are blind to the way the CPL model is addressed: there is a perfect match between the original formulation and that by the correlation optimized proposed in Wang (2008), but the errors on the parameters are much narrower in all cases of our exhaustive exploration, thus serving the purpose of stressing the convenience of this reparametrization.

  9. Detection of Supernova Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Bekman, B.; Holeczek, J.; Kisiel, J4

    2004-01-01

    Matter effects on neutrino oscillations in both, a supernova and the Earth, change the observed supernova neutrino spectra. We calculate the expected number of supernova neutrino interactions for ICARUS, SK and SNO detectors as a function of the distance which they traveled in the Earth. Calculations are performed for supernova type II at 10kpc from the Earth, using standard supernova neutrino fluxes described by thermal Fermi--Dirac distributions and the PREM I Earth matter density profile.

  10. Bolometric Lightcurves of Peculiar Type II-P Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Jeremy A.; Baron, Edward A.

    2017-01-01

    We examine the bolometric lightcurves of five Type II-P supernovae (SNe 1998A, 2000cb, 2006V, 2006au and 2009E) which are thought to originate from blue supergiant progenitors using a new python package named SuperBoL. With this code, we calculate SNe lightcurves using three different techniques common in the literature: the quasi-bolometric method, which integrates the observed photometry, the direct integration method, which additionally corrects for unobserved flux in the UV and IR, and the bolometric correction method, which uses correlations between observed colors and V-band bolometric corrections. We present here the lightcurves calculated by SuperBoL along with previously published lightcurves, as well as peak luminosities and 56Ni yields. We find that the direct integration and bolometric correction lightcurves largely agree with previously published lightcurves, but with what we believe to be more robust error calculations, with 0.2 ≤ δL/L ≤ 0.5. Peak luminosities and 56Ni masses are similarly comparable to previous work. SN 2000cb remains an unusual member of this sub-group, owing to the faster rise and flatter plateau than the other supernovae in the sample. Initial comparisons with the NLTE atmosphere code PHOENIX show that the direct integration technique reproduces the luminosity of a model supernova spectrum to ˜5% when given synthetic photometry of the spectrum as input. Our code is publicly available. The ability to produce bolometric lightcurves from observed sets of broad-band light curves should be helpful in the interpretation of other types of supernovae, particularly those that are not well characterized, such as extremely luminous supernovae and faint fast objects.

  11. Bolometric Light Curves of Peculiar Type II-P Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Jeremy A.; Baron, E.

    2017-04-01

    We examine the bolometric light curves of five Type II-P supernovae (SNe 1998A, 2000cb, 2006V, 2006au, and 2009E), which are thought to originate from blue supergiant progenitors like that of SN 1987A, using a new python package named SuperBoL. With this code, we calculate SNe light curves using three different common techniques common from the literature: the quasi-bolometric method, which integrates the observed photometry, the direct integration method, which additionally corrects for unobserved flux in the UV and IR, and the bolometric correction method, which uses correlations between observed colors and V-band bolometric corrections. We present here the light curves calculated by SuperBoL, along with previously published light curves, as well as peak luminosities and 56Ni yields. We find that the direct integration and bolometric correction light curves largely agree with previously published light curves, but with what we believe to be more robust error calculations, with 0.2≲ δ {L}{bol}/{L}{bol}≲ 0.5. Peak luminosities and 56Ni masses are similarly comparable to previous work. SN 2000cb remains an unusual member of this sub-group, owing to the faster rise and flatter plateau than the other supernovae in the sample. Initial comparisons with the NLTE atmosphere code PHOENIX show that the direct integration technique reproduces the luminosity of a model supernova spectrum to ∼5% when given synthetic photometry of the spectrum as input. Our code is publicly available. The ability to produce bolometric light curves from observed sets of broadband light curves should be helpful in the interpretation of other types of supernovae, particularly those that are not well characterized, such as extremely luminous supernovae and faint fast objects.

  12. The Search for Failed Supernovae with the Large Binocular Telescope: Constraints from 7 Years of Data

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, S M; Gerke, J R; Stanek, K Z

    2016-01-01

    We report updated results for the first 7 years of our program to monitor 27 galaxies within 10 Mpc using the Large Binocular Telescope to search for failed supernovae -- core-collapses of massive stars that form black holes without luminous supernovae. In the new data, we identify no new compelling candidates and confirm the existing candidate. Given the 6 successful core-collapse SNe in the sample and one likely failed SN, the implied fraction of core-collapses that result in failed SNe is $f = 0.14^{+0.33}_{-0.10}$ at 90% confidence. If the current candidate is a failed SN, the fraction of failed SN naturally explains the missing high-mass RSG SN progenitors and the black hole mass function. If the current candidate is ultimately rejected, the data implies a 90% confidence upper limit on the failed SN fraction of $f < 0.35$.

  13. Estimation of conformal cosmological model parameters with SDSS and SNLS supernova samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervushin, V. N.; Arbuzov, A. B.; Zakharov, A. F.

    2017-03-01

    In spite of an enormous progress of standard ΛCDM cosmology (SC) a number of alternative approaches has been suggested because there are great puzzles with an origin and essence of dark matter and dark energy which unavoidably arise in the framework of the standard approach. Alternative approaches have to pass a number of observational tests including one with distant type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) data. As it was shown [1] a conformal cosmological (CC) approach can explain cosmological SNe Ia data without introducing Λ-term, however, introducing an exotic rigid equation of state is needed. Later on, these statements were confirmed with larger samples of observational data [2, 3]. In the paper we check previous claims with joint SDSS-II and SNLS supernova samples.

  14. A dozen type II-P supernovae seen with the eyes of Spitzer

    CERN Document Server

    Szalai, T

    2012-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (CC SNe), especially those of type II-plateau (II-P), are thought to be important contributors to cosmic dust production. The most obvious indicator of the presence of newly-formed and/or pre-existing dust is the time-dependent mid-infrared (MIR) excess coming from the environment of SNe. Our goal was to collect publicly available, previously unpublished measurements on type II-P (or peculiar IIP) SNe from the Spitzer database. The temporal changes of the observed fluxes may be indicative of the underlying supernova, while spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting to the fluxes in different IRAC channels may reveal the physical parameters of the mid-IR radiation, presumably due to warm dust. IRS spectra were extracted and calibrated with SPICE, while photometric SEDs were assembled using IRAF and MOPEX. Calculated SEDs from observed fluxes were fit with simple dust models to get basic information on the dust presumed as the source of MIR radiation. We found twelve SNe satisfying the ...

  15. Incorporating Astrophysical Systematics into a Generalized Likelihood for Cosmology with Type Ia Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Kara A.; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2016-07-01

    Traditional cosmological inference using Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have used stretch- and color-corrected fits of SN Ia light curves and assumed a resulting fiducial mean and symmetric intrinsic dispersion for the resulting relative luminosity. As systematics become the main contributors to the error budget, it has become imperative to expand supernova cosmology analyses to include a more general likelihood to model systematics to remove biases with losses in precision. To illustrate an example likelihood analysis, we use a simple model of two populations with a relative luminosity shift, independent intrinsic dispersions, and linear redshift evolution of the relative fraction of each population. Treating observationally viable two-population mock data using a one-population model results in an inferred dark energy equation of state parameter w that is biased by roughly 2 times its statistical error for a sample of N\\quad ≳ \\quad 2500 SNe Ia. Modeling the two-population data with a two-population model removes this bias at a cost of an approximately ˜ 20 % increase in the statistical constraint on w. These significant biases can be realized even if the support for two underlying SNe Ia populations, in the form of model selection criteria, is inconclusive. With the current observationally estimated difference in the two proposed populations, a sample of N\\quad ≳ \\quad 10,000 SNe Ia is necessary to yield conclusive evidence of two populations.

  16. The Rise-Time of Normal and Subluminous Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Gaitan, S; Bianco, F B; Howell, D A; Sullivan, M; Perrett, K; Carlberg, R; Astier, P; Balam, D; Balland, C; Basa, S; Fouchez, D; Fourmanoit, N; Graham, M L; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Lidman, C; Pain, R; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the average stretch-corrected rise-time of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the Supernova Legacy Survey. We use the aggregate lightcurves of spectroscopic and photometrically identified SNe Ia to fit the rising part of the lightcurve with a simple quadratic model. We obtain a lightcurve shape corrected, i .e. stretch-corrected, fiducial rise-time of 17.02^{+0.18}_{-0.28} (stat) days. The measured rise-time differs from an earlier finding by the SNLS (Conley et al. 2006) due to the use of different SN Ia templates. We compare it to nearby samples using the same methods and find no evolution in the early part of the lightcurve of SNe Ia up to z=1. We search for variations among different populations, particularly subluminous objects, by dividing the sample in stretch. Bright and slow decliners (s>1.0) have consistent stretch-corrected rise-times compared to fainter and faster decliners (0.8SNe Ia (here defined as objects...

  17. The Dependence of Type Ia Supernova Luminosities on their Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, M; Howell, D A; Neill, J D; Astier, P; Balland, C; Basa, S; Carlberg, R G; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Pain, R; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Perrett, K M; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Baumont, S; Hsiao, E; Kronborg, T; Lidman, C; Perlmutter, S; Walker, E S

    2010-01-01

    (Abridged) Precision cosmology with Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) makes use of the fact that SN Ia luminosities depend on their light-curve shapes and colours. Using Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) and other data, we show that there is an additional dependence on the global characteristics of their host galaxies: events of the same light-curve shape and colour are, on average, 0.08mag (~4.0sigma) brighter in massive host galaxies (presumably metal-rich) and galaxies with low specific star-formation rates (sSFR). SNe Ia in galaxies with a low sSFR also have a smaller slope ("beta") between their luminosities and colours with ~2.7sigma significance, and a smaller scatter on SN Ia Hubble diagrams (at 95% confidence), though the significance of these effects is dependent on the reddest SNe. SN Ia colours are similar between low-mass and high-mass hosts, leading us to interpret their luminosity differences as an intrinsic property of the SNe and not of some external factor such as dust. If the host stellar mass is in...

  18. The Carnegie Supernova Project: First Near-Infrared Hubble Diagram to z~0.7

    CERN Document Server

    Freedman, Wendy L; Phillips, M M; Wyatt, Pamela; Persson, S E; Madore, Barry F; Contreras, Carlos; Folatelli, Gaston; Gonzalez, E Sergio; Hamuy, Mario; Hsiao, Eric; Kelson, Daniel D; Morrell, Nidia; Murphy, D C; Roth, Miguel; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Sturch, Laura; Suntzeff, Nick B; Astier, P; Balland, C; Bassett, Bruce; Boldt, Luis; Carlberg, R G; Conley, Alexander J; Frieman, Joshua A; Garnavich, Peter M; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Howell, D Andrew; Kessler, Richard; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Pain, R; Perrett, Kathy; Regnault, N; Riess, Adam G; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P; Sullivan, Mark; Wood-Vasey, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) is designed to measure the luminosity distance for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as a function of redshift, and to set observational constraints on the dark energy contribution to the total energy content of the Universe. The CSP differs from other projects to date in its goal of providing an I-band {rest-frame} Hubble diagram. Here we present the first results from near-infrared (NIR) observations obtained using the Magellan Baade telescope for SNe Ia with 0.1 < z < 0.7. We combine these results with those from the low-redshift CSP at z <0.1 (Folatelli et al. 2009). We present light curves and an I-band Hubble diagram for this first sample of 35 SNe Ia and we compare these data to 21 new SNe Ia at low redshift. These data support the conclusion that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating. When combined with independent results from baryon acoustic oscillations (Eisenstein et al. 2005), these data yield Omega_m = 0.27 +/- 0.0 (statistical), and Omega_DE = 0.7...

  19. Type Ia Supernova Rate Measurements to Redshift 2.5 from Candles: Searching for Prompt Explosions in the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney, Steven A.; Riess, Adam G.; Strogler, Louis-Gregory; Dahlen, Tomas; Graur, Or; Casertano, Stefano; Dickinson, Mark E.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Garnavich, Peter; Cenko, Stephen Bradley

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) was a multi-cycle treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope(HST) that surveyed a total area of approx. 0.25 deg(sup 2) with approx.900 HST orbits spread across five fields over three years. Within these survey images we discovered 65 supernovae (SNe) of all types, out to z approx. 2.5. We classify approx. 24 of these as Type Ia SNe (SNe Ia) based on host galaxy redshifts and SN photometry (supplemented by grism spectroscopy of six SNe). Here we present a measurement of the volumetric SN Ia rate as a function of redshift, reaching for the first time beyond z = 2 and putting new constraints on SN Ia progenitor models. Our highest redshift bin includes detections of SNe that exploded when the universe was only approx. 3 Gyr old and near the peak of the cosmic star formation history. This gives the CANDELS high redshift sample unique leverage for evaluating the fraction of SNe Ia that explode promptly after formation (500 Myr). Combining the CANDELS rates with all available SN Ia rate measurements in the literature we find that this prompt SN Ia fraction isfP0.530.09stat0.100.10sys0.26, consistent with a delay time distribution that follows a simplet1power law for all timest40 Myr. However, mild tension is apparent between ground-based low-z surveys and space-based high-z surveys. In both CANDELS and the sister HST program CLASH (Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey with Hubble), we find a low rate of SNe Ia at z > 1. This could be a hint that prompt progenitors are in fact relatively rare, accounting for only 20 of all SN Ia explosions though further analysis and larger samples will be needed to examine that suggestion.

  20. THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE CLUSTER SUPERNOVA SURVEY. III. CORRELATED PROPERTIES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR HOSTS AT 0.9 < z < 1.46

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, J.; Barbary, K.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Goldhaber, G. [Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Aldering, G.; Faccioli, L.; Hsiao, E. [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Barrientos, L. F. [Departmento de Astronomia, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Brodwin, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dawson, K. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Deustua, S.; Fruchter, A. S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Doi, M.; Ihara, Y. [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Eisenhardt, P. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Gilbank, D. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University Of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Gladders, M. D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gonzalez, A. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Hattori, T. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North Aohaku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Kashikawa, N., E-mail: jmeyers314@berkeley.edu [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Collaboration: Supernova Cosmology Project; and others

    2012-05-01

    Using the sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey and augmented with HST-observed SNe Ia in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields, we search for correlations between the properties of SNe and their host galaxies at high redshift. We use galaxy color and quantitative morphology to determine the red sequence in 25 clusters and develop a model to distinguish passively evolving early-type galaxies from star-forming galaxies in both clusters and the field. With this approach, we identify 6 SN Ia hosts that are early-type cluster members and 11 SN Ia hosts that are early-type field galaxies. We confirm for the first time at z > 0.9 that SNe Ia hosted by early-type galaxies brighten and fade more quickly than SNe Ia hosted by late-type galaxies. We also show that the two samples of hosts produce SNe Ia with similar color distributions. The relatively simple spectral energy distributions expected for passive galaxies enable us to measure stellar masses of early-type SN hosts. In combination with stellar mass estimates of late-type GOODS SN hosts from Thomson and Chary, we investigate the correlation of host mass with Hubble residual observed at lower redshifts. Although the sample is small and the uncertainties are large, a hint of this relation is found at z > 0.9. By simultaneously fitting the average cluster galaxy formation history and dust content to the red-sequence scatters, we show that the reddening of early-type cluster SN hosts is likely E(B - V) {approx}< 0.06. The similarity of the field and cluster early-type host samples suggests that field early-type galaxies that lie on the red sequence may also be minimally affected by dust. Hence, the early-type-hosted SNe Ia studied here occupy a more favorable environment to use as well-characterized high-redshift standard candles than other SNe Ia.

  1. A Search for New Candidate Super-Chandrasekhar-mass Type Ia Supernovae in the Nearby Supernova Factory Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzo, R.; Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Bongard, S.; Buton, C.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Childress, M.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Gangler, E.; Guy, J.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M.; Nugent, P.; Paech, K.; Pain, R.; Pecontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rigault, M.; Runge, K.; Smadja, G.; Tao, C.; Thomas, R. C.; Weaver, B. A.; Wu, C.; Nearby Supernova Factory, The

    2012-09-01

    We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of five Type Ia supernovae discovered by the Nearby Supernova Factory selected to be spectroscopic analogs of the candidate super-Chandrasekhar-mass events SN 2003fg and SN 2007if. Their spectra are characterized by hot, highly ionized photospheres near maximum light, for which SN 1991T supplies the best phase coverage among available close spectral templates. Like SN 2007if, these supernovae are overluminous (-19.5 constant in time from phases as early as a week before, and up to two weeks after, B-band maximum light. We interpret the velocity plateaus as evidence for a reverse-shock shell in the ejecta formed by interaction at early times with a compact envelope of surrounding material, as might be expected for SNe resulting from the mergers of two white dwarfs. We use the bolometric light curves and line velocity evolution of these SNe to estimate important parameters of the progenitor systems, including 56Ni mass, total progenitor mass, and masses of shells and surrounding carbon/oxygen envelopes. We find that the reconstructed total progenitor mass distribution of the events (including SN 2007if) is bounded from below by the Chandrasekhar mass, with SN 2007if being the most massive. We discuss the relationship of these events to the emerging class of super-Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia, estimate the relative rates, compare the mass distribution to that expected for double-degenerate SN Ia progenitors from population synthesis, and consider implications for future cosmological Hubble diagrams.

  2. A SEARCH FOR NEW CANDIDATE SUPER-CHANDRASEKHAR-MASS TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IN THE NEARBY SUPERNOVA FACTORY DATA SET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scalzo, R. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Childress, M.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Hsiao, E. Y. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Guy, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universite Paris Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Nugent, P., E-mail: rscalzo@mso.anu.edu.au [Computational Cosmology Center, Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 50B-4206, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Collaboration: Nearby Supernova Factory; and others

    2012-09-20

    We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of five Type Ia supernovae discovered by the Nearby Supernova Factory selected to be spectroscopic analogs of the candidate super-Chandrasekhar-mass events SN 2003fg and SN 2007if. Their spectra are characterized by hot, highly ionized photospheres near maximum light, for which SN 1991T supplies the best phase coverage among available close spectral templates. Like SN 2007if, these supernovae are overluminous (-19.5 < M{sub V} < -20) and the velocity of the Si II {lambda}6355 absorption minimum is consistent with being constant in time from phases as early as a week before, and up to two weeks after, B-band maximum light. We interpret the velocity plateaus as evidence for a reverse-shock shell in the ejecta formed by interaction at early times with a compact envelope of surrounding material, as might be expected for SNe resulting from the mergers of two white dwarfs. We use the bolometric light curves and line velocity evolution of these SNe to estimate important parameters of the progenitor systems, including {sup 56}Ni mass, total progenitor mass, and masses of shells and surrounding carbon/oxygen envelopes. We find that the reconstructed total progenitor mass distribution of the events (including SN 2007if) is bounded from below by the Chandrasekhar mass, with SN 2007if being the most massive. We discuss the relationship of these events to the emerging class of super-Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia, estimate the relative rates, compare the mass distribution to that expected for double-degenerate SN Ia progenitors from population synthesis, and consider implications for future cosmological Hubble diagrams.

  3. Evidence for Type Ia Supernova Diversity from Ultraviolet Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Lifan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Baron, Eddie; Kromer, Markus; Jack, Dennis; Zhang, Tianmeng,; Aldering, Greg; Antilogus, Pierre; Arnett, David; Baade, Dietrich; Barris, Brian J.; Benetti, Stefano; Bouchet, Patrice; Burrows, Adam S.

    2011-01-01

    We present ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and photometry of four Type Ia supernovae (SNe 2004dt, 2004ef, 2005M, and 2005cf) obtained with the UV prism of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. This dataset provides unique spectral time series down to 2000 Angstrom. Significant diversity is seen in the near maximum-light spectra (~ 2000--3500 Angstrom) for this small sample. The corresponding photometric data, together with archival data from Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Te...

  4. Deflagration to detonation transition by amplification of acoustic waves in type Ia supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Charignon, Camille; Chièze, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    We study a new mechanism for deflagration to detonation transition in thermonuclear supernovae (SNe Ia), based on the formation of shocks by amplification of sound waves in the steep density gradients of white dwarfs envelopes. Given a large enough jump in density a small pressure and velocity perturbation, produced by the turbulent deflagration, turns into a shock down of the gradient, where it will dissipate and heat up the media. With the right frequency and amplitude the heating can be en...

  5. Ultra-stripped supernovae and double neutron star systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tauris, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of close-orbit progenitor binaries of double neutron star (DNS) systems leads to supernova (SN) explosions of ultra-stripped stars. The amount of SN ejecta mass is very limited from such, more or less, naked metal cores with envelope masses of only 0.01-0.2 Msun. The combination of little SN ejecta mass and the associated possibility of small NS kicks is quite important for the characteristics of the resulting DNS systems left behind. Here, we discuss theoretical predictions for DNS systems, based on Case BB Roche-lobe overflow prior to ultra-stripped SNe, and briefly compare with observations.

  6. The Supernovae Analysis Application (SNAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, Amanda J.; Fryer, Chris L.; Wollaeger, Ryan; Wiggins, Brandon; Even, Wesley; de la Rosa, Janie; Roming, Peter W. A.; Frey, Lucy; Young, Patrick A.; Thorpe, Rob; Powell, Luke; Landers, Rachel; Persson, Heather D.; Hay, Rebecca

    2017-09-01

    The SuperNovae Analysis aPplication (SNAP) is a new tool for the analysis of SN observations and validation of SN models. SNAP consists of a publicly available relational database with observational light curve, theoretical light curve, and correlation table sets with statistical comparison software, and a web interface available to the community. The theoretical models are intended to span a gridded range of parameter space. The goal is to have users upload new SN models or new SN observations and run the comparison software to determine correlations via the website. There are problems looming on the horizon that SNAP is beginning to solve. For example, large surveys will discover thousands of SNe annually. Frequently, the parameter space of a new SN event is unbounded. SNAP will be a resource to constrain parameters and determine if an event needs follow-up without spending resources to create new light curve models from scratch. Second, there is no rapidly available, systematic way to determine degeneracies between parameters, or even what physics is needed to model a realistic SN. The correlations made within the SNAP system are beginning to solve these problems.

  7. The Supernovae Analysis Application (SNAP)

    CERN Document Server

    Bayless, Amanda J; Wiggins, Brandon; Even, Wesley; Wollaeger, Ryan; de la Rosa, Janie; Roming, Peter W A; Frey, Lucy; Young, Patrick A; Thorpe, Rob; Powell, Luke; Landers, Rachel; Persson, Heather D; Hay, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The SuperNovae Analysis aPplication (SNAP) is a new tool for the analysis of SN observations and validation of SN models. SNAP consists of an open source relational database with (a) observational light curve, (b) theoretical light curve, and (c) correlation table sets, statistical comparison software, and a web interface available to the community. The theoretical models are intended to span a gridded range of parameter space. The goal is to have users to upload new SN models or new SN observations and run the comparison software to determine correlations via the web site. There are looming problems on the horizon that SNAP begins to solve. Namely, large surveys will discover thousands of SNe annually. Frequently, the parameter space of a new SN event is unbounded. SNAP will be a resource to constrain parameters and determine if an event needs follow-up without spending resources to create new light curve models from scratch. Secondly, there is not a rapidly available, systematic way to determine degeneracie...

  8. Constraining cosmic isotropy with type Ia supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Bengaly,, C A P; Alcaniz, J S

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the validity of the Cosmological Principle by constraining the cosmological parameters $H_0$ and $q_0$ through the celestial sphere. Our analyses are performed in a low-redshift regime in order to follow a model independent approach, using both Union2.1 and JLA Type Ia Supernovae (SNe) compilations. We find that the preferred direction of the $H_0$ parameter in the sky is consistent with the bulk flow motion of our local Universe in the Union2.1 case, while the $q_0$ directional analysis seem to be anti-correlated with the $H_0$ for both data sets. Furthermore, we test the consistency of these results with Monte Carlo (MC) realisations, finding that the anisotropy on both parameters are significant within $2-3\\sigma$ confidence level, albeit we find a significant correlation between the $H_0$ and $q_0$ mapping with the angular distribution of SNe from the JLA compilation. Therefore, we conclude that the detected anisotropies are either of local origin, or induced by the non-uniform celestial co...

  9. Hubble Space Telescope and Ground-Based Observations of the Type Iax Supernovae SN 2005hk and SN 2008A

    CERN Document Server

    McCully, Curtis; Foley, Ryan J; Chornock, Ryan; Holtzman, Jon A; Balam, David D; Branch, David; Filippenko, Alexei V; Frieman, Joshua; Fynbo, Johan; Galbany, Lluis; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Garnavich, Peter M; Graham, Melissa L; Hsiao, Eric Y; Leloudas, Giorgos; Leonard, Douglas C; Li, Weidong; Riess, Adam G; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Sollerman, Jesper; Steele, Thea N; Thomas, Rollin C; Wheeler, J Craig; Zheng, Chen

    2013-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2005hk and SN 2008A, typical members of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe). These objects are peculiar cousins of normal Type Ia SNe, with SN 2002cx as the prototype. Here we focus on late-time observations, where these objects deviate most dramatically from normal SNe Ia. Instead of the dominant nebular emission lines that are observed in normal SNe Ia at late phases (and indeed, in SNe of all other types), spectra of SNe 2005hk and 2008A show lines of Fe II, Ca II, and Fe I more than a year past maximum light, along with narrow [Fe II] and [Ca II] emission. We use spectral features to constrain the temperature and density of the ejecta, and find high densities at late times, with n_e >~ 10^9 cm^-3. Such high densities should yield enhanced cooling of the ejecta, making these objects good candidates to observe the expected "infrared catastrophe," a generic feature of SN Ia models. However, our HST photom...

  10. SN 2010ay is a Luminous and Broad-lined Type Ic Supernova within a Low-metallicity Host Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Nathan E; Valenti, S; Chomiuk, L; Berger, E; Smartt, S; Hurley, K; Barthelmy, S D; Chornock, R; Foley, R J; Levesque, E M; Narayan, G; Kirshner, R P; Botticella, M T; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Terada, Y; Gehrels, N; Golenetskii, S; Mazets, E; Cline, T; von Kienlin, A; Boynton, W; Chambers, K C; Grav, T; Heasley, J N; Hodapp, K W; Jedicke, R; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R -P; Luppino, G A; Lupton, R H; Magnier, E A; Monet, D G; Morgan, J S; Onaka, P M; Price, P A; Stubbs, C W; Tonry, J L; Wainscoat, R J; Waterson, M F

    2011-01-01

    [abridged] We report on our serendipitous pre-discovery detection and detailed follow-up of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova SN 2010ay at z\\approx0.067 imaged by the Pan-STARRS1 3{\\pi} survey just \\sim3 days after explosion. We estimate the explosion date and the peak luminosity of the SN, MR\\approx-20.2 mag, significantly brighter than known GRB-SNe and one of the most luminous SNe Ic ever discovered. We measure the photospheric expansion velocity of the explosion, v_ph\\approx19.2x10^3 km/s at \\sim40 days after explosion. In comparison with other broad-lined SNe, the characteristic velocity of SN 2010ay is 2-5x higher and similar to the measurements for GRB-SNe at comparable epochs. Moreover the velocity declines two times slower than other SNe Ic-BL and GRB-SNe. Assuming that the optical emission is powered by radioactive decay, the peak magnitude implies the synthesis of an unusually large mass of 56 Ni, M_Ni=0.9+0.2 M_solar. Our modeling of the light-curve points to a total ejecta mass, Mej\\approx4.7M_so...

  11. Hubble space telescope and ground-based observations of the type Iax supernovae SN 2005hk and SN 2008A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Foley, Ryan J. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Chornock, Ryan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Holtzman, Jon A. [Department of Astronomy, MSC 4500, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Balam, David D. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Branch, David [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Li, Weidong [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Frieman, Joshua [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Fynbo, Johan; Leloudas, Giorgos [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Galbany, Lluis [Institut de Física d' Altes Energies, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Garnavich, Peter M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Graham, Melissa L. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Hsiao, Eric Y. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Leonard, Douglas C., E-mail: cmccully@physics.rutgers.edu [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); and others

    2014-05-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2005hk and SN 2008A, typical members of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe). Here we focus on late-time observations, where these objects deviate most dramatically from all other SN types. Instead of the dominant nebular emission lines that are observed in other SNe at late phases, spectra of SNe 2005hk and 2008A show lines of Fe II, Ca II, and Fe I more than a year past maximum light, along with narrow [Fe II] and [Ca II] emission. We use spectral features to constrain the temperature and density of the ejecta, and find high densities at late times, with n{sub e} ≳ 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. Such high densities should yield enhanced cooling of the ejecta, making these objects good candidates to observe the expected 'infrared catastrophe', a generic feature of SN Ia models. However, our HST photometry of SN 2008A does not match the predictions of an infrared catastrophe. Moreover, our HST observations rule out a 'complete deflagration' that fully disrupts the white dwarf for these peculiar SNe, showing no evidence for unburned material at late times. Deflagration explosion models that leave behind a bound remnant can match some of the observed properties of SNe Iax, but no published model is consistent with all of our observations of SNe 2005hk and 2008A.

  12. Hubble Space Telescope and Ground-Based Observations of the Type Iax Supernovae SN 2005hk and SN 2008A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W.; Foley, Ryan J.; Chornock, Ryan; Holtzman, Jon A.; Balam, David D.; Branch, David; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Frieman, Joshua; Fynbo, Johan; Galbany, Lluis; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Garnavich, Peter M.; Graham, Melissa L.; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Leloudas, Giorgos; Leonard, Douglas C.; Li, Weidong; Riess, Adam G.; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Sollerman, Jesper; Steele, Thea N.; Thomas, Rollin C.; Wheeler, J. Craig; Zheng, Chen

    2014-04-24

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2005hk and SN 2008A, typical members of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe). Here we focus on late-time observations, where these objects deviate most dramatically from all other SN types. Instead of the dominant nebular emission lines that are observed in other SNe at late phases, spectra of SNe 2005hk and 2008A show lines of Fe II, Ca II, and Fe I more than a year past maximum light, along with narrow [Fe II] and [Ca II] emission. We use spectral features to constrain the temperature and density of the ejecta, and find high densities at late times, with ne109 cm–3. Such high densities should yield enhanced cooling of the ejecta, making these objects good candidates to observe the expected "infrared catastrophe," a generic feature of SN Ia models. However, our HST photometry of SN 2008A does not match the predictions of an infrared catastrophe. Moreover, our HST observations rule out a "complete deflagration" that fully disrupts the white dwarf for these peculiar SNe, showing no evidence for unburned material at late times. Deflagration explosion models that leave behind a bound remnant can match some of the observed properties of SNe Iax, but no published model is consistent with all of our observations of SNe 2005hk and 2008A.

  13. A Review of Type Ia Supernovae as Stellar Endpoints and Cosmological Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, D Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Empirically, Type Ia supernovae are the most useful, precise, and mature tools for determining astronomical distances. Acting as calibrated candles they revealed the presence of dark energy and are being used to measure its properties. However, the nature of the SN Ia explosion, and the progenitors involved, have remained elusive, even after seven decades of research. But now new large surveys are bringing about a paradigm shift --- we can finally compare samples of hundreds of supernovae to isolate critical variables. As a result of this, and advances in modeling, breakthroughs in understanding all aspects of SNe Ia are finally starting to happen.

  14. Curvas de luz de supernovas ricas en hidrógeno

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Kaufmann, M. L.; Bersten, M.

    2016-08-01

    Type II supernovae (SNe II) are the most common type of explosions in the Universe. There is a small and peculiar subgroup of those objects that show light curves similar to the famous SN 1987A. In this work we present an analysis of how the variation of certain physical parameters such as the mass and radius of the progenitor star, the energy of the explosion and the amount of radioactive material impact on the light curve of these objects, based on models that simulate the stellar explosions. In particular, we analyze the case of SN 2009mw, one of the few supernovae with similar characteristics to the SN 1987A.

  15. Cosmology with Contaminated Samples: Methods of Measuring Dark Energy with Photometrically Classified Pan-STARRS Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, D O; Riess, A G; Kessler, R; Rest, A; Kirshner, R P; Berger, E; Ortega, C A; Foley, R J; Chornock, R; Challis, P J; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Draper, P W; Flewelling, H; Huber, M E; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R -P; Metcalfe, N; Wainscoat, R J; Waters, C

    2016-01-01

    The Pan-STARRS (PS1) Medium Deep Survey discovered over 5,000 likely supernovae (SNe) but obtained spectral classifications for just 10% of its SN candidates. We measured spectroscopic host galaxy redshifts for 3,073 of these likely SNe and estimate that $\\sim$1,000 are Type Ia SNe (SNe Ia) with light-curve quality sufficient for a cosmological analysis. We use these data with simulations to determine the impact of core-collapse SN (CC SN) contamination on measurements of the dark energy equation of state parameter, $w$. Using the method of Bayesian Estimation Applied to Multiple Species (BEAMS), distances to SNe Ia and the contaminating CC SN distribution are simultaneously determined as a function of redshift. We test light-curve based SN classification priors for BEAMS as well as a new classification method that relies upon host galaxy spectra and the association of SN type with host type. By testing several SN classification methods and CC SN parameterizations on 1,000-SN simulations, we conservatively es...

  16. Possible Detection of the Stellar Donor or Remnant for the Type Iax Supernova 2008ha

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, Ryan J; Jha, Saurabh W; Bildsten, Lars; Fong, Wen-fai; Narayan, Gautham; Rest, Armin; Stritzinger, Maximilian D

    2014-01-01

    Type Iax supernovae (SNe Iax) are thermonuclear explosions that are related to SNe Ia, but are physically distinct. The most important differences are that SNe Iax have significantly lower luminosity (1% - 50% that of typical SNe Ia), lower ejecta mass (~0.1 - 0.5 M_sun), and may leave a bound remnant. The most extreme SN Iax is SN 2008ha, which peaked at M_V = -14.2 mag, about 5 mag below that of typical SNe Ia. Here, we present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of UGC 12682, the host galaxy of SN 2008ha, taken 4.1 years after the peak brightness of SN 2008ha. In these deep, high-resolution images, we detect a source coincident (0.86 HST pixels; 0.043"; 1.1 sigma) with the position of SN 2008ha with M_F814W = -5.4 mag. We determine that this source is unlikely to be a chance coincidence, but that scenario cannot be completely ruled out. If this source is directly related to SN 2008ha, it is either the luminous bound remnant of the progenitor white dwarf or its companion star. The source is consistent with ...

  17. METALLICITY DIFFERENCES IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS INFERRED FROM ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Kirshner, Robert P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-05-20

    Two ''twin'' Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), SNe 2011by and 2011fe, have extremely similar optical light-curve shapes, colors, and spectra, yet have different ultraviolet (UV) continua as measured in Hubble Space Telescope spectra and measurably different peak luminosities. We attribute the difference in the UV continua to significantly different progenitor metallicities. This is the first robust detection of different metallicities for SN Ia progenitors. Theoretical reasoning suggests that differences in metallicity also lead to differences in luminosity. SNe Ia with higher progenitor metallicities have lower {sup 56}Ni yields and lower luminosities for the same light-curve shape. SNe 2011by and 2011fe have different peak luminosities ({Delta}M{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 0.6 mag), which correspond to different {sup 56}Ni yields: M{sub 11fe}({sup 56}Ni) / M{sub 11by}({sup 56}Ni) = 1.7{sup +0.7}{sub -0.5}. From theoretical models that account for different neutron-to-proton ratios in progenitors, the differences in {sup 56}Ni yields for SNe 2011by and 2011fe imply that their progenitor stars were above and below solar metallicity, respectively. Although we can distinguish progenitor metallicities in a qualitative way from UV data, the quantitative interpretation in terms of abundances is limited by the present state of theoretical models.

  18. THREE-DIMENSIONAL EXPLOSION GEOMETRY OF STRIPPED-ENVELOPE CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. I. SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Iye, Masanori [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Kawabata, Koji S.; Yamanaka, Masayuki [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan); Hattori, Takashi; Aoki, Kentaro; Sasaki, Toshiyuki [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Mazzali, Paolo A. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2 D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Maeda, Keiichi; Nomoto, Ken' ichi [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa (Japan); Pian, Elena, E-mail: masaomi.tanaka@nao.ac.jp [Istituto Naz. di Astrofisica-Oss. Astron., Via Tiepolo, 11, 34131 Trieste (Italy)

    2012-07-20

    We study the multi-dimensional geometry of supernova (SN) explosions by means of spectropolarimetric observations of stripped-envelope SNe, i.e., SNe without a hydrogen-rich layer. We perform spectropolarimetric observations of two stripped-envelope SNe, Type Ib SN 2009jf and Type Ic SN 2009mi. Both objects show non-zero polarization at the wavelength of the strong lines. They also show a loop in the Stokes Q - U diagram, which indicates a non-axisymmetric, three-dimensional ion distribution in the ejecta. We show that five out of six stripped-envelope SNe, which have been observed spectropolarimetrically so far, show such a loop. This implies that a three-dimensional geometry is common in stripped-envelope SNe. We find that stronger lines tend to show higher polarization. This effect is not related to the geometry, and must be corrected for to compare the polarization of different lines or different objects. Even after the correction, however, there remains a dispersion of polarization degree among different objects. Such a dispersion might be caused by three-dimensional clumpy ion distributions viewed from different directions.

  19. Three-Dimensional Explosion Geometry of Stripped-Envelope Core-Collapse Supernovae. I. Spectropolarimetric Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Hattori, Takashi; Mazzali, Paolo A; Aoki, Kentaro; Iye, Masanori; Maeda, Keiichi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Pian, Elena; Sasaki, Toshiyuki; Yamanaka, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    We study the multi-dimensional geometry of supernova (SN) explosions by means of spectropolarimetric observations of stripped-envelope SNe, i.e., SNe without a H-rich layer. We perform spectropolarimetric observations of 2 stripped-envelope SNe, the Type Ib SN 2009jf and the Type Ic SN 2009mi. Both objects show non-zero polarization at the wavelength of the strong lines. They also show a loop in the Stokes Q-U diagram, which indicates a non-axisymmetric, three-dimensional ion distribution in the ejecta. We show that five out of six stripped-envelope SNe which have been observed spectropolarimetrically so far show such a loop. This implies that a three-dimensional geometry is common in stripped-envelope SNe. We find that stronger lines tend to show higher polarization. This effect is not related to the geometry, and must be corrected to compare the polarization of different lines or different objects. Even after the correction, however, there remains a dispersion of polarization degree among different objects....

  20. Gravitational Wave Emission from the Single-Degenerate Channel of Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Falta, David; Khanna, Gaurav

    2010-01-01

    The thermonuclear explosion of a C/O white dwarf as a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) generates a kinetic energy comparable to that released by a massive star during a SN II event. Current observations and theoretical models have established that SNe Ia are asymmetric, and therefore -- like SNe II -- potential sources of gravitational wave (GW) radiation. We establish an upper-bound GW amplitude and expected frequency range based upon the energetics and nucleosynthetic yields of SNe Ia. We perform the first detailed calculations of the gravitationally-confined detonation (GCD) mechanism within the single-degenerate channel of SNe Ia. The GCD mechanism predicts a strongly-polarized GW burst from the SD channel of SNe Ia in the frequency band around 1 Hz. Third-generation spaceborne GW observatories currently in planning, including the Big Bang Observer (BBO), and the Deci-Hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (DECIGO), as well as earthbound instruments, including the Einstein Telescope (ET), may be abl...

  1. Twins for life? A comparative analysis of the Type Ia supernovae 2011fe and 2011by

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Melissa L; Zheng, Weikang; Kelly, Patrick L; Shivvers, Isaac; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Filippenko, Alexei V; Clubb, Kelsey I; Ganeshalingam, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    The nearby Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) 2011fe and 2011by had nearly identical photospheric phase optical spectra, light-curve widths, and photometric colours, but at peak brightness SN 2011by reached a fainter absolute magnitude in all optical bands and exhibited lower flux in the near-ultraviolet (NUV). Based on those data, Foley & Kirshner (2013) argue that the progenitors of SNe 2011by and 2011fe were supersolar and subsolar, respectively, and that SN 2011fe generated 1.7 times the amount of 56Ni as SN 2011by. With this work, we extend the comparison of these SNe Ia to 10 days before and 300 days after maximum brightness with new spectra and photometry. We show that the nebular phase spectra of SNe 2011fe and 2011by are almost identical, and do not support a factor of 1.7 difference in 56Ni mass. Instead, we find it plausible that the Tully-Fisher distance for SN 2011by is an underestimate, in which case these SNe Ia may have reached similar peak luminosity, formed similar amounts of 56Ni, and had lowe...

  2. Solving the 56Ni Puzzle of Magnetar-powered Broad-lined Type IC Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling-Jun; Han, Yan-Hui; Xu, Dong; Wang, Shan-Qin; Dai, Zi-Gao; Wu, Xue-Feng; Wei, Jian-Yan

    2016-11-01

    Broad-lined Type Ic supernovae (SNe Ic-BL) are of great importance because their association with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) holds the key to deciphering the central engine of LGRBs, which refrains from being unveiled despite decades of investigation. Among the two popularly hypothesized types of central engine, i.e., black holes and strongly magnetized neutron stars (magnetars), there is mounting evidence that the central engine of GRB-associated SNe (GRB-SNe) is rapidly rotating magnetars. Theoretical analysis also suggests that magnetars could be the central engine of SNe Ic-BL. What puzzled the researchers is the fact that light-curve modeling indicates that as much as 0.2{--}0.5 {M}⊙ of 56Ni was synthesized during the explosion of the SNe Ic-BL, which is unfortunately in direct conflict with current state-of-the-art understanding of magnetar-powered 56Ni synthesis. Here we propose a dynamic model of magnetar-powered SNe to take into account the acceleration of the ejecta by the magnetar, as well as the thermalization of the injected energy. Assuming that the SN kinetic energy comes exclusively from the magnetar acceleration, we find that although a major fraction of the rotational energy of the magnetar is to accelerate the SN ejecta, a tiny fraction of this energy deposited as thermal energy of the ejecta is enough to reduce the needed 56Ni to 0.06 M ⊙ for both SN 1997ef and SN 2007ru. We therefore suggest that magnetars could power SNe Ic-BL in aspects both of energetics and of 56Ni synthesis.

  3. SPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF AN ANCIENT SUPERNOVA USING LIGHT ECHOES IN THE LMC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rest, A; Matheson, T; Blondin, S; Bergmann, M; Welch, D L; Suntzeff, N B; Smith, R C; Olsen, K; Prieto, J L; Garg, A; Challis, P; Stubbs, C; Hicken, M; Modjaz, M; Wood-Vasey, W M; Zenteno, A; Damke, G; Newman, A; Huber, M; Cook, K H; Nikolaev, S; Becker, A C; Miceli, A; Covarrubias, R; Morelli, L; Pignata, G; Clocchiatti, A; Minniti, D; Foley, R J

    2008-02-07

    We report the successful identification of the type of the supernova responsible for the supernova remnant SNR 0509-675 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using Gemini spectra of surrounding light echoes. The ability to classify outbursts associated with centuries-old remnants provides a new window into several aspects of supernova research and is likely to be successful in providing new constraints on additional LMC supernovae as well as their historical counterparts in the Milky Way Galaxy (MWG). The combined spectrum of echo light from SNR 0509-675 shows broad emission and absorption lines consistent with a supernova (SN) spectrum. We create a spectral library consisting of 26 SNe Ia and 6 SN Ib/c that are time-integrated, dust-scattered by LMC dust, and reddened by the LMC and MWG. We fit these SN templates to the observed light echo spectrum using {chi}{sup 2} minimization as well as correlation techniques, and we find that overluminous 91T-like SNe Ia with {Delta}m{sub 15} < 0.9 match the observed spectrum best.

  4. Real-time Analysis and